Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00100

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text
S&L. LO/ -A: /


Morbidity and Mortality



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE '1 0-

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE

Prepared by the 634 MA 1963

For release February 22, 1963 ATLANTA 22, GEORGIA 1. No. 7
PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THE ITE [AT D ON
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED FEBRUARY 16, 19


INFLUENZA Outbreaks of influenza-like disease have
now been reported from 21 States and the District of
Columbia. The States reporting outbreaks this week for
the first time include Kentucky, West Virginia, Indiana,
Tennessee, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Michigan, and New
Jersey. Influenza A2 virus has been isolated or confirmed
by serologic titer rise as the causative agent of outbreaks
in the District of Columbia, Maryland, Michigan, Kansas,
North Carolina, New York, Illinois, and Massachusetts.
The pattern of spread of disease which, during the month
of January tended to confine itself to both a northerly
and southerly direction along the Atlantic seaboard, now


shows evidence of a more westerly course. (See map,
page 50).
The number of pneumonia-influenza deaths reported
weekly for 108 cities has extended above the epidemic
threshold for the last 6 weeks and continues the sharp
upswing noted during the week ending February 9. Excess
pneumonia-influenza deaths are showing continued marked
increases in the South and Middle Atlantic States. (See
graph, page 52).
The following reports come from areas of the country
currently experiencing new or widening outbreaks of
influenza-like disease.


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous week)
7th Week Cumulative
Disease Ended Ended Median First 7 weeks
Disease Median
February 16, February 17, 1958 1962 Median
1963 1962 1963 1962 1958 1962
Aseptic meningitis................ 19 19 -- 164 104
Brucellosis ..................... 8 9 8 39 37 77
Diphtheria...................... 3 14 14 39 95 136
Encephalitis, infectious .......... 19 24 16 129 179 153
Hepatitis, infectious and serum.. 1,233 1,518 828 7,827 10,453 5,017
Measles...... ................. 11,072 13,090 13,090 62,095 67,121 67,121
Meningococcal infections......... 47 50 53 380 362 379
Poliomyelitis, total.............. 3 3 14 26 55 137
Paralytic .................... 3 2 9 23 34 76
Nonparalytic............... 2 2 8 44
Unspecified................... 1 3 1 13 17
Streptococcal sore throat
and Scarlet fever ............ 11,021 9,627 -- 64,081 58,841 ---
Tetanus ........................ 1 --- 23 17 ---
Tularemia...................... 6 5 --- 32 44 --
Typhoid fever ................... 5 6 11 34 48 64
Typhus fever, tick-borne,
(Rocky Mountain spotted)...... --2
Rabies in Animals............... 61 71 72 391 445 538


Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: Psittacosis: Mich.-1 11
Botulism: Rabies in Man:
Malaria: N.J.-1, Ky.-1 13 Smallpox:
Plague: Typhus, murine: Texas-1 2









50 Morbidity and Mor



INFLUENZA AND INFLUENZA
January 1 through F


















Dutbreaka characteristic of influen-a
0 vith laboratory confirmation
Outbreaks pidemiologically characteristic
of influenza. No laboratory confirmation
Outbreaks of febrile respiratory disease resemblin
0 Adequate epidemiologic characterization lacking. N



Georgia Epidemic respiratory disease, compatible
with influenza has been observed in the Atlanta area
during the week ending February 16. The clinics of the
Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta have reported a sharp
increase in case load during the past two weeks, and at
least four schools in the area have noted excessive ab-
senteeism during this period. One school closure has
been reported. Specimens from these areas have been
submitted to the Respirovirus Laboratory, CDC, and are
being processed.
(Reported by W. J. Murphy, M.D., Director, Epidemiology,
Georgia Department of Public Health.)

Illinois The recent outbreak among recruits at the
Great Lakes Naval Training Station (MMWR Vol. 12, No. 5)
continues to decline. A limited outbreak has been re-
ported from the Chicago House of Correction where ap-
proximately 200 cases have been seen since February 1.
Specimens have been obtained and are currently being
processed. Influenza A2 isolates have been obtained in
4 sporadic cases from the Chicago and Urbana areas.
(Reported by Norman J. Rose, M.D., Chief, Bureau of
Epidemiology, Illinois Department of Public Health.)

Indiana A localized outbreak of influenza-like ill-
ness with onset about February 11 has been reported
from a high school in Harrison County. The illness has
been characterized by sudden onset of headache, fever,
and myalgia of 3-4 days duration. School absenteesim
reached 26 percent on a peak day. Other areas of the
State report only sporadic cases of influenza-like disease.
Laboratory studies are in progress.
(Reported by Dr. A. L. Marshall, Jr., Director, Division
of CDC. Indiana State Board of Health.)


tality Weekly Report



A-LIKE DISEASE OUTBREAKS U. S. A.
february 20, 1963 By State


g influenza
lo laboratory confirmation


Kansas During the last week, mild community out-
breaks of influenza-like illness have been noted in Doug-
las, Shawnee and Johnson Counties. In addition, there
has been an increasing number of cases of influenza-like
disease seen at the University at Lawrence. A2 influenza
virus has been isolated in 3 separate instances from
cases seen at the University infirmary.
(Reported by Dr. Don E. Wilcox, State Epidemiologist,
Kansas State Board of Health.)

Kentucky Extensive outbreaks of a relatively
mild influenza-like syndrome have been reported from
several areas in the State, since the first week of Febru-
ary. These came from the Louisville area and from sever-
al communities in northeastern Kentucky adjoining the
Cincinnati metropolitan area, site of a recent epidemic.
Subsequent reports have come from nearly all sections
of the State. Laboratory specimens are being processed.
(Reported by J. CI.lIt.rd Todd, State Epidemiologist,
Kentucky State Department of Health.)



Massachusetts-A university infirmary in the Boston
area has noted a two- to sixfold increase in admissions
for acute respiratory disease beginning February 8. Typi-
cal symptoms consist of acute onset of fever and chills,
with headache, myalgia, dry cough and weakness of 3-6
days duration. Throat washings from 8 typical cases
have demonstrated hemagglutinating agents in 5 in-
stances; two have been identified as A2 influenza virus.
(Reported by Nicholas J. Fiumara, Director of Communi-
cable Diseases, Massachusetts Department of Public
Health.)









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Michigan A laboratory confirmed outbreak of A2 in-
fluenza, restricted to employees of a single department
store, has been reported from Lansing, Michigan. Eighty
of the store's 250 employees became ill during a 2-week
period beginning approximately February 1. Throat wash-
ings were obtained from 6 cases, including 2 with com-
plicating pneumonia; all have yielded Type A2 influenza.
Additional cases were observed among 15 individuals
from Grand Rapids who visited the store on February 3.
All remained well until February 6, when 7 of these
individuals became ill with an influenza-like syndrome.
A similar illness has been observed in Detroit where
hospital emergency rooms have reported an increasing
case load and at least 1 large industrial population has
noted excessive absenteeism.
(Reported by George H. Agate, M.D., Epidemiologist,
Michigan Department of Health.)


Minnesota A limited outbreak of influenza-like
illness was observed among patients at the Veterans Ad-
ministration Hospital, Fort Snelling, Minnesota, during
early February. A total of 75 cases was reported, with no
evidence of spread to the surrounding community. Type
A2 influenza virus was recovered from throat washings in
two cases. No other outbreaks have been reported in
the State.
(Reported by D. S. Fleming, M.D., Director, Disease Pre-
vention and Control, Minnesota State Department of
Health.)


New Jersey Eight counties, located in different
sections of the State, reported influenza-like illness
during the week ending February 15. School, university,
industrial and prison populations have been among those
affected. One school closure has been reported. Labora-
tory specimens have been obtained from selected
populations.
(Reported by William J. Dougherty, Director, Division of
Preventive Disease, New Jersey State Department of
Health.)

New York Restricted outbreaks of influenza-like
illness in school age children were first recognized
February 11-14 in three small communities in the Albany-
Troy-Schenectady area of New York State. Additional foci
have been noted during the past two weeks in two mental
institutions in the southeastern part of the State. Lab-
oratory confirmations are not yet available. Serologic

evidence of recent infection with influenza A2 has been
obtained from three cases seen in Nassau and West-
chester Counties, adjoining New York City, as well as
one case from Columbia County near the Massachusetts
border.


Pneumonia-influenza deaths for New York City con-
tinued well above expected levels for the week ending
February 16 (167 deaths compared to an expected number
of 68). However, the increased mortality has been out of
proportion to other indices of epidemic activity. School
and industrial absenteeism have remained at near normal
levels. One outpatient clinic of a large teaching hospital
reported an increasing case load of influenza-like disease
with laboratory confirmation of A2 influenza in three
cases.
(Reported by Robert M. Albrecht, M.D., Director, Epidemi-
ology Division, New York State Department of Health;
and Harold T. Fuerst, M.D., Director, Bureau of Pre-
ventable Disease, New York City Department of Health.)


Ohio Three isolates of influenza A2 virus have
been recovered from cases in the Columbus area, and
1 from Cincinnati. (See MMWR Vol. 12, No. 6) Community-
wide outbreaks, largely confined to the southern half
of the State, continue to be reported.
(Reported by Winslow Bashe, M.D., Acting Chief, Division
of Communicable Diseases, Ohio Department of Health)


Oklahoma An outbreak of influenza-like illness
has been noted at one high school in Oklahoma City. On
February 12, absenteeism reached 27 percent. In addition,
an outbreak has been reported from a reformatory at El
Reno, reaching peak proportions about February 7. Labor-
atory studies are underway.
(Reported by Dr. F. R. Hassler, Chief, Communicable
Disease Control and Laboratory Services, Oklahoma State
Department of Health).


Vermont Enosburg Falls, Franklin County, has re-
ported over 50 cases of influenza-like illness since
February 3. The outbreak has affected all age groups;
there has been above normal absenteeism in the city
schools. A similar outbreak has occurred in the town of
Johnson, Lamoille County, with first cases appearing on
February 9. Laboratory studies are presently underway.
(Reported by Dr. Linus J. Leavens, Director, Communi-
cable Disease Control, Vermont Department of Health.)

West Virginia Above seasonal incidence of respira-
tory disease has been noted in the eastern counties of
Berkeley, Jefferson, Mineral, Pocahontas, and Upshur,
beginning during the week of February 4. School ab-
senteeism, which normally is 5-7 percent, is currently
running 10-12 percent in most areas and 18 percent in
Mineral County. Local physicians in the areas report
that illnesses resemble influenza. Laboratory studies
are in progress.
(Reported by Dr. L. A. Dickerson, Director, Disease
Control, West Virginia State Health Department.)








52 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


NUMBER OF DEATHS NUMBER OF DEATHS


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Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


INTERPRETATION OF WEEKLY PNEUMONIA-
INFLUENZA CHARTS


The solid line on the pneumonia-influenza excess
mortality charts indicates the expected number of weekly
deaths based on 1954-60 seasonal change and secular
trend. The epidemic threshold (dashed line) is placed at
a distance of 1.64 times the standard deviation of the
expected number during inter-epidemic periods. Recorded
deaths are shown as circles connected by straight lines.
The criterion that recorded deaths exceed the epi-
demic threshold for two successive weeks is used as an
indication of possible epidemic increase. With this crite-
rion, the approximate probabilities (1) of erroneously
classifying a random fluctuation as a true increase in
excess mortality, or conversely (2) failing to recognize a
true rise in excess mortality are:


(1) Using a simple model of independent repeated
trials, the probability that during a 26 week
period of endemic influenza mortality, chance
variation will result in one or more instances
in which the number of recorded deaths exceeds
the epidemic threshold for 2 successive weeks,
is approximately equal to 0.1.



(2) On the other hand, given a moderate to large
epidemic increase, the chance that the recorded
number of deaths will fail to exceed the epidemic
threshold during both the second and third week
of the epidemic is <0.1.


INFANT DEATHS IN 108 CITIES

The weekly average number of infant deaths in 108
cities for the four-week period ending February 16 was
770 as compared with an expected 773 weekly average.


WEEK ENDING 4 Week Weekly
1/26 2/2 2/9 2/16 Total Average
Observed 790 758 759 774 3,081 770
Expected 778 775 771 768 3,092 773
Excess 12 -17 -12 6 11 -3


DEATHS UNDER ONE YEAR OF AGE IN 108 U.S. CITIES
Average number per week by four-week periods


900 ---------------_--------------- ----------

RECORDED
/DEATH-*


NUMBER

OF

DEATHS







PERIOD NC ,- R .. f T
1960 [ 1961 1962 1 1963
*BY PLACE ENCE O**F 1UECEUT M IR E ERIENC


(See Table, page 57)









54 Mlorbidity and Mortality WXeekly Report



Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

FEBRUARY 16, 1963 AND FEBRUARY 17, 1962



Poliomyelitis, Aseptic
Poliomyelitis, total cases Poliomyelitis, paralytic nonparalytic Meningitis
Cumulative Cumulative
Area
7th week First 7 weeks 7th week First 7 weeks 7th week 7th week

1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962


UNITED STATES...... 3 3 26 55 3 2 23 34 19 19

NEW ENGLAND.............. 1
Maine................. -
New Hampshire......... -
Vermont ............... -
Massachusetts........ -
Rhode Island ..........
Connecticut.......... -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC .......... 1 1 4 24 1 4 13 1 1
New York.............. 1 1 3 24 1 3 13
New Jersey............ -
Pennsylvania 1 1 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL........ 1 7 5 1 6 4 1 1
Ohio.................. 2 3 1 3 1 1
Indiana............... 1 -- 1- -
Illinois.............. 4 1 4
Michigan.............. 1 1 1 I
Wisconsin ............- -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL........ 4 1 2.
Minnesota............. 2
Iowa.................. 2 _
Missouri.............. 2
North Dakota.......... -
South Dakota...........-
Nebraska ...............
Kansas.................

SOUTH ATLANTIC........... 1 2 5 1 2 4 3 1 3
Delaware............... 1
Maryland.............. -
District of Columbia.. -
Virginia.................. 1 1 1
West Virginia......... -
North Carolina........ 1 2 1 1 2 1
South Carolina........ -
Georgia ...............
Florida............... 2 2 2

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL ....... 1 2 1 2 6
Kentucky.............. 1 3
Tennessee............. .. 1 1
Alabama............... i 1 -
Mississippi ........... 3

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 2 9 8 2 9 7 1 1
Arkansas..............
Louisiana .... ..... 8 2 8 2
Oklahoma..............
Texas................. 2 1 6 2 1 5 1 1

MOUNTAIN................. 3 2 5 1
Montana................ 2 1
Idaho...... ............
Wyoming.................
Colorado.............. 5 1
New Mexico............. .
Arizona................
Utah.................. 1 1
Nevada................

PACIFIC.................. 3 4 2 2 5 6
Washington.......... 3 1
Oregon................. -
California............ 3 4 2 2 2 5
Alaska................ -
Hawaii...............

Puerto Rico..............








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 55


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

FEBRUARY 16, 1963 AND FEBRUARY 17, 1962 (Continued)



Brucellosis Diphtheria Encephalitis, Hepatitis, Measles
infectious infectious and serum
Area
Cumu- Cumu- 7th week
native lative Under 20 &
7th week 7 weeks 7th week 7 weeks 7th week 20 yr. over Total 7th week
1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1962


UNITED STATES...... 8 39 3 39 19 24 668 481 1,233 1,518 11,072

NEW ENGLAND............... 1 1 3 84 72 156 75 451
Maine................. 35 26 61 10 11
New Hampshire.......... 4 4 8 7 -
Vermont ............... 19
Massachusetts......... 1 3 34 32 66 42 121
Rhode Island.......... 1 2 2 7 36
Connecticut........... 11 8 19 9 264

MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 2 2 7 5 1 122 103 225 162 1,088
New York............... 2 2 1 79 64 143 61 462
New Jersey............ 1 17 16 33 55 159
Pennsylvania .......... 2 4 5 26 23 49 46 467

EAST NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 2 2 1 2 153 88 251 344 4,832
Ohio.................. 43 17 64 105 568
Indiana................ 15 8 23 28 171
Illinois.............. 1 2 2 1 22 26 52 62 236
Michigan ............... 1 1 44 28 72 143 1,057
Wisconsin............. 29 9 40 6 2,800

WEST NORTH CENTRAL ...... 7 31 9 2 32 19 54 149 809
Minnesota............. 2 1 6 1 8 19 72
Iowa................... 5 23 1 4 4 9 68 383
Missouri.............. 1 1 17 4 22 22 -
North Dakota.......... 11 249
South Dakota.......... 2 6 1 2 3 4
Nebraska.............. 1 1 1 4 5 6 105
Kansas................ 2 2 1 3 4 7 19 NN

SOUTH ATLANTIC........... 9 8 2 62 32 98 194 858
Delaware .............. 1 1 2 3 9
Maryland.............. 1 3 1 4 26 25
District of Columbia.. 2 2 7 1
Virginia.............. 1 12 11 23 41 264
West Virginia......... 11 4 15 39 312
North Carolina........ 1 1 1 23 6 29 46 59
South Carolina......... 2 8 3 15 4 53
Georgia ............... 1 1 2 3 12 3
Florida............... 4 7 3 2 5 16 132

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL ....... 1 6 2 68 34 102 271 482
Kentucky .............. 16 10 26 140 264
Tennessee............. 1 1 34 11 45 57 191
Alabama............... 1 5 8 10 18 42 20
Mississippi........... 1 10 3 13 32 7

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 2 1 4 5 51 41 103 105 791
Arkansas.............. 1 1 2 11 3 20 25 39
Louisiana............. 7 7 14 10 3
Oklahoma.............. 1 3 5 8 12 12
Texas................. 1 3 3 30 26 61 58 737

MOUNTAIN................. 1 1 28 7 91 71 816
Montana............... 11 1 12 6 64
Idaho................. 28 10 137
Wyoming ............... 1 1 -
Colorado.............. 6 1 17 22 160
New Mexico............ 7 2 12 3 NN
Arizona ............... -- 14 16 281
Utah .................. 1 1 4 3 7 13 164
Nevada................ 10

PACIFIC.................. 1 4 6 68 85 153 147 945
Washington............ 1 14 13 27 30 167
Oregon ................ 4 10 14 10 194
California............ 1 4 5 49 58 107 101 354
Alaska................ 1 4 5 4 109
Hawaii................ 2 121


13,090

1,575
268
47
3
832
52
373

1,798
902
615
281

1,377
74
128
450
562
163

447
8
219
21
138
56
5
NN

1,003
9
118
56
346
214
26
15
6
213

1,343
213
898
63
169

3,238
10
2
95
3,131

623
209
55

192
NN
115
52


1,686
662
264
690
65
5

156


Puerto Rico ........... 1 5 4 9 13 10


I








56 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

FEBRUARY 16, 1963 AND FEBRUARY 17, 1962 (Continued)


Meningococcal Streptococcal Tickborne
Infections Sore Throat & Tetanus Typhus Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in Aninals
Scarlet Fever (Rcky Mt.
Area mu- Spotted) Cumu- Cumu-
lative lative lative
7th wk. 7 weeks 7th week 7th wk. 7th wk. 7th wk. 7th wk. 7. weeks 7th week 7 weeks
1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963

UNITED STATES.... 47 380 11,021 9,627 6 5 34 61 71 391

NEW ENGLAND......... 4 33 1,209 518 2 -
Maine.............. 1 7 236 10 -
New Hampshire..... 10 3 -
Vermont............. 1 21 34 -
Massachusetts...... 1 11 192 127 2 -
Rhode Island....... 1 4 108 42 -
Connecticut........ 1 10 642 302 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC..... 6 45 783 679 1 5 2 14
New York............ 1 17 429 352 1 5 1 13
New Jersey......... 2 9 150 146 -
Pennsylvania........ 3 19 204 181 1 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL.. 10 66 1,373 1,209 1 5 12 54
Ohio................ 4 21 244 167 1 24
Indiana............ 11 191 203 1 8 6
Illinois........... 2 11 159 188 1 3 3 10
Michigan........... I 14 475 419 -- 11
Wisconsin.......... 3 9 304 232 1 3

WEST NORTH CENTRAL.. 3 19 455 350 3 1 15 21 89
Minnesota........... 1 3 27 38 9 4 26
Iowa............... 122 137 4 9 26
Missouri........... 7 12 1 1 1 2 21
North Dakota....... 1 160 114 4 2
South Dakota........ 2 4 18 1 2 14
Nebraska........... 2 6 2 -
Kansas............. 140 31 2 -

SOUTH ATANTIC...... 5 83 1,264 625 1 1 7 11 9 74
Delaware........... 1 1 5 12 -
Maryland........... 13 46 28 2 -
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 2 1 -
Virginia........... 2 19 274 178 6 2 30
West Virginia...... 1 7 270 159 1 2 1 5 25
North Carolina..... 14 69 41 1 1 3
South Carolina..... 1 6 277 32 -
Georgia............ 4 4 10 I- -
Florida............ 18 319 163 2 3 1 16

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 25 1,514 1,748 1 4 6 10 37
Kentucky........... 6 256 335 1 1 4 1 16
Tennessee............ 12 1,071 1,215 3 2 8 19
Alabama............ 4 95 39 1 2
Mississippi........ 3 92 159 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 6 37 1,407 1,021 1 8 13 15 68
Arkansas........... 3 17 6 6 1 4 6
Louisiana.......... 3 12 24 3 1 1 1 9
Oklahoma............. 7 69 16 2 1 6
Texas............... 3 15 1,297 996 2 9 9 47

MOUNTAIN............ 14 1,331 1,748 1 2 7
Montana............ 57 71 -
Idaho.............. 111 288 -
Wyoming............ 38 62 -
Colorado............* 3 552 514
New Mexico......... 1 2 317 422 1 2 4
Arizona............ 3 171 186 3
Utah............... 5 85 203 -
Nevada............. 1 2 -

PACIFIC............. 13 58 1,685 1,729 2 6 9 2 48
Washington......... 5 510 595 -
Oregon............. 2 38 32 1 1
California......... 13 47 989 931 2 5 9 2 47
Alaska............. 4 108 146 -
Hawaii............. 40 25 -- -


Puerto Rico.........


- -1 4 2










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 57





Table 4 (C). TOTAL DEATHS UNDER 1 YEAR OF AGE IN REPORTING CITIES



(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.)o


For weeks ending For weeks ending
Area Area
1/26 2/2 2/9 2/16 1/26 2/2 2/9 2/16


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass............... 11 10 18 21
Bridgeport, Conn........... 4 2 4 3
Cambridge, Mass............ 2 0 0 0
Fall River, Mass.......... 2 2 0 0
Hartford, Conn........... 4 3 1 6
Lowell, Mass.............. 4 0 2 2
Lynn, Mass................. 1 3 1 1
New Bedford, Mass......... 1 1 0 2
New Haven, Conn.......... 2 3 8 13
Providence, R.I........... 5 5 5 3
Somerville, Mass......... 0 0 0 0
Springfield, Mass......... 5 2 3 0
Waterbury, Conn............. 2 4 1 1
Worcester, Mass........... 2 3 2 7

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y............... 5 8 4 4
Allentown, Pa............. 2 2 2 0
Buffalo, N.Y............... 7 9 4 9
Camden, N.J............... 8 3 2 6
Elizabeth, N.J............ 3 2 2 2
Erie, Pa.................. 2 2 3 4
Jersey City, N.J.......... 6 5 6 1
Newark, N.J............... 4 7 5 5
New York City, N.Y......... 76 83 91 76
Paterson, N.J............. 0 3 2 4
Philadelphia, Pa.......... 21 33 23 12
Pittsburgh, Pa............ 16 11 5 11
Reading, Pa................ 2 1 1 2
Rochester, N.Y............ 8 8 9 2
Schenectady, N.Y........... 0 3 1 1
Scranton, Pa.............. 1 4 0 2
Syracuse, N.Y ............. 3 3 8 7
Trenton, N.J.............. 3 2 1 2
Utica, N.Y................ 3 1 1 0
Yonkers, N.Y.............. 1 5 4 3

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio............... 5 5 2 7
Canton, Ohio .............. 0 0 0 3
Chicago, Ill................. 51 57 65 38
Cincinnati, Ohio.......... 11 13 6 6
Cleveland, Ohio........... 10 19 21 16
Columbus, Ohio............ 6 12 6 12
Dayton, Ohio.............. 10 7 7 4
Detroit, Mich............. 19 21 31 36
Evansville, Ind........... 1 3 3 5
Flint, Mich............... 5 4 7 1
Fort Wayne, Ind........... 4 0 1 2
Gary, Ind................. 0 5 1 1
Grand Rapids, Mich........ 2 3 1 2
Indianapolis, Ind......... 15 6 5 13
Madison, Wis............. 2 4 3 4
Milwaukee, Wis............. 11 4 5 23
Peoria, Ill............... 1 2 3 3
Rockford, Ill................ 4 2 0 2
South Bend, Ind........... 0 2 2 3
Toledo, Ohio............... 10 5 2 8
Youngstown, Ohio.......... 2 0 4 4

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa.......... 0 2 3 4
Duluth, Minn.............. 0 1 1 0
Kansas City, Kans......... 6 5 3 4
Kansas City, Mo............ 12 5 3 10
Lincoln, Nebr............. 4 1 1 3
Minneapolis, Minn......... 5 8 9 8
Omaha, Nebr............... 8 2 6 2
St. Louis, Mo............. 7 12 16 13
St. Paul, Minn............ 2 4 1 4
Wichita, Kans............. 7 4 5 4


Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.

NOTE: All deaths by place of occumrece.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga............... 7 14 15 18
Baltimore, Md............ 18 6 25 20
Charlotte, N.C........... 0 5 4 2
Jacksonville, Fla........ 4 3 8 4
Miami, Fla.........-..... 5 3 9 9
Norfolk, Va............... 4 4 9 8
Richmond, Va.............. 7 5 4 5
Savannah, Ga............. 3 7 1 0
St. Petersburg, Fla...... 0 1 1 2
Tampa, Fla............... 10 2 6 5
Washington, D.C........... 22 20 13 15
Wilmington, Del.......... 5 0 2 1

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala........... 11 7 20 6
Chattanooga, Tenn........ 3 0 4 8
Knoxville, Tenn.......... 1 3 0 3
Louisville, Ky............ 11 14 14 6
Memphis, Tenn............ 14 18 15 6
Mobile, Ala............... 5 5 4 4
Montgomery, Ala.......... 2 3 2 6
Nashville, Tenn........... 4 6 4 3

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.............. 4 2 4 1
Baton Rouge, La.......... 4 4 4 9
Corpus Christi, Tex...... 2 2 5 3
Dallas, Tex.............. 9 11 15 11
El Paso, Tex............. 8 5 4 10
Fort Worth, Tex........... 8 2 6 5
Houston, Tex.............. 13 10 15 9
Little Rock, Ark......... 6 1 1 9
New Orleans, La.......... 13 15 13 14
Oklahoma City, Okla...... 7 3 6 7
San Antonio, Tex......... 5 8 6 8
Shreveport, La........... 3 9 6 4
Tulsa, Okla.............. 5 5 5 4

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex...... 3 6 7 6
Colorado Springs, Colo... 3 1 2 1
Denver, Colo............ 10 15 3 14
Ogden, Utah.............. 0 0 3 2
Phoenix, Ariz............ 13 4 5 3
Pueblo, Colo............. 2 1 0 0
Salt Lake City, Utah..... 4 4 2 3
Tucson, Ariz ............. 3 3 5 2

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.......... 0 2 1 2
Fresno, Calif............ 3 2 7 3
Glendale, Calif........... 2 1 1 2
Honolulu, Hawaii......... 3 9 6 6
Long Beach, Calif........ 13 4 2 3
Los Angeles, Calif....... 35 40 21 39
Oakland, Calif........... 11 10 1 6
Pasadena, Calif.......... 0 1 2 1
Portland, Oreg............ 6 8 2 4
Sacramento, Calif........ 3 5 3 1
San Diego, Calif......... 24 8 7 9
San Francisco, Calif..... 13 5 3 4
San Jose, Calif.......... 2 6 4 2
Seattle, Wash............ 6 14 12 6
Spokane, Wash............ 3 1 2 4
Tacoma, Wash.............. 1 2 2 2

San Juan, P.R.............. 4 4 11 7


OCurrent Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities

4(A) Total Mortality, all ages................... 13,112
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages........ 759
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age............. 774
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over..... 7,601







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report



SUMMARY OF REPORTED CASES OF INFECTIOUS SYPHILIS


JANUARY 1963 AND JANUARY 1962


CASES OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SYPHILIS: By Reporting Area January 1963 and January 1962

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INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES
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