Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00098

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text

FS. 6 0/9 o/s 7






Morbidity and Mo



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


Prepared by the


634-5131


For release September 20, 1963 ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333 Vol. 12, No. 37

PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THE UNITED STATES AND ON
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED SEPTEMBER 14, 1963


POLIOMYELITIS- A total of 18 cases, 17 paralytic,
were reported by eight States during the week ending
September 14. Pennsylvania reported 6 cases; Michigan,
3 cases; and Virginia, Alabama, and Mississippi, 2 cases
each.
Four of .the cases reported by Pennsylvania are from
Philadelphia, bringing the city's corrected total to 44
cases for the year. Type I oral vaccine from the CDC
epidemic reserve has been administered since September 11
in lower socio-economic areas in Philadelphia where
cases have been clustered; an intensive city-wide pro-
gram has been planned for September 22.
The Virginia cases are from Petersburgh where three
cases have occurred in recent weeks among unvaccinated
Negro children. Laboratory studies are in process.


A case of paralytic poliomyelitis due to Type III
poliovirus with onset in late August has been reported
from Albany, Vermont, near the Quebec border. In the
eastern Quebec counties an outbreak of over 50 cases
of paralytic poliomyelitis has occurred in recent weeks.
(Continued on page 302)

Poliomyelitis (Cumulated Weekly) 1st Through 37th Week


1963 1962 1961 1960 1959

Paralytic 222 416 517 1,312 3,455
Total 257 536 780 1,908 5,474
Poliomyelitis (Six Week Totals) 32nd Through 37th Week
Paralytic 103 162 278 632 1,855
Total 114 202 418 960 3,023


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous week)
I 37th Week 1Cumulative


Disease


Aseptic meningitis...............
Brucellosis .....................
Diphtheria .....................
Encephalitis, infectious ..........
Hepatitis, infectious and serum...
M easles ........................
Meningococcal infections..........
Poliomyelitis, total..............
Paralytic ....................
Nonparalytic. ................
Unspecified.................
Streptococcal sore throat
and Scarlet fever ...........
Tetanus ........................
Tularemia......................
Typhoid fever..................
Typhus fever, tick-borne,
(Rocky Mountain spotted) ......

Rabies in Animals...............


Ended
September 14,
1963


3,592
8
5
26

6

70


Ended

September 15,
1962

164
6
12
47
898
843
29
32
23
5
4

3,499
3
2
26

8

53


Median
1958 1962


First 37 weeks
Median
S 1962 1958 1962


1,159
267
168
1,101
31,133
358,487
1,768
257
222
25
10

251,332
178
202
363

151

2,740


1,634
297
274
1,306
40,116
442,727
1,566
536
416
86
34

232,961
184
214
432

186

2,834


545
438
1,306
26,322
395,788
1,661
1,914


2,769


Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY.
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: Mass. 4 Psittacosis: 43
Botulism: Calif. 6 12 Rabies in Man: 1
Malaria: N.Y. 1 65 Smallpox:
Plague: Typhus, murine: N.c. 1, Texas 1 17







Morliidily and Mortality Weekly Report



NUMBER OF DEATHS DUE TO SYPHILIS


U.S.- SELECTED YEARS


NO. OF
DEATHS
16000

14000

12000-

10000

8000-

6000-

4000-

2000-


1933 '37 '41 '45 '49 '53 '57 '61 1962


YEARS


*Source: Vital Stotistics in the United States


Deaths Classified According to the International Statistical Classification of Causes of Death.
Deaths from 1933 through 1948 hove been adjusted to the classification used in the sixth revision. Begin-
ning with 1958, the number of deaths are c assified according to the seventh revision of the international
classification.


MORTALITY DUE TO SYPHILIS A reduction in the
mortality due to syphilis of 82 percent has occurred be-
tween 1938 and 1962.
Approximately 15,000 deaths due to syphilis were
reported annually in the United States prior to 1938. in
1 -. stimulated by grants and aid to States, case finding
activities expanded and rapid treatment centers were


established for the :,..i..-i and treatment of venereal
disease. During World War II, penicillin was found
to be effective in treatment and soon was widely
applied.
The estimate of the number of deaths due to phii,-
in 1962 was 2,700, bases on a 10 percent sample of all
deaths.


SPoshomyelitis conrtnued frornm ront pageR
Type III poliovirus has been recovered from a number of
:he cases. Over 130,000 doses of trivalent polio vaccine
have been administered in r... .. since mid-August.
Type Ill oral polio vaccine from the CDC epidemic reserve
will be led in the three northern Vermont counties be-
ginting this week.




BOTULISM Six cases of botulism, i .;, 1 n :.i one death)
were reported from California for the week ending Sep-
tember 14. All victims consumed home-canned marinated
mushrooms at a dinner in July in Southern California.
An epidemiologic investigation is in progress.


EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS

Dengue Fe r
Puerto R c :
A cotal of 8 96 cases of dengue fever has been of-
reported th Purto Rico Department of IHalth
as of noon, September 16, 1963. This represents an in-
crease of i i I. reported cases during the past
week. Although 59 of 77 municipios have reported cases,
8 mrurstictp s have accounted for 6,565, or 75%, of the
8,796 cases.
Present information indicates that the disease in-
cidence is considerably under reported.
((, init ft d orn page ti)o


:102


I'i


I
i/.

,-'/



/z








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Q Fever New Hampshire and Rhode Island
A case of Q Fever diagnosed clinically and con
firmed by serology has been reported in a New Hampshire
textile worker.
On June 28, a 58-year-old white male, supervisor of
a textile company carding room, suffered acute onset of
an illness characterized by chills and fever, headache,
stiff neck, and a mild, non-productive cough. Examination
by the plant physician failed to disclose any positive
findings. A chest X-ray was negative. The patient had a
spikirtF temperature to 104-1050 over the next two days.
Although the patient worked in New Hampshire, he
commuted to his home in Rhode Island on weekends.
Over the July 4th weekend he consulted a physician in
Rhode Island who heard bilateral pulmonary rales. The
remainder of the examination was negative. A repeat
chest X-ray was also reported as negative. Tetracycline
therapy was instituted without beneficial response, and
he was hospitalized the following day. The attending
physician in the hospital, who had diagnosed one of
Rhode Island's last known Q Fever cases (a textile mill
worker from Massachusetts), suspected Q Fever on the
basis of the patient's occupation and clinical course.
Blood specimens taken a week apart demonstrated
a rise in the complement fixation screening test, as
shown in the following table:
First Specimen (July 6) 4+ at 1:32
Negative at 1:64


Second Specimen (July 12) 4+ at 1:128
1+ at 1:256
Tetracycline therapy was reinstituted. The patient
recuperated uneventfully. He has since resumed work.
An investigation of the materials handled and the
environment of this textile company proved negative for
the source of his infection. No further cases were demon-
strated upon investigation.
At the same textile plant, two employees were
afflicted with Q Fever ten years ago. A study made at
that time revealed no other clinical cases, but did reveal
many high Q Fever complement fixation titers in the
textile workers.
The present patient worked in the carding room,
which is the dustiest area of the textile plant. Prior to
the patient's clinical onset of illness, the textile factory
was known to be processing goat hair and camel hair.
Although several cases of Q Fever have been epidemio-
logically associated with goat hair, no cases specifically
related to the textile industry are known. Goat hair may
be contaminated with Coxiella burnetii from the feces
and from the lochia during the lambing season. No reports
of camel hair as a source of infection are known.
(Reported by James Bowes, Director, Division of Epide-
miology, Rhode Island Department of Health, and Forrest
H. Bumford, Director of Occupational Health, Department
of Health and Welfare, Division of Public Health Services,
New Hampshire.)


TOTAL DEATHS REPORTED IN 108 CITIES

The weekly average number of total deaths in 108 cities
for the four-week period ending September 14 was
10,459 as compared with an expected weekly average
of 10,550.


TOTAL DEATHS RECORDED IN 108 UNITED STATES CITIES

WEEK ENDING
4 Week Weekly
8/24 8/31 9/7 9/14 Total Average

Observed 10,486 10,377 10,077 10,897 41,837 10,459
Expected 10,525 10,523 10,550 10,603 42,201 10,550

Excess -39 -146 -473 294 -364 -91


TOTAL DEATHS RECORDED IN 108 U S. CITIES
Average number per week by four-wee, peril

5,soo500 ----


NUMBER I TV


DEATHS r



,..
,,' ', -|

i. ...... .j ... ... ...
,, r L ,s o r96 l 92


(See Table, Page 307)


303








:301 Morbidilt and IMoralitl Weekly Ileporl



Tabhlc CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: U UNITED STATES

FOR WE KS ENDID

SEPTEMBER 14, 1963 AND SEPTEMBER 15, 1962



Poliomyelitis, Aseptic
Poliomyelitis, total cases Poliomyelitis, paralytic nonparalytic Meningitis


Area




UNITED STATES......

NEW ENGLAND ..............
Maine.................
New Hampshire.........
Vermont ...............
Massachusett s.........
Rhode Island.........
Connecticut............

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...........
New York ..............
New Jersey.............
Pennsylvania

EAST NORTH CENTRAL .....
Ohio .................
Indiana ...............
Illinois..... .........
Michigan............
Wisconsin............

WEST NORTH CENTRAL.......
Minnesota............
Iowa..................
Missouri..............
North Dahk ta .........
South Dakota.........
Nebraska.............
Kansas................

SOUTH ATLANTIC..........
Delaware.............
Maryland .............
District of Columbia..
Virginia .............
West Virginia........
North Carolina.......
South Carol ina........
Georgia ...........
Florida ..............

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL........
Kentucky..............
Tennessee .............
Alabama ..............
Mississippi...........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL.......
Arkansas.............
Louis iana....... ......
Oklahoma..............
Texas...............

nMONTAIN..................
Montana .............
Idahoi...............
Wyoming...............
C l Ir idi..........
New M i..............
rio .............


P Uti .................
Nev i. d .. ............
PA(IF IC .................
r ishin gt o< .. ... ......

C Cil U1ii.. ........
Aisk. ..........
Ala s ;a Ri........


Cumulative Cumulative
37th week First 37 weeks 37th week First 37 weeks 37th week 37th week

1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962


18 32 257 536 17 23 222 416 1 5 57 164

3 5 3 5 4


-1 1 2 -
2 4 2 4

1 12

6 3 87 60 5 3 68 42 1 9 10
S 3 7 46 3 5 30 9 8
1 5 1 5
6 79 9 5 62 7 1 2

3 4 33 55 3 1 25 38 3 5 36
S 2 8 16 1 4 14 1 1 22
2 7 1 5
S 1 12 22 11 12 1 2
3 1 7 7 3 7 6 1 2 14
4 3 2 1

4 4 26 4 4 16 6 24
3 6 3 6 6 7
5 2 1
7 2 1
3 -
1 1 1 1- -
3 1 4 3 1 4
S- 15

4 1 33 36 4 1 30 31 3 5
S 1 1

1 2 1 1
2 4 7 2 3 7 1 4
1 5 1 5 1 1
3 4 3 4 -
1 6 4 1 5 4
1 12 6 1 11 5
6 8 6 5 1 -

4 4 54 45 4 1 52 34 10 8
1 20 14 1 2
2 8 9 8 4 2 5
2 1 41 14 2 1 39 14 1
2 5 2 2 5 2 7

1 9 24 240 1 7 23 189 2 1 27
1 4 6 1 3 6 3
S 14 14 14 12
2 11 2 9
1 6 6 209 1 4 6 162 2 1 24

1 1 12 1 8 2
3 2-
1 2 1 1
1- 2 1 -
1 1 2

3 3
1 1 1


6 18 57 6 16 53 19 52
1 1 2 1 1 2 3 4
2 5 1 5 1 1
5 15 50 5 14 46 15 47



1 5 11 4 11 1










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 305


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

SEPTEMBER 14, 1963 AND SEPTEMBER 15, 1962 (Continued)



Brucellosis Diphtheria Encephalitis, Hepatitis, Measles
infectious infectious and serum
Area
Cumu- Cumu- 37th week
lative lative Under 20 &
37th week 37 weeks 37th week 37 weeks 37th week 20 yr. over Total 37th week
1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1962
UNITED STATES...... 7 267 9 168 25 47 371 316 738 898 825 843

NEW ENGIAND.............. 1 8 61 41 106 61 31 62
Maine ................. 35 19 54 20 6 16
-New Hampshire.......... 15 7 23 7 -
Vermont............... 1 3 2 8 1 .2
Massachusetts......... 6 6 9 15 20 18 24
Rhode Island.......... 2 2 2 2 2 2
Connecticut........... 2 2 4 11 5 18

MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 5 21 4 11 81 79 160 171 131 116
New York.............. 3 13 4 9 43 51 94 97 88 77
New Jersey............. 3 7 8 15 24 31 26
Pennsylvania.......... 2 5 2 31 20 51 50 12 13

EAST NORTH CENTRAL....... 3 29 1 23 6 5 42 53 102 192 159 216
Ohio.................. 1 3 14 21 38 59 23 13
Indiana............... 5 1 5 5 2 8 10 17 28 10
Illinois.............. 3 18 12 1 11 8 21 46 31 11
Michigan.............. 5 3 1 1 14 16 30 63 46 110
Wisconsin............. 1 2 1 3 7 31 72

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 150 37 3 3 11 6 24 41 50 22
Minnesota............. 8 15 2 1 5 8 -
Iowa .................. 1 111 1 2 2 4 16 12 10
Missouri.............. 11 1 1 2 2 4 7 2 2
North Dakota.......... 1 2 2 2 32 10
South Dakota......... 8 11 1 1 2 1 4 -
Nebraska............... 6 8 1 I I -
Kansas................. 6 1 3 8 6 NN NN

SOUTH ATLANTIC........... 14 3 37 .6 13 41 24 65 111 104 72
Delaware .............. 2 2 1 4
Maryland .............. 4 2 6 13 7 4
District of Columbia. 1 3 2 5 2 2
Virginia.............. 6 8 3 11 17 16 10
West Virginia......... 1 15 6 21 20 25 39
North Carolina......... 4 2 1 3 3 6 31 2 7
South Carolina........ 3 12 1 1 2 3 7
Georgia................ 3 12 3 1 4 6 1 -
Florida............... 1 9 5 13 2 6 8 19 45 6

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 13 2 12 1 2 27 24 55 94 82 52
Kentucky.............. 3 10 5 19 30 54 6
Tennessee.............. 6 2 1 11 9 20 29 24 35
Alabama................ 4 2 10 3 3 6 18 3 10
Mississippi........... 1 1 3 7 10 17 1 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 2 32 3 23 5 47 34 81 40 45 105
Arkansas.............. 2 7 1 2 8 3 11 2
Louisiana............. 8 2 7 6 7 13 10 1
Oklahoma.............. 5 6 5 5 4 2
Texas................. 12 8 5 28 24 52 28 41 102

MOUNTAIN................. 9 4 2 13 3 45 43 94 64
Montana ............... 1 2 7 2 19 20
Idaho................. 8 2 35 13
Wyoming............... 1 1 -
Colorado .............. 3 1 1 6 7 8 16
New Mexico............ 1 2 10 10 8 NN NN
Arizona............... 3 13 16 19 7
Utah.................. 5 1 1 7 13 7
Nevada............. -

PACIFIC .................. 1 14 3 3 8 48 52 100 145 129 134
Washington............ 1 15 5 20 45 9 30
Oregon................ 2 7 5 12 20 27 30
California............. 1 11 3 3 7 23 36 59 67 77 45
Alaska................ 3 6 9 13 10 5
Hawaii................ 1 6 24

Puerto Rico.............. 12 17 4 21 19 12 17











M1orbiditv and M'ortalily Weekly Report


Tahbi (. CASES OF SPICIFIFD NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: IUNITDI) STATES

FOR WIEKS ENDED

SEPTEMBER 14. 1963 AND SEPTEMBER 15, 1962 (Continued)


UNITED STATES...

NEW ENGLAND.......
Ma iine..............
New Hampshire......
Vermont ...........
Massachusetts......
Rhode Island......
Connecticut........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC.....
New York...........
New Jersey.........
Pennsylvania.......

EAST NORTH CENTRAL..
Ohio...............
Indiana ............
Illinois...........
Michigan ...........
Wisconsin ..........

WEST NORTH CENTRAL..
Minnesota..........
Iowa...............
Missouri...........
North Dakota.......
South Dakota.......
Nebraska...........
Kansas.............

SOUTH ATLANTIC......
Delaware...........
Maryland...........
Dist. of Columbia..
Virginia...........
West Virginia......
North Carolina.....
South Carolina.....
Georgia............
Florida.............

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL..
Kentucky...........
Tennessee..........
Alabama.............
Mississippi........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL..
Arkansas..........
Louisiana.........
Oklahoma ..........
Texas.............


Infections

Cumu-
lative
37th wk. 37 weeks


27

1










1
3
2



7

4
1
2


- i








6
2





2
1
1

4

2
2


MOUNTAIN............
Montana.........
Idaho...............
............. -

New Mexico.........
Arizona............ -
Utah...............
Nev.ad a............ -

PACIFIC ............. 6
'ashington......... 2
Oreon.............
California......... 4
Alaska.............
Hawaii............. -


. r i .,.. I
Sore Throat & Tetanus
Scarlet Fever


37th week 37th wk.


Typhus Tularmia Typhoid Fever Rabies in Animals
(Rcky Mt.
Spotted) Cumu- Cumu-
------lative lative
37th wk. 37th wk. 37 37k. 37 weeks 37th week 37 weeks


- 4 i i


I I 4 2


4


1,768

110
17
4
4
52
10
23

246
116
34
96

271
76
35
50
83
27

113
22
6
33
12
5
24
11

325
4
49
6
74
16
55
17
26
78

132
28
59
23
22

164
11
67
29
57

59
3
6
4
16
4
9
14
3

348
28
25
275
12
8


3,592

206
59
7

11
12
117

128
105
8
15

203
12
44
44
86
17

143
6
26
7
55
5

44

344
5
2
1
106
144
5
14

67

946
72
857
7
10

442

I
10
431

714
35
48
2
136
327
69
97


466
65
1
352
6
42


3,499

351
170
7
14
40
19
101

99
59
30
10

239
18
55
51
71
44

65
3
13

42
7



318

1

64
201
13
7
2
30

721
31
630
5
55

638

2
1
635

638
26
99
17
159
143
100
94


430
55
8
320
31
16


8


363

10
2

1
5

2

73
33
5
35

36
14
6
9
2
5

21
3
2
13

1
1
1
I

46
1
8

8
6
6
2
2
13

46
10
?1
9
6

68
23
22
5
18

16


1
6
3
6



47
2
2
40
1
2


Puerto Rico......... 6 3 3 1 2 1 I


I iL.J


2,740

26
1
12
12
1



86
64

22

436
258
41
62
41
34

700
166
269
119
28
79
23
16

386
1


137
104
11
7
58
68

221
106
98
17


528
56
41
43
388

93



15
27
42

9

264

7
248
9


306


. lk, I :.,


' 'L-











Morbidity and Mortality Weekl% Report





Table 4 (A). TOTAL DEATHS IN REPORTING CITIES



(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.)o


Area


F. t L U
Boston, Mass. ...........
Bridgeport, Conn. ........
Cambridge, Mass...........
Fall River, Mass. .........
Hartford, Conn. ...........
Lowell, Mass. .............
Lynn, Mass ........... ...
New Bedford, Mass .......
New Haven, Conn. .........
Providence, R.I. .........
Somerville, Mass. .........
Springfield, Mass. .......
Waterbury, Conn. .........
Worcester, Mass. ..........

MIDDLE ATLNTIC:
Albany, N.Y. ..............
Allentown, Pa ............
Buffalo, N.Y. .............
Camden, N.J. ........... ..
Elizabeth, N.J. ..........
Erie, Pa. .................
Jersey City, N.J. .........
Newark, N.J. ............
New York City, N.Y. ....
Paterson, N.J. ............
Philadelphia, Pa. .........
Pittsburgh, Pa.............
Reading, Pa ..............
Rochester, N.Y. ...........
Schenectady, N.Y. .........
Scranton, Pa ............
Syracuse, N.Y. ..........
Trenton, N.J. ............
Utica, N.Y. ...............
Yonkers, N.Y. ......... ...

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio................
Canton, Ohio..............
Chicago, Ill. ............
Cincinnati, Ohio..........
Cleveland, Ohio............
Columbus, Ohio.............
Dayton, Ohio................
Detroit, Mich. ..........
Evansville, Ind ..........
Flint, Mich .............
Fort Wayne, Ind. .........
Gary, Ind .......... .
Grand Rapids, ?Ic" ,.o
indianapolis, Inc

a ison i .... ......
PeFria, n11 ..o...........

R ckford, I ...........
Sou h B nd, Ind .........
Tledo, Ohio ...............
rcusstcy Ohio. ...........

I SST NORTlH CEINTRL:
Des Moines, Iowa...........
Dulath, Minn ............
Kansas Citly, fans .......
Kansas City, Mo ........ .
11-nne 'ii, :t. ..

lnaha, ,ebr.

St. Paul, Min
Wichicta, ns. .


For weeks ending

8/24 8/31 9/7 9/14


198
35
19
23
55
21
17
25
41
53
13
33
21
71


47
30
121
44
26
41
56
98
1,510
35
534
171
32
96
22
49
53
36
27
36


58
20
619
160
189
111
76
304
28
50
41







17
37
84
60


I L I _


232 216
32 29
28 2-
30 26
45 43
21 3C
24 14
25 32
43 39
65 61
13 15
52 41
33 26
45 51


42 48
31 27
129 130
45 33
28 19
40 29
77 85
74 107
1,496 1,491
23 33
409 502
175 152
35 36
88 109
22 26
29 26
59 54
43 22
32 27
23 33


50 65
42 2
672 657
138 147
196 183
102 105
72 76
318 247
37 37
32 41
33 39
63 13
40 29
110 44
33 | 27
94 114
26 23
25 28
35 26
84 I 75
55 1 54


218
29
24
21
47
26
26
28
38
54
12
32
26
44


53
40
144
40
21
37*
55
86
1,490

485
207
47
93
21
42


25
23


41
34
700
174
212
1.9
82
352
26
57



68


130
283
29


Area


Atlanta, Ga. ..............
Baltimore, d. ............
Charlotte, N.C. ...........
Jacksonville, Fla. ........
Miami, Fla. ..... ........
Norfolk, Va. ..............
Richmond, Va. .............
Savannah, Ga..........
St. Petersburg, Fla ......
Tampa, Fla ...............
Washington, D.C. ..........
Wilmington, Del .........

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Bic ingham, Ala. ..........
Chatanooga, Tenn. ........
Inoxville, Tenn. .........
Louisville, Ky. ...........
Memphis, Tenn. ...........
Mobile, Ala. ..............
Montgomery, Ala ..........
Nashville, Tenn ..........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex. ............
Baton Rouge, La. ........
Corpus Christi Te.......
Dallas, Tex.. ............
El Paso, Tex. .............
Fort Worth, Tex. ..........
Houston, Tex. ............
Little Rock, Ark. .........
New Orleans, La. ........
Oklahoa City, la ......
San Antonio, Tex .........
Shreveport, La ...........
Tulsa, Okla ..............

O USTAIN:
bquerque, ex ......
Colorado Springs, Cole. ...
Denver, Cloi ... ..........
Ogden, Utah ...............
Phoenix, Ariz. ............
Pueblo. Col .......
Salt Lake City, Utah......
Tucson, Ari. ... .....


ngdi Cal. if....
clulu, .Haaii ......
g Beach, Calif- ...
dnei es, C if.
land, Calif .. ......

=la:.d. Oreg ...........
ra:.er: t:~, Calif. .........
a~so aif


For weeks ending

8/24 8/31 9/7 9/14


127
239
41
61
86
46
76
34
68

184
39


77
50
30
80
99
38
25
83


37
23
19
149
33
82
226
36
169
59
124
43
45


28
28
105
19
69
14
39
47



-7
32
47
64
456
106
19
71
70
I 5


::u2-onia- ilr.uenz ueatnea,
total Deaths under 1 Year
-tal Deaths, Persons 65 y,


NOTF:"All deas-i b place occurmene.


31)7


*Estirate based on average percent of divisional total.
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.


g es ......
and ;ver .....


_I 1









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Reported Cases
Population* Through Sept. 16

69,879 1,231
19.334 1,210
33,678 711
21,486 846
29,354 1,141
18,094 394
251,384 474
30,189 558


I1 __- _-


* 1960 Census


A random sample conducted in Guaynabo, eight miles
south of San Juan, moderately early in the epidemic (see
MMWR, Vol. 12, page 294) revealed a somewhat higher
attack rate of dengue-like illness among those in the 40
to 59 year age groups, with lower but similar attack rates
in the other age groups. Further analysis reveals age
specific attack rates which are notably higher among
females in essentially all age groups (see table below).
A greater exposure by females to the indoor-biting Aedes
aegypti mosquitoes may account for these differences.

DENGUE-LIKE ILLNESS BY AGE AND SEX
GUAYNABO, PUERTO RICO
AUGUST 18 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 16. 1963


AGE POPULATION
GROUP M F Total


383 728
257 540
211 397
142 263
114 230
83 167
106 193
4 7

1,300 2.525


CASES

M F Total

28 41 69
25 26 51
9 27 36
10 13 23
11 19 30
14 11 25
7 11 18
1 0 1

105 148 253


ATTACK RATE %

M F Total

8.1 .10.7 9.5
8.8 10.1 9.4
4.8 12.8 9.1
8.3 9.2 8.7
9.5 16.7 13.0
16.7 13.3 15.0
8.0 10.4 9.3


8.6 11.4 10.0


INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES

Immunization Information for International Travel
1962 Edition
Public Health Service Publication No. 384
The following information should be added to the list of
Yellow Fever Vaccination Centers in Section 6:

PAGE 74
CITY: Los Angeles, California
CENTER: White Memorial Hospital
Clinical Laborotory
218 North Boyle Avenue
Tel. AN 9-9131, Ext. 593
CLINIC HOURS: Monday-Thursdoy, 2:00 p.m.
FEE: Yes


UIJIV OF CL r
DOCI'- lMEr TS CEp






U.S. DEPOSITORY

x
m


4 Z





O
>

a t
S-,'



z
ii Sn


( Reported by Vic tlr (;,nzales. M.P., I)rrcltor, tlurreau of
Health, Puerto Rico Dept. o/ IHealth, and a team from the
Communicable Disease ( enter.)

Continental United States

Three additional cases of Dengue have been diag-
nosed clinically in New York City, bringing the known
total there to five. All were patients who had traveled
from Puerto Rico or Jamaica and who acquired the dis-
ease while in those areas. Four cases were reported
previously from Michigan, where a Jamaican family had
visited (see MMWR, Vol. 12, page 270). Thus, at least
nine cases of dengue, acquired elsewhere, have occurred
within the continental United States.
(Reported by Dr. larold 7. Fuerst, Diretror, Burr'au of
P'repentab hlr Isease, New York )Departmennt of Health.)


:314H


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

1i2lI II08I43mlH ll
3 1262 08864 0338


Municipio

Arecibo
Barceloneta
Guayomo
Juncos
Monati
Morovis
Rio Piedras
Vega Bajo


Location


North Central Coast
North Central Coast
Southeast Coast
Eastern Interior
North Centrol Coast
North Centrol Coast
Northeast Coast
North Central Coast


0-9 345
10-19 283
20-29 186
30-39 121
40-49 116
50-59 84
60 87
Unknown 3

TOTAL 1.225