Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00097

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text
5 4, (ouy4: /a/i$


Morbidity and Mortality



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


W el


Fa ... : '- '. 3


PROhISIONAL INFORMATION 0 SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DI-E LF N THE LMNTED -nCT AND ION
DEiTH. IN SELECTED CITIEs FOR WEEK ENDED AP 1'~3 -




INFLUENZA One o ,r obr.ea:t~ oInt nr~.-l-. .'- : -. .eh-l- ..'
ise'asc h.'E no ber r ': .: O .: e : : 3 .- :. L. : .- .
District of Columbia. The State of Wyoming was the only helow the epidemic threshold for the fi-st e since
one to report outbreaks for the first time this week. Taauary 5.
Influenza A2 virus has been isolated or confirmed by Califomia Two additional otbr eks of in -feza-
serologic titer rise as the causative agent of one or more like illness have been reported rom coarEtiites __
outbreaks in 33 States and the District of Columbia. The northern California during the week -:_; i:- 13.
State of Utah reported confirmed outbreaks for the first Both reports have come from areas lying c~ose to si:es
time this week. Outbreaks have now subsided in most of recent loca'ized ocubreaks in Napa and San Joaqnin
affected areas in the Eastern and Middle Western Unied Coundes '.!-7.'. Vol. 12 Nos. 2, 1:
States. Two additional localized outbreaks were reported Amador Count- reported over 200 cases, a occur-
from northern California during the week ending April 13. ring in a single boys' reformamr wiT: a o:ai popUarton
The number of pneumonia-influenza deaths reported for of about 850. A steady level of incidence ha been noted




Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and elad reports through previous week)


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B r .jcjI ,- .... .. .. .. .
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Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY

Anthrax: 1 Psitacos:
Botulism: 5 Rabies in Man:
Nalaria: Ill. 1, N.Y. 1, Ga. 2 30 Smafpx:
Plague: Typus, marine:


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Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


since the latter part of March followed by clear evidence
of declining epidemic activity during the past week. The
illness appeared typical of influenza clinically, although
laboratory confirmation has not been obtained as yet.
A small community outbreak has been described in
Merced County where an estimated 40-50 patients have
been hospitalized with an influenza-like syndrome. Many
additional cases have been noted in the surrounding
community, the peak incidence having occurred in early
April. This is the first reported outbreak in the State
which has involved individuals outside of an institu-
tional setting.
The State Viral and Rickettsial Disease Laboratory
has thus far obtained serologic confirmation of influenza
A2 infection in a total of 47 cases from 18 counties,
representing all geographic regions within the State.
School absenteeism remains normal, but industrial ab-
senteeism has shown some increase. It is the impression
of State health authorities that there has been some
influenza throughout the State, occurring mainly among
adults, and in low enough concentration to escape routine
surveillance measures.
(Reported by Dr. Philip K. Condit, Chief, Bureau of
Connumicable Diseases, California Department of
Public Health).




Ohio Influenza A2 virus has been confirmed as
the etiologic agent in outbreaks of acute febrile respira-
tory disease observed in the Columbus area earlier this
year. It has been estimated that approximately 100,000
cases occurred during the epidemic, which reached its
peak in late February. School and industrial absentee
rates of 10-15% were observed at the height of the epi-
demic period. Outbreaks of influenza-like illness have
now been reported from 36 of the State's 88 counties.
Influenza A2 virus has been confirmed as the etiologic
agent in two or more cases in 10 of these 36 counties.
(Reported by Dr. Winslow Bashe, Division of Communicta-
ble Diseases, Ohio Department of Health).



Utah Influenza A2 virus infection has been con-
firmed serologically in two cases seen during recent out-
breaks in San Juan County (MMWR Vol. 12, No. 14).
Additional small community outbreaks have been reported
from Weber and Salt Lake Counties, in the northern part
of the State. Laboratory confirmation of influenza A2
infection has been obtained in three cases from the Salt
Lake outbreak.
(Reported by Dr. A. A. Jenkins, Director, Communicable
and Chronic Disease Section, Utah State Department
of Health).


Wyoming A small outbreak of influenza-like illness
has been reported from Sublette County in the western part
of the State. The epidemic appeared to have reached its
peak during the first week of April. Laboratory confirma-
tion is not available as yet.
(Reported by Dr. Robert Alberts, Acting Director of
Medical Programs, Wyoming Department of Public Health).






EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS

Erythema Infectiosum Circleville, Ohio
In January 1963, following the Christmas holidays,
an outbreak of mild exanthematous illness developed
among children of the elementary school of Circleville,
Ohio. Histories and physical examinations of 38 affected
children elicited symptoms and signs suggestive of ery-
thema infectiosum. A questionnaire sent home to parents
of all students attending the school provided information
for 286 households, with a total population of 1,259 in-
dividuals. One hundred and fifty eight cases of the ill-
ness were identified by this means.


FIGURE I.
WEEK OF ONSET OF 149 CASES OF ERYTHEMA INFECTIOSUM
Circleville, Ohio Winter1962-63


LEGEND
TOTAL CASES-
ELEMENTARY
SCHOOL CASES-----


' \/, \

5 0
5 .0



,/ \ -------

12 /15 12/22 12/29 5 2 9 S VZ 26 2/2 2/9 2/16 2/23 3/2 3/9
1962 1963
WEEK ENDING



Known onset dates for 149 of the cases (Figure 1)
indicate the outbreak reached its peak during the week
ending January 26; 85 percent of the cases occurred
within a six-week period during January and early Febru-
ary. Clinically the disease was mild. Rash appeared in
all cases, usually beginning on the face as a confluent
red "butterfly" or as flat or slightly raised macules in
the cheeks. The rest of the face typically remained clear,


123









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


124


although flexor and extensor surfaces of the arms, as
well as abdomen and back, were frequently involved two
to three days after appearance of the facial eruption. Fre-
quently recurrent, the rash persisted in many cases for
several weeks, unaccompanied by desquamation or hyper-
pigmentation. Distribution of symptoms among the 158
patients is given below:

TABLE 1

DISTRIBUTION OF SYMPTOMS OF ERYTHEMA INFECTIOSUM
IN 158 PATIENTS

RASH 100% SORE THROAT 23%
PRURITIS 53% ABDOMINAL PAIN 23%
FEVER 41% RUNNY NOSE 22%
HEADACHE 32% SORE EYES 18%


The illness primarily involved individuals of both
sexes in the elementary school age group (5-12 yrs.).
Age distribution and age specific attack rates among those
surveyed are given below:

TABLE 2
AGE SPECIFIC ATTACK RATES OF ERYTHEMA INFECTIOSUM

AGE POPULATION NUMBER ATTACK RATE
(YEARS) SURVEYED CASES PER 100

0 4 116 21 18.1
5 -12 444 119 26.8
13 AND OVER 699 18 2.6

TOTAL 1,259 158 12.5



Thirty-three percent of the pre-school children devel-
oping illness were siblings of school-age children previ-
ously affected. Fifteen percent of the pre-school cases
occurred in families with no other affected members. A
statistical evaluation of intervals between first and second
cases in 35 households and 14 classrooms suggested an
incubation period of 5-10 days.
Previous history of rubella, rubeola, and varicella
were similar for both those ill and those not ill, but those
individuals with a previous history of allergy seemed more
likely to develop clinical evidence of the illness. Of the
individuals surveyed who had no previous indication of
jllce.: manifestations, 10.8% developed the illness,
whereas 27.2 percent of those with previous history of
allergic problems acquired the disease. This apparent
increased susceptibility of allergic individuals was ob-
served in both the under 13 and over 13 age groups.
A popular, putty-like compound known as flubberr"
has been used quite extensively by children in the area in
recent weeks. This material is composed of mineraloil
and butadiene. Examination of the sales of flubber in the
area (Figure 2) indicated that the outbreak occurred well


FIoURE 2
COMPARISON OF 124 CASES OF ERITHEMA INFECTIOSUM
BY WEEK OF ONSET, TO SALE OF FLUBBER
Cilrc(,lF., OhW WiaNr 962-63


/2,2s6Z t22 V|s I3 vit v9 l wl, z elW w/ 2 s 5 O6 !a ys
WEEK ENDING


in advance of peak flubberr" distribution and failed to
link this material in any way to the spread of the illness.
The epidemic curve and the spread within classrooms
and homes seemed best explained by person- to-person
contact transmission. Intensive bacteriologic and virologic
laboratory investigations did not reveal any etiologic agent.
(Reported by Winslow ]. Bashe, M. D., M.P.H. Acting
Chief, Division of Communicable Diseases, Ohio Depart-
ment of Health; Mrs. Pauline Kirkpatrick. R.N., Pickaway
County Health Department; and the Communicable Disease
Center.)





Botulism Canned Tuna Supplemental Report
Since the death of two Michigan women due to Type E
botulism acquired from commercially canned tuna (MMWR,
Vol. 12, No. 12), intensive investigations have been con-
ducted by the Food and Drug Administration, State, and
local health departments. Tuna packed by the Washington
Packing Company under several labels but identifiable by
the code letters WY3 or WY2 (first three figures in the
code) have been withdrawn from trade and laboratory
study, particularly of defective cans, is in process.
The tuna involved was packed by the Washington
Packing Company, San Francisco, at a new plant which
began regular commercial operation in early January and
terminated activities in early April. A few cases only of
tuna were packed in December. Most of the production was
shipped to the A & P Company as "A & P Chunk Tuna".
This was promptly withdrawn by the company when the
facts of the case were first known. Additional tuna packed
under the tradenames "Tastewell" and "Ocean Beauty"
was distributed only within California. That packed by
the Washington Packing Company has been taken into
custody by the California State Health Department. A
quantity labeled Dagim brand packed for Dagim Tahorim
/Ir,,r:,aM 01 .Iof 1741









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


EXCESS MORTALITY IN 108
-1963


PNEUMONIA-INFLUENZA DEATHS





0[ ~


U. S. CITIES
1960
ALL CAUSES OF DEATH


AGE 65 AND OVER


CALENDAR WEEK NUMBER
1960 WEEK I ENDS JAN 9 1963- WEEK I EN


During the week ending April 13 excess pneumonia-
influenza deaths for the 108 cities fell below the epidemic
threshold for the first time since the week ending January
5th. The excess was 14 deaths in comparison to 109 dur-
ing the week ending April 6th. In all Divisions except
the East and West South Central and Pacific, pneumonia-
influenza mortality was near expected levels for this time
of the year. In the East and West South Central States
further declines brought excess mortality to slightly above
the epidemic threshold. In the Pacific States a small
increase in pneumonia-influenza deaths caused the weekly
total to slightly exceed the epidemic threshold.
Excess mortality during the 1963 epidemic is compared
with that of the 1960 epidemic in the accompanying chart.
The upper panels show weekly excess mortality for com-
parable weeks of the two epidemics. The lower panels
show cumulative excess mortality for each epidemic.
In 1963 excess pneumonia-influenza deaths increased
later in the year and rose to a higher peak level than in
1960. However, the cumulative excess ascribed to pneu-
monia-influenza during the entire epidemic period was less
in 1963 than in 1960.
Excess deaths from all causes at ages 65 and over
and also at all ages, reached higher weekly levels in 1963
than in 1960 and the cumulative excess was also greater.
Infant Deaths As shown in the accompanying table
and bar chart, infant deaths were slightly below expected
levels during the four week period ending April 13th.


/ /







DS JAN. 5
ST TISTICS SECTION-EPIDEMN LOGY8 CT -CDC-PHS-DIE




INFANT DEATHS IN 108 CITIES


WEEK ENDING
WEEK ENDING 4 Week Weekly

3/23 3/30 4/6 4/13 Total Average

Observed 757 708 778 658 2,901 725
Expected 748 745 742 739 2,974 744

Excess 9 -37 36 -81 -73 -19







DEATHS UNDER ONE YEAR OF AGE IN 108 U.S CITIES
Average number pr week by four-week prods















(SI a ip 131)
.(See table, page 131)




(See table, page 131)


125


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Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Company, Brooklyn, and labeled "Tuna Kosher for Pass-
over" has been embargoed by the New York City Health
Department. Shipments of this brand to Pittsburgh, Cleve-
land, Baltimore, Detroit, Augusta, Georgia and a few other
cities are presently being picked up.

Extensive laboratory testing of normal and suspect
cans is being conducted by the FDA, by the California
State Health Department and the Hooper Foundation, Uni-
versity of California. Preliminary results indicate type E,
C. botuhnium organisms to be present in a number of cans
evidencing leakage or spoilage which were packed by this
company at different times between early January and
March.

To be emphasized is that only cans bearing the code
1W2 or WY3 was the first letters in the code are presently
suspect. This code identifies the packer and the year of
packing. It should be noted that each tradename may
include tuna from several packers; thus the tradename
itself is not adequate identification.

(Reported by the Food and Drug Administration; the Cali-
fornia State Health Department and Dr. K. F. Meyer,
Hooper Foundation, (nzversity of California.)


INTERNATIONAL NOTES

Food Poisoning in British Columbia An Unusual
Etiology
In October 1962, three elderly couples developed
vomiting and diarrhea shortly after eating a turkey supper.
Samples of the turkey meat, dressing, cranberry sauce,
and vomitus from the patients failed to reveal bacteriologic
evidence of any of the usual food poisoning organisms.
One of the guests at the supper suggested by telephone
that he suspected the onions used in the turkey dressing
to be the cause of the trouble. Investigation showed that
a bulb, later positively identified as a daffodil bulb, was
unknowingly substituted for onions used in making the
the turkey dressing. As turkey dressing was eaten by all
the guests and as daffodil bulbs are known to be poison-
ous, producing symptoms of vomiting and diarrhea when
eaten, it seems probable that ingestion of portions of a
daffodil bulb was responsible for this interesting out-
break.
(Reported by Dr. A. A. Larson. D.P.H., Director of Epi-
demrology, Department of Health Sernices and Hospital
Insurance. Victoria, B.C., and E. W'. R. Best, M.D., P.H.,
Chief, Epidemiolog) Division, Department of National
Health and welfare Ottawa, Dominion of Canada.)


126











Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


MARCH 1963 AND MARCH 1962


CASES OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SYPHILIS: By Reporting Area March 1963 and March 1962
Provisional Data


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128 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table J. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

APRIL 13, 1963 AND APRIL 14. 1962



Poliomyelitis, Aseptic
Poliomyelitis, total cases Poliomyelitis, paralytic nonparalytic Meningitis
Cumulative Cumulative
Area
15th week First 15 weeks 15th week First 15 weeks 15th week 15th week

1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962

UNITED STATES...... 3 2 42 83 3 1 38 55 1 22 27

NEW ENGLAND.............. 1 1 1
Maine.................. -
New Hampshire......... -
Vermont ............... -
Massachusetts......... 1 -
Rhode Island.......... -
Connecticut........... 1 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 6 29 6 16 2 2
New York................ 4 29 4 16 2 1
New Jersey............. 1 -
Pennsylvania 1 1 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL........ 2 11 9 2 10 6 6
Ohio.................. 1 4 4 1 3 4 -
Indiana................ 3 2 -
Illinois.............. 1 5 2 1 5 2
Michigan............... 2 2 4
Wisconsin............ -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 6 1 3 1 -
Minnesota............. 1 1 1
Iowa.................. 3 2
Missouri.............. 1 2 1 -
North Dakota .......... .
South Dakota.......... ..
Nebraska ................ .
Kansas................. ...

SOUTH ATLANTIC........... 1 3 7 2 5 1
Delaware.............
Maryland ................
District of Columbia.. 1 -
Virginia.................. 1 1
West Virginia......... ...
North Carolina........ 2 1 2 1 -
South Carolina........ -. .-
Georgia................. 1 1 1
Florida ............... 1 3 2 1 -

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 1 3 2 1 2 1 3
Kentucky .............. -
Tennessee............. 1 1 1 1 -
Alabama.............. 2 1 1 1 -
Mississippi.............. 3

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 1 10 18 1 10 15 3 3
Arkansas..............
Louisiana............. 9 4 9 4
Oklahoma .............. 1 1
Texas................. 1 1 14 1 1 11 2 2

MOUNTAIN..................- 5 4 3 -
Montana................ 2 1
Idaho.... ... ... ........
Wyoming.................-
Colorado.............. 3
New Mexico............
Arizona ............... 2 2
Utah .................. 1 1
Nevada,...............

PACIFIC................... 8 6 7 4 9 16
Washington............ -
Oregon................. 1
California.............. 7 6 6 4 9 16
Alaska................ -
Hawaii..................

Puerto Rico.............. 2 5 2 5-












Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 129


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
FOR WEEKS ENDED

APRIL 13, 1963 AND APRIL 14, 1962 (Continued)



Brucellosis Diphtheria Encephalitis, Hepatitis, Measles
infectious infectious and serum
Area
Cumu- Cumu- 15th week
lative lative Under 20 &
15th week 15 weeks 15th week 15 weeks 15th week 20 yr. over Total 15th week
1963 1963 1963 19619 63 3 1962 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1962


UNITED STATES...... 6 93 8 101 39 52 391 359 791 1,168 17,543

NEW ENGLAND............... 3 4 3 45 23 72 58 714
Maine................ 20 11 31 19 15
New Hampshire......... 5 1 7 3 -
Vermont............... 1 1 111
Massachusetts......... 2 2 2 14 5 20 25 196
Rhode Island.......... 1 2 1 3 4 2 37
Connecticut........... 5 3 9 9 355

MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 4 3 16 6 11 67 62 129 166 1,528
New York............... 3 3 11 2 11 34 45 79 71 579
New Jersey............. 1 8 8 16 42 410
Pennsylvania.......... 1 4 4 25 9 34 53 539

EAST NORTH CENTRAL....... 6 7 7 11 53 65 125 296 8,219
Ohio................... 2 4 16 21 41 92 913
Indiana............... 3 7 6 15 35 232
Illinois.............. 6 2 2 10 16 27 84 355
Michigan .............. 1 1 7 20 19 39 78 2,536
Wisconsin............. 1 2 3 3 7 4,183

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 4 69 28 3 3 20 21 43 99 1,053
Minnesota............. 6 15 1 1 3 4 19 29
Iowa.................. 4 51 1 2 6 3 9 28 482
Missouri.............. 4 1 1 9 13 22 24 416
North Dakota .......... 2 2 3 121
South Dakota.......... 3 7 -
Nebraska.............. 3 4 1 1 2 9 5
Kansas................ 2 3 1 4 16 NN

SOUTH ATLANTIC........... 1 2 20 4 5 44 29 75 112 1,202
Delaware.............. 1 1 157
Maryland............... 1 1 8 6 14 14 66
District of Columbia.. 3 4
Virginia .............. 1 2 4 3 7 13 265
West Virginia......... 1 4 3 7 20 328
North Carolina........ 1 20 6 26 41 94
South Carolina........ .- 3 1 123
Georgia............... .- 1 6 1 6 2 8 5 29
Florida............... 1 1 8 3 1 2 8 12 15 136

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 2 8 3 2 55 33 89 141 820
Kentucky .............. 14 3 18 33 382
Tennessee............. 1 26 16 42 62 306
Alabama............... 1 7 4 4 8 23 88
Mississippi........... 3 2 11 10 21 23 44

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL ....... 7 3 17 3 29 30 63 81 1,224
Arkansas.............. 2 1 1 5 3 8 12 52
Louisiana............. 2 2 10 10 21 12 6
Oklahoma.............. 2 1 5 3 3 5
Texas.................. 3 9 2 14 14 31 52 1,166

MOUNTAIN................. 1 1 1 12 4 37 50 1,196
Montana............... 4 1 5 11 94
Idaho ................. 7 174
Wyoming ............... 1 3 4 8
Colorado............... 6 6 306
New Mexico............ 1 5 2 7 4 NN
Arizona................. 13 14 473
Utah.................. 1 1 2 1 3 4 93
Nevada ................ .- 48

PACIFIC.................. 2 3 1 11 14 66 92 158 165 1,587
Washington ............ 2 1 14 17 31 25 163
Oregon ................ 10 11 21 28 173
California............ 2 3 1 9 13 38 61 99 106 996
Alaska................ 4 4 2 33
Hawaii.................. 3 3 4 222

Puerto Rico.............. 1 8 11 1 12 57 13


24,158

2,831
162
28
96
1,291
166
1,088

4,803
2,642
1,810
351

2,921
489
546
860
786
240

1,363
24
1,076
26
227
8
2
NN

1,235
16
144
17
363
290
124
20
41
220

1,481
52
1,223
108
98

5,217
383
9
141
4,684

1,097
369
8

264
NN
296
156
4

3,210
892
737
1,488
29
64

205











130 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISE1 ASES: I UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENI)ED

APRIL 13, 1963 AND APRIL 14, 1962 (Continued)


Meningococcal Streptococcal Tickborne
Infections Sore Throat & Tetanus Typhus Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in Animals
Scarlet Fever (Rcky Mt.
AreaCumu- Spotted) Cumu- Cumu-
lative lative lative
15th wk. 15 weeks 15th week 15th wk. 15th wk. 15th wk. 15thwk. 15weeks 15th week 15 weeks
1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963

UNITED STATES.... 54 898 7,406 7,980 4 4 13 108 98 109 1,053

NEW ENGLAND.......... 5 62 909 474 1 5 2 8
Maine .............. 10 71 12 -- 1
New Hampshire...... 2 11 3 -- 5
Vermont............ 2 4 1 2 2
Massachusetts...... 5 28 169 98 1 3 -
Rhode Island........ 6 73 30 -
Connecticut........ 14 585 327 1 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC..... 2 111 557 504 2 14 2 3 32
New York............ 50 349 272 1 10 1 3 22
New Jersey......... 1 19 106 78 1 1 -
Pennsylvania....... 1 42 102 154 3 1 10

EAST NORTH CENTRAL.. 4 142 1,132 1,236 1 1 6 17 34 145
Ohio............... 1 43 160 124 1 2 12 24 70
Indiana............ 17 147 180 1 2 6 19
Illinois........... 19 195 398 1 1 3 3 26
Michigan........... 3 44 410 223 1 20
Wisconsin.......... 19 220 311 1 1 10

WEST NORTH CENTRAL.. 7 55 209 283 1 4 17 26 235
Minnesota........... 10 13 42 1 4 9 69
Iowa............... 2 55 96 1 8 6 76
Missouri............. 3 24 13 28 1 2 2 2 46
North Dakota....... 1 100 87 3 5
South Dakota....... 3 10 2 3 4 33
Nebraska ........... 3 13 2 3
Kansas............... 1 2 18 28 3

SOUTH ATLANTIC ..... 6 180 315 591 1 5 21 10 7 177
Delaware........... 1 6 10 -
Maryland........... 26 38 31 1 3 -
Dist. of Columbia.. 3 4 4 -
Virginia............ 1 47 134 150 2 3 1 2 64
West Virginia....... 9 147 5 5 5 67
North Carolina .... 2 29 31 39 3 4
South Carolina..... 1 12 19 36 5
;. r, ..... ...... 1 11 1 4 1 2 2 9
Fl-r,............... 1 42 82 170 1 1 5 2 28

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 5 85 963 1,456 1 1 9 8 9 102
Kentucky........... 2 28 50 29 2 4 6 43
Tennessee.......... 2 33 860 1,282 1 6 4 3 48
Alabama............ 11 25 30 1 11
Mississippi........ 1 13 28 115 1 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 4 103 698 845 2 2 20 18 25 211
Arkansas........... 5 8 2 7 5 1 17
Louisiana.......... 1 46 11 2 5 2 25
Oklahoma............ 1 18 16 41 2 4 17
Texas.............. 2 34 674 791 2 6 7 24 152

MOUNTAIN............ 5 32 1,334 1,067 2 4 1 21
Montana..,.......... 1 50 81 -
Idaho.............. 1 1 179 34 -
Wyoming............ 1 65 34
Colorado............ 1 7 545 369 -
New Mexico......... 2 237 217 1 3 1 11
Arizona............ 1 6 123 176 1 10
Utah............... 1 11 129 155 -
Nevada............. 1 3 6 1- -

PACIFIC............. 16 128 1,289 1,524 1 2 27 20 4 122
Washington......... 11 497 581 -
Oregon.............. 1 6 38 42 2 1
California.......... 14 105 696 828 1 2 23 14 4 115
Alaska.............. 4 41 44 6 6
Hawaii............. 1 2 17 29 2 -
Puerto Rico......... I- 1 4 3 3 1 4










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 131





Table 4 (C). TOTAL DEATHS UNDER 1 YEAR OF AGE IN REPORTING CITIES



(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.)o


For weeks ending For weeks ending
Area 2 3/30 Area 3/23 4/6
3/23 3/30 4/6 4/13 3/23 3/30 4/6 4/13


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass..............
Bridgeport, Conn .........
Cambridge, Mass...........
Fall River, Mass..........
Hartford, Conn.............
Lowell, Mass..............
Lynn, Mass...............
New Bedford, Mass.........
New Haven, Conn...........
Providence, R.I...........
Somerville, Mass..........
Springfield, Mass.........
Waterbury, Conn...........
Worcester, Mass...........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y...............
Allentown, Pa............
Buffalo, N.Y..............
Camden, N.J..............
'Elizabeth, N.J...........
Erie, Pa.................
Jersey City, N.J.........
Newark, N.J................
New York City, N.Y.......
Paterson, N.J.............
Philadelphia, Pa.........
Pittsburgh, Pa...........
Reading, Pa..............
Rochester, N.Y............
Schenectady, N.Y.........
Scranton, Pa..............
Syracuse, N.Y.............
Trenton, N.J..............
Utica, N.Y................
Yonkers, N.Y.............

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio...............
Canton, Ohio...............
Chicago, Ill..............
Cincinnati, Ohio...........
Cleveland, Ohio............
Columbus, Ohio.............
Dayton, Ohio...............
Detroit, Mich.............
Evansville, Ind...........
Flint, Mich...............
Fort Wayne, Ind...........
Gary, Ind.................
Grand Rapids, Mich........
Indianapolis, Ind.........
Madison, Wis.............
Milwaukee, Wis............
Peoria, Ill...............
Rockford, Ill.............
South Bend, Ind............
Toledo, Ohio...............
Youngstown, Ohio...........

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa...........
Duluth, Minn..............
Kansas City, Kans.........
Kansas City, Mo............
Lincoln, Nebr.............
Minneapolis, Minn.........
Omaha, Nebr...............
St. Louis, Mo..............
St. Paul, Minn.............
Wichita, Kans.............


3
4
11
8
4
4


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga............... 12 12 10 8
Baltimore, Md............ 27 11 26 17
Charlotte, N.C........... 2 3 4 1
Jacksonville, Fla........ 3 4 9 2
Miami, Fla............... 5 3 0 6
Norfolk, Va.............. 6 9 9 5
Richmond, Va.............. 8 4 5 4
Savannah, Ga.............. 1 1 4 2
St. Petersburg, Fla...... 2 0 1 7
Tampa, Fla ............... 4 6 4 5
Washington, D.C.......... 12 12 32 25
Wilmington, Del.......... 1 1 4 4

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala........... 2 8 2 5
Chattanooga, Tenn........ 4 4 3 2
Knoxville, Tenn.......... 2 3 2 3
Louisville, Ky............ 8 9 9 8
Memphis, Tenn........... 14 4 12 8
Mobile, Ala............... 4 5 1 1
Montgomery, Ala.......... 3 2 2 5
Nashville, Tenn......... 12 8 6 7

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.............. 4 4 2 4
Baton Rouge, La.......... 2 1 2 1
Corpus Christi, Tex...... 0 7 4 2
Dallas, Tex.............. 13 10 12 4
El Paso, Tex.............. 4 4 6 5
Fort Worth, Tex.......... 5 3 9 3
Houston, Tex.............. 17 10 17 11
Little Rock, Ark......... 3 4 4 5
New Orleans, La.......... 12 8 8 15
Oklahoma City, Okla...... 6 6 3 9
San Antonio, Tex.......... 11 12 6 15
Shreveport, La........... 4 2 7 6
Tulsa, Okla............... 3 4 7 3

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex...... 2 4 11 2
Colorado Springs, Colo... 1 1 0 2
Denver, Colo.............. 19 3 14 9
Ogden, Utah............... 0 3 1 0
Phoenix, Ariz............. 9 1 7 7
Pueblo, Colo.............. 2 1 0 0
Salt Lake City, Utah..... 6 5 6 5
Tucson, Ariz.............. 3 1 1 3

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.......... O 0 0 0
Fresno, Calif............ 3 2 4 4*
Glendale, Calif.......... 1 2 1 0
Honolulu, Hawaii.......... 5 3 8 6
Long Beach, Calif ........ 6 3 2 4
Los Angeles, Calif....... 32 44 26 36
Oakland, Calif........... 6 5 7 5
Pasadena, Calif.......... 0 0 1 0
Portland, Oreg ........... 5 6 3 8
Sacramento, Calif........ 4 5 5 3
San Diego, Calif......... 6 9 8 5
San Francisco, Calif ..... 12 10 4 11
San Jose, Calif.......... 2 4 2 3
Seattle, Wash,........... 8 5 4 7*
Spokane, Wash........... 3 3 3 2
Tacoma, Wash.............. 1 4 4 3

San Juan, P.R.............. 1 2 0 (--)


OCurrent Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities

4(A) Total Mortality, all ages................... 11,202
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages........ 513
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age............ 658
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over..... 6,284


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.

NOTE: All deaths by place of occurrence.




LurJIER ir t OF FLORIDA

I 31 620UI8 4 ll lllllll lll 1435ll111111111111111111
3 1262 08864 1435


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES

Immunization Information for International Travel
1962 edition
Public Health Service Publication No. 384
The following corrections should be made to the list
of Yellow Fever Vaccination Centers in Section 6, page 75:

CITY: Durham, North Carolina
CENTER: Duke Medical Private Diagnostic Clinic
Duke University Medical Center
Tel. 681-0111, Ext. 2411
CLINIC HOURS: By Appointment only
FEE: Yes


Notes: These provisional .t are based on weekly telegsms t the Comami.
cable Disease Center by the individual State health departments.
Symbole: --- Data no, available
Quantity zero
Procedure. for construction of various mortality carves omy be obtsaied from
Staistis. Seclio.. Commiacable Disease Center, Public Health Service,
U. S. Department of Health, Education. and Welfare. Atlanta 22. Georgia.


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132