Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00095

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text





Morbidity and Mortality


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE
PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


Prepared by the


6345131


For release May 17, 1963 ATLANTA 22, GEORGIA Vol. 12. No. 19
PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THE UNITED STATES AND ON
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED MAY 11, 1963


ANIMAL RABIES TRENDS Cases of rabies in animals
thus far during 1963 are about 10 percent lower than for
the same period last year. Except for New England, no
major shifts in the geographic distribution of cases are
apparent. In the New England States, where rabies has
appeared for the first time in many years, cases of rabies
have been reported from New Hampshire, Vermont, and
Maine. These apparently represent an eastward extension
of epidemic fox rabies from Canada.
Cumulative cases through the 19th week for 1959-
1963, and total cases for the years 1959-1962 are shown
in the table (right column).


EQUINE I 'B X An outbreak of respiratory dis-
ease among horses was reported this week from Maywood
Park, Maywood, Illinois. Approximately 80 percent of the
horses there were ill. Prominent clinical signs included
coughing and temperatures of 102-1050F. The epidemic
was characterized by high morbidity, a short incubation


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous week)
19th Week Cumulative
Ended Ended First 19 weeks
Disease Median
May 11, May 12, 1958 1962 Median
1963 1962 1963 1962 1958 1962
Aseptic meningitis................ 17 22 --- 410 353 ---
Brucellosis ..................... 5 11 11 123 140 244
Diphtheria...................... 2 6 9 107 183 275
Encephalitis, infectious.......... 43 20 28 533 539 534
Hepatitis, infectious and serum... 882 1,093 778 18,896 25,243 14,629
Measles........................ 17,937 24,632 20,763 247,384 313,332 263,971
Meningococcal infections ......... 54 42 46 1,131 940 1,046
Poliomyelitis, total.............. 2 14 14 48 115 281
Paralytic..................... 1 12 12 43 84 201
Nonparalytic.................. 2 2 2 15 50
Unspecified .................. 1 3 16 30
Streptococcal sore throat
and Scarlet fever ............ 6,984 7,428 -- 176,901 160,470 ---
Tetanus........................ 4 --- 72 53 ---
Tularemia...................... 1 2 --- 71 89 --
Typhoid fever................... 7 6 16 132 146 191
Typhus fever, tick-borne,
(Rocky Mountain spotted)...... 2 5 --- 6 14 -
Rabies in Animals............... 105 85 76 1,483 1,623 1,590

Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: 1 Psittacosis: N.Y. 1, Mich 2. 24
Botulism: 5 Rabies in Man:
Malaria: 34 Smallpox:
Plague: Typhus, murine: 3


W el


I C,'%.\I N'CABE DSF::I( ,\_f


FS 0/bo/0/f I ly









158


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report







SUMMARY OF REPORTED CASES OF INFECTIOUS SYPHILIS

APRIL 1963 AND APRIL 1962


CASES OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SYPHILIS: By Reporting Area April 1963 and April 1962 Provisional Data

Cumulative Cumulative
Reporting Area April January April Reporting Area April January April
1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962
NEW ENGLAND............... 40 34 143 201 EAST SOUTH CENTRAL........ 132 97 487 379
Maine..................... 0 0 2 3 Kentucky................. 10 4 34 43
New Hampshire............ 1 0 3 2 Tennessee................ 24 26 140 106
Vermont.................. 0 0 1 0 Alabama.................. 69 61 224 208
Massachusetts............. 21 28 70 141 Mississippi.............. 29 6 89 22
Rhode Island.............. 0 1 5 12
Connecticut............... 18 5 62 43 WEST SOUTH CENTRAL........ 218 219 904 884
Arkansas................. 26 24 74 57
MIDDLE ATLANTIC............ 488 346 1,998 1,831 Louisiana................. 59 90 207 383
Upstate New York.......... 54 33 191 192 Oklahoma.................. 8 9 58 28
New York City........... 255 155 1,126 994 Texas..................... 125 96 565 416
Pa. (Excl. Phila.)....... 13 6 50 38
Philadelphia............. 66 83 268 264 MOUNTAIN .................. 45 26 162 116
New Jersey............... 100 69 363 343 Montana.................. 0 0 0 0
Idaho.................... 0 0 0 1
EAST NORTH CENTRAL ........ 172 120 655 568 Wyoming .................. 2 0 5 0
Ohio...................... 34 28 128 94 Colorado................. 0 6 15 17
Indiana ................. 5 1 17 25 New Mexico............... 10 2 36 21
Downstate Illinois....... 10 11 43 53 Arizona................... 25 15 78 58
Chicago.................. 72 64 298 276 Utah..................... 2 0 9 2
Michigan.................. 43 12 148 102 Nevada ................... 6 3 19 17
Wisconsin................ 8 4 21 18
PACIFIC ................... 169 137 734 549
WEST NORTH CENTRAL......... 47 21 159 112 Washington............... 12 3 54 10
Minnesota................ 5 3 27 15 Oregon................... 4 7 14 17
Iowa...................... 8 0 15 3 California............... 152 126 658 516
Missouri................. 17 13 62 55 Alaska................... 0 0 2 2
North Dakota ............. 3 0 3 1 Hawaii................... 1 1 6 4
South Dakota............... 2 3 7 15
Nebraska.................. 5 0 21 4 U. S. TOTAL............... 1.756 1.484 7.245 6.514
Kansas................... 7 2 24 19
TERRITORIES............... 56 32 235 137
SOUTH ATLANTIC............ 445 484 2,003 1,874 Puerto Rico.............. 55 32 229 130
Delaware.................. 3 4 18 17 Virgin Islands............ 1 0 6 7
Maryland.................. 36 41 166 177
District of Columbia..... 62 50 249 236
Virginia.................. 25 48 104 164
West Virginia............. 3 1 18 11
North Carolina........... 63 54 293 202 Note: Cumulative Totals include revised and delayed reports
South Carolina........... 35 80 217 247 through previous months.
Georgia.................. 86 73 349 310
Florida .................. 132 133 589 510


period and clinical illness lasting 3 to 5 days. On suc-
cessive days, 30, 60 and 80 percent of the horses were
ill. The track was closed May 13-16 due to a lack of
competitors.
Similar disease outbreaks have been reported at race
tracks in Florida, New York, Delaware, Kentucky, and
Ohio. The disease has also appeared on horse farms in
Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Ohio. The first outbreak
was recognized in Miami, Florida, in late March. Currently
at least three tracks are closed as a result of this dis-
ease. Drs. Michael Sigel and G. H. Waddell, University of
Miami, report that an isolation from the Miami outbreak
appears related to type A influenza virus. Dr. E. R. Doll,
University of Kentucky, has investigated outbreaks at
several of the tracks and feels this is a previously un-
known disease in horses in this country; sera from
affected horses cross react with influenza virus A2/
Japan :''57. Information received to date indicates that


the disease is not transmitted from horses to man. Further
investigations of these outbreaks are currently in
progress.
(Reported by Drs. Sigel, Waddell and Doll; Dr. John
Foley, Track Veterinarian, Maywood Park, Illinois; and
by the follow ing Stale Health Departments: Illinois
(Dr. Franklin Yoder); Pennsylvania (Dr. Ernest Witte);
New Jersey (Dr. James Nichols); Kentucky (Dr. Ronald
Hectorne); Ohio (Dr. Paul Schnurrenberger); Delaware
(Dr. Floyd Hudson).


EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS

Trichinosis Wisconsin

Circumstances relating to the occurrence of trichino-
sis in a Wisconsin University graduate student provided a
unique opportunity to demonstrate the source of the in-
fection, contaminated pork chops.









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


About October 1, 1962, two graduate students who
shared cooking facilities purchased two thick pork chops
at a local market. Hasty preparation resulted in inade-
quate cooking of the chops. Both chops were sampled but
then refrigerated. One of the students consumed one of
the chops on the following day.
Three weeks later, he experienced anorexia and
nausea without vomiting or diarrhea, followed by aching
muscle pains in the chest and back, malaise, non-
productive cough, chills and fever to 1030. His eyelids
became swollen and he developed severe, throbbing head-
aches and boring eye pain. He was admitted to the hos-
pital on November 3. A trichinella skin test was positive;
biopsy of the gastrocnemius muscle revealed Trichinella
spiralis. He recovered uneventfully. The second student
experienced similar but milder symptoms. His skin test
was equivocally positive.
After discharge, the patient brought the remaining,
now six-week old, pork chop to the State Laboratory of
Hygiene. Microscopic examination revealed encysted T.
spiralis in the meat.
(Reported in the State of Wisconsin Laboratory of Hygiene
Newsletter.)


Salmonella Derby Infections In Hospitals
During the past six weeks an increase in the report-
ing of Salmonella derby isolations has been noted by the
mechanism of routine Salmonella surveillance. Prelimi-
nary totals of Salmonella serotype identifications and
total Salmonella derby identifications by month are shown
in the accompanying table. Isolations of S. derby rose
from an average of 20 to 30 per month (2.0 3.0 percent
of all identifications reported) to 57 in April (4.7 percent)
and to 50 (6.4 percent) during the first two weeks in May.
The increase in S. derby reporting has occurred pri-
marily in the northeastern States, and preliminary epi-
demiologic investigation indicates that most isolations




INFANT DEATHS IN 108 CITIES

The weekly average number of infant deaths in 108
cities for the four-week period ending May 11 was 728
as compared with an expected weekly average of 733.



TOTAL DEATHS UNDER ONE YEAR OF AGE IN 108 CITIES

WEEK ENDING
4 Week Weekly
4/20 4/27 5/4 5/11 Total Average

Observed 701 657 817 736 2,911 728
Expected 737 734 732 730 2,933 733

Excess -36 -77 85 6 -22 -5


SALMONELLA ISOLATIONS REPORTED, BY MONTH,
TO THE SALMONELLA SURVEILLANCE UNIT,
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


Month Total Identifications S. Derby Percent of Total

December 1962 794 16 2.0
January 1963 1,111 30 2.7
February 1963 1,059 22 2.1
March 1963 931 28 3.0
April 1963 1,217 57 4.7
May 1963 780 50 6.4
(1st two weeks)
(Preliminary Figures)



have been obtained from hospitalized patients. Investiga-
tions are currently underway in four New York City hos-
pitals and three hospitals in Philadelphia. In addition,
three other hospitals in New York State and one in
Pennsylvania have reported S. derby isolations from
hospitalized patients and several other reports in those
areas are currently under investigation.
The largest total of isolations reported from any one
hospital is 62 including 41 from patients with a history
of febrile diarrhea and 21 from employees, only 5 of whom
had symptoms. Most of the onsets of illness consistent
with Salmonella infection have been recorded since
March 10.
Intensive epidemiological investigations to detect a
common source among hospital populations are currently
underway by local, State and federal authorities.
(Reported by Dr. Hzrold Fuerst, Director, Bureau of
Preventable Diseases, New York City Health Depart-
ment; Dr. Robert Albrecht, Director, Office of Epidemi-
ology, New York State Department of Health; Dr. Sylvan
Fish, Chief, Communicable Disease Control, Philadel-
phia Department of Public Health; Dr. Wm. Schrack,
Director, Division of Communicable Disease Control,
Pennsylvania State Department of Health; and, a team
from the Communicable Disease Center.)


1(See table, page 163)
(See table, page I63)


DEATHS UNDER ONE YEAR OF AGE IN 108 U S CITIES
Average number pr week by four-ek prods
/i j











160) Mlrl bidily and Mortalit Weekly Report


Table CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MAY 11, 1963 AND MAY 12, 1962



Poliomyelitis, Aseptic
Poliomyelitis, total cases Poliomyelitis, paralytic nonparalytic Meningitis
Cumulative Cumulative
Area
19th week First 19 weeks 19th week First 19 weeks 19th week 19th week

1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962


UNITED STATES....... 2 14 48 115 1 12 43 84 2 17 22

NEW ENGLAND.............. 1 1
Maine.................. -
New Hampshire......... -
Vermont............... -
Massachusetts......... -
Rhode Island.......... -
Connecticut........... 1 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 6 30 6 17 1 4
New York............... 4 30 4 17 4
New Jersey............. 1 1- -
Pennsylvania 1 1 1 -

EAST NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 12 10 10 6 4 3
Ohio .................. 4 4 3 4 1 1
Indiana............... 1 1 3 2
Illinois.............. 5 2 5 2
Michigan.............. 2 2 3
Wisconsin............. 1

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 7 1 4 2 -
Minnesota ............. 1 I 1 2
Iowa................... 3 2
Missouri.............. 1 3 1 1
North Dakota........... -
South Dakota...........
Nebraska.............. -
Kansas..................

SOUTH ATLANTIC............ 1 6 10 1 1 5 8 -- 1
Delaware...............
Maryland.............. .
District of Columbia.. 1 i
Virginia.............. 1 1 2 1 1 2
West Virginia .........
North Carolina........ 2 2 2 2 -
South Carolina........
Georgia............... 1 1 2 1 2
Florida............... 2 3 2 2

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 3 3 2 2
Kentucky.............. 1 1
Tennessee............. 1 1 1
Alabama............... 2 1 1 1
Mississippi ...........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL ...... 8 11 35 7 11 31 1 3 2
Arkansas.............. 1 1 -
Louisiana............. 9 5 9 5
Oklahoma .............. -
Texas................. 8 2 29 7 2 25 1 3 2

MOUNTAIN................. 1 6 1 5 2
Montana................ 2 -
Idaho ................. -
Wyoming............... -
Colorado.............. 2
New Mexico..............
Arizona................ 1 3 1 3
Utah................... 1 1
Nevada................

PACIFIC .................. 4 9 13 3 8 10 1 6 11
Washington............ 1
Oregon............... I 1 -- -
California............. 4 8 13 3 7 10 1 6 10
Alaska................ .. .
Hawaii ................. .

Puerto Rico.............. 2 5 2 5










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 161


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MAY 11, 1963 AND MAY 12, 1962 (Continued)



Brucellosis Diphtheria Encephalitis, Hepatitis, Measles
infectious infectious and serum
Area Cumu- Cumu- 19th week
lative lative Under 20 &
19th week 19 weeks 19th week 19 weeks 19th week 20 yr. over Total 19th week
1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1962
UNITED STATES...... 5 123 2 107 43 20 484 335 882 1,093 17,937 24,632

NEW ENGLAND.............. 4 5 2 49 30 80 56 794 3,286
Maine................. 32 13 45 14 15 308
New Hampshire......... 3 1 4 3 2 47
Vermont ............... 1 48 105
Massachusetts......... 2 3 10 13 23 27 280 1,250
Rhode Island............ 2 2 2 1 2 141 232
Connecticut........... 4 3 7 9 308 1,344

MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 4 2 19 10 2 95 75 170 132 2,313 5,571
New York............... 3 1 13 2 2 64 52 116 66 938 2,989
New Jersey............ 1 8 11 19 28 611 2,346
Pennsylvania .......... 1 1 5 8 23 12 35 38 764 236

EAST NORTH CENTRAL........ 10 11 4 3 97 62 164 244 7,387 3,803
Ohio.................. 24 16 40 69 602 654
Indiana ............... 1 4 13 4 19 35 435 405
Illinois............. 8 3 3 3 23 19 45 57 840 1,074
Michigan.............. 1 3 1 36 22 58 73 2,710 1,291
Wisconsin............. 1 1 1 2 10 2,800 379

WEST NORTH CENTRAL........ 2 88 30 4 17 12 35 60 703 513
Minnesota ............. 7 15 2 5 3 11 6 239 78
Iowa .................. 1 62 1 5 1 6 20 152 140
Missouri.............. 4 1 3 4 7 19 112 99
North Dakota.......... 1 4 195 162
South Dakota.......... 1 4 8 2 2 4 2
Nebraska .............. 5 4 3 3 3 34
Kansas................ 6 1 2 4 6 4 NN NN

SOUTH ATLANTIC............ 2 19 8 2 45 44 104 141 1,874 1,376
Delaware.............. 2 80 6
Maryland.............. 1 2 1 3 13 71 96
District of Columbia.. 1 1 2 3 3 2
Virginia .............. 1 1 12 11 29 31 769 340
West Virginia.......... 1 13 9 27 17 638 547
North Carolina........ 1 1 9 11 20 32 85 19
South Carolina........ 3 1 1 9 112 55
Georgia............... 6 2 6 8 6 10 64
Florida.................. 1 8 6 1 6 4 14 28 106 247

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 3 9 2 56 18 75 167 1,034 1,824
Kentucky.............. 14 5 20 51 551 285
Tennessee ............. 2 2 31 4 35 48 311 1,349
Alabama................ 1 7 3 2 5 59 122 121
Mississippi........... 2 8 7 15 9 50 69

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 8 13 2 38 24 62 62 723 2,944
Arkansas............... 2 1 1 12 13 137
Louisiana.............. 2 12 3 15 10 4 1
Oklahoma.............. 2 5 3 3 6 3 23 58
Texas................. 4 5 2 22 18 40 37 683 2,748

MOUNTAIN................. 2 4 1 1 8 3 45 61 1,320 2,066
Montana............... 1 2 3 3 53 648
Idaho.................. 17 19 200 49
Wyoming ............... 1 1 2 11 99
Colorado.............. 1 1 5 15 185 582
New Mexico............ 1 4 4 9 NN NN
Arizona................. 1 2 13 11 782 358
Utah...............* 1 2 3 2 65 126
Nevada ................ 24 204

PACIFIC.................. 1 4 1 10 8 79 67 147 170 1,789 3,249
Washington........... 1 1 17 6 23 30 185 1,279
Oregon ................ 1 1 9 11 20 30 185 774
California............ 3 1 8 7 48 48 96 105 1,169 1,142
Alaska................ 2 2 5 3 19 7
Hawaii................ 3 3 2 231 47

Puerto Rico.............. 8 8 1 9 19 17 80










162 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MAY 11, 1963 AND MAY 12, 1962 (Continued)


Meningococcal Streptococcal Tickborne
Infections Sore Throat & Tetanus Typhus Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in Animals
Scarlet Fever (Rcky Mt.
Area Cumu- Spotted) Cumu- Cumu-
lative lative lative
19th wk, 19 weeks 19th week 19th wk. 19th wk. 19th wk. 19thwk. 19 weeks 19th week 19 weeks
1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963

UNITED STATES.... 54 1,131 6,984 7,428 4 2 1 7 132 105 85 1,483

NEW ENGLAND......... 3 74 820 444 5 12
Maine.............. 1 12 133 7 I
New Hampshire...... 2 4 2 7
Vermont............ 2 17 4 1 4
Massachusetts...... 2 36 136 90 3
Rhode Island ...... 6 61 34 -
Connecticut........ 16 469 307 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC..... 15 161 523 459 1 1 17 4 1 42
New York............. 8 75 334 267 1 1 13 3 1 31
New Jersey......... 23 85 94 -
Pennsylvania....... 7 63 104 98 3 1 11

EAST NORTH CENTRAL.. 7 180 921 1,037 1 1 7 38 36 229
Ohio............... 2 52 123 52 2 33 20 137
Indiana............ 1 23 174 170 1 1 10 24
Illinois........... 1 23 160 408 1 1 2 3 2 31
Michigan........... 3 60 278 246 1 1 24
Wisconsin............. 22 186 161 1 4 13

WEST NORTH CENTRAL.. 6 70 229 259 1 8 20 20 331
Minnesota.......... 1 12 17 44 1 3 5 6 89
Iowa............... 3 89 48 1 11 8 122
Missouri........... 1 26 4 23 4 3 5 60
North Dakota....... 2 3 63 73 1 8
South Dakota....... 4 3 1 44
Nebraska........... 1 17 5 3
Kansas.............. 1 5 53 65 1 5

SOUTH ATLANTIC ..... 5 207 814 552 2 1 27 13 4 250
Delaware........... 1 8 4 1 -
Maryland........... 1 30 39 17 3 -
Dist. of Columbia.. 4 1 1 -
Virginia........... 1 52 418 230 1 3 5 1 93
West Virginia...... 1 12 152 80 5 3 2 80
North Carolina..... 1 33 15 11 3 4
South Carolina..... 1 13 76 34 --- 5
Georgia............ 11 2 1 1 2 2 23
Florida............ 51 103 174 1 10 3 1 45

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 2 99 892 979 2 13 5 9 121
Kentucky........... 29 87 80 2 2 3 56
Tennessee.......... 2 41 779 801 7 3 6 54
Alabama............ 13 11 23 2 4 11
Mississippi........ 16 15 75 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 3 117 623 715 2 22 21 12 310
Arkansas...........* 7 1 9 1 20
Louisiana.......... 1 49 1 1 5 28
Oklahoma........... 22 24 13 2 3 29
Texas.............. 2 39 599 700 1 6 18 11 233

MOUNTAIN............ 1 40 1,053 1,129 2 2 26
Montana............ 1 3 34 61 -
Idaho.............. 3 92 150 -
Wyoming............ 1 50 80 -
Colorado........... 11 412 390 1
New Mexico......... 2 210 229 1 1 13
Arizona............ 6 145 159 1 13
Utah................ 11 100 54 -
Nevada............. 3 10 6 -

PACIFIC.............. 12 183 1,109 1,854 2 31 2 3 162
Washington.......... 2 15 418 650 -
Oregon............. 1 10 26 31 2 1 1
California ........ 9 148 612 1,059 1 26 2 2 152
Alaska............. 5 39 71 1 1 9
Hawaii............. 5 14 43 2
Puerto Rico......... 4 21 5 2 5 5









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 163





Table 4 (C). TOTAL DEATHS UNDER I YEAR OF AGE IN REPORTING CITIES



(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.)o


For weeks ending For weeks ending
Area 4/27 ---4 11 Area 40 1 47
4/20 4/27 5/4 5/11 4/20 4/27 5/4 5/11


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass............... 14 11 15 15
Bridgeport, Conn.......... 1 3 1 2
Cambridge, Mass............... 1 0 1
Fall River, Mass........... 1 1 1 2
Hartford, Conn............ 2 6 4 3
Lowell, Mass.............. 1 1 1 1
Lynn, Mass............... 2 3 0 3
New Bedford, Mass.......... 1 2 0 0
New Haven, Conn ........... 1 1 1 1
Providence, R.I........... 4 5 3 3
Somerville, Mass........... 1 0 1 0
Springfield, Mass.......... 2 2 4 0
Waterbury, Conn............ 3 1 0 0
Worcester, Mass........... 2 2 3 2

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y................ 3 2 3 6
Allentown, Pa............. 1 2 3 1
Buffalo, N.Y.............. 8 12 11 12
Camden, N.J............... 2 4 3 5
Elizabeth, N.J............ 0 3 2 1
Erie, Pa................. 4 0 2 2
Jersey City, N.J........... 1 6 1 2
Newark, N.J................ 6 6 8 3
New York City, N.Y........ 73 78 70 83
Paterson, N.J............. 5 3 8 4
Philadelphia, Pa.......... 21 21 44 22
Pittsburgh, Pa............ 15 4 17 10
Reading, Pa............... 1 2 4 0
Rochester, N.Y............ 3 3 6 11
Schenectady, N.Y........... 1 0 2 0
Scranton, Pa.............. 1 0 1 1
Syracuse, N.Y............. 5 7 6 2
Trenton, N.J.............. 3 6 0 1
Utica, N.Y................ 3 0 2 0
Yonkers, N.Y.............. 1 2 1 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio................ 4 4 5 5
Canton, Ohio.............. 3 0 3 4
Chicago, Ill.............. 42 30 61 47
Cincinnati, Ohio.......... 10 12 12 6
Cleveland, Ohio........... 21 6 26 11
Columbus, Ohio............. 9 15 15 7
Dayton, Ohio ............ 5 5 5 4
Detroit, Mich.............. 16 32 43 17'
Evansville, Ind........... 5 1 0 6
Flint, Mich............... 7 6 6 5
Fort Wayne, Ind........... 4 4 1 2
Gary, Ind................. 3 1 1 3*
Grand Rapids, Mich........ 3 3 4 2
Indianapolis, Ind......... 10 11 11 11
Madison, Wis............. 3 3 3 2
Milwaukee, Wis............ 6 4 6 24
Peoria, Ill............... 4 4 5 3
Rockford, Ill ............. 1 0 3
South Bend, Ind........... 6 2 1 3
Toledo, Ohio............... 1 2 3 8
Youngstown, Ohio.......... 2 5 2 1

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa.......... 2 3 1 5
Duluth, Minn.............. 2 4 0 4
Kansas City, Kans......... 5 4 4 6
Kansas City, Mo........... 7 6 8 12
Lincoln, Nebr............. 2 2 1 1
Minneapolis, Minn......... 5 5 5 7
Omaha, Nebr................. 4 3 5 7
St. Louis, Mo............. 14 7 15 14
St. Paul, Minn............ 5 6 7 1
Wichita, Kans.............. 3 3 3 3

*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.

NOTE: All deaths by place of occurrence.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.............. 13 4 16 3
Baltimore, Md............. 15 16 13 17
Charlotte, N.C........... 4 3 6 5
Jacksonville, Fla........ 7 4 9 6
Miami, Fla............... 1 4 5 3
Norfolk, Va............... 3 5 7 6
Richmond, Va.............. 10 6 15 4
Savannah, Ga............. 4 4 3 5
St. Petersburg, Fla...... 3 5 3 1
Tampa, Fla............... 4 0 5 5
Washington, D.C ......... 12 8 13 10
Wilmington, Del.......... 7 2 5 5

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.......... 8 7 13 5
Chattanooga, Tenn........ 4 2 3 7
Knoxville, Tenn........... 3 3 3 3
Louisville, Ky............ 2 7 10 6
Memphis, Tenn............ 7 12 11 8
Mobile, Ala............... 3 6 6 1
Montgomery, Ala.......... 1 5 3 3
Nashville, Tenn.......... 7 3 5 6

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.............. 1 3 2 4
Baton Rouge, La.......... 2 3 4 3
Corpus Christi, Tex...... 4 3 1 4
Dallas, Tex.............. 9 13 17 11
El Paso, Tex.............. 3 3 4 4
Fort Worth, Tex.......... 9 2 5 8
Houston, Tex.............. 18 10 16 12
Little Rock, Ark.......... 5 3 2 2
New Orleans, La.......... 16 9 17 15
Oklahoma City, Okla...... 9 6 7 3
San Antonio, Tex......... 6 12 9 5
Shreveport, La........... 8 10 9 2
Tulsa, Okla.............. 1 2 1 4

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex ..... 1 4 3 6
Colorado Springs, Colo... 1 0 0 0
Denver, Colo.............. 8 8 9 14
Ogden, Utah............... 1 0 0 1
Phoenix, Ariz............. 3 9 5 10
Pueblo, Colo............. 0 0 0 1
Salt Lake City, Utah..... 6 4 5 2
Tucson, Ariz............. 2 2 2 2

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.......... 0 0 0 0
Fresno, Calif............ 2 1 4 5
Glendale, Calif.......... 1 3 2 0
Honolulu, Hawaii.......... 9 6 4 9
Long Beach, Calif........ 5 3 5 5
Los Angeles, Calif....... 41 36 33 43
Oakland, Calif........... 6 3 5 10
Pasadena, Calif.......... 0 2 3 2
Portland, Oreg............ 8 6 9 4
Sacramento, Calif........ 4 7 2 4
San Diego, Calif......... 9 7 12 6
San Francisco, Calif..... 6 6 8 12
San Jose, Calif.......... 3 7 4 4
Seattle, Wash........... 9 2 4 15
Spokane, Wash............ 1 1 1 1
Tacoma, Wash.............. 0 2 1 1

San Juan, P.R.............. 5 2 3 2


OCurrent Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities

4(A) Total Mortality, all ages.................... 11,416
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages........ 422
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age............. 736
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over..... 6,366




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08864 1419


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Erratum:
The epidemiological report, Typhoid Fever Los
Angeles, California, which appeared on page 120, MMWR
Vol. 12, No. 14 (April 12, 1963), incorrectly identified
the Los Angeles County Health Department as the in-
vestigating agency.
This outbreak was principally investigated by the
Los Angeles City Health Department under the direction
of Dr. Herbert Cowper, in charge of the Communicable
Disease Control Unit.



INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES

Immunization Information for International Travel
1962 Edition
Public Health Service Publication No. 384
The following information should be added to the
list of Yellow Fever Vaccination Centers in Section 6:


The Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report is published by
by the Communicable Disease Center, Atlanta, Georgia, and as
of May 3, 1963, had a circulation of 10,400 copies.


Chief, Communicable Disease Center
Chief, Epidemiology Branch
Chief, Statistics Section
Asst. Chief, Statistics Section
Chief, Surveillance Section
Deputy Chief, Surveillance Section


James L. Goddard, M.D.
A. D. Langmuir, M.D.
R. E. Serfling, Ph.D.
I. L. Sherman, M.S.
D. A. Henderson, M.D.
D. W. Ruthig, M.D.


CITY:
CENTER:



CLINIC HOURS:
FEE:


Chicago, Illinois
Chicago Board of Health
O'Hare International Airport
Tel. 686-2200
Friday, 10-11 a.m., registration 9:45 a.m.
No


In addition to the established procedures for report-
ing morbidity and mortality, the Communicable Disease
Center welcomes accounts of interesting outbreaks or
cases. Such accounts should be addressed to:

Editor, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
Communicable Disease Center
Atlanta 22, Georgia


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