Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00093

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text
f5 S (ao/9e'/L/6


Morbidity and Mortali



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFA

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE a t<


Prepared by the


For release February 15, 1963


ATLANTA 22,


PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THE UNIT
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED FEBRUARY 9, 1963


INFLUENZA Outbreaks of influenza-like illness have
now been reported from the District of Columbia and thirteen
States including North Carolina, Maryland, Virginia, Dela-
ware, Kansas, Illinois, Georgia, Maine, Vermont, South
Carolina, New York, Ohio, and Massachusetts. Influenza
A2-virus has been isolated or confirmed by serologic titer
rise as the causative agent of outbreaks in the District
of Columbia, Maryland, Kansas, North Carolina, New York
and at the Great Lakes Naval Training Station in Illinois.
Currently influenza is most active in the Middle West
and Southwest States.
The number of pneumonia-influenza deaths reported
weekly by 108 cities has remained above the epidemic
threshold for the last 5 weeks with a sharp upswing for


'ATES AND ON


the week ending February 9. Excess pneumonia-influenza
deaths have increased sharply in the last week in the
Middle and South Atlantic States. The greatest excess
has occurred in the sample cities of Richmond, Virginia,
Baltimore, Maryland, Washington, D. C. and New York
City, all areas in which the presence of A2 (Asian) in-
fluenza has been confirmed.

No further outbreaks of influenza-like disease have
been reported this week from Maine, Vermont, Illinois,
Kansas, or Georgia, areas in which limited outbreaks were
reported in previous weeks. (See MMWR Vol. 12, Nos. 4,
5). The following reports come from areas of the country
currently experiencing influenza-like disease.


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous week)
6th Week Cumulative
Disease Ended Ended n First 6 weeks
Disease Median
February 9, February 10, 1958 1962 Median
1963 1962 1963 1962 1958 1962
Aseptic meningitis................ 15 11 --- 145 85 ---
Brucellosis ..................... 9 5 11 31 28 69
Diphtheria ...................... 4 8 13 36 81 119
Encephalitis, infectious .......... 23 23 23 109 155 131
Hepatitis, infectious and serum... 1,188 1,515 688 6,495 8,935 4,228
Measles ........................ 11,172 12,404 11,482 50,516 54,031 54,031
Meningococcal infections......... 67 60 54 331 312 326
Poliomyelitis, total.............. 6 6 10 23 52 116
Paralytic..................... 5 2 9 20 32 67
Nonparalytic ................. 1 2 8 38
Unspecified................... 1 4 1 12 11
Streptococcal sore throat
and Scarlet fever ............ 10,231 9,081 --- 52,316 49,214
Tetanus ........................ .3 1 --- 23 16
Tularemia...................... 3 5 --- 26 39
Typhoid fever ................... 4 8 8 29 42 50
Typhus fever, tick-borne,
(Rocky Mountain spotted)...... 2 ---
Rabies in Animals ............... 63 73 73 329 374 467


Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: Psittacosis: Minn.-1, Calif.-1 10
Botulism: Rabies in Man:
Malaria: Conn.-l 11 Smallpox:
Plague: Typhus, murine: 1
Figures for current week exclude reports from Vermont, Montana, Washington, and Oregon (State Holiday).


I CNI1LN CALE ISAS CNTR


i/








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


INFLUENZA AND INFLUENZA-LIKE DISEASE OUTBREAKS U. S. A.
January I through February 13, 1963 By State


Outbreaks characteristic of influenza
0 with laboratory confiretion
Outbreaks epidemiologically c-aractristic
Sof influenza. No laboratory confirmation
Othreaks of fc rile respiratory disease res nbling influenza
0 Adequate epidemiologic c6iract-rization lackirg. No laboratory confirmation


New York City The first confirmed isolations of
A2 influenza virus in New York City were made during
the week of January 28. To date, eleven A2 isolates have
been reported from the city, five of which came from speci-
mens collected during an epidemic of influenza-like ill-
ness in a children's institution in Manhattan. Over 100
children in a population of 500 were affected. Pneumonia-
influenza deaths for New York City have been well above
expected levels during the month of January, with a rather
sharp rise for the week ending February 1, as shown in
the following table.

PNEUMONIA-INFLUENZA DEATHS NEW YORK CITY

Tolerance Zone
Week Ending Expected Observed
Upper Lower
Dec. 28 55.0 98.8 76.9 75
Jan. 4 55.9 100.1 78.0 101
11 55.7 99.9 77.8 102
18 54.9 98.7 76.8 94
25 53.2 96.4 74.8 102
Feb. 1 51.7 94.5 73.1 121


(Reported by Harold T. Fuerst, M.D., Director, Bureau of
Preventable Diseases, New York City Department of
Health.)


Washington, D. C. Industrial absenteeism con-
tinues high in the District of Columbia although school
absenteeism has declined over the last week. Seventeen
A2 influenza isolates have been obtained from cases in
this area.
(Reported by Dr. Frederick C. Heath, Deputy Director of
Public Health, District of Columbia Department of Public
Health.)


Influenza-like Illness Virginia Follow-up Report-
Total cases of influenza-like disease reported to State
health officials rose to over 9,000 for the week ending
February 9, as compared to a total of approximately 4,500
for the previous week. This is the third consecutive week
in which there has been an increase in reported influenza-
like disease. Principal foci of epidemic activity continue
to be in counties adjoining the cities of Richmond, New-
port News, and Washington, D. C., as well as in several
rural areas along the North Carolina border. Only the
western portion of the State has been free of community-
wide outbreaks thus far, although a small number of cases
has recently been reported from the city of Lynchburg,
approximately 100 miles west of Richmond.
Serologic confirmation of recent infection with A2 in-
fluenza virus has been obtained thus far in three cases
from the Richmond area. Additional specimens have been
submitted from numerous other parts of the State and are
currently being processed.
(Reported by James B. Kenley. M.D., Director, Bureau of
Epidemiology, Virginia State Department of Health.)




Maryland -Influenza in Baltimore seems to be waning,
with school and industrial absenteeism returning to nor-
mal in many parts of the city. Frederick County is pres-
ently reporting the wide-spread occurrence of influenza-
like illness. Two isolates of influenza A2 virus have
been obtained at Fort Detrick.
(Reported by Dr. John H. Janney, Acting Chief, Division
of Epidemiology, Maryland Department of Health.)

Pelaware Outbreaks of influenza-like diseases have
recently been observed in four communities in the State








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


of Delaware. Schools serving these areas have noted
abnormally high absenteeism during the past two weeks
with absence rates varying between 12 and 18 percent.
Industrial absenteeism has not been abnormal thus far.
The illness is described as clinically compatible with
influenza, although laboratory confirmation has not been
obtained.
(Reported by Floyd Hudson, M.D., Acting Director, Pre-
ventable Diseases, Delaware State Board of Health.)


South Carolina- Three counties (Dillon, Chesterfield
and Horry) (all in the vicinity of the original North
Carolina influenza focus) experienced widespread in-
fluenza-like illness in school children and in the elderly
toward the end of January. Two counties in the central
part of the State experienced abnormally high school


absenteeism in the last week. No excess school or in-
dustrial absenteeism has occurred in the larger cities.
Laboratory studies are in progress.

(Reported by Dr. G. E. McDaniel, Director, Division of
Disease Control, South Carolina State Board of Health.)


North Carolina Influenza has continued epidemic
throughout the State with increased involvement of
counties in the West Central portion of the State during
the last week.
(Dr. Jacob Koomen, Assistant Secretary and State Health
Director, North Carolina State Board of Health.)



(Continued on page 48)


PNEUMONIA AND INFLUENZA DEATHS

During the week ending February 9 there were 705
pneumonia-influenza deaths reported in the 108 cities,
an excess of 157 over the expected number of 548. This
number of excess deaths is greater than the peak number
of 147 excess deaths during the week ending March 3 of
the 1962 epidemic of influenza B, but considerably less
than the 508 excess deaths during each of the weeks
ending February 13 and 20, 1960, the peak of the influ-
enza A2 epidemic of that year. Recent excess mortality
has been greater in the Middle and South Atlantic States


with further increases during the week ending February 9,
1963.
During the last four weeks the average weekly excess
has been 106 deaths, 19 percent above expected levels.


WEEK ENDING 4 Week Weekly
1/19 1/26 2/2 2/9 Total Average
Observed 637 611 652 705 2,605 651
Expected 541 545 547 548 2,181 545
Excess 96 66 105 157 424 106


PNEUMONIA-INFLUENZA DEATHS IN 108 U.S CITIES
Average number per week by four-week periods
1,000 C--- ] --------

1NF1.UENZA Az
90c 0-





R 700
RECORDED
/_DEATHS'



500 r._
00 H I III"EXPECTED"

400- NUMBER


3.:M :::; ;:. ; ^


PERIOD NUMBER | 7 1 1 7 I 1
S1E960M_ 90 1961 [
B l-ACE o CUENScE CALCLuflTEO ROM I s9a-'60 EXPEIEThE


1962 1 1963


(See Table, page 47)


NUMBER
OF
DEATHS


(See Table, page 47)












44 Morbidity and Nlortalitl Weekly Reporl


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

FEBRUARY 9, 1963 AND FEBRUARY 10, 1962



Poliomyelitis, Aseptic
Poliomyelitis, total cases Poliomyelitis, paralytic nonparalytic Meningitis
Cumulative Cumulative
Area
6th week First 6 weeks 6th week First 6 weeks 6th week 6th week
1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962


UNITED STATES...... 6 6 23 52 5 2 20 32 15 11

NEW ENGLAND..............
Maine...................
New Hampshire .........
Vermont ............... --- -
Massachusetts.........
Rhode Island..........
Connecticut........... -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC .......... 1 3 3 23 1 1 3 13 1 2
New York............... 1 3 2 23 1 1 2 13
New Jersey............ -
Pennsylvania 1 1 1 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 6 5 5 4 1 2
Ohio.................. 2 3 1 3 -
Indiana................ 1 1
Illinois............... 1 4 1 4 1 1
Michigan .............
Wisconsin ............. 1

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 4 1
Minnesota..........-.. -
Iowa.................. 2 1
Missouri.............. 2
North Dakota..........
South Dakota.......... -
Nebraska..............
Kansas.. ..............

SOUTH ATLANTIC............ 1 1 5 1 4 2 1
Delaware...... ....
Maryland..............
District of Columbia.. 1 1
Virginia........ ....... i 1 2 1
West Virginia.........
North Carolina........ 1 1 1 1
South Carolina........
Georgia.... ...........
Florida............... 2 2

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 1 2 1 5 3
Kentucky............... 4 1
Tennessee................ 1 1
Alabama................ 1 1 1- -
Mississippi........... 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 4 1 9 6 4 1 9 5
Arkansas.. ...........
Louisiana............. 3 1 8 2 3 1 8 2
Oklahoma.............. -
Texas.................. 1 1 4 1 1 3

MOUNTAIN................. 3 2 1 1
Montana............... --- 2 --- ---
Idaho .................- -
Wyoming...............
Colorado .............. 1
New Mexico..............-
Arizona................. 1
Utah................... 1 1
Nevada............... -

PACIFIC ................. 3 4 2 2 5 2
Washington ............... -- --- -
Oregon ................ ..... --- ---
California............ 1 3 4 2 2 5 2
Alaska.................

Hawaii ..................
Puerto Rico ..............










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 45


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

FEBRUARY 9, 1963 AND FEBRUARY 10, 1962 (Continued)


Brucellosis Diphtheria Encephalitis, Hepatitis, Measles
infectious infectious and serum
Area
Cumu- Cumu- 6th week
lative lative Under 20 &
6th week 6 weeks 6th week 6 weeks 6th week 20 yr. over Total 6th week
1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1962
UNITED STATES...... 9 31 4 36 23 23 688 392 1,188 1,515 11,172 12,404

NEW ENGLAND................ 1 2 2 110 68 186 75 348 1,983
Maine................. 59 29 89 11 18 294
New Hampshire.......... 8 3 16 14 2 120
Vermont ............... -- -- --- --- --- --- -- 25
Massachusetts......... 1 1 29 21 52 36 76 1,007
Rhode Island.......... 2 8 25 43
Connecticut........... 1 14 15 29 6 227 494

MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 2 2 5 3 6 146 88 234 173 1,052 1,662
New York.............. 2 2 1 97 60 157 81 611 823
New Jersey............ 1 1 14 13 27 40 141 546
Pennsylvania .......... 1 2 3 5 35 15 50 52 300 293

EAST NORTH CENTRAL....... 2 2 4 108 75 189 390 4,794 1,330
Ohio................... 1 22 18 42 140 645 69
Indiana................ 10 11 21 49 199 210
Illinois .............. 2 1 2 44 13 61 73 380 500
Michigan .............. 2 31 29 60 103 1,315 366
Wisconsin............. 1 4 5 25 2,255 185

WEST NORTH CENTRAL ....... 9 24 9 1 16 11 30 108 1,540 275
Minnesota............. 1 2 1 3 3 8 37 125 29
Iowa .................. 7 18 1 4 2 6 25 824 96
Missouri.............. 1 1 3 4 7 23 198 4
North Dakota.......... .- 3 1 4 2 387 124
South Dakota .......... 2 6 1 9 6 21
Nebraska.............. 1 1 2 1 4 2 1
Kansas................ 1 1 10 NN NN

SOUTH ATLANTIC........... 9 4 4 98 48 158 223 803 877
Delaware ............. 2 2 1 7
Maryland.............. 2 1 19 8 31 36 34 140
District of Columbia.. 1 2 2 6 1 25
Virginia.............. 1 1 1 21 12 40 56 148 335
West Virginia ......... 13 4 18 38 320 219
North Carolina ........ 1 1 31 10 41 61 88 33
South Carolina ........ 2 6 6 6 49 31
Georgia............... 1 4 4 6 12
Florida............... 4 1 6 8 14 13 156 82

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 1 1 6 1 1 74 29 120 223 712 1,399
Kentucky.............. 1 28 45 63 447 163
Tennessee............. 1 28 13 41 78 195 1,146
Alabama................ 1 1 5 10 9 19 57 31 44
Mississippi........... 1 8 7 15 25 39 46

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 2 3 5 68 26 98 121 586 3,032
Arkansas.................. 1 1 1 12 1 13 20 24 58
Louisiana.............. 13 9 23 18 6
Oklahoma.............. 1 8 3 11 12 55
Texas................. 2 4 35 13 51 71 562 2,913

MOUNTAIN ................. 1 2 28 12 98 78 629 731
Montana ........... -- --- --- --- --- 5 --- 213
Idaho................. 11 16 44 23
Wyoming** ............. 1 1
Colorado.............. 7 2 28 20 194 228
New Mexico............ 9 4 13 8 NN NN
Arizona............... 27 15 152 88
Utah.................. 1 2 12 6 18 12 215 64
Nevada ............... 1 1 23 115

PACIFIC................... 1 1 8 1 40 35 75 124 708 1,115
Washington ............ --- --- 1 --- --- 16 --- 410
Oregon ................ -- -- -- --- -- 20 --- 273
California............. 1 1 8 32 34 66 78 326 393
Alaska................ 8 1 9 10 197 33
Hawaii ................ 185 6

Puerto Rico............. 1 1 9 3 12 8 19










46 %Inrbidilv and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 3 CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

FEBRUARY 9, 1963 AND FEBRUARY 10, 1962 (Continued)


Meningococcal Streptococcal Tickborne
Infections Sore Throat & Tetanus Typhus Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in Animals
Scarlet Fever (Rcky Mt.
AreaCumu- Spotted) Cumu- Cumu-
lative lative lative
6th wk. 6 weeks 6th week 6th wk. 6th *k. 6th wk. 6th wk. 6 weeks 6th week 6 weeks
1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963

UNITED STATES.... 67 331 10,231 9,081 3 3 4 29 63 73 329

NEW ENGLAND......... 7 29 1,323 691 1 2
Maine............... 3 6 205 30 -
New Hampshire...... 9 2 -
Vermont.............. --- 1 --- 36 -- -- --
Massachusetts...... 2 10 192 206 1 2
Rhode Island....... 3 101 57 -
Connecticut ........ 2 9 816 360 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC..... 5 39 701 650 1 4 3 4 14
New York............ 4 16 410 357 4 3 13
New Jersey......... 7 124 115 -
Pennsylvania....... 1 16 167 178 1 4 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL.. 10 56 1,131 942 16 18 49
Ohio................ 3 17 147 197 10 8 24
Indiana............ 11 252 184 1 6 5
Illinois........... 5 9 221 137 3 2 7
Michigan........... 2 13 256 128 2 1 11
Wisconsin.......... 6 255 296 1 2

WEST NORTH CENTRAL.. 2 16 372 342 1 15 20 74
Minnesota........... 2 22 42 2 1 17
Iowa............... 126 84 6 8 22
Missouri........... 7 9 10 1 5 3 20
North Dakota....... 1 158 125 3 2
South Dakota....... 2 7 9 2 5 13
Nebraska............ 2 4 1 -
Kansas............. 49 72

SOUTH ATLANTIC...... 20 78 891 689 3 2 6 13 11 62
Delaware............ 5 5 -
Maryland............. 6 13 47 21 1 2
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 3 3 -
Virginia............ 6 17 371 231 1 5 9 23
West Virginia...... 6 245 120 1 1 7 2 24
North Carolina..... 4 14 35 43 I 2
South Carolina..... 5 67 110 -
Georgia............ 4 4 7 27 2 -
Florida............ 18 111 129 2 1 13

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 3 25 1,378 1,657 3 7 7 31
Kentucky........... 6 170 162 4 2 12
Tennessee.............. 2 12 1,071 1,376 3 3 5 17
Alabama.............. 1 4 43 21 2
Mississippi........ 3 94 98 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 3 31 1,080 1,191 1 1 8 6 11 55
Arkansas............ 1 3 23 2 1 6 3 5
Louisiana.......... 2 9 5 9 1 1 1 8
Oklahoma............. 7 37 60 4
Texas.............. 12 1,015 1,120 2 5 7 38

MOUNTAIN ............ 7 14 2,225 2,065 1 1 5
Montana ........... --- --- 60 -- --- --
Idaho............... 283 182
Wyoming............ 42 143 -
Colorado............ 1 3 1,146 947
New Mexico......... 2 2 339 293 1 2
Arizona ............ 1 3 154 233 1 3
Utah................. 2 5 249 207 -
Nevada ............. 1 1 12 -

PACIFIC................. 10 43 1,130 854 1 4 3 1 39
Washington............ 3 --- 477 --- --- -- -- --
Oregon ............. -- 2 -- 61 --- --- --- --- 1 --- 1
California......... 9 34 957 230 1 3 3 1 38
Alaska............. 1 4 74 43 -
Hawaii ............. 43 -
Puerto Rico......... 2 2 4 1









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report





Table 4 (B). REPORTED PNEUMONIA-INFLUENZA DEATHS IN REPORTING CITIES


(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.)o


For weeks ending For weeks ending
Area 1 26[ j 2/9 II Area 1/ 1/2
1/19 1/26 2/2 2/9 1/19 1/26 2/2 2/9


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass..............
Bridgeport, Conn...........
Cambridge, Mass...........
Fall River, Mass..........
Hartford, Conn............
Lowell, Mass..............
Lynn, Mass................
New Bedford, Mass.........
New Haven, Conn ..........
Providence, R.I...........
Somerville, Mass..........
Springfield, Mass.........
Waterbury, Conn...........
Worcester, Mass...........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y...............
Allentown, Pa.............
Buffalo, N.Y...............
Camden, N.J................
Elizabeth, N.J............
Erie, Pa..................
Jersey City, N.J..........
Newark, N.J..............
New York City, N.Y........
Paterson, N.J............
Philadelphia, Pa..........
Pittsburgh, Pa............
Reading, Pa...............
Rochester, N.Y............
Schenectady, N.Y.........
Scranton, Pa..............
Syracuse, N.Y .............
Trenton, N.J...............
Utica, N.Y...............
Yonkers, N.Y..............

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio...............
Canton, Ohio..............
Chicago, Ill..............
Cincinnati, Ohio..........
Cleveland, Ohio...........
Columbus, Ohio...........
Dayton, Ohio...............
Detroit, Mich .............
Evansville, Ind...........
Flint, Mich................
Fort Wayne, Ind...........
Gary, Ind.................
Grand Rapids, Mich........
Indianapolis, Ind.........
Madison, Wis..............
Milwaukee, Wis............
Peoria, Ill...............
Rockford, Ill.............
South Bend, Ind...........
Toledo, Ohio..............
Youngstown, Ohio..........

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa..........
Duluth, Minn..............
Kansas City, Kans.........
Kansas City, Mo...........
Lincoln, Nebr.............
Minneapolis, Minn.........
Omaha, Nebr...............
St. Louis, Mo.............
St. Paul, Minn.............
Wichita, Kans.............


2
7
4
1
6
7
12
118
6
11
8
0
13
2
2
1
4
0
5


2
2
48
12
2
10
4
18
1
4
3
3
2
2
0
5
0
3
1
4
1


2
0
8
12
3
3
5
14
3
5


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga............... 5 7 0 3
Baltimore, Md............. 12 16 28 35
Charlotte, N.C............ 5 1 2 6
Jacksonville, Fla........ 1 4 0 4
Miami, Fla............... 0 2 2 2
Norfolk, Va .............. 9 5 0 7
Richmond, Va.............. 2 5 9 15
Savannah, Ga.............. 3 1 4 3
St. Petersburg, Fla...... 4 5 4 4
Tampa, Fla............... 3 6 1 0
Washington, D.C.......... 8 21 21 22
Wilmington, Del.......... 3 7 4 7

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.......... 3 8 5 3
Chattanooga, Tenn........ 6 2 3 8
Knoxville, Tenn.......... 0 3 0 3
Louisville, Ky............. 18 13 16 16
Memphis, Tenn............ 6 5 5 7
Mobile, Ala............... 2 4 2 1
Montgomery, Ala.......... 3 3 0 7
Nashville, Tenn.......... 5 4 1 6

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex............... 11 7 7 5
Baton Rouge, La.......... 3 3 0 2
Corpus Christi, Tex...... 1 2 0 1
Dallas, Tex............. 6 7 9 6
El Paso, Tex............. 4 4 4 0
Fort Worth, Tex.......... 3 4 3 4
Houston, Tex.............. 5 6 8 7
Little Rock, Ark.......... 8 4 6 1
New Orleans, La.......... 10 8 6 6
Oklahoma City, Okla...... 3 2 1 0
San Antonio, Tex......... 12 7 12 5
Shreveport, La.......... 7 10 4 6
Tulsa, Okla............... 7 6 4 4

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex...... 6 4 7 10
Colorado Springs, Colo... 2 1 0 1
Denver, Colo.............. 1 10 7 12
Ogden, Utah.............. 1 1 1 1
Phoenix, Ariz............. 4 12 5 5
Pueblo, Colo.............. 0 0 0 0
Salt Lake City, Utah..... 3 1 2 1
Tucson, Ariz.............. 3 1 3 6

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.......... 0 1 0 1
Fresno, Calif ............ 1 3 4 4
Glendale, Calif .......... 0 1 0 1
Honolulu, Hawaii.......... 1 2 0 2
Long Beach, Calif ........ 0 0 5 0
Los Angeles, Calif....... 24 21 19 23
Oakland, Calif........... I 1 1 0
Pasadena, Calif.......... 1 1 0 0
Portland, Oreg............ 4 3 1 1
Sacramento, Calif ........ 4 3 5 6
San Diego, Calif......... 5 7 6 7
San Francisco, Calif ..... 5 7 5 4
San Jose, Calif.*........ 3 5 2 2
Seattle, Wash............. 6 5 7 6
Spokane, Wash............ 0 0 0 0
Tacoma, Wash.............. 0 1 2 2*

San Juan, P.R.............. 2 2 1 (---)


oCurrent Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities

4(A) Total Mortality, all ages................... 13,552
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages........ 705
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age............ 762
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over..... 7,824


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.

NOTE: All deaths by place of occurrence.




UrJIVEARiTV OF FLORIDA

II I 11111111 IIIII 111 1I1111111111111111i II Ill
3 1262 08864 1476


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Ohio Epidemic febrile respiratory disease, clini-
cally compatible with influenza, has been reported from
the cities of Cincinnati, Springfield and Dayton during
the week ending February 8. Laboratory studies are
in progress.
(Reported by Dr. Winslou Bashe, Acting Chief, Division
of Communicable Diseases. Ohio Department of Health.)

Massachusetts An outbreak of febrile respiratory
disease clinically resembling influenza has occurred at a
college in western Massachusetts. The outbreak began
abruptly on February 11. Laboratory specimens are under
study.
(Reported by Dr. Nicholas J. Fiumara, Director, Division
of Communicable Diseases, Massachusetts Department
Sof Public Heallh.)


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U 5 DEPOS;1T ; /


INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES
No additional pertinent information or changes


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