Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00088

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text
FS- z.4o/1 Wi


Morbidity and Mortality



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


Prepared by the


634-5131


For release May 10, 1963 ATLANTA 22, GEORGIA Vol. 12, No. 18
PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THE UNITED STATES AND ON
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED MAY 4, 1963


DIPTHERIA Cumulative reported cases of diphtheria
through the eighteenth week this year are once again at
record low levels. (See graph page 150.) The rate of de-
cline in reported diphtheria cases, reasonably constant
since 1945, shows some evidence of an accelerated
decline this year. Cumulative cases through the 18th


Notably, over half of the cases reported this year
are from the Northern States. Only two States have re-
corded more than 10 cases; Minnesota with 15 cases
and New York with 12.


week for 1959-1963 and total cases for the years 1959- EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS
1962 are shown below: Anthrax New Mexico
Two reported and three addition. human
No. of Cases 1963 1962 1961 1960 1959 cases of cutaneous anthrax occur Fn r-
Through 18th Week 105 177 252 281 312 ovation in Taos Pueblo, New t e a
Total for Year 458* 617 918 934 of October 1962. At least 16 /of anthrax in c
*Provisional and swine were also thought t v occurred.
S MAY1963


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED At S
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous week) A


18th Week Cumulatie
Ended Ended First 18 weeks
Disease Median
May 4, May 5, 1958 1962 Median
1963 1962 1963 1962 1958 1962
Aseptic meningitis................ 22 19 --- 393 331 --
Brucellosis ................... .. 7 12 13 118 129 235
Diphtheria ...................... 4 12 12 105 177 270
Encephalitis, infectious .......... 37 20 29 490 519 479
Hepatitis, infectious and serum... 802 1,163 813 18,009 24,150 13,851
Measles........................ 17,341 23,971 22,108 229,442 288,700 247,295
Meningococcal infections......... 75 40 44 1,077 898 1,007
Poliomyelitis, total.............. 1 9 12 46 101 272
Paralytic.................... 1 8 8 42 72 196
Nonparalytic................. 2 2 13 46
Unspecified ................. 1 2 2 16 30
Streptococcal sore throat
and Scarlet fever ............ 7,519 7,311 --- 169,916 153,042
Tetanus ........................ 11 7 --- 68 53 -.
Tularemia ...................... 6 1 --- 70 87 .
Typhoid fever ................... 8 9 13 125 140 .181
Typhus fever, tick-borne,
(Rocky Mountain spotted)...... 1 4 --- 4 9
Rabies in Animals............... 98 95 77 1,378 1,538 1,494

Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cm.
Anthrax: 1 Psittacosis: 21
Botulism: 5 Rabies in Man:
Malaria: 34 Smallpox:
Plague: Typhus, murine: s.c. 3


I CMM NIABE ISAS CNTR








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


The first evidence of the outbreak was on Sunday,
October 14, when a white-faced steer was found dead.
It was known to have been healthy one day prior to its
death. An Indian and his wife found the animal in the
community pasture and eviscerated the animal, disposing
of the entrails in a creek that passed through the com-
munity. They cut up the beef for "jerky", air-dried meat
that is used for human consumption either with or without
further cooking. Samples of this meat were later found to
contain spores of Bacillus anthracis. A friend of the
couple took the hide and soaked it in creek water, in
preparation for making drums and moccasins. Some of the
freshly cut up meat was given to 25 friends of the couple,
at least two of whom ate the meat raw. Most of the Pueblo
residents ate portions of the other freshly cut up meat in
a well-cooked stew that was prepared for a ceremony.
No illness resulted. The unusable portions of the meat
and bones were scattered for dogs and swine to consume
at their leisure.
On October 20, two slightly swollen, itching areas
appeared on the forearm of the woman who originally
found the dead steer. She initially regarded them as in-
sect bites but, because of their persistence, went to a
nearby clinic. When seen, the lesions were somewhat
raised in the center with a small erythematous border.
She was given bacitracin and terramycin, and instructed
to soak the infected areas. A day later, her arm had be-
come swollen and edematous to the shoulder with some
edema spreading out over the pectoral muscles. She had
numerous blebs on her forearm with a green-violet dis-
coloration of the arm. Bacillus anthracis was cultured
from the lesions. The patient was hospitalized and, under
treatment, recovered uneventfully.
On October 24, the son of one of the men to whom
freshly cut up meat had been given appeared at the clinic
with two small lesions on the right upper and lower eye-
lids. Erythema and swelling was noted above the eye,
which was nearly closed. There was extensive edema
of the scalp and right side of the face. He recovered
under treatment.
On October 25, the Indian who found the dead car-
cass appeared at the local clinic with a lesion on his
right hand. It was characterized as a punched out, very
deep ulcer with raised edges, black discoloration at the
base, and surrounding erythema. In spite of the depth
and proximity to the fifth metacarpal periosteum, the
patient experienced no pain and only slight itching about
the lesion. He was not treated for this lesion though it
is suspected that he may have consumed some of the
tetracycline capsules given to his wife.
Shortly thereafter, a fourth Indian was seen with a
similar finger lesion. This man refused to be examined
by local health personnel, but was seen casually outside
the clinic, perhaps a week later, where a black eschar


175r


DIPHTHERIA CASES*
11960
by 4-week periods
1960-1963

*'WEEKLY TELEGRAPHIC REPORTS *
I
I

/
/


I

I
I





/
I\ A 1961



A I/I *1962


I 2 3 '4 a 6 7 8 9 i O 12 13
FOUR WEEK PERIOD


was noted at the base of his ulcerated finger lesion with
modest surrounding erythema.
A fifth person, an Indian youth, was seen on Novem-
ber 14 by a local veterinarian. He was noted to have two
black eschars on his upper lip. Upon questioning, the
boy admitted burying two swine that had died by strangu-
lation approximately 3 to 4 weeks previously. (Anthrax
deaths in swine are usually the result of strangulation
caused by massive cervical lymphadenopathy.) Ulcers
had appeared on his upper lip two weeks later, followed
by edema of both lips and the anterior nares. He had
experienced some itching but no pain. The lesions sub-
sided spontaneously.
Although the first known case among cattle occurred
on October 14, some carcasses had been noted earlier
in surrounding pastures. At least 12 cattle had died with
symptoms consistent with anthrax. In addition to the two
swine who died of strangulation, two others were seen
who appeared listless with evidence of swollen jowls
and recent weight loss. A mass immunization program for
the cattle in the area was carried out.
(Reported by Dr. H. Gordon Doran, Jr., New Mexico De-
partment of Public Health; Dr. Jack Hill, Department of
Agriculture. Animal Disease Eradication Division; Dr.
Harold Fleetwood, USPHS Clinic, Taos Pueblo, New
Mexico; and a physician from the Communicable Disease
Center.)









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Tetanus Arkansas 1958-1962

A review of human tetanus cases in Arkansas over the
past five years was recently carried out by the State Board
of Health. Of the 47 cases occurring during this period, 35
were fatal. The age distribution of the cases is shown
below:
CASES OF TETANUS ARKANSAS 1958-1962

MALE FEMALE TOTAL DEATHS
Neonatal (first 28 days) 5 5 10 10
1-4 2 0 2 1
5-9 2 0 2 0
10-19 4 2 6 4
20-29 2 0 2 2
30-39 1 0 1 0
40-49 3 2 5 4
50-59 4 2 6 3
60 +7 6 13 11

30 17 47 35


Ten of the 47 could be classified as tetanus neona-
torum. The remainder are scattered by age group; notably,
25 of the 37 occurred among males.
An effort was made to classify the type of injury pre-
ceding the disease in each case. Suprising is the fre-
quency with which tetanus was associated with apparently
trivial wounds.


TYPE OF WOUND ASSOCIATED WITH OCCURRENCE OF TETANUS
(Excluding neonatal cases)


Puncture Wound
Cut, abrasion, blister, or bruise
Gangrene associated with burns, frostbite or diabetes
Splinter
Fracture
Unknown or classification uncertain


PNEUMONIA-INFLUENZA DEATHS IN 108 CITIES

The weekly average number of pnuemonia-influenza
deaths for the four-week period ending May 4 was 498 as
compared with an expected weekly average of 484.


WEEK ENDING
4 Week Weekly
4/13 4/20 4/27 5/4 Total Average
Observed 512 540 481 457 1,990 498
Expected 499 489 479 468 1,935 484
Excess 13 51 2 -11 55 14


PNEUMONIA-INFLUENZA DEATHS IN 108 U.S. CITIES
Average number per week by four-week periods
I,000


900 TT -------------------







600--- ---- -


700 -
EXPECTED"'
NUBE \ "" t '

4 /,T,,S ,.fi ,I N


NUMBER
OF
DEATHS


IS I I7 I 7 15 I 7
I 1961 1 t962 1 1963
"CALfUL-ATED FROM 19-'60 EXPERIENCE


PERIOD NUMBER 1 60
By PLACE OF OCCURRENCE

(See table, page 155)


/










152 Morbidity and Mlortality Weekly Report



Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MAY 4, 1963 AND MAY 5, 1962



Poliomyelitis, Aseptic
Poliomyelitis, total cases Poliomyelitis, paralytic nonparalytic Meningitis
Cumulative Cumulative
18th week First 18 weeks 18th week Firstl8 weeks 18th week 18th week
1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962

UNITED STATES...... 1 9 46 101 1 8 42 72 22 19

NEW ENGLAND............. 1 1
Maine.................. -
New Hampshire........ -
Vermont.............. -
Massachusetts.........
Rhode Island.......... -
Connecticut........... 1 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC............ 6 30 6 17 1 1
New York............... 4 30 4 17 1
New Jersey............ 1 I -
Pennsylvania 1 1 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 11 10 10 6 2
Ohio.................. 4 4 3 4
Indiana............... 3 2
Illinois.............. 5 2 5 1
Michigan............... 2 2 1
Wisconsin................ 1 1

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 7 1 4 2 1
Minnesota............. 1 1 2 1
Iowa .................. 3 2
Missouri................ 1 3 1 1
North Dakota..........
South Dakota..........
Nebraska. ........... .
Kansas............... -

SOUTH ATLANTIC............ 1 5 9 1 4 7 3 1
Delaware .............. -
Maryland...............
District of Columbia.. 1
Virginia.............. 2 2
West Virginia..........
North Carolina........ 1 2 2 1 2 2
South Carolina........
Georgia ............... 1 1 1
Florida ............... 2 3 2 2 3 1

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 3 3 2 2 3 2
Kentucky........... .... 1 I 1
Tennessee............. 1 1 1 1
Alabama............... 2 1 1 1 1
Mississippi............ 1 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 5 11 27 5 11 24 4
Arkansas................ 1 1
Louisiana............. 9 5 9 5
Oklahoma..............- 2
Texas................... 5 2 21 5 2 18 2

MOUNTAIN ................ 5 4 6
Montana ............... 2 1 1
Idaho..................
Wyoming................. .
Colorado............... 5
New Mexico............ -
Arizona................. 2 2
Utah...................- 1 -
Nevada........ ........

PACIFIC.................. 1 2 9 9 1 2 8 7 9 6
Washington ............ 3
Oregon................. 1 -
California............ 1 2 8 9 1 2 7 7 6 6
Alaska..................
Hawaii..................

Puerto Rico.............. 2 5 2 5










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 153


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MAY 4, 1963 AND MAY 5, 1962 (Continued)



Brucellosis Diphtheria Encephalitis, Hepatitis, Measles
infectious infectious and serum
Area
Area Cumu- Cumu- 18th week
lative lative Under 20 &
18th week 18 weeks 18th week 18 weeks 18thweek 20 yr. over Total 18th week
1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1962
UNITED STATES...... 7 118 4 105 37 20 397 325 802 1,163 17,341 23,971

NEW ENGLAND .............. 4 2 2 39 35 75 57 717 3,072
Maine................. 14 9 23 10 14 246
New Hampshire.......... 6 2 8 9 1 53
Vermont............... 1 1 2 114 76
Massachusetts......... 2 1 2 12 16 29 22 301 1,460
Rhode Island........... 2 1 1 1 2 33 167
SConnecticut........... 7 6 13 12 254 1,070

MIDDLE ATLANTIC........... 4 1 17 8 2 66 61 129 143 2,029 5,250
New York............... 3 1 12 3 2 35 37 72 54 762 2,502
New Jersey............ 1 13 17 32 36 733 2,488
Pennsylvania .......... 1 4 5 18 7 25 53 534 260

EAST NORTH CENTRAL....... 3 10 2 11 2 3 71 48 137 235 7,618 3,329
Ohio................... 1 18 12 33 64 668 708
Indiana............... 1 1 1 4 10 2 12 35 321 555
Illinois.............. 1 8 3 1 2 17 14 35 71 382 912
Michigan .............. 1 1 1 3 1 23 18 46 58 2,703 840
Wisconsin............. 1 3 2 11 7 3,544 314

WEST NORTH CENTRAL ....... 2 86 1 30 2 2 37 14 62 85 738 678
Minnesota............. 1 7 15 1 5 1 9 22 102 92
Iowa.................. 61 1 17 7 24 22 282 244
Missouri.............. 4 1 11 5 19 20 151 96
North Dakota........... 1 1 4 200 219
South Dakota........... 3 1 8 1 3 4 1 1 12
Nebraska.............. 1 5 4 1 5 4 2 15
Kansas................ 6 2 12 NN NN

SOUTH ATLANTIC............ 1 2 19 4 4 37 30 73 135 1,351 1,144
Delaware.............. 1 1 76 9
Maryland.............. 1 2 2 4 11 70 121
District of Columbia.. 3 3 3 2 11
Virginia.............. 1 4 5 15 32 430 396
West Virginia.......... 1 8 1 9 27 475 388
North Carolina........ 1 1 1 1 3 11 6 17 25 62 25
South Carolina........ 3 1 1 11 63 89
Georgia............... 6 1 1 2 2
Florida................ 1 8 1 1 10 12 22 24 171 105

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 1 3 9 1 1 65 42 117 203 1,187 1,415
Kentucky .............. 14 1 4 26 119 664 262
Tennessee.......... ... 1 2 2 1 34 26 62 46 419 905
Alabama................ 1 7 11 6 17 17 61 105
Mississippi........... 1 6 6 12 21 43 143

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 8 13 3 2 16 14 35 86 762 3,774
Arkansas.............. 2 1 3 2 5 9 19 130
Louisiana.............. 2 3 3 7 15 1 5
Oklahoma.............. 2 5 1 1 2 24 108
Texas ................. 4 5 3 2 9 9 22 60 718 3,531

MOUNTAIN................. 2 1 9 7 40 70 1,103 1,725
Montana............... 3 1 8 3 50 480
Idaho................. 5 10 173 42
Wyoming............... 2
Colorado .............. 4 22 246 679
New Mexico ............ 1 5 3 8 10 NN NN
Arizona............... I 11 15 488 306
Utah.................. 1 1 3 4 10 100 213
Nevada ............... 44 5

PACIFIC.................. 3 1 15 4 57 74 134 149 1,836 3,584
Washington ............ 1 11 14 28 23 334 1,261
Oregon................ 3 3 6 13 256 765
California............ 3 1 14 4 42 56 98 104 1,197 1,443
Alaska................ 1 1 2 6 31 41
Hawaii................ 3 18 74

Puerto Rico.............. 8 19 1 20 28 10 212










154 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MAY 4, 1963 AND MAY 5, 1962 (Continued)


Meningococcal Streptococcal Tickborne
Infections Sore Throat & Tetanus Typhus Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in Animals
Scarlet Fever (Rcky Mt.
Area Cumu- Spotted) Cumu- Cumu-
lative lalative
18th wk. 18weeks 18th week 18th wk. 18th wk. 18thwk. 18thwk. 18weeks 18th week 18 weeks
1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963

UNITED STATES.... 75 1,077 7,519 7,311 11 1 6 8 125 98 95 1,378

NEW ENGLAND......... 2 71 736 496 5 2 12
Maine............... 1 11 14 13 1
New Hampshire...... 2 2 12 2 7
Vermont............ 2 1 27 1 4
Massachusetts...... 1 34 164 90 3
Rhode Island ...... 6 52 14 -
Connecticut........ 16 503 340 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC..... 13 146 499 411 1 16 1 2 38
New York............ 4 67 310 227 12 1 2 28
New Jersey......... 2 23 120 74 1 -
Pennsylvania....... 7 56 69 110 1 3 10

EAST NORTH CENTRAL.. 13 173 965 770 7 3 19 191
Ohio............... 5 50 116 94 2 5 104
Indiana............ 1 22 132 184 1 1 8 23
Illinois........... 2 22 154 144 2 1 1 28
Michigan............ 4 57 329 172 1 1 2 23
Wisconsin........... 1 22 234 176 1 3 13

WEST NORTH CENTRAL.. 3 64 255 156 1 1 2 7 29 20 311
Minnesota.......... 11 20 38 1 2 6 8 84
Iowa............... 3 91 69 1 1 11 8 111
Missouri........... 25 4 10 1 4 5 3 57
North Dakota....... 1 129 18 7
South Dakota........ 4 3 8 6 1 44
Nebraska........... 2 16 3 3
Kansas.............. 1 4 8 10 1 1 5

SOUTH ATLANTIC...... 7 202 557 870 5 3 26 15 11 237
Delaware........... 1 6 9 -- 1 -
Maryland.......... 29 43 25 3 -
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 4 -
Virginia........... 51 212 134 3 4 6 88
West Virginia...... 1 11 126 100 5 2 4 77
North Carolina..... 32 19 46 2 3 4
South Carolina..... 12 25 160 5
Georgia............ 11 2 2 4 21
Florida............. 5 51 124 396 3 3 9 5 1 42

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 6 97 1,192 1,107 3 1 1 11 1 11 116
Kentucky........... 29 138 108 1 2 8 54
Tennessee.......... 4 39 1,017 899 3 1 7 1 3 51
Alabama............ 13 16 14 2 11
Mississippi........ 2 16 21 86 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 7 114 616 652 1 4 2 22 24 24 289
Arkansas............ 2 7 14 7 2 1 9 1 1 20
Louisiana.......... 2 48 3 4 5 1 28
Oklahoma........... 1 22 25 18 2 3 1 26
Texas.............. 2 37 574 623 1 2 1 6 19 22 215

MOUNTAIN............ 6 39 1,261 1,299 2 1 1 24
Montana.............. 2 24 62 -
Idaho.............. 2 3 133 101 -
Wyoming............ 1 27 34 -
Colorado........... 4 11 373 566 1
New Mexico......... 2 346 244 1 12
Arizona............ 6 201 177 1 1 12
Utah............... 11 156 115 -
Nevada ............. 3 1 -

PACIFIC ............. 18 171 1,438 1,550 1 29 22 7 160
Washington......... 1 13 543 627 -
Oregon............. 2 9 19 27 2 1
California ........ 13 139 703 861 1 25 22 7 150
Alaska.............. 1 5 78 22 9
Hawaii.............. 1 5 95 13 2- -
Puerto Rico......... 4 39 3 3 1 5










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report





Table 4 (B). REPORTED PNEUMONIA-INFLUENZA DEATHS IN REPORTING CITIES


(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.)o


For weeks ending For weeks ending
Area 4/20 4/2 ___ Area 4/ 4/2
4/13 4/20 4/27 5/4 4/13 4/20 4/27 5/4


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass..............
Bridgeport, Conn...........
Cambridge, Mass...........
Fall River, Mass..........
Hartford, Conn............
Lowell, Mass..............
Lynn, Mass................
New Bedford, Mass.........
New Haven, Conn..........
Providence, R.I...........
Somerville, Mass..........
Springfield, Mass.........
Waterbury, Conn..........
Worcester, Mass ...........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y...............
Allentown, Pa.............
Buffalo, N.Y...............
Camden, N.J...............
Elizabeth, N.J............
Erie, Pa................
Jersey City, N.J.........
Newark, N.J...............
New York City, N.Y........
Paterson, N.J.............
Philadelphia, Pa .........
Pittsburgh, Pa............
Reading, Pa................
Rochester, N.Y.............
Schenectady, N.Y..........
Scranton, Pa..............
Syracuse, N.Y..............
Trenton, N.J.............
Utica, N.Y...............
Yonkers, N.Y.............

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio................
Canton, Ohio...............
Chicago, Ill..............
Cincinnati, Ohio..........
Cleveland, Ohio...........
Columbus, Ohio............
Dayton, Ohio..............
Detroit, Mich.............
Evansville, Ind...........
Flint, Mich...............
Fort Wayne, Ind..........
Gary, Ind..................
Grand Rapids, Mich........
Indianapolis, Ind.........
Madison, Wis...............
Milwaukee, Wis............
Peoria, Ill...............
Rockford, Ill.............
South Bend, Ind...........
Toledo, Ohio...............
Youngstown, Ohio..........

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa...........
Duluth, Minn..............
Kansas City, Kans.........
Kansas City, Mo............
Lincoln, Nebr.............
Minneapolis, Minn.........
Omaha, Nebr...............
St. Louis, Mo.............
St. Paul, Minn............
Wichita, Kans............


0
9
1
2


1
4
35
7
3
2
4
16
3
2
2
0
3
7
0
2
1
3
2
4
0


0
0
4
4
7
3
0
5
5
4


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga............... 9 4 6 4
Baltimore, Md............ 4 5 4 4
Charlotte, N.C........... 0 1 2 4
Jacksonville, Fla........ 2 6 3 0
Miami, Fla............... 0 2 0 0
Norfolk, Va.............. 2 1 3 2
Richmond, Va.............. 2 7 3 0
Savannah, Ga.............. 7 2 0 4
St. Petersburg, Fla...... 8 5 5 3
Tampa, Fla............... 2 4 0 2
Washington, D.C.......... 7 14 6 6
Wilmington, Del.......... 2 1 4 1

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala .......... 3 0 2 4
Chattanooga, Tenn......... 10 7 2 1
Knoxville, Tenn.......... 3 1 3 2
Louisville, Ky........... 7 10 8 17
Memphis, Tenn............ 6 9 7 5
Mobile, Ala.............. 2 1 1 2
Montgomery, Ala.......... 3 2 1 1
Nashville, Tenn............ 17 3 2 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.............. 9 4 5 5
Baton Rouge, La.......... 0 3 4 3
Corpus Christi, Tex...... 1 0 1 0
Dallas, Tex.............. 4 5 2 4
El Paso, Tex............. 2 2 1 0
Fort Worth, Tex........... 1 1 0 0
Houston, Tex.............. 4 6 3 6
Little Rock, Ark.......... 7 7 5 2
New Orleans, La.......... 7 6 8 0
Oklahoma City, Okla...... 3 2 2 0
San Antonio, Tex......... 11 4 4 3
Shreveport, La........... 10 6 16 6
Tulsa, Okla............... 3 2 4 2

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex...... 2 5 4 4
Colorado Springs, Colo... 4 3 2 2
Denver, Colo.............. 8 14 5 6
Ogden, Utah.............. 0 1 3 0
Phoenix, Ariz............ 4 5 4 3
Pueblo, Colo............ 0 1 0 0
Salt Lake City, Utah..... 3 3 6 2
Tucson, Ariz ............. 2 1 2 1

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.......... 0 0 0 0
Fresno, Calif............ 2 3 2 4
Glendale, Calif.......... 1 0 2 1
Honolulu, Hawaii.......... 0 0 1 0
Long Beach, Calif........ 0 1 2 0
Los Angeles, Calif....... 29 19 17 22
Oakland, Calif........... 5 4 1 3
Pasadena, Calif.......... 0 1 0 0
Portland, Oreg........... 3 8 3 3
Sacramento, Calif........ 7 5 4 3
San Diego, Calif......... 8 9 1 3
San Francisco, Calif ..... 4 7 7 9
San Jose, Calif.......... 10 2 6 6
Seattle, Wash........... 7 3 0 6
Spokane, Wash............ 3 3 1 2
Tacoma, Wash.............. 0 3 0 0

San Juan, P.R.............. 3 1 0 2


OCurrent Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities

4(A) Total Mortality, all ages.................... 11,769
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages........ 457
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age............ 817
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over..... 6,519


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.

NOTE: All deaths by place of ocecrence.




UtIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08864 1286


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Food-Borne Disease Outbreaks of Unknown Etiology -
1961 Summary (Completed)

Summarized below are the remaining 34 outbreaks of
food-borne disease of unknown etiology reported during
1961.
Seven of these, noted by asterisks, were listed in
previous issues of MMWR as due to Staphylococcus
enterotoxin. However, these were not laboratory con-
firmed and have been placed in the unknown etiology
category.
The present listing completes the food-borne disease
outbreaks reported between January 1 and December 31,
1961.













-m z

It .

i i














-. .



-- ---- ---- -
.Il -'








i I- *" --------








01; "


INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES

Immunization Information for International Travel
1962 Edition
Public Health Service Publication No. 384

The following information should be added to the list
of Yellow Fever Vaccination Centers in Section 6:

CITY: Chattanooga, Tennessee
CENTER: Chattanooga-Hamilton County Heolth Department
921 East Third Street
Tel. 265-2581
CLINIC HOURS: Wednesday, 2 p.m., by appointment
FEE: Yes


i ,__ __ OST_,.
;1 S DEPOSITOR.


x
m

>



f o




0 IM U t > M
0 ra














mtt
wQ 0Z Z
9 0"
E^ 2- ;i *4


o Z -
S~a seZ








; 50
tb. S >

tt m






'1















-On
F


156