Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00084

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text





Morbidity and Mortality


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


Prepared by the


I S CI C


634-5131


For release September 6, 1963 ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333 Vol. 12, No. 35
PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THE UNITED STATES AND ON
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED AUGUST 31, 1963


POLIOMYELITIS A total of 31 cases of poliomyelitis,
26 paralytic, were reported for the week ending August 31,
1963. Twenty-six were reported by Pennsylvania; of
these 21 were from Philadelphia and two from adjacent
Delaware County. Philadelphia's cases to date represent
18 per cent of the 1963 national total.


Philadelphia
This week's 21 cases doubled Philadelphia's
cumulative 1963 total to 42. The 42 Philadelphia cases
reported through August, 1963, already exceed the annual
totals in that city since the introduction of poliomyelitis
vaccine (1955) with the single exception of 1958 when 76
cases were reported for the entire year. The peak inci-


dence of poliomyelitis in Philadelphia does not custom-
arily occur until September. The annual totals for
Philadelphia poliomyelitis for the past 10years are shown
below.

POLIOMYELITIS PHILADELPHIA
By Year

Year Total Cases Year Total Cases
1954 228 1959 21
1955 40 1960 8
1956 13 1961 1
1957 10 1962 0
1958 76 1963 42*

*Through August 31 only.


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous w
35th Week I ative
Ended Ended Fir l 3
Disease Median -... -
August 31, September 1, 1958 1962 Median
1963 1962 1963 2 1958 1
Aseptic meningitis............... 52 94 --- 1,066 1
Brucellosis ..................... 5 6 8 248 284-
Diphtheria ...................... 2 4 11 159
Encephalitis, infectious .......... 28 78 70 1,050 1,190
Hepatitis, infectious and serum... 673 786 698 29,709 38,456 24,951
Measles........................ 657 781 994 356,993 441,136 394,271
Meningococcal. infections ......... 30 26 26 1,715 1,498 1,592
Poliomyelitis, total.............. 31 37 215 229 473 1,586
Paralytic.................... 26 31 123 196 367 1,086
Nonparalytic ................. 5 6 51 23 77 350
Unspecified ................. 41 10 29 150
Streptococcal sore throat
and Scarlet fever ............ 2,991 3,041 -- 244,787 226,377 .
Tetanus ........................ .8 6 164 175 -
Tularemia...................... 8 7 194 207
Typhoid fever................... 16 17 20 315 395 512
Typhtis-fever, tick-borne,
(Rocky Mountain spotted)...... 9 6 --- 141 172 ---
Rabies in Animals............... 44 37 46 2,605 2,739 2,634

Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. cum.
Anthrax: 2 Psittacosis: Ill. 1 42
Botulism: 5 Rabies in Man:
Malaria: Miss. 1, Calif. 2 62 Smallpox:
Plague: Typhus, murine: 15


Wekl






Morbidity and Mortality W'eekly Report


PHILADELPHIA POLIOMYELITIS 1963
BY WEEK OF ONSET OF ILLNESS


rTITTE~


1 I I 1


I 8 15 22 29
June


I F 1 I


6 13 20 27 3
July


= Paralytic

=Non Paralytic

I =Type I Isolation


10 17 24 31
August


Shown above is the epidemic curve to date. Follow-
ing the occurrence of sporadic cases during June and
July, an abrupt increase in cases occurred early in August.
Twenty Type I isolations have been made.
Although cases are reported from eight of Philadel-
phia's ten health districts, more than one-half (22) of the
cases are concentrated in one health district (see table
below).


POLIOMYELITIS PHILADELPHIA 1963
By Health District

Population
Health Districts (1960 Census) Total Cases

1 96,545 1
2 200,974 2
3 203,984 2
4 197,224 3
5 192,319 6
6 154,894 24
7 253,655 2
8 233,707 2
9 265,238 0
10 202,241 0
42

Inadequately vaccinated pre-school age children
comprise the majority of poliomyelitis victims in the
Philadelphia outbreak, as seen in the following table.
(Reported by Dr. Eugene A. Gillis. Commissioner, Philadelphia
Department of Public HIealth and Dr. 1. F. Gratch, Pennsyl-
iania State Department of fHealth).


POLIOMYELITIS PHILADELPHIA 1963
By Age and Inactivated Vaccine Status*

Age OV 1-2V 3V 4+V Total
Under 1 2 2
1 7 3 1 11
2 3 1 4
3 5 1 6
4 2 2
5-9 3 3 2 3 11
10-19 2 1 1 4
20 and over 2 2

Total 24 10 4 4 42
*None of these children are known to have received oral polio
vaccine.

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS

Dengue Fever Puerto Rico
The outbreak of dengue fever in Puerto Rico (See
MMWR, Vol. 12, page 2" has been identified byserologi-
cal study of acute and convalescent sera as due to a
Group B arbovirus, presumably of the dengue virus com-
plex. Specific etiologic diagnosis will depend on virus
isolation and identification. Through September 4, a total
of 3,551 cases have been officially reported from 31 of
the 76 municipios of the Commonwealth.
Field studies now indicate that occasional clinically
characteristic cases were occurring in late July, although
the source and site of the initial introduction have not
yet been determined. The presence of dengue, however,


Week
of
Onset


t r::1rt;.c:::;;;I.;...


||*


286







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


was not recognized until early August wnen an outbreak
of clinically characteristic cases was reported from
Manati, a community on the north central coast of the
Island. Within the next week, groups of similar cases were
recognized in neighboring areas and also in the moun-
tainous community of Juncos in the Eastern part of the
island.
Reports continued to be received from new areas
until September 4; outbreaks consisting of 25 or more
officially reported cases had been recognized in 14
municipios.

AREAS WITH 25 OR MORE CASES

Reported Cases Through
Municipio Population* September 4
Arecibo 69,879 528
Barceloneta 19,334 555
Bayamon 72,221 63
Guayama 33,678 325
Hatillo 20,238 62
Humacao 33,381 40
Juncos 21,486 213
Manati 29,354 690
Morovis 18,094 211
Rio Piedras 251,384 146
San Sebastian 33,451 41
Vega Alta 17,603 58
Vega Baja 30,189 336
Villalbo 16,239 34

-1960 Census

It is believed that the disease incidence is con-
siderably under reported and may well be present in
areas not yet reporting cases.
Limited surveys in neighborhoods in which cases
are known to have occurred have revealed the prevalence
of an acute febrile disease of varying severity, lasting
5-7 days and characterized by sudden onset, generalized
myalgia, retro-orbital pain and often by rash. Crude
attack rates from 25 to 40% have been estimated. Both




INFANT DEATHS IN 108 CITIES
The weekly average number of infant deaths in 108
cities for the four-week period ending August 31 was 753
as compared with an expected weekly average of 744.



TOTAL DEATHS UNDER ONE YEARS OF AGE IN 108 CITIES

WEEK ENDING 4 Week Weekly
8/10 8/17 8/24 8/31 Total Average
Observed 702 793 810 707 3,012 753
Expected 740 743 745 748 2,976 744

Excess -38 50 65 -41 36 9


children and adults have been involved without predilec-
tion for particular age groups. Often whole families have
been attacked typically, secondary cases following a
week or more after the index case.
Entomological surveys have revealed the wide-
spread occurrence of Aedes aegypti within and surround-
ing the dwellings in the epidemic areas. The prevalence
of this species has been noted in various places with a
frequency considerably higher than has been recorded in
past surveys.
An island-wide program of health education has
been directed at the individual householders, urging the
spraying of their homes and the elimination of both in-
door and outdoor breedingsites. The established mosquito
control activities of the Department of Health have been
strengthened.
(Reported by Victor Gonzalez, M.D., Director, Bureau of
Health, Puerto Rico Department of Health, and a team
from the Communzcable Disease Center.)

Suspect Western Encephalitis

Outbreaks of suspect and confirmed cases of Western
Encephalitis have been reported among humans and
horses in the High Plains area of Texas and Saskatche-
wan. Sporadic cases only among horses have been noted
in North Dakota and Wyoming.
In Texas, a marked decrease in the incidence of sus=
pected cases of encephalitis has been noted in Hale
County during the past week. The 1963 total for this
region is now 50 with the reports of four new human
suspect cases this past week. No deaths or additional
horse cases were reported this week. There is serological
evidence that Western Encephalitis is active in this area,
but there have been no virus isolations as yet. Further
laboratory studies are in progress. (See MMWR, Vol. 12,
page 278).
(Continued on page 292)


DEATHS UNDER ONE YEAR OF AGE IN 108 U.S. CITIES
Average number per week by four-week periods


1960 961 j 962


(See Table, page 291)


287


19,3









288 Morbidity and Mlortaliti Weekly Report


Table 3 CASIS OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: I UNITED STATES

FOR WE KS INI)DE)

AUGUST 31, 1963 AND SEPTEMBER 1, 1962



Poliomyelitis, Aseptic
Poliomyelitis, total cases Poliomyelitis, paralytic nonparalytic Meningitis
Cumulative Cumulative
Area
35th week First 35 weeks 35th week First 35 weeks 35th week 35th week

1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962

UNITED STATES...... 31 37 229 473 26 31 196 367 5 6 52 94

NEW ENGLAND............. 1 2 5 1 2 5 7 -
Maine.............. ... 1
New Hampshire.........- -
Vermont............... 1 1 1 4
Massachusetts......... 1 4 1 4 1
Rhode Island.......... 1
Connecticut............ 1 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 26 1 81 52 21 1 63 35 5 7 6
New York............... 1 7 42 1 5 26 5 4
New Jersey............ 1 5 1 5
Pennsylvania 26 73 5 21 57 4 5 2 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL........ 1 9 30 45 1 8 22 33 1 15 15
Ohio................... 3 8 12 3 4 11 5
Indiana............... 2 5 1 4 1 -
Illinois............... 1 5 12 20 1 4 11 12 1 4 3
Michigan............... 1 4 6 1 4 6 10 6
Wisconsin............. 4 2 2 1

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 4 5 22 2 5 12 2 2 11
Minnesota............. 1 3 6 1 3 6 2 8
Iowa.................. 5 2 -
Missouri.............. 2 1 7 1 2 2
North Dakota.......... 3 1 -
South Dakota .......... -
Nebraska................ 1 1 1 1 1 1
Kansas................. 3

SOUTH ATLANTIC........... 2 3 28 32 2 3 25 27 5 7
Delaware .............. 1 1 1
Maryland.............. 1
District of Columbia.. 1
Virginia.............. 1 2 7 1 1 7 2
West Virginia.......... 1 1 4 1 1 4 1
North Carolina......... 3 3 3 3 -
South Carolina ........ 1 5 4 1 4 4 1
Georgia................ 2 10 6 2 9 5 -
Florida............... 6 7 6 4 4 2

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 1 5 44 37 1 5 42 29 1
Kentucky.............. 1 18 1 13 1
Tennessee........... 1 6 6 1 6 3 -
Alabama............... 4 35 11 4 33 11
Mississippi........... 3 2 3 2 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 10 22 220 7 22 173 3 8
Arkansas............. 1 3 5 1 3 5
Louisiana.............. 14 11 14 9 -
Oklahoma.............. 1 7 1 5 -
Texas................. 8 5 197 5 5 154 3 8

MOUNTAIN................. 11 8 2
Montana............... 3 2 --
Idaho................. 2 1 -
Wyoming .............. 1 1 -
Colorado ............... -1 2
New Mexico.............
Arizona............... 3 3 -
Utah.................. I -
Nevada.. ............. -

PACIFIC.................. 5 17 49 5 15 45 14 46
Washington............. 1 1 1 2
Oregon.................. 2 5 1 5 1
California............ 5 15 43 5 14 39 13 43
Alaska................ -
Hawaii...............- -

Puerto Rico.............. 4 10 4 10








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 289


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

AUGUST 31, 1963 AND SEPTEMBER 1, 1962 (Continued)



Brucellosis Diphtheria Encephalitis, Hepatitis, Measles
infectious infectious and serum
Area
Cumu- Cumu- 35th week
lative lative Under 20 &
35th week 35 weeks 35th week 35 weeks 35th week 20 yr. over Total 35th week
1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1962


UNITED STATES...... 5 248 2 159 28 78 289 314 673 786

NEW ENGLAND.............. 1 8 1 22 31 56 72
Maine................. 13 7 20 9
New Hampshire.......... 5 6 11 1
Vermont............... 1 -
Massachusetts ......... 6 4 13 18 43
Rhode Island.......... 2 2 -
Connecticut........... 1 5 5 19

MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 5 21 8 8 68 79 147 144
New York............... 3 13 4 4 39 53 92 77
New Jersey............. 3 7 4 11 18
Pennsylvania......... 2 5 4 4 22 22 44 49

EAST NORTH CENTRAL....... 2 24 23 4 9 56 52 110 130
Ohio.................. 1 2 9 15 15 31 48
Indiana................ 4 5 3 2 5 8
Illinois.............. 14 12 2 12 19 32 24
Michigan .............. 2 5 3 21 16 37 39
Wisconsin.............. 1 2 5 5 11

WEST NORTH CENTRAL........ 1 144 37 7 10 9 26 28
Minnesota............. 8 15 1 1 3 11
Iowa.................. 105 1 3 3 3
Missouri.............. 1 11 1 1 5 8 7
North Dakota.......... 1 4 1 1 3
South Dakota........... 8 11 2 3 4 7 -
Nebraska.............. 6 8 -
Kansas..........,,.... 6 1 4 4

SOUTH ATLANTIC............ 13 1 33 6 56 33 35 71 107
Delaware .............. 3 3 1
Marylan .............. 1 8 6 14 19
District of Columbia.. 1 3
Virginia .............. 5 2 3 2 7 9 15
West Virginia......... 1 9 2 12 8
North Carolina........ 4 2 1 9 9 18 24
South Carolina........ 9 2
Georgia............... 3 1 11 2 6
Florida................ 1 9 2 53 2 11 13 29

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 13 10 1 28 21 49 43
Kentucky.............. 3 3 4 7 9
Tennessee............. 6 2 1 18 9 27 23
Alabama............... 4 8 4 4 8 6
Mississippi.......... 3 4 7 5

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 1 29 20 23 22 47 73
Arkansas.............. 1 5 1 6 6 12 4
Louisiana............. 7 5 3 1 4 5
Oklahoma.............. 5 6 1
Texas................. 12 8 14 15 31 63

MOUNTAIN ................ 9 4 1 4 6 61 42
Montana.............. 1 1 3
Idaho................. 25 13
Wyoming................ 1 -- 2
Colorado............. 3 1 1 18 6
New Mexico............ 1 1 3 7 8
Arizona ............... 3 7 5
Utah .................. 5 1 2 3 5
Nevada.............. -

PACIFIC.................. 1 10 1 3 2 3 45 59 106 147
Washington ............ 13 9 23 34
Oregon ................ 2 4 4 9 12
California ............ 1 7 1 3 2 3 25 45 70 90
Alaska................ 3 3 8
Hawaii................ 1 1 1 3


657 781

11 37
4
3

5 18
5
6 7

123 91
80 72
20
23 19

192 245
29 28
4
34 23
59 109
70 81

5 18
1 2
1 10
2
1 6


NN NN

62 68
S 12
11 7

4 13
33 10
4
4

6 26

19 29
2 3
15 18
1
1 8

53 84
2


51 84

64 60
16 9
20 12

2 14
NN NN
17 17
9 8


128 149
2 6
21 44
92 61
11 11
2 27


Puerto Rico.............. 1 12 25 5 30 23 12 16









Morbidity and Mortality W'eeklI Report



Table i. (ASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISI ASIS: NITtI) SIAIE

FOR W\' IKbS I NI)I1)


AUIGUST 31. 1963 AND SEPTEMBER 1, 1962 (Continucd)


Area


Infecti



35th wk.


UNITED STATES.... 30

NEW ENGLAND.......... 3
Maine.............
New Hampshire......
Vermont...........
Massachusetts...... 1
Rhode Island....... I
Connecticut......... 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC .... 6
New York........... 3
New Jersey......... 1
Pennsylvania....... 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL.. 2
Ohio................ 2
Indiana...........
Illinois...........
Michigan...........
Wisconsin.........

WEST NORTH CENTRAL.. 3
Minnesota.......... 1
Iowa...............
Missouri..........
North Dakota....... 2
South Dakota.......
Nebraska...........
Kansas..............

SOUTH ATLANTIC...... 2
Delaware...........
Maryland ...........
Dist, of Columbia..
Virginia...........
West Virginia.....
North Carolina..... 2
South Carolina.....
Georgia.............
Florida............

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 2
Kentucky............
Tennessee......... 2
Alabama.............
Mississippi ........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 2
Arkansas...........
Louisiana............
Oklahoma...........
Texas.............. 2

MOUNTAIN ............ 1
Montana............
Idaho.............. 1
Wyoming............
Colorado............
New Mexico.........
Arizona............
Utah................
Nevada.............

PACIFIC............. 9
Washington......... 1
Oregon............. 1
California ......... 7
Alaska..............
Hawaii............
Puerto Rico.........


ons Sore Throat & Tetan
Scarlet Fever

lal-ive
35 weeks 35th week 35th w
1963 11963 962 1963

1,715 2,991 3,041 8

109 144 116
17 6 1
4 5 -
4 -
51 7 17 -
10 6
23 125 92

240 89 96
112 64 86
33 10 2 -
95 15 8

263 175 184 2
75 17 9 1
31 43 40
49 39 40
81 41 55 1
27 35 40

109 106 65 1
22 4 2 -
6 16 12 -
33 4 4 1
10 20 46
5 1 1
22 -
11 61 -

316 258 261
2 7 2
49 5 3
6 2
72 47 39
16 78 69
55 4 -
15 13 10
24 1 1 -
77 101 137

125 757 741 1
26 1 17 -
56 719 674 1
21 2 -
22 37 48

163 436 465 1
11 1 1 -
66 2 1
29 -
57 433 464

59 720 731
3 24 28
6 46 64
4 8 5
16 233 290
4 268 174
9 51 118
14 90 52
3 -

331 306 382 3
26 30 -
25 5 7 -
260 278 306 3
12 26 -
8 23 13
6 4 3


Is


Typhus
(Rcky Nt.
Spotted)


Tiulremia Typhid Fever Rabies in Animals


k. 35th wk. 35. ~ .

1963 1963 1963 1963


it I I___


315

10
2

1
5

2

64
26
3
35

25
12
2
7
2
2

18
3
2

11






1
8

7
6
6
2
2
13

37
7
19
8
3

58
22
15
4
17

15


1
6
2
6



43
1
2
37
1
2
12


1963 1962


44 37 2,605

S 26
I
12
12




4 4 82
4 3 62

1 20

1 6 422
1 246
3 40
S 62
2 40
1 34

10 11 658
2 3 158
3 1 251
S 3 113
1 27
2 1 75
1 1 21
1 2 13

5 4 364

1

1 130
2 102
1 9

49
1 7
49
2 1 66

4 3 211
2 2 99
2 1 95
17


12 7 500
3 49
1 40
1 40
7 7 371

1 86



1 15
26
41

4

7 2 256

2 3
5 2 244
S 9

1 11


a m L: I f L .









Morbidly and Mortality Weekly Relort 291





Tablc i ((). TOTAL DEATHS UNDER 1 YEAR OF AGE IN REPORTING CITIES



(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.)o


For weeks ending For weeks ending
Area 1 8/17 8/24 Area8
8/10 8/17 8/24 8/31 8/10 8/17 8/24 8/31


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.............
Bridgeport, Conn.........
Cambridge, Mass...........
Fall River, Mass..........
Hartford, Conn...........
Lowell, Mass..............
Lynn, Mass................
New Bedford, Mass.........
New Haven, Conn...........
Providence, R.I..........
Somerville, Mass..........
Springfield, Mass.........
Waterbury, Conn ..........
Worcester, Mass...........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y...............
Allentown, Pa.............
Buffalo, N.Y..............
Camden, N.J...............
Elizabeth, N.J............
Erie, Pa..................
Jersey City, N.J..........
Newark, N.J...............
New York City, N.Y........
Paterson, N.J.............
Philadelphia, Pa..........
Pittsburgh, Pa ............
Reading, Pa...............
Rochester, N.Y.............
Schenectady, N.Y..........
Scranton, Pa,.............
Syracuse, N.Y.............
Trenton, N.J..............
Utica, N.Y ................
Yonkers, N.Y..............

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio................
Canton, Ohio..............
Chicago, Ill..............
Cincinnati, Ohio..........
Cleveland, Ohio............
Columbus, Ohio............
Dayton, Ohio...............
Detroit, Mich.............
Evansville, Ind...........
Flint, Mich ...............
Fort Wayne, Ind...........
Gary, Ind.................
Grand Rapids, Mich........
Indianapolis, Ind.........
Madison, Wis ............
Milwaukee, Wis.............
Peoria, Ill..............
Rockford, Ill............
South Bend, Ind...........
Toledo, Ohio..............
Youngstown, Ohio..........

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa..........
Duluth,. Minn...............
Kansas City, Kans ........
Kansas City, Mo............
Lincoln, Nebr.............
Minneapolis, Minn.........
Omaha, Nebr................
St. Louis, Mo..............
St. Paul, Minn............
Wichita, Kans.............


12*
3
3
0
0
1
3
0
2
4
0*
4
1
3


2
2
3
2
3
2
2
3
69
4
18
10
2
6
0
2
8
6
1*
0


2
1
37
9
18
12
4
22
2
4
1
3*
4
7
5
6
2
2*
2
3
6


6
3
5
6
2
5
5
8
4
1


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.............. 7 9 15 8
Baltimore, Md............. 7 18 19 13
Charlotte, N.C............ 4 1 3 1
Jacksonville, Fla........ 7 8 7 7
Miami, Fla............... 4 2 8 2
Norfolk, Va............... 8 10 4 0
Richmond, Va.............. 5 13 6 7
Savannah, Ga.............. 3 0 3 5
St. Petersburg, Fla...... 1 6 0 0
Tampa, Fla............... 4 9 3 3
Washington, D.C.......... 31 13 22 23
Wilmington, Del.......... 4 1 5 2

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.......... 5 9 8 10
Chattanooga, Tenn......... 2 9 1 4
Knoxville, Tenn.......... 2 2 5 2
Louisville, Ky............ 16 7 10 9
Memphis, Tenn............. 21 6 15 7
Mobile, Ala............... 2 5 3 5
Montgomery, Ala.......... 2 2 3 0
Nashville, Tenn......... 6 9 8 7

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex............... 3 1 4 2
Baton Rouge, La.......... 1 1 1 5
Corpus Christi, Tex...... 6 3 6 2
Dallas, Tex............... 18 16 12 23
El Paso, Tex.............. 7 9 15 1
Fort Worth, Tex.......... 4 5 8 5
Houston, Tex.............. 20 12 17 24
Little Rock, Ark.......... 5 3 6 4
New Orleans, La.......... 21 31 16 26
Oklahoma City, Okla...... 8 3 6 12
San Antonio, Tex......... 11 11 7 14
Shreveport, La........... 3 9 8 3
Tulsa, Okla............... 0 2 1 2

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex...... 5 6 3 6
Colorado Springs, Colo... 1 0 3 5
Denver, Colo ............. 8 11 8 9
Ogden, Utah............... 0 3 0 2
Phoenix, Ariz............. 3 4 6 7
Pueblo, Colo.............. 1 1 2 2
Salt Lake City, Utah..... 1 1 6 2
Tucson, Ariz............. 0 5 2 2

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.......... 0 2 0 4
Fresno, Calif............ 5 5 6 8
Glendale, Calif.......... 2 5 1 2
Honolulu, Hawaii.......... 4 6 10 4
Long Beach, Calif ........ 5 6 5 6
Los Angeles, Calif....... 30 37 44 33
Oakland, Calif........... 7 6 8 6
Pasadena, Calif.......... 4 0 0 0
Portland, Oreg............ 4 7 8 2
Sacramento, Calif........ 4 4 3 4
San Diego, Calif......... 6 3 14 10
San Francisco, Calif ..... 11 19 14 6
San Jose, Calif.......... 3 7 2 2
Seattle, Wash............ 8 3 11 12
Spokane, Wash........... 0 3 3 1
Tacoma, Wash.............. 3 1 0 2

San Juan, P.R............... 6 1 0 (---)


OCurrent Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities


4(A) Total Mortality, all ages....................
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages........
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age.............
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over.....


10,378
346
707
5,643


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.

NOTE: All deaths by place of curence.









292


Morbidity and Mortalilv Weekly Report


In Saskatchewan, an endemic area for Western En-
cephalitis, over 220 confirmed cases of Western Encepha-
litis in horses have been reported during the past two
weeks. The outbreak is the largest in recent years. More
than 50 cases of an encephalitic illness in humans have
been reported during this same period. The illness is
characterized by respiratory symptoms and lymphade-
nopathy for 7-10 days, followed by abrupt onset of high
fever and clinical encephalitis. All age groups have been
affected; however, the illness has been most severe in
elderly persons and pre-school age children. Laboratory
studies are in prc. ri ss.
(Reported by r'. j. I I'eavy, State Commissioner of
Health, Texa. P...a. of Public Health; Kenneth
Mosser, I',r'.et-.. Division of Preventable Diseases,
North P,,iota '.ite Department of Health: Dr H.
i... rp. Provincial Epidemiologist, Department of
i. ..,'il. Saskatcheuan, Canada; and a team from the
Communicable Disease Center.)




INTERNATIONAL NOTES

Smallpox Hungary

One case of smallpox has occurred in Budapest,
which has been declared infected with smallpox as of
August 31.
All travellers to Budapest are advised to have had a
successful vaccination within the past six months;
travellers otherwise, may be subject to detention.

Smallpox Switzerland

One laboratory-confirmed case of smallpox has been
reported from Zurich in a patient who arrived in Switzer-
land from a foreign area. Zurich has been declared a non-
infected local area.

Smallpox Poland

No further cases of smallpox have been reported from
Poland as of August 29, according to the World Health
Organization. A total of 110 cases, including 7 deaths,
has been reported to date. The last recognized cases
were hospitalized August 11.
More than six and one-half million vaccinations were
given during the epidemic.
Poland has declared Opole free of smallpox as of
August 30.


Dengue Fever Jamaica
Only two cases of dengue fever were reported for the
week ending August 17, 1963, bringing the cumulative
total for 1963 to !11 cases. (See also Dengue Fever,
Puerto Rico.)


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08864 0486


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