Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00081

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text
FS ~ o r~~.-'1e: -.I sr -%


Morbidity and Mortality


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


Prepared by the


634.5131


For release May 3, 1963 ATLANTA 22, GEORGIA Vol. 12, No. 17


PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THE UNITED STATES AND ON
DEM ECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED APRIL 27, 1963




HEPATITIS ported hepatitis cafes continue at a only one to report an outbreak for the first time this week
level of ap rfk matifgtl)3W week,:i essentially a con- Outbreaks have subsided in most areas of the East an
scant level he past several month The proportion- Middle West, with the exception of a recent localize
ate number .'f It cases by S.a.t s not remarkable outbreak in Minnesota. Of the Pacific Coast States, only
except for Ca' where 68.p' t (72 of 106 cases) Alaska has reported wide scale community outbreaks. 0
this week are a e eight weeks in Cali- particular interest has been the continuing laboratory)
fornia, adult cases rom 55 to 65 percent of evidence of the presence of A2 influenza virus in many
the total; over the past six weeks, this proportion has areas of California with the lack of evident community
been steadily rising, outbreaks in many of these areas. Most outbreaks in


INFLUENZA One or more outbreaks of influenza-like
disease have now been reported from 43 States and the
District of Columbia. The State of Washington was the


California have, so far, been confined to institutions. The
total pneumonia-influenza deaths reported for 108 cities
is again below the epidemic threshold this week, and all
regions have now returned to essentially normal levels.


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous week)
17th Week Cumulative
Ended Ended First 17 weeks
Disease Median
April 27, April 28, 1958 1962 Median
1963 1962 1963 1962 1958 1962
Aseptic meningitis............... 19 20 -- 371 312 --
Brucellosis ..................... 5 7 10 111 117 217
Diphtheria ...................... 4 5 6 101 165 255
Encephalitis, infectious .......... 46 28 35 453 499 443
Hepatitis, infectious and serum... 825 1,377 875 17,203 22,987 13,047
Measles........................ 16,287 23,525 19,917 212,098 264,729 230,979
Meningococcal infections......... 58 42 43 1,002 858 945
Poliomyelitis, total .............. 2 3 8 45 92 260
Paralytic .................... 2 3 6 41 64 188
Nonparalytic.................. 2 2 13 44
Unspecified................... 2 15 28
Streptococcal sore throat
and Scarlet fever ............ 7,927 6,750 -- 162,390 145,731 --
Tetanus ........................ 2 3 --- 55 46 ---
Tularemia..................... 3 6 --- 64 86 ---
Typhoid fever ................... 3 9 9 117 131 168
Typhus fever, tick-borne,
(Rocky Mountain spotted)...... 1 3 5
Rabies in Animals ............... 130 107 95 1,280 1,443 1,420

Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: 1 Psittacosis: 21
Botulism: 5 Rabies in Man:
Malaria: va. 1, Ark. 1 34 Smallpox:
Plague: Typhus, murine: 2


--


Wekl


COMMUNICABLEDISEASE ENTE


d
1

f
y

y








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Alaska Increased incidence of influenza-like ill-
ness has now been noted from all judicial districts of the
State. During the week ending March 29, Nome reported
240 cases in a population of 1,500. For this same period,
Glen Allen and Kotzebue reported increased incidence of
respiratory disease. During the week ending April 5,
Fairbanks experienced an outbreak with 275 cases, and
over 250 cases were reported from the villages of Gambell
and Savoonga on St. Lawrence Island. An outbreak began
about April 12 at the Mt. Edgecumbe School near Sitka,
with an estimated 100 cases occurring to date. Many small
Eskimo villages in the western part of the State have also
experienced explosive outbreaks. As yet, there has been
no laboratory confirmations obtained from any of these
outbreaks.
(Reported by Dr. E. O. Wicks, Director, Division of Public
Health, Alaska Department of Health & Welfare).


California An outbreak of influenza-like illness has
been reported from a men's institution in San Luis Obispo
County, with greatest incidence of illness during the week
of April 22. An estimated 300 cases have occurred to date
in a population of 1400 men. Illness has been character-
ized by sudden onset of chills, fever, cough and prostra-
tion of 3 days duration.
(Reported by Dr. Philip K. Condit, Chief, Bureau of Com-
municable Diseases, California State Department of
Health).

Minnesota A community outbreak of influenza-like
illness has been reported from one town in Beltrami
County with onset about April 10. Twenty-five percent
absenteeism was noted in one school during the outbreak.
Increased incidence of the disease has also been reported
from the Red Lake Indian Reservation. Significant rises in
A2 antibody titer have been reported from 3 sporadic
cases, one each in Steele, Scott and Mahnomen Counties.
(Reported by Dr. D. S. Fleming, Disease Prevention and
Control, Minnesota State Department of Health).

New Mexico Serologic evidence of influenza A2
infection has now been obtained from cases in Bernalillo,
Eddy, Colfax, Chaves and Sandoval Counties during April.
However, surveillance has failed to indicate the presence
of outbreaks in any of these areas.
(Reported by Dr. Gerald Parkes. Acting Director, Division
of Preventive Medicine, Neu. Mexico Department of Public
Health).

Utah An outbreak of influenza-like illness has now
been observed in Tooele County, with approximately 200
cases reported for the week ending April 27. i;cer fiijni
influenza A2 titer rises were demonstrated during this
week in 3 pairs of serums, one from San Juan County and
two from Salt Lake County.
(Reported by Dr. A. A. Jenkins. Director. Communicable
and Chronic Disease Section. Utah State Department of
Health).


Washington A localized outbreak of influenza-like
illness has been observed in a kindergarten class in King
County. The peak of the outbreak occurred about March 12
and involved 50% of the class with acute symptoms of
fever, chills, cough, and weakness of 2-4 days duration.
Influenza A2 virus has been isolated from the teacher,
who was ill during the outbreak. Although serologic evi-
dence of the presence of influenza A2 virus has recently
been obtained from a numbE;r p areas in the counties report no ore than' the usual incidence of acute
respiratory di-easc e
(Reported by Dr. E. A. Ager, Hea.i. C .., ,'i'.i ',' Dis-
ease Control, Washington State f, ,[,, rermnt Health).

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS

Sporotrichosis Connecticut
Recently, Sporotrichum schenckii was isolated from
a specimen of salt hay submitted by a country club in
Fairfield County, Connecticut. Investigation revealed
that the salt hay was used as a winter covering for as-
phalt tennis courts at the country club. Interestingly, 8
or 9 human cases of sporotrichosis have occurred in the
town during the past 4 to 5 years, the period during which
the salt hay had been used. All cases appeared to be
associated with use of the courts. The salt hay had been
imported from Long Island but its exact source could not
be determined.
(Reported by Dr. James C. Hart, Director, Division of
Preventable Diseases, Connecticut Department of Health
and Dr. Leanor Haley, Director, Nancy Sayles Day My-
cology Laboratory, Grace-New Haven Community Hos-
pital).

Ed. Note: This report is particularly interesting in light
of the report of Singer, et al.* of 8 cases of sporotrichosis
occurring within a 30 square mile area on the south shore
of Suffolk County, Long Island. Six of the eight had a
clear history of contact with salt hay used to mulch flower
bulbs during late fall and winter months. An additional
six cases of sporotrichosis from this same area on Long
Island was reported by Graham** in 1946; all of the cases
similarly had contact with salt meadow hay used in
mulching tulip bulbs.
The suspect hay, known botanically as Spantina
poteus (official name: marsh hay cord grass), is a peren-
nial marsh plant found in saline marshes of the seacoast.
Its principal use is as an insulating ground cover or mulch
for flower bulbs.
*Singer, J. 1 and Munire, J. E.: New York State J. Med.
52:2147, 1952.
**Graham, J. C.: Arch Dermat. and Syph. 54:726. 1946.


Hepatitis Among American Indians
During the years 1957 through 1961, hepatitis among
American Indians, exclusive of Alaska, .liflired in several
respects from the experience of the general U. S. popu-
tion.









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


While reported cases have shown a general upward
trend for the United States as a whole, there was less
fluctuation in the incidence of hepatitis among the In-
dian population (Figures 1 and 2). It will be noted that
1959 was a peak year for hepatitis among Indians, while
for the country as a whole 1961 represented the peak year.

(FIGURE I.)


NUMBER
CASES
900
800
700
600
500
400
300
200
100


AMERICAN INDIANS* 1957-1961


*EXCLUSIVE
OF ALASKA


1957 '58 '59 '60 '61
YEAR


CASES OF VIRAL HEPATITIS

(FIGURE 2.


REPORTED

NUMBER
CASES


The seasonal distribution of hepatitis cases among
Indians over this period has, in general, been similar to
that of the entire country except that seasonal fluctua-
tions have been wider. Since this is also a characteristic
of States in the Mountain Region, where most of the In-
dian population lives, the observed marked seasonal
variations may not be peculiar to the Indians alone.
The age distribution of cases among Indians differed
somewhat from the age distribution of total U. S. cases.
A comparison of the 1959 figures (Figure 3) reveals a high
proportion of hepatitis among Indians in the age group
under 5 years. While the proportion of the Indian popula-
tion under 5 years (18.8 percent) is higher than those
under 5 for the United States as a whole (11.4 percent),
the difference in percent distribution of the cases is too
great to be accounted for on this basis alone.



FIGURE 3.

PER CENT DISTRIBUTION OF
REPORTED VIRAL HEPATITIS CASES BY AGE-1959
AMERICAN INDIANS AND TOTAL U.S. COMPARED

PERCENT
CASES
50
INDIANS
40. __ _TOTAL U.S.

30-
/o- / \
2 \

10- / \


0-4 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 45,
AGE


YEAR


TOTAL DEATHS IN 108 U. S. CITIES

During the four-week period ending April 27, the aver-
age weekly number of deaths declined to the expected
level for the first time since the four-week period ending
January 5. The observed average weekly number of total
deaths was 11,722 as compared with an expected 11,716.

TOTAL DEATHS RECORDED IN 108 UNITED STATES CITIES

WEEK ENDING 4 Week Weekly
4-6 4-13 4-20 4-27 Total Average
Observed 12,139 11,203 11,838 11,708 46,888 11,722
Expected 11,832 11,759 11,679 11,594 46,864 11,716

Excess 307 -556 159 114 24 6


TOTAL DEATHS RECORDED IN 108 U S CITIES
Average number perweek by four-week perl






I I 1




,... ... ... .
L I


(See table, page 147)


I


"~'~ "









144 Morbidity and Mortaliit Weekly Report


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

APRIL 27, 1963 AND APRIL 28, 1962



Poliomyelitis, Aseptic
Poliomyelitis, total cases Poliomyelitis, paralytic nonparalytic Meningitis


Area


Cumulative Cumulative
17th week First 17 weeks 17th week First 17 weeks 17th week 17th week


1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962


UNITED STATES...... 2 3 45 92 2 3 41 64 19 20

NEW ENGLAND ............. 1 1 1
Maine................ .
New Hampshire .........
Vermont............... -
Massachusetts .........
Rhode Island........... 1 - 1
Connecticut........... 1 I

MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 6 30 6 17 1 1
New York.............. 4 30 4 17 1
New Jersey............ 1 1 -
Pennsylvania 1 1 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL....... 11 9 10 6 2 3
Ohio................... 4 4 3 4 1
Indiana............... 3 2
Illinois.............. 5 2 5 1
Michigan.............. 2 2 2 1
Wisconsin .............

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 1 7 1 1 4 1
Minnesota ............. 1 1 1
Iowa.................... 3 2
Missouri ............... 1 1 3 1 1 1
North Dakota..........
South Dakota...........
Nebraska..............
Kansas................

SOUTH ATLANTIC............. 1 1 5 8 1 1 4 6 2 1
Delaware.............. 1
Maryland..............
District of Columbia.. 1
Virginia.............. 2 1 2 1 1
West Virginia..........
North Carolina......... 2 1 2 1
South Carolina........
Georgia................ 1 1 1
Florida ............... 1 2 3 1 2 2

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 3 3 2 2 1 4
Kentucky.............. 1 1 1 3
Tennessee............. I 1 1
Alabama ............... 2 1 1 1
Mississippi .......... 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL........ 1 11 22 1 11 19 1
Arkansas............... 1 1
Louisiana.............. 9 5 9 5
Oklahoma.............. 1 -
Texas................. 1 2 16 1 2 13-

MOUNTAIN ................. 5 4 3
Montana................ 2 1 -
Idaho..................
Wyoming...............
Colorado.............. 2
New Mexico.............. I - 1
Arizona............... 2 2
Utah.................. 1
Nevada.................

PACIFIC.................. 1 8 7 1 7 5 10 8
Washington............. 1 3
Oregon.............. ... 1 I -
California............ 1 7 7 1 6 5 9 9 5
Alaska. ..............
Hawaii ...............

Puerto Rico.............. 2 5 2 5







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 145


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

APRIL 27, 1963 AND APRIL 28, 1962 (Continued)



Brucellosis Diphtheria Encephalitis, Hepatitis, Measles
infectious infectious and serum
Area
Cumu- Cumu- 17th week
lative lative Under 20 &
117th week 17 weeks 7th wee 17 eek 17th week 20 yr. over Total 17th week
1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1962


UNITED STATES...... 5 111 4 101 46 28 435 336 825 1,377 16,287

NEW ENGIAND................ 1 4 1 44 34 80 60 555
Maine................... 28 16 44 19 14
New Hampshire.......... 3 1 5 3 -
Vermont................ 1 1 101
Massachusetts.......... 2 6 12 18 26 167
Rhode Island.......... 1 2 1 4 31
Connecticut........... 7 4 12 8 242

MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 4 16 8 4 86 74 160 193 1,812
New York.............. 3 3 11 5 2 40 43 83 97 763
New Jersey............. 1 12 16 28 30 484
Pennsylvania.......... 1 4 3 2 34 15 49 66 565

EAST NORTH CENTRAL ....... 7 1 9 2 4 69 42 116 330 6,991
Ohio.................. 1 28 13 42 64 819
Indiana............... 3 11 2 15 73 349
Illinois.............. 7 3 2 7 9 18 111 319
Michigan.............. 1 2 2 1 21 18 39 78 1,884
Wisconsin............. 1 2 2 4 3,620

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 3 84 1 29 3 3 18 15 39 73 418
Minnesota............. 6 15 2 3 5 9 21 208
Iowa.................. 1 61 1 2 2 5 8 50
Missouri.............. 4 1 3 5 5 10 6 32
North Dakota.......... 1 1 1 1 1 12 123
South Dakota........... 3 7 4 1 -
Nebraska ............. 4 4 5 5
Kansas................ 2 6 8 2 10 20 NN

SOUTH ATLANTIC........... 1 19 6 7 62 31 95 138 1,417
Delaware .............. 1- 1 1 2 66
Maryland ............... 1 3 6 10 16 7 74
District of Columbia.. I 3_ 3
Virginia.............. 1 13 4 18 22 342
West Virginia......... 1 1 13 3 17 21 657
North Carolina........ 1 1 1 14 8 22 46 76
South Carolina......... 3 2 1 1 9 86
Georgia............... 6 3 2 5 14 23
Florida................ 1 8 1 1 11 4 15 17 90

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL ...... 2 1 9 1 1 54 19 83 170 962
Kentucky .............. 12 4 24 86 491
Tennessee............... 1 1 2 1 26 9 37 49 324
Alabama............... 1 7 6 6 18 66
Mississippi........... 1 10 6 16 17 81

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 1 8 13 1 3 30 29 60 111 1,090
Arkansas.............. 2 1 1 6 5 11 10 26
Louisiana............. 2 3 1 5 33 8
Oklahoma .............. 2 5 2 2 2 20
Texas................. 1 4 5 1 2 19 23 42 66 1,036

MOUNTAIN.................... 1 2 1 13 6 44 75 1,167
Montana............... 4 4 8 10 104
Idaho ................. 11 8 218
Wyoming ................ 1 1 2 16
Colorado.............. 7 13 347
New Mexico............ 1 6 1 7 10 NN
Arizona ............... 1 1 6 26 374
Utah .............. 1 3 3 6 107
Nevada................. 1 1

PACIFIC................... 3 1 25 5 59 86 148 227 1,875
Washington........... 1 1 10 5 18 61 206
Oregon............... -. 14 7 21 29 223
California............ 3 1 24 4 34 72 106 106 1,230
Alaska................ 1 2 3 31 11
Hawaii ................I 205


Puerto Rico............. 8 2 8 8 16 38 16


23,525

2,800
476
5
137
1,063
161
958

6,186
2,946
2,893
347

3,187
871
513
685
888
230

828
53
391
188
183
13

NN

1,203
18
206
19
297
393
29
65
26
150

1,769
394
1,216
111
48

4,072
5
5
146
3,916

1,108
276
28

353
NN
323
128


2,372
693
577
1,015
13
74

123


I


-I' -C, I I 'I ~II, 'I r I









146 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Tabli 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

APRIL 27, 1963 AND APRIL 28, 1962 (Continued)


Meningococcal Streptococcal Tickborne
Infections Sore Throat & Tetanus Typhus Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in Animals
Scarlet Fever (Rcky Mt.
AreaCumu- Spotted) Cumu- Cumu-
lative lative lative
17th wk. 17 weeks 17th week 17th wk. 17th wk. 17th wk. 17thwk. 17 weeks 17th week 17 weeks
1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963

UNITED STATES.... 58 1,002 7,927 6,750 2 1 3 3 117 130 107 1,280

NEW ENGLAND......... 2 69 829 471 5 2 10
Maine............... 10 103 10 1
New Hampshire...... 2 9 2 -- 5
Vermont.............. 2 45 4 1 2 4
Massachusetts...... 2 33 122 88 3 -
Rhode Island....... 6 64 31 -
Connecticut........ 16 486 336 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC..... 13 133 507 571 2 16 3 2 37
New York ........... 9 63 295 276 2 12 3 1 27
New Jersey......... 21 92 103 1 -
Pennsylvania....... 4 49 120 192 3 1 10

EAST NORTH CENTRAL.. 10 160 759 867 7 41 26 188
Ohio................ 45 118 64 2 34 18 104
Indiana............ 3 21 97 119 1 3 7 22
Illinois........... 20 103 226 2 27
Michigan........... 5 53 259 257 1 2 22
Wisconsin.......... 2 21 182 201 1 2 1 13

WEST NORTH CENTRAL.. 3 61 332 293 1 5 23 26 282
Minnesota........... 1 11 35 28 1 6 7 78
Iowa............... 1 3 89 66 1 10 11 100
Missouri........... 25 11 1 3 4 3 52
North Dakota....... 1 153 128 7
South Dakota....... 1 4 10 2 2 3 38
Nebraska........... 14 1 2 3
Kansas.............. 3 44 58 1 4

SOUTH ATLANTIC...... 7 195 615 433 1 1 1 23. 12 6 222
Delaware........... 1 4 6 1 1
Maryland............ 2 .29 56 25 3 -
Dist. of Columbia.. 3 1 5 -
Virginia........... 2 51 176 95 l 3 7 3 84
West Virginia...... 10 231 77 5 1 75
North Carolina..... 2 32 26 25 3 4
South Carolina..... 12 42 131 5
Georgia............ 11 4 21 1 2 1 2 17
Florida............ 1 46 75 48 6 4 37

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 3 91 1,201 1,214 11 7 11 115
Kentucky........... 29 136 118 2 6 5 54
Tennessee.......... 1 35 936 1,032 7 1 6 50
Alabama............ 1 13 37 5 2 11
Mississippi........ 1 14 92 59 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 2 107 792 752 2 20 31 17 265
Arkansas............ 5 I 1 8 1 1 19
Louisiana.......... 46 5 7 1 5 1 1 27
Oklahoma........... 2 21 29 50 2 6 1 23
Texas............... 35 758 694 5 23 14 196

MOUNTAIN............ 1 33 1,708 1,206 2 3 23
Montana............. 1 2 59 70 -
Idaho............... 1 209 103 -
Wyoming............ 1 53 17 -
Colorado............ 7 758 428 1 -
New Mexico......... 2 266 325 1 2 12
Arizona............ 6 131 190 1 11
Utah............... 11 231 73 -
Nevada.............. 3 1 -

PACIFIC............. 17 153 1,184 943 1 28 11 16 138
Washington......... 12 508 260 -
Oregon............. 1 7 26 33 2 1 1
California......... 14 126 578 595 1 24 8 15 128
Alaska............. 4 32 21 3 9
Hawaii............ 2 4 40 34 2 -
Puerto Rico......... 4 28 6 2 3 1 5









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report




Table 4 (A). TOTAL DEATHS IN REPORTING CITIES


(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.)o


Area For weeks ending Area For weeks ending
Area 4/13 4/20 7 4/6 4 4Area0 47
4/6 4/13 4/20 4/27 4/6 4/13 4/20 4/27


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass. ............
Bridgeport, Conn. .........
Cambridge, Mass. ..........
Fall River, Mass. .........
Hartford, Conn. ...........
Lowell, Mass. ............
Lynn, Mass ........ ......
New Bedford, Mass. ........
New Haven, Conn. ..........
Providence, R.I..........
Somerville, Mass. .........
Springfield, Mass. ........
Waterbury, Conn. ..........
Worcester, Mass. ..........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y. ..............
Allentown, Pa ............
Buffalo, N.Y. .............
Camden, N.J. ..............
Elizabeth, N.J ...........
Erie, Pa ........... ......
Jersey City, N.J. .........
Newark, N.J ..............
New York City, N.Y. .......
Paterson, N.J. ............
Philadelphia, Pa. .........
Pittsburgh, Pa. ...........
Reading, Pa. ..............
Rochester, N.Y. ...........
Schenectady, N.Y. .........
Scranton, Pa ............
Syracuse, N.Y. .............
Trenton, N.J. .............
Utica, N.Y. ...............
Yonkers, N.Y. .............

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio................
Canton, Ohio...............
Chicago, Ill. ..............
Cincinnati, Ohio...........
Cleveland, Ohio.............
Columbus, Ohio..............
Dayton, Ohio...............
Detroit, Mich. ............
Evansville, Ind. ..........
Flint, Mich. ..............
Fort Wayne, Ind. ..........
Gary, Ind. ................
Grand Rapids, Mich. .......
Indianapolis, Ind. ........
Madison, Wis .............
Milwaukee, Wis. .........
Peoria, Ill. ..............
Rockford, Ill. ............
South Bend, Ind. ..........
Toledo, Ohio................
Youngstown, Ohio...........

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa............
Duluth, Minn. .............
Kansas City, Kans. ........
Kansas City, Mo. ..........
Lincoln, Nebr. ............
Minneapolis, Minn. ........
Omaha, Nebr. ..............
St. Louis, Mo. ............
St. Paul, Minn. ...........
Wichita, Kans. ............


279
59
49
34
44
35
32
24
50
57
22
40
36
48


53
30
143
35
30
47
83
119
1,563
40
547
243
57
113
26
38
56
33
19
43


55
30
795
159
212
128
73
399
33
35
40
39
56
142
39
138
32
27
57
102
78


81
28
38
118
21
146
68
282
64
66


249
35
27
28
50
22
22
23
55
51
12
54
32
60


45
38
125
31
19
35
67
94
1,665
35
385
99
63
100
26
44
71
49
39
29


63
36
621
166
192
123
82
310
36
48
60
22
50
157
54
109
25
26
30
111
57


72
23
35
112
43
109
79
221
58
44


260
43
30
28
50
24
26
28
40
69
11
32
39
52


48
45
125
35
29
51
69
115
1,689
47
524
179
38
127
35
46
64
65
24
28


66
34
880
155
223
128
70
265
37
67
66
29
46
138
31
137
27
36
63
95
69


58
33
44
145
19
131
77
231
91
46


221
33
32
35
58
33
32
36
47
65
19
47
32
61


44
36
170
42
30
42*
69
108
1,725
35
589
190
45
98
23
54
67
45
19
32


67
35
691
139
212
122
72
338
37
42
50
31
59
148
37
112
35
27
41
101
53


69
36
41
112
35
131
60
225
85
55


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga. ..............
Baltimore, Md. ............
Charlotte, N.C. ...........
Jacksonville, Fla. ........
Miami, Fla. ...............
Norfolk, Va. ..............
Richmond, Va. .............
Savannah, Ga. .............
St. Petersburg, Fla ......
Tampa, Fla. ...............
Washington, D.C. ..........
Wilmington, Del. ..........

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala. ..........
Chattanooga, Tenn ........
Knoxville, Tenn. ..........
Louisville, Ky. ..........
Memphis, Tenn. ............
Mobile, Ala. ..............
Montgomery, Ala ..........
Nashville, Tenn. ..........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex ..............
Baton Rouge, La. ..........
Corpus Christi, Tex ......
Dallas, Tex. ..............
El Paso, Tex. .............
Fort Worth, Tex. ..........
Houston, Tex. ............
Little Rock, Ark. .........
New Orleans, La. ..........
Oklahoma City, Okla. .......
San Antonio, Tex. .........
Shreveport, La ...........
Tulsa, Okla. ..............

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex. ......
Colorado Springs, Colo. ...
Denver, Colo. .............
Ogden, Utah.................
Phoenix, Ariz. ............
Pueblo, Colo..............
Salt Lake City, Utah.......
Tucson, Ariz. ..............

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif ..........
Fresno, Calif. ............
Glendale, Calif. ..........
Honolulu, Hawaii............
Long Beach, Calif. ........
Los Angeles, Calif. .......
Oakland, Calif. ...........
Pasadena, Calif. ..........
Portland, Oreg. ..........
Sacramento, Calif. ........
San Diego, Calif. .........
San Francisco, Calif. .....
San Jose, Calif. ..........
Seattle, Wash. ............
Spokane, Wash. ............
Tacoma, Wash. .............


121
226
55
71
90
41
85
34
87
74
213
51


76
79
45
128
170
33
39
84


64
34
20
149
39
89
175
55
172
72
122
59
56


44
18
120
16
143
11
65
65


21
49
41
50
56
570
93
26
115
64
91
213
26
139
46
50


133
253
43
74
65
52
91
33
99
79
183
39


83
65
52
67
123
48
43
88


39
39
36
134
37
58
179
73
190
85
88
57
49


40
24
137
23
98
10
59
49


16 20
50 49
47 30
33 56
52 64
600 543
92 70
32 28
142 96
74 68
104 107
201 179
39 37
151 151
53 49
36 44


89
274
44
62
89
41
86
31
81
70
194
29


84
55
36
81
137
45
26
65


37
39
27
159
38
60
153
63
157
72
115
73
57


37
23
102
24
112
17
52
58


San Juan, P.R. .............. 25 33 23 i 22


0Current Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities

4(A) Total Mortality, all ages................... 11,708
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages........ 480
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age............ 659
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over..... 6,688


NOTF: All deaths by place of occurrence.


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 08864 llll1427IIIllllllllllllllllllllllllli
3 1262 08864 1427


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Food-Borne Disease Outbreaks of Unknown Etiology -
1961 Summary (Continued)

Summarized below are 36 of a total of 95 appar-
ent food-borne disease outbreaks of unknown etiology
which occurred during the period January 1 to December 31,
1961. Previous issues of the MMWR (Vol. 10, No. 12, and
Vol. 10, No. 28) summarized the first 25 of these. A subse-
quent issue of the MMWR will complete the summarization
of the food-borne disease outbreaks for 1961.


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INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES
Suspect Smallpox Great Britain
The suspect case of smallpox reported in MMl'R,
Vol. 12, No. 16, in a 2-month-old girl who arrived in
London on April 22, 1963, from Karachi, has been of-
ficially reported as not being smallpox.

Immunization Information for International Travel
1962 edition
Public Health Service Publication No. 384
The following information should be added to the list
of Yellow Fever Vaccination Centers in Section 6:
CITY: Morgantown, West Virginia
CENTER: West Virginia University Health Service
Tel. 549-3411, Ext. 294
CLINIC HOURS: By appointment only
FEE: Yes


D T -'EP





U.S. DEPOSITORY


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