Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00080

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text






Morbidity and Mortality



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE'

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


Prepared by the


I OM NIAsr LEDIEAE CNTR


For release August 2, 1963


ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333


S-, I N
.1,0[4 INl


PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED JULY 27,


POLIOMYELITIS The 11 cases of poliomyelitis reported
for the week ending July 27, of which 10 were paralytic,
continues well below the level of reported cases during

Cumulative poliomyelitis totals for the United States
are compared with the previous four years in the table
Right column).
California and Georgia each reported two cases this
eeek, without geographic concentration in either State.
Nea York, Pennsylvania, and Nebraska each reported one
ca.e. Four cases were reported from Alabama.
Three of the four Alabama cases were from Walker
Counrv, where a total of seven cases have occurred be-
tweer late May and mid-July, 1963. Additional suspect


cases are under investigation, and Type I polio virus was
recently isolated from two of the cases. A mass immuni-
zation program will be conducted on Saturday, August 3,
in Walker County (approx. 65,000 population), with Type I
oral polio vaccine from the CDC epidemic reserve.
Poliomyelitis (Cumulated Weekly) 1st Through 30th Week

1963 1962 1961 1960 1959
Paralytic 109 230 213 609 1,342
Total 132 301 327 837 2,040
Poliomyelitis (Six Week Totals) 25th Through 30th Week
Paralytic 51 95 75 325 823
Total 65 126 124 450 1,304


Table I. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous week)
30th Week Cumulative
Ended Ended First 30 weeks
Disease Median ______
July 27, July 28, 1958 1962 Median
1963 1962 1963 1962 1958 1962
Aseptic meningitis................ 50 87 -- 806 883
tru,.ll.-, ................... .. 4 10 14 207 242 448
Di phrh.: t ; ..... ............. 6 2 6 150 231 360
E nei-i.Chj" :, infectious ......... 24 33 42 904 921 921
Hepatitis, infectious and serum.. 689 808 628 26,116 34,689 21,573
S .............. 2,532 2,601 3,052 350,748 434,130 385,955
M.le a.ii. ..cl infections ........ 34 32 33 1,581 1,351 1,480
Polic.mn i, total.............. 11 20 113 132 301 837
Paralytic ................... 10 17 81 109 230 609
Nonparalytic................. 1 3 26 14 50 168
Unspecified.................. 6 9 21 60
Streptococcal sore throat
and Scarlet fever ............ 3,403 3,326 -229,382 210,357
Tetanus ........................ 4 9 --- 139 138 ---
Tularemia ...................... 9 14 --- 160 171 ---
Typhoid fever ................... 10 19 19 236 308 395
Typhus fever, tick-borne,
(Rocky Mountain spotted) ..... 8 15 --- 83 126 ---
Rabies in Animals ............... 80 81 69 2,314 2,476 2,310


Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: 2 Psittacosis: Mass. 1, Mich. 1, Ill. 1 38
Botulism: 5 Rabies in Man:
Malaria: La. 1, N. C. 1 53 Smallpox:
Plague: Typhus, murine: 12


- --


Wekl









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


REPORTED MALARIA MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY
IN THE
UNITED STATES
1932-1962


VlARS


EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORT

Salmonellosis California

On April 19, 1963, a California County Health Depart-
ment received a report that two teenagers, a 16-year-old
boy and his girl friend, had become ill on April 15, one
day after eating Easter Sunday dinner with another teen-
age couple at a local cafeteria. Three of the individuals,
including the two with illness, had eaten turkey and
dressing, while the other ate fish. The one person who
ate turkey and dressing but did not become ill stated that
the turkey and dressing served to her was from a new
tray.
Investigations at the cafeteria disclosed that the
management had received a report from another customer
stating that three members of his party became ill on
Monday after eating the turkey and dressing on Easter
Sunday. No name or phone number had been obtained.
Subsequently, three other individuals, in two separate
groups, were reported as having developed illness on
April 15, all with a history of having eaten the turkey
and dressing at the cafeteria the day previously.
The five ill individuals who could be contacted had
incubation periods ranging between 19 and 24 hours fol-
lowing consumption of the turkey and dressing dinner at
the cafeteria on April 14, 1963. All patients were hospi-
talized and had stool cultures positive for Salmonella
schuarzengrund. Clinical symptoms in these cases in-
cluded nausea, vomiting, stomach cramps, diarrhea, chills
and fever to 1040 F.


Stool specimens were obtained from the 16 food
handlers who had assisted in the preparation and serving
of the turkey and dressing, and from the remaining 118
employees. Six of the 16 food handlers had stool cultures
positive for Salmonella schwarzengrund. Among those
positive was the head chef, who did most of the prepara-
tion and who stated that he had been ill with "intestinal
flu" about the second week of Mach 1963. Positive
cultures were also obtained from another cook who helped
in preparing the turkey, and from two counter girls and
two supply boys who assisted in serving. Ten additional
positive cultures were obtained fiom the remaining 118
employees. Only one of the employees had complained
of being ill, having had symptoms of stomach cramps,
vomiting, and fever on Monday, April 15, after having
eaten the turkey dinner on Easter Sunday. In addition to
the 16 employees from whom Salmonella schwarzengrund
was obtained, one employee was positive for Salmonella
typbi.

Investigation of food handling facilities disclosed
that the procedures used in preparing the dinners for
Easter Sunday differed from the normal operating pro-
cedure in that preparation of the 20 frozen turkeys used
for the meal had begun on April 10, four days before
serving, in contrast to a 48-hour period ordinarily re-
quired. The turkeys had been cooked for adequate periods
on April 11. Subsequent procedures including boning,
preparation of dressing and slicing, at intervals over the
subsequent 22 days prior to serving, indicate the likeli-
hood that contamination took place after cooking and that


246








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


adequate incubation times were present for growth of the
organism.
Following identification of positive carriers in the
kitchen staff, all employees with positive stool speci-
mens were removed from work until their infections had
cleared.
(Reported by F. A. Listick, Assistant Supervising Sanita-
rian, Los Angeles City Health Department, and Dr. Philip
K. Condit, Chief, Bureau of Communicable Diseases,
California State Department of Health.)



SURVEILLANCE SUMMARIES
Malaria Surveillance United States 1962
Reports of 119 cases of malaria, with onsets of
illness during 1962, were received by the Malaria Sur-
veillance Unit from 30 States, the District of Columbia
and the military services. The table "on page 252 shows
the cases according to geographic distribution and
classification.
One hundred of the 119 cases, in whom a positive
blood smear had been obtained, were reported as "con-
firmed". Although confirmation by blood film was not
obtained in the remaining 19 cases, these were classi-
fied as presumptive on the basis of clinical and epidemi-
ological evidence suggesting malaria. Plasmodium vivax
was confirmed in 72 cases; Plasmodium falciparum in
20 cases; and Plasmodium malaria in 4 cases. The type
of parasite was undetermined in 4 cases.
One hundred and ten of the 119 cases reported during
1962 were of foreign origin. Seventy-five of these oc-
curred in military personnel, all of whom had served in
areas of the world where malaria incidence is high.


Among the 44 civilian cases, 24 occurred in Americans
infected while traveling abroad, 11 among foreign visitors
to the United States, and 9 were reported as indigenous
to the United States.
The 9 cases of malaria classified as indigenous
were reported from six States. Of these, a California
case and one from Illinois occurred in persons with
previous histories of malaria, who had no known recent
exposure. One case (reported from Tennessee) was vol-
untarily infected while a prisoner. Multiple units of
whole blood, the donors of which have not yet been
completely studied, had been received by the case re-
ported from New York, which is believed to have been
transfusion-acquired. No definite source of infection
has been found for the remaining five cases, reported
from Arizona, Illinois, and New Hampshire.
The reported malaria morbidity and mortality in the
United States for the period 1932-1962 is shown in the
figure on pape 246 The moderate rise in total cases
during 1962, as compared to the previous four years,
is due to an increase in the number of cases among
military personnel, especially those who served in South-
east Asia. Of the 119 cases reported during 1962, 75
were accounted for by military personnel, as compared
to 45 for the year 1961.
(Case reports included in the Malaria Surveillance
Summary for 1962 were submitted by State Health Depart-
ments and the military services. To facilitate reporting
National Malaria Surveillance Report forms are avail-
able from the Surveillance Section, Communicable Dis-
ease Center. In addition a National Malaria Depository


(Continued on page 252)


SUMMARY OF PNEUMONIA AND INFLUENZA DEATHS

The weekly average number of pneumonia-influenza
deaths for the four-week period ending July 27 was
410 as compared with an expected weekly average of
386.



PNEUMONIA-INFLUENZA DEATHS IN 108 CITIES

WEEK ENDING 4 Week Weekly
7/6 7/13 7/20 7/27 Total Average
Observed 426 459 369 388 1,642 410
Expected 393 388 384 380 1,545 386
Excess 33 71 -15 8 97 24


PNEUMONIA-INFLUENZA DEATHS IN 108 US CITIES
Average number per week by for-week per-ods


"I I

NUMBER I I
DEATHS J, "

; l L


II t ;_ I yi L 1 -
_.. .. 1. 1I 1 _- ..... .. .
.Lli. M i:. p i!jul


(See Table, page 251)


247











2 i~ MNorbidity and mortality Weekly i lre|ort


Sale 3- ( ASI'S OF SPF( IIII) NOTIFIABLF )ISI A S: ['NI I 1) S'IATIFS

FOR WEVIkS I N)DEI)

JILY 27, 1963 AND JULY 28. 1962


Poliomyelitis, Aseptic
Poliom ylitis to tcal cases Poliomyelitis, paralytic ponparalytic Meningitis
Cumulative Cumulative
30th week First 30 weeks 30th week First 30 weeks 30th week 30th week
1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962


L1 TD STATES...... 11 20 132 301 10 17 109 230 1 3 50 87

Tl: E:CIA D............... 1 4 1 4 1
21 oCL ...1 ...............
*. w Hapshi. -
V Ir ol nt .............

lssl(t iciut ........... 1 3 1


IIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 2 35 39 1 26 26 1 3 3
Ne, York.............. 1 6 35 5 22 1 3 2
Ni J, r.-y............ 1 3 1 3 -
Pnns y vania 1 28 1 1 20 1 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL........ 4 20 18 3 13 12 1 8 15
Oh i .................... 1 7 6 1 3 6 5
Indiai ............... 1 2 4 1 1 3 2 3
llinis.............. .. 1 7 6 1 6 3 3 3
Michi .............. 2 2 3 4
Wiscno in ............. 1 2 2 1 1

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 5 13 1 5 7 3 3
innesota............. 3 3 3 3 3 3
Iowa ................... 5 2 2
Missouri.............. 1 5 1 2
North Dakota......... -
South Dakota.......... -
Nhbraska............... 1 1 1 1
Kansas............... --

SOUTH ATLANTIC........... 2 2 17 18 2 2 14 15 6 1
Delaware ... ............ -
Maryland...............
District of Columbia,. i
Virginia............... 1 2 3 1 1 3 -
West Virginia......... 1 3 I 3
North Carolina......... 3 2 3 2
South Carolina........ 1 3 1 1 2 1
Georgia............... 2 3 2 2 2 2 -
Florida ............... 5 6 5 4 6 1

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL........ 4 3 21 13 4 3 19 9 1 5
Kentucky ............. 1 6 1 4 1 -
Tennessee ............. 4 3 4 1 1
Alabama............... 4 1 15 3 4 1 13 3 -
Mississippi ........... 1 2 1 1 2 1 4

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 10 17 154 8 17 121 2 3 33
Arkansas.............. 1 1 1 -
Louisi ana ............. 1 14 9 14 7 1
Oklahoma.............. 2 1 2
Texas................. 9 2 142 8 2 113 1 2 31

MOUNTAIN.................. 9 7 2
Montana................... 3 2
Idaho ................. -
Wyomini ................. 1 1
Colorado .............. I
New Mexico............
Arizona............. 3 3 2
Utah................... 1 1
Nevada................. .

PACIFIC ................. 2 1 16 33 2 1 14 29 24 26
Washington ........... 2
Oregon................. 2 5 1 5 -
California............ 2 1 14 28 2 1 13 24 22 26
Alaska.... .............
Hawaii...............-

Puerto Rico.............. 4 9 4 9











Morbidily and Mortality Weekly Report 249


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JULY 27, 1963 AND JULY 28, 1962 (Continued)



Brucellosis Diphtheria Encephalitis, Hepatitis, Measles
infectious infectious and serum
Area Cumu- Cumu- 30th week
lative lative Under 20 &
30th week 30 weeks 30th week 30 weeks 30th week 20 yr. over Total 30th week
1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1962
UNITED STATES...... 4 207 6 150 24 33 340 315 689 808 2,532 2,601

NEW ENGIAND............... 7 1 2 33 40 78 58 95 214
Maine................. 16 12 28 15 12 42
New Hampshire.......... 9 8 17 1 5
Vermont............... 2 1 3 2 16 9
Massachusetts......... 5 2 5 16 21 34 40 96
Rhode Island.......... 2 1 4 1 3 16
Connecticut........... 1 3 5 5 19 51

MIDDLE ATLANTIC........... 5 21 6 13 84 66 150 174 577 495
New York............... 3 13 5 10 48 40 88 96 362 330
New Jersey............. 3 16 9 25 29 143 109
Pennsylvania.......... 2 5 1 3 20 17 37 49 72 56

EAST NORTH CENTRAL......... 18 5 22 1 4 64 60 127 151 638 634
Ohio.................. 1 8 14 22 51 126 56
Indiana............... 5 1 5 5 3 8 12 43 33
Illinois.............. 10 4 11 2 26 18 46 34 105 51
Michigan.............. 2 3 1 2 22 23 45 46 200 291
Wisconsin............. 1 2 3 2 6 8 164 203

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 127 37 3 1 12 11 24 48 61 26
Minnesota.............. 8 15 1 7 9
Iowa.................. 92 1 1 2 11 29 11
Missouri .............. 7 1 1 1 2 3 11 3
North Dakota........... 1 1 1 4 5 10 24 6
South Dakota.......... 8 11 5 1 6 2 5
Nebraska.............. 1 6 8 3 3 3 -
Kansas................ 6 1 1 4 5 4 NN NN

SOUTH ATLANTIC........... 1. 9 1 30 5 2 42 33 76 80 244 218
Delaware.............. 1 1 2 11 10
Maryland .............. 1 1 6 4 10 13 43 19
District of Columbia.. 3 1 4 3 1 -
Virginia.............. 3 8 4 13 16 52 71
West Virginia ......... 1 7 5 12 11 86 81
North Carolina........ 1 2 1 1 8 15 23 15 13 5
South Carolina ........ 9 2 1 3 4 6 7
Georgia............... 3 10 3 1 4 4 1 2
Florida............... 1 1 9 3 1 4 2 6 12 31 23

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 10 10 1 1 22 20 42 78 113 100
Kentucky.............. 3 1 1 7 8 26 35 10
Tennessee............. 5 2 7 6 13 24 63 80
Alabama............... 2 8 6 3 9 19 12 9
Mississippi........... 1 8 4 12 9 3 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 2 24 17 1 2 39 24 64 54 145 203
Arkansas.............. .- 4 1 3 1 4 8 2 1
Louisiana............. 2 5 2 8 5 13 11 3 3
Oklahoma .............. 5 6 1 1 3 15 4
Texas................. 10 8 1 2 27 18 46 32 125 195

MOUNTAIN ................ 7 4 6 4 31 26 254 241
Montana............... -- 4 1 5 2 38 34
Idaho................. 6 4 24 13
Wyoming .................. 1 3 1 4
Colorado.............. 3 4 5 67 92
New Mexico............ 1 2 2 2 NN NN
Arizona............... 3 11 2 94 34
Utah.................. 3 3 3 8 30 64
Nevada................ -

PACIFIC.................. 7 2 6 8 38 57 97 139 405 470
Washington ............ 1 4 3 7 37 34 40
Oregon................ 2 2 7 10 11 35 129
California............ 4 2 4 7 29 46 75 86 271 234
Alaska................ 2 3 4 4 57 14
Hawaii ................ 1 1 1 1 8 53

Puerto Rico.............. 10 5 1 6 4 9 15










2511 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JULY 27, 1963 AND JULY 28, 1962 (Continued)


Meningococcal Streptococcal Tickborne
Infections Sore Throat & Tetanus Typhus Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in Animals
Scarlet Fever (Rcky Mt.
AreaCumu- Spotted) Cumu- Cumu-
lative lative lative
30th wk, 30weeks 30th week 30th wk. 30th wk. 30th wk. 30thwk. 30 weeks 30th week 30 weeks
1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963

UNITED STATES.... 34 1,581 3,403 3,326 4 8 9 10 236 80 81 2,314

NEW ENGLAND......... 4 99 254 171 6 24
Maine............. 1 17 9 4 1
New Hampshire...... 4 12
Vermont............. 3 4 1 1 10
Massachusetts...... 2 46 53 49 4 1
Rhode Island....... 9 4 11 -
Connecticut........ 1 20 184 106 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC..... 7 220 109 76 4 55 3 7 71
New York............ 4 100 83 55 1 19 2 5 53
New Jersey......... 1 32 14 9 2 -
Pennsylvania....... 2 88 12 12 3 34 1 2 18

EAST NORTH CENTRAL.. 6 247 219 201 1 16 16 34 388
Ohio................ 1 72 15 18 6 4 24 231
Indiana............ 31 35 23 1 2 2 38
Illinois........... 1 42 50 30 1 6 1 55
Michigan........... 4 75 78 81 1 6 38
Wisconsin.......... 27 41 49 2 4 7 26

WEST NORTH CENTRAL.. 92 77 96 3 2 15 31 23 582
Minnesota.......... 19 1 3 3 6 10 143
Iowa............... 5 36 19 1 2 12 8 224
Missouri............ 31 1 1 8 5 3 102
North Dakota........ 4 40 43 3 1 22
South Dakota....... 5 2 1 1 4 1 63
Ncbraska........... 20 I 17
Kansas.............. 8 29 1 1 11

SOUTH ATLANTIC...... 7 298 263 454 6 1 38 7 9 335
Delaware .......... 2 2 3 1 1
Maryland............ 3 47 38 11 2 1 5 -
Dist. of Columbia.. 4 -
Virginia............ 1 72 86 67 2 5 1 2 121
West Virginia...... 16 70 134 6 2 2 98
North Carolina..... 1 52 11 5 5 1 6
South Carolina..... 1 14 30 129 1 2 6
Georgia............ 22 3 2 1 1 41
Florid............ 1 69 26 102 12 2 4 62

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 119 737 751 1 1 21 7 3 188
Ketucky ........... 25 8 34 1 1 3 1 88
Tennessee.......... 53 619 648 14 4 1 84
Alabama............. 21 21 8 1 4 1 16
Mississippi........ 20 89 61 2 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 1 154 548 560 2 4 1 39 8 445
Arkansas........... 10 1 18 32
Louisiana.......... 63 1 1 8 1 38
Okllahoma ........... 29 12 1 4 3 35
Texas............... 1 52 535 559 1 10 7 340

MOUNTAIN ............ 1 53 757 565 1 1 7 3 1 57
Montana............ 3 26 21 -
Idaho.............. 4 26 63 -
yoinig .,............ 4 13 8 -
Colorado........... 12 319 194 1 3 6
New sxico........ 4 190 161 1 21
Arizona ............ 1 9 108 70 1 3 3 30
Utah.............. 14 75 48 1
Nev Ido......... .. 3 -

PACIFIC.............. 8 299 439 452 1 2 39 5 4 224
LWahington......... 3 24 38 34 -- 1
,- ............. 20 18 14 2 1
........ 5 236 347 30C 2 33 5 4 214
Alska ............. 11 29 12 1 9
Hawaii............. 88 7 2 2 -
Puerto Rico......... 5 14 1 3 11 1 10











Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 251





Table 4 (B). REPORTED PNEL'MONIA-INFLUENZA DEATHS IN REPORTING CITIES


(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.)o


For weeks ending For weeks ending
Area 7/13 7/ ____2 Area 76 /1
7/6 7/13 7/20 7/27 7/6 7/13 7/20 7/27


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass............... 5 4 8 3
Bridgeport, Conn......... 13 1 4 2
Cambridge, Mass........... 0 0 4 0
Fall River, Mass.......... 0 1 0 1
Hartford, Conn............ 0 1 0 0
Lowell, Mass.............. 0 3 1 2
Lynn, Mass................ 0 1 2 0
New Bedford, Mass......... 1 2 1 0
New Haven, Conn............ 1 3 0 0
Providence, R.I........... 4 3 1 4
Somerville, Mass.......... 2 5 1 1
Springfield, Mass.......... 6 8 7 5
Waterbury, Conn........... 0 0 0 0
Worcester, Mass............ 7 2 0 2

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y................ 3 1 3 0
Allentown, Pa............. 2 0 1 2
Buffalo, N.Y............... 9 3 3 6*
Camden, N.J................ 5 1 2 1
Elizabeth, N.J............ 3 3 0 1
Erie, Pa.................. 5 0 4 3
Jersey City, N.J.......... 8 13 5 4
Newark, N.J................ 4 4 2 1
New York City, N.Y......... 132 83 54 59
Paterson, N.J............. 5 4 3 3
Philadelphia, Pa.......... 3 13 28 22
Pittsburgh, Pa............ 1 4 5 6
Reading, Pa................ 5 2 4 0
Rochester, N.Y............. 8 11 8 13
Schenectady, N.Y.......... 0 0 0 0
Scranton, Pa.............. 2 2 0 2
Syracuse, N.Y............. 1 2 2 4
Trenton, N.J.............. 2 8 4 2
Utica, N.Y................. 3 3 3 1
Yonkers, N.Y............... 2 3 2 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio................ 1 0 1
Canton, Ohio.............. 2 4 2 0
Chicago, Ill.............. 28 22 26 28
Cincinnati, Ohio.......... 4 5 3 2
Cleveland, Ohio........... 4 4 2 2
Columbus, Ohio ........... 2 2 1 3
Dayton, Ohio............... 1 0 1 0
Detroit, Mich............. 9 5 7 15
Evansville, Ind........... 1 0 3 2
Flint, Mich ............... 3 5 2 2
Fort Wayne, Ind........... 3 1 3 1
Gary, Ind.................. 2 5 1 1
Grand Rapids, Mich........ 1 0 7 1
Indianapolis, Ind......... 2 5 3 4
Madison, Wis.............. 0 0 0 0
Milwaukee, Wis............ 3 3 3 1
Peoria, Ill................ 0 0 0
Rockford, Ill............. 7 5 1 0
South Bend, Ind........... 2 4 1 3
Toledo, Ohio.............. 1 5 6 1
Youngstown, Ohio........... 1 0 0 1

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa.......... 0 2 1 1
Duluth, Minn.............. 0 0 0
Kansas City, Kans......... 3 3 1 8
Kansas City, Mo........... 1 5 1 1
Lincoln, Nebr............. 0 3 1 3
Minneapolis, Minn......... 3 4 2 0
Omaha, Nebr............... 1 1 0 1
St. Louis, Mo............. 6 10 4 8
St. Paul, Minn............. 4 7 1 2
Wichita, Kans............. 6 5 5 3

*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.

NOTE: All deaths by place of occurrence.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.............. 1 1 1 5
Baltimore, Md............ 5 6 7 6
Charlotte, N.C........... 0 1 1 3
Jacksonville, Fla........ 1 1 1 0
Miami, Fla............... 0 1 0 1
Norfolk, Va.............. 6 4 0 2
Richmond, Va............. 1 3 0 4
Savannah, Ga............. 0 4 1 2
St. Petersburg, Fla...... 4 6 1 4
Tampa, Fla............... 3 5 1 5
Washington, D.C.......... 8 11 7 7
Wilmington, Del.......... 2 4 0 0

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.......... 1 3 3 1
Chattanooga, Tenn ....... 3 4 4 2
Knoxville, Tenn.......... 0 0 1 1
Louisville, Ky........... 7 15 1 7
Memphis, Tenn............ 2 3 4 6
Mobile, Ala............... 1 0 0 0
Montgomery, Ala.......... 0 2 0 3
Nashville, Tenn.......... 2 4 2 6

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.............. 3 3 9 6
Baton Rouge, La.......... 1 3 2 1
Corpus Christi, Tex...... 4 1 2 0
Dallas, Tex............... 0 0 2 4
El Paso, Tex............. 2 1 0 4
Fort Worth, Tex.......... 1 2 4 1
Houston, Tex.............. 0 5 6 3
Little Rock, Ark......... 1 5 4 5
New Orleans, La.......... 4 3 11 11
Oklahoma City, Okla...... 0 1 1 1
San Antonio, Tex......... 4 7 4 2
Shreveport, La........... 7 4 4 4
Tulsa, Okla............... 0 3 0 2

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex...... 4 1 2 0
Colorado Springs, Colo... 2 3 2 2
Denver, Colo ............. 4 8 6 9
Ogden, Utah............... 0 4 0 1
Phoenix, Ariz............. 2 6 6 5
Pueblo, Colo.............. 1 1 0 0
Salt Lake City, Utah..... 0 2 1 0
Tucson, Ariz.............. 0 1 2 3

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.......... 0 1 0 2
Fresno, Calif............ 7 1 1 0
Glendale, Calif.......... 1 1 0 0
Honolulu, Hawaii.......... 0 2 1 1*
Long Beach, Calif........ 2 2 0 0
Los Angeles, Calif....... 7 13 15 13
Oakland, Calif........... 0 5 0 2
Pasadena, Calif.......... 0 0 0 1
Portland, Oreg............ 2 0 2 0
Sacramento, Calif........ 0 1 1 1
San Diego, Calif.......... 2 0 2 3
San Francisco, Calif ..... 2 6 3 3
San Jose, Calif.......... 0 1 9 0
Seattle, Wash............. 4 5 3 0
Spokane, Wash............. 0 0 0 2
Tacoma, Wash............... 1 2 1 0

San Juan, P.R............... 1 2 1 2


OCurrent Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities

4(A) Total-Mortality, all ages....................
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages........
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age............
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over.....


11,045
388
732
6,143




IitlIVERSITY OF FL ORiDA


3il1l 62 08864 1229IIIII
3 1262 08864 1229


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


is maintained at CDC under the direction of the Chief,
Microbiology Section, CDC. Blood smears may be sub-
mitted either with the Surveillance Form or may be
mailed directly to the National Malaria Depository,
Communicable Disease Center, Atlanta, Georgia, 30333).


REPORTED CASES OF MALARIA UNITED STATES 1962


ORIGIN
Total No. No. Foreign Indig.
State* Cases Confirmed Presumpt. Military Civil. Visit.
Alabama 2 2 1 1 -
Arizona 2 1 1 2
California 8 6 2 2 3 2 1
Colorado 1 1 1 -
Connecticut 4 3 1 1 3 -
Dist. of Col. 1 1 1 -
Florida 8 7 1 3 3 2 -
Georgia 2 2 2 -
Hawaii 14 6 8 14 -
Illinois 5 4 1 2 3
Indiana 1 1 1 -
Kansas 1 1 -
Kentucky 3 3 3 -
Maryland 2 1 1 1 1 -
Massachusetts 3 3 3 -
Michigan 1 1 1 -
Minnesota 3 3 1 1 1
Mississippi 1 1 1 -
Missouri 4 4 3 1 -
Nebraska 1 1 1 -
New Hampshire 2 2 1 1
New Jersey 1 1 1 -
New Mexico 2 2 2 -
New York 6 6 3 2 1
North Carolina 32 31 1 32 -
North Dakota 1 1 1 -
Oregon 1 1 1 -
Pennsylvania 1 1 -
Rhode Island 1 1 1 -
Tennessee 2 2 1 1
Virginia 3 3 3 -
TOTALS 119 100 19 75 24 11 9
*States not reporting cases not listed.


UrNIV F FL I-t
DOCL'MENTS DEP






U S DEPOSITORY


INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES

Smallpox Poland
A total of 17 cases of smallpox, including 2 deaths
and one imported case, have been reported to date in
Wroclaw, Poland.


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