Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00068

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text

r__ 5 0 6 0 / / 3 3



Morbidity a ad Mo



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND


PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN TN-
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED AUGUST 18, 1962


POLIOMYELITIS Twenty-three cases of poliomyelitis
t21 paralryic)were reported for the week ending August 18,
1962. This remains at the unusually low level of 27 cases
(21 paralyric) noted the previous week.
Twelve Stares reported cases this week, with Texas
reporting eight, the largest number for any single State.
In Texas. the reports were from six different counties,
although two aere from the city of Amarillo in the
Panhandle.
Not included in this week's telegraphic report are
outbreaks of 4 cases each in Flemmingsburg, Kentucky,
and Patton, Pennsylvania. Type I polioviruses have been
recovered in both outbreaks. Type specific oral polio-
vaccine was administered in these communities last week
as a deterrent to further occurrence of the disease.


The cumulative totals for the nation through the 33rd
week in 1962 and the previous four years is presented in
the following table:


POLIO CUMULATEDD WEEKLY) THROUGH
(1958-1962)


THE 33RD WEEK


1962 1961 1960 1959 1958
Paralytic 296 322 874 2,201 835
Total 381 482 1,224 3,401 1,691


HEPATITIS A total of 759 cases of viral hepatitis was
reported for the week ending August 18.


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous week)
33rd Week Cumulative
Disease Ended Ended n First 33 weeks
Disease Median
August 18, August 19, 1957 1961 Median
1962 1961 1962 1961 1957 1961
Aseptic meningitis ............... 90 130 -1,151 1,419 -
Brucelloui, ................ 10 10 14 267 388 514
Diphtheria ...................... 5 13 10 245 352 397
Encephalitis, infectious.......... 38 37 58 1,015 999 1,059
Hepatitis, infectious and serum... 759 1,041 392 36,841 50,648 14,326
Measles. ....................... 1,406 1,466 1,466 439,270 383,740 391,982
Meningococcal infections ......... 29 39 38 1,447 1,453 1,567
Poliomyelitis, total.............. 23 69 229 381 482 1,638
Paralytic.................... 21 48 114 296 322 782
Nonparalytic................. 2 13 81 59 105 593
Unspecified.................. 8 34 26 55 263
Streptococcal sore throat
and Scarlet fever ............ 3,000 2,812 --- 220,226 228,148 -
Tetanus ....................... 4 153 -
Tularemia ..................... 11 --- 195 ---
Typhoid fever ................... 21 30 30 350 451 480
Typhus fever, tick-borne,
(Rocky Mountain spotted)...... 6 --- --- 158
Rabies in Animals .............. 51 51 63 2,648 2,273 2,527


Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY

Anthrax: Psittacosis: Calif. 1
Botulism: Rabies in Man: Texas 1
Malaria: Ill. 1, N.C. 1, Fla. 1 Smallpox:
Plague: Typhus, murine:







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS

Smallpox Canada
On August 18, a suspect case of smallpox in a 14-
year-old boy was reported from Toronto, Canada. It was
confirmed by virological study on August 20. The boy had
entered the United States at Idlewild Airport in New York
on August 11 and had proceeded through New York State
by train arriving in Toronto on August 12 on which date
the eruptive phase of the disease was first noted.
The boy, a son of missionary parents, had been born
in Canada but had lived in South America since he was
two weeks of age except for a brief period seven years
before. The family had resided in the Southern portion of
Brazil in the town of Laranjieros do Sul, Parana State,
for the past several years. Between July 22 and July 29,
the boy had visited family friends at a ranch approxi-
mately 30 miles south of this town. While there he had
been in contact with four children in this family, three of
whom were said to have recovered recently from "vari-
cella" and another was said to be developing it. The
patient did not recall that any child had visible lesions;
he did recall having seen a rash similar to his own in
Laranjieros two or three years previously. The cases were
said to be cases of "varicella."
The family traveled to Sao Paulo where they enplaned
early in the morning of August 11 for New York on Argen-
tine Airlines flight 322. On the preceding day, the patient
experienced the onset of an illness characterized by
nausea with some vomiting, fever, aching in the shoulders,
frontal headache and chilly sensations. Seen by a physi-
cian, he was diagnosed as having "flu" or grippee".
Although listless while on the plane, he appeared to be
essentially well by the following noon, August 11, when
the plane arrived at Idlewild. The family traveled directly
to Grand Central Station by taxicab and remained there
until boarding the Toronto bound coaches of the New York
Central train ("North Star") in the evening. At the station,
the boy stayed on a bench in the main waiting room; he
experienced some nausea and was generally listless. He
had no respiratory symptoms. While at the station, he first
felt a small hard lump in the mid-posterior palate. Just
prior to crossing the border at Fort Erie, he noted a cu-
taneous lesion over the left clavicle. This he recognized
as similar to those he had seen among children at Laran-
jieros who had been diagnosed as having varicella. Near-
ing Toronto, in the early morning hours, small bumpy red
spots were noted on his face.
From the Toronto station, the family called a physi-
cian friend who concurred with the family diagnosis of
varicella and took the family directly to his home. Within
a day's period the rash had spread over the patient's
body, involving predominantly the forearms, legs, face,
buttocks and mucosal surfaces of the mouth. During the


succeeding several days, he was listless, without fever,
and because of the lesions in the mouth able to take only
liquids and soft foods. Failure to improve plus a tempera-
ture rise on August 16 prompted the physician to consider
smallpox. Consultation was requested and he was hos-
pitalized in isolation on August 17 with the presumptive
diagnosis of smallpox. Virological studies carried out by
Dr. Donald M. McLean, Hospital for Sick Children.
Toronto, confirmed the diagnosis.
The boy was thought possibly to have been immu-
nized seven years previously in Brazil. On entrance to
to the United States, he presented an official certificate
of immunization from the local health authority in Brazil
dated July 22, 1962. No definite vaccination scar was
seen on examination. Each of the family was given a sur-
veillance notice when they. passed through quarantine
inspection at Idlewild. This directed them to report to a
physician or health authority should they develop suspi-
cious symptoms of illness and warning them of having pos-
sibly been exposed to smallpox in endemic areas in
Brazil. Unfortunately, this card was never shown to their
physician.
Passengers of the Argentine Airlines plane have
been contacted, revaccinated. and placed under close
surveillance. All persons who traveled the train in ques-
tion or had possible contact in Grand Central Station
have been requested to report for vaccination and are also
being placed under surveillance. The family has been
rigidly quarantined as have the families where the patient
briefly visited.
Physicians have been requested to closely evaluate
apparent chickenpox cases, particularly among possible
contacts. It is advised that hospital personnel, custo-
marily at greatest risk when a case is introduced, be
vaccinated promptly.
(Reported by Dr. Matthew B. Dymond, Minister of Health,
Province of Ontario; Quarantine, Immigration Medical and
Sick Mariners' Services, Department of National Health
and teltare, Dominion of Canada; the Division of Foreign
Quarantine and the Communicable Disease Center, U. S.
Public Health Service.)


Rabies in Man Texas

The first case of human rabies during 1962 has been
reported from Cameron County, Texas. The patient, a
three-year-old white child. had onset of illness on July 16,
1962, and died on July 25. The child was one of a number
of children who had played with a puppy which became ill
and died several weeks before onsetof the child's illness.
Negri bodies were found on laboratory examination of
autopsy material and positive results were obtained with
fluorescent antibodies and on mouse inoculation.
(Reported by Dr. Van C. Tipton, Epidemiologist, State
Department of IkIalrh. Austin, Texas.)


258









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Human Brucellosis in the United States 1961

The 580 cases of human brucellosis reported to the
Communicable Disease Center during 1961 continues the
progressive decline in cases which has occurred since
1948, as shown in the accompanying graph. Individual
case histories were received on 413 of the cases.
The geographic distribution of human brucellosis
has shown the highest concentration since 1958 in the
upper midwestern area (See map). In 1961, Iowa reported
the greatest number of cases, 219, followed by Illinois
with 61 cases and Kansas with 54. In the North and
in the West, most cases occurred among packing house
workers and butchers, while most of the cases in the
South were related to persons handling infected animals
and to the ingestion of milk products from diseased
animals.
The National Brucellosis Eradication Program has
made marked progress in recent years in control of bovine


1947 48 49 50 51


REPORTED HUMAN BRUCELLOSIS

UNITED STATES 1947 19i6




















52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61
YEAR

(Continued on page 256)


TOTAL DEATHS REPORTED IN 108 CITIES

The weekly average number of total deaths in 108
cities for the four-week period ending August 18 was
10,514 as compared with an expected 10,500 weekly
average.


WEEK ENDING 4 Week Weekly
7/28 8/4 8/11 8/18 Total Average
Observed 10,613 10,587 10,519 10,335 42,054 10,514
Expected 10,577 10,528 10,473 10,420 41,998 10,500
Excess 36 59 46 -85 56 14


TOTAL DEATHS RECORDED IN 108 U.S. CITIES
Average number per week by four-week periods
13,500















10,000 "EXPECTED"
.0 0 ... ... .. ------------- ------------- ----------------------
120,000 _---- ---- --- /--






RECORnumED Ii 7^ 3? 7 \3 7 /


Period number 13 7 13I 7 13 7
| 1960 1 1961 | 1962 I 1963 1


'BY PLACE OF OCCURRENCE


*"CALCULATED FROM 1954-60 EXPERIENCE


(See Table, page 255)


259


NUMBER

OF

DEATHS


(See Table, page 255)










21,)) 1Morlbiditv and MlotaliIt Weekly 'Reporl


Tablc .i CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

AUGUST 19, 1961 AND AUGUST 18, 1962


Poliomyelitis, Aseptic
Poliomyelitis, Total Cases Poliomyelitis, Paralytic Nonparalytic Meningitis
Cumulative Cumulative
Area
33rd week First 33 weeks 33rd week First 33 weeks 33rd week 33rd week

1962 1961 1962 1961 1962 1961 1962 1961 1962 1961 1962 1961

UNITED STATES...... 23 69 381 482 21 48 296 322 2 13 90 130

NEW ENGLAND............... 4 6 9 2 6 7 21
Maine................. -
New Hampshire......... 1 1 -
Vermont............... 2 3 2 3 -
Massachusetts........ 1 4 3 4 2 12
Rhode Island.......... 9
Connecticut........... 2 2 2 2 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 1 12 38 51 1 7 24 43 4 2 5
New York............... 1 9 37 27 1 5 23 21 3 2 3
New Jersey............ 2 1 17 2 1 16 -
Pennsylvania 1 7 6 1 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL...... 1 5 32 44 1 2 22 24 3 20 28
Ohio .................. 8 14 7 6 6 4
Indiana............... 5 4 4 3 -
Illinois............... 1 2 12 14 1 6 7 2 3 11
Michigan.............. 3 5 7 2 5 6 1 11 13
Wisconsin............. 2 5 2 -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL........ 2 4 17 29 2 2 10 13 6 24
Minnesota.............. 2 5 3 2 5 3 6 24
Iowa .................. 4 5 9 2 2 4 -
Missouri.............. 5 8 2 2 -
North Dakota ........... 2 1 -
South Dakota............- -
Nebraska.............. 3 -
Kansas................ 5 2 -

SOUTH ATLANTIC............ 3 23 27 104 3 21 23 82 1 4 5
Delaware............... 2 -
Maryland.............. 6 17 17 -
District of Columbia.. 1 1 1
Virginia.............. 2 6 5 2 6 5 5
West Virginia.......... 3 11 3 7
North Carolina........ 1 2 8 1 1 6
South Carolina........ 2 2 4 10 2 1 4 8
Georgia............... 1 3 5 25 1 3 4 19
Florida .............. 9 6 25 8 5 18 1 4

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL ........ 1 4 18 41 1 3 14 22 6 8
Kentucky.............. 8 18 6 4 1
Tennessee............. 2 4 10 2 2 6 3 1
Alabama ............... 1 3 6 1 3 6 1 1
Mississippi ........... 1 1 3 7 1 3 6 2 5

EST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 12 11 193 83 10 7 153 43 2 3 18 6
Arkansas.............. 1 3 5 6 1 3 5 4 -
Loulsi.ana............. I 2 11 24 1 2 9 17
Oklahoma.............. 2 1 5 3 2 3 2
Texas................. 8 5 172 50 6 2 136 22 2 3 15 6

MOUNTAIN.................. 2 10 37 2 8 22 -
Montana ............... 3 3 2 2 -
Idaho ................. 1 1 12 1 1 6 -
Wyoming ................ 1 1 -
Colorad................. 1 1 5 1 -
New Mli................ 3 -- -
Arizo ................ 3 7 3 5-
Utah.................. 1 7 1 4
Nvaida................ .

PACIFIC.................. 3 4 40 84 3 2 36 66 2 34 32
ahngt .............. 1. 1 12 1 1 12 2
Oregon................ 1 5 11 1 5 4
Cal -orni............. 2 3 33 59 2 1 29 48 2 34 30
ask ...............- -
Haw;ii ................. 1 2 1 2

S. .. ... ... .. ... .I I J .1










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 261


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

AUGUST 19, 1961 AND AUGUST 18, 1962 (Continued)


Brucellosis Diphtheria Encephalitis, Hepatitis, Measles
Infectious Infectious and serum
Cumu- Cumu- 33rd week
lative lative Under 20 &
33rd week 33 weeks 33rd week 33 weeks 33rd week 20 yr. over Total Total 33rd week
1962 1962 1962 1962 1962 1961 1962 1962 1962 1961 1962 1961

UNITED STATES...... 10 267 5 245 38 37 351 365 759 1,041 1,406 1,466

NEW ENGLAND.............. 1 1 2 1 28 27 56 41 97 127
Maine.................. 9 9 18 4 10 7
New Hampshire......... 3 2 6 3 1 14
Vermont............... 1 1 4 18 31
Massachusetts......... 1 1 1 13 9 22 22 53 49
Rhode Island........... 1 2 2 5 2 3
Connecticut........... 1 3 4 7 3 13 23

MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 6 5 6 11 81 97 178 104 247 166
New York.............. 2 3 4 10 28 49 77 46 165 88
New Jersey............. 1 1 17 18 35 18 52 16
Pennsylvania ......... 3 1 2 1 36 30 66 40 30 62

EAST NORTH CENTRAL....... 2 64 6 12 4 76 57 138 225 375 430
Ohio.................. 1 4 32 21 56 86 29 70
Indiana............... 5 3 8 1 9 18 16 6
Illinois.............. 46 1 4 13 13 28 51 42 178
Michigan .............. 4 3 4 21 18 39 68 174 102
Wisconsin ............. 1 8 3 2 4 6 2 114 74

WEST NORTH CENTRAL ....... 5 105 55 13 16 29 92 64 29
Minnesota............. 9 17 4 3 7 20 17 1
Iowa.................. 5 64 1 2 4 6 35 5 6
Missouri.............. 3 5 3 3 6 18 1
North Jakota.......... 1 7 3 3 6 1 33 21
South Dakota.......... 4 11 2 2 1 9
Nebraska.............. 11 13 4 -
Kansas................ 13 1 1 1 2 13 NN NN

SOUTH ATLANTIC........... 20 3 50 5 5 47 42 90 127 129 126
Delaware .............. 1 1 2 1 4 1
Maryland.............. 1 7 4 11 3 8 33
District of Columbia.. 1 2 2 3 17
Virginia.................. 10 1 10 1 1 12 8 20 19 13 42
West Virginia ......... 1 3 1 5 14 42 26
North Carolina ........ 2 2 6 1 8 9 17 30 6 1
South Carolina........ 5 4 2 6 2 6 1
Georgia ............... 2 8 1 5 6 17 1 1
Florida............... 6 19 2 3 11 10 21 38 49 4

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL ....... 12 16 1 1 32 25 57 130 19 86
Kentucky ............... 1 9 7 16 25 1 6
Tennessee............ 4 7 1 5 9 14 55 13 67
Alabama............... 6 3 14 4 18 28 1 7
Mississippi........... 1 6 1 4 5 9 22 4 6

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 1 22 2 93 3 5 29 27 56 68 115 182
Arkansas .............. 4 10 1 4 5 9 9
Louisiana............. 4 8 4 5 9 14
Oklahoma.............. 1 3 6 1 2 3 5 3 67
Texas.................. 11 2 69 3 3 19 14 33 42 115 115

MOUNTAIN................ 1 10 9 1 8 5 41 50 120 108
Montana............... 1 6 1 2 2 4 5 33 17
Idaho.................. 1 1 2 5 4 14
Wyoming............... 1 1 1 4 5
Colorado........... 2 3 19 20 44
New Mexico............ 2 2 1 3 2 NN NN
Arizona............... 2 23 3 39 17
Utah................... 1 3 3 2 5 10 24 8
Nevada................ 2 3

PACIFIC.................. 1 27 10 9 9 37 69 114 204 240 212
Washington............ 1 2 6 7 16 27 8 26
Oregon ................ 1 3 1 8 6 14 23 45 58
California ............ 22 5 8 6 20 56 77 145 115 118
Alaska........ ......... 1 5 3 7 9 45 9
Hawaii............... 1 27 1

Puerto Rico.............. 1 33 20 6 26 27 24 11











262 Mlorlpiilily and Mortality Weekly Report


Tahic 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

AUGUST 19, 1961 AND AUGUST 18, 1962 (Continued)


Irnlni ',n il t r pE c 1 Tic l-born
Inf ci s Sore Throat & Tetanus Typhus Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in Anaals
Scarlet Fever (Rcky Mt.
AreaCumu- Spotted) u..u- (uTuo-
lative larI lativ.
33rd wk 33 weeks 33rd week 33rd wk. 33rd wk. 33rd wk. 33rd wk. 33 .Lk 33rd week I33 Ie s
Q19b6 I t2 1i6 i' Ib2 19,2 1 14t67 .2 l061 Ib't2 1961 1962

UNITED STATES.... 29 1,447 3,000 2,812 4 6 11 21 350 51 51 2,648

NEW ENGLAND........ 86 193 99 1 5 -
Maine.............. 12 60 4 1
New HimphiLre....... 3 3
Vermont............ 2 17- -
Massachusetts...... 36 31 16 1 3-
Rhode Island....... 8 7 3 -1 -
Connecticut........ 25 95 56 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC..... 6 249 91 49 1 1 2 16 2 5 86
New York........... 3 110 64 30 1 1 1 20 1 5 58
New Jersey......... 3 69 13 6 8 1 1
Pennsylvania....... 70 14 13 1 8 27

EAST NORTH CENTRAL.. 7 295 204 152 1 2 3 58 6 3 633
Ohio............... 2 89 37 17 1 32 4 1 321
Indiana............ 24 62 24 2 5 171
Illinois........... 66 35 28 2 13 1 2 82
Michigan........... 5 95 39 41 5 1 30
Wisconsin.......... 21 31 42 1 3 29

WEST NORTH CENTRAL.. 1 78 94 86 10 18 16 681
Minnesota ......... 15 4 2 -- 7 2 154
Iowa............... 10 19 11 1 2 9 269
Missouri........... 20 2 1 7 5 4 113
North Dakota ...... 6 56 68 1 45
South Dakota....... 1 5 1 3 79
Nebraska........... 12 I 16
Kansas............. 10 13 4 1 5

SOUTH ATLANTIC ..... 2 232 256 211 1 3 1 7 69 10 3 240
Delaware........... 1 31 1 -
Maryland........... 1 15 6 5 3 1
Dist. of Columbia.. 7 3 3 1 6 -
Virginia........... 51 58 76 2 1 14 6 2 100
West Virginia...... 12 59 43 4 1 1 88
North Carolina .... 54 6 5 1 3 -
South Carolina ..... 12 18 6 4 -
Georgia............ 9 1 7 15 6
Florida............ 41 105 65 1 6 19 3 45

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL. 1 89 669 691 1 1 30 5 2 288
Kentucky............ 1 20 60 30 4 2 100
Tennessee.......... 37 577 625 1 11 5 168
Alabama............ 18 6 2 1 10 20
Mississippi........ 14 26 34 5 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL. 116 568 586 1 2 4 85 7 17 500
Arkansas........... 13 2 1 2 3 18 5 57
Louisiana.......... 53 1 19 17
Oklahoma ........... 6 3 4 1 4 22
Texas.............. 44 563 580 1 44 7 12 404

MOUNTAIN............ 1 47 440 692 5 2 28 22
Montana............ 3 26 58 10
Idaho ....,........ 3 27 41 -
Wyoing............. 4 4 1 3
Colorado.......... 8 108 276 3 1
New Mexico......... 3 118 117 8 11
Arizona............. 13 81 112 2 4 10
Utah............... 1 8 76 88 4 -
Nvada............. -

PACIFIC............. 11 255 485 246 -3 29 3 5 198
Washington ......... 18 47 72 1
Oregon ........... 15 13 23 1 II
Californi.......... 11 212 385 136 -- 3 28 2 5 187

uerto ..........8 2 13
Puerto Rico ......... .I I ... 2....1 ___.- __..- ___ 1 1 51 13











Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report




Table 4 (A). TOTAL DEATHS IN REPORTING CITIES


(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period. o


263


For weeks ending AFor weeks ending
Area 8/ Area __ 8/18________________

______________________ 7/28 8/4 8/11 8/18_______________________ 7/28 8/4 8/11 8/18


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass. ............
Bridgeport, Conn. .........
Cambridge, Mass. ..........
Fall River, Mass. .........
Hartford, Conn. ..........
Lowell, Mass. .............
Lynn, Mass. ...............
New Bedford, Mass. ........
New Haven, Conn. ..........
Providence, R.I. ..........
Somerville, Mass. ........
Springfield, Mass. .......
Waterbury, Conn. ..........
Worcester, Mass. ..........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y. ..............
Allentown, Pa. ............
Buffalo, N.Y. ...........
Camden, N.J. ..............
Elizabeth, N.J............
Erie, Pa. .................
Jersey City, N.J. .........
Newark, N.J. ..............
New York City, N.Y. .......
Paterson, N.J. ............
Philadelphia, Pa. .........
Pittsburgh, Pa. ...........
Reading, Pa. ..............
Rochester, N.Y. ...........
Schenectady, N.Y. .........
Scranton, Pa. ............
Syracuse, N.Y. ............
Trenton, N.J. .............
Utica, N.Y. ...............
Yonkers, N.Y. ..............

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio................
Canton, Ohio................
Chicago, Ill. ..............
Cincinnati, Ohio............
Cleveland, Ohio.............
Columbus, Ohio..............
Dayton, Ohio................
Detroit, Mich. ............
Evansville, Ind. ..........
Flint, Mich. .............
Fort Wayne, Ind. ..........
Gary, Ind. ................
Grand Rapids, Mich .......
Indianapolis, Ind. ........
Madison, Wis. .............
Milwaukee, Wis. ...........
Peoria, Ill. ..............
Rockford, Ill. ...........
South Bend, Ind. ..........
Toledo, Ohio................
Youngstown, Ohio............

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa............
Duluth, Minn. .............
Kansas City, Kans. ........
Kansas City, Mo. ..........
Lincoln, Nebr. ............
Minneapolis, Minn. ........
Omaha, Nebr. ..............
St. Louis, Mo. ...........
St. Paul, Minn. ...........
Wichita, Kans. ............


255
44
28
25
44
25
19
32
38
54
8
41
25
49


36
31
130
50
18
42
64
77
1,479
35
523
150
27
82
17
33
46
39
24
27


60
29
634
152
169
118
98
300
40
48
47
37
44
136
46
115
20
26
34
93
62


51
16
22
98
20
106
68
256
69
51


216
31
29
27
42
21
20
21
53
51
17
39
19
49


40
30
166
22
24
31
56
82
1,504
31
495
223
17
96
30
30
45
32
22
23


47
39
682
167
173
93
77
297
36
43
38
32
35
113
28
134
18
21
37
93
55


45
29
32
112
34
104
70
227
77
60


229
52
23
29
48
23
21
24
39
60
18
49
34
44


46
38
149
49
18
46
57
84
1,429
35
491
156
30
67
31
30
60
38
22
32


54
26
671
167
182
117
86
310
44
42
44
30
66
131
32
96
27
25
44
112
46


63
29
50
143
32
117
66
224
54
47


210
36
14
19
36
25
S34
30
28
67
16
31
29
53


42
38
135
34
24
33
59
116
1,459
29
393
222
20
91
26
35
62
28
26
30


50
18
673
125
197
104*
76
291
34
49
44
25
35
134
29
106
29
26
34
94
43


47
16
24
113
26
118
62
199
65
49


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga. .............. 120 113 111 114
Baltimore, M. ............ 242 232 223 202
Charlotte, N.C. .......... 33 34 38 18
Jacksonville, Fla. ........ 62 56 50 64
Miami, Fla. ............... 80 97 89 75
Norfolk, Va. .............. 37 50 51 67
Richmond, Va. ............. 81 59 82 56
Savannah, Ga. .............. 27 34 38 27
St. Petersburg, Fla. ...... 79 71 69 71
Tampa, Fla. ........ ...... 51 67 68 75
Washington, D.C. .......... 188 153 188 188
Wilmington, Del. .......... 43 38 27 36

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala. .......... 74 79 83 108
Chattanooga, Tenn. ........ 35 44 43 41
Knoxville, Tenn. .......... 34 26 23 23
Louisville, Ky. ............ 117 125 103 107
Memphis, Tenn. ........... 140 108 125 122
Mobile, Ala. .............. 42 35 47 37
Montgomery, Ala. ......... 41 46 24 33
Nashville, Tenn. .......... 75 71 54 72

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex. .............. 36 55 38 50
Baton Rouge, La ........... 29 43 29 28
Corpus Christi, Tex. ...... 20 22 26 27
Dallas, Tex. .............. 133 117 138 130
El Paso, Tex .............. 34 45 31 33
Fort Worth, Tex. .......... 80 76 69 67
Houston, Tex. ............. 197 226 157 162
Little Rock, Ark. ....... 50 60 51 40
New Orleans, La. ........... 195 166 182 203
Oklahoma City, Okla. ...... 72 54 80 71
San Antonio, Tex. .......... 106 112 109 145
Shreveport, La. ........... 55 55 57 61
Tulsa, Okla. .............. 63 50 38 53

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex. ...... 30 26 28 24
Colorado Springs, Colo. .. 16 22 14 15
Denver, Colo. ............. I01 82 116 110
Ogden, Utah................ 19 17 19 15*
Phoenix, Ariz. ............ 76 81 84 82
Pueblo, Colo ............... 13 15 16 18
Salt Lake City, Utah....... 39 53 53 34
Tucson, Ariz. .............. 54 47 37 36

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif. .......... 21 8 15 13
Fresno, Calif. ............ 27 44 35 45
Glendale, Calif. ........... 28 38 33 38
Honolulu, Hawaii........... 40 46 63 38
Long Beach, Calif. ......... 54 33 47 69
Los Angeles, Calif ........ 449 453 447 440
Oakland, Calif. ............ 80 70 84 103
Pasadena, Calif. .......... 33 39 43 37
Portland, Oreg. ........... 111 128 79 99
Sacramento, Calif. ......... 56 60 54 58*
San Diego, Calif. .......... 103 92 92 71
San Francisco, Calif. ..... 184 191 159 188
San Jose, Calif. .......... 39 39 44 46
Seattle, Wash. ............. 138 137 113 135
Spokane, Wash............. 35 46 39 43
Tacoma, Wash. ............. 36 39 35 35

San Juan, P.R. ............... 38 26 23 43


OCurrent Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities

4(A) Total Mortality, all ages................... 10,335
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages......... 314
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age............. 737
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over..... 5,613


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.

NOTE: All deaths by place of occrrece.








264





--'


Morbidity and Mortal


IlICIn LOSS




.. .. i ."





--

F K!


brucellosis; however, the control and eradication of bru-
cellosis in swine has been less successful. The source
of infection for the 413 cases on which this information is
available (Table I) shows that swine-associated cases
now account for almost one-half of the infections. The
occupations of persons having brucellosis are shown in
Table II. Packing house workers accounted for the largest
number of cases, 174, while farm workers constituted the
next most vulnerable group.

TABLE I
HUMAN BRUCELLOSIS CASES BY PROBABLE SOURCE
OF INFECTION, 1961

Swine 122
Cattle 70
Cattle and swine 52
Sheep or Goat 1
Packing House 41
Rendering Plant 2
Raw Milk 34
Vaccine Accidents 9
Others 7
Not stated 75
Total 413


TABLE II
HUMAN BRUCELLOSIS CASES BY OCCUPATION, 1961

Packing House 174
Rendering Plant 4
Stock Yard 3
Farm Workers 80
Wives and Children 53
Professionals 23
Others or Not Stated 76
Total 413




INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES

Smallpox Europe

England London was declared a non-infected local area
on August 16 follnwnr importation of a suspected case of
smallpox on August 15. Smallpox was confirmed August 21.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

IIIIIIIIH IIIII III III11ul
3 1262 08884 1559
ily Weekly Report




The patient, a rhree-vear-old Indian boy, boarded the
cruise ship S. S. Oronsay at Bombay on July 30, He
became sick on August 10, with an illness suspected as
being chicken pox, and was confined 1o his cabin. He is
hospitalized at the Long Reach Isolation Hospital, Darn-
ford, Kent. The patient's mother, brother, and sister,
under observation at the same hospital, have had no
signs of illness.

Smallpox North America

Canada Toronto was declared a non-infected local area
on August 18. See Epidemiological Reports, page 258.





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