Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00058

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text


FS 2. 6


Morbidity and Mortality


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE
PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


Prepared by the


-


MElrose 4-5131


For release September 7, 1962 ATLANTA 22, GEORGIA Vol. 11. No. 35
PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THE UNITED STATES AND ON
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED SEPTEMBER 1, 1962


POLIOMYELITIS- A total of 34 cases of poliomyelitis
(29 paralytic) was reported for the week ending September
1, 1962. This marks a sharp decline from the 43 cases
(37 paralytic) noted during the previous week and remains
well below the totals for the comparable week in 1961
which showed 58 cases of poliomyelitis, 35 paralytic.
Sixteen States reported cases this week with eight
States submitting only single cases. Texas accounted for
5 cases, 3 of which were paralytic, while California re-
ported 5 paralytic cases and Illinois and Alabama 4 each.
In California four of the five cases noted were from
Los Angeles County, bringing that county's 1962 total
to 16 cases. Within the county, there have now been 5


cases from Pasadena. Type I poliovirus has been re-
covered from each of these patients. Three of the five
patients had onset of illness during mid-August and all
of the patients reside within a geographic sub-segment
of the community. The Pasadena Health Department and
the California State Department ofl e planning to
administer Type I oral polio i L DC epi-
demic reserve to the resident, e area
In Alabama all four.r fred cases this ej ere
from Mobile County vuhichl.d previously note ra-
lyric cases. Type I po~ rus Wg rA red the
early cases and Type I t'olio vaccine iro he DC
epidemic reserve was a nired under the sniD s of


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous week)
35th Week Cumulative
Disease Ended Ended Median First 35 weeks
September 1, September 2, 1957 1961 Median
1962 1961 1962 1961 1957 1961
Aseptic meningitis ............... 94 204 -- 1,346 1,726--
Brucellosis ..................... 6 11 10 284 413 540
Diphtheria ...................... 4 8 11 255 373 417
Encephalitis, infectious .......... 68 37 55 1,106 1,067 1,169
Hepatitis, infectious and serum... 785 1,002 323 38,382 52,701 14,992
Measles ........................ 781 871 994 441,136 385,628 394,271
Meningococcal infections......... 26 30 21 1,498 1,515 1,614
Poliomyelitis, total ............... 34 58 276 464 617 2,225
Paralytic .................... 29 35 77 365 417 1,052
Nonparalytic ................ 5 18 144 72 134 820
Unspecified .................. 5 55 27 66 353
Streptococcal sore throat
and Scarlet fever ............ 3,041 2,718 -226,366 233,691
Tetanus ........................ 6 --- 171
Tularemia ..................... 7 --- --- 206
Typhoid fever ................... 19 30 27 397 510 520
Typhus fever, tick-borne, 3 2
(Rocky Mountain spotted)..... 5 .--- --- -- 170
Rabie' in Animals............... 38 62 52 2,735 2,397 2,634

Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Anthrax: Psittacosis:
Botulism: Rabies in .Man:
Malaria: Smallpox:
Plague: Typhus, murine:


[E 1', -N (_ IT E


S35








Morhidily and Mortality Weekly Report


Viral Hepatitis Cases'Over and Under 20 Years
Since 16th Week 1961














-- IrI aix i-l..Hie- le( 'i I ** **p 1C B ***I of **.....

*Argeness egeC~R sposettsl Aspab** Le*** Inow -rl '***


2 24 I'8 3 4S 0 is44
It,,


si a i2 is 0o a n a2 a
i962


the State and County Health officials to over 250,000
persons on September 5 and 6.
The cases reported from Illinois largely represent
delayed reports. No epidemic concentration has been
noted in this State.
The total number of reported cases of poliomyelitis
thus far this year remains well below the totals recorded
for any previous year. The number of paralytic cases
also remains at a record low level. The cumulative totals
throughh the 35th week of 1962 and for the previous four
years are presented in the tabulation below:

POLIO CUMULATEDD WEEKLY) THROUGH THE 35TH WEEK
(1958 1962)

1962 1961 1960 1959 1958
Paralytic 365 417 1,090 2,828 1,108
Total 464 617 1,582 4,445 2,281



HEPATITIS Reported cases of viral hepatitis totaled
785 for the week ending September 1. There has been
little change in the national incidence over the last
6 weeks.
Nationally this year, 41.7 percent of cases have been
in persons 20 years of age or over. Three States only
have shown consistently higher proportions in this age
group. These are Connecticut with 62.3 percent of cases
in the 20 and over age group, California with 58.6 percent,
and Hawaii with '5.6 percent. No explanation for the
unusually large proportion of adult cases in these States
is presently available.
Cases by week in persons under 20 years of age and
20 years or over is shown in the accompanying graph.
A marked seasonal fluctuation in cases is seen among
those under 20 years of age, the low week, July 7, repre-


senting but 29.0 percent of total cases reported during
the highest week, February 4. Among those 20 and over,
this seasonal variation is less notable. The low week,
July 7, represents 50.4 percent of the total cases re-
ported during the highest week, February 17.



EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORT
Arthropod-Borne Encephalitis Florida
An outbreak of arbovirus encephalitis in Pinellas
and surrounding counties in Florida began during the
fourth week of July. Since the onset of the first case on
July 24, 180 cases of presumptive arthropod-borne enceph-
alitis have been reported and are under investigation.
One hundred and fifty-six cases have occurred in Pinellas
County. Ten cases are being investigated in persons not
from Pinellas County but who are known to have been in
the county prior to the onset of their illness. Two of these
are from Maryland and New York State, while the remain-
der are from other Florida counties, including Hillsborough,
Lake, Citrus, Suwanee, Hendry, Palm Beach, and Alachua.
Fourteen cases in persons not known to have been in
Pinellas County have been reported from Sarasota, Mana-
tee, Orange, Sumter, Nassau, Hendry, Escambia, and
Marion Counties.
The epidemic curve for 150 of the cases with known
onsets in Pinellas County is shown, p.275. Beginning in
mid-August there was a fairly rapid build-up of cases to
a level which has persisted for the last three weeks.
(Included are cases reported as of September 5).
There have been 12 deaths in patients within Pinellas
County. Autopsy findings in four cases were consistent
with viral encephalitis. An elevated HAI titer to Group B
arbovirus was found in one of the patients who died.
Elevated HAI antibody titers to Group B arbovirus were


274









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report




PRESUMPTIVE ARTHROPOD-BORNE ENCEPHALITIS
PINELLAS COUNTY


AUGUST
DATE OF ONSET


found in 33 of 70 acute sera tested from Pinellas County
patients. Two cases in which acute and convalescent
blood sera have been obtained showed rising HAI anti-
body titers to Group B. arbovirus.
Three deaths in individuals having presumptive
clinical diagnosis of acute encephalitis have occurred
outside of Pinellas County, one each in Orange, Alachua,
and Lake Counties. The diagnosis was confirmed by
autopsy in the Orange County and Alachua County cases,
both of which had history of visiting in Pinellas County


prior to the onset of their illness. An acute sera on the
Lake County case showed an elevated HAI titer to Group
B arbovirus. Five of the eight cases of presumptive
arthropod-borne encephalitis reported from Sarasota Coun-
ty have demonstrated elevated HAI titers to Group B
arbovirus.
The age distribution for cases occurring in Pinellas
County and age specific attack rates are shown in the
table (p. 280). Almost two-thirds of the cases have been in
persons 50 years of age and over and attack rates are
(Continued on page 280)


INFANT DEATHS IN 108 CITIES

The weekly average number of infant deaths in 108
cities for the four-week period ending September 1 was
765 as compared with an expected 761 weekly average.


WEEK ENDING 4 Week Weekly
8/11 8/18 8/25 9/1 Total Average
Observed 764 746 820 731 3,061 765
Expected 757 760 762 765 3,044 761
Excess 7 -14 58 -34 17 4


DEATHS UNDER ONE YEAR OF AGE IN 108 U.S. CITIES
Average number per week by four-week periods


900

RECORDED
850 /DEATHS*
"EXPECTED"
NUMBER-*




Soo.


650 i -


1960


*B LACE OF OCCURRENCE


(See Table, page 279)


NO. of
CASES


275


JULY


SEPT.


NUMBER

OF

DEATHS


1961 j 1962
**caluuLATED F9oU Os-CBI OPEIIENCE


1963


rcERIi N.-


(See Table, page 279)










276 '11Irlilily and Mortalit-i Weekly RH'por


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: I NIIl) STATES
FOR WEEKS ENDED

SEPTEMBER 2, 1961 AND SEPTEMBER 1, 1962


t ,I t l i ..* I 1 [ 1 "-, A : p t l(
P,,It- .-- I L I L I I1 1 L IS, P. ] '-.,I I L t P r l,,t t.. 'npsraralyt i c Men nan tl.


Area


Cumulative Cumulative
35th week First 35 weeks 35th week First 35 weeks 35th week 35th week


Puerto Rico.............. __ 10 5 10 5


92 1 I I 'b lt It I 'ii I 61 lE.Il 14"62 1i91 1962 1901

UNITED STATES...... 34 58 464 617 29 35 365 417 5 18 94 204

NEW ENGLAND.............. 3 6 14 3 6 12 9
Maine................. 1 2 1 2 1
New Hampshire ......... 1
Vermont............... 3 -3
Massachusetts......... 2 4 6 2 4 5 4
Rhode Island......... -
Connecticut .......... 2 2 2 2

IDDLE ATLANTIC........... 24 49 108 1 13 33 83 7 6 4
New York.............. 1 20 41 71 1 10 26 52 6 4 2
New Jersey............ 3 4 23 2 4 20 1
Pennsylvania 1 4 14 1 3 11 2 2

EAST NORTH CETRAL....... 9 9 44 64 8 6 33 38 1 2 15 49
Ohio.................. 3 1 12 19 3 11 10 5 9
Indiana............... 1 5 6 1 4 5 1
Illinois.............. 5 1 19 17 4 12 7 .1 1 3 18
Michigan............... 1 2 6 12 1 1 6 10 1 6 18
Wisconsin............. 4 2 10 4 6 1 3

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 4 5 22 36 2 1 12 16 2 4 11 81
Minnesota............. 1 6 4 1 6 4 8 8
Iowa................... 1 5 10 2 4 1 73
Missouri .............. 2 2 7 10 2 2 2 2
North Dakota.......... 3 1 1
South Dakota........... -
Nebraska.............. 1 1 4 1 1 3
Kansas................ 2 7 1 3 1 3

SOUTH ATLANTIC............ 3 3 32 120 3 28 92 3 7 2
Delaware.............. 2 1
Maryland.............. 21 21 1
District of Columbia.. 1 1 1
Virginia.............. 1 8 7 1 8 7 2 2
West Virginia......... 1 4 14 1 4 9 1
North Carolina......... 3 3 11 2 6 3
South Carolina........ 1 4 11 1 4 9 1
Georgia............... 6 27 5 20 -
Florida............... 6 26 5 18 2 1

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL........ 5 9 34 53 5 9 29 32 1 17
Kentucky.............. 1 1 15 19 1 1 13 5 1 3
Tennessee ............. 5 12 2 6
Alabama............... 4 2 11 8 4 2 11 8 1
Mississippi ........... 6 3 14 6 3 13 13

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 7 4 216 95 5 2 170 50 2 2 8 7
Arkansas.............. 1 2 5 10 1 5 4 2
Louisiana............. 1 11 30 1 9 22
Oklahoma.............. 1 7 3 1 5 2
Texas ................. 5 1 193 52 3 1 151 24 2 8 5

MOUNTAIN ................ 11 38 8 23 2
Montana............... 3 3 2 2 -
Idaho.................. 2 12 1 6 -
Wyoming................1 1 -
Colorado.............. 1 6 6 -
New Mexico............. 3 1
Arizona.............. 3 7 3 5
Utah................... 1 7 4 -
Nevada.................

PACIFIC.................. 5 1 50 89 5 1 46 71 46 33
Washington............ 1 1 15 1 1 15 2
Oregon................ 5 11 5 4 1 1
California............. 5 43 61 5 39 50 43 32
Alaska.................
Hawaii................ 1 2 1 2










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 277


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

SEPTEMBER 2, 1961 AND SEPTEMBER 1, 1962 (Continued)


Brucellosis Diphtheria Encephalitis, Hepatitis, Measles
Infectious Infectious and serum
Area _-----
Cumu- Cumu- 35th week
lative lative Under 20 &
35th week 35 weeks 35th week 35 weeks 35th week 20 yr. over Total Total 35th week
1962 1962 1962 1962 1962 1961 1962 1962 1962 1961 1962 1961

UNITED STATES...... 6 284 4 255 68 37 393 335 785 1,002 781 871

NEW ENGLAND............... 2 1 1 1 48 23 72 61 37 54
Maine...................... 7 2 9 4 5
New Hampshire......... 1 10 3 6
Vermont................ 7 -
Massachusetts......... 1 1 1 29 14 43 37 18 28
Rhode Island.......... 4 5 7
Connecticut........... 1 1 12 7 19 3 7 8

MIDDIE ATLANTIC.......... 6 5 7 10 74 69 143 157 91 148
New York.............. 2 3 4 9 35 42 77 74 72 103
New Jersey............. 1 1 9 9 18 42 21
Pennsylvania.......... 3 1 3 1 30 18 48 41 19 24

EAST NORTH CENTRAL ....... 1 66 7 9 11 58 59 130 185 245 241
Ohio.................. 1 9 5 23 24 48 55 28 24
Indiana.............. 5 3 7 1 8 26 4 25
Illinois.............. 1 48 1 2 9 13 24 27 23 73
Michigan.............. 4 3 3 18 21 39 72 109 76
Wisconsin............. 8 1 1 11 5 81 43

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 110 55 2 9 17 28 86 18 20
Minnesota ............ 9 17 2 8 11 17 2 -
Iowa................... 1 69 1 2 3 26 10 4
Missouri............... 3 5 1 5 2 7 21 6
North Dakota..-........ 1 7 1 2 3 6 9
South Dakota.......... 4 11 4 1
Nebraska ............. 11 13 1 10
Kansas................ 13 1 1 3 4 8 NH NN

SOUTH ATIANTIC........... 1 22 1 55 47 54 49 107 99 68 80
Delaware. ............. 1 1 12
Maryland .............. -. 8 10 19 5 7 17
District of Columbia.. I 1 2 3 4 3
Virginia.............. 11 1 11 3 8 7 15 11 13 19
West Virginia........ 1 4 1 8 18 10 23
North Carolina....... 2 6 14 10 24 34 3
South Carolina .......* 5 1 1 2 2 6
Georgia............... 3 12 6 6 6 -
Florida................. 6 19 44 18 11 29 19 26 9

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL ....... 14 16 3 29 14 43 148 29 52
Kentucky .............. 6 3 9 36 3 4
Tennessee ............ 6 7 15 8 23 50 18 42
Alabama............... 6 3 4 2 6 25 1
Mississippi ........... 1 6 3 4 1 5 37 8 5

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 1 25 3 97 5 37 27 73 57 84 101
Arkansas.............. 5 11 2 3 1 4 5
Louisiana............. 5 8 3 2 5 2
Oklahoma ............. 1 4 6 1 1 1 3
Texas................. 11 3 72 2 31 23 63 47 84 101

MOUNTAIN ................. 2 12 9 1 10 9 42 61 60 56
Montana............... 1 6 1 2 3 9 -
Idaho................. 1 1 13 3 12 2
Wyoming................ 1 1 1 2 5 -
Colorado.............. 2 1 6 18 14 6
New Mexico............. 2 4 4 8 7 NN NN
Arizona............... 1 3 5 10 17 26
Utah................. 1 4 4 1 5 6 8 12
Nevada................... 1 12 10

PACIFIC.................. 27 10 3 5 74 68 147 148 149 119
Washington ........... 21 10 34 14 6 8
Oregon................ 3 8 4 12 23 44 31
California............. 22 5 3 5 37 52 90 99 61 67
Alaska........... ....... 1 5 6 1 8 11 11 11
Hawaii................ 2 1 3 1 27 2

Puerto Rico.............. 31 34 18 4 22 12 16 26










278 Morbidily and iMortaliy Weekly Report


Tabhl 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: I NITI ID STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

SEPTEMBER 2, 1961 AND SEPTEMBER 1, 1962 (Continued)


M% ring -: :c al tr. pts. r l I c bornc
Infections Sore Throat & Tetanus Typhus Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in Animals
Scarlet Fever (Rcky Mt.
SC.,j- -Spotted) Cumu- Cumu-
lative lative lative
35th wk. 35 weeks 35th week 35th wk. 3Mth wk. 35th wk, 35th wk. 35 weeks 35th week 35 weeks
1962 1962 1962 1961 1962 1962 1962 1962 1962 1962 1961 1962

UNITED 2TATi.... 26 1,498 3,041 2,718 6 5 7 19 397 38 62 2,735

NEW ENGLAc.D......... 1 87 116 88 5 1
Maine ............. 12 1 -
New Hampshire...... 3 5 2 -
Vermont............ 2 -
Massachusetts...... 36 17 14 3 I
Rhode Island....... 1 9 1 10 -
Connecticut........ 25 92 60 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC..... 6 262 96 73 -- 1 38 4 5 93
New York........... 3 118 86 54 20 3 3 64
New Jersey......... 1 72 2 5 9 1
Pennsylvania....... 2 72 8 14 1 9 1 2 28

EAST NORTH CENTRAL.. 4 302 184 184 1 1 5 67 6 7 645
Ohio............... 1 90 9 9 1 1 36 1 2 324
Indiana............ 24 40 52 3 9 3 2 175
Illinois........... 2 68 40 28 1 13 2 83
Michigan........... 1 99 55 60 1 6 2 1 34
Wisconsin.......... 21 40 35 -- 3 29

WEST NORTH CENTRAL. 81 65 34 3 15 11 23 710
Minnesota.......... 15 2 1 -- 3 8 162
Iowa............... 10 12 12 1 2 1 7 279
Missouri........... 20 4 3 2 9 3 5 117
North Dakota....... 6 46 9 2 45
South Dakota....... 5 1 1 1 2 82
Nebraska........... 14 1 1 1 18
Kansas............. 11 9 2 7

SOUTH ATLANTIC...... 5 238 261 216 2 2 4 77 5 4 253
Delaware........... 32 2 1 2 -
Maryland ........... 15 3 2 1 1 3 1 2
Dist. of Columbia.. 7 6 -
Virginia.............. 1 52 39 79 1 16 1 105
West Virginia...... 12 69 43 6 2 1 93
North Carolina..... 1 55 5 1 3-
South Carolina..... 2 14 10 18 -- -
Georgia............ 9 1 2 17 6
Florida............. 1 42 137 69 1 20 1 3 47

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 1 91 741 680 2 2 1 1 35 3 4 293
Kentucky........... 20 17 8 1 1 6 2 4 102
Tennessee.......... 1 39 674 593 1 1 1 1 14 1 171
Alabama............ 18 2 2 10 20
Mississippi........ 14 48 77 5 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 4 123 465 614 1 3 2 97 7 16 516
Arkansas........... 1 15 1 1 3 2 21 4 57
Louisiana.......... 3 57 2 26 1 18
Oklahoma............ 6 3 6 22
Texas.............. 45 464 609 44 7 11 419

MOUNTAIN ........... 1 50 731 582 1 3 32 22
Montana............ 3 28 5 0 -10
Idaho.............. 3 64 37
Wyoming............ 5 5 1 3 -
Colorado........... 8 290 195 3 1
New Mexico.......... 4 174 139 2 II 11
Arizona............. 13 118 114 1 5 10
Utah................ 8 52 88 -
Nevada............. 1 6 3 -

PACIFIC............. 4 264 382 247 2 31 2 3 202
Washington......... 19 30 37 -
Oregon............. 15 7 9 1 11
California......... 3 219 306 154 I 30 2 3 191
Alaska ............. 1 7 26 47 -
Hawaii............. 4 13- -
Puerto Rico.......... 8 2 2 5 13










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 279





Table 4 (C). TOTAL DEATHS UNDER I YEAR OF AGE IN REPORTING CITIES



(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.0


For weeks ending For weeks ending
Area 81 88 85 91 Area 8 8/8
8/11 8/18 8/25 9/1 8/11 8/18 8/25 9/1


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass............. 11 14 12 11
Bridgeport, Conn.......... 5 1 0 2*
Cambridge, Mass........... 1 0 1 1*
Fall River, Mass........... 1 0 0 0
Hartford, Conn............ 6 7 7 4
Lowell, Mass............... 1 3 2 1
Lynn, Mass................ 1 1 2 1
flew Bedford, Mass......... 0 1 0 2
New Haven, Conn............ 1 1 2 2
Providence, R.I........... 2 7 8 6
Somerville, Mass.......... 1 0 0 0
Springfield, Mass......... 1 1 2 1
Waterbury, Conn........... 5 1 1 2
Worcester, Mass........... 0 1 5 3

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y................ 4 4 5 6
Allentown, Pa............. 1 2 1 1
Buffalo, N.Y............... 9 4 4 5
Camden, N.J............... 5 2 2 2
Elizabeth, N.J............ 3 2 2 1
Erie, Pa.................. 6 0 5 1
Jersey City, N.J.......... 5 6 1 8
Newark, N.J............... 6 17 17 3
New York City, N.Y........ 93 87 85 81
Paterson, N.J............. 3 1 0 1
Philadelphia, Pa.......... 25 28 41 24
Pittsburgh, Pa............ 9 7 13 14
Reading, Pa............... 2 0 0 1
Rochester, N.Y............. 3 11 6 4
Schenectady, N.Y.......... 3 0 2 0
Scranton, Pa.............. 0 1 2 1
Syracuse, N.Y............. 2 5 5 5
Trenton, N.J.............. 2 3 0 4
Utica, N.Y................ 1 1 3 2
Yonkers, N.Y............... 0 2 0 3

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio................ 5 5 7 7
Canton, Ohio............... 2 1 2 3
Chicago, Ill.............. 40 39 54 35
Cincinnati, Ohio........... 16 4 11 3
Cleveland, Ohio............ 10 6 13 15
Columbus, Ohio............. 11 17 27 1
Dayton, Ohio............... 5 4 5 8
Detroit, Mich............. 27 24 24 23
Evansville, Ind........... 2 1 2 0
Flint, Mich............... 6 5 7 6
Fort Wayne, Ind........... 3 0 7 1
Gary, Ind................. 3 0 4 3
Grand Rapids, Mich........ 1 4 2 1
SIndianapolis, Ind......... 12 10 14 7
Madison, Wis.............. 4 3 1 3
Milwaukee, Wis............. 5 22 5 10
Peoria, Ill.............. 1 4 0 3
Rockford, Ill............... 3 1 3 1
South Bend, Ind........... 1 1 3 4
Toledo, Ohio............. 5 5 4 6
Youngstown, Ohio.......... 2 5 0 0

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa.......... 7 2 3 5
Duluth, Minn.................. 0 2 0 3
Kansas City, Kans......... 5 1 5 9
Kansas City, Mo........... 9 8 8 5
Lincoln, Nebr............. 3 2 4 3
Minneapolis, Minn...*...... 9 10 7 10
Omaha, Nebr............... 7 3 3 5
St. Louis, Mo.. .......... 16 12 16 11
St. Paul, Minn............ 3 6 5 6
Wichita, Kans............. 5 7 1 4


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.
NOTE: All delahs by place of occnnece.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga............... 6 8 8 9
Baltimore, Md............. 26 17 19 26
Charlotte, N.C........... 5 0 2 4
Jacksonville, Fla........ 4 6 9 4
Miami, Fla............... 4 6 9 2
Norfolk, Va.............. 4 7 3 7
Richmond, Va............. 14 5 12 5
Savannah, Ga.............. 2 1 1 1
St. Petersburg, Fla...... 2 1 1 2
Tampa, Fla ............... 3 3 7 9
Washington, D.C.......... 20 23 9 30
Wilmington, Del.......... 0 0 2 0

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.......... 5 5 10 2
Chattanooga, Tenn........ 1 2 3 6
Knoxville, Tenn.......... 0 3 3 2
Louisville, Ky............ 13 7 7 4
Memphis, Tenn............ 15 8 30 8
Mobile, Ala.............. 5 4 6 3
Montgomery, Ala.......... 1 2 1 3
Nashville, Tenn.......... 4 11 3 3

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.............. 2 5 5 2
Baton Rouge, La.......... 5 2 1 3
Corpus Christi, Tex...... 3 3 4 1
Dallas, Tex............... 12 14 11. 12
El Paso, Tex............. 10 6 5 3
Fort Worth, Tex........... 4 3 3 7
Houston, Tex............. 15 15 23 20
Little Rock, Ark......... 3 3 1 17
New Orleans, La.......... 24 10 14 14
Oklahoma City, Okla...... 8 8 12 5
San Antonio, Tex......... 15 7 19 8
Shreveport, La............. 4 11 6 4
Tulsa, Okla............... 4 1 6 5

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex...... 3 4 4 6
Colorado Springs, Colo... 1 2 1 1
Denver, Colo.............. 6 15 6 16
Ogden, Utah............... 2 2 0 2
Phoenix, Ariz............ 9 4 6 8
Pueblo, Colo.............. 1 2 3 3
Salt Lake City, Utah..... 5 1 5 2
Tucson, Ariz.............. 2 3 4 4

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.......... 2 0 0 2
Fresno, Calif............ 2 2 4 4
Glendale, Calif.......... 2 3 0 2
Honolulu, Hawaii.......... 4 5 4 4
Long Beach, Calif..,..... 3 2 2 5
Los Angeles, Calif....... 31 25 32 28
Oakland, Calif.......... 7 20 4 5
Pasadena, Calif.......... 0 2 0 4
Portland, Oreg........... 3 5 6 5
Sacramento, Calif........ 4 5 6 3
San Diego, Calif......... 8 14 10 7
San Francisco, Calif ..... 7 4 8 7
San Jose, Calif.......... 5 5 1 6
Seattle, Wash............. 2 7 6 4
Spokane, Wash............ 1 3 3 2
Tacoma, Wash.............. 2 1 2 2

San Juan, P.R............... 2 9 1 5


OCurrent Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities

4(A) Total Mortality, all ages................... 10,605
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages........ 315
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age............ 731
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over..... 5,743




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

l3 122 08IIII64 1708
3 1262 08864 1708


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


AGE SPECIFIC ATTACK RATES, PRESUMPTIVE ARTHROPOD-
BORNE ENCEPHALITIS CASES PINELLAS COUNTY

Age Group Population* No. Cases Attack Rate/100,000
0-9 54,554 7 12.8
10-19 43,929 12 2Z.3
20 29 29,256 9 30.8
30-39 39,442 16 40.6
40.49 41,249 14 33.9
50. 59 44,326 25 56.4
60-69 65,375 24 36.7
70-79 45,588 36 79.0
80 + 10,964 13 118.6
Total 374,863 156 41.6
Population figures from final census report of 1960.


highest for those above 70 years of age. All but 8 of the
cases occurred in the white population.
Intensive control measures have been instituted, in-
cluding ground fogging for killing the adult mosquito popu-
lations and clean-up of mosquito breeding areas about
domiciles and other areas. Although the adult mosquito
densities were found to be at a relatively low level,
mosquito breeding sites were found to be widespread.
Mosquito collections consisted primarily of Aedes aegypti
and Culex nigripalpus. The latter is considered the most
likely vector for transmission of the virus in this outbreak
although no virus isolations have yet been made. Birds
are particularly prevalent in the area and include predomi-
nantly ducks, pigeons, blackbirds, blue jays, and turtle
doves. Serologic studies on blood samples from over 400
birds of the various species are being carried out.
(Reported by Dr. Obenschain, Director of Communicable
Disease Control, Pinellas County Health Department,
Florida; Division of Epidemiology and Bureau of Labora-
tories, Florida State Board of Health; and, a team from
the Communicable Disease Center).


INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES

Japan Measures to Prevent Introduction of Cholera
Japan is imposing strict quarantine restrictions on
all traffic arriving from Taiwan, where cholera is epi-
demic. All ships from this island must stop in designated
quarantine areas for 72 hours (or until three stool exami-
nations have been conducted on each person aboard).
El Tor type of cholera has been reported in the Taiwan
epidemic, which is still occurring.

Smallpox Europe

England Two additional imported cases of smallpox
have been reported. The two individuals were aboard the
SS. Oronsay, which arrived in England on August 15.
London remains a non-infected local area.


Immunization Information for International Travel

Travelers visiting the Philippines, Taiwan, and Hong
Kong are reminded to be vaccinated against cholera. The
certificate is valid for a period of 6 months, beginning 6
days after the'first injection of ihe vaccine or in the
event of a revaccination within such period of 6 months,
on the date of that revaccination. Vaccination against
this disease is required by most countries including the
United States when persons arrive from infected areas
within 5 days.
In addition to the foregoing countries, cholera is
also present in Indonesia, India, and East Pakistan.



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