Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00051

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text



NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

BUREAU OF DISEASE PREVENTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND RE 6 SN
DIPHTHERIA Alabam

From August 4 to October 11. 1967 ajse.s of diph-
theria, including two deaths, and 41 1e MOV Vr.. i-
were reported to the Alabama State De -tnnt of Public
Health. The State Laboratory confirm reports by
isolations of Corynebacteriumi dip/it/heriae t ountie
of residence of the cases and carriers are sho .
Mobile County is in the southwestern corner o
the three other counties are contiguous and in the central
portion of the state.
The two deaths occurred in unrelated. unimmunized.
Negro females (ages 1 and 7). both of whom developed


Vol. 16, No. 41


WEEKLY

SrEPOFRT


Week Ending
October 14, 1967



PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


(ONTKNTS

Cmioioeic NIno s and Ro
o o niicx of thieri i t Due to e mild in full







Moderate. 5 of 1a hi I ere ir i n Io ple t \im.n i ndi
ocarditis and laryngotracheobronchitis requiring trache-
ostomy. Of the remaining 1i2 cases, two were mild in fully
ininmmunized children. and 10 were classified as mild to
moderate. 5 of which were in incompletely immunized indi-
xiduals and .5 in unimmunized individuals.
'(on inued o(ni piage 346)


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
41st WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST 41 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE OCTOBER 14, OCTOBER 15. 1962- 1966 MEDIAN
1967 1966 1967 1966 1962- 1966
Aseptic meningitis ................... ... 86 80 68 2.287 2.403 1,659
Brucellosis............................. 8 6 6 200 205 295
Diphtheria ........... ................. 3 6 9 116 153 201
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-borne & unspecified ........... 36 40 1,278 1,727 -
Encephalitis, post-infectious .......... .2 5 -- 665 621 -
Hepatitis, serum ................... ..... .40 22 1,708 1,091
Hepatitis, infectious ................... .670 573 681 30,195 25040 30,442
Malaria ............................... 24 18 3 1.553 342 77
Measles (rubeola)........................ 263 679 857 58,708 191,496 361,744
Meningococcal infections, total ........... 27 35 37 1,798 2.853 2,191
Civilian ............................ 26 33 1,681 2.572 -
Military .............................. 1 2 117 281 -
Poliomyelitis, total ................ 2 5 25 75 92
Paralytic ................. .......... 2 5 21 70 76
Rubella (German measles) ................ 248 202 -- 40.654 42.576 -
Streptococcal sore throat & scarlet fever .. 6,541 5,906 5,093 352,354 332,667 310,785
Tetanus .. .............................. 7 5 6 180 152 219
Tularemia ............................. 4 2 4 144 143 226
Typhoid fever ........ ................. 9 11 12 333 310 345
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. spotted fever)- 4 4 4 285 226 212

Rabies in animals ........................ 73 57 65 3,476 3,290 3.290

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: ......................................... 2 Rabies in man:. ............ ..... .......... 2
Botulism: ........................................... 2 Rubella, Congenital Syndrome:Md.-l .................. 5
Leptospirosis: ..................................... ... 32 Trichinosis:Ill.-l, N.Y. Ups.-l ....... ..... ........ 51
Plague: ............................................. 2 Typhus, murine: .... ....................... .... 34
P sittacosis: T ex.-l ................................. 37 P olio, U nsp......... ..... ... ...... ... 4














Table 1
Counties of Residence of Cases and Carriers of Diphtheria
Alabama

County Population Cases Carriers

Dallas 57,100 11 23
Mobile 366,900 1 1
Montgomery 188,100 2 15
Autauga 19,050 0 2
TOTAL 14 41

Twelve of the 14 confirmed diphtheria cases occurred
in children from 1 to 12 years of age (mean age of 6.4
years). Eleven of these 12 cases were in residents of Dal-
las County, two of whom live in the same trailer park.
In a culture survey including over 200 of the trailer park
residents, 12 carriers were detected, giving a minimum
carrier rate of 5.6 percent. Six additional carriers were
discovered among 105 first-grade classmates of one of the
trailer park cases, and one other carrier was found among
97 fourth-grade classmates. One of the 19 carriers was
one year old; all others were from 5 to 14 years of age
(mean 8.7 years). None of the other cases in residents of
Dallas County could be epidemiologically related.
Two adult cases were reported from Montgomery County.
One was a mild case of pharyngeal diphtheria in an in-
completely immunized 19-year-old Negro female. The other
case was mild cutaneous diphtheria in a 45-year-old unim-
munized Negro farm worker who had an infected leg ulcer.
I r,..- rii of the 70 members of the all-Negro farm colm-
munity in which the patient lived were cultured, and 13


OCTOBER 14, 1967


carriers were discovered (attack rate of 18.8 percent).
Seven of the patient's 10 children had positive oropha-
ryngeal and nasopharyngeal cultures; two of these chil-
dren also had positive cutaneous cultures.
The laboratory characterization of the diphtheria
isolates, performed by the Bacterial Serology Unit of the
Laboratory Program at NCDC, is shown in Table 2.

Table 2
Laboratory Characterization of Diphtheria Isolates
August 4 October 11, 1967
Alabama

Virulence Type*

Not
Vir. :'Non-Vir. M I G Reported

Cases 14 ; 0 7 2 0 5
Carriers 29 12 25 3** 0 15

*M-Mlitis, I-Intermedius, G-Gravis
**Two carriers were positive for both mitis and intermedius
types of diphtheria isolates.

hinensive immunization campaigns are currently being
conducted in areas where cases and carriers have been
found. In Dallas County, approximately 21,000 individuals
have been immunized to date.

(Reported by W. H. Y. Smith, M.D., Director, Bureau of
Preventable Diseases, William J. Donald, M.D., Director,
Bureau of County Health Services; Thomas Hosty, Ph.D.,
Director, Bureau of Laboratories, all with the Alabama
State Department of Public Health; and an EIS Officer.)


EPIDEMIC OF FEBRILE GASTROENTERITIS DUE TO INGESTION OF CONTAMINATED ICE
Morgantown, West Virginia


Late Sunday evening on September 24, 1967, 100
students of West Virginia University appeared in the Emer-
gency Room of the Medical Center with complaints of
nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, mild fever, dizziness, head-
ache, and fainting. The next day 600 more students sought
medical attention, 42 of whom were hospitalized. Many
students from nearby high schools reported similar ill-
nesses. All of the ill persons were among the 14,000
spectators at the University of West Virginia football
game Saturday afternoon (September 23).
The onsets of 178 of the University cases are pre-
sented in Figure 1. The concentration between noon Sep-
tember 24 to noon September 25 strongly suggests a
common-source exposure, with a median incubation time
of 32 hours, and a range of 10 to 68 hours. The duration
of symptoms was from 4 to 24 hours.
Undergraduate students who attended the game were
requested to answer a food and illness history question-
naire; 337 completed forms were returned. The results of
the food histories are presented in Table 3. The most sig-


nigicant difference (p<0.005) was between those who
drank and did not drink soft drinks. There were two types
of soft drinks, A and B; the attack rate among those who

Figure 1
EPIDEMIC OF GASTROENTERITIS
BY HOUR OF ONSET
MORGANTOWN, WEST VIRGINIA SEPTEMBER 1967


121 4 1 4 6 2
4174 4?4


S -


SEPT 4 4 SP !
s640 24 44P4 21


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report



DIPHTHERIA Alabama (Continued from front page)


. I












Table 3
Attack Rates for Foods Consumed
at West Virginia University Football
September 23, 1967

ATE

Ill Not Ill Total


Hotdog
Popcorn
Peanuts
Soft drinks


Hotdog
Popcorn
Peanuts
Soft drinks


39 8 47
32 7 39
19 16 35
177 111 288

DID NOT EAT
146 144 290
153 145 298
166 136 302
8 41 49


drank A was 57 percent, while for those who
63 percent.
The soft drinks were prepared at separate
stands, each dealing exclusively with one


the cola syrups were from different sources. they could
not be implicated. City water, which was used to mix the
Game soft drinks, could not be implicated. The only remaining
common ingredient in the soft drinks was ice. It was dis-
covered that several persons also became ill who had eaten
ice alone or who had put ice obtained from one of the
Attack Rate stands into beverages brought from home.

82% The ice had been purchased out of state and shipped
82% to Morgant.own for the game. Preliminary bacteriologic
54% studies indicate high coliform counts in samples of left-
61% over ice. The ice manufacturing plant is currently being
investigated, but as of this date, no other consumers of

15 ice obtained from this plant have experienced outbreaks
5- of gastroenteritis.
Stool cultures and acute sera were obtained from
55 o
,16% 30 of the sick persons: laboratory studies are in progress.
Preliminary results do not implicate a specific etiologic
had B it was organism.


e concession (Reported by Dr. ,. H. Dyer, Director of Health. WIest Vir-
brand. Since yinia State Department of Health; and an EIS Officer.)


SURVEILLANCE SUMMARY
SHIGELLOSIS January through June 1967


For the first 6 months of 1967, a total of 4,849 shi-
gella isolations from humans were reported in the United
States. This total represents a 24.8 percent decrease
from the 6,448 isolations notified for the last 6 months
of 1966, and a 22.6 percent increase over the 3,995 iso-
lations for the first 6 months of 1966. The overall at-
tack rate in the U.S. was 25.0 cases per million for the
first half of 1967, as compared to 33.3 cases per million
for the last half of 1966.


Fifty-one of the 54 reporting centers now participat-
ing in the i ;.i, Surveillance Program recorded human
isolations of shigella from January through June 1967.
Of the 22 serotypes reported, the six most frequently in-
cluded are listed in Table 4.
The regional distribution of shigella isolates, parti-
cularly of Shigella flexneri and S. sonnei, appears con-
sistent with patterns observed since 1964 (Figure 2).
(Continued on page 352)


Figure 2
SEASONAL DISTRIBUTION OF SHIGELLA ISOLATIONS BY SEROTYPE AND REGION
15 STATES WHICH HAVE REPORTED SINCE JANUARY 1964
STATES NORTH OF DIVIDING LINE
All IlOIlons
..... s so~nno


0 1 ... "......... ... ... .. .. .
J F M A 'M J' J A S '0 N D J F M 'A M J J S O N D I
1964 1965
ILLINOIS, KANSAS, MARYLAND, NEW JERSEY, NORTH DAKOTA, OHIO. OREGON, SOUTH DAKOTA.AND VERMONT
ARIZONA. NEW MEXICO, NORTH CAROLINA, OKLAHOMA, TENNESSEE AND TEXAS.
*ADJUSTED TO 4-WEEK MONTHS,


OCTOBER 14, 1967


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report









348 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

OCTOBER 14, 1967 AND OCTOBER 15, 1966 (41st WEEK)


ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS
ASEPTIC Primary
AREA MENINGITIS BRUCELLOSIS DIPHTHERIA including Post- Serum Infectious
unsp. cases Infe
1967 1966 1967 1967 1967 1966 1967 1967 1966 1967 1966


UNITED STATES... 86 80 8 3 36 40 2 40 22 670 573

NEW ENGLAND.......... 8 2 1 1 37 23
Maine.............. 1 5
New Hampshire...... 2 1
Vermont ............
Massachusetts...... 5 1 15 10
Rhode Island....... 2 2 4 3
Connecticut........ 1 15 4

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 3 7 1 4 18 11 84 88
New York City...... 2 1 8 7 19 16
New York, up-State. 1 2 1 30 26
New Jersey.......... 1 2 1 9 4 21 15
Pennsylvania....... 1 1 1 1 1 14 31

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 7 5 16 10 1 3 1 97 111
Ohio................ 2 15 10 2 45 26
Indiana............. 1 10 6
Illinois........... 3 1 1 4 19
Michigan........... 2 1 1 1 34 52
Wisconsin.......... 3 4 8

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 1 2 6 1 39 41
Minnesota.......... 1 1 1 1 9 11
Iowa............... 3 5 9
Missouri........... 2 16 12
North Dakota....... 1 1 4
South Dakota....... 1 -- 1 2
Nebraska........... 3 -
Kansas............. 4 3

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 13 6 7 1 2 61 44
Delaware........... 1- -
Maryland............ 9 1 8 9
Dist. of Columbia.. I -
Virginia........... 1 2 1 13 6
West Virginia...... 9 3
North Carolina..... 1 -- 5 5
South Carolina..... 4
Georgia.............. 15 11
Florida............. 3 2 7 1 6 10

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 31 5 1 2 1 45 42
Kentucky............ 14 16 13
Tennessee.......... 6 1 -- 14 20
Alabama............ 7 5 7
Mississippi........ 4 1 1 15 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 4 15 3 2 7 1 2 81 50
Arkansas........... 10 8
Louisiana.......... 1 2 3 1 2 27 4
Oklahoma........... 1 2 4
Texas.............. 3 15 2 2 40 38

MOUNTAIN............. 1 2 2 29 35
Montana............ 2 2
Idaho.............. 1 1
Wyoming..............
Colorado........... 1 3
New Mexico......... 1 13 21
Arizona.............. 1 -- 10 5
Utah............... 1 3
Nevada.............. 3 -

PACIFIC.............. 26 31 3 9 9 14 7 197 139
Washington......... 1 11 4
Oregon.............. 2 2 20 20
California......... 22 28 2 9 7 14 7 166 112
Alaska............. -- 3
Hawaii............. 2 2 -


Puerto Rico I I 24 31







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 349


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

OCTOBER 14, 1967 AND OCTOBER 15, 1966 (41st WEEK) CONTINUED



MALARIA MEASLES (Rubeola) MENINGCOCCAL INFECTIONSPOLIOMYELITIS RUBELLA
TOTAL
AREA ________
AREA Cumulative Cumulative Total Paralytic
Cum.
1967 1967 1967 1966 1967 1967 1966 1967 1967 1967 1967
UNITED STATES... 24 263 58,708 191,496 27 1,798 2,853 21 248

NEW ENGLAND........... 6 871 2,327 2 73 125 31
Maine............... 239 223 3 10 4
New Hampshire...... 2 76 80 2 9 1
Vermont............. 42 266 1 4 3
Massachusetts...... 4 361 788 1 34 50 5
Rhode Island....... 62 72 4 15 3
Connecticut........ 91 898 1 29 37 15

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 3 3 2,305 18,097 4 292 347 5 30
New York City...... 1 2 474 8,302 51 49 1 11
New York, Up-State. 594 2,549 1 71 97 1 4
New Jersey.......... 2 490 1,862 2 96 103 9
Pennsylvania....... 1 747 5,384 1 74 98 3 6

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 39 5,614 69,053 2 253 452 3 38
Ohio................ 3 1,155 6,365 1 82 123 4
Indiana............. 2 604 5,734 40 79 1
Illinois............ 8 1,006 11,384 56 83 10
Michigan........... 7 950 14,600 1 58 121 3 10
Wisconsin.......... 19 1,899 30,970 17 46 13

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 4 2,877 8,744 2 80 151 3 16
Minnesota.......... 123 1,643 19 34 3
Iowa............... 750 5,327 16 22 1 10
Missouri.......... 337 533 16 58 -
North Dakota....... 2 874 1,124 2 11
South Dakota....... 55 40 6 5
Nebraska........... 2 644 77 13 8 3
Kansas.............. 94 NN 2 8 13 2 -

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 10 34 6,970 15,406 7 349 484 2 11
Delaware........... 49 257 7 4 -
Maryland.......... 1 2 165 2,111 2 46 48 1
Dist. of Columbia.. 24 384 1 11 13 -
Virginia........... 2,197 2,196 1 41 60 3
West Virginia...... 3 1,401 5,340 1 33 31 2
North Carolina..... 8 19 880 500 71 125 1
South Carolina..... 1 511 658 29 50 -
Georgia............. 36 234 2 53 63 -
Florida............ 10 1,707 3,726 58 90 6

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 24 5,254 19,847 1 140 250 1 29
Kentucky........... 5 1,345 4,736 1 41 88 14
Tennessee.......... 16 1,909 12,384 59 85 14
Alabama............. 3 1,332 1,698 26 54 1
Mississippi........ 668 1,029 14 23 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 3 75 17,613 24,841 6 230 386 7 1
Arkansas ........... 1,404 971 1 33 35 -
Louisiana........... 2 1 156 99 3 91 143 -
Oklahoma........... 1 3,351 494 17 19 1
Texas............... 74 12,702 23,277 2 89 189 6 1

MOUNTAIN.............. 18 4,723 12,087 33 89 9
Montana............ 7 303 1,838 2 4 -
Idaho............... 2 391 1,625 3 5 -
Wyoming.............. 181 168 1 6 -
Colorado............. 7 1,584 1,321 13 48 5
New Mexico......... 591 1,137 3 10 -
Arizona............. 2 1,022 5,312 4 10 4
Utah................ 382 641 4 1 -
Nevada............. 269 45 3 5 -

PACIFIC.............. 8 60 12,481 21,094 3 348 569 83
Washington......... 23 5,501 3,816 31 40 24
Oregon.............. 13 1,643 1,849 27 36 14
California.......... 8 22 5,017 14,747 3 276 472 36
Alaska.............. 145 540 10 17 8
Hawaii............... 2 175 142 4 4 1
Puerto Rico.......... 9 2,142 2,915 13 16








350 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

OCTOBER 14, 1967 AND OCTOBER 15, 1966 (41st WEEK) CONTINUED


STREPTOCOCCAL TYPHUS FEVER
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA TYPHOID TICK-BORNE RABIES IN
AREA SCARLET FEVER (Rky. Mt. Spotted) ANIMALS
1967 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum.
1967 1967 1967 1967 1967
UNITED STATES... 6,541 7 180 4 144 9 333 4 285 73 3,476

NEW ENGLAND.......... 649 2 1 7 1 2 93
Maine.............. 45 1 20
New Hampshire...... 17 1 45
Vermont .......... 17 22
Massachusetts...... 119 1 1 3 1 4
Rhode Island....... 61 1 2
Connecticut........ 390 1 3 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 139 12 1 34 35 1 81
New York City...... 5 6 17 -
New York, Up-State. 113 1 9 9 68
New Jersey......... NN 1 1 4 15 -
Pennsylvania....... 21 4 4 11 1 13

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 448 2 20 12 5 35 22 2 332
Ohio............... 76 4 2 9 11 2 117
Indiana............. 80 3 2 11 1 75
Illinois........... 82 1 10 10 2 5 10 63
Michigan........... 133 1 3 1 8 21
Wisconsin........... 77 2 56

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 395 2 15 21 17 4 13 803
Minnesota.......... 8 1 4 1 1 4 161
Iowa............... 95 1 1 3 106
Missouri........... 5 1 8 8 8 1 2 147
North Dakota....... 103 -- 5 143
South Dakota....... 44 1 2 94
Nebraska............ 120 4 2 1 55
Kansas............. 20 1 10 1 1 97

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 718 38 10 1 50 1 114 7 437
Delaware...........- -
Maryland............ 110 2 21 3
Dist. of Columbia.. 7 2 1 6
Virginia............ 123 9 6 27 2 188
West Virginia...... 154 1 2 1 1 59
North Carolina..... 9 6 1 4 1 45 3
South Carolina..... 5 1 2 10 5 1 2
Georgia............ 7 3 5 14 15 1 106
Florida............. 303 18 1 11 2 70

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,263 30 1 10 54 2 51 18 663
Kentucky........... 50 3 I 23 14 2 153
Tennessee.......... 1,014 8 1 7 9 2 25 14 459
Alabama............ 174 11 10 12 2 42
Mississippi........ 25 8 2 12 9

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 642 3 45 3 75 36 1 38 21 758
Arkansas........... 1 5 2 44 11 1 14 3 102
Louisiana.......... 3 4 7 14 63
Oklahoma .......... 30 3 18 7 15 11 277
Texas.............. 608 3 33 1 6 4 9 7 316

MOUNTAIN............. 1,201 1 9 19 9 1 108
Montana............. 37 1 2 -
Idaho............. 141
Wyoming............. 48 2 5
Colorado............ 701 1 12 9 10
New Mexico......... 142 1 2 1 32
Arizona............. 107 3 49
Utah............... 23 5 3
Nevada............. 2 9

PACIFIC.............. 1,086 17 6 2 81 11 8 201
Washington......... 373 2 1 2 2 1
Oregon............. 103 1 1 3 3 4
California......... 477 13 3 1 73 6 8 196
Alaska............. 77 -
Hawaii............. 56 3 3 -

Puerto Rico.......... 5 16 6 30









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report






DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED OCTOBER 14, 1967

(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)


All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under
Area and 1 year Area All 65 years and year
Area Ages and over Influenza All 5 e Influenza All
All Ages Causes All Ages Causes


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.--------.
Bridgeport, Conn.---..
Cambridge, Mass.-----.
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-.----.
Lowell, Mass.--------.
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.---
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.----------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, lowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


649
215
35
38
24
49
33
19
23
42
44
7
38
23
59

2,956
48
31
117
34
30
30
46
84
1,502
43
473
155
42
117
22
21
34
57
35
35

2,460
76
22
701
175
215
127
77
333
32
55
34
47
44
115
40
119
42
20
24
98
64

769
47
23
45
151
28
96
64
210
63
42


411
126
24
30
16
31
20
13
16
20
27
5
22
15
46

1,706
27
18
68
15
20
24
22
41
876
22
265
92
23
68
16
10
20
26
28
25

1,366
46
10
388
96
113
66
30
185
22
22
29
23
25
64
23
73
15
14
16
66
40

481
30
17
29
89
20
62
40
126
35
33


SOUTH ATLANTIC: 1,059 575 30 33
Atlanta, Ga.----------- 119 67 2 4
Baltimore, Md.---------- 180 90 3 6
Charlotte, N. C.------- 41 17 1 1
Jacksonville, Fla.----- 83 39 2 2
Miami, Fla.------------ 67 42 1 2
Norfolk, Va.----------- 51 26 2 2
Richmond, Va.----------- 81 49 1 1
Savannah, Ga.----------- 27 10 1
St. Petersburg, Fla.--- 75 60 4
Tampa, Fla.------------ 79 43 6 2
Washington, D. C.------ 213 105 3 10
Wilmington, Del.------- 43 27 5 2

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL: 630 336 33 36
Birmingham, Ala.------- 96 54 3 6
Chattanooga, Tenn.----- 38 22 2
Knoxville, Tenn.------- 34 23 3 3
Louisville, Ky.--------- 138 75 5 8
Memphis, Tenn.---------- 131 67 10 8
Mobile, Ala.----------- 54 19 4 6
Montgomery, Ala.------- 44 26 2 2
Nashville, Tenn.------- 95 50 4 3

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL: 1,010 498 29 73
Austin, Tex.----------- 38 20 3 3
Baton Rouge, La.------- 12 7 1 1
Corpus Christi, Tex.--- 41 19 1
Dallas, Tex.----------- 134 63 3 14
El Paso, Tex.---------- 35 16 2 3
Fort Worth, Tex.------- 83 43 2 12
Houston, Tex.---------- 191 78 1 15
Little Rock, Ark.------ 49 26 2
New Orleans, La.------- 143 64 3 7
Oklahoma City, Okla.--- 59 36 3 2
San Antonio, Tex.------ 124 64 2 9
Shreveport, La.-------- 51 28 4 4
Tulsa, Okla.----------- 50 34 3 2

MOUNTAIN: 385 228 18 18
Albuquerque, N. Mex.--- 25 19 2 3
Colorado Springs, Colo. 25 17 2 2
Denver, Colo.---------- 109 68 2 2
Ogden, Utah----------- 23 8 1 3
Phoenix, Ariz.--------- 103 61 6 3
Pueblo, Colo.---------- 23 14 1 1
Salt Lake City, Utah--- 35 19 1 1
Tucson, Ariz.---------- 42 22 3 3

PACIFIC: 1,324 780 29 56
Berkeley, Calif.------- 20 13 1
Fresno, Calif.--------- 43 17 2 1
Glendale, Calif.------- 26 19 -
Honolulu, Hawaii------ 42 22 1 5
Long Beach, Calif.----- 63 41 3 4
Los Angeles, Calif.---- 411 244 8 17
Oakland, Calif.-------- 73 40 2
Pasadena, Calif.------- 23 16 1
Portland, Oreg.---- 102 71 3 1
Sacramento, Calif.----- 53 31 2 4
San Diego, Calif.------ 89 47 4 12
San Francisco, Calif.- 132 66 1 2
San Jose, Calif.------- 39 19 2
Seattle, Wash.--------- 114 65 2 3
Spokane, Wash.--------- 65 49 2 -
Tacoma, Wash.---------- 29 20 1 1

Total 11,242 6,381 352 525

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------ 502,689
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 286,669
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 17,612
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age-------------- 25,638


Week No.







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report





SHIGELLOSIS (Continued from page 346)


Table 4
Six Most Frequently Isolated Serotypes from Humans
January through June 1967

Rank
Number Calcu- Calcu-
Rank Serotype Re- lated lated
Dec.
ported Number* Percent
1966

1 S. sonnei 2,360 2,378 49.0 1
2 S. flexneri 2a 592 994 20.5 2
3 S. flexneri 3a 156 473 9.8 3
4 S. flexneri 4a 150 293 6.0 5
5 S. flexneri 6 219 267 5.5 4
6 S. flexneri 2b 88 148 3.1 6

Subtotal 3,565 4,553 93.9

Total (all serotypes) 4,849 4,852

*Calculated Number is derived by distributing the unspecified
isolations in each group to their subgroups in the same pro-
portions as the distribution of the specified isolations of that
group.
S. flexneri has repeatedly accounted for about two-thirds
of isolations in southern states, but less than one-third
of isolations in northern states.
Around 70 percent of the shigella isolations during
the 6-month period were from children under 10 years of
age. No apparent sex predilection was noted.
There were 15 nonhuman isolations of shigella re-
ported from January through June 1967. Ten of these were
from monkeys.
(Reported by the Bacterial Diseases Section, Epidemiology
Program, NCDC.)


CURRENT TRENDS
MEASLES

For week 41 (ending October 14, 1967), a total of
263 cases of measles were reported to the NCDC. Of
these, 186 (71 percent) were reported from seven states:
Texas (74), Washington (23), California (22), North Caro-
lina (19), Wisconsin (19), Tennessee (16), and Oregon (13).
According to the most recent information available,
81 counties or health districts reported 221 of the re-
ported cases. Twenty-six counties account for two-thirds
of the national weekly total. In week 41 for 1966, 679
cases were reported from 174 counties or health districts.
The 74 Texas cases are from 19 health districts, with
the Armed Forces reporting unit, and Smith and Galveston
Counties leading the list. In California, 9 counties re-
ported the 22 measles cases with 7 cases from Ventura
County. Eighteen of North Carolina's 19 cases were from
Rowan County; these cases are now under intensive epi-
demiologic review. Wisconsin reported 13 of their 19
cases from Milwaukee and they are beginning an immediate
investigation. No reports are presently available from
Washington, Tennessee and Oregon.


OCTOBER 14, 1967
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

111 11 1262111 II I 11 118 2
3 1262 08864 1872


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT, WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 17,000, IS PUBLISHED AT THE NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE
DISEASE CENTER, ATLANTA, GEORGIA.
DIRECTOR, NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
DAVID J. SENCER, M.D.
CHIEF, EPIDEMIOLOGY PROGRAM A.D. LANGMUIR, M.D.
ACTING CHIEF, STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN, M.S.
IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY, THE NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE
INVESTIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH
OFFICIALS AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF
COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE
ADDRESSED TO:
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
NATIONAL : .'l.r.'l, &L DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA, : .. A "::' 3
NOTE: THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE
BASED ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE NCDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL
STATE HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES
ON SATURDAY; COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED
ON THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY.



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