Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00046

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text



NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE


Vol. 16, No. 38


WEEKLY

REPORT


Week Ending

September 23, 1967



PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


BUREAU OF DISEASE PREVENTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL


CURRENT TRENDS
ENCEPHALITIS 1967

Through the 3Sth week of 1967 (week i,-,h. Septem-
ber 23). cumulative totals of 1,171 cases of primary en-
cephalitis and 649 cases of "post-infectious" encephali-
tis have been reported through the National \orbidity
Reporting System. The totals of primary and "post-infec-
tious" encephalitis cases notified through the 38th week
of 1966 were 1,547 and 598. respectively.
The total number of encephalitis cases reported in
1966, shown with breakdowns of primary and "post-infec-
tious" encephalitis cases, is compared to respective data
for the first 36 weeks of 1967 in Figure 1. Approximately
the same incidence and seasonal distribution of "post-
infectious" encephalitis is evident in 1966 and to date

Fi
PRIMARY AND POST-It
600-
BY WEEK OF REI
TOTAL
1966
1967 -
500- PRIMARY
1966 ******.
1967 ......
POST-INFECTIOUS
o 400. 1966 -
a 1967 -
Cd


300-
a
LJ


Q-



100-
1 .. *;***e*.* *- ---
--oo# --,


O0 n -- i- ,
0 .


CONTENTS
Current Trends
Encephaliti 19 7 .........
Epidemiologic Notv, and Report
Salmonellois Nobracka ......
Pertussis Oklahoma ... .
International Notes
Poliom eli Nicaraua . .
Obscure DI)siase Related to African Monkeys


. 17


. 319
. 32 1


in 1967. The 1967 rate and seasonal distribution for pri-
mary encephalitis was similar to the trend in 1966 until
August and September. The summer peak of 1967 is con-
siderably lower than that of 1966. fi.. :,-, the relatively
few numbers of cases attributable "- encephalitis
reported thus far this year. fti|lnl.


gure 1
INFECTIOUS ENCEPHALITI
'ORT,* 1966 AND 1967


_:It %
^^******'
* Ik ^ *


48 52
)V DEC


4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40 44
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NC
WEEK NUMBER
TELEGRAPIC REPORTS FROM STATES TO NCDC (NATIONAL MORBIDITY REPORTING SYSTEM)


i i i






Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


SEPTEMBER 23, 1967


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
38th WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST 38 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE SEPTEMBER 23, SEPTEMBER 24, 1962 1966 MEDIAN
1967 1966 1967 1966 1962- 1966
Aseptic meningitis ...................... 128 136 94 2,023 2,062 1,431
Brucellosis. ............................ 4 5 9 193 174 273
Diphtheria............................... 4 10 9 94 142 178
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-borne & unspecified ........... 39 72 1,171 1,547 ---
Encephalitis, post-infectious .......... .. 14 9 649 598 -
Hepatitis, serum ........................ 59 33 ) 1,575 1,005
Hepatitis, infectious .................... 709 590 27,742 23,284 2
Malaria ............................... 30 23 3 1,431 297 69
Measles (rubeola)......................... 204 375 624 58,046 189,867 359,232
Meningococcal infections, total ........... 24 28 31 1,717 2,741 2,078
Civilian ............................ 23 26 1,603 2,465 --
Military .................... ......... 1 2 114 276 -
Poliomyelitis, total .................. 5 25 71 81
Paralytic ............................. 4 21 67 67
Rubella (German measles) ................ 146 216 --- 40,022 41,905 -
Streptococcal sore throat & scarlet fever .. 5,350 4,757 4,525 334,115 314,957 293,530
Tetanus................................. 2 3 6 158 131 196
Tularemia .............................. 3 8 6 134 132 210
Typhoid fever .......................... 8 9 12 306 275 303
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. spotted fever) 14 4 5 274 211 198

Rabies in animals ....................... 87 65 65 3,287 3,126 3,126

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: ......................................... 2 Rabies in man:............. ........................ 2
Botulism: .......................................... 2 Rubella, Congenital Syndrome: ........................ 4
Leptospirosis: .......................... ............ 28 Trichinosis: .......................... ........... 48
Plague:............ ..... ............. ............ 2 Typhus, murine: ................................... 31
Psittacosis: Texas-1 ........... ....... ........... 34 Polio, Unsp ....................................... 4


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
SALMONELLOSIS Nebraska


An outbreak of febrile gastroenteritis caused by Sal-
monella typhi-murium occurred over the Labor Day weekend
in Oxford, Nebraska, a town with a population of around
1,300 in the south central part of the state. On Septem-
ber 2, the town held its annual Turkey Days barbecue, in-
viting everyone in- the area to a free meal. Of the 4,000
people from 30 states attending, approximately 1,000 be-
came ill 12 to 72 hours later with diarrhea, cramps, and
fever. About 10 persons were hospitalized; no deaths were
reported. In a culture survey performed 2 weeks after the
outbreak, 1.78 of 1,100 persons who had eaten the meal
were still positive for S. typhi-murium.
Food histories implicated barbecued turkey roll as
the vehicle of infection. The turkey rolls had been pre-


pared from processed inspected frozen whole turkeys which
were thawed overnight and then boned, rolled, and refro-
zen in several hours. Prior to the barbecue, the rolls
were thawed, placed in a barbecue pit, and cooked over-
night. Apparently the pit temperature was not high enough
to adequately cook all of the meat. S. typhi-murium was
subsequently cultured from a sample of meat that was
served at the barbecue.
A repeat stool culture survey has been scheduled for
October 3 to evaluate the extent and duration of the car-
rier state in persons who attended the event.
(Reported by Dr. A. E. Rogers, Health Commissioner,
Nebraska Department of Health; Dr. Neil Bentley, Attend-
ing physician, Oxford, Nebraska; and a team from NCDC.)


PERTUSSIS Oklahoma


For the week ending September 11, 1967, nine cases
of whooping cough which occurred in the town of Kingfisher
(population 3,249) were reported to the Oklahoma State
Department of Health by the Kingfisher County Health De-
partment. At the time of the initial report, no etiologic
agent had been determined and the diagnosis had been
based on the characteristic clinical syndrome of whoop-
ing and post-tussive vomiting in an afebrile illness. Symp-


toms persisted for as long as one month. White blood counts
were in the range of 10,000 to 20,000 with no differentials
available. None of the nine children had previously re-
ceived any of the DPT series.
Upon further investigation, five additional suspect
cases were discovered. The 14 patients, whose ages ranged
from 9 months to 10 years, experienced onset of illness
(Continued on page 324)


318







SEPTEMBER 23, 1967


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


INTERNATIONAL NOTES
PARALYTIC POLIOMYELITIS Nicaragua


Through August 26, 1967, Nicaragua reported a total
of 457 cases of paralytic poliomyelitis to the Pan Ameri-
can Health Organization, representing an overall attack
rate of 26.0/100,000. A total of 44 deaths have been at-
tributed to the disease, giving a case fatality ratio of
9.6/100 cases. The attack rates in the 16 political de-
partments are, in general, directly proportional to the per-
cent of urban population in the given departments. The
epidemic curve for the 457 cases, based on the dates of
report, is shown in Figure 2.
The age distribution of cases and age specific attack
rates are listed in Table 1. Over 90 percent of the cases
occurred in children 4 years of age and younger. Most of
the 44 deaths have been in patients with bulbar polio-
myelitis. The age distribution for 42 of the fatal cases is
as follows: <1 year 15 deaths; 1 year 14 deaths; 2
years 8 deaths; 3 years none; 4 years 3 deaths;
5-9 years 2 deaths; and no deaths in patients 10 years
of age and older.
Table 1
Poliomyelitis in Nicaragua, 1967
Age Specific Attack Rates

Age Number Percent Attack
Group of of Total Population Rate per
(Years) Cases Cases 100,000

<1 137 30.4 317,259 129.5
1-4 274 60.8
5-9 23 5.1 302,252 7.6
>10 6 1.3 1,137,406 0.5
Unknown 17 2.4 --- --
Total 457 100.0 1,756,917 26.0
*Cases reported through August 26, 1967.


A National Immunization Campaign was held on July 9;
600,000 doses of trivalent oral poliovaccine were given


Fi
POLIOMYELITIS CASES IN NI


to children from 3 months to 15 years of age at any of
1,500 voting stations. On a follow-up Vaccination Day
conducted on July 20, over 820,000 doses of vaccine were
given to children up to 15 years of age.
Several type I poliovirus isolations have been made
from specimens submitted on paralytic cases at the Middle
America Research Unit.
(Reported by Dr. Charles Williams, Deputy Director, Pan
American Health Organization; Dr. Karl Johnson, Director,
Middle America Research Unit, National Institute of Al-
lergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH, Canal Zone; and a
team from NCDC.)
Editorial Note:
Poliomyelitis is endemic in Nicaragua. In Table 2,
epidemics are listed chronologically, beginning with the
first recorded one in 1938, with type of poliovirus and
attack rate per 100,000. In recent years, poliomyelitis
has reached epidemic proportions every 2 to 3 years. Ex-
cept for the 1958 epidemic when the disease reached a
peak in June and lasted until November, the outbreaks
have usually spanned the first 4 to 5 months of the year.
The current epidemic has had the highest recorded attack
rate to date.

Table 2
Epidemics of Poliomyelitis in Nicaragua
1935 1967

Year Type of Attack Rate
Poliovirus per 100,000
1938 ? 6.6
1958 II 17
1960 I 18.4
1963 III 9
1965 Unknown 6
1967 I 26.0


gure 2
CARAGUA BY DATE OF REPORT
1967


1Tk i
.:* ** r-.-'* --


319


4 Il 8 25 1 8 15 2229 6 13 2027 3 10 1724 1 8 15 2229 5 12 19 26 2 9 16 2330
MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT
DATE OF REPORT








320 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

SEPTEMBER 23, 1967 AND SEPTEMBER 24, 1966 (38th WEEK)

ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS

ASEPTIC Primary
AREA MENINGITIS BRUCELLOSIS DIPHTHERIA including Post- Serum Infectious
unsp. cases necti
1967 1966 1967 1967 1967 1966 1967 1967 1966 1967 1966
UNITED STATES... 128 136 4 4 39 72 14 59 33 709 590

NEW ENGLAND.......... 2 11 1 2 3 50 37
Maine.............. 2 12
New Hampshire...... 1
Vermont .............-
Massachusetts...... 1 2 1 1 22 15
Rhode Island....... 1 9 1 6 2
Connecticut........ 3 20 7

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 9 32 9 11 1 20 20 112 102
New York City...... 3 7 2 4 11 13 43 27
New York, up-State. 4 1 2 1 17 22
New Jersey......... 3 18 4 5 4 24 19
Pennsylvania....... 3 3 7 2 1 2 2 28 34

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 7 22 15 23 5 1 81 86
Ohio................ 2 7 15 22 26 25
Indiana............. 2 6 11
Illinois........... 2 6 1 4 15 19
Michigan........... 3 3 3 1 1 33 27
Wisconsin.......... 4 1 4

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 5 3 1 8 2 1 1 45 47
Minnesota.......... 5 1 2 1 11 4
Iowa............... 8 32
Missouri........... 1 7 1 23 4
North Dakota....... 2 1
South Dakota....... -
Nebraska........... -- 3
Kansas............. 1 3 3

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 42 18 2 2 2 3 81 53
Delaware........... 1 12 2
Maryland............ 32 3 1 17 17
Dist. of Columbia.. -
Virginia........... 1 6 7 4
West Virginia...... 1 1 1 9 2
North Carolina..... 7 1 2 1 7 10
South Carolina..... 5 1
Georgia............ 10 2
Florida............. 1 6 1 3 14 15

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 24 11 1 2 2 1 42 38
Kentucky............ 13 1 1 14 19
Tennessee.......... 2 9 1 2 1 7 14
Alabama ........... 1 8 3
Mississippi........ 9 1 13 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 5 10 3 3 13 1 4 1 75 40
Arkansas........... 4 7 5
Louisiana.......... 2 1 3 3 4 15 7
Oklahoma............. 2 2 3
Texas............... 3 8 2 6 1 1 51 25

MOUNTAIN............. 1 3 30 31
Montana............. 4
Idaho............... 1 1 4
Wyoming............ 3
Colorado............ 2 8 3
New Mexico......... 4 4
Arizona............ 4 12
Utah................ 9 2
Nevada............. 3

PACIFIC.............. 33 29 1 10 9 3 28 7 193 156
Washington......... 1 8 9
Oregon............... 3 3 6 17
California.......... 32 27 1 10 6 3 24 7 177 128
Alaska............ 1 1
Hawaii.............. 1 1 1 1
Puerto Rico 49 27









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 321


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

SEPTEMBER 23, 1967 AND SEPTEMBER 24, 1966 (38th WEEK) CONTINUED



MALARIA MEASLES (Rubeola) MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS, POLIOMYELITIS RUBELLA
AREA Cumulative Cumulative Total Paralytic
Cum.
1967 1967 1967 1966 1967 1967 1966 1967 1967 1967 1967


UNITED STATES... 30 204 58,046 189,867 24 1,717 2,741 21 146

NEW ENGLAND.......... 2 856 2,264 68 121 26
Maine.............. 239 201 3 9 1
New Hampshire...... 74 80 2 9 -
Vermont............ 42 238 1 4 -
Massachusetts...... 2 349 781 32 49 7
Rhode Island ....... 62 72 4 13 3
Connecticut........ 90 892 26 37 15

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 8 15 2,276 18,013 5 280 333 5 11
New York City...... 4 8 464 8,286 1 49 47 1 8
New York, Up-State. 2 2 587 2,535 1 68 93 1 3
New Jersey.......... 3 490 1,846 93 98 -
Pennsylvania....... 2 2 735 5,346 3 70 95 3 -

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 56 5,501 68,748 4 244 428 3 23
Ohio............... 8 1,150 6,351 80 116 6
Indiana............. 2 597 5,698 1 36 75 2
Illinois........... 2 979 11,363 1 55 79 2
Michigan........... 5 937 14,472 1 56 115 3 4
Wisconsin.......... 39 1,838 30,864 1 17 43 9

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 8 2,857 8,687 1 73 147 3 8
Minnesota.......... 123 1,643 18 34 2
Iowa................ 749 5,308 14 22 1 4
Missouri........... 333 531 15 57 -
North Dakota........ 870 1,088 1 11 -
South Dakota........ 1 54 40 6 4
Nebraska........... 7 635 77 1 13 8 2
Kansas............. 93 NN 6 11 2 -

SOUTH ATLANTIC........ 12 18 6,898 15,277 4 330 458 2 17
Delaware............ 46 257 6 4 -
Maryland............ 3 161 2,106 43 46 1 3
Dist. of Columbia.. 22 383 10 11 -
Virginia........... 2 2,191 2,182 41 55 2
West Virginia...... 4 1,390 5,286 1 26 24 9
North Carolina..... 11 4 853 487 3 70 118 1
South Carolina..... 511 657 29 48 -
Georgia............ 36 234 49 63 -
Florida............. 1 5 1,688 3,685 56 89 3

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 17 5,213 19,716 129 242 1 9
Kentucky........... 6 1,337 4,711 35 85 3
Tennessee.......... 8 1,880 12,301 55 81 4
Alabama......... 1,329 1,686 26 54 2
Mississippi........ 3 667 1,018 13 22 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1 47 17,439 24,570 3 222 375 7
Arkansas........... 1,404 971 31 35 -
Louisiana.......... 1 155 99 2 88 138 -
Oklahoma............ 3,351 487 16 19 1 -
Texas.............. 47 12,529 23,013 1 87 183 6 -

MOUNTAIN............. 17 4,672 11,978 1 32 85 16
Montana............ 5 287 1,817 1 4 1
Idaho............... 1 385 1,570 3 5 -
Wyoming............. 181 161 1 6 -
Colorado ........... 8 1,569 1,314 13 46 14
New Mexico......... 586 1,133 3 10 -
Arizona............. 1 1,019 5,300 4 10 -
Utah............... 2 376 640 4 1
Nevada............. 269 43 1 3 4 -

PACIFIC.............. 9 24 12,334 20,614 6 339 552 36
Washington.......... 2 8 5,439 3,565 29 37 9
Oregon.............. 5 1,609 1,801 2 27 34 2
California.......... 7 11 4,975 14,587 4 269 462 22
Alaska.............. 140 523 10 15 1
Hawaii............. 171 138 4 4 -


Puerto Rico.......... 14 2,126 2,770 12 11


~


~







322 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

SEPTEMBER 23, 1967 AND SEPTEMBER 24, 1966 (38th WEEK) CONTINUED

STREPTOCOCCAL TYPHUS FEVER
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA TYPHOID TICK-BORNE RABIES IN
AREA SCARLET FEVER (Rky. Mt. Spotted) ANIMALS
1967 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum.
1967 1967 1967 1967 1967
UNITED STATES... 5,350 2 158 3 134 8 306 14 274 87 3,287

NEW ENGLAND ...... 637 2 1 4 1 5 87
Maine.............. 59 16
New Hampshire...... 7 -- 1 43
Vermont............. 42 2 22
Massachusetts...... 143 1 1 2 1 2 4
Rhode Island....... 55 I 2
Connecticut........ 331 1 -- 1-

MIDDLE ATLANTIC ..... 151 12 1 30 4 34 4 73
New York City...... 5 6 15 -
New York, Up-State. 122 1 1 9 1 9 4 63
New Jersey......... NN 1 3 3 15
Pennsylvania....... 24 4 3 10 10

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 360 17 12 26 22 11 322
Ohio............... 29 4 6 11 4 110
Indiana............. 124 3 2 10 1 3 74
Illinois........... 53 8 10 3 10 62
Michigan........... 93 2 6 21
Wisconsin.......... 61 1 4 55

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 317 10 21 17 1 4 17 763
Minnesota.......... 8 3 1 1 1 5 150
Iowa............... 80 1 1 3 3 104
Missouri........... 4 5 8 8 1 3 142
North Dakota ...... 149 2 134
South Dakota....... 22 1 2 2 94
Nebraska........... 54 4 2 50
Kansas............. 10 1 2 89

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 557 38 9 1 49 2 111 10 417
Delaware ........ 8 -
Maryland........... 92 2 20 3
Dist. of Columbia.. 2 5 5
Virginia........... 176 9 1 6 27 183
West Virginia...... 139 1 2 1 1 57
North Carolina..... 14 6 3 1 44 3
South Carolina..... 5 1 2 10 1 5
Georgia............. 11 3 4 14 14 2 100
Florida............. 112 18 1 11 3 66

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,070 2 26 9 1 53 4 49 9 626
Kentucky............ 46 3 1 1 22 14 3 146
Tennessee.......... 805 8 6 9 23 5 431
Alabama............ 156 9 10 4 12 1 40
Mississippi........ 63 2 6 2 12 9

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 547 35 2 68 1 34 3 33 18 707
Arkansas........... 6 5 2 41 9 2 10 3 95
Louisiana.......... 4 3 6 14 2 61
Oklahoma............ 28 2 17 1 7 15 8 253
Texas............... 509 25 4 4 1 8 5 298

MOUNTAIN ............. 966 1 1 9 17 9 2 105
Montana............ 57 1 -- -
Idaho................. 55 -
Wyoming.............. 49 2 5
Colorado............ 571 I 12 9 10
New Mexico......... 107 1 1 1 31
Arizona............. 70 3 1 48
Utah............... 57 1 5 3
Nevada............... 8

PACIFIC.............. 745 17 5 4 76 11 11 187
Washington......... 180 2 1 2 1
Oregon.............. 74 1 1 3 3 3 1 4
California......... 420 13 2 1 69 6 10 182
Alaska.............. 52 -
Hawaii.............. 19 3 3 -

Puerto Rico.......... 3 15 1 5 1 27







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report






DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED SEPTEMBER 23, 1967

(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)


323


All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under

Area Al 65 years and year Area All 65 years and year
Ages and over influenza All Ages and over Influenza All
All Ages Causes All Ages Causes


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.-----
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.---------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.----
Philadelphia, Pa.----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.-----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.-----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio----------
Canton, Ohio-----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio-----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


708
226
45
24
32
61
25
21
28
40
54
15
59
31
47

3,156
50
38
116
42
32
43
56
84
1,640
35
464
183
38
118
30
42
45
47
22
31

2,441
53
36
699
158
186
116
80
340
42
48
25
20
47
151
33
129
39
32
36
113
58

802
69
28
39
131
21
102
68
205
87
52


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.-----------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.-----------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.----------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.----------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.-----------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.-----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.-----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.---------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.----------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


Total 11,794 1,753 366 625

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------ 467,904
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 266,905
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 16,488
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 23,861


Week No.
38


1,143
131
269
48
68
89
61
76
30
70
62
195
44

643
93
58
36
129
135
48
39
105

963
38
30
9
138
31
86
179
40
152
76
96
52
36

401
35
16
109
14
111
28
34
54

1,537
21
51
23
39
69
484
69
36
112
74
98
167
32
150
70
42






324 Morbidity and Mo





PERTUSSIS Oklahoma
(Continued from page 318)

between the last week in July and the second week in
September; however, 12 of the 14 cases occurred during or
after the last week in August. No common source exposure
could be elicited, ;ilh..,i.-h 8 of the 14 children live within
three blocks of each other.
Positive fluorescent antibody determinations for Borde-
tella pertussis were made from specimens from four chil-
dren who had experienced onset within the proceeding 10
days. Two of the four had been treated with antibiotics
but were still positive. Determinations on additional sus-
pect cases are now being performed.
To date, 57 cases of pertussis have been reported in
Oklahoma, compared to 17 for all of 1966. An immuniza-
tion campaign is currently in progress in Kingfisher County.
(Reported by R. LeRoy Carpenter, M.D., State Epidemiolo-
gist, Oklahoma State Department of Health; and an EIS
Officer.)






INTERNATIONAL NOTES
OBSCURE DISEASE RELATED TO AFRICAN MONKEYS
Serological Studies


In an attempt to facilitate identification of the agent
causing the obscure disease in persons having contact with
tissue from African green monkeys (MMWR, Vol. 16, Nos.
36 and 37), German investigators have made sera available
to a number of laboratories throughout the world. The re-
sults of extensive testing at the Yale Arbovirus Research
Unit, Rockefeller Foundation, are now available.
Specimens tested thus far include six sera taken 24
to 26 days after onset in patients with typical illnesses.
The complement fixation procedure has been carried out
using a wide variety of antigens. Three sera gave posi-
tive reactions at 1:8 dilution with Herpesvirus hominis;
this result is not considered significant. Negative or es-
sentially negative results have been obtained in all other
tests, which have included various Group A, Group B,
and Group C arboviruses, the Bunyamewera Supergroup,
the Tacaribe-Junin Group, and some 50 arboviruses still
categorized as "Ungrouped." Although the illness had
many features of a hemorrhagic fever, no evidence could
be found for a serologic relationship to Russian spring-
summer encephalitis, Omsk hemorrhagic fever, Kyasanur
Forest disease, or the South American hemorrhagic fever.
(Reported by Yale Arbovirus Research Unit, Rockefeller
Foundation, New Haven, Connecticut, through the Labora-
tory and Foreign Quarantine Programs, NCDC.)


irtality Weekly Report


SEPTEMBER 23, 1967
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

I 11111111 II l Illl II 2 111I 1 I lI
3 1262 08864 2029


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT, WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 17,000, IS PUBLISHED AT THE NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE
DISEASE CENTER, ATLANTA, GEORGIA.
DIRECTOR, NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
DAVID J. SENCER, M.D.
CHIEF, EPIDEMIOLOGY PROGRAM A.D. LANGMUIR, M.D.
ACTING CHIEF, STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN, M.S.
IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY, THE NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE
INVESTIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH
OFFICIALS AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF
COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE
ADDRESSED TO:
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333
NOTE: THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE
BASED ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE NCDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL
STATE HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES
ON SATURDAY; COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED
ON THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY.


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