Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00039

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text
' NATI / O COMMUNE E D E

NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE
BUREAU OF DISEASE PREVENTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL


Vol. 16 No. 4







SWeek Ending

January 28,1967




PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


CURRENT TRENDS
MEASLES-1967


A total of 1,660 cases of measles was reported for
the fourth week (ending January 28), an increase of 209
cases from the total of the previous week but 4,126 cases
less than the total of 5,786 reported for the 4th week in
1966. The three states reporting the highest numbers of
cases were Texas with 300, Washington with 248, and
West Virginia with 133 (includes delayed reports). Seven
states reported no measles activity; 14 states notified at
least one, but fewer than 10 cases.
Figure 1 presents the reported cases of measles from
the beginning of the epidemiologic year (week ending
October 15) in comparison with the same period during the
previous 3 years.


12,000




10,000-



C,
w
c, 8,000-

W
(C
0
I-
a- 6,000-
W




2 4,000-




2,000-


CONTENTS
Current Trends
Measles- 1967 .................. .... .. 25
Surveillance Summary
Botulism 1966 ........................ 2ti
Epidemiologic Notes and Reports
Staphylococcal Infection Washington .......... 32


(Reported by the Childhood Viral Diseases IUnit, Epi-
demiology Program, NCDC.)

Camden, New Jersey
Camden, New Jersey, (pop. 115,000) reported 44
eases of measles during the months of November and
December 1966. Over the previous 3 years Camden had
reported an average of 18 cases for the comparable period.
(Continued on page 26)


/ 1963-64


/"- 1964-65
/ /
/ ./


I.- -


87 / -//
/. 1 "




"I / ,"

.... .. "-


<.^' ". ." 1966-67
--O'o .


.-1965-66


15 22 29 5 12 19 26 3 10 17 24 31 7 14 21 28 4 II 18
OCT. NOV. DEC JAN FEB


Figure 1
REPORTED MEASLES IN THE UNITED STATES
1966-67 COMPARED WITH 1963-64 TO 1965-66







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CURRENT TRENDS- MEASLES, 1967
(Continued from front page)


Preliminary investigations revealed 99 unreported
cases in a single school system. A survey of kindergarten
through third grade children in the Camden public and
parochial schools indicated that there were 2,615 sus-
ceptibles among 7,000 children. Fifty percent of 12,500
preschoolers were estimated to be susceptible to measles.
During the week January 9 through 17, in an attempt
to abort thepotential epidemic, school physicians adminis-
tered 2,334 doses of Schwarz strain vaccine which had
been provided by the State Department of Health. Fur-
thermore, on Sunday, January 15, following a week of
intensive publicity, 2,125 preschool children were also
vaccinated. It is estimated that 75 percent of the pre-
school and school-age population of Camden is now pro-
tected against measles.
(Reported by Dr. William J. Dougherty, Director, Div-
ision of Preventable Diseases, New Jersey State Depart-
ment of Health; and an EIS Officer.)

Bangor, Maine
Sporadic cases of measles occurred in Bangor,Maine,
during the late summer months of 1966, and increasing
numbers of cases were noted in the early fall. On Novem-
ber 19, 1966, a citywide immunization program was con-


ducted during which 750 children were immunized (MMWR,
Vol. 15, No. 44). Despite this effort to control the disease,
measles cases continued to be reported from this com-
munity. During the second week in January 1967, it became
apparent that the cases reported from Bangor accounted
for over half (40/71) of the total reported from Maine in
November and December. Investigation indicated that the
cases were confined to the five elementary schools in
the western half of the city.
On January 11, it was declared that an epidemic
situation existed in Bangor; measles vaccine from the
NCDC epidemic control vaccine supply was requested
for use in containing the epidemic. On January 14, 1967,
a special Measles Epidemic Control Program was operated
cooperatively by three local pediatricians, the City Health
Department, and the State Health Department. Of the 380
children given Edmonston strain measles vaccine with
measles immune globulin, 216 were from the western
sector of the city. No cases of measles have been reported
in Bangor since this special Epidemic Control Clinic
was held.

(Reported by Dr. Dean Fisher, Commissioner, Maine
Department of Health and Welfare; and an EIS Officer.)


SURVEILLANCE SUMMARY
BOTULISM 1966


Thirteen cases ofbotulism from seven outbreaks were
reported to the NCDC from five states in 1966 (Table 1).

F
REPORTED CI
UNITED ST
50



40



u 30

20
u


W 20
z


io


No deaths were recorded. The diagnosis was confirmed in
nine cases by laboratory demonstration of botulinum toxin


figure 2
CASES OF BOTULISM
ATES, 1950-1966


1950 SI 2 5 54 5 5 '5 58 960 616 63 665 6 '7 6


JANUARY 28, 1967


1950 '51 '52 '53 '54 '55 '56 '57 '58 '59 '60 '61 ''62 '63


'64 '65 '66 '67 '68








JANUARY 28, 1967


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


in samples of incriminated foods orin sera of the patients.
No cases were attributed to commercially processed food.


Table 1
Botulism Cases 1966


State


New York
Maryland (Foreign
merchant ship)
Delaware
California
California
California
Indiana


Number
of
patients


Vehicle


1 Homecannedmushrooms B

3 ?Fish ?Smoked ham B


Home smoked venison
Home canned beets
and eggs


Total 13

The most unusual outbreak in 1966 occurred in Cali-
fornia where botulinum toxin, presumptively type F, was
isolated from venison jerky (MMWR, Vol. 15, Nos. 41 and
42). This is the second type F outbreak recorded.


Seven emergency requests for antitoxin were made to
the NCDC for presumptive cases of botulism during 1966.
Investigation indicated that two of these requests involved
outbreaks in which four persons were confirmed as having
type B botulism (Table 1). In two other "outbreaks,"
rapid recovery of patients and failure to demonstrate
toxin made the diagnosis of botulism doubtful. Diagnosis
in the remaining "outbreaks" included familial hyper-
cholesterolemia, staphylococcal food poisoning, and
atropine intoxication.
The numbers of botulism cases reported for the past
17 years is shown in Figure 2. In 1965, eighteen cases
from seven outbreaks in six states were documented. The
unusually high incidence recorded in 1963 is the highest
since 1939 and represents 46 cases from 12 outbreaks.
Three of the 1963 outbreaks involved 22 cases of type E
botulism and were related to the consumption of com-
mercially prepared smoked fish.




(Reported by the Bacterial Diseases Section, Epidem-
iology Program, NCDC.)


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
4th WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE. FIRST 4 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE JANUARY 28, JANUARY 29. 1962 1966 MEDIAN
1967 1966 1967 1966 1962 1966
Aseptic meningitis ................ ..36 22 26 112 109 109
Brucellosis.............................. 6 8 6 14 14 19
Diphtheria. ........ .............. .. 3 4 7 6 10 18
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-borne & unspecified .......... 20 21 -- 78 89 -
Encephalitis, post-infectious ......... ... 11 12 -- 31 50 -
Hepatitis, serum ........................ 30 24 1 138 76 3
Hepatitis, infectious .................... 810 756 1,1 2.829 2,74748
Malaria ............................... 22 12 1 89 25 6
Measles (rubeola)......................... 1,660 5,786 7,644 5,593 20,146 26,398
Meningococcal infections, total ......... 44 68 50 235 289 205
Civilian ............................ 41 64 218 264 -
Military ............ .................. 3 4 17 25 -
Poliomyelitis, total ......... .- 4 1 5
Paralytic ........................... 3 3
Rubella (German measles) ................ 642 963 -- 2,044 3,113 -
Streptococcal sore throat & scarlet fever 12,457 10,126 10,177 42,909 36,482 33,862
Tetanus ................................ 4 3 5 10 6 11
Tularemia .................... ......... .4 5 5 13 17 30
Typhoid fever ........................... 9 8 9 18 18 21
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. spotted fever) 1 4 7 3

Rabies in animals ...................... 78 81 81 283 284 244

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax ...................... .................... Rabies in man ............ .......................
Botulism ..... ......... ... ....... .......... Rubella, Congenital Syndrome ........................
Leptospirosis ........................................ 3 Trichinosis: NYC-1, NY-UpS.-1 ...................... 7
Plague .......................................... Typhus, murine ....................................... -
Psittacosis ........................................ 5 ............. .........................









28 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED
JANUARY 28, 1967 AND JANUARY 29, 1966 (4th WEEK)


ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS

ASEPTIC Primary
AREA MENINGITIS BRUCELLOSIS DIPHTHERIA including Post- Serum Infectious
unsp. cases Infectious

1967 1966 1967 1967 1967 1966 1967 (1967 1966 1967 1966
UNITED STATES... 36 22 6 3 20 21 11 30 24 810 756

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1 1 2 2 37 26
Maine.............. 5 7
New Hampshire...... 1 2
Vermont..............
Massachusetts...... 1 16 9
Rhode Island....... 1 3 4
Connecticut........ 1 1 2 12 4

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 9 5 1 2 9 18 9 139 156
New York City...... 2 1 3 8 5 51 19
New York, up-State. 1 2 3 1 39 53
New Jersey.......... 7 2 1 2 7 3 21 18
Pennsylvania....... 1 1 1 2 28 66

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 4 2 1 8 3 2 3 148 157
Ohio............... 8 1 1 30 31
Indiana............. 1 1 21 19
Illinois........... 1 1 16 33
Michigan........... 2 2 1 2 1 63 71
Wisconsin.......... 1 18 3

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 2 1 1 2 47 24
Minnesota.......... 1 2 13 11
Iowa................ 1 4 2
Missouri............ 26 6
North Dakota....... 1 1
South Dakota....... --1 1 1
Nebraska........... 1
Kansas............. 1 3

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 3 3 1 3 2 6 1 85 55
Delaware............ 1 1 5 1
Maryland............ 1 1 1 1 24 8
Dist. of Columbia.. -
Virginia........... 1 2 14 10
West Virginia...... 15 9
North Carolina..... 1 1 5 11
South Carolina..... 5 3
Georgia............ 9 2
Florida............ 1 2 5 8 11

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 9 1 1 59 59
Kentucky........... 14 18
Tennessee.......... 1 25 26
Alabama............ 9 1 8 4
Mississippi ........ 12 11

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 3 1 1 1 2 89 53
Arkansas........... 8 9
Louisiana.......... 1 1 2 5 3
Oklahoma............ 7
Texas.............. 3 1 69 41

MOUNTAIN............. 2 1 2 48 66
Montana............ 1 -
Idaho.............. 3 1
Wyoming............ 1 6 2
Colorado............ 1 1 1 3 5
New Mexico......... 1 26 21
Arizona............ 6 18
Utah............... 3 19
Nevada............. -

PACIFIC.............. 11 7 1 4 2 4 6 7 158 160
Washington......... 1 1 1 16 6
Oregon............... 45 21
California.......... 9 5 4 2 3 6 7 96 132
Alaska............. 1
Hawaii............. 1 -

Puerto Rico 4 10









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 29


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JANUARY 28, 1967 AND JANUARY 29, 1966 (4th WEEK) CONTINUED


MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS,
MALARIA MEASLES (Rubeola) TOTAL POLIOMYELITIS RUBELLA
AREA ________Total Paralytic
AREA Cumulative Cumulative Total Paralytic
Cum.
1967 1967 1967 1966 1967 1967 1966 1967 1967 1967 1967
UNITED-STATES... 22 1,660 5,593 20,146 44 235 289 642

NEW ENGLAND........... 2 14 47 277 1 7 19 55
Maine............... 1 5 31 1 6
New Hampshire...... 4 7
Vermont............. 4 109 1 -
Massachusetts...... 2 10 31 63 3 5 21
Rhode Island....... 2 27 2 3
Connecticut........ 3 5 43 1 3 4 25

MIDDLE ATLANTIC..... 7 80 240 3,307 8 37 56 23
New York City...... 1 10 34 1,549 1 7 13 10
New York, Up-State. 18 68 471 2 11 10 13
New Jersey......... 22 77 302 3 14 18 -
Pennsylvania....... 6 30 61 985 2 5 15 -

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 173 613 8,376 7 22 47 72
Ohio............... 22 57 469 2 9 18 10
Indiana............. 17 96 345 2 3 4 -- 6
Illinois........... 23 62 1,766 1 4 6 16
Michigan........... 44 161 1,305 1 4 15 40
Wisconsin.......... 67 237 4,491 1 2 4 -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 71 211 710 10 14 32
Minnesota.......... 6 11 344 1 3
Iowa................ 9 38 166 2 2 25
Missouri........... 2 8 34 3 5 -
North Dakota....... 25 74 157 7
South Dakota....... 14 1 1 1 -
Nebraska........... 29 66 8 2 1 -
Kansas............. NN NN NN 1 2

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 2 283 693 1,944 11 44 51 85
Delaware............ 3 7 35 3
Maryland............. 5 7 311 3 6 6 1
Dist. of Columbia.. 4 84 -
Virginia........... 133* 199 121 3 6 3 14
West Virginia...... 34 121 983 1 8 2 21
North Carolina..... 47 122 32 2 9 9 -
South Carolina..... 1 2 3 93 1 2 10 5
Georgia.............. 8 28 4 4 -
Florida............. 1 59 222 257 1 9 17 41

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 134 599 2,425 4 19 9 42
Kentucky............ 21 86 830 2 6 3 1
Tennessee........... 40 235 1,522 7 4 19
Alabama............. 52 118 30 2 2 22
Mississippi........ 21 160 43 2 4 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 5 394 1,526 1,115 9 39 23
Arkansas............ 1 41 178 22 2 -
Louisiana.......... 6 19 16 5 17 6 -
Oklahoma............ 4 47 148 10 2 2 -
Texas............... 300 1,181 1,067 2 20 15 -

MOUNTAIN............. 127 467 832 6 13 29
Montana............ 24 112 198 1 11
Idaho .............. 7 35 200 -
Wyoming............ 12 -
Colorado............ 52 94 61 1 10 13
New Mexico......... 26 73 4 3 1 -
Arizona.............. 11 66 327 -
Utah................ 2 12 26 5
Nevada............. 5 75 4 1 1

PACIFIC.............. 6 384 1,197 1,160 4 51 57 304
Washington.......... 248 677 346 1 5 163
Oregon.............. 55 205 128 1 4 3 17
California.......... 6 66 255 667 2 44 40 117
Alaska............... 7 46 1 1 2 7 4
Hawaii.............. 8 14 18 2 3
Puerto Rico.......... 1 53 166 248 1 1

*Includes delayed reports not allocated to week.








30 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JANUARY 28, 1967 AND JANUARY 29, 1966 (4(h WEEK) CONTINUED


STREPTOCOCCAL TYPHUS FEVER
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA TYPHOID TICK-BORNE RABIES IN
ARSCARLET FEVER (Rky. Mt. Spotted) ANIMALS
AREA
1967 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum.
1967 1967 1967 1967 1967

UNITED STATES... 12,457 4 10 4 13 9 18 1 4 78 283

NEW ENGLAND.......... 2,119 1 1
Maine.............. 112 1 1
New Hampshire...... 11 -
Vermont............ 30
Massachusetts...... 396
Rhode Island....... 84
Connecticut........ 1,486 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 630 3 4 9
New York City...... 26 2 2 -
New York, Up-State. 471 -- 6
New Jersey......... NN -
Pennsylvania....... 133 1 1 -- 3

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 1,300 2 2 1 1 5 13
Ohio................ 241 1 1 4 8
Indiana............ 122 1 2
Illinois........... 200 2 2 3
Michigan ........... 512 -
Wisconsin ......... 225 -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 507 1 3 18 86
Minnesota.......... 7 1 10 20
Iowa................ 228 1 7
Missouri .......... 4 1 4 23
North Dakota....... 145 1 13
South Dakota....... 13 2 10
Nebraska........... 5 4
Kansas.............. 105 2 9

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 1,492 1 2 2 1 3 10 36
Delaware ........... 23 -
Maryland.......... 277 -
Dist. of Columbia.. 20 -
Virginia............ 567 1 1 4 17
West Virginia...... 385 3 6
North Carolina..... 27 1 2
South Carolina..... 28 2 -
Georgia............ 8 1 2 8
Florida............. 157 1 1 5

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,338 3 1 2 1 3 1 1 18 66
Kentucky........... 29 4 17
Tennessee.......... 1,085 3 1 2 1 1 1 1 14 48
Alabama............ 192 2 -
Mississippi........ 32 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,229 1 1 1 4 21 48
Arkansas........... 3 2 8
Louisiana.......... 3 1 4 3 5
Oklahoma .......... 47 1 1 5 11
Texas.............. 1,176 11 24

MOUNTAIN............. 2,221 3 2 4 7
Montana............. 89 1 -
Idaho.............. 118 -
Wyoming............. 130 -
Colorado............. 1,237 -
New Mexico......... 376 4 4
Arizona............. 138 1 3
Utah.............. 130 2 -
Nevada............. 3

PACIFIC.............. 1,621 3 4 3 3 1 17
Washington......... 429 -
Oregon.............. 74 -
California......... 967 2 3 3 3 1 17
Alaska.............. 122 -
Hawaii............. 29 1 1 -

Puerto Rico.......... 8 2 2








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED JANUARY 28, 1967


(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)

All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under

Area All 65 years and 1 year Area All 65 years and i year
Age and over Influenza All Age and over Influenza All
All Ages Causes All Ages Causes


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.-----
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.*--------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.-----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.-----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.-----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------l
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.-------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


751
223
39
32
41
64
27
28
30
51
57
15
59
30
55

3,396
41
48
134
49
27
34
71
111
1,710
40
514
206
50
109
36
31
64
61
27
33

2,695
53
30
791
156
228
122
64
430
45
52
39
19
60
155
29
147
34
29
28
122
62

925
63
25
35
123
41
140
63
275
93
67


470
124
24
24
30
37
17
20
24
32
34
11
36
17
40

2,024
27
30
87
29
13
17
52
42
1,021
26
275
117
38
75
20
25
45
41
20
24

1,566
33
16
448
91
126
82
38
247
34
24
25
10
36
78
15
87
19
19
19
72
47

592
40
18
21
71
35
89
42
170
69
37


*Estimate based on average percent


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.-----------
Baltimore, Md.----------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.-----------
Savannah, Ga.-----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.------------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.-----------
Fort Worth, Tex.--------
Houston, Tex.----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.-----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.-
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash..---------


1,208
140
253
53
82
81
53
86
40
67
90
195
68

655
99
42
44
131
144
44
30
121

1,125
40
32
15
147
39
69
217
56
175
94
130
69
42

461
39
23
139
22
96
35
46
61

1,871
23
36
41
58
78
624
135
44
124
61
87
240
50
159
62
49


Total 13,087 7,692 542 677

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks


All Causes, All Ages -------------------------
All Causes, Age 65 and over-------------------
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages-------------
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age---------------


54,325
31,354
2,236
2,794


Week No.


I


of divisional total.















EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
STAPHYLOCOCCAL INFECTION Washington


An outbreak of cutaneous infections due to Staphylo-
coccus aureus(coagulase positive, phage type 29) occurred
among members of a high school football team in Washing-
ton (luring the end of August and beginning of September
1966. Of the six players who developed boils or follicu-
litis. one had had a series of dermatological problems
over the summer, including the onset of pustular lesions
on his right knee 3 days prior to the first football scrimmage
on August 27. Three players shared the index case's elbow
pad and subsequently developed lesions at the right el-
bow. Two of the other players borrowed elbow pads from
infected players and developed similar lesions. The sixth
player used only his own equipment; he probably became
infected through body contact during scrimmage sessions
or via fomites. Four- of the six infected players suffered
enough discomfort to contact a physician; one person was
hospitalized. There. was no evidence of a concurrent prob-
lem of this type elsewhere in the school.
Nasal swabs' were obtained from 33 members of the
team. Staphylococcus aureus coagulasee positive) was
recovered from 17 of the 33 individuals, including the head
coach, from the wounds of five of the six players with
abscesses, and from an elbow pad and a helmet. The strains
from the five players with abscesses and from the coach
were phage type 29; the organism carried by the players
was sensitive to penicillin, however, while that from the
manager was resistant to penicillin.
Upon recommendation of the public health nurse, the
football equipment was sprayed with Lysol. locker-room
floors were treated with an antiseptic, and facilities were
scrubbed with disinfectants. All boys with lesions were
temporarily barred from participating with the team until
their infections had cleared.
(Reported by Dr. E.A. Ager, State Epidemiologist, Wash-
ington State Health Department; and two EIS Officers.)



ERRATUM: Vol. 16, No. 3, pages 20-22:

The Weekly Telegraphic Report received from Hawaii
for the week ending January 21, 1967, was inaccurate.
Incorrect data should be changed as follows:

Incorrect Correct

Aseptic meningitis 3
Measles 16 2
Rubella 210 10
Streptococcal Sore Throat
and Scarlet Fever 252 52


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

1 IIIII I ll lIIlIIII II It ll 111111111111
3 1262 08864 2185

JANUARY 28, 1967


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT, WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 17.000, IS PUBLISHED AT THE NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE
DISEASE CENTER, ATLANTA, GEORGIA.
DIRECTOR, NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
DAVID J. SENCER, M.D.
CHIEF, EPIDEMIOLOGY PROGRAM A.D. LANGMUIR, M.D.
ACTING CHIEF, STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN, M.S.
IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY. THE NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE
INVESTIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH
OFFICIALS AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF
COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE
ADDRESSED TO:
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333
NOTE: THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE
BASED ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE NCDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL
STATE HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES
ON SATURDAY; COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED
ON THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY.




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