Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00038

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text



NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER /H.


| Vol. 16, No. 2







eek Ending
'W "'E i E. u..' iuary 14, 196;




U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND iNEALTH SERVICE

BUREAU OF DISEASE PREVENTION AND ENVIRON L


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
SALMONELLOSIS- Georgia

A large outbreak of salmonella gastroenteritis has
been traced to a New Year's Eve party at which a buffet
dinner was served. From an incomplete list of approx-
imately 540 guests, 116 persons were interviewed by
telephone for clinical and food histories. Of these, 51
(44 percent) were ill with watery diarrhea, cramps, vomiting,
headache, and fever of 101-1030; three persons were
briefly hospitalized. The mean incubation period was 22/,
hours and the illness lasted from 2 to 4 days. Salmonella
st. paul has been recovered from stool specimens from
five of the patients.


CONTENT
Epidemiologic Notes and Reports
Salmonellosis .. ......
Current Trends
Measles- 1967 ...
Surveillance Summary
Meningococcal Infections- 1967


9
. . 9

. . 10

S 1 1


Food histories clearly incriminated a turkey salad
made from commercially prepared, precooked frozen turkey
rolls and salad ingredients. The same salad ingredients
were used in other salads which were not implicated, and
cold sliced turkey from the same lot as the turkey rolls
was served separately but not implicated. None of the
(Continued on page 10)


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
2nd WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST 2 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE JANUARY 14, JANUARY 15, 1962 1966 MEDIAN
1967 1966 1967 1966 1962 1966
Aseptic meningitis ................... ... .26 41 30 47 71 49
Brucellosis................ ............ 2 4 4 6 4 7
Diphtheria.......... ..................... 2 2 6 2 3 9
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-borne & unspecified ......... 21 24 37 43
Encephalitis, post-infectious ............ 8 16 -- 13 25 -
Hepatitis, serum ........................ 42 22 869 79 32
Hepatitis, infectious .................... 718 695 1,270 1,360
Malaria ............................... 19 3 40 8 2
Measles rubeolaa) ....................... 1,345 5,544 6.746 2,417 9,428 11,949
Meningococcal infections, total .......... 76 94 56 118 158 102
Civilian ............................ 68 87 --- 109 146
Military........... ......... .... .... 8 7 9 12 -
Poliomyelitis, total ......... .. .. .. .- 1 1 1
Paralytic ......................... -
Rubella (German measles)................. 503 930 752 1,326 -
Streptococcal sore throat & scarlet fever .. 10,211 9,441 8,734 18,525 16,835 15,544
Tetanus................................ 2 5 3 3 8
Tularemia ................................ 3 4 7 5 8 15
Typhoid fever ......................... 2 5 5 4 8 7
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. spotted fever). 2 3 7 1

Rabies in animals ..................... 66 70 70 134 142 119

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: .... ........................ .......... Rabies in man:................... .. ..........
Botulism: ............ ........... .............. Rubella, Congenital Syndrome: ......................
Leptospirosis: Fla.-l, Hawaii- ........................ 3 Trichinosis: Mass.-l, Pa.- ........................... 4
Plague: ..................................... ........ Typhus, marine: ............................. ..
Psittacosis: K ans.-l, M ass.-1 ................... ..... 4 ................ ..................... .








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
SALMONELLOSIS Georgia
(Continued from front page)


served food was available for culture. The kitchen em-
ployees denied symptoms of gastroenteritis, but 6 of 14
stool cultures obtained from them grew Salmonella st. paul.
All six employees with positive cultures had a hand in
preparing the turkey salad and admitted that they had
eaten a portion during preparation.
Cultures from the environment and from food ingredi-


ents were negative for salmonella. Several studies are
in progress, including a more extensive sampling of the
turkey rolls from the same commercial shipment.
(Reported by Dr. John McCroan, Director, Section of Bio-
logic Studies, and Mr. Tom McKinley, Assistant State
Epidemiologist, Georgia Department of Public Health;
and two EIS Officers.)


CURRENT TRENDS
MEASLES 1967


The low level of reported measles in the 1966-67
epidemiologic year continued during the week ending
January 14 when 1,345 cases were recorded. This total is
273 cases higher than the total of 1,072 for the week
ending January 7, but is 4,199 cases less than the total
of 5,544 reported for the comparable week in 1966.
Thirty percent of the current week's total number of


cases were reported from Texas (298 cases) and Washing-
ton (110 cases). Seven additional states reported more
than 50 cases. Nine states reported less than five cases,
and no cases were reported from eight states.


(Reported by the Childhood Viral Diseases Section,
Epidemiology Program, NCDC.)


Figure 1
REPORTED MEASLES IN THE UNITED STATES
1966-67 COMPARED WITH 1963-64 TO 1965-66


..1965-66
o''


-- .... 1966 67


JANUARY 14, 1967


12,000




10,000-




S8,000-
o


0
S6,000-




4,000
z
Z


2,000


15 '22 '29 5 12 19 26 3 I 17 24 31 7 14 21 28 4 II 18 25
OCT NOV DEC. JAN. FEB.
*EEK ENDING








JANUARY 14, 1967


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


ANNUAL SURVEILLANCE SUMMARY
MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS -1966


The total of 3,373 meningococcal infections reported
to the National Communicable Disease Center during 1966
represents an increase of 10.6 percent over the 1965 total
of 3.051 cases. Most of this increase occurred from March
through June 1966; since July the weekly totals have
closely followed those of the previous years (Figure 2).


Of the 1966 total, 331 cases (9.8 percent) were re-
ported from military installations; 80 percent of these
cases were from California, Louisiana, New Jersey,
Kentucky, Texas, South Carolina, and Missouri. In con-
trast, only 7 percent of total cases in 1965 were reported
from the military.


Figure 2
MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS BY WEEK OF REPORT
1965, 1966 AND MEDIAN, 1961-65- UNITED STATES


1961-65 MEDIAN


I I I I '
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY


The 1966 attack rate for meningococcal infections in the
United States was 1.7 per 100,000. As shown in Figure 3,
this represents a continuation of the mild upward trend in
attack rates which has been evident since 1962.

Figure 3
MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS-ANNUAL RATE
PER 100,000-UNITED STATES, 1920-65


JUN JUL AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC
MONTH
Table 1 presents the analysis by serogroup of 776
strains of Neisseria meningitidis which were isolated
mainly from blood or cerebrospinal fluid in 1966. As
anticipated on the basis of experience in 1964 and 1965,
the predominant serogroup was again group B, comprising
approximately 70 percent of the total number of strains.


Table 1
Strains of Neisseria meningitidis
Submitted to NCDC 1966

Serogroup Number Percent

A 2 0.25
B 548 70.6
C 98 12.6
D 2 0.25
Not typed &
"rough" strains 126 16.3


0o,- -25 90 5Tta7710 0


1940 45 1950 '55 1960 65 1970


1 I I I I I 1 1_1 Ir_ I 1 11 __ T---T --.-1 1---


Total


776 100.0


1920 '25 1930 35









12 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED
JANUARY 14, 19671AND JANUARY 15, 1966 (2nd WEEK)


ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS

ASEPTIC Primary
AREA MENINGITIS BRUCELLOSIS DIPHTHERIA including Post- Serum Infectious
unsp. cases Infectious
1967 1966 1967 1967 1967 1966 1967 1967 1966 1967 1966
UNITED STATES... 26 41 2 2 21 24 8 42 22 718 695

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1 1 3 1 41 36
Maine............... 1 5 17
New Hampshire...... 1 1
Vermont............ -
Massachusetts...... 1 16 10
Rhode Island....... 1 1 6 -
Connecticut........ 1 13 8

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 3 6 5 9 16 13 83 137
New York City...... 2 1 2 2 11 4 27 11
New York, Up-State. 2 2 1 17 63
New Jersey.......... 1 1 1 3 2 7 17 25
Pennsylvania....... 2 4 3 1 22 38

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 5 3 2 2 118 117
Ohio................ 5 2 31 25
Indiana............. 1 8
Illinois........... 1 16 28
Michigan........... 1 2 2 62 47
Wisconsin .......... 8 9

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 1 52 18
Minnesota.......... 1 2 3
Iowa................ 10 5
Missouri........... 1 28 5
North Dakota........ 2 1
South Dakota....... -
Nebraska............ 3 -
Kansas............. 7 4

SOUTH ATLANTIC........ 3 3 1 1 5 2 2 81 56
Delaware............ 2 3
Maryland........... 1 1 1 21 10
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 1-
Virginia........... 1 2 22 12
West Virginia...... 13 4
North Carolina..... 2 1 1 2 14
South Carolina..... 1 2
Georgia............ 14
Florida............ 2 1 1 1 5 11

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1 11 1 1 1 63 67
Kentucky............ 10 39 23
Tennessee.......... 1 1 1 1 14 32
Alabama............ 1 3 3
Mississippi........ 7 9

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1 4 2 1 1 1 2 58 54
Arkansas........... 1 5 6
Louisiana.......... 7 8
Oklahoma........... 1 2
Texas............. 1 4 2 1 2 44 40

MOUNTAIN............ 2 2 1 46 53
Montana............ 5
Idaho.............. 8 2
Wyoming ............
Colorado........... 1 1 3
New Mexico......... 2 11 15
Arizona............ 2 16 25
Utah............... 5 4
Nevada............. 4

PACIFIC.............. 18 13 2 4 4 19 6 176 157
Washington......... 19 9
Oregon............. 39 19
California......... 16 13 2 1 4 19 6 116 122
Alaska............. 6
Hawaii .............- -

Puerto Rico -










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 13


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JANUARY 14, 1967 AND JANUARY 15, 1966 (2nd WEEK) CONTINUED


MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS
MALARIA MEASLES (Rubeola) TOTAL POLIOMYELITIS RUBELLA
AREA Cumulative Cumulative Total Paralytic
Cum.
1967 1967 1967 1966 1967 1967 1966 1967 1967 1967 1967
UNITED STATES... 19 1,345 2,417 9,428 76 118 158 503

NEW ENGLAND........... 3 16 24 122 4 4 12 79
Maine.............. 1 2 4 16 1 1 17
New Hampshire...... 3 3
Vermont............ 1 47 1
Massachusetts...... 2 11 16 28 2 2 4 25
Rhode Island....... 2 2 9 1 5
Connecticut........ 1 1 19 1 1 3 32

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 3 62 92 1,640 14 21 35 18
New York City...... 1 10 13 740 2 4 11 11
New York, Up-State. 16 29 282 5 6 5 6
New Jersey.......... 19 29 241 6 10 10 -
Pennsylvania....... 2 17 21 377 1 1 9 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 153 252 4,101 5 8 24 118
Ohio................ 12 19 212 3 5 10 8
Indiana............. 21 41 221 3 5
Illinois........... 12 18 978 1 1 3 11
Michigan........... 54 72 488 1 6 42
Wisconsin.......... 54 102 2,202 1 1 2 52

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 75 89 231 6 7 9 16
Minnesota.......... 4 4 66 1 1 3 4
Iowa................ 11 14 68 2 2 1 6
Missouri........... 1 2 2 16 2 2 1 -- 1
North Dakota....... 28 37 76 5
South Dakota....... 1 1
Nebraska........... 30 32 4 1 2 1 -
Kansas............ NN NN NN 2

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 4 141 247 965 8 24 26 29
Delaware ........... 17 -
Maryland............ 1 1 1 125 1 1 4 3
Dist. of Columbia.. 4 4 32 -
Virginia........... 23 46 20 1 2 1
West Virginia...... 16 44 559 3 15
North Carolina..... 27 43 13 2 6 4
South Carolina..... 3 1 72 1 1 7
Georgia............. 20 4 4 -
Florida............ 70 108 107 3 7 7 10

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1 113 273 1,007 4 6 1 14
Kentucky............ 8 33 282 1 5
Tennessee.......... 73 121 687 3 4 1 9
Alabama............. 1 4 34 9 1 1 -
Mississippi........ 28 85 29 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 2 380 650 492 12 19 10 27
Arkansas........... 61 66 18 I 1
Louisiana.......... 1 9 9 10 6 8 2
Oklahoma........... 1 12 16 1 -
Texas.............. 298 559 463 6 11 7 26

MOUNTAIN............. 121 234 408 1 2 8 53
Montana............ 11 56 79 1
Idaho............... 16 22 107 37
Wyoming............ 7 -
Colorado........... 15 33 27 8 1
New Mexico......... 22 29 2 1 2
Arizona............ 21 43 175 14
Utah................ 4 7 -
Nevada............. 36 47 4 -

PACIFIC............... 5 284 556 462 22 27 33 149
Washington.......... 110 269 132 1 1 1 46
Oregon............... 88 140 65 2 3 2 39
California......... 5 69 112 258 19 23 21 56
Alaska.............. 13 31 7 5
Hawaii.............. 4 4 7 2 3
Puerto Rico.......... 7 50 108 2










14 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JANUARY 14, 1967 AND JANUARY 15, 1966 (2nd WEEK) CONTINUED


STREPTOCOCCAL TYPHUS FEVER
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA TYPHOID TICK-BORNE RA IN
AREA SCARLET FEVER (Rky. Mt. Spotted) ANIMALS
AREA
1967 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum.
1967 1967 1967 1967 1967

UNITED STATES... 10,211 2 3 3 5 2 4 3 66 134

NEW ENGLAND........... 1,470 -
Maine .............. 87
New Hampshire...... 8 -
Vermont ............ 42 -
Massachusetts ...... 264 -
Rhode Island....... 138 -
Connecticut........ 931 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 310 1 4
New York City...... 26 -
New York, Up-State. 230 1 3
New Jersey......... NN -
Pennsylvania....... 54 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 1,485 1 4
Ohio............... 171 1
Indiana............ 151 1 1
Illinois........... 370 2
Michigan ........... 624 -
Wisconsin .......... 169 -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 512 1 2 2 1 45
Minnesota.......... 8 5 6
Iowa............... 185 2 5
Missouri........... 19 1 1 6 11
North Dakota....... 170 4 10
South Dakota....... 32 2 6
Nebraska........... 4 1
Kansas............. 94 1 2 6

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 1,122 1 2 3 12 21
Delaware........... 34
Maryland............ 181 -
Dist. of Columbia..
Virginia............ 458 8 12
West Virginia...... 166 1 3
North Carolina..... 17 2
South Carolina..... 5 1 2 -
Georgia............ 8 1 3 6
Florida............. 253

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,257 2 3 1 1 2 2 19 36
Kentucky............ 235 4 9
Tennessee.......... 936 2 3 1 1 15 27
Alabama............ 23 2 2 -
Mississippi........ 63

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,027 5 15
Arkansas........... 21 4 4
Louisiana .......... 3 1 1
Oklahoma........... 47 5
Texas ............. 956 5

MOUNTAIN............. 1,194 2 1 3
Montana............ 59 -
Idaho.............. 206 -
Wyoming............ 42 -
Colorado............ 517 -
New Mexico......... 212
Arizona............ 153 1 1 3
Utah ...............- -
Nevada ............ 5 -

PACIFIC.............. 1,834 6 6
Washington......... 515 -
Oregon............ 67 -
California......... 1,118 6 6
Alaska............. 102 -
Hawaii ............ 32 -

Puerto Rico.......... -








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report






DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED JANUARY 14, 1967

(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)


All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under

Area All 65 years and 1 year Area All 65 years and 1 year
Influenza All Ages and over Influenza All
All Ages Causes All Ages Causes


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.-----
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.----------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.-----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.---------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


787
258
43
35
37
45
18
18
33
60
69
14
60
40
57

3,594
49
38
158
48
24
40
88
112
1,833
38
560
181
67
116
32
44
48
48
32
38

2,810
70
22
820
186
253
128
78
382
53
43
51
61
45
144
23
149
41
35
43
113
70

1,033
104
23
48
161
24
149
91
286
86
61


458
140
26
25
23
21
10
15
24
32
41
10
34
25
32

2,146
28
22
98
23
13
25
55
55
1,082
23
339
98
47
79
24
31
28
29
22
25

1,584
44
15
432
107
140
62
46
216
35
24
32
32
35
80
13
95
22
18
20
71
45

645
62
17
25
102
21
99
59
164
63
33


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.-----------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.-----------
Savannah, Ga.-----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.- ----
Wilmington, Del*-----

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.----------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.------------
El Paso, Tex.-----------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.-----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.----------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.-----------


1,356
174
283
55
101
112
54
82
53
98
74
217
53

782
119
53
48
184
166
49
53
110

1,289
59
35
27
173
49
100
173
60
232
84
132
72
93

513
48
23
147
19
113
36
48
79

1,867
24
39
40
48
101
730
60
50
118
74
102
202
36
146
47
50


Total 14,031 8,015 574 752

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 27,480
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 15,677
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 1,168
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 1,445


Week No.


3
3
13
8
8
19
8
23
5
9
6
4

25
6
2
9

6
1

1

79


1
3
5
39
3
2
2
3
5
5

8
2
1








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


3 1262 08864 2300

JANUARY 14, 1967


MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS -1966
(Continued from page 11)


The sulfadiazine sensitivity of meningococci submit-
ted to the NCDC from 1964 to 1966 is shown in Figure 4.
The pattern of sulfadiazine sensitivity of strains isolated
in 1966 was quite similar to that observed in 1965, espe-
cially at minimum inhibitory concentrations of 1 milligram
percent or less. There was,however, a higher proportion of
strains in 1966 that required 5 milligrams percent or more
for inhibition. Forty percent of the 1966 strains were
resistant to a concentration of 1 milligram percent of
sulfadiazine.

Figure 4
SUSCEPTIBILITY OF MENINGOCOCCI
oo, TO SULFADIAZIN E*


5 01 05 so 5o 100 >100
MINIMUM 1N1IaiTORY coNCENtRATION
MILIR.MS PERCENT
"SOLITED FROM BLOOD OR CEREBROSPINA, IL SUMITrTro TO TUE NCDC

In Figure 5 the sulfonamide sensitivity of groups B
and C Neisseria meningitidis is compared. In contrast
to the generally more resistant group B meningococci,
over 80 percent of group C strains were inhibited by 1
milligram percent or less of sulfadiazine. Nevertheless,
10 percent of group C strains were resistant to 10 milli-
grams percent sulfadiazine.

Figure 5
SUSCEPTIBILITY OF GROUP B AND C MENINGOCOCCI
ooi TO SULFADIAZINE


MI NIMUM 51 100 T o 0o



(Reported by /he BcRterial Diseases Section, Epidenm-
iology Program; and Dr. Josep/h H. Schubert, Bacterial
Serology Unit, Bacteriology Section, Laborattoy Improve-
ment Program, NCDC.)


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT, WITA i .: *
TION OF 17,000, IS PUBLISHED AT THE NATIONAL C*:**'i.*N.: ,-.1_
DISEASE CENTER, ATLANTA, GEORGIA.
DIRECTOR, NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
DAVID J. SENCER, M.D.
CHIEF, EPIDEMIOLOGY PROGRAM A.D. LANGMUIR, M.D.
ACTING CHIEF, STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN, M.S.
IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY, THE NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE
INVESTIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH
OFFICIALS AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF
COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE
ADDRESSED TO:
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333
NOTE: THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE
BASED ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE NCDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL
STATE HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES
ON SATURDAY; COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED
ON THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY.


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1964-267


751 STRAINS