Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00037

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text
~I IL/
fr. (C;9 J i '7
I r
L
F v


NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


'$ .d*'


aIC~d 2ff.:>.


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE


Vol. 16, No. 6







Week Ending

Februaryll,1967



PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


BUREAU OF DISEASE PREVENTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL


CURRENT TRENDS
MEASLES 1967

The pattern of a gradually increasing incidence of
measles cases observed during the first 5 weeks of 1967
is continuing (Figure 1). For the 6th week (ending Febru-
ary 11). 2,406 cases were reported. This total is 201
cases more than for the previous week, but is 4,613 cases
less than for the comparable week of 1966.
Five states reported more than 100 cases for the
current week: Arkansas-5 12; California-149: Tennes-
see-132: Texas-457: and Washington-251. A large
percentage of the total number of cases reported from
\rkansas for the sixth week repr. -, -I I,..] Ir '.....
the last week of January and ttI. r-i 'I -I ..) !

-/ ,

R1:,OTED MEASLES IN
12,0001 o MPARE I


I 0,000




co 8,000


ir
0
L 6,000


L,
m 4,000
z


2,000


CONT ENT'S
current t Trends
Measles 19 67 ......
EpidemiolonUi Notie andi Report_
tIpatitis -I N 'v Mexico ...
Report',d (~, is<- (il Infl ctious Syphili,
January 9Liti January 1967 .


. 7. t

. 17


The cumulative number of cases for the first 6 weeks
of 1967 is 10,326. During the same 6-week period in 1966,
cases totaled 33,022, and for the previous 3 years the
respective totals were 42,629, 38,191, and 51,041. Thus.
the current year's total is approximately one quarter of
the mean number of cases for the comparable (i-week
period of the previous 4 years.
(Reported by the Childhood Viral Diseases Unit, Epi-
demiolojy Program, (CC.)



UNITED STATES, 1966-67
.-64 TO 1965-66
/1963-64
/


-1964-65



.-1965-66


-"',i- (. .1966-67





15 22 29 5 12 19 26 3 10 7 24 31 7 14 21 28 4 II 18 25
OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB


SL ..
..... ".:.#. ,/


;
i


.1















Between August 1 and November 20, 1966, 51 cases
of hepatitis are known to have occurred among Indians
living on or near the Zuni Indian Reservation in north-
western New Mexico. No cases had been reported during
the first 7 months of 1966. All of the patients had typical
icteric illnesses characterized by fever, nausea, malaise,
abdominal pain, and hepatomegaly. These illnesses were
generally mild and there were no deaths. Liver function
tests performed on 46 of the patients showed abnormal-
ities consistent with viral hepatitis.
Of the 51 patients, 48 were Zuni Indians and 3 were
Navaho Indians living in the Ramah-Navaho Area south-
east of the Zuni Reservation. Only one of the latter three
patients had either visited Zuni or had had known contact
with persons from Zuni.
The age and sex distribution of the 51 cases is
shown in Table 1. Forty-five of the 51 patients were less
than 10years old, and of these, 42 were clustered between
2 and 7 years of age. Twenty of the patients were males
and 31 were females.
The epidemic curve by weekof onset shows an initial
small cluster in mid-August, followed by a single wave

F
10VIRAL HEPATITIS IN THE ZU
ZUNI, N
AUGUST 1-N
9


8


7


FEBRUARY 11, 1967


Table 1
Age and Sex Distribution of 51 Cases of Viral Hepatitis
Zuni-Romah Health Service Unit, Zuni, New Mexico

Age Males Females Total

0-4 8 14 22
5-9 9 14 23
10-14 1 1 2
15-19 0 1 1
20-29 0 0 0
30-39 1 1 2
40-49 1 0 1
50+ 0 0 0

Total 20 31 51


with the peak number of cases having onsets during the
week ending October 16 (Figure 2). There was no signi-
ficant geographic aggregation of cases. Thirty-four per-
cent of the patients had had definite contact with a prior
case of hepatitis 2 weeks to months prior to their onsets.

(Continued on page 52)


igure 2
NI-RAMAH HEALTH
IEW MEXICO
OVEMBER 20, 1966


SERVICE UNIT


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report



EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
HEPATITIS ON ZUNI INDIAN RESERVATION
New Mexico


AUGUST SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER

WEEK ENDING











FEBRUARY 11, 1967


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


SUMMARY OF REPORTED CASES OF INFECTIOUS SYPHILIS JANUARY 1967 AND JANUARY 1966
CAnS' OF PRIMARY MAN SilCONDARY ';YPHl IS: BY RH PORTING; ARIAN IANUARY 1967 ANDU V NIA RY lit r I'KV I't' I NA. i)lDA


Repirtting Ar-.


'iiW E NCt(IANI)..........

New Hlri;p hi ra.-.. ..... .
M .r. ................
,ssa ihus t..........
Rhode Isliandi............


MIIDDIO F ATLANT1(:..........
tpsltt e Nt w Y r t ........
New York City...........

Philadelphia. .. ... ......
New Jers y.. .............

EAST NORTH CENTRAL. .........
Ohio ................... ..
tndtia t ..............
Donstate I nois.......
Chicago ..... ..........
Mich ga... ..............




NMt nneso................
iowa I. .. ..... .... ... .
N, mis ur t .. .. ...........
Nt ua s ..............


iOUlTH AT1ANT lC(...........
Dl i.war .................
iLirv land. i.... ..
District of C l hibia ....
Vlrganta ................
W-st Vri.- u i .........
North Ca liam ..........
Vouth Car. a. ....... .
C ,ria.................
Fiir'da .........t.....


Jn147 1966 1.967 ,
I~thl l st, itri]1 trot6


Reptri ng At,,t


+ P -i. i P i ____


48


EA:T ,.OU1 (.KRAl ....... I


Kctit i~v ........ .. .


AIr S .o ..... .........i... t


MOiUNTAIN.............. 57
ip' .OlT, to.. N ......... .
Arkin. s... ........... .. I

MOUNTA I ................ 5
iotat ................ .
Iahr ................. 1
Wyoming .................



oth.. .............


PCIFI .... ......... .... 1
Washini t ... ... ...
reg 3. ............ .
C ifornati .............. 144
AlaskH .................
Oawa itT ..............

U, 5, TOTAL ............. i,6l


1 .853


I .853


TERRITORIE5 ...8 8
T:RR 1-, Ei ......50 4 )........ 4
Ri 48 82 4 82
Virg;n Islandi...........




Note Cumulativ'e Totals include revised and delayed reports
through previous m nths.


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)

6th WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE. FIRST 6 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE FEBRUARY 11, FEBRUARY 12. 1962- 1966 MEDIAN

1967 1966 1967 1966 1962 1966

Aseptic meningitis ... ... ...... ... 26 29 22 168 157 157
Brucellosis ....... ...... 2 7 7 17 24 28
Diphtheria. .......... .......... .4 4 4 16 16 28
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-borne & unspecified ......... 34 24 --- 126 137
Encephalitis, post-infectious .. ...... ... 13 12 -- 58 76 -
Hepatitis, serum ................... .... 31 19 208 121
Hepatitis, infectious .................... 790 711 1,039 4.490 4.186 5,504
Malaria ............................ 48 9 2 197 35 12
Measles (rubeola)....................... 2,406 7,019 9,361 10,326 33,022 42,629
Meningococcal infections, total ........... 57 85 70 345 439 337
Civilian ........ ................... 54 65 321 387 -
Military ............. .... ........... 3 20 --- 24 52
Poliomyelitis, total ................ ... 1 1 2 6
Paralytic ................... ........ 1 1 1 4
Rubella (German measles) .............. 1,021 1.375 3.921 5,642 --
Streptococcal sore throat & scarlet fever .. 12,062 12,155 11,315 67.045 59,022 56,146
Tetanus................................ 2 3 3 15 10 20
Tularemia .......................... 1 6 4 14 24 37
Typhoid fever .......................... 6 4 6 34 28 39
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. spotted fever). 4 7 3

Rabies in animals ....................... .. 86 92 89 438 434 407


NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY


A nthrax ...................
B otulism ................................. ......
Leptospirosis Md.-l ..............................
P league ............... .. ..................... .
Psittacosis: Mass.-I ............... ...... .........


Cum.

Rabies in man .. .......
Rubella. Congenital Syndrome
5 Trichinosis: Calif.-1, Maine-1, Mass.-l ........
Typhus. murine........... ........
6


i... .. i r y i









48 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

FEBRUARY 11, 1967 AND FEBRUARY 12, 1966 (6th WEEK)


ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS

ASEPTIC Primary
AREA MENINGITIS BRI Cl LOSIS DIPHTHERIA including Post- Serum Infectious
unsp. cases Infectious
1967 1966 1967 1967 1967 1966 1967 1967 1966 1967 1966


UNITED STATES... 26 29 2 4 34 24 13 31 19 790 711

NEW ENGLAND.......... 2 5 3 2 34 30
Maine............. 10
New Hampshire...... 4 3
Vermont...........
Massachusetts...... 1 2 1 1 21 8
Rhode Island....... 1 3 2 1 4 8
Connecticut ....... 5 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 8 2 4 7 13 10 101 102
New York City...... 4 3 10 5 19 19
New York, Up-State. 1 41 27
New Jersey......... 5 1 2 2 5 8 14
Pennsylvania....... 2 1 1 33 42

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 1 1 8 4 2 1 1 164 122
Ohio................ 1 5 34 31
Indiana.............. 1 1 1 25 14
Illinois........... 1 1 1 27 24
Michigan........... -- 3 2 1 54 46
Wisconsin.......... 1 24 7

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 1 1 1 54 29
Minnesota.......... 1 4 9
Iowa............... 14 4
Missouri ........... 1 26 6
North Dakota....... 1 1
South Dakota...... -
Nebraska............ 1 -
Kansas............. 8 9

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 1 4 10 3 5 2 2 86 59
Delaware ........... 3 1
Maryland........... 1 1 1 28 16
Dist. of Columbia.. -
Virginia........... 1 17 9
West Virginia...... 7 6
North Carolina..... 3 7 13
South Carolina..... 4 1
Georgia............ 10 12 -
Florida............. 2 4 1 1 8 12

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 3 7 1 1 63 66
Kentucky........... 4 16 26
Tennessee.......... -i I 33 27
Alabama............ 3 3 10 4
Mississippi........ 1 4 9

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 2 5 1 2 1 4 71 63
Arkansas........... 1 5 7
Louisiana........... 1 1 1 10 6
Oklahoma........... 9 4
Texas.............. 2 4 1 1 3 47 46

MOUNTAIN............. 1 2 1 21 50
Montana............ 1 3
Idaho.............. 5 -
Wyoming............ 1 2
Colorado........... 1 11 15
New Mexico......... 3 13
Arizona............ --- 1 -- -- --- --- --- --- 13
Utah................ 2 4
Nevada.............. -

PACIFIC.............. 9 8 1 6 3 1 12 5 196 190
Washington......... 2 1 1 23 18
Oregon............. 1 35 28
California......... 6 8 4 3 11 5 135 143
Alaska............. 2 1
Hawaii............. 2 1


Puerto Rico I- 8 9








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly ReKport 49



CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED) STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED)

FI BRIARY 11, 1967 AND EIlBRI AR 12, 1966 (Ith l W1 K) (ONTINI El)



MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS,
MALARIA MEASLES (Rubcola) NIN TOTAL POLIOMYELITIS RUtBELIA
AREA- T.l P y l.....
Cumulative Cumulat iv
C I t r 0,C t I To a I,,a,

UNITED STATES... 48 ,406 10,326 33,022 57 345 439 1,021

NEW ENGLAND........... 1 33 116 459 1 10 24 128
Maine......... ..... 3 8 48 I 57
New Hampshire...... 5 7 1
Vermont............ 3 16 136 1 -
Massachusetts...... 10 56 159 4 8 12
Rhode Island....... I 14 20 32 2 4
Connecticut........ 1 16 79 1 5 6 54

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 5 94 419 5,131 7 50 71 24
New York City...... 10 54 2,559 9 14 9
New York, Up-State. 32 116 674 3 15 15 15
New Jersey.......... 1 9 107 447 3 20 23
Pennsylvania....... 4 43 142 1,451 1 6 19

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 235 996 13,087 3 34 73 201
Ohio............... 60 130 711 1 13 24 10
Indiana............. 13 127 471 1 4 7 19
Illinois............ 23 100 2,617 1 7 13 37
Michigan........... 84 267 2,130 8 20 44
Wisconsin.......... 55 372 7,158 2 9 91

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 75 359 1,311 4 18 21 59
Minnesota .......... 3 16 519 2 4 5 3
Iowa............... 1 51 99 439 2 4 47
Missouri........... 4 14 81 1 5 6 2
North Dakota....... 10 128 255 7
South Dakota....... 15 2 3 1
Nebraska........... 7 87 15 1 3 2
Kansas............. NN NN NN 1 3

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 22 169 1,168 2,889 11 63 74 56
Delaware........... 9 41 2
Maryland............ 5 18 521 2 9 8 9
Dist. of Columbia.. 4 129 -
Virginia........... 57 299 220 2 8 7 8
West Virginia...... 43 278 1,411 8 3 15
North Carolina..... 18 32 257 37 3 12 17
South Carolina..... 2 8 12 132 2 14 4
Georgia............. 2 9 34 2 10 5
Florida............. 24 282 364 2 12 20 20

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 2 238 1,306 4,320 8 34 29 77
Kentucky............ 12 370 1,772 2 11 15 3
Tennessee.......... 132 515 2,395 4 15 10 13
Alabama............ 2 76 235 81 1 3 3 61
Mississippi........ 18 186 72 1 5 1 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 3 1,048 3,137 2,233 12 59 49 64
Arkansas........... 1 512* 711 24 1 1 5 5
Louisiana........... 2 3 22 25 5 27 9 -
Oklahoma............ 76 371 21 2 2 -
Texas.............. 457 2,033 2,163 6 29 33 59

MOUNTAIN ............. 55 656 1,410 1 9 19 46
Montana............ 14 138 255 2 7
Idaho............... 20 72 224 1 4
Wyoming.............. 12 21 1 -
Colorado............ 8 114 149 3 13 32
New Mexico......... 4 100 4 3 1
Arizona............. --- --- 92 700 --- --- --- ---
Utah............... 4 23 53 1 1 3
Nevada............. 5 105 4 1 1

PACIFIC.............. 14 459 2,169 2,182 10 68 79 366
Washington........... 251 1,199 636 1 2 5 75
Oregon.............. 45 286 220 1 6 3 21
California.......... 4 149 604 1,294 8 58 61 244
Alaska............... 7 55 7 2 8 2
Hawaii............. 10 7 25 25 2 24

Puerto Rico........... 53 293 379 2 3 1

*Delayed Reporting For Last Week of January and First Week of February.









50 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

FEBRUARY 11, 1967 AND FEBRUARY 12, 1966 (6th WEEK) CONTINUED


STREPTOCOCCAL TYPHUS FEVER
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA TYPHOID TICK-BORNE RABIES IN
AREA SCARLET FEVER (Rky. Mt. Spotted) ANIMALS
1967 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum.
1967 1967 1967 1967 1967
UNITED STATES... 12,062 2 15 1 14 6 34 4 86 438

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1,627 2 3
Maine............... 95 1
New Hampshire...... 18 1 1
Vermont............ 5 1 1
Massachusetts...... 277 -
Rhode Island....... 94 -
Connecticut........ 1,138 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 469 1 1 6 9
New York City...... 18 1 4
New York, Up-State. 390 1 6
New Jersey......... NN -
Pennsylvania....... 61 1 3

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 1,619 2 2 11 28
Ohio............. .. 226 1 5 15
Indiana............. 236 4 7
Illinois........... 237 2 1 4
Michigan............ 675 1 1
Wisconsin.......... 245 1 1

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 646 1 3 19 129
Minnesota.......... 22 1 7 33
Iowa............... 337 1 14
Missouri........... 9 1 6 31
North Dakota....... 162 1 22
South Dakota....... 17 4 15
Nebraska........... 5 4
Kansas.............. 94 2 10

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 1,034 3 2 1 2 3 11 52
Delaware........... 8
Maryland............ 191
Dist. of Columbia.. -
Virginia........... 402 2 1 1 5 26
West Virginia...... 264 2 8
North Carolina..... 44 1 2 1 1
South Carolina..... 70 2 -
Georgia............ 5 1 2 11
Florida............ 50 1 1 6

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,760 3 2 4 1 20 102
Kentucky............ 126 3 25
Tennessee........... 1,411 3 2 1 1 16 74
Alabama............ 134 3 1 2
Mississippi........ 89 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,125 1 2 1 4 12 16 82
Arkansas........... 4 1 1 5 16
Louisiana.......... 2 3 11 1 7
Oklahoma........... 7 1 3 18
Texas.............. 1,112 1 2 7 41

MOUNTAIN .............. 1,827 1 4 2 7
Montana............ 142 1 -
Idaho............... 189 -
Wyoming............ 3 -
Colorado........... 1,108 1 1
New Mexico......... 166 4
Arizona............ --- --- --- --- 1 --- --- 3
Utah................ 205 2 -
Nevada............. 14

PACIFIC .............. 1,955 1 5 6 7 26
Washington......... 498
Oregon............. 92 .
California......... 1,299 1 4 6 7 26
Alaska............. 33 -
Hawaii.............. 33 1 -


Puerto Rico.......... 9


I7_T I







Morbidity and Mortality WeeklH Report


DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED FIBRIUARY 11, 196'

(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)


All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under
Area All 65 years and 1 year Area All 65 years and 1 yar
Age and over Influenza All and over Influenza All
All Ages Causes All Ages LCauses


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.------..
Bridgeport, Conn.----
Cambridge, Mass.----..-
Fall River, Mass.-----.
Hartford, Conn.------
Lowell, Mass.-----...
Lynn, Mass.----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.----------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.-----
Erie, Pa.------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.--------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.--------
Reading, Pa.-----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.----------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.-----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.----------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.-----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans*----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.-------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


759
275
39
38
25
49
22
27
26
42
56
12
49
34
65

3,358
61
30
162
53
32
48
67
85
1,614
45
511
215
61
120
22
43
70
48
38
33

2,677
59
43
786
149
221
110
80
391
25
64
40
44
48
180
42
132
37
27
26
101
72

882
65
41
39
138
26
114
98
236
67
58


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.------------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.-------------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.-----------
Savannah, Ga.-----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.--------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.----------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.-----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.--------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.-----------


1,111
134
172
53
59
112
63
83
38
74
72
202
49

607
111
50
34
108
122
42
47
93

1,267
48
32
30
126
53
91
201
84
203
132
120
70
77

426
56
13
108
18
96
22
58
55

1,692
22
43
33
50
67
533
72
36
140
65
98
193
48
188
55
49


608
61
93
25
33
64
35
52
17
63
46
94
25

333
61
24
16
70
58
20
29
55

677
31
15
20
66
24
49
99
42
108
63
79
40
41

240
30
10
60
11
51
13
34
31

1,059
13
22
28
26
44
342
41
25
81
38
61
111
36
124
37
30


Total 12,779 7,385 469 671

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 79,744
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 45,963
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 3,258
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 4,101


Week No.














EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
HEPATITIS ON ZUNI INDIAN RESERVATION
New Mexico (('otinued from page 46)

Cases among older children tended to occur early in
the epidemic while cases among younger children had
later onsets. Of 21 cases occurring on or before October 2,
only 4 (19 percent) were in children from 0 to 4 years of
age. while among the 30 cases occurring after October 2,
1S (60 percent) were in children between 0 and 4 years
of age.
Thirty of the 51 cases were in children attending
school, most of whom were in the lower grades, and 17 of
the cases were in preschool children. However, there was
no particular concentration in any elementary school and
no particular aggregation of ill children in certain class-
rooms. Furthermore. those patients having histories of
contact with a prior case had that contact away from
school.
The occurrence of cases over an interval of nearly 4
months, together with the predominance of cases among
children, suggests that the mode of transmission was
person-to-person. The clustering of cases in children
7 years of age and younger appears to represent new
susceptibles introduced into the community since 1960-61,
the last epidemic year at this Reservation.
During the course of the epidemic, gamma globulin
was administered to household contacts of each patient
and to other children in the same classroom as the patient.
\lore than 70 Iprcent of the younger school children re-
ceived globulin while only about 5 percent of the pre-
school group received it. It was observed that, as an
increasing level of passive immunization among the
older group was achieved, the proportion of cases among
preschool children increased. Subsequently, the overall
incidence declined. Thus, the administration of immune
globulin chiefly among one segment of the susceptible
population appears to have been important in ini ,r.' the
epidemic.
(Reported by Dr. E.F. Mclntyre, Assistant, Indian Health
Area Director, Albuquerque Field Office, Division of
Indian Health, Bureau of Medical Services, PHS; Dr.
Riehard W. Sauerman, Service Unit Director, USPHS
Indian Hospital, Gallup, New Mexico; Dr. Thomas H.
Tomlinson Jr., Associate Director, Human Factors, New
Vexico Department of Public Health; and a team from
CDC.)



ERRATUM: Vol. 16, No. 4, p. 25:

VX.r, r,; not West V;r;ini., reported 133 measles
cases i .i iudir.in delayed reports) for the week ending
January 28, 1967.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

111 I I I I 1111 111111111111 II IIII III
3 1262 08864 2326

FEBRUARY 11, 1967


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT, WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF i i"-; IS PUBLISHED AT THE NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE
DISEASE C i'Tr, ATLANTA, GEORGIA.
DIRECTOR NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
DAVID J. SENCER. M.D.
CHIEF EPIDEMIOLOGY PROGRAM A.D. LANGMUIR. M.D.
ACTING CHIEF. STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN. M.S.
IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDiTY AND MORTALITY, THE NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE
INVESTIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH
OFFICIALS AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF
COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE
ADDRESSED TO:
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
NATIONAL : "-'r,.,- .lt DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA, :.
NOTE: THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE
BASED ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE NCDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL
STATE HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES
ON SATURDAY; COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED
ON THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY.



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