Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00019

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text


NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER ^


Vol. 16, No. 31







Week Ending
August 5, 1967


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE


PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


BUREAU OF DISEASE PREVENTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
POLIOMYELITIS Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

In July 1967, one case of poliomyelitis was reported
from Philadelphia. Pennsylvania. A second possible case
is under investigation. Prior to these, no cases had been
reported from the city since 1963.
One case was reported in a 9-month-old Puerto Rican
boy who developed asymmetrical paralysis of the extrem-
ities which progressed to respiratory insufficiency early
in July. Poliovirus type 1, subsequently characterized as
a "wild type" at the Wistar Institute, was isolated from
throat washings and stool specimens. The patient had
never been immunized against polio.


CONTENTS
Epid-nmi olo. e Notes and Reports
Poliomyelitis Philadelphia, Pennslvan ia .. .. 257
Case of Imported R:abies Nev York ..... 25
Survcil lance Summnary
Hep titis Spring Quarter and ReIie of
-piemi olo ic Year 1966-6 . ..... 25S
International Notes
Quarantine Measures ............... .. ... 264

A possible case occurred in a 2-year-old Negro male
who developed a febrile illness with vomiting, diarrhea.
and leg weakness in early June. Although the clinical
picture \\as complicated by plumbism. type 1 polio\irus
was isolated from throat washings and stool specimens.
(Continued on page 258)


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
31st WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE. FIRST 31 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE AUGUST 5, AUGUST 6, 1962 1966 MEDIAN
1967 1966 1967 1966 1962 1966
Aseptic meningitis ........ ........ .. 72 93 64 1,178 1,104 952
Brucellosis ............................. 7 3 6 160 131 216
Diphtheria ............................ .- 1 1 61 99 151
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-borne & unspecified .......... 47 39 -- 827 841 --
Encephalitis, post-infectious .... ...... 23 13 557 533 --
Hepatitis, serum ....... .................. 45 44 63 1,251 815 24,239
Hepatitis, infectious .................... 655 559 22,886 19,558
Malaria .......................... ..... 36 3 1 1,184 192 52
Measles (rubeola)......................... 288 844 1,746 56,624 186,190 352,595
Meningococcal infections, total ........... 26 43 40 1,564 2,525 1.795
Civilian ............................ 26 43 1,456 2,261 -
Military....................... ...... .- --- 108 264 -
Poliomyelitis, total .................. .. 1 10 9 19 55 61
Paralytic.............................. 1 10 8 16 51 51
Rubella (German measles) ................ 203 281 -- 38,849 40,386 -"
Streptococcal sore throat & scarlet fever .. 4,201 4,396 3,911 301,031 286,236 265,358
Tetanus. ................................. 3 6 8 116 98 146
Tularemia ... ....................... 6 2 6 100 94 170
Typhoid fever .......................... 10 12 11 234 206 236
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. spotted fever) 15 16 15 160 150 135

Rabies in animals ...................... ..76 70 69 2,729 2,602 2,602

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: ............... ............................ 2 Rabies in man: NYState-1* ............. ....... 2
Botulism: ........................................... 2 Rubella, Congenital Syndrome: ....................... 4
Leptospirosis: ....................................... 22 Trichinosis; NYC-2 .. .............. ... ...... 45
P league: ............................................. 2 Typhus, m urine: Ala.-1 .................... .......... 28
Psittacosis: Jass.-2, Tex.-1 .......................... 31 Polio, Unsp................ ............ ...... 3
*Imported







258


Further characterization is pending. The patient was hos-
pitalized for one month and is now fully recovered. The
child had an undocumented history of unknown doses of
oral polio vaccine in 1965 and 1966.
Preliminary investigation failed to reveal any rela-
tionship of the cases to vaccine or to each other, and did
not suggest a link to cases in other geographic areas. The
two cases occurred within a half mile of each other in
low socioeconomic neighborhoods; an earlier survey in-
dicated that the residents in these areas were poorly
immunized. A survey of selected Philadelphia hospitals

CASE OF IMPORTED
A confirmed case of imported rabies occurred in a 58-
year-old woman who was bitten by a stray dog in Guinea,
Africa, on May 31. 1967, and died in a New York Naval
Hospital on July 25, 1967.
The patient had been treated with 21 daily doses of
duck embryo vaccine but no serum. The lesion on her leg
was slow to heal, and on July 16 she began experiencing
pain in the left leg which progressed into the lumbar re-
gion by the next day. She was transferred from Africa.by
plane to New York; while en route, she had laryngeal
spasms and was agitated and belligerent. On admission to
St. Albans Naval Hospital on July 20, she was unable to


AUGUST 5, 1967


disclosed no other cases of paralytic disease. Further
investigation and an ongoing program of hospital surveil-
lance will be undertaken by the Philadelphia Health De-
partment in cooperation with NCDC.
(Reported by William D. Schrack, Jr., M.D., Director, Divi-
sion of Communicable Diseases, Pennsylvania Department
of Health; Lewis D. Polk, M.D., Deputy Health Commis-
sioner for Community Health Services, and Sylvan M. Fish,
M.D., Chief, Communicable Disease Section, both withthe
City of Philadelphia Department of Health; and an EIS
Officer.)


RABIES New York
swallow. The patient followed a clinical course of increas-
ingly severe encephalitic symptoms to death on July 25.
Autopsy specimens were found highly positive for ra-
bies by Sellers stain and by direct fluorescent microscopy
procedures by the Laboratories for Veterinary Science,
Griffin Laboratory, New York State Department of Health.

(Reported by Dr. Julia Freitag, Director, Office of Epi-
demiology, Division of Public Health Research, Develop-
ment and Evaluation, New York State Department of Health;
Dr. C. F. Bishop, Director of Laboratories, St. Albans
Naval Hospital, St. Albans, New York.)


SURVEILLANCE SUMMARY
HEPATITIS
Spring Quarter and Review of Epidemiologic Year 1966-67*


During the last quarter of the epidemiologic year 1966-
67* (April 2 through July 1, 1967), 9,920 cases of viral
hepatitis were reported in the United States. This repre-


sents a rate of 5.0 cases per 100,000 population for the
spring quarter. For the entire epidemiologic year 1966-67
(July 3, 1966 through July 1, 1967), a total of 37,250 cases


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report




POLIOMYELITIS Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
(Continued from front page)







AUGUST 5, 1967


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


HEPATITIS continued d from paye 258S


of viral hepatitis were reported in the Inited States, repre-
senting an annual rate of IS.t cases per 100.000 population.
Figure 1 presents the number of reported cases per
100,000 population by 4-week periods from July 1952
through the 30th week of 1967 (week .i;. July 29, 1967).
The decline in incidence observed over the past 3 months
is consi-tent with the normal seasonal patterns. However.
the upswing noted during the fall and winter quarters of
epidemiologic year 1966-67 appears to represent a reversal
in the downward trend observed in the 5 years following
the peak year of 1960-61.
Tables I and 2 show the numbers of cases and rates.
respectively. for the spring quarter and epidemiologic year
1966-67 in relation to those for the last 10 epidemiologic


Table 1
Number of Reported Cases of Viral Hepatitis Per Quarter
(Values include revised and delayed iueckly report
through current tueek)

Fpidemi- Summer Fall Winter ",_ Total-
oloic Quarter Quarter Quarter Quarter Year
Year
1956-57 3,469 4.115 5,019 3,938 16,541
1957-58 2,925 2.782 4,414 3.876 13,997
1958-59 3,262 4,243* 7,0bS 4,s6-t 19,457
1959-60 4,630 6,134 9.793 9.917 30.774
1960-61 8,940 1.2403 23,026 19.898 641,267
1961-62 14.229 15.637 18,02b 13,626 61.520
1962-63 10,273 11.383 13,805 9,S61 45.322
1963-64 8,969 10.256 12.118 9,330 40.673
1964-65 7.590 9.350* 10,311 7.876 35.127
1965-66 7,361 8.100 9,508 .,107 33,076
1966-67 7.298 9.153 10,82 9.920 37.253
S'1 l-week periods

Table 2
Reported Cases of Viral Hepatitis
Per 100,000 Population Per Quarter
(Population as of January 1. middle of epidemiologic year)

Epidemi-
ologic Summer Fall W'inter Spring Total
Year Quarter Quarter Quarter Quarter Year

1956-57 2.1 2.4 2.9 2.3 9.7
1957-58 1.7 1.6 2.5 2.2 8.0
1958-59 1.9 2.3 4.0 2.7 10.0
1959-60 2.6 3.6 5.4 5.5 17.1
1960-61 5.0 6.9 12.6 10.9 35.4
1961-62 7.8 8.5 9.7 7.3 33.3
1962-63 5.5 6.1 7.3 5.2 24.1
1963-64 4.8 5.4 6.3 4.9 21.4
1964-65 4.0 4.5 5.3 4.1 17.9
1965-66 3.8 4.2 4.9 4.1 17.0
1966-67 3.7 4.6 5.5 5.0 18.8


years. Following the peak spring quarter incidence in
1960-61(10.9). successive spring quarters through 1965-66
reflect a continuing decline in rates (Table 2). This down-
ward trend was reversed during the spring quarter of the
epidemiologic year 1966-67 when a rate of 5.0 \ as oh-
served, compared with 4.1 during the spring quarter of the
preceding ear (1965-66). A simar 166). A ilr reversal insuccessive
spring quarterly rates occurred in 19.5-;59. 2 years before
the peak year (1960-61) of the second epidemic cycle
(Figure 1).
Similarly, following the peak annual incidence of 35.4
observed during 1960-61. a continuing decline in annual
rates is notable through 1965-66. The rate of 1S.5 for epi-
demiologic year 1966-67 represents a reversal in this
downward trend from the peak year 1960-61.

Table 3
Reported Cases and Rates of Viral Hepatitis by Division


Division
Total unitedd States
New England
Mid Atlantic
East North Central
\\est North Central
South Atlantic
East South Central
W\et South Central
Mountain
Pacific


1965-66 1966-67
CaseI. Rate-( C'ases IRate-


33,076
1 .-t 5,
5.735
6.406
1 .837
3,440
2.695
2.630
1.579
7,296


37.9253
1.699
6.572
5.835
2,358
3., 11
2,438
3.364
1,933
9.243


Percent
Change in
Rates
(1965-(6 -
1966-67)


*Reported c.eses per 100,000 population for opidemiologic year
Based on January 1 population estimates, middle of epidemi-



Table3 lists the number of reported cases, rates, and
percent change in rates for epidemiologic years 1965-66
and 1966-67 for each of the nine geographic divisions of
the country. An overall increase in rate of 11 percent was
seen in the United States from 1965-66 to 1966-67. In-
creases in rates were similarly observed in seven of the
nine divisions, ranging from 8 to 28 percent. Large in-
creases were noted in four divisions. West North Central.
West South Central, Mountain, and Pacific (28. 26. 21. and
24 percent. respectively). Two of the nine divisions. East
North Central and East South Central. showed decreases
in rates (-10 percent).

(Reported by the Hepatitis Surieillatnce Unit, Epidemio-
logy Program. VCDC.)

*Hepatitis morbidity da a are summarized in terms of an "Epi-
demiologic year," which runs from the 27th week of each year
through the 26th week of the succeeding ?ear.







260 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

AUGUST 5, 1967 AND AUGUST 6, 1966 (31st WEEK)


ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS

ASEPTIC Primary
AREA MENINGITIS BRUCELLOSIS DIPHTHERIA including Post- Serum Infectious
unsp. cases Infectious
1967 1966 1967 1967 1967 1966 1967 1967 1966 1967 1966
UNITED STATES... 72 93 7 47 39 23 45 44 655 559

NEW ENGLAND........... 1 19 1 5 3 3 29 39
Maine.............. 1 1 6
New Hampshire...... 1
Vermont............ -
Massachusetts...... 1 15 2 2 1 17 17
Rhode Island...... 2 1 2 -- 1 3 5
Connecticut........ 1 1 1 1 8 10

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 12 9 7 12 17 25 109 82
New York City...... 3 1 3 3 7 12 21 15
New York, Up-State. 1 3 1 2 1 19 31
New Jersey......... 5 2 5 7 11 41 11
Pennsylvania....... 3 3 3 2 3 1 28 25

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 6 14 1 20 11 4 1 2 107 54
Ohio................ 1 1 13 6 20 8
Indiana............. 6 3
Illinois........... 4 9 1 4 4 1 1 43 7
Michigan ........... 1 3 3 3 1 1 33 30
Wisconsin........... 1 1 5 6

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 2 3 2 4 2 4 1 1 31 52
Minnesota.......... 1 3 1 I 3 1 3 2
Iowa................ 1 2 1 7 12
Missouri........... I 1 11 33
North Dakota....... 1 -
South Dakota........ -
Nebraska........... 1 1 3
Kansas............. 1 9 2

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 14 4 2 7 2 2 1 72 63
Delaware............ 1 3
Maryland............ 4 1 3 14 6
Dist. of Columbia.. 2 -
Virginia........... 2 1 2 2 1 9 12
West Virginia...... 3 4 5
North Carolina..... 1 1 5 12
South Carolina..... 5 2 1
Georgia............. 14 12
Florida............. 1 2 2 19 15

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 9 6 1 1 1 33 26
Kentucky............ 1 13 5
Tennessee.......... 4 1 1 1 1 9 14
Alabama............ 2 5 1
Mississippi........ 2 5 6 6

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 9 11 1 3 1 66 42
Arkansas........... 1 1 3 7
Louisiana.......... 1 2 1 1 13 8
Oklahoma............ 5 1 2 6 4
Texas............... 2 8 44 23

MOUNTAIN............. 1 1 1 2 20 42
Montana............- 2 4
Idaho............... -
Wyoming............ 2 1
Colorado............ 1 1 2 8
New Mexico......... 4 6
Arizona............ 9 11
Utah................ 1 3 7
Nevada ............. 5

PACIFIC............... 19 26 3 3 10 25 12 188 159
Washington.......... 1 3 -- 2 18 26
Oregon............... 2 16 23
California......... 14 23 3 3 8 25 12 154 108
Alaska..............- -
Hawaii............. 2 2

Puerto Rico 1 -18 32







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 261


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

AUGUST 5, 1967 AND AUGUST 6, 1966 (31st WEEK) CONTINUED



MALARIA MEASLES (Rubeola) MENINGOCOCCAL INJECTIONS, POLIOMYELITIS RUBELLA
TOTAL
AREA Totai Paralytic
AREA Cumulative Cumulative Total Paralytic
Cum.
1967 1967 1967 1966 1967 1967 1966 1967 1967 1967 1967
UNITED STATES... 36 288 56,624 186,190 26 1,564 2,525 1 1 16 203

NEW ENGLAND.......... 4 818 2,203 5 65 113 21
Maine.............. 1 234 194 3 9 -- 8
New Hampshire...... 74 75 2 9
Vermont ............ 42 221 1 1 4
Massachusetts...... 3 319 761 2 32 44 -- 10
Rhode Island....... 62 72 4 12
Connecticut........ 87 880 2 23 35 3

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 1 18 2,185 17,872 5 255 297 4 22
New York City...... 1 8 429 8,223 2 46 41 1 18
New York, Up-State. 6 549 2,483 1 61 84 1 4
New Jersey......... 1 479 1,844 2 90 87 -
Pennsylvania....... 3 728 5,322 58 85 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 2 65 5,202 67,747 6 214 391 65
Ohio ............... 2 1,127 6,315 1 70 107 1
Indiana............. 1 2 587 5,615 1 30 66 10
Illinois........... 16 920 11,244 3 50 75 1
Michigan........... 1 18 897 13,983 1 49 104 14
Wisconsin.......... 27 1,671 30,590 15 39 39

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 3 9 2,801 8,647 1 67 140 2 7
Minnesota........... 1 120 1,638 16 33
Iowa............... 743 5,298 1 13 22 1 5
Missouri............ 1 331 529 13 54 -
North Dakota....... 6 840 1,067 1 9 2
South Dakota....... 52 40 6 4 -
Nebraska........... 1 622 75 12 8 -
Kansas............. 3 93 NN 6 10 I -

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 12 53 6,769 14,851 5 297 421 2 22
Delaware............ 43 251 6 4
Maryland........... 1 147 2,090 1 35 43 1 2
Dist. of Columbia.. 22 380 10 11 -
Virginia............. 38 2,159 2,090 1 35 51 4
West Virginia...... 9 1,355 5,098 1 21 19 9
North Carolina..... 10 1 842 431 2 66 104 1 -
South Carolina..... 1 1 507 652 28 46
Georgia............ 32 233 44 57
Florida............. 1 3 1,662 3,626 52 86 7

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1 16 5,090 19,433 123 217 1 4
Kentucky........... 1,315 4,665 34 80
Tennessee.......... 8 1,802 12,124 51 72 2
Alabama............ 1 7 1,316 1,660 25 46 2
Mississippi........ 1 657 984 13 19 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 2 63 17,050 23,820 1 212 359 1 1 7 2
Arkansas........... 1,404 966 28 33
Louisiana........... 2 1 151 98 1 83 136 -
Oklahoma........... 5 3,325 470 16 18 1
Texas............... 57 12,170 22,286 85 172 1 1 6 2

MOUNTAIN............. 6 19 4,556 11,664 27 80 14
Montana............ 277 1,301 4 3
Idaho.............. 1 375 1,520 1 5 -
Wyoming.............. 1 179 144 1 6 -
Colorado............ 5 4 1,527 1,231 12 41 7
New Mexico.......... 1 2 575 1,108 3 10 -
Arizona............. 10 997 5,227 4 10 3
Utah................ 1 357 590 4 1
Nevada............. 269 43 2 4

PACIFIC............... 9 41 12,153 19,953 3 304 507 46
Washington......... 7 5,407 3,458 25 37 6
Oregon.............. 2 9 1,548 1,655 24 33 4
California.......... 5 16 4,904 14,375 3 242 418 23
Alaska.............. 2 132 340 9 15 13
Hawaii.............. 2 7 162 125 4 4 -
Puerto Rico.......... 25 2,084 2,504 1 12 10 2







262 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

AUGUST 5, 1967 AND AUGUST 6, 1966 (31st WEEK) CONTINUED


STREPTOCOCCAL TYPHUS FEVER
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA TYPHOID TICK-BORNE RABIES IN
AREA SCARLET FEVER (Rky. Mt. Spotted) ANIMALS
1967 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum.
1967 1967 1967 1967 1967


UNITED STATES... 4,201 3 116 6 100 10 234 15 160 76 2,729

NEW ENGLAND.......... 575 1 3 1 2 62
Maine.... : ....... 28 15
New Hampshire...... 15 2 37
Vermont ........... 7
Massachusetts...... 114 1 2 1 2
Rhode Island....... 44 1
Connecticut........ 374 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 150 2 11 21 17 1 53
New York City...... 3 5 0 10
New York, Up-State. 144 1 7 4 1 44
New Jersey......... NN 1 2 6 -
Pennsylvania....... 3 2 4 2 7 9

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 268 15 10 2 19 15 9 287
Ohio................ 12 4 4 7 2 99
Indiana............. 64 2 2 2 6 1 5 63
Illinois........... 43 7 8 2 7 56
Michigan........... 113 2 6 23
Wisconsin.......... 36 1 2 46

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 126 10 3 17 1 14 1 15 645
Minnesota.......... 2 3 1 4 124
Iowa................ 34 I 1 2 3 79
Missouri........... 5 5 2 6 1 7 1 1 119
North Dakota....... 46 5 116
South Dakota....... 10 1 1 1 91
Nebraska............. 19 3 40
Kansas............. 10 1 9 1 1 76

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 464 25 8 3 30 12 69 8 356
Delaware ........... 2 -
Maryland............ 48 2 11
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 -
Virginia........... 101 6 4 1 17 3 170
West Virginia...... 125 2 1 1 1 54
North Carolina..... 13 6 3 10 30 3
South Carolina..... 52 1 2 4 3
Georgia............. 17 3 3 8 7 4 83
Florida............ 106 9 1 3 7 1 46

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 944 19 8 2 34 3 30 5 521
Kentucky............. 83 1 14 1 10 114
Tennessee.......... 721 8 5 6 1 14 5 369
Alabama............ 132 8 1 9 1 6 36
Mississippi........ 8 3 2 1 5 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 449 1 20 3 46 1 29 13 23 571
Arkansas........... 2 5 2 28 7 3 77
Louisiana.......... 3 3 3 12 3 49
Oklahoma........... 25 1 12 1 6 6 10 187
Texas............... 419 1 12 3 4 4 10 258

MOUNTAIN ............. 532 7 16 8 5 89
Montana............. 20 1 -
Idaho ..... ...... .. 17 -
Wyoming............. 3 2 1 5
Colorado............ 267 1 11 8 10
New Mexico......... 125 1 2 26
Arizona............. 35 3 2 43
Utah............ ... 65 3 2
Nevada............... 3

PACIFIC.............. 693 15 4 1 68 6 8 145
Washington......... 95 2 1 1
Oregon.............. 40 1 1 2
California......... 470 12 2 1 65 5 7 142
Alaska.............. 40 -
Hawaii ............. 48 2 3 -


Puerto Rico.......... 7 9 4 --5







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report






DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED AUGUST 5, 1967


(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)

All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under
Area All 65 years and 1 year Area All 65 years and 1 year
Influenza All Ages and over Influenza All
All Ages Causes All Ages Causes


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.-----
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.-----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.-----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.-----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.-----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.------
Wichita, Kans.------


757
227
79
19
24
56
26
23
28
59
69
12
46
29
60

3,069
54
29
147
46
34
52
66
76
1,580
35
416
166
57
107
19
34
61
38
18
34

2,412
48
34
692
152
197
114
72
393
40
53
40
22
55
139
25
115
17
29
37
83
55

764
52
21
41
128
18
92
44
216
89
63


442
125
39
13
14
34
19
12
19
25
45
7
34
14
42

1,720
26
16
81
29
22
38
35
35
869
21
219
84
42
70
16
21
39
20
12
25

1,301
26
17
358
91
96
67
41
197
22
26
22
13
33
70
19
70
11
16
27
49
30

473
36
10
25
75
15
51
28
132
66
35


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.-----------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.-----------
Savannah, Ga.-----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.-----------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.-----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.-----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.--------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


1,036
108
236
58
63
86
59
64
29
52
76
172
33

624
84
59
37
140
111
42
43
108

1,034
32
30
28
154
30
66
201
33
162
74
99
57
68

397
50
21
117
22
75
14
53
45

1,472
28
56
20
49
65
438
84
35
106
64
76
179
35
144
48
45


Total 11,565 6,407 345 615

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages -------------------------387,301
All Causes, Age 65 and over-------------------221,656
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------ 14,018
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 19,643


Week No.
31








264 Morbidity and Mo





INTERNATIONAL NOTES
QUARANTINE MEASURES


Health Information Series for International Travel
The following leaflets in the health information series
for international travel were revised in May 1967 and are
on sale at the Superintendent of Documents, Government
Printing Office, Washington, D. C. 20402. "Health Infor-
mation for Travel in Europe," PHS-748: "Health Informa-
tion for Travel in Mexico*, Central and South America and
the Caribbean," PIS-748B; "Health Information for Travel
in Asia including Japan, Indonesia, and the Philippines
and in Australia and New Zealand," PHS 748C; "Health
Information for Travel in Africa," PHS 748D. The price
is five cents a copy or $3.75 per hundred copies. Previous
issues of these leaflets should be destroyed because of
changes in typhoid, tetanus, diphtheria, poliomyelitis,
and plague vaccinations.

*Since the revision of this leaflet, smallpox vaccination is no
longer required for persons traveling between the United States
and Mexico provided they have visited only in these two coun-
tries during the preceding 14 days.






ERRATUM: Vol. 16, No. 30, p. 245
In the front page table, "Cases of Specified Notifiable
Diseases: United States," the reported number of cases
of meningococcal infections among civilians for the 30th
week (ending July 30, 1966) should read 34; the cumula-
tive total for civilians for the first 30 weeks of 1966 should
read 2,218.


)ralI


Ey w eeKly Report AUGUST 5, 1967
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


IINNIIIHUIIIIN-11YIIIII1IIN l
3 1262 08864 2052

THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT, WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 17,000, IS PUBLISHED AT THE NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE
DISEASE CENTER, ATLANTA, GEORGIA.
DIRECTOR, NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
DAVID J. SENCER, M.D.
CHIEF, EPIDEMIOLOGY PROGRAM A.D. LANGMUIR, M.D.
ACTING CHIEF, STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN, M.S.

IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY, THE NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE
INVESTIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH
OFFICIALS AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF
COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE
ADDRESSED TO:
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
", T.i :,r COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
TL -r,'TL GEORGIA 30333

NOTE: THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE
BASED ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE NCDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL
STATE HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES
ON SATURDAY; COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED
ON THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY.


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