Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00015

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text

Fs2. o/l: Y-


NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER





ad a: :, "":,:
v" ; :


Vol. 16, No. 25


.. -: vveeK Ecning
i = June 24, 196



TION, AND WELFARE FPBLIC HEALTH :.F..'-ICE

Lt fliTION AND nr.'i r '.lE'; T, CONTROL


7


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTSi g RTS
COMMON SOURCE OUTBREAK OF
INFECTIOUS HEPATITIS Tennessee

\iione 10 persons who ate a common meal in a pri ate
honm in Memphis, Tennessee, on April 13, 1!)17. eight
der eloped iral hepatitis. The luncheon group included
Ihe hostess, her husband and daughter. and seen rlimalo
guists. Both the husband and daughter and six of the
-'\ otn feIalne guests developed symptoms rompalible ith
hepatitis. Seven of the eight ill -persons had jaundice
and or scleral icterus. Time intervals between the meal
and onset of symptoms in these patients ranged from 5 to
33 days (Figure 1). The eighth person. felt to have anic-
terichepattits, had onset of illness 42 days after the meal.


Iao ,nim, m uNii c n of

Sur," I i u mni.ir r
Ipor I int. 1 1 n 1 1 9 7



The age.s of the ill person- rangvidl' oi 3m to .:5 \ear-.
in additional ('ase of hepatiti- occurred in a 24-
year-old male friend of the ho-t faimil \ ho ti-iied in the
home during the -same week the luncheon v\as held. li-
illness began 33 days after the Minail. 11e (li admlit ha ling
eaten at the home, hut could hno rr call specific food
(fontinu ed oi page 2(J'2


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
25th WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE. FIRST 25 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE JUNE 24. JUNE 25, 1962 1966 MEDIAN
1967 1966 1967 1966 1962- 1966
Aseptic meningitis ..................... 57 46 37 849 722 696
Brucellosis .................. .......... 8 5 7 124 100 163
Diphtheria. ............. ............... 3 4 4 52 76 133
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-borne & unspecified .......... 35 37 --- 634 625
Encephalitis, post-infectious ..... .. 31 16 -- 448 430
Hepatitis, serum .. 64 23 577 984 623 20850
Hepatitis, infectious .................... 678 542 t 19,137 16,456
Malaria ................... ............ 52 10 2 963 143 43
Measles (rubeola)...... ................ 786 3,225 8,801 53,824 175,960 328.026
Meningococcal infections, total ........... 34 59 50 1,379 2,289 1.555
Civilian ....... ....................28 57 1.275 2.035
Military ............................... 6 2 104 254
Poliomyelitis, total ..................... 1 1 2 11 13 38
Paralytic............................ 1 1 9 12 30
Rubella (German measles) ................ 1,230 775 35,968 37,885
Streptococcal sore throat & scarlet fever 6,038 6,762 5,029 271.737 259,719 239.869
Tetanus ................................ 5 1 7 85 67 107
Tularemia .............................. 3 2 5 67 70 114
Typhoid fever ............ ......... ... 6 16 10 182 149 172
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. spotted fever). 13 17 15 79 72 57
Rabies in animals ....................... 80 90 90 2.234 2.181 2.178

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax .......................... ....... ......... 2 R abies in man ................. ............. .
Botulism ........................... ................ Rubella, Congenital Syndrome: Colo.-1. Pa.-2 ...... 6
Leptospirosis: La.- ................................... 18 Trichinosis .......... ... ..... 37
Plague ....................... .................... Typhus, marine: Tex.-l. ........ .. ........ ... 18
Psittacosis: N.J.-2 ....................... ....... 22 Polio. Unsp: Calif.-I .................... 2


Ir g







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


INFECTIOUS HEPATITIS ( continued if/' iio/,' pae)

Figure 1
COMMON SOURCE OF OUTBREAK OF INFECTIOUS HEPATITIS
-- COMMON MEAL


JUNE 24. 1967


E ICTERIC
3 ANICTERIC


II 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 I 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27
APRIL MAY
DATE OF ONSET

* DID NOT EAT SPECIFIC MEAL BUT ATE IN HOME DURING SAME WEEK.


items eaten. Through June 20, no secondary cases have
been reported.
The meal consisted of packaged ham (cooked and
sliced at home), bee' consomme, rolls, avocado, grape a nd
cottage cheese salad, frozen raspberries served oxer
sponge cake, beer, and a gin drink. All foods were pre-
pared by the hostess except for the salad Ahich was
contributed by one of the guests.
Each of the persons awho attended the luncheon ate
all foods served except for the two beverages. However,
there was no ,-_ .i1, ,1r difference among ill persons who
drank or did not drink a specific beverage. The hostess
denied known exposure to a hepatitis case. Liter function
tests done on the hostess after recognition of the outbreak


\ere normal. Fi\, children in the host family who did not
eat any of the foods served at the luncheon remained well.
Inspection of the home failed to disclose sewage prob-
lems or water contamination.
The cluster of cases described here most likely
represents a common source outbreak of infectious hepa-
titis. One of the foods served at the luncheon probably
was the responsible vehicle; however, food histories do
not permit incrimination of a specific item.
(Reported bhy Dr. ('eril B. 7'ucker. Director. Division of
Preretable Tiscu~is's, Tcimessse Iepartment of Public
Health: rind Dr. Robert C. Rendtorff, director, Division
of C(mmuniiable Disea ites, lemphis and Shelby County
Health Depairtmenl.)


ANNUAL SURVEILLANCE SUMMARY
MALARIA 1966


The Malaria Surveillance Unit of the National Com-
municable Disease Center has received epidemiologic
information on 678 cases of malaria with onset of illness
in 1966 in the United States and Puerto Rico. This is the
largest number of malaria cases recorded in the U.S. for
any year since 1954. Military personnel (including recently
,i-. tI, r 2. veterans) accounted for 563 cases, and 115
cases occurred among non-military persons (civilians).
While the number of civilian cases is comparable to those
in the previous 2 years, the number of military-associated
cases has shown a tenfold increase (Table 1). Of the 678
cases, all but 5 were in patients who were infected abroad.
These five cases include two introduced, one congenital,
one induced, and one cryptic.
No established seasonal pattern was discernible due
to the increase in military cases as the year progressed
(Figure 2). \l -i..,,i. malaria patients had onset of illness
in all but eight of the states, the geographic distribution
of cases shows concentrations in California, Georgia,
Kentucky, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and
Texas due primarily to the location of military centers.
The age distribution showed a marked concentration
in the 20- to 29-year age group, refl,-, i.;n the large number


of military cases. Malaria cases in females were reported
only in the non-military group, of which they comprised
23.5 percent.
As shown in Table 2, the plasmodium species was
identified in 636 of the total 678 cases (93.8 percent).
P. vivax was diagnosed in 56 percent and P. falciparum in
33 percent of the infected individuals. This compares with
Table 1
Military and Civilian Cases of Malaria
United States 1956-1966*

Year Military Civilian Total

1957 56 45 101
1958 33 37 70
1959 12 38 50
1960 21 41 62
1961 45 37 82
1962 75 40 115
1963 58 90 148
1964 52 119 171
1965 51 105 156
1966 563 115 678

*Onset of illness in the United States and Puerto Rico.
















Figure 2
MILITARY AND CIVILIAN CASES OF MALARIA
DIAGNOSED IN THE UNITED STATES DURING 1966
BY MONTH OF ONSET


-- MILITARY PERSONNEL
-.--- CIVILIAN


Table 2

Cases of Malaria by Plasmodium Species
United States 1966


SpIecies

P. rirae,

P. f l'al ir,.,

P. o ,Ic


Mixed Infec.t lon

I ndeterm i ned


3:h2


..o N


Total 67h 100.0


65 percent ntcd 7 percent. respectively. in 1965. The

number of cases due to P. ouale increased to 13 from the
4 cases notified in 1964 and the in 1965. Only 12' case-
of P. malariae wrer reported. as compared with h in 1964
and 13 in 196.5.

Onset of illness occurred more than 30 days after

arrival in the U'.5. in 56 percent of the 540 cases for which

both date of onset and date of arri\ al are known. A marked
difference in this inter al is apparent in 1\iax and fal-
ciparum malaria: 79 percent of the falciparuin eases oc-
curred within one month after arrival as compared w ith

only 27 percent of the \ i\a\ cases.


(Continued oln page 208)


JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC
1966


SUMMARY OF REPORTED CASES OF INFECTIOUS SYPHILIS

MAY 1967 AND MAY 1966
CASES OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SYPHILIS: By Reporting Areas May 1967 and May 1966 Provisional Data

Cumulative Cumulative
Reporting Area JAN MAY Reporting Area M JAN MAY
1967 1966 1967 1966 1967 1966 1967 1966
NEW ENGAND............... 40 42 164 206 EAST SOUTH CENTRAL........ 179 177 772 939
Maine.......... ..... 1 4 Kentucky................ 17 11 55 52
New Hampshire........... 1 5 5 Tennessee............. 19 15 108 117
Vermont................. 2 1 Alabama................. 110 109 448 508
Massachusetts............ 22 28 99 138 Mississippi............. 33 42 161 262
Rhode Island............ 7 4 15 15
Connecticut............. 11 8 43 43 WEST SOUTH CENTRAL...... 295 228 1,277 1,084
Arkansas................. 15 3 60 66
MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 285 310 1,453 1,766 Louisiana................ 58 58 262 273
Upstate New York........ 32 23 118 165 Oklahoma. .............. 15 7 57 60
New York City........... 174 190 873 1,124 Texas................. 207 160 898 685
Pa. (Excl. Phila.)...... 14 12 104 88
Philadelphia............ 10 22 103 109 MOUNTAIN ................. 44 38 254 165
New Jersey.............. 55 63 255 280 Montana.................. 1 2 4 18
Idaho. .................. -13 1
EAST NORTH CENTRAL ....... 262 280 1,350 1,296 Wyoming............ 3 -
Ohio.................... 51 46 280 243 Colorado................ 7 5 37 22
Indiana .............. 9 14 46 36 New Mexico............... 10 6 68 33
Downstate Illinois....... 17 15 69 85 Arizona.................. 16 20 113 78
Chicago.................. 76 87 407 426 Utah .................. 3 4 4
Michigan................. 108 106 533 456 Nevada................... 3 5 8 9
Wisconsin.......... ... 1 12 15 50
PACIFIC................... 125 96 762 761
WEST NORTH CENTRAL ........ 29 30 112 186 Washington............... 5 27 17
Minnesota ................ 7 4 19 11 Oregon................ 6 2 20 20
Iowa.................... 2 6 12 28 California............. .. 113 93 709 713
Missouri............... 8 11 36 84 Alaska................... 1 3
North Dakota............. 1 4 Hawai............. ..... 1 5 8
South Dakota............. 3 3 14 22
Nebraska................. 6 4 16 18 U. S. TOTAL............... 1,726 1.716 8,621 9,059
Kansas.................. 3 2 14 19......... ... 40
IRRITOIES ....... 84 81 381 407
SOUTH ATLANTIC......... 467 515 2,47 2,656 Perto Rico.............. 80 78 361 397
Delaware................. 10 5 24 15 Virgin Islands........... 4 3 20 10
Maryland............. 45 41 262 221
District of Columbia..... 59 38 272 190
Virginia ................ 18 21 117 124
West Virginia............ 1 4 7 25
North Carolina........... 56 75 283 405 Note: Cumulative Totals include revised and delayed reports
South Carolina........... 67 89 363 402 through previous months.
Georgia. ................ 58 77 371 45
Florida .................. 153 165 778 829


JITNI 24, 1967


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


P Ir,.,nl


/ N~
5s .-~


To" l: I









204 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JUNE 24. 19 7 AND JUNE 25, 1966 (25th WEEK)


ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS
ASEPTIC Primary
CLAREA MENINGITIS ICLOSIS DIPHTHERIA including Post- Serum Infectious
AREA MENINGITIS unsp. cases Infectious

1967 1966 1967 1967 1967 1966 1967 1967 1966 1967 1966
UNITED STATES... 57 46 8 3 35 37 31 64 23 678 542

NEW ENGLAND........... I 1 2 25 19
Maine............... 3 3
New Hampshire...... 1 1
Vermont ............-
Massachusetts...... -- 1 13 9
Rhode Island....... 1 1 3 1
Connecticut........- 1 5 5

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 5 5 2 9 10 1 28 10 108 108
New York City...... I 2 4 20 6 50 23
New York, up-State. 1 1 1 2 25 30
New Jersey......... 3 3 2 4 3 12 20
Pennsylvania....... 1 4 1 3 2 1 4 1 21 35

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 5 3 9 2 16 1 103 75
Ohio............... 2 5 26 23
Indiana............. 1 3 7 8
Illinois........... 2 1 10 1 36 12
Michigan........... 1 1 1 6 25 27
Wisconsin.......... 1 9 5

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 2 2 5 3 1 53 41
Minnesota.......... 4 3 13 6
Iowa................ 1 5 9
Missouri........... 1 29 25
North Dakota ....... --- 1 1
South Dakota....... -
Nebraska........... 1 1 1
Kansas............. 5 -

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 5 7 1 5 5 3 1 69 65
Delaware........... 3 3
Maryland........... 1 1 14 22
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 -
Virginia........... 1 2 14 4
West Virginia...... 1 5 9
North Carolina..... 1 4 2 9 7
South Carolina ..... 2 2
Georgia............ 7 6
Florida............. 3 6 I 3 1 14 12

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 8 3 1 1 2 2 1 43 34
Kentucky............ 1 15 11
Tennessee.......... 6 1 2 2 18 9
Alabama............ 2 1 1 2 10
Mississippi........ 2 8 4

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 8 8 1 2 3 2 90 33
Arkansas........... 4 1
Louisiana.......... 3 1 2 3 11 3
Oklahoma........... 9 4
Texas............... 5 7 1 2 66 25

MOUNTAIN.............. 2 2 3 31 21
Montana............ 1
Idaho.............. 2 2
Wyoming............. 1 5 3
Colorado............ 1 1 1 6 4
New Mexico.......... 10 4
Arizona............. 3 3
Utah............... 1 1 4 5
Nevada............. -

PACIFIC............... 26 18 2 6 9 6 30 8 156 146
Washington......... I 8 5
Oregon.............. I 6 13
California.......... 21 12 1 5 9 5 30 8 137 128
Alaska.............. 5 -
Hawaii............. 4 6 1 1-

Puerto Rico 23 33









1M rlrbillii ant Mortality Weekly Report 211-


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JUNE 24, I967 AND JUNE 25, 1966 (25th WEEK) -CONTINUED



MALARIA MEASLES (Rubeola) MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS, POLIOMYELITIS RUBELLA
TOTAL
AREA fTotal Paralytic
Cumulative Cumulative Total Par
Cum.
1967 1967 1967 1966 1967 1967 1966 1967 1967 1967 1967
UNITED STATES... 52 786 53,824 175,960 34 1,379 2,289 1 9 1,230

NEW ENGLAND.......... 2 25 756 2,096 57 105 248
Maine.............. 7 221 189 3 8 21
New Hampshire...... 71 60 2 9 21
Vermont ............ 41 218 3 14
Massachusetts...... 2 13 282 733 29 42 67
Rhode Island....... 60 72 4 12 24
Connecticut........ 5 81 824 19 31 101

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 2 38 1,991 17,433 5 210 260 2 110
New York City...... 9 368 8,078 1 36 36 1 26
New York, Up-State. 17 442 2,261 1 51 75 84
New Jersey.......... 6 462 1,823 2 80 73 -
Pennsylvania....... 2 6 719 5,271 1 43 76 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 2 151 4,841 64,020 8 176 362 219
Ohio................ 47 1,089 6,071 62 97 12
Indiana............. 2 12 550 5,237 21 63 17
Illinois........... 28 845 11,003 3 43 71 31
Michigan........... 19 852 12,397 4 38 97 65
Wisconsin.......... 45 1,505 29,312 1 12 34 94

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 19 2,666 8,311 1 63 128 14
Minnesota.......... 1 3 114 1,613 15 31 2
Iowa ............... 2 725 5,115 12 18 7
Missouri............ 2 300 506 12 51 3
North Dakota....... 2 782 964 1 1 7 2
South Dakota....... 47 38 6 4 -
Nebraska........... 10 606 75 11 8 -
Kansas............. 92 NN 6 9 -

SOUTH ATLANTIC........ 25 130 6,344 13,804 6 264 374 1 84
Delaware............ 3 40 237 5 4 5
Maryland............ 8 127 2,015 1 32 37 1 12
Dist. of Columbia.. 20 371 9 9 -
Virginia........... 40 1,930 1,779 27 48 18
West Virginia...... 17 1,297 4,816 1 20 12 16
North Carolina..... 25 9 834 358 3 53 93 --
South Carolina..... 8 486 608 24 43 11
Georgia............ 29 230 43 55 -
Florida............. 45 1,581 3,390 1 51 73 22

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 18 86 4,850 18,536 1 116 202 1 104
Kentucky............ 18 60 1,254 4,524 1 34 77 82
Tennessee.......... 22 1,671 11,524 47 66 22
Alabama............ 1 1,278 1,559 23 42 -
Mississippi........ 3 647 929 12 17 I

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 127 16,561 22,297 3 197 336 5 8
Arkansas........... 1 1,400 955 1 25 28 -
Louisiana.......... 143 87 1 78 128
Oklahoma........... 5 3,311 457 13 18 1
Texas.............. 121 11,707 20,798 1 81 162 4 8

MOUNTAIN............. 92 4,143 10,858 25 73 102
Montana............ 6 268 1,721 4 4
Idaho.............. 3 359 1,320 1 5
Wyoming.............. 68 129 1 5 -
Colorado............. 45 1,383 1,096 10 37 48
New Mexico......... 11 552 1,062 3 10 -
Arizona............ 22 922 5,027 4 8 50
Utah............... 5 322 464 4 -
Nevada............. 269 39 2 4 -

PACIFIC.............. 2 118 11,672 18,605 10 271 449 1 341
Washington.......... 1 25 5,356 3,324 24 35 7
Oregon.............. 9 1,469 1,344 24 29 27
California......... 1 72 4,595 13,642 9 212 366 1 295
Alaska.............. 2 126 189 1 9 15 3
Hawaii............. 10 126 106 2 4 9
Puerto Rico.......... 2 50 1,917 2,222 9 8 3









206 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JUNE 24, 1967 AND JUNE 25, 1966 (25th WEEK) CONTINUED


STREPTOCOCCAL TYPHUS FEVER
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA TYPHOID TICK-BORNE RABIES IN
AREA SCARLET FEVER (Rky. Mt. Spotted) ANIMALS
1967 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum.
1967 1967 1967 1967 1967
UNITED STATES... 6,038 5 85 3 67 6 182 13 79 80 2,234

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1,070 2 3 53
Maine............... 35 13
New Hampshire...... 35 3 31
Vermont............ 39 --- 7
Massachusetts...... 181 2 1
Rhode Island....... 74 1
Connecticut ........ 706 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 154 7 3 19 6 13 2 42
New York City...... 16 3 9 -
New York, Up-State. 117 1 1 6 3 4 2 33
New Jersey......... NN 1 1 2 3 5
Pennsylvania....... 21 2 1 2 4 9

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 484 10 8 11 5 16 218
Ohio................ 45 1 4 4 7 87
Indiana............. 84 2 1 1 1 1 36
Illinois........... 101 5 7 I 4 47
Michigan........... 185 2 4 1 19
Wisconsin.......... 69 1 3 29

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 307 1 5 2 14 5 1 19 503
Minnesota.......... 8 2 1 3 96
Iowa................ 76 1 2 2 60
Missouri........... 6 1 3 1 4 1 4 101
North Dakota....... 94 6 87
South Dakota ...... 30 1 2 70
Nebraska........... 28 I 32
Kansas............... 65 1 8 1 2 57

SOUTH ATLANTIC ...... 1,249 19 7 17 4 28 11 294
Delaware.......... 15 -
Maryland............ 216 2 3 5
Dist, of Columbia.. 1 1 -
Virginia........... 139 4 2 7 5 148
West Virginia...... 174 1 1 1 49
North Carolina..... 43 5 2 12 3
South Carolina..... 461 1 2 3 1 3
Georgia............. 9 3 3 2 1 3 62
Florida............. 191 6 1 4 2 32

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 646 17 7 1 27 2 13 12 470
Kentucky........... 50 1 13 1 5 3 99
Tennessee.......... 507 8 4 5 4 8 335
Alabama............ 75 7 1 6 1 4 1 34
Mississippi........ 14 2 2 3 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 512 14 1 21 2 22 1 7 15 463
Arkansas........... 2 4 1 8 2 7 1 64
Louisiana.......... 3 3 2 11 2 39
Oklahoma........... 30 8 1 4 8 142
Texas............... 477 7 3 4 2 5 218

MOUNTAIN ............. 728 7 15 6 1 71
Montana............. 38 1 1
Idaho............... 32 -
Wyoming............ 2 4
Colorado........... 415 1 11 6 8
New Mexico......... 127 21
Arizona............ 38 3 36
Utah............... 78 3 -
Nevada ............ 1 2

PACIFIC.............. 888 4 13 3 64 6 1 120
Washington......... 105 2 1
Oregon............. 38 1 1
California......... 674 4 10 1 61 5 1 119
Alaska............. 54 -
Hawaii............... 17 2 3 -

Puerto Rico.......... 5 1 7 4 20








Morlidity and Mortalit)y weekly Report






DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED JI'l 1x,7


(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)

All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under

Area All 6 years and year Area All 6 years n ya
Influenza All Influenza All
Ages and over Ages and over
All Ages Causes All Ages Causes


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.-------..
Bridgeport, Conn.-----
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.--------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.----------
Yonkers, N. Y.---------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.---------
Evansville, Ind.-------
Flint, Mich.-----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.-----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.-------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


778
299
44
27
29
65
25
20
19
46
60
18
43
32
51

3,251
39
36
154
42
37
49
72
83
1,639
38
411
251
58
120
21
38
58
45
27
33

2,618
59
40
670
169
253
111
93
367
34
59
38
50
50
171
33
111
36
37
47
124
66

791
45
23
33
105
22
103
81
268
68
43


469
155
28
16
23
37
13
11
14
30
45
13
27
22
35

1,908
24
20
92
20
23
33
40
43
923
23
248
151
38
82
16
27
36
29
22
18

1,508
32
25
351
104
151
64
59
225
22
29
21
26
35
87
19
64
20
25
30
83
36

468
36
15
18
63
13
50
44
158
51
20


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ca.----------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C. -- ----
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.----------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.-----------
Fort Worth, Tex.--------
Houston, Tex.----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.----------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.--------
Tacoma, Wash.-----------


1,095
135
233
40
58
96
56
66
40
74
62
189
46

565
76
54
39
141
106
42
40
67

1,062
33
26
12
150
31
61
202
47
159
78
123
67
73

397
43
27
117
20
93
17
42
38

1,478
14
50
23
47
91
468
79
33
99
45
79
199
33
125
51
42


Total 12,035 6,901 347 579

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 317,073
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 182,746
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 11,942
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 15,857


Week No.









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


MALARIA 1966 (Continu ie from page 2'03)


Among the 115 non-military ceases, several distinct
groups are notable. Thirty cases occurred in former Peace
('orps volunteers, as compared with 17 in 1965i and 5 in
1964. All hut one of thle olunteers had served in We t
\frica. Twenty cases in seamen were reported. 16 of whom
were U.S. citizens. Missionaries and their dependents
accounted for 7 case-, compared with 5 in 1965. Thirty
malaria cases occurred among foreign visitors to the U.S.:
14 woro in foreign students and 2 in foreign physicians
who lad onsets while receiving medical training in this
countrU .
Malaria infections acquired in Vietnam accounted for
538 of the 673 imported cases (79.9 percent). P. riina
was the etiologic agent in 315 of these 538 cases (,58.5
percent). P. fioaiipairum in 177 cases (33.0 percent), and
I'. malaria in i6 case s (1.1 percent). Six cases had a
mixed infection (1.1 percent), and in 34 cases the plas-
modium species was not identified (6.3 percent). Fifty-
eight percent of the 525 cases for which the information
was available had a hiisory of malaria while in Vietnam.
In 62 persons the malaria infection acquired in Vietnam
did not result in clinical illness until after discharge
from the military ser\ ice.
Four deaths due to malaria were reported. Three
servicemen died within one month of return from Vietnam.
The fourth death occurred in a Negro minister from Florida
who had visited in Wesi Africa: he had taken no malaria
chemoprophylaxis and no precautions against mosquitoes
(MMWR. Vol. 15. No. 32).
Only five cases of malaria were acquired in the U.S.
Two cases of introduced malaria occurred in 5- and 3-
year-old siblings from Fort Knox. Kentucky, in May 1966:
the etiologic agent was P. rirca (MMWR. Vol. 15, No. 21).
One case of congenital malaria due to P. malarioe was
detected in August in Chicago (MMWR. Vol. 15. No. 34).
A case of induced falciparum malaria occurred in a 64-
year-old man in New York City following a blood trans-
fusion (MMWR, Vol. 15, No. 52). A case classified as
"cryptic" (an isolated case of malaria in which there is
no clear mode of transmission and no secondary cases)
occurred in a 32-year-old male nurse in a military hospital
in St. Albans. New York (MMWR. Vol. 16. No. 15).


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT, WI t c I .'L'.
TION OF 17,000 IS PUBLISHED AT THE NATIONAL C M'..u. LE
DISEASE CENTER, ATLANTA, GEORGIA.
DIRECTOR, NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE, DISEASE CENTER
DAVID J. SENCER, M.D.
CHIEF, EPIDEMIOLOGY PROGRAM A.D. L-r .,.. M.D.
ACTING CHIEF, STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. :.Mru ,. M.S.

IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY, THE NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE
INVESTIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH
OFFICIALS AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO.THE CONTROL OF
S ,I :5ELC DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD' BE
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30333
NOTE: THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE
BASED ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE NCDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL
STATE HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES
ON SAT'.'r i--m FILED DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED
0D 7 THE .- .-.,. FRIDAY.


SNIP. 0p ELL IL
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U.S. DEPOSITOR


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JUNE 24, 1967
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

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