Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00012

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text

F S2 1. 4/7 14/I?


NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE


V l16,' No. 18






= Week Ending

May 6, 1967



PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


BUREAU OF DISEASE PREVENTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
SALMONELLOSIS-New York, New Jersey,
Connecticut, Maine

A kosher imitation ice cream has been implicated as
the cause of 14 outbreaks of febrile gastroenteritis in
New York. New Jersey. Connecticut. and Maine during the
first 3 weeks in April 1967. Each outbreak occurred one
to 3 days after a catered banquet at which kosher food
was served. Of approximately 3.300 persons who attended
the banquets, an estimated 1,800 persons (54 percent)
developed diarrhea, abdominal pain or cramps, fever,
chills, headache, nausea, and vomiting. The median
duration of illness was 3 days. There were no deaths.


C ON TEN TS
E id mI.II i c N I Nl .s w'i k N .d rop rts

C mi cticut, M iine .... . .
,Suivr 11 lance0 Summ ItV
SuImonetllosi,- Januiurv, l't-lruar.r a d M c'h \ 1Uf7 i12
Current Trends
Mr,sles 1967 . . 1 .

Salmonella typhi-muriun was recovered from stool speci-
mens from 12 persons who represented six of the banquets.
Results of additional stool cultures are I..,,i..
Comparison of menus from initial outbreaks demon-
strated that an imitation ice cream was the only food item
common to all menus. Food histories from persons who
(Continued on0 page 42)


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
18th WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST 18 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE MAY 6, MAY 7. 1962 1966 MEDIAN
1967 1966 1967 1966 1962- 1966
Aseptic meningitis ..... 28 27 26 523 491 491
Brucellosis. ... ............. ....... 2 5 71 67 118
Diphtheria. . .... .. 3 1 3 38 51 74
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-borne & unspecified .. ....... 29 23 432 439
Encephalitis, post-infectious ... 19 9 282 294
Hepatitis, serum .............. .... .. 45 29 755 680 445 16,156
Hepatitis, infectious ........ ............ 769 608 14,218 12,218 16,156
Malaria ............................... 29 9 2 690 100 30
Measles (rubeola)....................... 2.355 8.257 17,338 42.132 134.318 229,338
Meningococcal infections, total .......... 51 100 75 1,063 1.794 1,193
Civilian ............................ 45 92 981 1.574 -
Military.............................. 6 8 --- 82 220 -
Poliomyelitis, total .... .... 1 1 6 7 24
Paralytic..... ................... 1 5 6 19
Rubella (German measles) .......... ... 1.719 1,782 22,630 26,483 "
Streptococcal sore throat & scarlet fever .. 10,423 8,822 8,769 214,646 206.724 193,259
Tetanus.................... ........ 2 2 4 53 37 68
Tularemia .................. ......... .... 5 1 2 49 52 70
Typhoid fever ............... .. 6 5 7 115 97 112
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. spotted fever). 10 1 1 23 11 9

Rabies in animals ............ .. .... 96 84 95 1,605 1,605 1,605

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
A nthrax: ............................... ... .... 1 R abies in m an: .... ......
Botulism: ........................................... Rubella, Congenital Syndrome: 1
Leptospirosis: La.- ..... ... . . 12 Trichinosis: N.Y. Up-State-1 30
Plague: .............. ... .. ......... ... .. ... Typhus, marine: Texas-1 ......................... 9
Psittacosis: Conn -I P-li., Tr-. l I....








/ Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report



SALMONELLOSIS-New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Maine
(Continued from front page)


attended the banquets implicated 'this non-dairy product
as the source of the outbreak. It is estimated that 60,000
servings of this frozen dessert, which is manufactured by
a single business in New York City, were produced and
distributed during the first 3 weeks in April. Cultures
from the "ice cream" left over from the banquets yielded
S. typhi-murium. Environmental cultures of the plant and
employee stool cultures were negative for salmonellae.
Cultures were taken of all of the ingredients of the "ice
cream." All were negative except the frozen egg yolks,
which yielded S. typhi-murium.
The frozen egg yolks are an unpasteurized product
of a New York City egg-breaking plant. Environmental
cultures at the plant have revealed several serotypes of
salmonella including S. typhi-murium. Employee stool
cultures yielded only one positive for salmonella, but
this was not S. typhi-murium.
Action taken by the New York City Health Department
officials resulted in temporary suspension of operation
by the "'ice-cream" and the egg-breaking plant. All imi-
tation ice cream manufacturers in the City have been


placed under the milk code which will require production
of a certified pathogen-free product. The incriminated egg-
breaking plant has agreed to pasteurize its raw egg prod-
ucts. Joint action taken by the City Health Department,
state officials, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration
resulted in the recovery or destruction of several thousand
servings of the contaminated "ice cream." Further epi-
demiologic and laboratory studies are in progress.

(Reported by Dr. Harold T. Fuerst, Assistant Commis-
sioner of Health, Preventable and Chronic Disease
Services, City of New York Department of Health; Mr.
Weimes Clevenger, New York District Director, Food and
Drug Administration; Dr. Julia L. Freitag, Director,
Office of Epidemiology, New York State Department of
Health; Dr. Barbara W. Christine, ', Epidemiology
Section, Connecticut State Department of Health; Dr.
W.J. Dougherty, Director, Division of Preventable Dis-
eases, New Jersey State Department of Health; Dr. Dean
H. Fisher, Commissioner. Maine Department of Health,
and Welfare; and a team from NCDC.)


SURVEILLANCE SUMMARY
SALMONELLOSIS-January, February, and March 1967


For the months of January. February, and March 1967.
the total numbers of salmonellae reported from human
sources were 1,435, 1,184, and 1,411, respectively. The
weekly averages for the 3 months (359, 296. and 282, res-
pectively) have consistently decreased, demonstrating the


expected seasonal pattern (Figure 1). The age and sex
distributions were similar to those of previous months. In
Table 1. the seven most frequently reported serotypes
from human sources for the first 3 months of 1967 are
shown.


Figure 1
REPORTED HUMAN ISOLATIONS OF SALMONELLAE IN THE UNITED STATES


j L
96. 1965 f966 1967


142


MAY 6, 1967


~







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Reports of 979 nonhuman isolation" repro'ented he 63
serotypes were received 'ront 35 states in January. The(
total number of reported nonhuman violations dropped to
771 in February; 6I s. roty'pes xere represented in the
report- from :16 state-. In March, SS2 nonhuman isolation


rnprosontdl ). b\ -TI +rot *\ ,*- \nor, rlporptd from 31 iat,-
Tht -tin\ most cott oti ll\ roportlii nonhlluman -orotI),p-
and i hoeir source .- are listed bi I month in Tablle 2.
t H ported by /h f/ Sa/lmon//e n 0it/. Hiacter/al i) 'eas '.' S't
,' on, Epidcmiolouy// Pro iram. \'( '.)


Table 1
Seven Most Frequently Reported Serotypes from Human Sources
January, February, and March 1967

Januaar\ Februar March
Seroityps Rank NurmbIr Percent Rank Number Percent Rank Numobr Percent

S. typAhi-murium i, S. typhi-miurium 1 471 32.S 1 347 29.3 1 .11i 29.:
\ar. coi en'^p ldi/
2 117 .2 2 106 9.0 2 142 111.1
S. saint-paul 3 h(i 6.0 7 53 4.5 7 49 3
S. newport I r2 5.7 1 65 5.5 5 (13 4.5
S. infanti 5 62 1.3 (6 55 4 6 3 S1.2
I. cnterit iis (; 44 :3.1 3 6. 5.7 4 70 ..0
. fyphi 7 41 -2.9 5 61 5.2 6 53.
Total 903 63.0 75i5 63.+ h8O 62.

Total all serotypes 1.435 1.1,S4 1.4 1


Table 2
Seven Most Frequently Reported Serotypes from Nonhuman Sources
January, February, and March 1967

January February March
Serotyps---
erotype RRank Number Percent Rank Number Percent Rank Number Percent
S. typhi-murium 6- S. typh i-mulrium 1 129 13.2 2 52 6.7 1 106 12.)
\ar. copenhagen
S. derby 2 6 6 6.5 1* 135 17.5 2 94 10.7
S. chbana 3 5, 5.9 6 34 4.4
S.. he 1 4 52 5.3 4 40 5.2 3 54 6.1
S. anatum 5 52 3 3 43 5.6 5 49 5.6
S. infants 6 51 5.2 5 35 4.5 4 51 5.h
S. alachua 7 46 4.7
S. mon/teide o 7 32 4.2
S. tennessee 6 35 4.0
S. newington 7 34 3.9
Total 452 46.1 371 48.1 423 4S.0
Total all serotypes 979 771 S82

Most Common Sources of Nonhuman Isolations
Swine 1 20b 21.2 1 220 28.5 2 136 15.4
Turkey 2 140 14.3 2 92 11.9 1 166 15.h
Chicken 3 101 10.3 4 68 8.8 4 S1 9.2
Livestock feed 4 54 5.5 5 64 8.3
Dry milk 5 51 5.2 3 83 10.5 3 9S 11.1
Bone meal & meat scraps 5 62 7.0
*Salmonella derby ranks first in February due to 115 isolation from swine reported by Louisatna


CURRENT TRENDS
MEASLES -1967


The number of reported measles cases (49,538) for
the first 28 weeks of the 1966-67 epidemiologic year
(October 9, 1966, through April 22, 1967) represents an


almost threefold decrease from the 141.073 cases of the
preceding year (Figure 2). However, the usual seasonal
(Continue'd on page 1 8)


143


MAY 6 1967








144 11 rhidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MAY 6, 1967 AND MAY 7, 1966 (18th WEEK)


ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS

ASEPTIC Primary
AREA MENINCITIS If eLtosiS DIP)IITIIEBIA including P ious Serum Infectious
unsp. cases Infectious
1967 1966 1967 1967 1967 1966 1967 1967 1966 1967 1966
UNITED STATES... 28 27 2 3 29 23 19 45 29 769 608

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1 3 1 25 31
Maine.............. 5 4
New Hampshire ...... -
Vermont............ 1
Massachusetts...... 2 1 7 20
Rhode Island ....... 1 1 3
Connecticut ........ 11 4

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 5 2 2 4 6 23 12 184 121
New York City...... 1 1 1 18 9 43 22
New York, Up-State. 2 2 3 37 25
New Jersey......... 2 1 1 2 2 70 38
Pennsylvania ....... 1 1 4 2 1 34 36

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 3 7 9 5 5 2 120 80
Ohio ............... 1 1 5 3 1 19 19
Indiana............ 1 2 19 2
Illinois........... 1 5 2 4 37 26
Michigan........... 1 1 1 39 27
Wisconsin ........... 1 6 6

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 2 1 1 62 49
Minnesota.......... 1 17 5
Iowa............... 2 9 16
Missouri ........... 26 17
North Dakota....... 4
South Dakota....... i 1
Nebraska ............ 1 -3 5
Kansas .............- 2 5

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 4 2 5 6 1 2 3 73 73
Delaware ........... 3 1 7 4
Maryland........... 1 13 13
Dist. of Columbia.. 1
Virginia........... 3 2 8 7
West Virginia...... 1 4 9 -
North Carolina..... 1 1 2 2 3 10
South Carolina ..... -
Georgia ............ 17 11
Florida ............ 1 16 26

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1 2 2 1 1 43 59
Kentucky............ 12 11
Tennessee.......... 1 1 16 24
Alabama............ 1 1 17
Mississippi........ 1 1 15 7

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 5 1 2 3 1 4 1 79 57
Arkansas........... 1 2 7
Louisiana.......... 1 2 3 7 15
Oklahoma........... 10 -
Texas............... 4 1 2 1 1 1 60 35

MOUNTAIN............. 1 1 3 16 19
Montana............ 2 1
Idaho.............. 1 4
Wyoming............. 2
Colorado........... 1 1 3 -
New Mexico......... 1 8
Arizona............ I 2 5 5
Utah ............... i
Nevada.............. -

PACIFIC............... 8 12 6 1 5 15 11 167 119
Washington......... 1 1 2 8 5
Oregon............. I 17 17
California......... 8 9 5 3 15 11 140 96
Alaska............. 2
Hawaii............. --- i --- --- --- -- ... .. ... I

Puerto Rico 1 9 25









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 145


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MAY 6, 1967 AND MAY 7, 1966 (18th WEEK) CONTINUED



MALARIA MEASLES (Rubeola) MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS, POLIOMYELITIS RUBELLA
AREA Cumulative Cumulative Total Paralytic
Cuulative Cumulative Cum.
1967 1967 1967 1966 1967 1967 1966 1967 1967 1967 1967
UNITED STATES... 29 2,355 42,132 134,318 51 1,063 1,794 1 5 1,719

NEW ENGLAND.......... 17 501 1,546 5 46 79 145
Maine.............. 121 166 2 7 18
New Hampshire ...... 69 33 1 7 10
Vermont............. 35 204 3 14
Massachusetts ...... 8 187 586 4 23 31 31
Rhode Island ....... 4 31 66 1 2 7 4
Connecticut ........ 5 58 491 18 24 68

MIDDLE ATLANTIC ...... 5 101 1,399 14,981 14 164 198 2 81
New York City ...... 1 18 244 7,407 2 26 30 1 35
New York, Up-State. 21 319 1,699 5 41 55 45
New Jersey......... 1 27 336 1,555 5 66 56 -
Pennsylvania ....... 3 35 500 4,320 2 31 57 1 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 2 253 3,414 49,486 6 118 267 350
Ohio................ 19 571 4,573 3 44 73 41
Indiana ............ 2 39 414 3,411 15 44 20
Illinois........... 74 558 9,462 2 25 52 24
Michigan........... 31 714 8,277 1 25 72 118
Wisconsin.......... 90 1,157 23,763 9 26 147

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 96 1,853 6,343 2 45 96 106
Minnesota.......... 8 92 1,449 9 24 8
Iowa................ 42 460 3,610 9 13 83
Missouri........... 6 135 381 11 38 -
North Dakota ....... 1 27 669 831 4 4
South Dakota ....... 1 46 4 6 3 -
Nebraska........... 12 451 68 2 8 7 11
Kansas............. NN NN NN 2 7 -

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 11 176 4,777 10,248 6 205 288 1 110
Delaware ........... 5 32 152 5 3 4
Maryland........... 2 4 85 1,522 1 26 29 1 18
Dist. of Columbia.. 12 338 1 6 7 -
Virginia........... 1 77 1,494 1,080 2 18 40 17
West Virginia ...... 53 907 3,771 16 10 35
North Carolina..... 7 14 760 185 2 43 62 -
South Carolina ..... 8 352 471 19 39 9
Georgia............ 1 23 192 33 42 -
Florida............ 15 1,112 2,537 39 56 27

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 212 4,130 14,983 4 99 159 111
Kentucky........... 8 1,073 4,085 29 69 33
Tennessee .......... 57 1,401 8,850 2 41 47 77
Alabama............ 134 1,050 1,279 1 18 32 1
Mississippi........ 13 606 769 1 11 11 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 595 14,348 16,231 8 161 270 2 16
Arkansas........... 3 1,351 528 3 19 15 -
Louisiana.......... 17 104 74 59 106 -
Oklahoma........... 6 3,216 365 10 12 1
Texas.............. 569 9,677 15,264 5 73 137 1 16

MOUNTAIN............. 2 262 3,175 7,775 1 21 65 158
Montana............ 33 237 1,155 4 4
Idaho.............. 9 319 747 1 4 -
Wyoming............ 1 21 100 3 1
Colorado........... 2 88 879 783 10 35 68
New Mexico......... 22 478 686 3 9 -
Arizona............ 78 723 3,998 2 8 85
Utah................ 18 261 282 1 3 -
Nevada............. 13 257 24 2 2 -

PACIFIC.............. 8 643 8,535 12,725 5 204 372 1 642
Washington......... 1 300 4,081 2,162 20 24 141
Oregon............. 118 1,138 914 17 24 18
California.......... 7 224 3,139 9,511 5 158 307 1 461
Alaska............. 1 97 61 8 14 22
Hawaii............. --- --- 80 77 --- 1 3 --- --- ---
Puerto Rico............... 79 1,445 1,673 8 4 -









146 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MAY 6, 1967 AND MAY 7, 1966 (18th WEEK) CONTINUED


STREPTOCOCCAL TYPHUS FEVER
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA TYPHOID TICK-BORNE RABIES IN
AREA SCARLET FEVER (Rky. Mt. Spotted) ANIMALS
1967 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum.
1967 1967 1967 1967 1967


UNITED STATES... 10,423 2 53 5 49 6 115 10 23 96 1,605

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1,829 1 1 41
Maine............... 128 1 9
New Hampshire ...... 8 25
Vermont............ 83 7
Massachusetts ...... 212 1 -
Rhode Island ....... 123 -
Connecticut........ 1,275 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC ...... 625 5 1 14 32
New York City ...... 22 3 1 9 -
New York, Up-State. 562 1 3 23
New Jersey ......... NN 1 --
Pennsylvania ....... 41 1 1 9

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 830 2 1 6 1 10 1 3 8 131
Ohio ............... 153 1 4 2 6 63
Indiana............ 51 1 1 1 1 21
Illinois........... 197 2 1 5 1 1 21
Michigan........... 256 4 4
Wisconsin ......... 173 1 22

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 555 1 10 2 19 342
Minnesota .......... 5 1 3 68
Iowa................ 172 1 2 1 37
Missouri........... 22 3 3 78
North Dakota ....... 178 5 59
South Dakota ....... 15 3 49
Nebraska ........... 46 1 22
Kansas............. 117 6 3 29

SOUTH ATLANTIC ....... 1,234 12 2 7 1 15 5 10 14 223
Delaware........... 33 -
Maryland ........... 566 1
Dist. of Columbia.. 20 1
Virginia........... 211 3 2 2 2 12 120
West Virginia ...... 276 1 1 2 38
North Carolina ..... 19 4 2 3 7 1
South Carolina ..... 10 2 1 3 -
Georgia............ 7 1 1 3 1 1 41
Florida............ 92 4 1 1 4 23

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,185 1 14 6 12 2 3 19 384
Kentucky........... 121 I 4 2 2 3 73
Tennessee .......... 879 1 7 4 4 1 15 281
Alabama............ 142 5 4 1 28
Mississippi ........ 43 2 1 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 690 1 11 1 12 17 2 30 313
Arkansas........... 1 3 1 3 8 51
Louisiana ......... 4 1 2 11 2 30
Oklahoma........... 99 1 6 2 10 80
Texas.................. 586 1 7 3 3 10 152

MOUNTAIN............. 1,791 1 7 1 15 2 3 1 42
Montana ............ 52 1 1 -
Idaho .............. 92 -
Wyoming............ 58 1 2 -
Colorado ........... 965 1 11 2 3 5
New Mexico......... 198 9
Arizona............ 261 1 3 1 28
Utah............... 160 3 -
Nevada ............. 5 -

PACIFIC.............. 1,684 8 1 2 29 2 4 97
Washington ......... 433 -
Oregon............. 128 1
California......... 1,071 6 1 2 26 2 4 96
Alaska............. 52 -
Hawaii............. --- --- 2 --- --- 3 ---


Puerto Rico......... 4 31 4 2 16


i









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report






DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED MAY 6, 1967

(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)


All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under

Area All 65 years and I year Area All 65 years and I year
Ages and over Influenza All Ages and over Influenza All
All Ages Causes All Ages Causes


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass ----------
Bridgeport, Conn.-----
Cambridge, Mass.-------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.--------
Lowell, Mass.----------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.-------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.-------
Worcester, Mass.-------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.----------
Allentown, Pa.---------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.----------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.--------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.----------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.--.....-
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.--------
Reading, Pa.-----------
Rochester, N. Y.-------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.----------
Syracuse, N. Y.--------
Trenton, N. J.---------
Utica, N. Y.-----------
Yonkers, N. Y.---------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio-----------
Chicago, Ill.----------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio-----------
Detroit, Mich.---------
Evansville, Ind.-------
Flint, Mich.-----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.-------
Gary, Ind.-----------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.--------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.-----------
Rockford, Ill.---------
South Bend, Ind.-------
Toledo, Ohio-----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
*Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.----------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.----
Lincoln, Nebr.---------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.-----------
St. Louis, Mo.---------
St. Paul, Minn.--------
Wichita, Kans.---------


749
255
50
30
24
54
33
21
25
60
50
15
40
43
49

3,261
57
39
160
42
34
39
62
80
1,679
41
489
165
46
112
30
32
52
32
33
37

2,473
65
60
726
158
197
116
70
356
42
31
33
47
57
146
28
113
24
30
29
92
53

854
58
25
37
125
35
103
65
257
77
72


467
150
33
21
14
24
23
16
20
37
33
9
28
31
28

1,906
37
24
90
28
22
28
40
42
977
25
261
80
33
82
20
21
32
18
23
23

1,407
44
37
371
96
96
63
48
206
26
16
19
22
42
85
15
63
17
20
19
66
36

508
38
16
25
76
20
61
36
144
51
41


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ca.------------
Baltimore, Md.----------
Charlotte, N. C.--------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.- --------
Norfolk, Va.------------
Richmond, Va.-----------
Savannah, Ca.-----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.-------
Wilmington, Del.--------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.--------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.---------
Memphis, Tenn.- --------
Mobile, Ala.------------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.------------
Baton Rouge, La.--------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.-----------
Fort Worth, Tex.--------
Houston, Tex.----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.--------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.-------
Shreveport, La.---------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo .----------
Ogden, Utah-------------
Phoenix, Ariz.----------
Pueblo, Colo.-----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.-----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.--------
Fresno, Calif.----------
Glendale, Calif.--------
Honolulu, Hawaii -------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.---------
Pasadena, Calif.--------
Portland, Oreg.---------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.-------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.--------
Seattle, Wash.----------
Spokane, Wash.----------
Tacoma, Wash.-----------


1,125
123
247
56
68
93
44
84
35
76
80
167
52

637
95
44
46
131
149
51
36
85

1,057
46
16
37
149
35
62
204
45
147
97
106
46
67

416
32
21
116
20
101
18
57
51

1,604
19
47
35
51
67
508
71
31
124
72
101
177
46
149
67
39


620
54
140
29
33
58
17
50
15
69
44
84
27

336
44
23
30
79
67
33
23
37

533
26
8
26
70
20
33
90
26
72
54
56
23
29

258
21
13
69
11
60
13
36
35

976
14
30
20
23
45
311
41
17
85
40
62
102
31
81
49
25


5
1
2


Total 12,176 ] 7,011 466 597

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 231,602
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 133,921
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 9,192
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 11,626


Week No.
18


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.











148


MEASLES 1967
(Continued from page 143)


Figure 2
REPORTED MEASLES BY FOUR-WEEK PERIODS,
UNITED STATES EPIDEMIOLOGIC YEAR, 1966-67
COMPARED WITH 1964-65 AND 1965-66


48,000-

440000 -

40.000 -









206,000



12,000-

8,000-

8.0001


5 3 31 28 25 25 2 20 I 15 12 9 7
NOV DEC DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG. SEP OCT
FOUR-WEEK PERIOD ENDING


increase in the late winter and early spring months was
noted. In the previous two years the marked seasonal rise

started in December, whereas the greatest increment in
the current year came in February. The seasonal peak for

1966-67 seems to have leveled out at about 10,000 cases
per 4-week period during the early spring months.
During the week ending May 6, 2,355 cases of mea-
sles were reported-77 fewer than the preceding week.
Measleswas virtually absent(17 cases) from New England.
Decreases from the preceding week's totals were noted in
the South Atlantic and West South Central regions. The
largest numbers of cases were reported from Texas and
Washington, 569 and 300. respectively. Alabama notified
a greater than fourfold increase over the preceding week's
total.
(Reported by the Childhood Viral Diseases Unit, Epi-
demiology Program, NCDC.)


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA



3 1262 08864 2383

NIAV 6 1967


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Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


1966-87