Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00011

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text




NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

BUREAU OF DISEASE PREVENTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL


V Vol. 16, No. 12

WU .KIY



Week Ending

March 25, 1967



PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


INTERNATIONAL NOTES
SMALLPOX IMPORTED INTO GERMANY FROM INDIA
A Hanover. Germany, dermatologist is the third patient
with imported smallpox to be identified in Europe since
March 5. He apparently became ill 2 days before leaving
Bombay on March 23 and had facial lesions on arrival in
Hanover the same day. Smallpox virus was recovered from
these lesions. His travels in India included visits to New
Delhi and to Yaitur (March 4 and 10 respectively) where
he was reported to ha\e been exposed to smallpox. He
gave a history of revaccinations in 1966 and in February
1967. both accompained by minimal reaction.
The patient flew from Bombay to Frankfurt on Air
India flight 107 leaving Bombay about 1:00 a.m. After


CONTEN'I S
Internal tional Note.
Smallpox Imported into (ermany from India . 93
Quarantine Measures . t1 00
Measles Vaccine Distribution . 95


intermediate stops in Beirut and Rome. he deplaned in
Frankfurt and traveled to Hanover aboard Lufthansa :Il.1
541. Air India flight 107 meanwhile flew on to London and
John F. Kennedy Airport in New York City.
A total of 15 passengers known to have been on Air
India flight 107 subsequently entered the U'SA and pro-
ceeded to destinations in 'I l.3B- \'isconsin,
g\\ 0age 9.'0<


Figure 1
SMALLPOX CASES BY WEEK OF REPORT-BOMBAY, INDIA
140 PRAGUE IMPORT LEFT BOMBAY MARCH 4,1967 -, .


1201
REGENSBURG IMPORT LEFT BOMBAY FEB 21,1967


1966
0 In -.---

0 i -- -- -- -


I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
WEEK NUMBER
SOURCE WHO WEEKLY EPIDEMIOLOGICAL RECORD


10 II 2


PS 2.6 0/1: /(/II-



















Import No.


Place

Regensburg (Germany)


Prague (Czech.)


Hanover (Germany)


Patient's
Occupation

Shopkeeper


Airline
crew man
Dermat-
ologi-st


Date Entry


3-'23


Virginia and Puerto Rico. Three others traveled to Canada
and Venezuela after in-transit stopovers at the John F.
Kennedy Airport.
On March 27, the names and addresses of persons
bound for each State were provided to the responsible
State Epidemiologist who immediately arranged with local
health officers to locate these individuals and institute
surveillance procedures. Surveillance will include daily
health status inquiries and temperature i ....i,'.,-. through
April 8 (16 days after last exposure to smallpox).
Identifying information for those persons traveling to
other countries was provided to the pertinent health agen-
cies through international channels.
The epidemiological characteristics of the Hanover
case are compared in Table I with those of the two cases
previously imported into Europe (see also MMR. Vol. 16.
Nos. 9 and 10).
Notifications received by the t.orl,J Health Organiza-
tion during the first 10weeks of 1967 (hr.'..ih week ending
March 11) show a total of 6,452 cases (in. iul.r,c imported
cases) of smallpox reported from India. This total is almost
twice as large as the 3.236 cases of smallpox reported
during the first 10 weeks of 1966.
Notable increases have been observed in Bombay
(Maharasthra State), Nagpur (Maharasthra State), Gaya
(Bihar -i ii,'i Kanpur (Uttar Pradesh State), Lucknow
(Uttar Pradesh State), and Visakhapatnam (Andhra Pradesh
State). From these cities, a total of 1,812 cases with 766
deaths were reported through the week ending March 11,


Date Onset

3-3


3- 7


3-21


Source


Bombay


Bombay


New Delhi
or Yaitur


MARCH 25. 1967


Vace. History

Childhood?
revace. 1965
Revacc. 1966
unsucc.
Revacc. 1967 ?
success


Severity

Fulr I ir, Ai i na


Atypical rash

Very mild
few lesions


1967, as compared with 105 cases and 38 deaths during the
similar period of time in 1966. Of this year's total. 840
cases and 346 deaths were reported from Bombay.
The pattern of smallpox occurrence in Bombay, 1967,
is shown in I- ,r.. 1 as compared with the similar period
in 1966. Dates of departures are noted for the patients who
acquired their infection in Bombay.
(Reported by Dr. Huston K. Spangler, MOC, PHS Foreign
Quarantine Program, American Consulate, Munich; data
compiled from Weekly Epidemiological Record, WHO)

On March 27, 1967 the National Communicable Disease Center
sent the following telegram to State and Territorial Health Officers;
Executive Vice President, American Medical Association: Director,
American Hospital Association; Regional Offices, U.S. Public Health
Service: and the Foreign Quarantine Program:
"Reports to the World Health Organization and the Foreign Quar-
antine Program indicate that smallpox is on the increase in several
areas of India and can be considered epidemic in Bombay.
Incidence can be expected to increase for a number of weeks.
Although no cases have occurred in the United States, three
cases have been introduced into Europe, all in returning tourists,
the most recent a physician with an apparently valid vaccination
history. Urge high level of suspicion of any international traveler
particularly with history of visit in India who presents symptoms
possibly related to smallpox-fever, backache and any type of rash.
In partially immune persons, rash can be variable. Urge that all
members of health professions and hospitals be alerted with
particularly high priority given to international air and seaport
cities. CDC ready to offer diagnostic support at 404-634-2561
on 24-hour coverage. The American Medical Association and
American Hospital Association are cooperating in alerting the
profession."


MEASLES VACCINE DISTRIBUTION


During the past 4 years, 20,956,383 doses of live
measles virus vaccine were sold or distributed i,,i.uti,
December 1966 by manufacturers in the United States.
This total is the supply designated for United States
domestic and -,,,11-, r, dependent use and does not include
supplies produced for foreign consumption. The number of
doses distributed each year since vaccine licensure in
March 1963 is shown in Table 3.


Table 3- Doses of Live Measles Virus Vaccine
Distributed For U.S. Domestic and Military Use by Year
Year Number of Doses
1963 (10 months) . ..... 3,179,416
1964 . .......... .... 3,820,146
1965 .............. ......... 6,027,582
1966 . .......... 7 '12 9 ~ i'

Total . ... 1'.-..,


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report



SMALLPOX IMPORTED INTO GERMANY FROM INDIA
(Continued from front page)

Table 1
Cases of Imported Smallpox Europe, 1967







MARCH 25i, 1967


Morbidity and Mortali


ty Weekly Report 95



doiu dis rib ited increase d fro;n app;roxinal v 301 11.I 001
inch nionlt during l!t3 ;trild 1961 to 500,000 ( during 16;5
and 6000,000 during 196t.

(R'eparted )y ('h Childho/ od V r al'/i'/ ) /i. I p-
dieiolo/y/i Proy/ram, C(//) .)


Thte quartwrl distributing of th0 I .S. do0(mStiC 3ad
military \ atCl'int supply I'or the 4--yoar p rilod 196(;1-6i6 1,
shmon in Figure 2. It can ib noted t hat therein \\as a nrktd
increase in \i;ccin e distributed in 196>5 anld 1961i Th,
licensing of additional companies for IbO, production ofl
vaccine explain, this incrreaso. Tho a\erag numbl)er of


Figure 2
NUMBER OF DOSES OF LIVE MEASLES VIRUS VACCINE DISTRIBUTED FOR DOMESTIC AND MILITARY
3 USE BY QUARTER, 1963-1966


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
12th WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST 12 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE MARCH 25, MARCH 26. 1962 1966 I MEDIAN
1967 1966 1967 1966 1962 1966
Aseptic meningitis .... .. ... ....... 28 20 21 332 343 315
Brucellosis ... .................... 4 6 6 44 46 70
Diphtheria 6 6 28 35 51
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-borne & unspecified ......... 35 17 270 281 -
Encephalitis, post-infectious 21 17 152 195 -
Hepatitis, serum .. .............. 43 25 908 440 270 11.290
Hepatitis, infectious .............. ...... 896 685 9 9,539 8.561
Malaria .............. ..... ......... 42 5 2 479 67 21
Measles rubeolaa).. .............. ...... 2,578 9,479 14,746 25,929 85,084 125,918
Meningococcal infections, total ........ 42 125 79 702 1,185 746
Civilian ........... .......... 39 114 651 1,024 -
Military ............................. 3 11 51 161 -
Poliomyelitis, total .. 1 2 5 17
Paralytic ........ ... 1 2 4 13
Rubella (German measles) ... . 1,498 2,175 12,084 15,588 -
Streptococcal sore throat & scarlet fever 12,812 13,722 11,199 147,115 140,578 127.714
Tetanus. . .. ..... 2 2 32 23 42
Tularemia .... ... ........ ... 3 3 3 27 49 52
Typhoid fever ............. .. 7 5 5 63 59 75
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. spotted fever) 7 10 3

Rabies in animals ...... ......... ..... 95 135 110 956 958 926

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum
A nthrax .... .......... .. ....... 1 R abies in m an .......... .... ....
Botulism .......................... Rubella, Congenital Syndrome .. .. ..
Leptospirosis ...... ....... ..... Trichinosis:Mass.-1 19
Plagu .............. ...... ....... .. Typhus, marine ................................ .. 5
Pi.u j,.u. ,.".hin IL 9 I


-- I7


/I









96 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MARCH 25, 196- AND MARCH 26. 1966 (12th WEEK)


ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS

ASEPTIC Primary
AREA MENINGITIS Bi< IELL)SIS DIPHTHERIA including Post- Serum Infectious
unsp. cases Inectious
1967 1966 1967 1967 1967 1966 1967 1967 1966 1967 1966
UNITED STATES... 28 20 4 35 17 21 43 25 896 685

NEW ENGLAND.......... I 1 2 1 38 17
Maine............... 5 2
New Hampshire ...... I -
Vermont............ 1 1
Massachusetts ...... 1 27 10
Rhode Island ....... 1 2
Connecticut ........ 2 4 2

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 2 3 3 2 25 14 220 103
New York City...... 2 21 9 57 28
New York, up-State. 1 2 1 1 23 30
New Jersey......... 1 1 3 4 103 12
Pennsylvania....... 1 1 1 37 33

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 9 6 1 1 2 139 142
Ohio................ 6 2 1 21 32
Indiana ............ 1 2 2 22 9
Illinois........... 1 1 1 29 42
Michigan........... 1 1 1 49 57
Wisconsin .......... 18 2

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 2 1 78 47
Minnesota .......... 11 7
Iowa ............... 20
Missouri........... 1 63 12
North Dakota ....... 2 -
South Dakota ....... 2 -
Nebraska...........
Kansas.............. 1 2 8

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 7 5 1 3 1 7 2 1 70 68
Delaware........... 1 3 3 1
Maryland............ 1 2 2 15 19
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 2
Virginia........... 2 3 19 6
West Virginia ...... 3 9 7
North Carolina ..... 1 1 7 13
South Carolina ..... 1 I
Georgia............. 9 2
Florida............ 1 2 1 2 1 6 17

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 6 2 74 77
Kentucky............ 2 1 28 36
Tennessee .......... 2 2 21 28
Alabama ............ 5 8
Mississippi........ 2 20 5

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 5 3 1 2 1 1 68 65
Arkansas............ 2 1 12
Louisiana.......... 2 7 11
Oklahoma............ 3 7
Texas............... 3 3 1 1 58 35

MOUNTAIN.............. 10 1 39 22
Montana............. 6 2
Idaho............... I
Wyoming............. 8 -
Colorado............ 7 4
New Mexico.......... 1 11 1
Arizona............. 10 12
Utah ............... 6 3
Nevada............... .- -

PACIFIC.............. 10 8 1 6 1 8 15 6 170 144
Washington......... I 1 12 5
Oregon ............. 16 45
California......... 10 7 1 6 1 7 15 6 140 93
Alaska.............. 2 -
Hawaii ............... ..--- --- --- --- --- i
Puerto Rico 1 16 28








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 97


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MAR( H 25, 1967 AND MARCH 26. 1966 (12th WEEK) CONTINUED



MALARIA MEASLES (Rubeola) MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS, POLIOMYELITIS RUBELLA
TOTAL
AREA T Pr :
Cumulative Cumulative Total -Paralyti-
Cum.
1967 1967 1967 1966 1967 1967 1966 1967 1967 1967 1967
UNITED STATES... 42 2,578 25,929 85,084 42 702 1,185 2 1,498

NEW ENGLAND .......... 27 288 1,028 2 26 58 169
Maine............. 1 49 139 1 6 -- 77
New Hampshire ...... 61 12 1 7 4
Vermont............ 21 163 2 1
Massachusetts ...... 24 107 376 1 13 24 39
Rhode Island ....... 21 48 4 2
Connecticut ........ 2 29 290 1 11 15 46

MIDDLE ATLANTIC ...... 1 70 816 11,148 2 85 127 1 51
New York City ...... 11 130 5,631 1 16 23 1 20
New York, Up-State. 17 186 1,230 25 30 31
New Jersey......... 14 202 1,179 1 33 39 -
Pennsylvania ....... 1 28 298 3,108 11 35 -

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 155 2,137 33,399 9 70 173 248
Ohio............... 38 336 2,355 5 30 47 7
Indiana............ 18 244 2,043 3 8 24 27
Illinois............ 12 326 7,282 1 14 36 -- 25
Michigan........... 20 461 5,183 13 51 84
Wisconsin.......... 67 770 16,536 5 15 105

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 3 76 1,158 3,899 3 34 63 94
Minnesota........... 2 48 1,148 2 7 13 -
Iowa............... 27 243 1,796 6 11 74
Missouri........... 1 10 39 279 9 25 6
North Dakota ....... 29 481 631 3 14
South Dakota ....... 38 3 1 5 2 -
Nebraska........... 8 309 42 6 3 -
Kansas ............. 2 NN NN NN 1 6 -

SOUTH ATLANTIC ....... 11 365 2,802 6,527 12 147 193 182
Delaware........... 4 24 91 5 1 4
Maryland........... 7 56 1,100 18 19 8
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 9 282 3 1
Virginia........... 1 162 840 549 2 13 21 29
West Virginia ...... 23 505 2,717 12 8 22
North Carolina..... 6 30 584 129 2 30 41 -
South Carolina..... 1 30 90 324 3 12 27 21
Georgia............ 3 1 10 150 28 32 -
Florida............ 107 684 1,185 5 29 41 97

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 10 222 3,080 9,791 5 69 101 160
Kentucky........... 10 72 1,009 3,190 2 20 51 61
Tennessee.......... 85 949 5,446 2 30 27 99
Alabama............ 47 648 734 1 12 17 -
Mississippi........ 18 474 421 7 6 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 3 887 8,848 8,412 5 122 187 1 44
Arkansas........... 16 1,200 322 10 11 1
Louisiana.......... 7 57 53 3 49 69 -
Oklahoma........... 3 7 1,619 165 7 7 -
Texas.............. 857 5,972 7,872 2 56 100 1 43

MOUNTAIN ............. 9 202 1,691 4,364 16 37 144
Montana ............ 3 177 688 3 5
Idaho .............. 12 171 510 1 1- -
Wyoming ............ 1 13 80 1 -
Colorado........... 9 29 400 492 7 21 93
New Mexico......... 69 274 184 3 5 -
Arizona............ 35 354 2,283 2 5 44
Utah ............... 53 138 120 1 2
Nevada............. 164 7 2 1 -

PACIFIC.............. 5 574 5,109 6,516 4 133 246 406
Washington ......... 273 2,565 1,495 1 11 13 65
Oregon ............. 68 590 531 10 9 40
California.......... 5 224 1,830 4,422 3 110 209 296
Alaska............. 9 73 24 2 12 5
Hawaii............. --- 51 44 --- 3 -- -- --
Puerto Rico........... 107 820 956 7 1 3








98 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report



CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MARCH 25, 1967 AND MARCH 26, (12th WEEK) CONTINUED


STREPTOCOCCAL TYPHUS FEVER
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA TYPHOID TICK-BORNE RABIES IN
AREA SCARLET FEVER (Rky. Mt. Spotted) ANIMALS
1967 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum. 1967 Cum.
1967 1967 1967 1967 1967
UNITED STATES... 12,812 32 3 27 7 63 7 95 956

NEW ENGLAND.......... 2,225 1 17
Maine................. 68 4
New Hampshire ...... 20 1 7
Vermont ............ 103 6
Massachusetts ...... 254 -
Rhode Island ....... 95 -
Connecticut ........ 1,685 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC ...... 689 4 9 3 20
New York City ...... 33 2 6 -
New York, Up-State. 598 1 2 3 13
New Jersey ......... NN -
Pennsylvania ....... 58 1 I 7

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 1,299 2 4 3 1 15 72
Ohio ............... 204 1 1 9 34
Indiana............ 116 1 15
Illinois........... 393 2 3 4 13
Michigan ........... 368 1 I
Wisconsin........... 218 1 2 9

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 686 1 1 8 2 8 202
Minnesota .......... 8 1 48
Iowa............... 305 1 2 1 19
Missouri........... 44 3 1 44
North Dakota ....... 274 2 43
South Dakota....... 17 2 25
Nebraska ........... 5 2 10
Kansas ............. 33 1 4 13

SOUTH ATLANTIC ....... 1,431 6 1 5 1 6 4 13 121
Delaware........... 17 -
Maryland........... 238 -
Dist. of Columbia.. -
Virginia........... 619 2 1 2 7 62
West Virginia ...... 297 1 I 18
North Carolina..... 23 2 1 3 1
South Carolina..... 2 2 --
Georgia ........... 8 1 2 1 2 23
Florida............ 227 2 2 4 17

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,533 9 2 8 1 27 263
Kentucky........... 376 4 7 51
Tennessee.......... 1,019 5 2 1 1 12 195
Alabama............ 101 3 3 7 15
Mississippi ........ 37 1 1 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL ... 836 4 1 4 16 17 179
Arkansas........... 3 32
Louisiana ......... 3 11 1 19
Oklahoma........... 81 3 6 39
Texas............... 752 4 1 1 2 10 89

MOUNTAIN............. 2,230 4 5 8 5 20
Montana............ 86 1 1 -
Idaho .............. 151 -
Wyoming............ 30 -
Colorado........... 1,034 1 4 5 3 3
New Mexico......... 534 5
Arizona............ 165 1 2 2 12
Utah............... 230 2 -
Nevada............. -

PACIFIC.............. 1,883 6 1 11 1 6 62
Washington......... 437 -
Oregon............. 74 1
California......... 1,295 5 1 10 1 6 61
Alaska............. 77 -
Hawaii............. --- --- 1 --- 1 --- ---

Puerto Rico ......... 4 2 4 1 7









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report






DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED MARCH 25, 1967


(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)

All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under

Area All 65 years and I year Area All 65 and year
lInfluenza All years e All
All Ages Causes Ages and over All Ages Causes


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.------.---
Bridgeport, Conn.------
Cambridge, Mass.-------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.--------
Lowell, Mass.----------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.-------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.-------
Worcester, Mass.-------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.----------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.---------
Camden, N. J.----------
Elizabeth, N. J.-------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.----------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.--------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.--------
Reading, Pa.-----------
Rochester, N. Y.-------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.----------
Syracuse, N. Y.--------
Trenton, N. J.---------
Utica, N. Y.-----------
Yonkers, N. Y.---------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio------------
Canton, Ohio-----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio --------
Dayton, Ohio-----------
Detroit, Mich.---------
Evansville, Ind.-------
Flint, Mich.-----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.-------
Gary, Ind.-------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, III.-----------
Rockford, Ill.---------
South Bend, Ind.-------
Toledo, Ohio-----------
Youngstown, Ohio -----

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.-*-------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.---------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.-----------
St. Louis, Mo.---------
St. Paul, Minn.----
Wichita, Kans.---------


828
325
65
20
32
66
30
20
18
46
50
13
47
30
66

3,269
39
37
154
27
30
36
64
61
1,671
34
530
191
47
116
25
43
60
42
32
30

2,773
69
36
781
179
215
125
82
404
34
57
45
57
52
136
38
105
57
34
52
146
69

781
60
22
29
123
37
108
76
215
68
43


515
193
42
18
19
35
17
17
14
28
28
9
28
21
46

2,001
22
27
87
14
17
25
29
40
1,012
24
331
105
33
85
15
29
40
28
17
21

1,600
36
21
419
123
105
67
52
241
19
31
30
28
35
81
15
69
34
24
26
99
45

478
38
14
15
81
24
65
35
125
50
31


29
12
1

1
4
1


1
4
1
1
1
2

130
4
1
6

3
1
2
1
66
1
24
10

3
1

1
2
2
2

123
5
3
35
2
6
10

22
2
6
3
2
2
6
2
4
3
1
2
5
2

40
3
1
1
7
1
4
4
11
6
2


*Estimate based on average percent


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.------------
Baltimore, Md.----------
Charlotte, N. C.--------
Jacksonville, Fla.------
Miami, Fla.-------------
Norfolk, Va.------------
Richmond, Va.- ---------
Savannah, Ga.-----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.-------------
Washington, D. C.-------
Wilmington, Del.--------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.--------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.--------
Louisville, Ky.---------
Memphis, Tenn.----------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.--------
Nashville, Tenn.--------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.----------
Baton Rouge, La.--------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.-----------
Fort Worth, Tex.--------
Houston, Tex.-----------
Little Rock, Ark.-------
New Orleans, La.--------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.-------
Shreveport, La.---------
Tulsa, Okla.------------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.-----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------n
Pueblo, Colo.-----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.-----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.---------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.---------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.-------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.--------
Seattle, Wash.----------
Spokane, Wash.----------
Tacoma, Wash.-----------


1,213
134
242
31
69
95
51
97
45
90
91
230
38

592
80
37
33
131
139
35
33
104

1,146
40
55
23
164
33
72
218
60
138
79
127
61
76

446
51
25
123
18
94
19
57
59

1,580
23
56
38
39
75
461
81
35
161
71
86
203
37
134
41
39


Total 12,628 J 7,284 1 474 617

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 157,076
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 90,930
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 6,398
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 7,934


Week No.


of divisional total.









100 Morbidity and Mo




INTERNATIONAL NOTES
QUARANTINE MEASURES

Immunization Information for International Travel
1965-66 edition-Public Health Service Publication No. 384

Page 16 Poliomyelitis
Delete all information and insert:
Polio immunization is important for travelers because
the disease continues to be present in many parts of
the world. Immunization: Oral poliovirus vaccine is
the predominant form used in the United States. Two
doses of the combined or trivalent vaccine are given
6 to 8 weeks apart, followed by a third dose some 9 to
12 months later. Additional recall doses are recom-
mended before entering elementary school or traveling
abroad. Individuals who have received the killed
poliovirus vaccine (Salk type) should receive at least
one dose of the trivalent oral vaccine before leaving
the country.
Page 16 Measles
Delete all information and insert:
Measles virus vaccine is recommended for all persons
who have neither had measles nor been vaccinated
previously. It is believed that one dose of live, atten-
uated vaccine will give life-long protection.


The following information should be added to the list
of Yellow Fever Vaccination Centers in Section 6:


Page 73
City:
Center:
Clinic Hours:
Fee:


Fresno, California
Fresno County Health Department
Tuesday. 1-4 p.m.


NOTE: PHS Publication No. 384, Immunization Information
for International Travel, and the leaflets are in the proc-
ess of being revised.


reality Weekly Report


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT, WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 17,000, IS PUBLISHED AT THE NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE
DISEASE CENTER, ATLANTA, GEORGIA.
DIRECTOR, NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
DAVID J. SENCER, M.D.
CHIEF. EPIDEMIOLOGY PROGRAM A.D. LANGMUIR, M.D.
ACTING CHIEF. STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN, M.S.
IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEC'-..F: )r EO4T..NG
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY, THE NATIONAL rE'.'N..SBL *.EASE
CENTER WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE
INVESTIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH
OFFICIALS AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF
COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE
ADDRESSED TO:
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
STIC''.L C'.:MMr-L :Ae- DISEASE CENTER
ATLfAN TA t.'AC,-
NOTE: THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE
BASED ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE NCDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL
STATE HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES
ON SAT'C..'- MP"ILED DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED
ON THE : ': 'I: I FRIDAY.







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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

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3 1262 08864 2359

MARCH 25, 1967