East Orlando sun

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East Orlando sun
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Your community connection since 1995 As of Thanksgiving, there were 3,241-recorded homeless students in Or ange County. Homelessness and hunger are problems that go hand-in-hand as two of the biggest hurdles facing students living and learning in Orange County, said Home less Education Liaison for OCPS, Chris tina Savino. To help these kids, she said, the county, along with individual schools and part nerships with local businesses and organizations, have increased the number of services they have available to help needy students get by and succeed. These students often fall behind, and with education really being the focus and key of getting out of poverty and homelessness, she said, its important to wrap them around with as many ser vices as possible to keep them on track for graduation. From corporate sponsored food pan tries and emergency stashes of granola bars kept in teacher drawers, to stocks of surplus school supplies and an extra available jacket when its cold, Savino says every little thing helps. On Friday afternoon, 26 students from by one into an unassuming storage closet next to the schools auditorium. Their names are checked off a list complied by teachers and administrators as students listed a homeless or in great need, and theyre each handed a paper or plastic bag sometimes seemingly bigger able food items to take home to feed their family over the weekend. Some of these kids during the week depend on our free breakfast and lunch, but then come in again Monday after the weekend and you know they may not have eaten since, Compliance Teacher Guadalupe Armenteros said. This way we can make sure they had food. Friday, Jan. 27 was opening day for En glewoods LOVE Food Pantry one of 30 to open in Orange and Seminole counties public schools since the fall, coordinated by the Christian Service Center for Central Florida and half of its shelves are already empty. At Timber Creek High School, econom ics teacher Michael Robbins and his stu dents started their own food pantry out of a cupboard in his classroom last year, stocked with canned foods, soups, cere Social networking, a fresh website and new partnerships are what the East Orlando Chamber of Commerce hopes will turn things around after a long absence of leadership in the organization. The tipping point for the Chamber: the de parture of executive director Kevin McFall in January after only three months on the job. Were working with other groups to see what kind of symbiotic relationships we can develop such as government, which we can tap to let people know about new tax incen tives or local transportation issues and mem bers like our members from Medical City, Board Chairman Brian Watson of Broad and Cassel in Orlando said. It goes back to con nectivity. Its not just about networking. Before McFall, there was only one staff person running the show for more than a year planning events, building up mem bership and acting as the mouthpiece for the organization. At its peak, which was during the eco nomic boom in 2004 and 2005, the EOCC had about 800 members. Now it has a little more than 200 members. The boards vice chairper son, Carol Ann Dykes, manager of the Uni versity of Central Florida Business Incubator, attributed the decline to the recession and a lack of leadership. We had periods of time when weve been without core leadership, when we have not had a face in the community. Weve lost memberships and not attained a lot of new members like we could have if we had that strong core leadership in place. Were looking forward to having that, she said. Now, not only are they looking for a new leader, the chamber inducted nine new mem bers to its 18-person Board of Directors last month. Dykes said new blood mixing with the old on the board should help cultivate the change the chamber needs to become stronger in the community. Were very excited to have a lot of new energy and fresh ideas and new perspectives. But its also very important for any board to have those individuals who have been there for a while too for continu ity and history, she said. We are refocusing, reorganizing and we really want to re-energize this chamber. Last year, the chamber moved from their store front in the Alafaya Village plaza along Alafaya Trail to e S 7 S 10 S 14 16 16 rt 7 fete O 11Chamber heads in new directionHungry after school MEGAN STOKEsS SS O P chCHAmMBER L BBy the numbers O Homeless students by school as of NNov. 17: O S SARAhH WILsSON SS P hHOmMELEssSS They sleep in motels, shelters and cars, and live off free school breakfasts and lunches and donated groceries. Orange Councreasing number of stories of homelessness and hunger from stu

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Page 2 OS I PS O PUBLISHER KK yle T T aylor ASSOCIaA TE PUBLISHER Jannett RR. RRoberts OO WNER BBeat KKahli ASSOCIaA TE EEDITOR Megan Stokes MaANaA GING EEDITOR Jenny A Andreasson DDESIGNER Jonathan GGallagher CCOpPY EEDITORS Sarah Wilson IIsaac BBabcock INTERN Jordan KK eyes ADVERTISING SaSALES LLinda Stern LS CCOLUmMNIST Josh GGarrick SSUBSCRIpPTIONS | CCIRCULaA TION AAmanda RRayno Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. E a s t BBeat KK AhHL II Owner Coffee Hour with BeatWe should all learn from Seminole Countys mistake 5900 Oleander Dr., Orlando, FL 32807Thursday, Feb. 16th5 p.m. 11 p.m.$15 all you can rideFriday, Feb. 17th5 p.m. 11 p.m.Good Shepherd School Pride Night$15 all you can ride Saturday, Feb. 18th12 p.m. 11 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 19th12 p.m. 6 p.m. Politically, professionally and personally, I am conservative. Ill always prefer the practical choice over pie-in-the-sky, and facts over forecasts. In politics, I lean toward initiatives that will reduce our taxes and streamline government operations. As a developer, I know for certain that I can build a road or school for less money than govern ment will spend on the same product. And Ive actually done it. I admit I am not a fair compari son. Im a business owner. I want end product that does what its supposed to do sustainably. Process, to me, is secondary. Government is not a business. Nor should it be. Government isnt just me, its us. Good government is everyone. For the past 20 years or so, Seminole County has attracted major employers and thousands of home owners by touting some of the states best elementary and secondary schools. Seminole County schools are highlighted in every Realtors brochure. Chambers of Commerce laud their schools the way farmers praise rich soil and ample rainfall. But Seminole County parents are up in arms. The School Board wants to close some schools, con solidate student bodies, econo mize. Unfortunately, the parents are way too late. As Scott Maxwell pointed out in The Orlando Sentinel, Seminole voters have consistently elected local and state politicians who have promised to cut their taxes and reduce government spending to make their lives even better. We live in a democracy. For better or worse, our government is us. Seminole Countys dilemma its an ugly one ought to inspire a little soul-searching. What do we want our government to do? Our schools are among the most important things government does, and I defy anyone to show me how the private sector can do public schools any better. In East Orlando, we are blessed with some of the best public schools in Florida. I couldnt be more proud of Avalon Park El ementary School or Timber Creek High School, two that I know the best. My company paid for and built Avalon Middle School. We are being reimbursed, but the decision to fund and to build the school took long and careful consideration. I dont know everything about public schools, but I can assure you I spent many hours thinking about them. We need public schools because we know our community is better off if every child gets a decent education. We pay taxes to build the schools, pay the teachers, and buy the books. We dont do this so that every kid will become a doctor. Thats the job of the kid and the kids parents. We support public schools so that every kid can learn to read and write, understand our laws, see how our system works, and learn to earn a living. Thats very that I can enjoy a better, safer, more orderly community. We want our government to do most of the things it does for the same reasons. Government isnt bad. Government is us. And good government results when we all pay attention, when we all take a hand in it. Seminole County voters have thrown out the baby and kept the bathwater. We need to learn from their mistake. Government is not a business. Nor should it be. Government isnt just me, its us. Good government is everyone.

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Page 3 OS Community News EOEOSun.com Results from water quality tests of Bithlo wells should be avail able in mid-February, after En vironmental Protection Division specialists traveled throughout the small town in December and January. Chris and Christy White were one of the 105 homeowners in Bithlo who requested water test ing during a packed public meet ing held at the Bithlo Community Center in early December. There, Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs promised that everyone in Bithlo who is worried about their water can have it tested by the county free of charge usu ally, tests cost homeowners about $100. The Whites said theyre not afraid of the results. Its well water so people should know what theyre getting, Chris said, adding that they use water softener. The problem is that people move in next to these car crushing places and gas stations and its really buyer beware. No ones forced to live there, Christy added. You have choices from one end of town to the oth er for good prices. Lately people have the impression that people are stuck here. EPD Environmental Specialist Mark Kronor said hes seen mixed reviews from homeowners as he tests their wells. Some people are concerned and some accept that well water resigned to the fact that you will need some kind of water treat ment, whether it be for toxins or the smell, he said. There are close to 2,000 private water wells in the community, possibly making it the densest in private wells in the county, accord ing to the Orange County Health Department. If left untreated, the water can be foul-smelling, rustcolored, thick in consistency and full of toxins. The most important thing to get across to people is that some and its bad for your health, while other times it looks and smells bad for yourself, EPD Manager Lori Cunniff said. TThe reason some worry In November, Orange County sent letters to Bithlo homeowners about water testing results, which showed that private wells in the six-block zone surrounding the old Circle K gas station, located south of East Colonial Drive in Bithlo, exceeded the maximum level for benzene to which long-term ex posure may cause cancer iron, aluminum and manganese. A petroleum leak was discovered from the Circle K in 1986. The state has designated the Circle K leak an imminent threat, meaning that if left unchecked, it poses a hazard to human health and safety or the natural environ ment. Orange County Health Department Director Dr. Kevin Sher in said 100 wells were sampled in this zone and about 13 or 14 wells showed contamination. Because of the states SUPER Act, anyone Jocelyn and Jim Darity have never had their water tested but because of its orange-brown color, they dont drink it. They had their water tested by the county in Jan uary as well. We just want to see what the result is, why its turning brown and why it leaves an orangebrown residue in the sink, tub and shower, Jocelyn said. We have no idea what to expect. The water is so bad, it looks oily Since they moved into their Bithlo home in 2007, theyve only drank bottled water from Publix and they take their white cloth ing to a coin laundry to be cleaned since they discovered that the wa ter will stain their clothing. Its even turned their white dishes a faint orange. I wouldnt drink it, Jim said, cringing. Residents were also concerned that if water tests conclude that able to afford it. If you dont qual people can buy. But the OCHD leum products, which is the issue in the Circle K zone, can cost up to $10,000. If contamination is found, Cunniff said DEP would need to take back positive, theyll send the homeowner vouchers for bottled drinking water. Then, theyll supIts my understanding that if anything is above the primary drinking water standards that they will put them into the (DEP) program, Cunniff said. The $10,000 the county is spending for Bithlo testing is worth it to them because they need to know that their water is safe, Jacobs said. Were quite sults. To those who fear the possibil ity of public water, Jacobs said: Running water lines: that is the last option. Im a big believer that people should be able to choose how much government they want, she said. PD O D questions or concerns. TT esting the water MEGAN STOKEsS SS Pht bmeat ke AAn environmental specialist

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Page 4 OS Community News EOEOSun.com an older building donated to the organization on East Colonial Drive. But Dykes is excited about yet another move the chamber will make soon to the UCF Incu bator in the Central Florida Re search Park. The building is an older build ing. It really doesnt present the image that we would like and it kind of isolates the chamber being in that location, Dykes said. At the incubator, the chamber will be able to interact with the nearly 50 businesses that are in cubator clients, and have access to meeting facilities to host events and seminars and storage space. Being so close to the UCF campus, it will allow the chamber to more easily take on student interns. It was a no-brainer for me. We have a lot of opportunity to give exposure to these small busi nesses, in the chamber and the Incubator. Theres a lot of mutual Elaine Hinsdale, the EOCCs executive director from 2009 to 2010, said a strong chamber is most important during an eco nomic slump because when a chamber is not functioning effectively, the small business commu nity suffers, as small businesses tend to make up the majority of chamber membership. If youve got small businesses that are able to grow, theyre go ing to be hiring and the local econ omy is going to be doing well, but if they are struggling and shut ting their doors, then the opposite happens.Help is hereOne of the partnerships the chamber has created is with Oviedo/Winter Springs Regional Chamber of Commerce. President and CEO Cory Skeates said his chamber has already essentially recreated what a chamber does by getting on Facebook and Twit ter, creating different avenues for their memberships to showcase their business to the community such as an online calendar they can post events to and hiring a marketing person to ensure expo sure to the community. We try to be more of a civic or ganization rather than just a busi ness organization, he said. The Oviedo/Winter Springs chamber has 475 members 200 more than when Skeates started boom there were about 650 mem bers, so he said they have seen a reduction but those members are now starting to come back. Skeates is one of a three-person staff at the chamber, including a marketing and events director, whom he credits with a lot of the chambers success. We put in a lot of hours, thats for sure, he said. If youre on the outside looking in, you wouldnt know its that few of staff. We have a lot of members who step up and help out. Being involved helps them as much as it does us. Dykes said theres no way they could hire another staff person at this time. would love to hire another staff person but we need to build our events to re-grow the chamber and rebuild its budget, Dykes said. Weve been operating in the black and thats really a testament to the board members of the past cal management. Although they may not be able to follow the Oviedo/Win ter Springs chambers lead in that way, they are planning to team up with them in hopes to attract new members and retain the ones they have. For instance, theyre planning a dual-chamber speed networking event, a hob nob on June 26 at the UCF Bright House Stadium, and they are partnering for the annual Ovations Awards program, which recognizes excellence in business. Were really trying to do what we can to make sure all of the chambers in the area are suc cessful, Skeates said. The worst thing for every chamber right now is to have a neighboring chamber the chambers. During a struggling economy, to suffer is memberships to differ ent organizations. Hinesdale said the only way to retain member ship during this time is to provide something members need and cant get elsewhere. Here, with all this going on with the Alafaya Trail widening and now the East Colonial Drive widening from Dean (Road) to Bithlo, thats going to impact the business community. Theres a great chamber opportunity there: provide the businesses along those corridors with news and information that they cant get in their local newspapers or any where else. 02/29/12 C ONINDO fr ta e chCHAmMBER Ken Zooks title was incorrect in the article Staying Healthy in East Orlando, which ran in the Jan. 6 issue of the East Orlando Sun. Zook is the general manager of the Waterford Lakes Community Association. The article also stated that the Waterford Lakes Walking Trail is open to the general public but it is only open to Waterford Lakes residents.Correction Pht bmeat ke Chief Judge BBelvin Perry OD

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Page 5 OS Community News EOEOSun.com als and granola bars donated by the school community. Robbins says students can drop by when ever theyre in need, or students will be referred to as in need by a teacher or the schools Homeless Coordinator, Jo Lynn Schall, and provided a bag of food to take with them to their families. We recognized that some students at our school didnt have enough food at home and that times are tough, so we decided we wanted to provide a helping hand, Robbins said. Students cant learn if they dont know where their next meal will be coming from. In addition to food, Timber Creek as well as other local schools, like East River High School, have clothes closets available to students who might need a jacket when its cold, or new pants or shoes if theirs get worn out. The schools also have stocks hand out to students as needed. The whole idea is to keep them stable at school since their situation already is what it is at home, Yolanda Dorta, a social worker for OCPS, said.Sponsoring changeAfter CBSs Minutes ran two specials on the prevalence of homelessness among students in Central Florida last year, Sarah Au, the senior specialist for Part ners in Education with OCPS, said the school board has seen an outpouring of support from local businesses and organizations to try to help students in need. It has had such a positive im pact in bringing together people who want to help and people who need help, she said. Were trying to match up the businesses that want to help with the schools who need it. The LOVE Food Pantry installed at Englewood Elementary is an example of one of these ef forts. After viewing the specials, members of the First Baptist Church of Orlando pledged $5 million dollars to go toward help ing Central Floridas hungry and homeless students. Partnering with OCPS and the Christian Service Center of Central Florida, they decided the money would be best spent to ward installing food pantries in schools in need, opening 13 in the fall of 2011. This spring, 17 more have opened across the county, each totally free to the schools they service and restocked weekly. project doubled in size, Danny de Armas, senior associate pastor at First Baptist Church Orlando, said. It was not even by us giv ing any more money, but by other sponsors and businesses hear ing about it and wanting to fund more. Associates at Keller Williams Realty in Waterford Lakes also saw the CBS special and have decided to dedicate their annual day of service on May 12, known as RED Day, to helping local East Orlando students in need. Beth Hobart, a realtor with has decided to adopt three local schools Castle Creek, Camelot and Timber Creek and is cur rently working out details with the principals and faculty at the schools to assess their needs, and how Keller Williams can best help. When we saw the Min utes special and realized this is happening right in our own backyard, we knew we had to do something, Hobart said. Stephanie Phillips, the home less education coordinator at Castle Creek Elementary, said she is very excited about the partner ship her school has in the works with Keller Williams and the aid it can bring to her students. Its such a wonderful thing, she said. We have a lot of need in our community, but we have a lot of people wanting to help, too. Avalon Dance The Performing Arts Company Emergency Services 24Whats Your Emergency???2012 has started with a bang for local Orlando based Emergency Services 24 (ES24). With expansion into South Florida and the Tampa region ES24 has been steadily assisting property owners in their time of need after suffering unexpected water damage or re damages to their buildings. This is the season for building res but with the mild weather there has been a drop in house or commercial building res. The cold weather usually creates more hazards to buildings as replaces, space heaters and other electric overloads create the potential for unexpected res. We have been running around the clock eld supervisor Brian Honea states. The water losses to homes have been steady enough to keep all of trucks servicing properties 24/7. We can be at any property within 30 minutes in the metro area with crews to extract water, keep properties from further damage and get owners back to normal as quickly as possible. ES24 has ofces in Orlando, Boca Raton, and Tampa and is expanding into Naples/Fort Meyers and Jacksonville this year. ES24 also services the Atlanta metro area with ofces in Atlanta, Athens and Macon along with Birmingham Alabama. ES24 specializes in building loss recovery and stabilization due to any catastrophic event that can happen. Pipe Breaks, Floods, Fires or natural disasters never stop. Our new motto of Whats Your Emergency says it all. We will handle any building crisis, quickly, professionally and get any property back to normal as efciently as possible.Contact our 24 hour emergency number 877-936-8998 and visit our website today, http://www.waterdamage24.com Mike & Mary Kranz The Kranz TeamKeller Williams Advantage Group407-716-6614mikemary@mindspring.com www.kranzteam.com Short Sale Certied High Integrity Strong Negotiators Superior Customer Service Serving our Waterford Area neighbors since 1995For all of your Real Estate needs contact: C ONINDO fr ta e hHOmMELEssSS Pht barah BBags of food await homeless

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Page 6 OS Community News EOEOSun.com $100 to $500 OFFAny Servicewith this ad On Call 24 Hours A DayServing Central Florida Since the s Let Us Handle Your Emergency!Call Our Hotline 877-936-8998 www.EmergencyServices24.comServing Floridas Residential & Commercial Community Since 1990 IMMEDIAT E RESPONSE Whats Your Emergency?CBC057844 F lood l Leaks l Mold l F ire l Storm l Smoke l Roong Get the look you deserve... Contact us at 4079146445 Were 100% mobile Car Wash & Wax $15* Insured Business For a limited time only. Restrictions ap ply due to size and condition of vehicle. about how much money Let us help you! Call today!(407)-644-6646www.aSafeHarbor.com Member of Bob Adams President/CEO A SafeHarbor, LLC bob@asafeharbor.comSTOP Worryingyou have for retirement.Instead of being concerned with the value of your retirement account, you should be more concerned with the income that account provides. Income maintains your quality of life so you may live in retirement as you did when you were working. You need to have the income so you can travel, see your grandkids and live whatever retirement dreams you may have. If you would like to see how you can MAXIMIZE YOUR INCOME FOR LIFE call us today. There are options available that most Americans dont know about. Give us one hour to see if we can give you your lifetime. Februarys Rotary Business of the Month is Embroidery Solutions in East Orlando. Since opening 14 years ago, the company has been a huge supporter of East Orlando schools, especially Timber Creek and East River high schools, giving them free T-shirts and uniforms, award plaques for their banquets and buying banner advertisements at their sports elds. Embroidery Solutions gives to other schools as well and has donated merchandise to East Orlando organizations such as Eastside Cycling and the Timber Creek High School Booster Club. Embroidery Solutions is located at 6457 Hazeltine Na tional Drive, Ste. 120, Orlando. For more information, call 407-438-8188, email info@embroiderysolutions.com or visit www.embroiderysolutions.net BusinessMonthof theRotary Co-sponsored by the Rotary Club of Avalon Park, the East Orlando Sun and Pinnacle Awards and Promotions, the Rotary Business of the Month recognizes East Orlando businesses and organizations that are actively involved in their communities and embody the motto of Rotary: Service above self. Winners receive a plaque, a free advertisement in the Sun and a spot in the Downtown Avalon Park Discount Card, which serves all of East Orlando. Nominate a business at www.facebook.com/avalonparkrotaryEmbroidery Solutions SLSD P SN Food trucks in east Pht baacbabcck TThe A A valon Park Food T T ruck B Bazaar

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Page 7 OS S EOEOSun.com The Timber Creek boys soccer team had to enter the state play offs with a sense of urgency. Weve got to play like there is no tomorrow and in the state play offs, there isnt, Timber Creek Coach Ibrahim Chehab said after winning a third straight district title in late January. round of the state playoffs against Lake Howell ended Timber Creeks streak on Jan. 31. The 1-1 tie at the end of regula tion forced a 10-minute overtime period. Senior Chris Aguilar had scored early for the Wolves and Lake Howell had answered with a score off a corner kick late in the Six minutes into the overtime period, the Wolves goalie Tyler Richards made a save deep in the box and a Lake Howell player col lided with him. The referee ruled that the ball had broken the plane of the goal and Lake Howell had a 2-1 overtime win to advance in the playoffs. It was a very controversial ending, Chehab said. As we shook hands, the Lake Howell coach said I do not see how that was a goal. He also told that to our goalie. referees whistle was due to the collision between Richard and a Lake Howell player in the box. Then he saw the referee point to the center circle and knew the game was over. Chehab described it as a difteam had not taken advantage of some quality scoring chances. In soccer, sometimes that happens, he said. You just dont hit on your chances. Both teams fought real hard. Timber Creek Wolves did earn their third consecutive district trophy on Friday, Jan. 27, with a 3-2 win over Winter Park High School. Chehab said stability has been a key to Timber Creeks success. The players have had the same coach, the same system and the same message during the threeyear run: preparation. Winning the district title starts on day-one of the season, Chehab said. We have to be moti vated every game. To win the top seed, every game counts. Besides being prepared, the players have had it drilled into their heads that everyone on the team is equally important. That is not always an easy concept to teach in our world of sports celeb rities. I am more concerned about the guys that dont play a lot than the ones that do. They come to practice every day and they need to push every starter in practice, Chehab said. Although everyone is valued, there are a few stand out players. Assistant Coach Clay Phillips de scribed senior Austin Stirtz as the glue that holds the Wolves de fense together. He is steadfast, Phillips said. Stirtz said he enjoys the defen sive side but also likes the oppor tunity to score. I think we are pretty solid on defense, Stirtz said. Chehab puts the utmost impor tance on a teams defense. In Sierra Leone, West Africa doubled as streets. Stones and sticks made up their goals. This is where Chehab learned how to play soccer and he earned his playing time as a defender and My philosophy is that we should win most games 1-0 or 2-1, he said. We should not score 4 and give up 3 or score 4 and give up 5. Goalie Tyler Richards has also been a defensive stalwart for the Wolves. In each of the three dis trict tournament games, the soph omore keeper stopped a penalty kick. He has been outstanding, Chehab said. If he doesnt stop those penalty kicks, I dont know where we would be. Although their push is over this year, Chehab will be work ing to keep the group motivated. He described soccer as 40 to 50 percent skill and 50 to 60 percent passion. Against Winter Park, we were the better team, he said. But give them credit. They closed the gap by being more aggressive. They wanted it so much. My job is to not let our opponents beat us by having more passion. You can count on the passion from the streets of Sierra Leone being part of the Timber Creek Wolves as long as Coach Chehab is using soccer to teach Timber Creek players life lessons. 2012 Curry Ford Road Orlando, FL 32806 407.895.7075License # CAC1816227 Air & Heat Services:Same day repair services $79.95 annual maintenance programs Low price system replacements/ upgrades Ductwork replacement/repairs Insulation Indoor air quality Financing available 10% discount when you mention this ad OF CENTRAL FLORIDA CELEBRATING OVER 25 YEARS SERVING YOUR COMMUNITYBernard S. Zeffren, MD Eugene F. Schwartz, MD Winnie Whidden, MSN, ARNP-CVoted Best Doctors of Central FL, Orlando Magazine for 7 consecutive yearsDiplomates American Board of Allergy and Immunology www.orlandoallergy.com250 N. Alafaya Trail Ste 130 Orlando, FL 32825407-380-7991 Evening hours available7560 Ste. 2064 Oviedo, FL 32765407-366-7387 TThird district title for T TCHS soccer JOhHN BBEDELL SS Pht bjhbee TTCHS boys soccer coach I Pht baacbabcck TT ristan Spurlock The Knights had a rough week in conference play, but still have plenty of time to recover before the mens basketball champion ship season. UCF fell in two straight games to Conference USA foes, after go ing 5-1 to start conference play. In the process the formerly highfourth, bypassed by Tulsa and Southern Miss, who handed them their two recent losses. Against Tulsa Jan. 25, the Knights found themselves within a point of the lead with just more than two minutes left to play in the game, but a series of fouls, turn overs and missed shots sank the Knights, who watched the Golden Hurricane slowly pull away in the 66-61. There was no singular hero the court, spreading double-digit scores among three players. Keith Clanton again led the way with 15 points, 11 rebounds and four turn overs. Captain A.J. Rompza had an unusual night, picking up zero turnovers, steals or rebounds and only one assist, but dropping 11 points into the net. Rising backup forward Tristan Spurlock rained down 10 points while grabbing seven boards. It was more frustration for the Knights on Jan. 28 as they watched a 12-point lead disintegrate rap idly heading into halftime, then watched as Southern Miss piled on a lead that would reach its peak of the game. The Golden Eagles would win that game 78-65, with the Knights plagued by abysmal shooting for a second straight night, hitting 40 percent of over all shots, and only 28.6 percent of three pointers. A big rebound in shooting and defense led the Knights to a 84-69 decimation of Palm Beach Atlantic on Monday, as they shot 47.8 per cent, thanks largely to newcomer Kasey Wilson, who came out of nowhere to nearly lead the team in points with 15, hitting seven of 10 shots. Marcus Jordan led the team in points with 17. The Knights return to the court at 3 p.m. on Saturday at SMU in Feb. 8 showdown against Mar shall. That game tips off at 7 p.m.Knights struggle in C-USA play IsISAAc C BBABcCOcCK SS

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Page 8 OS S EOEOSun.com reThinkYourCommute.comEconlockhatchee Park & Ride Lot 16622 E. Colonial Dr. OrlandoFree parking Meet-up place for carpools and vanpools On LYNX Route 104 to downtown Orlando Additional Park & Ride lots on SR 50 located at: Dean Road Chuluota Road/SR 419 1-866-610-RIDE (7433) Now Open! 50 Share the ride! TThe Scoop AA valon Middle boys and girls basket ball NSGS I UCF junior guard GGevenia Carter SPW SSP W UCF senior guard A A.J. RRompza SPW EEast RRiver boys wres tling team S G SI DD P S AAJ RRompza GGevenia Carter KK eith Clanton

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Page 10 East Orlando Sun Feb. 3 March 1, 2012 Lifestyle EOSun.com Wesley Rivera was 12 when he started getting sick. He was pale, got infections, had bruises and fatigue, but the doctor his family took him to didnt recognize how serious it was. His mother had a gut feeling something wasnt right. She took him to a new doc tor who took one look at Rivera and sent him to the emergency room. The now Timber Creek High School senior had leukemia, and he needed a bone marrow trans plant to survive. It really was a lot to take in I kind of went in autopilot, Ri vera, 18, said. He spent months in the hospi tal, underwent chemotherapy and had a life-saving bone marrow transplant from the donation of his sister, who was a perfect match. At 12, the process was tough to com prehend, but knowing his life was at risk was something he fully understood. He knew he could die. I knew it was real, that the possibility was real, and I felt the pain of the leukemia, Rivera said. But with the strength from his family, who was determined to get through this, that possibility would just never become a real ity. His parents, sister and brother never left his side, and he was never alone. There was no other alterna tive, there was no giving in to any doubt that I wouldnt come out of there alive and that we wouldnt knowing that really helped me get through it. Hell been cancer-free for six years on Feb. 14, which makes his second birthday March 29, the day of his bone marrow transplant each year with a family dinner. His favorite is steak or his dads special garlic chicken, and no one misses the night. Its a treasure to celebrate simple, regu lar moments like a family dinner, his mom said. Its like a rebirth, said his mom Mrs. Rivera. Shaped by cancerAnd though he lives a busy life as a high school senior, Wing Commander in JROTC the highest rank there is in the or ganization dedicated student be accepted to Yale University, he hasnt forgotten how cancer has shaped him as a person. It has made me who I am today, Rivera said. I just was forced to grow up. A lot of kids take a lot of things for granted, waking up, having your loved ones and everything, and through this I got to realize how quickly that can be taken away from you. His friends see that, too. He realizes that life is short and he appreciates things more and respects things more, said Monai Williams, a friend of 10 years. Williams has even been in spired to become a pediatric on cologist after supporting Rivera Cancer changed Riveras val ues and work ethic, he said. Rivera volunteers at three organizations related to cancer: Floridas Blood Centers, Kids Beating Cancer and The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. Hes brought blood drives to TCHS with the help from his JROTC cadets. His instructor, Maj. Brian Humphrey, said hes a lead er people want to listen to. Hes one of those young men that I dont know what he has in his system that drive, that de termination, that forthrightness to want to be the best, Humphrey said. Rivera also shares his story with anyone who will listen and inspires others to help. Michael Pratt, interim CEO for Floridas Blood Centers, said Riveras story always gives that extra nudge when people are deciding to do nate blood. Wesley has the ability to reach in and grab you by the heart and squeeze it, Pratt said. Rivera serves as a compelling story of survival for families bat tling cancer with their children, said Margaret Guedes, CEO, pres ident and founder of the charity Kids Beating Cancer. Hes an amazing young man whos overcome incredible obstacles and hes done it with grace and courage, she said. It gives the families optimism and hope. But Rivera sees this as self service. Hell never stop giving some of his life to the organiza tions he said saved his. And hell always be reminded of that each year, for the rest of his life, when he goes to get his cancer-free check up. Those days never worry him, like you might think, they only tell him that hes healthy. They make him feel good, and hes quite mat ter of fact about it. Im not afraid, he said. 445 north park avenue winter park, orida 32789 (407) 645-5311follow us on www.morsemuseum.org The NewMorseat theTIFFANY WingFree Friday Nights 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.The Morse Museums new galleries feature 200 art and architectural objects from Louis Comfort Tiffanys Long Island estate, Laurelton Hall. Coming up February 10 Live Music 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Family Tour 5:15 p.m. Glassmaking Demonstration 6 p.m. Curator Tour 7 p.mNow Open Wesley Rivera volunteers for sev eral organizations, visit each ones website to get more information about how you can help, too. For Floridas Blood Centers visit www. oridasbloodcenters.org, Kids Beating Cancer at www.kidsbeatingcancer.com and The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society at www. LLS.orgBeating cancer to help others BRITTNI JoOHNsoSON Sun StaffTimber Creek High School senior volunteers for the organizations he said helped save his life PhotoHOTO bBY brBRIttTTNI JohOHNsoSON Wesley R Rivera is the rst TCHS stu dent to be accepted into Y Y ale University.

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Page 11 East Orlando Sun Feb. 3 March 1, 2012 Lifestyle EOSun.com Jim Foulks wont be friends with someone who doesnt re cycle, so he just makes it happen for them. I call it recycling interventions, Foulks said with a grin. I will, in a friendly way, make peo ple feel guilty about recycling. Say hes at a barbecue and a friend tosses their can in the trash Foulks just takes it right out and asks where the recycling bins are. Its a simple act, but it certainly gets the point across. Hes not the recycling police by any means, but for Foulks, its important to share the idea that recycling is easy. Weve converted a lot of peo ple to recycling, he said. Foulks, who lives in Avalon Park with his wife and three kids, recycles more than half of his waste through Orange Countys recycling program and composting his organic trash. And for Floridas goal to reach a 75 per cent recycling rate by 2020, his family is a model for many, but most Central Florida cities have a long way to go before their rates reach that level.Oviedos successOrange County hadnt even reached that 30 percent goal that was made before the 75 percent mark was set, and many Orange County cities are far even from those numbers. Winter Park, for example, re cycles about 10 percent of its solid waste. But Oviedo is a bright spot in Central Floridas recycling mis sion. Oviedo residents are the best recyclers in Seminole County, said Johnny Edwards, the solid waste manager for Seminole County. They recycle about 35 percent of their waste, and 500 pounds per home, per year. Residents have ac cess to unlimited bins for recycling at no extra charge, and can earn up to $100 in rebates each year using Recyclebank, a program that gives discounts in exchange for points you earn recycling. The program is free for residents and included in the citys waste con tract. Oviedo is the only local city that offers this. Since implementing unlimited bins, the city has seen 150 more pounds of waste per home, per year being recycled. Oviedo Util ity Manager, Josef Grusauskas, said Recyclebank has kept resi dent recycling momentum up. Its more of a reward for recy cling being done, to not let it slip back, Grusauskas said. RRecycling options There are options to encour age more recycling, and some Foulks considers great ideas for Avalon Park. As of now, Avalon Park doesnt have recycling on its main commercial streets and its businesses dont have recycling programs. Foulks wife Linda has taken home thousands of water bottles from the local YMCA to recycle. Its almost embarrassing to not have the opportunity for recy cling, he said. But Avalon Park doesnt represent all of East Orlando. Karin Brantley, who is in inhouse sales and responsible for Waste Pros commercial business, said 70 per cent of their commercial clients in East Orlando do choose to have some form of recycling. Waterford Lakes Town Cen ter has a cardboard container for businesses and requires them to use it for their cardboard waste, Debbie Sponsler, section manager for Orange Countys Utilities Solid Waste Division, said there has been progress with getting more recycling programs going in the past, but with the economy its tough. Unlike Waterford, she said overall most businesses in the area dont want to spend the money. Theres no way to require businesses to recycle because they negotiate their own waste contracts, but Sponsler said she does see encouraging them to include recycling as an important step to ward the states recycling goals. We need to reach out more to commercial businesses, she said. Theres also the option to offer larger recycling bins for residents or a pay-as-you-go method to gar bage pickup the more trash you create, the more you pay. Edwards said thats not a system he sees coming to Central Florida any time soon. TThe struggle with apartmentsTheres also the lack of apart ment complexes offering recy cling to their residents. Most multi-family dwellings are left out of the convenient community curbside programs, and would have to purchase it through their own waste management contract, which is an added cost that most dont choose. In this economy you want to cut costs and recycling costs mon ey, Sponsler said. Many of East Orlandos student centered apartment complexes offer recycling, such as University House, Alafaya Club and Knights Landing. But for regular citizens, the choices are slim. GrandeV ille on Avalon Park was the only apartment complex listing their recycling options. The complex, which has 487 units, offers its resi dents a large compactor to place their recyclables, and Waste Pro sorts the items for them. Its important to offer every thing. People have different life styles and if theyre strong with recycling we want to offer that to them, Leasing Consultant Jenni fer Middleton said. Theres also a cost in educating tenants on how to use the recycling bins. One of the biggest problems in apartment complex recycling is contamination from people putting the wrong things, or even their garbage, in the wrong bins, Sponsler said. Economic effectsEconomics play a role in re cycling developments, too. The down economy has cut waste in Orange and Seminole counties by at least 20 percent from people buying less, keeping more and eat ing out less means, all contribut ing to less trash. But it also means less money to spend on recycling and the necessary facilities. James Golden, a geologist with 30 years of experience in environ ment and solid waste management consulting, and the owner of HSA Golden Engineering in Orlando, said that the future will be in recy cling. But he said he doesnt think Florida can reach the 75 percent recycling goal by 2020, and that even if it did on a state level, poor rural communities would never individually reach it. Unfortunately it takes invest ment, he said. Foulks thinks its worth the investment and time. He doesnt claim to be a super recycler, and even admits he forgets his reusable bags for grocery shopping from time to time. But the fact that he calls himself an average Joe recycler means, to him, that any normal family can do it, and should. Its just good business, he said, its good for the environment and its common sense. ACT OF VALOR Military Movie Weekend Event Regal Cinemas at Waterford Lakes Information provided and donations are welcomed for the Navy Lone Sailor Memorial, Blue Jacket ParkThe Crosshairs (supplier of military and law enforcement equipment) is bringing you a action packed weekend event at Regal Cinemas with a mock bunker and festivities will include: and Cadets Marine Corps. Troy Edwards, owner of The Crosshairs is a retired Sr. Police Detective and experienced tactical operator that uses and tests every product that we sell to ensure the highest quality merchandise at reasonable prices. Community Placed, Sports Based Marketing Driveways, Patios, Pool DecksEpoxy Garage FloorsKSC Concrete, Inc.800 570-0187Email: Decorative Concrete Resurfacing Decorative Concrete Resurfacing For information about Orange County recycling, visit ocrecycles.net. IIf youre an Oviedo resident, visit recyclebank.com for more information about their rewards program. Waste not, win big BRITTNI JoOHNsoSON Sun StaffCentral Florida has a long way to go to reach its 75 percent recycling goal, but local cities are working toward it despite tough economic odds PhotoHOTO bBY brBRIttTTNI JohOHNsoSON Jim Foulks, showing off his compost, said hes not a maniac about the environment he doesnt even own a recycling bumper sticker. Recycling is just common sense.

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Page 12 East Orlando Sun Feb. 3 March 1, 2012 Lifestyle EOSun.com FEBRUARY Y Orange County Animal Services offers free dog training classes at their ofce located at 2769 Conroy Road in Orlando. The classes are taught by a certied trainer from Think Alpha Dog training school. For more information or to register, call 407-254-9140 or email animalser vices@oc.net Free Medicare, Medicaid, Medigap/ HMO counseling, prescription drug plans and long-term care insurance counseling is available by the Florida Department of Elder Affairs SHINHINE program. The program is from 10 a.m. to noon on the third Tuesday of each month (closed JJ uly-August) at the East Orange Community Center, 12050 E. Colonial Drive, Orlando. For more information, call 407-254-9610 ext. 0. Bring a list of medications of prescription bottles, insurance card or Medicare card.FEB. 2Local theater company Magic Curtain Productions will be performing Little Orphan Annie Feb. 2-4 at the Timber Creek High School Performing Arts Center. Shows start at 7 p.m. nightly with a 2 p.m. matinee on Saturday. Tickets are $10 in advance and $12 at the door. Kids 3 and younger are free. For more information visit mcptheater.com or call 407-282-8368. FEB. 3 Faces of HIHIV a mobile art exhibit depicting the lives of Florida residents living with HIIV and AIIDS will be at the University of Central Florida Student Union from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, Feb. 3. For more information, visit wemakethechange.com/facesFEB. 4Country singer Miranda Lambert will be live in concert with special guests Chris Y Y oung and JJ errod NNei mann at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 4, at the UCF Arena. For tickets or more information, visit ucfarena.com FEB. 7CFLSG 3, a networking event to benet the UCF Alumni Excellence Fund, is from 5:30-11:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 7, at Terrace 390 in downtown Orlando on the rst oor of the Bank of America building. Admission is $10 in advance and $15 at the door, which includes parking, appetizers and drink specials all night. For more information, visit csg3. eventbrite.com RRock band T T ool will be making a stop in Orlando as part of their Winter Tour at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 7, at the UCF Arena. Tool will be joined by special guest Y Y OB. For more informa tion or for tickets, visit ucfarena.com or Ticketmaster. FEB. 9The UCF Alumni Association will be hosting the Canvas & Cabernet fundraiser at 6 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 9, at the UCF Fairwinds Alumni Center on the UCF Campus. Pre-registration costs $25 and is required. Proceeds benet the UCF Visual Arts and Design Alumni Chapter scholarship. Visit ucfalumni.com/artFEB. 11There is a Father-Daughter Dance event from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 11, at Avalon Parks Founders Square. The fee is $15 per father in advance or $20 at the door. There will be a DJJ, food and drinks. To register or for more information, visit www.christkingdom.org The Orange County Adopt-A-Tree program will be holding an adoption event from 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, Feb. 11, at Ft. Christmas Histori cal Park, 1300 Ft. Christmas Road, Christmas. For more information call 407-254-9200 or visit orange.ifas.u. eduFEB. 17 IIrish folk music troupe Celtic Woman will perform their Believe Tour at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17, at the UCF Arena. For tickets or more information, visit ucfarena.comFEB. 18The Orlando Wetlands Festival will take place from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 18, at Fort Christmas Park, 1300 NN. Fort Christmas Road, Christ mas. Admission is free. Call Orlando Wetlands Park 407-568-1706 or visit cityoforlando.net/wetlands.FEB. 26The UCF Art Gallery is hosting an art show featuring almost 50 Central Florida artists through Feb. 26 in room 140 of the UCF Visual Arts building, open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Saturday. For information visit http://gallery.cah.ucf.edu Hours: M-F 8am to 4:30pm 2315 Lee Road Winter Park, Florida 32789 Your Guiding Beacon for Quality Healthcare Harbour Private Duty Nursing, LLCSkilled Nursing Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Companionship Home Health Aid Homemaking Flexible Schedules Free RN Assessments The Services of Harbour Private Duty Nursing provide peace of mind to loved ones, trust ofcers, guardians and physicians. Our professional team prides itself on making your life easier. We also provide in-hospital private duty care, which offers close, personal attention and reassurance in an unfamiliar and often frightening environment. Our ofce hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm. Our professional team is available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. During hours when the ofce is closed and during the weekends and holidays, the on-call coordinator is available by telephone 24 hours per day.www.HarbourPrivateDutyNursing.com License # 299991382phone (407) 895-8188 fax 407-895-9339 YY oga East Orlando will offer Partners Yoga Classes at 1 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 5. Partners of all levels of yoga experience can take this special one-day, two-hour class for $25 per individual or $45 per couple. Register online at yogaeastorlando.com or by phone at 407-730-3257. Pottery Pad will be offering a pottery package for two. The package allows couples to paint any two items under $20 for only $25. Desserts will be served from 5 to 10 p.m. For reservations or more information call 407-674-7844 or visit potterypador lando.com Sweet! By Good Golly Miss Holly cupcake bakery is taking orders for its special Valentines Day Collection through Tuesday, Feb. 14. A variety of special avors are available by the dozen for $18. For more infor mation visit sweetbyholly.com. The UCF Jazz Chamber Groups Concert will take place on Tuesday, Feb. 14 from 8 to 9:30 p.m. in the au ditorium of the UCF Rehearsal Hall. For more information, visit music.cah. ucf.edu/events.php. Bayridge Sushi will be offering a Valentines dinner for two package that includes soup, salad, sushi, hibachi and wine. The package will cost $89.95. For reservations and more information, call 407-282-8488 or visit brsushi.com/locations/avalon-park.Valentines Day calendar Calendar Pottery Pad Sweets cupcakes Celtic Woman UCF Art Gallery Faces of HIHIV

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Page 13 East Orlando Sun Feb. 3 March 1, 2012 Lifestyle EOSun.com Feb. 4 T The musical rites of springWorks by visionary composers will be performed by the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra when Maestro Christopher Wilkins leads the Orchestra in a Legendary Composers concert at 8 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 4, at the Bob Carr PAC in Orlando. The entire course of musical history changed when the world accepted the genius of Beethoven. His th Symphony (the Pastorale) joins Stravinskys The Rite of Spring, which changed ballet music forever. These works represent two opposing views of nature: one bucolic, the other utterly terrifying, says Maestro Wilkins. Beethovens Pastorale symphony is one of the most enticing musical landscapes in history, while The Rite of Spring seems more like the eruption of a volcano. Even those unfamiliar with orchestral music will recognize the works from Disneys Call 407-770-0071, or visit www. orlandophil.orgFeb. 10-12 Ballets Battle of the Sexes The Orlando Ballets Artistic Director Robert Hill put Cen season when he created a series of sexy ballets for a program he called Battle of the Sexes. Working with bodies that stretch and exercise every day as part of their job, the idea was received with standing ovations with Hill proving thats how to bring sexy back Florida style! Battle of the Sexes III, presented by the Orlando Ballet, will take place on Feb. 10-12 at the Bob Carr Per forming Arts Center in Orlando. You can get those Valentines Day tickets at 407-426-1739 or orlandoballet.org Feb. 12 Valentines Day with Andrea Bocelli We need a word bigger than superstar for the Italian tenor Andrea Bocelli, who will make a very special Valentines Day weekend appearance at the Amway Center for an evening of romance on Sunday, Feb. 12. The performance will highlight Bocellis lushly romantic reper toire of classical arias along with the worlds most famous love performance in Orlando. Bocelli (the Voice) has sold more than 65 million albums worldwide and continually receives rave reviews throughout his sold-out U.S. tours. And a welcome local note is struck by the news that 60 members of Winter Parks Bach Festival Choir will join Bocelli for his only Central Florida perfor mance. You can buy tickets at amwaycenter.com, Amway Cen800-745-3000 or at Ticketmaster. comFeb. 15 to 26 Billy ElliottBilly Elliot is a kid from a working-class family in England who is training to be a boxer, because his hard-drinking father wants him to be something more than an out-of-work factory bloke. But Billy discovers and becomes obsessed with the world of ballet. While his family attempts to come to terms with this strange (for them) career path, Billy gets a shot at a scholarship with a prestigious dance school that may be his way out of town. Billy Elliot the Musical opened on Broadway in 2008 with a book by Lee Hall and music by Elton John. The Musical won 10 Tony Awards including BEST Musical. Chore ographer Pete Darling is quick to say that the show is about much more than just ballet. He used tap, hip-hop, jazz, acrobatics and folk dancing to tell this inspiring story. Billy Elliot the Musical is at the Bob Carr Performing Arts Center in Orlando from Feb. 1526. Visit ticketmaster.com Feb. 24 Sleeping Beauty And speaking of ballet, the legendary Bolshoi dancer Sergei Radchenko will bring the Moscow Festival Ballet, made up of extraordinary dancers from throughout Russia to Daytona Beach on Feb. 24. Staging new productions of timeless classics, they will bring Tchaikovskys Sleeping Beauty to the Peabody Auditorium as part of a coast-tocoast tour of the United States. For one evening, we are invited royal beauty as the dancers blend the rich traditions and classical training of Russias Bolshoi and Maryinsky theaters in centuries of ballet tradition. This one-nightonly performance is presented by the Daytona Beach Symphony Society. Visit www.dbss.orgFeb. 28-29 Michael JacksonConsider a repertoire of the greatest pop music of all time created by Michael Jackson as that music is used for Cirque du Soleils newest full-length evening of performance magic. The must-see ticket of the season MJ THE IMMORTAL will be performed in two per formances onlyFeb. 28-29at the Amway Center in Orlando. This life-changing production combines Michael Jacksons music with the choreography and athleticism of Cirque du Soleil to give fans a unique view into the spirit, passion and heart of the artistic genius who forever transformed global pop culture. Writ ten and directed by Jamie King, who has channeled Michaels love of music and dance, fairy tale and magic, and the fragile beauty of nature into a show fea turing more than 60 international dancers, musicians and acrobats. Tickets are available at ticketmas ter.com or 1-800-745-3000.March 2 and 4 A Verdi masterpiece Commissioned to write a new opera in 1850, Giuseppe Verdi was entranced by a story by Victor Hugo. But Hugo's play depicted a king as an immoral womanizer an idea that was not accepted in Europe at that time. So the king became a duke, and Verdi created the compel ling story of Rigoletto, the hunchback court jester and the seductive Duke of Mantua a fascinating tale of seduction, treachery and Italian vendettas. Produced in collaboration with the new Florida Opera Theatre, this concert opera features the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra in performance March 2 at 8 p.m. and March 4 at 2 p.m. at the Bob Carr in Orlando. Call 407-7700071 or visit orlandophil.orgJosh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC2400 N Forsyth Rd., Suite 101 Orlando, FL 32807Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 17 years! Scan QR Code Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendarLocal Valentines Day events abound Billy Elliot Michael Jackson Beethoven

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Page 14 East Orlando Sun Feb. 3 March 1, 2012 Education EOSun.com The days of candy bars and magazine subscriptions as school fundraiser material may soon be a thing of the past. Thanks to the Fuel My School program, East Orlando schools have found a faster, easier way to raise support via the Internet. Sunrise Elementary School has raised more than $17,000 in funds and resources since starting the program in 2011. Much of that went to a technology fund, which helped put sorely needed projectors and computers into their classrooms. "If a parent says, 'How can I help?' I send them right to Fuel My School," Sunrise Elementary Principal Shayne Grove said. "It's easy they'll know exactly what we need and they can write it off on their taxes." Windermere resident Lisa Hil genfeldt founded FMS to make fundraising easier on parents and schools alike. The program gives each member school a webpage that they can use to connect di rectly with potential supporters and provide them with a num ber of ways to track and meet schools individual needs. Each FMS page links visitors to several different options for supporting their school. "It's a one-stop shop to go to support your school and drive funds and resources to your school," said Lisa Hilgenfeldt, the founder of FMS. One choice that parents and sponsors have is the "school mall." This option allows anyone to shop at various online retailers that they would already be us ing, such as Amazon or Best Buy, where a percentage of the pro ceeds will go directly to the school. The most direct support method is the school wish list, which al lows administrators to post items or materials that the school needs and connect with someone who can meet that need. wish list, we had cases of water on there, "Grove said. "It was up there for less than a week and a mom brought two cases of water for our clinic." Sunrise teacher Maggie Franklin uses the technology provided through FMS on a daily basis. She is able to use one of several tech nology carts that have a variety of devices used to enhance the learning process. The projectors help us save paper as well as give students a visual element to connect with, Franklin said. Sunrise PTA members Jamie Korenstein and Jenny Burton have been working with the schools site for more than a year. Burton prioritizes communicating with the community through email as well as through the school's FMS page. Just keeping it organized and updating it are key, Burton said. You have to remind people, 'There's a new wish. Go look! Though schools like Sunrise are making huge strides in fund raising through FMS, some are work for them. Waterford Elemen tary principal Charles Lindlau admits that, though he has seen some wishes granted through the program, his school hasn't had as much success as other schools in the East Orlando area. He pointed out that the school has been no tifying parents through emails, phone calls and newsletters, but they will continue promoting it through other mediums. a commercial starring our young students to get the word out," Lindlau said. "We want to show just how simple it is." Convenience has become a sort of rallying cry for those who are trying to spread the word about FMS. The concept was born out of Hilgenfeldt's frustration with the typical fundraising methods. Her son was cut from his freshman football team because the school didn't have enough helmets. I have four children in Or ange County schools and I'm do ing everything that's required to support their education, Hilgen feldt said. In our life, we don't have the time to do that in the tra ditional way. HHelp during a crisis School funds are tight. OCPS per-student spending has been consistently dropping, going from $6,945 to $6,667 just since last year. In the midst of this, FMS is providing a new way to meet may not have room in the budget for anymore. "From a stapler to an outdoor water fountain to some really specialized sensory equipment, all of that is available out there," said Sara Au, head of the Orange County Public Schools' Partners in Education initiative, who has been helping OCPS partner with FMS. "But since Fuel My School gives us an online reach, it makes it that much more accessible." Since its launch in the fall of 2010, every school in Orange County has joined the program and Lake County schools are join ing rapidly. Though Hilgenfeldt said that the program will always be focused on Central Florida, schools in seven other states have started using FMS. In total, Fuel My School has helped grant more than 300 wishes and pumped more than $100,000 into Central Florida schools. The success of the pro gram comes as no surprise to Grove. "To me, it's a no-brainer," Grove said. "It's really easy and my main suggestion would be to have an outstanding parent group." Jennifer A C WardIndependent Advanced Director Phone: 407-273-6047 jenacward@aol.com www.pamperedchef.biz/jenniferward Jennifer A C WardIndependent Advanced Director Phone: 407-273-6047 jenacward@aol.com www.pamperedchef.biz/jenniferward Jennifer A C WardIndependent Advanced Director Phone: 407-273-6047 jenacward@aol.com www.pamperedchef.biz/jenniferward Yoga Classes including Hot Yoga, Chair Yoga and 3734 Avalon Park Boulevard East Orlando, FL 32828 Leading the WayWellness.toIntroductory deal applicable to rst time visitors only. Oer cannot be combined with any other promotions. www.YogaEastOrlando.com3734 Avalon Park Boulevard East Orlando, FL 32828Leading the Wayto Wellness.Yoga Classes including Hot Yoga, Chair Yoga and Introductory deal applicable to rst time visitors only. Oer cannot be combined with any other promotions. Individual & Family health plans For an Instant Quote or to apply, visit our website www.HealthInsuranceIBS.com407-831-5166 For more information, visit fuelmyschool.comLocal schools new fundraising tool JoORdaDAN KeyesEYES Sun StaffA new online program is making school fundraising easier for educators and parents alike PhotoHOTO bBY JordaJORDAN keKEYesES Kennedy, a Sunrise Elementary fourth-grader, goes through a grammar exercise using a projector that Fuel My School funds helped purchase. The school was able to use money from the new program to reach their technology fundraising goals.

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Page 15 East Orlando Sun Feb. 3 March 1, 2012 Education EOSun.com School N News The Avalon Middle School Art Club was awarded the grand prize in their art competition for the second straight year. IIn addition to the grand prize, AMS students were given the Sponsors Award for their work on a gingerbread house. Magic Curtain Productions Senior Performance T T roupe had a successful rst showing at the N N ational JJ unior Theater Festival in Atlanta, Ga. MCP theater director Rhonda Cato was awarded the top Freddie G. award for her dedication and achievement in youth theater. MCP choreographer Victoria Kroll was also honored with the Broadway Slam Event Choreography award. Avalon Middle Schools Service Learning Clubs: Student Council, Beta Club, N N ational J J unior Honor Society and Builders Club combined their efforts to hold a food and toy drive for local families in the community. Classes competed for who could bring in the most toys, and the winners were Ms. Lucas sixth grade class; Ms. Garritys class and Ms. Hilyers class tied in the seventh grade category; and Ms. Carrs class and Ms. Morales class tied in the eighth grade category. Carolyn Deeb, Avalon Middle School athletic director and tness teacher, was awarded the 2012 Sports Professional of the Y Y ear Award for the Southeast region. The award was established to honor outstanding leaders in the professional domain of sports. Coach Deeb will be honored at the Southern District convention in February. More than 100 people helped The Kiwanis Club of East Orange County and Kids Against Hunger a national organization with a mission to reduce the number of hungry children in the world to package more than 4,000 meals that will be delivered to food pantries throughout Orange County Public Schools on Saturday, JJan. 28. Avalon Middles JJay Fligor, Lourdes Miranda, Azalia Samsam and Amber Teagues artwork was chosen to be on displayed in the Peggy Crosby Student Gallery at the Orlando Museum of Art. Avalon Elementary tied for seventh in Floridas recent ranking of its more than 3,000 public schools. Schools were ranked based on points earned in the states grading system, which gives each school a letter grade. Grades for elementary and middle schools are based on student performance and improvement on the FCAT. Kids Against HHunger Mrs. Aldridge [Principal of Camelot] because she cares for us and because she wanted to be our principal. Liliana, 6 My friend Ashley because shes my best friend. Alexis, 7 My mom because shes so sweet to me. She gets food for me and takes me to theme parks. Kennedy, 6 II dont know. Kennedy because hes my best friend. Alexander, 7 Hannah from my classroom because shes beautiful and nice and because she has beautiful freckles on her cheeks. JJayden, 7 My mom because she plays with me a lot. Aliyah, 6 We asked Camelot Elementary students about their valentine.

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Page 16 East Orlando Sun Feb. 3 March 1, 2012 Opinions EOSun.com I am often asked if I will meet with someone prior to an interview to help them polish up their skills. Many people are not comfortable with the interview process and second guess themselves when it comes to answering questions. Recently we interviewed for a position at Christian HELP and we were very fortunate to have several great candidates. The interviews all went very well and we actually had a difWhen it came down to it there were a few factors that we looked at above and bemented the people already in place, and the second was their long-term goals and how they saw themselves growing within the organization. One of the interviewees was someone I was already con nected with so she felt comfort able in the interview. This was great for both of us, but she said she is not always that comfortable in interviews. As I gave her advice, I let her know that she had done great in the process and should always be like that in an interview. Practice sample interview questions with a friend or a coach prior to interviewing. If you have no one else, use a mirror. Listen to your answers as they come out. Answers to standard questions like Tell me about yourself and What are your strengths and what are your weaknesses should just roll off your tongue. These are asked so regularly that you should always have an answer. After you leave an interview record your impressions. This will help you to improve. Also use that time to write a thank you note and re-capture what you want to emphasize from the interview and anything that you would like the interviewer to know.Sandi Vidal, an Avalon Park resident, is the executive director for Christian HELP and the Central Florida Employment Council and has more than 15 years of recruiting and human resources experience. Visit www.cfec. orgThe Orange County School Board aims to be the top producer of successful students in the nation. Their goals center on an intense focus on student achievement, a high performing and dedicated team, a safe learning and work environment, efficient operations, and sustained community engagement. This year, one of the most important tasks that the board will face will be to choose a new superintendent who will support and achieve these goals. Supporting and ensur ing that the designated search process includes public input and is transparent is key to selecting a superintendent. The task of selecting a new superintendent wont end the day that he or she takes over the reins of leadership on July 1. It is my goal to encourage a smooth transition period and build a strong, positive relationship with the new superintendent so that he or she is able to successfully continue the upward trend of academic achievement for all OCPS students. Some of the most productive plants I grow in my garden could be categorized as Asian greens. The simple abundance of harvesting the early leaf and stem portions of these vegetables provide a quick and nutritious harvest with minimal maintenance. As we grow into our lucrative spring season, take advantage of some of the easiest crops to produce on Earth. Most Asian greens must be started from seeds instead of off-the-shelf transplants. Locating the seeds is a low hurdle to choosing many of these exotic plants. (I havent had much luck at nursery center seed racks.) An Internet search of seed catalogs will provide numerous options. Since purchasing seeds offers an incredible economy of scale over buying transplants, dont skimp on trying a spectrum of varieties. Starting the seeds requires a balanced mix of quality potting soil, clean containers, moisture, warmth and sunlight. Most Asian greens germinate in just a few days, so be prepared to deliver the new sprouts to full sun. Left in limited light, lanky, weak seedlings are prone to stem disease and damage. Provide fresh air and ventilation as a warm sunny day could lead to overheating. In three to four weeks most of these seedlings will be ready to grow in the great expanse of the garden. Available soil fertility, moisture, pest controls, sunlight and space provided in almost any adequate. A 3-gallon landscape ting mix supplies ample space for six transplants. A 4-foot square bed using grid pattern spacing produces dozens of heads. As the crop starts to mature, pick crowded thinning greens for those gourmet baby vegetables that are so expensive in the grocery store. Most Asian greens are in the Brassica family of plants, similar to radish or cabbage. I repeatedly plant Pac choi, a smaller variety of Bok choi. Another favorite is Mizuna, which produces a large quan or purple fern-like foliage. For Tatsoi is spoon shaped, quick to mature, but has a strong mus with your spell-checker are Shungiku, Bekana, Komatsuna, Vit or Michilli. Gather individual leaves and stems or harvest the whole head by cutting at ground level. Promptly rinse to avoid wilting. I graze fresh from my garden, taste testing to compare and contrast many of these unique mineral components of Asian greens are easily off the charts. Ill leave it to you to research the myriad recipe and menu possibilities of one of the worlds most popular crops. Asian greens, Seeds, nursery center, seed catalog, exotic plants, crops, wilting, Brassica, Bok choi, Mizuna, Pac choi, Tat soi, Hon Tsai Tai, Shungiku, Bekana, Komatsuna, Vit, MichilliTom Carey is the owner of Sundew Gardens, a you-pick gardening business near the University of Central Florida in East Orlando. Visit the Sundew Gardens Facebook page. Sandi Vidal Ask Sandi Daryl Flynn Orange County School Board member TT ed Edwards Orange County District 5 CommissionerCommissioners Corner Easy-to-grow Asian greens are a mustOrange County elected ofcials offer NNew Years resolutions TT om Carey From My Garden to YoursNow that its a new year, my staff and I have begun work on goals for a productive year objectives for the upcoming year: -A main priority is to continue advocating prudent spending of taxpayer dollars and providing excellent county services consis tent with available resources. -Encouraging investment in infrastructure for improvement in access and safety on local roadways, such as relieving congestion on State Road 50 through the FDOT road widening project. -Promoting sidewalk projects around schools to create connections with neighborhoods. -Through serving on UCF Research Park Board of Directors, well work toward bringing high-tech job growth in simu lation and defense industries, which will promote diverse economic development within Orange County to provide var ied work and business opportunities. -Encouraging growth that protects our environment and all of our citizens, such as ad dressing the contaminated water issue in Bithlo resulting from leaky gas tanks. -Integrating the environment into our decisions as we work toward creating sustainable community, particularly related to our lakes and stewardship of land by creating a Lake Pickett Advisory Board. -Continuing to improve liv ability and quality of all District 5 neighborhoods by working with our county departments on completion of construction in Christmas and splash park in Bithlo. Feeling comfortable during the interview NOTHIn N G LIKE THIS COULD HAPPEn N In N WIn N TER PPARK OR HHEATHROw W. II STILL THIn N K A CLASS ACTIOn N SUIT IS THE wW AY TO GO. CCALL JOHn N MORGAn N An N D LET THAT COCKY LITTLE BASTARD wW In N IT FOR YOU! LLISA EEIKE FFULFORD TTHE COUn N TY SHOULD HAVE SEn N T THE RESIDEn N TS OF BBITHLO An N APPLICATIOn N FORm M TO GET wW ATER TESTED An N D USED THE LOCAL COmm MM Un N ITY CEn N TER AS A CEn N TRAL POIn N T TO HAVE wW ATER TESTED. NOT EVERYOn N E In N BBITHLO IS Aw W ARE OF THIS SITUATIOn N. WHERES A COn N TACT PHOn N E nN Um M BER An N D HOw W DO wW E APPLY FOR wW ATER TEST? MIKE JAZO Heres what EOSun. com readers are writing about the Jan. 13 article Bithlo under a microscope, which details the water quality testing by Orange County government in the small town:My goal this year is to keep the Alafaya Trail widening on schedule, address bigger transportation concerns in our suitable location for the East Or ange Homeless Drop-In Center. Jennifer T Thompson Orange County District 4 Commissioner

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Page 17 East Orlando Sun Feb. 3 March 1, 2012 Opinions EOSun.com Letters to the editor Book club breeds readers Every day, elementary school students in the U.S. spend an average of only six minutes reading a book. By comparison, these students devote four hours to watching television and seven hours on a computer, playing video games and using a cell phone or other hand-held device. These sobering statistics are manifested in the classroom by challenge areas such as low desire to read, poor comprehension, inability to analyze or apply what has been read and poor test scores. Timber Lakes Elementary School has the action plan to change this paradigm. What have we done? The school was selected by Scholastic International to host an exclusive Harry Potter Book Club. Out of the nationally se student participation, books read, volun teer hours procured and products donated. start of the book club, 57 percent of book club students minutes reading outside of school increased by 26 minutes per day. thusiasm for reading and reading-related activities increased by 90 percent. More than one-third of all third-, the Harry Potter Book Club and enroll ment continues to grow every day. Due to the overwhelmingly positive response to this book club, a book club featuring the and second-grade students will launch in January 2013. This club initially targeted a 30-student enrollment; more than 80 have registered. The Harry Potter Book Club also collaborated with a wide variety of community partners to create its own reading interactive computer game and threedimensional castle. They also participated in a local festival and parade, performing the Hogwarts School Song for hundreds of festival attendees. Timber Lakes also created a mentor reading program in partnership, where Timber Creek High School Beta Club members read with our most unmotivated and struggling readers to help inspire our students to love reading, comprehend what they've read and apply it in the classroom. How did we do it? Timber Lakes was selected to host these exclusive book clubs as the result of educational advocacy work at the local, district and state level and the positive and productive relationship developed with Scholastic International. Weve secured active participation from more than 90 percent of Timber Lakes' fac ulty and staff and accumulated thousands of parent volunteer hours to develop and deliver unique and innovative reading lessons tailored to our book club students. The school raised nearly $173,000 via in-kind donations to create our own website, computer game, graphics and video; custom murals for the media center, sci book awareness and enthusiasm; planned visits to Universal Studios and Dinosaur World; and provided books and other pur chased items to ensure book club appeal to all students. More mentor opportunities were cre ated through the International Academy of Design and Technology, the University of Central Florida, Kiwanis of Avalon Park and other key contributors to build oneon-one mentor relationships with our book club students. JJ enny Wojcik, third grade teacher File for homesteadI would like homeowners to be aware exemption. Those who bought and occupied a home prior to Jan. 1, 2012 may be eligible $742 annually for most homeowners. The Property Appraisers website has a simple and quick feature that allows the convenience of their home for the up to $50,000 homestead exemption deduction. All new homeowners were mailed a letter four to six weeks following the recording of their deed that contained tion. Current property owners who have experienced a transfer of title, such as an addition or removal of a name on the title, name change from divorce, death of a spouse or establishing a trust, were also the exemption. The letter contains an individually assigned user ID and password for safe access is available. We are extremely pleased to be able to take the lead in Florida by offering this ser vice to our customers. In these busy times, the on-line application process delivers on my promise to provide easier, quicker and friendlier service to Orange County property owners. Bill Donegan Orange County Property Appraiser Credit helps people in need Its no secret that East Orange County, as well as all of Central Florida, is fac ing a heartbreaking and growing crisis of poverty and homelessness among local children and families. Many of us have been deeply moved by televised reports on CBS Minutes, CNN and other national news outlets that have highlighted families crowded into cars and sleeping in parking lots; fathers standing guard all night to protect their loved ones; and children getting washed and ready for school in public restrooms. Its a crisis that United Way and our agency partners have been witnessing, and responding to, for quite some time. Its also something weve been tracking through 2-1-1, United Ways free 24-hour information, referral and crisis helpline. Last year alone more than 163,590 Orange, Osceola and Seminole county residents sought urgent assistance through 2-1-1 an alarming 101-percent increase time callers who never needed help before and more than half required assistance with utilities and housing basic human needs. One of the many things United Way is doing to help stem this tragic tide, is promoting awareness of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), which is credited with lifting more children out of poverty than any other federal program. By offering tax credits of up $5,717, EITC can make a life-changing difference for people who are struggling to pay for rent, electricity, daycare, medical treatment or any ordinary expense. Best of all, claiming EITC is easy to do at more than 30 free local tax preparation sites, which help people receive 100 percent of their refund usually within 10 days or less. the local economy. More than half a billion dollars in refunds were distributed in the tri-county region alone last year. With the majority of dollars spent on such things as groceries, car repairs, home improvements, medical care and other goods and services, local merchants and retailers also prosper. Revenue Service estimates that one in four eligible recipients fail to claim EITC, mainly due to lack of awareness. Thats why United Way is calling on residents, businesses and others to help us promote it. While EITC is not a silver bullet, it is one of the best tools our community has for helping families survive and recover from the ongoing economic crisis. With well paying, full-time jobs still hard to So if you know someone who may qualify for EITC or needs help with any basic need, please urge them to simply dial 2-1-1. Together, by living united, we can help our neighbors and communities recover from this crisis. Robert H. (Bob) Brown, president/CEO Heart of Florida United Way HHelp kids with Crohns For the last four years, East Orlando resident Cameron Cox, 14, has been living with Crohns disease, a chronic and often painful digestive disease. He has always been a very healthy child. He is super active in sports, loves traveling with his family and hanging out at the beach. He would never get sick. Then one day he did. had a stomach virus and was advised to let it run its course. Then he had blood work, and the doctor was still at a loss. Cam was then sent to see a Pediatric Gastroenterolo gist. His diagnosis was a long and painful experience. Cam spent February through April of 2008 going from doctor to doctor, hospital to hospital, and having test after test. He was constantly being told, Drink this, sit still, hold your breath, dont move! pains and a lot of diarrhea and even some blood in his stool. At this point, he had lost 24 pounds from having chronic diarrhea and could hardly eat anything. Finally he had to have two procedures: a colonoscopy and an endoscopy. He was so scared to get the I-V as well as the anesthesia. These two tests and the biopsy Crohns disease. All he wanted to do was go to school, play sports and hang out with his friends and family. Cams life, as he knew it, had changed forever. He had lost so much of his freedom. There are days Cam just cant get out of bed because of the pain. Cam really tries to have a good attitude toward his new daily routine. He has to take up to 16 pills a day now. He continues to have a normal childhood and still loves to play golf, basketball and volley ball as long as he feels up to it. He wakes up each morning and faces the day as it comes to him. There are days when Cam feels sorry for himself, and then he can hear his moms gentle words of encourage ment, suck it up cupcake pity party is now over, that train has left the station. She hugs him and kisses him on the head and he moves on. Cam wishes he did not have Crohns disease. He deals with it the best he can with the support of his family, friends and his wonderful doctors. He knows there are others out there far worse than him, but for this awful disease. Join Team Challenge, the Crohns and Colitis Foundations half marathon training program, during the summer 2012 race season for the Virginia Wine Country Half Marathon. The Virginia Wine Country Half Mara Wine Country Half Marathon series, and Loudoun County, this race course is a sce bucolic Doukenie winery. Come visit DCs fabulous wine country while helping make a difference with the Crohns and Colitis Foundation. When you train with Team Challenge you will receive everything you need to by two professional coaches, round-trip airfare to Virginia, ground transportation, race entry with race day shirt, three-night hotel stay, team challenge pre-race pasta party, and an amazing wine festival after party. Contact Amy Stickel at astickeltemp@ ccfa.org or 646-875-2079 for more information or visit www.ccteamchallenge.org Lindsey Gardner Crohns and Colitis FoundationCam spent February through April of 2008 going from doctor to doctor, hospital to hospital, and having test after test. The school was selected by Scholastic International to host an exclusive Harry Potter Book Club. Out of the nationally selected schools, Timber Lakes ranks first in student participation, books read, volunteer hours procured and products donated. King Features Weekly ServiceJanuary 30, 2012

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Page 18 East Orlando Sun Feb. 3 March 1, 2012

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Page 19 East Orlando Sun Feb. 3 March 1, 2012 PRESENTED BYPROCEEDS TOBENEFIT Target 10,000 14,000 anticipated attendees Amazing advertising exposure Showcase your company and sell your product Give back to your community Think you make a mean chili? Compete with national chili champions! A chance to take home serious bragging rights Great prizes and trophies B E A S PONSOR B E A C HILI C OOK For more info on sponsorship, competing as a cook, or tickets... please call 407-777-8309 FREEComplete Door Maintenance with any Service 407-780-1691 Orlando, FL Call now to diversify your advertising .866.742.1373www.Florida-Classifieds.com g g g g gg Pest ControlProblems with insects? Termites, Roaches, Ants, Spiders. New home purchase inspections [WDo]. Tonys Pest Mgmt. Inc.Call 407-592-1047tonyspestmgmt.webs.com lisboa1047@bellsouth.net The Marketplace EOSun.com CLEANINNING SERVIICES #1 Cleaning We clean houses apartments and ofces! We have excellent references! Our estimates are for free! Call us now! JJaqueline Oliveira, (407) 694 5565, jaqorlando25@hotmail. com CURB APPEAL LANNDSCAPINING ARE Y Y OU TIIRED OF BAD LAWNNCARE COMPANINIES? ARE YY OU STIILL GETTINING LETTERS FROM Y Y OUR HOME OWNNERS ASSOCIIATIIONN? IIF Y Y OU ARE NNOT HAPPYY WIITH Y Y OUR COMPANYNY CALL US NNOW. WE WIILL MAKE YY OUR LAWNN THE BEST ININ THE NNEIIGHBORHOOD! CURB APPEAL LANNDSCAPINING, 407-312-0335, doylemullins@yahoo.com PIIANNO LESSONNS Concert Pianist, Teacher,Composer & Arranger Accepting new students starting JJanuary 2012 Specializing in young children and children with special needs. Call 407-267-2222 Ask for Ms. Gee PROFESSIONAL SERVICE ALLI I ED HEALTH career training Attend college 100% online. JJ ob placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualied. SCHEV certied. 800-481-9409 EARN N COLLEGE DEGREE ONNLININE *Medical, *Business, *Criminal JJ ustice. JJ ob placement available. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualied. SCHEV certied. 877-206-5165 UHS Walks for Teen Suicide Prevention Awareness JJ oin the UHS TEAM CATS and American Foundation for Suicide Preventions Out of the Darkness 5K Walk in Orlando, FL. Sat. Feb. 4th from 8am-12pm Walk with us to raise awareness, because the loss of a child is one too many. Contact Madeleine Plumey-Cruz, 3219480781, uhsptsa@ yahoo.com HEAT & AI I R J J OBS READY Y TO WORK?3 week accelerated program. Hands on environment. NNationwide certications and Local JJ ob Placement Assistance! 877-994-9904 EDUCATION HUGE DI I SCOUN N TS WHEN N YY OU BUY Y 2 TY Y PES OF ADVERTIISINING! 122 weekly newspapers, 32 websites, 25 daily newspapers. Call now to diversify your advertising with Advertising NNetworks of Florida. 866-742-1373 PREGN N AN N T, CON N SI I DERIN IN G ADOPTIIONN? We can help! Expenses paid; free counseling; open and semi-open adoptions; select a loving family; receive updates on your child; condential care. JJ eanne Tate & NNicole Moore (agency attorneys). Lic #100019753. Heart of Adoptions, IInc, 407-898-8280 RED GREENN LIIVE Experience this hilarious one-man show. April 5th, Tampa Theatre (800745-3000), April 7th, NNews-JJ ournal Centre, Davidson Theatre, Daytona State College. (800-595-4849). www. redgreen.com ANNOUNCEMENTS Mobile Home with acreage ready to move in,great for pet. Lots of space for the price. 3BR/2BA. Serious offers only, no renters. 850-308-6473 REAL ESTATE: FOR SALE $$$ ACCESS LAWSUI I T CASH NNOW!!! $$$ As seen on TV $$$. IInjury Lawsuit Dragging? NNeed $500 $500,000++ within 48 hrs? Low rates APPLY Y NNOW BYY PHONNE! Toll-Free 800-568-8321 FINANCIAL SERVICES DRI I VER-START OUT THE YYEAR WIITH DAIILY Y PAY Y! and weekly home time! Single Source Dispatch. Van and Refrigerated. CDL-A, 3 months recent experience required. driveknight.com 800-414-9569 DRI I VERS: RUN N 5 STATE REGIIONNAL! Get home weekends, earn up to $.39/ mi, 1 yr OTR Flatbed exp. Sunbelt Transport, LLC 800-572-5489 ext 227 AIIRLININES ARE HIIRINING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualied Housing available. Call Aviation IInstitute of Maintenance. 866-314-3769 A FEW PRO DRI I VERS NNEEDED TOP PAY Y & 401K 2 mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp. www. meltontruck.com DRI I VERS WAN N TED: CLASS A-CDL W/HAZMATCompany & O/Os Lots of Freight to move!! Call 877-893-9645 Help Wanted Sweet Mamas RestaurantFamily owned restaurant looking for upbeat energetic servers & grill cooks. apply at either location. 12205 NNarcoossee Rd. Orlando 407-282-7737 or 3020 Lamberton Blvd. Orlando (corner of Curry Ford & Dean) 407704-7957 Life Share IInc. Kids NNeed Y Y ou! Become a Foster Parent, contact 407-739-8462! HELP WANTED Classieds Religious DIRECTORY CHRIHRISTT KININGDOM CHHURRCHH -Services at 10 a.m. Sundays at Discovery Middle School (601 Woodbury Road, 32828) -N N ursery & Childrens Program available through fth grade -YY outh Group (6thth grade) meets at 7 p.m. on Wednesdays at Primrose School on Tanja King Blvd. -Visit www.christkingdom.org -A congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America AVALON N CH H UR R CH H -Were Y Y our Church! -13460 Tanja King Blvd. in Avalon Park -Sunday Worship 9 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. -Loving nursery for birth2 years -Exciting childrens ministry for 3 yearsth grade -YY outh service Sunday 6 p.m. -College group Tuesday 7 p.m. -Pastor Dale Brooks -www.avalonchurch.org -407-275-5499 CON N GR R EGATI TI ON N GESH H ER R SH H ALOM OF OR R LAN N DO -Bridge of Peace J J ews & Gentiles following the Messiah YY eshua (JJ esus) -Rabbi, Dr. Charles I I Kluge -6969 Venture Circle, Orlando, Fla 32807 -Service: Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 11 a.m. NNurseryPreSchool-Shabbat SchoolTeen, College & Career, Singles Groups,Dance Workshops, Spanish translation available, youth service, IInteractive Adult Bible Study (ages 1339) rst and third Wednesday of each month, child care & nursery available. -All are welcome, I I nterfaith Couples -Phone: 407-671-4700 -Find us now on FacebookCongregation Gesher Shalom -Rabbi@geshershalom.com, www.geshershalom.com, Shalomorlando.com PURIIM YY ou are invited to our Purim Festival at 11 a.m. Saturday, March 10. A time of fun for the whole family, with a "Speil" (play) costumes, face painting, games, crafts and treats! Free admission. PASSOVER SEDER Plan now to attend our 8th Annual Community Passover Seder, at 5:45 p.m. Saturday, April 7 at the Rosen Plaza Hotel, 9700 I I nternational Drive. Enjoy a traditional Seder and learn about Y Y eshua (J J esus) in the Passover. Music and dance specials, an Akomen (matzah) search for the children, and JJ onathan Settel in concert! $50 for adults, $25 for children (4-12 years of age); no charge for children under 4. Free self-parking, valet available. Seating is limited! Make your reservation now at shalomorlando.com. For more information, call 407-671-4700 or 407-7826177.EOSun.com EOSun.com EOSun.com Plan your weekend withThe Weekender!This weekly newsletter keeps you up to date on events happening in Central Florida's cities, including Winter Park, Maitland, Oviedo, Winter Springs, Avalon Park and Waterford Lakes.Visit eosun.com and click "Subscribe to Newsletter"

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Your community connection since 1995 As of Thanksgiving, there were 3,241-recorded homeless students in Or ange County. Homelessness and hunger are prob lems that go hand-in-hand as two of the biggest hurdles facing students living and learning in Orange County, said Home less Education Liaison for OCPS, Chris tina Savino. To help these kids, she said, the county, along with individual schools and part nerships with local businesses and orga nizations, have increased the number of services they have available to help needy students get by and succeed. These students often fall behind, and with education really being the focus and key of getting out of poverty and homelessness, she said, its important to wrap them around with as many ser vices as possible to keep them on track for graduation. From corporate sponsored food pan tries and emergency stashes of granola bars kept in teacher drawers, to stocks of surplus school supplies and an extra available jacket when its cold, Savino says every little thing helps. On Friday afternoon, 26 students from by one into an unassuming storage closet next to the schools auditorium. Their names are checked off a list complied by teachers and administrators as students listed a homeless or in great need, and theyre each handed a paper or plastic bag sometimes seemingly bigger able food items to take home to feed their family over the weekend. Some of these kids during the week depend on our free breakfast and lunch, but then come in again Monday after the weekend and you know they may not have eaten since, Compliance Teacher Guadalupe Armenteros said. This way we can make sure they had food. Friday, Jan. 27 was opening day for En glewoods LOVE Food Pantry one of 30 to open in Orange and Seminole counties public schools since the fall, coordinated by the Christian Service Center for Cen tral Florida and half of its shelves are already empty. At Timber Creek High School, econom ics teacher Michael Robbins and his stu dents started their own food pantry out of a cupboard in his classroom last year, stocked with canned foods, soups, cere Social networking, a fresh website and new partnerships are what the East Orlando Chamber of Commerce hopes will turn things around after a long absence of leadership in the organization. The tipping point for the Chamber: the de parture of executive director Kevin McFall in January after only three months on the job. Were working with other groups to see what kind of symbiotic relationships we can develop such as government, which we can tap to let people know about new tax incen tives or local transportation issues and mem bers like our members from Medical City, Board Chairman Brian Watson of Broad and Cassel in Orlando said. It goes back to con nectivity. Its not just about networking. Before McFall, there was only one staff person running the show for more than a year planning events, building up mem bership and acting as the mouthpiece for the organization. At its peak, which was during the eco nomic boom in 2004 and 2005, the EOCC had about 800 members. Now it has a little more than 200 members. The boards vice chairper son, Carol Ann Dykes, manager of the Uni versity of Central Florida Business Incubator, attributed the decline to the recession and a lack of leadership. We had periods of time when weve been without core leadership, when we have not had a face in the community. Weve lost memberships and not attained a lot of new members like we could have if we had that strong core leadership in place. Were looking forward to having that, she said. Now, not only are they looking for a new leader, the chamber inducted nine new mem bers to its 18-person Board of Directors last month. Dykes said new blood mixing with the old on the board should help cultivate the change the chamber needs to become stronger in the community. Were very excited to have a lot of new energy and fresh ideas and new perspectives. But its also very important for any board to have those individuals who have been there for a while too for continu ity and history, she said. We are refocusing, reorganizing and we really want to re-energize this chamber. Last year, the chamber moved from their store front in the Alafaya Village plaza along Alafaya Trail to 7 10 14 16 16 7 11 Chamber heads in new direction Hungry after school MEGAN STOKES CHAMBER By the numbers Homeless students by school as of Nov. 17: SARAH WILSON HOMELESS T hey sleep in motels, shelters and cars, and live off free school breakfasts and lunches and donated groceries. Orange Coun creasing number of stories of homelessness and hunger from stu

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Page 2 PUBLISHER K yle T aylor ASSOCIA TE PUBLISHER Jannett R. Roberts O WNER Beat Kahli ASSOCIA TE EDITOR Megan Stokes MANA GING EDITOR Jenny Andreasson DESIGNER Jonathan Gallagher COPY EDITORS Sarah Wilson Isaac Babcock INTERN Jordan K eyes ADVERTISING SALES Linda Stern COLUMNIST Josh Garrick SUBSCRIPTIONS | CIRCULA TION Amanda Rayno Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. E a s t Beat K AHL I Owner Coffee Hour with Beat We should all learn from Seminole Countys mistake 5900 Oleander Dr., Orlando, FL 32807Thursday, Feb. 16th5 p.m. 11 p.m.$15 all you can rideFriday, Feb. 17th5 p.m. 11 p.m.Good Shepherd School Pride Night$15 all you can ride Saturday, Feb. 18th12 p.m. 11 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 19th12 p.m. 6 p.m. Politically, professionally and personally, I am conservative. Ill always prefer the practical choice over pie-in-the-sky, and facts over forecasts. In politics, I lean toward initiatives that will reduce our taxes and streamline government operations. As a developer, I know for certain that I can build a road or school for less money than govern ment will spend on the same prod uct. And Ive actually done it. I admit I am not a fair compari son. Im a business owner. I want end product that does what its supposed to do sustainably. Pro cess, to me, is secondary. Government is not a business. Nor should it be. Government isnt just me, its us. Good government is everyone. For the past 20 years or so, Seminole County has attracted major employers and thousands of home owners by touting some of the states best elementary and secondary schools. Seminole County schools are highlighted in every Realtors brochure. Chambers of Commerce laud their schools the way farmers praise rich soil and ample rainfall. But Seminole County parents are up in arms. The School Board wants to close some schools, con solidate student bodies, econo mize. Unfortunately, the parents are way too late. As Scott Maxwell pointed out in The Orlando Sentinel, Seminole voters have consistently elected lo cal and state politicians who have promised to cut their taxes and reduce government spending to make their lives even better. We live in a democracy. For bet ter or worse, our government is us. Seminole Countys dilemma its an ugly one ought to inspire a little soul-searching. What do we want our government to do? Our schools are among the most important things government does, and I defy anyone to show me how the private sector can do public schools any better. In East Orlando, we are blessed with some of the best public schools in Florida. I couldnt be more proud of Avalon Park El ementary School or Timber Creek High School, two that I know the best. My company paid for and built Avalon Middle School. We are be ing reimbursed, but the decision to fund and to build the school took long and careful consideration. I dont know everything about public schools, but I can assure you I spent many hours thinking about them. We need public schools because we know our community is better off if every child gets a decent education. We pay taxes to build the schools, pay the teachers, and buy the books. We dont do this so that every kid will become a doctor. Thats the job of the kid and the kids parents. We support public schools so that every kid can learn to read and write, understand our laws, see how our system works, and learn to earn a living. Thats very that I can enjoy a better, safer, more orderly community. We want our government to do most of the things it does for the same reasons. Government isnt bad. Govern ment is us. And good government results when we all pay attention, when we all take a hand in it. Seminole County voters have thrown out the baby and kept the bathwater. We need to learn from their mistake. Government is not a business. Nor should it be. Government isnt just me, its us. Good government is everyone.

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Page 3 Community News EOSun.com Results from water quality tests of Bithlo wells should be avail able in mid-February, after En vironmental Protection Division specialists traveled throughout the small town in December and January. Chris and Christy White were one of the 105 homeowners in Bithlo who requested water test ing during a packed public meet ing held at the Bithlo Community Center in early December. There, Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs promised that everyone in Bithlo who is worried about their water can have it tested by the county free of charge usu ally, tests cost homeowners about $100. The Whites said theyre not afraid of the results. Its well water so people should know what theyre get ting, Chris said, adding that they use water softener. The prob lem is that people move in next to these car crushing places and gas stations and its really buyer beware. No ones forced to live there, Christy added. You have choices from one end of town to the oth er for good prices. Lately people have the impression that people are stuck here. EPD Environmental Specialist Mark Kronor said hes seen mixed reviews from homeowners as he tests their wells. Some people are concerned and some accept that well water resigned to the fact that you will need some kind of water treat ment, whether it be for toxins or the smell, he said. There are close to 2,000 private water wells in the community, possibly making it the densest in private wells in the county, accord ing to the Orange County Health Department. If left untreated, the water can be foul-smelling, rustcolored, thick in consistency and full of toxins. The most important thing to get across to people is that some and its bad for your health, while other times it looks and smells bad for yourself, EPD Manager Lori Cunniff said. The reason some worry In November, Orange County sent letters to Bithlo homeowners about water testing results, which showed that private wells in the six-block zone surrounding the old Circle K gas station, located south of East Colonial Drive in Bithlo, exceeded the maximum level for benzene to which long-term ex posure may cause cancer iron, aluminum and manganese. A pe troleum leak was discovered from the Circle K in 1986. The state has designated the Circle K leak an imminent threat, meaning that if left unchecked, it poses a hazard to human health and safety or the natural environ ment. Orange County Health De partment Director Dr. Kevin Sher in said 100 wells were sampled in this zone and about 13 or 14 wells showed contamination. Because of the states SUPER Act, anyone Jocelyn and Jim Darity have never had their water tested but because of its orange-brown color, they dont drink it. They had their water tested by the county in Jan uary as well. We just want to see what the result is, why its turning brown and why it leaves an orangebrown residue in the sink, tub and shower, Jocelyn said. We have no idea what to expect. The water is so bad, it looks oily Since they moved into their Bithlo home in 2007, theyve only drank bottled water from Publix and they take their white cloth ing to a coin laundry to be cleaned since they discovered that the wa ter will stain their clothing. Its even turned their white dishes a faint orange. I wouldnt drink it, Jim said, cringing. Residents were also concerned that if water tests conclude that able to afford it. If you dont qual people can buy. But the OCHD leum products, which is the issue in the Circle K zone, can cost up to $10,000. If contamination is found, Cun niff said DEP would need to take back positive, theyll send the homeowner vouchers for bottled drinking water. Then, theyll sup Its my understanding that if anything is above the primary drinking water standards that they will put them into the (DEP) program, Cunniff said. The $10,000 the county is spending for Bithlo testing is worth it to them because they need to know that their water is safe, Jacobs said. Were quite sults. To those who fear the possibil ity of public water, Jacobs said: Running water lines: that is the last option. Im a big believer that people should be able to choose how much government they want, she said. questions or concerns. T esting the water MEGAN STOKES An environmental specialist

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Page 4 Community News EOSun.com an older building donated to the organization on East Colonial Drive. But Dykes is excited about yet another move the chamber will make soon to the UCF Incu bator in the Central Florida Re search Park. The building is an older build ing. It really doesnt present the image that we would like and it kind of isolates the chamber being in that location, Dykes said. At the incubator, the chamber will be able to interact with the nearly 50 businesses that are in cubator clients, and have access to meeting facilities to host events and seminars and storage space. Being so close to the UCF campus, it will allow the chamber to more easily take on student interns. It was a no-brainer for me. We have a lot of opportunity to give exposure to these small busi nesses, in the chamber and the Incubator. Theres a lot of mutual Elaine Hinsdale, the EOCCs executive director from 2009 to 2010, said a strong chamber is most important during an eco nomic slump because when a chamber is not functioning effec tively, the small business commu nity suffers, as small businesses tend to make up the majority of chamber membership. If youve got small businesses that are able to grow, theyre go ing to be hiring and the local econ omy is going to be doing well, but if they are struggling and shut ting their doors, then the opposite happens. Help is here One of the partnerships the chamber has created is with Oviedo/Winter Springs Regional Chamber of Commerce. President and CEO Cory Skeates said his chamber has already essentially recreated what a chamber does by getting on Facebook and Twit ter, creating different avenues for their memberships to showcase their business to the community such as an online calendar they can post events to and hiring a marketing person to ensure expo sure to the community. We try to be more of a civic or ganization rather than just a busi ness organization, he said. The Oviedo/Winter Springs chamber has 475 members 200 more than when Skeates started boom there were about 650 mem bers, so he said they have seen a reduction but those members are now starting to come back. Skeates is one of a three-person staff at the chamber, including a marketing and events director, whom he credits with a lot of the chambers success. We put in a lot of hours, thats for sure, he said. If youre on the outside looking in, you wouldnt know its that few of staff. We have a lot of members who step up and help out. Being involved helps them as much as it does us. Dykes said theres no way they could hire another staff person at this time. would love to hire another staff person but we need to build our events to re-grow the chamber and rebuild its budget, Dykes said. Weve been operating in the black and thats really a testament to the board members of the past cal management. Although they may not be able to follow the Oviedo/Win ter Springs chambers lead in that way, they are planning to team up with them in hopes to attract new members and retain the ones they have. For instance, theyre planning a dual-chamber speed networking event, a hob nob on June 26 at the UCF Bright House Stadium, and they are partnering for the annual Ovations Awards program, which recognizes excel lence in business. Were really trying to do what we can to make sure all of the chambers in the area are suc cessful, Skeates said. The worst thing for every chamber right now is to have a neighboring chamber the chambers. During a struggling economy, to suffer is memberships to differ ent organizations. Hinesdale said the only way to retain member ship during this time is to provide something members need and cant get elsewhere. Here, with all this going on with the Alafaya Trail widening and now the East Colonial Drive widening from Dean (Road) to Bithlo, thats going to impact the business community. Theres a great chamber opportunity there: provide the businesses along those corridors with news and information that they cant get in their local newspapers or any where else. 02/29/12 C CHAMBER Ken Zooks title was incorrect in the article Staying Healthy in East Orlando, which ran in the Jan. 6 issue of the East Orlando Sun. Zook is the general manager of the Waterford Lakes Commu nity Association. The article also stated that the Waterford Lakes Walking Trail is open to the gen eral public but it is only open to Waterford Lakes residents. Correction Chief Judge Belvin Perry

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Page 5 Community News EOSun.com als and granola bars donated by the school community. Robbins says students can drop by when ever theyre in need, or students will be referred to as in need by a teacher or the schools Homeless Coordinator, Jo Lynn Schall, and provided a bag of food to take with them to their families. We recognized that some stu dents at our school didnt have enough food at home and that times are tough, so we decided we wanted to provide a helping hand, Robbins said. Students cant learn if they dont know where their next meal will be coming from. In addition to food, Tim ber Creek as well as other lo cal schools, like East River High School, have clothes closets avail able to students who might need a jacket when its cold, or new pants or shoes if theirs get worn out. The schools also have stocks hand out to students as needed. The whole idea is to keep them stable at school since their situation already is what it is at home, Yolanda Dorta, a social worker for OCPS, said. Sponsoring change After CBSs Minutes ran two specials on the prevalence of homelessness among students in Central Florida last year, Sarah Au, the senior specialist for Part ners in Education with OCPS, said the school board has seen an outpouring of support from local businesses and organizations to try to help students in need. It has had such a positive im pact in bringing together people who want to help and people who need help, she said. Were trying to match up the businesses that want to help with the schools who need it. The LOVE Food Pantry in stalled at Englewood Elementary is an example of one of these ef forts. After viewing the specials, members of the First Baptist Church of Orlando pledged $5 million dollars to go toward help ing Central Floridas hungry and homeless students. Partnering with OCPS and the Christian Service Center of Central Florida, they decided the money would be best spent to ward installing food pantries in schools in need, opening 13 in the fall of 2011. This spring, 17 more have opened across the county, each totally free to the schools they service and restocked week ly. project doubled in size, Danny de Armas, senior associate pastor at First Baptist Church Orlando, said. It was not even by us giv ing any more money, but by other sponsors and businesses hear ing about it and wanting to fund more. Associates at Keller Williams Realty in Waterford Lakes also saw the CBS special and have decided to dedicate their annual day of service on May 12, known as RED Day, to helping local East Orlando students in need. Beth Hobart, a realtor with has decided to adopt three local schools Castle Creek, Camelot and Timber Creek and is cur rently working out details with the principals and faculty at the schools to assess their needs, and how Keller Williams can best help. When we saw the Min utes special and realized this is happening right in our own backyard, we knew we had to do something, Hobart said. Stephanie Phillips, the home less education coordinator at Castle Creek Elementary, said she is very excited about the partner ship her school has in the works with Keller Williams and the aid it can bring to her students. Its such a wonderful thing, she said. We have a lot of need in our community, but we have a lot of people wanting to help, too. Avalon Dance The Performing Arts Company Emergency Services 24Whats Your Emergency???2012 has started with a bang for local Orlando based Emergency Services 24 (ES24). With expansion into South Florida and the Tampa region ES24 has been steadily assisting property owners in their time of need after suffering unexpected water damage or re damages to their buildings. This is the season for building res but with the mild weather there has been a drop in house or commercial building res. The cold weather usually creates more hazards to buildings as replaces, space heaters and other electric overloads create the potential for unexpected res. We have been running around the clock eld supervisor Brian Honea states. The water losses to homes have been steady enough to keep all of trucks servicing properties 24/7. We can be at any property within 30 minutes in the metro area with crews to extract water, keep properties from further damage and get owners back to normal as quickly as possible. ES24 has ofces in Orlando, Boca Raton, and Tampa and is expanding into Naples/Fort Meyers and Jacksonville this year. ES24 also services the Atlanta metro area with ofces in Atlanta, Athens and Macon along with Birmingham Alabama. ES24 specializes in building loss recovery and stabilization due to any catastrophic event that can happen. Pipe Breaks, Floods, Fires or natural disasters never stop. Our new motto of Whats Your Emergency says it all. We will handle any building crisis, quickly, professionally and get any property back to normal as efciently as possible.Contact our 24 hour emergency number 877-936-8998 and visit our website today, http://www.waterdamage24.com Mike & Mary Kranz The Kranz TeamKeller Williams Advantage Group407-716-6614mikemary@mindspring.com www.kranzteam.com Short Sale Certied High Integrity Strong Negotiators Superior Customer Service Serving our Waterford Area neighbors since 1995For all of your Real Estate needs contact: C HOMELESS Bags of food await homeless

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Page 6 Community News EOSun.com $100 to $500 OFFAny Servicewith this ad On Call 24 Hours A DayServing Central Florida Since the s Let Us Handle Your Emergency!Call Our Hotline 877-936-8998 www.EmergencyServices24.comServing Floridas Residential & Commercial Community Since 1990 IMMEDIAT E RESPONSE Whats Your Emergency?CBC057844 F lood l Leaks l Mold l F ire l Storm l Smoke l Roong Get the look you deserve ... Contact us at 4079146445 Were 100% mobile Car Wash & Wax $15* Insured Business For a limited time only. Restrictions ap ply due to size and condition of vehicle. about how much money Let us help you! Call today!(407)-644-6646www.aSafeHarbor.com Member of Bob Adams President/CEO A SafeHarbor, LLC bob@asafeharbor.comS T OP Worryingyou have for retirement.Instead of being concerned with the value of your retirement account, you should be more concerned with the income that account provides. Income maintains your quality of life so you may live in retirement as you did when you were working. You need to have the income so you can travel, see your grandkids and live whatever retirement dreams you may have. If you would like to see how you can MAXIMIZE YOUR INCOME FOR LIFE call us today. There are options available that most Americans dont know about. Give us one hour to see if we can give you your lifetime. Februarys Rotary Business of the Month is Embroidery Solutions in East Orlando. Since opening 14 years ago, the company has been a huge sup porter of East Orlando schools, especially Timber Creek and East River high schools, giving them free T-shirts and uniforms, award plaques for their banquets and buying banner advertise ments at their sports elds. Embroidery Solutions gives to other schools as well and has donated merchandise to East Orlando organizations such as Eastside Cycling and the Timber Creek High School Booster Club. Embroidery Solutions is located at 6457 Hazeltine Na tional Drive, Ste. 120, Orlando. For more information, call 407-438-8188, email info@embroiderysolutions.com or visit www.embroiderysolutions.net Business Month of the Rotary Co-sponsored by the Rotary Club of Avalon Park, the East Orlando Sun and Pinnacle Awards and Promotions, the Rotary Business of the Month recognizes East Orlando businesses and organizations that are actively involved in their communities and embody the motto of Rotary: Service above self. Winners receive a plaque, a free advertisement in the Sun and a spot in the Downtown Avalon Park Discount Card, which serves all of East Orlando. Nominate a business at www.facebook.com/avalonparkrotary Embroidery Solutions Food trucks in east The A valon Park Food T ruck Bazaar

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Page 7 EOSun.com The Timber Creek boys soccer team had to enter the state play offs with a sense of urgency. Weve got to play like there is no tomorrow and in the state play offs, there isnt, Timber Creek Coach Ibrahim Chehab said after winning a third straight district title in late January. round of the state playoffs against Lake Howell ended Timber Creeks streak on Jan. 31. The 1-1 tie at the end of regula tion forced a 10-minute overtime period. Senior Chris Aguilar had scored early for the Wolves and Lake Howell had answered with a score off a corner kick late in the Six minutes into the overtime period, the Wolves goalie Tyler Richards made a save deep in the box and a Lake Howell player col lided with him. The referee ruled that the ball had broken the plane of the goal and Lake Howell had a 2-1 overtime win to advance in the playoffs. It was a very controversial ending, Chehab said. As we shook hands, the Lake Howell coach said I do not see how that was a goal. He also told that to our goalie. referees whistle was due to the collision between Richard and a Lake Howell player in the box. Then he saw the referee point to the center circle and knew the game was over. Chehab described it as a dif team had not taken advantage of some quality scoring chances. In soccer, sometimes that hap pens, he said. You just dont hit on your chances. Both teams fought real hard. Timber Creek Wolves did earn their third consecutive district trophy on Friday, Jan. 27, with a 3-2 win over Winter Park High School. Chehab said stability has been a key to Timber Creeks success. The players have had the same coach, the same system and the same message during the threeyear run: preparation. Winning the district title starts on day-one of the season, Chehab said. We have to be moti vated every game. To win the top seed, every game counts. Besides being prepared, the players have had it drilled into their heads that everyone on the team is equally important. That is not always an easy concept to teach in our world of sports celeb rities. I am more concerned about the guys that dont play a lot than the ones that do. They come to practice every day and they need to push every starter in practice, Chehab said. Although everyone is valued, there are a few stand out players. Assistant Coach Clay Phillips de scribed senior Austin Stirtz as the glue that holds the Wolves de fense together. He is steadfast, Phillips said. Stirtz said he enjoys the defen sive side but also likes the oppor tunity to score. I think we are pretty solid on defense, Stirtz said. Chehab puts the utmost impor tance on a teams defense. In Sierra Leone, West Africa doubled as streets. Stones and sticks made up their goals. This is where Chehab learned how to play soccer and he earned his playing time as a defender and My philosophy is that we should win most games 1-0 or 2-1, he said. We should not score 4 and give up 3 or score 4 and give up 5. Goalie Tyler Richards has also been a defensive stalwart for the Wolves. In each of the three dis trict tournament games, the soph omore keeper stopped a penalty kick. He has been outstanding, Chehab said. If he doesnt stop those penalty kicks, I dont know where we would be. Although their push is over this year, Chehab will be work ing to keep the group motivated. He described soccer as 40 to 50 percent skill and 50 to 60 percent passion. Against Winter Park, we were the better team, he said. But give them credit. They closed the gap by being more aggressive. They wanted it so much. My job is to not let our opponents beat us by having more passion. You can count on the passion from the streets of Sierra Leone being part of the Timber Creek Wolves as long as Coach Chehab is using soccer to teach Timber Creek players life lessons. 2012 Curry Ford Road Orlando, FL 32806 407.895.7075License # CAC1816227 Air & Heat Services:Same day repair services $79.95 annual maintenance programs Low price system replacements/ upgrades Ductwork replacement/repairs Insulation Indoor air quality Financing available 10% discount when you mention this ad OF CENTRAL FLORIDA CELEBRATING OVER 25 YEARS SERVING YOUR COMMUNITYBernard S. Zeffren, MD Eugene F. Schwartz, MD Winnie Whidden, MSN, ARNP-CVoted Best Doctors of Central FL, Orlando Magazine for 7 consecutive yearsDiplomates American Board of Allergy and Immunology www.orlandoallergy.com250 N. Alafaya Trail Ste 130 Orlando, FL 32825407-380-7991 Evening hours available7560 Ste. 2064 Oviedo, FL 32765407-366-7387 Third district title for TCHS soccer JOHN BEDELL TCHS boys soccer coach T ristan Spurlock The Knights had a rough week in conference play, but still have plenty of time to recover before the mens basketball champion ship season. UCF fell in two straight games to Conference USA foes, after go ing 5-1 to start conference play. In the process the formerly highfourth, bypassed by Tulsa and Southern Miss, who handed them their two recent losses. Against Tulsa Jan. 25, the Knights found themselves within a point of the lead with just more than two minutes left to play in the game, but a series of fouls, turn overs and missed shots sank the Knights, who watched the Golden Hurricane slowly pull away in the 66-61. There was no singular hero the court, spreading double-digit scores among three players. Keith Clanton again led the way with 15 points, 11 rebounds and four turn overs. Captain A.J. Rompza had an unusual night, picking up zero turnovers, steals or rebounds and only one assist, but dropping 11 points into the net. Rising backup forward Tristan Spurlock rained down 10 points while grabbing seven boards. It was more frustration for the Knights on Jan. 28 as they watched a 12-point lead disintegrate rap idly heading into halftime, then watched as Southern Miss piled on a lead that would reach its peak of the game. The Golden Eagles would win that game 78-65, with the Knights plagued by abysmal shooting for a second straight night, hitting 40 percent of over all shots, and only 28.6 percent of three pointers. A big rebound in shooting and defense led the Knights to a 84-69 decimation of Palm Beach Atlantic on Monday, as they shot 47.8 per cent, thanks largely to newcomer Kasey Wilson, who came out of nowhere to nearly lead the team in points with 15, hitting seven of 10 shots. Marcus Jordan led the team in points with 17. The Knights return to the court at 3 p.m. on Saturday at SMU in Feb. 8 showdown against Mar shall. That game tips off at 7 p.m. Knights struggle in C-USA play ISAA C BABCOCK

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Page 8 EOSun.com reThinkYourCommute.comEconlockhatchee Park & Ride Lot 16622 E. Colonial Dr. OrlandoFree parking Meet-up place for carpools and vanpools On LYNX Route 104 to downtown Orlando Additional Park & Ride lots on SR 50 located at: Dean Road Chuluota Road/SR 419 1-866-610-RIDE (7433) Now Open! 50 Share the ride! The Scoop A valon Middle boys and girls basket ball UCF junior guard Gevenia Carter UCF senior guard A.J. Rompza East River boys wres tling team AJ Rompza Gevenia Carter K eith Clanton

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Page 10 East Orlando Sun Feb. 3 March 1, 2012 Lifestyle EOSun.com Wesley Rivera was 12 when he started getting sick. He was pale, got infections, had bruises and fatigue, but the doctor his family took him to didnt recognize how serious it was. His mother had a gut feeling something wasnt right. She took him to a new doc tor who took one look at Rivera and sent him to the emergency room. The now Timber Creek High School senior had leukemia, and he needed a bone marrow trans plant to survive. It really was a lot to take in I kind of went in autopilot, Ri vera, 18, said. He spent months in the hospi tal, underwent chemotherapy and had a life-saving bone marrow transplant from the donation of his sister, who was a perfect match. At 12, the process was tough to com prehend, but knowing his life was at risk was something he fully un derstood. He knew he could die. I knew it was real, that the possibility was real, and I felt the pain of the leukemia, Rivera said. But with the strength from his family, who was determined to get through this, that possibility would just never become a real ity. His parents, sister and brother never left his side, and he was never alone. There was no other alterna tive, there was no giving in to any doubt that I wouldnt come out of there alive and that we wouldnt knowing that really helped me get through it. Hell been cancer-free for six years on Feb. 14, which makes his second birthday March 29, the day of his bone marrow transplant each year with a family dinner. His favorite is steak or his dads special garlic chicken, and no one misses the night. Its a treasure to celebrate simple, regu lar moments like a family dinner, his mom said. Its like a rebirth, said his mom Mrs. Rivera. Shaped by cancer And though he lives a busy life as a high school senior, Wing Commander in JROTC the highest rank there is in the or ganization dedicated student be accepted to Yale University, he hasnt forgotten how cancer has shaped him as a person. It has made me who I am today, Rivera said. I just was forced to grow up. A lot of kids take a lot of things for granted, waking up, having your loved ones and everything, and through this I got to realize how quickly that can be taken away from you. His friends see that, too. He realizes that life is short and he appreciates things more and respects things more, said Monai Williams, a friend of 10 years. Williams has even been in spired to become a pediatric on cologist after supporting Rivera Cancer changed Riveras val ues and work ethic, he said. Rivera volunteers at three organizations related to cancer: Floridas Blood Centers, Kids Beating Cancer and The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. Hes brought blood drives to TCHS with the help from his JROTC cadets. His instructor, Maj. Brian Humphrey, said hes a lead er people want to listen to. Hes one of those young men that I dont know what he has in his system that drive, that de termination, that forthrightness to want to be the best, Humphrey said. Rivera also shares his story with anyone who will listen and inspires others to help. Michael Pratt, interim CEO for Floridas Blood Centers, said Riveras sto ry always gives that extra nudge when people are deciding to do nate blood. Wesley has the ability to reach in and grab you by the heart and squeeze it, Pratt said. Rivera serves as a compelling story of survival for families bat tling cancer with their children, said Margaret Guedes, CEO, pres ident and founder of the charity Kids Beating Cancer. Hes an amazing young man whos overcome incredible ob stacles and hes done it with grace and courage, she said. It gives the families optimism and hope. But Rivera sees this as self service. Hell never stop giving some of his life to the organiza tions he said saved his. And hell always be reminded of that each year, for the rest of his life, when he goes to get his cancer-free check up. Those days never worry him, like you might think, they only tell him that hes healthy. They make him feel good, and hes quite mat ter of fact about it. Im not afraid, he said. 445 north park avenue winter park, orida 32789 (407) 645-5311follow us on www.morsemuseum.org The NewMorseat theTIFFANY WingFree Friday Nights 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.The Morse Museums new galleries feature 200 art and architectural objects from Louis Comfort Tiffanys Long Island estate, Laurelton Hall. Coming up February 10 Live Music 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Family Tour 5:15 p.m. Glassmaking Demonstration 6 p.m. Curator Tour 7 p.mNow Open Wesley Rivera volunteers for sev eral organizations, visit each ones website to get more information about how you can help, too. For Floridas Blood Centers visit www. oridasbloodcenters.org, Kids Beating Cancer at www.kidsbeat ingcancer.com and The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society at www. LLS.org Beating cancer to help others BRITTNI JOHNSON Sun Staff Timber Creek High School senior volunteers for the organizations he said helped save his life PHOTO BY BRITTNI JOHNSON Wesley Rivera is the rst TCHS stu dent to be accepted into Y ale University.

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Page 11 East Orlando Sun Feb. 3 March 1, 2012 Lifestyle EOSun.com Jim Foulks wont be friends with someone who doesnt re cycle, so he just makes it happen for them. I call it recycling interven tions, Foulks said with a grin. I will, in a friendly way, make peo ple feel guilty about recycling. Say hes at a barbecue and a friend tosses their can in the trash Foulks just takes it right out and asks where the recycling bins are. Its a simple act, but it certainly gets the point across. Hes not the recycling police by any means, but for Foulks, its important to share the idea that recycling is easy. Weve converted a lot of peo ple to recycling, he said. Foulks, who lives in Avalon Park with his wife and three kids, recycles more than half of his waste through Orange Countys recycling program and compost ing his organic trash. And for Floridas goal to reach a 75 per cent recycling rate by 2020, his family is a model for many, but most Central Florida cities have a long way to go before their rates reach that level. Oviedos success Orange County hadnt even reached that 30 percent goal that was made before the 75 percent mark was set, and many Orange County cities are far even from those numbers. Winter Park, for example, re cycles about 10 percent of its solid waste. But Oviedo is a bright spot in Central Floridas recycling mis sion. Oviedo residents are the best recyclers in Seminole County, said Johnny Edwards, the solid waste manager for Seminole County. They recycle about 35 percent of their waste, and 500 pounds per home, per year. Residents have ac cess to unlimited bins for recycling at no extra charge, and can earn up to $100 in rebates each year using Recyclebank, a program that gives discounts in exchange for points you earn recycling. The program is free for residents and included in the citys waste con tract. Oviedo is the only local city that offers this. Since implementing unlimited bins, the city has seen 150 more pounds of waste per home, per year being recycled. Oviedo Util ity Manager, Josef Grusauskas, said Recyclebank has kept resi dent recycling momentum up. Its more of a reward for recy cling being done, to not let it slip back, Grusauskas said. Recycling options There are options to encour age more recycling, and some Foulks considers great ideas for Avalon Park. As of now, Avalon Park doesnt have recycling on its main commercial streets and its businesses dont have recycling programs. Foulks wife Linda has taken home thousands of water bottles from the local YMCA to recycle. Its almost embarrassing to not have the opportunity for recy cling, he said. But Avalon Park doesnt rep resent all of East Orlando. Karin Brantley, who is in inhouse sales and responsible for Waste Pros commercial business, said 70 per cent of their commercial clients in East Orlando do choose to have some form of recycling. Waterford Lakes Town Cen ter has a cardboard container for businesses and requires them to use it for their cardboard waste, Debbie Sponsler, section man ager for Orange Countys Utilities Solid Waste Division, said there has been progress with getting more recycling programs going in the past, but with the economy its tough. Unlike Waterford, she said overall most businesses in the area dont want to spend the money. Theres no way to require businesses to recycle because they negotiate their own waste con tracts, but Sponsler said she does see encouraging them to include recycling as an important step to ward the states recycling goals. We need to reach out more to commercial businesses, she said. Theres also the option to offer larger recycling bins for residents or a pay-as-you-go method to gar bage pickup the more trash you create, the more you pay. Edwards said thats not a system he sees coming to Central Florida any time soon. The struggle with apartments Theres also the lack of apart ment complexes offering recy cling to their residents. Most multi-family dwellings are left out of the convenient community curbside programs, and would have to purchase it through their own waste management contract, which is an added cost that most dont choose. In this economy you want to cut costs and recycling costs mon ey, Sponsler said. Many of East Orlandos student centered apartment complexes of fer recycling, such as University House, Alafaya Club and Knights Landing. But for regular citizens, the choices are slim. GrandeV ille on Avalon Park was the only apartment complex listing their recycling options. The complex, which has 487 units, offers its resi dents a large compactor to place their recyclables, and Waste Pro sorts the items for them. Its important to offer every thing. People have different life styles and if theyre strong with recycling we want to offer that to them, Leasing Consultant Jenni fer Middleton said. Theres also a cost in educating tenants on how to use the recycling bins. One of the biggest problems in apartment complex recycling is contamination from people put ting the wrong things, or even their garbage, in the wrong bins, Sponsler said. Economic effects Economics play a role in re cycling developments, too. The down economy has cut waste in Orange and Seminole counties by at least 20 percent from people buying less, keeping more and eat ing out less means, all contribut ing to less trash. But it also means less money to spend on recycling and the necessary facilities. James Golden, a geologist with 30 years of experience in environ ment and solid waste management consulting, and the owner of HSA Golden Engineering in Orlando, said that the future will be in recy cling. But he said he doesnt think Florida can reach the 75 percent recycling goal by 2020, and that even if it did on a state level, poor rural communities would never individually reach it. Unfortunately it takes invest ment, he said. Foulks thinks its worth the investment and time. He doesnt claim to be a super recycler, and even admits he forgets his reus able bags for grocery shopping from time to time. But the fact that he calls himself an average Joe recycler means, to him, that any normal family can do it, and should. Its just good business, he said, its good for the environ ment and its common sense. ACT OF V ALOR Military Movie Weekend Event Regal Cinemas at Waterford Lakes Information provided and donations are welcomed for the Navy Lone Sailor Memorial, Blue Jacket ParkThe Crosshairs (supplier of military and law enforcement equipment) is bringing you a action packed weekend event at Regal Cinemas with a mock bunker and festivities will include: and Cadets Marine Corps. Troy Edwards, owner of The Crosshairs is a retired Sr. Police Detective and experienced tactical operator that uses and tests every product that we sell to ensure the highest quality merchandise at reasonable prices. Community Placed, Sports Based Mark eting Driveways, Patios, Pool DecksEpoxy Garage FloorsKSC Concrete, Inc.800 570-0187Email: Decorative Concrete Resurfacing Decorative Concrete Resurfacing For information about Orange County recycling, visit ocre cycles.net. If youre an Oviedo resident, visit recyclebank.com for more information about their rewards program. Waste not, win big BRITTNI JOHNSON Sun Staff Central Florida has a long way to go to reach its 75 percent recycling goal, but local cities are working toward it despite tough economic odds PHOTO BY BRITTNI JOHNSON Jim Foulks, showing off his compost, said hes not a maniac about the environment he doesnt even own a recycling bumper sticker. Recycling is just common sense.

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Page 12 East Orlando Sun Feb. 3 March 1, 2012 Lifestyle EOSun.com FEBRUAR Y Orange County Animal Services offers free dog training classes at their ofce located at 2769 Conroy Road in Orlando. The classes are taught by a certied trainer from Think Alpha Dog training school. For more information or to register, call 407-254-9140 or email animalser vices@oc.net Free Medicare, Medicaid, Medigap/ HMO counseling, prescription drug plans and long-term care insurance counseling is available by the Florida Department of Elder Affairs SHINE program The program is from 10 a.m. to noon on the third Tuesday of each month (closed J uly-August) at the East Orange Community Center, 12050 E. Colonial Drive, Orlando. For more information, call 407-254-9610 ext. 0. Bring a list of medications of prescription bottles, insurance card or Medicare card. FEB. 2 Local theater company Magic Curtain Productions will be performing Little Orphan Annie Feb. 2-4 at the Timber Creek High School Performing Arts Center. Shows start at 7 p.m. nightly with a 2 p.m. matinee on Saturday. Tickets are $10 in advance and $12 at the door. Kids 3 and younger are free. For more information visit mcptheater.com or call 407-282-8368. FEB. 3 Faces of HIV a mobile art exhibit depicting the lives of Florida residents living with HIV and AIDS will be at the University of Central Florida Student Union from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, Feb. 3. For more information, visit wemakethechange.com/faces FEB. 4 Country singer Miranda Lambert will be live in concert with special guests Chris Y oung and J errod Nei mann at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 4, at the UCF Arena. For tickets or more information, visit ucfarena.com FEB. 7 CFLSG 3 a networking event to benet the UCF Alumni Excellence Fund, is from 5:30-11:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 7, at Terrace 390 in downtown Orlando on the rst oor of the Bank of America building. Admis sion is $10 in advance and $15 at the door, which includes parking, appetizers and drink specials all night. For more information, visit csg3. eventbrite.com Rock band T ool will be making a stop in Orlando as part of their Win ter Tour at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 7, at the UCF Arena. Tool will be joined by special guest Y OB. For more informa tion or for tickets, visit ucfarena.com or Ticketmaster. FEB. 9 The UCF Alumni Association will be hosting the Canvas & Cabernet fundraiser at 6 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 9, at the UCF Fairwinds Alumni Center on the UCF Campus. Pre-registration costs $25 and is required. Proceeds benet the UCF Visual Arts and De sign Alumni Chapter scholarship. Visit ucfalumni.com/art FEB. 11 There is a Father-Daughter Dance event from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 11, at Avalon Parks Founders Square. The fee is $15 per father in advance or $20 at the door. There will be a DJ, food and drinks. To register or for more information, visit www.christkingdom.org The Orange County Adopt-A-Tree program will be holding an adoption event from 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, Feb. 11, at Ft. Christmas Histori cal Park, 1300 Ft. Christmas Road, Christmas. For more information call 407-254-9200 or visit orange.ifas.u. edu FEB. 17 Irish folk music troupe Celtic Woman will perform their Believe Tour at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17, at the UCF Arena. For tickets or more information, visit ucfarena.com FEB. 18 The Orlando Wetlands Festival will take place from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat urday, Feb. 18, at Fort Christmas Park, 1300 N. Fort Christmas Road, Christ mas. Admission is free. Call Orlando Wetlands Park 407-568-1706 or visit cityoforlando.net/wetlands. FEB. 26 The UCF Art Gallery is hosting an art show featuring almost 50 Central Florida artists through Feb. 26 in room 140 of the UCF Visual Arts building, open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Saturday. For information visit http://gallery.cah.ucf.edu Hours: M-F 8am to 4:30pm 2315 Lee Road Winter Park, Florida 32789 Your Guiding Beacon for Quality Healthcare Harbour Private Duty Nursing, LLCSkilled Nursing Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Companionship Home Health Aid Homemaking Flexible Schedules Free RN Assessments The Services of Harbour Private Duty Nursing provide peace of mind to loved ones, trust ofcers, guardians and physicians. Our professional team prides itself on making your life easier. We also provide in-hospital private duty care, which offers close, personal attention and reassurance in an unfamiliar and often frightening environment. Our ofce hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm. Our professional team is available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. During hours when the ofce is closed and during the weekends and holidays, the on-call coordinator is available by telephone 24 hours per day.www.HarbourPrivateDutyNursing.com License # 299991382phone (407) 895-8188 fax 407-895-9339 Y oga East Orlando will offer Part ners Yoga Classes at 1 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 5. Partners of all levels of yoga experience can take this special one-day, two-hour class for $25 per individual or $45 per couple. Register online at yogaeastorlando.com or by phone at 407-730-3257. Pottery Pad will be offering a pot tery package for two. The package allows couples to paint any two items under $20 for only $25. Desserts will be served from 5 to 10 p.m. For reservations or more information call 407-674-7844 or visit potterypador lando.com Sweet! By Good Golly Miss Holly cupcake bakery is taking orders for its special Valentines Day Col lection through Tuesday, Feb. 14. A variety of special avors are available by the dozen for $18. For more infor mation visit sweetbyholly.com. The UCF Jazz Chamber Groups Concert will take place on Tuesday, Feb. 14 from 8 to 9:30 p.m. in the au ditorium of the UCF Rehearsal Hall. For more information, visit music.cah. ucf.edu/events.php. Bayridge Sushi will be offering a Valentines dinner for two package that includes soup, salad, sushi, hibachi and wine. The package will cost $89.95. For reservations and more in formation, call 407-282-8488 or visit brsushi.com/locations/avalon-park. Valentines Day calendar Calendar Pottery Pad Sweets cupcakes Celtic Woman UCF Art Gallery Faces of HIV

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Page 13 East Orlando Sun Feb. 3 March 1, 2012 Lifestyle EOSun.com Feb. 4 The musical rites of spring Works by visionary compos ers will be performed by the Orlando Philharmonic Orches tra when Maestro Christopher Wilkins leads the Orchestra in a Legendary Composers concert at 8 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 4, at the Bob Carr PAC in Orlando. The entire course of musical history changed when the world ac cepted the genius of Beethoven. His th Symphony (the Pasto rale) joins Stravinskys The Rite of Spring, which changed ballet music forever. These works represent two opposing views of nature: one bucolic, the other utterly terrifying, says Maestro Wilkins. Beethovens Pastorale symphony is one of the most enticing musical landscapes in history, while The Rite of Spring seems more like the eruption of a volcano. Even those unfamiliar with orchestral music will rec ognize the works from Disneys Call 407-770-0071, or visit www. orlandophil.org Feb. 10-12 Ballets Battle of the Sexes The Orlando Ballets Artistic Director Robert Hill put Cen season when he created a series of sexy ballets for a program he called Battle of the Sexes. Working with bodies that stretch and exercise every day as part of their job, the idea was received with standing ovations with Hill proving thats how to bring sexy back Florida style! Battle of the Sexes III, presented by the Orlando Ballet, will take place on Feb. 10-12 at the Bob Carr Per forming Arts Center in Orlando. You can get those Valentines Day tickets at 407-426-1739 or orland oballet.org Feb. 12 Valentines Day with Andrea Bocelli We need a word bigger than superstar for the Italian tenor Andrea Bocelli, who will make a very special Valentines Day weekend appearance at the Amway Center for an evening of romance on Sunday, Feb. 12. The performance will highlight Bocellis lushly romantic reper toire of classical arias along with the worlds most famous love performance in Orlando. Bocelli (the Voice) has sold more than 65 million albums worldwide and continually receives rave reviews throughout his sold-out U.S. tours. And a welcome local note is struck by the news that 60 members of Winter Parks Bach Festival Choir will join Bocelli for his only Central Florida perfor mance. You can buy tickets at amwaycenter.com, Amway Cen 800-745-3000 or at Ticketmaster. com Feb. 15 to 26 Billy Elliott Billy Elliot is a kid from a working-class family in England who is training to be a boxer, because his hard-drinking father wants him to be something more than an out-of-work factory bloke. But Billy discovers and becomes obsessed with the world of ballet. While his fam ily attempts to come to terms with this strange (for them) career path, Billy gets a shot at a scholarship with a prestigious dance school that may be his way out of town. Billy Elliot the Musical opened on Broadway in 2008 with a book by Lee Hall and music by Elton John. The Musical won 10 Tony Awards including BEST Musical. Chore ographer Pete Darling is quick to say that the show is about much more than just ballet. He used tap, hip-hop, jazz, acrobatics and folk dancing to tell this inspiring story. Billy Elliot the Musical is at the Bob Carr Performing Arts Center in Orlando from Feb. 1526. Visit ticketmaster.com Feb. 24 Sleeping Beauty And speaking of ballet, the legendary Bolshoi dancer Sergei Radchenko will bring the Mos cow Festival Ballet, made up of extraordinary dancers from throughout Russia to Daytona Beach on Feb. 24. Staging new productions of timeless classics, they will bring Tchaikovskys Sleeping Beauty to the Peabody Auditorium as part of a coast-tocoast tour of the United States. For one evening, we are invited royal beauty as the dancers blend the rich traditions and classical training of Russias Bolshoi and Maryinsky theaters in centuries of ballet tradition. This one-nightonly performance is presented by the Daytona Beach Symphony Society. Visit www.dbss.org Feb. 28-29 Michael Jackson Consider a repertoire of the greatest pop music of all time created by Michael Jackson as that music is used for Cirque du Soleils newest full-length evening of performance magic. The must-see ticket of the season MJ THE IMMORTAL will be performed in two per formances onlyFeb. 28-29at the Amway Center in Orlando. This life-changing production combines Michael Jacksons music with the choreography and athleticism of Cirque du Soleil to give fans a unique view into the spirit, passion and heart of the artistic genius who forever trans formed global pop culture. Writ ten and directed by Jamie King, who has channeled Michaels love of music and dance, fairy tale and magic, and the fragile beauty of nature into a show fea turing more than 60 international dancers, musicians and acrobats. Tickets are available at ticketmas ter.com or 1-800-745-3000. March 2 and 4 A Verdi masterpiece Commissioned to write a new opera in 1850, Giuseppe Verdi was entranced by a story by Victor Hugo. But Hugo's play depicted a king as an immoral womanizer an idea that was not accepted in Europe at that time. So the king became a duke, and Verdi created the compel ling story of Rigoletto, the hunchback court jester and the seductive Duke of Mantua a fascinating tale of seduction, treachery and Italian vendettas. Produced in collaboration with the new Florida Opera Theatre, this concert opera features the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra in performance March 2 at 8 p.m. and March 4 at 2 p.m. at the Bob Carr in Orlando. Call 407-7700071 or visit orlandophil.org Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC2400 N Forsyth Rd., Suite 101 Orlando, FL 32807Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 17 years! Scan QR Code Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar Local Valentines Day events abound Billy Elliot Michael Jackson Beethoven

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Page 14 East Orlando Sun Feb. 3 March 1, 2012 Education EOSun.com The days of candy bars and magazine subscriptions as school fundraiser material may soon be a thing of the past. Thanks to the Fuel My School program, East Orlando schools have found a faster, easier way to raise support via the Internet. Sunrise Elementary School has raised more than $17,000 in funds and resources since starting the program in 2011. Much of that went to a technology fund, which helped put sorely needed pro jectors and computers into their classrooms. "If a parent says, 'How can I help?' I send them right to Fuel My School," Sunrise Elementary Principal Shayne Grove said. "It's easy they'll know exactly what we need and they can write it off on their taxes." Windermere resident Lisa Hil genfeldt founded FMS to make fundraising easier on parents and schools alike. The program gives each member school a webpage that they can use to connect di rectly with potential supporters and provide them with a num ber of ways to track and meet schools individual needs. Each FMS page links visitors to several different options for supporting their school. "It's a one-stop shop to go to support your school and drive funds and resources to your school," said Lisa Hilgenfeldt, the founder of FMS. One choice that parents and sponsors have is the "school mall." This option allows anyone to shop at various online retailers that they would already be us ing, such as Amazon or Best Buy, where a percentage of the pro ceeds will go directly to the school. The most direct support method is the school wish list, which al lows administrators to post items or materials that the school needs and connect with someone who can meet that need. wish list, we had cases of water on there, "Grove said. "It was up there for less than a week and a mom brought two cases of water for our clinic." Sunrise teacher Maggie Frank lin uses the technology provided through FMS on a daily basis. She is able to use one of several tech nology carts that have a variety of devices used to enhance the learning process. The projectors help us save paper as well as give students a visual element to connect with, Franklin said. Sunrise PTA members Jamie Korenstein and Jenny Burton have been working with the schools site for more than a year. Burton prioritizes communicating with the community through email as well as through the school's FMS page. Just keeping it organized and updating it are key, Burton said. You have to remind people, 'There's a new wish. Go look! Though schools like Sunrise are making huge strides in fund raising through FMS, some are work for them. Waterford Elemen tary principal Charles Lindlau admits that, though he has seen some wishes granted through the program, his school hasn't had as much success as other schools in the East Orlando area. He pointed out that the school has been no tifying parents through emails, phone calls and newsletters, but they will continue promoting it through other mediums. a commercial starring our young students to get the word out," Lindlau said. "We want to show just how simple it is." Convenience has become a sort of rallying cry for those who are trying to spread the word about FMS. The concept was born out of Hilgenfeldt's frustration with the typical fundraising methods. Her son was cut from his freshman football team because the school didn't have enough helmets. I have four children in Or ange County schools and I'm do ing everything that's required to support their education, Hilgen feldt said. In our life, we don't have the time to do that in the tra ditional way. Help during a crisis School funds are tight. OCPS per-student spending has been consistently dropping, going from $6,945 to $6,667 just since last year. In the midst of this, FMS is providing a new way to meet may not have room in the budget for anymore. "From a stapler to an outdoor water fountain to some really specialized sensory equipment, all of that is available out there," said Sara Au, head of the Orange County Public Schools' Partners in Education initiative, who has been helping OCPS partner with FMS. "But since Fuel My School gives us an online reach, it makes it that much more accessible." Since its launch in the fall of 2010, every school in Orange County has joined the program and Lake County schools are join ing rapidly. Though Hilgenfeldt said that the program will always be focused on Central Florida, schools in seven other states have started using FMS. In total, Fuel My School has helped grant more than 300 wishes and pumped more than $100,000 into Central Florida schools. The success of the pro gram comes as no surprise to Grove. "To me, it's a no-brainer," Grove said. "It's really easy and my main suggestion would be to have an outstanding parent group." Jennifer A C WardIndependent Advanced Director Phone: 407-273-6047 jenacward@aol.com www.pamperedchef.biz/jenniferward Jennifer A C WardIndependent Advanced Director Phone: 407-273-6047 jenacward@aol.com www.pamperedchef.biz/jenniferward Jennifer A C WardIndependent Advanced Director Phone: 407-273-6047 jenacward@aol.com www.pamperedchef.biz/jenniferward Yoga Classes including Hot Yoga, Chair Yoga and 3734 Avalon Park Boulevard East Orlando, FL 32828 Leading the WayWellness.toIntroductory deal applicable to rst time visitors only. Oer cannot be combined with any other promotions. www.YogaEastOrlando.com3734 Avalon Park Boulevard East Orlando, FL 32828Leading the Wayto Wellness.Yoga Classes including Hot Yoga, Chair Yoga and Introductory deal applicable to rst time visitors only. Oer cannot be combined with any other promotions. Individual & Family health plans For an Instant Quote or to apply, visit our website www.HealthInsuranceIBS.com407-831-5166 For more information, visit fuelmyschool.com Local schools new fundraising tool JORDAN KEYES Sun Staff A new online program is making school fundraising easier for educators and parents alike PHOTO BY JORDAN KEYES Kennedy, a Sunrise Elementary fourth-grader, goes through a grammar exercise using a projector that Fuel My School funds helped purchase. The school was able to use money from the new program to reach their technology fundraising goals.

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Page 15 East Orlando Sun Feb. 3 March 1, 2012 Education EOSun.com School News The Avalon Middle School Art Club was awarded the grand prize in their art competition for the second straight year. In addition to the grand prize, AMS students were given the Sponsors Award for their work on a gingerbread house. Magic Curtain Productions Senior Performance T roupe had a suc cessful rst showing at the N ational J unior Theater Festival in Atlanta, Ga. MCP theater director Rhonda Cato was awarded the top Freddie G. award for her dedication and achievement in youth theater. MCP choreographer Victoria Kroll was also honored with the Broadway Slam Event Choreography award. Avalon Middle Schools Service Learning Clubs : Student Council, Beta Club, N ational J unior Honor Society and Builders Club combined their efforts to hold a food and toy drive for local families in the com munity. Classes competed for who could bring in the most toys, and the winners were Ms. Lucas sixth grade class; Ms. Garritys class and Ms. Hilyers class tied in the seventh grade category; and Ms. Carrs class and Ms. Morales class tied in the eighth grade category. Carolyn Deeb Avalon Middle School athletic director and tness teacher, was awarded the 2012 Sports Professional of the Y ear Award for the Southeast region. The award was established to honor outstanding leaders in the professional domain of sports. Coach Deeb will be honored at the Southern District convention in February. More than 100 people helped The Kiwanis Club of East Orange County and Kids Against Hunger a national organization with a mission to reduce the number of hungry children in the world to package more than 4,000 meals that will be delivered to food pantries throughout Orange County Public Schools on Saturday, Jan. 28. Avalon Middles Jay Fligor, Lourdes Miranda, Azalia Samsam and Amber Teagues artwork was chosen to be on displayed in the Peggy Crosby Student Gallery at the Orlando Museum of Art. Avalon Elementary tied for sev enth in Floridas recent ranking of its more than 3,000 public schools. Schools were ranked based on points earned in the states grading system, which gives each school a letter grade. Grades for elementary and middle schools are based on student performance and improve ment on the FCAT. Kids Against Hunger Mrs. Aldridge [Principal of Camelot] because she cares for us and because she wanted to be our principal. Liliana, 6 My friend Ashley because shes my best friend. Alexis, 7 My mom because shes so sweet to me. She gets food for me and takes me to theme parks. Kennedy, 6 I dont know. Kennedy because hes my best friend. Alexander, 7 Hannah from my classroom because shes beautiful and nice and because she has beautiful freckles on her cheeks. Jayden, 7 My mom because she plays with me a lot. Aliyah, 6 We asked Camelot Elementary students about their valentine.

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Page 16 East Orlando Sun Feb. 3 March 1, 2012 Opinions EOSun.com I am often asked if I will meet with someone prior to an interview to help them polish up their skills. Many people are not comfortable with the interview process and second guess themselves when it comes to answering questions. Recently we interviewed for a position at Christian HELP and we were very fortunate to have several great candidates. The interviews all went very well and we actually had a dif When it came down to it there were a few factors that we looked at above and be mented the people already in place, and the second was their long-term goals and how they saw themselves growing within the organization. One of the interviewees was someone I was already con nected with so she felt comfort able in the interview. This was great for both of us, but she said she is not always that comfort able in interviews. As I gave her advice, I let her know that she had done great in the process and should always be like that in an interview. Practice sample interview questions with a friend or a coach prior to interviewing. If you have no one else, use a mirror. Listen to your answers as they come out. Answers to standard questions like Tell me about yourself and What are your strengths and what are your weaknesses should just roll off your tongue. These are asked so regularly that you should always have an answer. After you leave an interview record your impressions. This will help you to improve. Also use that time to write a thank you note and re-capture what you want to emphasize from the interview and anything that you would like the interviewer to know. Sandi Vidal, an Avalon Park resident, is the executive director for Christian HELP and the Central Florida Employment Council and has more than 15 years of recruiting and human resources experience. Visit www.cfec. org The Orange County School Board aims to be the top pro ducer of successful students in the nation. Their goals center on an intense focus on student achievement, a high perform ing and dedicated team, a safe learning and work environ ment, efficient operations, and sustained community engage ment. This year, one of the most important tasks that the board will face will be to choose a new superintendent who will support and achieve these goals. Supporting and ensur ing that the designated search process includes public input and is transparent is key to selecting a superintendent. The task of selecting a new superin tendent wont end the day that he or she takes over the reins of leadership on July 1. It is my goal to encourage a smooth transition period and build a strong, positive relationship with the new superintendent so that he or she is able to suc cessfully continue the upward trend of academic achievement for all OCPS students. Some of the most produc tive plants I grow in my garden could be categorized as Asian greens. The simple abundance of harvesting the early leaf and stem portions of these vegetables provide a quick and nutritious harvest with minimal maintenance. As we grow into our lucrative spring season, take advantage of some of the easiest crops to produce on Earth. Most Asian greens must be started from seeds instead of off-the-shelf transplants. Locat ing the seeds is a low hurdle to choosing many of these exotic plants. (I havent had much luck at nursery center seed racks.) An Internet search of seed catalogs will provide numerous options. Since purchasing seeds offers an incredible economy of scale over buying transplants, dont skimp on trying a spec trum of varieties. Starting the seeds requires a balanced mix of quality potting soil, clean containers, moisture, warmth and sunlight. Most Asian greens germinate in just a few days, so be prepared to deliver the new sprouts to full sun. Left in limited light, lanky, weak seedlings are prone to stem disease and damage. Provide fresh air and ventilation as a warm sunny day could lead to overheating. In three to four weeks most of these seedlings will be ready to grow in the great expanse of the garden. Available soil fertility, mois ture, pest controls, sunlight and space provided in almost any adequate. A 3-gallon landscape ting mix supplies ample space for six transplants. A 4-foot square bed using grid pattern spacing produces dozens of heads. As the crop starts to mature, pick crowded thinning greens for those gourmet baby vegetables that are so expensive in the grocery store. Most Asian greens are in the Brassica family of plants, similar to radish or cabbage. I repeatedly plant Pac choi, a smaller variety of Bok choi. Another favorite is Mizuna, which produces a large quan or purple fern-like foliage. For Tatsoi is spoon shaped, quick to mature, but has a strong mus with your spell-checker are Shungiku, Bekana, Komatsuna, Vit or Michilli. Gather individual leaves and stems or harvest the whole head by cutting at ground level. Promptly rinse to avoid wilting. I graze fresh from my garden, taste testing to compare and contrast many of these unique mineral components of Asian greens are easily off the charts. Ill leave it to you to research the myriad recipe and menu pos sibilities of one of the worlds most popular crops. Asian greens, Seeds, nurs ery center, seed catalog, exotic plants, crops, wilting, Brassica, Bok choi, Mizuna, Pac choi, Tat soi, Hon Tsai Tai, Shungiku, Be kana, Komatsuna, Vit, Michilli Tom Carey is the owner of Sundew Gardens, a you-pick gardening business near the University of Central Florida in East Orlando. Visit the Sundew Gardens Facebook page. Sandi Vidal Ask Sandi Daryl Flynn Orange County School Board member T ed Edwards Orange County District 5 Commissioner Commissioners Corner Easy-to-grow Asian greens are a must Orange County elected ofcials offer New Years resolutions T om Carey From My Garden to Yours Now that its a new year, my staff and I have begun work on goals for a productive year objectives for the upcoming year: -A main priority is to continue advocating prudent spending of taxpayer dollars and providing excellent county services consis tent with available resources. -Encouraging investment in infrastructure for improvement in access and safety on local roadways, such as relieving con gestion on State Road 50 through the FDOT road widening project. -Promoting sidewalk projects around schools to create connec tions with neighborhoods. -Through serving on UCF Research Park Board of Direc tors, well work toward bringing high-tech job growth in simu lation and defense industries, which will promote diverse economic development within Orange County to provide var ied work and business opportu nities. -Encouraging growth that protects our environment and all of our citizens, such as ad dressing the contaminated water issue in Bithlo resulting from leaky gas tanks. -Integrating the environment into our decisions as we work toward creating sustainable community, particularly related to our lakes and stewardship of land by creating a Lake Pickett Advisory Board. -Continuing to improve liv ability and quality of all District 5 neighborhoods by working with our county departments on completion of construction in Christmas and splash park in Bithlo. Feeling comfortable during the interview NOTHI N G LIKE THIS COULD HAPPE N I N WI N TER PARK OR HEATHRO W. I STILL THI N K A CLASS ACTIO N SUIT IS THE W AY TO GO. CALL JOH N MORGA N A N D LET THAT COCKY LITTLE BASTARD W I N IT FOR YOU! LISA EIKE FULFORD THE COU N TY SHOULD HAVE SE N T THE RESIDE N TS OF BITHLO A N APPLICATIO N FOR M TO GET W ATER TESTED A N D USED THE LOCAL CO MM U N ITY CE N TER AS A CE N TRAL POI N T TO HAVE W ATER TESTED. NOT EVERYO N E I N BITHLO IS A W ARE OF THIS SITUATIO N. WHERES A CO N TACT PHO N E N U M BER A N D HO W DO W E APPLY FOR W ATER TEST? MIKE JAZO Heres what EOSun. com readers are writing about the Jan. 13 article Bithlo under a microscope, which details the water quality testing by Orange County government in the small town: My goal this year is to keep the Alafaya Trail widening on schedule, address bigger transportation concerns in our suitable location for the East Or ange Homeless Drop-In Center. Jennifer Thompson Orange County District 4 Commissioner

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Page 17 East Orlando Sun Feb. 3 March 1, 2012 Opinions EOSun.com Letters to the editor Book club breeds readers Every day, elementary school students in the U.S. spend an average of only six minutes reading a book. By compari son, these students devote four hours to watching television and seven hours on a computer, playing video games and using a cell phone or other hand-held device. These sobering statistics are manifested in the classroom by challenge areas such as low desire to read, poor comprehension, inability to analyze or apply what has been read and poor test scores. Timber Lakes Elementary School has the action plan to change this paradigm. What have we done? The school was selected by Scholastic International to host an exclusive Harry Potter Book Club. Out of the nationally se student participation, books read, volun teer hours procured and products donated. start of the book club, 57 percent of book club students minutes reading outside of school increased by 26 minutes per day. thusiasm for reading and reading-related activities increased by 90 percent. More than one-third of all third-, the Harry Potter Book Club and enroll ment continues to grow every day. Due to the overwhelmingly positive response to this book club, a book club featuring the and second-grade students will launch in January 2013. This club initially targeted a 30-student enrollment; more than 80 have registered. The Harry Potter Book Club also col laborated with a wide variety of com munity partners to create its own reading interactive computer game and threedimensional castle. They also participated in a local festival and parade, performing the Hogwarts School Song for hundreds of festival attendees. Timber Lakes also created a mentor reading program in partnership, where Timber Creek High School Beta Club members read with our most unmotivated and struggling readers to help inspire our students to love reading, comprehend what they've read and apply it in the classroom. How did we do it? Timber Lakes was selected to host these exclusive book clubs as the result of educational advocacy work at the local, district and state level and the positive and productive relationship developed with Scholastic International. Weve secured active participation from more than 90 percent of Timber Lakes' fac ulty and staff and accumulated thousands of parent volunteer hours to develop and deliver unique and innovative reading les sons tailored to our book club students. The school raised nearly $173,000 via in-kind donations to create our own web site, computer game, graphics and video; custom murals for the media center, sci book awareness and enthusiasm; planned visits to Universal Studios and Dinosaur World; and provided books and other pur chased items to ensure book club appeal to all students. More mentor opportunities were cre ated through the International Academy of Design and Technology, the University of Central Florida, Kiwanis of Avalon Park and other key contributors to build oneon-one mentor relationships with our book club students. J enny Wojcik, third grade teacher File for homestead I would like homeowners to be aware exemption. Those who bought and occupied a home prior to Jan. 1, 2012 may be eligible $742 annually for most homeowners. The Property Appraisers website has a simple and quick feature that allows the convenience of their home for the up to $50,000 homestead exemption deduction. All new homeowners were mailed a letter four to six weeks following the recording of their deed that contained tion. Current property owners who have experienced a transfer of title, such as an addition or removal of a name on the title, name change from divorce, death of a spouse or establishing a trust, were also the exemption. The letter contains an individually assigned user ID and password for safe access is available. We are extremely pleased to be able to take the lead in Florida by offering this ser vice to our customers. In these busy times, the on-line application process delivers on my promise to provide easier, quicker and friendlier service to Orange County property owners. Bill Donegan Orange County Property Appraiser Credit helps people in need Its no secret that East Orange County, as well as all of Central Florida, is fac ing a heartbreaking and growing crisis of poverty and homelessness among local children and families. Many of us have been deeply moved by televised reports on CBS Minutes, CNN and other national news outlets that have highlighted families crowded into cars and sleeping in parking lots; fathers standing guard all night to protect their loved ones; and children getting washed and ready for school in public restrooms. Its a crisis that United Way and our agency partners have been witnessing, and responding to, for quite some time. Its also something weve been tracking through 2-1-1, United Ways free 24-hour information, referral and crisis helpline. Last year alone more than 163,590 Orange, Osceola and Seminole county residents sought urgent assistance through 2-1-1 an alarming 101-percent increase time callers who never needed help before and more than half required assistance with utilities and housing basic human needs. One of the many things United Way is doing to help stem this tragic tide, is pro moting awareness of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), which is credited with lifting more children out of poverty than any other federal program. By offering tax credits of up $5,717, EITC can make a life-changing difference for people who are struggling to pay for rent, electricity, daycare, medical treatment or any ordinary expense. Best of all, claim ing EITC is easy to do at more than 30 free local tax preparation sites, which help people receive 100 percent of their refund usually within 10 days or less. the local economy. More than half a billion dollars in refunds were distributed in the tri-county region alone last year. With the majority of dollars spent on such things as groceries, car repairs, home improvements, medical care and other goods and services, local merchants and retailers also prosper. Revenue Service estimates that one in four eligible recipients fail to claim EITC, mainly due to lack of awareness. Thats why United Way is calling on residents, businesses and others to help us promote it. While EITC is not a silver bullet, it is one of the best tools our community has for helping families survive and recover from the ongoing economic crisis. With well paying, full-time jobs still hard to So if you know someone who may qualify for EITC or needs help with any basic need, please urge them to simply dial 2-1-1. Together, by living united, we can help our neighbors and communities recover from this crisis. Robert H. (Bob) Brown, president/CEO Heart of Florida United Way Help kids with Crohns For the last four years, East Orlando resident Cameron Cox, 14, has been living with Crohns disease, a chronic and often painful digestive disease. He has always been a very healthy child. He is super active in sports, loves traveling with his family and hanging out at the beach. He would never get sick. Then one day he did. had a stomach virus and was advised to let it run its course. Then he had blood work, and the doctor was still at a loss. Cam was then sent to see a Pediatric Gastroenterolo gist. His diagnosis was a long and painful experience. Cam spent February through April of 2008 going from doctor to doctor, hospital to hospital, and having test after test. He was constantly being told, Drink this, sit still, hold your breath, dont move! pains and a lot of diarrhea and even some blood in his stool. At this point, he had lost 24 pounds from having chronic diarrhea and could hardly eat anything. Finally he had to have two procedures: a colonoscopy and an endoscopy. He was so scared to get the I-V as well as the anesthesia. These two tests and the biopsy Crohns disease. All he wanted to do was go to school, play sports and hang out with his friends and family. Cams life, as he knew it, had changed forever. He had lost so much of his freedom. There are days Cam just cant get out of bed because of the pain. Cam really tries to have a good attitude toward his new daily routine. He has to take up to 16 pills a day now. He continues to have a normal childhood and still loves to play golf, basketball and volley ball as long as he feels up to it. He wakes up each morning and faces the day as it comes to him. There are days when Cam feels sorry for himself, and then he can hear his moms gentle words of encourage ment, suck it up cupcake pity party is now over, that train has left the station. She hugs him and kisses him on the head and he moves on. Cam wishes he did not have Crohns disease. He deals with it the best he can with the support of his family, friends and his wonderful doctors. He knows there are others out there far worse than him, but for this awful disease. Join Team Challenge, the Crohns and Colitis Foundations half marathon train ing program, during the summer 2012 race season for the Virginia Wine Country Half Marathon. The Virginia Wine Country Half Mara Wine Country Half Marathon series, and Loudoun County, this race course is a sce bucolic Doukenie winery. Come visit DCs fabulous wine country while helping make a difference with the Crohns and Colitis Foundation. When you train with Team Challenge you will receive everything you need to by two professional coaches, round-trip airfare to Virginia, ground transportation, race entry with race day shirt, three-night hotel stay, team challenge pre-race pasta party, and an amazing wine festival after party. Contact Amy Stickel at astickeltemp@ ccfa.org or 646-875-2079 for more informa tion or visit www.ccteamchallenge.org Lindsey Gardner Crohns and Colitis Foundation Cam spent February through April of 2008 going from doctor to doctor, hospital to hospital, and having test after test. The school was selected by Scholastic International to host an exclusive Harry Potter Book Club. Out of the nationally selected schools, Timber Lakes ranks first in student participation, books read, volunteer hours procured and products donated. King Features Weekly ServiceJanuary 30, 2012

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Page 18 East Orlando Sun Feb. 3 March 1, 2012

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Page 19 East Orlando Sun Feb. 3 March 1, 2012 PRESENTED BYPROCEEDS TOBENEFIT Target 10,000 14,000 anticipated attendees Amazing advertising exposure Showcase your company and sell your product Give back to your community Think you make a mean chili? Compete with national chili champions! A chance to take home serious bragging rights Great prizes and trophies B E A S PONSOR B E A C HILI C OOK For more info on sponsorship, competing as a cook, or tickets... please call 407-777-8309 FREEComplete Door Maintenance with any Service 407-780-1691 Orlando, FL Call now to diversify your advertising .866.742.1373www.Florida-Classifieds.com Pest ControlProblems with insects? Termites, Roaches, Ants, Spiders. New home pur chase inspections [WDo]. Tonys Pest Mgmt. Inc.Call 407-592-1047tonyspestmgmt.webs.com lisboa1047@bellsouth.net The Marketplace EOSun.com CLEANING SERVICES #1 Cleaning We clean houses apartments and ofces! We have excellent references! Our estimates are for free! Call us now! Jaqueline Oliveira, (407) 694 5565, jaqorlando25@hotmail. com CURB APPEAL LANDSCAPING ARE Y OU TIRED OF BAD LAWNCARE COMPANIES? ARE Y OU STILL GETTING LETTERS FROM Y OUR HOME OWNERS ASSOCIATION? IF Y OU ARE NOT HAPPY WITH Y OUR COMPANY CALL US NOW. WE WILL MAKE Y OUR LAWN THE BEST IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD! CURB APPEAL LANDSCAPING, 407-312-0335, doylemullins@yahoo.com PIANO LESSONS Concert Pianist, Teacher,Composer & Arranger Accepting new students starting January 2012 Specializing in young children and children with special needs. Call 407-267-2222 Ask for Ms. Gee PROFESSIONAL SERVICE ALL I ED HEALTH career training Attend college 100% online. J ob placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualied. SCHEV certied. 800-481-9409 EAR N COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINE *Medical, *Business, *Criminal J ustice. J ob placement available. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualied. SCHEV certied. 877-206-5165 UHS Walks for Teen Suicide Prevention Awareness J oin the UHS TEAM CATS and American Foundation for Suicide Preventions Out of the Darkness 5K Walk in Orlando, FL. Sat. Feb. 4th from 8am-12pm Walk with us to raise awareness, because the loss of a child is one too many. Contact Madeleine Plumey-Cruz, 3219480781, uhsptsa@ yahoo.com HEAT & A I R J OBS READ Y TO WORK? 3 week accelerated program. Hands on environment. Nationwide certications and Local J ob Placement Assistance! 877-994-9904 EDUCATION HUGE D I SCOU N TS WHE N Y OU BU Y 2 T Y PES OF ADVERTISING! 122 weekly newspapers, 32 websites, 25 daily newspapers. Call now to diversify your advertising with Advertising Networks of Florida. 866-742-1373 PREG N A N T, CO N S I DER IN G ADOPTION? We can help! Expenses paid; free counseling; open and semi-open adoptions; select a loving family; receive updates on your child; condential care. J eanne Tate & Nicole Moore (agency attorneys). Lic #100019753. Heart of Adoptions, Inc, 407-898-8280 RED GREEN LIVE Experience this hilarious one-man show. April 5th, Tampa Theatre (800745-3000), April 7th, News-J ournal Centre, Davidson Theatre, Daytona State College. (800-595-4849). www. redgreen.com ANNOUNCEMENTS Mobile Home with acreage ready to move in, great for pet. Lots of space for the price. 3BR/2BA. Serious offers only, no renters. 850-308-6473 REAL ESTATE: FOR SALE $$$ ACCESS LAWSU I T CASH NOW!!! $$$ As seen on TV $$$. Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500 $500,000++ within 48 hrs? Low rates APPL Y NOW BY PHONE! Toll-Free 800-568-8321 FINANCIAL SERVICES DR I VER-START OUT THE YEAR WITH DAIL Y PA Y! and weekly home time! Single Source Dispatch. Van and Refrigerated. CDL-A, 3 months recent experience required. driveknight.com 800-414-9569 DR I VERS: RU N 5 STATE REGIONAL! Get home weekends, earn up to $.39/ mi, 1 yr OTR Flatbed exp. Sunbelt Transport, LLC 800-572-5489 ext 227 AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualied Housing available. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance. 866-314-3769 A FEW PRO DR I VERS NEEDED TOP PA Y & 401K 2 mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp. www. meltontruck.com DR I VERS WA N TED: CLASS A-CDL W/HAZMAT Company & O/Os Lots of Freight to move!! Call 877-893-9645 Help Wanted Sweet Mamas Restaurant Family owned restaurant looking for upbeat energetic servers & grill cooks. apply at either location. 12205 Narcoossee Rd. Orlando 407-282-7737 or 3020 Lamberton Blvd. Orlando (corner of Curry Ford & Dean) 407704-7957 Life Share Inc. Kids Need Y ou! Become a Foster Parent, contact 407-739-8462! HELP WANTED Classieds Religious DIRECTORY CHRIST KINGDOM CHURCH -Services at 10 a.m. Sundays at Discovery Middle School (601 Woodbury Road, 32828) N ursery & Childrens Program available through fth grade -Y outh Group (6thth grade) meets at 7 p.m. on Wednesdays at Primrose School on Tanja King Blvd. -Visit www.christkingdom.org -A congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America AVALO N C H U R C H -Were Y our Church! -13460 Tanja King Blvd. in Avalon Park -Sunday Worship 9 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. -Loving nursery for birth2 years -Exciting childrens ministry for 3 yearsth grade -Y outh service Sunday 6 p.m. -College group Tuesday 7 p.m. -Pastor Dale Brooks -www.avalonchurch.org -407-275-5499 CO N G R EGA TI O N GES H E R S H ALOM OF O R LA N DO -Bridge of Peace J ews & Gentiles following the Messiah Y eshua (J esus) -Rabbi, Dr. Charles I Kluge -6969 Venture Circle, Orlando, Fla 32807 -Service: Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 11 a.m. NurseryPreSchool-Shabbat SchoolTeen, College & Career, Singles Groups,Dance Workshops, Spanish translation available, youth service, Interactive Adult Bible Study (ages 1339) rst and third Wednesday of each month, child care & nursery available. -All are welcome, I nterfaith Couples -Phone: 407-671-4700 -Find us now on FacebookCongregation Gesher Shalom -Rabbi@geshershalom.com, www.geshershalom.com, Shalomorlando.com PURIM Y ou are invited to our Purim Festival at 11 a.m. Saturday, March 10. A time of fun for the whole family, with a "Speil" (play) costumes, face painting, games, crafts and treats! Free admission. PASSOVER SEDER Plan now to attend our 8th Annual Community Passover Seder, at 5:45 p.m. Saturday, April 7 at the Rosen Plaza Hotel, 9700 I nternational Drive. Enjoy a traditional Seder and learn about Y eshua ( J esus) in the Passover. Music and dance specials, an Akomen (matzah) search for the children, and J onathan Settel in concert! $50 for adults, $25 for children (4-12 years of age); no charge for children under 4. Free self-parking, valet available. Seating is limited! Make your reservation now at shalomorlando.com. For more information, call 407-671-4700 or 407-7826177. EOSun.com EOSun.com EOSun.com Plan your weekend with The Weekender! This weekly newsletter keeps you up to date on events happening in Central Florida's cities, including Winter Park, Maitland, Oviedo, Winter Springs, Avalon Park and Waterford Lakes. 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258 South Chickasaw Trail, Suite 100 | Orlando, FL 32825 | www.FloridaHospitalEast.com/SurgeryThe Florida Hospital Surgery Center combines the highest quality personalized care with state-of-the-art technology, allowing our physicians to perform the latest minimally invasive procedures. Conveniently located on the campus of Florida Hospital East Orlando, the innovative facility features private patient bays and advancedmulti-specialty operating rooms and interventional endoscopy suites.Have your procedure close to home with one of our highly skilled physicians, by calling (407) 303-6580.COLORECTAL Sam Atallah, MD Teresa deBeche-Adams, MD Samuel DeJesus, MD GASTROENTEROLOGY Steven Feiner, DO Keith Moore, DO Mario Moquete, MD Srikiran Pothamsetty, MD Seela Ramesh, MD Srinivas Seela, MD Aniq Shaikh, MD GENERAL SURGERY Ajmal Baig, MD Joseph Bennett, DO Kenley Davis, MD Malcolm McDonald, DO GYNECOLOGY Fernando Gomez, MD Fernando Lopez, MD OPHTHAMOLOGY Mont Cartwright, MD MyHanh Nguyen, MD ORAL SURGERY Scott Farber, DDS Lincoln Taylor, DDS ORTHOPAEDICS Juan Agudelo, MD M. Anwarul Hoque, MD Brian Leung, MD Sean McFadden, DO OTOLARYNGOLOGY (ENT) Michael Bibliowicz, DO David Rabaja, DO Lisa Waizenegger, MD PODIATRY Jay Bornstein, DPM Joseph Conte, DPM Thomas Fann, DPM Andres Perez-Gomez, DPM Luis Sanchez-Robles, DPM Anthony Saranita, DPM Amber Shane, DPM UROLOGY Daniel Cohen, MD Stephen Dobkin, MD Zamip Patel, MD Frank Troilo, DO SURGERY CENTER PHYSICIANS:EAST-11-5390 Setting the Standard in Outpatient Surgery