Pyrus malus brentfordiensis

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Material Information

Title:
Pyrus malus brentfordiensis or, a concise description of selected apples
Physical Description:
91 p. : ill. ; 38 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Ronalds, Hugh
Publisher:
Longman, Rees et al
Place of Publication:
London
Manufacturer:
Richard Taylor, printer
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Apples -- Varieties   ( lcsh )
Genre:
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
Hugh Ronalds ; with a figure of each sort drawn from nature on stone by his daughter.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 08266733
ocm08266733
Classification:
lcc - QK495.R78 R6 1831
System ID:
AA00010106:00001

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Pyrus Malus Brentfordiensis:

OR,

A CONCISE DESCRIPTION

OF


SELECTED


HUGH RONALDS,
NURSERYMAN, BRENTFORD'


APPLES.


F.H.S.


WITH


A FIGURE OF EACH SORT

DRAWN FROM NATURE ON STONE

BY HIS DAUGHTER.


" Sunt nobis mitia poma."


VIRG.


"Let every tree in every garden own
The Red-streak as supreme, whose pulpous fruit
With gold irradiate and vermilion shines." PHILLIPS.
". the fragrant stores
Of apples, which the lusty-handed year,
Innumerous, o'er the blushing orchard shakes:
A various spirit, fresh, delicious, keen,
Dwells in their gelid pores." THOMsoN.


LONDON:

PRINTED BY RICHARD TAYLOR, RED LION COURT, FLEET STREET;
FOR LONGMAN, REES, ORME, BROWN, AND GREEN, PATERNOSTER-ROW.
183.1.





























CUJITURAL
LIBRARY



















TO

THE MOST NOBLE

HUGH DUKE OF NORTHUMBERLAND, K.G.


THIS WORK

IS,

BY HIS GRACE'S KIND PERMISSION,

WITH THE GREATEST RESPECT AND GRATITUDE

FOR THE VERY MANY FAVOURS

RECEIVED FROM HIS GRACE AND HIS NOBLE ANCESTORS,

DURING AN UNBROKEN SERIES OF MORE THAN FIFTY YEARS,

INSCRIBED,

BY

HIS GRACE'S

FAITHFUL AND OBEDIENT SERVANT,


HUGH RONALDS.











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INTRODUCTION.


AFTER more than half a century of constant practical attention to their
production, I have ventured to publish a descriptive Catalogue of those
varieties of Apples which I have thought most excellent, assisted by my
daughter Elizabeth, who has drawn them on stone from specimens of my
own growth.

The sorts will by some persons be thought too numerous; but it should
be considered that many kinds are requisite to ensure a constant supply
of fruit in every season and at all times, as some of them will every year
fail in bearing. There is also some peculiar good quality in each of this
selection to recommend it to different tastes, with some singularity of ap-
pearance rendering it pleasing to the eye; and there seems no reason why
a fancy should not be indulged in Apples as well as in Tulips, Ranun-
culuses, &c., as they present the greatest and most beautiful variety of any
species of fruit, and so eminently combine the useful with the agreeable.

The Descriptions are concise, and designed to point out in a plain way
the distinct character and qualities of each kind, with the name (encum-
bered with but few synonyms) by which each variety is most generally
known. The Figures are of medium size, and the habit of the tree is given,
with its history, where it is known, or is remarkable.

Appropriate Lists are added for the Orchard, extensive and smaller
Gardens, for Paradise Stocks, for the purpose of Sale, and for Walls.









Vlll

I feel it proper here very thankfully to acknowledge the great assistance
I have received from my friends, and particularly from the Horticultural
Society, in making up the collection; also to Mr. Loudon, conductor of
the Gardener's Magazine, &c. for his kindness in suggesting the work,
which I hope will be found practically useful in assisting gentlemen and
gardeners to form assortments in every respect suitable to the particular
situations for which they may be required.
















CONTENTS.





Page.
PLATE I. . .
Fig. 1. Sack and Sugar.-Fig. 2. La Fameuse, or Pomme de Neige.
-Fig. 3. White Juneating.-Fig. 4. Yellow Ingestrie.-Fig. 5.
Spitzemberg, or Pomegranate Pippin.-Fig. 6. Red Ingestrie.-
Fig. 7. Red Quarenden.-Fig. 8. White Astrachan.
PLATE II. .. . .. 3
Fig. 1. Wax Apple.-Fig. 2. Brown's Summer Beauty.-Fig. 3. Thorle
or Thoral Pippin.-Fig. 4. Sops of Wine.-Fig. 5. Eve or Egg Ap-
ple.-Fig. 6. Hicks's Fancy.
PLATE III . . ... .. 5
Fig. 1. Manks Codlin.-Fig. 2. Carlisle Codlin.-Fig. 3. Keswick
Codlin.-Fig. 4. Spring Grove Codlin.
PLATE IV. .. . .. .. 7
Fig. 1. Hawthornden.-Fig. 2. Wormsley Pippin, or Knight's Codlin.
-Fig. 3. Edgar's Apple.-Fig. 4. Early Marrow.
PLATE V . . .. 9
Fig. 1. Wilmot's Seedling.-Fig. 2. Red Astrachan.-Fig. 3. Rowe's
Seedling.-Fig. 4. Salopian Pippin.
PLATE VI. . ... 11
Fig. 1. Margaret, or Striped Juneating.-Fig. 2. Summer Oslin.-
Fig. 3. Kerry Pippin.-Fig. 4. White Summer Pippin.-Fig. 5.
Tartarian Crab.-Fig. 6. Duchess of Oldenburgh.
PLATE VII . . 13
Mammoth.
PLATE VIII. . .. ... 15
Fig. 1. Early Crofton, or Peach Apple.-Fig. 2. Bell's Scarlet Pear-
main.-Fig. 3. Calville Rouge d'Et6 of Duhamel.-Fig. 4. Aromatic
Russet.











Page.
PLATE IX. .... ....... 17
Fig. 1. Kentish Fill-basket.-Fig. 2. Potter's Large Seedling.
PLATE X . . 19
Fig. 1. Winter Pippin.-Fig. 2. Rawlins's Fine Red-streak.-Fig. 3.
Newtown Spitzemberg.-Fig. 4. Lemon Pippin.
PLATE XI. . . 21
Fig. 1. Reinette de Canada.-Fig. 2. Yorkshire Greening.

PLATE XII. . . 23
Fig. 1. Court pendu Plat Rougehtre.-Fig. 2. Fearn's Pippin.-
Fig. 3. Court of Wick, or Rival Golden Pippin.-Fig. 4. Margil.
-Fig. 5. Kirke's Golden Reinette.-Fig. 6. Golden Reinette.

PLATE XIII. . .. 25
Fig. 1. Gooseberry Apple.-Fig. 2. Sovereign.-Fig. 3. Nonpareil
Russet.-Fig. 4. Golden Worcester.-Fig. 5. Little Beauty.-Fig. 6.
Queen Charlotte.-Fig. 7. Kedlestone Pippin.-Fig. 8. King George
the Third, or Borsdorffer.-Fig. 9. Powell's Russet.

PLATE XIV . .. 27
Fig. 1. Kirke's Lord Nelson.-Fig. 2. London or Five-crowned Pippin.
-Fig. 3. Lucombe's Seedling.-Fig. 4. Striped Holland Pippin.

PLATE XV. . . 29
Fig. 1. Beauty of Kent.-Fig. 2. Flower of Kent.

PLATE XVI . .. 31
Fig. 1. Rosemary Apple.-Fig. 2. Cobourg Pippin.-Fig. 3. Orange
Pippin.-Fig. 4. Bellidge Pippin.-Fig. 5. Padley's Royal George
Pippin.-Fig. 6. Pomme Grise.

PLATE XVII. . . ... 33
Fig. 1. Newtown Pippin.-Fig. 2. Somerset Lasting.

PLATE XVIII. . ... 35
Fig. 1. Dobbs's Kernel Golden Pippin.-Fig. 2. Autumn Golden
Pippin.-Fig. 3. Franklin's Golden Pippin.-Fig. 4. Hughes's.
Golden Pippin.-Fig. 5. Golden Pippin.-Fig. 6. Dredge's Golden
Pippin.
PLATE XIX . . 37
Fig. 1. Duke of Wellington, or Dumelow's Seedling.-Fig. 2. Tom
Potter.-Fig. 3. Cornish Aromatic.-Fig. 4. Cornish Gilliflower.











rage.
PLATE XX. .. ........ . 39
Fig. 1. Pomme D'Api Gros.-Fig. 2. Pornme Violette, or Black Apple.
-Fig. 3. Large White Incomparable Crab.-Fig. 4. New Small
Lemon Pippin.
PLATE XXI ..... ............. 41
Fig. 1. Russet Table Pearmain.-Fig. 2. Lamb Abbey Pearmain.-
Fig. 3. Parry's Pearmain.--Fig. 4. Barcelona Pearmain.

PLATE XXII. . . 43
Fig. 1. Royal Pearmain.-Fig. 2. Winter Pearmain.-Fig. 3. Loan's
Pearmain.-Fig. 4. Herefordshire Pearmain.

PLATE XXIII. .. . . 45
Fig. 1. Pomme de Pigeon.-Fig. 2. Brookes's Apple.-Fig. 3. Seek
no Further.-Fig. 4. Golden Harvey, or Brandy Apple.-Fig. 5.
Hood's Seedling.-Fig. 6. Golden Pearmain.-Fig. 7. Citron des
Carmes.-Fig. 8. Bess, or Best Pool.-Fig. 9. Cockle Pippin.

PLATE XXIV. . . ... 47
Fig. 1, Kentish Broading.-Fig. 2. Baltimore.

PLATE XXV. . . 49
Fig. 1. Devonshire Queen.-Fig. 2. Noblesse de Gand.-Fig. 3. Back-
house's Lord Nelson.-Fig. 4. Cowarne's Queening.

PLATE XXVI. . . 51
Fig. 1. Dutch Minion, or Reinette Dorde.-Fig. 2. Drap d'Or.

PLATE XXVII. .. . ... 53
Fig. 1. East Grinstead.-Fig. 2. Devonshire Red Streak.-Fig. 3.
Ribston Russet.-Fig. 4. Stonor Park Apple.-Fig. 5. Ribston
Pippin.-Fig. 6. Beachamwell Seedling.

PLATE XXVIII. ...... ..... 55
Fig. 1. Hoary Morning.-Fig. 2. Bedfordshire Foundling.-Fig. 3.
Marmalade, or Welsh Pippin.-Fig. 4. Rambour Gros.
PLATE XXIX. . . 57
Fig. 1. Royal Russet.-Fig. 2. Golden Russet.-Fig. 3. French Pip-
pin.-Fig. 4. Large Russet.
PLATE XXX. . . 59
Fig. 1. Osterley Apple.-Fig. 2. Lewis's Incomparable.-Fig. 3. Winter
Strawberry.-Fig. 4. Hanwell Souring.











Page.
PLATE XXXI. . . 61
Fig. 1. D'Astems, or Strifling d'Hiver.-Fig. 2. Blenheim Orange.-
Fig. 3. Brabant Belle Fleur, or Iron Apple.-Fig. 4. White Winter
Calville.
PLATE XXXII. . . 63
Fig. 1. Api, Petite.-Fig. 2. American Plate Apple.-Fig. 3. Robin-
son's Pippin.-Fig. 4. Isle of Wight Pippin.-Fig. 5. Ashmead's
Kernel.-Fig. 6. The Grange Apple.-7. Moorhen Pippin.-Fig. 8.
Reinette Grise.-Fig. 9. Golden Knob.
PLATE XXXIII . . 65
Fig. 1. Hall Door.-Fig. 2. Norfolk Storing.-Fig. 3. Norfolk
Beaufin.-Fig. 4. Minshul Crab.
PLATE XXXIV. . .... .. 67
Fig. 1. Scarlet Nonpareil.-Fig. 2. Golden Nonpareil.-Fig. 3. Brad-
dick's Nonpareil.-Fig. 4. Green or Petworth Nonpareil.-Fig. 5.
Original Nonpareil.-Fig. 6. Flat Nonpareil.-Fig. 7. Ross Non-
pareil.
PLATE XXXV. . .. .. 69
Fig. 1. Alfriston.-Fig. 2. Emperor Alexander.
PLATE XXXVI. .. . 71
Fig. 1. Striped Monstrous Reinette.-Fig. 2. Dutch Codlin.
PLATE XXXVII. .. . .. 73
Fig. 1. Cockpit.-Fig. 2. Nonsuch.-Fig. 3. The Cole, or Scarlet
Perfume Apple.-Fig. 4. White Calville.
PLATE XXXVIII. .... ................ 75
Fig. 1. Syke-house Russet.-Fig. 2. Delaware, or Trumpington.-
Fig. 3. Russian Transparent.-Fig. 4. The King of Pippins.
PLATE XXXIX. . . .. 77
Fig. 1. Golden Burr, or Burr Knot.-Fig. 2. American Fall.
PLATE XL. .. .. . .. 79
Fig. 1. Gravenstein.-Fig. 2. Hollandbury.
PLATE XLI. . . 81
Fig. 1. Wyken Pippin.-Fig. 2. Rymer.-Fig. 3. Christie's Pippin.-
Fig. 4. Crofton Pippin.
PLATE XLII ... . .. 83
Fig. 1. Burrell's Red.-Fig. 2. Devonshire Golden Ball.-Fig. 3.
French Crab.-Fig. 4. Hambledon Deux Ans.






















































































N1- Sack SS-uuai.
2 La&Fameuse.
3- June ian.
i-Yellow Inges tie.


I? SSpitzemnherg erppPm
6IR&edIngestrie.
7 Devonshire Qiuarenden
8 MWhite Astrachan.


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PLATE I.


1. SACK AND SUGAR.

Is a dessert apple, below the middle size of apples in general, somewhat pursed
about the eye, of a whitish colour, an agreeable flavour, and very juicy. It is in per-
fection from the middle to the end of July. The fruit when ripe is so very tender as
to require great care in gathering and carrying, to prevent its being bruised.
The tree is of free and spreading growth, and frequently bears so profusely as to
weaken and render it unfruitful the next year. This sort is seldom attacked with
that most injurious disease, the canker.



2. LA FAMEUSE, OR POMME DE NEIGE.

Introduced about the year 1794 from Canada, by the late Alexander Barclay, Esq.,
of Brompton. It is a very beautiful fruit, rather below the medium size, of a globular
form, glossy and deep red next the sun: is remarkable for the whiteness of its flesh,
which is very juicy and well flavoured. It is ripe in September and October, but will
keep till near Christmas.
I received cuttings of this sort in 1820, through Mr. Braddick, from America, under
the name of American Nonpareil, which when grafted bore fine fruit the same year.
It is a spreading tree, and sometimes cankers. Blossoms pink and white.



3. WHITE JUNEATING.

This first in Pomona's never-ending train, is so old a sort as to be included in Evelyn's
" List of Fruits," published about the year 1660 : is ripe in July; and in forward sea-
sons as early as June: it is a smallish globular apple, of an uniform straw colour,
has a juicy and pleasant flavour if eaten within a few days after gathering, but soon
grows mealy and insipid.
The tree is of upright and rather slender growth, but seldom cankers.













4. YELLOW INGESTRIE.

An excellent dessert apple, raised by Mr. Knight from the Orange and Golden Pippin
united: is a little larger than the Golden Pippin, of an oblong shape, flattened at
both ends, of a clear elegant golden colour. It ripens in September and October, and
is excellent when fresh gathered.
The tree is of wide spreading growth, and bears well. Blossoms white.


5. SPITZEMBERG oR POMEGRANATE PIPPIN.

An oval fruit of middle size, smooth and regular outline, pale yellow colour without
stripes; both eye and stalk nearly prominent: it has a profusion of rich vinous juice
when ripe and fresh gathered; is an abundant bearer. The fruit is tender, and requires
care in gathering and storing.
The tree grows in a spreading form, and seldom cankers.


6. RED INGESTRIE.

Although raised with the preceding sort from a single fruit, it differs from it mate-
rially, very much resembling the Golden Reinette in form and colour, only rather
smaller: the flesh is very juicy, crisp, and highly flavoured. This is a first-rate
dessert apple, and in perfection throughout September and October.
The tree resembles the Yellow Ingestrie in its growth.


7. RED QUARENDEN.

A much esteemed Devonshire apple of the middle size, spherical form, but a good
deal flattened and hollowed at the eye, of a deep red colour approaching to purple:
it has a brisk, pleasant, and rather peculiar flavour, and is a very desirable dessert
apple, in use from August to November.
The tree grows large, spreads much, and seldom cankers.


8. WHITE ASTRACHAN.

A white oblong apple, rather under the medium size, very early, ripening in July and
August, well-flavoured if taken in time, but soon gets sleepy.
Blossoms white.




















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PLATE II.



1. WAX APPLE.
Named from its colour and appearance, when ripe much resembling wax: the fruit
is of middle size, oblong shape, and close texture, having plenty of acid; it is best
when fully ripe in August and September: its appearance on the tree at that time is
very beautiful.
The tree is of wide open growth, and not apt to canker.



2. BROWN'S SUMMER BEAUTY.
Is a seedling raised by Mr. Brown, at Slough, of medium size, oval shape, straw
colour with a flush of unmixed red, both eye and stalk prominent: the flesh delicate
and full of richly flavoured juice. This is a first-rate table apple, ripening in Septem-
ber. A great bearer, and being recently raised from seed grows freely without canker.



3. THORLE oR THORAL PIPPIN.
A favourite Scotch apple, rather under the middle size, globular shape, rather flat-
tened, richly striped, and exceedingly beautiful, very juicy, but like most of the
Northern sorts has rather two much acid: it ripens in August and September. The
tree grows freely, rather pendent, and bears in clusters.
White and lilac blossoms.



4. SOPS OF WINE.
Is of moderate size, nearly globular, but rather irregular in shape, of a crimson or
purplish colour, deepest on the exposed side, richly striped, dotted with yellow, and
covered with bloom like a plum: the flesh is of a pinkish hue, suffused with a rich
vinous juice. It is a valuable dessert apple, ripe in October, and keeps till December.
The tree is of wide open growth, and but little subject to canker.













5. EVE oR EGG APPLE.

A very pretty tempting sort. It is much grown on the banks of the Clyde, of middle
size, egg-shaped, straw-colour, a little striped; the stalk small, the eye prominent: it
has a pleasant flavour, and is a useful apple either for the table or kitchen. It is in
perfection from October till January. A healthy and free grower.



6. HICKS'S FANCY.

A dessert apple, rather under the middle size, of a globular form, a little contracted
towards the eye, which is prominent; the colour pea-green with some russet: it is
remarkably juicy and of poignant flavour when taken fresh from the tree in October
or beginning of November. Of upright and rather delicate growth, but a good bearer.





































































N l Manks Co dhn.
2 Carlisle Godlm.
3.Kesil C o dlin.
'.Spring Grove C odlin.













PLATE III.


1. MANKS CODLIN.

A Northern apple, called The Eve by the Caledonian Horticultural Society, of an ovate
form, middle size, cream colour, with some bright unmixed red next the sun: it has
a pleasant lively flavour with plenty of juice, and bakes excellently; ripens for use in
July, and keeps till November. The tree grows upright in a compact form, and is a
great bearer; the blossoms and young fruit are, however, rather tender and apt to
blight in unfavourable seasons.
Blossoms light pink and white.


2. CARLISLE CODLIN.

This apple is much esteemed in the North as a kitchen fruit; it is also acceptable in
the dessert: it is of moderate size, oval shape, and straw colour; makes excellent
sauce, and of fine flavour : in use from August till Christmas, and is a profuse bearer.
The tree grows freely in an upright form.


3. IESWICK CODLIN.

A favourite sauce apple from the North of England. It is above the middle size, of
oblong shape, a little flattened and angulated at the eye, cream colour, and has
frequently a longitudinal line as if drawn with a pencil on the surface: it is a light
fruit, but bakes well and is highly flavoured. It is a very abundant bearer: in season
from August till October. The trees grow in a bushy form.
Blossoms pink suffused with blush.


4. SPRING GROVE CODLIN.

Was raised by Mr. Knight and cultivated by Sir Joseph Banks at Spring Grove, who
has given a description of it in the Horticultural Society's Transactions, vol. i. p. 197.
It is of middle size, rather irregular in shape, but generally pyramidal, plaited round
the eye when ripe; the ground is yellow, a good deal covered with slight russet, a
little dull red on the exposed side: the flesh is juicy, bakes soft, and of rich flavour:
is in use from the beginning of August to the end of September.
The tree grows in a close compact form, and bears plentifully.













































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PLATE IV.



1. HAWTHORNDEN.

I received this most useful kitchen apple from Mr. Austin, of Glasgow, about the
year 1810; and have since that time dispersed thousands of the trees, chiefly among
market gardeners, and I believe the demand continues unabated throughout the
Nursery trade. It is a little above the middle size, of globular shape, light straw
colour, with frequently a flush of bright scarlet on the sun side: the fruit is brisk
and juicy. This is perhaps the most useful kitchen apple we have, and which Scot-
land has the merit of producing. The tree preserves a bushy form, and never fails
bearing a good crop.
The blossoms are full red and white.


2. WORMSLEY PIPPIN, o KNIGHT'S CODLIN.

A large globular apple, from Wormsley Grange; the eye much sunk; the colour
straw, thickly set with dark specks : the flesh is juicy, and perhaps unrivaled in the
richness and excellency of the sauce it produces ; but there is a tenderness in the
fruit which we find causes it sometimes to blight and be checked in its growth. The
tree is of robust growth, and naturally bears well.
Blossoms light pink and white.


3. EDGAR'S APPLE.

So called from the friend who presented it to us. It is of the medium size, globular
shape, yellow laced with some bright red striping. It is a beautiful fruit, and ex-
cellent either for the dessert or for kitchen use: in perfection throughout November
and December. It grows well, and is a good bearer.


4. EARLY MARROW.

A large cream-coloured Scotch apple, of globular form, but contracted towards the
eye, and with rather strong ribs; the stalks slender, and deeply inserted. The fruit
is tender, and bakes well. It bears well, and is in use in September and October.
















































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3 Rowe.'s Seeding.
4' Salopia .
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PLATE V.


1. WILMOT'S SEEDLING.

Raised by Mr. James Wilmot, of Isleworth : it is above the medium size, of a conical
form, the eye moderately sunk in a small even cavity; of a straw colour, variegated
with light red streaks. This is an excellent early sauce apple, ripening in July and
August, very firm, fragrant, and juicy. The tree grows upright and strong, with un-
commonly large leaves, which, when the fruit is ripe, have a mellow autumnal
appearance.

2. RED ASTRACHAN.

Is of the medium size, nearly globular, of a rich crimson colour, with a fine bloom
covering nearly the whole of the fruit. This is a new and very early apple, ripening
frequently in July, when it has few competitors: the flesh is white, crisp, juicy, and
of agreeable flavour; the leaves are singularly long, and partake, with the branches,
of a purple colour.
Our figure is too large; it was taken from an imported fruit. [Some dissimilarity
will sometimes occur betwixt the description and the plate, owing to their being
taken from different specimens, which often vary in size, shape, and colour.]


3. ROWE'S SEEDLING.
A very valuable Devonshire sauce apple; large, and of rather conical shape, with
small prominences round the eye, of a pea-green colour: it has plenty of juice, and
a very pleasant flavour: ripe in August and September. Is a great bearer, and the
tree grows freely.

4. SALOPIAN PIPPIN.
A Shropshire apple, of middle size, introduced to the neighbourhood of London by
the late Mr. Williams of Turnham Green: its shape globular, a little compressed;
a pea-green colour, with a slight flush of pale red, and sprinkled over with brown
spots: it has great merit as a sauce apple, as it dresses well, is juicy, and well-
flavoured: in use from October till Christmas. The tree grows in a compact form,
and is a constant bearer.






























































































































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1. Striped- Junmating.

2 Summer Oslin.

5 Xerry ,ippin .

4. SummeT Pi pmi

S6 Tartarian Crob .

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PLATE VI.


1. MARGARET, OR STRIPED JUNEATING.

Is a little larger than the White Juneating, of an oblong shape, yellow ground richly
striped with full red: it is high flavoured, juicy and excellent, when fresh from the
tree: the fruit is produced plentifully at the end of the branches, in clusters of four
or five together: it is ripe about Midsummer.
Blossom white with a little rose colour.


2. SUMMER OSLIN.

Original or Mother Apple, so called in Scotland where it originated and has been a
favourite many years, perhaps some centuries: it is under the middle size, perfectly
spherical, of an unmixed straw colour; it is juicy, and has a peculiar spicy flavour:
it bears abundantly in clusters. The tree is upright in its growth, and blossoms the
first of all the apples,-this sometimes causes the crop to fail: it is otherwise a great
bearer. Ripens in July and August.
Flowers pink and white.

3. KERRY PIPPIN.

Is of Irish origin, and perhaps altogether the best of our summer dessert apples; a
little larger than the Golden Pippin, of an oblong form; a rich golden colour, faced
with bright red; the stalk is small and prominent, and generally attended by a small
protuberance; the flesh is firm, of a rich saccharine yet poignant flavour: in perfec-
tion throughout September, October, and November. The tree grows freely, seldom
cankers or blights, and bears plentifully, chiefly in 'clusters at the extremity of the
branches.
Blossoms pale pink and white.


4. WHITE SUMMER PIPPIN.

An early dessert apple, of middle size and globular shape ; of a straw colour, mottled
and variegated with some russet and purple spots. The fruit is very tender and deli-
cious if eaten ripe off the tree in August. It grows and bears well.









12


5. TARTARIAN CRAB.

A most abundant bearer, very hardy tree, and useful for tarts or preserving, having
plenty of acid.

6. DUCHESS OF OLDENBURGH.

A Russian apple, of middle size; shape globular, colour golden richly streaked with
bright red. This is a very beautiful sort, of a: pleasant flavour, with enough of acid:
it is valuable either for the table or sauce: ripens in September and October; grows
freely, and bears well. The flowers lilac with white.
















































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PLATE VII.



MAMMOTH.
A remarkably large variety of the Newtown Pippin; of an oblong but irregular shape,
ribbed at the eye, which, as well as the stalk, is deeply seated; straw colour, flushed
with light red: the flesh breaks easy, and bakes well: it keeps till February or March.
The tree grows upright, with broad leaves; the fruit is apt to fall from its weight,
dwarf trees should therefore be preferred in planting.
Blossoms rose-colour and white.







































































2 1 'Fe';( Apple.
2.Beal SocaiLet.
3.Caille i ouge d'Ete.
4'. A- matie Eijis et














PLATE VIII.



1. EARLY CROFTON, on PEACH APPLE.
An Irish apple, of the middle size and flattish shape, of an olive green colour, much
variegated with red, has a rich saccharine flavour; ripens in August: it is most
esteemed for the dessert, but excellent also as a sauce apple. The tree grows well,
and, like most of the Irish sorts, keeps very free from canker.
The flowers are large, pink and white.


2. BELL'S SCARLET PEARMAIN.

Was, I believe, introduced by Mr. Bell, land-steward to the Duke of Northumberland
at Sion, about the year 1800: it is a dessert apple of medium size, oblong shape, of
a rich scarlet colour approaching to crimson: the flesh has a pinky tint, and is of
delicious flavour when taken ripe from the tree in September and October; but in a
favourable season it will keep till near Christmas. It should be planted in a rich
loamy soil, being of rather slender growth, and apt to canker.
Blossoms lilac.


3. CALVILLE ROUGE D'ETE OF DUHAMEL.

A French apple, in shape conical, much ribbed, especially about the eye; it is beau-
tifully striped with scarlet, and dotted with light spots ; has a rich flavour as a dessert
apple, but gets sleepy when over-ripe: it is an early sort, ripening at the beginning
of August.


4. AROMATIC RUSSET.

A table apple of moderate size, conical shape, surrounded by unequal ribs; colour
brown russet tinged with dull red; the stalk long and slender. This, although not
handsome, is an excellent dessert sort, with a rich spicy flavour: in season October
and November. It is a great bearer : the branches of the tree are slender and pendent.
Blossoms suffused with pink.

















































































I1 .Kenti.shK f. Basket.
2.Potters lage .






















PLATE IX.


1. KENTISH FILL-BASKET.

A very large noble apple, of globular shape, slightly ribbed; colour pea-green with
some red blotching; the eye rather deeply sunk: it is a very excellent apple, and
useful, from its size and abundance in bearing. The tree also grows large and free.


2. POTTER'S LARGE SEEDLING.

A very large sauce apple, being frequently fourteen and fifteen inches in circumference;
rather oblong, with some irregular projections of a lemon colour, with a little red on
the exposed side: it is well tasted, and dissolves to a fine pulp in dressing: mature
in November, December, and January. The tree grows luxuriantly, and bears well.




























































































































N1l. Water PippjL.

2 .Rawlms fine red streak

3 Newtown Spitz eb erg.

4i Lem.onaippin.


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PLATE X.



1. WINTER PIPPIN.

A large light-green apple, nearly globular; the eye small, and but little depressed:
a fine firm weighty kitchen sort, bakes well, and keeps till March. The tree grows
large, and in general bears well.


2. RAWLINS'S FINE RED-STREAK.

In form nearly globular, of middle size, has some slight irregularity of surface, lemon
coloured, streaked nearly all over with brilliant red: the flesh is sugared and juicy: it
is an excellent sauce apple, and bears well. Ripens in November and December.



3. NEWTOWN SPITZENBERG.

A large beautiful American sauce apple, perfectly globular in shape; the eye and stalk
moderately sunk; skin straw-colour, flushed with a rich cherry cheek, smooth and
glossy: in season January and February. This is a very estimable variety.


-4. LEMON PIPPIN.

An old and much-esteemed kitchen apple, of middle size and oval shape, much like
a lemon both in form and colour, having generally a small protuberance at the stalk:
it is of a firm texture, brisk flavour, juicy, and with plenty of acid; will keep excel-
lent till March, is a good bearer; and the tree generally thrives well.
Blossoms pink and white.


























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2.. Reinette dI Caia.d.a .

SYForkshire Greening.



















PLATE XI.



1. REINETTE DE CANADA.

This apple has also the appellation of Pomme de Caen, and is supposed to have
been carried from Normandy to America, and brought from thence under its present
name. It is a large, firm, and excellent kitchen fruit, of irregular figure; straw colour
with a light tinge of brown: The tree grows strong, the branches wide'and straggling,
and rather apt to canker: it bears moderately well.



2. YORKSHIRE GREENING.

A very valuable large kitchen apple, flattened in shape, and ribbed irregularly; of
a green colour, with dark red stripes: it has a pleasant flavour, is juicy, and bakes
excellently. The tree is of robust, hardy, bushy growth, seldom cankering or failing
to bear. This is reckoned a first-rate sort in the North.
























































^.^ c47 ^a'/;b.d o4aJea n7. >,.i ,A,1,1
3 .X^o.1 of 1Ty. 4 ^ es dei e..














PLATE XII.


1. COURT PENDU PLAT ROUGEATRE.

An estimable dessert apple of Nonpareil size; very flat in shape, and the eye much
sunk in a wide cavity; the colour yellow; a good deal covered with full red; it is
of high saccharine flavour and close consistence: the fruit keeps till February or
March. The tree grows upright, and bears well.
The flowers are pink and white.


2. FEARN'S PIPPIN.

A middle-sized table apple, globular, a little flattened, yellow coloured, about three
quarters covered with deep red; the eye rather prominent. This is generally ranked
among the first-rate dessert apples at Christmas: it is of close texture and rich
flavour; in eating December, January, and February. The tree grows and bears well.
Blossoms white, with a little pink.


3. COURT OF WICK, oR RIVAL GOLDEN PIPPIN.

A dessert apple from Somersetshire, which vies with the Golden Pippin in richness
of flavour, and much excells it in other respects; it is rather larger in shape, of a
golden hue with red stripes, very handsome. This is esteemed the finest Christmas
apple we have; keeps well till February or March. The tree is of wide spreading
growth, seldom cankers, and never fails bearing.
Blossoms white, with a little light pink.


4. MARGIL.

Is an old dessert apple of great excellence, although not so showy in appearance as
many other sorts: it is of middle size and pyramidal shape; the eye small and very
little sunk, encompassed with several small angles; the ground colour yellowish
green, with dull red, chiefly on the exposed side; the flesh rich, crisp, and juicy:
this is a rival of the Ribston Pippin: it excells it in juiciness, and in being of a better
size for the dessert: is in perfection from October till February. The tree is of mo-
derate growth, and rather uncertain in bearing, from some tenderness in the blossom.









24


5. KIRKE'S GOLDEN REINETTE.

Is an improved variety of the old Golden Reinette. The fruit is in general more clear
and beautiful, the flavour equal. The tree bears as well, and is more healthy in its
growth.

6. GOLDEN REINETTE.

An old and deservedly esteemed table apple, of middle size, oval shape, a golden
colour richly striped with bright red; it has a rich delicious flavour: in use from
October till January. A great bearer, but rather inclined to canker.




























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N.. G o os eb erry.
2.Sovereign.
3.Nonpareel Russet.


N. 4 Golden Worcester. N' 7.Keddlestone Pippin
5 Little B eauty. 8 B ors dorffer.
6 Queen Charlotte. 3. Powells RBusset.


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25


PLATE XIII.


1. GOOSEBERRY APPLE.

A neat and pretty little apple, of a yellow colour with some scarlet striping: it has
a lively pleasant flavour; but its chief excellence is its abundant produce, which almost
equals its namesake, the Gooseberry Bush. It ripens in October.

2. SOVEREIGN.

Another seedling of Mr. Oliver's at Coombe Abbey: it is about the size of the Golden
Pippin, of an oblong shape, flat at the top, the eye seated in a wide cavity; a slender
stalk; the colour light brown with a small flush of red: the fruit firm, rich, and
sweet. It keeps till March or April: Mr. Oliver gives it a high character.

3. NONPAREIL RUSSET.

A smallish fruit, of rather irregular shape, tapering towards the eye; straw-coloured
ground, nearly covered with russet. It is an excellent hardy sort, of rich flavour,
keeps excellent (perhaps the longest of any dessert apple) even to May and June.-
The tree grows freely in a spreading form, and is a sure bearer.

4. GOLDEN WORCESTER.

A small dessert apple, of perfectly spherical shape; a rich golden colour very slightly
tinged with red; the eye and stalk both prominent; the flesh firm, well-flavoured,
and yellow as the skin. The fruit keeps till January: before gathering, it has a
beautiful effect, appearing like golden balls among the leaves of the tree, which are
of light airy growth.

5. LITTLE BEAUTY.

(From the late Mr. Swainson's collection.) It is a small table apple, spherical, a little
flattened; yellow, with a brownish tinge on the sun side, and sprinkled with dark
points ; it is of a rich flavour, but rather dry. The tree grows upright, and bears so
abundantly as sometimes to cause barrenness the succeeding season: the fruit has the
peculiar good quality of adhering so firmly to the. riches that the wind scarcely
ever dislodges it. It will keep through the winter, and is well worth cultivating.












6. QUEEN CHARLOTTE.

A dessert apple, brought into this country from Germany, with the Borsdorffer, by
the late Queen Charlotte: it is of a conical form; green colour, with a facing of
brown tint; has a brisk and pleasant flavour, which it preserves till March or April.
The tree seldom blights or cankers, and bears plentifully.

7. KEDLESTON PIPPIN.

A Derbyshire table apple, of middle size; straw colour, slightly russeted; of a glo-
bular shape, rather pointed towards the eye. It is a highly flavoured juicy fruit, and
has the peculiar property of keeping in perfection from October till January. The
tree grows well, and bears freely.

8. KING GEORGE THE THIRD, OR BORSDORFFER.

A dessert apple, brought from Germany by the late Queen Charlotte on her first arrival
in England, and planted by the late Mr. Aiton in Kew Gardens, where the original
tree now stands, and bears abundantly. It is rather larger than, the Golden Pippin;
a beautiful fruit, of a clear yellow on the shaded, and full red with a little russet on
the exposed, side: very firm in texture, fine flavour, and keeps well till March or
April. The tree is diffuse in its growth, blossoms late, and bears sparingly till it has
been four or five years planted, after which it seldom fails.

9. POWELL'S RUSSET.

A very pretty dessert apple, in shape like the Nonpareil, but smaller; of a beautiful
light brown russet: the flesh is brisk, highly flavoured, and of remarkably close
texture:-will keep as long as the Nonpareil. The tree grows in a light rather up-
right form, and is a good bearer.






































































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3.L on&onBHppin.
3.Liueombe's Seedling.
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PLATE XIV.


1. KIRKE'S LORD NELSON.
A very estimable and beautiful apple, either for sauce or the table, above the middle
size, of a globular form, straw colour, three-fourths covered with bright red, a little
striped: the flesh is firm, rich, and brisk, and bakes excellently; it is in season
throughout the winter. This is reckoned one of our best winter sorts: it grows
robust, and bears well.


2. LONDON oR FIVE-CROWNED PIPPIN.
So called from the five protuberances round the eye, which is prominent. It is of the
medium size, straw colour, with crimson covering the greatest part of the fruit.
This is a very useful sauce apple from December till March.-The tree grows large, is
very durable, and bears plentifully.



3. LUCOMBE'S SEEDLING.
(Introduced by Mr. Lucombe of Exeter.) A fine large globular apple, with slightly
projecting ribs, pea-green colour, lightly streaked and dotted with red. It is a noble
sauce apple, ripe in November, December, and January, very juicy with a rather spicy
flavour, and bakes well.
The tree grows spreading and healthy.



4. STRIPED HOLLAND PIPPIN.
A fine large firm apple, of an oblong shape, yellow colour, richly striped with bright
red; the flesh highly flavoured, and dissolves readily in baking: this sort keeps well
through the winter.-The tree spreads much, grows freely, and bears plentifully,
unless its beautiful deep red early blossoms are destroyed by frost. This is a very
desirable kind.





















2






























NI.Be.auit of Kei .
2.Y ower of Kent .



















PLATE XV.



1. BEAUTY OF KENT.

A large apple of a pyramidal shape, with ribs enlarging towards the eye; its colour
yellow, enriched with bright red stripes and irregular discolorations on the sun side.
This is a beautiful and much esteemed sauce apple, in use through November,
December, and January.-A strong spreading grower, but apt to canker if not in
congenial soil.



2. FLOWER OF KENT.

A large and elegant fruit, perhaps excelling the preceding; globular, but rather
broadest at the base ; the eye is large and open ; colour yellow, flushed with briJht
red: the flesh is well flavoured, with plenty of acid and juice; bakes well, and is
in use through November and December.
The tree grows well, and is hardier than the Beauty of Kent. Blossoms white, with
blush.






















































































NI Rosemary. N0 4 B elidge Pppm
2. oourg Pippin. Padleys Pippm:
3.0range Plppm. 6.Pomrme CGTi .


' l *"- ^ =--,3 T --- -















PLATE XVI.



1. ROSEMARY APPLE.
Of medium size, tapering to a small contracted eye, pea-green, a little red and rus-
sety on the outside: the fruit is firm, and of a high rich flavour. A very hardy, pro-
ductive, useful sort, either for the table or kitchen use: keeps throughout December,
January, and February.
Blossoms peach-coloured.



2. COBOURG PIPPIN.
(A seedling raised by Mr. Oliver, many years the respectable gardener at Coombc
Abbey, in Warwickshire.) It is a dessert apple, a little larger than the Nonpareil and
nearly of the same shape; the colour pea-green with russet; the flesh firm and rich,
yet acidulous: it is a valuable winter sort, and will keep till March and April.-This
and the Sovereign have not yet been offered for sale.



3. ORANGE PIPPIN.
In shape, size, and colour, much like a moderate-sized orange. A very pretty apple,
of pleasant flavour and juicy, equally desirable for the dessert or for sauce : in use in
December and January. A good grower, and bears well.



4. BELLIDGE PIPPIN.
A Derbyshire apple, of moderate size and globular shape; the skin smooth, and of a
grass green till nearly ripe, when it changes to a lemon colour. It is a very pretty
solid apple, fit equally for the table or for sauce: it has an agreeable flavour, and
keeps well till February or March.














5. PADLEY'S ROYAL GEORGE PIPPIN.

A seedling raised by Mr. Padley, formerly His Majesty's gardener at Hampton Court.
It is rather larger than the Nonpareil, but not so flat in shape; of a pale yellow
colour, covered with a good deal of slight russet: the stalk is long and slender; the
flesh yellowish, close in texture, and in its rich saccharine flavour it has no superior:
is in eating from December till March or April. The tree bears well, but is of rather
shy growth and apt to canker. -Mr. P. informed me that when he first sent it to
His Majesty George the Third at Windsor, the King was pleased to express a pre-
ference for it, and to desire him to cultivate it plentifully.



6. POMME GRISE.

A dessert apple; a little smaller and flatter than the Nonpareil, russety, with some
red about the eye: it is very rich in flavour, and keeps till February or March. This
apple was introduced from Canada (where it is a great favourite) about the year 1794,
by my late friend Mr. Barclay of Brompton. It bears well, but grows delicately and
is rather inclined to canker.























































N.l1-Newtom- Pippm.
2 omer s e t L as tmag.


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Jwww o7ahwrSwh 5dfNw yJZ fvZnas.



















PLATE XVII.



1. NEWTOWN PIPPIN.
The original of several varieties from America. It is large, of an oblong form, straw
colour, glossy, with a flush of red; five ribs encompass the fruit, and rise above the
eye. It is a well-flavoured juicy apple, but has little of the pine-apple flavour which
is found in the imported fruit. Its season of use is November and December.
The tree spreads much, but is a little apt to canker.



2. SOMERSET LASTING.
A large and very handsome sauce apple, of an uniform globular shape, clear straw
colour, with a slight flush of dull red. It is a very good sort during the winter, and
will keep till March.



























































rO.L E-R Pijpi]PY%,

' S ( S W IL u ^ ^ a '














PLATE XVIII.


1. DOBBS'S KERNEL GOLDEN PIPPIN.

This is a seedling from the old Golden Pippin, raised by Mr. Dobbs upon a small
farm called Solomons, about four miles west of Gloucester, where the original tree
(about seventy years old) is now standing. Cuttings from the parent stock were,
I believe, sent about the year 1800 to Mr. Kirke and Mr. Barclay of Brompton, by
Mr. Griffith of Gloucester, from whom I received the above account. It is nearly of
the same size as the old sort, rather broader at the eye, of a golden colour,-perhaps
not quite so rich in flavour; but it has the advantage in growing more freely, and
in bearing more plentifully, which it does in .clusters at the end of the pendulous
branches. It is ripe in November, and will keep till March or April.


2. AUTUMN GOLDEN PIPPIN.

Rather larger than the old Golden Pippin, lemon-coloured with sometimes a little
russet, and freckled with a few dark points. It has a delicious flavour when fresh-
gathered in September and October.
The tree grows well.


3. FRANKLIN'S GOLDEN PIPPIN.

(So named, I suppose, after the celebrated Doctor Franklin.) It is of American origin;
considerably larger than the old sort, of an oblong shape, diminishing towards the
eye, which is a little flattened, of an agreeable yellow colour mixed with a greenish
hue and freckled with dark points : the flesh has a brisk flavour, with more acid
than any other of the golden pippins. The tree is also more robust, bears well, and
is but little subject to canker.


4. HUGHES'S GOLDEN PIPPIN.

A very excellent table apple, considerably larger than the old sort, nearly globular
in shape, of a fine golden colour, wrinkled round the eye, and freckled. It has a
delicious flavour, and keeps in perfection through November, December, and perhaps
January.














5. GOLDEN PIPPIN.

This variety is too well known to need description, as a small golden-coloured dessert
apple of distinguished excellence. The fruit is said to be of firmer texture and of
richer flavour when gathered from an elderly tree in an exposed situation, and after
hanging on the tree as long as the season will admit. Much has been said, both for
and against Mr. Knight's opinion,-that fruit trees in general" decay about the same
time as the mother tree. There seems little doubt that species of trees, as well as in-
dividuals, have their periods of infancy, maturity, and old age; but it is perhaps not
easy to determine their duration with any precision, as the Golden Pippin is included
in Mr. Evelyn's list in the year 1660. The same stock of the Golden Pippin has
been cultivated under my eye above half a century, and the young trees grow as well
now as at the first; but those planted some years ago for bearing are much can-
kered. It is therefore certain that this apple requires a more loamy rich soil than
others. Thus treated, however, I have little doubt that it will yet thrive well. I have
one tree, planted about six years ago, which is perfectly sound and in vigorous growth.
The Golden Pippin is a native of England, and it is said will not thrive in any other
climate.



6. DREDGE'S GOLDEN PIPPIN.

A beautiful Golden Pippin, a little larger than the original; flattish in shape, with a
broad open eye and clear yellow colour. It is very firm and sweet, keeps well with
care till February or March.
The tree grows well, and is a good bearer.





















2




























































2.TomiPotter
3.(1 ornish Aiomatic.
4.(Gdliflower.















PLATE XIX.



1. DUKE OF WELLINGTON, oR DUMELOW'S SEEDLING.

A capital kitchen apple, above the middle size, of a globular shape, clear yellowish
white colour, with a bright cherry cheek without streaks or any unevenness of
surface. It is a weighty apple, of crisp consistence, and sweet with a due portion of
acid. In use from November till March.
The tree grows large and spreading.


2. TOM POTTER.

A much esteemed Devonshire apple, of middle size, contracted about the eye, which
is in a small cavity and surrounded by wrinkles; the ground colour yellow, richly
striped, and blotched with bright red. It is a juicy high-flavoured table apple, ripe
in September and October. A healthy-growing tree, but rather uncertain in bearing.


3. CORNISH AROMATIC.

A kitchen apple, said to have been cultivated for some centuries in Cornwall. It is a
large apple, of a light yellow colour, three-fourths covered with red stripes, contracted
at the eye, which is prominent, and encircled by projecting plaits. In use from
November till January; an excellent sauce apple, but with very little of the spicy
flavour which its name imports.
The tree grows well, and is a good bearer.


4. CORNISH GILLIFLOWER.

A very old variety, being included in Evelyn's List. It is a little above the middle size,
of oval shape, with irregular ribs ; the eye small, the stalk short and prominent, colour
olive-green streaked with dull red. The flesh light yellow, of a rich aromatic flavour
and fragrant scent. It bears at the extremity of the branches, but is not very pro-
lific: it keeps through the winter.




















1




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3
4 .
NI. Poinme cApi .roa.
2. Pommne Viole tte.
3. White Graib.
4. Small lemon Pippin.














PLATE XX.



1. POMME D'API GROS.

A globular apple, of middle size, flattened at the eye, which is moderately sunk in
a broad cavity; the stalk deeply inserted: it has a grass-green colour till about
Christmas, when it changes to a pale yellow. This is a valuable sort either for the
table or kitchen use; is of an agreeable flavour, and will keep till March.
The tree grows in an unusually compact form, and is an exuberant bearer. Blos-
soms pink and white.



2. POMME VIOLETTE, oR BLACK APPLE.

Of middle size; form nearly oval, of a dark copper or purple colour, covered with a
fine blueish bloom. It has a brisk acid flavour, and is very useful as a sauce apple:
will keep till March or April. It is a good bearer, but rather apt to canker.



3. LARGE WHITE INCOMPARABLE CRAB.

An apple rather larger than the middle size ; of an uniformly clear colour, betwixt
yellow and cream; the stalk is slender and deeply inserted; the flesh crisp, with
plenty of rich juice and acid. It is very excellent either for the dessert or for culi-
nary purposes: in use from October till Christmas. It is very hardy, and bears pro-
fusely.


4. NEW SMALL LEMON PIPPIN.

An excellent variety of the original Lemon Pippin, rather smaller, and of more deli-
cate texture, oblong, but nearly globular; clear yellow colour, with many red points
on the outward side; the flesh juicy and of pleasant flavour. It is equally estimable
for the table or for kitchen use: in perfection through November, December, and
January. It is a hardy-growing tree, and bears plentifully.







































































PIEAEMAJS .
1V.Table hLufs et. N 3.Pary'si .
2La.-bAb]bey. e 4Ba acelon.a.















PLATE XXI.



1. RUSSET TABLE PEARMAIN.

A dessert apple a little larger than the Golden Pippin, oblong, but rather inclined to
be conical; when ripe, straw-coloured with a red flush mixed with russet on the
exposed side. It is a remarkably pretty apple, very firm, the flavour rich and juicy;
keeps till March or April. Bears well, but is of rather slender growth, and requires
a rich loamy soil, which it well deserves.
Blossoms white.


2. LAMB ABBEY PEARMAIN.

A smallish apple, of oblong shape, green, with some copper colour round the eye.
A very firm and sweet apple. It is an excellent dessert sort, and will keep till May
or June.


3. PARRY'S PEARMAIN.

A smallish oval dessert apple, presented to me by the late Roger Wilbraham, Esq. of
worthy memory. It is of a pea-green colour, variegated with red stripes and white
spots; has generally a small protuberance at the stalk: the flesh is uncommonly
firm, rich, and sweet: it will keep till March or April, and does not shrivel. The
tree is of slender growth, but bears well.
Blossoms pink and white.


4. BARCELONA PEARMAIN.

Of an oval shape, rather less than the medium size, with a protuberance at the stalk;
straw-coloured, three-fourths covered with full red, and curiously mottled with white
spots. It is a pleasant dessert apple, in use from November till January, but rather a
weak grower.






















it












































' 1oyal
2 P Tte:r
L o. loyal

3.Loausb
F.Hereford.sire


3


OIIUIIJ~W JVhltLI~~ 611VLI~U(i(lY~Y~b















PLATE XXII.



1. ROYAL PEARMAIN.

Of Pearmain shape and middle size, richly variegated with red and yellow; the eye
large, open, and deep; the stalk short: the flesh is sweet and juicy: it is an estimable
dessert apple from October till Christmas. The tree grows moderately, and bears
well.


2. WINTER PEARMAIN.

An old well known useful apple either for the table or for kitchen use; of middle
size, oblong shape, remarkably close in texture; dark green, with dull red; is highly
flavoured, and bakes well: in use from December till April or May. The tree, like
many of the old sorts, is rather apt to canker.


3. LOAN'S PEARMAIN.

So old an apple as to have a place in Evelyn's Collection. It is of moderate size,
oblong shape, pea-green colour, with red stripes covering nearly the whole surface.
The fruit is rich, solid, and yet melting. A very valuable sort either for the dessert
or for sauce: in use from November till January.



4. HEREFORDSHIRE PEARMAIN.

A handsome apple, rather above the middle size, with slightly protruding ribs;
yellow, striped all over with full red, but most richly on the exposed side. It is
highly flavoured, with plenty of juice, and a very estimable sort either for the dessert
or for culinary uses: keeps well till March or April.


























































9
8


NI?. ommx e de Pigeon.
2.Brookesks.
3. Seeknoifurther.


NI.'CTolcden Harvey.
5.Hoods Seedling.
6 .GoldePearmai..


N.7. Citron dces Garmne.s
8B efsPoole.
3. Co cle Pippin.













PLATE XXIII.



1. POMME DE PIGEON.

A Norman apple, described by Duhamel; small and of conical shape, pale straw
colour flushed with red next the sun. It has remarkably white delicate flesh, a crisp
and pleasant flavour; is an abundant bearer, and in use for the table in December,
January, and February.
The tree is a free but not robust grower.


2. BROOKS' APPLE.

A Shropshire apple; small, of conical shape; the eye rather large and open; the stalk
prominent: of a rich golden colour with bright red, and freckled with both light and
dark spots, a little russety: the flesh yellow, firm, and very rich in flavour. In
season from November till March.
It is of slender growth, and has white blossoms.


3. SEEK NO FURTHER.

This apple is of moderate size and oval shape, with slight protrusions, pale yellow
on the shaded, and laced with red stripes on the outward, side. It is a firm well-
tasted fruit, and suitable either for the table or for kitchen use: will keep till March.
The tree grows free of canker, and bears well.

4. GOLDEN HARVEY, on BRANDY APPLE.

A dessert apple not larger than the Golden Pippin; the eye broad; the stalk long
and slender: colour light yellow with a flush of red and embroidered with a roughish
russet. It is called Brandy Apple from the superior specific strength of its juice:
is of remarkably close texture, very rich in flavour, and will keep till April or May.
The tree is of slender growth, and does not bear well for the first two or three years,
but after that time it seldom fails.
Blossoms small: colour lilac and white.












5. HOOD'S SEEDLING.

It is of a pyramidal shape and medium size; flat at the top, with a long slender stalk
deeply inserted. This is a very handsome apple, yellow with a good deal of bright
red, but little striped. The fruit is of firm consistence, sweet, but rather mealy if too
long kept. Ripe in December and January. It is a great bearer and good grower.


6. GOLDEN PEARMAIN.

A dessert apple, in shape resembling the Golden Pippin, but a little larger. It has a
yellow ground, with some slight russet and a good deal of red striping. This is one
of the first-rate winter dessert apples; it is firm, rich, and highly flavoured. The
tree is of upright growth and bears well, but is rather delicate and requires good
ground.
Blossoms white.


7. CITRON DES CARMES.

A small French dessert apple of an oblong shape, angulated and pursed at the eye,
of a light brown colour, a little russety; rich in flavour, but rather deficient in juice.
Mature in December and January.


8. BESS, OR BEST POOL.

This apple, which I believe to be correctly named, is a much-esteemed Warwickshire
fruit, of middle size and Pearmain shape, tapering to a small eye; of a pea-green
colour, richly embroidered with red stripes of various shades; has frequently a small
rising at the stalk: of a rich and poignant flavour. In use from November till Fe-
bruary. In general a good bearer, from being unusually late in flowering.


9. COCKLE PIPPIN.

An excellent apple, of middle size, much cultivated in Sussex. It is of an oval form,
rather tapering to the eye, pea-green colour, a good deal embroidered with russet:
a compact long-keeping sort, juicy and highly flavoured; estimable either for the
table or kitchen use. Grows in a spreading form, is in general healthy, and bears
well.



































































".;







2


iT1.Kentish Broa.ing.
2.3altimore















PLATE XXIV.




1. KENTISH BROADING.

Is very large, broadest at the base, and rather flattened in form; the eye a little de-
pressed and angulated; the stalk small and deeply inserted; rather russety and slightly
striped. This is a noble apple for kitchen use, very rich and juicy, and bakes well.
In perfection in November and December. It is a tree of free growth, and is a
good bearer.



2. BALTIMORE.

A variety of the Newtown Pippin, of extraordinary size. A specimen presented by
Sir Joseph Banks to the Horticultural Society weighed one pound seven ounces and
a half, was one foot two inches and three quarters in circumference, and four inches
in height. A description, with a figure, is given in the Hort. Trans. vol. iii. p. 120.
The colouring there is more florid and the shape more flat than it usually grows
in this country. With us it generally assumes an oblong shape, flat at the top, a
little ribbed on the sides, and a grayish hue. The flavour is fine, and it affords ex-
cellent sauce.
Blossoms light pink and white.




















































A









































4rCOawaiiL6'a Qujeem g
Azwn nvwr ot i2 Nolole lased fe Gal.
SBacl.ouse.s Ne .on.




~atn. ronv Wcraermo'lt; on tZrw 1on& -~' ~'














PLATE XXV.



1. DEVONSHIRE QUEEN.

A beautiful apple, rather large, straw-coloured, enriched over three-fourths of its
surface with bright red stripes. It is an excellent apple, juicy and high-flavoured, fit
either for the table or for sauce, but particularly the latter. Ripe in October. It is
a general favourite in the West of England.



2. NOBLESSE DE GAND.

A large sauce apple, straw-coloured, without stripes, nearly globular, but contracted
towards the eye. It is a firm weighty fruit, rich in flavour, with a due proportion of
acid.
A very excellent new sort, in use January and February.



3. BACKHOUSE'S LORD NELSON.

From Messrs. T. and J. Backhouse's Nursery at York.-It is a fine large kitchen
apple, of a tall pyramidal shape, with slight protrusions on the sides; of a cream
colour: the flesh is soft, and bakes well. This is a very useful apple in December and
January. The tree is a strong grower, and has remarkably large and long leaves.
Large crimson and white flowers.



4. COWARNE'S QUEENING,

(Called also NORTHERN GREENING.) A large oval-shaped apple, of a golden colour,
with some unmixed red on the outward side. It is an excellent sauce apple, in use
from November till January. The tree grows in an upright compact form, and is a
free bearer.






































2








,,












































Nl.agtakMgnonne.

2Dap I'O .


.1.


--
--


"-



















PLATE


XXVI.


1. DUTCH MINION, oR REINETTE DOREE.

Above the middle size; of a pea-green colour, a good deal striped with light red,
nearly globular, but rather irregular in shape; very firm in flesh, crisp, and juicy. It
is a very excellent sauce apple in January and February; an abundant bearer, and of
strong and healthy growth.



2. DRAP D'OR.

A large sauce apple, of oblong shape, even surface, straw-coloured, without any tinge
of red, sprinkled over with small darkish points : the skin is thin ; and the fruit tender,
juicy, but rather weak in flavour. A desirable sort in October, but will keep through
November.
































































Sr 1'EaSt Grenstea&d
Z Devonihire Recl Steak.
3-Bih stca.1u.faet.


1W 4- Stonaor aik Seedlig.
65 1b tom-Eppm.
S-Bea.camawell See dng.














PLATE XXVII.



1. EAST GRINSTEAD.

A Sussex apple of great excellence either for the table or for kitchen use. It much
resembles the Ribston Pippin, little if at all inferior in flavour, has plenty of juice
and acid, and will keep till April or May.
Blossoms lilac and white.



2. DEVONSHIRE RED STREAK.

An old apple, and highly esteemed in the West of England. It is of middle size,
globular, but a little oval; straw-coloured, with a good deal of scarlet striping: the
flavour is poignant, with plenty of juice and acid. It is excellent either for the
dessert or for cider, and will keep in perfection till January.



3. RIBSTON RUSSET.

A seedling from the Ribston Pippin, to which it has a good deal of resemblance,
but is more globular and flattened in shape; has much russet, with some red striping.
It is a firm hardy useful sort either for the table or kitchen, well worthy of cultiva-
tion. In season December and January.



4. STONOR PARK APPLE.

A new seedling, raised in the garden of Thomas Stonor, Esq., Stonor Park, near
Henley. A dessert apple of middle size, rather conical in shape; the stalk slender
and deeply inserted; straw-coloured, with scarlet stripes. It is beautiful and high-
flavoured, with just enough of acid. Ripens in November.












5. RIBSTON PIPPIN.

A seedling raised at Ribston, in Yorkshire, the seat of Sir Henry Goodricke, Bart.
It is well known, and held in general estimation: above the middle size, of an oval
shape, prominent eye and stalk, golden colour, with red stripes; very rich in flavour,
and of firm close texture. Excellent either for the dessert or for sauce, throughout
November, December, and January. The tree spreads much in its growth, has very
glaucous leaves, and is rather apt to canker.



6. BEACHAMWELL SEEDLING.

Raised by John Motteux, Esq. of Beachamwell, in Norfolk: is an excellent dessert
apple, which no garden should be without; a little larger than the Golden Pippin, of
an oval shape, both eye and stalk prominent; straw coloured, faced with a slight flush
of red. It is juicy, firm, and of rich flavour: in eating in December, January, and
February.
















1























































N.l.Eloary Morning.
2. e dfordshire fouidling
3. Mannaladie Bpp i.
4. amnb our O Gros.














PLATE XXVIII.



1. HOARY MORNING.

A large sauce apple of globular shape, but diminishing towards the eye, which is
small and prominent. It is of a golden colour, richly striped all over with bright
red: in use in December and January. Its name is from a hoariness, like a peach,
on the skin of the fruit.



2. BEDFORDSHIRE FOUNDLING.

A fine large oblong kitchen apple, pea-green, with a slight tinge of red: the flesh is
firm, sweet, and juicy; it bakes excellently, and is a very valuable sort: for use in
December and January.
The finest trees and specimens I have seen of this fruit and some others, are in
the Queen's Garden at Bushey.



3. MARMALADE oR WELSH PIPPIN.

An oblong apple, of middle size, flattened at the eye; of a lemon colour, singularly
mottled with whitish spots. It is a good sweet juicy apple, a great favourite in
Wales; of hardy growth, a profuse bearer, and will keep till February.
Blossoms white, with a little pink.



4. RAMBOUR GROS.

A large oval apple, with some slightly projecting ribs; eye and stalk small, and but
little sunk; colour yellow, striped with light red. It bakes well, and has an agree-
able flavour. In use in December and January.























































































J tw flrfr"om vr, Ik om (nw Ifn A' R, A' m A 'n


M, S 9 9, ET 8
?7.1 TRoyal-
2, Gr o Ldei















PLATE XXIX.



1. ROYAL RUSSET.

Of globular shape and medium size, coated entirely over with brown russet. It is
an excellent richly flavoured kitchen apple; in use December and January. A good
bearer, but, like most of the Russets, apt to canker if not in loamy rich soil.



2. GOLDEN RUSSET.

An oblong apple, of middle size when ripe, of a fine golden colour, slightly spread
over with light brown russet. It is a high-flavoured sweet apple, suitable either for
the table or kitchen. In perfection through December and January. The tree grows
freely and bears well, but is rather apt to canker.



3. FRENCH PIPPIN.

(Or rather, FRENCH RUSSET.) A sauce apple above the middle size, of globular shape;
the eye small and prominent: its ground colour is a yellowish green, the sun side faint
red; about half the apple is generally russety. It has a pleasant flavour, but is rather
light in substance, for which defect it makes amends by a vigorous growth, ample
produce, and seldom suffering by canker or blight. Its season is from November
till January.


4. LARGE RUSSET.

A fine old well-known large sauce apple, mentioned in Evelyn's Collection. It is of
oblong shape; green ground colour, covered nearly all over with brown russeting. It
is of fine flavour, and bakes well. Will keep till February or March. The tree, like
some other old apples imported from Normandy, is apt to canker, and seems rather
on the decline.
























































3 4
1.01Osterly 3.Winter Strawberry'
Z.Lewis's Incomparabl. 4.Hanwell S6u-iing


*















PLATE XXX.



1. OSTERLEY APPLE.
A seedling from the Ribston Pippin, raised by Mr. Ellis the gardener at Osterley
Park. It very much resembles its parent in appearance, is not inferior in flavour,
and has the advantage of keeping a month longer. The tree grows freely without
canker, and is a good bearer.



2. LEWIS'S INCOMPARABLE.
A fine large kitchen apple, nearly globular, but terminating in a small contracted
eye; straw colour, variegated with scarlet streaks. The flesh is white, juicy, and
agreeably flavoured. The tree grows large, and bears plentifully.


3. WINTER STRAWBERRY.

This variety is above the middle size, of a globular shape, plaited about the eye,
which, as well as the stalk, is.very little depressed; straw colour, richly striped with
scarlet. It is a good winter apple, of a pleasant subacid flavour.



4. HANWELL SOURING.

A large apple, of ovate form, contracted at the eye, which is seated in a small cavity;
of a pea-green colour, with some light red. It is a weighty apple, juicy, and retains
its brisk acid flavour even to April and May. This sort is a favourite in Warwick-
shire.




































































N-. IA stems '3 ron Apple
S Blenheim (range 4 Ca ville Blanche d' Hiver















PLATE XXXI.



1. D'ASTEMS, OR STRIFLING D'HIVER.
A noble kitchen fruit, large, and of a globular shape; a little flattened at the eye,
which is deeply sunk and large; green with some dull red streaks, chiefly on the
top of the fruit. It is a first-rate sort, firm, with rich flavour, and dresses well; will
keep till March or April.



2. BLENHEIM ORANGE.
A large, noble sauce apple, very generally esteemed; its form is ovate and uniform;
colour when ripe, orange with some lively red on the sun side; it has a rich flavour,
and bakes well: in use November, December, and January. The tree grows very
strong and bears well, but not till after it has been a few years planted.



3. BRABANT BELLE FLEUR.
Received by the Horticultural Society, under the name of IRON APPLE, from Mr. Booth
of Hamburgh,-probably so called from the solidity and weight of its fruit. It is very
large and handsome, rather conical in shape, slightly ribbed, yellow-coloured, with
red stripes. This is a capital sauce apple, juicy, and of very pleasant flavour; in use
from December till April.



4. WHITE WINTER CALVILLE.

Of a pyramidal form, with strong ribs, above the middle size; the eye and stalk
hollow and contracted; colour pea-green tinged with unstriped red. A French sauce
apple, juicy, with plenty of acid: in season November, December, and January. It
grows naturally robust, but is rather subject to canker if not on a good deep soil. ,




































/
'6 e




44








L9




a




























S-1 .Api leot. IC 5Aihmeabs Kernel.
2 American Plate. 6 Gran4e.
3-Robison s. 7-Moor Hen .
lisle oWiW4bt Goldeneppim. 8LRe3iette Grise.
9 GoliennEobl.













PLATE XXXII.

1. API, PETITE.
Or LADY APPLE of the Americans. A very small popular French dessert apple, flat-
tened in shape, with several prominences round the eye; the stalk deeply seated, straw
colour, beautifully flushed with crimson. It has a pleasant flavour, and will keep
till March or April; bears in clusters, and is sometimes called the Pompone Apple.
The tree is of upright growth, with small reflexed leaves.


2. AMERICAN PLATE APPLE.
In shape like the old Golden Pippin, but rather smaller, greenish on the under side,
and has a brown tinge on the exposed. It is a remarkably profuse bearer, the fruit
hanging close round the stem like gooseberries or ropes of small onions ; is crisp,
juicy, and of pleasant flavour: in eating in December and January. The tree is of
humble growth, but hardy, and seldom cankers.


3. ROBINSON'S PIPPIN.
In size and shape resembling the Golden Pippin, but broader and flatter at the eye;
of a yellowish green, with russet and a little dull red on the outward side. It is a
very excellent table apple, eats crisp and juicy like the Nonpareil; keeps well till
March or April: of slender, upright growth, little apt to canker, and produces fruit
in abundance in clusters.


4. ISLE OF WIGHT PIPPIN.

A beautiful small dessert apple, of globular shape; the eye and stalk prominent, of
a golden colour, with a flush of orange. It is very excellent and richly flavoured.
In perfection in January and February.-Blossoms white.


5. ASHMEAD'S KERNEL.

An excellent table apple. The original tree is in the garden of Mr. Griffiths of Glou-
cester, where it was raised by Mr. Ashmead, his predecessor. Mr. G. informs me that
the tree is a hundred years old, and that it still continues to bear tolerably well.
It is about the size and shape of a Nonpareil, of a brown russet mingled with green,
and a little faint red on the outward side. A very nice crisp fruit, in perfection from
December till February.















6. THE GRANGE APPLE.

For this excellent variety, as well as many others, we are indebted to Mr. Knight,
President of the Horticultural Society. It is of medium size, a rich golden colour
embroidered with some russet, and light and dark specks;: of a globular shape, rather
flattened, and without any inequalities of surface; the eye is large and prominent:
the flesh is yellowish, close in texture, of a pleasant flavour. It is excellent either
for the dessert or for cider, and is in use from October to Christmas. The tree
grows well, and is little subject to canker.



7. MOORHEN PIPPIN.

A dessert apple, in high estimation in Hampshire. It is of middle size, pea-green
colour, variegated with scarlet blotching and some russet; firm in substance, and rich
in flavour: keeps well till April. A great bearer, and grows well.



8. REINETTE GRISE.

A famous dessert apple (presented to me by the Horticultural Society) from the Lux-
embourg Gardens at Paris. It is of rather small size, both eye and stalk prominent,
oblong in shape, of a pea-green ground, covered nearly all over with light brown
russet; it has a sweet and rich flavour: in use from December till March. The
apples of this sort imported from France are much more beautiful, and keep longer
in perfection, than those grown in this country. The tree is delicate, and apt to
canker; if planted on an east or west wall, (of which situation it is well worthy,) its
fruit would probably rival those from France.



9. GOLDEN KNOB.

A favourite dessert apple, particularly in Surrey and Sussex ; it is rather small and of
globular shape, the eye and stalk both small, of a golden colour with a little silvery
russet. It is very neat and pretty, of excellent flavour, and keeps in perfection from
Christmas till March. The tree thrives and bears well.









































































I'. Hall DooT
2 Norfolk Sbtcing.
3 lToTfolk B eaufm .
Mvhindshul Crab


rvwWfIwa VA2a&W&ek>o-n CK -,onais.


33
1) %)

















PLATE XXXIII.



1. HALL DOOR.
A rather large sauce apple, of flat shape, pea-green colour, with a grayish hue, and
bright red stripes. It is rather coarse in texture, but of a brisk yet rich flavour,
rendering it desirable for kitchen use. It is mature in December, January, and
February.
The tree is hardy, and generally bears well.



2. NORFOLK STORING.
A little larger than the Norfolk Beauffin, and of a lighter red colour; the flesh is
tenderer, more juicy, and of richer flavour. It ripens in December and January.
Grows vigorously, and bears well.



3. NORFOLK BEAUFFIN.
A well-known Norfolk apple, much used for drying and baking. It is rather large,
globular, and a little ribbed about the eye; of a deep copper colour, with a little pea-
green striping. It is a very close heavy apple, has plenty of acid, but is rather weak
in flavour. The fruit will keep till April or May. The tree grows large, and bears
abundantly.


4. MINSHUL CRAB.

A large compact heavy apple, of globular shape, the eye broad and moderately sunk;
when ripe, yellow, with a little red on the sun side. It has a good deal of juice with
sufficient acid, and dissolves well in dressing. The tree grows in a very spreading
form, hardy, and free from canker.
































































N;


.No1 Scarlet
2 G'ol&en
3 Bradiick's


4'. Green
5 Common Ol& Sort
6 lat
7. The Rofs
















PLATE XXXIV.



1. SCARLET NONPAREIL.

This is of a larger size than the original sort, and of globular form; pale yellow,
three-fourths covered with fine unmixed bright red: the eye very little sunk in a
small cavity, the stalk long and rather thick. It is a beautiful and well-flavoured
fruit, but not so crisp and,juicy as the old kind, nor will it keep quite so long; but
the tree grows sounder and stronger.


2. GOLDEN NONPAREIL.

Very much resembling the original both in size and shape; but is of a golden colour,
mingled with russet and a slight blush of red. It is a very pretty dessert apple, high-
flavoured, but with too much acid for most palates. This sort is of rather delicate
growth, apt to canker, and of course requires good loamy ground. It is in use from
October till December.



3. BRADDICK'S NONPAREIL.

This is nearest to the original sort of all the varieties. It has a good deal of red
colour, a rich juicy flavour, and is a very excellent dessert apple from December
till February.


4. GREEN on PETWORTH NONPAREIL.

Raised, I believe, at the Earl of Egremont's: larger than the old Nonpareil, but of
nearly the same shape; its colour green. This is a valuable apple for the table,
crisp, juicy, and high-flavoured; will keep till February or March. It is a good
bearer, and of stronger growth than the original.















5. ORIGINAL NONPAREIL.

This old and general favourite is so well known as hardly to need description. It is
nearly globular, but smallest at the eye; pea-green, with some dull red: the flavour
is brisk, juicy, and highly flavoured, which good qualities it preserves longer than
any other apple, even till April and May. It bears well, but is of slender growth,
and, like many old sorts, apt to canker.



6. FLAT NONPAREIL.
Differs from the old sort only in being of flatter shape, and in not keeping so long;
but it is a very nice juicy apple. In eating, December, January, and February.
The tree grows free of canker, and bears well.



7. ROSS NONPAREIL.
Of globular shape, russety, and a little larger than the original. It has a sweeter
taste than the old sort, is of firm texture, and a good table apple in January and
February.














































NIlAlfceston.
2-Emperor Alexander


i23%tr~2ftowv, uYt&r, l ct~rno 4y


-Antid {y cffMcamedC


















PLATE XXXV.



1. ALFRISTON.

(A variety of the Newtown Pippin). An apple of large dimensions, oval shape, with
some slightly projecting ribs; pea-green colour, embroidered with a little russet. This
is a firm useful apple, well-flavoured, and bakes well. In use in January and February.



2. EMPEROR ALEXANDER.

A magnificent Russian apple, imported from Riga by Messrs. Lee and Kennedy in
1817, (see a description and figure in the Horticultural Society's Transactions, vol. ii.
p. 407,) and presented to me about the same time by Mr. Padley, of Hampton Court,
under the name of Kiefs Koy. The fruit is frequently twelve to fifteen inches in cir-
cumference at the base, of a conical figure; the eye is considerably sunk in a small
cavity, and surrounded by several prominences; straw-coloured, enriched with much
scarlet striping; the stalk slender and very deeply inserted. This is perhaps the most
elegant apple in the collection. The fruit is sweet and juicy, but not compact and
firm in texture. Its season, October till Christmas.
The tree grows large and broad, and bears moderately well: the leaves change in
the autumn to a fine red hue.


















































N?1-Strped Monstrous Remette
2-D)utch. Co duhl.


I~~n~iozv~a~ an' cS1rn~ ~tjt S~~rtc~




















PLATE XXXVI.



1. STRIPED MONSTROUS REINETTE.
A large globular apple, having irregular ribs, terminating in strong wrinkles round
the eye. It is finely variegated with red stripes, or blotches, on a greenish-yellow
ground; the stalk small and rather long. The flesh is tender, juicy, and of an agree-
able flavour. A very useful kitchen fruit in October and November.
It is a strong-growing tree, a little pendulous, perhaps from the weight of the fruit.



2. DUTCH CODLIN.
It is a large oblong-shaped apple, with some projecting ribs, and plaited about the eye;
of excellent quality as a sauce apple: in use from October till December. The tree
is of spreading growth, with large leaves, a good bearer, but rather apt to canker.




















































4-















rr

















2 iNonesuAcL
SCole Apple .
1i\ e rl".e
--- o cpite C -


''2' /9 'Fl I th~ ic N '2/Ft.' PQPCL%'&IJIC Ihrukdi ~ (Cv














PLATE XXXVII.



1. COCKPIT.
Much cultivated in the North of England, as a useful pleasant apple, either for the
table or kitchen. It is of ordinary size, oval shape, both eye and stalk (which is
slender) prominent; when ripe of a yellow colour. The flesh is tender and of brisk
flavour. Ripe in November and December. It grows healthily and bears constantly.
Its season, October till Christmas.
Blossoms white, with blush.


2. NONSUCH.
An old, well-known, and highly esteemed sauce apple, inferior to none in its season
either in beauty or excellence, having a brisk high flavour, plenty of juice, and re-
ducing itself to a fine pulp in dressing. It is a most abundant bearer: its only defect
is a tendency to canker. Ripe in September, but will keep in use till November.


3. THE COLE, OR SCARLET PERFUME APPLE.

It is a new sort, moderately large, flattened both at the eye and stalk, nearly globular,
with slightly projecting ribs: if divided transversely, one line across is longer than
the other, giving the fruit the appearance of being flat-sided. The colour of three-
fourths of the apple is a rich deep red, very little striped. The flesh is juicy and rich,
with a little spicy flavour: very desirable for the table; but, from its size, is fitter
for culinary purposes. It is ripe in September and October.


4. WHITE CALVILLE.

(CALVILLE BLANCHE of Duhamel.) It is of moderate size, oblong, flattened at the
top; cream-coloured: is a very excellent sauce apple, baking to a full red sauce, of
rich flavour; and in perfection from September till December. A robust tree, and a
good bearer. The blossoms of this sort are peculiarly large and beautiful.

















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