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The Jewish Floridian ( February 17, 1935 )

UFJUD

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562 P. L. & R. THE SLOGAN Justice, Not Charity DRIVE DAYS February 18th-2. r ,th wJewist) Florid tin ipecial Edition Published in the Interest of the Jewish Welfare Bureau 1935 Campaign 8—No. 7-A MIAMI, FLORIDA, SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1935 Price Five Cents ewish Welfare Bureau Launches Drive [5,000 Needed to Carry on Work of Helping Those in Need During Coming Year faced by the necessity to either raise sufficient funds to carry on itf work for the coming year, or dote its doors in the face of constant demands for relief, the officers and directors of the Jewish Welfare Bureau last week accepted the challenge, and announced a campaign to raise $15,000 during the next week. Business men, professional men, Rabbis and leaders in every walk of life of the Greater Miami Jewish community are unanimous in urging everyone not merely to agree that the fund is necessary, but to give generously, and to offer one's services during the present brief campaign. "The challenge to the self-respect of the Jewish community of Greater Miami is one that cannot be ignored," said a prominent leadr er in local relief work. "This drive will once and for all determine that regardless of conditions, our less fortunate and needy brethren will not be permitted to go hungry, lack clothing or shelter." Jews throughout the ages, even in the darkest times of pogroms and persecutions, shared their very last bite of bread with those who had none. I cannot believe that now, in Greater Miami, our people will be permitted to starve," continued this leader. "I feel certain that those who will be seen by our voluntary solicitors will Up their very utmost and give to the greatest extent, even 'to the point where it hurts.' And I have the greatest confidence that many of our residents and tourists who may not be contacted because of lack of time, will voluntarily send their contributions into our office." The campaign opens officially Monday, February 18th, and will continue for one week. The "Big Gifts Committee," composed of Mark Max, Philip Lieberman and Day J. Apte, have been soliciting all during the past week when they visited the larger mercantile and industrial firms of the city. It is hoped that teams will visit every Jewish family in the Greater Miami area. Each team, consisting of five members, is captained by a member of the board of directors of the bureau. DINNER OPENS BIG CAMPAIGN HEAVIER DRAIN DUE TO TRANSIENTS Throughout the country Jewish charities are ever faced with the problem of taking care of their own occasionally do they have to take care of those who are not their own That is the exception and not the rule. The Jewish Welfare Bureau in Miami is confronted with a problem peculiar to itself not because of any fault on the part of Miamians but because of Miami. Along with the tourists that come here as the result of the intensive advertising, because of our God-given climate our sunshine and our beauty there arrive here, others that become a problem that is daily threatening to engulf the Jewish Welfare Bureau way beyond its means There is the problem of the Jew, be he man. woman or child who lias been struggling throughout the North, East or West ... he has made a livelihood and then falls victim to one of the numerous ills which make life unbearable the physician in his home : town has exhausted every known remedy to help his patient and then "Your only chance • %  • your nly opportunity for re, lief, for help ... is MIAMI Every last possession is disposed of, sold and sacrificed so that the family or even the individual may get to Miami. She family, often several in number, arrive in Miami with not even enough to pay for a night's lodging, or to provide food for the next meal often there's a baby and several little children tfty soon find the office of the Jewish Welfare Bureau there they pour out their tale of woe what can the Bureau do? True, the poor of Miami come first it is the Bureau's duty to help the local needy first but in the name of everything that is good and honest, are we going to let these strangers within the gates go hungry? The answer is inevitable these people must be fed they are fed they are clothed they are helped to try and regain health if they need the local climate and then they are sent back to their homes of course, it's a drain on the funds of the organization the help given these strangers depletes the meager funds with which the Jewish Welfare Bureau is working. And so it is the problem of the transients, that few other communities throughout the country are faced with that cause the Jewish Welfare Bureau officials to worry, and ponder, and struggle. We cannot turn them away, for The directors of the Jewish Welfare Bureau and Ladies' Auxiliary attended a banquet tendered in their honor by Mr. Mark Max, prominent welfare worker of this city, last Monday evening at Weinkle's Restaurant at Miami Beach. The purpose of the gathering was outlined by Mr. Max after being introduced by Mr. Gerald Lewis, president of the Bureau, who presided. Mr. Max stated: "It is high time that the Jews of Miami realized their responsibilities to their fellow Jews. We must learn to give, not only because of necessity, but because of a desire to satisfy our own consciousness." Mr. D. J. Apte, a former president of the Welfare Bureau, was the keynote speaker of the evening and called upon those present to assist in the annual drive of the Jewish Welfare Bureau for funds that was about to take place. He sounded the call to all Miami Jews to do their part In making the drive a success. With sincerity he stated dbring the course of his remarks, "it is a matter of justice and not charity that we demand for our fellow Jews; there is only one word in the Hebrew Innguage to denote the giving of help to those less fortunate than ourselves, and that is righteousness and not charity. If we are to do justice to ourselves, to our religion and to our fellow Jews, we must give of our own to those who need our help; Justice, not Charity, shall be the. slogan of our campaign." Rabbis S. M. Machtei, Julius Washer and Dr. J. II. Kaplan and P. Scheinberg, Phillip Lieberman and Stanley C. Myers also addressed the gathering. At the conclusion of the addresses final plans were made for the great drive to raise funds, which starts on Monday, February 18th. Enthusiasm and a spirit to succeed in their work permeated the evening. have we not been told "Remember, that you, too, were strangers in the land of Egypt." The answer to the problem a very simple one Jews of Miami, resident and tourist, must give give and give again. Almsgiving is practiced by means of money, but charity also by personal services and by words of advice, sympathy and encouragement. Success of Drive Expected By Mayor Sewell Mayor E. (J. Sewell when advised that the Jewish Welfare Bureau 1986 campaign would begin Monday February 18th said "I THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE J. GERALD LEWIS I am happy to announce that the Jewish Welfare Bureau will conduct a two weeks' campaign for funds, beginning Monday, February 18th, 1985, One of our members will call upon you to solicit your contribution and I trust that you will give generously. We are all proud of the Welfare Bureau's past services in this community and we need everyone's help in order that we may carry on in our work. Last year our bureau spent $9,000 in caring for the needy. So many cases that came to our attention needed additional help, but, owing to insufficient funds, our services in many cases had to be curtailedi We have set a goal to raise $15,000 this year; a modest amount in a community as large as ours. No reminder is necessary that poverty, sickness and under-privileged families are in our midst. Transients that find themselves without funds have to be provided for. Our Jewish people have set an example of caring for their own. We want you to feel that you have a real interest in our work and that you will accept the responsibility of feeding and caring for the hungry and dependent. It is our duty and traditional responsibility to contribute to those not as fortunate as ourselves. We cannot, we must not, we will not fail. Your generous contribution will help us. (Signed) J. GERALD LEWIS. MAYOR E. (J. SEWELL know of the splendid work that the Jewish Welfare Bureau has been doing in our community. It is needless for me to say that I wish the Bureau and all its splendid workers a full realization of the needs and wants of the Bureau. The Jewish people have never failed when a call for help has been sounded. I know that the Jews of Miami will respond to the call wholeheartedly. I feel sure that the goal set will be more than achieved."



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WILL YOU GIVE YOUR SHARE-IN FINANCIAL SUPPORT? Page Tn ) THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Sunday, February 17. 11,35 wJewisti IFIIondlaain IXORIDA S OXLT JEW Ml WtEIXY PUBLISHED IV ESI FSIDAT b7 ta JEWISH PLORID1A.V Pl'BLlSHBiG CO. P. O. B.i :i 1 Newi Tower Bldf. Miami. FU. Phone 2-3JM • li S. w. ilia -. iDrroiXAL omcHi: urn J. LOUIS SHOCHET. Bailor PEBD K. 9HOCHET. Orralatiaa Mau( CANTOR BORIS SCHLACHMAN Field Representative I •. U >••. CJ min: Job ItM. at UM Poat Off lea at Miaimt uadar •• %  Act uf March I. I' WEST PALM BEACH 8AMUEL SCHUTZER Repreier. :„'. ST. PETERSBUBG MRS. MAE BENJAMIN Representative ORLANDO IRENE BRAVERMAN Representative TAMfA MRS. M. H. KISLiE Representative WEST FLORIDA BUSINESS AGENT S. G. AKOSON 4209 Central Ave., Tampa, FT*. %  OaWLlIf HOW Hi M.a... Oma Taai -S1.M SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1935 Vol. I—No. 7-A Shall We Forget Our Own? Just a word to those men and women from all parts of the country who are now pleasantly sojourning within our mid~t. These men and women who we welcome to Greater Miami with open arms happy to see them enjoy that great gift of God sunshine, climate, an opportunity to get awaj from the rigors of the North ... to live, if even for a ~-h>rt time, in God's own country. During the next week, beginning Monday, Februarj I s the Jewish Welfare Bureau, which takes care of the poor and needy in this area will make 'he rounds, of the city to ask for heln for financial support of your fellow men and women who are le> fortunate than you We sincerely hope that \ou will not turn them down that you will not say to them that you have those of your own cities and towns to aid. The records of the Jewish Welfare Bureau are replete with cases where help has been requested and full-heartedly i\en. not to those of Miami, but to those of the very same cities and towns that you live in You are blessed that you are able to coine to our fair shores to enjoy your winter stay .. others are less fortunate you think in terms of pleasure they think in terms of bread and life. Receive these solicitors with that spirit that is truly and really Jewish give as much as you can give more than you think you can but give it freely, voluntarily and with a smile encourage the solicitor to continue his work and get to work for a little while yourself get your friends to help along. MOTHER AND CHILD ARE FOUND STARVING Last night local authorities found a woman and infant child at the corner of Fifth ave. and Fourth -:.. northwest, in a semi-conscious conditi n. Mother and child were rushed to the hospital, where it was found that they had nc-ared I irvation. An Inves%  n showed that the woman and child v I ish and tb ir.d and father had deserted them and left them penniless. The worn:.: -<: picked up in refuse cam and had let the child ar death for lack of food. She said she had applied to I urned down and re. help. It the woman ar.'i U recover. THIS DID NOT THIS COULD NOT HAPPEN IN MIAMI ... The Jewish Welfare Bureau recently was advised of a case wherein a Jewish woman and infant child, sick, undernourished, had been deserted by the husband and father. The mother aunable to work because of her physical condition. What did the Jewish Welfare Bureau do? The mother and child are being maintained, as they deserve, until the mother will recover her strength and be able to take a position, go to work and support her child. In the meantime e\ery effort will be made to locate the husband and father. Of course this could happen if the Jewish Welfare Bureau did nut exist in Miami. Hearts of Women Work in "G I morning, Mrs. Silverman, how are you?" I am greeted one morning as I answer the door bell, by a pleasant little woman. I had met several t mes. "What can I do for you?" I respond. And in a few w r iI learn the m She's just one of the ( women of the Ladies' Auxiliary f the Jewish W< reau, out daily to try and get indies of cast-off clothing, and :. :... A vis:: to the rum magi the Ladies' Aux liary at 167 N. W. Fifth st. is a real education. Situated on the edge of the negro section of Miami, it is filled from time to time with clothing of every kind and description. Shirts for dresses for women unmention•-. tr users, suits everything that one could think of the women sitting there patiently mending the clothing s: that more money may be realized ... to watch the sales one woulJ that these women's very lives depended on their getting another dime, another nickel or even r penny for the merchan. I was astounded when I learned that were it not for thi Rummagi* rat4 I by -.he Ladies' AuxBureau ul I ge sum :' m n trulj .1 %  bef ... •• %  was reral years ago ': t i at 1 arr; a iu : k •. %  %  %  '. I led 1 rtey if it BUJ I pi ,.: %  a nd i he Lalies' Au :. Mr-. %  the c been spons I, lai been carried out .... illture class undei M Bertha B, luring th ASKS JEWS AGAIN TO ANSWER CALl Have Duty to Perform. Tradition to Carry on and Reputation to Sustain. Says Rabbi Shapiro It ha] lat in Ami Miami Ji life, % %  pride in labeling our• %  i lized allenge 11s! What do we mean by it? isuming we kn w what that Does iization mean "Kapotes" for brides, men's club? Does it mean Jewish cookod pronounced "Kugel" r "keegel"' (The last -• vital It acy congregational divisions in many cities.) There is sailor who n an unknown coast. "Are RABBI MAX SHAPIRO und here savage or %  %  : tting in a swearing and playing cards. ] "Thank God," he said, "thi;. an civilized." A good civilized Jew must believe in the purposiveness of Jewish existence, that the existence ol I the Jew is intended to purpose, that it is not merely at accident of physical pignv or geographic orientation. He haa part to play, a part so noblj expounded by the Prophets and the Sages of Israel. He is here to affirm and espouse, as Jew, tht moral greatness of the Hebrew civilization. There is the practical element which may be regarded as the translation of the belief in the pur. posiveness of Jewish existence. Ii is necessary not only to believe, but to act on that belief, to give tangible expression of it by loyalty, by participation in deavors which make for the preservation of the Jewish peo; J< % % % %  ish culture. If disaster threatens a portion of our people here in Miami, it is our duty to extend help, not meretse of a humanitarian motive, but because it is our t ty to safeguard the physical f the Jewish peo; t may properly be able challenges us to deed! It prompts us • elfare of our bretl always ; e< n an Miai hearken to ft Welfare I Once more give of you: ally, unselfish'.;. and the blessings < :' G.: be upon you. •• n... Engler, assisted by other coed .. Mrs. J. L. women from time to time. a:e ll Mrs. Rattner and Mrs. J. (Continued on Page Team Workers in the 1935 Campaign for the Jewish Welfare Bureau Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan Rabbi S, If. Machtei Rabbi David I. Rosensloom Rabbi Max Shapiro Rabbi Julius Washer J. Gerald Lewis Stanley C. Myers Mark Max Baron de Hirsch Meyer Dr. A. E. Rosenthal Nathan Ada'.man Day J. Apte Philip Liberman Norman J. Mirsky PincuScheiaberg Mrs. D. J. Apte Mrs. Morris Dubler Mrs. H. N. Levy Mrs. Alex Miller Mrs. Harry N> Mrs. Meyer Schwartz Mrs. R %  S mpson Mrs. Harry Z. Silverman %  MEN'S DIVISION Benj. Axelroad R. R. Adler Sam Blank Arthur Berel Leonard Barr Henry Bulbin Morris Cowen Herbert U. Feibelman Bernard Feldman Sol Go'.dstrom Max Hoffman Herbert E. Kleiman Abe Kurman lac Levin Harry I. Lipton WOMEN'S DIVISION Mrs. I. Weinstein Mrs. Stanley C. Myers Mrs. Morris Cowen Mrs. J. A. Ratner Mrs. Isidor Cohen Mrs. L. Hartz MM Jules Perlman Mrs. P.. R. Adler Mrs. Marvin Bronner Harold Landfield J. M. Lipton Harry Magid Max Rappaport Meyer Rauzin I. Roth Morris Rubin David Slann Tobias Simon Julius Simpson Milton Weiner I*o Ackerman Leon Lichtenstetter Jesse D. Scheinman Abe Aronoritz Mrs. Mark Max Mrs. Ida Optner Mrs. Max Ghertler Mrs. C. Greenfield Mrs. J. Gerald Lewis Mrs. H. E. Kleiman Mrs. Henry Bulbin Mrs. H. I. Homa



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WILL YOU GIVE YOUR SHARE-IN SERVICE? ISunday, February 17, 1935 THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Page Three WHAT YOUR MONEY DID IN PAST YEAR One is often asked at the Jewish (Welfare Bureau what is done with the money? He cares not for the Ireconstrucion of the dependent into |one of independent ... he cares not for the alleviation of suffering or the clothing of the naked or the feeding of the hungry I. nor does he desire to know and [learn of the words of cheer and comfort that mean so much to the sore and distressed, to the heartveary and soul-oppressed ... to Isuch inquirers, so that they, too, nay answer others the following statistical report is submitted: [Report of Receipts and Disbursements From October 1, 1933, to Oct. 31, 1934: Receipts: Campaign, |3,426.50; |Ladies' Auxiliary, ? 1,727.50; Ball account, $1,066.19; Community :hest, $268.91; dues, $424; out-of-j town organizations, $918; New' fear's donations, $145.80; donations, $170.98; Ponce de Leon supker, $.'178.50; refund monetary relief. $162.50; weekly allotment, $111; loans, $:i87; transportation, $ll.">.8(i; school lunches, $29; medtj %  cine, $7.66; expenses, 23 cents; I telegrams, $4.06—Total, $9,247.63. Disbursements: Weekly allotment, $3,493.90; monetary relief, $1,525.86; transportation, $317.03; medicine, $123.91; school lunches, $177.25; loans, $700; salary, 1,311; office transportation, $107.90; telephone, $107.16; telegraph, $29.95; postage, $78.35; miscellaneous expenses, $154.39; printing and secretary supplies, $12.50; rent, $150—Total, $8,289.20. Cash on hand October 31, 1934, $958.43. Social Service, 850 Families: Offive interviews, 1,172; collateral interviews, 2,279; collateral visits, 784; home visits, 293; transients, 162; jail cases, 20; medical, 63; transportation, 16; out-of-town inquiries, 48; new cases, 107; reopened cases, 15. RELIEF OF POOR r.RF ri/i T r|j TY But Charity Also Must Attempt to Remove Cause of Suffering, Says Rabbi Machtei Iron break.s stone; fire melts iron, water extinguishes fire; the clouds consume water; the storm dispels clouds; man withstands the storm; fear conquers man; wine banishes fear; sleep overcomes wine, and death is the master of sleep; but "Charity," says Solomon, "saves from death." HUMANITY FACES GREATEST TEST Response for Those in Need Will Tell How We Meet It, Says Rabbi Rosenbloom Charity is universal. No one is immune from a feeling of pity or sympathy at the sight of human misery ami unhappiness. It is a trait that we draw into our systems %  With our mother's milk. Maladjustments and misfits of society lore re probably always and everywhere catered to and extended a helping hand. Efforts were always made to lift them out of the pit of oblivion, a fate to which they Would have otherwise been doomed. 1 ,%  EiMfinJ Bk f %  HBA9*DA I • M ^^ %  >W m n 1 W 4 1 -2pi i*m p-f .'AJ*3| %  %  %  ABB! DAVID I. ROSENBLOOM %  he notable exception we know of in recorded history is that of the %  otorious Sodom and Gomorrah, Wlic-c inhabitants were presumably innoculated with an antidote to the sensation which spontaneously arises in the human breast when It is exposed to spectacles of biological agony and pain. The masters of our faith have realized this. Our sages, therei fore, framed a unique and hitherI to unparalleled philosophy in faI vor of the submerged tenth of society. It may be summed up in the one Hebrew word, Zedakkah, which is usually rendered! righteousnesa or justice. The dole given to the poor and downtrodden is not a matter of grace. Judaism names it simply justice. The destitute are entitled to the support derived from society. The prophets recognize that destitution was fundamentally a consequense of social and economic exploitation. And since we are all brothers, children of one God, no one may assume the right to oppress his fellow. Then the poor man has a distinct share in the wealth of the rich. His sweat and energy went into the making of the prosperity owned by the man who stands above him in, society. Those then who were ill-treated by grim fate were, nevertheless, not to be denied a minimum, at least, of life's blessings. They are not to be condemned to extinction because they failed to manipulate conditions so as to swell their belongings. They are not cursed and despised of God. They are merely the victims of an unbalanced social structure, which permitted the enrichment of the few at the exi pense of th many. A person, then, I who has amassed a fortune automatically becomes a trustee appointed by God to administer His wealth. Existence in this world requires the co-operation and mutual help on the part of all its creatures, but more especially of the human family. The term "rehabilitation" came the funds of a charitable organizainto common usage only since the tion the one avenue which contribWorld War. It was applied to utes to tne lasting benefits to the the efforts of the United States government to restore to their former station, rank, position and usefulness in the sense of economic productiveness ana self-support, those of the disabled veterans who could be trained in a trade or profession, wherein their physical handicaps would not hinder them in gainful occupation. The idea was acclaimed as a great forward stride, an advantage over the compensation paid these men during their sickness and periods of idleness. Maimonides, the 800th anniversary of whose birth is celebrated this year, classified Tzedokoh into eight groups. He assigned the first and highest position to that form of assistance which helps the one in need to re-establish himself as a productive and self-supporing member of the community. In the methods of administering j recipient and HEARTS OF WOMEN IN WORK (Continued From Page 2) unceasing and untiring in their efforts to keep the Rummage Sale supplied with merchandise, and the coffers of the Jewish Welfare Bureau supplied with funds. The dues to the Ladies' Auxiliary are only three dollars annually. Meeti ings are held monthly and are in| teresting, too. Of course, the Ladies' Auxiliary j of the Jewish Welfare Bureau are just women but they're imbued with a love for their fellow man. RABBI S. M. MACHTEI to society is that As a garment is made up of single threads, so every single gift aids in building the great work of oharity. phase of the work devoted to rehabilitation. Make a man independent; restore to him his earning power; "put him on his own," and you have restored to him the greatest of all gifts—confidence in himself, courage, hope. Temporary financial relief is merely "Chayai Sho'oh"— life for an hour. Remove the need for charity by rehabilitating the individual and you have given him what God endowed him with— "Chayai Olam"—eternal life. You have that Divine power. Exercise it. Support the Jewish Welfare Bureau. WANTED-PARTNERS! Are there men and women of vision and faith in Greater Miami who are willing to become partners in one of the greatest undertakings in recent days in this section? We want only those who have an abiding faith in their fellow men who can see the good rather than the bad in men and women of their own blood one who can look past the immediate present, and visualize the future that is bound to come who can look into the faces of men and women, and disregarding their personal appearances, their clothing and surroundings, still realize and conceive their true values and characters those who will not disregard their less fortunate brethren and scorn them We want partners in the business of rehabilitating men and women ... we want partners in the business of alleviating the sufferings of mankind ... we want partners in the business of feeding the hungry, clothing the naked. WE WANT PARTNERS IN THE 1935 CAMPAIGN TO AID OUR FELLOW JEWS Apply to The Jewish Welfare Bureau Safe Deposit Kldg. MIAMI, FLORIDA Mtw.••••<-*< ••> *^w# "Blessed is he who considereth the poor, the Lord will remember him in time of trouble" Ps. xli.



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GIVE GENEROUSLY AND NOW! Page Pour THE JEWISH FI.ORIDIAN Sunday, February 17, 1986 A CHALLENGE TO JEWISH IDEALISM To He a Jew Means Sacrifices for Faith and People. Declares Rabbi Julius Washer Modern people have been in redoing what seemed to be to them cent years reducing their religion RABBI JULIUS WASHER to ever ami ever simpler term*. until it consists of little more than Imum of giving. their •duty." So. too, has it been m the field of philanthropies. Invariably when we approach men for some philanthropic endeavor they tell us. "I believe I have already done my 'duty ." He will go a step further and tell us that "I am a good Jew, for have I not already given my contribution?" As a general rule we may say that the man who gives such an answer has done or has given very little in comparison with what he actually should do. In this respect how different are the generations. There were days when people spoke and' acted in terms of the maximum of faith, and the spirt of their generation was not "how little." but "how much." In our days, however, our thesis is. "How little can we believe, and how little can we give?" In this appeal for the Jewish Welfare Bureau, the challenge is definitely laid before us to revert to a maximum of faith and a maxRummage Sales Store of the Jewish Welfare Bureau. In picture are Mrs. Julius Simpson, MrsJ JH.rtz Mrs. J.En B ler and Mrs. J.Rattner, all enthusiastic and act.ve workers for the Ladies Auxiliary Rummage sales. : the children and wife are taken The boy must be given care of by the Bureau. unhesitatingly responds, and he will be taken care of. He is all alone in this world. Of course. the Bureau will supply food and maintenance. %  Y es. it's a beautiful child, healthy and one that would cheer are both in their late sixties, they the home of anyone. It was abansay. I suggest they are older, of the Jewish Welfare Bureau. "No. doned shortly after birth by both They have tried their best, but n the least, providing you mother and father and has been at now they have no food, no clothdon't interfere and keep me from thi C ant) H ipital since then. It ing just Spending a Day "You don't mind if I sit around and watch your work for a while do you. Mrs. Rose?" said I to the genial executive secretary I cannot help but think of the „ tppfc work they eave the chance Just one ray of sunshine truly by "people of mercy" are And here come some young men. these unfortunates taken care of. They came to seel prayer we recite on Yom Kippur afe not tne ngua] wandering kind in the synagogue. "Forsake me w h 0 tramp along they are sinCharity is more valuable than not in my old age." Husband and cere food and lodging, at least sacrifices, and alone equals the exwife tell their pitiable story. They until their case can be investigated, ercise of all religious forms. must be given some are sent home they cannot be left to Even he who lives upon charity starve should practice benevolence. I. who thought I was case-hard%  ened ... I begin to break ... I The practice of beneficence will cannot stand this kaleidoscopic unassure the maintenance of ones a bit of flotsam on my work too much." was the anmust have a home that will be of the tide of life ... The Bureau swer. "17. promise to behave." the fini where the child will will answer the age-old prayer. It was my reply, and I tat down receive thi proper care." An apcannot forsake them. A .'. .. .. yjjj, -.. ;.. ; | .... pt ;of this little Here is a problem that is coneomes in a cheerful greeting girl just a little more than a year tinually recurring. Who will not and then the story unfolds ... a Id resulti childlesi 1 risk their all for a bit of life? Wb blind man. a wife splendid reputati n adopting it will not stake everything when infani child h tries to And so thi* little waif is provided health is at the danger point? A > at %  meager livt y sella home by the Bureau. father, m ther and three children. I cann I help but avert my face They don't belong in Miami. A boy Dr. Kaplan Says Those Who Fail to Give to Jewish Philan folding of suffering and distress possessions. ALL NOT IN NEED SHOULD AID DRIVE street f discussioi I is get I ng ah ng •• %  • '-: % % %  ... "We".'. There's a husband a wife and two just eleven years old suffering children. The husband is a victim from rheumatic fever of the heart. Iread at "white His ONLY char, The it wi ran for : %  a." he Is plague." tu (is, and must be familj ry all The Bureau will pay rent, sent to Denver if he is tc have a t< giv -nee suppl) food, clothing and other nechar for his life. The wife and n w they're here. It's c h a are penniless and must! be pr blem. But it la l I The fed ai Doee the Bureau, husbar.i is returned to the N rth thropies Lack Social Conscience mes ai %  ag ceMities Hen He is in Mrs. try that has OFFICIALLY recogved. and the BUREAU WILL MAINj CIAL MIXDEDXESs! nized 'L America is begins Befori he must For :: %  :• %  %  ..:. : : • art the fon I i w rl i great isa esson, the The world IS beginning to learn the meaning of SOCIAL MINDEDXESS, Russia is the only c onSo TAIN THE FAMILY UNTIL THE The husband is sent to Denver, and HUSBAND CAN" FIND WORK ====== 1) IT, For the purpose of maintaining the work of the JEWISH WELFARE BUREAU OF Ml \MI. Fl ORIDA. and in consideration of the participation of others I hereby ; l — PI EDGE A CONTRIBI HON OP J %  [ ] {—APPL1 FOR A MEMBERSHIP $ Contributions, life and Memberships are payable aindica ted by donor. 1 herewith: $ in SO days: $ in M da>>. S 1MB ADDRESS "Let thy hand be wide open for the distre ssed" Just ':'• I world esson. the Jew himself i RABBI 1>R. JACOB H. KAPLAN in life THAT LESSOX. it somewhat reluctant'.;.'. Humanity is a co-operativv which means we must bedly minded, which n lo the RIGHT thing by AND our fellow D should not have t lo justice, whi people call charity, is bis very : reason for his living. The JEWISH WELFARE BCREAU ng a drive for week, and any Jew who does : thank the committee f r m the opportunity to C "•fund of right" f s :a! mindedness, ing in the very elementary D • %  "•. im. T my way of thinking thern %  %  ; % %  lack this --. this sense of th< :' helping less fortunate ren. If the commit t e es will d" I feel morally certain th U do theirs. REMEMBER: (::-. Pays ruary 18-85 GIVE: To Those Who Have NothingHelp Them Survive.


MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
February 17, 1935

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03199

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
February 17, 1935

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03199

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text
562 P. L. & R.
THE SLOGAN
Justice, Not Charity
DRIVE DAYS
February 18th-2.r,th
wJewist) Florid tin
ipecial Edition Published in the Interest of the Jewish Welfare Bureau 1935 Campaign
8No. 7-A
MIAMI, FLORIDA, SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1935
Price Five Cents
ewish Welfare Bureau Launches Drive
[5,000 Needed to Carry on Work of Helping Those in
Need During Coming Year
faced by the necessity to either
raise sufficient funds to carry on
itf work for the coming year, or
dote its doors in the face of con-
stant demands for relief, the offi-
cers and directors of the Jewish
Welfare Bureau last week accepted
the challenge, and announced a
campaign to raise $15,000 during
the next week.
Business men, professional men,
Rabbis and leaders in every walk
of life of the Greater Miami Jew-
ish community are unanimous in
urging everyone not merely to
agree that the fund is necessary,
but to give generously, and to of-
fer one's services during the pres-
ent brief campaign.
"The challenge to the self-re-
spect of the Jewish community of
Greater Miami is one that cannot
be ignored," said a prominent leadr
er in local relief work. "This drive
will once and for all determine that
regardless of conditions, our less
fortunate and needy brethren will
not be permitted to go hungry, lack
clothing or shelter." Jews through-
out the ages, even in the darkest
times of pogroms and persecu-
tions, shared their very last bite of
bread with those who had none. I
cannot believe that now, in Great-
er Miami, our people will be per-
mitted to starve," continued this
leader. "I feel certain that those
who will be seen by our voluntary
solicitors will Up their very utmost
and give to the greatest extent,
even 'to the point where it hurts.'
And I have the greatest confidence
that many of our residents and
tourists who may not be contacted
because of lack of time, will vol-
untarily send their contributions
into our office."
The campaign opens officially
Monday, February 18th, and will
continue for one week. The "Big
Gifts Committee," composed of
Mark Max, Philip Lieberman and
Day J. Apte, have been soliciting
all during the past week when they
visited the larger mercantile and
industrial firms of the city. It is
hoped that teams will visit every
Jewish family in the Greater Miami
area. Each team, consisting of
five members, is captained by a
member of the board of directors
of the bureau.
DINNER OPENS BIG CAMPAIGN
HEAVIER DRAIN
DUE TO TRANSIENTS
Throughout the country Jewish
charities are ever faced with the
problem of taking care of their
own occasionally do they have
to take care of those who are not
their own That is the excep-
tion and not the rule.
The Jewish Welfare Bureau in
Miami is confronted with a prob-
lem peculiar to itself not be-
cause of any fault on the part of
Miamians but because of
Miami.
Along with the tourists that
come here as the result of the in-
tensive advertising, because of our
God-given climate our sun-
shine and our beauty there ar-
rive here, others that become
a problem that is daily threaten-
ing to engulf the Jewish Welfare
Bureau way beyond its means .
There is the problem of the Jew,
be he man. woman or child .
who lias been struggling through-
out the North, East or West ... he
has made a livelihood and then
falls victim to one of the numer-
ous ills which make life unbear-
able the physician in his home :
town has exhausted every known
remedy to help his patient .
and then "Your only chance
your nly opportunity for re- ,
lief, for help ... is MIAMI .
Every last possession is disposed
of, sold and sacrificed so that the
family or even the individual may
get to Miami.
She family, often several in
number, arrive in Miami with not
even enough to pay for a night's
lodging, or to provide food for the
next meal often there's a baby
and several little children .
tfty soon find the office of the
Jewish Welfare Bureau there
they pour out their tale of woe
. what can the Bureau do? True,
the poor of Miami come first .
it is the Bureau's duty to help the
local needy first but in the
name of everything that is good
and honest, are we going to let
these strangers within the gates
go hungry? The answer is inev-
itable these people must be
fed they are fed they are
clothed they are helped to try
and regain health if they need the
local climate and then they
are sent back to their homes .
of course, it's a drain on the funds
of the organization the help
given these strangers depletes the
meager funds with which the Jew-
ish Welfare Bureau is working.
And so it is the problem of the
transients, that few other commu-
nities throughout the country are
faced with that cause the Jew-
ish Welfare Bureau officials to
worry, and ponder, and struggle.
We cannot turn them away, for
The directors of the Jewish Wel-
fare Bureau and Ladies' Auxiliary
attended a banquet tendered in
their honor by Mr. Mark Max,
prominent welfare worker of this
city, last Monday evening at Wein-
kle's Restaurant at Miami Beach.
The purpose of the gathering was
outlined by Mr. Max after being
introduced by Mr. Gerald Lewis,
president of the Bureau, who pre-
sided.
Mr. Max stated: "It is high time
that the Jews of Miami realized
their responsibilities to their fel-
low Jews. We must learn to give,
not only because of necessity, but
because of a desire to satisfy our
own consciousness."
Mr. D. J. Apte, a former presi-
dent of the Welfare Bureau, was
the keynote speaker of the eve-
ning and called upon those pres-
ent to assist in the annual drive
of the Jewish Welfare Bureau for
funds that was about to take place.
He sounded the call to all Miami
Jews to do their part In making
the drive a success.
With sincerity he stated dbring
the course of his remarks, "it is
a matter of justice and not char-
ity that we demand for our fellow
Jews; there is only one word in
the Hebrew Innguage to denote the
giving of help to those less fortu-
nate than ourselves, and that is
righteousness and not charity. If
we are to do justice to ourselves,
to our religion and to our fellow
Jews, we must give of our own to
those who need our help; Justice,
not Charity, shall be the. slogan of
our campaign."
Rabbis S. M. Machtei, Julius
Washer and Dr. J. II. Kaplan and
P. Scheinberg, Phillip Lieberman
and Stanley C. Myers also ad-
dressed the gathering.
At the conclusion of the ad-
dresses final plans were made for
the great drive to raise funds,
which starts on Monday, February
18th. Enthusiasm and a spirit to
succeed in their work permeated
the evening.
have we not been told "Remember,
that you, too, were strangers in
the land of Egypt."
The answer to the problem .
a very simple one Jews of
Miami, resident and tourist, must
give give and give again.
Almsgiving is practiced by means
of money, but charity also by per-
sonal services and by words of ad-
vice, sympathy and encourage-
ment.
Success of
Drive Expected
By Mayor Sewell
Mayor E. (J. Sewell when ad-
vised that the Jewish Welfare Bu-
reau 1986 campaign would begin
Monday February 18th said "I
THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE
J. GERALD LEWIS
I am happy to announce that the Jewish Welfare Bureau will con-
duct a two weeks' campaign for funds, beginning Monday, February
18th, 1985, One of our members will call upon you to solicit your
contribution and I trust that you will give generously.
We are all proud of the Welfare Bureau's past services in this
community and we need everyone's help in order that we may carry
on in our work.
Last year our bureau spent $9,000 in caring for the needy. So
many cases that came to our attention needed additional help, but,
owing to insufficient funds, our services in many cases had to be cur-
tailedi We have set a goal to raise $15,000 this year; a modest amount
in a community as large as ours.
No reminder is necessary that poverty, sickness and under-privi-
leged families are in our midst. Transients that find themselves with-
out funds have to be provided for. Our Jewish people have set an
example of caring for their own. We want you to feel that you have
a real interest in our work and that you will accept the responsibility
of feeding and caring for the hungry and dependent.
It is our duty and traditional responsibility to contribute to those
not as fortunate as ourselves. We cannot, we must not, we will not
fail. Your generous contribution will help us.
(Signed) J. GERALD LEWIS.
MAYOR E. (J. SEWELL
know of the splendid work that the
Jewish Welfare Bureau has been
doing in our community. It is
needless for me to say that I wish
the Bureau and all its splendid
workers a full realization of the
needs and wants of the Bureau.
The Jewish people have never
failed when a call for help has
been sounded. I know that the
Jews of Miami will respond to the
call wholeheartedly. I feel sure
that the goal set will be more than
achieved."


WILL YOU GIVE YOUR SHARE-IN FINANCIAL SUPPORT?
Page Tn )
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Sunday, February 17. 11,35'
wJewisti IFIIondlaain
IXORIDA S OXLT JEW Ml WtEIXY
PUBLISHED IV ESI FSIDAT
b7 ta
JEWISH PLORID1A.V Pl'BLlSHBiG CO.
P. O. B.i :i 1
Newi Tower Bldf. Miami. FU. Phone 2-3JM
li S. w. ilia -.
iDrroiXAL omcHi:
urn
J. LOUIS SHOCHET. Bailor
PEBD K. 9HOCHET. Orralatiaa Mau(
CANTOR BORIS SCHLACHMAN
Field Representative
I U >- CJ
min: Job ItM. at Um Poat Off lea at Miaimt
uadar Act uf March I. I' .
WEST PALM BEACH
8AMUEL SCHUTZER
Repreier. :'.
ST. PETERSBUBG
MRS. MAE BENJAMIN
Representative
ORLANDO
IRENE BRAVERMAN
Representative
TAMfA
MRS. M. H. KISLiE
Representative
WEST FLORIDA BUSINESS AGENT
S. G. AKOSON
4209 Central Ave., Tampa, FT*.
OaWLlIf HOW
Hi M.a...
Oma Taai
-S1.M
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1935
Vol. INo. 7-A
Shall We Forget Our Own?
Just a word to those men and women from all parts of
the country who are now pleasantly sojourning within our
mid~t. These men and women who we welcome to Greater
Miami with open arms happy to see them enjoy that
great gift of God sunshine, climate, an opportunity to
get awaj from the rigors of the North ... to live, if even
for a ~-h>rt time, in God's own country.
During the next week, beginning Monday, Februarj Is.
the Jewish Welfare Bureau, which takes care of the poor
and needy in this area will make 'he rounds, of the city
to ask for heln for financial support of your fellow men
and women who are le> fortunate than you We sincerely
hope that \ou will not turn them down that you will not
say to them that you have those of your own cities and towns
to aid.
The records of the Jewish Welfare Bureau are replete
with cases where help has been requested and full-heartedly
i\en. not to those of Miami, but to those of the very same
cities and towns that you live in You are blessed that you
are able to coine to our fair shores to enjoy your winter stay
. .. others are less fortunate you think in terms of pleas-
ure they think in terms of bread and life.
Receive these solicitors with that spirit that is truly and
really Jewish give as much as you can give more than
you think you can but give it freely, voluntarily and with
a smile encourage the solicitor to continue his work .
and get to work for a little while yourself get your friends
to help along.
MOTHER AND CHILD
ARE FOUND STARVING
Last night local authorities found
a woman and infant child at the
corner of Fifth ave. and Fourth -:..
northwest, in a semi-conscious con-
diti n. Mother and child were
rushed to the hospital, where it
was found that they had nc-ared
I irvation. An Inves-
n showed that the woman
and child v I ish and tb
ir.d and father had deserted
them and left them penniless. The
worn:.: -<: picked
up in refuse cam and had let the
child ar death for lack of
food. She said she had applied to
I urned down and re-
. help. It
the woman ar.'i U recover.
THIS DID NOT THIS
COULD NOT HAPPEN IN MI-
AMI ... The Jewish Welfare Bu-
reau recently was advised of a case
wherein a Jewish woman and in-
fant child, sick, undernourished,
had been deserted by the husband
and father. The mother a- un-
able to work because of her phys-
ical condition. What did the Jew-
ish Welfare Bureau do? The
mother and child are being main-
tained, as they deserve, until the
mother will recover her strength
and be able to take a position, go
to work and support her child. In
the meantime e\ery effort will be
made to locate the husband and
father.
Of course this could happen .
if the Jewish Welfare Bureau did
nut exist in Miami.
Hearts of Women
Work
in
"G I morning, Mrs. Silverman,
how are you?" I am greeted one
morning as I answer the door bell,
by a pleasant little woman.
I had met several t mes. "What
can I do for you?" I respond. And
in a few w r i- I learn the m
. She's just one of the
( women of the Ladies' Aux-
iliary f the Jewish W<
reau, out daily to try and get in-
dies of cast-off clothing, and
:. :- ...
A vis:: to the rum magi
the Ladies' Aux liary at 167 N. W.
Fifth st. is a real education. Sit-
uated on the edge of the negro sec-
tion of Miami, it is filled from time
to time with clothing of every kind
and description. Shirts for
dresses for women unmention-
- -. tr users, suits .
everything that one could think of
. the women sitting there pa-
tiently mending the clothing s:
that more money may be realized
... to watch the sales one woulJ
that these women's very
lives depended on their getting an-
other dime, another nickel or even
r penny for the merchan-
. .
I was astounded when I learned
that were it not for thi Rummagi*
rat4 I by -.he Ladies' Aux-
Bureau ul I
. ge sum :' m n
. trulj .1
bef ...
was r-
eral years ago ': -
. t i at 1 arr; a iu
: k '. I
led 1 rtey if it
buj
I pi ,.:
and
i he La-
lies' Au :. Mr-.
-
-

the c......
been spons I, lai
been carried out .... ill-
ture class undei M Bertha B,
luring th
ASKS JEWS AGAIN
TO ANSWER CALl
Have Duty to Perform. Tradition to Carry on and Reputation
to Sustain. Says Rabbi Shapiro
It ha] lat in Ami
Miami Ji
life, pride in labeling our-
ilized
allenge
11s! What do we mean by it?
isuming we
kn w what that Does
iization mean "Kapotes"
for brides,
men's
club? Does it mean Jewish cook-
od pronounced
"Kugel" r "keegel"' (The last
. vital It ac-
y congregational di-
visions in many cities.) There is
sailor who
n an unknown coast. "Are
RABBI MAX SHAPIRO
und here savage or
.
: .
tting in a
swearing and playing cards. ]
"Thank God," he said, "thi;. an
civilized."
A good civilized Jew must be-
lieve in the purposiveness of Jew-
ish existence, that the existence ol I
the Jew is intended to -
purpose, that it is not merely at
accident of physical pignv
or geographic orientation. He ha-
a part to play, a part so noblj
expounded by the Prophets and the
Sages of Israel. He is here to af-
firm and espouse, as Jew, tht
moral greatness of the Hebrew civ-
ilization.
There is the practical element
which may be regarded as the
translation of the belief in the pur.
posiveness of Jewish existence. Ii
is necessary not only to believe,
but to act on that belief, to give
tangible expression of it by
loyalty, by participation in
deavors which make for the pres-
ervation of the Jewish peo;
J< ish culture.
If disaster threatens a portion
of our people here in Miami, it is
our duty to extend help, not mere-
tse of a humanitarian mo-
tive, but because it is our t
ty to safeguard the physical
f the Jewish peo;
t may properly be able
challenges us to deed!
It prompts us
elfare of our bretl
always ; e< n an
Miai hearken to "
ft Welfare I
Once more give of you:
ally, unselfish'.;.
. and the blessings < :' G.:
be upon you.
n... Engler, assisted by other coed
.. Mrs. J. L. women from time to time. a:e ll
Mrs. Rattner and Mrs. J. (Continued on Page
Team Workers in the 1935 Campaign for the
Jewish Welfare Bureau
Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan
Rabbi S, If. Machtei
Rabbi David I. Rosensloom
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Rabbi Julius Washer
J. Gerald Lewis
Stanley C. Myers
Mark Max
Baron de Hirsch Meyer
Dr. A. E. Rosenthal
Nathan Ada'.man
Day J. Apte
Philip Liberman
Norman J. Mirsky
Pincu- Scheiaberg
Mrs. D. J. Apte
Mrs. Morris Dubler
Mrs. H. N. Levy
Mrs. Alex Miller
Mrs. Harry N>
Mrs. Meyer Schwartz
Mrs. R S mpson
Mrs. Harry Z. Silverman
- '
MEN'S DIVISION
Benj. Axelroad
R. R. Adler
Sam Blank
Arthur Berel
Leonard Barr
Henry Bulbin
Morris Cowen
Herbert U. Feibelman
Bernard Feldman
Sol Go'.dstrom
Max Hoffman
Herbert E. Kleiman
Abe Kurman
lac Levin
Harry I. Lipton
WOMEN'S DIVISION
Mrs. I. Weinstein
Mrs. Stanley C. Myers
Mrs. Morris Cowen
Mrs. J. A. Ratner
Mrs. Isidor Cohen
Mrs. L. Hartz
Mm Jules Perlman
Mrs. P.. R. Adler
Mrs. Marvin Bronner
Harold Landfield
J. M. Lipton
Harry Magid
Max Rappaport
Meyer Rauzin
I. Roth
Morris Rubin
David Slann
Tobias Simon
Julius Simpson
Milton Weiner
I*o Ackerman
Leon Lichtenstetter
Jesse D. Scheinman
Abe Aronoritz
Mrs. Mark Max
Mrs. Ida Optner
Mrs. Max Ghertler
Mrs. C. Greenfield
Mrs. J. Gerald Lewis
Mrs. H. E. Kleiman
Mrs. Henry Bulbin
Mrs. H. I. Homa


WILL YOU GIVE YOUR SHARE-IN SERVICE?
ISunday, February 17, 1935
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Page Three
WHAT YOUR MONEY
DID IN PAST YEAR
One is often asked at the Jewish
(Welfare Bureau what is done with
the money? He cares not for the
Ireconstrucion of the dependent into
|one of independent ... he cares
not for the alleviation of suffering
. or the clothing of the naked
or the feeding of the hungry
I. nor does he desire to know and
[learn of the words of cheer and
comfort that mean so much to the
sore and distressed, to the heart-
veary and soul-oppressed ... to
Isuch inquirers, so that they, too,
nay answer others the follow-
ing statistical report is submitted:
[Report of Receipts and Disburse-
ments From October 1, 1933, to
Oct. 31, 1934:
Receipts: Campaign, |3,426.50;
|Ladies' Auxiliary, ? 1,727.50; Ball
account, $1,066.19; Community
:hest, $268.91; dues, $424; out-of-j
town organizations, $918; New'
fear's donations, $145.80; dona-
tions, $170.98; Ponce de Leon sup-
ker, $.'178.50; refund monetary re-
lief. $162.50; weekly allotment,
$111; loans, $:i87; transportation,
$ll.">.8(i; school lunches, $29; medt- j
cine, $7.66; expenses, 23 cents; I
telegrams, $4.06Total, $9,247.63.
Disbursements: Weekly allot-
ment, $3,493.90; monetary relief,
$1,525.86; transportation, $317.03;
medicine, $123.91; school lunches,
$177.25; loans, $700; salary, 1,-
311; office transportation, $107.90;
telephone, $107.16; telegraph,
$29.95; postage, $78.35; miscella-
neous expenses, $154.39; printing
and secretary supplies, $12.50;
rent, $150Total, $8,289.20. Cash
on hand October 31, 1934, $958.43.
Social Service, 850 Families: Of-
five interviews, 1,172; collateral in-
terviews, 2,279; collateral visits,
784; home visits, 293; transients,
162; jail cases, 20; medical, 63;
transportation, 16; out-of-town in-
quiries, 48; new cases, 107; re-
opened cases, 15.
RELIEF OF POOR
r.RF
ri/i
T r|jTY
But Charity Also Must Attempt to Remove Cause of Suffer-
ing, Says Rabbi Machtei
Iron break.s stone; fire melts
iron, water extinguishes fire; the
clouds consume water; the storm
dispels clouds; man withstands the
storm; fear conquers man; wine
banishes fear; sleep overcomes
wine, and death is the master of
sleep; but "Charity," says Solomon,
"saves from death."
HUMANITY FACES
GREATEST TEST
Response for Those in Need Will Tell How We Meet It, Says
Rabbi Rosenbloom
Charity is universal. No one is
immune from a feeling of pity or
sympathy at the sight of human
misery ami unhappiness. It is a
trait that we draw into our systems
With our mother's milk. Malad-
justments and misfits of society
lore re probably always and every-
where catered to and extended a
helping hand. Efforts were always
made to lift them out of the pit
of oblivion, a fate to which they
Would have otherwise been doomed.
1 ,- '
EiMfinJ Bk '
f HBA9*DA
I
M ^^ >W
m n 1W 4
1
-2pi i*m p-f '
.'AJ*3|

ABB! DAVID I. ROSENBLOOM
he notable exception we know of
in recorded history is that of the
otorious Sodom and Gomorrah,
Wlic-c inhabitants were presum-
ably innoculated with an antidote
to the sensation which spontaneous-
ly arises in the human breast when
It is exposed to spectacles of bio-
logical agony and pain.
The masters of our faith have
realized this. Our sages, there-
i fore, framed a unique and hither-
I to unparalleled philosophy in fa-
I vor of the submerged tenth of so-
ciety. It may be summed up in
the one Hebrew word, Zedakkah,
which is usually rendered! righ-
teousnesa or justice. The dole
given to the poor and downtrod-
den is not a matter of grace. Juda-
ism names it simply justice. The
destitute are entitled to the sup-
port derived from society. The
prophets recognize that destitu-
tion was fundamentally a conse-
quense of social and economic ex-
ploitation. And since we are all
brothers, children of one God, no
one may assume the right to op-
press his fellow. Then the poor
man has a distinct share in the
wealth of the rich. His sweat and
energy went into the making of the
prosperity owned by the man who
stands above him in, society. Those
then who were ill-treated by grim
fate were, nevertheless, not to be
denied a minimum, at least, of
life's blessings. They are not to
be condemned to extinction because
they failed to manipulate condi-
tions so as to swell their belong-
ings. They are not cursed and
despised of God. They are merely
the victims of an unbalanced so-
cial structure, which permitted the
enrichment of the few at the ex-
i pense of th many. A person, then,
I who has amassed a fortune auto-
matically becomes a trustee ap-
pointed by God to administer His
wealth.
Existence in this world requires
the co-operation and mutual help
on the part of all its creatures, but
more especially of the human
family.
The term "rehabilitation" came the funds of a charitable organiza-
into common usage only since the tion the one avenue which contrib-
World War. It was applied to utes to tne lasting benefits to the
the efforts of the United States
government to restore to their for-
mer station, rank, position and
usefulness in the sense of economic
productiveness ana self-support,
those of the disabled veterans who
could be trained in a trade or pro-
fession, wherein their physical
handicaps would not hinder them
in gainful occupation. The idea
was acclaimed as a great forward
stride, an advantage over the com-
pensation paid these men during
their sickness and periods of idle-
ness.
Maimonides, the 800th anniver-
sary of whose birth is celebrated
this year, classified Tzedokoh into
eight groups. He assigned the
first and highest position to that
form of assistance which helps the
one in need to re-establish him-
self as a productive and self-sup-
poring member of the community.
In the methods of administering j recipient and
HEARTS OF WOMEN
IN WORK
(Continued From Page 2)
unceasing and untiring in their
efforts to keep the Rummage Sale
supplied with merchandise, and the
coffers of the Jewish Welfare Bu-
reau supplied with funds. The
dues to the Ladies' Auxiliary are
only three dollars annually. Meet-
i ings are held monthly and are in-
| teresting, too.
Of course, the Ladies' Auxiliary
j of the Jewish Welfare Bureau are
just women but they're im-
bued with a love for their fellow
man.
RABBI S. M. MACHTEI
to society is that
As a garment is made up of sin-
gle threads, so every single gift
aids in building the great work of
oharity.
phase of the work devoted to re-
habilitation.
Make a man independent; re-
store to him his earning power;
"put him on his own," and you have
restored to him the greatest of all
giftsconfidence in himself, cour-
age, hope. Temporary financial re-
lief is merely "Chayai Sho'oh"
life for an hour. Remove the need
for charity by rehabilitating the
individual and you have given him
what God endowed him with
"Chayai Olam"eternal life.
You have that Divine power. Ex-
ercise it. Support the Jewish Wel-
fare Bureau.
WANTED--
PARTNERS!
Are there men and women of vision and faith in Greater Miami who
are willing to become partners in one of the greatest undertakings in recent
days in this section?
We want only those who have an abiding faith in their fellow men
. who can see the good rather than the bad in men and women of their
own blood one who can look past the immediate present, and visualize
the future that is bound to come who can look into the faces of men
and women, and disregarding their personal appearances, their clothing
and surroundings, still realize and conceive their true values and charac-
ters those who will not disregard their less fortunate brethren and
scorn them .
We want partners in the business of rehabilitating men and women
... we want partners in the business of alleviating the sufferings of man-
kind ... we want partners in the business of feeding the hungry, clothing
the naked.
WE WANT PARTNERS IN THE 1935 CAMPAIGN TO AID OUR
FELLOW JEWS
Apply to
The Jewish Welfare Bureau
Safe Deposit Kldg.
MIAMI, FLORIDA
- Mtw.<-*< > *^w#
"Blessed is he who considereth the poor, the Lord will remember him in time of trouble"
Ps. xli.


GIVE GENEROUSLY AND NOW!
Page Pour
THE JEWISH FI.ORIDIAN
Sunday, February 17, 1986
A CHALLENGE TO
JEWISH IDEALISM
To He a Jew Means Sacrifices for Faith and People. Declares
Rabbi Julius Washer
Modern people have been in re- doing what seemed to be to them
cent years reducing their religion
RABBI JULIUS WASHER
to ever ami ever simpler term*.
until it consists of little more than Imum of giving.
their duty." So. too, has it been
m the field of philanthropies. In-
variably when we approach men
for some philanthropic endeavor
they tell us. "I believe I have al-
ready done my 'duty-." He will go
a step further and tell us that "I
am a good Jew, for have I not al-
ready given my contribution?" As
a general rule we may say that
the man who gives such an an-
swer has done or has given very
little in comparison with what he
actually should do.
In this respect how different are
the generations. There were days
when people spoke and' acted in
terms of the maximum of faith, and
the spirt of their generation was
not "how little." but "how much."
In our days, however, our thesis is.
"How little can we believe, and
how little can we give?"
In this appeal for the Jewish
Welfare Bureau, the challenge is
definitely laid before us to revert
to a maximum of faith and a max-
Rummage Sales Store of the Jewish Welfare Bureau. In picture are Mrs. Julius Simpson, MrsJ .
JH.rtz Mrs. J.EnBler and Mrs. J.Rattner, all enthusiastic and act.ve workers for the Ladies
Auxiliary Rummage sales.________________________:_______________
the children and wife are taken The boy must be given
care of by the Bureau.
unhesitatingly responds, and he
will be taken care of. He is all
alone in this world. Of course.
the Bureau will supply food and
maintenance.
Yes. it's a beautiful child,
healthy and one that would cheer are both in their late sixties, they
the home of anyone. It was aban- say. I suggest they are older,
of the Jewish Welfare Bureau. "No. doned shortly after birth by both They have tried their best, but .
n the least, providing you mother and father and has been at now they have no food, no cloth-
don't interfere and keep me from thi C ant) H ipital since then. It ing just
Spending a Day
"You don't mind if I sit around
and watch your work for a while
. do you. Mrs. Rose?" said I
to the genial executive secretary
I cannot help but think of the tppfc work they ,eave
the chance Just one ray of sunshine .
truly by "people of mercy" are
And here come some young men. these unfortunates taken care of.
They came to seel
prayer we recite on Yom Kippur afe "not tne ngua] wandering kind
in the synagogue. "Forsake me wh0 tramp along they are sin- Charity is more valuable than
not in my old age." Husband and cere food and lodging, at least sacrifices, and alone equals the ex-
wife tell their pitiable story. They until their case can be investigated, ercise of all religious forms.
must be given some are sent-------------------------
home they cannot be left to Even he who lives upon charity
starve should practice benevolence.
I. who thought I was case-hard- ------------------------
ened ... I begin to break ... I The practice of beneficence will
cannot stand this kaleidoscopic un- assure the maintenance of ones
a bit of flotsam on
my work too much." was the an- must have a home that will be of the tide of life ... The Bureau
swer. "17. promise to behave." the fini where the child will will answer the age-old prayer. It
was my reply, and I tat down receive thi proper care." An ap- cannot forsake them.
A .'. .. .. yjjj, -..;.. ; | .... pt ;- of this little Here is a problem that is con-
eomes in a cheerful greeting girl just a little more than a year tinually recurring. Who will not
and then the story unfolds ... a Id resulti childlesi 1 risk their all for a bit of life? Wb
blind man. a wife splendid reputati n adopting it will not stake everything when
infani child h tries to And so thi* little waif is provided health is at the danger point? A
> at meager livt y sell- a home by the Bureau. father, m ther and three children.
I cann I help but avert my face They don't belong in Miami. A boy Dr. Kaplan Says Those Who Fail to Give to Jewish Philan
folding of suffering and distress possessions.
ALL NOT IN NEED
SHOULD AID DRIVE
street .
f discussioi I is get
I ng ah ng
'-: ... "We".'.
There's a husband a wife and two just eleven years old suffering
children. The husband is a victim from rheumatic fever of the heart.
Iread at "white His ONLY char, The
it wi ran for : a." he Is plague." tu (is, and must be familj ry all
, The Bureau will pay rent, sent to Denver if he is tc have a t< giv -nee .
suppl) food, clothing and other ne- char for his life. The wife and n w they're here. It's
ch a are penniless and must! be pr blem. But it la l I The
fed ai Doee the Bureau, husbar.i is returned to the N rth
thropies Lack Social Conscience
mes ai ag
ceMities
Hen .
He is in
Mrs.
try that has OFFICIALLY recog-
ved. and the BUREAU WILL MAIN- j cial MIXDEDXESs! nized 'L America is begins
Befori he must
For ::: ..:. : : art the
fon I i w rl i
great isa esson, the
The world IS beginning to learn
the meaning of SOCIAL MIND-
EDXESS, Russia is the only c on-
So TAIN THE FAMILY UNTIL THE
The husband is sent to Denver, and HUSBAND CAN" FIND WORK
====== 1) IT,
For the purpose of maintaining the work of the JEWISH WELFARE BUREAU
OF Ml \MI. Fl ORIDA. and in consideration of the participation of others I hereby
; lPI EDGE A CONTRIBI HON OP J
[ ] {APPL1 FOR a MEMBERSHIP $

Contributions, life and Memberships are payable a- indica ted by donor.
1 herewith: $ in SO days: $ in M da>>.
S 1MB
ADDRESS
"Let thy hand be wide open for the distre ssed"
Just ':' I world
esson. the Jew himself i
RABBI 1>R. JACOB H. KAPLAN
in life
THAT LESSOX.
it somewhat reluctant'.;.'.
Humanity is a co-operativv
which means we must be-
dly minded, which n
lo the RIGHT thing by
AND our fellow D
should not have t
lo justice, whi
people call charity, is bis very
: reason for his living.
The JEWISH WELFARE BC-
REAU ng a drive for
- week, and any Jew who does
- : thank the committee f r -
m the opportunity to C "-
fund of right"
- f s :a! mindedness, -
ing in the very elementary D "-
. im.
T my way of thinking ther- n
- ; lack this -
--. this sense of th<
:' helping less fortunate
ren.
If the committees will d"
I feel morally certain th
U do theirs.
REMEMBER:
(::-. Pays
ruary 18-85
GIVE:
To Those Who Have Nothing-
Help Them Survive.