The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03125

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
J Volume 61 Number 52
Miami, Florida Friday. December 23, 1988
fndSlfch*
Price 50 Cents
Labor /Likud Establish Unity Government
EMPTY SEATS. The Israeli delegation's seats remained empty during Palestinian leader
Yasir Arafat's recent address before the United Nations General Assembly meeting in
Geneva. The Geneva location was prompted by the U.S. government's refusal to allow Arafat
into this country to speak at UN headquarters in New York City. (AP/Wide World Photo.)
No Tolerance for Terrorism
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) If
future acts of terrorism are
traceable to the Palestine Lib-
eration Organization, the
I'nited States will expect
those involved to be expelled
from the PLO, the State
Department's top specialist on
the Middle East said.
In such a scenario, the
I'nited States "will expect the
FLO leadership to disassociate
itself from the terrorist act
and to take disciplinary action,
"including expelling those
involved from the organiza-
tion," said Richard Murphy,
assistant secretary of state for
Near Eastern and South Asian
affairs. He spoke on ABC-TVs
"This Week with David Brink-
ley" program.
President-elect George Bush
reiterated that position when
he told a news conference that
opening a dialogue with the
PLO does not mean the United
States is softening its opposi-
tion to terrorism.
"I don't care whether it
comes from a faction of the left
or from the center or right or
wherever. I don't think that
we should indicate any willing-
ness to be tolerant of terror-
ism from the PLO," Bush said.
But it appears that the
United States will not hold the
PLO accountable for continued
violence in the Israeli-admini-
stered territories, as it will in
other parts of the world.
Continued on Page 12
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The Labor Party and the Likud
reached agreement to form another unity coalition government,
in which both parties will have equal representation.
The decision, coming seven weeks after indecisive Knesset
elections produced a political stalemate, drew expressions of
anger and disappointment from Labor's left wing and from
Likud's die-hard right.
One key element of the agreement is that if either party
decides to quit, the only alternative will be a new round of
elections, not a narrow coalition with other parties. Another
provision gives each of the two partners veto power over
admitting a third party to their government.
Labor party officials approved the coalition proposal just one
day after Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir persuaded his Likud
party to approve the agreement in a stormy seven-hour meeting
during which members booed and jeered.
The ultra-Orthodox parties and most of those on the far right
of the political spectrum are furious. Politicians from the
religious bloc realize that the elaborate promises made them by
Likud negotiators in recent weeks have been largely nullified by
the agreement with Labor. They accused Likud of "betrayal."
One of the religious parties, Degel Hatora, has brought suit
against Likud for breach of contract. "It's our duty to denounce
ministers who sign agreements only to cancel them a few days
later," said Rabbi Abraham Ravitz, head of Degel Hatora.
Labor and Likud have been dickering for more than a week
over a broad coalition. Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir was
reported earlier to be "fed up" and ready to go with the
extremist parties.
The breakthrough reportedly came when Likud acquiesced to
a Labor demand that one of its people would chair the influential
Knesset Finance Committee.
Shimon Peres, the Labor Party leader, already had agreed to
relinquish the office of foreign minister, which he has held for
the past two years. He will become finance minister in the new
government.
Continued on Page 24
TIP-OFF___________________________
Palestine Liberation Organization leader Yasir Arafat,
speaking in an interview with the Yugoslav newspaper,
Politika was asked if he believed a Palestinian state would
exist in five years.
"If God is willing, it will be within two years," Arafat
reportedly told the paper. Ending a one-day visit to Belgrade,
the latest stop in an international tour to gain support for an
independent Palestine, Arafat said the PLO is working on the
creation of a provisional government-in-exile.
Ambassador Meir Rosenne:
On Bonds, Arafat & PLO Covenant
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
One test of solidarity
amongst Diaspora Jewry and
the Jewish homeland will be
the upcoming Israel Bonds
campaign, said Meir Rosenne,
former Israeli ambassador to
the United States.
Rosenne, who spoke to The
lewith Floridian during a
recent visit to Miami, was
appointed to succeed Gen.
Vehudah Halevy as head of the
worldwide Israel Bonds
1 'r^anization beginning Jan. 1.
Rosenne, who served as his
nation's chief diplomatic envoy
to the U.S. from 1983 to 1987,
will become the organization's
president and chief executive
officer.
"Israel Bonds today are
more important than before
because these investments are
needed in order to enable
Israel to solve some of its
social problems, to provide
Meir Rosenne
jobs for emigrants and to
strengthen the economy of the
country."
Making reference to the
wars Israel has had to fight,
Rosenne said that Bonds are
especially important because a
large segment of Israel's
budget ia invested in the
defense of the country.
Tensions between Israeli
and Diaspora Jewry have
mounted over the proposed
amendment of Israel's Law of
Return. Although Miami Jew-
ish Federation leader Donald
Lefton has said this commun-
ity intends to remain firm in
its broad support of Israel,
Jewish leaders from other cit-
ies say the political rift on the
so-called "Who Is A Jew"
issue may tighten American
purse strings.
"At a time when our ene-
mies are creating the impres-
sion of a rift between Israel
and the Diaspora, the Bonds
campaign is a test of the soli-
darity of the Jews of the Dias-
pora with the state of Israel,"
Rosenne said.
Asked about recent reports
of a possible reduction in the
U.S. aid to Israel which has
withstood previous threats of
reduction and maintained an
annual allocation of $1.2 billion
in economic and $1.8 billion in
military aid Rosenne said,
"I'm not worried at all."
"This is certainly one of the
best investments of the U.S.
government," Rosenne
declared. "The U.S. spends
$150 billion for defense of
Europe and Asia and has
hundreds and thousands of
troops stationed there. And
when the United States asked
for overflight rights in order to
bomb Libya, not one of its
allies in Europe granted them
these rights."
Rosenne's trip to America
last week came amidst major
U.S. policy decisions: refusal
of a visa for Palestine Libera-
tion Organization leader Yasir
Arafat to enter this country
and the change in long-
standing American policy that
Continued on Page 2


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 23, 1988
Security of the American Jew
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) A
career professional in the field
of monitoring anti-Semitic
developments is convinced
that Jewish security is not at
risk in modern America.
Jerome Chanes suggested
there may be "a considerable
quotient of naivete in the wor-
ries of American Jews about
such incidents."
Chanes, associate director
for domestic concerns of the
National Jewish Community
Relations Advisory Council,
offered an in-depth analysis on
"Anti-Semitism in the U.S.:
An Update," in the current
issue of Congress Monthly, the
publication of the American
Jewish Congress, a NJCRAC
affiliate. NJCRAC is an
umbrella agency for 11
national community relations
groups and 113 local commun-
ity councils.
Chanes elaborated on his
analysis in a telephone inter-
view with the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency.
Despite his comment about
"naivete," he stressed to JTA
his strong belief that "the
grass roots" of American
Jewry is reacting to "very real
situations."
He said those Jews "are
constantly telling us profes-
sionals important things, and
my view is that we profession-
als should be listening to them
very carefully, as we always
try to do."
But with that axiom stated
for the professionals, he said
he would reiterate his belief
that "the fundamental secur-
ity of American Jews, and of
other minority groups,
remains strong in this
society."
Chanes said that "instances
of anti-Semitism and Jewish
security can be viewed as con-
centric circles and thus inti-
mately related."
Nevertheless, he added, it
was vital to make a distinction
between Jewish security and
the occurrence of a number of
anti-Semitic incidents which
might be perceived as a threat
to that security.
For very real reasons, he
declared, Jewish historical
experiences often lead to very
strong reactions by Jews to
such incidents.
But at the same time, "there
is evidence from a range of
data on different criteria
which we use to measure the
seriousness of a given anti-
Semitic act," that Jewish
security remains strong in
America.
FndShoeket
Phone: (305) 373-4605
Published weekly every Friday
since 1927 by The Jewish Florl-
dian. Office and Plant 120 N.E.
6th St., Miami, FL 33132. Phone
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its columns.
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$18.00. Out of town, country
upon request. By mail $1.45 per
copy.
The bulk of his Congress
Monthly analysis concerned
hostile developments he felt
Jews should be properly con-
cerned about.
Chanes listed the Aryan
Nations and The Order, two
white-supremicist groups, bro-
ken up by federal prosecution.
He reported that the number
of anti-Semitic incidents had
increased slightly in the
United States during the past
two years, and that political
anti-Semitism "occasionally
raised its abhorrent head."
Other examples were the
Steve Cokely episode in Chi-
cago, in which the then aide to
Mayor Eugene Sawyer
asserted that Jewish doctors
were injecting black babies
with AIDS, and "the anti-
Semitic fallout" created by the
Martin Scorscese film on
Jesus.
Chanes also cited evidence of
anti-Semitic attitudes among
blacks, stemming perhaps
from the feeling that Jews
were excluding them from
competition for professional
and academic opportunities.
Nevertheless, he declared,
"one can't escape the statis-
tics."
He said the long-term down-
ward trend of anti-Semitism
during recent years with
occasional blips, such as the
increase during the past two
years had continued during
recent years and that most
observers expected the down-
ward trend to continue.
Surveys of attitudes have
substantiated findings "that
the level of conventional anti-
Semitic beliefs held fast to its
40-year decline.
Chanes said American Jews
could feel confident for their
security derived from the
"societal constraints that are
inherent in American society,
that derive from a history and
tradition of constitutional pro-
tections and that inform and
foster voluntarism, remain
strong in this country,."
He declared that while his-
tory "teaches us there is nei-
ther reason or place for com-
placency, this fact, reinforced
by the patterns of recent
years, presages well for the
rights of individuals and
groups in our society."
Rabbi Abraham Korf, director of Lubavitch/Chabad act unties in
Florida, arranged for a private forklift to light a Chanukah
menorah behind Miami Beach City Hall. Joining Korf. second
from left, lighting the menorah on Dec. 7 are Mami Beach Mayor
Alex Daoud, Commissioners Abe Resnick and Ben Grenald.
Bonds, Arafat & PLO Covenant
Continued from Page 1
formerly had rejected direct
U.S. discussions with the PLO.
Rosenne said U.S. Sec. of
State George Shultz's decision
to deny Arafat the visa was
"undoubtedly in conformity
with American law, since
American law prohibits the
entry in American territory of
terrorists."
But asked about the Reagan-
Bush-Shultz sea change tow-
ard the PLO in last week's
flurry of events, Rosenne
shrugged and said, "Ask
American authorities."
"As far as Israel is con-
cerned, we hope that the U.S.
will realize that it was a mis-
take and will change its deci-
sion concerning negotiations
with the PLO," the diplomat
added.
Rosenne says the change in
U.S. policy has caused Israel
concern about the "credibil-
ity" of the U.S. commitment to
Israel. Rosenne, who helped
draft the Camp David Accords
and the critical "three condi-
tions" that would determine
the U.S. recognition of the
PLO, said Arafat's statements
all fall short of not only Israeli,
but U.S. conditions, as well.
Arafat did not recognize
Israel's right to exist, Rosenne
said. "This would be done only
by changing the Palestinian
Charter," which calls for
Israel's destruction. None of
the preceeding week's events
resulted in a PLO statement of
renunciation of its charter or
consideration of amending its
charter.
"The test is changing the
covenant and secondly by hav-
ing a test to see if he really
stops terrorist attacks. Forty-
eight hours ago there was a
(terrorist) attack against
Israel in Jerusalem." This
came after the U.S. Adminis-
tration's decision to initiate
conversations with the PLO.
"I don't think Arafat repre-
sents all the Palestinians. If he
is the leader of the Palestini-
ans and terrorist attacks stop"
it is one situation, Rosenne
said. "And if he is not the
representative, why negotiate
with him? By negotiating with
him you deter other Palestini-
ans" from taking active roles
in the negotiations process.
Rosenne said the lack of a
formation of a coalition gov-
ernment during these recent
developments is not a factor in
the U.S.'s aggressive move.
"Because on this issue (in
Israel) there is national unity,"
Rosenne said.
"The decision of the U.S. to
negotiate with the PLO is in
the opinion of the Israel gov-
ernment a mistake and is not
going to help in the peace
process. Because Arafat did
not give up terrorism and the
recognition of Israel had to be
adopted in a formal resolution
of the Palestine National
Council, since the provision
concerning the aim of the PLO
to destroy the State of Israel is
included in the Palestinian
covenant of 1985.
"The fact that Arafat states
in a press conference that he
recognizes the state of Israel
would not revoke a provision
of the Palestinian covenant."
So it appears Israel has more
to be skeptical about than Ara-
fat, according to Rosenne.
"The way the decisions were
taken these last days and espe-
cially the interpretation given
as to the Arafat acceptance of
the three conditions of the
U.S., casts a doubt as to the
credibility of international
commitment," Rosenne said.
A career diplomat "not a
politician" the Rumanian-
born Rosenne, emigrated to
Israel in 1944 and participated
in the War of Independence at
the age of 17.
Having served the Israel
government since 1956, includ-
ing the consul of Israel in New
York from 1961 to 1967, coor-
dinator of the Israel Atomic
Energy Commission from
1969 to 1971, Rosenne will
now undertake the new chal-
lenge with Bonds, which has
mobilized over $9 billion in the
past 37 years.
By next year, Rosenne and
world Jewry will see whether
the 1988 campaign which
raised $605 million interna-
tionally, will be topped.
World Conference on Soviet Jewry: Shoshana S. Cardxn. right
chairman of the National Conference on Soviet Jewry; and
Simcha Dinitz, chairman of the executives of both the World
Zionist Organization and the Jewish Agency for Israel, at a
session of the International Council of the World Cm "rence on
Soviet Jewry, held in Jerusalem.
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Sen. John Tower:
Defense Appointment
Solid on Israel
Friday, December 23, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 3
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Former Sen. John Tower
(R-Texas) is expected to work
to increase the strategic coop-
eration between Israel and the
I'nited States while support-
ing continued arms sales to
Arab countries, if the Senate
confirms him as the new
secretary of defense.
Tower, who was named to
head the Pentagon by Presi-
dent-elect George Bush had a
record of support for Israel
and Soviet Jewry during his 24
years in the Senate.
Even before Bush's election
in November, Tower had been
expected to be named to the
post he has long sought. But
the announcement, expected
weeks ago, had been held up
by rumors about Tower's per-
sonal life, his closeness to
defense contractors and the
push by some Bush advisors
for someone with management
experience at a time of fiscal
austerity.
Bush said that Tower had
received a "clean bill of
health" and will be stronger in
his new job because of the
intensive investigation he had
undergone.
Tower, who was chairman of
the Senate Armed Serices
Committee during President
Reagan's first term, when
Republicans controlled the
Senate, has visited Israel eight
times and made five trips to
other Middle East countries.
He was a strong supporter of
the development of strategic
cooperation during the Reagan
administration, in the belief
that Israel is the major ally in
preventing Soviet influence in
the Middle East.
Tower was considered
influential in the adoption of
the strong plank in support of
Israel at the Republican
National Convention in New
Orleans last August, according
to pro-Israel activists.
He supports foreign aid in
general and aid to Israel in
particular. He also was a
strong supporter of the 1978
Camp David accords, which
led to the Israeli-Egyptian
peace treaty.
Tower was one of 76 senat-
ors who wrote President Ger-
ald Ford a letter in 1974
objecting to his "reassess-
ment," which held up arms
sales to Israel. He was also
critical of the Carter adminis-
tration in 1980 for the U.S.
vote in favor of a UN Security
Council condemning Israel's
settlement policy. President
Jimmy Carter later apologized
for the U.S. vote.
But Tower has not sup-
ported congressional moves
urging the United States to
move its embassy in Israel
from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, on
the grounds that this is a deci-
sion to be made by the presi-
dent, not Congress.
Tower was quoted in 1981 as
supporting a "balanced policy"
in the Middle East. He has
supported all U.S. arms sales
to Arab countries.
In a Senate speech support-
ing the sale of AWACS sur-
veillance planes to Saudi Ara-
bia, Tower stressed that the
United States "has no better
friend in the Middle East than
Israel." He stressed that the
sale to the Saudies did not
jeopardize Israel's security
ana he would never vote for
anything that did.
Tower was first elected to
the Senate in 1961, in a special
election after Lyndon Johnson
gave up his seat to become vice
president. He was the first
Republican senator elected in
Texas since the Reconstruc-
tion era.
In Tel Aviv:
Soviet Spy Sentenced
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) A one-
time Soviet emigre convicted
of espionage was given a nine-
year prison sentence by a Tel
I Aviv district court.
Shabtai Kalmanovitch, who
arrived here from the Soviet
I nion 15 years ago, was found
guilty by a three-judge tri-
bunal of espionage and contact
with a foreign agent.
His minimal nine-year sent-
ence followed plea bargaining
between the defense and pros-
ecution, under which the major
charge of aggravated espion-
age was dropped in return for
pleading guilty to the lesser
charge of espionage. His trial
was closed to the public and
details of the case were barred
from publication.
With the year he has already
served in prison, and one-third
off for good behavior, the 43-
year-old Kalmanovitch should
be free within five years.
There have been rumors
here and abroad that Kalman-
ovitch might be released and
sent back to the Soviet Union,
as part of a three-way
exchange between the Pol-
lards in the United States and
a third unidentified espionage
prisoner who would be
returned to the United States.
CJF Executive Vice President Carmi Schwartz and Associate
Executive Vice President Donald Feldstein review the over
100,000 signatures received to date on petitions opposing any
change in Israel's Law of Return. The petition drive was
organized by the Council of Jewish Federations in cooperation
with its 200 member Federations. All petitions were packaged
and delivered to Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir by a
team of Federation leaders.
Anti-Semitic Graffiti
At South Beach Synagogue... Again
For the second time this year, Beth Tfilah Congregation in
Sou'.h Beach was the target of vandals who desecrated the
four-decade-old synagogue with a swastika, a red spray painted
word "NAZI" and the word "WASP."
About six months ago, the synagogue, plagued like others in
the area by a decreasing membership due to the aging and death
of many of its members, was desecrated when a dozen windows,
including a stained glass window were shattered.
"It's just another in a series of annoying harassments," said
Beth Tfilah spiritual leader Rabbi Israel M. Tropper. "We try to
watch when we can and we asked the police to give a little more
supervision if they can."
Cantor Henry Fuchs noticed the recent markings when he
parked his car in the back lot and noticed the desecration on the
wall.
"I call myself an artist," said Fuchs. "And I believe this
writing is very well known to me from other graffiti artists. It is
the same story, anti-Semitic," he said with sadness. "Nothing
else."
Interfaith Confab To Convene in Zurich
Miles Lerman, a Holocaust
survivor and chairman of the
U.S. Holocaust Memorial
Council's international rela-
tions committee, has been
{appointed national chairman
\of "A Campaign to Remem-
\ber." The Campaign's goal is to
\raise $l/>7 million for the
[construction and endowment of
\the U.S. Holocaust Memorial
luseum adjacent to the
lational Mall in Washington,
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) Jews
and Catholics will gather at a
conference in February to
examine the Christian roots of
anti-Semitism, according to
Rabbi Marc Tanenbaum, chair-
man of the International Jew-
ish Committee for Interfaith
Consultations.
The conference is expected
to initiate work on a Vatican
document that would chal-
lenge Catholic teachings
worldwide.
The conclave, scheduled to
take place Feb. 20 through 24
in Zurich, is expected to be the
first of several meetings that
will discuss the development of
Christian thinking from early
days to present times, includ-
ing how it bears on anti-
Semitism and its relation to
the Holocaust.
The conference is an out-
growth of a meeting held in
Miami on Sept. 11, 1987,
between Pope John Paul II and
206 Jewish leaders. Soon
after, a joint Jewish-Vatican
conference to explore the roots
of Christian anti-Semitism was
approved by the pope.
The conference is condi-
tional on the removal of a
Carmelite convent at Aus-
chwitz to a center away from
the Auschwitz grounds.
This was decided by mem-
bers of the international com-
mittee, the body involved in
Vatican-Jewish negotiations.
The move must be made before
Feb. 20.
Tanenbaum said the upcom-
ing conference would "begin
as a serious scholarly examina-
tion of the history of anti-
Semitism in the Western
world through the ancient, the
medieval and the modern peri-
ods, culminating in the Nazi
Holocaust."
Talks on the long-awaited
document will probably take
several years to complete.
They will involve careful
examination of 11 volumes of
Vatican records of the years
between 1939 and 1945.
Members of the Jewish
group, which meets with
Catholics, explained their
opposition to a conference cen-
tering on the Holocaust.
Rabbi Fabian Schoenfeld, a
member of the committee and
a past president of the Rabbin-
ical Council of America,
explained that the Rabbinical
Council position "tends to
agree with the Hasidic com-
munity," which conducts dia-
logue with Christians only on
social issues and not on theol-
ogy-
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being sent by American Jewish
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organization of the American
Jewish community which
assists people in the develop-
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ous or ethnic background.
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Page 4 The Jewish FIoridian/Friday, December 23, 1988
Viewpoirii
A Forward Step
Responding to appeals both from President
Herzog and top representatives of world
Jewry, Prime Minister Shamir has formed a
coalition government in Israel.
Both the Likud and Labor party leaders had
to overcome major opposition internally to
achieve the new agreement. But the selection
of the top cabinet posts appears to be the most
representative alignment possible.
While Washington seemed to prefer the
Peres stance in favor of an international peace
conference, neither the Reagan-Bush Admin-
istration nor world Jewry is likely to protest
the final coalition.
There are those who have hastily concluded
that the new Israeli government is unable to
meet the challenges inherent in the PLO's new
political power.
A far better attitude is to give both Shamir's
coalition and President-Elect Bush time to set
their respective agendas. What has waited 40
years can wait a few more weeks.
Reaction To The Inevitable
Would that we were wrong.
For 13 years now, the United States has
stood firm in a principled posture neither to
acknowledge, deal nor negotiate with the
Palestine Liberation Organization. Former
Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and
later President Reagan laid the foundation
for any potential dialogue by demanding a
troika of prerequisites: that the PLO explicitly
recognize the State of Israel; that the PLO
renounce rather than simply denounce
terrorism in all its forms; and that the PLO
recognize UN Resolutions 242 and 338 as the
bases for a peace settlement.
Finally, a catch-22 scenario. In spite of the
U.S. insistence that PLO Chairman Yasir
Arafat was too much of a terrorist to be
eligible for a visa for entry purposes, Secret-
ary of State George Shultz was forced to open
talks with the PLO because its recalcitrant
titular head finally uttered the requisite
words.
The open sesame salvo may indeed be a
Pandora's box instead.
Like the mythical figure whose action
released into the world untold ills, the verbal
transaction of this week past will surely have
repercussions rippling on shores far from
landlocked Switzerland.
The first and foremost, from this paper's
perspective, is that Israel should be left
even by perception in a singularly lonely
and isolated political locale. While the United
States has reiterated time and again that its
overture was one of contact rather than
substantive negotiations, it appears on the
world screen that Israel is the last player to
make its entrance.
To add to the isolation, Israel is now being
portrayed as intransigent when in fact its
position is one of self-protection.
In an interview last week with The Jevnsh
Fhridian, Meir Rosenne, former ambassador
from Israel to the United States, suggested
that instead of a three-prong test for the PLO,
as dictated by the U.S., Israel has its own
two-part litmus test to measure PLO sincer-
ity.
>*n*\>
A Shared Response to Catastrophe
By RABBI
MARC H. TANENBAUM
All people of conscience
must share the grief that over-
whelms our Armenian neigh-
bors during these tragic days.
The natural catastrophe of
the earthquake, which has
resulted in the deaths of tens
of thousands and the destruc-
tion of whole villages in Soviet
Armenia, evokes the deepest
feelings of compassion and
human solidarity.
In the Jewish community, I
have found a special sense of
identification with the Arme-
nian people in this trying time.
Both Armenians and Jews
are numerically small people.
As one American Armenian
aptly put it, "Armenia being
such a small country, it doesn't
matter if it's a member of the
family or not. We take our
losses very hard. Every single
member is important."
That could have been a Jew
describing the ethnic closeness
of the Jewish people.
Both Armenians and Jews
have had long and often pain-
ful histories dating back to
biblical times. The Talmud
suggests that there were Jew-
ish communities in Armenia
since the Babylonian disper-
sion.
Armenians, like Jews, have a
homeland and a Diaspora
which figure centrally in their
religious and national consci-
ousness.
In more recent times,
Ambassadors Oscar Straus
and Henry Morgenthau played
crucial roles in seeking to end
the 1915 massacres of Armeni-
ans, and they have become
authentic heroes among know-
ledgeable Armenians
When I was working as con-
sultant on the NBC 1 Y series
"Holocaust" in the lv70s. one
of the first people to respond
with deep understanding of
the Nazi victimization of the
Jews was Archbishop Torkom
Manoogian, primat.' of the
Armenian church. "Armeni-
ans understand Jewish suffer-
ing," he declared publicly.
Now it is our turn to respond
with equal sympathy and car-
ing. The Armenian churches.
and major relief groups listed
in newspapers are key places
to provide help.
In the Jewish community.
the American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee and
the American Jewish World
Service are mobilizing relief
for the Armenian people.
According to Rosenne, Israel needs to see a
change in the PLO covenant which pres-
ently calls for the destruction of a Zionist
presence rather than a vocal recognition.
And in lieu of a verbal renouncement of
terrorism, Israel demands a cessation of the
violence in the administered territories and
elsewhere.
Now, in a clever ploy of diminished expecta-
tions, Arab League spokesmen and other
apologists for the PLO are excusing before
the fact terrorist actions against Zionist
targets. By explaining that Arafat cannot
control radicals within the umbrella organiza-
tion, the chairman may not be held responsible
for any such behavior that does not conform to
the newly revised international persona for
the PLO.
Consequently, Arafat has nothing to lose
according to this thesis. He won't be damned if
he does or doesn't stop the terrorist activities
of his Palestinian cohorts.
That, of course, is not what the United
States is demanding. Ronald Reagan used
language exquisite in its strength: the
renouncement of terrorism must be "perva-
sive and permanent" for the U.S. not to pull
out of these fledgling contacts. We support
that stance, which simply put is that the PLO
must match its words with deeds.
Still to be determined is whether the inti
fada described by one Arab League as
"ennobling" the cause of Palestinian self-
determination will cease. Still to be decided
is how Arafat will be dealt with by radical
forces within his Oriental world. If his "float-
ing constituency" actually sees him as leading
the vanguard out of the third world of realpol-
itick, then perhaps the moves last week will
have been prescient.
Until and unless all appropriate and demo;
cratic demands are met by those former'
terrorists, we cannot but hold out skeptical
hope for a peaceful resolution to the conflict.
Would that we were wrong.
Fred K. Shochet
Editor and Publisher
eJewish Floridian
Suzanne Shochet
Executive Editor
Norma A. Orovitz
Managing Editor
Joan C Teglas
Director ol Advertising
Friday, December 23,1988
Volume 61
15TEVET5749
Number 52


Analysis:
Potential Strain
on U.S./Israel Ties
Friday, December 23, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 5
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The Reagan administration's
decision to open talks with the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion could leave a legacy of
renewed friction between the
United States and Israel for
George Bush, when he
assumes the presidency Jan.
20.
A period of tension may be
ahead between the United
States and Israel, especially if
the talks with the PLO, being
undertaken by Robert Pelle-
treau, the U.S. ambassador in
Tunisia, are seen as going well.
At the same time, the deci-
sion frees the Bush White
House of a commitment to
Israel that has been upheld by
the last three administrations,
since it was first made in 1975
by then-Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger.
Kissinger said on ABC-TV
that the 1975 commitment for-
malized existing U.S. policy
not to hold talks with the PLO
until it accepts Israel's right to
exist and U.N. Security Coun-
cil Resolutions 242 and 338.
The Reagan administration
added the demand that the
PLO renounce terrorism in all
its forms.
Secretary of State George
Shultz, at a news conference
announced that the United
States was ready to open a
"substantive dialogue" with
the PLO, since it had met
these conditions. After
Shultz's announcement, both
President Reagan and Presi-
dent-elect Bush said they sup-
ported the decision.
But Shultz made clear that
he will not himself talk with
PLO leader Yasir Arafat or
other PLO officials. He said
the Arabic-speaking Pelle-
treau is "the only authorized
channel of communications"
with the PLO. For anyone else
to engage in the dialogue
would be a decision of the next
administration.
"Now what may evolve from
this remains to be seen," he
said. "But I think when it
comes to any genuine substan-
tive discussion, we are in a
transition phase, and it is basi-
cally for the next administra-
tion to decide what to do."
Shultz conceded that Israel
will not negotiate with the
PLO, even if meets the U.S.
conditions.
"It's totally for Israel to
make its own decisions about
what it wants to do, and
there's nothing to be inferred
judgmentally about what they
should do," Shultz said.
However, Shultz and Rea-
gan stressed that the decision
did not lessen U.S. support for
Israel and was aimed at mov-
ing the peace process forward.
"We view this development
as one more step toward the
beginning of direct negotia-
tions between the parties,
which alone can lead to a com-
prehensive peace in the Middle
East," Reagan said in a state-
ment issued by the White
House.
"The United States' special
commitment to Israel's secur-
ity and well-being remains
unshakable," Reagan said.
"Indeed, a major reason for
our entry into this dialogue is
to help Israel achieve the rec-
ognition and security it
deserves."
Shultz reiterated that the
United States does not accept
the decision at the Palestine
National Council meeting in
Algiers last month to declare
an independent Palestinian
state.
"The status of the West
Bank and Gaza cannot be
determined by unilateral acts
of either side, but only through
a process of negotiations," he
said.
Shultz and Reagan also
stressed that the United
States wants to be sure that
the PLO's renunciation of ter-
rorism is fulfilled not just in
words, but in deeds.
The secretary said terrorism
was to be the first item on the
agenda for Pelletreau when he
speaks with the PLO. "And
we'll make it clear that our
position about the importance
of the renunciation of terror-
ism is central," he said.
The Reagan statement also
said that the United States
expects the PLO to live up to
the statements made by Ara-
fat at a news conference in
Geneva. "In particular, it must
demonstrate that its renuncia-
tion of terrorism is pervasive
and permanent," Reagan said.
Reagan said that if the PLO
does not live up to its word,
"we certainly (will) break off
communications.''
The U.S. decision came after
Sweden asked the United
States on Dec. 2 what lan-
guage it would consider
acceptable from Arafat. But
while Arafat appeared to come
close at the PNC meeting,
after a meeting with five
American Jews in Stockholm
and in his address to the UN
General Assembly session on
Palestine, the United States
said his remarks continued to
be ambiguous.
But Arafat apparently used
the right words in his Geneva
news conference. The United
States found them unambigu-
ous, particularly the recogni-
tion of Israel's right to exist.
Arafat also said he has gone
Continued on Page 6 L-
SHULTZ FIELDS QUESTIONS. At a State Department
news conference following President Reagan's declaration
that he had authorized the State Department to enter into a
"substantive dialogue" with the Palestine Liberation
Organization (PLO), Secretary of State George Shultz fields
reporters' questions. "Our object is not a dialogue," said
Shultz, "our object is peace." (APIWide World Photo)
Arafat Could Affect
Political Process
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel's official expression of
regret over the U.S. decision
to begin a "substantive dia-
logue" with the Palestine Lib-
eration Organization does not
reflect a politically united
country, despite the fledgling
coalition government.
While Israelis were clearly
stunned by the unexpected
news from Washington, reac-
tions ranged from bitterness
on the far right to jubilation on
the far left.
There were differences too
in the reactions of Labor and
Likud politicians.
Prime Minister Yitzhak Sha-
mir's media spokesman, Avi
Pazner, insisted that the
reversal of American policy
would not change Israel's
determination never to deal
with the PLO, under any cir-
cumstances.
Israel Television reported
that the Likud leader himself
was in an angry, depressed
mood all day and had turned
down scores of interview
requests.
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres, the Labor Party leader,
commented, "This is a sad day
for all of us." He added, how-
ever, that "sadness alone is no
Posthumous Credit:
Lemkin Coined 'Genocide'
An effort by the Federation of
Polish Jews of the U.S. would
honor the late Dr. Raphael
Lemkin, credited with coining
the germ "genocide" and mak-
ing it part of international law.
The group urges the UN to
honor Lemkin, who was one of
only two members of his family
to survive the Holocaust, by
naming the Genocide Conven-
tion after him.
Enabling legislation to ratify
the Genocide Treaty was
passed recently by the Senate,
nearly 40 years after Presi-
dent Harry S. Truman first
submitted it in 1949. Until his
death in 1959, at the age of 58,
Lemkin had dedicated his life
to making genocide a crime
punishable under international
law.
A prominent international
jurist, secretary of the War-
saw Court of Appeals and alter
prosecuting attorney in pre-
war Poland, Lemkin fled to
Sweden, and then the U.S.,
following the German invas-
ion of his country. For several
years, he taught law at Duke
and Yale and worked for the
U.S. Board of Economic War-
fare but, in 1944, when he
realized the full extent of the
Jewish tragedy in Europe, he
gave up his academic career
and devoted his life to his
battle against genocide.
It was due to the efforts of
Raphael Lemkin, a single per-
son who did not represent any
government or any govern-
mental agency, that the Geno-
cide Convention came into
being.
policy," and urged a new
Israeli initiative.
Ezer Weizman, a Laborite
minister without portfolio, cal-
led the American move "a new
beginning (that) could lead to a
happy ending."
The leftist Mapam and Citi-
zens Rights Movement, like
Labor doves, hailed the PLO's
"new moderation."
On the right, there was
anger and resentment toward
the United States.
A group of Jewish settlers
from the West Bank pitched
tents outside Shamir's resi-
dence. They declared a hunger
strike to protest what they
called the trend toward terri-
torial concessions.
Some pundits believe the
Labor-Likud coalition talks
have suffered, just when the
two parties seemed to be near-
ing an understanding.
Those circles say there is a
growing feeling in Likud, and
especially in Shamir's coterie,
that the possible advantages of
a coalition partnership with
Labor have been weakened by
the American decision.
Until now, they say, Shamir
wanted a broad government to
fight off the PLO "diplomatic
offensive."
But now that PLO chief
Yasir Arafat's offensive has
succeeded, Shamir does not
want to contend with Laborite
doves in his government.
Those very doves, including
Weizman, Knesset members
Ora Namir, Yossi Beilin and
others, urged their party to
think twice about a new unity
government with Likud.
Israel Television said Shamir
would meet privately with
Peres "to resolve the fate of
the coalition talks, one way or
the other."
But Shamir's alternative, for
a narrow Likud-led regime in
partnership with the religious
and right-wing parties, also
seemed to be fading.
Rabbi Eliezer Schach, spiri-
tual mentor of Degel HaTorah,
and a strong influence in Shas,
both ultra-Orthodox parties
needed by Shamir, was
reported to have spoken in
favor of the American decision
to talk to the PLO. His
grounds were said to be that
the move would ultimately
"save lives."
Given that situation, some
observers believe new Knesset
elections to be imminent.
The following is a sampling
of opinion from various parts
of the political spectrum:
Likud Minister Yitzhak
Modai urged Israel not to act
hastily. He said it was far from
certain that the American
Congress and public opinion
would back the new policy.
But Ephraim Evron, a for-
mer ambassador to the United
States, said it was an illusion
to think Congress will differ
with the administration on this
issue.
Avner Shaki, leader of the
National Religious Party, cal-
led for an energetic propa-
ganda campaign in the United
States to convince Washington
to abandon its new course.
Yossi Sarid of the CRM, an
outspoken dove, declared,
"This is a happy day," and
added, "Peace is almost within
reach."
Yuval Ne'eman, leader of
the right-wing Tehiya party,
called for the immediate estab-
lishment of a Likud-led rightist
government to move toward
annexation of the West Bank.
He also called for an intensive
settlement building program
to preclude any territorial
compromise.
Uzi Baram, secretary-
general of the Labor Party,
said he "regretted" the
expression of "regret" by the
government. He said Israel
should not be perceived to be
rejecting a hand of peace
extended by Arafat.
Yair Tsaban of Mapam, the
United Workers Party, urged
Israel to follow the American
Continued on Page 6


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 23, 1988
Most Organizations
Support Move
Potential Strain
on U.S./Israel Ties
By
ANDREW SILOW CARROLL
NEW YORK (JTA) With
few exceptions, major Ameri-
can Jewish groups said they
understood U.S. Secretary of
State George Shultz's decision
to allow "substantive talks"
between representatives of the
United States and the Pales-
tine Liberation Organization.
The Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith said the
United States is "living up to
its commitments." Both the
American Jewish Congress
and the American Jewish
Committee said Shultz acted
"correctly." The Union of
American Hebrew Congrega-
tions called the decision a "vic-
tory" for Shultz.
But while agreeing that the
PLO seemed to have accepted
the U.S. government's condi-
tions for dialogue, nearly all
the groups released state-
ments demanding that PLO
leader Yasir Arafat be made to
match his "magic words" with
deeds.
"Yasir Arafat has now met
the technical requirements for
a dialogue with the United
States," said Warren Eisen-
berg. director of the Interna-
tional Council of B'nai B'rith.
But, he added, "the PLO has
to show through deeds that it
has finally come to terms with
Israel's existence and intends
to pursue the path of peace
and eschew violence."
Morris Abram, chairman of
the Conference of Presidents
of Major American Jewish Or-
ganizations, said at a news
conference that Secretary of
State George Shultz believed
"honestly" that Arafat had
met U.S. demands for dia-
logue, as outlined in a 1975
U.S. Memorandum of Agree-
ment with Israel.
But Abram implied that the
United States should ask even
more of the PLO, and he went
so far as to spell out one of
those deeds.
In a statement drafted at a
meeting with representatives
of the 46 Conference of Presi-
dents constituent organiza-
tions, Abram said that the
PLO should be made to repudi-
ate its National Covenant.
"There can be no progress
toward peace in the Middle
East if the PLO insists on
adhering to the covenant its
basic political document
which calls on Palestinian
Arabs 'to repel the Zionist and
Egyptians Detain
Israeli Fisherman
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel is
trying to obtain the release of
four fishermen from Eilat
detained by Egypt for violat-
ing its territorial waters on the
Red Sea. Israeli military
sources said that according to
their investigation, the Egyp-
tian authorities in Nueiba were
justified in seizing the men and
their boat.
Apparently they were sail-
ing within 50 yards of the
Egyptian shore, in violation of
an Israeli-Egyptian agreement
forbidding vessels from com-
ing within 300 yards of shore.
The fishermen were fined
$300, but were unable to pay.
imperialist aggression against
the Arab homeland' and
demands 'the elimination of
Zionism in Palestine,' said
Abram.
AJCongress said the United
States should demand assur-
ances that PLO terrorism has
ended, that Arafat accept Res-
olution 242 unencumbered by
any other UN resolutions and
that Arafat say to the Arab
world what he has been saying
in the Western press.
Theodore Ellenoff, president
of AJCommittee, added to the
list of demands that the United
States now "urge the Palestin-
ians in the territories to call off
the uprising" and "pursue
high-level talks with Israel" to
coordinate strategy on the
peace process.
The Union of Orthodox Jew-
ish Congregations of America,
which said the PLO "may have
met America's technical condi-
tions," said another "neces-
sary action" would be that the
PLO turn over Mohammed
(Abul) Abbas to Italy. He is
wanted there in connection
with the terrorist attack on the
cruise ship Achille Lauro.
The warmest words of praise
for Shultz came from Rabbi
Alexander Schindler, presi-
dent of Reform Judaism's
UAHC.
Schindler said in a statement
that the American decision
"represents a victory for
Secretary Shultz and his insist-
ence that the PLO meet the
conditions first laid down by
Secretary (Henry) Kissinger in
1975."
Even the often har-lined
Zionist Organization of
Ameria refrained from
directly criticizing Shultz,
although it called his decision
"troublesome" and a "sober-
ing reality."
Only two of the larger organ
izations issuing statements,
the World Zionist Organiza-
tion-American Section and the
Simon Wiesenthal Center,
were critical of the U.S. deci-
sion.
Continued from Page 5
as far as he can. "Enough is
enough," he said three times.
"All remaining matters should
be discussed around the table
and within the international
conference."
This leaves the Middle East
peace process about where it
was when the agreement
between Arafat and King Hus-
sein of Jordan bogged down in
1987. The issues now remain
the same as then: the conven-
ing of an international confer-
ence and who should represent
the Palestinians in negotia-
tions. ._._i vat
Israel's Prime Minister Yitz-
hak Shamir and his Likud
party oppose such a confer-
ence. But even Foreign Minis-
ter Shimon Peres and his
Labor Alignment, which sup-
port the conference, reject the
PLO as a participant. The
Israelis want Palestinians to
be represented by residents of
the West Bank and Gaza Strip.
White House spokesman
Marlin Fitzwater reiterated
the U.S. position that it would
accept an international confer-
Political Process
Continued from Page 5
lead and hold its own talks
with the PLO.
Likud Knesset member Bin-
yamin Begin, son of former
Prime Minister Menachem
Begin, called the U.S. move
"deplorable" and a "grave
folly."
He suggested the Americans
were taken in by Arafat. "A
snake wearing a jacket and tie
is nothing more than a well-
dressed snake." he said.
Labor dove Haim Ramon
said Israel is "strong enough"
to talk to the PLO without
fear.
Yossi Ben-Aharon, director
general of the Prime Minis-
ter's Office, said he told the
U.S. ambassador, Thomas Pic-
kering, that America had
made a bad blunder and would
Cost of Living Rises
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
cost-of-living index crept up by
1.6 percent in November, the
Central Bureau of Statistics
said.
The price index has risen at
an annual rate of 16 percent
since the start of the year, but
the 25 percent rate rise over
the last three months indicates
that inflation in 1988 will be
well above last year's 16 per-
cent.
realize it soon enough.
"The United States is very
far from this area. We have to
live here we can't afford to
blunder," Ben-Aharon said he
told the envoy.
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ence, but only if it leads to
direct negotiations and is not a
substitute for it. Bush has sup-
ported this position.
But if the U.S.-PLO dialogue
makes any progress, the Bush
administration could end up
pressing Israel to accept the
PLO in negotiations. How-
ever, Fitzwater, who will be
Bush's press secretary, said
"we would not try to dictate"
Israeli talks with the PLO.
Bush reportedly has not
decided whether to make the
Middle East a high priority
next year. At least two pres-
tigious studies have urged him
not to come up with any new
proposals right away, but
appoint a special representa-
tive to go to the Middle East to
discuss the issues with the
parties.
But the dynamics of
the U.S.-PLO talks could lead
to an early Bush proposal and,
perhaps, a clash with Israel.
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Soviet Refuseniks
Become Italian Delayniks
Friday, December 23, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 7
By RUTH E. GRUBER
LADISPOLI, Italy (JTA) -
In a modest two-room apart-
ment, just a block away from
the Mediterranean Sea, fear,
uncertainty and bewilderment
sit hand in hand.
"We can't understand why
we were singled out from all
the Jews in Ladispoli," said
22-year-old Eugene Zafrin.
"Our reasons for leaving the
Soviet Union are strong
enough to leave as refugees,"
he said. "They don't differ
very much from those of peo-
ple who were let in" to the
United States.
Zafrin, a computer techni-
cian from Moscow, is one of
approximately 200 Soviet
Jews who have left the USSR
in recent months and have
been refused permission to
enter the United States as
refugees.
With grim humor, they call
themselves "refuseniks" an
ironic reference to the refuse-
nik Jews still in the Soviet
Union who have been denied
exit visas by the Soviet author-
ities.
"Yes, we are refuseniks
here," said Ljubov Myas-
kovsky, a vivacious 35-year-old
economist from Moscow with
dark brown hair and eyes.
She, her husband, Ramon,
who is a 35-year-old auto
mechanic, and their two young
children also were refused ref-
ugee status.
"We were very surprised at
the U.S. consul's decision,"
she said. "We didn't see any
reasons for it."
"There are different ways to
enter the United States, she
said. "We feel that we are
refugees."
Jewish sources here said
that as of a few weeks ago, 67
Soviet Jewish families await-
ing U.S. visas in Italy had been
refused refugee status.
Soviet Jews have been enter-
ing the United States as refu-
gees through Italy for at least
15 years. Italy has a relatively
open-door policy as a transit
country for political refugees
waiting for visas to enter such
countries as the United States,
Canada and Australia.
Besides thousands of Soviet
Jews, there are also thousands
of Poles, Ethiopians, Iranians
and others here hoping for
visas.
Currently there are about
1,000 Soviet Jewish families
awaiting U.S. visas as many
as 4,000 people. They are tem-
porarily housed in this seaside
resort town north of Rome.
They are given a per-diem
financial allowance, covering
rent and food, by the Ameri-
can Jewish Joint Distribution
Committee. HIAS, the
Hebrew Immigrant Aid
Society, assists the immi-
grants with documentation,
pre-migration planning and
transportation.
American sources say that
about six to seven percent of
Soviet Jews who have applied
for visas in recent months
have been found not to qualify
Continued on Page 24
KVETCHr
vj-
Q
Vb
"Might I recommend the catch-of-the-day: Gefilte Fish."
1988 David S Boxerman and Mark Saunders All rights reserved
Austria to Exchange Envoys With PLO
By REINHARD ENGEL
VIENNA (JTA) Austria
and the Palestine Liberation
Organization will soon ex-
change ambassadors, accord-
ing to an announcement made
during PLO leader Yasir Ara-
fat's one-day visit here.
While Austria has not recog-
nized the independent state of
Palestine Arafat proclaimed
last month at the Palestine
National Council meeting in
Algiers, the PLO representa-
tive in Vienna, Daoud Barakat,
will be accredited as an am-
bassador before the year's
end. At the same time, the
Austrian ambassador to
Tunisia will receive accredita-
tion from the PLO, which has
its headquarters in the North
African country.
Arafat, whose international
stature seemed to soar after
the United States reversed a
13-year-old ban on official
dialogue with the PLO, arrived
here from Cairo. He met with
Chancellor Franz Vranitzky
and Foreign Minister Alois
Mock, who hold the rank of
vice chancellor.
Arafat was also received by
President Kurt Waldheim at
his villa in the afternoon, a call
apparently initiated by Wald-
heim, as it was not on Arafat's
itinerary.
The PLO chief said he was
"gratified" by his talks with
Vranitzky, leader of the ruling
Socialist Party, and with
Mock, who heads its coali-
tion partner, the conservative
People's Party. Mock said
afterward that the PLO
changed radically when it
disassociated itself from
terrorism.
But the Austrian Jewish
community disagrees. In a let-
ter to Mock, the community
leaders warned that the PLO
is talking peace, but planning
the destruction of Israel.
Mock, for his part, used
the occasion of tne visit to
appeal to the Israeli govern-
ment to react in a positive way
to Arafat's statements in
Geneva, where he addressed a
special session of the UN
General Assembly.
Vranitzky announced that
Austria would increase its aid
to the Palestinian population,
but through United Nations
channels, not the PLO. He
mentioned specifically medical
and agricultural assistance.
While the Austrian Foreign
Ministry welcomes Arafat's
proclamation of an inde-
pendent Palestine, it refrained
from recognizing it formally.
Diplomatic practice requires
that a state possess territory,
which is not the case with the
PLO.
Block by Rep. Larry Smith
Congressmen Oppose Sale
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Three Democratic lawmakers
warned President-elect
George Bush that they would
lead a congressional effort to
block a multibillion dollar arms
sale to Saudi Arabia expected
to be proposed next spring.
Sen. Alan Cranston and
Rep. Mel Levine, both of Cali-
fornia, and Rep. Larry Smith,
of Florida, told Bush in a let-
ter, delivered Dec. 10, that
they "would take the lead in
Congress to oppose actively an
administration request to
license export of such a major
new Saudi arms package."
The three cited "persistent
reports" about a possible new
arms sale in the "early months
of your administration."
The Washington Times first
reported in late October that
the Saudis were considering
asking the United States by
April for F/A-18 fighter
Congressman Larry Smith
planes, M-l battle tanks, M-2
and M-3 Bradley Fighting
Vehicles and Patriot tactical
air defense missiles.
For Israel, the most objec-
tionable component of the
package are the fighter planes,
which were first sold to the
Arab world in August, when
Kuwait received 40 of them.
"We view with alarm," the
lawmakers said, "the prospect
of a new divisive proposal to
add our most advanced offen-
sive weapons systems to the
already teeming Saudi
arsenal."
Last year, Great Britain con-
cluded a deal with the Saudis
estimated in the tens of billions
of dollars.
"We don't believe that such
arms sales are justified, espe-
cially so soon after enormous
Saudi arms purchases from
both us and our allies."
A Capitol Hill source said
the letter was not in response
to any specific event, such as
outgoing Secretary of Defense
Frank Carlucci's November
visit to Saudi Arabia.
But he added that a possible
Saudi request is "coming down
the pipe. '
*/L Jewish National Fund
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 23, 1988
Peres Expresses
Mutual Trust
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres has
assured Secretary of State
George Shultz that Israel con-
tinues to place its confidence
and trust in the United States,
despite deep disagreement
over the U.S. move to begin
talks with the Palestine Liber-
ation Organization.
Peres, chairman of the
Labor Party, made public his
reply to a letter he received
from Shultz explaining
the U.S. position on its talks
with the PLO, which began in
Tunisia.
Shultz sent an identical let-
ter to Prime Minister Yitzhak
Shamir, the Likud leader.
"While I remain convinced
that the American decision
was at best premature, I
was reassured by the content
of your letter, as well as by
some additional information
provided by (U.S.) Ambassa-
dor (Thomas) Pickering,"
Peres wrote.
"Specifically, I took note of
your challenges to the PLO to
close the gap between the
expressed commitment to
abandon terrorism and the
reality of its actions in
Media Bias
Cited In
Anti-Orthodox
Rhetoric
JERUSALEM (INB) The
anti-Orthodox rhetoric which
has dominated the Israeli
media in recent weeks "has
gone way too far," according
to a prominent secular Israeli
journalist.
Writing in the left-wing
Jerusalem weekly Kol Ha'ir,
Ehud Ashrai complained that
"editors, reporters and car-
toonists have allowed them-
selves to use anti-Orthodox
images so harsh that, at any
other time, they would have
been ruled unprintable by their
editorial boards."
Ashrai cited an article in the
Mapam Party daily Al
Hamishmar which began,
"From where did this frighten-
ing swarm of ultra-Orthodox
blacks sprout up?" The term
'swarm' "is usually used in
regard to ants or bees,"
Ashrai pointed out. An illus-
tration of an Orthodox man, in
the daily Hadashot, employed
"typically anti-Semitic fea-
tures," Ashrai charged. He
also criticized the Israeli artist
Yigal Tumarkin, who was
asked by an interviewer to
comment on the apperance of
Orthodox Jews, and replied, in
pejorative fashion.
Anshrai was also critical
about the extensive use of the
word "black," which in
Hebrew has especially severe
connotations. He cited articles
about the Orthodox in Al
Hamishmar and in the Labor
Party daily Davar, which bore
headlines like "The Black
Reaction," "Black Night,"
"Saw Black," and "Blackness
in the Soul."
The success of the Orthodox
parties in the recent Israeli
elections "has released all the
genies that the secular press
usually keeps under lock and
key," Ashrai charged.
Israel, in the territories and
elsewhere; your continued
adherence to the longstanding
American policy of not sup-
porting the establishment of
an independent Palestinian
state; and the clarification that
opening a dialogue, in and of
itself, does not constitute
American recognition of the
PLO as a negotiating part-
ner," Peres wrote.
He added that the "lack of
unanimity between us" on the
"extent to which the PLO has
already undergone a transfor-
mation" must not affect the
"solid relationship between
our two countries.
"Our complete trust in Pres-
ident Reagan and your own
friendship served to reinforce
the bond between our two
countries. I am fully confident
that this will be the case in
future years as well," Peres
concluded.
No Swiss Ban on Neo-Nazis
By TAMAR LEVY
GENEVA (JTA) The Swiss government decided there was
no need to implement a law barring Nazi activity in Switzerland,
because there was no actual threat.
Police Minister Arnol Kholer said after a debate on the subject
that the several neo-Nazi incidents that have occurred in recent
months represent no real danger to democracy.
He said the government would follow these "symptoms"
closely but would take no "exceptional action."
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At a ceremony in the office of University of Miami President
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by the state legislature during its 1988 session, the award wiil
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Syria Urged To Release Jews
Friday, December 23, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 9
U.S. Negative On Settlements
By YOSSI LEMPKOWICZ leave Syria.
BRUSSELS (JTA) -
The European Parliament in
Strasbourg has intervened on
behalf of six Syrian Jews who
are missing or were impri-
soned because they wanted to
A resolution urging their
immediate release will be
delivered to the Damascus
government by the president
of the parliament, the legis-
British Jew Named
To European Commission
By YOSSI LEMPKOWICZ
BRUSSELS (JTA) An
active member of Britain's
Jewish community and former
British Cabinet minister is one
of the 16 new appointees to the
European Commission, the
executive body of the Euro-
pean Community here.
Leon Brittan, a member of
the Board of Deputies of Brit-
ish Jewry who served as minis-
ter of trade and industry in
{'rime Minister Margaret
Thatcher's Cabinet, was
named to be commissioner in
charge of competitive policy
and financial institutions.
The sole Jewish member of
the outgoing commission,
Stanley Clinton Davis, is also
Rosensaft
Survives
Labor Zionist
Vote
By
ANDREW SILOW CARROLL
NEW YORK (JTA) Mena-
chem Rosensaft, one of the
five American Jews who met
with Palestine Liberation
Organization chairman Yasir
Arafat in Stockholm, will not
be asked to resign as president
of the Labor Zionist Alliance.
At a meeting held in Balti-
more, members of the LZA's
National Executive Commit-
tee voted 12-5, with four
abstentions, to reject a resolu-
tion calling for his resignation.
The committee resisted a
call for Rosensaft's resigna-
tion from Yechiel Leket, chair-
man of the World Federation
of Labor Zionists, of which the
LZA is a member.
Instead, the committee
accepted Rosensaft's apology
for not having consulted with
the leadership of LZA or the
Labor Zionist leadership in
Israel before taking part in the
controversial meeting with
Arafat.
The meeting with the PLO
chairman was planned in
secret by officers of the Ameri-
can section of the Interna-
tional Center for Peace in the
Middle East.
Rosensaft is a member of the
organization's board and said
he attended the meetings in
that capacity only. He is also
founding chairman of the
International Network of Chil-
dren of Jewish Holocaust Sur-
vivors. The officers of the net-
work issued a statement say-
ing Rosensaft went to Stock-
holm as an individual and not
as their representative.
The Stockholm meeting
began a week of diplomatic
activity that resulted in the
PLO eventually seeming to
meet the U.S. government's
terms for a face-to-face meet-
ing. ,........._.........
British.
Meanwhile, a prominent
Spanish businessman, Abel
Matutes, 47, has been named
European commissioner in
charge of Mediterranean pol-
icy. His venue includes trade
and financial relations with
Israel. Matutes, who succeeds
Claude Cheysson of France,
supports the Middle East pol-
icy of Spain's Socialist govern-
ment. Spain will assume the
six-month rotating chairman-
ship of the E.C. Council of
Ministers on Jan. 1.
lative body of the European
Community. It will also be
delivered to the 12 E.C. mem-
ber states.
The resolution was intro-
duced by two members of the
Liberal group, Jean-Thomas
Nordmann of France and
Carles-Alfred Gasoliba Byohm
of Spain, during a debate on
human rights violations
around the world.
It notes that there are some
5,000 Jews living in Syria
today, with three Jews,
Ibrahim Lahal, Victor Lahal
and Selim Sued, confined to
prison.
Three others, Eli Sued,
Jacques Lalo and Zaki Mam-
roud, disappeared after their
arrest. They were all accused
by the authorities of trying to
leave Syria.
In calling on Syria to let
these Jews leave, the resolu-
tion cited the Universal
Declaration on Human Rights.
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The State Department reiter-
ated its longstanding position
that the establishment of addi-
tional Israeli settlements in
the administered territories is
"not helpful" in advancing
Middle East peace prospects.
Department spokeswoman
fhyllis Uakley would not com-
ment directly on a Likud-
Labor compromise to build
eight new settlements in the
coming year.
But she said the United
States considers the building
of new settlements as "not
helpful in moving toward the
comprehensive peace settle-
ment that we all desire."
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Page 10 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 23, 1988
TV Reporter Quits
In Anti-Bias Protest
JERUSALEM (INB) -
Left-wing author David Gross-
man has resigned his position
at Israel Television to protest
the refusal of ITV officials to
permit an appearance by PLO
chairman Yasir Arafat.
Grossman, author of the con-
troversial book The Yellow
Wind, was an editor in the
news department of Israel
Television."
The controversy erupted
when Uri Porat, director-
general of the Israel Broad-
casting Authority, issued a dir-
ective prohibiting the broad-
cast, on radio or television, of
excerpts from Yasir Arafat's
speech at the Palestine
National Council session in
Algeria.
Explaining his decision,
Porat said "it is unthinkable
that Israel's media would pro-
vide a forum for the enemies of
the Jewish State." Porat said
he was upholding a long-
standing policy of banning pro-
paganda by Arab terrorist
groups.
But Grossman denounced
Porat's move as "political cen-
sorship" and submitted his
resignation. Grossman's prot-
est was seconded by the left-
wing Association for Civil
Rights in Israel, which accused
Porat of "unfairly censoring
Arafat."
Meanwhile, Porat sparked
another controversy by re-
marking that some left-wing
journalists at Israel Television
and Israel Radio are politically
biased. Thirty ITV reporters
immediately sent a protest let-
ter to Porat, accusing him of
"spreading a blood libel"
against them. The journalists
argued that the employees of
the ITV news department
"naturally represent a variety
of political views."
Amended Bill Would
Prevent Hostile Conversions
JERUSALEM (INB) -
Passage of the "Who is a Jew"
bill will prevent hostile Arabs
from infiltrating Israel after
undergoing quick conversions
to Reform Judaism, according
to a senior Israeli official.
Yossi Ben-Aharon, director-
general of the Prime Minis-
ter's office, told reporters that
the security angle was an addi-
tional reason for Likud's sup-
port of the "Who is a Jew"
legislation.
Ben-Aharon cited the case of
Mubarak Awad, the Arab-
American who was expelled
from Israel earlier this year
because of his leadership role
in recent Arab rioting. Follow-
ing his return to the United
States, Awad said that several
Reform rabbis had offered to
convert him so that he could
re-enter Israel as a "Jew."
If the "Who is a Jew" bill is
passed, Ben-Aharon said, con-
versions of doubtful validity
will not be recognized, thereby
disqualifying Awad and others
like him from entering Israel.
Ben-Aharon pointed to
quickie conversions performed
in twenty-four hours. Not
many Jews would accept such
conversions as sincere, Ben-
Aharon said, but unless the
"Who is a Jew" bill is passed,
such converts would be
regarded as Jewish under
Israeli law.
Budapest
Inaugurates
Jewish Studies
Center
By CATHRINE GERSON
JERUSALEM (JTA) Two
Hebrew University professors
were to attend the inaugura-
tion of the Center for Jewish
Studies in Budapest.
The first institution of its
kind in Eastern Europe, it was
founded in 1987 as a joint
venture of the New York-
based Memorial Foundation
for Jewish Culture and the
Hungarian Academy of
Sciences.
The Center for Jewish Stud-
ies does academic research,
issues publications and per-
forms archival work, accord-
ing to Philip Klutznick, chair-
man of the executive commit-
tee of the Memorial Founda-
tion.
The center is directed by Dr.
Geza Komoroczy, who visited
the Hebrew University a year
ago to take part in a seminar
on the economic history of
Jews in Hungary.
Professor Sara Japhet,
chairperson of the Institute of
Jewish Studies at the Hebrew
University, and Professor
Ephraim Urbach, professor
emeritus of Talmud and Mid-
rash, were invited by Komor-
oczy to participate in the inau-
gural.
It is being held at the Univ-
ersity of Budapest, which is
attached to the new center.
The two-day program
includes lectures by Hungarian
Jewish scholars and visits to
the rabbinical seminary in
Budapest, the only one in
Eastern Europe.
Israel Prize to Hebrew U. Professors
Three professors from the Hebrew University of Jerusa-
lem have been named winners of the Israel prize, which is
awarded on Israel Independence Day. Prof. Elihu Katz,
founding director of Israel Television, 1967-69, was cited
for his pioneering work in sociological research on the
impact of the mass communications media. Prof. Israel
Yeivin was awarded the prize for his research in ancient
punctuation and vocalization systems in Hebrew; and Prof.
Samuel Werses was chosen for his research in Hebrew
literature, particularly for the 200 year period beginning
with the "Haskala" movement until the mid '20s.
ISRAEL AIDS USSR. Members of an Israeli army team,
taking part in relief efforts in earthquake-ravaged A rm
in the USSR discuss the conditions with an Armr,
Although Israel has no diplomatic relations with the
Soviets, the Israelis were allowed in that country to share
their expertise and equipment. (APIWide World Photm
A cast call for the Miami Beach Community Theatre's
production of Bob Fisher and Arthur Marx's "The Impossible
Years" will be held Wednesday. Jan. 4. 3 p.m.. in the Miami
Beach Senior High School auditorium Comedian Tubby ftoots
will star in the play, which is scheduled for late March and early
April. 1989
THE ALTERNATIVE FOR
RELIGIOUS FAMILIES WHO
WANT TO LIVE IN ISRAEL
Matityahu, A Moshav Shitufi Established By Bnei
Torah English Speaking Families.
MATITYAHU
Is anxious to absorb young Orthodox families
Shomrei Mitzvos from 21 to 35 years of age.
Every family will have a private house
Communal Torah activities and daily Shiurim.
A board supervises a diversified economic
structure, with a highly successful agricultural
system and light industry.
15 new additional houses are being bulit for the
new arriving families.
Experience community living among caring
friends.
AN ANNUAL CONVENTION WITH RABBI
LEFF (RABBI OF MOSHAV MATITYAHU)
WILL TAKE PLACE JANUARY 1989.
For Further information please call Nathan Tal
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Evenings 718-375-1266
OrSlava Chitrik 718-258-8445 Eve. 718-735-6100
OR WRITE TO:
POALE AGUDAT ISRAEL
Office: 3190 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, NY. 11210
Dr. Samuel I. Cohen, executive
vice president, Jewish
National Fund, was recently
appointed a member of the exec-
utive board of the Conference of
Jewish Communal Service, the
North American agency that
oversees a spectrum of services
to Jewish communities. Dr.
Cohen has also held leadership
positions in the American
Zionist Federation, the Ameri-
can Jewish Congress,
B'nai B'rith and the Long
Island Zionist Youth Commis-
sion.
CHEF OPPORTUNITIES
SUMMER CAMP
Nonprofit 400-bed co-ed
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to fill the following positions
CAMP CHEF
This position will require
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related opportunities In the
area of Assistant Chef.
Renge Cooks, etc.
CAMP KITCHEN
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The individual responsible
lor this position will oversee
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This highly respected well
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competitive salaries and
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ATHLETICS
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Soccer
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Hiking
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Jewish Education
FUN, SPORTS, CREATIVE &
PERFORMING ARTS IN A
JEWISH COMMUNITY'
THE ARTS
Arts & Crafts
Drama
Photography
Creative Visual
Israeli Dance
Modern dance
Aerobics
Jazz Dance
ITS A GREAT SUMMER
EXPERIENCE FOR CHILDREN
OF ALL AGES
Session II July 18 to August 14
Session I June 19 to July 17
8 Weeks June 19 to August 14
For additional information, i AtIanta 404-897-1462
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Friday, December 23, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 11
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Community Corner
The South Florida Women's Committee of Shaare
Zedek Hospital in Jerusalem will hold a luncheon
meeting Wednesday, Dec. 28, 11:30 a.m., at the Shel-
borne Hotel. Rabbi Rubin Dobin will be the guest
speaker.
An ongoing class on "Viewing Life Through the Eyes
of Our Patriarchs" is offered by Project Heritage of
Greater Miami. The relevance of the teachings of the
Bible to today will be explored during the one hour
Monday evening sessions which begin at 8:15 p.m. For
information and location: 534-5007.
The Yivo Committee of Greater Miami will open its
42nd season with Dr. David Fishman speaking in
Yiddish about "Glasnost and Soviet Jewry" on Wed-
nesday, Jan. 4, 1 p.m., at Temple Beth Sholom. The
afternoon will also include a musical program featur-
ing Jenny Eisenstein. The Yivo Committee holds lec-
tures every Wednesday afternoon.
The Coral Gables-Miami-Kendall chapter of
Women's Division American Society for Technion-
Israel Institute of Technology will hold its annual High
(Chai) Tea honoring Life Members and prospective Life
Members Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2:30-4:30 p.m., at the home
of Mrs. David Sernaker, 11601 S.W. 62 Ave.
The program will feature Ellen Baum's review of "The
Haj" by Leon Uris.
The Men's Club of the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged at Douglas Gardens (MJHHA) is
sponsoring a benefit preview performance of "Flora,
the Red Menace" Wednesday, Dec. 28 7:30 p.m., at the
Ruth Foreman Theatre on the FIU Campus, No. Miami
Beach. All proceeds benefit the frail elderly at MJHHA.
Local actress Julie Prosser plays Flora in this produc-
tion.
Ongoing classes on "Synagogue and Prayer" are
offered by Project Heritage of Greater Miami Wednes-
day evenings, 8-9 p.m., at Congregation Ohr Chaim of
Miami Beach.
The free classes are designed to provide a basic
understanding of the prayer service and a familiarity
with the ritual and customs of a synagogue service.
The Sisterhood of Temple Ner Tamid will meet
Wednesday, Dec. 28, noon, in the Miami Beach syna-
gogue's Sklar auditorium. Ner Tamid's rabbi, Dr.
Eugene Labovitz, will speak on the importance of Torah
Fund, and Sherry Sukel, vice president of the Florida
branch of Torah Fund, will present a slide presentation
on its history.
Under the auspices of Chabad Lubavitch of Florida,
the Mitzvah Campaign for Outreach and Crisis Inter-
vention will hold a Melava Malka social celebration for
Jewish singles, ages 20-40, Saturday, Dec. 31, 9 p.m.-2
a.m., at the home of Roxanne Lux in Boca Point.
Information: 538-6130.
The Men's Club of the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged at Douglas Gardens is holding a
benefit theater party Wednesday, Dec. 28, at the Ruth
Foreman Theatre. The 8 p.m. curtain time for "Flora,
the Red Menace" will be preceded by cocktails at 6
p.m.
The Miami Council's annual Childrens Home Lunch-
eon for disturbed boys in Israel will be held Wednes-
day, Jan. 4, at Signature Gardens. BBW National
President Hyla Lipsky will be guest speaker.
The Young Israel of Greater Miami will hold its
annual dinner Saturday night, Jan. 7, at Tradition Hall.
Honorees are Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Theil and Mr. and Mrs.
Warren Berney.
Mount Sinai Medical Center offers its Fletcher
Addiction Treatment Program to help chemically
dependent persons return to an addiction-free life. The
program combines medical care with emotional coun-
seling. Information: 674-2932.
The B'nai B'rith Youth Organization, which serves
nearly 700 Jewish teenage boys and girls in 20 chap-
ters in southeast Florida, is seeking adult volunteer
advisors. Volunteers should be at least 21 years old.
Information: 581-0218.
_________________i__________________________________


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 23, 1988
Israel Thwarted In Quake Relief \
No Tolerance
for Terrorism
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel
has enlarged its earthquake
relief efforts for Soviet Arme-
nia, but it seems to have a
problem getting it off the
ground.
Three air force Hercules
cargo planes loaded with per-
sonnel and equipment were
scheduled to leave but their
takeoff was postponed because
of bad weather.
So far, only one Israeli relief
airlift has reached Yerevan,
the Armenian capital. A fol-
low-up flight by two Hercules
transports was recalled half-
way to its destination.
Brig. Gen. Aharon Vardi,
Israel's civil defense chief who
reached Armenia with the first
flight, advised the planes by
radio that their medical and
rescue personnel were not
needed in Yerevan or in the
stricken Leninakan region.
They were ordered to return
to Israel to await further
instructions. It was decided
later that supplies were more
urgently needed than person-
nel.
One of the transports was
withdrawn and the other was
equipped to carry cargo only.
But the picture changed when
the relief fleet was enlarged to
three Hercules aircraft, and
another 50 medical and rescue
personnel were assigned to the
mission along with administra-
tive staff.
Tel Aviv U. Profs Elected
Four professors at Tel Aviv University were reelected to
the Knesset in the recent Israeli elections. All representing
different parties, the four are David Libsi, a law professor
Labor Party; Yuval Ne'eman, a physics professor and
chairman of the Tahiya Party; Amnon Rubenstein, law
professor and chairman of the Center Party; and Avner
Shaki, a law professor, and chairman of the National
Religious Party.
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Continued from Page 1
Another top State Department
policymaker drew a distinction
between acts of terrorism and
the year-old Palestinian up-
rising in the territories.
"The intifada when it
emerged was not a byproduct
of a PLO decision; it reflected
a reaction to prolonged occu-
pation. So the reaction of peo-
ple to occupation is not going
to cease immediately,"
Michael Armacost, under-
secretary of state for political
affairs, said on CBS-TV's
"Face the Nation."
Also speaking on the CBS
program was Israeli Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres, who
left the door open to talks with
PLO members who are not
"shooting or killing."
Peres said he is "ready to sit
with every Palestinian, no
matter what his biography
was, if he is not shooting and
killing, if he is ready to talk, if
he represents his people, and if
he seeks peace."
Asked about a possible next
step for Israel to take, follow-
ing the PLO's move to re-
cognize Israel, Peres said that
his country must first see that
Arafat's renunciation of ter-
rorism is sincere. "Let's wait a
month, a couple of months,
and see if this is really going to
happen," Peres suggested.
A key obstacle to Israel
believing Arafat is sincere may
be whether it considers the
PLO accountable for continued
Palestinian violence in the
West Bank and Gaza Strip.
Peres said he includes
such violence as traceable to
Arafat. "We see to include it,
because for us, if a baby is
being killed or wounded by a
stone, what does it matter
what is the name?"
He presented a challenge to
the PLO on the West Bank. "If
the Palestinians would stop
violence right away, yester-
day, the whole feeling, the
whole emotions in Israel would
be entirely different."
Peres said he believes the
PLO has recently moderated
its position. "Until now the
Concerned
Citizens
Dade Circuit Court Judge D.
Bruce Levy installed the offi-
cers of the Concerned Citizens
of Northeast Dade at the
group's recent annual lunch-
eon at the Marco Polo Hotel.
Among those sworn in by
Levy, who is assigned to the
court's juvenile division, were
David Samson, president, and
Rubin Steiner, executive vice
president.
North Dade community
leader Anne Ackerman took
office as honorary vice presi-
dent. Others installed were
Hiram Goldstein, David Her-
man, Irving Schechtman, Eve-
lyn Schengrund, Marvin Man-
ning and Moe Zimmerman, as
vice presidents; William Far-
ber, treasurer; Mickey Bal-
sam, financial secretary; and
Estelle Weisblatt, recording
and corresponding secretary.
Norman M. Giller, founder
and president emeritus of Con-
cerned Citizens, was chairman
of the nominating committee.
PLO would never say the
expression which is called
'peace' or the expression
which is called 'Israel.' They
wanted Israel without a peace
or a peace without an Israel."
But, he added, "now the '
question is: Is that a change in
the language or is that a
change in the position?"
In contrast to Peres, Likud
Knesset member Binyamin
Netanyahu, appearing on the
Brinkley show, seemed to
reject any PLO moderation
outright. "The PLO uses
declarations of peace as a tac-
tic of war," he said. He noted
that Winston Churchill, Great
Britain's prime minister dur-
ing World War II, "refused to
have any dealings with Hitler"
prior to or during the war.
He also argued that the
opening of a U.S. dialogue
with the PLO has "made peace
much more difficult," by push-
ing away Palestinian Arabs
"who want to look for a real
negotiation, a real coexistence
with Israel."
Finally, on NBC-TV's "Meet
the Press," White House Chief
of Staff Kenneth Duberstein,
the first Jew to hold that post,
said the administration con-
sidered domestic fallout from
U.S. Jews when reaching its
decision to begin talks with the
PLO.
He attributed the minimal
amount of American Jewish
criticism of Secretary of State
Shultz's decision to "an awful
lot of confidence in Ronald
Reagan and George Shultz and
the very special commitment
that there is between this
government and the Israeli
government."
Ram (uDpci N> change


Friday, December 23, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 13
Community News
Sexual Abuse is Secreted
In Community Closet
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Child abuse is expressed in
many forms and variations.
And the media usually focuses
on the extreme: the beating
death of six-year-old Lisa
Steinberg in New York City.
Yet, says Richard Oxman,
senior clinician at Jewish Fam-
ily Service, "The severe child
abuse is only one to two per-
cent of all the child abuse cases
that go through the system
nationally.
"Severe child abuse is bodily
injury or death," said Oxman,
who had worked for the state
Health and Rehabilitative Ser-
vices' Protection Service divi-
sion for three years before
joining JFS 15 months ago.
There are other forms of
child abuse, he says: sexual,
emotional and psychological.
"What we're seeing is that
most of the two million cases
that go through the National
Child Protection System .
are for poverty issues, mal-
treatment, neglect including
educational neglect. It's
related more to poverty than
abuse."
So there are two basic prob-
lems, Oxman explains: under-
reaction and overreaction.
"We have people over-
reacting in terms of protecting
the child at any cost, destroy-
ing the family without mean-
ing to do so. Pulling children
out of the home can hurt,
because separation from par-
ents can be devastating."
On the other hand, people
call in allegations about child
abuse, perhaps "good-inten-
tioned or maliciously" and
some cases involved women
charging sexual abuse by their
spouse in child custody cases,
he says.
In the Jewish community,
some families encounter
"domestic violence," Oxman
says, citing a study of such
situations in Los Angeles.
There is also a "greater
stigma" about reporting child
abuse in the Jewish commun-
ity, Oxman added, "because
the Jewish community feels
it can take care of its own
problems."
Florida law, according to
Oxman, describes what consti-
tutes child abuse: any bruises
or marks on a child's body is
considered child abuse and
penalties range from mis-
demeanor to felony charges.
But cases in which bruises are
not obviously evident are diffi-
cult to prove: particularly,
sexual abuse.
State law mandates law
enforcement officials, doctors,
social workers and other pro-
fessionals such as mental
Continued on Page 18
Turning golden-colored spades at the recent groundbreaking for the new Aventura Turnberry
Jewish Center are, from left, Joseph Glazer, founding president; Roy Sager, past president;
Marvin Bernstein, representing the Aventura Turnberry community; Florence Lieberman,
sisterhood president; Dr. Morton Gooze, chairman, building committee; Ruth and Jacob Cohen,
president of the congregation; Rabbi David B. Saltzman; Fred Hirsch, temple vice president;
Henry Raff, founder, and Morton Borisoff, vice president. Also participating in the ceremony, but
not pictured, were William Landa, chairman of the founder's committee and Ida Soffer Reis,
community leader. Construction on the new building, that will replace the 13-year-old
congregation's storefront location, will begin next month at NE 20Srd Street and 80th Avenue in
North Miami Beach. Occupancy is scheduled for Spring, 1990.
Aventura Turnberry Groundbreaking
Groundbreaking ceremonies
at the site of the new Aventura
Turnberry Jewish Center were
held Sunday, Dec. 4, following
a morning march by congreg-
ants, dignitaries, residents and
friends from the present site of
the center to the new site on
NE 203 Street and NE 30
Avenue.
Highlights of the ceremony
included the presentation of a
proclamation by Dade County
Commissioner Sherman Winn,
representing Mayor Stephen
P. Clark, and congratulations
from Cong. William Lehman;
Cong. Gwen Margolis; Harold
Wishna, executive director of
United Synagogue of America;
Rev. Luther Jones, director of
chaplaincy services at Jackson
Memorial Hospital; William
W. Landa, chairman of the
Founders' Committee; Harold
Wenal, developer of the
nearby Promenade Shops; and
Alfred Golden, vice president
of Beth David Memorial Gar-
dens.
The ceremony was led by
Rabbi David Saltzman and
Cantor Bernard Knee, who
also conducted the Chanukah
candle lighting.
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Page 14 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 23, 1988
Ruthi Navon on the Charts
...Again
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridxan Staff Writer
RUTHI Navon had it all. As
a gifted Israeli singer, she
made it to the top of the charts
with her records and drew
large crowds at some of
Israel's largest concert halls.
And because her father, Itz-
hak Navon, is an Israeli ambas-
sador, she traveled around the
world, bringing her repertoire
of pop songs, likened by some
to America's Whitney Hous-
ton, to stages in Thailand,
Europe, Asia, Africa and
Cyprus.
But along with the fame and
glory, Navon had the attend-
ant lifestyle, including a
Greenwich Village apartment
in New York.
"I had a Bohemian life, like
every other artist."
Eventually, Navon, did an
about-face. She has become
totally observant of Jewish
traditions, including not sing-
ing before mixed audiences.
So when Navon, now 37,
holds her first major concert in
Miami, her home for the past
eight years, she will sing to an
audience of women only. The
concert is set for Dec. 25 at 8
p.m. in the 643-seat audito-
rium of the Alexander Gross
Hebrew Academy of Greater
Miami.
THE concert, which includes
religious as well as mellow pop
songs, will include a female
orchestra and back-up female
singers. It is being produced
by Jane Sragiwicz, of 770 Pro-
ductions, named in honor of
770 Eastern Parkway head-
quarters of the worldwide
Lubavitcher movement.
Sragiwicz also produced
what Navon refers to as her
first "kosher" album after 15
years: "Lead Me To Your
Way."
Why women only when, dur-
ing the height of her career,
she sang before co-ed groups
in decollete clothes, make-up
and flashy jewelry?
"It says in the Torah a
phrase that translates to: a
women's voice is sensuous, a
private thing," Navon told The
Jewish Floridxan. "It is not
Ruthi Navon
permissible to sing in front of
men live some say it's OK
through records and cassettes,
but more Orthodox Jews will
only let their wives and daugh-
ters hear it. It even says on the
cassette: 'For Women Only.' "
Navon says that music pro-
duces an energy that can touch
souls. "It can attract. It can
move you. That's why there's a
limitation here."
What changed Navon was
the realization that she "didn't
like the mishoogenah life of
show biz. It's a constant ego
trip. Without knowing it, you
have to concentrate on your-
self 24 hours a day. There's no
time for the real truth, the
Torah life, and you forget who
you really are just a plain
human being who has to func-
tion like God wants you to.
And if you have a talent, it's
not yours. It's only a gift from
Hashem and you have to know
how to use it the right way."
FOR Navon, the change in
her flickered 15 years ago
when she was seriously injured
in a car accident that killed a
close friend.
"It was like a shock treat-
ment for me," Navon recalls.
"You can't compare the
lifestyle" now and then, she
says. "The big difference is
when you go through a crisis,
when you are religious and
when you have the God of
Israel you can conquer things
much better and can handle
things with common sense.
Your emotions are not com-
pletely in charge.
For concert tickets or infor-
mation: 861-5111 or 534-0506.
Haim and Gila Wiener are preserving and enhancing the art of
Jewish liturgical music in the U.S., Israel, Hungary, Rum
and the Soviet Union. Through their Society for the Advancement
of the Cantorial Arts, their funding of the Israel Institute 0f
Cantorial Art, and the Gila and Haim Wiener Foundation, the
Miami Beach couple have underwritten cantorial conct
Moscow's Choral Synagogue, Leningrad's main synagogut. and
other cities "behind the Iron Curtain."
Wieners Sponsored
Cantorial Concerts
Bar Mitzvah Year for
Beth Am Chaverah
A group of Temple Beth Am
congregants, who started a
chaverah 13 years ago, held
their bar/bat mitzvah cere-
mony recently at the Miami
synagogue. Chaverah Achat
(achat is Hebrew for first and
foremost) was formed at a
week-end retreat devoted to
raising Jewish consciousness.
The group's membership has
essentially remained stable,
although some changes have
occurred during the years.
Presently Achat's members
are Peggy Bieley, Florence
and Murray Birchansky, Eve-
lyn and Bernie Goodman,
Esther Kessler and Herman
Pitter, Geraldine and Frank
Legow, Jean and Al Leibert,
Barbara and Stan Mintz,
Jackie and Al Rose, Frances
and Bill Sanes, Joanne and
Bernie Saper, and Shirley and
Sam Steen.
While its nearly 150 monthly
meetings have been peppered
with wit and humor, food, fel-
lowship and discussions, good
deeds have been the core of
Chaverah Achat. In honor of
their 13th anniversary, chav-
erah members undertook a
"13-Good-Deeds-Project,"
with specific tzedakah and
mitzvot ranging from audio-
taping for the blind to aiding
the hungry and homeless.
Cantors from the U.S. and
Canada have been crossing the
Atlantic Ocean to conduct ser-
vices behind the Iron Curtain,
in Romania, Hungary and Rus-
sia, thanks to the generosity of
a Miami Beach couple, Gila and
Haim Wiener and their Foun-
dation for the Advancement of
Cantorial Arts.
"It was a love-in," Cantor
Jacob Mendelson of Temple
Israel in White Plains, N.Y.,
described the feeling during
Simchat Torah at the Choral
Synagogue in Moscow. As he
walked out of the synagogue,
following services, Cantor
Mendelson found the sur-
rounding streets filled with
"thousands of young people,
dancing the hora and singing
their own songs The joyful
spirit inside and outside the
synagogue" the cantor said,
"made it an unforgettable
day."
Cantor Pinchas Rabinovicz
of Beth Jacob Congregation in
Beverly Hills, California, spent
a week in November in Budap-
est conducting Sabbath ser-
vices and performing in con-
certs; and four master cantors
participated in sabbath ser-
vices in Moscow's Choral Syn-
agogue Dec. 3, on the eve of
Chanukah, followed later in
the week by a concert there
and in the main synagogue in
Leningrad. The four cantors -
Ben Zion Miller of Brooklyn.
David Bagley of Toronto. Yaa-
cov Motzen of Quebec and
Moshe Schulhof of Los
Angeles were accompanied
by Cantor Daniel Gildar of
Philadelphia.
This mission, which was also
sponsored by the American
Society for the Advancement
of the Cantorial Arts, was part
of a mission to preserve and
rejuvenate cantorial art in
Eastern Europe. Haim Wiener
and his wife, Gila, a Holocaust
survivor, founded the Founda-
tion for the Advancement of
Cantorial Arts nearly 10 years
ago and, more recently, the
Miami-based American
Society for the Advancement
of Cantorial Arts.
$1M Raised At Weizmann Event
More than 900 guests, the
largest number for a fund rais-
ing event in the history of the
Wiezmann Institute of Sci-
ence's Florida region,
attended the recent dinner
dance at the Fontainebleau
Hilton Hotel honoring Mel and
Bobbi Dick. Dinner Chairman
Jay Weiss announced that the
event raised approximately $1
million and also established a
professorial chair at the Weiz-
mann Institute in honor of the
Dicks.
Guest entertainers were
comedian Shecky Greene,
vocalist Jerry Vale, and the
legendary singer Eddie
Fisher, who appeared as a
last-minute replacement for
composer-singer Paul Anka.
Guest speakers were Cana-
dian businessman Murray Kof-
fler, chairman of the Weiz-
mann Institute's International
Board of Governors, ami Raha-
mim Timor, Consul General of
Israel for Florida and Puerto
Rico.
Dinner co-chairmen were
Harvey Chaplin, Elliot Dinner-
stein, Isidore A. Becker. David
L. Paul and Marvin H Shan
ken. Chairman of the Weiz-
mann Florida Region is Row
land Schaefer.
,L
Friends of the IDF Director Martin Fisher is seen here, left,
presenting a certificate of appreciation to Vice President Morris
Laufer, President Max Wein and Vice President Eddy Estrakch
of the David Ben-Gurion Culture Club. The club of holocaust
survivors has been generous in its support ifthe well-l>eing of the
soldiers offsraet.
Jeb Bush, son of President-
Elect George Bush, and chair-
man of Bush Klein Realty,
Inc., has been elected to the
board of directors of Sun-
Bank/Miami, N.A.
Bush formerly was Secret-
ary of the Florida Department
of Commerce following his
appointment by Gov. Bob Mar-
tinez in January, 1987. During
two presidential campaigns, he
served as his father's execu-
tive assistant.
In Houston, Texas, Bush
held various positions with
Texas Commerce Bank, later
moving to Caracas, Venezuela
where he was the bank's
assistant vice president and
representative.
Mel and Bobbi Dick, at right, photographed with daughters
Lahna, left, and Meloni, were honored at the Institute of Si
Florida regions annual dinner dance, which raised M a rly $1
mJfiAti *V.m iL A f~____I* mi ..l~ ,. t :,\,\U
riomaa regions annual dinner dance, which raised many y
million for the Israeli research center. The couple not oiujf
actively supports Weizman, but also the Mary Beth Weiss'
Research Fund, the Paparicolasu Comprehensiv '
actively supports Weizman, but also the Mary Beth Weisi
Research Fund, the Paparicolasu Comprehensive
Research Center at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorm
Hospital and Project Few, Born. '



Friday, December 23, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 15
Fred Albert's whimsical vision is his version of mid-Miami
Beach.
Fred Albert's Vision
Is Miami's Whimsical
Version
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
IN the early '80s, Bronx-
horn Fred Albert was labeled a
"near-cult figure" in Miami's
art world.
Pressed in dusty clothbound
hooks and frames in his Miami
Beach home are the more tra-
ditional works that dated back
to the nudes he drew as an art
student and sketches he made
during travels around Europe
and points east.
What gave Albert the most
noted media coverage, how-
ever, was his decision in the
70s to start painting down-
town murals and works that
labeled his work "whimsy."
Like Andy Warhol's Camp-
bell's soup can brought the late
artist into the international
picture, Albert, now 55, has
won recognition by developing
a style of his own. Spontan-
eously, he decided to draw
what he wanted, where he
wanted as he saw it. Well, with
some permission anyway.
An underground parking
garage in downtown Miami
looked bare-awful. Albert
received permission from the
city and a "very small" com-
mission to make the unde-
rground come alive with a 300-
foot mural created in less than
a month.
FRED Albert was walking
through the then Pavilion
Hotel when it's elegant but
austere marble lobby was
being renovated for the incar-
nation to Hotel Intercontinen-
tal. Albert couldn't bear to see
the bare plywood. So, again,
he asked to add his touch to
the work.
It made quite a splash, not
only among curious hotel
guests, but among the media.
One of Albert's favorite stories
was written in 1986 by Miami
News editor Howard Klein-
berg, called, "Miami, See it
like Fred Albert."
Kleinberg described how
Albert worked to "fashion this
version of downtown Miami
from skyline to waterline .
using house paint, Crayola,
Magic Marker, six pieces of
neon, lots of colored foil."
And as Kleinberg noted, it
could take more than an hour
to notice all the details Albert
had used in the mural.
But the fate of these murals
ended in bits and pieces when
the garage was torn down and
the hotel renovations were
complete. The work that was
not purchased or salvaged was
Photographed with the guest of honor, Dr. Irving Lehrman, second left, at the gala celebrating his
45th and Temple Emanu-El 's 50th anniversary, are from left, congregational President Lawrence
M. Schantz; Gov. Bob Martinez; Cal Kovens, associate chairman of the event; and chairman
Stephen Muss.
Gala Tribute Honored Lehrman
Fred Albert, Miami High '51.
buried in landfill.
Claiming they would have
saved the work had it been
done by Picasso, Albert,
warns, "they'll be sorry some-
day."
Sometimes, though, he says
with a sigh, "it's difficult to
find my work if you don't go
sailing on a cruise ship (the
Nordic Prince or Song of Nor-
way) or looking through a gar-
bage can."
DESPITE the self-
deprecation, Albert's works
indeed have been purchased by
private collectors and he is
preparing for his second major
exhibit at Gusman Cultural
Center in 10 years, scheduled
to run from September '89 to
January 1989.
The artist, who moved to
Miami with his parents in
1949, says almost with a sense
of pride that he has avoided
living in the artsy section of
Coconut Grove or the Miami
Beach art deco district.
For the past two years his
work has been featured regu-
larly in Miami Beach Maga-
zine, and his illustrations may
be seen on the Mayfair Grill
menu and Nathan's Famous
Hot Dog Cookbook.
His most recent commission
was a painting-turned-poster
for the new Arthur Godfrey
Road branch of City National
Bank of Florida.
The spirit of his earlier mur-
als was captured again in the
bank's painting, where it
would take more than a quick
glance to notice all its nuances.
Albert has succumbed to
peer pressure. "I guess you
could call it whimsy," he says
with a smile. The painting is
colored with everything from
bold primaries to the pastels of
South Florida. It conforms to
the area's reality in an
exaggerated way in Fred
Albert's way.'
MIAMI BEACH More
than 1,000 community leaders,
congregants and international
dignitaries paid tribute to Dr.
Irving Lehrman, rabbi of
Temple Emanu-El of Greater
Miami, Saturday evening,
Jan. 17, at the Fontainebleau
Hilton Hotel. It was a joint
celebration: Lehrman's 45th
anniversary and the 50th anni-
versary of the Temple
Gov. Bob Martinez pre-
sented Rabbi Lehrman with a
special plaque. Archbishop
Edward A. McCarthy and Dr.
Ismar Schorsch, chancellor of
the Jewish Theological Semin-
ary of America, paid tribute to
Lehrman for his efforts for
brotherhood and peace.
The gala was chaired by
Stephen Muss, and co-chaired
by Cal Kovens, Irving Cowan
and David L. Paul. Highlight-
ing the evening was the cut-
ting of the four-tiered anniver-
sary cake by Rabbi Lehrman
and his wife, Belle, and the
burning of a $2.5 million mort-
gage on the Lehrman Day
School, the special anniversary
"gift" sought by Temple
Emanu-El's spiritual leader.
Led by Dr. Amir Baron, the
school's director, eight young
students sang "mazeltov" mel-
odies to the Lehrmans.
Also present was sculptor
Yakov Heller, whose busts of
Rabbi Lehrman were presentd
to the gala's Founders.
Outstanding
Citizens' Awards
Individuals and organiza-
tions that have contributed to
the betterment and enhance-
ment of life in the South Flor-
ida community will be honored
at the 39th annual B'nai B'rith
Outstanding Citizens Awards
luncheon Friday, Feb. 24, at
the Biscayne Bay Marriott
Hotel, Miami.
Keynote speaker will be
Edward T. Foote II, president
of the University of Miami.
Organizations may submit
nominations to the B'nai B'rith
Outstanding Citizens Award,
3107 W. Hallandale Beach
Blvd., Suite 105, Hallandale,
Florida 33009, attention
Milton Samuels, chairman.
Free Federal Consumer
Information Catalog.
l).-pi l)F Pueblo, Colorado 81IHM
Lawrence M. Schantz, president of Temple Emanu-El of Greater
Miami assists Rabbi Irving Lehrman in burning the $2.5 million
mortgage on the Lehrman Day School, the special gift marking
Dr. Lehrman's 45th anniversary as Temple Emanu-El's spiri-
tual leader.
Adam Holzman, a student at Barry University, was
named student editor of the National Collegiate Hon-
ors Council's Forum Four Honors Newsletter at the
council's recent annual convention in Las Vegas,
which he attended with Dr. Jesus Mendez, director of
Barry's honors program. As student editor of the
national newsletter, Holzman's column will focus on
the response from students and educators to what is
happening in honors education. Holzman, who has
been involved in Barry's honors program since his
freshman year, is vice president and founding member
of the Honors Students Association and editor of its
newsletter, The Beacon.
HowTbKeepFrom
ngNickelecfAnd Dimed
\ Death By>ur Bank.
You give your
tank thousands
ol dollars in
business And
what do you
gel in
return?
Service
charges and fees
Bui no! with the
DduxeVALUE?"
Account, only at
NCNB National
Bank..Just keep
$2*500 in savings or
.SHUXHlinCDswitluis.and
you can save over $200ayear on the services
von use most (and that's a lot of nickels and dimes).
Stop I >v sot >n. Aru I see hi wv wew >rk
toUMheU'st bank in the nei^ht M>rl iood. National Bank


Page 16 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 23, 1988
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
.. "And Israel stretched out his right hand, and laid it upon
Ephraim's head, who was the younger, and his left hand upon
Manasseh's head"
(Gen. U8.U).
VAYEHI
VAYEHI Jacob lived in Egypt 17 years. On his death bed, he
blessed his sons, predicting the destiny of the tribes that were to
descend from each of them. Ephraim and Manasseh, Joseph's two
sons, were included in the roster of Jacob's sons, the heads of
future tribes. Jacob died; the Egyptian physicians embalmed his
body, after the custom of the country. Jacob was buried in the
land of Canaan, in the Cave of Machpelah, together with his
ancestors.
Joseph continued to provide for his brothers after their father's
death. Before his own death, Joseph made his brothers swear that
when they returned to Canaan they would take his bones with
them to the Promised Land. Joseph died; meanwhile, his
embalmed body was placed in a coffin, awaiting the return to
Canaan.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and
based upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by
P. Wollman-Tsamir, published by Shengold. The volume is available
at 75 Maiden Lane, New York, N.Y. 10038.)
AMIT
MDCC Foundation Names Panel
Members of the Miami-Dade
Community College Founda-
tion's Presidential Blue Rib-
bon Committee, recently hon-
ored at a dinner at the Omni
Hotel, include Louis Wolf son
III and Andrew Blank, co-
chairmen of the Endowed
Teaching Chair Campaign;
Seth Gordon, Donald Kipnis
and Nancy Swerdlow Kipnis.
Committee members will
assist the college in attracting
endowed teaching chairs,
which reward excellence in
teaching.
Bonds* Women's Chair
Barbara Stollman, chairman
of the Metropolitan Detroit
Israel Bonds Women's Divi-
sion since 1986, has been
named national chairman of
the Women's Division of the
Israel Bonds campaign.
Stollman is a member of the
boards of the Women's Divi-
sion of the Jewish Welfare
Federation of Detroit, the
Detroit chapter of Bar Han
University, the Anti-
Defamation League and the
Detroit Soviet Jewry Commit-
tee Council; and is a member
of Hadassah, ORT, Council of
Jewish Women and League of
Jewish Women.
t
Chai chapter will hold a
luncheon meeting Wednesday,
Dec. 28, 11:30 a.m., at Temple
Beth Tov, South Miami.
Geula Chapter will meet
Wednesday, Dec. 28, at 7:30
p.m., in the social hall of
Tower 41, 4101 Pine Tree Dr.,
Miami Beach. Guest speaker
will be state Rep. Elaine
Bloom.
Shoshana and Hadar chap-
ters will hold a luncheon meet-
ing Tuesday, Dec. 27, noon, in
the State Room of Seacoast
Towers South, Miami Beach.
The Simcha chapter will
celebrate its seventh birthday
Monday, Dec. 25, with a noon-
time luncheon and birthday
party in the Winston Towers
300 building, Miami Beach.
Essie Goldman will present a
book review of "In The Begin-
ning Love" by Edith
Samuels.
Siyum
Celebration
In conjunction with Jews all
over the world, Greater Miami
Jewry celebrated the siyum
(completion) of the Rambam's
Mishna Torah with a Siyum
Celebration at the Crown
Hotel Thursday, Dec. 22.
The event, marked the fifth
year since the Lubavitcher
Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem M.
Schneerson, instituted the
study of Rambam as part of
Jewish daily life.
GLATT KOSHER PESACH 89
April 19th 28th
in LAS VEGAS
You'll stay at the
Spectacular...
&
An exclusive NON-GAMING
Resort just two blocks from
the Fabulous Las Vegas Strip.
II f
( RESORT ? LAS VEGAS )
$
Featuring:
20 acres of lush greenery,
streams, and waterfalls an
oasis in the desert
All deluxe suites with refrig-
erator & color television
Health club, 3 swimming pools,
tennis courts, nine-hole putting
green
Complimentary transportation
to and from McCarran Interna-
tional Airport and to the "Strip"
Offering the color and beauty of
nearby Redrock Canyon,
Valley of Fire and the Grand
Canyon for a day of serene
sightseeing. Recreational op-
portunities also include water-
skiing, sailing and fishing at
Lake Mead
Includes:
Nine days / Nine nights
Two Traditional Seders
Two Barbecues
Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner
Glatt Kosher Meals prepared
under Strict Orthodox
Rabbinical Supervision
Daily Synagogue Services
Daily Tea Room featuring Ice
Cream Sunday Bar
$1,549.00
per person
plus 22% tax and gratuities
based on double occupancy
Children under 12 Half Price
(Additional Nights Available)
Limited Capacity
Early Reservations Suggested
For Reservations & Information
Call Las Vegas Kosher Tours
1-800-552-7255
4S26 W. Choffston Blvd. Lot Vegas, Nevada 89102
*
Synagogue
Listing
Candle Lighting Time
5:17 p.m.
AOATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Zvl Bonn Conservative
Executive Director /gfo,
Harry J. Sllverman (Wf
Daily Mlnyan 7:30 a.m. & 5:30 p.m.
FA 5 p.m. Sat. 8:30 a.m. Services, Bar
MlUvsh of Jon Moses
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 667-6667
Leonard Schoolman, Sr. Rabbi
Mark Kram, Associate Rabbi
Lynn Goldstein, Assistant Rabbi
Fri., 8:15 p.m. Sarvlca. Rabbi Kram on:
'Challenge* To Our Jewish Identity."
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami Beach
534-7213-534 7214
Barry J. Konovitch, Rabbi /;
Snoiem Epelbaum, President,
Religious Committee
Daniel Kaizler, Cantor
Miguel Karpel, President
TEMPLE EMANUEL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Sol Landau, Ph.D., Aux. Rabbi
"ehuda Shlfman, Cantor
Frl..5p.m Kabbalal Shabbat, 8 p m late
evening service. Sat. 9 a.m. Service Or
Landau wilt preach on the weekly portion
ot the Bible: Cantor Shlfman will chani
assisted by Temple Choir.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive, Miami Beach
5326421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schitt
Delly 7:30 a.m.fMon. & Thurs. 7:15) & 7 p m
Fri. 7 p.m. Sat. 9 a.m.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 654-3911
Jack Riemer, Rabbi
Benjamin Adler, Cantor ,f*j^
Rev. Milton Freeman,
Ritual Director
>
Sat. 9 a.m. Shabbat Service
Sun. 8 am I 5:30 p.m. Services
Dally Services
Mon. & Thuri. 7:30 a.m. I 5:30 p.m
Tuee. Wed. Fri. 7:45 a.m. & 5:30 p.m.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF SUNNY ISLES
17274 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach Fl. 33160 947-1196
Hillel Prtca, President
Rubin R. Dobin, Rabbi
Fri. 5:15 p.m. Sabbath Eve services. Rabbi
Dobin on Jewish Lore. Sat 8:45 am
Services. Observance ol 40th anniversary
ot signing of UN Declaration of Human
Rights. Rabbi Dobin on "Human Rights
For All People". 5:15 p.m. Evening Services
Weekdays 8 a.m. & 5:15 p.m. Services
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami. FL 33161
6915508 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs. Rabbi
111
Fri. 8 p.m. Sabbath evening services
Sat 8:45 am Sabbath service
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave., M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Ralph Y. Carmi
Cantor Moshe Buryn
Fri 5 p.m. Kabbalal Shabbat Service Sat
8:30 a.m.. 4:30 p.m Rabbi's Bible Class,
5:15 p.m. Mlncha. followed by Shalosh
_____________Suedos a Maanv
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
236-2601 /
Rabbi David H. Auerbach
Cantor Stephen Freedman
Fri. B p.m. Services Sat 9:30 am Ser
vices. Services are conducted by Rabbi
Auerbach & Cantor Freedman
Daily services Sun 9 30 a m Wed 7.30
p.m.; Mon., Tues. 8 Thurs 7:30 am
Tues. 1:30 p m Senior Assembly, featur-
my tenor Alex Redhill
thSli.tIH4,.t,J,LoM mS
OAav A. QUCKSTEIN. Senior Rabbi
HAMYJCH.T,Au,,,uPtobbl
JASON QWASOOFF Aaaiatam Rabbi
IAN AI.PERN. Csntor
DAVID CONVISER. Cintor Emeritus
'" r*>m GoMsg* ft*****, ,cei,o* 10. co~m iijM^t,
1 >>'*> IXKH S IOMcm
BfJHJORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd. s>.
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz, Rabbi ( })
Zvee Aronl, Cantor v X-'
Harvey L. Brown. Exec. Director
^"iT"? Mon F" 7:3 "n5:3 p<*
Fn. 8 p.m late services Sat 8:25 am
Services with Bar Mitnah of Jason Mev-
*rs. Mlncha 5.30 p.m Sun 8 .T."
p.m. Services
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Miami's Pleaaev Reform Congregation
137 N.E. 19th St. Miami, 573-5900
Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob G. Bomstein
Fri. 8 p.m Qumenlck Chapel, Services
Rabbi Perimeter will welcome Cong w,
Ham Lehman who will speak on A Jew
ish Perspective On the 1988 Elections
liturgy: Cantor Nelson. A discussion with
the Congressman 8 Rabbi will follow
Service broadcast live on WTMI 93 i FM
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Relorm
Coral Gables 667 5657
Michael B. EJsenstat, Rabbi
Fri. B:15 p.m. Services. College Shabbat
Set 11 15 am Shabbat Service
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz >.
Cantor Murray Yavneh {if)
Sat. a.m. Sebbeth service
Dally Mlnchah Sunday Friday
8 a.m and 8 p.m
Sat. 9 m. and 5:15 p.m
TEMPLE NERTAMID 866 8345
7902 Carlyle Ave.. 866 9833
Miami Beach 33141 con.i.,
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Cantor Edward Klein
(J;
Fri. 8:15 p.m. Services
Set Serv. 8:45 a.m & 7:45 p.m
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St
North Miami Beach 651-1562
Orthodox
Rabbi Yakov Sprung
ue-rovncea Suns 30a m .Mon I iw "
Tues Wad S Fn 7 15 a m Mincne 10 minim
bel ore tuned Sat 9 a m Daily cieaeee
SHAARE TEFILLAH
TORAH CENTER OF KENDALL
7880 SW 112 Street
232-6833
Rabbi Hershel Becker
Dally Sen. 7 a.m. Fri. 10 mln. after candle
lighting time Shabbos a m Shabboi
Mlncha 10 mln before candle lighting time
Sun i 30 am ____
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave
North Dede's Reform Congreotnon
* Qly.0010
Ralph P. Kingsley. Rabbi
Irving SftulKes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administrator
Fn 8 p.m Services conducted by Rabbi
Kingsley 8 Cantor Shulkes. adult Choii
will |oln Cantor in chanting the liturgy
Sal 10 30 Services naming of Samantna
Lauren, daughter of Ban and Leslie Fnn
del
H


Friday, December 23, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 17
A recent Saturday evening dinner/dance at a Miami Beach home drew some 200 supporters of the
Friends of the IDF to hear visiting Israeli Air Force Col. Uri Dromi, who is touring the U.S. on
behalf of the international group. Relatively new in this country, Friends of the IDF established an
office in Miami just this year and has succeeded in raising $30,000. At the dinner/dance were,
from left, Frida Arber; Ida Raij; Sofia Horenstein; Fania Rivliansky, receiving a plaque for the
organization's fundraising efforts; Miriam Jacobi; and Martin Fisher, director.
Consul Recanati At NCJW Luncheon
Yair Recanati, consul at the
Israeli Consulate in Miami, will
be guest speaker at the RIFIE
(Research Institute for Innova-
tion in Education) luncheon of
the National Council of Jewish
Women (NCJW), Greater
Miami Section, Wednesday,
Jan. 18, 11:30 a.m., at the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion.
RIFIE was established by
NCJW in 1968 as part of the
Yair Recanati
Shenberg
Investiture
Harvey N. Shenberg, who
was elected without opposition
this past September, will be
sworn in as Dade County
Court Judge Thursday, Jan-
uary 5, noon, at the Dade
County Courthouse.
Florida Supreme Court Jus-
tice Gerald Kogan will deliver
the oath to Judge Shenberg, a
former assistant Dade State
Attorney, and Chief Judge
Gerald T. Wetherington will
['reside at the investiture.
Speakers on the program will
include former Dade State
Attorney Richard E. Gerstein,
I)ade Circuit Court Judge
Ellen Morphonios, and Manny
Crespo, a member of the
Hoard of Governors of the
Florida Bar and past president
of the Cuban American Bar
Association, representing the
Florida Bar.
Shenberg, a member of the
Florida Bar since 1968, was
named an assistant Dade State
Attorney in 1969, and was a
capital crimes prosecutor and
major crimes prosecutor for
the next three-and-one-half
years. He left in 1973 to join a
Miami law firm, but since
served as special assistant
state attorney, special assist-
ant Dade public defender, pub-
lic defender of the City of
Opa-locka and special assistant
state attorney.
school of education of Hebrew
University in Jerusalem. At
RIFIE, educational protects
for immigrant and disadvan-
taged children are developed
and tested.
Nan Rich, a NCJW national
board member who attended
RIFIE's 20 year and Israel's
40 year anniversaries in Israel,
will give an update of RIFIE's
newest projects.
Harvey L. Brown, executive director of Beth Torah
Congregation for the past nine years, was installed as
honorary president of the National Association of
Synagogue Administrators at its recent convention in
Jerusalem, Israel.
Dr. Carolee A. DeVito, of South Shore Hospital and
Medical Center and the University of Miami School of
Medicine, has been named one of the outstanding
women at the U-M medical school. DeVito also is
associate director of the Miami Area Geriatric Educa-
tion Center (MAGEC), which is funded by the United
States Department of Health and Human Services
through 1991.
North Miami Beach resident Eric Salm is serving as
chairman for the Greater Miami Israel Bonds cam-
paign. Salm heads up a drive seeking to mobilize all
payments due for Israel Bonds subscriptions enrolled
this year.
Miami Beach attorney Howard Galbut and Harry
Mildner, president of the Miami Beach Retirees, have
been elected chairman and vice chairman respectively
of the City of Miami Beach Housing Authority. Mildner,
a retired manufacturer and builder, was a member of
the city's planning board for 15 years.
News From
*% JM ^American Friends off ^M ^
Sans Meatcal Center
N
E
N
Hope
The Anatomy ofcrModern Miracle
Harry and Mary Stein
The stretcher carrying 71 year-old
Harry Stein burst through the automatic
doors of the emergency room even before
they had a chance to open electronically.
"Let's get some help here!" the paramedic
yelled. "We've got a heart attack..early
seventies... .slipping fast"
Stein's condition was quickly stabi-
lized, but not before he had fallen into a
deep coma. Despite the medicines, diag-
noses and prayers. Stein refused to wake.
The vigil began. Despite the desperate
situation and the pessimistic prognosis, the
doctors continued their comprehensive
treatment Day after day, his wife Mary
would sit by his side and speak to him.
She would usually begin their one-sided
conversations by asking. "How are you.
Harry?" And then she would talk about
the weather. About the news. About almost
anything. True. Harty had lived a full life.
but "giving up" were two words not found
in Mary's version of the dictionary.
Fifty-one days after Harry Stein was
rushed to Sanz Medical Center suffering
a massive heart attack the miracle oc-
cured. For when Mary asked her usual
question, "How are you feeling, Harry?",
he responded by stating simply
"Excellent", plainly unaware of the com-
motion that had surrounded him for the
past seven weeks.
Medical experts throughout Israel
hailed Sanz Medical Center for its "heroic
measures...far beyond reasonable proce-
dure," and acclaimed the commitment
that 're-taught the meaning of the value
oflife".
Superior medical technology. Dedi-
cated staff. Commitment to life. Faith. And
last, but certainly not least Mrs. Mary
Stein. The ingredients for a miracle.
Hospital Receives Gift of Brotherly Love
Isaac Weis of Miami Beach,
Florida is a longtime friend and sup-
porterofSam Medical Center. When
he decided to make a Suing gift to
the Hospital through his wHL he called
his friends and relatives to celebrate.
His brother, Solomon, moved by
Isaacs gesture, did the same. Years
later, when Solomon passed away,
the Hospital was the beneficiary of
a generous contribution and invited
Isaac to Israel, to take part ti a
specialmemonal tributeto his brother.
Help Sanz Medical Center celebrate its BAR MITZVAH Anniversary of service to the People of Israel.
Enclose your tax-deductible BAR MITZVAH gift to American Friends of Sanz Medical Center, today!
American Friends of
Sanz Medical Center
18 West 45th Street/New York, New York 10036 (212) 944-2690
Please accept my BAR MITZVAH gift of $
D VOLlXTEERACmTIES[
Please send more information about
WLL PRERUUTTOS I ] DEIWATK)S OIVORTL A772ES"r I ESTATE PLAXHMG
\ame_
. Mm.
Jltwk-.
L.
V


Page 18 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 23, 1988
Sexual Abuse is Secreted In Jewish Community Closet
Continued from Page 13
health counselors to report
even potential child abuse
cases. That law, in effect since
1974, could result in civil pen-
alties for the latter for failing
to make the report. Although
the name of the person or
institution which makes the
report remains anonymous, all
records and interviews regard-
ing these cases are not confi-
dential and must be turned
over to HRS.
That puts professionals in a
"double-edged sword" posi-
tion, Oxman observed. "A lot
of times people go to profes-
sionals for help and then the
professional has to report the
child abuse to the system.
Even when the parents bring
their child to emergency rooms
or the family doctor, if child
abuse is suspected, it has to be
reported," he says.
Whether that will prevent
people from seeking help
remains questionable. Oxman
says JFS immediately informs
clients that such cases must be
reported. "It poses a difficult
clinical problem for us,
because we still want to help
people," he says.
On the other hand, reporting
cases to the HRS can be advan-
tageous, Oxman acknow-
Richard Oxman
ledges. "A lot of times it's
important to get the system
involved with families that
abuse their children, because
we can't force anybody to
come to counseling, whereas
the state has that authority.
So, it's a very complex
problem."
In the Jewish community,
Oxman says he has seen cases
that range from domestic vio-
lence to physical and psycholo-
gical abuse.
"Very few people are going
to call up and say, 'I've been
abusing my child. I need help.'
They're going to call up when
the stress in the family has
gotten out of control or the
abuse has gotten so bad that it
can't be denied anymore."
And that leads to the ques-
tion of what rights a parent
has in terms of punishment.
The state has not clearly arti-
culated guidelines.
Thus, Oxman's perspective:
"The punishment should be
used to train the child versus
the parent's gratification of
uncontrolled rage. Now, the
other side of the coin is, can
the child appreciate the correc-
tive response of discipline and
is the punishment appropriate
for the child's misdeeds?
"Any punishment that's
brutal or degrading should
certainly not be used."
Jewish day school pro-
fessionals are starting to rec-
ognize that child abuse is a real
problem, Oxman says. "We
can educate the community as
to what constitutes abuse. The
Jewish community needs to
work with the larger system
like HRS.
"Society has lost a lot of the
power to guide people. And as
professionals in the Jewish
community, we have to help
our clients deal with the con-
fusion when it comes to child
abuse."
Child abuse is generally
caused by "intergenerational
repetition," that is, sub-
consciously following the
method of discipline used by
one's parents, Oxman noted.
"We know that child abuse is
aggravated by situational
stressors, such as financial
stress, marital problems and
drug abuse. Also, we know
that personal characteristics
of the child can elicit parents
abusing their child.
Asked if there are many
cases of children who are
beaten or abused because thev
are indeed incorrigible, Oxman
responses: "Most child abuse
is related to family problems
as opposed to a child who is so
aberrant in his behavior
I've never seen a child who is
so aberrant and the family is
healthy."
Gulfstream Opens Jan. 8
Gulfstream Park will cele-
brate its 50th Anniversary
meeting when the Hallan-
dale track opens for its
50-day meeting Sunday,
Jan. 8. Prices will be rolled
back in honor of the event.
"Rolling back prices is
one of our ways to express
Gulfstream's appreciation
for its patrons strong sup-
port during past years,"
commented Douglas Donn,
Gulfstream president and
chief executive officer. "We
are giving away, free, a
limited edition, collector's
item, key ring, engraved
with a 50th anniversary
emblem especially created
for the occasion. We also
will have appropriate enter-
tainment, personalities and
films to mark the memor-
able day."
Admission to the Grand-
stand will be 50 cents and to
the Clubhouse $1 for this
day only.
CRAMER. Ralph. 73. Bay Harbor
Islands, Dec. 14. Shalom Memorial
Gardens.
RAYMOND, Bernard, 66, Key Bis
cayne, Dec. 12, funeral services in
Brookline, MA.
BERSON, William, Bal Harbour,
interred N.Y.
KUTASH, Yetta, funeral services in
Ohio.
LEVY, Charlotte Schwartz, 79, for-
merly of Miami Beach.
LIPSHITZ, Sadie, 99, Surfside, Eter-
nal Light, Mt. Sinai Cemetery.
MERV1S, Ralph L.. Miami Beach,
services at Temple Emanu-El.
ROTHMAN, Dorothy, 67, Bay Har-
bor, Dec. 15, Levitt-Weinstein, Beth
David Cemetery.
SAX, Goldie, 74, No. Miami Beach,
Dec. 17, Riverside. Lakeside Memo-
rial Park.
BROWDY, Lillian L. 85, Miami Beach,
Levitt-Weinstein.
GELMAN, Miriam (Mitzi), Miami,
Eternal Light.
GROSSMAN (Bobby) Bessie, 82,
Miami Beach, Dec. 14, Levitt-
Weinstein.
KAUFFMAN. Robert Irwin, 44,
Miami, Dec. 15, Menorah Chapels.
KELTON, Benjamin, Miami Beach,
funeral services held.
WEILAND. Charles, Bal Harbour,
funeral services held.
BLONDER, Charles B Bal Harbour,
Dec. 13, Riverside.
COHEN, Louis, funeral services held.
EISENBERG, Benjamin, 92, No.
Miami Beach, Dec. 12, Riverside.
KAUFMAN, George J Miami Beach,
Dec. 7, Blasberg Funeral Chapel.
KODISH. Sally, 74. Miami Beach, Star
of David Memorial Park.
MALTER. Mitchell, 42, formerly of
Miami Beach, Dec. 9, Menorah
Chapels, Mt. Nebo-Kendall Memo-
rial Gardens.
POSKANZER, Adele, Miami Beach,
Mount Nebo-Kendall.
GRUBER, Gabriel. 66, Kendall. Dec.
19, Mt. Sinai Cemetery.
HIRSCH, Martin, 68. Miami, Dec. 19,
Star of David Memorial Park.
SHEINGOLD, Bernard, Miami Beach.
Riverside.
SHEINGOLD, Frances, Miami Beach,
Riverside.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service
Dade County
532 20W
Broward County
r>:i2 2(KW
Represents by Riverside Memorial Cha|l. Inc
New York: (718) 263 7(Miyueens Blvd. &7KthR Tradition. It's what makes us Jewish.
RIVERSIDE
MEMORIAL GUARDIAN CHAPELS
Dade: 531-1151 Broward: 523-5801
Palm Beach: 683-8676 Boca/Delray: 276-5777
Serving the South Florida Jewish Community tor Over 50 Years
eturn in beauty\
to ancient tmaitkms.
Mt. Nebo Garden Mausoleum
Tombs cut from rock were traJition.il
burial chambers for Jewish people in
earliest times. Jewish history tells ol
above-ground burial in the sides ol
mountains to provide safety, perma-
nence and accessibility
The Jewish concept of life eternal
is expressed with dignity, love an J
devotion at Mt. Nebo Memorial
Gardens in our Garden Mausoleum
Hen- in Miami's mt>st beautiful exclu-
sively Jewish Cemetery youcan select
space in our handsome mausoleum,
with its distinctive design, solid mar-
ble finish, spacious lawn and lush
landscaping. We also have attractive
private family mausoleum spai i
available.
Ask about the financial advan
tages ol above-mound burial Our
counselors will be happy t provide
you with information.
Sharing the Weinstein family
tradition in funeral servit
MT. NFBO
MEMORIAL GARDENS
5505 N.W. 3rd Street
Miami, FL 3313ft
Alfred Golden, President
(305) 261-7612


Friday, December 23, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 19
Amy Dean Chairs Super Sunday
Amy Dean, a Greater Miami
Jewish Federation Board
member, is chairman of Super
Sunday, the federation's
annual communitywide fun-
draising phonathon to be held
Sunday, Jan. 29, 9 a.m.-9 p.m.
at Temple Israel of Greater
Miami.
Dean, who currently serves
as chairman of the federation's
Soviet Jewry Committee and
as chair of the United Jewish
Appeal's Young Women's
Leadership Cabinet, received
the federation's Stanely C.
Meyers Presidents' Leader-
ship Award in 1984. She has
also chaired the federation's
Planning and Budget Subcom-
mittee on local agencies, the
Women's Division Campaign
and the Attorneys Division.
Amy Dean, chairman of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation Super Sunday, meets with her
committee chairpersons. Among those serving are, from left, bottom row: Ellen Elbrand, traffic
control; Amy Dean; Zena Inden, Expo; top row: Maureen Berkowitz, appoint-a-thon; Elaine
Rich man, women's division; Ken Hoffman, at-large; Dorothy Podhurst, at-large; and Bonnie
Epstein, at-large.
Discussing plans for the annual Awards Luncheon of American
Red Magen David for Israel (ARMDI), to be held Thursday,
March 16, at the Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel, are, from left. Dr.
Robert L. Sadoff, national president of ARMDI; Joseph Handle-
man, luncheon honoree; and Seymour Brief, incoming president
of ARMDI southeast region. Handleman, former national chair-
man of ARMDI, is chairman of the International Committee for
Magen David Adorn (MDA), Israel's emergency medical network.
< for the financial climate of 1989 was discussed by a panel oj market experts at the Miami
h Home and Hospital for the Aged at Douglas Gardens (MJHHA). Present were, from left,
list B. Carter Randall; MJHHA Executive Director Marc Lichtman; panelist Charles Gam;
MJHHA Planned Gifts Co-Chair Helen Rechtschaffer; panelist Stan Weinstein; and A. Jeffrey
>>. Planned Gift co-chair.
Linda Siegel Nevel of Miami
Beach has been appointed
director of development for
JFTV, Jewish television in
Miami. Nevel has been active
in real estate and health
related businesses as well as in
civic and philanthropic organi-
zations.
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
NOTICE OF SALE by MARIA SAMA
PI USl ANT TO CHAPTER 45 Deputy Clerk
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF Attorney for Plaintiff
TIU KLEVENTH JUDICIAL Joseph M. Paniello. Esquire
< IKH IT. IN AND FOR DADE One Tampa Center. Suite 2720
COUNTY, FLORIDA 201 North Franklin Street
GENERAL JURISDICTION Tampa. Florida 33601
DIVISION Published 12/22-30
CASK NO. 88-1366 Esquire
SE< 06 One Tampa Center, Suite 2720
THK PRUDENTIAL INSUR- 201 North Franklin Street
AM E COMPANY OF AMERI- Tampa. Florida 33601
(A Published 12/23-30_____________
I NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
\1\KM> LUIS RAMOS, if living, in THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
and if married. MRS. MARIO THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CORPORATION, a
II IS K AMOS, his wife, if living. CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE poration, successor by merger to
including any unknown spouse of COUNTY. FLORIDA STOCKTON. WHATLEY. DAV-
Bid Defendants, if either has GENERAL JURISDICTION IN & COMPANY.
DIVISION Plaintiffls)
CASE NO. 87-31398 vs.
SEC 06 NORRIS YOUNG. DORIS LA-
Suite 2300. (entrust Financial
Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami. Florida 33131-2198
Published 12/23-30_______________
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 88-16161
SEC. 25
BANCBOSTON MORTGAGE
Florida cor-
remarried. etc.. et al.,
: .nt(s)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
mt to an Order or Final
'nt entered in this case now
.: in said Court, the style of
il indicated above, I will sell
highest and best bidder for
n THE SOUTH STEPS of
If County Courthouse in
Miami, Dade County. Florida at
i dock A.M., on the 10TH
JANUARY, 1989. the fol
I'scribed property:
">M)OMINIUM UNIT NUM-
BKK 301. OF BUILDING 8841 W
FLAGLER STREET OF THE
GREENS CONDOMINIUM. AC
("KIHNGTOTHE DECLARA-
Rosenthal & Yarchin
Suite 2300. ('entrust Financial
Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami. Florida 33131-2198
Published 12/23-30______________
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-25694
SEC. 21
PENNAMCO. INC..
Plaintiffls)
vs.
ELIGE GRACE. JR.. also known
as ELIJAH HAKEEM SALEEM.
and if married. MRS. ELIGE
GRACE, alto known as MRS.
ELIJAH HAKEEM SALEEM.
his wife, et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
BANCBOSTON MORTGAGE VENDER, and the unknown
CORPORATION, a Florida cor- spouses, et al..
poration, successor by merger to Defendants)
STOCKTON. WHATLEY. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
DAVIN & COMPANY pursuant to an Order or Final pursuant to an Order or Final
Plaintiffls) Judgment entered in this case now Judgment entered in this case now
vs pending in said Court, the style of pending in said Court, the style of
CHARLES E WILLIAMS; et which is indicated above, I will sell which is indicated above I will sell
. to th,, highest and best bidder for to the highest and best bidder for
Defendants) cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN the Dade County Courthouse in the Dade County Courthouse in
Order or Final Miami. Dade County. Florida at Miami, Dade County. Florida at
1100 o'clock A.M.. on the 10TH 11:00 oclock A.M.. on the II
pursuant to an
Judgment entered in this case now
' uagment enierea in uus case m> n. uu. .. .....- ----- hwiiadv iaao ,k fi
! pending in said Court, the style of day of JANUARY. 1989, the fol- day of JANUARY. 1989. the fol-
- which is indicated above. I will sell lowing described property: owing de^scnbe.1 property:
-- to the highest and best bidder for Lot 13. Block 5. of FLEET- \g^SSSaJfff 15
TION OF CONDOMINIUM cash THE SOUTH STEPS of WOOD GARDENS SECTION SHORES SECTION D. accord-
"IIREOF. AS RECORDED IN the Dade County Courthouse in ONE. according to the Plat ther- |.to the Pla thereofrecoirded
"I FICIAL RECORDS BOOK Miami. Dade County, Florida at eof. a. recorded in Pl.t Book 57. in Pl.t Book 46. *(*
012 PAGE 402 OF THE PUB- 11 00 o'clock A.M.. on the 10TH Page 76. of the Public Records of Public Records of Dade ( ounty.
WJ RECORDS OF DADE day of JANUARY. 1989. the fol- Dade County. Florida 'n'frvn tlu. 21ST riv of OF-
"" \TY FLORIDA. AND ALL |wm({ described property: The United States of America DATED the 21ST da> of DE-
MINDMENTS THERETO: Lot 3. Block 1. BERK shall have the right of redemp- t EMBLK 19^
* I' TOGETHER WITH AN HEIGHTS, according to the Plat tion provided by 28 l.S.C. Sec.
I MMVIDED INTEREST IN thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2410(c) for the period provided
THE COMMON ELEMENTS 66 Page 3. of the Public Records therein, running from the date of
DECLARED IN THE DECLAR- f Dade Countv. Florida. the Certificate of Title issued
"<>N OF CONDOMINIUM TO DATED the 21ST day of herein.
I!l \N APPURTENANCE TO DECEMBER. 19KX.
THE ABOVE DESCRIBED RICHARD P. RRINKER
'W FIXING UNIT. Clerk of Circuit Court
,.l'.'.AJEI) tne 2,ST ^ of DE- (Circuit Court Seal)
1 K*BER. 1988. by MARIA SAMA
KK'HARD P. BRINKER Deputy Clerk
tort of Circuit Court Attorney for Plaintiff
" lr,u,t Co"rt Seal) Rosethal & Yarchin
DATED the 21ST day of DE-
CEMBER. I'.'HK
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Joseph M. Paniello. Esquire
Suite 2720. One Tampa City Cen-
ter
201 North Franklin Street
Tampa. Florida 33602
Published 12/23-30
......
t * NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-47107
SEC. 17
THE PRUDENTIAL INSUR-
ANCE COMPANY OF AMERI-
CA.
Plaintiffls)
vs.
TRANS-CONTINENTAL INV-
ESTMENTS. INC.. a Florida
corporation, et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami, Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M., on the 3rd day
of January, 1989, the following
described property:
CONDOMINIUM UNIT NUM-
BER 408, OF BUILDING 8801
W. FLAGLER ST. OF THE
GREENS CONDOMINIUM. AC-
CORDING TO THE DECLARA-
TION OF CONDOMINIUM
THEREOF. AS RECORDED IN
OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK
10912 PAGE 402 OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA. AND ALL
AMENDMENTS THERETO;
AND TOGETHER WITH AN
UNDIVIDED INTEREST IN
THE COMMON ELEMENTS
DECLARED IN THE DECLAR-
ATION OF CONDOMINIUM TO
BE AN APPURTENANCE TO
THE ABOVE DESCRIBED
DWELLING UNIT.
DATED the 14th day of Decem-
ber. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sams
lieputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Joseph M. Paniello. Esquire.
One Tampa City Center,
Suite 2720.
Tampa. Florida Street
Published 12/16-23______________
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 88-25390
SEC. 18
FIREMAN'S FUND MORT-
GAGE CORPORATION, former-
ly known as Manufacturers
Hanover Mortgage Corporation,
Plaintiffls)
vs.
ISAAC HORN, et al..
Defendant^)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami, Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M., on the 3rd day
of January, 1989, the following
described property:
Lot 2 in Block 2 of RICHMOND
MEADOWS, according to the
Plat thereof, recorded in Plat
Book 99. at Page 89 of the Public
Records of Dade County, Flori-
da.
DATED the 14th day of Decem-
ber. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sams
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Joseph M. Paniello, Esquire,
One Tampa City Center. Suite
2720.
201 North Franklin Street
Tampa. Florida 33602
Published 12/16-23


Page 20 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 23, 1988
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
STATE OF FLORIDA.
(i No.: 88-48949
General Jurisdiction
Florid. Bar No.: 060980
GMAC MORTGAGE
CORPORATION, formerly known
as Norwest Mortgage, Inc..
Plaintiff,
vs.
GARY M. HELLER, if living, et
ux.. et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
STATE OF FLORIDA
TO: GARY M. HELLER, if living,
and MARLA M. HELLER,
his wife, if living, including
any unknown spouse of said
Defendants, if either has
remarried and if either or both
of said Defendants are
deceased, their respective
unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, creditors,
lienors and trustees, and all
other persons claiming by,
through, under or against the
named Defendants.
Whose residence address is c/o
Fraser Grind. 33300 Groesbeck,
Fraser. Michigan 48026.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 5 and the East 8 feet of Lot
4. Block 111. FULFORD BY
THE SEA. AMENDED PLAT
OF SECTION "H". according
to the Plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 14. at Page 40, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and
MRS. RAYA and if married,
JOHN DOE, her husband, whose
real name is uncertain and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on:
JOSEPH M. PANIELLO,
ESQUIRE, Plaintiff's attorney,
whose address is:
201 N. Franklin Street. Suite
2720. Tampa, Florida 33602 on or
before the 27 day of Jan., 1989,
and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Complaint or Petition.
DATED on this 19 day of Dec.,
1988.
Richard P. Brinker
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
Joseph M. Paniello, Esquire
Attorney for Plaintiff
P.O. Box 2347
Tampa, Florida 33601
11041 December 23.30.1988;
January 6, 13, 1989.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
Civil Action No. 88-50785 PC 18
ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
KATALIN BELAN.
Petitioner
and
ERNO BELAN.
Respondent
TO: ERNO BELAN
638 Race Street
New Orleans, Louisiana 70130
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Richard I. Kroop,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 420 Lincoln Road, Suite
512 Miami Beach, Florida 33139,
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before Jan. 27, 1989; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this IS day of Dec., 1988.
Richard P. Brinker
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Richard I. Kroop, Esq.
Kwitney, Kroop & Scheinberg, PA.
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 512
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
(306) 538-7575
Attorney for Petitioner
11033 December 23.30,1988;
January 6, 13. 1989.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 88-53046
Florida Bar No. 076660
NOTICE OF ACTION:
IN RE: The Marriage of
LUIS ALBERTO CASTANO,
Petitioner/Husband,
and
DIANA GOLDENBERG
CASTANO,
Respondent/Wife.
TO:
DIANA GOLDENBERG
CASTANO. Respondent
One Peadra Street
319 No. 2
Barque, De Los Mardorez
Codago Postal 04000
Mexico, D.F. Mexico
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses if any, to-wit on:
ROBERT I. SPIEGELMAN.
ESQ.. Of Counsel for SPIEGEL-
MAN & SPIEGELMAN, Peti
tioner's Attorneys, 518 Biscayne
Building, 19 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida 33130, on or before
Jan. 27th, 1989. and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of this Court
either before service on Peti-
tioner's attorneys or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Petition.
Dated on the 16 day of Decem
ber, 1988.
Richard P. Brinker
As Clerk of the Court
By: Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
11036 December 23,30, 1988;
January 6, 13, 1989.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA.
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-49371
ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CAMITA CURTIS
Petitioner-Wife
and
ANTHONY CURTIS
Respondent-Husband
TO: ANTHONY CURTIS
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Joshua S. Galitzer,
P.A. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 1701 N.E. 6th
Avenue, North Miami Beach, Flor-
ida 33162 and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before Jan. 27, 1989; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or peti-
tion.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 15 day of Dec., 1988.
Richard P. Brinker
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOSHUA S. GALITZER. PA.
17101 N.E. 6th Avenue
North Miami Beach, Florida 33162
(305) 653-3535
Attorney for Petitioner
11039 December 23,30, 1988;
January 6, 13, 1989.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 88-52854
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL HOME LOAN
MORTGAGE CORPORATION,
Plaintiff
vs.
ISABEL C. ESPINO, et al.,
Defendants.
TO:
EZEQUIEL ESPINO
615 61st Street
West New York, N.Y. 07093
and
ANA MARIA ESPINO
615 61st Street
West New York, N.Y. 07093
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 7, in Block 1, of KARNAT.
according to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 49. at
Page 90, of the Public Records
of Dade County, Florida a/k/a
2730 S.W. 29th Court, Miami,
Florida 33133.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Alfred J. Tirella, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida. 33146 on or before
Jan. 27th, 1989 and file the origi-
nal with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 15 day of Dec..
1988.
Richard P. Brinker
As Clerk of the Court
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
11030 December 23, 30,1988;
January 6, 13, 1989.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 88-40600 CA 17
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION,
an association organized and
existing under the laws of the
United States of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
MARIO P. JOSEPH, et ux., et al..
Defendants.
TO: MARIO P. JOSEPH
9101 Don Avenue
Stockton, CA 95209
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 1. Block 1. DE PAULY
HEIGHTS, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 49, at Page 8. of the
Public Records of Dade
on or before Jan. 27, 1989; other- 55 Church Street day of JANUARY. 1989 the f i
wise a default will be entered Patterson, NJ lowing described property
against you for the relief YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED Lot 4, in Block 9, of R(j(ws
demanded in the complaint or peti- ggg an actjon for Dissolution of PARK, according to the PUt
tion. Marriage has been filed against thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
This notice shall be published once you and you are required to serve a ** *t Page 97, of the Public
each week for four consecutive weeks copy 0f your written defenses, if Records of Dade County Flori
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN. any, to it on DAVID S. BERGER. da.
WITNESS my hand and the seal attorney for Petitioner, whose
of said court at Miami, Florida on address is 100 North Biscayne
this 15 day of Dec.. 1988.
Richard P. Brinker
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOSHUA S. GALITZER, P.A.
17101 N.E. 6th Avenue
North Miami Beach, Florida 33162
(305) 653-3535
Attorney for Petitioner
11034 December 23, 30, 1988; thls
__________January 6, 13, 1989.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
STATE OF FLORIDA.
Case No.: 88-49628
General Jurisdiction
Florida Bar No.: 060980
COLUMBIA BANKING
SAVINGS & LOAN
ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SAMUEL W. DAVIS, if living.
et ux., et al..
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
STATE OF FLORIDA
TO: SAMUEL W. DAVIS, if liv-
ing, and CAROL ANN
DAVIS, his wife, if living,
including any unknown spouse
of said Defendants, if either
has remarried and if either or
both of said Defendants are
deceased, their respective
unknown heirs, devisees.
Blvd., No. 1707. Miami, FL 33132
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before January 20,1989; otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
12 day of Dec. 1988.
Richard P. Brinker
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DAVID S. BERGER
100 N. Biscayne Blvd. No. 1707
Miami. FL 33132
Telephone: (305) 371-4555
Attorney for Petitioner
11027 December 16, 23,30,1988.
January 6, 1989
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 88-4198
Division: 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HAROLD BRAND.
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an
grantees, assignees, creditors, Order of Summary Administration
lienors and trustees, and all has been entered in the estate of
other persons claiming by,
through, under or against the
named Defendants.
Whose residence address is
unknown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 6, Block 138, REVISED
PLAT OF A PORTION OF
PLAT NO. THREE. OPA
LOCKA, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
70, Page 98 of the Public Records
of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and
County, Florida, a/k/a DADE COUNTY, a political sub-
940 N.W. 133rd Street. North divigjon of the State of Florida.
Miami, FL THE PUBLIC HEALTH TRUST
has been filed against you and you 0F DADE COUNTY, a political
are required to serve a copy of subdivision of the State of Florida,
your written defenses, if any. to it, operating Jackson Memorial
Hospital, DR. COMPERATONE,
a corporation,
HOSPITALS OF
on Alfred J. Tirella, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite M.D., PA..
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral LIFEMARK
Gables, Florida. 33146 on or before
Jan. 27th, 1989 and file the origi-
nal with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 16 day of Dec.,
1988.
Richard P. Brinker
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
11035 December 23, 30,1988;
January 6. 13. 1989.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-49374
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
SOLANGE PIERRE
Petitioner/Wife
and
INEL PIERRE
Respondent/Husband
TO: Inel Pierre
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Joshua S. Galitzer,
P.A. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 1701 N.E. 6th
Avenue, North Miami Beach, Flor-
ida 33162 and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
FLORIDA. INC.. a corporation,
d/b/a PALMETTO GENERAL
HOSPITAL and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on:
JOSEPH M PANIELLO,
ESQUIRE. Plaintiffs attorney,
whose address is:
201 N. Franklin Street, Suite
2720, Tampa. Florida 33602 on or
before the 3 day of Feb., 1989, and
file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint
or Petition.
DATED on this 20 day of Dec.,
1988.
Richard P. Brinker
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
Joseph M. Paniello, Esquire
Attorney for Plaintiff
P.O. Box 2347
Tampa, Florida 33601
11044 December 23, 30. 1988;
January 6, 13, 1989.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-49404
DAPHNE MITCHELL,
Petitioner/Wife
and
ALFRED MITCHELL
Respondent/Husband.
TO:
ALFRED MITCHELL
Harold Brand, deceased, File
Number 88-4198. by the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida.
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street,
3rd Floor. Miami, Florida 33130,
that the total cash value of the
estate is $16,485.00 and that the
names and addresses of those to
whom it has been assigned by such
order are:
Sara Finifter Brand
Apt. 704
1450 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida
All persons are required to file
with the clerk of said court,
WITHIN 3 CALENDAR MONTHS
FROM THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
all claims against the estate in the
form and manner prescribed by
Section 733.703 of the Florida
Statutes and Rule 5.490 of the
Florida Rules of Probate and Guar-
dianship Procedure.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 23. 1988.
Mindy C. Funk, Esquire
Attorney
Florida Bar Number 353337
Rosenthal & Yarchin
Suite 2300
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami. Florida 33131-2198
Telephone: (305) 374-6600
11043 December 23, 30,1988.
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-47295
SEC. 24
BANCBOSTON MORTGAGE
CORPORATION, a Florida cor-
poration, successor by merger to
STOCKTON. WHATLEY. DAV-
IN A COMPANY.
Plaintiffls)
vs.
NORMA PETERSON and------
PETERSON, her husband, if
married, et al.,
Defendant(s)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami, Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M., on the 10TH
DATED the 21ST day of ijp
CEMBER. 1988. *
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin.
Suite 2300. Centrust Finsncial
Center,
100 Southeast Center.
Miami, Florida 33131-2198
Published 12/23-30
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 15
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 88-3612
SEC. 08
FEDERAL NATIONAL MORT-
GAGE ASSOCIATION, a Unit-
ed States corporation.
Plaintiffls)
vs.
DAVE ALFORD. et al.,
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this ease now
pending in said Court, the Style of
which is indicated above. I will sell
to the highest and best bidder tor
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami. Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M., on the 10TH
day of JANUARY, 1989. the fol-
lowing described property:
Lot 4. in Block 5, of MANSION-
ETTE HOMES, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 56. at Page 1. of the Public
Records of Dade County. Flori-
da.
DATED the 21ST day of DE-
CEMBER. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin
Suite 2300. Centrust Financial
Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami. Florida 33131-1298
Published 12/23-30____________
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 88-6869
SEC. 21
BANCBOSTON MORTGAGE
CORPORATION, a Florida cor-
poration, successor by merger to
STOCKTON, WHATLEY. DAV-
IN ft COMPANY.
Plaintiffls)
vs.
LARRY WAYNE MCNEAL. et
al..
Defendant^)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case IK
.,.),., in uiH frallt till' -1
pending in said Court,
which is indicated above.
will sell
to the highest and best biddi
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS ol
the Dade County Courthot
Miami. Dade County. Flor
11:00 o'clock AM., on th.' 10TH
day of JANUARY. 1989. the fol
lowing described property
Lot 37. in Block 1. of AVOCADO
VILLAS, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
97. at Page 15. of the Public
Records of Dade County. Flori-
da.
DATED the 21ST day of DE-
CEMBER. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKEK
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal ft Yarchin .
Suite 2300. Centrust Financial
Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami. Florida 33131-219*
Published 12/23-30
For Legal Forms
Call 3734605


Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
Friday, December 23, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 21

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
BADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Cue No. 88-33646 CA 02
NOTICE OF ACTION
BAMBOSTON MORTGAGE
CORPORATION, a Florida
corporation, successor by merger
to Stockton, Whatley,
Darin & Company.
Plaintiff,
v.
AI.VARO MIRANDA, et al.,
Defendants.
TO Paperades, Inc. whose resi-
dence is unknown, and the
unknown parties who may be
grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees, and all
parties claiming interest by,
'hrough, under or against the
id Defendant, and all parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title, or interest in the
property herein described.
yOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
acti'in to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 9, Block 23. of KINGS
GARDENS SECTION
THREE, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 95, at Page 30, of
!h< Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
en filed against you and you
liiired to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Albert C. Galloway, Jr.,
Esquire, Rosenthal & Yarchin,
Suite 2300, CenTrust Financial
100 Southeast 2nd Street.
Miami. Florida 33131-2198, on or
Ian. 13. 1989 and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
either before service on
Plaintiff! attorneys or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise, a
will be entered against you
e relief demanded in the
iaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on Dec. 5, 1988.
Richard P. Brinker
Clerk
By Sherry Days
Deputy Clerk
Albert C. Galloway, Jr., Esquire
R'wnthal & Yarchin
2800
CenTrust Financial Center
utheast 2nd Street
Florida 33131-2198
none: (305) 374-6600
BMC No. 423015-1-575-H
FHA No. 092-3446386-703
1 "7
1 hvember 9, 16. 23, 30, 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN \ND FOR DADE COUNTY.
STATE OF FLORIDA.
Case No.: 88-48979
General Jurisdiction
Florida Bar No.: 060980
FKI)F.RAL NATIONAL
GAGE ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JACK ROTE, if living, et ux.. et
al .
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
STATE OF FLORIDA
TO JACK ROTE, if living, and if
married, MRS. JACK ROTE,
his wife, if living, including
my unknown spouse of said
Defendants, if either has
'(married and if either or both
f said Defendants are
deceased, their respective
unknown heirs, devisees,
irrantees, assignees, creditors,
ienors and trustees, and all
"ther persons claiming by,
through, under or against the
named Defendants.
WhOM residence address is 1250
A lams Avenue, Apt. N. 202, Costa
1 alifornia 92626.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
to foreclose a mortgage on
'he following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 12. Block 74 of NOR-
WOOD FIFTH ADDITION,
SECTION TWO, according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 65. at Page 109, of
the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida.
has been filed against you and
SHIRLEY ROTHE, if living, and
if married, JOHN DOE, her hus-
band whose real name is uncer-
tain, if living, including any
unknown spouse of said Defend-
ants if either has remarried and if
e.ther or both of said Defendants
are deceased, their respective
unknown heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, creditors, lienors and
trustees, and all other persons
claiming by, through, under or
against the named Defendants
NORMAN F. SOLOMON. LEO
ROSSELL JR., Director as Trus-
tee of LEO ROSELLE PLUMB
ING, INC., a dissolved corpora-
tion, AMPCO PRODUCTS, INC..
a corporation, SHELLY BAR
LOW, formerly known as SHEL-
LEY MORE, BENEFICIAL
FINANCE CO. NORTH DADE
CITY, A CORPORATION, FRE
DERIC J. HODKIN, and
ROBERT A. MAYER and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on:
JOSEPH M. PANIELLO,
ESQUIRE, Plaintiffs attorney,
whose address is:
201 N. Franklin Street, Suite
2720. Tampa, Florida 33602 on or
before the 20 day of Jan., 1989,
and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Complaint or Petition.
DATED on this 6 day of Dec..
1988.
Richard P. Brinker
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Sherry Days
Deputy Clerk
Joseph M. Paniello, Esquire
Attorney for Plaintiff
P.O. Box 2347
Tampa. Florida 33601
11009
December 9. 16, 23, 30, 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 884)8977 CA 05
NOTICE OF ACTION
BANCBOSTON MORTGAGE
CORPORATION a Florida
corporation, successor by merger
to STOCKTON. WHATLEY.
DAVIN & COMPANY.
Plaintiff,
v.
BENJAMIN MORRIS, etc.. et al..
Defendants.
TO: Bias A. Bullones and Nydia
Atala Caruci De Bullones,
whose residences are
unknown, and the unknown
parties who may be spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees and all parties claim-
ing interest by, through,
under or against the said
Defendants, who are not
known to be dead or alive, and
all parties having or claiming
to have any right, title, or
interest in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 1, Block 7, PINE LAKE
SECTION TWO. according
to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 111,
Page 51, of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Albert C. Galloway, Jr.,
Esquire. Rosenthal A Yarchin,
Suite 2300, CenTrust Financial
Center, 100 Southeast 2nd Street,
Miami, Florida 33131-2198, on or
before Jan. 13, 1989, and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise, a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on Dec. 5, 1988.
Richard P. Brinker
Clerk
By Sherry Days
Deputy Clerk
Albert C. Galloway, Jr., Esquire
Rosenthal & Yarchin
Suite 2300
CenTrust Financial Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami. Florida 33131-2198
Telephone: (305) 374-6600
BMC No. 240923-1-575-H
FHA No. 092-268830-203
11006
December 9. 16. 23. 30. 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 88-44435
NOTICE OF
ADOPTION PROCEEDINGS
IN THE MATTER OF THE
ADOPTION OF:
A MINOR
TO:
ROSALEE WALFISH
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Petition for the Adoption of your
adult child has been filed and com-
menced in this Court and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, on MAR-
VIN I. MOSS. PA.. Petitioner's
attorney, whose address is P.O.
Box 6250, 1090 Kane Concourse,
Suite 202, Bay Harbor Islands,
Florida 33154 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court on or
before Jan. 12, 1989; otherwise a
Default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the
Petition.
WITNESS my hand and official
3eal of the Court, at Miami, Dade
County, Florida on Dec. 5, 1988.
Richard P. Brinker
as Clerk of said Court
By B.J. Foy
as Deputy Clerk
11005
December 9, 16, 23, 30, 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
STATE OF FLORIDA.
Case No.: 88-24979
Genera] Jurisdiction
Florid. Bar No.: 060980
APPLE BANK FOR SAVINGS
formerly known as
Harlem Savings Bank,
Plaintiff,
vs.
THOMAS R. MESA, if living,
et ux., et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
STATE OF FLORIDA
TO: PATRICIA L. MESA, his
wife, if living, including any
unknown spouse of said
Defendant if she has re-
married and if said Defendant
is deceased, her respective
unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, creditors,
lienors and trustees, and all
other persons claiming by,
through, under or against the
named Defendants.
Whose residential address is
unknown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 7, in Block 62, BEL AIRE
SECTION SIXTEEN accord-
ing to a plat thereof recorded in
Plat Book 92 at Page 7 of the
Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and
THOMAS R. MESA, if living,
including any unknown spouse of
said Defendant if he has remarried
and if said Defendant is deceased,
their respective unknown heirs,
devises, grantees, assignees, credi-
tors, lienors and trustees, and all
other persons claiming by,
through, under or against the
named Defendant, FLAGSHIP
NATIONAL BANK OF MIAMI, a
banking corporation, UNITED
STATES OF AMERICA, SUN
BANK OF MIAMI. N.A., a
national banking corporation,
SEARS, ROEBUCK & COM-
PANY, a corporation and,
JANICE F. MESA and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on:
JOSEPH M. PANIELLO,
ESQUIRE, Plaintiffs attorney,
whose address is:
201 N. Franklin Street, Suite
2720, Tampa, Florida 33602 on or
before the 13 day of Jan., 1989.
and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Complaint or Petition.
DATED on this 5 day of Dec.,
1988.
Richard P. Brinker
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Sherry Days
Deputy Clerk
Joseph M. Paniello, Esquire
Attorney for Plaintiff
P.O. Box 2347
Tampa, Florida 33601
11004
December 9, 16, 23, 30, 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name(s) MARTIN
PHOTO STUDIO and MARTIN
PHOTO STUDIO & BRIDAL
SHOP at 4150 N.W. 7 STREET
#207, MIAMI, FL 33126 intends)
to register said namefs) with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
MARTIN PHOTO STUDIO &
BRIDAL SHOP, INC.
4150 N.W. 7 St.. #207
MIAMI, FL 33126
11003
December 9, 16, 23, 30, 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name(s) EDYA
INTERNATIONAL at 1825 N.E.
164 SREET, NORTH MIAMI
BEACH, FL 33162 intend(s) to
register said name(s) with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
OPTICARE CENTER, INC.
11008
December 9, 16, 23. 30. 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-6456
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LILLIAN MOGIL,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of LILLIAN MOGIL, deceased,
File Number 88-6456, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West Flag-
ler Street, Miami. Florida 33130.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE:
(1) all claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an interested
person on whom this notice is
served that challenges the validity
of the will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 23, 1988.
Personal Representative:
DR. CHARLES FEINGOLD
3900 Oaks Clubhouse Drive
Unit 407
Pompano, FL 33069
Co-Personal Representative:
THEODORE R. NELSON. ESQ.
NELSON & FELDMAN. PA.
1035 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands, FL 33154
Telephone: (305) 865-5716
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
THEODORE R. NELSON. ESQ.
NELSON & FELDMAN, P.A.
1035 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands, FL 33154
Telephone: (305) 865-5716
11042 December 23,30,1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-6692
Division (02)
IN RE:ESTATE OF
LEWIS FELDSHER.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of LEWIS FELDSHER.
deceased, File Number 88-6692, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami, Flor-
ida 33130. The names and
addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal repre
sentative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this Court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE:
(1) all claims against the estate and
begun on December 23, 1988.
Personal Representative:
RITA F. NORTON
19 West Flagler Street, Suite 1201
Miami, Florida 33130
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
RITA F. NORTON
19 West Flagler Street, Suite 1201
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 374-3116
Florida Bar No. 183030
11038 December 23,30,1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-5990
Division (03)
IN RE:ESTATE OF
RUDOLF PAPANEK.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of RUDOLF PAPANEK,
deceased, File Number 88-5990, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
Dade County Courthouse, Probate
Division, 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida 33130. The names
and addresses of the personal rep-
resentative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this Court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE:
(1) all claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an interested
person to whom notice was mailed
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue,
or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 23. 1988.
Personal Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler Street, Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler Street. Suite 1201
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (305)374-3116
11031 December 23, 30, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-5824
Division (02)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
GERDA MICHAELIS.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of GERDA MICHAELIS.
deceased. File Number 88-5824
(02), is pending in the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is
Dade County Courthouse, 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this Court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE:
(1) all claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an interested
person to whom notice was mailed
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue,
or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 23, 1988.
Personal Representative:
JAMES MICHAELIS
343 Forest Avenue
Paramus, New Jersey 07652
Personal Representative
ELLA KUGELMAN
100 Bayview Drive, Apt. 1620
North Miami Beach. Florida 33160
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
HENRY NORTON, Esquire
19 West Flagler Street, Suite 1201
Miami, Florida 33130
SARAH LINTON,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Sarah Linton, deceased, File
Number 88-5927 (03), is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West Flag-
ler Street, Miami, Florida 33130.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE:
(1) all claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an interested
person on whom this notice is
served that challenges the validity
of the will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 23, 1988.
Personal Representative:
HENRY E. LINTON
10185 Collins Avenue
Bal Harbour. FL 33154
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
NELSON & FELDMAN, P.A.
1135 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands. FL 33154
Telephone: 865-5716
11040 December 23.30.1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-5809
Division (04)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FRANCIS MODEL
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of FRANCIS MODEL, deceased.
File Number 88-5809, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West Fla-
gler Street, Miami, Florida 33130.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE:
(1) all claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an interested
person on whom this notice was
served that challenges the validity
of the will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 23, 1988.
Personal Representative:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
EILEEN CHAFETZ
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
11037 December 23,30,1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the ficti-
tious name(s) Lourdes Cao D/B'A
Data Accounting & Taxes at 3315
NW 7 St., Miami, Florida 33125
intend(s) to register said name(s)
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
Lourdes Cao
11046 December 23,30.1988;
January 6, 13, 1989.
(2) any objection by an interested
person to whom notice was mailed Tf^Phone: ^_^ OQ ,
that challenges the validity of the
11032
December 23, 30, 1988.
will, the qualifications of the |N TKe CIRCUIT COURT FOR
personal representative, venue, DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-5927
Division 03
Fla. Bar No. 068319
For
Legal Forms
Call
373-4605
Publication of this Notice has ^ gg. ESTATE OF


Page 24 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 23, 1988
Labor/Likud Establish National Unity Government
Continued from Page 1
Each party will have 10 min-
isters, with two in each bloc
holding no portfolios. If the
practice of the outgoing gov-
ernment is retained, Labor
and Likud would each have
five ministers in the Inner
Cabinet, the government's top
policy-making body.
Of the senior cabinet assign-
ments, it appears the new gov-
ernment will shape up as fol-
lows:
Prime minister, Yitzhak
Shamir (Likud); vice premier
and finance minister, Shimon
Peres (Labor); defense minis-
ter, Yitzhak Rabin (Labor);
foreign minister. Moshe Arens
(Likud); housing minister,
David Levy (Likud); economic
coordination minister, Yitzhak
Modai (Likud).
The justice and transporta-
tion portfolios are to go to
either Ronni Milo or Dan Meri-
dor, both of Likud.
When news of the agree-
ment broke, the smaller par-
ties that had been the object of
intensive courtship by Likud
reacted with fury and threat-
ened to go into opposition.
"Not honoring the promises
Likud made to the religious
Earties is an act of treason,
ikud will have to account for
it," declared veteran Knesset
member Menahem Porush of
the ultra-Orthodox Agudat
Yisrael party.
The National Religious
Party said it would join opposi-
tion ranks unless it got control
of the Education Ministry,

Among those elected with-
out opposition to the Florida
Bar's 51-member board of gov-
ernors were Edward R. Blum-
berg of Miami, Alan T. Dimond
of Miami and Robert Sondak,
Miami. Members of the board
of governors will be sworn in
June 16 during the bar's
annual meeting.
INa Amat
Eva Kaufman, president of
Chai chapter of Na'amat USA
will discuss the importance of
tree-planting and land recla-
mation in Israel, a project of
the Jewish National Fund, at a
meeting of the group Monday,
Dec. 26. 1 p.m. at the Raleigh
Hotel. The Chai Musicians and
Singers will entertain after the
meeting.
Italian
Delayniks
Continued from Page 7
for refugee status.
The U.S. State Department,
however, has said that Soviet
Jews seeking entry to the
United States will not be
turned away.
If they do not qualify for
refugee status, they may enter
the United States under the
U.S. attorney general's parole
authority. But this disqualifies
them from receiving U.S. refu-
gee resettlement assistance
and makes it much more diffi-
cult for them to become Amer-
ican citizens.
promised it by Likud.
Shas, the ultra-Orthodox
Sephardic party, made the
same threat if it does not get
the interior and housing port-
folios.
The Labor-Likud agreement
provides that promises made
to the religious parties would
be reviewed by the new gov-
ernment in the context of next
year's national budget. Those
promises included heavy subsi-
dies for the ultra-Orthodox
schools and other institutions.
The two major parties
agreed that eight new settle-
ments would be established in
the administered territories
during the first year of the
new government. Additional
settlements would be subject
to review after a year.
Likud had promised the
right-wing Tehiya party 10
new settlements a year for a
total of 40 during the govern-
ment's four-year tenure. Nev-
ertheless, Tehiya indicated
that it might join the broad
coalition, despite the conces-
sion to Labor on settlements.
According to Knesset mem-
ber Geula Cohen, Tehiya is
needed in the government to
minimize the influence of
Labor "in view of the difficult
international situation which
Israel faces." This appeared to
be a reference to the U.S.
government's decision to
begin talks with the Palestine
Liberation Organization.
There were also expressions
of disappointment on the left.
Knesset member Haim Doron
of the socialist party Mapam
said the new government wi
being born "in sin."
Amnon Rubinstein of the
Center-Shinui Movement
charged that Peres was "fold.
ing the flag of peace" by enter-
ing a coalition with Likud
"We need a government with
a moderate foreign policy and
a liberal economic policy," said
Rubinstein. "Instead, we shall
get a rejectionist foreign pol-
icy and an irresponsible eco-
nomic policy."
"A HEARTY BREAKFAST IS THE
FOUNDATION OF A GREAT DAY!"
%S!k
$2.35
$2.35
2 EGGS any style FRESH BAKED ROLLS
GRITS or Potatoes Butter/Ball of Cream Cheese
.ilNI-DANISH & MUFFIN COFFEE or TEA
Served 6:00 AM to 11:00 AM_____________
"IN THE HEART OF MIAMI BEACH!"
GOURMET '
DELI RESTAURANT
Collins at 21st St.
MIAMI BEACH
a
Delicious Meals Like
Mom Used To
Make!"
"Nutritious'
JUMBO MUFFIN
COFFEE or TEA.
Honey-dipped
FRIED CHICKEN
Includes Potatoes A Vegetables'
For
"AFTER THEATER''
Snacks
OPEN
24 HOURS
"Grilled Juicy"
Delmonico STEAK
Smothered Onions
Potatoes
For "Take-Out" Orders or
Reserved Seat'^g tor Larger Parties
CALL
538-1



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