The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03114

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
dTewislhi Floridliami
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Volume 61 Number 41
Miami, Florida Friday, October 7, 1988
Ffc
Price 50 Cents
pace to Spare...
School/Synagogue Joint Ventures
Rv ELLEN ANN STEIN
h Floridian Staff Writer
THE synagogues had space
i, spare; the schools were
trammed with student bodies;
tch was made.
U least three Dade syna-
i.^ues are leasing space to
fade County school programs
a temporary basis and the
nil may be growing, school
b als say. Meanwhile, the
|.\tra dollars, in the tens of
misands, are boosting syna-
<,me budgets. And the school
ll'icials involved in the
[rrangement view it equally,
pus far, as a "sweetheart"
bal.
[ (>ne of the key parts of such
arrangement has posed no
jstacle; making certain there
no religious articles dis-
| 1 in the synagogue class-
ims used by the schools,
id those religious articles
rmanently in place, must be
kvered.
f'lt's an unbelievably crea-
te alternative," said Dr.
pchael Kesselman, principal
North Beach Elementary
:hool. "It's cost effective and
also programatically effec-
ve."
| Earlier this month, students
>m North Beach began to
^tend classes held at Temple
i h Sholom, just steps away
<>m the rear and side
ntrances of North Beach.
For the synagogue, it means
!."),000 annually, but temple
llministrator Dennis Rice
Lists the value goes beyond
pllars. "Certainly utilization
' space and finances are to be
:>nsidered," Rice said.
I "But the main thing is that
|ith a strong community, our
synagogue continues to stay
strong and grow stronger."
The second floor of Temple
Beth Sholom, which is now
used during the day by North
Beach, doesn't create a prob-
lem for the synagogue because
it doesn't have a day school
and its students do not attend
classes there until after regu-
lar school hours.
KESSELMAN said, for his
part, an additional 100 to 150
more students can be accom-
modated. North Beach, a top
merit school and selected as
one of the top 50 schools in
Florida has been subject
to increased demand for
enrollment. Dade County
schools are already generally
overcrowded, and North
Beach's achievements, Kessel-
man said, made the demand
for enrollment a problem.
"I didn't want to get to the
point where it affected our
programs. It's a long and tedi-
ous process to get portable
classrooms ... so we needed a
quick fix for the future," the
principal said.
The program could not have
worked if the temple and the
school did not already have a
symbiotic relationship, accord-
ing to Kesselman. Even before
the formal agreements were
Continued on Page 14
WOUNDED SISTERS Sisters Smadar, 13, Hadas, 5, and Inbal Hadad, 7, left to right,
were wounded in the legs as a bomb concealed between bread haves exploded in a grocery
store in an Orthodox Jerusalem neighborhood. A witness said it was planted by an Arab.
Another bomb, concealed in a bread loaf, exploded in the Old City but caused no injuries.
(AP/Wide World Photo.)
Lebanese
Terrorism
Attack
At Sea
Thwarted
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) An
Israeli gunboat sank a rubber
dinghy off the Lebanese port
of Tyre, killing its three occu-
pants. They were identified by
naval officers as members of
Al Fatah, the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization's military
wing.
The naval encounter fol-
lowed an Israeli air force
attack on what was described
as an Al Fatah naval base in
the southern Lebanese port
city of Sidon.
According to the naval offi-
cers, the dinghy was on a
course toward Israel when it
was challenged by a Dabour-
class gunboat. They said it was
the third attempt by terrorists
this year to infiltrate Israel by
sea.
Other boats carrying terror-
ists have been sunk while lay-
ing mines on routes used by
Israeli naval craft.
The air attack was the 14th
by Israel this year against tar-
gets in Lebanon. A military
spokesman said it was carried
out by three jets, with a fourth
flying cover.
They struck twice in 15 min-
utes at the base on the edge of
the Mieh Mieh refugee camp,
according to eyewitness
reports from Lebanon. All air-
craft returned safely to their
base, the spokesman said.
Judge Aronovitz Attains
Senior Status
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
U.S. District Judge Sidney
. Aronovitz, a native Key
Pester, ensconced on the 10th
loor of the new Federal
'ourthouse in downtown
^liami is moving on up.
Effective Nov. 1, Aronovitz
ivill become a "senior judge,"
:>ne of two in South Florida. It
[doesn't mean more pay, but it
loes mean a lighter case load,
^naybe a little more time with
lis wife, family and the golf
course.
For political observers, the
tare promotion or change in
[status creates some jockey-
ling for position. An opening
will be created by Aronovitz's
move. The judge, next in sen-
iority only to Chief Judge
lames Lawrence King (18
[ years), does not have a chance
to move into the chief judge
slot himself. That has to be
done by age 65. Aronovitz,
whose family has been in Flor-
ida since 1899, is 68.
But there is no age limit on
Judge Sidney M. Aronovitz
retirement, and Aronovitz said
he doesn't plan to retire from
the bench.
Aronovitz was appointed to
the District Court bench 12
years ago after being tapped
from private practice by Presi-
dent Gerald Ford. The presi-
dential selection was based
upon the recommendations of
then-U.S. Senators Richard
Stone and Lawton Chiles. The
uncertainty of this year's elec-
tion is one reason why Aronov-
itz won't publicly conjecture
on his replacement, although
inside speculation suggests
three Broward judges or attor-
neys are in the running.
Aronovitz is now the second
senior judge of the 15 in the
U.S. Southern District Court.
His caseload will be reduced to
70 percent. "In other ways, I'll
be in here every day like I've
always been," he said.
While becoming a senior
judge is not mandatory, it does
create a vacancy on the dis-
continued on Page 12
Did Wordplay
Gain Release?
It remains unclear what discussions Presi-
dent Reagan had in order to gain the release
this week of an Indian with resident alien
status in the United States. But according to
reports, the president was quoted as saying
that Palestinians "must have a voice in their
own future."
None of the nine American hostages held by
the Arab groups in Lebanon had been
released at press time but political observers
are questioning if Reagan's overtures were
an attempt at appeasement to gain the
release of the hostages.
Islamic Jihad for the Liberation of Pales-
tine reportedly sent a memo to journalists in
Moslem West Beirut prior to the release of
hostage Mithileshwar Singh, 60. Release of
the hostage did reportedly come from mis-
sives and alerts from Syria and Lebanon. The
communique was different from prior ones
because it did not seek the release of 400
Arab prisoners held by Israel.
Singh and three other American educators
were kidnapped by gunpoint Jan. 24, 1987 at
Beirut University College.
Continued on Page 18


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 7, 1988
Democrats Warn:
A President Dan Quayle?
By HYMAN BOOKBINDER
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
President Quayle? Don't
laugh. It's no laughing matter.
Just think of that proverbial
heartbeat away. It could hap-
pen.
And when you stop laughing
and start worrying, remember
that this was the first "presi-
dential" decision that George
Bush was called upon to make.
Lots to worry about. Quayle,
of course, but even more about
Bush's judgment. Compare
this with that of Michael
Dukakis in the selection of his
running mate, Lloyd Bentsen.
Can anyone deny his indisputa-
ble presidential qualities?
Might we also get a. .
White House Chief of Staff
Sununu?
Frequently described as the
vice president's closest politi-
cal friend and confidant in
light of his key role in Bush's
battle for the nomination
New Hampshire's governor
and co-chairman of the
national Bush campaign. John
Sununu, is the only one out of
50 governors refusing to call
upon the UN to rescind its
hateful Zionism-equals-racism
resolution.
Of course. Sununu might
prefer to be national security
adviser or ambassador to the
United Nations. And might we
get a .
Secretary of State Brzez-
inski?
Could be. With maximum
fanfare, Mr. Bush announced
Zbigniew Brzezinski as co-
chairman of his foreign policy
task force.
After years of merciless
swipes at Jimmy Carter's
alleged failures in foreign and
defense policy, Bush selected
Carter's national security
adviser to be his own principal
guide in foreign and defense
policy!
Will Brzezinski the one
major Carter official known to
have sought to weaken the
administration's pro-Israel
policies finally realize his
dream of being secretary of
state? And how about a .
Secretary of Education
Malek?
Mr. Bush has given Fred
Malek a clean bill of health:
"Not a trace of bigotry in
him."
Just forget, if you can,
Malek's role in that immoral as
well as illegal act of providing
Richard Nixon with informa-
tion about Jews running the
Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Try to forgive George Bush
for failing to say a mumbling
word about how immoral and
intolerable he found such
action to be.
And try to forget, too,
Malek's involvement in Water-
gate and in compiling the
"enemies" list. And can we
expect an .
Attorney General Brentar?
Co-chairman of the Bush
Coalition of American Nation-
alities, Jerome Brentar could
try to establish his credentials
by citing his efforts to prove
that the Holocaust never took
place, or that convicted Nazi
killer John ("Ivan the Terri-
ble") Demjanjuk was innocent.
nmmmta
Phone: (305) 373-4605
Published weekly every Friday
since 1927 by The Jewish Flori
Mo. Office and Plant 120 N.E.
6th St.. Miami, Fla. 33132 Phone
(305) 373-4605
Second-Class Postage paid in
Miami. Fla. USPS 275320
Postmaster: Form 3579 return to
Jewish Fioridian. P.O Box
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guarantee the Kashruth of the
merchandise advertised In its
columns
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: In
advance (Local Area) One year
$18 00 Out of town, country
upon request. By mail $1.45 per
copy.
Gov. Michael Dukakis
He could appoint as his
deputy one of the six other
coalition leaders forced to
resign after their Nazi and
anti-Semitic connections were
exposed, like Honorary Chair-
man Florian Galdau, chief of
the Iron Guard, Romania's
anti-Semitic, pro-Nazi move-
ment.
Some of these suggested
appointments are, of course,
not serious. Some are. They
help make this basic point: If
history teaches us anything, it
is that the quality of any presi-
dency depends not only on the
president's own intelligence,
instincts, and integrity, but on
the quality of the people who
surround him either as aides or
advisers.
There is already too much

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George Bush and
Operation Sheba
These companion columns
area special feature reprinted
u-ith permission from The
Washington Jewish Week.
disturbing evidence that a
Bush presidency would be
heavily and ominously affected
bv people and influences that
should disturb all Americans,
but especially American Jews.
Whom, for example, would a
President Bush select for the
Supreme Court?
The George Bush of 1988
surely is not the one we knew
before 1980.
His views on women's rights
(ERA. for example), on abor-
tion, on school prayers, on gun
control, on the death penalty
on the whole range of social
issues all reflect the strong
influence of the far right,
including the Christian far
right.
Just examine the GOP party
platform, reread the Bush
acceptance speech, and you
will find echoes of Jesse Helms
and Pat Robertson and Jerry
Falwell.
Change or flexibility or
updating of particular policies
is not necessarily wrong. But
the Bush record is one of obvi-
ous and regular bowing to the
sharp right on just about every
question.
The most obvious and shock-
ing example of this type of
"leadership" was, of course,
the selection of Dan Quayle to
be his running mate.
It is no secret that, like other
elements in the community,
Jewish supporters of Bush
were embarrassed and
stunned at the selection of one
so inexperienced, so unquali-
fied, so unimpressive.
Quayle, moreover, was vul-
nerable on the most important
single threat to Israel's secur-
ity, the arming of her enemies.
Nine times out of 11 during
his Senate career, according to
AIPAC criteria, he was wrong
on the issue of arms to Arab
nations, including AWACS to
the Saudis.
President Quayle? Don't
laugh.
Hyman Bookbinder, former Wash-
ington representative of the American
Jewish Committee, is presently serving
as a special adviser to the Dukakis
campaign on the Middle East, human
rights and the underprviieaed.
By GORDON ZACKS
WASHINGTON (JTA) As
we approach Election Day,
debates like the one on this
page will become sharper, and
will focus on issues that con-
cern all Americans, such as the
economy, and domestic and
foreign policy.
They will also address the
special concerns of the Ameri-
can Jewish community, such as
the security of Israel, the Mid-
dle East peace process, and
U.S.-Israel relations.
These issues are of vital
importance to American Jews
and receive a great deal of
media attention.
However, there is one issue
of major concern to American
Jews that has received mini-
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Vice President George Bush
mal news coverage; the plight
of Jews in lands of oppression.
In particular, little has been
reported about the rescue of
Ethiopian Jews.
In 1984, thousands of starv-
ing and persecuted Ethiopian
Jews walked the long miles to
Sudan and were airlifted from
the Sudanese refugee camps to
Israel.
Although the airlift, known
as Operation Moses, was suc-
cessful, a news conference by
Israeli officials confirming
news reports forced the mis-
sion to end abruptly; several
thousand Jews were left
stranded in the squalid Umra-
kuba and Tewa.wa refugee
camps in the Sudan, where
they were dying of hunger and
disease.
State Department'officials
used every means possible to
bring more Ethiopian Jews out
of the Sudan in the weeks
following the sudden end of
Operation Moses, but they
were not able to bring people
out quickly enough.
In March 1985, State
Department and Israeli offi-
cials told Bush about the Ethi-
opian Jews in Sudan.
According to Israeli Ambas-
sador Meir Rosenr.e. the vice
president was deeply moved
by the plight of the Ethiopian
Jews. He was determined to
do everything possible to hefe "
them reach Israel quickly and
safely.
The vice president then m
with State Department and
CIA officials and a plan was
developed to airlift the Ethio-
pian Jews from Sudan to
Israel.
Although they were pre-
pared to rescue the Jews, U.S.
officials were stymied by the
opposition of Sudanese gov-
ernment officials, including
President Mohamnv i Nimeiri,
Nimeiri, stung by Arab criti-
cism over his cooperation in
Operation Moses, v. as unwill-
ing to face similar Arab conde-
mnation for helping save the
lives of a few hundred Jews.
The vice president had the
delicate task of securing
Sudanese cooperation for I
Operation Sheba during his
visit to the Sudan in mid-1
March 1985.
After several days i if intense I
negotiations, the Sudanese
agreed and the American res-
cue mission was able to pro- ]
ceed. In the dead of night >
March 25, 1985, hundreds oil
Ethiopian Jews boarded
American planes and were]
whisked to Israel.
According to eyewitnenes,
Bush wept when he heard thai!
Operation Sheba was a suc-
cess.
Operation Sheha involved
enormous hazards. The lives of
American official- in the]
Sudan and Ethiopia were in
jeopardy. A news leak would
have been seen as ar. American |
breach of trust, destroying
America's credibility and repu-
tation in the region. And if |
there had been a news leak.
the Sudanese would have pre-
vented the American planes
from landing.
Never had the United States
government undertaken a
secret rescue mission of such
scope, or risked so much in
such an effort. Vice President
Bush, whose personal inter-
vention made the rescue possi-
ble, put both the credibility of
the U.S. and himself on the
line.
There are people who talk
and there are people who act
Any candidate for office Jl
claim to care about the people
whose votes he is trying to
win. The proof of a man>
caring and concern is in what
he does.
Vice President Bush puj
himself and many others at
risk to try to rescue Ethiopian
Jews. He responded to a ens-
which*was not playing on the
evening news, and which *&
Continued on Page 1'
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Friday, October 7, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 3
The Other Debate:
Jewish Handlers Talk
Mideast Issues
By
ANDREW SILOW CARROLL
NEW YORK (JTA) When
Jews meet to talk about the
relative merits of Vice Presi-
dent George Bush or Massa-
chusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis
for president, the conversation
inevitably turns neither to the
economy nor to the pledge of
allegiance, but to the Rev.
Jesse Jackson.
A debate between Jewish
representatives of the two can-
didates was no exception. It
was held during the Council of
Jewish Federation's quarterly
board and committee meetings
at New York's Marriott Mar-
quis Hotel.
The Democratic Party is
[being held hostage by Jack-
son's "un-American, anti-
American and certainly anti-
Jewish" forces, according to
Jack Stein, a representative of
Bush's campaign and a former
chairman of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
I Jewish Organizations.
But according to Hyman
I Bookbinder, special adviser to
Dukakis, the Republicans'
[claims that Jackson will deter-
Imine Dukakis' Middle East
(policy is both a "manufactured
[issue" and "mind-boggling."
[Bookbinder formerly served as
[Washington representative of
Ithe American Jewish Commit-
ee.
Jackson was not the only
[topic during a sometimes
heated debate between old
acquaintances that will cer-
tainly be repeated before other
(Jewish audiences in the next
I two months.
Bookbinder, for instance,
raised doubts about Bush's
I commitment to Israel, and
criticized Republican legisla-
tors for supporting arms sales
to Arab nations. He also
attacked the Reagan adminis-
t ration's recent attempts to
ensure Israel for a number of
actions in the administered
territories.
Stein relied on his own 18-
year acquaintance with Bush
to attest to the vice president's
feelings toward Israel and
Jews. He praised the Middle
East platform adopted at the
Republican National Conven-
tion as the "most pro-Israel"
that the American Israel Pub-
lic Affairs Committee "has
seen in years."
But the debate was really
about Jackson, to the extent
that Bookbinder, speaking
first, was also the first to bring
up the topic. "The Republicans
have decided to run against
Jesse Jackson, not Michael
Dukakis," he said.
Stein said the success of
Jackson and other Arab sym-
pathizers in the Democratic
Party in having a pro-
Palestinian plank debated at
the Democratic National Con-
vention was a taste of things to
come in a Dukakis administra-
tion.
Describing what he called
the "Dukakis-Jackson-
Bentsen" ticket as a "troika,"
Stein said the Democrats had
been "hijacked by a well-
organized minority" led by
Jackson.
Bookbinder countered that
both parties had their
"extreme wings," citing as
Republican examples Sen.
Jesse Helms of North Carol-
ina, television evangelist Pat
Robertson, former Moral
Majority leader Jerry Falwell
and New Hampshire Gov. John
Sununu.
He said the Democrats'
rejection of the Palestinian
plank, by a 2-1 margin, was
evidence that the Jackson
wing "has not prevailed."
Countered Stein: "Do you
mean one out of three dele-
gates was prepared to agree to
support this anti-Israel
action?"
Political Parties Registry
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) No
fewer than 28 political parties
will compete for the 120 Knes-
set seats in Israel's general
elections on Nov. 1.
All had duly registered and
paid their $7,660 deposit by
the time the lists closed.
But the number of compet-
ing parties could be reduced by
two. Lawsuits have been filed
to bar Rabbi Meir Kahane's
extremist Kach party and the
Progressive List for Peace,
from participating in the race.
The Progressive List is an
Arab-Jewish faction at the far
left of the political spectrum.
Israel's High Court of Jus-
tice will have to decide those
rases before Election Day.
The proliferation of parties
is due in large measure to the
unprecedented fragmentation
of the religious block into six
rival factions.
It was caused by llth-hour
splits in the Agudat Yisrael
and Shas parties. The National
Religious Party split in half
several months ago. And a
new middle-of-the-road religi-
ous party, Meimad, was
launched recently by Rabbi
Yehuda Amital.
An Agudah breakaway list
was set up at the urging of the
party's Bnei Brak sage, Rabbi
Eliezer Schach. It is headed by
Rabbi Avraham Ravitz, a well-
known Jerusalem yeshiva
head, and represents the Lith-
uanian element in the Agudah
camp.
Schach has been feuding
with the party's Hasidic fac-
tion.
The Shas party broke apart
when one of its Knesset mem-
bers, Shimon Pen-Shlomo, dis-
covered he had not been given
a safe spot on the party's
election list.
Ben-Shlomo is allied with
Baruch Abuhatzeira, son of
the late holy man, Baba Salli.
This is the Moroccan or
"Baba" branch of the party,
which has challenged the Shas
establishment.
A LEARNING EXPERIENCE: Following the fire which gutted the Brooklyn, New York
synagogue of Congregation Sharai Tor ah and burned six of its Tor ah scrolls, Abraham
Foxman, national director of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, answered
questions of public school students brought in to witness the resulting desecration. The visit,
by youngsters the same age as those allegedly responsible for the vandalism, was arranged by
the New York City Board of Education, New York City Police Department and the
synagogue's rabbi, Hillel David.
Finally... A Decision on Taba
By TAMAR LEVY
GENEVA (JTA) An inter-
national arbitration panel, by a
4-1 vote, awarded the Taba
area to Egypt but left in ques-
tion a 200-yard strip of beach
over which Israel and Egypt
will have to come to a separate
understanding.
Nevertheless, the six-year-
old boundary dispute on Taba
and 13 other locations claimed
by both countries was finally
settled.
In Washington, the U.S.
State Department was quick
to praise the outcome. "We
are pleased that this long-
standing difference between
Egypt and Israel has been
amicably resolved," depart-
ment spokeswoman Phyliss
Oakley said.
"It is now up to the parties
to implement the decision
fully, expediently and in good
faith as they have agreed to
do, and as the (Camp David)
peace treaty requires," she
added.
The verdict was announced
at ceremonies in the Geneva
city hall, two years after Israel
and Egypt agreed to binding
arbitration. The process began
in Geneva in December 1986.
At the United Nations,
meanwhile, Israeli Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres said
that Israel would honor the
judgment of the arbitration
panel.
Peres told reporters he
made that commitment to the
foreign minister of Egypt,
Esmat Abdel Meguid, with
whom he had just concluded a
45-minute meeting.
Neither man would say when
the decision would be imple-
mented. They explained that
they had to return to their
respective capitals to discuss
the matter and further study
the arbitration panel's ruling.
Peres told reporters that
Israel honors its 1979 peace
treaty with Egypt, and inas-
much as the Taba arbitration
was provided for under the
peace treaty, it was going to
honor that as well.
Peres refused to respond to
charges by Premier Yitzhak
Shamir, who accused him of
being responsible for the out-
come of the Taba arbitration.
A close aide to Peres said the
foreign minister and his
entourage were "shocked" by
the political debate initiated by
Likud as a result of the Taba
decision.
The aide accused Likud of
putting petty interests above
the national interests of the
country.
The arbitration panel in Gen-
eva, consisting of five experts
in international law from Swe-
den, Switzerland, France,
Israel and Egypt, ruled unani-
mously in Egypt's favor on
five border locations and in
favor of Israel on four.
But the ruling on the loca-
tion of five other border mar-
Portugal to Appoint
Resident Ambassador
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Portugal will soon upgrade its diplomatic
representation in Israel.
President Mario Soares of Portugal told Israeli Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres here that his country has decided to
appoint a resident ambassador to Israel and will do so "in a
matter of months."
Portugal presently has a non-resident ambassador accredited
to Israel. Israel maintains a full diplomatic mission in Lisbon,
headed by a career foreign service official with ambassadorial
rank. ______________
kers, resulting in the award of
Taba to Egypt, was by a 4-1
decision.
Professor Ruth Lapidot, the
Israeli member of the panel,
dissented in a written state-
ment issued as an appendix to
the ruling.
She said the majority had
sanctioned as border markers
"pillars erroneously erected at
locations inconsistent with the
lawfully recognized interna-
tional boundary between
Egypt and the former man-
dated territory of Palestine."
That line was originally
marked in 1906 by an agree-
ment between Britain, which
had asserted a protectorate
over Egypt, and the Ottoman
Turks, who then ruled Pales-
tine.
Taba is a 765-yard strip of
beach on the Red Sea adjoin-
ing the Israeli resort town of
Eilat. The panel, which
inspected the site last Febru-
ary, left the final 200-yard
stretch from the beach to the
edge of the sea undefined.
This leaves unsettled the
status of the Avia Sonesta, a
luxury hotel Israelis erected on
the beach some years ago.
Nabil el-Arabi, the Egyptian
ambassador to the United
Nations in Geneva, told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency.
"We are very satisfied and as
far as we are concerned, the
issue is over."
Immediately after the ver-
dict was announced, Arabi met
with Avraham Tamir, director
general of the Israeli Foreign
Ministry and the ministry's
legal advisor, Robi Sabel.
Tamir said the two countries
would have to come to an
understanding over the unre-
solved portion of the Taba
boundary.
The Israeli delegation which
came to Geneva to hear the
decision reportedly is of two
opinions.
Some members say Israel
must stick to the agreement
and implement it. Others say
the uncertain aspects should
be exploited to gain time.


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 7, 1988
Viewpofgi
Intraf aith Malevolence
The news report could easily be out of a
morgue; the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
release is reminiscent of the anti-Semitic
attacks of pre-World War II Germany.
But there is no mistimed dateline on the
current news coming from New York: an
Orthodox group of rabbinical leaders assem-
bled recently to mobilize its members in the
United States and Canada in a uniform attack
on Conservative and Reform Judaism.
Citing trends toward intermarriage, the
rightist group Agudas Harabonim sought
to disparage and damn the two branches'
"dangers" and thereby thwart their influence
here and in Israel.
The Anglo-Jewish and general press have
reported the repeated attempts by Orthodox
groups to pressure for amendments to Israel's
Law of Return. Under the guise of questioning
only Conservative and Reform conversion
practices, the Orthodox have truly attempted
to disenfranchise most of Diaspora Jewry
not to mention the majority of non-traditional
Jews in Israel. These coercive acts have
resulted in spiritual trauma and physical vio-
lence.
Enough!
When will respect be granted to all the
world's Jewry? When will these intrafaith
attacks cease? When will tunnel-vision, com-
munal self-hatred and bigoted malevolence
based upon ghetto mentality stop rending Am
Yisroael, the people Israel?
Is there not enough political and religious
hostility toward Jews and Israelis already? Is
there not sufficient diplomatic grist for the
Palestinian mill?
Synagogue Solutions
Of the three roles that a synagogue fulfills
that of a house of study, a house of prayer and
a house of community none is so inextri-
cably tied to its environs than the latter.
Indeed, a synagogue is truly a living entity,
a function of the community wherein it
resides, a part of the vibrancy and life experi-
enced therein.
So, it is a reflection of the very health of the
community or its lack thereof when a syna-
gogue withers and, yes, dies ...
Or survives by moving, merging or other-
wise utilizing its facilities.
In the last weeks, and continued this week,
the pages of the Floridian have been devoted
to a partial overview of this community's
problems vis-a-vis its houses of worship and
the steps taken to protect their existence.
We have noted the sad and significant
challenges faced by South Beach synagogues
in an area already changed. We have noted
that, despite hope against the inevitable, some
Beach rabbis have discussed partial solutions
until the area is revived.
Last week, our reports reflected a trend in
synagogues flourishing where demographics
indicate that Jewish population is doing the
same. A relatively new North Dade storefront
synagogue is building its first permanent
home just blocks from where an established
congregation is intending to move. Following
its congregants as its original neighborhood
changes is one, though costly, solution.
And, this week, we note how synagogues
whose classrooms and corridors are more
empty than in the past creatively work with
Daily Diet of Morality
Bv RABBI
MARC H. TANENBAUM
Recently, tribal warfare in
Burundi between the majority
Hutus and the minority Tutsi
tribes resulted in the brutal
massacre of some 5,000 peo-
ple.
That frightful news of mas-
sive human destruction was
practically a 48-hour sensa-
tion, and then seems almost to
have disappeared completely
from our TV screens and our
consciences.
In the Sudan, some 300,000
refugees flee into impover-
ished Ethiopia, after years of
massive killings.
Tens of thousands of Sikhs,
Moslems and Hindus have died
in recent years in India. The
same has been true of Sri
Lanka, Ireland and South
Africa. The atrocities seem
almost without limit.
Why, then, is it the Palestin-
ian struggle with Israel that
seems to occupy the majority
of our attention, while these
other great human tragedies
are almost ignored?
I don't want to minimize for
a moment the legitimate issues
of justice and security between
Israel and the Palestinians.
But there is something terri-
bly out-of-whack morally when
the Palestinian intifada, upris-
ing, becomes the staple of our
daily diet of news, while mil-
lions of others are allowed to
suffer and die without our
thoughts, our caring, or our
prayers.
Guest Editorial: A Shultz Valedictory
Secretary of State George Shultz, who has
labored hard on behalf of Arab-Israeli peace, made
some important points recently in what could
prove to be his valedictory talk on the Middle East.
Speaking to a conference sponsored by the Wash-
ington Institute for Near East Policy, Shultz
stressed that:
"The existence, security and well-being of
Israel are the first principles of any settlement.
Israel has the right to exist... in security. We will
do our utmost to ensure it." The requirements for
such security "include military hardware, defensi-
ble geographic positions, and technological know-
how."
Apparently referring to PLO Chairman Yasir
Arafat's long-standing "olive branch and gun"
rhetoric, Shultz stated that "no participant in a
peace process can wave the flag of justice in one
hand, and brandish the weapons of terrorism in the
other. All participants must renounce violence and
terrorism. Each must agree to negotiate on the
accepted international basis of [UN] Security Coun-
cil Resolutions 242 and 338."
the surrounding neighborhoods for the benefit
of both. Shared facilities bring back both full
utilization and a fiscally responsible budget
enhancement to three area synagogues.
The Floridian coverage is more than coinci-
dental".
By citing valid concerns and plausible solu-
tions, we hope that those synagogues suffer-
ing the prevalent plight of aging and changing
congregations will know that there is com-
munity support.
And reports of recovery.
Fred K. Shochet
Editor and Publisher
Suzanne Shochet
Executive Editor
Norma A. Orovitz
Managing Editor
Joan C Teglas
Director ot Advertising
Friday, October 7,1988
Volume 61
26TISHREI5749
Number 41
"The United States cannot accept 'self-
determination' when it is a code word for an
independent Palestinian state or for unilateral
determination of the outcome of negotiations. To
expect the PLO to accept Resolutions 242 and 338
as the basis for negotiations is not to ask it to make
a concession."
The Secretary ruled out Israeli annexation or
permanent control of the West Bank and Gaza
Strip as well as "a declaration of independent
Palestinian statehood or government-in-exile" as
unilateral actions prejudging negotiations.
And Shultz reminded Moscow that "there are
also no free rides for outside parties that want to
play a role in settling the conflict. There is no
longer any excuse for the Soviets to avoid diplo-
matic relations with Israel; nor is there justifica-
tion for preventing Jews who wish to emigrate
from doing so."
At times the secretary was blunt. For example,
he stressed that while Palestinian Arab participa-
tion "is required at every stage of the negotia-
tions" they also "need to decide whether to remain
a part of the problem in the Middle East, or become
part of the solution. History will not repeat itself.
Palestinian Arabs "must accept the right of Israel
to exist in peace and present themselves as a viable
negotiation partner. They cannot murder or
threaten other Palestinians who maintain contact
with Israeli authorities."
Similarly, "an attempt by Israel to transfer
Palestinians from the West Bank and Gaza would
also be a unilateral act to determine tin status ot
those territories. The United States would oppose
this vigorously."
Answering questions afterward, Shultz made it
clear he thought that demanding Israel's retreat to
the pre-1967 armistice lines, let alone the IM
1947 partition plan, was not something "reasona-
ble to expect the Israelis to do." Simultaneous!).
Resolution 242 requires of Israel "the exchange"'
territory for peace."
Secretary Shultz repeatedly has proven himsel
not just a friend of strengthened U.8.'Wj[
relations but a key figure in bringing them about-
and a dedicated leader in the pursuit ot
Arab-Israeli settlement. His successor will do wet
to build on the Shultz example.
Thil guest editorial is reprinted with mvmtnim fin* **
Eant Report.


Missiles and Politics
Impact on Mideast
Friday, October 7, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 5
By MORRIS J. AMITAY
Events in the Middle East
the past few months have
added some ominous new
twists to some already bad
situations. As if the prepon-
derance of arms in the hands
of Israel's Arab foes in
terms of numbers of tanks,
planes and troops was not
sufficiently threatening
Israel is now facing brand new
dangers. These include the
very recent installation of fifty
to sixty Chinese-made missiles
with a 1,900 mile range in
Saudi Arabia. In addition,
Syria has already been sup-
plied with Soviet-made mis-
siles which can reach selected
targets in Israel. Of a more
unconventional nature, but
posing a greater threat to civil-
ian populations is the produc-
tion of chemical weapons in a
number of Arab states. Along
with this new-found capability
is the willingness of Arab
states to employ poison gas as
demonstrated during the Iran-
Iraq war by both sides. More
recently this was gruesomely
highlighted by the mass use of
gas against Kurdish civilians.
The end of the Gulf conflict
finds Iraq emerging as a signi-
ficant military power in the
region. Already, this new posi-
tion of strength is being
exploited to settle scores with
neighboring Syria which had
backed Iran. Reports of Iraqi
A Modern Miracles
support for Christian elements
in Lebanon is evidence of
Iraq's Saddam Hussein seek-
ing revenge against his Syrian
Arab brothers. However,
there is little doubt that in a
future Arab-Israel conflict,
internecine strife would
become secondary to the prime
goal of eradicating Israel.
King Hussein's political and
economic retreat from the so-
called West Bank in the wake
of the Palestinian uprising is
yet another new element of
instability injected into an
already volatile reign. Hussein
was at least known to the
Israelis. Arafat is known too
well.
If you add to all these new
elements the upcoming elec-
tions in both the United States
and Israel, the ailing Egyptian
economy, continuing Libyan
support of terrorism, and the
possible establishment of a
Palestinian Government-in-
exile you have the makings
of a very interesting period
ahead. Hopefully, the new
leadership in the United States
and Israel will be able to work
together to at least keep the
lid on in the Middle East if
not make some small progress
toward eventual peace.
Zbigniew Brzezinski who
was responsible for some of
the more negative elements of
the Carter Administration's
Middle East policies, recently
PERES MEETS PETROVSKY Shimon Peres, right, Israeli foreign minister, meets with
reporters after discussions with Vladimir Petrovsky, left, deputy foreign minister of the
Soviet Union, in New York. The meeting was held at Peres' hotel suite. (APIWide World
Phot) Please see story page 7.
announced his support for
George Bush. This curious
endorsement prompted one
veteran Washington observer
to compare this to Winston
Churchill's reaction upon
being informed of Italy's
announcement of its siding
with Nazi Germany in World
War II. Churchill's reported
reaction was "That's all
right we had Italy on our
side in World War I."
Insiders here in Washington
who interact with the U.S.
Congress on a daily basis had
more reason than most to be
surprised over the choice of
Sen. Dan Quayle to fill the
vice-presidential slot on the
Republican ticket. While most
political commentators made
comparisons between Quayle's
experience and that of some
other well known contenders
for the second spot such as
Senator Bob Dole and Repre-
sentative Jack Kemp a more
obvious comparison closer to
home was overlooked. The
"other senator" from Indiana
is Richard Lugar, the bearer of
some very impressive creden-
tials.
The 56 year-old Lugar was
elected to the Senate in 1976
after serving as the well-
regarded Mayor of Indiana-
polis for six years. In the Sen-
ate he held the prestigious
position of chairman of the
Foreign Relations Committee,
and when the Democrats
regained control of the Senate
Continued on Page 11
Recovery of European Jewry
By JERRY HOCHBAUM
Some preliminary observations:
first, European Jewry is not monoli-
thic. Conditions vary markedly from
East to West, from Scandinavia to
Britain to Belgium. Even within a
particular country, such as France,
there are considerable differences
within the Jewish community.
Second: The Holocaust did more
than slaughter six million Jews; it left
deep psychological scars, often ex-
pressed in a sense of futility
regarding the very future of Jewish
communal life.
Third: Many Jews have "made it"
in professional and economic life,
despite endemic anti-Semitism in
many parts of Europe, and intermar-
riage rates are high. It has become
easier to opt out of Jewish life, and
many do.
Fourth: Israel is a crucial force in
maintaining Jewish commitment and
Jewish pride.
There is no question that Europe's
Jewish communities have come back
from the brink. The real issue is how
successfully they have been regener-
ated since the Holocaust. In my judg-
ment, there are good reasons to be
hopeful.
Cultural Orphans No More
During the immediate post-war
years Jewish communities in Europe
were cultural orphans, without rabbis
to lead services, without shochtim
(ritual slaughterers) and mohalim,
(circumcisers) cantors and communal
workers to carry out the tasks that
Judaism requires, without teachers to
transmit the Jewish heritage to the
next generation. This continues to be
a major problem across the continent,
and especially in Eastern Europe.
Yet a beginning has been made in
recruiting and training young people
for these roles.
OT?\
In Oslo and Helsinki, for example
Jewish communities with fewer than
1,000 souls each rabbis trained in
Israel have revived and transformed
Jewish life. Norway had not had a
full-time rabbi for 20 years. Five
years ago Rabbi Michael Melchior
came on the scene. Today more than
80 percent of all Jewish young people
in Oslo are involved in one war or
another with the community.
Helsinki has witnessed a similar
achievement due to Rabbi Ove
Schwarz, who also serves as
educator, youth worker, shochet and
mohel. Today nearly 85 percent of the
community's children are enrolled in
the Jewish day school, and there are
new books about Judaism in Finnish,
which Rabbi Schwarz wrote.
An 'Aleph' for Budapest
A year ago in Budapest, the
Memorial Foundation for Jewish
Culture, which was also instrumental
in helping Rabbis Melchior and
Schwarz in Scandinavia, launched its
"Aleph" Library on Jewish subjects
in Hungarian for Jewish young
people and their families. Some
30,000 copies of the three volumes
were published and sold out within
months in a community that does not
exceed 80,000 souls a remarkable
statement of Jewish resiliency and
even hope in Eastern Europe.
Jewish history was made again in
Hungary last year when an agree-
ment was signed with the Hungarian
Academy of Sciences to establish a
Center for Jewish Studies at the
University of Budapest the first
university center of its kind in all of
Eastern Europe. In its first year 20
students have enrolled.
"Let my people know" is the slogan
of the Nahum Goldmann Fellowships,
initiated two years ago for men and
women between the ages of 25 and 40
the future leaders of Europe's
Jewish communities. Last summer in
England, 32 young men and women
from both Eastern and Western
Europe were exposed to an intensive
Jewish learning experience, meeting
with some of the best minds in Jewish
life people like Adin Steinsaltz,
Arthur Hertzberg, Shaul Friedlander
and others.
The "students" proved remarkably
receptive to the experience, and
almost all of them have returned
home determined to deepen their
lives as Jews. One of the Goldmann
Fellows, a young medical student
from Yugoslavia, is now playing a
leading role in efforts to build a
synagogue in his home community of
Zagreb. Others have also become
involved in leadership positions since
returning home.
Adding It Up
Our experience in such programs
is encouraging. Europe's Jewish
communities have demonstrated the
capacity to restore themselves if
mly they are provided with appro-
priate resources. The success is two-
fold:
Many of the surviving Jewish
communities of Europe did not have
the confidence to believe they could
rebuild. Some were not sure they had
any future at all. Programs have been
able to expand their vision of what is
possible.
Equally important, these Jewish
communities are doing the job them-
selves not via visiting experts.
They are learning that they are
capable not only of raising their
expectations, but of achieving their
goals.
Dr. Jerry Hoekbautn M inrutur director of
tin Memorial Fouwlation for Jewixh Cullun


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 7, 1988
Nobel Peace Prize
To UN Forces
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel hailed the announce-
ment that the United Nations
peacekeeping forces were
awarded this year's Nobel
Peace Prize.
"Even more than a prize for
existing achievements, this is a
testimony of the yearning for
peace and understanding," the
Israeli Foreign Ministry said
in a statement.
The Nobel committee said in
Oslo that the 10,000-troop
peacekeeping forces were cho-
sen for voluntarily taking on
"a demanding and hazardous
service in the cause of peace."
UN forces are now on patrol
in seven trouble spots world-
wide, including Afghanistan,
the Persian Gulf and Lebanon.
The multinational United
Nations Interim Force in
Lebanon, or UNIFIL, is head-
quartered at Nakoura on the
Lebanese side of the frontier.
UNIFIL consists of 5,700
soldiers drawn from nearly a
dozen countries, including 850
from Norway, where the
Peace Prize was announced.
UNIFI1 was established fol-
lowing the first major Israeli
incursion into southern
Lebanon, known as the "Lit-
ani Campaign," in 1978.
Its mission was to separate
the contending forces in
Lebanon and prevent terrorist
infiltration into Israel.
But there was friction from
the outset, with the Israel
Defense Force charging that
UNIFIL was not stopping
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion infiltrators, but merely
taking weapons away from
suspected terrorists headed
toward the Israeli border and
returning them soon after-
wards.
Since its establishment by
the UN Security Council 10
years ago, 156 UNIFIL sol-
diers have been killed there,
most of them in drunk driving
accidents rather than in peace-
keeping-related incidents.
UN peacekeeping and obser-
ver forces are also stationed in
the Golan Heights, Cyprus and
Kashmir.
Iranian Jewish Refugees
A Congressional Concern
WASHINGTON In a
recent letter to Secretary of
State George P. Shultz, Con-
gressman Larry Smith urged
the Reagan Administration
not to cut a proposed Fiscal
Year 1989 allocation for refu-
gees from the Near East
region. The Administration's
proposal reduces by 2,000
from the previous year's level
the number of refugees from
the Near East region that
would be permitted to enter
the United States.
Over the last nine years, the
Jewish community in Iran has
decreased from approximately
80,000 to 20,000. Many of
those who emigrated did so
because they faced human
rights abuses.
In the letter. Smith, whose
committee assignments in-
clude jurisdiction over refugee
issues, expressed concern that,
as the Iran-Iraq war winds
down, Jews living in Iran will
be subject to increasing anti-
Semitism. This potentially ser-
ious problem, coupled with the
widespread abuse of human
rights in Iran, could result in
further emigration of Jews
from Iran.
"Thousands of soldiers will
be returning from the war to
destroyed homes with no food,
money or prospect of employ-
ment. Historical precedence
illustrates that in times of
national hardship, govern-
ments have often channeled
public frustration onto vulner-
able minority groups, particu-
SOBEL PEACE PRIZE WINNERS AT WORK. It mm
to be work as usual for these UN peacekeeping force.- aboard
their Armored Personnel Carrier after hearing th. vem
that the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to the I
keeping forces serving on the front lines of the world't
trouble spots. This photograph was taken at the Isr
checkpoint bordering the self-designated Israeli security
zone in southern Lebanon. (APIWvk World Photo.)
larly the Jewish community,"
Smith said in his letter.
Congressman Peter W.
Rodino, chairman of the House
Judiciary Committee, also
raised the matter at a recent
meeting with the secretary of
state. Rodino has advised
Smith that he shares his con-
cerns and is hopeful that the
levels which are established
for refugee admissions this
year will accommodate the
problem.
Smith expressed hope that
these efforts will convince the
Administration to respond to
the plight of Iranian .lews.
"The Jews of Iran ar. at risk.
They need the security of
knowing that they can c>me to
the United States if their lives
become intolerable in Iran."
Smith said.
PUT ON YOUR BLUE SUEDE SHOES
and Stroll, Twist, Jitterbug or Bop to the
THROT SHOP Hop
Sunday, October 9,1988
Noon
The Aaron "Artie" Kravitz Building
3194 Hallandale Beach Boulevard
8S
TS*S
r7
X
K
as the Douglas Gardens Miami
Jewish Home Thrift Shop rolls back
our prices to the Fabulous Fifties!
o Great Music! o 25* hot dogs
o Kiddie Rides! o 10 o Drawings for o 150 popcorn
prizes!
... and of course, rock-bottom prices on
top-notch merchandise!
COME FOR THE PARTY AND STAY FOR THE BARGAINS
T*
^


Positive Meet Between
Peres andPetrovsky
NEW YORK (JTA) Israel
is satisifed that the Soviet
Union is taking meaningful
measures to remove obstacles
in the way of Jewish emigra-
tion, Israeli officials indicated,
after a meeting here between
Israeli Foreign Minister Shi-
mon Peres and Soviet Deputy
Foreign Minister Vladimir
Petrovsky.
But differences between the
two countries remain. Moscow
is insisting that the restoration
of diplomatic relations
between the two countries be
conditional on the convening
of an international conference
for Middle East peace.
Israel further finds objec-
tionable the Soviets' continued
elevation of the Palestine Lib-
eration Organization as the
rightful representative of the
Palestinian people, entitled to
speak for them in the peace
process.
Those were the key points
that emerged after the two
diplomats conferred for 90
minutes here a meeting that
had been scheduled to last only
a half-hour.
Petrovsky was substituting
for Foreign Minister Eduard
Shevardnadze, who was sud-
denly called home for an
urgent meeting of the Soviet
Communist Party's Central
Committee.
Petrovsky and Peres each
answered reporters' questions
after their get-together. The
substance of their meeting was
elaborated on later by an aide
to Peres, who briefed Israeli
reporters.
According to the aide, the
two discussed the situation in
the Middle East, bilateral rela-
tions and the issues of Soviet
Jewry.
Petrovsky indicated that a
story appearing in The New
York Times regarding the
Soviets relaxing steps in the
emigration process was essen-
tially correct.
The Soviet Union is unde-
rgoing a process of liberaliza-
tion, including changes in its
immigration policy, Petrovsky
said.
"The highest international
standards will be applied" by
the Soviet Union on the sub-
ject of emigration, Petrovsky
said.
One measure eliminated,
according to the Times, was
the requirement that would-be
emigrants must have an invita-
tion from a close blood relative
living abroad.
According to the aide, Peres
noted to Petrovsky that there
has been real progress on the
issue of Soviet Jewry since his
meeting with Shevardnadze
here in September 1987.
He said that all "prisoners of
Zion" have been released and
Jewish emigration has
increased tenfold.
But Peres emphasized to
Petrovsky the importance of
giving Soviet Jews cultural
autonomy and freedom to
learn Hebrew and open more
synagogues.
He also presented the Soviet
official with a list of Jewish
refuseniks asking permission
to emigrate, the aide said.
According to the aide,
Petrovsky indicated that the
Soviet Union is adopting a new
approach, and that these sub-
jects are being discussed in the
USSR today.
After the meeting, Peres
told reporters "We had a very
friendly talk. We have made
some progress, but not
enough. '
Peres said he sees no reason
why the Soviet Union will not
re-establish diplomatic rela-
tions with Israel.
However, Petrovsky said
that Moscow will resume rela-
tions with Israel once there is
progress for peace in the form
of an international peace con-
ference.
Reforms Insufficient
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) Soviet Jewry activists wel-
comed proposed reforms in the Soviet emigration code, but
said the reforms would still not bring the Soviets into
compliance with international human rights accords.
They were responding to a report in The New York Times
that Soviet authorities had informed U.S. officials of some
proposed changes during Foreign Minister Eduard She-
vardnadze's visit here.
One proposed change would end the requirement that
potential emigrants receive a letter of invitation from
family members abroad.
Also, those denied emigration on the grounds of access to
"state secrets" could not be denied on those grounds, after
a certain number of months or years had elapsed.
Anyone whose parents refused to allow them to emigrate
could appeal to a judicial board.
State Department spokeswoman Phyllis Oakley said that
"even with these changes, not all individuals will still be
able to exercise their right to leave the Soviet Union.
Oakley said she was not aware of any timetable guiding
Soviet enactment of the proposed changes.
Micah Naftalin, national director of the Union of Councils
for Soviet Jews, said that when he visited Moscow in June
Soviet officials had discussed precisely the proposed
reforms and promised that they would be placed in draft
form by the end of September.
Morris Abram, chairman of both the National Conference
on Soviet Jewry and the Conference of Presidents of Major
American Organizations, called the possible changes a
"hopeful sign."
Nevertheless, he added, "We judge by performance."
Abram, who met with Secretary of State George Shultz,
also said he was not surprised by the possibility of changes.
"We have been told for a long time that changes are
coming."
KViTCHt
Friday, October 7, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 7
TM
"So much for bearing false witness.
..How does this one grab you: Thoik
Wfihatt not covet."
W/'/ W "'^1" & 1988 Davld s Boxerman and Mark Saunders. All rights reserved
I
Na'amat USA Conference
Esther Zackler, a past
national president of Na'amat
USA who made aliyah, will be
a principal speaker at the
annual Southeast Area Con-
ference of Na'amat USA Mon-
day and Tuesday, Oct. 31 and
Nov. 1 at the Deauville Hotel.
Zackler, who is former presi-
dent of the Association of
Americans and Canadians in
Israel, will speak at the 6 p.m.
dinner, Monday, Oct. 31.
Other speakers include
Miami Beach Mayor Alex
Daoud; Na'amat national vice
president Harriet Green; and
Gerald Schwartz, national vice
president of the American
Zionist Federation and associ-
ate national chairman of
Friends of Na'amat USA.
An 11:30 a.m. brunch on
Oct. 31, chaired by regional
coordinator Gert Aaron, will
be followed by a slide show,
"Light Up Their Lives."
Tuesday's activities begin
with an 8:30 a.m. breakfast
featuring a dialogue between
Zackler and Green on "The
Empowerment of Women/
Status of Women."
Mayor Daoud, a frequent vis-
itor to Israel who has served as
legal counsel to Na'amat USA
in Florida, will be the featured
speaker at the noon luncheon.
His talk will follow a 10:45
a.m. presentation, "The
Women Who Made It Hap-
pen," written by Lillian Elkin,
a national board member, and
narrated by Shulamith Saltz-
man.
aoooooooooo'
M JNF EMERGENCY FOREST FUND
FDM5H
Jewish National Fund Keren Kayemeth Leisrael
Calls on the community to
HEAR THE CRY
of the Burning Trees and the Scorched Land
and respond to the
'JNF EMERGENCY FOREST FUND"
To Replace Every Burned Tree...
To Restore Every Acre Of Scorched Land...
DO IT TODAY!
Yes...I will help replant the burned trees
Yes...I will help restore the devastated land
Yes...l will help purchase essential fire fighting equipment
Enclosed is my gift of: $___________________________

Name
Phone-
Address
.Apt. No.-
All contributions to JNF are tax deductible.
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND, INC.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 353 Miami Beach, Florida 33139 Phone 538-6464
>OOQOOOOOOOOP
loooooooeoni


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian/Friday. October 7. 1988
Orthodox Attack
Conservative and Reform
Kef usenik Protest I
Results In Arrest
NEW YORK iJTA) Lead-
ers of an Orthodox rabbinical
group met here to call for a
mass campaign to "alert the
public to the dangers of
Reform and Conservatism."
Rabbis attending the special
meeting of the Union of Ortho-
dox Rabbis of the United
States and Canada drew a
direct link between non-
Orthodox Jewish denomina-
tions and an increasing inci-
dent of marriage between
Jews and non-Jews.
They vowed to organize a
"united front"' to urge all
Orthodox organizations to
explain to Jews "the impor-
tance of staying away from
Reform"' and Conservative
Judaism, according to Hersh
Ginsberg, director of the
union, which is more com-
monly known as the Agudas
Harabonim.
The meeting was prompted
by a request from the Chief
Rabbinate of Israel, according
to Ginsberg.
"The rabbinate feels that
Reform and Conservative are
pushing themselves strongly
into Israel." said Ginsberg.
"They have influence with
(Foreign Minister Shimon)
Peres, the prime minister
(Yitzhak Shamir) and the gov-
ernment, because of the big
funds they are able to give.
The Chief "Rabbinate asked us
to put pressure on the (Israeli)
government not to allow this."
The meeting was called in
the wake of a number of politi-
cal and public relations victo-
ries for non-Orthodox Jewish
movements in Israel.
Both Reform and Conserva-
tive Zionist groups boasted
unprecedented levels of repre-
sentation at the most recent
Shultz Reports Progress
In Ministerial Talks
Jewish Agency General
Assembly.
Earlier this year. Orthodox
political parties were again
rebuffed in their attempts to
pass an amendment to Israel s
Law of Return, that would
deny extension of automatic
citizenship to those converted
to Judaism by a non-Orthodox
rabbi.
More recently, the Conser-
vative movement ordained its
first four Israeli rabbis, and
successfully fought the Jerusa-
lem Rabbinate's attempt to
withdraw the kosher certifica-
tion of its Jerusalem youth
hostel.
Ginsberg was unequivocal in
his opposition to the non-
Orthodox movements.
"It leads to mixed marri-
age." he said of Reform, add-
ing that Conservative Judaism
was considered "even more
harmful to Orthodoxy''
because it acts as a "stepping-
stone" to Reform.
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
:' State Georgl
-
-ere witk S \it: Foreign
I >hevard-
iieated I -ther
cr.:? has
think tha: -.--.
reasonably promising, but we
not quite there yet."'
Shultz ss
He spoke to reporters after
President Reagan met with
Shevardnadze, at the conclu-
sion of the meetings between
the two foreign ministers.
The talks were expected to
be the last major meeting
between the two superpowers
during the Reagan administra-
tion.
But Shultz stressed that the
administration will continue
working with the Soviets "to
accomplish as much as can be
accomplished" in the four
areas that all their discussions
have focused on: arms control,
human rights, regional issues
IBd :_a:era. issues.
The Mcretarv said that over
the past three years, these
meetings have become routine
and the Soviets have acknowl-
edged that such issues as
human rights are part of the
regular agenda between the
two countries.
He said he believes this pat-
tern will continue in the next
administration, regardless of
whether Vice President
George Bush or Gov. Michael
Dukakis is elected president.
The human rights issue
focused on the Conference on
Security and Cooperation in
Europe now being held in
Vienna as a follow-up to the
1975 Helsinki Accords. The
United States and other West-
ern nations are maintaining
mat the conference must con-
clude additional written guar-
antees on human rights before
talks on reducing conventional
arms can begin.
Stressing that iee la are
more important than words,"
Shultz said that in assess
the Soviet Union's human
rights record, the United
States looks at emigration fig-
ures, political and religious pri-
soners, and the cases of div-
ided families
"We've seen quite a bit of
change in Soviet behavior and
in the behavior of other East-
ern European countries." he
said.
But he added that in addition
to changes in behavior, there
must be changes in language
produced in Vienna about
human rights. He noted, in
particular, that the United
States wants the Soviets to
allow groups to monitor com-
pliance with the Helsinki
Accords.
Shultz said that the United
States had received assur-
ances that the Soviets are
drafting new legislation on
religious freedom, emigration
and changes in the criminal
code.
The secretary has long
sought, for example, to get the
Soviets to institutionalize emi-
gration procedures, so that
Jews and others would no
longer be refused exit visas on
arbitrary decisions of officials.
While Shultz said that he
and Shevardnadze discussed
the Middle East, it was appar-
ently not a major part of the
talks
But he said there was a long
discussion about the need to
ban the production of chemical
weapons. U.S. and Soviet
experts are to meet Dec. 16 on
ways of halting their prolifera-
tion.
MDAAids Gilbert's Victims
TEL AYTV (JTA) Magen David Adorn. Israels Red Cross
equivalent, has rushed urgently needed medical supplies to help
the victims of Hurricane Gilbert in Jamaica.
The Israeli Embassy in Kingston, the Jamaican capital,
compiled a list of supplies requested by rescue teams.
They were sent via El Al. Israel's national airline, without
charge to the Caribbean nation.
NEW YORK (JTA) Eight
persons, four of them doctors
and one a rabbi, had them-
selves arrested outside the
Soviet Mission to the United
Nations to dramatize the
plight of Georgi Samoilovich. a
Jewish refusenik suffering
from cancer.
They blocked the entrance,
in violation of a city ordinance,
and were charged with disor-
derly conduct and released.
The'eight will stand trial in
New York City Criminal Court
on Nov. 15.
Samoilovich. 63. has been
seeking an emigrati-.r. visa for
11 years, without success. An
American doctor who visited
Moscow earlier this v.- \j jjag.
nosed Samoilovich as having
large-cell lymphoma. a : rmof
cancer. The doctor. Richard
Rosenbluth. offered -reat
him at the Hackensa -
Center in New Jem
But the Soviet aut
refused Samoilovich
visa. He also was der. treat-
ment at the Blokhin
Institute of Moscow,
to the Student Strut-_ f,,r
Soviet Jewry.
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A picture is a powerful weapon Espe-
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Unfortunately, the Miclfiiiniuuii
pjcsencd tc > Amencan> hv enemies < 4 brad
b often danger >uslv distorted
Riskv huMncNv a >n>idcnrig the survival
4 a kwt>h xar couki dependm how tha
picture ts interpreted h\ Washington
That's wtn the American brad Puhix Al
tar- (. unmitur ts < A sixh v ml imp irunce
\IP\( has played a critical role in
pn Mdmg the true \bddk East picture t< > p ?
utKa! leader. on Capitol Hill since 195*
W irking suooanMjr with Republicans and
DemoLTats alike n > rruinrain the strong nat-
ural bond between this nation and brad
whale hulking much needed grassn ts sup-
purt Pamcuhrlv m ti iwns where there are
onlv a handful 01 Jewish families, and on
college campuses
AD*C:*. uroifje h the pn >-brad k ttx
The onlv American < irganuati^ regracred
tolohr* (ijngrev.inhehalf of astmngl'S-
brad rdatKjnship The results speak for
tnemsdves Annmg them passageol'the
ingoing 13 billion aid package for brael
Vt for all its importance. Affl*X~ owe B>
existence cntirelv to v our generosirv
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a commtin enemv
Even when he \how> two bees
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Columbus Day Retrospective:
Friday, October 7, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 9
''////'/''"'' -
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
BOSTON (JTA) When we
think of celebrations, as the
20th century fades and the
21st nears, we may list as key
events (1) the quincentenary of
the 1492 voyage across the
Atlantic by Christopher
Columbus, and (2) the 350th
anniversary (2004) of the
establishment of the first per-
manent settlement of Jews in
New Amsterdam (now New
York).
Three years planning have
already been devoted to mark-
ing the arrival in the New
World of the Nina, the Pinta
and the Santa Maria.
On Sept. 12, 1954, many
Jewish communities began
celebrating the American Jew-
ish tercentenary. President
Eisenhower, at a banquet in
the Astor Hotel, spoke glow-
ingly; standing beside him was
Irving Berlin, now a centenar-
ian himself, who sang "God
Bless America."
Now, with the publication by
the American Jewish Archives
of a new study by Dr. Lewis
Feuer, we learn that Joachim
Gaunse deserves to be recog-
nized as the first recorded Jew
to appear in English-speaking
North America.
Having served on faculties of
the University of California-
Berkeley, Toronto, Vassar,
City College of New York, and
Virginia while offering
instructions in sociology, phi-
losophy, and government, Pro-
fessor Feuer brings us the
fruits of his research on the
amazing career of Gasunse, a
pioneer mining technologist.
The Feuer study reveals that
Gaunse joined with Sir Walter
Raleigh soon after that roman-
tic friend of Queen Elizabeth
was granted a patent to
explore the establishing of a
permanent settlement in
North America. The grant was
received in 1584.
This was just four years
before Phillip II of Spain
launched the Spanish Armada,
designed to overthrow the
Protestant monarch, Eliza-
beth, and bring Phillip to the
throne as England's Catholic
ruler.
Why, then, did Joachim
Gaunse, one of perhaps only
100 Jews in England, win
Raleigh's attention?
Wood resources in Britain
were dwindling, and a mining
engineer with Gaunse's skill
was needed to help with the
construction of cannon, and
thus enable London to strike
back at Spain's powerful
Armada.
The services Gaunse pro-
vided Raleigh when that
imaginative and controversial
nobleman attempted to found
Roanoke colony in Virginia
(actually on what is now North
Carolina soil) helped Gaunse
a few years later when he
became entangled back in
England in religious disputes.
Gaunse, "versed in the Tal-
mud." was branded a wicked
infidel by Bristol clergymen
when he dared ask why God,
the Almighty, needed to have a
son here below.
Charged as a blasphemer,
Gaunse was turned over to the
mayor and aldermen of Bristol
in 1589. But how could he be
thus tried, these perplexed
civic stalwarts wondered,
when after all he had never
been baptized a Christian?
Probably aware of what this
mining genius had done for
England knowing also that
Raleigh, his patron and
admirer, had himself been con-
sidered somewhat heretical
they tossed the ball into the
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Engineer Was N. America's
First Recorded Jew
Privy Council's court.
Feuer writes that after
Gaunse was fetched to London
as prisoner, speculation had it
that he was banished from
England and perhaps returned
to Prague, his place of birth.
Despite Gaunse's ordeal,
rooted in his convictions as a
Jew, he had been much
admired earlier by English
royalty for improvements he
achieved for England in the
smelting of copper, and for
other scientific contributions,
detailed by Feuer.
It is of even greater interest,
as Feuer puts it, "that in the
character of his contemporary,
the Jewish mining engineer,
Joachim Gaunse, Francis
Bacon found a prototype of the
Jew Joabin in his prophetic,
scientific romance, 'The New
Atlantic' "
In his day, Bacon shared
anti-Semitic attitudes preva-
lent in England (see Shake-
speare and Marlowe); but
Feuer believes Bacon felt bet-
ter disposed toward Jews as
his career advanced.
As Gaunse's colorful life
story unfolds, a reader of
Feuer's findings and conclu-
sions is impressed by this tri-
bute to a proud Jew, whose
scientific achievements made a
lasting impression on Francis
Bacon and other prominent
Englishmen during the reign
of Queen Elizabeth.
German-Jewish Student "Bridge"
A group of 20 American stu-
dents belonging to the Jewish
student organization Hillel at
Stanford University in Califor-
nia participated in the "Bridge
of Understanding '88" in
Bonn.
The 17-day program, which
is run annually by the Univer-
sity of Bonn, included meet-
ings with the minister of state
in the Federal Chancellery,
Lutz Stavenhagen, as well as
discussions with former Presi-
dent Karl Carstens, Bonn
Mayor Hans Daniels and
Green Party Bundestag
Deputy Petra Kelly.
The students also traveled to
Berlin, visiting both sections
of the divided city, and toured
Hamburg, where they met for
a discussion with young Bun-
deswehr officers. In addition,
the group visited the former
Bergen-Belsen concentration
camp and toured Mainz and
the old city of Worms, a center
of Jewish life in the middle
ages.
Dantashc Israel
MINI PACKAGES
A medley of holiday extensions November 15,1988March 1. 1989
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King David (12/18-1/3) $70
KDdeluxe (12/18-1/3) $35
Dan Tel-Aviv (12/18-1/3) $25
PanoramaTLV (12/18-1/3) $10
Neptune Eilat (12/20-1/4) $45
GaleiKinnereth (12/20-1/4) $35
All supplements are per room per night
At Dan Caesarea HB compulsory every
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(not Including gas, mileage & insurance)'.
Combine these attractive hotel-only
packages with your own private car,
including:
- 4 or 7 sealer including
driver'guide (up to 200 km. per day) $145 per day
- Over mileage SO 60 (over 200 km. per day)
- Overnight guide (outside TIV) $40per night
- Entrance tees per person per day $7
Airport transfers (including assistance):
- to Tel-Avy SX per car cars up to 7 persons
- to Jerusalem $65 per car
All rates are in USS.
Maximum tree rental 7 days
Minimum 50 km per day compulsory
How To Book
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YOUR TRAVEL AGENT OR
Israel Hotel Representatives
Toll Free U.S.A. (800)223-7773
N.Y.(212) 752-6120
IhrDamolkrad


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 7, 1988
Senior
Judge
Continued from Page 1
trict court. In Aronovitz's
case, the appointment figures
add up too. The magic number
for senior status in any
combination is 80. Aronov-
itz will have 12 years on the
bench, plus his age of 68.
Aronovitz, a past state presi-
dent of B'nai B'rith, and his
wife Elinore live in Miami. His
son Todd, 38, practices law
here. His daughter Elaine is
married to Gene Glasser, a
Hollywood tax attorney. And
daughter Karen, married to
Brian Shonson, lives in
Atlanta.
Aronovitz's family came to
Key West in the late 1800s
from Romania. The family has
a vacation condo in North Car-
olina, but the judge maintains,
"Miami is my home."
The 1943 graduate from the
University of Florida Law
School served a period in the
army and subsequently
entered private law practice.
Once on the bench, he dealt
with cases involving racketeer-
ing, narcotics, loan sharking
and extortion.
One of the more controver-
sial judicial decisions Aronov-
itz has made was to strike
down the Florida abortion
Rivlin Brings
JNF Message
statute which required a doc-
tor to notify a husband of his
wife's decision to terminate a
pregnancy. Although he will
not handle the case himself, he
will be certain to tune into a
sure-to-be-challenged new
state law which requires teen-
agers under 18 to inform
either a parent or the courts
before undergoing an abor-
tion. That law went into effect
this week.
Aronovitz said working on
the district court bench has
personally been more reward-
ing than working on the appel-
late court. In the latter, the
judge says he is able to have
contact with litigants as well
as lawyers.
Besides not having to run for
re-election every four years,
Aronovitz also enjoys another
aspect of district court; not
being limited to construing
only state law.
He demurs on questions
about issues such as church/
state controversies, as well as
other timely yet touchy sub-
jects, maintaining, as most
judges do, that it is not appro-
priate to comment on cases
that may appear before him.
Still, the judge unhesitat-
ingly states: "I feel strongly
about the legitimacy of the Bill
of Rights and other quarantees
of freedom of religion, press,
trial by jury all the rights.
"I don't feel they're in jeo- jury system. The right to trial
pardy but I feel the federal by jury should be present at all
court system is often believed costs, the judge said,
to be the last bulwark of pro-
tection of citizens against the
government."
Asked about changes he has
witnessed during his 12 years
"No question but the cost of
litigation has grown considera-
bly and it is having an adverse
effect on middle and lower
income people," the judge
said. "I believe in tirm- to
as magistrate. Aronovitz said, come, Congress may have to
'the flood of litigation has address what can be done to
become indescribable. Ameri- enhance or attain counsei. I
Yhe flood of litigation is indescribable.
American people have become litigious.
can people have become litigi-
ous. Everyone goes to court."
On a further note, Aronov-
itz advocated his belief in the
don't know what the answer
is, frankly, but there's going to
have to be some means devised
to permit these people to have
access to the legal system."
Moshe Rivlin
Moshe Rivlin, world chair-
man of the Jewish National
Fund (JNF) will meet with
senators, congressmen and
members of the executive
branch, as well as with major
Jewish leaders throughout the
U.S., presenting a series of
addresses on the current wave
of arson plaguing Israel's for-
ests and pastureland. Since
April, over 1,000 fires have
been set, ravaging 85,000
acres of forests and pasture-
lands and destroying one mil-
lion trees at a cost of over $40
million.
Rivlan will also review
JNF's emergency reforesta-
tion efforts, including the "ten
for one" campaign, which calls
for the replacement of every
one tree destroyed by arson-
ists with ten new saplings.
JNF is also appealing for funds
to purchase the latest fire-
fighting equipment: fire
engines, forest observation
towers and communications
systems.
For information: 538-6464.
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! iii I
......
........... --"
-. imiAiMlunJfcimlPl'.
;ii'...... in'.....-In"
r
Goldstein to Leave
Documentation Center
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
ANGUISH."
That is the word Goldie
Goldstein uses to describe her
sion to retire from the
Holocaust Documentation and
Education Center. It's been
almost nine years. She was the
founding director, helped the
program grow and worked
sometimes six days a week
with not a penny in salary.
If the anguish of decision
reduced her to tears in recent
weeks, there are bound, she
admits, to be more tears when
she finally steps down as exec-
utive vice president and volun-
' teer director on Jan. 1. Ini-
I he organization was call-
ed the Southeastern Florida
Holocaust Memorial Center.
(loldstein discussed her
- and sketched the growth
and future hopes of the center
in an interview, but not before
r -taff came rushing forth
with accolades about their
departing leader.
loldstein returns the com-
pliment and says she is leaving
rnter well staffed. Assist-
ant Director Rositta Kenigs-
berg will become the center's
first paid full-time director.
Kenigsburg is the daughter
/if Holocaust survivors and is
president of the International
\< twork of Children of Holo-
caust survivors.
Goldstein, who arrived in
America as a child with her
parents after a trans-Atlantic
crossing from her native
-a, Russia, lives in Bay
Harbor Islands with her hus-
band Sol.
IN a letter Goldstein will
read to her board next week,
she says she will list two major
reasons for her retirement.
"First and most important,
is that my husband Sol has
been retired for four-and-a-
half years and has been very
patiently waiting for my
retirement.
"Secondly," the letter con-
tinues, "the center is growing
so rapidly, that it now requires
a full-time executive director."
Goldie Goldstein
The center has come a long
way from its humble start to
comfortable office space at the
North Miami-Bay Vista Cam-
pus of Florida International
University.
Originally, the center was
given free space in a trailer; it
had only desks and file cabin-
ets. "Not even paper clips and
pencils," she recalls.
But there was a mission. It
began sometime around 1978
when Goldstein was complet-
ing course work to earn a
degree in Professional Studies
at Barry University.
As she was granted her
diploma from then-Barry Pres-
ident Sister Trinita Flood,
Goldstein was told that two
men in the community, Arnold
Picker and Abe Halpern, were
starting a Holocaust center
primarily to take testimony
from Holocaust survivors, pro-
tectors and liberators. Gold-
stein's husband was not well at
the time so rather than take on
the full-time paid position as
director, she offered to volun-
teer her services, considering
the project invaluable.
THE center doors opened in
1980. With seed money
donated by Picker, the first
secretary was hired. Goldstein
began making appeals to
friends, college and university
administrators to get the
basics typewriters, and
office supplies.
While other centers through-
out the United States take
documentaries of Holocaust
victims, Goldstein added a
dimension to the program that
makes South Florida's first
and only such center unique.
It involved a 60-hour train-
ing program for interviewers.
Professors, educators, people
with expertise in interviewing
skills take the candidates
through the intensive course
Continued on Page 18
NJCRAC Gives Nod
To Soviet Glasnost
Bj ELLEN ANN STEIN
/ iriaA Floridian Staff Writer
SOVIET Jewry, apartheid,
the Palestinian question and
ling close relationships
with which ever party gains
'I of the White House in
November, are among the
the guest speaker at the
Federation's Community Rela-
tions Commission discussed
Albert D. Chernin
with the Floridian in an adv-
ance interview last week.
Albert D. Chernin, executive
vice chairman of the National
Jewish Community Relations
Advisory Council was
expected to speak at the local
CRC meeting this week,
according to Nan Rich, CRC
chairman.
NJCRAC is the national
coordinating body in the field
of Jewish community relations
and comprises 113 local bodies
and 11 national agencies
including American Jewish
Committee, American Jewish
Congress, B'nai B'rith's Anti-
Defamation League and a con-
sortium representing the vari-
ous Jewish religious move-
ments.
"One of the critical concerns
that we'll be addressing is the
issue of Soviet Jewry," said
Chernin. "We are moving into
a period that may provide new
opportunities and challenges
in the light of changes which
are taking place in the Soviet
Union.
"The fundamental issue is
that the situation has radically
changed under (the leadership
of Soviet Premier Mikhail)
Gorbachev for the better in
their promise of better things
to come."
BUT focusing on the new
U.S. administration come Jan-
uary, Gorbachev's own status
at home and the complaints of
long-time refuseniks, Chernin
said "What remains is how
those promises will apply to
Soviet Jews. It's still not possi-
ble to say 'yes' or 'no' when it
comes to the impact of glasnost
(openness) or perestroika
(restructuring)," Chernin
added.
Arabs act out their
concetn through acts
of violence.
"In regard to it, there has
been a significant increase in
emigration, which is a reversal
since the doors had practically
been closed since 1970. And
there is some reason to
(believe) the number will grow
in coming years."
Chernin, long-involved in
Soviet affairs, expressed more
optimism than some others
Continued on Page 16
Friday, October 7, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 13
Stein and Schaefer
Dedication
At Douglas Gardens
Louis and Bess Stein and
Rowland and Sylvia Schaefer
will be honored as benefactors
of the newest buildings at the
Miami Jewish Home and Hos-
pital for the Aged at Douglas
Gardens (MJHHA). The Louis
and Bess Stein Commons and
Rowland and Sylvia Schaefer
Hall will be dedicated in a
public ceremony Sunday, Oct.
23, 11 a.m. at MJHHA.
The Steins, residents of
Miami Beach, are Humanitar-
ian FOUNDERS of the Miami
Jewish Home, where Louis
Stein is also past president of
FOUNDERS, an honorary
vice president of MJHHA and
chairman of the program advi-
sory board for the Stein Ger-
ontological Institute, which
the couple endowed in 1981. A
member of the MJHHA Board
of Directors, Bess Stein is also
vice president of the Greater
Miami Women's Auxiliary,
which honored her as its
"Woman of the Year" in 1984.
Organizations and institu-
tions, which have also been
recipients of the Stein's philan-
thropy, include the Miami
Beach Community Center, Jef-
ferson Medical School in Penn-
sylvania, Fordham University
in New York, Technion Univ-
ersity in Haifa and an amphi-
theatre and mother and child
clinic in Jerusalem.
Louis Stein is a retired attor-
ney and retired chairman of
the board of Food Fair Stores.
He and his wife have three
daughters, ten grandchildren
and ten great-grandchildren.
Rowland Schaefer, chairman
of the board of Claire's Stores,
Inc., is an honorary vice presi-
dent of MJHHA as well as a
Humanitarian FOUNDER and
vice president of FOUNDERS.
The Schaefers are on the
board of directors at the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion and the Weizmann Insti-
tute in Israel where they are
also major benefactors. The
Hollywood couple has three
children.
The completion of Stein
Commons and Schaefer Hall
represents the latest phase of
a 10-year, $40 million capital
expansion project at MJHHA.
Rowland and Sylvia Schaefer
Steins Put School Drive Over Top
Miami Beach philanthropists Louis and Bess Stein's
$70,000 gift to the new University of Miami branch at
Miami Beach will ensure the opening of that school in time
for the fall 1989 semester. Mayor Alex Daoud had api
for that amount, needed to finish the" transformatTo!
three floors of the Old City Hall to a UM branch campus'
Stein, vice president of Temple Emanu-El of Greater
Miami and of the Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged
at Douglas Gardens, telephoned Daoud after he read that
the drive to headquarter the university branch in the Old
City Hall had fallen $70,000 short of the funds needed.
Daoud and Miami Beach hotel developer Stephen Muss
have served as co-chairmen of the campaign to raise
$575,000 for the new branch. Gifts of $50,000 each came
from Muss, Centrust President David Paul, Jack Penrod
and the Humana Corporation. Jefferson National Bank
donated $25,000; and Daoud and Miami Beach commission-
ers also made donations.


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 7, 1988
Leight and Hagen Featured
At Council Luncheon
The National Council of Jew-
ish Women (NCJW), Greater
Miami Section, will hold its
opening membership meeting
Wednesday, Oct. 26, 11 a.m.,
at the Greater Miami-Jewish
Federation.
Following the buffet lunch
and a short business meeting,
Dr. Sarah Hagen, director of
the Counseling and Profes-
sional Development Institute,
and Lynn Leight, founder and
executive director of the Sex,
Health and Education Center
(SHE), will discuss modern
relationships between parents
and children, as well as
women's careers.
A psychologist, Hagen's pre-
sent research focuses on the
Lynn Leight
relationship between mothers
and daughters. She has been
project director of the
National Institute of Drug
Abuse, executive director of
the Miami Dade Community
College Crisis Center, and con-
sultant for the Florida Council
of Parent Cooperative Pre-
Schools.
Leight, a registered nurse
and author of the recently pub-
lished "Raising Healthy Sex-
ual Children," is a certified sex
educator and counselor, an
adjunct assistant professor at
the University of Miami School
of Family Medicine, and foun-
der and executive director of
the "Middlessence Center,"
designed to enhance the well-
being of women in middle life.
School Space to Spare
approved by synagogue, PTA,
and Dade County School
Board administrators, the two
facilities shared auditoriums
and parking space. Many of
the North Beach students hap-
pen to attend Beth Sholom
anyway, Kesselman added.
If there is one impediment to
the relationship, it is that the
students from North Beach
must cross the street to get to
the temple. That potential
problem was solved when the
:ity of Miami Beach and the
Miami Beach Police Depart-
ment agreed to subsidize an
all-day crossing guard to safely
escort the children near the
Arthur Godfrey Road shop-
ping district.
A second school-synagogue
agreement that also went into
effect this month is even more
ideal in terms of location. Tem-
ple Israel of Greater Miami's
downtown facility is located
directly next door to Miramar
Elementary School. An agree-
ment for Miramar students to
use Temple Israel's classrooms
means an estimated $88,000
annually for Dade's pioneer
Reform congregation.
A Dade school official said
that the differential in price
per square footage for the
Beth Sholom and Temple
Israel rental agreements is due
to the real estate market. The
school official explained that
Temple Israel received about
$10 per square foot while Beth
Sholom received about $13 per
square foot.
BARBARA Moss, principal
of Miramar was elated about
the agreement, but was some-
what disappointed when
another school waylaid her
plans for the moment.
Morningside Elementary
School's new addition was not
completed on schedule so stu-
dents from that school will be
bused some 50 blocks to Tem-
ple Israel. Whgen the Mor-
ningside facility is completed
sometime around December,
Miramar students can take
advantage of their neighbor's
facilities.
"It provides a source of
is anxious to make use of the
nine classrooms in the syna-
gogue's upper wing. "I'm not
bursting at the seams yet,"
Moss said, but added that her
art and music teachers had to
be "put on wheels" last year,
which is school jargon meaning
they didn't have their own
rooms and had to move from
class to class.
Although most of the stu-
dents at Miramar are Catholic
or Baptist, Moss said, the prin-
cipal noted that she hasn't
received any complaints from
parents about the potential
shared arrangement. Moss
considers the synagogue even
better than the use of portable
The 'Annex Concept'provides a quick-fix
for school overcrowding.
income for space that's not
being used for other things,"
said Temple Israel admini-
strator Alan Heilig. "In our
case, we have satellite educa-
tion programs, not all at the
synagogue, so the need for
educational space at the tem-
ple is not as great as it once
was. It's a good deal for us,
and a good deal for the school
system," he surmised.
"There were no religious
articles in the classroom and if
there were, they would have
been removed," Heilig added.
Meanwhile, Miramar's Moss
The Muir String Quartet, winner of the 1981 Nnumberg Chamber
Music Award and the 1980 Evian International String Quartet
Competition, will be featured in the first of the five concert An
Afternoon, of Music Series, Sunday, Oct. 30, -J p.m.. at Temple
Beth Am. The quartet will play works by Mozart. Kreisler and
Ravel.
classrooms, because the porta-
bles would have to be located
across the street. The syna-
gogue is even closer; there are
no streets to cross; and that's a
bonus when it rains, Moss said.
BETH David congregation
may be the synagogue with the
longest tradition of leasing
space to students. For over ten
years, the Bertha Abess Chil-
dren's Center had leased space
from Miami's oldest congrega-
tion. The program is specially
designed for emotionally dis-
turbed children, but in recent
years the program was trans-
ferred to Dade County schools.
But Phil McGuire, supervisor
of business service for the
Abess Center, said his school
continues to lease space from
Beth David for its administra-
tive headquarters. The con-
tract is in the neighborhood of
$40,000 a year, McGuire said.
"It's hard to think of it as a
trend because they were here
for many years," said Susan
Jay, a spokesman for Beth
David.
While the agreeements
between the schools and the
synagogues are providing an
apparent all-around bonanza,
the movement is likely to see
an increase and then decline,
according to Lila Kalaf, super-
visor of site planning for Dade
County Public Schools.
Fortunately, with the pas-
sage of the bond referendum
we will have necessary capital
dollars to build new schools to
hopefully serve all the needs
we have identified," Kalaf
iJ
The Simon Wiesenthal Center's newly created General,,,,, Ai)tr
Committee met with Martin Mendelsohn, the center's legal
counsel, who was guest speaker at the committee's recent event.
Standing from left are: Jerry Levine, Davina Jerassy, Regional
Director Robert Novak, Marcia Sue Needle, Mendelsohn, Ariel
Furst, Bennett Bramson, Suzanne Frish, Rene Segal and Ivan S.
Segal; seated from left are: Lori Chadroff, Laz Rothstein. Linda
Rothstein, Lillian Olemberg, Darci Lester, Dr. Philip Benjamin
and Lori Rosen.
am Continued from Page 1
said, adding that school over-
crowding is an increasing
problem throughout the coun-
try.
And one of the temporary
solutions to the problem has
been the so-called "annex con-
cept"; a program of sharing
space with nearby facilities
such as synagogues, churches
and offices, especially in areas
where school space is too lim-
ited to include the placement
of portable classrooms on the
grounds.
But schools such as North
Beach elementary are slated
for expansion. "Once that
addition is completed we will
have no need for an annexed
school at Temple Beth Sho-
lom," said Kalif. So while the
annex concept "is here to
stay," specific annex schools
are only temporary.
KALAF agreed that
church/state issues had been a
factor to consider. "Our school
board attorney reviewed it and
as a condition of the lease
agreement, the temple is
required to remove or cover
any religious displays and that
would satisfy any concerns
that may be raised concerning
separation of church/state,"
Kalaf said.
She added: "I've found it's
always good to work with a
Awad at
Coalition
Lecture ^
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"Point of View: Crisis in the
Middle East," a series of lec-
tures exploring possibilities of
peace in that area, will be
presented by the South Florida
Peace Coalition.
The first program on Wed-
nesday evening, Oct. 12, will
feature Meir Amor and Peretz
Kidron, members of Yeah Gvul
(There is a Limit), a group of
Israeli soldiers who have
refused to serve in the admin-
istered territories because of
their moral opposition to the
occupation. The program will
begin at 8 p.m. at the Univer-
sity of Miami Hillel House. -
Mubarak Awad, the Pales-'
tinian-American recently
deported from Israel, will
speak at the second lecture on
Tuesday, Oct. 18, 8 p.m. in
room ACI-265 at the No.
Miami campus of Florida
International University.
Ii
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non-profit institution or a reli-
gious organization because
they're not as profit-oriented
as the private, commercial sec-
tor. They're very concerned
about the community."
Kalaf added that the school
board "will probablv have
other annex schools to look at
in the coming year."
Conference to Combat
Interfaith Bigotry
Through conferences with
Roman Catholics and Luther-
ans, the American Jewish
Committee (AJC) plans an
interfaith look at anti-
Semitism and religious bigotry
and how religious denomina-
tions can combat them.
The first conference on
Thursday and Friday, Oct. 13-
14, will bring together St.
Louis Roman Catholic Church
and Congregation Bet Shira.
Featured speakers will include
Rabbi A. James Rudin,
national interreligious director
of AJC and Dr. Eugene
Fisher, executive secretary for
Catholic Jewish Relation of the
Conferences of Catholic
Bishops. The conference opens
at St. Louis, Thursday at 7:30
p.m., and reconvenes Friday
9:30 a.m., at Bet Shira.
Bet Shira and St. Louis
came together as friends and
neighbors during the syna-
gogue's battle to win zoning
approval for a new building
and again after the extensive
desecration of that facility.
The tress which grace Bet
Shira's entrance are a gut
from St. Louis, whose pastor,
Father James Fetscher.
ordered a Star of David
erected on the church's root
following the vandalism.
The second conference will
be held Thursday and Friday. .
Dec. 1-2. AJC and the South
Florida Lutheran Council win
be joined by Congregation bnir
Ami and the South Miami Lut-
heran Church for a conference
which will focus on anti-
Semitism, the teachings w
Martin Luther, and the Lut-
heran Church's efforts to over-
come those teachings. The con
veners of the conference wm
callforaShabbatofKememO .
ance to mark the efforts o
Scandinavians to sum **'
during the Holocaust
A
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In
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Television's Joan Lunden ivill
discuss how she manages her
career and motherhood at the
North Shore Hospital's 6th
il Baby Expo Saturday,
Oct. 89, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Tours of
the maternity unit, exhibits,
babysitting, free lunches, and
drawings for special gifts will
also be offered.
Hadassah
Health Fair
The Miami Beach Region of
Hadassah will hold its first
communitywide Health Fair
Sunday, Oct. 23, 11 a.m.-2
p.m. at the Miami Beach Jew-
ish Community Center.
Participating agencies will
include American Cancer
League, American Lung Asso-
ciation. American Red Cross
and Aft Sinai Medical Center.
Dr. Jerald Carmel, a podiatr-
ist, and Dr. Arthur Shapiro
will conduct free scoliosis
screenings; a dentist from the
American Dental Association
, will check for mouth disorders;
glaucoma, diabetes, hearing,
and ctiolestrol tests will be
offered; and a dermatologist
will check for skin cancer.
A- a special attraction, the
Miami Beach Police Depart-
ment will provide a horse for
youngsters to pet and feed.
Janet Reno, Florida State
for Bade County, will
Goals and Objectives
' riminal Justice Sys-
fcm" at the Sunday, Oct. 9
"<) ofSholem Lodge 102U,
B'rith. The 10 a.m.
''""/< meeting will be held at
House, University of
Mumi Campus.
y*><
NMBarea5bdrm/2bthrm,
Pool, fenced corner lot.
Don't miss this one!
884-2828 Days
983-5786 Nights
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1988 Dodge Ram extra
long Van, new condition, j
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NCJW Panel: Women
In the Future
Friday, October 7, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 15
National Council of Jewish
Women (NCJW), Greater
Miami Section, will hold its
opening membership meeting
and buffet luncheon on Wed-
nesday, Oct. 26,10 a.m., at the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion.
The theme, "Women in the
Future" will be discussed by a
panel of community leaders,
who will cover the areas of
stresses and demands on
women, family relationships
and health.
Louise Stubins, a past presi-
dent of Greater Miami Section
and present chairwoman of
Program and Study Groups is
chairing the event.
For information: 576-4747.
Beth David Concert
"A Time for Song" will be
held at Beth David Congrega-
tion on Sunday, Oct. 23, at
7:30 p.m. in the synagogue's
sanctuary.
According to Beverly Gor-
don, concert chairperson, four
of South Florida's leading can-
tors will entertain with a vari-
ety of songs in English,
Hebrew and Yiddish. The can-
tors are Benjamin Adler of
Beth David; Zvi Adler, Temple
Emeth Delray Beach; Barbara
Margulis, Congregation Bet
Breira and Rachelle Nelson,
Temple Israel of Greater
Miami.
For information: 854-3911.
Beth David has facilities for
the hearing-impaired.
Bonds to Honor Webers
Arnold and Rena Weber of
North Miami Beach will be
honored by Greater Miami
Israel Bonds at a breakfast
Sunday, Oct. 16, 10 a.m., in
the auditorium of the Del
Prado condominium. The cou-
ple, originally from Canada, is
being recognized for support
of Israel's economic develop-
ment through the Israel Bonds
program, as well as for service
to other community and charit-
able causes.
Guest speaker Jerome Glee-
kel recently returned from
Israel. Traveling extensively
through Judea, Samaria and
Gaza, he interviewed high
Topf at
Technion
Sam Topf, Southern regional
chairman for Technion and a
member of its international
board of governors, will dis-
cuss the importance of Tech-
nion to Israel, at a lunch meet-
ing of the Miami Beach chap-
ter, Women's Division, Ameri-
can Technion Society on
Thursday, Oct. 13, noon, at the
Shelborne Hotel.
Israeli officials of both parties
and the military, and visited
A'rab cities and Palestinian
camps, where he met with
mayors and camp leaders.
The Del Prado Israel Bonds
Committee is chaired by
Charles Wilder and co-chaired
by Abe Albert, Jeanette Blu-
menthal, Irwin Fisher and Mac
Gale. For information: 531-
6731.
The Beba Idelson Chapter of
Na'amat USA will install offi-
cers at a meeting Wednesday,
Oct. 12, 11:30 a.m., in the
meeting room of the 100 Lin-
coln Road Building.
Inducted will be Irene Racz-
kowski, president; Esther
Weinstein, vice president;
Ethel Bergman, membership
vice president; Sabina Meyer-
son and Rose Luchter, co-
treasurers; Frances Singer,
financial secretary and Anne
Hanken, recording secretary.
Pianist Sarah Fershko will
speak on her recent trip to
England.
Rabbi Yehuda Melber of
Miami Beach will be guest
speaker at the Kinneret Chap-
ter's meeting on Monday, Oct.
10, noon, at Temple Ner
Tamid. Rabbi Melber will dis-
cuss the Jewish holidays and
their importance today. The
program also includes musical
entertainment.
A luncheon meeting of Chai
Chapter will feature entertain-
ment by the "Chai Musicians"
and a ceremony to honor the
memory of Golda Meir. The
meeting will be held Sunday,
Oct. 9, 1 p.m., in the home of
president Eva Kaufman of
Miami Beach. For information:
538-6213.
Steven M. Kramer has been
elected 1988-89 president of the
Miami Beach Board of Real-
tors. Kramer, who was the
Miami Beach 1987 Realtor of
the Year, has been a realtor for
15 years, director of the board
for eight years and vice presi-
dent for three. This year's
Miami Beach Realtor of the
Year award went to Beverly R.
Sulzberger, for her work as
education chairman.
ORT
Two hundred members of
Women's American ORT chap-
ters from Dade, Broward and
Palm Beach counties met Oct.
6 at the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation building as part of
a national networking and
problem-solving closed circuit
telecast on "Capital Funds
Solicitation." Among those
attending were District Capi-
tal Funds co-chairman Laurel
Shapiro of Miami; Bea Shultz,
capital funds chairman of
Southeastern Florida; Dale
Newberg, South Florida coor-
dinating committee; and Joan
Kobrin, Dade south region.
The Golden Shores chapter
of Women's American ORT
will begin its 1988-89 lecture
series on Thursday, Oct. 13,
7:30 p.m., at Imperial Club,
2751 N.E. 183 St., N. Miami
Beach.
Women's American ORT
Greynolds Park chapter, will
meet Tuesday, Oct. 11, 11:30
a.m., at Wong's 2 Restaurant,
N. Miami Beach. Billie Staff,
of the League of Womens Vot-
ers, will discuss the issues in
the coming election.
Diane Magnum, anchorwoman
for WPLG-TV, will be guest
speaker at Temple Israel Sis-
terhood's membership luncheon
Wednesday, Oct. 19, noon, at
the temple. Her topic will be:
'How True-to-Life Is TV
News?" The luncheon is open
to the general public.
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Page 16 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 7, 1988
Tree Price
Flourishes
NEW YORK (JTA) The
purchase of a tree from the
Jewish National Fund of
America will cost $7 beginning
Oct. 1, a $2 rise over its previ-
ous price.
However, several afforesta-
tion projects will remain at the
$5 rate, including: a garden,
100 to 999 trees; a grove,
1,000 to 1,999 trees; a wood,
2,000 to 4,999 trees; a park-
land, 5,000 to 9,999 trees; and
a forest, 10,000 or more trees.
JNF, in the 40 years of
Israel's Statehood, has planted
over 180 million trees, estab-
lishing more than 280 forests
and 110 major parks and picnic
areas. JNF municipal forest
Karks feature sports facilities,
iking trails and scenic points.
NJCRAC
Continued from Page 13
who have been involved in the
struggle for freedom and reli-
gious rights of Soviet Jews
when he said, "I think we may
see over the next couple of
years or even sooner, that
even the long-term refuseniks
may be permitted to emigrate,
changes that will lead to a
more liberal Soviet emigra-
tion."
One change is the recently
enforced policy that a Soviet
Jew must be sponsored by an
immediate family relative out-
side Russia in order to emi-
grate. Chernin also expressed
hope that the Soviets would
relax refusal on the basis that
the individual has so-called
"state secrets."
CHERNIN stopped short of
endorsing the recent Israeli
policy that all Soviet emigrees
must go to Israel. "I would
add, ideally," Chernin said, "it
would be desirable if they
would choose to go to Israel."
Chernin also said he would
report to the CRC group in
Miami information from
NJCRAC's recent mission to
South Africa. Chernin called
the meeting "fact-finding to
examine policies to combat
apartheid.
"We will be considering the
question in NJCRAC in com-
ing weeks about escalating
sanctions against South
Africa, but NJCRAC hasn't
made a final decision on that,"
Chernin said.
IN another area, Chernin
said, "We will also alert the
CRC to keep in mind that
when a new administration
comes in whether it's
Republican or Democrat we
will build close relationships
that have been strengthening
in the Reagan years T)etween
the U.S. and Israel."
On the Palestinian issue,
Chernin's position is that
Jewry needs to make the point
that "the obstacle to peace is
the refusal of the Arabs to
come to the (negotiating)
table. The Arabs act out their
concern through acts of vio-
lence," Chernin said, "without
showing a readiness to sit
down with the Israelis to dis-
cuss their future. And tragi-
cally, this is the pattern."
According to Nan Rich, local
issues will also be on the
agenda including the up-
coming countywide vote on the
Juvenile Welfare Board.
Letters l''onnn=
Abominable Usage
Combatting AIDS
Misinformation
EDITOR:
It is disappointing to find
that your article on AIDS
("Combatting the College Con-
sensus: AIDS Can't Happen to
Me") could devote only a dozen
lines to the only religious de-
nomination in Jewish life
the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations that
is involved in the field of
AIDS. It is even more disap-
pointing that the few lines
devoted to describing our work
contains little more than disin-
formation and distortions.
Our activities directed, to-
ward religious school students
and high school and college
youth, is only one part of a
comprehensive program initi-
ated almost three years ago
ato bring help and comfort to
those who are afflicted, to
their families and to loved
ones, in the Jewish tradition of
bikur cholim. Our purpose is to
dispel fear and prejudice with
knowledge and education.
The kit referred to in your
article was sent to more than
1,000 Reform rabbis, not to
students. We do not advocate
safe sex to our young people or
anyone else. There is no such
thing as safe sex. The use of
condoms is not foolproof. We
urge safer sex in our program
to inform all those we can
reach of the danger of AIDS.
All of this is done within the
context of the tradition values
of the simcha of sex and marri-
age.
Our Department of Educa-
tion has prepared study guides
for two films "The AIDS
Movie" and "An Early Frost."
EDITOR:
In your front page article
"Congregations Converge on
Upper Biscayne Blvd., Sept.
30 you write: "The good news
for the congregations is that
the area is saturated with
Jews, according to demogra-
phic studies."
I think your choice of the
word "saturated" is abomina-
ble. I would expect a bigot to
write that way not a Jew
You could have said "largely
populated by Jews" or "pre-
dominantly Jewish."

It's only a word but it means
a lot.
Didn't anyone proofread
your article?
SOPHIE H. ABRAMS
Miami, FL
.7
We have purchased copies of
these films and distributed
them to our religious schools,
along with two popular pam-
phlets on the dangers of AIDS.
AIDS committees are being
established in the UAHC's 13
religions across the country.
Their purpose is to inform and
train the staffs of our Reform
congregations and their religi-
ous schools, to act as watch-
dogs against any discrimina-
tory legislation and to partici-
pate in AIDS interfaith coali-
tions and other groups. These
and similar programs were in
expression of resolutions on
AIDS adopted at the UAHC's
national conventions in 1985
and 1987. At the 1987 conven-
tion, Surgeon General C
Everett Koop addressed a
plenary session of the 3,500
delegates, and four workshops
were conducted, participated
in by some 500 delegates.
I regret that the author of
the article, distributed by the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency,
did not check the validity of
the few facts to which refer-
ence was made. I hope this sets
the record straight.
RABBI
RICHARD STERNBERGER
Director
UAHC Committee on AIDS'
11
M
H
Ri
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only, Plain or Seeded
RYE BREAD IS 79*
Available at All Publix Stores and Fresh Danish
Bakeries. Maple Walnut
Coffee Cake.......... t H79
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only,
Carrot Cake
Slices.................2 ^
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only,
Egg Custard Pie... *1"
Available at All Publix Stores and Fresh Danish
Bakeries. A Light Dessert
Available at All Publix Stores and Fresh Danish
Bakeries. Delicious and Healthy
Apple Bran
Muffins..............6 ^ $139
Prices effective Thurs.. October 6 thru Wed..
October 12. 1988. quantity Rights reserved. Only
in Dade. Broward. Palm Beach. Martin. St. Lucie.
Indian River and Okeechobee Counties.
Angel Food Cake
10-02.
^ize
****e shopc-nq ,s o please


Friday, October 7, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 17
Synagogue
Listing
Candle Lighting Time
6:44 p.m.
8ETHY0SEPHCHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Seach. Fla.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig
531-2120
ADATH i'ESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Sinicha Freedman
Cantor: Zvl Roian Conservative
Executive Oirecton .>.,
Harry J. Sllverman (WY)
Da'v Minyan 7:30 a.m. t 6:30 p.m.
Fil Kabbalal Shabbat 6:30 p.m.
Sal 8 30 a m. Bat Mitzvah ot Max Rozen
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Or.
S. Miami 667-6667
Leonard Schoolman, St. Rabbi
Mark Kram, Associate Rabbi
Lynn Goldstein, Assistant Rabbi
-, Family Senlce in Sanctuary,
Oct birthdays announced, story by Rabbi
Schocman, adult service In Edith Schi Id
Goldstein will speak
iiamtn Adler, Cantor ^"rfiv
Milton Freeman, KSfi
>
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854-3911
Jack Riemer, Rabbi
Ben,
Rev
Ritual Director
Sat 9 am Shabbat Service
Sun 8 a m & 5 30 p.m. Services
Daily Services:
Mon t Thurs 7 30 a.m. & 5:30 p.m.
lues Wed. & Fn 7 45 a.m. & 5:30 p.m
YOUNG ISRAEL OF SUNNY ISLES
17274 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach Fl. 33160 947-1198
Hiiiei Price, President
Rubm R. Dobln, Rabbi
F- i iO p.m. Rabbi Doom on "Jewish
Lore Sat. 8:45 a.m. Rabbi Doom on
6 nninas Are Not That Difficult;"
6 pm evening Service. Sun. 8 a.m. Ser-
vice 9 a.m. "Taste of Torah' Breakfast
Weekdays 8 a.m. 4 6:30 p.m. Services
> V
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami, FL 33181
8915508 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs, Rabbi
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami Beach
534-7213-534-7214 ^
Barry J. Konovitch, Rabbi (lj&\
Snolem Epelbaum, President,
Religious Committee
Daniel Kaizler, Cantor
Miguel Karpel, President
m
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Sol Landau, Ph.D., Aux. Rabbi
Yehuda Shifman, Cantor
Fri. 6 p.m. Kabbalal Shabbat Sat. 9 a.m.
Service, Of. Lehrman will preach on the
weekly portion of the Bible, Cantor Shit-
man will chant aaslsted by Temple Choir
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive, Miami Beach
5326421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Dally 7:30 a m.(Mon. & Thura. 7:15) & 7 p.m
Fri. 7 p.m. Sat. 9 am
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Miami's Pioneer Reform Congreyafion
137 N.E. 19th St. Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor: Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob G. Bornstein
Downtown
Fri. 8 p.m Gumenick Chapel, A Simchat
Torah celebration, Liturgy Rabbi Perl-
meter, Cantor Nelson, with a particular
focua upon "The struggle for Freedom of
Soviet Jews (Service will broadcast live
on WTMI 93 1 FM)
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667 5657
Michael B. Eisenstat. Rabbi
Fri 8 15 p.m Worship Service.
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sat. 9 a.m. Sabbath service.
Dally Mlnchah Sunday Friday
S a.m. and 6 p.m.
Sat. 9 a.m. and 5:15 p.m.
G>
W
Fn 6 30 p.m. Servicea
Sat 8:45 am Services
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave., M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Ralph Y. Carml
Cantor Moshe Buryn
Daily Service 8 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Saturday 8:30 am
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
2382601
Rabbi David H. Auerbach
Cantor Stephen Freedman
.',
9
Fri. 8 p.m. Service
Sat 930 a.m. Bar Mitzvah of
Bradley Jacob Rosen
Daily Services Sun. 9:30 a.m.; Wed
' 30 p m Mon Tuea & Thurs 7:30 a.m.
WLfBETHsHflLoM 538-7231
Cfiase Ave. & 41St St. Liberal
S.oLE?NK*,0N,8M. Founding Rabbi
2 A QLICKSTEIN, Senior Rabbi
harry jolt, AuiWarv Rabbi
JASON OWASOOFrAaSSen.
">N ALPERN, Cantor
DAVID CONVISER. Cantor Emeritus
fn 8:15 p.m. Sabbath sen. Rabbi
Giickstem on "Creating New Worlds."
I RaoM
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
'051 N. Miami Beach Blvd. am*
!> Max A. Lipschit*. Rabbi '(Wti
fee Aroni, Cantor N-S-
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Sat. 8:25 am Service,
Daily Servicea Mon-Frl 7:30 a.m. 4 5:30 p.m
Sun. 8 a.m S, 5:30 p.m.
-i.
TEMPLE NERTAMID 866-8345
7902 Carlyle Ave.. 866-9833
Miami Beach 33141 Conservative
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz .flfiv
Cantor Edward Klein f|
Sat Serv. 8:45 a.m. 4 7:45 p.m
SHAARAYTEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung
SHAARETEFILLAH-
TORAH CENTER OF KENDALL
7880 SW112 Street *-.,.'.
232-6833 V- '
Rabbi Hershel Becker
Dally Sen 7 a.m. Frt. to mln. after candle
lighting, time. Shabboa 9 a.m. Shabboa
Mlncha 10 mln. before candle lighting time
Sun. 6:30 a.m.
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dade's Reform Congregation
932-9010
Ralph P. Kingsley, Rabbi
Irving Shuixes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administrator
Fri 7 30 p.m. Family Worship night, birth-
day blessings for children born In Oct.
Sat. 10:30 a.m. Sabbath Senlce.
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
271-2311 /SBJ.\
Or. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi fW )
David Katzenstein, Cantor JS*
David Rosenthal, Aux. Cantor
Fn.8:15pm Semces conducted by Rabbi
Shapiro. Sat. 9 a.m. Services conducted by
Rabbi Shapiro & Cantor Katzenstein
Minyan Semces: Mon. 6 Thurs 7 a.m 4
Sun. 9 am
Iiadassah
^-f^far
Judge Seymour Gelber of
the Circuit Court Juvenile Div-
ision, will be guest speaker at a
meeting of the Ko'ach Chapter
Wednesday, Oct. 12, 8 p.m., in
the Cadillac Hotel.
Gelber is a graduate of the
University of Miami School of
Law and holds a Ph.D. in
higher education from Florida
State University.
The I. R. Goodman Chapter
will meet Tuesday, Oct. 11, 1
p.m., at the American Savings
Bank, Lincoln and Alton
Roads, Miami Beach. Harriet
Cohen, region area advisor,
will report on the national
Hadassah convention held this
past August.
The chapter's first Oneg
Shabbat of the new year will
be held Saturday, Nov. 3, at
the Forte Towers 1200 Build-
ing.
The Forte Towers chapter of
Hadassah will meet Monday,
Oct. 10,12:30 p.m., at the 1200
West Avenue auditorium. Ann
Karp, soloist with the Forte
Towers Choral Group, will
entertain.
Hatikvah Hadassah will be
having its board meeting Oct.
13 at the home of Karen Frost,
7:30 p.m.
Hatikvah will also be having
its eighth annual progressive
dinner Oct. 15, 7:30 p.m. at the
home of Penny Pawliger. The
evening starts off with appe-
tizers, then proceeds to a din-
ner house of eight and ends
with another home for deserts.
For information: 255-7120.
The Hannah Senesch Chap-
ter will meet Wednesday, Oct.
5 at the Shelborne Hotel.
The Torah Chapter will meet
Monday, Oct. 10, noon, at the
Howard Johnson Hotel, 10201
S. Dixie Highway. Fred Ungar
will review the book "Ellis
Island" by Fred Stewart.
A candle lighting ceremony
will mark the first meeting of
the new year for the Lincoln
Chapter of Hadassah. The
meeting will be held Monday,
Oct. 10, noon, at 100 Lincoln
Road Club Room.
The Renanah Chapter will
hold a luncheon meeting Mon-
day, Oct. 10, 11:30 a.m. at the
Harry H. Brodie Pavilion,
Alton Road at Sixth Street.
Miami Beach Mayor Alex
Dabud will install chapter offi-
cers, as well as show slides of
his recent trip to Israel.
The Southgate Chapter will
meet Monday, Oct. 10, 12:30
p.m., at Southgate Terrace
Room. Attorneys David T.
Berg and Sheryl Berg Ettle-
man will discuss "Wills,
Bequests and Estate Plan-
ning."
Gordon Roofing ""
and Sheet Metal
Works, Inc.
1450 N.W 21st Street
Phone: 325-8287
Have your roof repaired now.
you will save on a new roof later
"Satisfactory Work by
Experienced Men"
Bar MHzvah
Max Rozen
Max Rozen, son of Cantor
and Mrz. Zvi Rozen, will be
called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah Saturday, Oct. 8, 8:30
a.m., at Adath Yeshurun Syna-
gogue. Rabbi Simcha Freeman
and Cantor Rozen will offici-
ate.
The celebrant is in the eighth
grade in the Hillel Community
Day School and is active in
B'Nai Akiva.
Prior to his family coming to
the U.S. slightly more than a
year ago, Max won the Inter-
School Award for Citizenship
and Fellowship in Israel. In
addition, he has in his posses-
sion the Top Emblem of an
Army Chanukah Menorah
which his father, Cantor
Rozen, was awarded when he
served as commander of a unit
in the Six Day War in Jerusa-
lem. Members of the unit
recently sent this honor to
Cantor Rozen, asking that it
be presented to his son, Max
for his Bar Mitzvah.
Cantor and Mrs. Rozen will
host the Kiddush luncheon fol-
lowing the services in honor of
the occasion.
Charles Wolfe, executive director of the Foundation
at Mount Sinai Medical Center since 1986, has been
appointed to the Alzheimer's Trust Fund Sub-
Committee, formed by the Governor's Advisory Com-
mittee on Alzheimer's Disease. The sub-committee is
charged with allocating monies received through dona-
tions, grants and other sources, to develop a compre-
hensive program for control or prevention of, and
education, training and research for Alzheimer's dis-
ease.
I
Attending a recent meeting of a dinner dance committee hosted by
the Florida Region of the American Committee for the Weizmann
Institute of Science were, from left, Mel and Bobbie Dick Miami
Beach Mayor Alex Daoud, and Renee and Jay Weiss. The Uwks
will be the honorees at the region's annual event to be held bunday
evening, Dec. 11, at the Fontainebleau Hilton. Jay VVetss, the
Weizmann Institute's honorary Florida chairman, w dinner-
dance chairman.
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
and God divided the
(Gen. l.S-i).
. "And God said: 'Let there be light'.
light from the darkness"
BERESHIT
BERESHIT God created the world in six days. On the first day
He created the light and called it "day;" the darkness He called
"night." On the second day He created the expanse of the
heavens. On the third day the waters were assembled into oceans
and dry land was seen. This was called "earth." Next, vegetation
flourished. On the fourth day the luminaries were fixed in the sky.
On the fifth day, fish, reptiles, and fowl were created. On the
sixth day, the beasts, animals, and man were created. On the
seventh day, God rested from all His labors. Therefore He blessed
the seventh day and sanctified it. Man was created alone;
afterward, God took a rib from Adam's side and fashioned a wife
for him; Adam called her Eve, meaning "the mother of all living
things." At first Adam and Eve lived happily in the Garden of
Eden; but they ate the fruit of the forbidden tree of knowledge
and were driven out of Paradise. The sons of man multiplied and
progressed. However, their ways were evil and God decided to
erase all men from the face of the earth. Only Noah found favor in
the eyes of God.
(The recounting ot the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and
based upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by
P Wollman-Tsamir, published by Shengold. The volume is available
at 75 Maiden Lane, New York, N.Y. 10038.)


Page 18 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 7, 1988
Jewish War Veterans, Harry H. Cohen Auxiliary 723,
will meet Sunday, Oct. 16,10 a.m. at Surfside Commun-
ity Center.
The Senior AIDES Program, a community service
employment program sponsored by Jewish Family
Service of Greater Miami, is taking applications for
part-time positions from seniors, age 55 or over who
meet income eligibility requirements. The program
matches older workers' skills with available commun-
ity service jobs.
The Temple Beth El Simcha Club will hold a dinner
for members on Sunday, Oct. 16. Members of the club
are singles or couples in their 20s through 40s.
Free classes in beginning Hebrew and in Bible are
offered by Temple Beth El on Monday evenings starting
Oct. 10. The Hebrew classes will be held 6-7 p.m.
followed by the one hour Bible classes.
The next meeting of the Miami Beach Jewish Com-
munity Center's monthly Dor L'Dor: Generation to
Generation program for single parents and their chil-
dren will be held on Sunday, Oct. 16,3-5 p.m. During the
free program, children participate in "hands-on" pro-
jects, while parents learn about Jewish holidays and
traditions.
Workmen's Circle, Miami Beach Branch 1059, will
meet Wednesday, Oct. 12, noon, in the Surfside Com-
munity Center. A speaker from the law firm of Spence,
Payne, Masington, Grossman and Needle will discuss
Amendment 10, which will be on the November election
ballot.
Opti-Mrs. of Miami Beach will hold its monthly
luncheon meeting Wednesday, Oct. 12, 11:30 a.m. at
Harbor House South. The program will feature Dr. S.
Shindling, director of Alternate Family Care Systems,
and guitarist Bill DeShara.
The Justine-Louise Wise Chapter of the American
Jewish Congress will hold a luncheon meeting Thurs-
day, Oct. 13, noon, at the American Savings and Loan
Association Bank, Alton and Lincoln Roads.
Edith Jacobson will teach a course on the Dynamics
of Psychology and Religion at the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation beginning Wednesday, Oct. 12. The
eight sessions will be held 10 a.m.-noon.
Young Israel of Sunny Isles will inaugurate its "Taste
of Torah" breakfast series on Sunday, Oct. 9, 9 a.m.
Rabbi Rubin R. Dobin will speak on "Jewish Leader-
ship for the Modern Age." Synagogue members David
Chmiel, Sam Forlich, Jack Block and Simon Stemmer
will be honored for their service to the congregation.
Hal Bergida, former executive director of the Tiger
Bay Luncheon Club and a political commentator on
radio stations in South Florida and Tampa, will be
guest speaker at the Brotherhood of Temple Beth Am's
congregational breakfast Sunday, Oct. 15, 9:30 a.m. in
the Temple's Youth Lounge.
Jeff Mell, assistant to Congressman William Lehman
and a recent delegate to the Democratic national
convention, will speak at a breakfast meeting of the
Simcha Aventura Lodge, B'nai B'rith, on Sunday, Oct.
16, 10 a.m., at the Jewish Community Center on 25th
Ave.
Mell, a graduate of the University of South Florida,
will talk on "Issues of the Day," particularly covering
the presidential election and the effects of the Cata-
strophic Assistance Bill.
Documentation Center Course
Enrollment is now being accepted for the Holocaust
Documentation and Education Center's eighth annual
Volunteer Interviewer Training Course and Holocaust
Lecture Series. The lectures run through January, with
interviewers' training in February and March.
Classes meet Wednesdays, 1-4 p.m., on the North Miami
campus of Florida International University.
The lecture series covers the entire Holocaust period
including the Nazi invasion, ghettoization, resistance, the
concentration camps and liberation and modern day
implications.
For information:940-5690.
Goldstein
Continued from Page 13
where they learn how to guide
the interviewee through mem-
ories of the most brutal
moments of his or her life. The
course itself is given once a
year and begins Oct. 5.
From the small trailer and
one secretary, the center now
nine years later houses
five paid staff including an
assistant director, director of
Documentation and Research,
director of Holocaust Educa-
tion Outreach, a bookkeeper
and a secretary.
"I could have gotten paid
from the beginning but I chose
not to," Goldstein says in
answer to a question. "It was
my service to the community."
Of the several aspects of the
program, Goldstein says she
will most miss Student Aware-
ness Day. Several times a
year, as many as 700 students
from private and public
schools gather at FIU for a
full-day program on prejudice.
GOLDSTEIN vividly recalls
the time a high school student
stood up in front of his peers
after one such session. Tears
were streaming down his face
as he admitted he had been
prejudiced but his attitude had
changed. His peers reacted by
giving the shaken youth a
standing ovation.
Many of the students also
hear from protectors, non-
Jews who risked their own
lives to protect and hide Jews
from Hitler's campaign.
"I hope in my prayers, that
these young people as they
learn about the result of preju-
dice will take this message
home to their family and
friends," Goldstein says.
Since the center has been
opened, over 550 taped inter-
views have been made on
video. These testimonies are
made available to public and
private schools in Dade
County.
Goldstein confides that she
recently met with Miami Arch-
bishop Edward McCarthy and
Sister Trinita Flood to discuss
bringing the Holocaust educa-
tion program into their paro-
chial schools.
Goldstein is planning to
remain on the center's Board
of Directors and says she will
be accessible to staff. She does
have some short and long term
goals, however.
SINCE the Goldsteins have
a weekend home near the
Broward/Palm Beach area, she
says she will work to form a
coordinating agency/clearing-
house for seniors who wish to
volunteer in community activi-
ties there.
As for the Holocaust Center,
Goldstein says she would like
to see a permanent exhibition
center one day. It would
include Holocaust memorabilia
and house tapes and trans-
cripts for community use.
"I also envision thousands of
students learning the truth of
the Holocaust in their schools
because I'm hoping the Florida
state school system will very
soon incorporate Holocaust
education into their curricu-
lum."
Meanwhile, the center is still
looking for a free-standing
permanent home hopefully
on Fill's campus.
And meanwhile, the tears
will continue for a few months.
9
Richard L. Fein. M.D.. medical advisor for the South Florida
chapter of Impotents Anonymous, will moderate a co-ed discus-
sion on "Non-Surgical Alternatives for the Treatment of
Impotence including Aphrodisiacs," at a meeting of the chapter on
Wednesday, Oct. 19. at 8 p.m. in the conference room at North
Miami Medical Center.
"Opera Tonight." a bi-weekly, half-hour radio show, will have
its premiere Wednesday. Oct 12. 8 p.m.. on WTMI-FM 93 1
The show will be hosted by Willie Anthony Waters, artistic
director of the Greater Miami Opera.
The Barry University School of Business is hosting the 13th
annual conference of the Society of Educators and Scholars on
Friday and Saturday. Oct. 7-8. at the university's Andreas School
of Business. With the theme of "Integrity in Education, the
conference will deal with ethical, societal and legal issues
The Miami Lighthouse for the Blind is participating in National
White Cane Safety Day. Oct. 15. This special day recognizes
those who use this unique mobility device and honors past and
present dedicated workers who make independence a possibility
for the visually impaired. Under Florida state law, a person
carrying a white cane in front of themselves must be given the
right-of-way.
A special VIP night to benefit CHARLEE family care homes
will highlight Branden's third South Florida store opening on
Wednesday. Oct. 26. at Promenade in Aventura. Nan Rich
CHARLEE board member, is chairman of the event
Michael Tilson Thomas will be featured as pianist in the first of
a series of chamber music concerts by The New World
Symphony Sunday. Oct 16. 5 p.m.. at the Colony Theater
Tilson Thomas, the symphony's artistic advisor and the newly
appointed principal conductor of the London Symphony Orches-
tra, will perform the Mahler Piano Quartet in A minor
\
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oth
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An:
Peres on Peace Moves
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) If the Labor
Party wins Israel's elections
Nov. 1, it will initiate peace
talks and then hold a referen-
dum on any peace agreement
that emerges, Foreign Minis-
ter Shimon Peres, the party
leader, said here.
He did not specify with
whom Israel would negotiate.
He stressed, however, that
Jordan still has an important
part to play in the peace pro-
cess, despite King Hussein's
recent renunciation of any
leadership role on behalf of the
Palestinians in the West Bank.
Peres spoke to reporters
after meetings with President
Francois Mitterrand and
Premier Michel Rocard.
He said Labor's election
campaign is based on peace in
exchange for territorial con-
cessions. "Israel should leave
the Gaza Strip and parts (if the
West Bank within the frame-
work of a comprehensiv
peace settlement," he said.
He made much the same
point in an interview published
in Le Monde.
"The movement I am repre-
senting is ready for a historic
compromise that would also
include a territorial element to
solve the Palestinian prob-
lem," Peres told the French
daily.
But "the time has come for
the Arabs and the Palestinians
to publicly and clearly state
the contribution thej are
ready to make for peace with
Israel," Peres stated.
The Israeli foreign ministej
was here on a private visit
before he was due to meet with
President Reagan and the
Egyptian foreign minister,
Ismat Abdel Meguid.
A
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Wordplay
Continued from Page 1
There are no firm indications that more releases will
preceed the November elections.
According to news reports, the State Department
restated its position in September of recognizing Palestin-
ian rights but stopped short of further details.
Further Islamic Jihad communiques warned the U.S.
that no change is a warning for the U.S. to prepare "for the
worst."
Reagan, reportedly embracing the role traditional to
U.S. Sec. of State George Shultz, applied pressure to Israel
to work on a solution to the Palestinian problem. Last
week, Reagan met with Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres, leader of the centrist Labor Party. The meeting was
considered a snub by Israeli Premier Yitzhak Shamir, who.
with his Likud party, has taken the stand of not trading
land for peace to Palestinians whose own covenant vows
that peace will come at the price of Israel's destruction.
"But it's not a ; leasing
re,
"This was like my baby,"
Goldstein said. 'Somebody when you realize why you"
said to me when I first got into doing it. It's very uphftmB
this, 'Why do you want to get Because you know the people
into something so depressing.' who died didn't die in vain.


Deaths
Friday, October 7, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 19
Returnee Paul Cowan
By SI SAN BIRNBAUM
SEW YORK (JTA) Paul
Cowan, a journalist from an
usimilated family who chroni-
led his own return to his
lewish roots, died of complica-
tions of leukemia at New York
jniversity Hospital. He was
$ years old.
Until his illness, Cowan, a
staff writer for The Village
Voice, and his wife, Rachel,
were regular worshipers at
Ansche Chesed synagogue on
Manhattan's Upper West Side,
where they were prime movers
in revitalising the once waning
congrepition with an infusion
of energetic, young, politically
involved people.
The couple helped begin the
Havurah School, where their
children. Lisa and Matt, and
other neighborhood children
could learn about Judaism
from the ground up. The
school, started in an apart-
ment, now flourishes at
Ansche Chesed.
DC
ied
ri'-
ric
Im
to
ib-
icfc
for
.IIS
lit-
re
!th
ej
sit
ith
he
20th Century
Time Capsule
A time capsule will be sealed
It Lakeside Memorial Park on
Oct. !'. Religious, fraternal or
civic ."tjanizations, schools,
synagogues are invited to
will microfilm
; charge documents,
rinted informa-
r inclusion. Memorabilia
accepted; small
and photos that exem-
: in late 20th century
F rida.
time capsule, to be
filer the floor of Lake-
outdoor Garden of
I hapel, will be opened
Paul Cowan was the son of
the late Louis Cowan, a former
president of CBS News and
producer of such television
programs as "The $64,000
Question" and "The Quiz
Kids."
His mother, Pauline Spiegel
Cowan, was of the family that
initiated and owned the Spie-
gel catalogue.
Cowan's parents raised their
children in an assimilated
ambience. They sent Cowan to
Choate, an Episcopal school
where attendance at daily
chapel services was manda-
tory.
Cowan graduated from Har-
vard University in 1963. Soon
afterward, he spent two years
in the Peace Corps in Ecuador.
He wrote a book on that expe-
rience, "The Making of an
Unamerican."
Following his parents' death
in a fire at New York's West-
bury Hotel in 1976, Cowan
began learning more about his
Jewish background, including
the fact that the family's last
name had been Cohen and that
his great-great-grandfather
was a rabbi in Lithuania.
His quest for his Jewish
roots produced a book, "An
Orphan in History," which
became a classic of the Jewish
returnee's experience.
In the book, he mused on his
double identity as Saul Cohen,
descendant of a rabbi, and
Paul Cowan, New York jour-
nalist.
Rachel Cowan, formerly a
Unitarian, converted to
Judaism after 15 years of mar-
riage. The couple became gra- cii
dually more observant iNnPllfl
together. UllCU<*
SPIRER. George S.. a resident of Surfside
for 20 years died suddenly Oct. 1. He was
president and founder of the Surfside
Taxpayers Association, past president of
the Kiwanis Club and vice president of
die Miami Beach Music Society. A Demo-
cratic committeeman, he was also a
member of the North Dade Democratic
Club. He is survived by his wife, Angela;
daughter, Patricia Shuren; and brother,
Oscar Spirer. Services were private with
arrangements handled by Eternal Light.
FLAXMAN, Regina, 87, No. Miami Beach.
Sept. 26. LevittWeinstein, Palm Beach
Memorial Park.
POLLACK, Gertrude. Riverside. Lakeside
Memorial Park.
ROWITZ, Albert. 75, Parkland, formerly of
No. Miami Beach. Sept. 26. Riverside.
CRANE, Faye K., No. Miami, Sept. 28.
Riverside, Lakeside Memorial Park.
DEW, Julius, RubinZilbert.
ELBAL'M, Dorothy, Miami Beach, Sept. 27,
Riverside.
GREENSPAN, Jerry M.. 24, Sept. 27.
Menorah, New Montifiore
Cemetery, N.Y.
KAUFMAN, Lily, RubinZilbert.
LENKOWSKY. Herbert. Bay Harbor.
Sept 27, Blasberg.
LEON, Harvey Leslie, Rubin -Zilbert, Lake
side Cemetery.
LIPPMAN. Betty K., Miami Beach. Sept
28, Riverside, Interment Philadelphia.
AL'SUBEL, (Blechman) Theresa L.. Miami
Beach, Sept. 28, Blasberg.
BERGER. Irvin F., No. Miami Beach. Sept.
28, Blasberg.
BERNSTEIN, Sylvia (nee Oboler).
HUNTMAN, Samuel, 84, No. Miami Beach.
Sept. 29. Menorah.
PLOTKIN, Louis, 82, Kendall. Sept. 29.
Mount Nebo Cemetery.
RICH, Sara, 89, Miami Beach, Sept. 28.
Riverside, Mount Nebo Cemetery.
SILVER, Abe, 72. Miami-Homestead area.
Sept. 29. Riverside. Palms Cemetery.
COTLER, Sunny Kauffman. 56. Lakewood,
Sept. 19, Temple Beth Am.
KALLENBERG, Milton (Mickey). No.
Miami Beach. Sept. 30. Levitt-Weinstein.
LEVY. Harry, Rubin Zilbert, Lakeside
Cemetery
The former Rachel Brown,
whose family traced itself to
Pilgrims who came to America
on the Mayflower, is now com-
pleting rabbinical studies at
the Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Institute of Religion.
She also studied Judaism at
the Jewish Theological Semin-
ary of America.
The Cowans published a
book together last year on
intermarriage, titled "Mixed
Blessings," which won a 1988
National Jewish Book Award.
the
South
The
placed
side's
Hen k
of 2088.
irmation, 592-0690.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC
Op*" Etui Dsr'C'OieO ShOm''
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888
When a loss occurs
away from home.
XI'IIH tllTZ BROTHERS
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service
Dade County
532-20BH
Broward County
532-209H
.
Represented bj Riverside Memorial Chapel. I no
ew York: (71-i _'..; 7600Queens Blvd & ~>>th Rd., Forest Hill.-. N V
*&
AND
ereRNM tat
UqItc o
Funeral Directors and Counselors
Twoofour The Covenant Plan
community's most
trusted names in
Jewish funerals have
combined their
services to make this
unique pre-need offer
traditional grave-
side funeral
casket aid
hearse
concrete vault
choice gravesite
opening and
closing charges
bronze or granite
marker
atiliii ml
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 895-7415
not a campaign issue.
But thanks to his efforts,
hundreds of people were saved
from starvation and persecu-
tion and today are building
new lives in Israel.
When American Jews, like
millions of other Americans,
stand in the voting booth, they
will remember not the prom-
ises and the rhetoric, but the
actions and the records of the
candidates.
A candidate who is not will-
ing to risk something for what
--------Continued from Page 2
he believes in will make a poor
showing as president.
Operation Sheba is just one
example of the sincerity and
commitment Bush has dis-
played all through his career.
It may be a small detail in the
history books, but I believe it
says a great deal about the
man. And that message should
appeal not just to Jews, but to
all Americans.
Gordon Zacks is chairman of the
n Campaign Committee for Bush
and a co-chairman of the National
Jewish Coalition.
Through years ot dedicated service
we have bCOm the largest Jewish
Kamily owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH THE ASSURED PLAN
LARRIES BLASBERG IRA M. BLASBERG MICHAEL C BLASBERG
,|uj. ;, u(. Funerji Directo' ., ^ ,# .
-{ 865-2353 v *v ... -
What It Takes To Be
A Riverside.
It takes years.
For over 'V wars Riverside
h.i- set the standard tor lewish
runeral service. Throughout the
vears leaders such as Charles
RoM.-nth.il and Carl Grossberti
exemplified their belief th.it
Jewish tuner.il service is not
merek .1 business, hut .1 solemn
trust held K runeral directors
on behalf ot the families
the\ serve.
IihJ.iv ihe Ri\ersidc
tradition continues
with a new
generation
ot caring lewish managers.
And todav, the name Riverside,
nurtured through the vears,
remains the most respected
name in lewish funeral service
in the world.
V- is turr tc
RIVERSIDE
53< 5< .....523-580*
6S3-9476 2'6-5777


Page 20 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 7, 1988
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-4730
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARCUS M. BAUMAN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the
estate of MARCUS M. BAUMAN.
deceased, File Number 88-4730, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami, Flor-
ida. The personal representative of
the estate is Aliza Brenner, whose
address is 7362 Gary Avenue.
Miami Beach, Florida 33141. The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the
clerk of the above court a written
statement of any claim or demand
they may have. Each claim must be
in writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim is not yet due,
the date when it will become due
shall be stated. If the claim is
contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim is secured, the
security shall be described. The
claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the claim to the clerk to
enable the clerk to mail one copy to
each personal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
any objections they may have that
challen^ the validity of the dece-
dent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the
venue or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
October 7, 1988.
Aliza Brenner
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of MARCUS M. BAUMAN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Richard I. Kroop, Esq. (128023)
Kwitney. Kroop & Scheinberg, P. A.
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 512
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-7575
19855________October 7,14,1988.
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 88-13268
SEC. 01
BANCPLUS MORTGAGE COR-
PORATION.
Plaintiffts)
vs.
BERTHA MONTALVO. and if
married, JOHN DOE. her hus-
band, whoae real name ii un-
kaown.
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, 1 will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami, Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M.. on the 25TH
day of OCTOBER, 1988. the fol-
lowing described property:
Lot 22 in Block 4 of BELLE
MEADE OF MIAMI SECTION
ONE, according to the Plat ther-
eof, m recorded in Plat Book 39
at Page 12, of the Public Records
of Dade County. Fla.
DATED the 5TH day of OCTOB-
ER. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Joseph M. Paniello. Esquire.
Suite 2720. One Tampa City Cen-
ter
201 North Franklin Street
Tampa. Florida 33602
Published 10/7-14
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 88-6385
SEC. 04
CENTRUST SAVINGS BANK, a
state charted savings bank, f/k/a
DADE SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION.
Plaintiffls)
vs.
OSCAR MENESES BELLO, and
the unknown spouse, et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
.ludgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above. I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami, Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M.. on the 25TH
day of OCTOBER. 1988, the fol-
lowing described property:
Condominium Villa No. 27 of
9674 GOLFVIEW VILLAS CON-
DOMINIUM, according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, recorded in Official Re-
cords Book 10747. at Page 1709.
of the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida, together with
all appurtenances thereto includ-
ing an undivided interest in the
common elements of said Condo-
minium, and any amendments
thereto.
DATED the 5TH day of OCTOB-
ER, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosen thai & Yarchin
Suite 2300, ('entrust Financial
Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami. Florida 33131-2198
Published 10/7-14______________
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 88-7275
SEC. 24
ALLIANCE MORTGAGE COM-
PANY, a Florida corporation.
Plaintiffls)
vs.
JAMES E. CLARK. MARY N.
CLARK. CHARLES V. WIL-
SON, and the unknown spouses,
etal.,
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami, Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M., on the 25TH
day of OCTOBER. 1988, the fol
lowing described property:
Lot 9. in Block 1. of PARK
ESTATES SECTION ONE. ac-
cording to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 123, at
Page 88, of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida.
DATED the 5TH day of OCTOB-
ER, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin.
Suite 2300. (entrust Fiancial
Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami. Florida 33131-2198
Published 10/7-14
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 88-16235
SEC. 20
BANCBOSTON MORTGAGE
CORPORATION, a Florida cor-
poration, successor by merger to
STOCKTON, WHATLEY. DAV-
IN & COMPANY.
Plaintiffls)
vs.
HAROLD LOYD PEACOCK, et
al..
Defendant^)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami, Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M., on the 25TH
day of OCTOBER. 1988, the fol-
lowing described property:
Lot 7. in Block 50. of LESLIE
ESTATES. SECTION FIVE, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 96. at
Page 79. of the Public Records of
Dade County. Florida.
DATED the 5TH day of OCTOB-
ER. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Roosenthal & Yarchin
Suite 2300. (entrust Financial
Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami. Florida 33131-2198
Published 10/7-14
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-30491 FC 15
ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ANTHONY M. HAYNES.
Petitioner, Husband
and
JAMIE LOU HAYNES,
Respondent, Wife
TO: JAMIE LOU HAYNES
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Bruce N. Crown,
Esquire, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 15490 N.W. 7th
Avenue, Suite #205, Miami, FL
33169, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before Oct. 14, 1988; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or peti-
tion.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 9 day of Sept., 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Bruce N. Crown, Esquire
15490 N.W. 7th Avenue
Suite #205
Miami. Florida 33169
(305) 687-3900
Attorney for Petitioner
19812 September 16,23,30;
October 7, 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the ficti-
tious name(s) BABY'S & TEEN'S
FASHIONS at 2200 S.W. 16 St.
#122. MIAMI, FL 33145 intend(s)
to register said name(s) with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
NITIA PONCE
2200 S.W. 16 St. #122
MIAMI. FL 33145
19819 September 16.23, 30;
October 7, 1988.
Rigging The
Refusenik System
For
Legal Forms
Call
373-4605
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Secretary of State George
Shultz has restated the U.S.
position that Soviet Jews
should have "freedom of
choice" in deciding whether
they want to immigrate to the
United States or some other
country rather than Israel.
"If they wish to go to Israel,
I'm all for that." he said in
testimony before the Senate
Judiciary Committee.
"But you do have a funda-
mental principle of freedom of
choice that we have to stand
by." Shultz added. "The
Israelis are not against free-
dom of choice; they just want
to rig the system a little bit."
Shultz was referring to the
Israeli Cabinet's decision in
June to restrict Israeli entry
visas to those Soviet Jews
committed to settling in Israel.
Those who wish to go to the
United States or some other
country would have to seek
visas from those countries.
To assure that this policy
would be carried out, Israel
has been seeking the coopera-
tion of the Soviet Union and
Romania to require Soviet
Jews with Israeli visas to go
directly to Israel through
Bucharest.
At present, most Soviet
Jews go to Vienna, from where
the majority then go to the
United States, rather than
Israel.
While not directly criticizing
the Israeli effort, Shultz said
that "if things are done that
seem to go against freedom of
choice, we can't be in favor of
that."
The Israeli proposal has not
yet been put into operation,
fiartly because the Nether-
ands has refused to cooperate.
The Dutch Embassy in Mos-
cow distributes the visas to
Jews who have been given
permission to emigrate.
Shultz's comments were
greeted with approval by the
Union of Councils for Soviet
Jews, which has criticized tin-
Israeli policy.
"We believe that it is the
responsibility of the United
States government, not Israel,
to press the Soviets to provide
for freedom of choice, consis-
tent with the international
agreements they have
signed," said Pamela Cohen
UCSJ president.
The UCSJ has pointed out in
the past that if Soviet Jews are
required to go to Israel, they
will no longer have freedom of
choice, since they will lose
their refugee status.
Shultz would not confirm
that the State Department has
been drafting legislation that
would allow Soviet Jews to
have refugee status even if
they go to Israel. He did note
that there "have been all .sorts
of suggestions about possible
screening in Moscow, rather
than after they leave Mos-
cow."
The National Conference on
Soviet Jewry said that it
"explicitly supports the princi-
ple of freedom of choice for
those Jews who apply to leave
the USSR."
But Morris Abram. NCSJ
chairman, said, "We believe
this choice should be exercised
while the applicants are in the
Soviet Union."
"The choice may be exer-
cised through a 'two-track sys-
tem' in which Soviet Jews with
Israeli visas travel directly
there through Bucharest, or
with American or other v isas,
to the West," he explained.
ORT Returns To Hungary
After an absence of 40 years,
ORT, the international Jewish
vocational and technical train-
ing organization, has ratified a
return of school operations to
Hungary. This decision was
made at ORT's World Execu-
tive Meeting held recently in
Budapest, Hungary.
The ORT program in Hun-
gary includes the delivery of
science and technology labor-
atories to the Anne Frank
Jewish Day School in Budap-
est. Earlier this year, the prin-
cipal and a teacher from that
school attended an ORT
seminar on Jewish education
in London.
During the executive meet-
ing, the Budapest Jewish com-
munity gave a reception to
welcome the committee.
Attending were Laszlo Bai,
the Hungarian minister of
Church Affairs, and members
of the diplomatic corps and
ambassadors from Sweden,
Denmark, the Netherlands,
Great Britain, Peru, Switzer-
land, China, Israel and West
Germany, countries currently
benefitting from ORT educa-
tional services.
The ORT executives also
attended Sabbath services at
the main Budapest synagogue.
ORT vocational courses
were first introduced in Hun-
gary in 1938, some 58 years
after its inception in Tsarist
Russia. During 1946-1949.
3,799 adolescents and adults
attended ORT institutions in
Hungary, but in 1949 ORT
schools there and in other
Eastern European area
closed down in the wake 01 a
period of Stalinism and anti-
Semitism. Women's American
ORT has just completed cele-
brating its 60th anniversary.
Readers:
We are currently preparing a section for our special
Hanukkah edition that will be geared to teens and children.
One feature is a "What Hanukkah Means To Me" story
that will be comprised of anecdotes and comments received
from our younger readers.
Please address contributions with the reader's name, age
and contact telephone number to "Hanukkah," c/o The
Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box 012973, Miami, FL 33101. AH
entries must be received by Nov. 21.


Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
Friday, October 7, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 21
^JecTrcuit court of
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOB
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 88-38827-03
FAMILY DIVISION
KI. BAR 368016
re the marriage of
ANNETTE PETITFRERE.
Petitioner
_i and
FORDl'LA PETTTFRERE,
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Fordula Petitfrere.
residence unknown
VOl' ARE NOTIFIED that an
iction for dissolution of marriage
ind to take your real property has
been filed against you; you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses upon: I.J.
GRAFF, attorney for Petitioner,
633 N.E. 167 St. N.M.B. Fl. 33162
on or before October 21st, 1988,
Md file the original with the clerk
of this court otherwise a default
will be entered against you. The
real property located in Dade
County. Fl. is described as Lot 23
& the South 1/2 of Lot 24 in Block
91 Golf Park Section 2, according
to the Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 23, Page 46, of the
Public Records of Dade County. Fl.
Richard P. Brinker
Clerk of the Court
By John Branda
As Deputy Clerk
19820 September 23,30;
October 7. 14, 1988.
address of which is 73 West Fla-
gler Street. Miami, Florida 33130.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forUi below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE:
(1) all claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an interested
person to whom notice was mailed
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the per-
sonal representative, venue, or jur-
isdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 30, 1988.
Personal Representative*:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler Street. Suite 1201
Miami, Florida 33130
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler St.. Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (305)374-3116
19843 September 30;
October 7, 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
thai the undersigned, desiring to
: usirirss under the ficti-
une(i) SUN-UP Billing
: it 2150 SW 16 AVE
110 MIAMI. FLA 33145 intend(s)
register said namels) with the
rl'lerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
'unty. Florida,
Nilda V. I.opez
September 23.30;
October 7.14. 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
hat the undersigned, desiring to
ngage in business under the ficti-
ious name(s) Viscount Hair Salon
t 5301 N.W. 36th Street. Miami
Spring Florida intend(s) to
register said name(s) with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County Florida.
President. Luz Marina Balbona
Lester Rogers. Esq.
Attorney(s) for Applicant
1454 N.W. 17th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33125
19831 September 23, 30;
October 7, 14. 1988.
For Legal Forms
Call 373-4605
.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the ficti-
tious namels) KIMB*ERLY
IMPORTS CO. at 125 N.E. 40
Street. Miami. FL 33137 intend(s)
to register said name(s) with the
[Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
ICE LIGHTING CO.
''*--' September 23.30;
October 7, 14, 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
hit the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the ficti-
tious namels) THE STEVENS
GROlPat 10410 S.W. Hammocks
Blv'l Miami, FL intend(s) to
register said name(s) with the
Clark ol th.-Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
WC AT WINSTON PARK. INC.
10410 S.W. Hammocks Blvd.
WINSTON PARK. INC.
10*10 S.W. Hammocks Blvd.
I Lngel. Esq.
A'torney,,, for The Stevens Group
JJWS.W Hammocks Blvd.
September 23.30;
_____October 7. 14. 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-4808
Division (02)
!N KL: ESTATE OF
R08ETICHAUER,
Deca i
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
"ROSE TICHAUER. deceased.
"Number X8-4808. is pending in
* Urcuit Curt for Dade County.
n NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA.
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-39071 (29)
ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ELAINE QUANITH.
Petitioner, Wife
and
KIAT QUANITH,
Respondent, Husband
TO: KIAT QUANITH
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed agait:st
you and you are required to serve .1
copy of your written defenses, il
any, to it on Bruce N. Crown.
Esquire, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 15490 N.W. 7th
Avenue. Suite #205, Miami, FL
33169, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 21. 1988;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or peti-
tion.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 15 day of Sept.. 1988.
Richard P. Brinker
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. Casamayor
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Bruce N. Crown, Esquire
15490 N.W. 7th Avenue
Suite #205
Miami, Florida 33169
(305) 687-3900
Attorney for Petitioner
19826 September 23,30;
October 7, 14. 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT.
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Caae No. 88-35053 (CA 02)
NOTICE OF ACTION
F.P.G. WHOLESALE. INC..
a Florida corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
ARCH R. MacKAY, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: ARCH R MacKAY
1253 Messina Avenue
Coral Gables, FL
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
That portion of Tract 41,
lying southerly of the
southerly right-of-way line of
Tamiami Trail, of Miami
Everglades Land co.. Ltd.. a
subdivision of the west one
half of Section 4. Township
54 South. Range 39 East.
according to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 3, at
Page 129, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida, less and except the
West 330.00 feet of said
Tract 41
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis, Allison &
Cohen, Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address is 111 N.E. 1st
Street, Miami, Florida 33132, on
or before Oct. 21, 1988, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise, a
Default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on this 13 day of Sept.,
1988.
Richard P. Brinker
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
19821 September 23,30;
____________October 7, 14, 1988.
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FC Caae No.: 88-39500
Florida Bar No. 318256
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ANNELISE McCOY.
Petitioner/Wife,
VS.
WILLIE B. McCOY.
Respondent/Husband.
TO: WILLIE B. McCOY
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN,
YOU shall serve a copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage upon ANTHONY
CARBONE. Attorney, 612 N.W.
12th 33136. Miami. Florida with
the Court Clerk on or before Oct.
21, 1988, otherwise a default will
be entered.
Sept. 19. 1988.
Richard Brinker
By: Clarinda Brown
19830 September 23,30;
October 7, 14. 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the ficti-
tious namels) 0 & B Salom at
13720 SW 34 Street Miami. Fla.
33175 intend(s) to register said
name(s) with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Obdulio & Beatrice Salom, Inc.
a Florida Corporation
19833 September 23.30;
____________October 7, 14, 1988.
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-35083
SEC. 24
THE SEAMEN'S BANK FOR
SAVINGS.
Plaintiffs)
vs.
JOHN PETER ROSS, if living.
and if married -------ROSS, his
wife, if living, including any un-
known spouse of said Defend-
ants) if either has remarried, if
either or both of said has remar-
ried, etc.. et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to 'he highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami. Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M., on the 18TH
day of OCTOBER. 1988. the fol
lowing described property:
Lot 18. Block 17. CAROL CITY,
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 57. at
Page 20. of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida.
DATED the 28TH day of
SEPTEMBER. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Joseph M. Paniello. Esquire
One Tampa City Center. Suite
2720
201 North Franklin Street
Tampa. Florida 33602
Published 9/30 10/7 ___________
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
STATE OF FLORIDA.
Caae No. 88-33134
General Jurisdiction
NOTICE OF ACTION
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
OF MONESSEN,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LUIS TRUEBA-CASTRO.
if living, et ux., et al.,
Defendants.
STATE OF FLORIDA
TO: CITIBANK. SOUTH
DAKOTA. N.A..
a banking corporation.
Whose domicile, principal place
of business is c/o Anna Losey,
Assistant VP, 41 Perimeter Center
E., Suite 300, Atlanta Georgia
30346.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida.
Lot 22, in Block 45. of
EIGHTH ADDITION TO
SOUTHERN ESTATES,
according to the Plat thereof,
recorded in Plat Book 80, at
Page 43, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and
LUIS TRUEBA-CASTRO. if
living, and if married, MRS. LUIS
TRUEBA-CASTRO. his wife, if
living, including any unknown
spouse of said Defendants, if either
has remarried and if either or both
of said Defendants are deceased,
their respective unknown heirs,
devisees, grantees, assignees,
creditors, lienors and trustees, and
all other persons claiming by,
through, under or against the
named Defendants, and PILAR F.
TRUEBA. if living, and if married.
JOHN DOE, her husband, whose
real name is uncertain, if living,
including any unknown spouse of
said Defendants, if either or both
of said Defendants have remarried
and if either or both of said
Defendants are deceased, their
respective unknown heirs, devi-
sees, grantees, assignees, credi-
tors, lienors and trustees, and all
other persons claiming by,
through, under or against the
named Defendants. SOUTHEAST
BANK, N.A., formerly known as
SOUTHEAST SERVICES, INC.,
CITIBANK, SOUTH DAKOTA,
N.A.. a banking corporation.
UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA. SOUTHEAST
BANK. N.A.. a banking corpora
tion, formerly known as SOUTH-
EAST FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF MIAMI, formerly known as
SOUTHEAST FIRST
NATIONAL BANK OF MIAMI
SPRINGS, formerly known as
FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF
MIAMI SPRINGS, UNITED
STATES FIDELITY AND
GUARANTY COMPANY, a
Foreign corporation as Subrogue
for Jose Daniel. AMERICAN
EXPRESS TRAVEL RELATED
SERVICES COMPANY. INC., a
corporation. FORD MOTOR
CREDIT COMPANY, a corpora-
tion, STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE,
AMI KENDALL REG. MED.
CENTER, a corporation and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on:
JOSEPH M. PANIELLO,
ESQUIRE, Plaintiff's attorney,
whose address is:
201 N. Franklin Street, Suite
2720, Tampa, Florida 33602 on or
before the 14 day of Oct., 1988,
and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
DATED on this 12 day of Sept..
1988.
Richard P. Brinker
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
Joseph M. Paniello, Esquire
Attorney for Plaintiff
P. O. Box 2347
Tampa, Florida 33601
19814 September 16,23, 30;
October 7, 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Cue No. 88-38626 16
NOTICE OF ACTION
SHADOW LAWN SAVINGS &
LOAN ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff
vs.
EDGARDO A. PASCALL, et al..
Defendants.
TO: EDGARDO A. PASCALL
Colonia Santo Matilde
(CAHSA)
San Pedro Sule Honduras
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described prop-
erty:
Condominium Unit 304 of
ORDUNA COURT CONDO-
MINIUM, according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, recorded in Official
Records Book 11527, Page
1417, of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida
together with all appurten-
ances thereof, including an
undivided interest in the
common elements of said
Condominium as set forth in
said Declaration also known
as 800 S. Dixie Highway,
#304, Miami, Florida 33189
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida 33146 on or before
Oct. 21, 1988 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 13 day of Sept..
1988.
Richard P. Brinker
As Clerk of the Court
By I. Casamayor
As Deputy Clerk
19816 September 16, 23,30;
October 7. 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA.
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
(Family Division)
Caae No. 88-38308 (88)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JENI CREDINCIOSU.
Petitioner,
and
SHAUL CREDINCIOSU,
Respondent.
TO: SHAUL CREDINCIOSU
c/o Lia Mikhael
39 Kol Israel St.,
Haverim. Haifa
ISRAEL
YOU. SHAUL-CREDINCIOSU,
are hereby notified that a Petition
for Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you. and you are
required to serve a copy of your
Answer or Pleading to the Petition
for Dissolution of Marriage on the
Petitioner's Attorney. FRANK,
SCHMITT & FRANK, ESQS., 502
Capital Bank Building, 1666
Kennedy Causeway, North Bay
Village, Florida 33141. and file the
original Answer or Pleading in the
Office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court on or before the 14th day of
October 1988. If you fail to do so,
Judgment or Default will be taken
against you for the relief
demanded in the Petition.
This Notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
DATED this 9 day of Sept., 1988.
Richard P. Brinker
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: John Branda
Deputy Clerk
FRANK, SCHMITT & FRANK,
PA.
Attorneys for Petitioner
502 Capital Building
1666 Kennedy Causeway
North Bay Village. Florida 33141
Telephone (305) 868-4711
19810 September 16. 23,30;
____________October 7, 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Caae No. 88-31868 CA 04
NOTICE OF ACTION
RESIDENTIAL FINANCIAL
CORP..
Plaintiff
vs.
DAVID L. GONZALEZ, et al..
Defendants.
TO: DAVID L. GONZALEZ and
SARA GONZALEZ
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by. through,
under or against DAVID L.
GONZALEZ and SARA
GONZALEZ, and all parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the
property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Unit 13-23 of TERRANOVA
3. a Condominium thereof, as
recorded April 5. 1983 in
Official Records Book 11749,
at Page 429, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida, a/k/a 10841 N.W. 7
Street, Unit 23, Miami, FL
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
Oct. 14, 1988. and file the original
with the clerk of this court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately there-
after, otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 9 day of Sept.,
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
19811 September 16, 23,30;
October 7, 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 88-38175 (06)
NOTICE OF ACTION-
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION.
Plaintiff
vs.
ROBERT NESTOR, et ux., et al.,
Defendants.
TO: ROBERT NESTOR and
WILENA NESTOR, his wife
441 Montgomery Avenue,
Apt. #4
Albemarle, North Carolina
28001
YOV ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described prop-
erty:
Condominium Unit No. 370,
GATEWAY WEST, a
Condominium, according to
the Declaration of the Condo-
minium thereof, recorded the
1st day of May 1981. in Offi-
cial Records Book 11089, at
Page 2244, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida, also known as 35303
S.W. 180th Avenue, Apt.
370, Florida City. Florida,
33034
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Alfred J. Tirella. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
October 14, 1988 and file the orig-
inal with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 9 day of Sept.,
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By John Branda
As Deputy Clerk
19813 September 16,23,30;
October 7, 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the ficti-
tious name(s) AMERICAN
TRUCK SUPPLIES at 7388 N.W.
72 AVE., MIAMI. FL 33166
intend(s) to register said name(s).
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
GENERAL TRUCK PARTS &
SUPPLIES, INC.
7388 N.W. 72 AVE.
MIAMI. FL 33166
19818 September 16.23.30;
October 7, 1988.
For
Legal Forms
Call 373-4605


Page 22 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 7, 1988
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA.
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-40015-19
ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
WILLIAM SAMARDAK, JR.
Petitioner, Husband
and
KATHY SAMARDAK.
Respondent, Wife
TO: Kathy Samardak
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 88-41011
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL HOME LOAN
MORTGAGE CORP.,
Plaintiff
vs.
RICARDO RODRIGUEZ, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: RICARDO RODRIGUEZ
1015 Pleasant Avenue
Yakima, WA 98902
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described prop-
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against erty:
you and you are required to serve a jjrat 3 of Building 1 of VIL
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on Bruce N. Crown, Esq.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 15490 N.W. 7th Avenue,
Suite 205. Miami. Florida 33169,
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before Oct. 28, 1988: otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 21 day of Sept. 1988.
Richard P. Brinker
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. Casamayor
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Bruce N. Crown. Esq.
15490 N.W. 7th Avenue
Suite 205
Miami, Florida 33169
(305) 687-3900
Attorney for Petitioner
19835 September 30;
October 7, 14. 21, 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the ficti-
tious name(s) R & C UNISEX
BOUTIQUE INC D.B.A. A HEAD
OF TIME at 7281 DADELAND
MALL MIAMI. FLORIDA 33156
intendfs) to register said ramrtsl
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
DAIL RESTREPO
19852 October 7.14,21,28.1988.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-40762 FC 05
ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
THE MARRIAGE OF:
ANA JUDITH LOPEZ a/k/a
ANA J. LOPEZ,
Petitioner/Wife
and
MIGUEL LOPEZ OVALLE a/k/a
MIGUEL LOPEZ.
Respondent/Husband.
TO: Miguel Lopez Ovalle a/k/a
Miguel Lopez
Residence and Address
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Bruce J. Scheinberg,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 420 Lincoln Road, Suite
512, Miami Beach. Florida 33139
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before Nov. 4, 1988; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 29 day of Sept. 1988.
Richard P. Brinker
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Barbara Rodriguez,
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Bruce J. Scheinberg, Esquire
KWITNEY, KROOP &
SCHEINBERG, P.A.
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 512
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
19850 October 7, 14,21,28, 1988.
LAS OF WESTLAND, a
Condominium according to
the Declaration of Condomin-
ium as recorded in Official
Records Book 12261 at Page
1304 of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida, and all
amendments made thereto;
a/k/a 2423 West 52nd Place,
Hialeah. FL.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Alfred J. Tirella, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida 33146 on or before
November 4, 1988 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 28 day of Sept.,
1988.
Richard P. Brinker
As Clerk of the Court
By John Branda
As Deputy Clerk
19847 October?. 14,21,28, 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the ficti-
tious name JEWELERS at 132 East Flagler
Street, Miami. Florida 33131
intendfs) to register said name(s)
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
KIRK JEWELERS, INC.
JULIAN H. NEWBAUER,
President
SHAPIRO AND WEIL
LAW FIRM
Attomey(s) for Kirk Jewelers, Inc.
166679th St. Cswy., Ste. 608
Miami Beach, Florida 33141
19851 October 7,14.21,28,1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the ficti-
tious name(s) Sorrel Development
at 8390 West Flagler Street, Suite
208, Miami. Florida 33144
intend(s) to register said name(s)
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
Sorrel Enterprises. Inc.
8390 West Flagler Street
Suite 208
Miami, Florida 33144
Layne Verebay
Attorneys) for
Sorrel Enterprises, Inc.
19838 September 30;
October 7, 14, 21, 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the ficti-
tious name(s) R & C UNISEX
BOUTIQUE INC D.B.A. A HEAD
OF TIME at 7281 DADELAND
MALL MIAMI, FLORIDA 33156
intend(s) to register said name(s)
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
DAIL RESTREPO
19852 October 7,14,21,1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Caae No. 88-32173 CA-24
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS.
Plaintiff
vs.
JOAN I. TISCHLER, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: JOAN I. TISHLER
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead< all parties
claiming interest by. through,
under or against JOAN I.
TISHLER, and all parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the
property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 34, Block 107, of LES-
LIE ESTATES SECTION 7,
according to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 97,
at Page 28, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida; a/k/a 2779 N.W.
192nd Terrace, Miami, FL.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
Nov. 14, 1988, and file the original
with the clerk of this court either
before service on Plaintiffs attor-
ney or immediately thereafter,
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 14 day of October,
1988.
Richard P. Brinker
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
19859 October 7, 14.21, 28,1988.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-41757 (18)
ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ELBERT JONES JR.
Petitioner, Husband
and
SHARON ANNETTE JONES,
Respondent, Wife.
TO: SHARON ANNETTE
JONES
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOV ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on Bruce N. Crown,
Esquire, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 15490 N.W. 7th
Avenue, Suite #205, Miami, FL
33169, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before November 14, 1988;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief deman-
ded in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 4th day of October. 1988.
Richard P. Brinker
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By JENNIS L. RUSSELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Bruce N. Crown, Esquire
15490 N.W, 7th Avenue
Suite #205
Miami, Florida 33169
Attorney for Petitioner
19858 October7. 14,21.28, 1988.
be entered contingent or unliquidated, the wa8 mailed that cnall
the relief nature of the uncertainty shall be validity of the will the aualifi.'.
wise a default will
against you for
demanded in the complaint or peti- stated. If the claim is secured, the tiong of the ^^^ represc"n;"
lion. security shalI be described. The ^ venue or jurjsdiction f h
claimant shall deliver sufficient
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA.
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-41729 (11)
ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
DANICA E. MOLINA.
Petitioner, Wife
and
LUIS MOLINA,
Respondent, Husband
TO: LUIS MOLINA
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Bruce N. Crown,
Esquire, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 15490 N.W. 7th
Avenue. Suite #205, Miami, Flor-
ida 33169. and file the original with
the clerk of the abov? styled court
on or before Nov. 14, 1988; other-
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 4 day of Oct.. 1988.
Richard P. Brinker
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. Casamayor
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Bruce N. Crown. Esquire
15490 N.W. 7th Avenue
Suite #205
Miami, Florida 33169
(305) 687-3900
Attorney for Petitioner
19860 October 7, 14.21,28,1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-5290
Division 01
IN RE:ESTATE OF
SAUL ROTHMAN, also known as
SAUL S. ROTHMAN,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of SAUL ROTHMAN. also known
as SAUL S. ROTHMAN,
deceased, File Number 88-5290, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street. Miami. Flor-
ida 33130. The names and
addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE:
(1) all claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an interested
person on whom this notice was
served that challenges the validity
of the will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 7, 1988.
Personal Representative:
HILDA ROTHMAN
1750 N.E. 191st Street
NO. MIAMI BEACH, FL.
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
SAMUEL I. LEFF, ESQ.
c/o LEFF, PESETSKY
& ZACK. PA.,
1367 N.E. 162nd Street
No. Miami Beach. Fl. 33162
Telephone. (305) 945-7501
19853 October 7,14.1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-4944
Division 03
IN RE:ESTATE OF
TOBA SANDACK.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS
HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the
estate of TOBA SANDACK,
deceased. File Number 88-4944. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
DADE County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami, Flor-
ida 33130. The co-personal repre-
sentatives of the estate JEAN L.
MILLER, 1495 Daytonia Rd.,
Miami Beach, FL 33141 and
PENNY LEE SALTZMAN, 15634
Summer Ridge Dr., Chesterfield,
MO 63017. The name and address
of the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
copies of the claim to the clerk to
enable the clerk to mail one copy to
each personal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice cf Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
any objections they may have that
challenge the validity of the dece-
dent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the
venue or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS, AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
October 7, 1988.
JEAN L. MILLER AND
PENNY LEE SALTZMAN
Co-Personal Representatives of
the Estate of:
TOBA SANDACK
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
LYNN W. FROMBERG, ESQ.
(#026940)
FROMBERG. FROMBERG AND
LEWIS. P.A.
#800,
2500 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Hallandale, FL. 33009
Telephone: (305) 940-0709
19848 October 7.14. 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-4902
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SYLVIA SIMON,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
(Florida Bar No. 048326)
The administration of the estate
of SYLVIA SIMON, deceased,
File Number 88-4902, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West Fla-
gler Street. Miami, Florida 33130.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE:
(1) all claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an interested
person on whom this notice was
served that challenges the validity
of the will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 7, 1988.
Personal Representative:
GLORIA COHEN
270-250 Grand Central Parkway
Floral Park. N.Y. 11005
ALAN R. LORBER, P.A.
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
1111 Lincoln Road, Suite 680
Miami Beach, Fl. 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-1401
19857 October 7.14,1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-4566
Division 01
FL BAR 368016
IN RE: ESTATE OF
THOMAS J. GOOCH,
Deceased
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN SAID ESTATE:
CO
IN 1
Till
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IN
CM
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K
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and
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attoi
ddn
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each
inTI
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ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS, AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
Personal Representative:
Margaret I. Bouchard
1215 NE 181 St
Miami, Fl. 33162
First publication of this notice or"*Vf',
administration on the 7 of October
1988.
I. JEROME GRAFF, ESy
633 N.E. 167th St., Suite 1016
Miami, Fla. 33162
651-3343
Attorney For
Personal Representatives
19849 October 7. 14, 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-2658
Division 04
FL BAR 368016
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOAQUIN BARCENA, Jr
aka JACK BARCENA, Jr..
Deceased
TO ALL PERSONS HA VIM;
CLAMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE KSTATE
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN SAID KST.ATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED ,
that the administration of the
estate of Joaquin Barcena, Jr.'
deceased, late of Dade County,
Florida. File Number 88-2K58.04 is
pending in the Circuit Court in and
for Dade County, 73 W Flagler
St., Miami. FL 33130. The name
and address of the personal repre-
sentative of this estate is set forth
below.
All interested persons are
required to file with thi- court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: all claim- against
the estate and any objects >n by an
interested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal representa-
tive, venue, or jurisdiction "f the
court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED v
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.^
Personal Representative
Olga Baracena
1545 NW 124 St
Miami. Fl. 33167
First publication of this notice of
administration on the 7th <.f Octo-
ber, 1988.
I. JEROME GRAFF, ESQ.
633 N.E. 167th St., Si.
Miami, Fla. 33162
Telephone: 651-3343
Attorney For
Personal Representatiw-
19856 October?
Bruc-
Atl
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 88-13075 V
SEC. 22
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOOT-
GAGE ASSOCIATION. I aR-
ed States corporation,
Plaintifffs)
vs.
MARIA L. CANO: et al..
Defendant^)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GPVEN
pursuant to an Order or
Judgment entered in this. :<
pending in said Court, the '
which is indicated above. I will sell
to the highest and beat
cash on THE SOUTH SI I
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami. Dade County. Fl< r rt
11:00 o'clock A.M., n the 2..1H
day of OCTOBER. 1088
lowing described property
Lot 15, in Block 20. of RO\ U
GREEN TOWNHOUSE SW
TION FIVE, according to the
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED ..... -
that the administration of the Plat thereof, as recorded in w
, estate of Thomas J. Gooch Book 91. at Page 28, V
demands against the estate are deceased, late of Dade County, Public Records of Dade ( nun ..
required, WITHIN THREE Florida. File Number 884566 01 is Florida. ,...,
pending in the Circuit Court in and DATED the 5TH day of Ot I' -
for Dade County, 73 W. Flagler ER. 1988.
St., Miami. FL 33130. The name RICHARD P. BRINkEh
and address of the personal repre- Clerk of Circuit Court
sentative of this estate is set forth (Circuit Court Seal)
below. by MARIA SAMA
All interested persons are Deputy Clerk
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the
clerk of the above court a written
statement of any claim or demand
they may have. Each claim must be
in writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name and required to file with this court. Attorney for Plaintiff
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim is not yet due,
the date when it will become due
shall be stated. If the claim is
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF Rosenthal & Yarchin ,
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF Suite 2300. Centrust r manual
THIS NOTICE: all claims against Center _, .,
the estate and any objection by an 100 Southeast 2nd Street
interested person to whom notice Miami. Florida,3313Wi*
Published 10/7-14
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19


Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
Friday, October 7, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 23

"Notice of action
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
1 ,N0 PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCI'IT OF FLORIDA.
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil'Action No. 88-40046 (05)
action for
Dissolution of marriage
re the marriage of
arlenf. robinson
Petitioner, Wife
10NNIE ROBINSON
ndent, Husband
TO- Lonnie Robinson
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
v,i|- ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
mm and > 'ii ""' required to serve a
pm of your written defenses, if
iny, id it nn Bruce N. Crown,
ittorne) for Petitioner, whose
ii N.W. 7th Avenue.
Miami. Florida 33169,
and file th original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
befon r28, 1988; otherwise
Ullt will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE IF. WISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
at Miami. Florida on
if September. 1988.
ard P. Brinker
A- Clerk, Circuit Court
nunty, Florida
By Barbara Harper
\ I toputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
N. Crown
5490 N W 7th Avenue
i
Florida 33169
Attorn' for Petitioner
September 30;
October 7. 14, 21, 1988.
Bru
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA.
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88 38601
ACTION FOR
." DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
CHRISTINE SMITH
Petitioner, Wife
and
JAMES SMITH
Respondent. Husband
TO IAMES SMITH
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED
action for Dissolution of
ige has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
your written defenses, if
t on BRUCE N. CROWN,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
490 N.W. 7th Avenue,
Suit,- 206, Miami. Florida 33169.
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled cour{ on or
I ictober 28. 1988; otherwise
lit will be entered against
the relief demanded in the
lint or petition,
bice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
m THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
K 11 NESS my hand and the seal
court at Miami. Florida on
this 20 lay of Sept., 1988.
Richard P. Brinker
la Clerk, Circuit Court
I lade County, Florida
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
Circuit Court Seal)
E N CROWN, ESQUIRE
W, 7th Avenue
s- h 206
FL .{3169
for Petitioner
September 30;
"ctoU-r 7. 14. 21, 1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
HCE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
in business under the ficti-
name West Flagler Street. Suite
Miami, Florida 33144
tend(g) to register said namefs)
*tth the Clerk of the Circuit Court
"' Dade County, Florida.
Sorrell Enterprises. Inc.
"390 West Flagler Street
Suite 208
Miami, Florida 33144
Layne Verebay
Attorney^) for
Surrell Enterprises, Inc.
19838 September 30;
________October 7, 14, 21, 1988.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA.
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-34930 FC 11
ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
KIMBERLY KLASSEN,
Petitioner, Wife
and
RIAN KLASSEN,
Respondent, Husband
TO: RIAN KLASSEN
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Bruce N. Crown,
Esquire, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 15490 N.W. 7th
Avenue, Suite 205, Miami, Florida
33169, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before Oct. 28, 1988; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or peti-
tion.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 20 day of Sept., 1988.
Richard P. Brinker
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Bruce N. Crown, Esquire
15490 N.W. 7th Avenue
Suite #205
Miami, Florida 33169
(305) 687-3900
Attorney for Petitioner
19837 September 30;
October 7, 14, 21, 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the ficti-
tious name(s) "SHOES TO YOU"
at 1925 BRICKELL AVE.. D1811.
MIAMI. FL 33131 intend(s) to
register said name(s) with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
SHOES TO YOU, INC.
KIMBERLY OSIASON.
PRESIDENT 100%
SHOES TO YOU, INC.
19984 September 30;
_________October 7, 14, 21, 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. STATE OF FLORIDA
Caae No.: 88-26900
General Jurisdiction
Florida Bar No.: 060980
CITY FEDERAL SAVINGS
BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JEAN LOUISNER
LOUISSAINT. if living,
et ux., et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
STATE OF FLORIDA
TO: THOMAS J. STEVENS. JR.
Whose residence address is
unknown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 2, in Block 7, of
SHADOWLAWN, according
to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 6. at
Page 47. of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and
JEAN LOUISNER LOUIS-
SAINT, if living, and MARIE N.
LOUISSAINT, his wife, if living,
including any unknown spouse of
said Defendants, if either has
remarried, and if either or both of
said Defendants are deceased,
their respective unknown heirs,
devisees, grantees, assignees, cre-
ditors, lienors and trustees, and all
other persons claiming by,
through, under or against the
named Defendant and ROSE
GELLMAN and MONTGOMERY
WARD AND CO., Inc., a corpora-
tion and you are required to serve
a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on:
JOSEPH M. PANIELLO,
ESQUIRE, Plaintiffs attorney,
whose address is:
201 N. Franklin Street, Suite
2720, Tampa, Florida 33602 on or
before the 28 day of Oct., 1988,
and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Complaint or Petition.
DATED on this 22 day of Sept
1988.
Richard P. Brinker
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
Joseph M. Paniello, Esquire
Attorney for Plaintiff
P.O. Box 2347
Tampa, Florida 33602
19841 September 30;
_________October 7, 14, 21, 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA
Caae No.: 88-33065
General Jurisdiction
SOVRAN MORTGAGE
CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RUBEN HUMBERTO LARA,
if living, et ux.. et al..
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
STATE OF FLORIDA
TO: RUBEN HUMBERTO
LARA, if living, and if mar-
ried. MRS. RUBEN HUM-
BERTO LARA, his wife, if
living, and ELSA EUGENIA
PONCE, if living, and if mar-
ried, JOHN DOE, her hus-
band, whose real name is
uncertain, if living, including
any unkown spouse of said
Defendants if any have remar-
ried and if any or all of said
Defendants are deceased,
their respective unknown
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, creditors, lienors
and trustees, and all other
persons claiming by, through,
under or against the named
Defendants.
Whose residence addresses are
unknown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
LOT 99. BLOCK 8. THE
LAKES OF ACADIA UNIT
SIX. ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 121, PAGE 49 OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF DADE COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA,
has been filed against you and
LAKE ARBOR VILLAGE
HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION
UNIT SIX, INC., a corporation
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on:
JOSEPH M. PANIELLO,
ESQUIRE. Plaintiffs attorney,
whose address is:
201 N. Franklin Street, Suite
2720, Tampa, Florida 33602 on or
before the 28 day of Oct.. 1988,
and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Complaint or Petition.
DATED on this 22 day of Sept.,
1988.
Richard P. Brinker
Clerk of the Qrcuit Court
By: Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
Joseph M. Paniello, Esquire
Attorney for Plaintiff
P.O. Box 2347
Tampa, Florida 33602
19840 September 30;
October 7, 14. 21. 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the ficti-
tious name of Plastics & Equip-
ment Sales Co. at 6001 NW 37th
Avenue. Miami. Florida 33142
intend(s) to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
Brown Plastics
Engineering Co., Inc.
1801 Holste Road
Northbrook, Illinois 60062
Richard W. Wasserman
Attorneys) for Brown Plastics
Engineering Co. Inc.
19844 September 30;
October 7, 14, 21, 1988.
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA
Caae No.: 88-36383
General Jurisdiction
SOVRAN MORTGAGE
CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,
VS.
JOSE L. CARHUAYO, if living,
et ux., et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
STATE OF FLORIDA
TO: JOSE L. CARHUAYO, if liv-
ing, and BRUSELAS CAR-
HUAYO, his wife, if living,
and GERMAN RUTZ, if liv-
ing, and if married, MRS.
GERMAN RUTZ, his wife, if
living, including any unknown
spouse of said Defendants, if
any or all of said Defendants
are deceased, their respective
unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, creditors,
lienors and all other persons
claiming by, through, under or
against the named Defend-
ants.
Whose residential addresses are
unknown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
LOT 20, BLOCK 1. TIM
BERWOOD MANORS,
ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 120, AT PAGE 66,
OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA,
has been filed against you and
GENERAL FINANCE CORPOR-
ATION, a corporation, L. GENE
GATTER, Director as Trustee of
Public Finance Service of Florida,
Inc., a dissolved Florida corpora-
tion, and UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on:
JOSEPH M. PANIELLO.
ESQUIRE. Plaintiffs attorney,
whose address is:
201 N. Franklin Street. Suite
2720, Tampa, Florida 33602 on or
before the 28 day of Oct., 1988,
and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Complaint or Petition.
DATED on this 22 day of Sept.,
1988.
Richard P. Brinker
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
Joseph M. Paniello, Esquire
Attorney for Plaintiff
P.O. Box 2347
Tampa, Florida 33602
19842 September 30;
October 7, 14, 21, 1988.
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 88-21181
SEC. 12
BANCBOSTON MORTGAGE
CORPORATION, a Florida cor-
poration, successor by merger to
STOCKTON, WHATLEY, DAV-
IN & COMPANY,
Plaintiffts)
vs.
JOHN D. HESTER. JR.. et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above. I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami. Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M., on the 18TH
day of OCTOBER, 1988. the fol-
lowing described property:
Lot 18. in Block 42. of WHIS-
PERING PINES ESTATES.
SECTION 4, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 68. at Page 9, of the Public
Records of Dade County. Flori-
da.
DATED the 28TH day of
SEPTEMBER. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Roeenthal & Yarchin
Suite 300, ('entrust Financial
Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami, Florida 33131-219
Published 9/30 10/7_____________
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA.
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-40713
ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MYRTLE COLE,
Petitioner, Husband
and
PRESLEY COLE,
Respondent, Wife
TO: PRESLEY COLE
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Bruce N. Crown,
Esquire, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 15490 N.W. 7th
Avenue, Suite #205, Miami, FL
33169, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before November 4, 1988;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or peti-
tion.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 27 day of September. 1988.
Richard P. Brinker
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Bruce N. Crown, Esquire
15490 N.W. 7th Avenue
Suite #205
Miami, Florida 33169
Attorney for Petitioner
19845 September 30;
October 7, 14, 21, 1988.
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 88-5951
SEC. 16
FEDERAL NATIONAL MORT-
GAGE ASSOCIATION, a United
States corporation.
Plaintiffls)
vs.
JESUS P. BISBAL. LILLIAN
BISBAL. MANUEL A. CAMPA.
EVELYN CAMPA. and the un-
known spouses, et al..
Defendant^)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above. I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami, Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M., on the 18TH
day of OCTOBER, 1988, the fol-
lowing described property:
Lot- 9 and 10. in Block 17. of
PLAT NO. ONE OPA LOCKA.
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 25. at
Page 44, of the Public Records of
Dade County. Florida.
DATED the 28TH day of
SEPTEMBER. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin
Suite 2300. (entrust Financial
Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami. Florida 33131-219
Published 9/30 10/7_____________
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 88-1773
SEC 23
THE LOMAS & NETTLETON
COMPANY; a Connecticut cor-
poration, successor by merger to
ADVANCE MORTGAGE COR-
PORATION.
Plaintiffls)
vs.
EUGENE HOWARD, et al.,
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami, Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M.. on the 18TH
day of OCTOBER. 1988, the fol-
lowing described property:
Lot 9. of CENTERVILLE, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 4, at Page
92. of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
DATED the 28TH day of
SEPTEMBER. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin
Suite 2300. (entrust Financial
Center
Miami. Florida 33131-219
Published 9/30 10/7_____________
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-6260
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARGARET ALICE HAMIL-
TON
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS
HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the
estate of MARGARET ALICE
HAMILTON, deceased. File Num-
ber 87-6260, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West Fla-
gler Street, Miami, Florida 33130.
The personal representative of the
estate is IVAN M. RUTLEDGE,
whose address is 4125 Walker
Blvd., Knoxville. Tenn. 37917. The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the
clerk of the above court a written
statement of any claim or demand
they may have. Each claim must be
in writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim is not yet due.
the date when it will become due
shall be stated. If the claim is
contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim is secured, the
security shall be described. The
claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the claim to the clerk to
enable the clerk to mail one copy to
each personal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
any objections they may have that
challenge the validity of the dece-
dent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the
venue or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publica ion of
this Notice of Administratio i:
September 30. 1988.
IVAN M. RUTLEDGE
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of
MARGARET ALICE HAMIL
TON
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
SANFORD F. DERNIS
10720 Caribbean Boulevard. Suite
455
Miami, Florida 33189
Telephone: (305) 233-3735
19846 September 10
October 7, 19>8.


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