The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03112

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
sJewislb Floridliami
J8!L&,
*fAVx
Volume 61 Number 39
Miami, Florida Friday, September 23, 1988
iFntfttacftM
Price 60 Cents
MOURNING DESTRUCTION OF TORAH Orthodox Jews in the
Brooklyn borough of New York City surround a wooden casket, containing
the burned remains of six Torah scrolls, as it is carried during a funeral
ceremony. Approximately 5,000 people mourned the loss of the sacred scrolls,
which were destroyed by vandals who broke into a synagogue. See related
story on page IS. AP/Wide World Photo
South Beach Synagogues
Seek Common Salvation
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Discos, night clubs, bouti-
ques, cafes, renovated art deco
apartments and expensive
condominiums all point to a
revival of South Beach. But a
group of rabbis from the
southern tip of Miami Beach
are wondering if that change
signals the end of an era of
dominant, thriving Jewish life.
South Beach was once
considered the hub of Jewish
life in Florida. A haven for
Jewish snowbirds and later for
retirees, there was nothing
quite like the area for a film-
maker or author who wanted
to depict the Jewish lifestyle.
When a group of rabbis
representing South Beach
synagogues met last week to
discuss changing demogra-
phics and declining synagogue
membership, a reporter asked
a rather disturbing question: is
the era forever over?
"We asked that ourselves,"
said Rabbi Tibor Stern, spiri-
tual leader of the Jacob C.
Cohen synagogue. "Are we
fighting a losing battle or is
there a revival?
"My opinion is there is no
question there is a future. Now
the question is, who's future?
Is it to replace it with young
people or with another batch
of old people?"
Last week's meeting was
overdue; the problem had been
building for years before it was
addressed, before the rabbis
formed a formal coalition and
outlined a program they hope
may reverse the trend. It took
some crisis to call the meetings
to order: the most notable
when vandals desecrated two
South Beach synagogues in
recent months. One synagogue
suffered the loss of costly
stained glass windows and
didn't know how its elderly
congregation members would
afford replacements. About
two months ago, Stern's own
synagogue was vandalized
when a Torah scroll was placed
on the floor twice and
Stern made a public plea for a
donation of a safe to keep the
scroll in.
"This is the first time that
the synagogues were all asked
to convene to discuss a mutual
concern," said Rabbi Solomon
Continued on Page 12
Hungary/Israel See
Significant Thaw in Relations
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Yitzhak Shamir said
that he expected full normali-
zation of diplomatic relations
with Hungary "soon," but he
could not say when.
Shamir spoke to reporters
on his return from a two-day
visit to Budapest. Although it
was billed as a "private" visit,
it included meetings with
Prime Minister Karoly Grosz
and Foreign Minister Peter
Varkonyi.
Citing Grosz's high standing
among the Soviet bloc leaders,
Shamir said the Hungarian
premier would be a source of
information for them about
Israel's positions on various
matters.
"Hungarian Premier Grosz
will tell (Soviet leader Mikhail)
Gorbachev and others,"
Shamir said, referring to posi-
tions he had articulated in
Budapest. He observed point-
edly that the Kremlin was "no
longer putting out daily
dogmatism" in its official
references to Israel and the
Middle East.
Shamir predicted the expan-
sion and acceleration of trade
and tourism between Hungary
and Israel, saying their polit-
ical differences would not
stand in the way of improved
bilateral relations.
As for future diplomatic ties,
the premier expects them, but
the Hungarians have not set a
time frame.
At the moment, Israel and
Hungary maintain interest
sections in Budapest and Tel
Aviv respectively, the lowest
Continued on Page 19


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 23, 1988
Czar's Drummer Boy Reunites
Soviet Activist and Refusenik
By JOSEPH SMUKLER
-PHILADELPHIA
One of my earliest recollec-
tions is a toy drum. It was my
first possession. Tucked in my
mind is the perception that it
was somehow very important.
For nearly 60 years, that
image has flickered in my
conscious. Two months ago in
Moscow, it became my central
focus.
I was sitting in the dining
room of the National Hotel,
looking out on the Kremlin.
Across the table from me were
two engaging young people.
Alexander Shmukler and Alia,
his wife.
My wife. Connie, and I have
been activists in the Soviet
Jewry advocacy movement for
close to 20 years. Both of us
have been to the Soviet Union
on a number of occasions on
behalf of that movement.
About a year ago. we came
across the names of Alexander
and Alia Shmukler on a list of
Soviet refuseniks. The name is
not that uncommon. There
have, in the past, been other
refuseniks bearing that
surname, so much like mine.
A while later. I was in the
Soviet Union for an Inter-
national Bar Association
seminar on human rights.
Connie had been refused a
visa, so I went alone.
Mutual friends had given us
glowing reports about the
Shm ukJers and the leadership
role they were taking in the
refusenik movement. Alex,
along with two other promi-
nent Moscow refuseniks. had
recently founded the Associa-
tion of Friendship Between
the USSR and Israel. I asked
to meet with them, and
arrangements were made.
We were to meet in front of
the Intourist Hotel on Gorky
Street, and though the side-
walk was crowded. I knew
them immediately. They were
handsome, vibrant, smiling
and warm. Alex immediately
said that it seemed to him that
we had met somewhere before.
He is 28 and earns his living
teaching chess. Alia is 27. a
pianist who conducts a child-
ren^ orchestra. They live in
Moscow.
They applied for exit visas
on 1985 and were refused in
1986. Alex lost his professional
work as a welding engineer.
They have one son. Geisha, age
seven. We sat and spoke of the
similarities of our names and
* Ai */> fkrkkan
Phon: (305) 373-4605
PuDiisheo weekly every Friday
since 1927 by The Jewish Ftori-
dian Office end Rent 120 N.E.
6th St.. Miami. Fla 33132 Phone
(305) 373-4605
Second-Class Postage paid in
Miami, Fla USPS 275320
Postmaster Form 3579 return to
Jewish Floridian. P.O Box
012973, Miami. Fla 33101.
The Jewish Floridian does not
guarantee the Kashruth of the
merchandise advertised in its
columns
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: In
advance (Local Area) One year
$18.00. Out of town, country
upon request. By mail $1.45 per
copy.
joked of the coincidence of a
Shmukler refusenik and a
Smukler Soviet Jewry activist.
Alex commented that his
grandfather had seen my name
in Izvestia in April 1977. in
relation to the accusations
against Anatoly Sharansky,
and he had wondered if we
might be from the same
family.
My father had come to the
United States in 1923 at age
24, after having been wounded
and gassed while serving in
the Russian army on the Gali-
cian front during World War I.
He had been born in Zaslavl. a
town in eastern Yolhynia. the
Ukraine.
My mother had come from
Novazipkov in Byelorussia.
They met while learning
English at night school in
Philadelphia and married in
1927. I was born in 1928.
My father had six brothers.
all of whom immigrated to
America. I remember my
grandfather, who had brought
over the seven brothers. He
had a fish store in Philadel-
phia's Strawberry Mansion
neighborhood, where I grew
up. He always told me we
came from a family that had
been fishermen and fish
sellers.
I never knew my father's
mother. She died following a
pogrom, during which she was
raped in the presence of
several of her children, among
whom was my father.
No one in the American part
of the family had ever had
communication with whatever
part of the family might have
remained in Russia. The cord
had been severed when the last
brother arrived in America in
1923.
I had told Alex the family
story, and he pulled out a
notebook with family informa-
tion, given him by his grand-
father. Joseph, age 85.
I remember the moment
precisely. Everything seemed
to shift to slow motion and
then stop for an instant. I was
lifting a glass of wine to my
lips as Alex's voice droned on.
reading unfamiliar names of
long lost ancestors from his
family, when they had left
their hometown of Zaslavl.
Everything stopped with that
word.
I recall the glass trembling
in my hand. He looked at me
and stopped reading. I asked
him to repeat the name of the
town, and he clearly said
Zaslavl. There couldbe no
mistake. Our families were
from the same town. We put
our hands out to one another
across the table in sudden
recognition that we must be
indeed related.
After that moment of
silence, he asked slowly.
"Were you given a toy drum
when you were born? I was
given one, and my son, Geisha,
was given one when he was
born. Were you given one?"
I remember my heart racing.
Stories told to me more than a
half-century ago by my grand-
father in Philadelphia rushed
breathlessly from my mouth.
They were the same stories
that AJex had been told by his
grandfather in Moscow.
We were both descended
from the drummer boy. In the
middle of the 19th century, a
young Jewish boy from Zaslavl
was taken into the czar's
army. He became a drummer
boy." He had performed some
act of incredible bravery we
each heard slightly different
versions. Either he had
captured a large quantity of
Sarasota
Religious
Breach
SARASOTA Swift action
taken by the Sarasota-Tampa
chapter of the American
Jewish Committee, in coopera-
tion with the Baptist Joint
Committee on Public Affairs,
the Interfaith." Interracial
Council and the Sarasota
Ministerial Council, to publi-
cize and condemn a political-
religious document calling for
a public and official "confes-
sion" of the "supremacy of
Jesus Christ" as a criterion for
holding office has led to retrac-
tions and apologies by seven of
the nine Sarasota County
candidates who had signed it
and an outpouring of public
outrage over the document's
unconstitutionally and breach
of church/state separation.
Last month. 25 political
candidates running for various
positions in Sarasota County
appeared at a forum sponsored
by We The People, a four
year-old, one-man organiza-
tion that seeks to inform
Christian voters about candi-
dates' positions on issues, with
specific focus on their personal
relationship with God and how
that would affect their
behavior in office.
After a short speech, each
candidate was asked to sign a
"Declaration of Dependence"
in front of an audience of
approximately 125 people. The
pledge read, in part:
"My desire is to see America
return to its Christian heritage
"I recognize that this will
only be possible as I and other
Americans place our faith
in Jesus Christ.
"May that day soon come
when our beloved nation will
publicly and officially confess:
. 'we the people of the
United States of America
distinctly acknowledge our
responsibility to God. and the
supremacy of his Son. Jesus
Christ and hereby ordain
that no law shall be passed by
the Congress of these United
States inconsistent with the
will of God, as revealed in the
Holy Scriptures.' "
Of the 25 candidates, nine
signed the document: 16
refused. The declaration was
made public by We The
People, who will later endorse
candidates and run advertise-
ments announcing the
endorsements in local papers
and in the newsletter
published by Scott Carter
director of We The People,
which boasts a circulation of
8,500. Carter says that he is
funded entirely through
contributions and that volun-
teers help with the work.
enemy arms or had killed a
large number of the enemy.
In any event, as a conse-
quence, he was granted the
equivalent of 75 acres of land,
including fishing rights on a
portion of the nearby river."
The fortunes of the family
changed, and thereafter, they
all became fisherman, oper-
ating fish stores and stalls.
From then on. every son. at
birth, was given a toy drum in
remembrance of the drummer
boy.
There could be no question
now. Alexander Shmukler.
Moscow, and Joseph Smukler.
Philadelphia, were related.
Two parts of the family one
in Russia, one in America
separated for more than 65
years had immigrated to
Israel. The descendants of the
drummer boy were in Russia
Israel and America.
We drank toasts to our
reunion. Our last toast was
that our families meet next
year in Jerusalem We
embraced and parted. I to
America and freedom, he to
his flat in Moscow, still waiting
for his exit visa.
Joseph Smukler w a pa.'-
the Jeu-ish Community Relation!
Council ofGrtater Pkxlnd- \pt ln member of the board s/tftn
Sational Conference on Sam I J The Head of the Year: Torah scroll and crown in >> Synagogue. Jerusalem.
TOP CASH PAID
OLD FURNITURE
ORIENTAL RUGS
OLD OIL PAINTINGS
Single Items or Complete Estates
T=^A/?4:ESXA:rc GALLERIES BROWARD
7O1-4770 6914 Biscavne Blvd. 462-0730
. Objects of Art
Bric--Brac
Tapestries
Bronzes
Pianos
Stiver
TROPICAL GLASS
* CONSTRUCTION CO. CQC M101M
MIRROR
WALLS & CEILINGS
TABLE TOPS EMERGENCY REPAIRS STOREFRONTS
Dade 757-0651 Broward 462-3711
HAROLD ROSENSTEIN, Pres. S. Htbii Espmoi
7933 N.W. 7th Avenue Miami


Friday, September 23, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 3
=Volunteers Aid=
MDA 'MASH' Unit
Yugoslavia-
Tel Aviv (MDA): Magen
David Adom (MDA) Israel's
Emergency Medical, Ambul-
ance, Blood and Disaster
Service has announced that
Magen David Adom is seeking
U.S. volunteers to supplement
MDA's staff. Magen David
them were doctors, in addition
to our Mobile Intensive Care
Unit doctor."
Historic Meet
Jerusalem's Denmark High
School, with two years' experi-
ence as an MDA Youth Volun-
teer and three MDA courses
"I was really proud of our
first-aiders impressed by basic first aid, mass disaster
their efficiency and their true handling, dispatch center
teamwork. We set up the training to his credit. Ran,
Mobile Intensive Care Unit who intends to pursue a career
Adom has successfully used 'ike a battlefield casualty in medicine, added his impres-
volunteers side by side with station, treating the most seri- sion of the incident: "Yes, it
ously injured first. It's the only was the largest accident I've
way to work in a disaster of ever seen, but that didn't
this type. Within an hour, our matter. When you have
people treated 17 victims, victims to treat, it doesn't
paid personnel in such posi-
tions as ambulance drivers and
ambulance crew members. The
most recent group of MDA
volunteer trainees in Israel
includes 12 volunteers from
the U.S. who will work in
Jerusalem for the remainder
of the summer.
According to Dr. Robert L.
Sadoff, president of the Amer-
ican Red Magen David for
Israel (ARMDI) MDA's sole
support in the U.S., "The use
of properly trained volunteers
at Magen David Adom has
proven effective in reducing an
otherwise overwhelming
workload for paid staff and
freed funds to hire staff for
positions volunteers can't fill.
There are 5,000 Magen David
Adom volunteers, making
MDA Israel's largest volun-
teer organization.
Volunteers are needed to work side by side with staff members of
Magen David Adom (MDA), Israel's Emergency, Blood and '
Disaster Services. MDA has used trained volunteers as ambul-
Chain Vigolik, director of ance drivers and crew members.
Magen David Adom's Jeru- "started 12 IV's, and sent all of matter if there are two or 20;
salem district gave an account
of how MDA's volunteers were
used at a recent major acci-
dent. "On a summer Thursday
evening, a truck crashed into a
bus in the Ramot road in North
Jerusalem, injuring 17 persons
and causing one of the most
serious road accidents in
Israel's history. Ramot is
fairly far away, near the
northern city limits of Jeru-
salem. Nevertheless, we were
there within three minutes
before the police or the fire
department with a Mobile
Intensive Care Unit and the
three ambulances on duty at
MDA Jerusalem. A minute
later, we were joined by a
fourth ambulance the one
we keep on alert in Ramot,
driven by a volunteer, a rabbi
who lives in the neighborhood.
By 7:30, four more volunteer
ambulance crews had been
called up from their homes all
over Jerusalem. Besides the
MICU and the eight ambu-
lances, we had more than 40
volunteers there; many of
them live on the Ramot road,
and came down to help as soon
as the sirens started. Two of
YOUR CAR IN ISRAEL
the victims to hospitals; eight
to Hadassah Hospital on
Mount Scopus, five to
Hadassah Hospital in Ein
Kerem, and four to Shaare
Zedek Hospital. By 8:30, the
area was clean," Vigolik said.
One of the volunteers on
duty that evening at MDA
Jerusalem was 17-year old Ran
Basa, an honor student at
the important thing is to keep
calm and keep working. We
just worked the way we were
taught, and I think we did a
good job.
"After we were finished, I
phoned home and asked my
parents to record the news
coverage of the accident. No,
not so I could see myself; I
wanted to get a better overall
JTA Staff Report
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Simcha Dinitz returned here
from a visit to Yugoslavia, the
first by an Israeli official since
Belgrade severed relations
with the Jewish state following
the Six-Day War of 1967.
Dinitz, who is chairman of
the World Zionist Organiza-
tion-Jewish Agency Execu-
tive, held an unprecedented
meeting with the Yugoslav
foreign minister. He was
accompanied by Mendel
Kaplan, chairman of the
Jewish Agency Board of
Governors, and Israel Singer,
secretary-general of the World
Jewish Congress, which
arranged the meeting.
Dinitz, who also serves on
the WJC Executive, told
reporters upon his arrival here
that Yugoslav Foreign
Minister Budimir Loncar
stressed his country's special
friendship with the Israeli
people and its desire to help
advance practical bilateral
matters and the Middle East
peace process.
He added, however, that
Loncar was critical of Israeli
policies.
In New York, WJC execu-
tive director Elan Steinberg
said this week's meetings
follow upon talks in July 1987
between WJC President
Edgar Bronfman and
Yugoslav leader Lazar Mojsov.
view of all the first aid teams
and how they worked. It's
something I can learn from."
According to Steinberg,
Mojsov said at that time that
"he would work toward better
relations with the Jewish
world as a whole and the State
of Israel."
Shortly after that meeting,
Tanjug, the official Yugos-
lavian news agency, opened an
office in Jerusalem. In January
1988, the Yugoslav ambas-
sador to the United Nations,
Marko Kosin urged closer ties
with Israel in remarks at UN
European headquarters in
Geneva.
Yugoslavia recognizes the
fact that Israel should have a
right to her sovereignty," he
said at the time.
In Belgrade, Singer handed
the Yugoslav foreign minister
a declassified 1948 U.S. Army
wanted list of 50,000 Nazi war
criminals, compiled after the
war. It includes the name of
Kurt Waldheim, wanted for
murder, Steinberg told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency.
Dutch Treat
AMSTERDAM (JTA) The
Netherland's first Jewish
elementary school outside of
Amsterdam will open this fall
in Rotterdam, with seven chil-
dren, ages 4 through 6,
attending.
The teaching staff of two
will consist of a general studies
teacher, paid for by the
Rotterdam municipality, and a
Jewish studies teacher, paid
for by the local Jewish founda-
tion.
elc/an
RENT-A-CAR
773N
asi-maion
SPECIAL LOW PRICES i
For reservation and
prepayment through
ELDAN RESERVATION CENTER
USA: 212-629-6090.1-800-533-8778
Ben Gurion International Airport
Jerusalem Tel Aviv Herzeliya Haifa
Netanya Eilat Ashkelon
SPECIAL OFFER
* a WEEKS
Unlimited
Mileage
CROUP B+A/C
FROM 1.9.M TILL ll.l.as

A Luxurious
Gainesville,
Florida
Golf Vacation
per
couple
3 days/2 nights
Your Deluxe Vacation Includes...
Unlimited golf
Stay in an elegant furnished
private villa
Gainesville's finest country club
community
A sumptuous free dinner for two
Half dozen free golf balls
Call 1 800 826 2701
For complete information
This special ofta is available only to adults 40 and ovci OSa is
tutted lO availability, and limited to MM lri|> per COUDM







* Z-Jt
S^'jt^jztr -L -*v-
Viewpoir^
Geopolitical Reach
a*, tie New Yean
rfwar
\# r-.
: r i--

^-.t:

. -.-, O-,
.-
' : uaak
t. a. beit
-*-a_.r.
''.-"--'
. Bhasssr
rsU-tS we

.-.:. .r'.-r.rj.Oi;. '.V&r ar.: i
bca itrainea
B- not reaching beyond the rras; :'
geopolitical reach to assume that the later. :'
i.*ruj-= wefl for the
This spring arid s a rr. j_:
:' an official na: are: Feres .T.e: with
Hungarian Prinze Minister Karoty Gross :r.
May. July witnessed Simeha Dinitz now
i hill ii of the Jewish Agency in Budepeet
at high-profile Jewish -
Subsequent visits included those ::'
Hungarian officials tfl Jerusa.e.T.
A:.: r.ow. happily this: Jewish hisl
being made in Hungary, with sanctioi
outreach to the community. There is, in dee
i.e.- pr-.-grarr. at the University of
Budapest
With arrangement! ah*eady sd on a
rarietj bjects inventory of Jewish
tea a *-.s'n education, and export of
Torah = tr.e groundwork is laid for
refur.ca.'T.er.ta. -tantive exchange.
Anachronistic Move
In the same month that the B'nai B'rith
International's (BBIi Jewish Monthly had as
its lead story a piece on an Orthodox rabbi who
stretches the limits of halocha to include
women's participation in areas heretofore left
to men-only functions, B'nai B'rith Women
(BBW) is assailing the move that its members
may now participate in formerly all-male
units.
What irony'
That a 1986 agreement between BBW and
parent BBI foreswore any other option for
women than a distaff one has subsequently
been terminated is no cause for such dissen-
tt, in our view.
Tr.e argument, that because it is a women's
organization, BBW can therefore "play a
leadership role in advocacy for family issues."
teems to beg the greater question. Certainly.
participation by men and women in one
amzation can voice a vote for traditional
issues in even greater number-.
With other national organizations having
dropped their anachronistic male-only status,
it would seem that BBI is taking the step
without the threat of a court order.
Women who choose the proud role of a BBW
member can still have that opportunity.
Now. however, options will be greater still
as B'nai B'rith International opens its
membership roles to the other half of its
potential population.
By JEFF RUBIN
Prsstcsi Define Palestine
'A'ecster = D ITJ sa.;. I
:r.e y. .--.r. ::' the Je
B:r...ra. part of this
territory ur.der a Br
mandate'after World War I:
divide: into Israel and Jordan
:; action of the U.N. in 1&47
It. 1910. Encyclopedia
Br:tannica included land on
both the Jordan River
in its description of Palestine.
The as-yet unabridged PLO
enant states: Palestine
nth its boundaries that
existed at the time of the
British Mandate, is an indivis-
- -:al unit."
One of the PLO"s logos bears
another outline of "Palestine"
which includes all the land
from the Jordan River to the
Mediterranean, i.e.. Israel, the
West Bank and Gaza Strip.
U.S. newspapers have begun
to refer to the West Bank and
Gaza Strip as "Palestine." The
Los Angeles Times has head-
lined a recent letters-to-the-
editor column "Deportations
in Palestine."
And now UN Secretary
General Javier Perez de
Cuellar has contributed his
own interpretation of "Pales-
tine." In a press conference
following a recent meeting
with Yasir Arafat, de Cuellar
referred to the West Bank and
Gaza Str ng "These are
occupied territories for me and
everybody with the exception,
of course, of the Israeli
ment. We call them
Palestinians and the land
Palestine."'
This new definition, greeted
warmly by the PLO. was not
historically accurate nor diplo-
matically proper. Her I
legacy of the League of
UN's Trojan Horse
Nations, the UN's de Cuellar
cer -hould have known
ter.
'.V-.en the League gave
Great Britain the Mandate for
Palestine in 1920. the territory
stretched from the Mediter-
ranean across the Jordan
River to the territories which
later became Saudi Arabia and
Iraq. In 1921. Britain lopped
off two-thirds of Mandatory
Palestine to create an emirate
for the Hashemite dynasty-
driven out of Saudi Arabia by
the Saud clan and named the
area Transjordan. (The
country's independence was
proclaimed in 1946).
In 1947. Arab leaders
rejected a UN resolution which
would have partitioned the
land to the west of the Jordan
into Arab and Jewish states.
Following the declaration of
the State of Israel in 1948.
Transjordan and fire other
Arab countries invaded Israel
in an effort to eradicate the
Jewish state. Hashemite King
Abdullah conquered the West
Bank, and proclaimed himself
king of "All Palestine." Now
astride both banks of the
Jordan River, he renamed his
country Jordan. In 1950.
Jordan formally annexed the
ter-.: rj For" the next 17
years. Jordan and Egypt
prevented the development of
an independent Arab state in
the West Bank and Gaza Strip.
| ectively.
Some within the Palestinian
Arab camp now seem to be
tying, without authority, that
they might be willing to "accept
a state in the West Bank and
Gaza Strip as originallv envi-
- ned in 1947. Many Pales-
tinian Arafal still cling to the
PLO Covenant's maximalist
claims to "all of Palestine" and
:r.;s usser.; -
ical and military
between rival fact
In his reference u Pies-
tine." Perez de C ir hat
endorsed PLO e:':' -
Palestinian Arai
territories and has ran rough-
shod o%-er Israel aims laj
requirements. By .- -
one party to the A -
dispute, be also -
on the tenets of UN Security
Council Resolutior. 5 vha
calls for negotiat:::. Ktwca
the parties to estal -.-. a pa
and durable pea in the
region. Ironically the U.N.
official said he h::-r. I -eq-
uate a se- Ars>
Israeli conflict as be is begun
to do in the Iran-Ira, war. Bu:
after his uniiate-
of Palestine. he-
regarded as an b.
The annual UN .'iradeon
"the question of I estim
has always beer. ar.
deride Israel, r. I
the Palestinians.
Palestine was n I r
to a narrow s:r ;
between the Jon:
the 194$ disenga,
Palestine started at the Mm
terranean and er I in tkf
arid Jordanian
embraced Israe
what became kn B*
West Bank and
The new. increasing.} popular
use of the word 1
synonym for the : Trojan horse
threat to
both banks oi the Jordan
River. Israel -
Palestinian Aral know A
And so should Perei de
Cuellar.
Jfff Rubxn \t tt *
EmMfUporl -
rrpnnted.
. D >
Sukkot's Many Messages
The many messages of Sukkot stand us in
good stead this year of 5749:
The historical theme which reminds us of the
Exodus from Egypt recalls the precarious
nature of our lives. If not actually living in
fragile thatched huts in the desert human
Jewish Floridian
Fred K Shochet
Suzanne Shochet
Executive Eejito
Norma A Orovitz
Maragmg Eanof
Joan C Tegias
Friday, September 23.1!
Votome61
12TISHREI5749
Number 39
existence still depends often on circumstances
beyond our control a humbling experience
The ingathering of fruits at the end of th
harvest also reminds us of our dependence on
nature's productivity and we are grateful fof
those final fruits of "the earth at this season.
The uncertainty of life can be seen daily in
the news reports of natural disaster? orby
those made by men. Our dependency on w
and on the God-like natures within us make lor
proper consideration.
And the synagogue custom of bringing foods
for the hungry and homeless just as '*
celebrate one of the three main agricultunj
festivals creates an appropriate social acWJ
agenda while world Jewry celebrates if
harvest.


Friday, September 23, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 5
Support for Israel Remains Strong
AMERICAN SYMPATHIES IN THE ARAB-ISRAELI CONFLICT
]
60 -r
50
E
R
40
C30
E
N
T
EC
10 -
SYMPATHY FOR ISRAEL
SYMPATHY FOR ARABS
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
1967 1969 197C 197? 1975 1977 1976 1979 1980 1961 1982 1963 1984 1985 1986 1967 199B
YEAR
To the standard question, "In the Middle East situation, are your sympathies
j more with Israel or more with the Arab nations?" respondents in a variety of
polls offered standard responses. Over a 22-year period, a study indicated that
| Israeli support averaged 48 percent and Arab support averaged 10 percent. In
11986, '87 and '88, the charted answers reflect an average of from two to six polls.
In an April 1988 poll, a variation on the question referred to Palestinians. The
studies were conducted by the Gallup Organization and others by Roper; Penn
and Schoen; Harris; Wirthlin Group; The Los Angeles Times; and Marttila
and Kiley.
Analysis:
Orthodox Split on Centrist Group
By
sDREW SILOW CARROLL
[NEW YORK (JTA) Can
Itablished Orthodox rabbinic
roups absorb or encourage
ke opinions of an emerging
fm of "centrist" rabbis, or is
separate body needed to
rovide support for those
ibbis who think Orthodoxy
i turned too far to the right?
[The more than 50 centrist
Orthodox rabbis who last
lonth attended the first
)nference of the Fellowship
[f Traditional Orthodox
tabbis (FTOR) did not seem
krepared to reject either ques-
lon.
On the one hand, their pres-
nce at the two-day conference
kid at New York's JFK
Lirport indicated their dissa-
Ssfaction with major Orthodox
krganizations like the Union of
Orthodox Jewish Congrega-
|ions of America or the
ibbinical Council of America.
They feel their voices are not
|>eing heard in the halls of
lose institutions.
On the other hand, nearly all
lignaled a reluctance to break
fcompletely from those groups,
ind know both the RCA and
fhe O.U. have come out
Igainst efforts to form what
[he organizations call
['splinter" groups.
Yet members of the FTOR
kpoke of their new entity as a
['support group" and a "forum
for ideas" rather than a
tolinter organization.
"We're embryonic," said
Rabbi Ephraim Zimand, of the
Traditional Congregation in
St. Louis.
"We're not going to issue
decisions but make available
all of the relevant acceptable
opinions. We'll provide an
open-minded platform where
you can exchange ideas
without feeling put down if
you had a minority opinion."
The FTOR represents the
avant-garde of centrist Ortho-
doxy, which is attempting to
combine adherence to halacha,
or Jewish law, with a commit-
ment to Zionism, a dedication
to secular education and
involvement, and a willingness
to at least conduct dialogues
with members of non-
Orthodox Jewish movements.
Although these centrists are
hardly unanimous to the
extent they are prepared to
move to the left, they are
nevertheless joined by a belief
that Orthodoxy has taken a
decided, and unwelcome, turn
to the right.
They find solace in the words
of Rabbi Norman Lamm, presi-
dent of Yeshiva University,
who said earlier this year that
the right-wing Orthodox in the
United States and Israel "have
set the religious agenda" for
too long.
Lamm, however, has no
connection with the new
group, and declined to be
interviewed for this article.
The FTOR began in August
1987 under the initiative of
Rabbis Stanley Wagner of
Denver, and Benzion Kaganoff
of Chicago.
remarriage.
The unity issue is at the root
of the "Who is a Jew?" debate
the Israeli Knesset.
in
'Israelis are secular by choice, but also in
part by lack of choice.'
According to Wagner, of
Congregation Beth Hame-
drosh Hagodol, the intention
was to create a group that
identified with what he calls
"traditionalist rabbis."
Wagner defined "tradition-
alists" as rabbis who are
liberal in their interpretation
of Jewish law or who even
makes sacrifices in terms of
halacha. A frequently cited
example of the latter is the
lack of a mehitza, the fence or
curtain that separates men
and women worshippers.
Wagner said at least 100
rabbis, most with mixed-
seating synagogues, have
expressed an interest in
joining the organization.
Although they advocate a
liberal approach in many
areas, the most important
issues seem to be conversion to
Judaism and divorce.
Rabbis and laypersons fear
that Orthodox and non-
Orthodox groups may take
such different legal
approaches to the processes of
one group that the Orthodox
may not even recognize the
Jewishness of a child born of a
non-Orthodox, or even liberal
Orthodox, conversion or
Orthodox parties and their
American supporters would
have Israel's Law of Return
extended only to those
converted under Orthodox
auspices.
Wagner acknowleges that
his left-wing Orthodox
approach is similar in some
ways to that of Conservative
Judaism's right wing, with
which he retains close profes-
sional ties.
But whereas "Conservatism
is trying to hold the line
against further erosion of hala-
chic norms," rabbis in the
FTOR are firmly committed to
the centrality of Orthodoxy.
FTOR endorses co-
educational Jewish high
schools and tolerates mixed-
seating synagogues, because
"they may become valuable
instrumentalities in authentic
kiruv," or outreach, according
to a resolution discussed at last
month's meeting.
"If I had my way, Orthodox
rabbis would fill every pulpit in
the country," said Rabbi
Joseph Ehrenkranz, spiritual
leader of Congregation
Agudath Sholom in Stamford,
Conn., and the first chairman
of FTOR.
Still, the new organization
represents a challenge to both
the O.U. and the RCA, the two
rabbinical organizations to
which most of the FTOR's
rabbis belong.
Last month, RCA President
Rabbi Max Schreier wrote the
entire membership that the
RCA "would not allow splinter
groups within Orthodoxy to
set the agenda of the Orthodox
community."
Wrote Schreier: "We appeal
to our colleagues to come back
to the RCA and cease their
separatist efforts."
Rabbi Binyamin Walfish,
executive vice president of the
RCA, said that the "tragedy"
of the FTOR is that there is
already a place for left-of-
center rabbis within the RCA.
The RCA is democratic,
Wallfish said, within the
bounds of halacha. "I've
begged them to do it under the
auspices of the RCA," he said.
The O.U. takes an identical
position to the new group as
the RCA, according to Rabbi
Pinchas Stolper, executive
vice president. "If there are
rabbis who feel they have
special agendas, it should be
addressed within the O.U.," he
said.
Stolper said the O.U. also
has an outreach program that
maintains contact with syna-
gogues that do not preserve
halachic standards, but wish to
associate with Orthodoxy.


Page 6 The Jewish Flondian Friday. September 23. 1988
Religious-Right Accused
of Polarizing Israel
NEW YORK .JTAi In a
sharply worded address. Dr.
bnr Schorsch. chanceilor of
the Jewish Theological
Seminary, accused Israel's
religious "right of repelling the
majority of Israelis from reli-
gion and of fostering a "messi-
anic mind-set'' among Israeli
leaders.
In addition. Schorsch ex-
pressed his support for a land-
for-peace formula as a solution
to the Palestinian-Israeli
conflict.
Schorsch delivered his
remarks at the opening of a
two-day Conservative move-
ment conference on Zionism,
at the seminary's main campus
in New York.
His keynote address demon-
strated "the increasing asser-
tiveness of Conservative
leaders in confronting the reli-
gious parties in Israel, who
have made clear their inten-
tion to deny legitimacy to non-
Orthodox Jewish movements.
The Jerusalem Rabbinate
relented las: rr. r.'.r. ifl
attempts to deny a Conserva-
tive youth hostel its kosher
:!ass:f. :sv.: r.
But religion forces in Israel
continue to press for a "Who is
a Jew*" amendment to Israel's
Law of Return that would
effectively delegitimizc
Conservative and Reform
rabbis.
Schorsch told the conference
that "It is preferable to drop
the Law of Return' rather
than agree to the f
amendments. "Israel must not
permit itself to be progres-
sively recast age of an
East Europear. shteu. sa;:
Schorsch.
A solution to tl ught-
marish prospect." he said.
would be to require military
service for all qualified Israel:
yeshiva students, who may
currently gain exemptions,
and to require that all state
rabbis and rabbinic judges
have university degrees in
addition to their religious
training.
N ~ -. "-
Israelis are not re
observant, Schora
Israelis are "secular by choice,
but also in part by lack
choice."
S r.orsch. calling for reli-
gious pluralism in Israel, said
there has been a "catastrophic
failure of Orthodoxy to expose
some 80 percent of Israeli
socie' er. a modicum of
re :gi -s vocabulary, study
and observance."
Schorsch also blamed
elements on the religious right
::r r. ;-.."*: :. t-eacefol Bett.e-
rr.er.t :: tr.e Palestinian rr.s-.s.
Ir. end rung a Jand-for-
t formula, Schorsch
barkened back to the original
United Nations plan to parti-
tion the country into separate
Jewish and Palestinian states.
"That long-retarded step
forward offers a glimmer of
hope for a political settle-
ment." he said.
Schorsch also said Conserva-
tive Jews are fearful of a
"political rupture" in Israel.
Soviets Pressed on
Cancer-Ridden Refusenik
By YOSSI LEMPKOWITZ
BRUSSELS (JTA) The
case of a Jewish refas
suffering from cancer has been
taken up at the highest level in
Moscow by Lord Plumb of
Britain, president of the Stras-
bourg-based Parliament of
Europe.
PJumb is making the first
official visit to the Soviet
capital by a president of the
parliament. His spokesman.
Lionel Stanbrook. said that he
discussed the predicament of
Georgi Samoilovich with
Andrei Gromvko. president of
the USSR.
Plumb "asked Gromvko for
details about the case of the
Jewish refusenik. who is
suffering from cancer for
which there is treatment only
in the I'nited States," Stan-
brook said.
The soviet OYIR office
informed Samoilovich that he
would not be given a medical
visa for cancer therapy being
offered him at a hospital in
New Jersey. News of the
refusal was reported in Wash-
ington by Pamela Cohen, pres-
ident of "the Union of Councils
for Soviet Jews.
Samoilovich. 63. was doag-
nosed by a visiting American
doctor as having large-cell
lymphoma.
It is essential that Samoi-
lovich undergo surgery not
available in Moscow within the
next few weeks. Lord Plumb's
office said.
Redgrave's Rights Not Violated
NEW YORK (JTA) -
British actress Vanessa Red-
grave suffered a setback after
a federal appeals court in
Boston ruled that the Boston
phony Orchestra did not
its her civil rights when it
canceled her performances,
wing tin ; prates-
It was the latest and prob-
. the final chapter in the
leeal battle between Redgrave
and the orchestra. It started in
1982 after the orchestra
decided to cancel Redgrave's
contract to narrate six per-
formances of Stravinsky's
"Oedipus Rex" in Boston.
The orchestra canceled her
appearance following threats
they received because of Red-
grave's support of the P
tine Liberation Organization.
The 3-2 de< -.he U.S.
Court of Appeals for the First
KSHir"* *****
oat*?**1
sSw"^
We*"* &*
<*1
The feeling u mutual for Muhammed Musalem. left. :ndGoi
Sharon, right. Arab and Jewish pre-schoolers at a .Va imat ty
Care Center recently opened in Bat Yam, Tel Aviv. The Center
has a mixed enrollment of Arab and Israeli children who, life
these two, seem to have no problem in getting along. .V.4 '.-LVL47
USA supports more than 368 day care centers throughout IsnA.
Nudel:-----------------------
Absorption Complaints
ax -
4 DAYS/3 WGHTS $84
305-538-5721 imCJtcxm o~~*v
Circuit said tnat the cancella-
tion of Redgrave's contract did
not violate the Massachusetts
Civil Right Act.
The court, however, upheld a
$12,000 award to Redgrave as
compensation for a lost role in
a Broadway play. A three-
member panel of the same
appeals court ruled in her
faor in October 1987.
The trial of Redgrave
against the orchestra, in which
light 15 million in
damages, went beyond a sim-
ple breach of contract case and
'. irned into a battle of freedom
: ipeect sad the mix of an
Ths estra said at the
ancel the
itract after it rec<
earning that
uld be picketing and
Re |-
and her
-ace of the PL11
B won the first
round of her legal battle when
'- :'- :-r.-a. jury ruled in
ber 1984 that the
breached the
contract and awarded her
*!'' n and
lost wa*:-
But in Februar;, 1985
District Court Judge Robert
Keaton dismissed the |
award and ruled Redgr
rights were not violated.
By HIGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Former
prisoner of conscience Ida
Nudel is disappointed with the
way Soviet Jews are treated in
Israel and thinks some of them
are better off in the United
States.
Nudel. who won a 16-year
battle for emigration from the
Soviet Union when she arrived
in Israel last Oct. 15. ex-
pressed her disillusionment
while taping an interview for a
television show. "The Year
That Was."
"Israel and Israelis are indif-
ferent to immigration from the
Soviet Union." Nudel contend-
ed. Soviet Jews "prefer to be
taxi drivers in New York and
to earn money rather than
driving a taxi in Israel and
engaging in self-degradation."
she was quoted as saving.
A former economist-
engineer at the Soviet Insti-
tute for Planning and Produc-
tion. Nudel said. "When Soviet
Jews ask me whether to immi-
grate to Israel. I tell them: If
you are an acaderr.. .-.an. don't
come here before j u learn
some menial profes-
"If you are a I : r or a>
chemist you v, : I have
anything to do in Israel."
With respect to her ;.>ersonal
experience. Nude! said that
she had trouble getting a loan
to build a house ir. the Jeru-
salem area.
Soviet emigres settling ii
Israel often complain about
the difficulties they experience
finding jobs and affordibh
housing. Officials in the ab-
sorption Ministry and the
Jewish Agency :' r Israel
admit there is a |
The Jewish Agency
Assembly this summer
adopted a plan aimed itt
reforming the al rption
system. Many of its prime
components ha v- : been
implemented.
Am //t ./..,.,/, &Lm**4m SmmA A **
r**4m 1-i/.'.. ./',,/ ^ Sftntrn'm+immti
/!.,. / ./',,/,.. dBmif >'.,,/.., 4mAA0* m4
EAUVILLE HOTEL
Please call
BILLGOLDRING
at (305) 865-8511
On the ocean at 67th Street Miami Beach.
(305)865-8511


W. Germany-
Friday, September 23, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 7
Community Endorses
Embezzlement Probe
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN, (JTA) The leader
|of West Germany's Jewish
community said he is not satis-
fied with the investigation of
I tin' Werner Nachmann embez-
zlement scandal.
Heinz Galinski said he
Ibelieves the investigation
[should be pursued without bias
to expose possible accom-
lices, whether they be Jews
3r non-Jews.
Nachmann, who was
:hairman of the Central
,'ouncil of Jews in Germany
(For 20 years until his sudden
jeath last January, was found
have misappropriated up to
^20 million provided by the
Jonn government to pay resti-
tution to Jewish Holocaust
jrvivors.
Galinski discovered the
lalfeasance shortly after he
>ok office as Nachmann's
jccessor.
Speaking to a West German
idio station in an interview,
falinski said that family
nembers and close associates
of Nachmann "must have had
at least some knowledge" of
what happened.
He said he would leave it to
the state prosecution to clear
up the question of accomplices.
"We are all co-responsible in
a moral sense, because we had
too much confidence" in Nach-
mann, Galinski said.
Nachmann, a wealthy indu-
strialist with good connections
in government, was a pillar of
the community. "Nobody had
the slightest suspicion that he
would steal money that was to
go to victims of the Holo-
caust," Galinski said.
He praised the West German
media for its unsensational
coverage of the affair and for
not using the scandal to launch
an anti-Semitic campaign.
Galinski said some elements
in the country would try to use
the scandal to incite anti-
Jewish feelings, but they
would do so even if no Jews
lived in Germany and there
had been no Nachmann
scandal.
Estonia Notes
Jewish Revival
By HENRIETTA BOAS
AMSTERDAM (JTA) A
evival of Jewish life is taking
tlace in the Soviet republic of
Estonia, according to a Dutch
cialist in Eastern European
lairs.
Writing in the daily Het
*arool, the specialist, Dick
^erkijk, reported that a
fewish cultural society,
[urportedly the first in the
sviet Union, was established
Estonia and officially regis-
;red. It is said to have 250
Jembers to date.
The society's first public
zent was a gala concert of
ewish music performed in the
tussian Theater in Tallinn, the
paltic republic's capital. The
50 seats were sold out within
vo hours, Verkijk said.
He said he spoke to two
members of the Executive of
the Jewish society, Samuel
Lazekin and Eugenia Loov.
They told him Hebrew lessons
would start next month.
Verkijk reported that about
5,000 Jews live in Estonia, the
same number as in 1939, when
it was an independent nation.
Most of the Jews who lived
there before World War II
were deported to their deaths
during the Nazi occupation.
After the war, Jews from
Moscow, Leningrad and other
parts of the Soviet Union
settled in Estonia, because the
atmosphere was less anti-
Semitic, Verkijk reported.
He said similar Jewish
cultural societies will soon be
established in the neighboring
Baltic republics of Latvia and
Lithuania, which also are part
of the Soviet Union.
Spy Trial in Recess
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Irial of suspected Soviet spy
>habtai Kalmanovitz is to
ecess until December.
His trial opened behind
Closed doors in Tel Aviv
)istrict Court with three
Judges: Menahem Ilan,
>hoshana Berman and Zvi
lacohen.
According to defense
Attorney Amnon Zichroni, the
irst session was devoted to a
['mini-trial" about the validity
)f the confession extracted
rom Kalmanovitz by the Shin
Jet, Israel's internal security
ervice.
The defendant claims that
the confession was extracted
from him by Shin Bet agents
using illegal methods.
Kalmanovitz, a Soviet-born
businessman with important
social, political and military
connections in Israel, was
arrested last December for
alleged espionage.
The case has electrified the
Israeli public, because
Kalmanovitz has been at the
center of previous scandals
and has ties to a number of
prominent Israeli officials.
He was reportedly close to
the late Premier golda Meir
and formerly served as an aide
to Samuel Flatto-Sharon, the
eccentric multimillionaire fugi-
tive from French justice who
served as a one-man Knesset
faction from 1977 to 1981.
Lorber Chapter National Awards
At the National Jewish
tenter for Immunology and
Respiratory Medicine Confer-
ence in Denver, the Lorber
Chapter, Miami, received the
Fannie E. Lorber award for
raising $45,000 for the hospital
'during the past year, the Best
Hospital Information Program
and Best Chapter Public Infor-
mation Program awards.
Lorber delegates were Presi-
dent Sheila Stern, Elaine
Cohen, Sue Diamond and Leta
Garvett.
BEFORE THE FALL Dov Grobermann of Israel is about to be thrown on the canvas by
Andrzej Glab of Poland during the men's Greco-Roman U8 kilogram category ivrestling
competition at Seoul's Sangmu Gymnasium during the Summer Olympic Games. Glab won
the event. APIWide World Photo.
Winnipeg's Withering Jewish Population
TORONTO (JTA) -
Winnipeg's Jewish community
is aging, diminishing and
moving to the South End of
the city, according to a report
prepared by Touche Ross
Management Consultants for
the Winnipeg Jewish
Community Council's long-
range planning committee.
The report indicates that
Winnipeg s Jewish population
has continued the decline that
begin in the 1960s, though
population loss has slowed
down, compared with the
period between the 1971 and
1981 censuses.
For 40 years Winnipeg's
Jewish population was
stationary, with a population
in the neighborhood of 20,000.
The peak year was 1961. The
population now stands at just
under 14,500, with 27 percent
over 65. This compares with 23
percent in the 1981 census.
Winnipeg, formerly the third
largest Jewish community in
Canada, now is closer to fourth
and possibly fifth place, edged
out by Vancouver and rivaled
by Ottawa.
Israel Population Rises
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel's population Rrew by just over
1.5 percent last year, reaching 4,455,000 at the New Year,
the Central Bureau of Statistics announced here.
Eighty-two percent of the population is Jewish, the
bureau noted.
Nearly 100,000 births were registered during the past
year, of whom 73,000 were Jews.
New immigrants totaled about 13,000 in 5748, about
1,000 more than the previous year.
JOOOOOOOOOOOO
UKil
nmD
JNF EMERGENCY FOREST FUND
Jewish National Fund Keren Kayemeth Leisrael
Calls on the community to
HEAR THE CRY
of the Burning Trees and the Scorched Land
and respond to the
"JNF EMERGENCY FOREST FUND"
To Replace Every Burned Tree...
To Restore Every Acre Of Scorched Land...
DO IT TODAY!
Yes...l will help replant the burned trees
Yes...I will help restore the devastated land
Yes...I will help purchase essential fire fighting equipment
Enclosed is my gift of: $
Phone-
.Apt. No.
All contributions to JNF are tax deductible.
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND, INC.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 353 Miami Beach, Florida 33139 Phone 538-6464
|M
>ooo.


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian/Friday. September 23, 1988
Treasures of the Temple
By LESLIE J. GOTTESMAN
(WZPS) Indiana Jones would
have a field day in the recesses
of Metziltayim Street in the
Jewish Quarter of Jerusalem^
Old City, for through an
arched doorway, hidden from
the brilliant sunshine, visitors
are greeted by a museum
exhibiting precisely-crafted
replicas of implements used in
the ancient Hebrew Temple.
A Glimpse of Jewish Heri-
tage
Since its official opening on
Jerusalem Day of this year,
the Museum of Treasures of
the Temple, a showcase of the
Temple Institute, a non-
Eolitical. independent body,
as offered both schoolchil-
dren and adults a glimpse of a
majestic Jewish heritage.
The inspiration for the
museum came from an ex-
paratrooper named Rabbi
Yisrael Ariel, who participated
in the battle for the Temple
Mount in the 1967 Six Day
War. His first army assign-
ment after the war. ironically,
was to guard the Dome of the
Rock, the great Moslem
mosque located on the tradi-
tional site of King Solomon's
Temple. Ariel recognized that
while the main spiritual center
of the Jewish people had been
returned to Israel, its trea-
sured symbols had not. The
objects had all been captured
in ancient times by conquering
armies, such as the Roman
forces in 70 CE. whose
conquests were recorded in the
famed reliefs on the Arch of
Titus in Rome.
Creation of the magnificent
objects used in the Temple
service signified, to Ariel,
restoration of pride in the
Jewish heritage. Although the
obligations of the Temple
could no longer be fulfilled, its
spiritual messages could be
communicated. His dream
fueled the efforts of expert
artisans, culminating in the
opening of the Temple Insti-
tute's exhibit.
Items on Display
The major elements of
worship in the ancient Hebrew
Temple are displayed behind
shiny black curtains, adorned
with applique' cherubim. All
the items exhibited, from the
woven garments worn by the
Cohen (or High Priest) to
silver trumpets and
Institute On
Jewish Ed
"Developmentally Appro-
priate Programs: Embracing
Challenges" will be the theme
of the Jewish Council of Early
Childhood Educators of South
Florida's semi-annual Profes-
sional Growth Institute on
Sunday, Sept. 25, 9 a.m. 1
p.m.. at the Miami-Dade
Community College North
Campus.
Keynote speaker Dr. David
Elkind is immediate past presi-
dent of the National Associa-
tion for the Education of
Young Children and professor
of child study at Tufts Univer-
sity.
More than 30 workshops
dealing with early childhood
education have been planned
and there will be displays of
educational materials.
chalice cup, are based
primarily on biblical and
rabbinic descriptions.
The laver, for example, used
by the priests for washing
hands and feet before worship
during the period the Israel-
ites wandered in the desert,
possessed two faucets. In the
Second Temple, it had twelve.
The present copper model
contains six. Its base, which
some traditional authorities
describe as convex, others
concave, combines both forms
in an expression of reconcilia-
tion.
The priest's robe must be
one continuous white garmet
without seams. In order to
weave it with a pattern of
squares within squares, a
computerized loom was devel-
oped. In the case of the priest's
avnet or belt, its length
wrapped around his chest, at
heart level, was obviously
intended to limit his move-
ments during the atonement
service while he grappled with
his conscience.
Other items, fashioned from
gold and silver, as well as
copper and brass, serve to
inspire visitors with the gran-
deur these symbols depict. The
regal crown, traditionally
donned by the High Priest, is
made of gold and the elon-
gated trumpets, standards of
an independent people, of one
continuous piece of silver. In
the case of the harp, its design
is based on cave drawings
found at Megiddo. and dating
back 4-5.000 years. A larger
model, complete with gut
strings, is presently being
made.
The most ambitious plan to
date is the projected design of
a gold menorah. The ingenuity
needed for its construction
from one mold will first be
applied in a more modest silver
model. And in an area long-
\
A schoolgirl observes some of the items in the 'WuW)nJ
Museum of Treasures of the Temple in the Jewish Ounw!I!WJ
Jerusalem's Old City. WZPS vhoto. *ner\
bathed in mystery, eleven
different ingredients used for
incense in the Temple service
have been refined and
preserved in different recepta-
cles. Their components, as well
as the formula for the special
bluish dye referred to in the
Bible, is based on the extensive
research of Rabbi Pinchas
Burstein.
The first Temple, built h
King Solomon, and thesecooi
by Herod the Great, wer>
noted for their unsurpass^
beauty. The replicas of ink
ments used in the Templt
displayed in the Museum oft
Treasures of the Temple, t
helped a fascii ating at
unique era in Jewish histort
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only.
RAISIN
PUMPERNICKEL
BREAD................. '* *1<
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only. Assorted Toppings. Individual
Danish Rolls........3 H
Available at All Publix Stores and Fresh Danish
Bakeries.
Apple Bran
Muffins..............6 ^ $139
Available at All Publix Stores and Fresh
Danish Bakeries. A Breakfast Treat
Cinnamon Raisin
ROIIS...................6 for *159
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only. Graham Cracker Crust
Key Lime Pie........'h*425
Available at All Publix Stores and Fresh
Danish Bakeries. Light and Tasty. (8-inch)
Angel Food Cake *&!
***** ^oppng -, apsjoso*
[3
I Publix
Sew V^qCRivervThursS n%L a 1V88-Quantity Rights reserved. Only in
hX iroward- P?"m Beach. Martin. St. Lucie.
Indian R.ver and Okeechobee Counties.


1
Mystery Murder Solved
Friday, September 23, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 9
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) This
is the story about the price of
naivete.
Ziva Goldovsky, 18, had no
doubts. She was so convinced
that relations between the
Jews and Arabs are only a
function of how they treat
each other, how they talk to
each other, that she had set
herself no barriers.
Goldovsky used to have as
many Palestinian friends as
she had Jewish friends in the
radical leftist circles in which
she had spent most of her
youth in Holon.
At the height of the Pales-
tinian uprising, she traveled
freely in the West Bank,
hitching rides with Arab cars,
socializing with Palestinian
youths and eventually falling
in love with one.
"Nothing will happen
to me," she promised her
worried parents. "I know
them, I know how to talk to
them." The parents tried to
convince her that although
they respected her liberal
views, she should be more
cautious. But she would not
listen.
On Aug. 13, her body was
found, totally burned, on a
farm near the industrial zone
of the Arab town of El-Bireh,
some 20 miles north of Jeru-
salem.
At first, rumors spread that
this was the body of a Pales-
tinian boy killed by the
security forces. Then it was
believed that the victim was a
Palestinian girl.
It took further investigation
and laboratory tests to reveal
the actual tragedy: that the
farm near El-Bireh was to be
the last stop on the journey of
a young Jewish woman who
was a victim of her own belief
in the good of humankind.
Police announced they had
solved the murder, after a
lengthy investigation in a
hostile environment.
According to a police commu-
nique, two suspects have been
Kaddish Recited
For Pakistan
Ambassador
NEW YORK (JTA) A
member of the United States
Embassy, Rosalie Kahn,
recited Kaddish at the
embassy's memorial service
for the late ambassador,
Arnold Raphel, 45, in what
may have been the first recita-
tion of Jewish prayer in
Islamic Pakistan.
Services for Raphel, who
was among the 29 people killed
in a plane crash with Pakistani
President Mohammad Zia ul-
Haq two weeks ago, were
attended by Ghulam Ishaq
Khan, the new chief executive,
and a delegation of Cabinet
ministers and high-ranking
military officers.
The service, according to an
article in New York Newsday,
was nonsectarian, as Catholic
and Protestant clergy also
participated.
During the evening news,
the state television network
noted that Ishaq Khan "partic-
ipated in various rites" of the
service, which was held on
embassy grounds.
arrested in connection with
the murder, both known for
their contacts with the victim.
One of them confessed that
he killed the young woman.
Another is suspected of having
helped the prime suspect to
remove the body and burn it.
The prime suspect reportedly
led the police officers to a
place where they found keys, a
purse and documents
belonging to the victim.
Ziva Goldovsky was raised in
Holon, far away from the
scene of violence. But coming
from a liberal home, she
became politically involved,
engaged herself in pro-
Palestinian activities and
made a number of acquain-
tances with Arabs.
She supported the Pales-
tinian uprising, and was
enraged at the almost daily
reports of violent encounters
between the security forces
and the local population. She
had faith that once political
differences are set aside, there
would be no justification for
fear.
According to the police
version of the murder, report-
edly based on the prime
suspect's own confession,
Goldovsky's last encounter
with an Arab began with a
minor exchange, as she and an
Arab friend took a walk deep
into remote areas of the farm.
The Arab not the young
man she was romantically
involved with began with
remarks on her immodest
attire, then charged that she
was an agent for the security
forces. When she denied this,
he said: "Prove it."
Goldovsky asked: "How can
I prove it?'-*
Said the Arab: "Get me a
pistol."
She replied: "I will not give
you a pistol so that you can
shoot Jewish children."
This prompted the suspect to
slap the young woman in the
face.
Goldovsky apparently still
believed, even at this gesture
of violence, that straight talk
could do it. "My parents have
never slapped me," she told
her friend, "and neither will
you."
But the suspect then
allegedly pushed her down,
strangled her and eventually
struck her head with a heavy
rock. He then called a friend,
and together they burned the
body.
THE COURAGE TO
REMEMBER
THE HOLOCAUST 1933-1945
The Simon Wwsenthal Center has announced the availability of
tte poster series on the Holocaust, "The Courage to Remember. "
Based on the Center's exhibit which had its international opening
m Vienna in March 1988, the UO full-color panels of the poster
series include over 200 original photographs, many never before
seen by the general public. Three years in the making, this series
not only depicts the Nazi terror, but also gives a perspective of
resistance and hope.
least
for your
money.
New creamy tasting --........
Mazola- Light has fewer calories
than any leading light spread. In
fact cholesterol-free Mazola Light
spread has just half the calories of
ordinary margarine. And of course.
Mazola Light carries the symbol
New Mazola Light. ^St^^2t^'"mmmmm "" 5" '48001
The lightest of the lights. I---------------------------------------r^,
SAVE 25(2
on any size
Mazola" Light Spread
CONSUME \m on coupon IK' PWCMM;> J UM
5c1ri CSi\ilut 100C Rl WiLlK Best looos f .tiIh.. you
E Sn .11* 01 Mi coupon pin 8C >i suonwiw ir, ,U""X'"" "J
,r*BMfooo-smpnc-Poi.c Sendiw.pwlotirr,p.x.to BM
25225"' 2
1988 Best tooth CPt inter nation* inc


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian/Friday. September 23. 1988
Soviets Sign Holocaust Pact
WASHINGTON. D.C. -
Several million Nazi docu-
ments, photographs and other
records of Nazi atrocities
seized by the Red Army in the
former German occupied terri-
tories of the Soviet Union and
Eastern Europe at the end of
World War II will be made
available to western scholars
and researchers for the first
time as a result of an agree-
ment the U.S. Holocaust
Memorial Council has signed
with the Soviet Union.
The vast collection of the
Soviet archives may constitute
a third or more of existing
Nazi and other Holocaust-
related materials.
As a result of the break-
through agreement signed in
Moscow, the Council will
microfilm the documents and
duplicate photographs to be
kept in the archival repository
of the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum expected to
open here in 1991. Major
components of these materials
will be displayed in the
Museum.
-We"re obviously thrilled."
said Miles Lerman. the
Council's international rela-
tions chairman, who headed a
six-person delegation that
visited archives in Moscow and
western republics of the Soviet
Union for two weeks. "We
have tried before to get this
information, but were always
U.S. Strips Ex-Nazis
Of Naturalization Papers
unsuccessful. But the new
spirit of glasnost (openness)
unlocked this important
source."
The Soviet Union's archival
collection provides an in-depth
picture of what happened to an
estimated 2.5 million Jews in
the Nazi invaded territories of
what are now the Soviet
republics of Ukrainia.
Moldavia. Byelorussia,
Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania,
as well as in portions of
Russia. Large numbers of non-
Jews living in these territories,
including Gypsies, political
dissidents, local national
patriots and others, also
became Nazi victims of arrest,
torture and execution.
"We saw glimpses of infor-
mation on everything about
Latvian attitudes toward
Jews, about Lithuanian seS
police, statistics on the move-
Tm J4WS'C?.rresPndence
of Nazi officers." said Univer
py.0H-,Kerm0nt Profeor
Raul Hilberg a members o
the Council delegation and one
of the nation s foremost Holo-
caust scholars.
Previously, Holocaust
related documents have tyni
cally been released only on a
case-by-case basis, usually for
trials of accused war criminals
in the Soviet Union and in
western courts. This agree-
ment calls for the mutual
exchange of Holocaust-related
collections between the
Council and the Main Archival
Administration of the USSR
Council of Ministers.
Bv HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Two Nazi war criminals living
in the United States. Stefan
Reger and Juris Kauls. were
ordered denaturalized by two
different judges.
Reger. 63. of Yardville. N.J..
was denaturalized by U.S.
District Court Judge Clarkson
Fisher in Newark, N.J.. on the
basis of his service as an SS
guard at the Auschwitz II
(Birkenau) concentration camp
between 1943 and 1945.
Kauls, 75. of Sun City. Ariz.
was denaturalized by U.S.
District Court Judge Robert
Bloomfield in Phoenix by a
default judgment based on
Kauls' failure to respond to
government charges that he
se rv eda^aNazn^oncentration
camp in Latvia during World
War II. and concealed that
service from federal immigra-
tion officials.
The two actions were among
the 29 cases pending before
U.S. courts brought by U.S.
district attorneys and the
Justice Department's Office of
Special Investigations, which
searches out and tries to prose-
cute accused war criminals
living in the United States.
Reger, who has fled to West
Germany, was not there for
the verdict, but admitted in
sworn testimony that he had
served as a SS guard at
Auschwitz.
Born in Yugoslavia. Reger
immigrated to the United
States in 1952 and became a
citizen in 1957. He had
contended in his immigration
forms that he had simply been
a combat soldier in the
German army.
Kauls was prosecuted with
the aid of official papers that
were stored in the Berlin docu-
ment Center in West Berlin
captured intact from the Nazis
by the U.S. Army which
showed "handwritten resumes
Kauls had submitted to Nazis
in which he admitted to being
inspector of guards at the Riga
concentration camp." an OSI
source said.
Kauls entered the United
States in 1954 and became a
U.S. citizen in 1960. Neal
Sher, OSI director, said Kauls.
like Reger, has left the United
States and will not be allowed
to return.
In Moscow, Miles Lerman. left, chairman of the U.S. H-ioeautt
\Umorial Council's International Relations Com>/ -'-e ani
Evgeny M. Kozhernikov. first deputy director of th>. Central
Archil* Administration of the USSR Council of Minis'- rs, sign
the cooperation agreement that will open immense Sovu holding!
of Nazi documents to Western scholars and research-
PUT ON YOUR BLUE SUEDE SHOES
and Stroll, Twist, Jitterbug or Bop to the
tHRlFT SHOP HOP
Sunday, October 9,1988
Noon
The Aaron "Artie" Kravitz Building
3194 Hallandale Beach Boulevard
as the
P* as the Douglas Gardens Miami
Jewish Home 1MII Shop rolls back
our prices to the Fabulous Fifties!
Great Musk! 25* hot dogs
Kiddie Rides! Kfcdrinks
Drawings for 15c popcorn
prizes!
.. and of course, rock-bottom prices on
fop-notch merchandise!
COME FOR THE PARTY AND STAY FOR THE BARGAINS
V


Kollek Invites Kohl
To Jerusalem
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) Jerusalem
Mayor Teddy Kollek invited
Chancellor Helmut Kohl of
West Germany to visit the holy
city and said here that the
German leader might come
sometime in December.
A spokesman for Kohl said
the chancellor definitely wants
to come to Jerusalem, but that
a visit would depend on his
schedule.
Kollek extended the invita-
tion during an hour-long chat
with the chancellor that
focused on a fountain, now
being built, that the West
German government has
donated to Jerusalem.
The fountain is a creation of
Gernot Rumpf, a German
artist. Kollek would like to see
Kohl dedicate it sometime at
the end of this year.
Kollek also met here with
Foreign Minister Hans-
Dietrich Genscher and several
other high-level officials.
The Jerusalem mayor said
that his discussions focused on
how to improve the overall
situation in Jerusalem through
contributions to specific social,
educational and other better-
ment programs.
Kollek's visit was made at
the invitation of the Adenauer
Foundation, an organization
allied with the Christian
Democratic Party that is
involved in education projects
in Jerusalem.
Egyptians Seize
Israeli Boat
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israeli
officials have expressed disap-
proval of the Egyptian coast
guard's move to ram and seize
an Israeli excursion boat in the
Gulf of Eliat. But the Foreign
Ministry is awaiting further
details of the incident before
deciding how Israel will
respond.
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin said that the incident
was not the sort of thing that
should occur between friendly
nations and was "completely
unnecessary."
Information so far indicates
that the seizure was an inde-
pendent initiative, not coordin-
ated with authorities in Cairo.
The Maya, with 35 Israeli
passengers and crew aboard,
was intercepted by the Egyp-
tian patrol ship, rammed and
towed to the Egyptian coast
guard station on Coral Island
in the gulf.
The Maya's deck and hull
were damaged, but no one was
hurt. Its passengers and crew
were detained. After several
hours, they were allowed to
return to Eliat aboard the
Maya, apparently on orders
from the authorities in Cairo.
The captain of the Maya,
Moshe Saar, said he was about
a mile offshore when attacked.
He said the Egyptians ordered
him not to use his radio. He
also said he refused to sign a
statement that his vessel had
sustained no damage.
According to the Egyptians,
the Maya was only about 300
yards offshore in Egyptian
waters and failed to heed
orders to stand clear.
Meanwhile, the Maya was
off again two days later,
carrying about 30 tourists. The
damage will be repaired at a
later date.
Lay-Rabbis Trained
In New England
NORTHWOOD, N.H. (JTA)
The work of the Para-Rabbi
Foundation, which provides
rabbinic training for lay people
in isolated New England
communities unable to afford
full-time rabbinic services, still
goes on, this time with the help
of Hebrew College in Brook-
line, Mass.
A group of rural New
England Jews recently spent a
weekend at Hebrew College's
Camp Yavneh in secluded
Northwood, N.H., learning the
true meaning of the Jewish
Sabbath.
They attended study
sessions led by resident rabbis
and teachers and participated
in prayers and songfests
conducted by Yavneh s 225
campers.
"All of us here this weekend
are tremendously thirsty to be
more Jewish," said Rick
Schwag of Lyndonville, Vt.,
executive director of the foun-
dation, of the 17 adults and
three children who attended.
"We'd be thrilled to have an
institute like this happen once
a month," he added.
Correspondence between
Schwag and Hebrew College
President Samuel Schafler
resulted in the Yavneh
weekend. Schwag and Hebrew
College are now negotiating a
follow-up program to the
Shabbat weekend.
In the coming year, Schwag
has arranged for courses in
Portsmouth, N.H., Bratt-
leboro, Mass., Bangor and
Montpelier, Vt., on such
subjects as how to conduct
Jewish funeral services,
preparing for a bar/bat
mitzvah, uses of the Jewish
ritual bath and understanding
Rosh Hashanah prayers.
Also on Schwag's agenda
are plans to build a sukkah on
the Appalachian Trail in cele-
bration of Sukkot.
Schwag has received a grant
from Boston's Combined
Jewish Philanthropies to
enable him to start a lending
film library to distribute films
of Jewish interests to rural
Jews from Portsmouth, N.H.,
to St. Johnsbury, Vt.
Opportunities such as the
film-lending service are
promoted in a small publica-
tion called Kfari, which comes
out six times a year and is
published by R.D. Eno, former
organizer of the annual
Conference on Judaism in
Rural New England.
Friday, September 23, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 11
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E. 1st Avenue Miami, Florida
VASELINE
INTENSIVE CARE
Lotion
All Types
10 oz. $1.99
15 oz. $2.99
VASELINE
HAIR
TONIC
3 5 oz $1.99
oz. $2.39
I
VASELINE
INTENSIVE
CARE
HAND & NAIL
FORMULA
2.5 oz.
$1.19
POND
::'.:r. IM'PC lejn-
m**~
PONDS
Dry Skin Cream .>
POND'S Cold Cream
Regular
3.6 oz. $2.59
6 1 oz $3.89
Dry Skin Cream
3.9 oz $2.99
6.5 oz. $3.99
11 oz $4.99
HairSprr.
RAVE
Aerosol
Hair
Spray
9.1 oz.
$2.99
CLOSE-UP
GEL
cud&iUP^
6.4 oz
$1.59
CLOSE-
UP
PASTE
PUMP
4.5 oz.
$1.59
AIM
Toothpaste
PUMP
Regular
Mint
POND'S
Cream and
COCOA
BUTTER
Lotion
12 oz.
$2.19
GROOM &
CLEAN
6.5 OZ.
$2.99
POND'S
Cold Cream
TUBE
2 oz $1.69
PUMP
Regular
2.7 oz $5.19
Dry Skin
2.9 oz. $3.29
AIM
GEL
REGULAR STRENGTH
4.5 oz.
$1.59
CLOSE-UP
PASTE
CLOSE UP ?
6.4 oz.
$1.59
6.4 oz.
$1.69
AIM
TOOTHPASTE
IXTNA STRENGTH
Aim
"I
8.2 oz.
$1.99
PEPSODENT
Toothpaste
-
ftepsodent
6.4 oz.
8.2 oz.
$1.19
$1.29
U SIGNAL
MOUTHWASH
32 oz.
$3.39
AIM
Toothbrushes
j^j^/Aim
ANTI PLAQUE
TOOTHBRUSH
$1.69
PEPSODENT
Toothbrushes
Pepsodent
$1.29
*
S~F
WORLD
OF
DISNEY
Toothbrushes
$1.39


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 23, 1988
Salvation____
Schiff, who attended the
meeting as a representative of
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation.
Schiff said the Federation is
concerned about the plight of
South Beach synagogues. The
rabbis expressed hope that the
Federation will augment their
expressions with financial and
other tangible assistance.
"The Jewish community has
always been a vital part of
Miami Beach," said Schiff.
"The Jewish community built
Miami Beach in large part.
And the people dedicated
themselves over many decades
to making Miami Beach a
haven for people moving into
our area from up north. And
it's very pitiful to see all that
was built, not only the physical
property of many beautiful
synagogues, but also the spiri-
tual richness, to disappear."
The rabbis pooled statistics
of attendance at recent High
Holy Day services during the
first portion of their meeting,
which was closed to the media.
There are approximately
4,000 synagogue seats in the
South Beach area, which, with
the exception of one Conserva-
tive congregation, are all
Orthodox. "There were less
than 1,000 worshippers in all
the synagogues together if the
rabbis' tallies were accurate,"
Stern said.
"We were discussing
mergers," Stern said. "If we
could close down five syna-
gogues. It would be a problem
as far as employment and
maybe walking distance but it
would strengthen in the long
run the function of the syna-
gogues qualitatively.
"These synagogues have to
function," Stern insisted. "We
have a service to give the
public. South Beach has
always been a community of
elderly people. And these
elderly people, many of them
are forsaken people. They
need spiritual, psychological
Republicans Swipe At
Pro-Arab Democrats
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Three Republican lawmakers
called on Democratic presiden-
tial nominee Michael Dukakis
to remove three pro-
Palestinian members of the
Democratic National
Committee.
Reps. Benjamin Oilman (R-
N.Y.) and John Miller (R-
Wash.), who are Jewish, and
Rep. Norman Lent (R-N.Y.)
asked Dukakis to "act at once
to dismiss" the three. They
are:
The Rev. Willie Barrow,
executive director of Opera-
tion PUSH, the Chicago-based
organization founded by the
Rev. Jesse Jackson. Barrow is
considered a supporter of
Nation of Islam leader Louis
Farrakhan, who has made
several disparaging remarks
about Jews and Judaism.
Robert Farrell. a Los
Angeles city councilman, who
in 1986 said that "Israel is
treating West Bank Arabs the
same way the Nazis treated
European Jews."
Ruth Ann Skaff of
Houston, a spokesman for the
pro-Palestinian Ad Hoc
Committee on Leboanon
The three were among the
ten Jackson supporters added
to the Democratic National
Committee as part of a unity
agreement between Jackson
and Dukakis at the start of the
Democratic National Conven-
tion in July.
Pathetic' Charges
The presence of the three
"raises questions about
Dukakis' judgment and his
submission to Jesse Jackson,"
the lawmakers said in a state-
ment. "If Jackson has this
much influence now, what kind
of influence will he have in a
Dukakis White House?"
Hyman Bookbinder, special
advisor to the Dukakis
campaign on the Middle East,
human rights and the unde-
rprivileged, called the
lawmakers' charges
"pathetic."
"There is just no comparison
between the two things they
are trying to make similar."
Bookbinder said.
He was referring to the
resignations last week of
allegedly anti-Jewish members
of the Vice President George
Bush's Coalition of Ethnic
Nationalities, an organ of the
Republican nominee's presi-
dential campaign.
Continued from Page 1
therapy that only a rabbi can
give. You see, Medicare
doesn't pay for it.
"A rabbi's door in South
Beach, when it is open, it is
open sometimes to a broken
heart of an old man or an old
woman, not only during
services."
The representatives of the
approximately 10 congrega-
tions, discussed several
courses of action. They
include:
Creating a formal coalition
of South Beach synagogues to
work cooperatively for their
mutual benefit:
Organizing joint
fundraising events;
Merging some of the
congregations;
Submitting a proposal to
the Jewish Federation for
funds to assist in specific
projects that would help the
social, welfare and educational
needs of the community such
as adult educational classes;
Inviting the City of Miami
Beach to discuss specific
services such as increased
police protection.
The group discussed several
proposals. One was a series of
mergers of some of the congre-
gations with the least member-
ship. Stern said that idea could
be beneficial in the long run
but would cause short term
problems in terms of employ-
ment at the closed syna-
gogues.
Miami Beach Mayor Alex
Daoud and Commissioner Abe
Resnick attended last week's
meeting and pledged coopera-
tion on the city's part. Some
rabbis said their congregation
members were too fearful to
even walk from their homes to
the synagogues for minyans
because of street crime in the
area.
Cantor Henry Fuchs, who
attended the meeting as a
representative of Beth Tfilah.
said the problem is a declining
membership due mostly to
deaths and members moving
into nursing homes.
According to a recent survey
of Jewish demographics done
by University of Miami
geographer Dr. Ira Sheskin,
Miami Beach has faced a
decline of about 20.000 Jews in
the past six years. Sheskin
attributed this mostly to
deaths and northern migra-
tion.
The rabbis and cantors are
j,nyir
D)1f
An exhibition of 250 photographs by war photograph-r Robert
Capa is on display at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art. S^me w
photos in the exhibit. "Stormy Years," were taken during Israeli
War of Independence and have been donated by Robert Capa's
brother, Cornell, to the musuem's permanent collection. C'jrnell
Capa, also a photographer, poses with a picture of h it late
brother, who was killed in 1954 covering the French withdrawal
from Indochina.
Gunter in Dade County
The importance of the
South Florida Jewish vote was
emphasized for the second
time this week on Monday
when U.S. Senate hopeful Bill
Gunter was flanked by local
Jewish leaders offering
endorsements at a North Dade
synagogue on Monday.
Gunter, state insurance
commissioner, staged a press
conference at Beth Torah
Congregation.
While Gunter's
opponent. U.S. Rep. Buddy
McKay was courting the
Jewish vote and endorsements
elsewhere in Dade County.
Gunter received support from
U.S. Congressman Larry
Smith and senior state Sen.
Jack Gordon.
Comm. Bill Gunter
Also at the synagogue to
offer their support for Gunter
were state Reps. Peter
Deutsch, Mike Abrams. Ron
Silver. Also appearing were
Broward County Commis-
sioners Scott Cowan and Nicki
Grossman, Local Jewish activ-
ist! included Jeffrey
Berkowitz. Harold Wishna
Alan Becker and Michaei
Adler.
Clarifying media reports
that there had been a whis-
pering campaign initiated
from the Gunter camp that
McKay was anti-Semitic.
Smith and other Gunter
supporters stood united
Monday in declaring that they
didn't believe that McKay was
either anti-Semitic oranti-
Israel and instead focused on
McKav's record.
elderly themselves. Fuchs, in
his 70s, recalls when South
Beach was filled with Jews in
the 60s and 70s. "Six hundred
eighty seats used to be filled
and more were added. Now it
was only 100," he said of his
own synagogue's recent High
Holy Day attendance.
Fuchs said the synagogue
has been fortunate that it
"saved a little money" and
financially isn't "so bad." Still,
a financial time bomb is ticking
for South Beach synagogues in
general, according to Stem,
who is the senior Orthodox
rabbi in the area and the
author of 18 volumes on
Jewish law.
"The lay leaders are people
in their 80s. The rabbis are
also elderly." says Stern. "We
do not have the stamina, the
strength, and we are really
crying out for help. I really
don't know what kind of help.
"The problem is that we
have synagogues with struc-
tural problems, synagogues
that can't meet their budgets,
synagogues that need security
from police because people are
afraid to come to services."
King Solomon, a temple on
Washington Avenue closed
two months ago and the
congregation sold its building
to the Jehovah's Witnesses.
None others have closed so far,
but Stern said that it is a
matter of time.
"Maybe some of them still
have savings. But there are
three major problems and I
will name them in the order
that may close them down. The
people: If you don't have a
mtnyan every morning and
evening. Second, the struc-
tural facility; if someone needs
a new $40,000 roof or 25,000
air conditioning system.
Ihree. budgetary needs of a
synagogue."
The Alliance of South Beach
Synagogues, as the group is
calling itself, is united for
social and economic purposes
Stern stressed. "It isn't a reli-
gious coalition because every
synagogue wants to retain its
own religious independence
and identity.
Meanwhile, the group
refuses to sound the death
knell. "The synagogues are
not on a respirator. We're not
dying," Stern declare- "But
we're undernourished and we
need help. Not everyone can
survive but it's the duty of the
Federation and the Jewish
community at large that it
should survive. Because
survival doesn't mean "nly for
the people here. It means an
injection of faith in the area so
newcomers should come."
The group is plar:.:ng to
meet again on Oct. 17 a: 4 p.m.
at Miami Beach City Hall.
Isn'ti
A10-W
!
flaws 1
I
"'
D> Station(i.icnargnWv
#*>


Arrests in Synagogue Arson
Friday, September 23, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 13
denounced by national and
ocal Jewish community
leaders and city officials,
including Mayor Edward Koch
and Police Commissioner
Benjamin Ward.
A Vicious Attack
Police said the two suspects
have been released in custody
of their parents, pending an
appearance in family court.
Their identities were not
revealed because of their age.
The police would not say
Five and probably all six of whether the youngsters were
the congregation's Torah residents of the neighborhood
scrolls were desecrated and or outsiders.
burned. One may be missing. The attack on ^ syn e
The incident evoked memo- was ferocious, according to
ries of Nazi attacks on syna- police and others at the scene,
gogues in Germany in the The charred remains of the
1930s. It was swiftly Torah scrolls indicate they
NEW YORK (JTA) Two
youngsters, one 12 and the
other 15 years old, were taken
into custody on suspicion of
arson and vandalism against a
brooklyn synagogue.
Orthodox Congregation
Rabbinical Institute Sharai
Torah in the Midwood section
was broken into by intruders
who set a series of fires around
the building and spray-painted
15 swastikas and obscenities
on the walls.
were pulled out of the cedar-
paneled Ark, their ornamented
velvet coverings ripped off and
the scrolls unrolled on the
floor, stamped on and set
afire.
Fires were set on the main
floor and spread to the second
floor of the two attached build-
ings, once private residences
which contain the sanctuary,
classrooms and other facilities
of the congregation.
No immediate estimate of
the damage was available.
There were conflicting
accounts. One said the fire
caused extensive interior
structural damage. Another
said it did little damage to the
building, which has been
closed.
Peres Accepts Reagan Invite
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM, (JTA) -
Foreign Minister Shimon
Feres formally accepted a U.S.
invitation to meet in New York
with President Reagan,
Secretary of State George
Shultz and Egypt's Foreign
Minister Ismat Abdel Meguid.
Peres wrote to Washington
that the Sept. 26 meeting,
which has triggered contro-
versy here, could be a welcome
opportunity to ensure that
avenues toward peace are
open for the new administra-
tions in the United States and
Israel.
The meeting, Peres added,
would also be a constructive
forum for exchanging views on
ongoing regional develop-
ments.
Informed sources in Jeru-
salem revealed that it was not
until last week that Wash-
ington made it clear that the
president himself would chair
the meeting.
Terrorists Captured In S. Lebanon
TEL AVIV (JTA) Four armed Lebanese terrorists
plotting a bombing in Israel were captured by an Israel
Defense Force patrol in the southern Lebanon security
zone.
One terrorist was seriously wounded in the exchange of
fire. There were no Israeli casualties.
The terrorists were identified as members of the
Lebanese Communist Party. The clash occurred on rough
terrain north of Taibeh village, less than four miles from
the Israeli border of the Galilee panhandle.
As a result, Prime Minister
Yitzhak Shamir and other
Likud leaders charged that the
meeting was planned to assist
Peres and his Labor Align-
ment in the election campaign.
Until last week, the diplo-
matic discussion between
Washington and Jerusalem
had proceeded on the under-
standing that Shultz would
chair the meeting, and Shamir
had not expressed any reserva-
tions over that format.
Israeli sources agree with
officials in Cairo, who have
been quoted as saying that
Reagan will probably use the
occasion to attempt a last-
ditch effort at a compromise
agreement over Taba.
Direct talks between the two
sides on Taba have reached an
impasse, and an international
panel of arbitrators is due to
present its formal and
binding verdict at the begin-
ning of October.
ARAFAT ADDRESSES NEWSMEN-P.L.O. chairman Yasir
Arafat addresses newsmen during a press conference he gave at
the European Parliament in Strasbourg. Looking on, at left, is
the president of the socialist group at the European Parliament
Rudi Arndt. AP/Wide World Photo.
Arabic to Outstrip French
As Second Israeli Language
the administered territories
last December.
Arabic language studies
have been hampered by a lack
of qualified teachers and
hostility on the part of parents
and pupils. Nevertheless, the
study of Arabic has increased
by 30 percent in recent years.
The Education Ministry,
citing the need for Arabic-
speaking soldiers in the Israel
Defense Force, has established
a new department devoted
solely to advancing instruction
in the Arabic language and
culture.
With instruction expanded,
it seems likely that Arabic will
replace French as the second
favorite foreign language
among Israelis, after English.
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
study of Arabic is being made
compulsory in Israel's public
education system, for the first
time since the state was
founded in 1948.
Education Minister Yitzhak
Navon established the policy at
the start of the current school
year. Until now, Arabic was a
required subject only in the
elementary grades. Over the
next six years, it will become
part of the general curriculum.
The new stress on teaching
Arabic coincides with an all-
time low in Arab-Jewish rela-
tions in Israel. They have been
deteriorating for some time
and reached the nadir after the
Palestinian uprising began in
cBveryone
someone special
like to call?
VLL FROM PALM BEACH TO:
Brdale $1 90
Ion $1.90
$2.50
$1.90
or alter 11pm and save even more
| are in effect 5-11 p.m.. Sunday-Friday
Southern Bell
SOUTH Company
vides services within your calling zone
Ion to other long distance companies
.0.^.00* noWBu^ca^c^co^
This Is Southern Bell!
stale and local tan* Appfcea to Intra-LATA long diatance cam only


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 23, 1988
News Koundup
Elie Wiesel Honored
CONNECTICUT (JTA) Elie Wiesel received an
honorary degree from the University of Connecticut at the
college's fall convocation. The convocation marked the
opening of the university's plan to house an archive of
Polish Jewish Holocaust material, which has been stored at
various Polish and Israeli sites.
Medal to Novelist
WASHINGTON (JTA) Leon Uris was presented with
the B'nai B'rith International President's Medal on the
30th anniversary of the publication of his novel "Exodus."
Uris, the first recipient of the President's Medal, was
recognized for his contributions to Jewish life and culture.
Reich Re-elected to B'nai B'rith
BALTIMORE Seymour D. Reich of New York has been
re-elected unopposed to his second two-year term as
president of B'nai B'rith International. Reich, a distin-
guished jurist and one of the youngest presidents of B'nai
B'rith International, was present in Iceland during the
Reagan-Gorbachev summit.
Holocaust Artifacts Sought
Donations of Holocaust-related artifacts and documents
are sought by the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. For
information: (202) 822-6464 or Curator. 2000 L. St.. XW.
Suite 717, Washington, DC 10036.
Jewish National Fund Announces
Tree Price Increase
Effective October 1, 1988
The Jewish National Fund of America has
announced that the price of individual tree purchases
will increase from $5.00 to $7.00 effective October 1,
1988.
The following afforestation projects will remain at
the $5.00 rate:
A GARDEN 100-999 TREES
A GROVE 1000-1999 TREES
A WOODLAND 2000-4999 TREES
A PARKLAND 5000-9999 TREES
A FOREST 10.000 or more TREES
Since the founding of the State of Israel, JNF has
planted over 180 million trees, in the process estab-
lishing more than 280 forests and 110 major parks and
picnic areas. JNF municipal forest parks, which
feature sports facilities, hiking trails and scenic
points, raise the quality of life in Israel's urban areas.
JNF forests also beautify the land, prevent soil
erosion, preserve precious water resources, protect
border communities and purify the air.
To plant trees in Israel in the name of loved ones, or
to commemorate a special event contact:
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 353
Miami Beach, FL 33139
Telephone 538-4S4
Simcha Dinitz, right, chairman of the Jewish Agency executive
and former Israeli ambassador to the U.S., and Mendel I.
Kaplan, left, chairman of the Jewish Board of Governors, will be
the featured speakers at the 57th General Assembly of the Council
of Jewish Federations, Nov. 16-20 in New Orleans. The theme of
the assembly is "Areyvim Zeh Bazeh: Responsibility and Service -
Federations Role in Creating a Caring Community." Dinitz will
discuss the need for mutual responsibility and caring between
Israel and North America. Kaplan will deliver a statement
following tht Thursday morning plenary session.
UN Groups
Adopt
Resolutions
By TAMAR LEVY
GENEVA (JTA) Two
United Nations bodies meeting
here have issued resolutions
condemning Israel for its
treatment of Palestinians in
the administered territories
and its handling of the Pales-
tinian uprising.
The United Nations Subcom-
mission on Human Rights
adopted a resolution
condemning Israel on the
"situation in the Palestinian
and Arab territories occupied
by Israel."
The declaration details a
litany of abuses allegedly
perpetrated by the "Israeli
occupation authorities"
resulting in maimings and
death, in "grave violations of
international law."
The resolution was adopted
by a roll-call vote, with only
the United States opposing.
There were 16 votes in favor
and seven abstentions.
The human rights subcom-
mission called for the
convening of an international
peace conference on the ques-
tion of Palestine and the
Middle East.
NGOs Urge Peace Confer-
ence
Some 200 representatives of
non-governmental organiza-
tions, holding their fifth
annual meeting at United
Nations headquarters here,
adopted a final declaration
calling for United Nations
observer teams in the West
Bank and Gaza. The NGOs also
urged an international Middle
East peace conference,
"without delay."
The NGO body condemned
the "systematic destruction of
the political and socio-
economic structure of Pales-
tinian society" and "the
attempt by the occupation
forces to eliminate Palestinian
society for the future."
The NGOs called on all Euro-
pean governments "to state
categorically that their bilat-
eral relations with Israel will
be affected by these breaches
of the Geneva Convention."
The Fourth Geneva Conven-
tion of 1949 forbids deporta-
tions.
But the NGOs also expre-
ssed strong support for the
"forces of peace in Israel
which favor the principle of a
Palestinian state." They
singled out for special acco-
lades those who refused to
serve in the military "in occu-
pied Palestine and other occu-
pied Arab territory."
New Ambassador to
West Germany
BONN (JTA) Israel's new
ambassador to West Germany,
Benjamin Navon, is due here
shortly to present his creden-
tials to President Richard von
Weizsacker of the Federal
Republic.
Navon, a career diplomat,
will be Israel's fifth envoy to
Bonn. He will succeed Yitzhak
Ben Ari, who has served here
as ambassador since 1981 and
will retire when he returns to
Jerusalem.
Navon served as the Foreign
Ministry's spokesman in Jeru-
salem from 1974 through
1976. His most recent assign-
ment has been the ministry's
chief of staff.
Israeli-Russian CC
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
further warming of relations
between the Soviet Union and
Israel and a first step toward
direct trade between the two
countries is appearing on the
horizon, as informed sources
here are saying there could be
an opening of chambers of
commerce soon in each
country.
Informed sources here indi-
cate that bilateral chambers of
commerce will be a subject of
discussion when Peres meets
with his Soviet counterpart,
Eduard Shevardnadze, during
the United Nations General
Assembly in New York, which
begins Sept. 20.
Earlier this summer during
a visit to Leningrad, Daniel
Gillerman, president of the
Israel Federation of Chambers
of Commerce, broached the
subject of the establishment of
mutual chambers of commerce
in Leningrad and Tel Aviv
with Soviet authorities.
At about the same time the
Soviets announced they would
be exporting television
programs to Israel.
The topic surfaced again
during talks between Nimrod
Novik, a foreign policy advisor
to Foreign Minister Shimon"
Peres, and Gennady Terasov
a Soviet Foreign Ministry
specialist on the Middle East
Meanwhile, the head of the
Israeli consular mission to
Moscow, Meron Gordon, was
back in Israel to brief Israeli
leaders on the status of Soviet-
Israel relations. He consulted
with both Peres and Premier
Yitzhak Shamir before
returning to Moscow.
According to speculations in
the press here, members of the
Moscow delegation return
frequently to Israel for
debriefings, because they lack
protected communication
equipment through which
diplomatic reports are
normally sent.
Eban Calls For Pressure
ROME (JTA) The Pales-
tine Liberation Organization
can decisevely influence
Israel's parliamentary elec-
tions Nov. 1, according to
Labor Party Knesset member
Abba Eban.
"A clear declaration, the
recognition of Israel and the
renunciation of terrorism (by
the PLO) would help the Labor
Party," Eban told reporters
after meetings here with
Foreign Minister Giulio
Andreotti and Socialist Party
leader Bettino Craxi.
Eban, a former foreign
minister and presently
chairman of the Knesset
Foreign Affairs and Defense
Committee, is on a mission on
behalf of Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres, leader of the
Labor Party.
He is visiting Western
Europe capitals to persuade
national leaders not t- i endorse
purported plans by the PLO to
declare an independent Pales-
tinian state in the West Bank
and to set up a government in
exile.
He is also urging Western
European countries to pres-
sure the PLO to recognize
Israel. The labor Party is
"ready to negotiate with any
Palestinians disposed to recog-
nize Israel and renounce
terrorism," Eban said.
He challenged PLO chief
Yasir Arafat "to find the
courage to make a unilateral
gesture" toward Israel. If
Israel did not respond, "there
would be time to do an about
face," Eban said.
I'll
YOUR
IS 68% WATER.
SHOULDN'T
YOUR
PURE?
You wouldn't pour excessive
sodium, sugar, unwanted
additives or pollutants into your
cells So why pour anything but
the best water into your body9
Pour yourself naturally pure
non-carbonated Mountain
Valley Water from Hot
Springs. Arkansas Noth-
ing is added to it-nothing
taken away. Because we
know nothing's better tor
your body
MOUNTAIN VALLEY
WATIR
>f*. rtA'f htmwn
Purely for drinking
DADE
696-1333
BROWARD
563-6114


Friday, September 23, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 15
Community News
NC JW Supports
Sex-Ed School Clinic
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridan Staff Writer
A pilot school-based health
clinic, supported by at least
one local Jewish organization
controversial because it will
include sex education and birth
control measures is sched-
uled to open in October.
The clinic, which will be
located at Northwestern High
School, received wide support
from area parents and
teachers and community
organizations. But the
program ran into major obsta-
cles from Gov. Bob Martinez
and other right-to-life activists
who opposed the birth control
segment of the program.
Supporters of the program
stress two important aspects
of the plan. First, they say, the
clinic will provide much-
needed basic health care to
students who could otherwise
not afford it. In addition,
Northwestern High School's
Parent-Teacher Association
voted that parents must be
involved with any treatment
given to their children.
"No child can get something
without the parent's consent,"
said Northwestern PTA presi-
dent Eva Grace. "The parents
agreed that each parent would
sign for their child's service."
Now, she added, the school
doesn't even have a nurse and
a sick child cannot get an
aspirin.
THE National Council of
Jewish Women, Greater
Miami Section, has contri-
buted approximately $2,500 to
the clinic for this year and one
of its members is a representa-
tive on the Citizens Advisory
Board for School Based
Clinics.
"It's something that falls in
line with what we think would
help the entire community,"
said Anna Mae Ross, the
NCJW's representative on the
county board.
"It's been proven to work in
other communities where
pregnancies have decreased.
But, that's just one part of an
entire health program. It's a
very small part," Ross said.
"But it is the part that takes
the flack."
NCJW national board
member Nan Rich was also
active in the battle to get the
health clinic concept approved.
Rich said the birth control
issue is "blown out of propor-
tion."
"It's a comprehensive school
clinic that makes quality,
primary health care available
to teen-agers in a convenient
setting," Rich said.
The project, which will be
the first of its kind in Dade
County, received support from
several children's support
groups and agencies including
the Governor's Constituency
for Children, which was estab-
lished statewide during the
Graham administration.
The coalition had secured a
$600,000 grant to pilot the
program in Dade from the
Robert Wood Johnson Founda-
tion, a national organization
that primarily grants money
for health-related programs.
But the grant was set to be
administered through the
state Health and Rehabilita-
tive Services office. Gov. Bob
Martinez, opposed to the idea
of sex education and providing
contraceptives to high school
students, had ordered HRS
Sec. Gregory Coler to return
the grant money to the founda-
tion in July 1987.
esteem.
"It's an unmet need," said
Sears. "At Jackson, we see it
more than anyone else. We see
people who come in who are
depressed and a lot of teen-
agers who come in are preg-
nant." The babies are often
underweight and suffering
from other effects of improper
pre-natal care, Sears said. In
addition, the girls usually don't
go back to school and get
caught up in what Sears called
"a vicious welfare cycle."
Sex education and contraceptives is
just a small part of the program. But it is
the part that takes the flack.
THE Dade County School
Board and parents association
had already endorsed the
program, however, and Rich
chastised Martinez for appar-
ently defeating his own
campaign promise of letting
local government run its own
show.
An alternative to funding
the project through a state
agency was sought. The solu-
tion was to administer the
program through the Public
Health Trust, the governing
board which manages Jackson
Memorial Hospital and the
North Dade Health Center.
Said Ross: "It means the
Citizens Advisory Board will
not be administering it. (But)
what we've done is gotten the
ball rolling. And the NCJW is
contributing funds toward
this."
Sandy Sears, vice president,
ambulatory services for the
Dade Public Health Trust, said
she has received approxi-
mately half of the $600,000
grant from the Robert Wood
Johnson Foundation, with the
remainder "renewable" if the
program is successful.
A similar program was also
scheduled for North Miami
Senior High School but demo-
graphics in that area did not
meet the foundation's criteria.
"There are some individuals
interested in raising funds so
once Northwestern is up and
going we can have a similar
clinic at North Miami," Sears
said.
SEARS said-the clinics have
been successful in schools
throughout the country and
have helped students continue
in school, lower absenteeism,
reduce the number of repeat
pregnancies and improve self-
The program is still being
developed under the guidance
of North Dade Health Center
Administrator Annie Neasman
and medical director Dr.
Jacqueline Simmons, who will
hire the clinic staff and devise
policies and procedures.
Services initially will be
offered to the students for
free, including prescriptions
such as birth control pills,
when available, Sears said.
The program will begin with
Northwestern students but
may expand to other "feeder"
schools in the Northwestern
area.
Asked why the clinic could
not have been started earlier
to take care of sore throats
and eye examinations without
the birth control function, Rich
of the CRC said that the Wood
Foundation would not allocate
money without the component
of contraceptives. "The whole
idea is to bring down the rate
of teen pregnancy," Rich said.
ACCORDING to Rich, the
Catholic Archdiocese of Miami
did issue a statement in 1986
expressing shock at a proposal
"that would endorse, unde-
rwrite and facilitate fornica-
tion."
"Obviously the anti-abortion
community is very much
opposed to this," Rich said.
"The clinics aren't performing
abortions. The most the clinics
are doing is providing contra-
ceptives. Every place the
clinics have been in effect,
such as Minnesota, teen-age
pregnancy rates have dropped
50 percent.
The clinic is also planning to
offer counseling on nutrition,
emotional problems, drug
abuse and offer free immuniza-
tions.
MB Chamber
Elects Blumberg
Stuart L. Blumberg, vice
president of the Muss Organi-
zation and of Seacoast Towers
Suite Hotel, has been elected
president of the Miami Beach
Chamber of Commerce for
1988-89. Blumberg had
succeeded the late Robert
Blum earlier this year when
the investor and Chamber
president died, and will take
office for a full, one-year term
at the organization's annual
installation dinner and dance
Saturday night, Oct. 29, at the
Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel.
Gerald Schwartz was elected
president-elect of the
Chamber. Schwartz served
five terms as vice president,
and has been a member of the
Continued on Page 19


*
y.
KETUBA, Jewish Marriage Contract, as painted by Miami
artist Nancy Greenberg. Modern style of ancient art form depicts
likeness of newly married couple.
KetubotMake For
Artistic Contracts
Nancy Greenberg's Jewish
Marriage Contracts Featured
at Temple Beth Am Art Exhi-
bition
Twelve Jewish marriage
contracts or ketubot painted by
Miami artist Nancy Greenberg
are featured in a special exhibi-
tion on display at Temple Beth
Am, throughout the month of
September.
The ketubot, on loan from
couples who commissioned the
works during the past ten
years, are examples of some
100 contracts Greenberg has
created since she moved to
South Florida nearly 20 years
ago. The works combine
watercolor painting and decor-
ation with fine Hebrew and
English calligraphy that depict
the details of the wedding
contract.
"The ketuba was actually
created over 2,000 years ago
during the exile of the Jews in
Babylonia," she said. "It was a
document concerned primarily
with protecting the bride and
listing the duties and obliga-
tions of the husband.
"But beyond the legalities,
the ketuba represented one of
the few opportunities for
Jewish artistic expression
outside the Temple. It devel-
oped into a medium in which
Jewish artists were able to
depict historical and religious
scenes, accompanied by vivid
colors and designs
surrounding the text of the
actual contract."
Most of the ketubot that
Greenberg creates include
highly personal elements. For
example, one of the ketubot on
display at Beth Am is one she
created for Temple Israel's
Cantor Rachelle Nelson and
her husband, Harvey Saun-
ders. Since both are musicians
who play many different
instruments, miniature paint-
ings of a piano, violin, guitar,
flute, trumpet and drums were
integrated into the border
design.
Another ketuba on display at
Beth Am was commissioned by
a couple for their 25th anniver-
sary. It features not only
portraits of the bride and
groom, but also their two chil-
dren.
Nancy Greenberg
Greenberg's concern for
including ketobot art that has
specific meaning for the
husband and wife seems to be
a particularly Jewish-
American approach. It differs
from the emphasis in ketubot
painted during past centuries
by Jews living in countries all
over the world.
In Gibralter, for example,
Sephardic Jews favored oval
wreaths of damask roses with
the Crown of England as an
integral part of the design. In
Italy, the influence of the
Renaissance led to the intri-
cate designs common during
that period, with the charac-
teristic design border of the
rounded bottom and straight
top. In Persia, floral patterns,
as in carpets, dominated.
Greenberg says that the
ketubot she creates interpret
the personal history, interests,
achievements and goals of the
couple. Symbolism may be
used but many couples prefer
having their actual likenesses
appear in the work as well as
family trees. The complete
process of creating a custom
ketuba ranges from three
weeks to four months,
depending on its complexity.


. ... I -. .1 .'. ..<-' ..''.'. V
... .
Page 16 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 23, 1988
StfSI^R
Mary-Gina Benezra
MARY-GINA BENEZRA
Mary-Gina Benezra,
daughter of Mrs. Raquel
Roffe, will be called to the
Torah as a Bat Mitzvah on
Saturday, Sept. 24, 10:30 a.m.,
Temple Emanu-El.
Mary-Gina is an eighth
grader at Nautilus Middle
School and a student at
Temple Emanu-El's afternoon
religious school, where she has
been on the Rabbi's Honor
Roll.
A reception and dinner will
be hosted by the celebrant's
mother and her grandmother,
Regina Roffe, will help cele-
brate the occasion. Mr. and
Mrs. Isidoro Roffe and chil-
dren from Puerto Rico will
also join in the celebration
along with many other out-of-
town relatives.
MADELYN KRANIS
Madelyn Kranis, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kranis,
will be called to the Torah as a
Bat Mitzvah at Temple Beth
Sholom at Shabbat services on
Saturday, Sept. 24, 10:45 a.m.
She will be "twinned" with
Irene Knokh of the Soviet
Union.
The services will be
conducted by Rabbis Gary A.
Glickstein and Jason Gwas-
doff.
Conference On
Ethnicity
and Aging
A conference on "Ethnicity
and Aging" will be held
Thursday, Oct. 6, 9 a.m. to 4
p.m., at the Sands Conference
Center of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the
Aged at Douglas Gardens.
Directed toward professional
caregivers, the conference will
focus on enhancing sensitivity
to the issue of ethnicity,
improving intergroup rela-
tions in health care facilities
and building a coalition.
Speakers will be State
Senator Jack Gordon and
Joseph Giordano, director of
the American Jewish
Committee's Center on
Ethnicity, Behavior and
Communications. Giordano
was the keynote speaker at
last February's conference.
Continuing Education Units
(CEU) are available. For regis-
tration information: 576-4240.
Starlight Ball Co-chairs Named
Dolores Gordon of Bal
Harbour and Marie-Therese
Shnapier of Miami Beach have
been named co-chairpersons of
the 1988 Starlight Ball of
South Shore Hospital and
Medical Center to be held
Saturday, Oct. 15, in the
Fontainebleau Hilton Ball-
room. A 7 p.m. reception will
precede the 8 p.m. dinner and
dance.
Theme of the ball will be
"You Are a Star."
South Shore Hospital and
Medical Center, which is affili-
ated with the University of
Miami School of Medicine, is
headquarters of UM's Compre-
hensive Pain and Rehabilita-
tion Center.
Members of the ball
committee are Dorothy Ash,
Lyla Berkson, Esther Bright,
Dr. Palma De Maio, Dr.
Carolee De Vito, Maria Domin-
guez, Susan Eisdorfer, Ingrid
Fine, Fana Holtz, Monica
Marshall Berkson, left, president of South Shore Hospital and
Medical Center and Dr. William Zubkoff, right, executive
director, have announced the acceptances of Dolores Gordon and
Marie-Therese Shnapier, second left and right, as co-
chairpersons of the 1988 Starlight Ball. To be held Saturday
evening, Oct. 15, the ball will benefit the South Shore Hospital and
Medical Center.
Heftier, Suszanne Brodie
Kaiser, Sally Klein and Doris
Lamb.
Also Vicki Land, Tobie
Levinson, Helene Owen, Betty
Pinks, Ruth Roney, Renee
Steele Rosomoff, Sara
Rutstein, Felice Schwartz,
Maria Teresa Soto and Nancy
Thompson.
Curtis A. Hamburg MD, a
board-certified physician in
internal medicine and cardi-
ology, is relocating his office to
the Baptist Hospital Medical
Arts Building in Kendall.
It's
"Schach"
Time Again!
The Finest
Palms for
Your Succah
Call
Steve Schiff
531-4631
The University of Miami Hillel will host a party
"Come Dancin," for all South Florida college students
on Saturday, Sept. 24, 9:30 p.m., at the University of
Miami Hillel. For information, 665-6948.
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
. "Give ear, ye heavens, and I will speak: And let the earth hear
the words of my mouth"
(Deut. SS.l).
HAAZINU
HAAZINU Moses' song beginning "Give ear, ye heavens, and I
will speak" contains the principal elements in the unique
relationship between God and his people Israel. Moses opens with
a call to heaven and earth to witness his declaration. From the
beginning of time, Moses asserts, the Lord had chosen Israel for a
special place among the nations of the world. He had first singled
out Israel in the desert, whence he lovingly led them into the land
of Canaan. But Israel, Moses prophesies, would abandon their
God for foreign idols. Then God would send a cruel nation to
enslave and torment the children of Israel. Eventually however
God would have compassion on His beloved people and wreak
vengeance on Israel's tormentors. All the nations would then
behold how the Lord had avenged the blood of His servants and
had made expiation for the land of His people.
At God's command, Moses prepares to ascend mount Nebo, in
the land of Moab. From there at a distance he is to glimpse the
Promised Land and die; as Aaron had died at mount Hor
Because ye trespassed against Me in the midst of the children of
Israel at the waters of Meribath-kadesh, in the wilderness of Zin-
because ye sanctified Me not in the midst of the children of Israel"
(Deuteronomy S2.51).
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion ot the Law is extracted and
based upon The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by
. Wollmwi-TMmir, published by Shengold. The volume is available
at 75 Maiden Lane, New York, N.Y. 10038.)
Synagogue
Listing
Candlighting Time
6:57 p.m.
BETH YOSEPHCHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach, Fla. 5312120
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig
SRSt -fl^7V2eV4Mi8mi BMCh
Barrv J. Konovitch, Rabbi /
Sholem Epelbaum, President
Religious Committee
Daniel Kaizler, Cantor
Miguel Karpel, President
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor: Zvl Rozen Conservative
Executive Director.
Harry J. Sllverman
\J
'v
Ct)
Dally Mlnyan 7:30 am & 6:30 p.nv
Frl. Kabbalat Shabbat 6:30 p.m.
Sat. 8:30am Services, 7 30 p.m. Mincha
Erev Succoth Sun. 6:50 p.m.
Mon. Succoth. 8 am & 7 p.m
Tuea., Succoth. 8 a.m. & 7 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 667-6667
Leonard Schoolman, Sr. Rabbi
Mark Kram, Associate Rabbi
Lynn Goldstein, Assistant Rabbi
Frl 8:15 p.m Service in Sanctuary. Rabbi
School man will speak on me Making ol a
Relorm Jew I: Ritual & Ethics."
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854 3911
Jack Riemer, Rabbi
Benjamin Adler, Cantor /"*
Rev. Milton Freeman,
Ritual Director
0
Sat. 9 a.m. Sabbath Services conducted by
Rabbi Riemer. followed by Kiddush
Sun 6 p.m. Erev Sukkot Service. Mon
Sukkot, 9 am Service & 6 p m Mlnchah
Tubs Sukkot 9 am Services 7 p.m
Mlnchah Wed.-Thurs and Frl. Choi
Hamoed Sukkot 7:30 am Services
YOUNG ISRAEL OF SUNNY ISLES
17274 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach Fl. 33160 947-1198
Hillel Price. President
Rubin R. Dobln, Rabbi
Fri 7:30 p.m. Services.
Sat 8:45 am & 7:30 p.m. Services.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St.. N. Miami. FL 33181
8915508 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs. Rabbi
)
Fn 6:30 p.m. Services
Sat 8:45 a m Services
m
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue /S>.
Miami Beach ^)
Dr. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi %'
Sol Landau, Ph.D.. Aux Rabbi
Yehuda Shifman, Cantor
. Kabbalat Shabbat 6pm
. : "? Servlce- Lehrman *,n oil,
elate. Canto, Shilman will chanTsT'
Mitzvah ol Mary Glna, daughter ot RMu
Roft. and David Be.e;,a Succo, -"C
Festival ol Joy Holiday Services w
and Mon. at 6:X p.m.. Mor, s Tu,s ,u
a.m. Rabbi Lehrman win ol-icai* b,h
mornings. Cantor Shifmar, *,n ch,m
assisted by Tempi, Choir
HE8REW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive. Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schill
Dally 7:30 am (Mon & Thurs 7 '5| & 7 p.m
Frl. 7 p.m. Sat 9 am
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave., M.B., FL 33139
Tel 538-4112
Rabbi Ralph Y. Carmi
Cantor Moshe Buryn
Daily Service 8 am and 7 p.m.
Saturday 8 30 am
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
238-2601 /SJJ.V,
Rabbi David H. Auerbach \ W)
Cantor Stephen Freedman "
Sukkot Services: Sun. Erev Sukkot 7:30
p.m.. Kxtdush in Sukkah. Mon And Tuea
9:30 a.m. Kidduah in Sukkah
Dally Services: Sun 9:30 a.m.; Wed 7 30
p.m., Mon.. Turn. & Thurs 7:30 a.m.
536-7231
'WNawAsrwTX'^.R.bb,
lANALPEKN.C.nlo.
0AV10 COMVIMP,. Center Emerttue
VaL'iIi^?li2?* """ iee
HSIIS!^1* CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd. -a-
Or Max A Lipsch.tz, Rabbi fib]
Zvee Aroni, Cantor 3,*
Harvey L. Brown. Exec. Director
Sat 8:25 a.m. Service,
Dally Services Mon Fri 7:30 a.m. a 5:30 p.m.
Sun. 8 am. a 5:30 p.m.
TEMPLE ISRAEL "
Of Greater Miami
Miami's Pioneer fterorm Congregalfon
137 N.E. 19th St. Miami. 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor: Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob G. Bornstein
Downtown
Frl. 8 p.m. Gumenick Chapel. fiatroi Pen-
neter on 'Celebrating the End Liturgy
Cantor Nelson
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Relorm
Coral Gables 667 5657
Michael B. Eisenstat. Rabbi
Fn. 8:15 p.m Worship Service
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowit.- /fij.
Cantor Murray Yavneh \^l
Sat. 9 a.m. Sabbath servici
Dally Mlnchah Sunday F-iday
8 a.m. and 6 p.m
Set. 9 a.m. and 5 15 p m
TEMPLE NERTAMID 8668345
7902 Carlyle Ave.. 866 9833
Miami Beach 33141 conwrirt
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Cantor Edward Klein
Sal Serv. 8:45 a.m 7 45pm
f
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St
North Miami Beach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung
SHAARE TEFILLAH
TORAH CENTER OF KENDALL
7880 SW112 Street
2324833
Rabbi Hershel Becker
BattySan. 7a.m. Frl 10mln "/J*'
lighting time. Shaboos a m.
M.nch. v4 mm. before candle NMW "
Sun. 9:90 a.m -
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Avr
North Dade's Relorm Coy!fff0
Ralph P. Kingsley. Rabbi
Irving Shumes. Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administrator
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
271-2311 /%%
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi \%l
David Katzenstein, Cantor
David Rosenthal, Aux. Cantor
Fr, 8 15 p.m Service, """"^Sgl
Shapiro: Set 9 am Services Dr snw
Centor Katzenetem. Mon a Joes
Sukkot Service Mlnyan Service i mo
Thurs. 7 a.m. & Sun 9am


Dr. Michael Silverman, has
joined the medical staff" of the
Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged at
Douglas Gardens and at its
outpatient medical facility.
Silverman received his
training in geriatrics at
Jackson Memorial Hospital.
He also has fifteen years of
clinical and research experi-
i nee as an oncologist. He
received his medical degree at
University of Maryland
and was an assistant professor
in oncology at the University of
Miami School of Medicine.
Lynn K. Gorman has been
appointed vice president for
hus mess development!trust
department for Jefferson
National Bank. Previously,
Gorman was an attorney with
Young, Stern and Tannen-
baum in Miami. The North
Miami Beach resident has a
B.A. from the University of
Florida, and a Juris Doctor
degree from the University of
Houston Law School.
Friday, September 23, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 17
Miami Beach Commissioner Abe Resnick, left, presents a key to
the City of Miami Beach and a proclamation to Esther K. Belfer,
who was recently appointed executive director of the Greater-
Miami Israel Bonds Organization. Witnessing the presentation
ui M. Ronald Krongold, general chairman of the Greater Miami
Israel Bonds campaign.
Aron Kelton has been
appointed campaign associate
of the Cuban Hebrew and the
Latin American Hebrew divi-
sions of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. A CPA
prior to immigrating to Miami
from Cuba in 1961, he has since
served as president, vice presi-
dent, secretary, administrator
and director of the Cuban
Hebrew Congregation-Temple
Beth Shmuel, Miami Beach,
and on several Federation
committees and events
including of the Community
Relations Domestic Concerns
Committee. He and his wife,
Lucia, were honored by the
Greater Miami Israel Bonds
Organization in 1986.
Property Tax Appeals
For hotels, apartments, shopping centers,
office buildings, restaurants, warehouses,
hospitals, specialty properties. Contingent or
hourly basis.
THOMAS R. POST, PA
ATTORNEYS
(305)379-1500 ____
MAGEN DAVID ADOM
0
Support Magen David Adorn (MDA),
the State of Israel's Emergency
Medical/Disaster/Ambulance/Blood Network.
AMERICAN RED MAGEN DAVID FOR ISRAELI (ARMDI)
16499 N E 19th Avenue. North Miami Beach, Florida 33162
(305) 947-3263 (Dade) (305) 941-0522 (Broward)_________
Renee Steele Rosomoff of
Miami Beach has been
appointed associate editor of
"Pain," the Journal of the
International Association of
the Study of Pain. Rosomoff,
program director of the
University of Miami Compre-
hensive Pain and Rehabilita-
tion Center at South Shore
Hospital, is an adjunct
assistant professor at the UM
School of Medicine.
Barry D. Sutton was recently
promoted to assistant vice
president of Southern Bell's
Florida Executive Department
at the company's state head-
quarters in Miami. Sutton, a
Kendall resident, will be
responsible for Southern Bell's
statewide public relations and
forecasting operations.
Honey Feinstein Realty
Your Discount Broker
Buying Selling Renting
WINSTON TOWERS,
COASTAL TOWERS
Specializing in:
North Miami Beach,
Sunny Isle
945-3943
N. Miami Beach resident Barry Galitzer, above, baggage in
tow, arrives at Yeshiva University's new student orienta-
tion week in New York City. The 18-year-old-son of Joshua
and Deborah Galitzer is a graduate of the Hebrew Academy
of Miami. Barry is studying pre-health sciences, with an eye
toward a medical career, at Yeshiva College. And N. Miami
Beach resident Arlene Fishbein, a 1969 graduate of Yeshiva
University's Stern College for Women, helps daughter Lisa,
18, as students marked the start of the school year.
11 I'
^
MI
/;:; a
Aliyah & Israel Activities Department
of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Wishes You
***
*?*
Happy New Year
mm niu
4200 Biscay na Boulavard. Miami, Florida 33137 (305) 573-2556
cjain mil*
T REGISTER
AND
VOTE IN '88
As citizens of the United States, it is our civic responsibility
to take part in the democratic process.
A recent study by the Synagogue Council of America
indicates that many Jews are not registered voters. The
Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami urges each and
every person who is eligible, to register and vote.
Contact the synagogue in your area for further information
regarding voter registration.
REGISTER TODAY!
Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami
4200 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, FL 33137
Telephone 576-4000
Rabbi Gary A. Glickstein
President
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Executive Vice President


Page 18 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 23. 1988
Hadassah
The Kinneret chapter will
meet Tuesday, Sept. 27, 12:30
p.m., at the El Conquistador
Clubhouse. Entertainment will
be provided by Yiddish inter-
preter Gert Bossak.
The Albert Einstein chapter
will have its paid-up member-
ship luncheon Tuesday, Oct.
11, noon, in the third floor
community room of the 163rd
Street Mall. Guest speaker will
AMTT
Chai Chapter will meet at
the home of a member on
Wednesday, Sept. 28th at 8
p.m.
Geula Chapter meets on
Wednesday, Sept. 28th at 7:30
p.m. in the social hall of Tower
41, Miami Beach.
Shoshana Chapter will hold
its monthly luncheon meeting
on Wednesday, Sept. 28th at
noon in the State Room of
Seacoast Towers South,
be Mayor Joe Moffat.
Sara Klyman and Sylvia
Eisenberg will be honored at
the chapter's Honoree
Luncheon on Thursday, Nov.
3. noon, at the Eden Roc. The
chapter will also be celebrating
the 40th anniversary of Israel.
A Thanksgiving weekend
(Thursday through
Monday. Nov. 24-28 at the San
Souci Hotel has been planned.
The Masada Chapter will
hold a brunch and card party
on Wednesday, Oct. 5. 11:30
a.m. at Pumpemick's in
Hallandale.
The Stephen S. Wise
Chapter will meet
Monday, Oct. 3, noon, at the
Ocean Pavilion. The program
will feature a four member
panel discussion on education
to be led by Marion Glazer.
Sparked by the theme "Be a Sport Donate Blood ih
Cedars Medical Centers blood drive will be held Wednesday6
Sept 28. 6:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.. in the centers South build,
Among the incentives for donors are two tickets for the \\,dm
Hurricanes vs. Missouri Tigers football game Ocl 1 &i ,h
Orange Bowl, and free footballs. Blood donors will also have their
cholesterol and HDL levels tested, free of charge. For inform*
lion: 325-5264
An all-day operathon on Saturday. Oct. 1. over WTMI FM
93.1 will feature the Greater Miami Opera from Bavside
Marketplace On-air performances of the 1988 In-School Opera
will be heard along with special events, including an auction
A HEARTY BREAKFAST IS THE
FOUNDATION OF A GREAT DAY!"
$2.35
$2.35
* 2 EGGS any style FRESH BAKED ROLLS
* GRITS or Potatoes Butter/Ball of Cream Cheese
* MINI-DANISH & MUFFIN COFFEE or TEA
Served 6:00 AM to 11:00 AM
^ffF
Women's American ORT,
Golden Shores chapter's 1988-
89 lecture series will kick off
Tuesday, Oct. 13, with the
topic "A Question??? Answers
to all the Concerns You Ever
Had About Sexuality, Inti-
macy, Relationships, and
Female Health Questions."
Guest speaker Lynn Leight is
a therapist and author of
"Raising Sexually Healthy
Children."
Succeeding lectures will be
"Nutrition and Fitness"
on Dec. 15; "Dealing with the
Men in Our Lives: Fathers,
Husbands, Lovers and Sons,"
Thursday, Feb. 23; "Personal
and Professional Perspectives
on Denial and Addiction,"
Thursday, March 16; a book
review of "The Best of Friends
Worst of Enemies" by Eva
Margolies, on Thursday, April
13; and Best Face Forward," a
lecture by a facial plastic
surgeon, Tuesday, June 6. All
lectures begin at 7:30 p.m. at
the Imperial Club.
The chapters paid-up
membership fashion show will
take place Wednesday, Sept.
28, 7:30 p.m. at the Imperial
Club, N. Miami Beach.
The Coral Gables Chapter of
Women's American ORT will
hold its paid-up membership
luncheon Wednesday, Sept.
28, noon, with a musical
program. For information:
666-2901.

Masada Chapter of Na'amat
USA will meet Wednesday.
Oct. 5. noon, at the Na'amat
area headquarters. 605
Lincoln Road Building. Miami
Beach. The program. "The
Women Who Made It
Happen." will honor Israel's
40th anniversary and those
women who played major roles
in the birth and development
of the modern Jewish state.
While the meeting is open to
the public, reservations are
required: 538-6213.
"IN THE HEART OF MIAMI BEACH!"
GOURMET '
DELI RESTAURANT
Collins at 21st St.
_M]AMI BEACH
Delicious Meals Like
Mom Used To
j^ Make!"
'Nutritious'
JUMBO MUFFIN
COFFEE or TEA.
Honey-dipped
FRIED CHICKEN
Includes Potatoes & Vegetables*
For
"AFTER THEATER"
Snacks
OPEN
24 HOURS
"Grilled Juicy"
Delmonico STEAK
Smothered Onions
Potatoes
For "Take-Out" Orders or
Reserved Seating for Larger Parties
CALL
538-I



Area Deaths=
Louis Fischer, Asst. Director Douglas Gardens
Louis C. Fischer, aged 41,
died Sept. 19.
Born in New York City, Mr.
Fischer moved to Florida 18
years ago, where he met his
future wife Anne in 1976. He
dedicated the past 14 years to
fund raising for charitable
organizations. Most recently
and for five years, worked at
the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged at
Douglas Gardens as assistant
director of Development.
His innovative ideas gave
rise to the Alzheimer's Care
Committee/NOTABLES and
the "Next Generation"
support groups at Douglas
Gardens. His wife, Anne, said
"all through his illness he
never lost his quick wit, his
great sense of humor and the
Louis C. Fischer
ability to make others around
him smile and feel good about
themselves."
Father to Lauren Ashley,
six, and Jessica Lynn, 16
months, all he ever wanted
was the best for his family.
In addiation to his wife and
daughters, he is survived by
his mother Betty Fischer,
brother Sam Fischer of
Houston, sisters Barbara Lee
Zarrow and Bella Goldstein,
brothers-in-law Bernard
Zarrow and Lester Goldstein,
and in-laws Pauline and Jerry
Linderbaum of Broward
County.
Services will be held at 2
p.m., Friday, Sept. 23rd at
Levitt-Weinstein, Hollywood.
EPSTEIN, Ruby. Eternal Light. Lakeside
Memorial Park.
FINN, Rose. 80. Kendall. Sept. 14.
FOX, Mathilda S., 91. Sept. 14, Blasberg.
KR1EDBERG, Miami and Bayport, N.Y.,
Si pi 14, Mt. Sinai Cemetery.
GASTWIRTH, Rebecca, Miami Beach,
Sept 12, Menorah.
HIRSCHK1ELD, Paul, 84, Miami, Sept. 17,
Star of David Memorial Park.
HOLLANDER, Barbara. 54, Ft. Lauder
dale, Sept. 15, Mt. Sinai Cemetery.
KASOW, Irving. Sept. 18, Blasberg.
KROW, Ruth C, 73, Miami Beach, Sept. 16,
Riverside.
Gloria Greene,
Heart Institute Nurse
Gloria H. Greene, assistant
I director of nursing at Miami
Heart Institute for 27 years,
died on Sept. 18. A registered
nurse and former stewardess,
she had been active in World
I Wings Inaternational.
She is survived by her
[husband, Dr. Leon Greene, a
long-time Miami
Beach physician specializing
in obstetrics/gynecology; a
sister Lorraine (Robert)
Peterson; brother Jack
Kaufman; and nieces and
nephews.
Services were held at River-
side.
Thaw
Continued from Page 1
^ level of diplomatic contact
1 between countries.
Shamir did not explicitly
lonfirm reports that a direct
lair link would soon be estab-
ished between Budapest and
Tel Aviv, but noted that 30,000
Israeli tourists visited
Hungary last year.
Earlier, in a telephone inter-
view with Israeli army radio
from Budapest, Shamir
disclosed that he had
committed himself to sending
teachers from Israel to the
80,000 strong Jewish
community in Hungary, and to
assisting the community in
enhancing its cultural life.
Shamir said the Hungarian
authorities raised no objec-
tions.
Political observers here art
intrigued by the thought proc-
esses in Budapest and
presumably *in Moscow
behind the invitation to
Shamir.
It can hardly have escaped
the notice of the Communist
leadership that the visit will
boost Shamir's image as a
statesman of moderation and
wide international recognition
during the final month of
Israel's fiercely fought elec-
tion campaign.
The Labor Party, for its
part, must deduce, or at least
ponder the thought, that there
is sympathy in Budapest for
Shamir and his Likud bloc.
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres, the Labor Party leader
in London for talks with Prime
Minister Margaret Thatcher,
noted that he had been invited
to Budapest two months ago.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
si mm iiiiiitibs
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service
Dade County
r>:,2 20W
Brow.ird County
r>:i2L'ow
I.ATEINER, Joseph, No. Miami, Rubin-
Zilbert, Mount Sinai Ceremony.
LEFF. Esther, 82, No. Miami Beach.
MOL1NE, Herman, 92, No. Miami Beach,
Sept. 13, Riverside.
ROSEN, Muriel Louise, Miami. Sept. 12,
Riverside. Star of David, Memorial Park.
SELESKI, Julius, Miami Beach, Rubin
Zilbert.
SELEY, Beatrice T.. Bal Harbour,
Menorah.
SMITH, Sylvia, Miami, Menorah.
STELCNER, Sara, 80, Kendall, Sept. 16,
Lakeside Memorial Park.
WEINGROFF, Rose, No. Bay Village, Sept.
16, Levitt-Weinstein, Lakeside Memorial
Park.
Friday, September 23, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 19
MB Chamber
Elects Blumberg
Continued from Page 17
mental affairs; Joel Gray, vice
president for tourism; Ira
Giller, vice president for econ-
omic development; Kalv, vice
president for membership; and
Weisburd, vice president for
education.
Leon Manne, past president
of the Chamber, will be
honored as the city's "Man of
the Year" at the Oct. 29
dinner. Manne is Chairman of
the Miami Beach Tourism and
Convention Center Expansion
Authority.
Board of Governors for the
past 10 years.
Blumberg appointed Jack
Lubin to fill the one-year unex-
pired term on the board of
Blum.
A. Anthony Noboa was re-
elected treasurer of the
Chamber.
Six members of the Chamber
were appointed to one-year
terms on the board by vote of
the Chamber's elected gover-
nors and trustees. They are
Tony Goldman and Sol Gross,
Arthur Barron, Paul Kalv,
Robert Spiegelman, and
Elayne Weisburd.
Six vice presidents will serve
with Blumberg, Schwartz and
Noboa on the Chamber execu-
tive committee for the
upcoming year. Commissioner
Bruce Singer continues as
executive vice president and
Elaine Rosen as general
manager of the Chamber.
Vice presidents ratified by
the Board of Governors are
Eric Jacobs, vice president for
public affairs; Harold Rosen,
vice president for govern-
Carl W. Mazorek has been
named branch manager for the
Cutler Ridge office of
SunBank/Miami, N.A.
Mazorek joined the bank as
Credit Analyst in 1985. In
January 1987, he was named
commercial banking represen-
tative, and in August of the
same year was promoted to
commercial lending officer.
Lakeside Services
Lakeside Memorial Park's
Annual High Holiday services
drew more than 600 worship-
pers to the Park's New Garden
of Heroes Chapel on Sept. 18.
Brought by courtesy buses
from locations on Miami Beach
and North Miami Beach, many
who are unaffiliated with a
particular synagogue or
unable to drive to the
cemetery came to pay respects
to their loved ones. Rabbi
Norman Lipson, director of
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation
officiated.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every DaC/osed Sabbath
140SW 57th Avenue
Phone 2662888
RUBIN
ZILBERT
CHAPEL
MONUMINTCO
CIM1TIRY COUNSELING
10 CHAPELS SERVING
DADE
BROWARD
l PALM BEACH A
RUBIN-ZILBERT I
DADE
538-6371
BROWARD
920-6660
ZILBERT-RUBIN
^inprial CXTCRNAL
Represented l>> Riverside Memorial Chapel. In*
New York: (718)263 7600 Funeral Directors and Counselors
*e*
two of our The Covenant Plan
community's most
trusted names in
Jewish funerals have
combined their
services to make this
unique pre-need offer:
includes
traditional grave- choice gravesite
side funeral
casket and
hearse
concrete vault
opening and
closing charges
bronze or granite
marker
(tatered-frte fbuaxag *>**)
Ce^MriMawkcnataMtiMaii
$1^95
TOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 895-7415


Page 20 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 23, 1988
Foreclosure Sales
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-12270
SEC II
FEDERAL NATIONAL MORT-
GAGE ASSOCIATION, a Unit-
ed SUtei corporation.
Plaintiffs)
vs.
JOYCE A. LATIMORE. et !..
Defendant^)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above. 1 will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOl'TH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami. Dad* County. Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M.. on the 3RD
day of OCTOBER. 19K8. the fol-
lowing described property:
Lot 15. in Block 28. of FIRST
ADDITION TO MYRTLE
GROVE, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
57. at Page 2. of the Public
Records of Dade County. Flori-
da.
DATED the 14TH day of
SEPTEMBER. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Roaenthal & Yarchin.
3050 Biscarne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
Published 9/16-23
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-39797
SEC. 07
SOVRAN MORTGAGE COR-
PORATION.
Plaintiffls)
vs.
ANTHONY P. BOLDING. and if
married. MRS. ANTHONY P.
BOLDING. his wife, et a!.,
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above. I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami. Dade County. Florida at
11 im> o'clock A.M., on the 4th day
of OCTOBER. 1988. the following
described property:
Lot 16. in Block 2. of POINT
ROY ALE SECTION ONE. ac-
cording to the Plat thereof, re-
corded in Plat Book 7. at Page
44, of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
DATED the 14TH dav of
SEPTEMBER. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Joseph M. Piaiello
One Tampa City Center. Suite
2720
201 North Franklin Street
Tampa. Florida 33602
Published 9/16-23
A collection of paintings by local artists, on loan from the
Bakehouse Art Complex, is on display through Oct. 15 at the May
Visitors Center of the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged at Douglas Gardens. The free exhibit is open seven days a
week, 7 a.m.-6 p.m.
The Philharmonic Orchestra of Florida will open its 1988-89
Celebrity Series season on Monday. Oct. 3. 8:15 p.m.. at
Gusman Center for the Performing Arts with the world premiere
of "Arrows of Time." a work composed expressly for the
orchestra by Marvin David Levy.
Kaplan On
School Board Race
Betsy Kaplan
While running in District
1 for election to the Dade
County School Board. Betsy
Kaplan said, "Win, lose or
draw. I will be at the school
board meeting on the
Wednesday after the elec-
tion."
Kaplan is vying for the
seat to be left vacant by
retiring Paul Cejas. She
passed her first elctoral test
by making it to the runoff
on Oct. 4.
Kaplan, former adminis-
trative aide to former board
member Ethel Beckham.
was educated in Dade public
schools and was graduated
from Miami Edison Senior
High. She received two
undergraduate degrees
with honors from Wesleyan
College and Conservatory
in Macon, Ga., and further
education at Barry Univer-
sity and the University of
Miami Teacher Training
Program. Kaplan has
taught at Miami Shores
Elementary School and
Miami-Dade Community
College.
She first became active in
community affairs through
her children's schools. Pres-
ident of Palmetto Junior
High School PTA, Kaplan
became the cultural arts
and educational media
chairman of the
Florida PTA, and then vice
president of the statewide
group in 1979.
Kaplan became president
of Dade County PTA in
1982, which evolved into
Dade-Monroe PTA through
1987. This year, Kaplan
chairs the Citizen's Coali-
tion for Public Schools.
Kaplan also chairs, since
1987, the Coalition for Full
Funding of Education. Her
formal appointments
include the Academic Advi-
sory Committee, which she
chaired in 1986; Attendance
Boundary Committee; and
Superintendent's Instruc-
tional Oversight
Committee.
Kaplan advocates school
renovation in lieu of new
construction and imple-
menting the U.S. Surgeon
General's recommendations
on nutrition in addition to
fiscal responsibility vis-a-vis
the new $980 million bond
issue.
Jewish Center Slated for Moscow
TEL AVIV (JTA) Plans to heard of, was cited in a Cor*
build a Jewish cultural center hagen dispatch publishJi ""
in Moscow are in the works,
according to unconfirmed
reports from the Soviet
capital.
According to a Moscow
publication called Soviet
Jewry, a delegation headed by
Edgar Bronfman and Simcha
Dinitz is expected in Moscow
sometime in the next few
weeks, in connection with
establishment of a Jewish
cultural center there.
Bronfman is president of the
World Jewish Congress.
Dinitz, who is chairman of the
World Zionist Organization-
Jewish Agency Executive, just
returned from a trip to Yugos-
lavia.
The Moscow publication,
which Soviet Jewry activists in
the United States have never
A 20TH CENTURY SCHE-
HERAZADE, the almost six-
foot tall Russian-Jewish
dancer Ida Rubenstein made
her debut in St. Petersburg in
1905 and was soon invited to
star in the Ballets Russes in
Paris. Rubenstein created the
roles of Cleopatra, Salome,
Helen of Sparta, Persephone,
Orpheus and above, Schehera-
zade. Mementos, programs,
and photographs of Rubenstein
are being collected for a special
exhibit to be shown at the
Judah Magnes Museum in
Berkeley, California in fall
1989.
BB W President
Objects To
New Ruling
B'nai B'rith Women's Presi-
dent Hyla Lipsky commenting
on B'nai B'rith International's
recent vote to take in women
as members of the previously
all male organization, says it
"undermines" an agreement
made in 1986 by both groups'
conventions.
The original agreement,
Lipsky explains, stipulates
that BBW be the only option
for membership for women in
B'nai B'rith in the U.S. and
sets up a Joint Executive
Council (JEC) where the two
groups could meet.
Legal Briefs
Donald I. Bierman and
Edward R. Shohat have
announced the formation of
their new firm, Bierman,
Shohat and Lowey, P.a!
Former Deputy Chief
Assistant State Attorney Ira
N. Loewy is a partner and
Pamela I. Perry, former law
clerk for Court of Appeals
Judge Daniel S. Pearson, is
associated with the firm.
a a,,, ~:;
Haaretz.
The Jewish cultural
center
would be the first of its kind in
the Soviet Union sine- World
War II, according to one
former refusenik.
According to the Moscow
magazine, construction of a
center would cost millions of
dollars, a sum Moscow Jews
hope could be picked up bv
Western Jewish communities
The magazine also reports
that the visit of Bronfman and
Dinitz will take place prior to
Simchat Torah. On that
holiday, thousands of Jews
converge in front of Moscow's
main synagogue, the Choral
Synagogue on Archipova
Street.
United Way Kicks Off Campaign
United Way of South Dade
County kicked off its 1988
campaign on Sept. 22 begin-
ning with bagels and coffee at
9 a.m. at Bayside Marketplace.
Members of the Campaign
Cabinet and dozens of other
volunteers traveled on decor-
ated trolleys to various corpor-
ations, where firms'
employees were picked up and
transported to one of 73
United Way agencies to see
the services provided.
Rallies were held throughout
the day in 10 Dade County
neighborhoods and volunteers
were given an opportunity to
visit local agencies.
At the end of the day, the
campaign cabinet announced
the Pacesetter campaign,
which is designed to set the
pace for the general effort.
Relief Efforts For
Gilbert's Victims
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Community Rela-
tions Committee (CRC) and
the Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami are joining in
the relief effort for the victims
of Hurricane Gilbert.
The Federation's Board of
Directors at its meeting last
week was urged to get the
word out to the community
that the Federation and the
Rabbinical Association will act
as a conduit for relief funds
which will go to the American
Joint Distribution Committee.
The JDC is part of a consor-
tium to collect funds for
disaster victims and will distri-
bute them throughout the
world. The Rabbinical Associa-
tion will ask rabbis to urge
their congregations during
Yom Kippur to contribute to
the emergency fund in the
days immediately following.
"The prophetic reading on
Yom Kippur speaks of the
need to be concern e on behalf of the needy, hungry
and destitute," said Rabbi
Gary Glickstein, president of
the Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami.
BAGELS AND SANGRIA HERITAGE TOUR
EL AL Introduces Tour of Spain and Israel
EL AL's Jewish Heritage Tour Series Expands
NEW YORK Ole! For the first time, EL AL l-rael
Airlines is offering a Jewish Heritage Tour to Spain and
Israel, the land where Jews settled in the first century and
the roots of the Sephardic community.
The eight night/nine day Spanish portion will include four
nights in Madrid, two nights in Sevilla and two nights in
Granada. The itinerary offers a sightseeing tour of Madrid,
including the Royal Palace, the Prado Museum with the
largest collection of paintings in Spain; a drive through La
Mancha, Cordoba; Costa del Sol; a tour of Malaga the
southern Castillian countryside, and Toledo. Land prices
start at $709 including services and taxes.
Accommodations include four star hotels, daily break-
fasts, dinners in Sevilla and Cordoba, arrivals and depar-
tures, and licensed English speaking tour guides.
For the Israeli leg of this journey, travelers can ch>
add on from a variety of EL AL's tours including: "Israel
Discovery Tour," "Israel at Leisure Tour" or "Israel Ph
Tour."
On all flights, EL AL continues to offer free wine and
headphones.
EL AL Israel Airlines offers the most nonstop flights
from New York to Israel and the most direct flights to
Israel from its five major gateways in the United States:
New York, Los Angeles. Chicago, Boston. Miami. EL AL
Airlines. Israel's national carrier, is located at 850 Third
Avenue, New York, NY.
1


Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
Friday, September 23, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 21
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 88-38827-03
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
ANNETTE PETTTFRERE,
Petitioner
and
FORDULA PETITFRERE,
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
|TO:FordulaPetitfrere,
resilience unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
[action for dissolution of marriage
[and to take your real property has
| been filed against you; you are
[required to serve a copy of your
{written defenses upon: I.J.
IgRAFF, attorney for Petitioner,
1633 N.E. 167 St. N.M.B. Fl. 33162
Ion or before October 21st. 1988.
land file the original with the clerk
|of this court otherwise a default
will be entered against you. The
teal property located in Dade
County, Fl. is described as Lot 23
I the South 1/2 of Lot 24 in Block
. Golf Park Section 2, according
i the Plat thereof, as recorded in
,lat Book 23, Page 46, of the
public Records of Dade County, Fl.
Richard P. Brinker
Clerk of the Court
By John Branda
As Deputy Clerk
|9820 September 23,30;
October 7, 14, 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
| NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
hat the undersigned, desiring to
ngage in business under the ficti-
DUI name(s) SUN-UP Billing
iTrice Corp. at 2150 SW 16 AVE
1 in MIAMI. FLA 33145 intend(s)
register said name(s) with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
ounty, Florida.
Nilda V. Lopez
19828 September 23.30;
October 7,14, 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
hat the undersigned, desiring to
Jngage in business under the ficti
ooa name(s) Viscount Hair Salon
|t 6901 N.W. 36th Street, Miami
: rings, Florida intend(s) to
kgistor said name(s) with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
iunty, Florida.
iilent, Luz Marina Balbona
[.ester Rogers, Esq.
kitorney(s) for Applicant
|4M N.W. 17th Avenue
liami, Florida 33125
19831 September 23,30;
October 7, 14, 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
he undersigned, desiring to
pngage in business under the ficti-
name(s) KIMBERLY
IMPORTS CO. at 125 N.E. 40
sr.it, Miami, FL 33137 intend(s)
i register said name(s) with the
lerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
'unty. Florida.
PALACE LIGHTING CO.
19822 September 23,30;
__________October 7, 14, 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
|tliat the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the ficti-
tious name(s) THE STEVENS
jROUP at 10410 S.W. Hammocks
llvd., Miami, FL intend(s) to
register said name(s) with the
lerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
| FHC AT WINSTON PARK. INC.
10410 S.W. Hammocks Blvd.
and
|SSC AT WINSTON PARK. INC.
10410 S.W. Hammocks Blvd.
|Steven I. Engel, Esq.
Utorneyfs) for The Stevens Group
110410 S.W. Hammocks Blvd.
|l9825 September 23,30;
__________October 7, 14. 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 88-3484 (02)
Florida Bar No. 182014
IN RE:ESTATE OF
JOAN PAQUETTE,
Deceaaed.
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Joan Paquette, deceaaed, File
No. 88-3484 (02), is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is Dade County
Courthouse. 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
name and addresses of the
Personal Representative and the
Personal Representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this Court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE:
(1) all claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an interested
person to whom notice was mailed
that challenges the validity of the
Will, the qualifications of the
Personal Representative, venue,
or jurisdiction of the Court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 23, 1988.
Personal Representative:
DEBBIE BAUDER
14250 S.W. 62 Street
Unit 207
Miami, Florida 33183
Bruce Lamchick, Esq.
LAMCHICK, GLUCKSMAN &
JOHNSTON, PA.
10725 S.W. 104th Street
Killian Parkway
Miami, Florida 33176
(305) 595-6333
19827 September 23,30;
____________October 7, 14, 1988.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-39071 (29)
ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ELAINE QUANITH,
Petitioner, Wife
and
KIAT QUANITH,
Respondent, Husband
TO: KIAT QUANITH
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Bruce N. Crown,
Esquire, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 15490 N.W. 7th
Avenue, Suite #205, Miami. FL
33169, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 21, 1988;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or peti-
tion.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 15 day of Sept., 1988.
Richard P. Brinker
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. Casamayor
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Bruce N. Crown, Esquire
15490 N.W. 7th Avenue
Suite #205
Miami, Florida 33169
(305) 687-3900
Attorney for Petitioner
19826 September 23,30;
October 7. 14, 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Caae No. 88-35053 (CA 02)
NOTICE OF ACTION
F.P.G. WHOLESALE, INC.,
a Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ARCH R. MacKAY, et si..
Defendants.
TO: ARCH R. MacKAY
1253 Messina Avenue
Coral Gables, FL
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County. Florida:
That portion of Tract 41,
lying southerly of the
southerly right-of-way line of
Tamiami Trail, of Miami
Everglades Land co., Ltd., a
subdivision of the west one
half of Section 4, Township
54 South. Range 39 Esat,
according to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 3, st
Page 129, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida, less and except the
West 330.00 feet of said
Tract 41
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis, Allison &
Cohen, Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address is 111 N.E. 1st
Street, Miami, Florida 33132, on
or before Oct. 21,1988, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise, a
Default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on this 13 day of Sept.,
1988.
Richard P. Brinker
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
19821 September 23, 30;
____________October 7, 14, 1988.
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC Case No.: 88-39500
Florida Bar No. 318256
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ANNELISE McCOY,
Petitioner/Wife,
VS.
WILLIE B. McCOY,
Respondent/Husband.
TO: WILLIE B. McCOY
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN,
YOU shall serve a copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage upon ANTHONY
CARBONE. Attorney, 612 N.W.
12th 33136, Miami, Florida with
the Court Clerk on or before Oct.
21, 1988, otherwise a default will
be entered.
Sept. 19, 1988.
Richard Brinker
By: Clarinda Brown
19830 September 23,30;
October 7. 14, 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-5179
Division (02)
Florida Bar #210889
IN RE: ESTATE OF
PAULINE HOCHBERG
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of PAULINE HOCHBERG,
deceased, File Number 88-5179, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
West Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE:
(1) all claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an interested
person on whom this notice was
served that challenges the validity
of the will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 23, 1988.
Personal Representative:
BERNARD GLASS
422 Beach 125th Street
Belle Harbor, New York 4624
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT,
ESQUIRE
GLABUT. GALBUT & MENIN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
19832 September 23.30. 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the ficti-
tious name(s) CASCO-CLINIC
AND DIAGNOSTIC
CENTER, INC. D.B.A. CASCO
CLINIC DIAGNOSTIC CENTER
at 16921 NW 57th AVENUE
MIAMI. FLORIDA 33055
intend(s) to register said name(s)
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florids.
19803
September 9, 16, 23, 30, 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-4794
Division (03)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALICE C. ERLIN KELETI,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ALICE C. ERLIN KELETI,
deceased, File Number 88-4794, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and
addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE:
(1) all claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an interested
person to whom notice was mailed
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 23, 1988.
Personal Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler Street, Suite 1201
Miami, Florida 33130
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
HENRY NORTON, Esquire
19 West Flagler Street, Suite 1201
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 374-3116
19829 September 23,30, 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the ficti-
tious name of RUMBLE
AIR, INC.. of 13501 S.W. 128th
Street, No. 114, Miami, Florida
33116 intends to register the said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida
Dated this 2nd day of September,
1988.
By. Ed Lamb, Jr.
James Hellman
Daniel A. Rumbley
Ronald A. Johnston
Attorneys for Applicant
LAMCHICK. GLUCKSMAN &
JOHNSTON, PA.
10725 S.W. 104th Street
Miami, Florida 33176
(305) 595-6333
18800
STREET #120 MIAMI, FL 33144
intend(s) to register said nsmefs)
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dsde County, Florida.
NANCY CONCEPCION
7935 S.W. 12 STREET
MIAMI FL 33155
19801
September 9, 16, 23. 30. 1988.
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 88-12199
SEC. 11
FLEET MORTGAGE CORP..
formerly known as Mortgage As-
sociates, Inc.,
Plaintiffls)
vs.
TERRY JONES and PATRICIA
R. JONES, his wife, et al.,
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursusnt to sn Order or Final
Judgment entered in this csse
now pending in ssid Court, the
style of which is indicated above.
I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dsde County
Courthouse in Miami, Dade
County. Florida at 11:00 o'clock
A.M., on the 11 'I'll day of OC-
TOBER, 1988, the following de-
scribed property:
Lot 178 Block 8 ALLAPATTAH
SCHOOL SUBDIVISION, accord
ing to the Plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 5 at Page 99 of the
Public Records of Dade County,
Florida.
The Defendant, THE UNITED
STATES OF AMERICA, shall
have the right of redemption pro-
vided by 28 U.S.C. Sec. 2410(c) for
the period provided therein, run-
ning from the date of the Certifi-
cate of Title issued herein.
DATED the 20TH day of
SEPTEMBER, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Joseph M. Pariello, Esquire,
Suite 2720, One Tampa City Cen-
ter
201 North Franklin Street
Tampa, Florida 33602
Publi.hed 9/23-30
SEC. 10
BANCBOSTON MORTGAGE
CORPORATION, a Florida cor-
poration, successor by merger to
STOCKTON, WHATLEY. DAV-
IN & COMPANY,
Plaintiffls)
vs.
SIMON ABELSON. et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this caae
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicsted sbove,
I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County
Courthouse in Miami. Dade
County, Florida at 11:00 o'clock
A.M., on the Mill day of OC-
TOBER, 1988. the following de-
scribed property:
Lot 44. in Block 5, of THE LAKES
OF ACADIA UNIT THREE, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 104, at Page
38, of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
DATED the 20TH day of
SEPTEMBER. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosen thai & Yachin
Suite 2300, Centrust Financial
Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami, Florida 33131-219
Published 9/23-30
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-39912
SEC. 08
GREAT AMERICAN FEDERAL
SAVINGS BANK.
Plaintiffls)
VS.
WILLIE REATH and EVA MAE
REATH, his wife, et al.,
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to sn Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest snd best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami. Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M., on the 3RD
day of OCTOBER. 1988, the fol-
lowing described property:
Lot 2. in Block 8. ACME GUL-
FAIR, according to the Plat ther-
eof, as recorded in Plst Book 40,
at Page 87, of the Public Records
of Dade County, Florida.
DATED the 14TH day
SEPTEMBER. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
of
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
September 9. 16. 23. 30. 1988. J- ^^
NOTICE UNDER BANCBOSTON MORTGAGE
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW CORPORATION, a Florida cor-
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN poration, successor by merger to
that the undersigned, desiring to fT(KKTON. WHATLEY. DAV- ((.jrcuit Court Seai)
engage in business under the ficti- JN COMPANY. by MARiA SAMA
tious name(s) FLORIDA Puuntiff(s) Deputy Clerk
SPECIALTY UNDERWRITERS ** nlanM ,. Attorney for Plaint.ff
at 6447 Miam. Lakes Drive. Suite VIVIAN ADDISON and the un- Jogeph M Pie0, ElM|uire,
105, Miami Lakes. Fl. 33014 known spouse, et si.. q^ TamD, citj CtnttTi Suiu
intend(s) to register said name(s) DeJJ$*,,I<. HFRFRY rlvEN 2720
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN m North Franklin Stree,
pursuant to an Order or Final Tmmp,i Florida 33602
Judgment entered in this case now puM^ed 9/16-23
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
of Dade County, Florida.
WELGO, Inc.
a Florida corporation
Richard W. Wasserman
Attorney for
WELGO. Inc.
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Fl. 33139
18799
September 9, 16, 23, 30, 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the ficti-
tious name(s)TICO AUTO SALES
at 3775 N.W. 28th Street, Miami
Florida 33142 intend(s) to register
said name(8) with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
J.D. ASSAMBLY
OF MIAMI INC.
3775 N.W. 28th Street
Miami, Florida 33142
JACINTO HERRERA-
PRESIDENT
J.D. ASSAMBLY
OF MIAMI INC.
18798
September 9. 16. 23, 30. 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the ficti-
tious name(s) EXOTIQUE
SOURCE at 8150 S.W. 8th
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
Miami, Dade County, Florida at engage jn business under the ficti-
11:00 o'clock A.M., on the 11TH tjous name day of OCTOBER. 1988, the fol- 13720 sw 34 Street Miami F|a.
lowing described property:
Lot 4, in Block 1, of VISTA
VERDE CLUSTERS UNIT ONE.
according to the Plst thereof, as
recorded in Plst Book 106. st
Psge 19, of the Public Records of
Dsde County, Florida.
DATED the 20TH day of
SEPTEMBER, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin, Jr.
Suite 2300, Centrust Financial
Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami, Florids 33131-219
Published 9/23-30
33175 intend(s) to register said
name(s) with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Obdulio & Beatrice Salom. Inc.
a Florida Corporation
19833 September 23.30;
October 7, 14, 1988.
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, UN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 88-9101
For
Legal Forms
Call
373-4605


Page 22 The Jewish Floridian/Friday. September 23, 1988
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
claiming interest d;
rn0dNZALEZn8and'1SAR,A Av"eTuTSuUe"#206. Miami. FL personal represenUtive
WWZALeI andall parties 33169. and file the original with venue or junction of _the
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
STATE OF FLORIDA.
Cat* No. 88-33134
General Jurisdiction
NOTICE OF ACTION
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
OF MONESSEN.
Plaintiff.
LUIS TRUEBA-CASTRO.
if living, et ux.. et al..
Defendants.
STATE OF FLORIDA
TO: CITIBANK. SOUTH
DAKOTA. N.A..
a hanking corporation.
Whose domicile, principal place
of business is c/o Anna Losey.
Assistant VP. 41 Perimeter Center
E.. Suite 300. Atlanta Georgia
30346.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County. Florida.
Lot 88, in Block 45. of
EIGHTH ADDITION TO
SOUTHERN ESTATES,
according to the Plat thereof.
recorded in Plat Book 80. at
Page 43. of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida,
has been filed against you and
LUIS TRUEBA-CASTRO. if
living, and if married. MRS. LUIS
TRUEBA-CASTRO. his wife, if
living, including any unknown
spouse of said Defendants, if either
has remarried and if either or both
of said Defendants are deceased,
their respective unknown heirs,
devisees, grantees, assignees,
creditors, lienors and trustees, and
all other persons claiming by,
through, under or against the
named Defendants, and PILAR F.
TRUEBA. if living, and if married.
JOHN DOE. her husband, whose
real name is uncertain, if living,
including any unknown spouse of
said Defendants, if either or both
of said Defendants have remarried
and if either or both of said
Defendants are deceased, their
respective unknown heirs, devi-
sees, grantees, assignees, credi-
tors, lienors and trustees, and all
other persons claiming by.
through, under or against the
named Defendants, SOUTHEAST
BANK. N.A.. formerly known as
SOUTHEAST SERVICES, INC.
CITIBANK. SOUTH DAKOTA,
N.A.. a banking corporation,
UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA, SOUTHEAST
BANK. N.A., a banking corpora
tion, formerly known as SOUTH-
FAST FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF MIAMI, formerly known as
SOUTHEAST FIRST
NATIONAL BANK OF MIAMI
SPRINGS, formerly known as
FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF
MIAMI SPRINGS. UNITED
STATES FIDELITY AND
GUARANTY COMPANY, a
Foreign corporation as Subrogue
for Jose Daniel. AMERICAN
EXPRESS TRAVEL RELATED
SERVICES COMPANY. INC.. a
corporation. FORD MOTOR
CREDIT COMPANY, a corpora
tion. STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE
AMI KENDALL REG MED
CENTER, a corporation a;
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on:
JOSEPH M PANIELLO.
ESQUIRE. Plaintiffs attorney
whose address is:
'201 N. Franklin Street. Suite
2720, Tampa. Florida 33602 on or
before the 14 day of Oct.. 1988,
and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter, otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
DATED on this 12 day of Sept..
1988.
Richard P Bnnker
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
Joseph M. PanieUo. Esquire
Attorney for Plaintiff
P. 0. Box 2347
Tampa. Florida 33601
19814 September 16. 23.30:
October T. 1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
SHADOW LAWN SAVINGS &
LOAN ASSOCIATION.
Plaintiff
vs.
EDGARDO A. PASCALL. et al..
Defendants.
TO: EDGARDO A. PASCALL
Colonia Santo Matilde
(CAHSA)
San Pedro Sule Honduras
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described prop
erty:
Condominium Unit 304 of
ORDUNA COURT CONDO-
MINIUM, according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, recorded in Official
Records Book 11527, Page
1417. of the Public Records of
Dade County. Florida
together with all appurten-
ances thereof, including an
undivided interest in the
common elements of said
Condominium as set forth in
said Declaration also known
as 800 S. Dixie Highway,
#304. Miami. Florida 33189
hi.- b filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it.
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida 33146 on or before
Od 81, 1988 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately there
after; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the Mai
of this Court this 13 day of Sept
1988.
Richard P. Brinker
As Clerk of the Court
By I. Casamayor
As Deputy Clerk
19816 September 16. 23,30;
October 7. 1988.
..___i, p.i, ottomev for Petitioner, challenge the validity of the dec*-
S;n?r,nStDDAtvTDt: STad^s^N.V, 7* it^^S*-**
having or claiming to have any the clerk of the above styledcourt
right title or interest in the on or before Oct. 14. 1988, other
pTperty herein described. wise a default will be entered
You are hereby notified that an y0" ^mouitorpeti
action to foreclose a mortgage on demanded in the complaint or pet.
the following property in DADE tion
County, Florida:
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
Unit 13-23 of TERRANOVA
3, a Condominium thereof, as
recorded April 5, 1983 in
Official Records Book 11749.
at Page 429. of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida, a/k/a 10841 N.W. 7
Street, Unit 23, Miami, FL
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for g^,* fj. Crown. Esquire
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite j5490 jj yy 7th Avenue
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral Suiu, ^5
Gables. Florida. 33146 on or before Mjami Klorida 33169
Oct. 14, 1988. and file the original
with the clerk of this court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately there-
after, otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
or the
court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
September 16, 1988.
Jerome Langer
As Personal RepresenUtive of the
Estate of SAUL WEINSTEIN
Deceased
of said court at Miami. Florida on ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
this 9 day of Sept.. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
(305) 687-3900
Attorney for Petitioner
19812 September 16,23.30;
October 7. 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
of this court this 9 day of Sept.. that the undersigned, desiring to 0f*Rutn Gruen. deceased, File pursuant to an
REPRESENTATIVE:
MORTIMER S. COHEN. ESQ.
2450 N.E. Miami Gardens Drive,
Suite 101
Miami, FL 33180
Telephone: (305) 937-0606
19815 September 16.23.1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-4581
Division (04)
IN RE:ESTATE OF
RUTH GRUEN.
Deceased.
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
1988.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
' As Deputy Clerk
September in. 23.30;
October 7. 1988.
business under the ficti
Jgg** of Dade c^.
DATED the iitu ,
SEPTEMBER. 1988 ^ of
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Joseph M. Pai||o, E(quir
O Tamp. City Center. Si*
201 North Franklin Strut
Tampa. Florida 33602
Published 9/16-23
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
THE ELEVENTH JUDICUl
CIRCUIT, IN AM; FOR DADF
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 88-16231
SEC. 16
FEDERAL NATIONAL M0RT
GAGE ASSOCIATION. 1 Usft.
ed States corporation,
Plaintiffs)
vs.
GEORGE CRAVERO. et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
lei or Final
engage in
tious name(s) A
TRUCK SUPPLIES
72 -WE.. MIAMI,
ider the ficti- Number 88-4581. is pending in the Judgment entered m this case
M ERIC AN Circuit Court for Dade county. now P?"*"* In. Si" : nu *
at 7388 NW F|orida Probate Division, the style of which is inn, :.-,-l above.I
FL 33166 address 0f which
s 73 West "i" **" to the hlkr'"' and ***
intends) to register said name(s) Fi^eV sTreet." Miami. Florida ^derfor cash on iK S01TH
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court 33,^ The names and addresses STEPS of the Dad.M -jntyCw
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Caoe Ne. tt-JMX* 1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA.
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
(Family Division)
Case No. 88-38308 (88)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JENI CREDINCIOSU.
Petitioner,
and
SHAUL CREDINCIOSU.
Respondent.
Ti' SHAUL CREDINCIOSU
c/o Lia Mikhael
39 Kol Israel St..
Haverim. Haifa
ISRAEL
YOU. SHAUL CREDINCIOSU.
are hereby notified that a Petition
for Dissolution of Marriage has
tx-en filed against you. and you are
required to serve a copy of your
Answer or Pleading to the Petition
for Dissolution of Marriage on the
Petitioner's Attorney. FRANK,
SCHMITT& FRANK. ESQS..502
Capital Bank Building. 1666
Kennedy Causeway. North Bay
Village/Florida 33141, and file the
original Answer or Pleading in the
Office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court on or before the 14th day of
(letober 1988. If you fail to do so.
Judgment or Default will be taken
against yon for the relief
demanded in the Petition.
This Notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
DATED this 9 day of Sept.. 1988.
Richard P. Brinker
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: John Branda
Deputy Clerk
FRANK. SCHMITT & FRANK.
PA
Attorneys for Petitioner
502 Capital Building
1666 Kennedy Causeway
North Bay Village. Florida 33141
Telephone (305) 868-4711
19810 September 16, 23. 30;
October 7, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 88-318*8 CA 04
NOTICE OF ACTION
RESIDENTIAL FINANCIAL
CORP.
Plaintiff
DAVID L. GONZALEZ, et al..
Defendant*
TO-. DAVID L GONZALEZ and
SARA GONZALEZ
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN .AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 88-38175 (0C)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION.
Plaintiff
vs.
ROBERT NESTOR, et ux.. et al..
Defendants.
TO: ROBERT NESTOR and
WILENA NESTOR, his wife
441 Montgomery Avenue,
Apt.
Albemarle. North Carolina
28001
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described prop-
erty:
Condominium Unit No. 370.
GATEWAY WEST, a
Condominium, according to
the Declaration of the Condo-
minium thereof, recorded the
1st day of May 1981. in Offi-
cial Records Book 11089. at
Page 2244, of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida, also known as 35303
S.W. 180th Avenue. Apt.
370. Florida City. Florida.
MOM
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it,
on Alfred J. Tirella. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida, 33146 on or before
October 14, 1988 and file the orig-
inal with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS m\ hand and the seal
of this Court this 9 day of Sept..
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As C- Court
B\ John Branda
As Deputy Clerk
September 16. 23.30.
October 7 1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY 1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA.
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY'
Civil Action No. 88-304J1 FC 15
ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
ANTHONY' M HAYNES.
Petitioner. Husband
and
JAMIE LOU HAYNES.
Respondent. Wife
TO: JAMIE LOU HAYNES
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
of Dade County. Florida.
GENERAL TRUCK PARTS &
SUPPLIES. INC.
7388 N.W. 72 AVE.
MIAMI. FL 33166
19818 September 16.23.30;
October 7, 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
of the personal representatives
and the personal representatives'
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this Court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE:
(1) all claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an interested ofT^d* County. Florida.
DATED the 14TH d
SEPTEMBER.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
thouse in Miami Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'< AM
the 4th day of OCTOBER. 1988.
the following dawrunij [iroperty-
The East 1/2 of Lot 2. tad tat
Weat 1/2 of Lot 3, in Block 26, tl
BAY SHORE UNIT NO. 3. ac-
cording to tbe Plat thereof, u
recorded in Plat Rook 12. it]
Page 50. of the Public Reeora |
#1?2 MIAMI FL 33145 intenoVs) jurisdiction of the court.
r^MidFnaSs,withle ALL^AIMS^ORIECTIONS
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
NIT1A PONCE
2200 S.W. 16 St. #122
MIAMI. FL 33145
19819 September 16.23,30;
October 7, 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-4130
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SAUL WEINSTEIN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS
HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the
estate of SAUL WEINSTEIN.
deceased. File Number 88-4130 -
Div 01. is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida.
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 16. 1988.
PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVES:
REGINA WEISSLER
625 Sunset Circle
Key Biscayne. FL 33149
IRENE JABLON
4613 Winthrop Avenue
Columbia. S.C. 29206
DENNIS R TURNER
Attorney for
Personal RepresenUtive
Florida Bar No. 184878
STEARNS WEAVER MILLER
WEISSLER ALHADEFF &
SITTERSON. PA
Museum Tower. Suite 2200
150 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33130
(305) 789-3200
19817 September 16. 23,1988
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
, CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
Probate Division, the address 01 COUNTY FLORIDA
which is 73 West Flagler Street. GENERAL JURISDICTION
Miami. Florida 33130 The DIVISION
personal represenUtive of the CASE Nq g7^M08
is Jerome Langer. whose eer qj
address is 520 West Avenue.
MANUFACTURERS HANOVER
Miami Beach. Florida 33139 The TRUST COMPANY
name and address of the personal j>iaintlff(5|
represenUtive s attorney are set
forth below-
All persons having claims or
demands against the esute are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the
clerk of the above court a written
sutement of any claim or demand
CHARLES PERREY. if living,
and LILIANE PERREY. his
wife, if living, including any un-
known spouse of said Defend-
ants), if either has remarried,
etc.. et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
they may have Each claim must be JudgmeM entered in ^ .^ now
in writing and must indicate the ^ jn ^ CouR ^ m|e of
:*>s for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim is not yet due.
the date when it will become due
shall be stated If the claim is
contingent or unliquidated, the
which is indicated above. I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami. Dade County. Florida at
11.00 o'clock A.M.. on the 4th day
of OCTOBER. 1988. the following
nature of the uncertainty shall be descnbed n
suted If the claim security shal 1 be described The Tow w, lof.tH m At Mh
claimant shall deliver sufficient floor of raE W1LSHIRE CON-
"^Zfj^"" to.1theclerk DOMIN1UM together with and
enable the derk to mail one copy o waM%iM imX.t Telu,t in
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal'
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Roeenthal et Yarchin
Suite 2300. Central Financial 4
Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami. Florida 33131
Published 9/16-23_________
NOTICE 01 SALEQ
PURSUANT TO CHAPTERS I
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT I
THE ELEVENTH JUDICLUl
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DAM|
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL Jl RISDICTKK|
DIVISION
CASE NO. 88-7107
SEC. 10
FLEET MORTl.At.E C0RP.I
formerly known al MortfipA|
sociates, lac..
Plaintiffis)
MARIE E. FONTAINE.MiL j
Defendants) L
NOTICE IS HEREBY GM|
pursuant to an I let or Pa
Judgment en;. --''_,
pending in said 1 ^Xjfi
which is indicate-: > I "~L
to the highest ar. I -' hi**!
cash on THE SOI HI *TEPS*|
the Dade Count) -rthousM
Miami. Dade Cou
11:00 o'clock A V a uwl
day of OCTOBER
lowing descn bad erg
Lot*, in Block.- ..fFULFOBj
BY THE SEA -Ft TION r[
according to the I'Ut there*' ]
recorded in Plat H -k S. alIWI
57. of the Public Records ofWl
Countv. Florida I
DATED th, 14TH day |
SEPTEMBER.
RICHARD I' BRINK**
Clerk of Cir. Court
(Circuit Court '
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy 1
Attorney for Pla
Joseph M. PanieUo.
One Tampa City Cent*.
2720
201 North Franklin Mreet
Tampa. Florida 33602
Published 9/16-23
Se>|
each personal represenUtive
All persons interested in the .^.u ,, ^ Lej
esute to whom a copy of this ElemenU anourtraant thereto
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED NoUce of Adnunmrauon has been ^"11 -- ^^
th* an action for ftsaohitior, of mailed are required. WITHIN c^o-i.i therrto 17rord-
Marru^ ha. been HJed against THREE MONTHS FROM THE SSSS-TafiSCKS
rouandy^arereqtnreduiservea DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLIC A- r^SSVt^cJSmi^
aT STonlr^t^rTwn "1' TH,ShNOT,- f"< PU? Booi ^ P^^T.f the
any. to it on Bruce V Crown, any objections they may have that
MAJOR CREDIT CARJ
credit M
Mb* new credit canl .
For intormatio"
Regardless crt
Also, nen
refused!
1-315*063 Ext'
17'


foreclosure Sales Public Notices
Friday, September 23, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 23
HnThe circuit court of
the eleventh judicial
circuit of florida
l and for dade county
general jurisdiction
division
Cue No. 88-28416 CA 30
NOTICE OF ACTION
DERAL HOME LOAN
klKTl.AGE CORPORATION,
Plaintiff
vs.
i.< \ CARDENAS,
lux., rt
Defendants.
j [,ns A CARDENAS
i S.W. 127 Avenue. #3114
ami. Florida 33183
i
\RI A VICTOR CARDENAS
.hi s W 127 Avenue, #3114
ami. Florida 33183
kill ARE NOTIFIED that an
|ion for Foreclosure of Mortgage
the following described prop-
ut No, 3114, of MILLER
GARDENS CONDO-
MINIUM a Condominium
according lo the Declaration
nt Condominium thereof,
recorded in Official Records
ok 11076, at Page 17%, of
|ht- Public Records of Dade
.unity. Florida, a/k/a 5900
3.W 127 Avenue. Unit 3114,
fiami, Florida 33183.
i been filed against you and you
required to serve a copy of
vritten defenses, if any, to it,
ird Faber, Attorney for
1: those address is Suite
Madruga Avenue, Coral
k Florida. 33146 on or before
19HK and file the original
e Clerk of this Court either
service on Plaintiff's
Irnej or immediately there-
rwtoe a default will be
fcr. i| against you for the relief
landed in the complaint.
DTNESS my hand and the seal
hi- Court this 31 day of Aug.,
(RICHARD P. BRINKER
A- Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
M
eptember 9, 16, 23, 30, 1988.
NOTICE OF ACTION
)NSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
IK ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
|( 1RCUIT OF FLORIDA,
] AND FOR DADE COUNTY
*il Vftion No. 88 37157 (OS)
ACTION FOR
SOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
#003473
IE:
IP SINGLETON
NES8A SINGLETON
\NESSA SINGLETON
I 804 Frank Cochran Dr.
61 North Gate.
Hinesville, Ga. 31313
1)1 ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
an action for Dissolution of
riage has been filed against
|:iini you are required to serve a
"f your written defenses, if
to it on JOY BARKAN,
^rney for Petitioner, whose
en is 2020 N.E. 163rd Street,
hh Miami Beach, Florida,
6L' and file the original with the
of the above styled court on
i-fore October 7, 1988; other-
a default will be entered
linst you for the relief
landed in the complaint or peti-
; notice shall be published once
I week for four consecutive weeks
FHE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
ITNESS my hand and the seal
id court at Miami, Florida on
jl day of Sept., 1988.
I RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Jennis L. Russell
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
eptember 9, 16, 23, 30, 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
JCTITIOUS NAME LAW
TICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
I the undersigned, desiring to
je in business under the ficti-
name(s) LIZ MEDICAL
TER, INC. D.B.A. SANTA
MEDICAL CENTER at
2nd AVENUE HIALEAH.
IRIDA 33010 intend(s) to
pter said naim-(s) with the
; of the Circuit Court of Dade
^ty, Florida.
IGNACIO MORALES
eptember 9, 16, 23, 30. 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No.: 88 37014
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: CHANGE OF NAME
FROM:
JAMIE JO RAYDON TO
JAMIE JO NOGUEIRAS
TO: DAVID SANTIAGO
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Petition for Change of Name
has been filed against you, and you
are required to serve a copy of
your Answer or pleading to the
Petition to the Mother's Attorney
MILTON C. GOODMAN, ESQ.'
Suite 907 Biscayne Building, 19
West Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida 33130, and file the original
Answer or pleading in the office of
the Clerk of the Circuit Court on or
before the 7th day of October,
1988. If you fail to do so, Default
Judgment will be taken against
you for the relief demanded in the
Petition.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami,
Florida, this 31 day of August,
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: JENNIS L. RUSSELL
Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18793
September 9. 16, 23, 30. 1988.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA.
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-37391 (07)
ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
JANICE SARA STEELE,
Petitioner,
and
ROBERT BARRETT STEELE
Respondent.
TO:
ROBERT BARRETT STEELE
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Philip A. Turtletaub,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 9995 Sunset Drive,
Suite 108, Miami, Florida 33173,
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before October 7th, 1988; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or peti-
tion.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 2 day of Sept., 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By John Branda
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Philip A. Turtletaub
9995 Sunset Drive. Suite 108
Miami, FL 33173
(305) 271-4000
Attorney for Petitioner
18795
September 9, 16, 23, 30, 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the ficti-
tious name(s) THE SOFTWARE
PROFESSOR at 5975 SUNSET
DRIVE, SUITE 604, S. MIAMI,
FL 33143 intend(s) to register said
name(s) with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
19802
September 9, 16, 23, 30, 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the ficti-
tious name(s) OROSUN COIN
intendd) to register said name(s)
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
EVELYN PINEDA
1138 West 40 PL
Hialeah, FL 33012
L9809
September 9, 16, 23, 30, 1988.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No: 88 36382
FAMILY DIVISION
FLORIDA BAR #252751
MOTION OF
ADOPTION PROCEEDING
IN THE MATTER OF
THE ADOPTION OF:
A MINOR CHILD by
Petitioners
MARIO STAGNARO and
DIANE STAGNARO, his wife
TO: JEFFREY DOE
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a petition for the adoption of
your minor child has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on BRUCE N. CROWN.
ESQUIRE, attorney for the Peti-
tioners, whose address is 15490
N.W. 7th Avenue, Suite #205,
Miami. Florida 33169, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Oct. 7,
1988; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in the Jewish Floridian Newspaper.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said Court at Miami, Florida on
this 26 day of Aug., 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: B. J. Foy
Deputy Clerk 1032
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioners:
BRUCE N. CROWN, ESQUIRE
15490 N.W. 7th Avenue
Suite #205
Miami, Florida 33169
(305) 687-3900
18787
September 2, 9, 16, 23. 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 88-32174 CA 03
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United
States of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
CLARENCE L. De PASS, et al
Defendants.
TO: CLARENCE L. De PASS and
JESSICA A. MURILLO
9156 N.W. 5 Avenue
Miami. Florida 33150
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described prop-
erty:
Beginning 25 feet West of
the Northeast corner of the
South 1/2 of the Southeast
1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of
the Southwest 1/4 of Section
1, Township 55 South, Range
41 East, thence run West 146
feet; thence run South 110.60
feet thence run East 146 feet,
thence run North 110.60 feet
to the point of beginning,
lying and being in Dade
County, Florida, a/k/a 9156
N.W. 5 Avenue, Miami
Florida 33150.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida. 33146 on or before
Sept. 30, 1988 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 29 day of Aug..
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
18788
September 2, 9, 16, 23, 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT.
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 88-35053 (CA 02)
NOTICE OF ACTION
F.P.G. WHOLESALE. INC., a
Florida corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
ARCH R. McKAY, et a).,
Defendants.
TO:UNITED BANK AND
TRUST COMPANY,
formerly known as NEW
BRITAIN NATIONAL
BANK, Trustee, under a
Certain Trust Agreement
between Olga V. Irons, Settlor
and said New Britain National
Bank, Trustee, dated March 3.
1970
Corporate Service Center
25 Holly Drive
Newington, Connecticut 06111
LAWRENCE AXELSON
13 Harding Street
New Britain, CT 06052
MARY AXELSON CROPPER
222 East 75th Street
Apartment LE
New York, New York 10021
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to quiet title on the
following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
That portion of Tract 41,
lying southerly of the
southerly right-of-way line of
Tamiami Trail, of Miami
Everglades Land Co., Ltd., a
subdivision of the west one
half of Section 4, Township
54 South, Range 39 East,
according to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 3, at
Page 129. of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida, less and except the
West 330.00 feet of said
Tract 41
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack. Lewis, Allison &
Cohen, Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address is HI N.E. 1st
Street, Miami, Florida 33132, on
or before Sept. 30, 1988 and file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
Default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 24 day of August.
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By E. Le Sueur
Deputy Clerk
18778
September 2, 9, 16, 23. 1988.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
ADOPTION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Civil Action No: 87-39949 FC 07
FAMILY DIVISION
FLORIDA BAR #252751
NOTICE OF ADOPTION
IN RE: THE ADOPTION OF
a minor by MARIE WILLIAMS.
and WINSTON WILLIAMS,
Petitioners
TO: MARIE DENISE
DESAMOURS
(natural mother)
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Petition for Adoption has
been filed and commenced in this
Court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on BRUCE
N. CROWN, ESQUIRE, attorney
for Petitioners, whose address is
15490 N.W. 7th Avenue, Suite
#205, Miami. Florida 33169, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled Court on or before
Sept. 30. 1988; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four (4) consecutive
weeks in the JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said Court at Miami, Florida on
this 24 day of Aug., 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: B. J. Foy
As Deputy Clerk 1032
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioners:
BRUCE N. CROWN, ESQUIRE
15490 N.W. 7th Avenue
Suite #205
Miami, Florida 33169
(305) 687-3900
18779
September 2, 9, 16, 23, 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 88-13204 CA 29
NOTICE OF ACTION
ALLIANCE MORTGAGE
COMPANY, a Florida corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
DAVID PRINCE; WILHEMENA
PRINCE; SARAH BLUM,
Individually and as Trustee;
STATE OF FLORIDA,
DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE;
COMMERCIAL BANK & TRUST
COMPANY, a Florida corporation;
ZELMA SINGER, and the
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other
parties claiming by, through,
under or against her; CHRISTIAN
BELLAMY; WILSON
MATTHEW, ARNOLD CHERY;
DOMINIQUE LAWRENCE;
MELANIE BELLAMY; MAUD
MATTHEW, FORTUNE JEAN;
and KELLY LAROCHELLE;
Defendants.
TO: Zelma Singer, whose resi-
dence is unknown, and the
unknown parties who may be
spouses, heirs, devisees, gran-
tees, assignees, lienors, credi-
tors, trustees and all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against said
Defendant, who are not
known to be dead or alive, and
all parties having or claiming
to have any right, title, or
interest in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclosure a mortgage
on the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 7, Block 6. of BUENA
VISTA HEIGHTS ADDI-
TION, according to the
Amended Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 3, at
Page 22, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it,
on Albert C. Galloway, Jr.,
Esquire, Rosenthal & Yarchin,
Suite 2300, CenTrust Financial
Center, 100 Southeast 2nd Street,
Miami, Floria 33131-2198, on or
relief prayed for in in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four (4) consecutive
weeks in the JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said Court at Miami, Florida on
this 24 day of Aug., 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
Dade County, Florida
By: B. J. Foy
As Deputy Clerk 1032
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioners:
BRUCE N. CROWN, ESQUIRE
15490 N.W, 7th Avenue
Suite #205
Miami, Florida 33169
(305) 687-3900
18777
September 2, 9, 16, 23, 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the ficti-
tious name(s) Koby's Delivery &
Messinger Service at Suite 207,
235 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach.
FL 33137 intend(s) to register said
name(s) with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Koby Berger, Sole Owner
Paul Kwitney, P.A.
Kwitney, Kroop & Scheinberg
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 512
Miami Beach, FL 33139
Attorney for: Koby Berger
18782
September 2, 9, 16, 23, 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 88-36936-FC
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
JEWEL W. GREEN
Petitioner
and
THOMAS GREEN
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Thomas Green,
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.J.
GRAFF. ESQ. attorney for Peti
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St. N.M.B. Florida 33162 on or
before Oct. 7. 1988. and file the
before Sept. 30, 1988 and file the origjnai wjth ^ clerk of ^ ,,,
original with the Clerk of this otherwjse a default will be entered
Court either before service on against you.
Plaintiff's attorneys or immedi- RICHARD p BRINKER
ately thereafter; otherwise, a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on 26 Aug.. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
Albert C. Galloway, Jr., Esquire
Rosenthal & Yarchin
Suite 2300
CenTrust Financial Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami, Florida 33131-2198
Telephone (305) 374-6600
AMC NO. 035865-200
FHA NO. 092-141625-203
18783
Clerk of the Court
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
18791
September 2. 9. 16, 23, 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the ficti-
tious nanieis) New York Style
Jewelry at 1839 NW 17 Ave..
Miami, FL 33125 intend(s) to
register said nanie(s) with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Dora VazquezPresident of
New York Style Jewelry, Inc.
A Fla. Corp.
September 2, 9, 16, 23, 1988. 18781
September 2. 9. 16, 23, 1988.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
ADOPTION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Civil Action No: 87-39949 FC 07
FAMILY DIVISION
FLORIDA BAR #252751
NOTICE OF ADOPTION
IN RE: THE ADOPTION OF
a minor by MARIE WILLIAMS.
and WINSTON WILLIAMS,
Petitioners.
TO: JEAN SERGE MAYAS
(natural father)
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the ficti-
tious name(s) Tamiami Pet Center
at 13806 SW 8 St. Miami, FL
33185 intend(s) to register said
name(s) with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Attorneys for
Manuel Hernandez as President of
M.A.H. Inc. A Florida Corporation
18780
September 2, 9, 16, 23, 1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that a Petition for Adoption has that the undersigned, desiring to
been filed and commenced in this engage in business under the ficti-
Court and you are required to tjous ame(s) CAREL VIDEO
serve a copy of your written PRODUCTIONS at 6239 West 24
defenses, if any, to it on BRUCE Ave., #206 Hialeah, FL 33016
N. CROWN, ESQUIRE, attorney intend(s) to register said name(s)
for Petitioners, whose address is with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
15490 N.W. 7th Avenue, Suite of Dade County, Florida.
#205. Miami, Florida 33169, and Eladio G. Batista
file the original with the clerk of 6239 West 24 Ave., #206
the above styled Court on or before Hialeah. FL 33016
Sept. 30,1988; otherwise a default [g789
will be entered against you for the September 2, 9, 16, 23, 1988.


I-t TSf .>^nsi Firum 7-narx 5*coesn>c iL!. ". i*S*
3_=:e:x 3Ese=*.s a*=s v: :-.
A:-r
; i
-51- Fj :
; f-r. f E i-: .: = -:* A5:-
t*m.<
1


Full Text
Kollek Invites Kohl
To Jerusalem
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) Jerusalem
Mayor Teddy Kollek invited
Chancellor Helmut Kohl of
West Germany to visit the holy
city and said here that the
German leader might come
sometime in December.
A spokesman for Kohl said
the chancellor definitely wants
to come to Jerusalem, but that
a visit would depend on his
schedule.
Kollek extended the invita-
tion during an hour-long chat
with the chancellor that
focused on a fountain, now
being built, that the West
German government has
donated to Jerusalem.
The fountain is a creation of
Gernot Rumpf, a German
artist. Kollek would like to see
Kohl dedicate it sometime at
the end of this year.
Kollek also met here with
Foreign Minister Hans-
Dietrich Genscher and several
other high-level officials.
The Jerusalem mayor said
that his discussions focused on
how to improve the overall
situation in Jerusalem through
contributions to specific social,
educational and other better-
ment programs.
Kollek's visit was made at
the invitation of the Adenauer
Foundation, an organization
allied with the Christian
Democratic Party that is
involved in education projects
in Jerusalem.
Egyptians Seize
Israeli Boat
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israeli
officials have expressed disap-
proval of the Egyptian coast
guard's move to ram and seize
an Israeli excursion boat in the
Gulf of Eliat. But the Foreign
Ministry is awaiting further
details of the incident before
deciding how Israel will
respond.
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin said that the incident
was not the sort of thing that
should occur between friendly
nations and was "completely
unnecessary."
Information so far indicates
that the seizure was an inde-
pendent initiative, not coordin-
ated with authorities in Cairo.
The Maya, with 35 Israeli
passengers and crew aboard,
was intercepted by the Egyp-
tian patrol ship, rammed and
towed to the Egyptian coast
guard station on Coral Island
in the gulf.
The Maya's deck and hull
were damaged, but no one was
hurt. Its passengers and crew
were detained. After several
hours, they were allowed to
return to Eliat aboard the
Maya, apparently on orders
from the authorities in Cairo.
The captain of the Maya,
Moshe Saar, said he was about
a mile offshore when attacked.
He said the Egyptians ordered
him not to use his radio. He
also said he refused to sign a
statement that his vessel had
sustained no damage.
According to the Egyptians,
the Maya was only about 300
yards offshore in Egyptian
waters and failed to heed
orders to stand clear.
Meanwhile, the Maya was
off again two days later,
carrying about 30 tourists. The
damage will be repaired at a
later date.
Lay-Rabbis Trained
In New England
NORTHWOOD, N.H. (JTA)
The work of the Para-Rabbi
Foundation, which provides
rabbinic training for lay people
in isolated New England
communities unable to afford
full-time rabbinic services, still
goes on, this time with the help
of Hebrew College in Brook-
line, Mass.
A group of rural New
England Jews recently spent a
weekend at Hebrew College's
Camp Yavneh in secluded
Northwood, N.H., learning the
true meaning of the Jewish
Sabbath.
They attended study
sessions led by resident rabbis
and teachers and participated
in prayers and songfests
conducted by Yavneh's 225
campers.
"All of us here this weekend
are tremendously thirsty to be
more Jewish, said Rick
Schwag of Lyndonville, Vt.,
executive director of the foun-
dation, of the 17 adults and
three children who attended.
"We'd be thrilled to have an
institute like this happen once
a month," he added.
Correspondence between
Schwag and Hebrew College
President Samuel Schafler
resulted in the Yavneh
weekend. Schwag and Hebrew
College are now negotiating a
follow-up program to the
Shabbat weekend.
In the coming year, Schwag
has arranged for courses in
Portsmouth, N.H., Bratt-
leboro, Mass., Bangor and
Montpelier, Vt., on such
subjects as how to conduct
Jewish funeral services,
preparing for a bar/bat
mitzvah, uses of the Jewish
ritual bath and understanding
Rosh Hashanah prayers.
Also on Schwag's agenda
are plans to build a sukkah on
the Appalachian Trail in cele-
bration of Sukkot.
Schwag has received a grant
from Boston's Combined
Jewish Philanthropies to
enable him to start a lending
film library to distribute films
of Jewish interests to rural
Jews from Portsmouth, N.H.,
to St. Johnsbury, Vt.
Opportunities such as the
film-lending service are
promoted in a small publica-
tion called Kfari, which comes
out six times a year and is
published by R.D. Eno, former
organizer of the annual
Conference on Judaism in
Rural New England.
Friday, September 23, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 11
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E. 1st Avenue Miami, Florida
VASELINE
INTENSIVE CARE
Lotion
All Types
10 oz. $1.99
15 oz $2.99
VASELINE
HAIR
TONIC
3 5 oz $1.99
5 oz $2.39
VASELINE
INTENSIVE
CARE
HAND & NAIL
FORMULA
2.5 oz.
$1.19

%
Oep( lean
C old ( ff.im
w
POND'S
Ory Skin Cream |
POND'S Cold Cream
Regular
3.5 oz. $2.59
6.1 oz. $3.89
Dry Skin Cream
3.9 oz. $2.99
6.5 oz. $3.99
11 oz $4.99
HarSpray
RAVE
Aerosol
Hair
Spray
9.1 oz.
$2.99
CLOSE-UP
GEL
' U O I O I 111 -^-v*'
CLOSE UP
6.4 oz
$1.59
CLOSE-
UP
PASTE
PUMP
4.5 oz.
$1.59
AIM
Toothpaste
PUMP
Regular
Mint
4.5 oz. $1.59
POND'S
Cream and
COCOA
BUTTER
Lotion
12 oz.
$2.19
GROOM &
CLEAN
6.5 OZ.
$2.99
PONDS
POND'S
Cold Cream
TUBE
2 oz $1.69
PUMP
Regular
2 7 oz $3.19
Dry Skin
2.9 oz. $3.29
AIM
GEL
GmSTBtNCIM
CLOSE-UP
PASTE
i U O I O I P 4 I ->_
CLOSE-UP /
'; ........
6.4 oz.
$1.59
6.4 oz.
$1.69
AIM
TOOTHPASTE
illBJ JTP1INGTK
Aim
8.2 oz.
$1.99
PEPSODENT
Toothpaste
ftepsodent
riuoftiof
6.4 oz.
8.2 oz.
$1.19
$1.29
M SIGNAL
MOUTHWASH
32 oz.
$3.39
AIM
Toothbrushes
Jo^/Aim
AMI PLAQUI
TOOTHBHlir.M
$1.69
PEPSODENT
Toothbrushes
Pepsodent
$1.29
**-
WORLD
OF
DISNEY
Toothbrushes
$1.39
u


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 23, 1988
Soviets Sign Holocaust Pact
WASHINGTON, D.C. -
Several million Nazi docu-
ments, photographs and other
records of Nazi atrocities
seized by the Red Army in the
former German occupied terri-
tories of the Soviet Union and
Eastern Europe at the end of
World War II will be made
available to western scholars
and researchers for the first
time as a result of an agree-
ment the U.S. Holocaust
Memorial Council has signed
with the Soviet Union.
The vast collection of the
Soviet archives may constitute
a third or more of existing
Nazi and other Holocaust-
related materials.
As a result of the break-
through agreement signed in
Moscow, the Council will
microfilm the documents and
duplicate photographs to be
kept in the archival repository
of the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum expected to
open here in 1991. Major
components of these materials
will be displayed in the
Museum.
"We're obviously thrilled,"
said Miles Lerman, the
Council's international rela-
tions chairman, who headed a
six-person delegation that
visited archives in Moscow and
western republics of the Soviet
Union for two weeks. "We
have tried before to get this
information, but were always
U.S. Strips Ex-Nazis
Of Naturalization Papers
unsuccessful. But the new
spirit of glasnost (openness)
unlocked this important
source."
The Soviet Union's archival
collection provides an in-depth
picture of what happened to an
estimated 2.5 million Jews in
the Nazi invaded territories of
what are now the Soviet
republics of Ukrainia,
Moldavia, Byelorussia,
Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania,
as well as in portions of
Russia. Large numbers of non-
Jews living in these territories,
including Gypsies, political
dissidents, local national
patriots and others, also
became Nazi victims of arrest,
torture and execution.
"We saw glimpses of infor-
mation on everything about
Latvian attitudes ton,
Jews, about LithuanianS
police, statistics on the S'
ment of Jews, corresrxnX
of Nazi officers," SJft*
sity of Vermont Profc-
Raul Hilberg, a meS?S
the Council delegation an?/
of the nation's foremost Hok
caust scholars. "
Previously, HolocaUst
related documents have tvni
cally been released only on
case-by-case basis, usually fi
trials of accused war criminak
in the Soviet Union and b
western courts. This agrM.
ment calls for the mutual
exchange of Holocaust-relate
collections between the
Council and the Main Archival
Administration of the USSR
Council of Ministers.
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Two Nazi war criminals living
in the United States, Stefan
Reger and Juris Kauls, were
ordered denaturalized by two
different judges.
Reger, 63, of Yardville, N.J.,
was denaturalized by U.S.
District Court Judge Clarkson
Fisher in Newark, N.J., on the
basis of his service as an SS
guard at the Auschwitz II
(Birkenau) concentration camp
between 1943 and 1945.
Kauls, 75, of Sun City, Ariz,
was denaturalized by U.S.
District Court Judge Robert
Bloomfield in Phoenix by a
default judgment based on
Kauls' failure to respond to
government charges that he
served at a Nazi concentration
camp in Latvia during World
War II, and concealed that
service from federal immigra-
tion officials.
The two actions were among
the 29 cases pending before
U.S. courts brought by U.S.
district attorneys and the
Justice Department's Office of
Special Investigations, which
searches out and tries to prose-
cute accused war criminals
living in the United States.
Reger, who has fled to West
Germany, was not there for
the verdict, but admitted in
sworn testimony that he had
served as a SS guard at
Auschwitz.
Born in Yugoslavia, Reger
immigrated to the United
States in 1952 and became a
citizen in 1957. He had
contended in his immigration
forms that he had simply been
a combat soldier in the
German army.
Kauls was prosecuted with
the aid of official papers that
were stored in the Berlin docu-
ment Center in West Berlin
captured intact from the Nazis
by the U.S. Army which
showed "handwritten resumes
Kauls had submitted to Nazis
in which he admitted to being
inspector of guards at the Riga
concentration camp," an OSI
source said.
Kauls entered the United
States in 1954 and became a
U.S. citizen in 1960. Neal
Sher, OSI director, said Kauls,
like Reger, has left the United
States and will not be allowed
to return.
In Moscow, Miles Lerman, left, chairman of the U.S. Holocau
Memorial Council's International Relations Cnwmittee m
Evgeny M. Kozhevnikov, first deputy director of the Centn,
Archive Administration of the USSR Council ofMi/'iMers.siji
the cooperation agreement that will open immense Sm\et holding
of Nazi documents to Western scholars and researchers.

PUT ON YOUR SLUE SUEDE SHOES
and Stroll, Twist, Jitterbug or Bop to the
turn" SHOP flop
Sunday, October 9,1988
Noon
The Aaron "Artie" Kravitz Building
3194 Hallandale Beach Boulevard
9m as the Douglas Gardens Miami
Jewish Home Ihrifl Shop rolls back
our prices to the Fabulous Fifties!
Great Music!
Kiddie Rides!
Drawings for
prizes!
and of course, rock-bottom prices on
top-notch merchandise!


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E5F4HOGFV_JYY8ID INGEST_TIME 2013-06-19T21:12:50Z PACKAGE AA00010090_03112
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES