The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03089

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
Je wislb Flor idiao
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Volume 61 Number 16
Miami, Florida Friday, April 15, 1988
Frtd Sfiocfttr
Price 50 Cents
Deportations, Expulsions from Territories
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israel expelled eight Palestinians from
the West Bank and Gaza Strip to Lebanon and ordered 12 others
deported.
Four of those ousted are from Beita village in the West Bank,
scene of a clash in which a teen-age Jewish girl was killed. The
other four, from Gaza, had been under deportation orders since
Jan. 3 and had waived their right to appeal.
The remaining 12 ordered deported may appeal to a military
tribunal and, if rejected, to Israel's Supreme Court.
The expulsions were the first by Israel since Jan. 13 when four
West Bank residents were deported after deciding not to appeal.
In Washington, State Department spokesman Charles Red-
man said the latest expulsions were "counterproductive" to
peace in the Middle East.
"We have said before we believe they are counterproductive;
that they are in violation of the Fourth Geneva Convention (of
V.'49) and that they only further inflame tensions," Redman
-aid.
Israeli military authorities described the deportees as "senior
activists in terrorist organizations who were involved in incite-
ment and subversion."
Hut their attorneys charged that the Israel Defense Force was
appeasing militant Jewish settlers who have demanded
vengeance for the death of 15-year-old Tirza Porat in Beita.
She was among 16 Jewish teen-agers from nearby Eilon
Moreh settlement on a Passover hike in the region, accompanied
by two armed adult settlers. An autopsy and investigation by the
IDF determined that the girl was killed by a bullet apparently
fired in panic by one of the settlers not from stoning by an
\rab mob as originally reported.
Passions Mount
After Porat's Murder
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Prime Minister Yitzhak
Shamir met the angry cries of
thousands of mourning set-
tlers with impassioned
rhetoric at the funeral of a
15-year-old Jewish girl stoned
to death by Arabs in a violent
encounter.
"God will avenge her blood,"
vowed Shamir, echoing set-
tlers from Eilon Moreh, who
cried "revenge" and "expul-
sions" during the eulogy. "The
blood of the whole nation is
boiling."
Meanwhile, Israeli troops
searching for suspects in the
hills around Beita, the village
where Tirza Porat was killed,
shot and killed an Arab
suspect. According to an army
spokesperson, the suspect was
shot after refusing repeated
warnings to stop, and later
died of his wounds.
Troops also arrested 15
residents of Beita and
destroyed the houses of at
least four people suspected of
inciting the attack on the
group of 16 Jewish teen-agers,
who were hiking on a holiday
outing.
In Washington, the State
Department condemned this
incident, which also left two
Arabs dead, shot by adults
escorting the hikers.
"This tragedy underscores
the urgent need for Palesti-
nians and Israelis to pull back
from confrontation, shun
violence and look to the peace
process to resolve dif-
ferences," department
spokeswoman Phyllis Oakley
said.
"Acts of violence serve no
one's interests and are bound
Continued on Page 3
Celebrate 'Israel 40'
A community march at 11 a.m. Sunday, April 17 will in-
augurate Greater Miami's celebration of Israel 40 at the
Miami Dade Community College-Mitchell Wolfson Campus
in downtown Miami.
The event, which is free to the public, will include a street
and food fair, entertainment by "The Mamas and The
Papas" at 4 p.m., the Dudaim Duo, hailed as Israel s Simon
and Garfunkel, at 3 p.m. and a Cantorial Concert scheduled
for 1:45 p.m. The celebration is scheduled to run to 5 p.m.
Among the special features will be an AT&T pavilion
with free phone calls to Israel, a model kibbutz and a youth
carnival.
Municipal parking will be available along NE and NW 3rd
St. and both Metrorail and Metromover will be operating.
Residents of the Jewish West Bank settlement
of Eton Moreh carry the body of 15-year-old
Tirza Porat, wrapped in a black tarpaulin
with a white Star of David. Porat was fatally
wounded following what was to have been a
youthful holiday outing. She was buried
amidst anguish and anger at the Karnei
Shomron Cemetery in the administered-
territories. AP/Wide World Photo.
Accusations, Explanations Fly
On Eve of New York Primary
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) The Rev. Jesse Jackson said that if he was elected
president he would try to bring Israel and the Palestinians together, but would
not "sit down" with Yasir Arafat, head of the Palestine Liberation Organization.
"We must not equate Arafat and PLO with a sovereign people, the Palestinian
people," Jackson said in an interview on the CBS-TV program "Face the
Nation."
"In the final analysis, it's not Arafat versus Israel; it's the Israelis versus the
Palestinians."
Jackson, campaigning in New York for the April 19 Democratic primary, has
come under fire for what is considered to be his anti-Israel positions.
Jackson has been under strong criticism from the American Jewish community
since the fall of 1979, when he met twice with Arafat in Beirut and was
photographed embracing the PLO leader. In between the two meetings with
Arafat, Jackson went to Cairo for talks with Egyptian President Anwar Sadat.
Another contender in the Democratic primary, Sen. Albert Gore Jr. of Ten-
nessee, in making a strong bid for the New York Jewish vote, has repeatedly
criticized Jackson's meetings with Arafat.
Both Gore, who has been attacked forpandering to Jewish voters, and Jackson
sought to clarify their position on the CBS program.
Jackson maintained he met with Arafat after meeting with Sadat "for the sole
purpose of challenging him to change his posture and move toward a mutual
recognition policy with Israel as opposed to an elimination-of-Israel posture.
He stressed that "our first obligation ought to be to assure Israel's security,"
which, he noted, includes "convincing the Palestinians to recognize their right to
Continued on Pae 9


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 15, 1988
Arab Influence in America
The Arab-American lobby,
growing in numbers and ag-
vely asserting the Arab
cause, is the subject of a com-
prehensive and scholarly
report just published by the In-
stitute of Jewish Affairs, the
London-based research arm of
the World Jewish Congr<
Michael Curtis, professor of
political science at Rutgers
University and editor of Mid-
dle East Review, is the author
of the report entitled "The
Arab Lobby in the L'nited
States."
Curtis begins by noting that
American Arab groups have
existed in the U.S. since
early part of the century when
Arab immigrants were mostly
Lebanese and Syrian and
usually Christian.
Since the late 1940's. Arab
immigrants have come from
Iraq. Yemen and Palestine and
are primarily Muslims. Some
Arab groups estimate the total
population of Arab-Americans
at about 2.5 million, almost
half the Jewish population in
the U.S. The metropolitan
area of Detroit has an Arab-
American population of
200,000 with a power base in
the United Automobile
Workers. Arab-Americans are
becoming more prosperous,
better-educated and have bet-
ter employment opportunities.
Since 1980, an Arab-American
lobby has developed which con-
centrates on antiIsrael
activity.
The Arab-American
organizations consciously im-
itate Jewish models. The Na-
tional Association of Arab
Americans (NAAA), formed in
1972 to counter the American
Israel Political Affairs Com-
mittee (AIPAC). claims a
membership of 13,000 and has
a staff of about 20. Curtis
asserts that such companies
doing business in the Arab
world like General Electric
and Mobil Oil appear to be the
chief source of funding for the
NAAA. The NAAA tends to
lean toward the Republican
party and indeed, in 1984 that
party designated Joseph
Baroudy as its Arab American
liaison. NAAA has established
a political action committee
but it has only been able to
distribute tiny amounts of
money to influential
Congressmen.
Another organization, the
Arab American Institute
(AAI), formed in 1985 by
James Zogby. has Democratic
Party leanings. Zogby was the
deputy campaign director in
Jesse Jackson's 1984 presiden-
tial campaign. In 1986, the
AAI organized a "Get Out the
5
i
'ChMIMM
PhoiM: (306) 379-4605
Published woekly vory Friday
sine* 1927 by The Jewish Ro*
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SUBSCRIPTION RATES: In ad-
vance (Local Area) One Year
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By Mail 91 45 per copy.
Thu< article is excerpted from the
March 1988 tdition ofBoycott Report,
n pub 'ht American Jewish
C,
ongrtm
Vote" campaign and sup-
ported the candidacy of
Republican Senator James
Abdnor of South Dakota, who
was defeated. It also sup-
ported the election of black
Congressmen frequently
critical of Israel, such as Mer-
vyn Dymally of California and
John Conyers and George
Crockett, both from Detroit.
A rival organization is the
American Arab Anti-
rimination Comnv
(ADC), modeled after the ADL
and established in 1980 by the
former U.S. Senator from
South Dakota. James G.
Abourezk, a Democrat. ADC
has fought negative
stereotypes of Arabs in the
media and anti-Arab
discrimination but most of its
activity is directed against
Israel. Curtis states that, like
the NAA, much of AD's
finances comes from American
corporations doing business in
the Mideast and from abroad.
An earlier organization
founded by James Zogby is the
Palestine Human Rights Cam-
paign which focuses exclusive-
ly on the human rights of "the
Palestinian people" and is
engaged principally in lobby-
ing Congress. Its conferences
have been addressed by Noam
Chomsky and Ramsey Clark.
Finally, the Association of
ArabAmerican University
Graduates (AAUC), founded in
1967 by a group which includ-
ed Hisham Sharabi. a political
scientist now at Georgetown
University, Edward Said, pro-
fessor of comparative
literature at Columbia, and
Andeen Jahara, is a tax-
exempt "cultural and educa-
tional" organization but accor-
ding to Curtis, it is essentially
restricted to anti-Israel activi-
ty. Some of its most prominent
members have been close to
the PLO.
There are also some
American organizations con-
sisting of those not of Arab
descent, who consistently sup-
port the Arab position in the
Arab-Israeli conflict. Among
them. Curtis states, are the
Middle East Institute.
Americans for Middle East
Understanding, the American
Arab Affairs Council, the
American Educational Trust,
the National Council on U.S.
Arab Relations and American
Near East Refugee Aid. Curtis
states that most of these
groups receive financial aid
from oil companies and other
corporations active in the
Mideast.
Many of the leaders of these
groups are former am-
idors or other diplomatic
officials who have served in
the Mideast but non-Arabists
also serve on the boards of
these companies, including
Senator Charles Percy. Ed-
mund Muskie and George
McGovem, who are on the
board of the American Arab
Affairs Council.
Included in the Arab Lobby
are, of course, the registered
foreign agents, publicists and
lawyers working for Arab
clients, including Frederick G.
Dutton, J. Crawford Cook,
Stephen Conners, former
Senator J. William Fulbright
and Michael Deever's firm.
Fees exceeding one million
dollars a year have been paid
to some of these agents.
Nor does Curtis omit the
Middle East centers and
departments now functioning
in 17 of our leading univer-
sities. A number of these
academic centers have ac-
cepted funds from Arab
sources. Among them: Har-
vard, Johns Hopkins,
Georgetown U., and the U. of
Southern California. Concern
has frequently been expressed
about these grants because of
the conditions attached to
them.
Curtis concludes that the
various constitutents of the
Arab lobby cannot be seen as a
"significant influence on
American policy" or as a
serious challenge to the
AIPAC. However, it appears
that their legislative and elec-
toral activities are bound to
become more significant as
they continue to grow.
New Chief For Shin Bet
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Cabinet approved the appoint-
ment of a new director for the
Shin Bet, Israel's internal
secret service agency. His
identity, by law, is not disclos-
ed to the public.
In another development at
the meeting, the resignation of
Amiram Nir, the prime
minister's adviser on ter-
rorism, was announced. He is
leaving his post voluntarily
after nearly four years of
service.
Originally appointed by
Shimon Peres when he was
prime minister, Nir's name
was closely linked to Lt. Col.
Oliver North, a member of
President Reagan's national
security staff, in connection
with the Iran-contra arms
sales scandal in 1986.
Premier Yitzhak Shamir
said Nir's deputy would take
over his duties, pending the
appointment of a new adviser.
The new Shin Bet chief took
office April 1. replacing Yosef
Harmelin, who was called out
of retirement in September
1986 after the director at the
time, Avraham Shalom, and
other senior operatives were
forced to resign under the
cloud of scandal.
Refusenik's
Release
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Sen. John Heinz (R-Pa.) met
with the second ranking of-
ficial of the Soviet Embassy
here to press for an exit visa
for Yuli Kosharovsky.
The refusenik has been
fasting in Moscow since March
10. the 17th anniversary of his
application for an exit visa to
leave the Soviet Union.
Heinz presented the official.
Sergey Chetverikov. with a
letter urging that Kosharov-
sky, his wife Inna and his three
children be allowed to
emigrate.
Formerly a synagogue, this building in Nevel, Lithuania, I'SSR,
is today a Red Army officers' club, with a Soviet star al
entrance. The photo was obtained from former refum
Semyon Yantovsky. who traveled across the USSR researching
the fates of many Jewish communities. In past years a center of
Jewish life, Nevel today has only several dozen Jews.
Hawkish Response
to Arab Demands
JERUSALEM (TNB) Most
Israelis want the government
to deal more severely with
Arab rioters, according to a
new public opinion survey.
The survey, conducted by
the Dehaf Institute, found that
72 percent of Israelis want the
authorities to use tougher
measures against the rioters.
Some 21 percent said they are
satisfied with the current
policy, and only 6 percent said
the government should take a
softer line.
The poll results suggest that
Israeli public opinion has re-
mained hawkish despite recent
international protests. A
Dahaf poll taken in December,
during the first month of the
rioting, found that 69 percent
of Israelis wanted a more
forceful policy against the
Arab mobs, and only 7 percent
wanted a less forceful policy.
Writing in the daily
Ha'aretz, political analyst Dan
Margalit suggested that public
opinion is likely to become
even more hawkish in
response to the recent spate of
extreme statements by Arabs
in the territories and within
Israel. Margalit cited Israeli
Arab poet Mahmoud Darwish,
who recently sparked an
uproar by writing a poem that
includes the line, "Get out of
our country, our land, our
sea." Margalit also pointed to
an Israel Television interview
with Mubarak Awad, the Arab
militant who advocates using
non-violent tactics against
Israel. "Awad explained that
the time has come for his peo-
ple to ask for their due in Haifa
and Jaffa," Margalit noted.
"This is no longer (a demand
for) autonomy, or sovereignty
in Nablus. All of a sudden, they
want rights within the Green
Line, right up to the Mediter-
ranean Sea."
Margalit was especially
disturbed by a recent public
opinion poll taken among
Arabs in Israel, by the leftw-
ing weekly Koteret Raishit.
"Its startling findings show-
that both Arabs within Israel
and those in the territories are
united in their desire to see the
elimination of Israel." accor-
ding to Margalit. "First there
will be a Palestine state
alongside Israel, and then
Israel is to be undermined
from within ... exploded by
means of the innocent-
sounding concept of 'the right
to return,' which means
flooding the countrv with all
the 1948 refugees... All Jews
who came here after the
establishment of the state
would be expelled, including
non-Zionists This is a
blood-curdling picture of the
situation," he concluded.
Arab Groups
Endorse Violence
HAIFA (INB) Thirty-one
Arab organizations in the
Galilee have signed a public
statement endorsing the riots
in Judea, Samaria and Gaza.
The statement was publish-
ed in the pro-PLO East
Jerusalem weekly Al Awdak.
It praised the rioters for their
"steadfast resistance and
determination to establish an
independent Palestinian
state"; accused Israel of "us-
ing terrorist methods" to com-
bat the violence; praised the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion as "the sole legitimate
representative of the Palesti-
nian people"; and implicitly
threatened more violence, by
concluding that those who re-
ject the PLO's demands "re-
ject their own right to live in
peace and are historically
responsible for the results of
the continuing conflict."
The signatories included a
wide range of political, social.
and cultural groups.


Eban: Negotiate With PLO
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) Ab-
ba Eban said that Israel shold
be willing to negotiate with the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion, providing the PLO re-
nounces terrorism and accepts
a peaceful resolution of the
Middle East conflict.
"I am willing to sit down and
negotiate with my enemy," the
Laborite Knesset member told
an overflowing auditorium at
the New School for Social
Research here. "We want to
negotiate with Palestinian
representatives, with those
who abjure terrorism and want
peace," he said.
Eban, a former Israeli am-
bassador to the United Na-
tions and the United States
who chairs the Knesset
Foreign Affairs and Defense
Committee, came out strongly
in favor of an international
conference to open direct
peace talks between Israel and
its Arab neighbors.
Charging that "a scare cam-
paign" against an interna-
tional conference is under way
"not only in Israel but in the
U.S. itself," Eban said that in
the last 40 years "Israel par-
ticipated in five of them, and
there is always a way out," if
something does not work out.
Eban noted that the United
States is offering "extraor-
dinary safeguards" to Israel to
participate in an international
conference and has assured
the Israeli government that
the United States will walk out
together with Israel from such
a conference if Israel's in-
terests are compromised.
Passions
Mount
Continued from Page 1
to result in more tragedy."
Mourners from Eilon Moreh
traveled to the funeral in a
thousand-car procession, driv-
ing through Nablus under
heavy security.
They were met by an angry
Shamir, who assured them
that his resolve to hold on to
the West Bank was not
weakened by the first death of
a Jewish civilian in the unrest
that began four months ago.
"Every murderous deed
unites the people of Israel and
strengthens us and ties us to
the land," said Shamir.
'These rioters, these
murderers will achieve
nothing," he added. "They
lead their people to tragedies,
to disaster."
Mourners responded with
calls that Shamir dismiss
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin and Gen. Dan Shomron,
the army chief of staff.
A leader of the settlers, Ben-
ny Katzover, said at the
funeral, "The children of
Israel must be free and safe to
hike in any part of the Land of
Israel." His remarks were
possibly addressed at some
Israeli critics who called the
teen-agers' hike an act of pro-
vocation in an already tense
area.
Katzover spent the previous
night with dozens of other
armed settlers at an encamp-
ment near the entrance to
Beita. They vowed to build a
new settlement on the site as a
memorial to the dead girl.
As for Soviet participation in
the conference, which some
have opposed since the Soviet
Union does not have
diplomatic relations with
Israel, Eban, asked: "How can
you have peace without Soviet
participation?"
He scoffed at the suggestion
that Israel would be isolated at
such a conference. "Israel and
America together will not be
isolated," he said.
Eban praised Secretary of
State George Shultz's new
peace initiative, claiming that
it has filled "a vacuum" in the
area as demonstrated by the
continued unrest in the West
Bank and the Gaza Strip.
"My only criticism is that it
came too late," he said, noting
that both Israel and the United
States are gearing up for
general elections this fall.
"But later is better than
never," he quipped.
"Anybody should want it not
to fail,' Eban said in reference
to Shultz's initiative, warning
that the coming year could be
"a year of breakthrough or a
tragic year."
Friday, April 15, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 3
Hawks Urge Eban Retirement
Abba Eban
JERUSALEM (INB) -
Some hawkish Labor Party ac-
tivists are said to be privately
urging Abba Eban to retire
before the Knesset elections in
November.
Eban, the 72 year-old chair-
man of the Knesset Defense
and Foreign Affairs Commit-
tee, is now regarded by some
of his Labor Party colleagues
as an electoral liability. They
point to Israeli public outrage
over Eban's recent visit to the
United States, when he made
remarks which seemed to en-
dorse U.S. pressure on Israel.
Eban raised eyebrows again,
when he implied, in an inter-
view with the Montreal
Gazette, that it would be more
"chivalrous" if the Israeli ar-
my would suffer a greater
number of casualties at the
hands of Arab rioters.
"There's the enormous
preponderance of power on
our side," Eban said. "There
isn't even the chivalry of
knowing they can resist or that
you can also suffer."
Arab-Americans Thwart Tear Gas Delivery
WASHINGTON (JTA) An
official of a California com-
pany that sells tear gas to
Israel said that its use is "the
most humane way of controll-
ing crowds."
"That's why it was
developed in the first place,"
Burl Alison, a vice president of
the Los Angeles-based
TransTechnology Corp., said
in a telephone interview.
She was responding to a de-
mand from the American-Arab
Anti-Discrimination Commit-
tee (ADC) that the company
stop shipping tear gas
canisters to Israel.
In a letter to
TransTechnology President
Dan McBride, Abdeen Jabara,
president of the ADC, charged
that the "lethal gas" is respon-
sible for the deaths of 32
Palestinians in the West Bank
and Gaza Strip, since early
December, as well as at least
100 miscarriages suffered by
Palestinian women.
Yosef Gal, the spokesman at
the Israeli Embassy here, said
that the ADC's death figures
were "purely propaganda."
He said that Israel's use of
tear gas possibly caused one
death in the territories since
December, but even that was
not certain.
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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 15, 1988
Viewpoint
Miami's Israel 40
While the actual observance of Yom Ha'atz-
maut falls on the English dates of May 14 and
15 and the Hebrew date coincides with next
Friday, April 22, Greater Miami will share in a
communitywide celebration of Israel In-
dependence Day on Sunday, April 17.
At that time, thousands are expected to
celebrate vicariously with other Diaspora and
Israeli Jews as nearly 70 Miami agencies, coor-
dinated by the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, co-sponsor all-day festivities at Miami-
Dade Community College-Mitchell Wolfson
Campus.
It is to be hoped that amid the local celebra-
tions from cantonal choirs to pop music,
from representational to performance arts,
from food and street fair to medical screenings
that the substantive message which IsraeFs
anniversary connotes will not De lost.
Greater Miami has been, since before there
was a State of Israel, Zionist to its communal
core.
This Year in Jerusalem
Even though the State of Israel will
celebrate its 40th anniversary of independence
this spring, only a fourth of American Jews
have visited the Jewish State.
Last year, tourism in Israel rose as the
number of international terrorist actions
decreased and as the cost of travel to Europe
and the Far East soared.
With the hoopla of the 40th anniversary,
Israel looked forward to shattering all tourism
records in 1988.
The tremendous publicity attendant to the
Palestinian disturbances in the administered
territories, however, has served to curb such
optimism.
With the streets of Israel still as safe as, if
not safer, than those of Miami and almost any
American city, it is incumbent on the Jewish
community to emphasize the need to help
Israel celebrate its birthday in Israel.
Travel to Israel on missions, in groups or
individually is informative, entertaining and
exciting. Hotels and restaurants offer good
values and good products.
One can hardly imagine the lure of the
Western Wall, of Masada, of the Tel Aviv
beaches or the majestic views of Haifa harbor
being dimmed by large headlines about
violence in Gaza and the West Bank.
Next year in Jerusalem has been a dream for
millenia.
This year it can be reality.
Temple Ner Tamid
In a joint celebration this Sunday, Temple
Ner Tamid will officially mark its 30th year
and Rabbi Eugene Labovitz will observe, as
well, his founding-rabbi status with the Nor-
thshore Miami Beach congregation.
Since those first set of High Holy Day ser-
vices in 1957, Ner Tamid has grown to a
synagogue of 400 families that has maintained,
by choice, a family/Aavura/t atmosphere.
Among those being honored Sunday evening
in the congregation s Sklar Ballroom will be
five pioneer presidents. That those early ac-
tivists still caD Ner Tamid their spiritual home
says much about the synagogue's participatory
nature.
Maintenance of a congregation demands
commitment, support and idealism. We con-
gratulate Ner Tamid's lay and rabbinical staff
on all three.
Restraint and Return to Modesty
By RABBI
MARC H. TANENBAUM
The recent dosage of sex
scandals involving politicians,
preachers and other instant
celebrities is sickening to any
sensitive moral conscience.
But the scandals assume
greater importance if viewed
as a dramatic illustration of
the declining sexual morality
in America and its devastating
human consequences.
For much of American
history, the Puritan moral
code dominated our society.
Stringent Puritanism con-
demned sex as sinful, leading
to repression and sexual guilt.
Then with the counter-culture
of the 1960's, a rebellion took
place and the pendulum swung
in the opposite direction.
Everything became permissi-
ble, and self-indulgence
became the new idolatry.
"If it feels good, do it" was
the motto. Never mind its
moral or human consequences.
Men and women felt free to
exploit each other as sex ob-
jects, playthings for instant
gratification. Pre-marital and
extra-marital relations,
menage-a-trois and incest were
all justified by the new nar-
cissism as "recreational sex."
Sexual freedom became
perverted into license whose
consequence has been much
unhappiness and human
degradation an assault on
the dignity of the human
person.
Jewish morality has always
advocated the golden mean,
the avoidance of both repres-
sion and mindless indulgence.
Sexual relationships, Judaism
teaches, must be an expression
of genuine love and respect
between two people within a
monogamous marriage. Tzniut
modesty, self-restraint -
must characterize all healthy
sexuality.
These sex scandals, not to
speak of the terror of AIDS,
may yet return all of us to the
balanced and healthy sexual
codes which humane religions
have long advocated.
Rabbi Marc H. Tawnbauin i$ direc-
tor of international relations for tkt
A meriean Jewish Comm i I
Letters Forum
Palestinian Alternative
Editor:
I have been reading the
"views" of many people, who
imply that they know about
the existing conditions in the
Mideast area. None of these
seem to base their statements
on facts from their ex-
periences while in Israel. How
Arabia, Jordan, Iraq, Iran,
Egypt, etc., and did they get
permission and assistance
from their so-called country's
government to migrate? Is it a
fact that they were Nomads
from a desert, and that their
so-called country had/has no
record of their existence, and
transportation for work, into
their towns and back; c) per-
mitted them to spend their
wages in their stores; d) helped
them build houses so they
would not have to live in tents;
e) provided water for their
homes; f) provided the first
electric power for their homes;
p"ww wiuie in israei. how ; many times were they there, n no way did they try to con- g) built the first schools for
how long, and in how many trol their migration? their children; h) they provided
many
areas did they travel?
First, let me state my
qualifications. I am a U.S.
Government retiree. I served
as a Foreign Service Officer,
and was in AID, The Agency
For International Develop-
ment. I have been required to
visit Israel many times, in
every area, in order to verify
the need of items for their
development programs.
Where did all the people who
are now living on the West
Bank of Israel come from?
1) Were they citizens of
2) When these migrants
heard that Israel was expan-
ding into a country, and that
they could use their help, they
packed their tents on their
heads, and walked with their
families through the desert to
the border of Israel.
3) Why did they leave their
so-called homeland? a) Did the
so-called government of their
country for the past thousand
years ever consider them as
citizens of their country? b)
Did these migrants, in the past
thousand years, receive any
consideration from their coun-
them with their first health
care, and hospitals.
They did not receive one
cent from their so-called
governments to provide for
these needs.
When these people came to
settle along the borders of
Israel, they never made a
claim that this land belonged
to their country; first they
were desert migrants, and se-
cond, their country had no in-
terest in them.
All of the above mentioned
services are still being provid-
ed! Has Israel shut off these
Fred K. Shochet
Editor and Publisher
eJewish Floridian.
t a.*,xk ------ 1 eo1 Hs israel snul i
nW e5Q8te4nce rf*ar- facUities, had them move back
ding housing, water, food, to their tents, shut down the
Suzanne Shochet
Executive Editor
Norma A. Orovitz
Managing Editor
Joan C. Teglas
Director of Advertising
Friday, April 15,1988
Volume 61
28NISAN5748
Number 16
health care, transportation'
etc. No! No!
4) So what did the Israelis do
when they saw these people
gather on their border? They
noted their condition and need
and: a) built roads to their set-
tlements; b) provided
schools, or
it No!
water, power
health care services.
Maybe they should ask the
Palestinians to provide these
services, or tell the countries
to take back their desert
people!
SOL H. BROWN, MIAMI


Analysis:^
Israeli Arabs'
Creeping Binationalism
Friday, April 15, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 5
Jerusalem As the even
split between the left and the
right in Israeli politics con-
tinues to become more and
more fixed and unbridgeable,
the significance of the Israeli
Arab vote as a pontential fac-
tor in coalition building in-
creases, said a visiting
American professor at the
Hebrew University of
Jerusalem.
Prof. Ian Lustick, author of
"Arabs in the Jewish State"
and a forthcoming book on the
Gush Emunim, spoke on
"Arab Political Mobilization"
at a program sponsored by the
Hebrew University's Leonard
Davis Institute for Interna-
tional Relations and the
Department of Political
Science. Lustick is professor
of government at Dartmouth
College in New Hampshire.
There existed previously a
basic assumption in Israeli
society that Jews of whatever
political shading had more in
common with each other
politically than with the Arabs,
said Lustick. Therefore, he
said, there was no real pursuit
of the Arab vote by the
mainstream parties.
This began to change after
1967, with the development of
sharper divisions within
Israeli politics that brought
about a pulling away from the
center toward left and right,
resulting in a near 50-50 split
in the vote. The result, he said,
is that Israeli Jews on the left
of the political spectrum have
begun to see the possibility of
forming political alliances with
"progressive" Arab political
elements more readily than
with the Jewish right.
This, naturally, would give
the Arabs a great deal more
political leverage within the
Israeli political system than
they have enjoyed until now.
Already, Lustick feels, Arab
political interests are being
treated more gingerly by the
political establishment even
by right-wing politicians
than in the past.
Lustick raised the possibility
of a Labor-left coalition
government that would in-
clude even the predominantly
Arab communists following
the next elections. This would
require, of course, that the
Arabs realize the political op-
portunities that await them
and seize them, he cautioned.
Lustick stated that growing
political influence by the Arabs
would lead to a situation
within Israel that could be
described as "creeping bina-
tionalism" in which the Arab
voice and Arab interests would
be felt much more strongly
than in the past.
Coming out of literal rather than figurative
deep water, Secretary of State George Schultz
climbs out of a swimming pool beside a sign
warning of the same. Following his early-
morning laps, Shultz renewed his Mideast
peace talks with Israeli Prime Minister Yit-
zhak Shamir in Jerusalem. APIWide World
Photo.
A 60-Year-Old Update: Killing Tor the Thrill of It'
By Robert E. Segal
Bobby Franks of Chicago
was only 14 years old in 1924
when he was murdered "for
the thrill of it." The killers
were acquaintances, Richard
Loeb, 17, and Nathan Leopold,
18.
Shaum Ouillette was about
Bobby Frank's age in
November 1986 when he was
beaten to death in Canton,
Mass. The 15-year-old killer, a
schoolmate, confided to young
friends that he wanted to kill
Shaum "just for the heck of
it."
Leopold and Loeb were sav-
ed from execution by skillful
defense attorney Clarence
Darrow.
Ouillette's killer, Rod Mat-
thews, was tried recently as an
adult because of the
viciousness of that crime. A
jury found him guilty of
second-degree murder. He
may win parole in the year
2003.
The slaying of Franks was
labeled nationwide as "the
crime of the century" even
in the epoch of mob leader Al
Capone because of its
outrageous nature and the pro-
minence of the Franks, Loeb
and Leopold families.
Franks' father was highly
respected and had acquired
wealth in real estate in-
vestments and watch manufac-
turing. Loeb's father was a
vice president of Sears and
Roebuck. The senior Leopold
had amassed a fortune in ship-
ping, copper mining and paper
manufacturing companies.
Messrs. Loeb and Leopold
were active in charitable af-
fairs and esteemed as civic
leaders.
Richard Loeb was the
Coungest graduate of the
'niversity of Michigan.
Nathan Leopold had a similar
record at the University of
Chicago. Influenced strongly
by the philosopher Nietzche's
contempt for what he con-
sidered the decadence of
Western civilization and his
call for breeding are a race of
supermen, they entered life's
"fast lane."
But bred with that opulence
and uncaring about conse-
quences, they plotted a murder
for "the sake of the thrill."
Cruising in their own
neighborhood, where they
knew youngsters of wealthy
families, they failed to spot the
lad they had intended to kid-
nap, but soon enticed Bobby
Franks to go for a ride.
In short time they stripped
him of his clothing, bludgeoned
him with a chisel, tossed his
body in a culvert, doused his
face with hydrochloride and
demanded $10,000 ransom.
The perfect crime? Not
quite. Leopold carelessly drop-
ped his horn-rim glasses near
the scene of their wanton
deed.
Wise in the ways of the law,
attorney Darrow did not have
the conniving pair plead in-
sanity. Instead, he had the pair
plead guilty and insisted their
crime could be traced to im-
mature and diseased minds.
So eloquent and powerful
was Darrow's appeal that the
judge wept openly. Loeb and
Leopold avoided execution,
but moved from their lux-
urious mansions to narrow
cells in Joliet Prison.
Twelve years later, Loeb
was killed in a fight with a
fellow convict. Leopold fared
better. He put his "diseased"
mind to work, participated in a
successful effort to test
prisoner-volunteers in a search
of a malaria cure, won a parole
after 33 years in prison and
died in Puerto Rico, where he
had studied to find a cure for
leprosy.
The heartless slaving of
Franks occurred in a
somewhat peaceful era. The
State of Illinois responded by
passing a law prohibiting
minors to read crime stories,
trying to spare the young from
lives of crime.
By contrast, Rod Matthews
was free in this era of
brutalization to view video
tapes celebrating high-voltage
crime and see peep shows
featuring sexual weirdness.
Children are growing up in
age of violence on television
and conveniently available
drugs, of loneliness, unconcern
and anonymity. With their up-
bringing increasingly the
school teachers' responsibility,
their problems slip through the
cracks. Signs of depression go
undetected, suicide rates rise
alarmingly.
Let us hope that the depth of
hurt and sorrow now engulfing
Canton, Mass., may jolt
thousands into new resolve to
be more vigilant, wise and
tender in their relations with
their children.
Robert E. Segal is a former
newspaper editor and director of the
Jewish community councils of Cincin-
nati and Boston.
A Poignant Letter from Germany
EDITOR'S NOTE: JTA
Jerusalem correspondent Gil
Sedan received this letter from
an uncle, a former Israeli who
has lived in West Germany for
the past three decades.
Dear Gil,
When you visited us, I pro-
mised you to tell you about
German Jewry, particularly
the community of Hanover.
Presently, some 25,000 to
30,000 Jews are registered in
the communities, some 40 per-
cent of them pensioners -
some emigrants, some former
Germans. Among the younger
generation there is a lot of in-
termarriages. Obviously, they
are indifferent to their
Jewishness, and their children
are even more likely to marry
non-Jews.
Why do Jews come to live in
Germany? Why don't they live
in Israel or the USA?
Most of the elderly Jews
here do not have a vocation.
The local social services help
them out. This way they incor-
porate themselves into the
framework of a German
fatherland, although most of
the Jews here are not "Ger-
man Jews" with a German
heritage.
Our father, for example,
came here from Jassi,
Romania, in 1905. My
mother's parents came here in
1907 from Posnan, a town on
the border between Germany
and Poland, which changed
hands from time to time. My
grandparents from both sides
spoke Yiddish. My father
received German citizenship
only in 1925. Thus, most of the
Jews who arrived in Germany
remained Russians, Poles, etc.
Presently, the German
government has a political in-
terest that Jews should live
here. The Jews serve as an
alibi. On top of personal
reparations, the government
pays large sums to the Jewish
communities; otherwise the
communities could not have
survived.
Thus, the officials in the
communities get accustomed
to a sort of a Jewish establish-
ment which works in close
cooperation with the govern-
ment. I attach an invitation by
the local community, asking
members of the community to
attend the annual memorial
services for the fallen in the
wars. Of course, this includes
German soldiers, as well as
war criminals.
This mentality is catching
growing circles. The backbone
of the Jews here has been
broken. I have a lot of
arguments with members ol
the community and other Jews
but in vain. Employment
and money kill the right mind.
For the Jews the questions is
- is it worthwhile fighting to
preserve local Jewry? As far as
I am concerned, the answer is
definitely yes. Those who do
not care chose the path of
assimilation. The only avenue
left is that of tradition, which
does not necessarily mean go-
ing back to Orthodoxy.
Continued on Page 14


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 15, 1988
KVBTCH!
TM
Peres Leads Shamir
In Prime Minister pfen
?
I
1967 David S. Boxerman and Mark Saunders. All rights reserved.
"Rabbi, why is this knight different from other knights?"
West German Gangs:
Black Bombers Replace Skinheads
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres remains Israel's most
popular choice for prime
minister, but his Likud rival,
incumbent Yitzhak Shamir,
has managed to close the
popularity gap considerably in
recent months, according to a
public opinion poll published in
the daily Afaariv.
Peres, who heads the Labor
Party, was favored for the top
post by 35.4 percent of
Israelis, while Shamir polled
27.3 percent, according to the
survey, which was conducted
by the Modi'in Ezrachi
Research Institute.
But Peres' popularity has
dropped from 42.7 percent last
November and 37.7 percent in
January, while Shamir's has
risen from 18 percent in
November and 17 percent in
January.
Ariel Sharon, a ,
member of Likud's a
wing, came in third for
and Defense Minister yE
Rabin was favored {*
percent. ~ J
Rabin, a Laborite, leads th.
preference for defeni!
minister, though his star.2
has dropped to 42.5 percent?
45.6 percent in January Z
49.2 percent in November
He is followed by Sharon
whose popularity has risen ti
Zb.b percent, compared to 20 2
percent in January and 16i
percent in November.
Sharon, a former defense
minister who now serves in the
Cabinet as minister of com-
merce and industry, has ad-
vocated a tougher stance
against the four-month-old
unrest in the administered
territories.
Moroccan King
Meets With Jewry
BONN (JTA) Police will
take harsher measures to limit
the activities of neo-Nazis in
the West German federal state
of North Rhine-Westphalia,
said the state's interior
minister, Herbert Schnoor.
In a statement released in
the city of Duesseldorf,
Schnoor charged that "the in-
creased provocative and
violent activities of neo-Nazis
in some towns have become
unbearable."
The local councils of the
towns of Essen, Bottrop,
Bielefeld and Dortmund have
recently imposed a ban on ren-
ting town-owned facilities,
such as meeting halls, to neo-
Nazi groups. Other town coun-
cils in the federal state are in
the process of considering such
proposals.
Last year more than 1,000
investigations were opened
against neo-Nazis operating in
North Rhine-Westphalia, of-
ficials said.
According to Dieter Jablon-
ski. an official of the town of
Dortmund, an "anti-fascist
working group" of officials
from 14 towns and localities
has designed a plan to protect
youths against the influence of
right-wing extremists.
Jablonski reported that new
neo-Nazi groups of so-called
"black bombers" have largely
replaced the "skinheads." The
"black bombers" have been
successfully drawing increas-
ing numbers of youth to social
and political activities, which
emphasize nationalistic and
Nazi values, and often end in
violent clashes.
According to experts, youths
are drawn to neo-Nazi groups
principally because of severe
unemployment. In the town of
Dortmund, for example, where
unemployment among the
young is high, there has been
an ongoing neo-Nazi campaign
with slogans such as "Jews are
the Turks of 1988" and
"Foreigners Out."
Synagogues and other
Jewish institutions throughout
West Germany have long been
protected by high fences and
armed police. Experts say this
is needed to defend the Jewish
communities against Arab ter-
rorists and West German ex-
tremists from the right as well
as from the left.
MARRAKECH Led by
their newly-elected secretary
general, Serge Berdugo,
representatives of the Council
of Jewish Communities of
Morocco were received by
King Hassan II at his winter
palace here in what was
described as a "warm and
friendly session."
The meeting at which
Moroccan Jews now living in
Britain, Canada, France,
Spain and other countries also
participated was described
by observers as politically
significant in view of the conti-
nuing unrest in the West Bank
and Gaza and the Moroccan
ruler's role as a leader of the
wing of the Arab
moderate
League.
At the meeting, Berdugo
cited Hassan's efforts in sup-
port of a negotiated Middle
East settlement and that
Hassan had met in Morocco
with then-Prime Minister
Shimon Peres of Israel in 1986
the first time any Israeli
leader had been publicly
received by an Arab ruler
other than a representative of
Egypt.
Of the approximately one
million Jews of Moroccan des-
cent now living around the
world, approximately 600,000
reside in Israel.
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Complete Convention FadlHk. M^or CredH Cant, Honored


Nixon Recommends Kissinger
For Shuttle Diplomacy
Friday, April 15, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 7
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Former President Nixon said
that the United States should
press Israel to reach a settle-
ment with the Arabs now,
rather than wait for a time
when the Israelis "will be forc-
ed to make one that will not be
in their interests."
"What Israel has to unders-
tand is that for their own in-
terests they should make the
deal now," Nixon said in an in-
terview on NBC-TVs "Meet
the Press."
He explained that while
Israel has won five wars, "in
the end the Arabs will learn to
fight," and eventually Israel
will lose.
The former president prais-
ed Secretary of State George
Shultz's efforts to bring about
negotiations between Israel
and the Arab countries. But he
said the situation in the middle
East so "so complex" that it
cannot be done by a secretary
of state part-time or even full-
time by second-level State
Department officials.
Instead, Nixon said that a
full time negotiator is needed,
and he urged the next presi-
dent to appoint his former
secretary of state and national
security adviser, Henry Kiss-
inger, to the job and give him a
year to accomplish the task.
In the Trenches,
Shultz is Stubborn
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) U.S.
Secretary of State George
Shultz left Israel insisting that
his peace initiative for the Mid-
dle East was still "intact and
alive," but admitting that he
had made no tangible progress
so far in drawing parties
toward negotiations.
After meeting separately
with Premier Yitzhak Shamir
and Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres, and taping a half-hour
interview which was to be
shown on Israeli television,
Shultz flew to Cairo, where he
met with President Hosni
Mubarak. He also visited the
Saudi capital of Riyadh, as well
as Amman, Jordan, before
heading for home.
With Shamir at his side,
Shultz told reporters that he
was a "stubborn" man and in-
tended to persevere with his
initiative.
He told Shamir privately, ac-
cording to a leaked report
from their meeting, that cer-
tain Arab leaders were urging
the United States to cut aid to
Israel, but that he would not
consider such a thing.
The secretary told the press
after his early morning
meetings with Shamir that
work would continue to ex-
amine and discuss "every
detail, every implication of this
initiative."
"Differences have not been
substantially narrowed,"
Shultz conceded. But he add-
ed, "We will continue our ef-
forts for peace. When vou are
down in the trenches doing it,
you certainly are aware of how
hard it is. But that does not
lessen in any way the impor-
tance of continuing the
effort."
Shamir, for his part, voiced
admiration for the secretary's
"readiness and devotion" to
peacemaking and said he had
"expressed our best wishes for
his success in the near future,
for him to make progress in
this direction."
The premier said he foresaw
further talks and
discussions."
Shultz repeatedly praised
King Hussein's approach,
which was "the kind needed to
move ahead."
He said the Jordanian
monarch had presented him,
during their talks, a detailed
list of questions to clarify
points in the peace plan and
that this demonstrated the
king's keen interest in the
initiative.
Shultz also briefed Peres,
together with Cabinet
Minister Ezer Weizman, who
holds no portfolio, on his talks
in Amman and Damascus.
Peres told waiting reporters
he believed that the majority
of Israelis supported the "land
for peace" equation, though
Israel could not return all of
the land "because we need
security,."
Peres' foreign policy ad-
viser, Dr. Nimrod Novik,
sought to put a bright face on
the situation, in a radio inter-
view after the secretary's
departure. He stressed that no
party had said no to Shultz and
that this enabled the secretary
to go ahead.
He maintained that Jordan's
response to the secretary had
been basically positive. But
King Hussein was not anxious
to "jump ahead and say yes,
when he feels there is no part-
ner on the Israeli side."
Novik said Shultz had ob-
tained much more specific in-
formation from the parties on
the various points of his in-
itiative. He had solicited work-
ing papers from the offices of
Shamir, Peres and Hussein,
which he would now try to
reconcile to produce further
progress.
"Henry is difficult, some
think he is obnoxious, but he is
a terrific negotiator," Nixon
said.
As for his own solution, Nix-
on rejected a Palestinian state
as endangering Israel's securi-
ty. He said the Palestinians
have to "have a system set up
whereby they govern
themselves," but at the same
time "Israel must have defen-
sible borders." He rejected
"this idea that Israel should
give up all of the occupied
territory."
Kissinger, appearing on
ABC-TV's "This Week with
David Brinkley," agreed. He
said Israel should give up the
Gaza Strip and some of the
West Bank, "Israel cannot go
back to the '67 borders
because it will then be indefen-
sible," Kissinger stressed.
But Kissinger repeated his
uneasiness about the interna-
tional conference Shultz has
proposed to set the stage for
negotiations between Israel
and its Arab neighbors.
He noted that "all the suc-
cesses" in the Middle East has
been achieved under American
rather than Soviet
sponsorship.
New York
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NEW YORK-(JTA)-The
New York State Court of Ap-
peals dismissed an appeal that
challenged the constitutionali-
ty of the Belle Harbor eruv, a
physical demarcation around
an area that allows observant
Jews to carry objects on the
Sabbath.
The case marks the second
time an eruv has been unsuc-
cessfully challenged in court.
In the previous case, Judge
Anne Thompson of the United
States District Court found in
favor of an eruv in Long
Branch, N.J.
The most recent lawsuit was
originally filed in 1985 by
Joseph Smith, a local resident,
against the City of New York,
Community Board 14, and the
Community Eruv of Belle Har-
bor, Queens.
Smith claimed that by gran-
ting construction permits to
Rabbi Jacob Reiner of Con-
gregation Ohab Zedek, the city
had violated the principle of
separation of church and state,
because public property was
involved. He also charged that
by creating a "religious aura
and designation' in the
neighborhood, the eruv would
consitute an "establishment of
religion" in violation of the
First Amendment.
In the initial ruling on the
suit, Justice Aaron Goldstein
had held that the eruv was a
valid accommodation of the
religious needs of a minority.
He also ruled that the eruv is a
"virtually invisible boundary
line indistinguishable from the
utility poles and telephone
wires in the area."
The Appellate Division of
the New York State Supreme
Court unanimously affirmed
the decision last August, and
Smith appealed this ruling to
the New York Court of
Appeals.
That appeal was dismissed
because the attorneys
representing Smith failed to
submit their appeal brief in
time.
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 15, 1988
Analysis:
TVagedy Pits Settlers Against Army
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
tragic events in the West Bank
village of Beita have further
Kolarized opinion in Israel over
ow to deal with Palestinian
unrest in the administered
territories.
If anything, attitudes have
hardened since the revelation
over the weekend that 15-year-
old Tirza Porat of Eilon
Moreh, alleged to have been
stoned to death by an Arab
mob, was actually killed by a
bullet fired in panic by an arm-
ed Jewish settler, Romam
Aldubi.
The cause of her death was
determined by autopsy and a
reconstruction of the incident
by Israel Defense Force in-
vestigators. This has turned
militant Jewish settlers and
their political allies fiercely
against the army. They no
longer can claim with much
credibility that young Tirza
was a martyr to Arab hatred
and violence.
Revelations about the actual
cause of death have not chang-
ed the minds of those
dedicated to a Greater Israel,
encompassing all of its biblical
territory, in which there is no
room for hostile Arabs.
On the other hand, Israelis
who believe that only com-
promise can end four months
of bloodshed between Arabs
and Jews see the Beita inci-
dent as yet another case to
pointing to the dangers in-
herent in Israel's continued
control of the West Bank and
Gaza Strip.
Some advocates of com-
promise believe Porat's death
could have been avoided had
she and 15 other Jewish teen-
age settlers not gone on a
Passover hike in an Arab-
populated area, at a time of
severe tension. They noted
that the group did not coor-
dinate its plans with the IDF
and that it was escorted by two
militant adult settlers, both
armed.
But according to David
Lanir. a Jerusalem student,
"the controversy over the
responsibility of the hikers in
the affair is off target. The
real controversy should have
been about the tough measures
taken against the villagers" of
Beita, he said, "because if
these are punitive measures
taken when the picture is not
yet clear, God knows how the
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authorities will react when a
similar event takes place and
the Arabs are clearly at fault."
The IDF has demolished 14
houses in Beita. but was
ordered by Israel's Supreme
Court to desist from further
demolitions.
Many Israeli leaders and
opinion-makers fear the most
dangerous long-term conse-
quence of the Beita affair is
that it has involved the army in
a political controversy with the
Israeli right wing.
Zeev Schiff, military cor-
respondent of Haaretz, wrote
that the IDF and extremists
among the Jewish settlers are
heading for an "inevitable con-
frontation." The IDF is not
prepared to allow the settlers
to determine the security
needs in the territories, Schiff
wrote.
"In their zeal to achieve
their goals, they do not refrain
from harming the IDF and do
not perceive that by doing so,
they are in effect aiding
Israel's enemies."
President Chaim Herzog
stepped into the dispute, warn-
ing that attempts to drag the
IDF into the political arena
"will bring catastrophe upon
us." He said, during a visit to
Galilee, that attacks on the ar-
my were "very dangerous and
must be guarded against at all
costs."
The settlers counter that
more harm is being done to na-
tional security by the IDF's
failure to take harsher
measures against the Arab
population than by their own
accusations. They have long
taken the view that the securi-
ty forces are not doing enough
to protect them.
The settlers have already
demanded that Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin fire
the IDF chief of staff. Gen.
Dan Shomron. Rabin has been
attacked by ministers of
Likud's Herut wing for the ar-
my leak to the media of its
preliminary- finding that Porat
died from a bullet, not stoning.
The situation is complicated
by the fact that this is an elec-
tion year in Israel. The
Jerusalem Post stated in an
editorial "True to its most
deep-seated political sen-
timents and fearful of a hemor-
rhage of its voters to Tehiya
and Kach, the Likud has been
tagging along.
"Where the integrity of the
land is involved, the party that
currently holds the premier-
ship apparently does not mind
lending a helping hand to at-
tacks on the army and what
can only be termea a putschist
attempt to take Israel's
democratic order by storm,"
the English-language
newspaper said.
Tehiya is an ultranationalist
right-wing opposition party.
Kach, is the extremist move-
ment headed by Rabbi Meir
Kahane. It advocates the ex-
pulsion of all Arabs from Israel
and the administered ter-
ritories. The party holding the
Eremiership is Likud, headed
y Yitzhak Shamir.
Ariel Sharon, the Likud-
Herut minister of commerce
and industry, proposed that in
reaction to the Beita affair, the
government should establish a
new settlement near Nablus to
be called Tirza, in memory of
the slain teen-ager.
In addition, Sharon called
for the evacuation of all Beita
residents from their homes,
except those found to have
sheltered Jewish children, and
a ban on further building in the
village.
U.S. To Sell
Israel Planes
WASHINGTON (JTA) 9-
The Reagan administration in-
formally notified Congress
that it intends to sell 75 F-16
fighter planes to Israel, worth
$2 billion, a Capitol Hill source
said.
The sale originated last year
as a way to help offset Israel's
cancellation of the Lavi fighter
plane project.
The administration must for-
mally notify Congress of the
sale. Congress then has 30
days to vote to block the sale.
If it does not vote on the mat-
ter, the sale will go through
automatically.
The source said that the
planes, which will be built by
General Dynamics, will be
delivered in 1990.
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Federal Court Acquits
White Supremacists
By SUSAN BIRNBAl M
NEW YORK (JTA) Thir-
teen white supremacists on
trial in Fort Smith, Ark., for
seditious conspiracy were ac-
quitted of all counts against
them.
The defendants, all members
of violently racist, anti-Semitic
groups, had been on trial since
Feb. 16 in a courthouse heavily
guarded by federal marshals.
The jury of 10 men and two
women had been deliberating
for four days.
Another of the original 14
defendants, Robert Smalley,
was acquitted March 17 by
U.S. District Court Judge Mor-
ris Arnold because of insuffi-
cient evidence.
A principal defendant, Louis
Beam, "ambassador at large"
of the racist Aryan Nations
and a fugitive until his ap-
prehension last November in
Mexico, said, "To hell with the
government" upon hearing the
verdict.
The trial was marked by
warnings by Judge Arnold
that he would have to call a
mistrial if the prosecution con-
tinued to present "hearsay"
evidence that went uncor-
roborated. He had several
times asked the jury to ignore
evidence because it was hear-
say or repetitive.
The acquittals came despite
testimony by key witnesses,
who were members of the
violently anti-Semitic groups,
about a plot to overthrow the
United States government.
Leonard Zeskind, research
director of the Center for
Democratic Renewal, which
monitors right-wing extremist
activity, said, "This is obvious-
ly a victory for the white
supremacist movement, and it
was made possible by rt*
government not presenting
the strongest case possible."
But government prosecuting
attorneys said they were
satisfied with the way thev had
presented their case!
Ten of the defendants
members of the "Christian
Identity" movement, had been
charged with 119 overt acts
including robbery'
counterfeiting and attempting
to murder federal officials
They were identified as the
"Rev." Richard Butler, so-
called pastor of the Church of
Jesus Christ-Christian of the
Aryan Nations; Robert Miles
former Ku Klux Klansman and
"pastor" of the Mountain
Church Jesus Christ the
Saviour in Cohoctah. Mich.;
Beam; Andrew Barnhill; David
Lane; Ardie McBreary; Bruce
Carroll Pierce; Richard
Scutari; Smalley; and Richard
Snell.
Snell, who is serving a prison
sentence for the 1984 murder
of an Arkansas state trooper,
and four others also had been
charged with conspiring to kill
federal Judge H. Franklin
Waters and and FBI special
agent Jack Knox. The other
four are Lambert Miller, David
McGuire, William Wade and
his son, Ivan Wade.
Waters and Knox were
allegedly killed for their roles
in the trial of an Arkansas cou-
ple who had been convicted of
harboring Gordon Kahl, a
fugitive member of the racist
group Posse Comitatus, who
had killed two federal mar-
shals in North Dakota.
Many of the defendants ac-
quitted are already serving
lengthy prison sentences for
related crimes.
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By ROBERT E. SEGAL
Modern conflicts across
borderlines hatch double
challenges. First, there is the
need to win world opinion as
fighting is portrayed on televi-
sion and reported and com-
mented on in the print media.
Then it is imperative to win on
battlefields, where modern
long-range guns, huge
bombers, and giant tanks can
prove formidable.
Israel is obviously losing the
war over fair play by the
media. The pictured and
reported activity of young
rock-throwers confronted by
well-trained soldiers breeds
anger and sympathy.
When the current genera-
tion of news and editorial
writers report on the strife in
the Gaza Strip and West Bank,
most are unmindful of Arab
refusal to accept the partition
plan adopted by Israel on Nov.
29, 1947.
Forgotten is the harsh fact
that Egypt, Syria, Transjor-
Israel's Concomitant Conflicts
dan, Saudi Arabia, Lebanon
and Iraq acted out their anger
by launching a war against
Israel, which has continued to
this day, muted only by the
1949 armistice agreement.
Stuck in such a quagmire,
Israel faces the possibility of
still another onslaught, not
just from youths who heave
stones, but from the ar-
maments of Arab nations that
Friday, April 15, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 9
worried President Eisenhower
and his secretary of state,
John Foster Dulles, pressured
the three nations to be mer-
ciful with Nasser and, along
the way, made a promise to
Israel that was never fulfilled.
Minister Begin and U.S. Presi-
dent Jimmy Carter.
Throughout four decades the
United States, inspired by the
rebirth of the Jewish homeland
and fully cognizant of the
Modern Challenges on Two Fronts
The respite has proved so
fragile that four subsequent,
lethal and costly engagements
cannot be forgotten.
In the present encounter,
israel has tried to end the
uprising conducted by Arab
youths. Success comes hard.
Arabs are well-acquainted
with the power of terror, and
Israel has been obliged to res-
pond day after day. The world
beholds an ugly scene. Arab
eaders, and those who side
with them, including many
Americans, are reaping a pro-
paganda harvest.
Bergen-Belsen Israeli
Denied Reparations
have refused to discuss peace
face-to-face with the govern-
ment of Israel.
It is dangerous and futile to
hope that the United Nations,
having concluded that Zionism
is to be equated with racism,
would be a dependable and un-
biased player if cast as
peacemaker. Once a power for
settling international disputes,
the impotent United Nations is
held in bondage by the Soviet
Union, the Arab nations and
some Third World nations.
Looking back over 40 years
of progress, Israel has
benefited by only one peace
agreement, the Camp David
compact engineered by the
martyred Egyptian President
Anwar Sadat, Israel's Prime
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) An Israeli
woman born in the Bergen-
Belsen concentration camp has
again been denied a pension as
reparation for her suffering.
District Court judges in the
town of Celle, site of the camp,
ruled that Miriam Turgeman-
Lewald, 44, could not be said
to have lived in Germany since
one cannot consider a concen-
tration camp a "lasting
residence."
Thus, as a "stateless" per-
son, she is not eligible for a
permanent pension above the
equivalent of $90 she received
from the German authorities
for every month she was in
Bergen-Belsen.
Turgeman-Lewald is disabl-
ed and has been seriously ill.
The judgement followed
what had been seen as positive
developments in the 30-year-
old case. A Bundestag member
of the Social Democratic Par-
ty, Ernst Waltemathe, wrote a
letter to his colleagues in the
legislative body, drawing their
attention to what he termed
"this unique and unbelievable
case."
Waltemathe sent a second
letter to Finance Minister
Gerhard Stoltenberg, asking
him to find a way to compen-
sate Turgeman-Lewald,
despite previous rulings by the
courts.
West German experts are
pointing to Turgeman-
Lewald's extraordinary sur-
vival, having been born in a
concentration camp under
supervision of a Jewish inmate
in unsanitary conditions.
While pensions have been
awarded to many survivors
who became unfit to support
themselves because of their
physical and mental suffering
under the Nazis, the German
experts say that current
reparations legislation does
not cover Turgeman-Lewald's
case. Their explanations make
Waltemathe furious.
"It's a shame to discuss legal
details and to deny reparations
on absurd grounds in such an
obvious case of persecution
and suffering," he said. "It's
our duty to find a prompt solu-
tion to this problem. No one
can argue convincingly that
Miriam is not eligible for a
pension."
Waltemathe's activities plus
the publication of the case in
some German newspapers may
bring about a resolution after
all. Finance experts here are
studying the possibility of us-
ing monies from a special $180
million fund for "hard cases"
of Nazi persecutees to compen-
sate Turgeman-Lewald.
New York Primary
Continued from Page 1
exist."
Jackson said that he wants
to be part of a process to move
Israel and the Palestinians
"toward mutual recognition,
as opposed to the present
posture of mutual annihilation
and daily killing."
Gore called the charge of
pandering to Jewish voters
"outrageous," noting that dur-
ing his eight years in the
House of Representatives he
"compiled a 100 percent
voting record in support of a
strong Israel, a strong
L'.S. -Israel relationship,"
while representing a rural far-
ming district that was less
than one-tenth of one percent
Jewish.
great value of Israel as a
dependable ally, has made an
enduring peace with clearly
defined boundaries for Israel a
prime foreign policy objective.
Down the years, the United
States has projected the
Rogers Plan and the proposals
of such distinguished
statesmen as Mike Mansfield,
Herbert Lehman, Eric
Johnston, Thomas Finletter
and other thoughtful
Americans.
The one hard-to-forget U.S.
effort came in 1956. Egypt's
Gamal Abdel Nasser, who na-
tionalized the Suez Canal, had
threatened to march into
Israel. Greatly provoked,
Israel, joined by France and
England, blitzed Egypt. A
In recent times, President
Reagan and State Secretary
George Shultz have made com-
mendable efforts to break the
Mideast deadlock. They know
that Japan lost a war and
recovered, and that Germany
lost a war and recovered, but
that Israel cannot afford to
lose a war. In their understan-
ding, indeed, in the concern of
all who value Israel's strength
as an ally, the paramount
necessity for Israel is SUR-
VIVAL in letters written
large.
Today Israel is the underdog
in its struggle with some col-
umnists and in the fight to win
public support, but people with
a solid understanding of Arab
determination to annihilate
the embattled democracy in
the Middle East will stand by
Israel over the long haul.
Robert E. Segal is a former
newspaper editor as well as former
director of the Jewish community
councils in Cincinnati and Boston.
Arab children from the Kalandia refugee "football" with Israeli soldiers.
camp north of Jerusalem, playing European jta/wzn News Photo
"I've articulated the same
position throughout this cam-
paign, and indeed for 12
years," Gore said, referring to
his eight years in the House
and the last four years in the
Senate.
Gore also denied that he had
endorsed Israeli Premier Yit-
zhak Shamir's positions when
he met with the Israeli leader
in New York last month.
He noted that he supports
the "land-for-peace formula-
tion" advanced by Secretary
of State George Shultz but re-
jected by Shamir, as well as
United Nations Security Coun-
cil Resolutions 242 and 338
which call for eturn of Arab
lands and recognition of
Israel's right to secure
borders.
gy| "Craata Land From Sand"
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Page 10 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 15, 1988
Chairman YosefNevo of Israel's Association for the Well-Being of
Soldiers, presents a commemorative coin to USO President
Charles T. Hagel, left.
Israel's "USO"
On Alert
WASHINGTON The
leaders of the world's two
largest civilian run military
service organizations discuss-
ed mutual concerns in a
meeting in Washington, D.C.,
when Chairman Yosef Nevo of
Israel's Association for the
Weil-Being of Soldiers met
with Charles T. Hagel, presi-
dent of the USO. The meeting
at USO World Headquarters
took place during Chairman
Nevo's recent tour on behalf of
the Friends of the IDF, the
Association's partner
organization in the United
States. It was the first
meeting of the heads of the
agencies in the more than 40
year history of both
organizations.
"We have many areas of
mutual concern," said Nevo.
"Both of us are dedicated to
helping the human needs of in-
dividual service men and
women and demonstrating
that the civilian population of
our respective nations stand
behind tnem."
Both men are personally
familiar with the difficult life
of a soldier. Nevo, who served
in numerous Israeli cam-
paigns, is best known for com-
manding the Jewish forces
that defended Jerusalem in
1948. Hagel is a highly
decorated Viet Nam veteran.
They discussed the close rela-
tionship that exists between
the Association and the USO
in Haifa, a regular liberty port
for the United States Sixth
Fleet. The Association's Bet
Hachayal (Soldiers Hostel) is
often visited by American
sailors.
Ontario Court
Upholds Religious Class
By BEN KAYFETZ
TORONTO (JTA) The
Ontario Appeals Court has re-
jected a claim that public
school pupils are being indoc-
trinated in religious classes
contrary to the Charter of
Rights, Canada's constitution.
The suit, launched by the
Canadian Civil Liberties
Association, contended that
religious instruction as outlin-
ed in the Ontario Education
Act was a good thing, but only
so long as it gave equal time to
all major religions. The case
focused on Elgin County in
southwestern Ontario, where
the board of education pro-
vides a program of religious
education of what opponents
call a highly evangelical
nature.
The original complainants in
the case were James and Nan-
cy Millington. members of the
Baha'i faith, who said that the
program had caused their
daughter Andrea to suffer
recurrent nightmares that the
Devil was chasing her and that
she was going to burn in hell.
But three of the judges on
the four-judge panel found
that the Millingtons, two other
families from the area and the
civil liberties association "had
failed to establish an infringe-
ment or denial of their
religious freedom or their
equality rights under the
Charter of Rights and
Freedom." They maintained
that students were given the
option of dismissing
themselves from the classes.
In a dissenting judgment
Justice Allan Austin concluded
that the purpose and the effect
of the regulation was religious
and therefore violated the
charter.
Ontario has had religious
education in its elementary
public schools since 1944.
The Canadian Civil Liberties
Association will appeal the
decision to the Supreme Court
of Canada, where supporters
are expecting it will be
overturned.
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Friday, April 15, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 11
Korea and the Pacific Rim Boycott
By WILLY STERN
SEOUL (JTA) South
Korea ended 40 years of
strongman rule in February
when Roh Tae Woo wag sworn
in as president. Despite high
hopes for political reform here,
one country appears likely to
be left out of the move toward
democracy Israel.
Today none of Korea's major
companies will trade openly
with Israel. The Korean
government has refused to
allow Israel to reopen its em-
bassy in Seoul, which was shut
in 1979 due to budget
considerations.
The Koreans even reneged
on a promise made last May to
host an Israeli trade mission to
the Far East, after Saudi
Arabia protested behind the
scenes. And official Korean
trade statistics inexplicably do
not include Israel.
These facts have been made
known to the American Steer-
ing Committee on Free Trade
with Israel, which was set up
in 1985 specifically to en-
courage Korean and Japanese
companies to trade with Israel.
So far the committee has
focused on Japan, where
pressure has started to bring
results. A committee
spokesman in New York said
attention in 1988 will turn to
Korea.
There are three reasons for
Korea's overt commercial and
diplomatic discrimination
against Israel. The first is a
Korean reliance on Arab oil
and Arab business.
With the "unofficial" sup-
port of the Korean Foreign
Ministry, every major Korean
firm has submitted to Arab
blackmail and complied with
the Arab economic boycott of
Israel, which states that any
company that trades with
Israel cannot also trade with
an Arab company. The United
States passed laws in the
1970s making it illegal to com-
ply with the boycott, and most
European nations subsequent-
ly followed suit.
The second reason for
isolating Israel is an unwill-
ingness in Korea to undertake
any sensitive diplomatic in-
itiatives that might upset plans
for the Seoul Olympic Games
scheduled for this summer.
Finally, South Korea is wor-
ried that Soviet-backed North
Korea might pre-empt its
precious export markets. As in
Japan, there exists in Korea a
strong pragmatic attitude of
acting in what Koreans see as
their commercial and political
best interests, in which morali-
ty seldom plays a role.
Meanwhile, the Korea
Times, Seoul's English-
language newspaper, reported
in February that anti-
Semitism had spread from
Japan to Korea. Leading
Koreans, according to the
newspaper, are blaming the
ongoing trade war with the
United States on an America
dominated by "Jewish Mafia in
control of business, press
media and even the CIA.'
And works by Japan's
leading anti-Semitic authors
who blame a Jewish conspiracy
for everything from trade fric-
tion to engineering the Wall
Street crash of 1929 have
now been translated into
Korean.
Korean businessmen say the
government here pressures
the private sector not to trade
openly with Israel. Korean
Foreign Ministry officials
naturally deny this. They imp-
ly there might be an improve-
ment in relations with Israel,
but not until after the
Olympics.
Korea has long intimated
that pressure from the United
States or Israel before then
would be counterproductive.
Israeli officials suspect this is
just a ploy to counter un-
wanted pressure. Meanwhile,
Korea continues to refuse to
take any action against com-
pliance with the boycott.
Trade between Korea and
Israel remains negligible in
comparison with the total
foreign trade of the two coun-
tries. Last year, Israel sold $19
Honor Roll Student Jason Epstein needs $5,000 to
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million of goods to Korea, of
which 80 percent was fer-
tilizers and chemicals.
Although every major
Korean firm, including
Daewoo, Hyundai, Gold Star
and Samsung, refuses to sell
goods directly to Israel, Israel
still managed to import $73
million worth of products from
Korea in 1987.
Long ago, major American
firms called the Arabs' bluff
and quickly learned that the
boycott was, for all practical
purposes, a "paper tiger."
Every nation in the Pacific
Rim except Korea and inciden-
tally, Japan, is now actively
trading with both Arab nations
and Israel.
Korean business leaders say
they are ready to trade with
Israel on an "unofficial and
quiet" basis, often through a
third party, if there are profits
to be made. Still, Korean of-
ficials readily admit that fear
of Arab pressure has put a
damper on Israeli-Korean
trade. Trade with the Arab
world is so important for
Korea that the fall in oil prices
in 1985 depressed the Korean
construction industry. The
value of the Arab market for
Korea is estimated at about $3
billion.
Meanwhile, the U.S. Jewish
community is hoping that rela-
tions between Korea and
Israel will improve. Meetings
are being arranged with
Korean diplomats and visiting
Korean business leaders will
be informed of the boycott's
discriminatory effects. But
how Korea will ultimately res-
pond remains unknown.
Willy Stern is Tokyo correspondent
for the Israeli newspaper Maariv.
Letters Forum
The Floridian welcomes signed letters to the editor.
Please include your address and daytime phone Dumber for
verification. Letters may be edited, condensed and/or cor-
rected for grammatical errors. Address all letters to The
Jewish Floridian, PO Box 01-2973, Miami. FL 33101.
Expertly crafted tombstones from the local
Jewish cemetery, now used to border a
farmer's manure pile, stand in mute
testimony to the vibrant community that ex-
isted in Yablonov, Galicia, currently part of
the USSR's western border. The local
synagogue is today a firehouse. Other tomb-
stones from the cemetery have been used to
pave a nearby road. This photo was taken by
former refusenik Dr. Semyon Yantovsky.
Before his recent emigration to Israel, Yantov-
sky researched the fate of 190 Jewish com-
munities across Russia.
Gorbachev Urges
Arafat on Recognition
to
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The State Department had no
reaction to a report that Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev has
urged Palestine Liberation
Organization leader Yasir
Arafat to recognize Israel's
right to exist.
Gorbachev made the request
during a meeting in Moscow
with Arafat according to a
report in the Communist Party
newspaper Pravda.
Pravda quoted Gorbachev as
saying: "The Palestinians are
a people with a difficult fate.
But they receive broad inter-
national support, and this is
the guarantee for resolving
the main question for the
Palestinians self-
determination.
"In the same way, recogni-
tion of the State of Israel, con-
sideration of its security in-
terests, the solution of this
question is a necessary ele-
ment in the establishment of
peace and good-neighborliness
in the region based on prin-
:iples of international law."
In addition, Soviet Foreign
Minister Eduard Shevard-
nadze was quoted by Tass, the
official Soviet news agency, as
saying that "the Palestinian
people, which is one of the
main parties to the Middle
East conflict, must be ensured
the right to self-determination
in the same measure as it was
ensured to the people of
Israel."
Gorbachev's remarks, much
TELL US YOU
WILL.
more conciliatory on Israel
than in the past, came as
Secretary of State George
Shultz prepared to go to
Moscow next week for
meetings with Shevardnadze.
The Mideast is expected to
be on their agenda as it will be
when President Reagan goes
to Moscow for his fourth sum-
mit meeting with Gorbachev
from May 29 to June 2.
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Page 12 The Jewish Florktian/Friday, April 15, 1988
n News *
Roundup
986 Soviet Jews Emigrated in March
NEW YORK (JTA) Jewish emigration from the Soviet
Union increased slightly in March, with 986 Jews leaving,
compared to 730 the month before, the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry reported.
The total for the first three months of 1988 is 2.438.
The March emigration figure was more than double the
figure for March 1987. which was 470.
Building to Be Named After Zorinsky
WASHINGTON (JTA) The Senate has approved a bill
to name the federal office building in Omaha. Neb., after
Sen. Edward Zorinsky (D-Neb.). who died March 6. 1987.
at age 58. Elected to the Senate in 1976. Zorinsky was the
first Jew to win a statewide election in Nebraska.
Exiled Soviet Director Receives
Russian Invitation
TEL AMY (JTA) A 70-year old Soviet stage director,
who has been living in Israel for the last year, had received
permission to return to Moscow next month to preside over
the opening of a production on which he was working
before he was exiled from the Soviet Union four years ago.
Yuri Lyubimov. who is not Jewish but received Israeli
citizenship by virtue of his marriage to a Jewish woman, is
the founder of the avant-garde Taganka Theater.
In March 1984. Lyubimov was fired from the theater and
expelled from the Communist Party. He moved to Israel
last year.
Taba Arbitration Panel Reconvenes
GENEVA (JTA) The international panel arbitrating
Israeli-Egyptian boundary disputes reconvened here
following the Passover-Easter recess to hear the final
arguments of both countries.
The panel's judgment will be binding on both parties. It
will settle disputed claims to 14 sites along the Israeli-Sinai
border, the most important of which is ownership of the
half-mile-square Taba resort region on the Red Sea.
It's 'Summer Time' in Israel
TEL AVTV (JTA) Israel went on daylight -saving time
as of midnight last Sunday, when clocks were advanced one
hour.
The change, which Israelis call "summer time." puts
Israel seven hours ahead of Eastern Daylight Time and two
hours in advance of British summer time.
Nazi Book burning: Exhibit at Library
of Congress
WASDHINGTON DC. The Nazi book burnings of
May 1^33 were among the first attempts a: "purifying"
German culture and a portent of anti-Jewish measures to
come.
"Nazi Book Burnings and the American Response" is an
exhibit co-sponsored by the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Coun-
cil and the Library of Congress Center for the Book to
memorialize the tragedy and remember lessons of those
events. The exhibit will run froir. April 11 through
September 11 on the first floor of the Library of Congress'
Madison Building.
Fund Awards 70.000th Claim
NEW YORK iJTA> The -ji eligible Holocaust
*or received a check fron: the Claims Conference
Hardship Fund last month, announced Dr. Israel Miller.
president of the Conference on Jewish Material Claims
Against Germany.
The Claims Conference was estarosbed primarily for vic-
tims of Nazi persecution who emigrated from Eastern
Europe after 1^5. Recipients tire in 27 countries, with the
majority bring in Israel and about 25 percent in the United
States- The fund is financed by the West German govern-
ment, which limits individual payments to the equivalent of
$3,032.00 per person.
Twin Cities Get Kosher Eatery
ST PAUL. Minn. (JTA. Observant Jews m the Twin
Cities finally have a kosher restaurant since Berkeh
Mishulovin. 29. from Samerkand. U.S.SJt. and his wife
Simon*. 21. from Los Angeles, have opened the Old City
Cafe. St. Paul and WmncapohY first such (vegetarian and
dairy) eatery.
Berkeh has brought together Israeli and Middle Eastern
cashes. New York-style ptzaa and American
bagels and cream cheese

'own* nn >niw
Rain did not deter the uvmen of SA'AM AT
Israel or friends of the Public Council for
Soviet Jewry from fasting at the Western Wall
to express their solidarity u-ith the hunger
strike held by hundreds of Soviet Jewish
women refuseniks in the USSR. Shown
participating in the Israeli demonstrations
are. from left: Rebbitzin Goren. wife of the
Chief Rabbi; Masha Lubelsky, secretary
general of NA 'AMAT Israel; Simcha Dinitz,
newly elected chairman of the World Zionist
Organization; MK Sava Arad. chairwoman
of the World Movement of SA'AMAT
(formerly Pioneer Women); Drora Meir,
SA AMAT Israel Organization Department
chair; and MK Yitzhak Artzi.
Hadassah
The Renanah Chapter will
hold a Youth Aliyah Luncheon
at Crawdaddy s. South Pointe
Park, on Monday. April 25. at
11:30 a.m. Rabbi Ronnie
Cahana. of Temple Emanu-El
will speak on his experiences
with Youth Aliyah and
guitarist singer Jacqueline
Shapiro will entertain in Yid-
dish. Hebrew and English.
The Albert Einstein Chapter
will meet on Monday. May 9.
at noon at Adath Yeshurun
Guest speaker will be North
Miami Beach Mavor Joe
Moffat.
Irving Widaen, national
director of Hadassah Zionist
Youth Commission, will ad-
dress the Youth Activities ses-
sion at the Miami Region of
Hadassah Annual Conference
on Monday. Mav 2 at the Omni
Hotel.
The Hatikvah Chapter of
Hadassah will honor its child
life members at a luncheon on
Sunday, April 24. at 11:30 a.m.
at the home of chapter presi-
dent Amy Mittelberg. Young
ladies, from one to seven-and-
a-half years old, will lunch on
sandwiches and work on an art
project, and receive party
favors. For information:
387-2486.
The Hannah Scnesch
Chapter of Hadassah will hold
its Donor and Installation
meeting at noon. May 10, at
the Shelborne Hotel. Miami
Beach.
SHE NEEDS
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to good use.
Help hundreds of frail indigent
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ouglas Gardens
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itjr(CJaannKr


Solidarity Sunday
March Canceled
Friday, April 15, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 13
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) For
the first time since it began 16
years ago, New York's
massive Solidarity Sunday
March for Soviet Jewry has
been canceled.
The Coalition to Free Soviet
Jews, which organizes the an-
nual rally, called the move a
postponement." It said it
would be organizing "smaller
events" as part of a "global
campaign designed to heighten
and sustain public awareness
of the continued plight of
Soviet Jewry" prior to the
summit meeting between
President Reagan and Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev,
scheduled to take place in
Moscow from May 29 to June
2.
"The Soviet Jewry move-
ment must focus its resources
and energies to make certain
our issue is prominently raised
at the summit, and that steps
are taken toward normalizing
the emigration process," said
Alan Pesky, coalition
chairman.
Soviet Jewry activists
believe the effectiveness of the
annual New York demonstra-
tion, ironically, may have been
reduced on the afternoon of
Dec. 6, when an estimated
200,000 demonstrators for
Soviet Jewry packed the
Ellipse near the White House
in Washington.
But the coalition described
that rally rather as a spr-
ingboard for new hopes and
plans. "We will build on that
momentum," the group
stated.
This year's march had been
scheduled for May 1, to end
with a demonstration in Dag
Hammarskjold Plaza, across
the street from the United Na-
tions. The annual event was,
until Dec. 6, the largest of its
kind in the nation.
The activities that are plann-
ed so far to fulfill the new
strategy include a Community
Action Day in Washington,
sometime in May, featuring
meetings with members of
Congress and Reagan ad-
ministration officials to gather
support for the Soviet Jewry
movement.
A public meeting will be
sought with the presidential
candidates at which "they
would take a forthright stand
on the issue of Soviet Jewry."
An advertisement is planned
for major publications, and
other public announcements
highlighting the new campaign
are also foreseen.
If Reagan follows through
with a plan to make a state-
ment on human rights in
Helsinki prior to his trip to
Moscow, "a delegation of
Jewish leaders will be in
Helsinki to publicly convey a
message that the Soviet Union
must adhere to the Helsinki
Accords and to the Interna-
tional Declaration of Human
Rights of 1948," the coalition
said in a statement.
In addition, a major event is
being planned in New York to
coincide with the start of the
summit itself, and the coalition
intends to "distribute dif-
ferent paraphernalia to
organizations and thousands
of people for use prior to, dur-
ing and after the summit
meeting."
No dates have yet been set
for any of the above.
Rally Cancellation Questioned
NEW YORK (JTA) Soviet Jewry groups for the
most part have lined up behind a decision made this week
by the Coalition to Free Soviet Jews to postpone the tradi-
tional Solidarity Sunday rally in New York, in favor of
alternative events. They stress that changes in the situa-
tion of Soviet Jews warrant a new approach and a new pro-
cess of education.
But at least one group, the Student Struggle for Soviet
Jewry, has questioned the coalition's authority to postpone
or cancel Solidarity Sunday, saying it "had taken the deci-
sion without consultation with its constituent
organizations."
The coalition emphasized that its decision to not hold the
massive demonstration on its prearranged May 1 date is
not a cancellation, but rather an indefinite postponement of
the event to a more appropriate time.
"Somewhere down the road there will be another
demonstration," said Zeesy Schnur, the group's executive
director. "The time will come again when we will have to
make another statement" like the one made Dec. 6 in
Washington, when more than 200,000 demonstrated near
the White House on the eve of President Reagan's third
summit meeting with Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev.
"You don't hold a demonstration because you have
nothing else to do. It should be part of an overall cam-
paign," she said. "The demonstration on its own has not
brought about the emigration of Soviet Jews. It's a
cumulative effect."
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Israeli soldiers carry the body of a Palesti-
nian guerilla, one of two killed in an attempt
to infiltrate northern Israel from Lebanon.
Four Israeli soldiers were also wounded. This
was the ninth attempted infiltration by
guerillas in less than five months. AP/Wide
World Photo.
Attempt to Infiltrate On Northern Border
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) A ter-
rorist was captured in an en-
counter between an Israel
Defense Force patrol and a
terrorist band just north of the
Israel-Lebanon border, the
IDF has confirmed.
Two terrorists were killed
and four soldiers from the
Golani and Givati brigades
were wounded in the clash,
which occurred near Kfar
Yuval, in Upper Galilee.
Despite a claim by the
mainline Al Fatah faction of
the Palestine Liberation
Organization in Sidon that its
men had taken part in the
abortive attack, the captured
terrorist, who was wounded,
has apparently told his inter-
rogators that the bang belong-
ed to George Habash's Popular
Front for the Liberation of
Palestine.
IDF troops prevented
another infiltration attempt on
the border of the south
Lebanon security zone after
the initial attack.
Israeli 'Drone'
Could Get Eglin Test"
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Israel Aircraft Industries is
urging the U.S. Air Force to
test the Harpy, a new radar-
tracking drone, for possible in-
clusion in the U.S. arsenal,
knowledgeable sources said.
The effort comes within a
year after Congress required
the Pentagon to buy $38
million worth of Pioneer
drones from Israel for use by
the Navy.
A Capitol Hill source said
the initial U.S. testing of sue
Pioneers has gone
"remarkably well," with the
possibility that an additional
40 drones could be deployed.
The six drones, which are
unmanned remotely piloted
vehicles, have been used by the
U.S. Sixth Fleet off the coast
of Lebanon, sources said.
The Harpy, which is
propeller-driven, is currently
in production. Israel is asking
the Pentagon to test the Har-
py at Eglin Air Force Base in
Florida under the U.S. foreign
weapons evaluation program.
The Harpy is designed to fly
missions similar to that of the
U.S. Seek Spinner, another
drone, which may not receive
funding in the next fiscal year.
Despite having spent $125
million previously to develop
the Seek Spinner, the Air
Force did not seek funding for
it for fiscal 1989, although the
House Armed Services Com-
mittee approved a preliminary
recommendation that $65
million be spent on the drone
in the coming year.
One of the sources said that
the Boeing Military Airplane
Co., which is offering the Seek
Spinner, was behind the effort
to fund this drone in 1989.
He added that Israel's Har-
py is two to three years closer
to being deployed than the
Seek Spinner, and that the Air
Force has determined that the
Seek Spinner would be inferior
to the Harpy.
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Page 14 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 15, 1988
Parsonage Eviction
Spurs Guidelines
By ALLAN RICHTER
NEW YORK (JTA) The
attempt of a rabbi's widow to
remain in a Valley Stream,
Long Island house owned by a
synagogue has led national
rabbinical organizations to
overhaul their guidelines con-
cerning rabbinical-
congregational relations.
The conflict, not the first
over the fate of a rabbinical
parsonage, has also raised a
debate. One side maintains
that rabbis are merely
employees of their synagogues
ana the synagogue's obliga-
tions are limited to what is
stipulated in the contracts.
The other side argues that a
secular legal contract should
not be the sole consideration,
but that Jewish law applies.
They add that unwritten rab-
binical obligations entail far
more than those of an ordinary
employee, and warrant special
treatment.
In February, a New York
State Supreme Court justice
dismissed a $2 million suit
brought against the (Conser-
vative) Temple, Gates of Zion
by Helen Resnikoff, whose
husband, Simon, was the con-
gregation's rabbi until his
death in April, 1987.
Resnikoff s suit denied the
synagogue's claim that she
was entitled to live in the two-
story colonial home which
she shared with her husband
for 35 years only for six
months after the rabbi's death.
Resnikoff charged that the
synagogue duped her husband
into believing she would be
allowed to live out her life in
the house.
Justice Patricia Collins back-
ed the synagogue's claim,
however, ruling that the con-
tract between the 375-member
temple and Rabbi Resnikoff
was valid. Her decision cleared
the way for Resnikoff s evic-
tion, and caused rabbinical
organizations to take a fresh
look at the treatment of pro-
fessionals' families.
The United Synagogue of
America, the Conservative
congregational body, sets stan-
dard contracts between
synagogues and their rabbis,
cantors and other profes-
sionals. Missing, however, are
policies on treatment of their
families, said Rabbi Benjamin
Kreitman, its executive vice
president. Kreitman said the
organization is working to in-
clude such guidelines.
Rabbi Binyamin Walfish, ex-
ecutive vice president of the
Rabbinical Council of America,
an Orthodox rabbinic body,
said, "we are revising our
standards" for treating
families. "We started on it
long before this (the Resnikoff
conflict) came to light, but
(this) has certainly made us
work a lot more quickly."
Kreitman and Walfish fear
that cases like the Resnikoff
dispute can deter young people
from entering the rabbinate.
Walfish noted that at least one
rabbinical training ground,
Yeshiva University, offers
courses on handling finances.
Rabbi Joseph Glaser, ex-
ecutive vice president of the
Reform movement's Central
Conference of American Rab-
bis, said that the CCAR's
guidelines for the rabbinical-
congregational relationship
provide for a "decent period of
time, either six months or the
end of a school year" for the
family to remain in a par-
sonage after the rabbi dies or
retires. However, said Glaser,
there are death benefits and a
"decent pension plan," while
the suggestion is often made
that the synagogue gradually
transfer the equity of the home
over to the rabbi.
Still, said Glaser, "we also
aren't terribly encouraging of
rabbis living in parsonages to
begin with, although it's up to
the rabbi." Glaser said a trend
toward rabbis owning their
own homes began soon after
World War II.
According to Rabbi Wolfe
Kelman, executive vice presi-
dent of the Rabbinical
Assembly, the Conservative
rabbinic body, "The Jewish
religion says we must go
beyond the minimum It's a
matter of doing the right and
decent thing."
If Resnikoff is evicted,
Kelman said he would stage a
protest along with 100 rabbis.
In most cases involving the
death of a popular rabbi with
many years at one temple, said
Kelman, the widow is allowed
to remain in the house without
title or is enabled to buy the
house through a fund-raising
effort. Gates of Zion con-
gregants, however, said that
while they loved their late rab-
bi, buying the house for his
widow is not in the budget.
United Synagogue officials
said they regret that the
Resnikoff conflict went to
court rather than to its Stan-
dards Committee. The
organization has successfully
negotiated dozens of conflicts
nationwide.
Robert Blakeman, the
Resnikoff s long-time friend
and lawyer, said he might ap-
peal the court's decision,
depending on Resnikoff's
health. He said she was recent-
ly scheduled to enter the
hospital for tests for cancer.
"I feel sad and disillusion-
ed," said Resnikoff before the
decision on her case was made.
"It's hard to understand. We
gave 35 years of our lives to
Temple Gates of Zion."
A Poignant Letter
Continued from Page 5
True, we believe that the
right way is Zionism. You may
ask why we have been so per-
sistent and stayed here. When
I left Israel in 1957, it was an
emotional move, which I can-
not explain now. But I regret
this move till today, and I
regret that your parents did
not try to convince me to stay.
But this was my decision, and
only I am reoyvnaiuie for that
decision.
As I am writing you, I heard
the news that the old Jewish
cemetery in Hanover was van-
dalized, destroying some 146
tombstones.
All the best to you and the
family.
Yours,
M.
Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck, here in
Israel to celebrate their 50th birthday and
Israel's UOth anniversary, planted trees with
the help of some Israeli vounasters. in the JNF
forest at Modiin.
JTA/WZN N.*s Photo
Genocide Treaty to Congress
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The long effort to make
genocide a crime in the United
States may finally be realized
if Congress, as expected,
adopts legislation implemen-
ting the United Nations con-
vention against genocide this
month.
But Warren Eisenberg,
director of the B'nai B'rith In-
ternational Council, warned
that the implementation
legislation could still be block-
ed if conservative senators,
who opposed ratification of the
UN convention, filibuster the
bill.
The Senate, by an 83-11 vote
on Feb. 19, 1986, ratified the
convention 37 years after it
was first submitted to the
Senate by President Harry
Truman and 40 years after it
was adopted by the United
Nations.
But before genocide can
become a crime under the U.S.
criminal code, implementing
legislation must be adopted by
both the Senate and the
House.
The legislation makes
genocide a federal crime if
committed in the United
States or by a U.S. citizen
anywhere. It was introduced in
the House by Rep. Peter
Rodino (D-N.J.), chairman of
the House Judiciary Commit-
tee, and in the Senate by Sens.
Joseph Biden (D-Del.), chair-
man of the Senate Judiciary
Committee, Howard Metzen-
baum (D-Ohio) and William
Proxmire (D-Wis.).
The law imposes a fine up to
$1 million and/or 20 years in
prison if the act results in a
death. Anyone convicted of
"incitement to genocide"
would face a fine of up to
$500,000 and/or five years in
prison.
The House Judiciary Com-
mittee has sent the bill to the
floor, where a vote was ex-
pected April 14, Holocaust
Remembrance Day (Yom
Hashoah). The Senate
Judiciary Committee may take
final action on the bill next
week.
Two members of the Senate
committee, Strom Thurmond
(R-S.C), the ranking
Republican, and Charles
Grassley (R-Iowa), were
among the 11 senators who
voted against ratification of
the convention.
At a committee hearing Feb.
19, both repeated their opposi-
tion, declaring that the con-
vention does not include
political genocide.
Opponents of the UN con-
vention threatened a filibuster
to prevent ratification in 1986.
But they abandoned the move
after the Senate Foreign Rela-
tions Committee adopted two
amendments submitted by
Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C),
another opponent of the
convention.
The amendments would bar
the World Court from hearing
a case brought against the
United States under the con-
vention without Washington's
consent and would prohibit the
United States from taking any
action under the convention
forbidden by the U.S.
Constitution.
Eisenberg said that there
was no indication that op-
ponents in the Senate would
try to filibuster to prevent
adoption of the implementing
legislation, but added that
such a move cannot be ruled
out.
B'nai B'rith has sent a
memorandum to its members
urging they contact members
of the Senate Judiciary Com-
mittee in support of the bill.
The memorandum, prepared
by Eisenberg and his assistant,
Reva Price, warns against
another tactic to stop the bill:
an amendment to add the
death penalty to the bill.
The fear is that many sup-
porters of the legislation are
opposed to capital punishment.
The State Department has
taken the lead for the Reagan
administration in pressing for
adoption of the bill, because of
the implications that rejection
would nave on the world com-
munity, according to
Eisenberg. The convention has
been adopted and is law in at
least 97 countries.
"U.S. implementation of the
genocide convention is impor-
tant to the United States and
to those throughout the world
who do look to this country for
leadership and strength in the
area of human rights,"
Richard Schifter, assistant
secretary of state for human
rights and humanitarian af-
fairs, said in testifying before
the Senate Judiciary
Committee.
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Friday, April 15, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 15
Going Up To Jerusalem...
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Elaine Laskin, nine-
years-old, is about to
become an Israeli
citizen. As soon as her parents,
Melvin and Rachel, sell their
North Miami Beach home, the
family will emigrate. And this
week's traditional Passover
toast, "Next year in
Jerusalem!" will become a
reality.
"1 don't want to go," Elaine
says candidly. "I like my
friends here."
Lillian Goldberg, 70-years-
old. is packing everything she
owns and is about to realize a
dream she has harbored for
years: going to live in the land
of Israel.
"I'm a Zionist and an
idealist and that's why I'm go-
ing." she says.
Adriana Worthalter,
M-years-old, came to Miami
from Colombia with her family
10 years ago. Last month she
packed a few suitcases and left
on her own to see what it's like
to live in Israel.
"I don't know," Worthalter
said before she left. "It just
came to my mind one day
why not go to Israel? I want to
feel like a Jew. I don 'tfeel like a
Jew here."
LEA Sisenwine was born in
Poland and moved to Israel six
months before the state was
born in 1948. Thirteen years
ago she came to live in
America, where she met and
married BUI, 61. They bought a
condominium in Bat Yam,
about 15 miles from Tel Aviv,
and now both are returning to
Israel to live.
"I wouldn't be going if it
weren't for Lea," says Bill, a
career salesman from
Philadelphia.
They come from varied
backgrounds and it would
seem that their individual ex-
periences amount to worlds of
differences. Similarities are
shared, though, the most
manifest being the desire to
make aliyah, or to return to
the land of Israel.
For a few hours on a recent
Sunday afternoon, they were
united at a party hosted by the
Aliyah Center, which has been
working for months to prepare
them for this major change in
their lives. In Israel, the
chances are they will all go
separate paths once again.
MOST of them will be in
Israel by the time it celebrates
Yom Ha'atzmaout, the Day of
Independence. The new set-
tlers have been closely
monitoring the recent unrest
m the Arab sections of
...Or Tel Aviv or Haifa
Jerusalem and in the ad-
ministered West Bank and
Gaza. None has let it deter his
or her decision to go.
"I'm not the least bit
scared," Goldberg says. Ten
years ago she purchased a
burial plot in Israel. "I say, if
an Arab wants to kill me, I
have my grave all ready and
it's a holy place in Israel
and, whatever is meant to be is
meant to be."
"Doesn't bother me at all,"
said Worthalter, on the eve of
her departure. Television in
the United States they over-
do it. If I don't go where I'm
not supposed to go, nothing's
going to happen to me. I've
been warned to stay out of the
Arab sections.
Bill Sisenwine has weighed
all the news reports, admitting
that he doesn't put much stock
in them, and he's talked with
friends already living in Israel.
His conclusion: It's safer in
Israel than in Miami.
MEL and Rachel Laskin,
who already have a teen-age
daughter living in Israel, have
different thoughts about it.
"I do, at night, at times, sit
and wonder about the danger
that I'm taking my family in-
to," says Mel.
"I don't think about the
danger," Rachel interjects. "I
think about the mundane
things like, will they have the
groceries I'm used to? The
brown rice? Cream of Wheat?
Will I fit in socially? Can I find
work? I think about how my lit-
tle one will feel."
Rachel says she has a faith
that Israel wil not be
destroyed again and the Jews
scattered despite what some
people have predicted.
"There's an old saying my
parents had," notes Rachel,
"Man proposes and God
disposes."
NOT anyone can go to
Israel, at least not with im-
mediate citizen-rather than
tourist-status. Individuals or
families who want to enter
Israel with the state's bless-
ing, are advised to go through
any of the Aliyah Centers
located in major U.S. cities
and run under the aegis of the
World Zionist Organization. In
South Florida, the Aliyah
Center is a division of the
Greater Miami Jewish
Federation.
"They have got to prove that
they have the capacity to be
absorbed in Israel," says Alex-
ander Levy, an Israeli who ar-
rived in Miami seven months
ago to direct the aliyah pro-
gram for Florida. Levy is not
an official; he volunteered to
serve the Aliyah Center in
Miami as someone who has liv-
ed in Israel and knows what
the country is looking for and
what type of person will best
be absorbed into the Israeli
nation.
"They have to convince me
they have the qualities and
mental balance and the desire
to go through so many
Temple Vandals Charged
The four South Dade youths responsible for the desecration of
Bet Shira Congregation in early March will be charged as
juveniles according to a jurisdiction determined late last week.
According to Shay Bilchik, chief assistant for administration in
the Dade State Attorney's Office, the felony offense involving
criminal mischief and the damage -in excess of $10,000- put
the case within the purvue of Circuit Court Judge Bruce Levy.
Although Bilchik was constrained from addressing the
specifics involving the juvenilesGary Gribble, Conrad Ritter
and William Jose, all 17, and 16-year-old James Leggett-he was
able to suggest the potential outcome of the criminal charges:
"According to the statutes and rules of procedure" involving
any such juvenile action and assuming a plea of guilty or finding
of guilt "a general order of probation or community control"
could be construed to result in community service work,
monetary restitution or counseling.
The punishment thereby could be "any action the court feels is
related to a sound rehabilitative plan."
Bilchik said that Judge Levy could "fine-tune or focus" judg-
ment following the recommendations of Health and
Rehabilitative Services (HRS) which could suggest either
residential or non-residential commitment and custody. Present-
lv the youngsters are living at home and assigned to Telecom-
munications program of the Merrick Educational Center
whereby they "attend" class via a telephone network.
A hearing date, or sounding, is scheduled for Monday when the
youths are expected to enter their pleas. A trial^PT^-
tional (sentencing) hearing, normally would follow within three
or four weeks. NormaA.Orovitz
Rachel, Elaine and Mel Laskin
obstacles in the way of gaining
a new country and a new
nationality."
Levy advises some people
not to go. Others, he
encourages.
"It's not a dream like many
people might think," says
Levy. "It needs preparation."
THE process takes about
two months. Applicants
undergo a psychological
evaluation and background
check. Not so much a formal
legal check, but a check of the
applicant's Jewish
background, involvement in
the community, work history
and old-fashioned reference
and word o f mouth
information.
This most recent class of
Aliyah Center graduates have
all passed Levy's scrutiny and
are on their way ...
Continued on Page 18
A Primer:
On Making Aliyah
THE Aliyah Center is look-
ing for a few good Jews, to
build and help strengthen and
share the dream of the Israeli
nation.
"If you are a Jew and you
spent a few years in jail, I'm
not so sure the state of Israel
is willing to have you on
board," says Alexander Levy,
regional director for the
Aliyah Center.
"If you are sick, and your il-
lness is contagious, I'm not
sure we're exactly the address
to accept you. If you are men-
tally (disturbed) and you are
incapable to face vigorous
pressure, heavy conflicts, then
I'm not sure you can make it.
This will be evaluated by
Jewish American authorities
like Jewish Family Service,
which will advise whether you
are capable or not."
No one is "really rejected by
me," Levy says. He does ad-
vise, however, against certain
individuals who make the re-
quest to move to Israel.
Anyone interested in making
aliyah, or the return to Israel,
is advised to go through the
Aliyah Center, which falls
under the auspices of the
World Zionist Organization. If
one does not go through the
Aliyah Center, he will receive
tourist status upon arrival in
Israel. Going through the
Aliyah Center helps expedite
the citizenship process.
IF a person is handicapped
and wants to live in Israel,
Levy will ask if he has means
of support. "The first obliga-
tion of the country is to help
their people. We have much
less need to help weaker peo-
ple than America does. And
the first priority is to help
weaker people like Ethiopians
and Russians, who have no
choice. And I will warmly ad-
vise somebody who was born
into American society, which
is rich and has a welfare policy,
to get help here rather than
help there."
This does not mean that a
family who has one handicap-
ped person will not be welcome
in Israel," Levy explains. "On
the contrary, by having a fami-
ly support him, he will be
received warmly."
Some people actually come
to his office, Levy says, and
want to send their handicap-
ped relatives to Israel. "Come
to my office and I will show
you how parents are willing to
get rid of their children."
Still, the Jewish Agency has
a policy of helping those who
wish to make Aliyah, says
Levy. "If they meet certain re-
quirements, like being under
35 to go on a kibbutz, or to be
over 65, in order to get some
subsidies and health insurance,
or being a professional who
needs Hebrew to develop his
career in all those cases and
many others, we will tailor a
suit which will fit his need."
LEVY, 50, is an Israeli. He
is one of the volunteers for the
agency who come to America
for two or three years to help
Americans make aliyah. They
are not professional Jewish
Agency workers. They are
"ordinary" people from Israeli
life who have succeeeded in
one field or another and pro-
vide information based on
their knowledge and
experience.
"If you don't go through my
office and you go to Israel, you
go to Israel under tourist
Continued on Page 18


Page 16 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 15, 1988
Frances Weinstein, president
for the past four years of the
Southern Region of Technion,
Israel's Institute of
Technology, was honored at the
North Dade Chapter, Women's
Division's annual Scholarship
Luncheon at the Doral Hotel.
Weinstein has also been presi-
dent of the chapter for eight
years.

------------1
Rahamin Timor, Israel's con-
sul general to Florida, will
speak on "Current Events in
Israel and the Prospects for
Peace in the Middle East" at a
service commemorating
Israel's UOth anniversary on
Friday, April 29, at 8 p.m. at
Temple Beth Moshe. Timor has
previously served as Israeli
ambassador to Brazil, Greeze,
Cypress, and Zaire, as well as
in parts of Washington, D.C.
and Ethiopia.
_____I
Workmen's
Circle
Yiddish Branch 67q
Workmen's Circle will host a
Ghetto Memorial Meeting tn
commemorate the 45th an
niversaryof the uprising of the
?W Ghetto, on Tuesday
April 19, lp.m.attheSurfside
Community Center.
The program will include
lighting of six candles bv
Holocaust survivors in
memory of six million Jews
who perished during the
Holocaust.
A musical pageant will por-
tray life, struggle and mar-
trydom, during the Nazi oc-
cupation of Europe and will be
performed.
The Second City Touring Company will ap- Center. Originators of ensemble comedy, Se-
pear at the Radisson Centre on Saturday, cond City features social and political humor
April 28, at 8 p.m. to benefit the building cam- and satire,
paign of the South Dade Jewish Community
To Appear
In Person
Dr. Bernard Cherruk. right, nee president of the Hebrew
I'mrersity of Jerusalem, was guest speaker at a meetinn "(the
American Friends of the Hebrew University held at the h
Mae Berezin, left. Cherrick was Chief Rabbi t th. Sen:
Synagogue in London and a chaplain in the British Arwu at the
outbreak of World War II.
Emanuel Gold, second from right, presents the Israel UOth An-
niversary Award to Isidore Chensky, second from left, who was
recognized during a recent reception at the Mar-Len Gardens.
Chensky and his wife Ala were honored for their support of the
State of Israel. Gold serves as the chairman of the Mar-Len
Gardens Israel Bonds campaign with Sol Goldwasser, left, as co-
chairman. Also present at the awards ceremony was Eddie Shaf-
fer, right, folk humorist.
Elder Support Network Cited
The Elder Support Network
(ESN) of the Association of
Jewish Family and Children's
Agencies an Annual Volun-
tarism is Action for the Aging
awards, sponsored by the Na-
tional Voluntary Organiza-
tions for Independent Living
for the Aging, an affiliate of
the National Council for the
Aging. The ESN is a telephone
"bridge" designed to link con-
cerned family members of frail
elderly relatives in distant
cities with Jewish Family Ser-
vice agencies that can provide
needed support and help for
these loved ones.
The Network is reached by
calling 1-800-634-7654.
Actor Robert Clary will ad-
dress the congregation of Tem-
ple Beth Moshe on Friday,
April 15, 8 p.m. services.
Clary, known for the TV series
"Hogan's Heroes" as well as
numerous movies, is the only
one of his 18-member im-
mediate family to survive the
concentration camps during
the Holocaust, he is national
chairman of the Simon wiesen-
thal Center's Outreach
Program.
Dan and Betty Supon will be honored by the Greater Miami
Israel Bonds Organization at a dessert reception on Thursday.
April 21, at 8 p.m. at Temple Sinai of North Dade. Residents oj
Miami Beach, the Supons are active in the Zionist Organization
of America, Temple Sinai, North Miami Rotary Club Snowbirds,
B'nai B'rith and Hadassah. The Supons lived in Hertzhya
Pituach in Israel from 1979 to 1981.


Friday, April 15, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 17
Lehrman Ball Nets Record $465,000
George Goldbloom, Temple Emanu-El vice president, receives Maimonides Award
from Dr. Irving Lehrman, right, as Evelyn Goldbloom looks on with approval. Chairman of 20th Annual Lehrman Day School Scholarship Ball, Harriet and
John Shapiro, held in Friedland Ballroom, receive Israeli silver kiddush cup
from Rabbi Lehrman.
Past Temple president. Judge Herbert Shapiro and wife Ruth; Sandra Morton
Goldberg and Barton S. Goldberg, Temple vice president and Jefferson National
Bank president.
Pleased with success of Ball are these Temple Emanu-El leaders, from left, Pat
and Dr. Phillip Frost; Maureen and Stephen Muss; Belle and Dr. Irving
Lehrman.
Rabbi Lehrman makes a point with Mama Schantz, wife of Emanu-El presi- Farmer Scholarship Ball chairmen Hal and Roberta Kaye and Bemice and B.
dent Lawrence Schantz, Fana Holyz and Abel Holtz, Temple vice-president and Morton uitmn.
Capital Bank President.
'Perennial Lehrman Day School multiple scholarship patrons,
Mr. and Mrs. William I. Bard
Temple Emanu-El leader Ruth Regina, her son Dade County Court Judge candidate Harvey
Shenberg and Elizabeth Shenberg.
&*o/nr.Av i .* .. ^.u^ nvA Henrietta Lehrman Day School leaders, from left, are Rowena Kovler, principal; Dr. Amir Baron,


Page 18 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 15, 1988
On Making Aliyah
Continued from Page 15
status. Aliyah is just a stupid
word if they want to
emigrate and they are well-
motivated because they belong
to a group which believes that
Jews should be settled (in
Israel), then you can call them
olim. They don't only move
their bodies to Israel but they
are well motivated by an
ideology. In this case you can
call it Aliyah. It has an
idealistic motivation behind it
and not just an immigration
move which is moving the body
from one place to another."
WHO is a Jew? is asked in a
practical sense. "You have to
be somewhat related to the
Jewish world in a way that is
good enough to make sure you
want to stay and live among
Jewish people."
Another reason for going
through the Aliyah Center, is
to find the best suitable loca-
tion for a person. For example,
if one has asthma, a moun-
tainous region is suggested.
Or, if a child needs special
schooling, a suitable location is
sought.
One question that is not ask-
ed, Levy says, is religious af-
filiation: Orthodox, Conser-
vative or Reform.
In the few months that he
has been working in the Aliyah
Center, Levy has advised
several people against making
the move to Israel.
"One man who would not
have qualified for health in-
surance in Israel, because of a
complicated medical history
and very advanced age, is one
case of a postponement
notice," Levy says. Another
case is of a young man who
was involved in drugs and was
sentenced by an American
court. He was temporarily
rejected.
"THE key issues to the
whole process is that Israel is
not an extensive country like
America. Every citizen in
Going Up To Jerusalem...
Continued from Page 15
MEL AND RACHEL LASKIN
Last December, Mel and Rachel Laskin's 16-year-old
daughter E.J. spent a few months in Israel on the
Alexander Muss High.School program. She called
her parents in North Miami Beach, said she had just visited
the Western Wall and was "ecstatic about it." She wanted
to stay. Her parents had similar sentiments.
Mel, 40, and Rachel, 45, erected a for sale-sign in front of
their North Miami Beach home and began attending Aliyah
meetings. Among the regulars there the topic most discuss-
ed was: Why would anyone want to go to Israel now?
"THE people said they were concerned about their
relatives living in Israel and their relatives said they had
been reading about the violent crime in Miami and had been
worried about us," said Mel.
Elaine, nine, has told her third grade friends at Sabal
Palm Elementary School that she will be moving half-way
around the world. "They say they wish I could stay," says
Elaine.
Mel is an electronics technician. Rachel is a teacher at
Sinai Academy. They consider themselves "relaxed Or-
thodox." That is, "We feel everybody has to make their
own decision how they should observe Judaism." But they
are each Ba'al Tshuvah they have made the return to
the observance of Judaism.
"When we met we were totally non-observant." says
Mel. Coincidentally, they both attended a lecture at Temple
Adath Yeshurun. Mel and Rachel were on opposite sides of
the room but noticed each other. They talked in the parking
lot after the meeting it was May 31, 1977 and they
married the following Sept. 25.
Rachel, Miami Beach High '60, and Mel, Miami High *65,
each have come a long way: "I've always considered myself
a rationalist," says Mel. Rachel has always been spiritual.
And when we married there was some discussion. The ra-
tionalist view: 'You're responsible for yourself.' Hers was.
'God will help you.' "
MEL says his rationalism led him to question how he
could carpool their daughter every week to religious school
and not go to shul himself. Rachel started to read the week-
ly Torah portion. And together, as a family, they grew
closer to Judaism.
Again, the rationalism. Says Mel: "The rationalist says if
you are Jewish, there's only one logical place for you to
reside, if you can survive it."
Says Rachel: "I am going because Mel has wanted to go
for many years, even before he met me, and I feel if a per-
son has that strong of a dream, he should fulfill it."
They decided to think about it for 30 days and if either
changed his mind, they would not go through with it.
Neither did.
Mel knows he will be required to join the Israeli Army the
homeguard since he is over 35. Their eldest daughter also
will join the military, but it will help pay for her education
in Israel.
"I don't think it's part of our religion to turn the other
cheek," says Mel.
THEY are planning to live in Carmel, a town outside of
Haifa. It is an industrial area with technical corporations, a
job field in which Mel expects to fit. When they first arrive
in Israel, they will live in a resettlement center and spend
their days intensively learning Hebrew.
LILLIAN GOLDBERG
44
M
there.
y heart pulls me there," says Lillian Goldberg,
explaining simply why she is going to make
Israel her final home after years of visiting
When I was a Junior Hadassah-ite, I wrote a letter to
Henrietta Szold (the founder of Hadassah) and told her I
wanted to go to Israel. (This was about some 40 years ago.)
I said I'm afraid, but it may be risky. She wrote me a letter
and gave me hell and she really admonished me for being
afraid of going when people had the courage to go as
pioneers. She said you shouldn't worry about safety. It's
always risky. Life is risky."
Goldberg, instead stayed in America to care for her fami-
ly. But she did go to Israel many times as a tourist.
In Israel, she will support herself primarily on the pen-
sion she receives from her former employment with New
York City. She found an inexpensive apartment in
Ashkelon, about an hour's ride from Jerusalem where the
buses stop at her front door.
WHY the move now? "Every time I came back I felt a lit-
tle nostalgia for America. But now, I feel that as much as I
love America, my allegiance is to Israel."
"Why I am going? I find God is in Israel. He's in every
nook and corner."
ADRIANA WORTHHALTER
Her family left Colombia, South America 10 years
ago. "There were a lot of kidnap threats against us
and other Jewish families," she says. Her parents
bought a toy store in Miami and they opened another for
her and her sister to run. "When things are slow, it's bor-
ing to be here," she says.
That is the mundane reason for the move. The real
motivation is that she is seeking her Jewish identity: "I
don't feel like a Jew here," she said. "I think I've forgotten
what it's like to be Jewish.
"One day I was thinking of my possibilities. What am I
going to do? I want to study. My cousin went to Israel. She
loved it. I went to a shaliach (an Israeli emissary) and
everyday I got more and more convinced."
Her family supports her move. "My parents love the
idea," she says. 'My mom always wanted the whole family
to live in Israel."
She left to go by herself and will live in an absortion
center.
"I am ready to go on with my life," says Adriana. "I am
really excited." She will study Herbew every morning and
plans to find work in the afternoons to add to the small nest
egg she already has saved. If she is accepted into a universi-
ty there, she will stay.
"I think it's an opportunity for me, because I don't have
any ties in this country."
She will leave behind her mother, father, brother-in-law,
aunts, uncles and other relatives. 'It's sad," she admits.
"But everybody's got a life and I've got to get on with my
life. I've been working with my parents since I'm 17. I've
got to get on with my life."
LEA AND BILL
SISENWINE
Lea was born in Poland and when the war broke out
she lived in Siberia For the duration, she shuttled
about Europe. In 1948, Lea went to then Palestine
from Marseilles. She came to America in 1975 for a visit
with her mother. She stayed.
Bill was bom in Philadelphia, had a career in sales and
served in World War II. He retired to Florida about 16
years ago. He was introduced to Lea and overcame her con-
cern about her poor command of English.
"Since I knew how to speak Yiddish," Bill recalls, "I
said, 'Don't worry, we'll get along fine.* From that time on,
it was dating and we were married a year later.
BILL and Lea went to Israel in 1984. He fell in love with
Israel and Lea's family there.
"They were exceptionally warm. They made me feel as if
I were in the family for a lifetime." says Bill. "Israel itself
reminded me of my childhood growing up, the way the
stores are. the way the people are. and it reminded me of
my childhood days in Philadelphia. Ninetv percent of the
people on the street where we lived were"from Europe."
Bill will live on his social security income in Israel.
"BEING in your 40s and 50s and retiring to Florida, you
have one hell of a time getting adjusted to the Florida
lifestyle,'' says BUI. "In Israel, there's a knock on your
door. It's your neighbor. Everybody has four things in their
house: fruits, nuts, tea and cake."
Lillian Goldberg's
Passport Photo
Israel has his position and his
capacity and his contribution
Those things are very quickly
noticed, because he is part of a
very small group which is
handling the country.
Therefore, everyone is a
tremendous contributor to the
system, and his position has
immediate influence on the
environment.
"Everyone is a treasure, the
only treasure we have. We
lack natural resources. And
our only resource is the human
capacity."
Clark to Sponsor
Presidents Club
Metro Mayor, Steve Clark
will sponsor the Presidents
Club of South Florida's dinner
buffet party, Tuesday, April
19, at the Surfside Community
Center.
The Presidents Club is com-
prised of the officers of social
clubs of high rise buildings,
condominiums and rental com-
plexes in Dade and Broward
Counties.
Taking office this year are
Allen Goldberg of Miami
Beach, president: Milton
Jacobson, Miami Beach, first
vice president; Daniel Gross,
Hollywood, second vice presi-
dent; Bert Fragner,
Hollywood, third vice presi-
dent; Emanuel Fink. Miami
Beach, treasurer; Ida Forer,
Miami Beach, recording
secretary; Carol Jacobs, Bal
Harbour, and Lou Saleer,
Miami Beach.
Beth Sholom's
Art Show
The felt wall hangings of
Israeli artists Bracha Brym
Lavee and Menachem Lavee
will be on exhibit at the Lowe-
Levinson Art Gallery of Tem-
ple Beth Sholom of Greater
Miami through April 27.
Scenes of Jerusalem and the
Bible are featured in the ex_
hibition which is in honor of
Yom Haatzmaut.
Born in Poland, Bracha
Lavee arrived in Israel at the
age of eight and has studied at
the Bezalel Art Academy in
Jerusalem.
Menachem Lavee was born
in Romania and emigrated to
Israel in 1950.
Humor at
Beth Am
"Is Jewish Humor Good or
Bad for the Jews?" will be the
topic of discussion at the nexi
Temple Beth Am Congrega-
tional Breakfast Forum on
Sunday morning, April
9:30 at the synagopu
Leading the discussion wj
be FIU psychology Ples*L
Dr. Bernard Saper, who is he
author of many soentiftc
papers, including some on
humor as a healing tool.


Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
6:17 p.m.
YEth yoseph chaim
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avanua
Miami Beach. Fla.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig
531-2120
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Fraadman
Canton Zvl Rozan Conaarvativa
Exacutlva Dtractor .ejjg*.
Harry J. Sllverman (f)
Frl no late service
Only Minyan 7:30 a.m. 6:30 p.m.
Sal 8.30 am. Bar Mltzvah of
David Hoffman
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Dr.
S, Miami 667-667
Leonard Schoolman, Sr. Rabbi
Mark Kram, Aaaociate Rabbi
Lynn Goldstein, Aaaistant Rabbi
Fn 9 in. Yizkor, Rabbi Schoolman
on "How To Remember"
815 p m Serv..Spring Concert of the
Mnir.i Dd Community College Chorus
follows services-Leonard Bernstein's
"Chichester Psalms" & compositions
from Jewish sources
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Bath Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami Baach
534-7213-534-7214
Barry J. Konovitch, Rabbi /Sftt
Sexglo Qrobsar, Praskiant \W)
ShoUm Epa+baum, Praaidentr^
RaHgloua Commlttaa
d
TEMPLE EMANUEL
1701 Washington Avanue
Miami Baach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Assistant Rabbi Ronny Cahan
Yehuda Shilman, Cantor
Kabbalat Shabbat 6 p.m.
Sat. 9 am Rabbi Cahana will preach on
the weekly portion of the Bible
Cantor Schlfman will chant: Jr Choir &
Adult Choir will participate
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Mnetree Drive. Miami Beach
532 6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Dally 7:30a.m.(Man. Thais. 7:1S)a 7 p.m.
Frl. 7 pan. Set. t a.m.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.VV. 3rd Avenue
Jack Riemer, Rabbi
Robert Albert,
Cantor
Rev. Milton Freeman.
Ritual Director
Sat 9 a.m.
7:30 p.m. Mlnchah
Daily Services: Mon. & Thurs.7:30 a.m
' jss Wed. & Frl. 7:45 a.m.
Sunday 8 am
Every Evening 5:30 p.m.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF SUNNY ISLES
17274 Col Una Avenue
Miami Beach Fl. 33160 947 1196
HIMert Price, President
Rubin R. Dobin, Rabbi
W 8:30 p.m. Servlcee
RaDDi Dobln on Jewish Lore
Sat 8:45 a.m. Services,
RabDi Oobin on "Despair and Deter-
mination The Holocaust & Israel";
7:30 p.m. Services
Weekdays 8 am. t 7:30 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami, FL 33161
8915508 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs, Rabbi
Dr. Joseph A. Gortinkel, /'
Rabbi Emeritus
Moshe Friedler, Cantor
m
Frl. 6:15 p.m.
Sat. 8:45 am
Weekday Sen. Mon Frl 8 a.m.
Mon Tours. 5 p.m. Sun. 8:30 am
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jetfarson Ave., M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 536-4112
Rabbi Aivadla Rosenberg
Cantor Moshe Buryn
Dally Service S a.m. and 5 p.m.
Saturday 8:30 a.m.
TEMPLE IBRAEL
Of Greater Miami
aeavaW'e *teaeer Wenum Congress I Ion
1S7IN.E. 19th St. Miami, 573-5900
BBBO N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor: Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob G. Bomsleln
Downtown:
Frl. 6:30 p.m Singles Service (20-45 yr);
8 p.m. Services. Rabbi Perimeter on
"Yom Hs-Shoah: The Book of Tears and
Remembering"
Liturgy: Cantor Nelson
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 867 5457
Michael B. Eiaenstat. Rabbi
Frl. 8:15 p.m. Worship Services
TEMPLE KINO SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Shoshanah Raab, Cantor
Services Frl. 7: J0 p.m
Sat : JO a.m
Oneg Shabbat wW fsNew.
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz ^
Ari Fridfcis. Assoc Rabbi fj
Cantor Murray Yavneh SX-
Set. ( a.m. Balsa* service
Delly MenctMrn Stmdey Friday
8 am and p.m
Sat Sam and 5:15 p.m.
TEMPLE NER TAMID 6*64345
7902 Carlyle Ave.. 866-9633
Miami Beach 33141 Conservative
Rabbi Eugene Labovltz -g>s
Cantor Edward Klein Si
OaIIv Serv Mon Frl I a.m 6 30 p.m tJaJf
Set. Serv 8:45 s.m. 8 7:45 p.m.
Sun Serv 8:30 a_m. & si 6:30 p.m.:
30th Anniversary celebrstlon 8 bsnquet
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung
BEt SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500SW.12O1h Street
2382601
Rabbi David H. Auerbach
Cantor Stephen Freedman
8 p.m Holoceust Msmorlsl Shabbat,
Sal 9 30 am Baby naming of
Jaclyn Michelle Larkln
Q*nv?1 KRO"WH,*Founding Rebel
0VID CONVISER. Cento. Emerltu.
Fn 6 15 pm Service
'" commemoration ol Yom Heaiwen. "I Never
*noiner Butterfly Sat 1015 Serv t Bar
uvaii ol Niohoiaa Oeraon.__________
^"JORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
WS1N. Miami Beach Blvd. ^>.
Ma A. Lipschitz. Rabbi (Vt)
Z'eeAroni. Cantor ^'
"fvey L. Brawn, baa Duau-to/
Daily Services Mon. thru Frl
7 30 s.m. 5:30 p.m.
Fn late services 8 p.m. with Bat Mltzvah
of Rachel Koppelman
Sal Services 8:25 s.m. with Bar Mltzvah
of Brad Koppelman:
Mincha 7:15 p.m
_ Sun aerv.ce.a.m and*: JO p.m
SHAARE TEFILLAH-
TORAH CENTER OF KENDALL
7680 SW112 Straet *.W>
232-6833
Rabbi Hershel Becker
Daily Serv. 7 s.m. Frl. 10 mln. alter candle
lighting lime Shebboe a.m. Shabbos
Mincha 10 mln before candle lighting time
Sun 8:30 a.m. _____
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dada's Reform Ccnaepation
Ralph P. Kingsley. Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I. Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administrator
7 30 p m Family Worship Service conducted by
RaMM Kinoaley s Cantor snuiaee
Sat 10.30 a.m.
Rabbi Kingsley on How Secure Should
American Jews Be?"
Bar Mltzvah of Jeffrey Greene
EMPLE ZION ISBAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
271 2311 ,-g\\
Or. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi .||
Benjamin Adler, Cantor *>
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Fn 8:15 p.m. followed by Adult Forum
SpeaKet Miriam Kassenoff, child of a
Holocaust survivor
Sat 9 a m Sun 9 am Service
Mon. and ihurs7 s.m. ""Inyan Servlcea
Conducted by Rabbi Shapiro and Cantor Adler
Bar Mitzvah
DAVID HOFFMAN
David Mark Hoffman, son of
Dr. and Mrs. Howard Hoff-
man, will be called to the
Torah as a Bar Mitzvah, Satur-
day, April 16, 8:30 a.m. at
Temple Adath Yeshurun, N.
Miami Beach.
David is a student in the Hay
class at Adath Yeshurun and
attends Highland Oaks Junior
High School, where he is in the
seventh grade.
Dr. and Mrs. Hoffman will
host a kiddush following the
services. Rabbi Simcha Freed-
man and Cantor Zvi Rozen will
officiate.
Na' amat
The Kinneret Chapter will
hold a meeting com-
memorating Israel's 40th an-
niversary on Monday, April
18, noon, at Temple Ner
Tamid. Bertha Liebman, presi-
dent of the Masada Chapter,
will review "Random Wind"
by Belva Plain and singer/ac-
cordianist Michael Skorr will
lead a musical portion. Vice
president Sheva Berland will
speak on Israel's 40th anniver-
sary and Tobi Gruber will
recite the poem Jerusalem.
The Golda Meir Chapter will
hold a program about the
Holocaust on Thursday, April
21, noon, in the civic room of
the 100 Lincoln Road Building.
Entertainer/singer Tony
Simone will head the program
at the Monday, April 18,1 p.m.
meeting of the Sharon Chapter
to be held at Four Freedoms
House. President Sadye Brill
will give a brief discussion of
Israel's 40th anniversary.
Friday, April 15, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 19
Jewish Home
Caribbean Fantasy
A Caribbean and salsa mood
will all be part of a "Tropical
Fantasy" at an April 23rd din-
ner/dance sponsored by the
Latin Auxiliary, a support
group of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Ag-
ed at Douglas Gardens
(MJHHA). The black-tie gala
will be held at the Normandy
Isle home of Anita Grosfeld,
the Latin Auxiliary's new
president, and her husband,
Jaime.
Anita Stone and Cuque Matz
and co-chaired by Margot
Backer, Raquel Wax, Mirra
Papir and Alberto and Alegre
Barrocas, will feature
cocktails through dinner.
"We're counting on the event
being a philanthropic fantasy
as well as a visual one!" said
Anita Grosfeld. "Our goal is to
raise $40,000 to benefit long-
term care patients at the
Miami Jewish Home."
The evening chaired by For information, 751-8626.
Eva Feig, kft, and Sharon Arison, right, attended a recent
cocktail party sponsored by the Friends of the IDF (Israel Defense
Forces) at the William's Island Club. Marty Gallanter, national
leader of the organization, addressed the need for financial and
moral support for the front-line soldiers during the current
unrest. Feig is chairman of the agency's local development
committee.
VISITING ISRAEL?
3 Room apartment in
Tel Aviv
Tel. 3 7510177
P.O. Box 8007
Ramt Gan 52562
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
. "These shall ye not eat of them the camel the rock-
badger the hare the swine they are unclean unto you"
(Leviticus 11.4-8).
SHEMINI
SHEMINI On the eight day of their consecration, Aaron and
his sons offered sacrifices for themselves and the people at Moses'
command. Then Moses and Aaron came out of the tent of
meeting, blessing the people. The glory of God appeared; a fire
from Heaven consumed the burnt-offering on the altar. At the
sight, the people cried out and fell on their faces. Nadab and
Abihu, Aaron's sons, offered "strange fire" on the altar, a fire
issued forth and devoured them. Aaron held his peace. The priests
are commanded not to drink wine or strong drink when entering
the tent of meeting "that ye may put difference between the holy
and the common, and between the unclean and the clean"
Leviticus 10.10). The portion details the laws describing
cleanliness and uncleanliness in regard to the eating of animals,
fowls, and fish.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
upon "the Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman-
Tsamlr $15 published by Shengold. The volume Is available at 75 Maiden
Lane, New York. N.Y. 10038. Joseph Schlang is presient of the society
distributing the volume.)
The Greater Miami Israel Bonds Organization will honor four
North Miami Beach residents during a luncheon commemorating
Israel's JtOth Anniversary as a state scheduled on Sunday, April
2A, at Adath Yeshurun. Being recognized are Rose and Michael
Lechner, Shirley Luftschein and Leona Schlesinger for their
strong commitment to the State of Israel through Israel Bonds
Organization. Guest speaker will be Mideast expert Jerome
Gleekel.
Birth
Announcement
jW^V^-^Ke^X^^
I <.af^ *^^"^?"Ket^Vt.f^*d^">le^* I
Orchestras DJ's Entertainment
Party Planners
8600 SW WV Ave 6 12
Miami. Florida 33193
(305) 382 3702
,^M^H^H^X^-^><^M^M^"^-><^-"^->V^H^<<^l^><^H^-<^-i
Dade County Court Judge
Joan Lenard and her husband
Howard, city attorney of
North Miami Beach, announce
the birth of their third
daughter, Samantha Pauline
Lenard, born at Jackson
Memorial Hospital March 16.
Samantha Pauline joins
sisters Hannah A. Lenard, 4,
and Rebecca A. Lenard, 2, at
the family home in Coconut
Grove.
ORT Legislative
Dialogue
A delegation from the
Southeastern Florida Region
of Women's American ORT
attended a Legislative
Dialogue in Tallahassee. ORT
leaders representing over
25,000 Florida members met
House Representatives and
Senators.
Included in the ORT delega-
tion were Pepi Dunay, presi-
dent of the Southeast District;
Sonia Lipschultz, Community
Sub-Committee chairman;
Hilda Katz, president of the
Southeastern Florida Region;
Louise Weinthall, American
Affairs chairman, and Ceel
Segall.


Page 20 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 15, 1988
Sen. Gordon to Chair
Select Subcommittee
Senator Jack D. Gordon
(Dem.-Miami Beach) has been
named chairman of a Select
Subcommittee of the Commit-
tee on Education for the pur-
pose of examining the issues of
student retention, testing,
class size and expenditures in
the state's public school
primary education programs.
Gordon's appointment was
announced by Sen. Don C.
Childers, chairman of the
Senate Committee on Educa-
tion, who also named Senators
Carrie Meek (Dem.-Miami) and
Bob Johnson (Rep.-Sarasota)
to the new subcommittee.
First meeting of the Select
Subcommittee is scheduled
April 20 at noon at the Senate
in Tallahassee.
In the current legislative
Sen. Jack D. Gordon
session Sen. Gordon, former
President Pro Tem of
I londa s upper house, is serv-
ing on the commerce and
health and rehabilitative ser-
vices committees as well as on
the education committee.
Local Educators
At New York Confab
More than 150 members and guests of the
Men's Club of the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged at Douglas Gardens at-
tended a special premiere performance of
"Twice Around the Park" and a pre-theater
reception at the Ruth Forman Theatre. Shown
with Ms. Forman are Men's Club Officers,
seated from left, Treasurer, Ed Levine and
Immediate Past President, Dr. Jon Rauch.
Standing, from left, are Vice Presidents Tom
Abrams, Lou Nathan, Joe Gardner, Nathan
Vlock and President Ben B. Buten.
Jewish educators from
throughout North America
recently gathered at the Con-
cord Hotel for the 36th annual
Kallah of the Jewish
Educators Assembly. The
theme for this gathering was
"Tikun Chinuch Yehudi: Prac-
tical Approaches for the Reali-
ty and Challenges in Jewish
Education."
Dr. Michael Halzel, head-
master of Bet Shira Solomon
Schechter Day School, Arleen
Magier, principal of Bet Shira
Religious School and Miles
Bunder, acting day school con-
sultant from the Central Agen-
cy for Jewish Education
represented the Miami com-
munity at this annual
conference.
Janet Chusmir
Chusmir At
Temple Israel
The Downtown Business
Breakfast Forum, hosted by
Temple Israel of Greater
Miami, will feature executive
editor of The Miami Herald,
Janet Chusmir on Thursday,
April 21, 7:45-9 a.m. at the
synagogue's downtown
facility.
Chusmir's topic for discus-
sion will be "Miami: Yester-
day, Today, and Tomorrow."
For information, 573-5900.
Letters
Forum
Editor:
In response to your article
"American Jews Worry the
Jackson Race," about the
Michigan caucuses:
I'm from Michigan and the
reason the Rev. Jesse Jackson
won the caucuses in Michigan
was because our primaries
were held on Saturday, March
26, in which none of the Or-
thodox Jews could vote. Your
paper had failed to mention
the fact that it was Shabbat.
If our caucuses weren't held
on a Saturday, maybe Jesse
Jackson wouldn't have won.
Vivian S. Adler
Southfield, MI
TO GET THIS GREATTASTE,
YOU'LL HAVE TO GIVE UP CHOLESTEROL.
A small price to pay. Who wants all that
cholesterol in their diet anyway? Nobody.
That's why all Mazola products are made
from 100% pure com oil, so they're choles-
terol-free.
Whether it's Regular, Diet, or Unsalted
Margarine; Com Oil or No Stick Cooking Spray,
all Mazola products are not only good, they're
good for you, too. And they
all carry the Union of Ortho-
dox Jewish Congregations'
symbol on their packages.
Mazola.Use it and be well.
I9M Bml Food* CPC m*monl mc


jNF's Miami
Woodland
The Jewish National Fund
(JNF) Southern Region will
participate in "Israel 40," a
celebration of Israel's 40th
year of independence, on Sun-
day, April 17, from 11 a.m.-5
p.m., at the Miami Dade Com-
munity College Mitchell
Wolfson Campus.
At the JNF booth, each per-
son planting a tree will receive
a special pin-on label that
reads "I Planted a Tree." The
goal, states JNF regional
president Zev Kogan is "to
raise enough money to plant a
woodland of trees in Israel in
honor of the Miami Jewish
Community's uncompromised
support for the Jewish state on
her 40th anniversary.
JNF afforestation and land
reclamation activities in Israel
include the northern Galilee,
where JNF is preparing the
rocky terrain for new mitzpim,
hilltop outposts; the Negev
desert, where JNF is transfor-
ming wastelands for new rural
kibbutzim; tourist facilities, in-
cluding new projects from the
Galilee shoreline to Timna
Valley archaeological park in
the Negev, and municipal
forest parks in Israel's urban
areas, featuring sports
facilities, hiking trails and
scenic points.
For information on "Israel
40 Miami Forest,"
538-6464.
Bonds to Honor Zwick
Friday, April 15, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 21
Miami Beach attorney
Laurence Feingold has been
named chairman of a
testimonial dinner for Ar-
chbishop Edward A. McCarthy
of the Miami Diocese. Co-
chaired by Anthony Abraham,
the affair urill be held Saturday
night, April SO, at the Foun-
tainebleau Hilton Hotel and
will benefit an endowment fund
for Hospice patients at Mercy
Hospital
Charles J. Zwick
Charles J. Zwick, chairman
of the board and chief ex-
ecutive officer of Southeast
Bank, will be the guest of
honor on Sunday, May 1, when
State of Israel Bonds hosts
Israel's 40th Anniversary
Medal Dinner at the Hyatt
Regency Hotel.
Zwick is being recognized
for his service to the communi-
ty and to the Florida banking
industry, his humanitarian ac-
tivities and his support of
Israel. He is also a director of
the Manville Corp., Southern
Bell and MasterCard Interna-
tional, and is a trustee of The
Rand Corp., The Aerospace
Corp., the Brookings Institu-
tion, the Committee for
Economic Development,
Florida TaxWatch, Inc., and
the University of Miami. He is
the last U.S. Management and
Budget director to balance the
federal budget, under Presi-
dent Lyndon Johnson in
1968-69. His other activities
include chairman (1987-88) of
the Board of United Way of
Dade County, and membership
on the Florida Council of 100
and in the Greater Miami
Chamber of Commerce.
For information: 531-6731.
K c/=? jfl f if. [

$*'

Lillian Brown, center, founder and chairman of Brown's Resort
Hotel in New York's Catskill Mountains, is presented with the
Samuel Reinhard Humanitarian Award at a recent luncheon of
the Southeast region of the American Red Magen David for
Israel, held at Beth Torah Congregation, Miami Beach. Presen-
ting the award is Lil Kaye, luncheon chairperson, and Robert L.
Schwartz, region director.
Jewish genealogist Miriam
Weiner will speak on "ExpUrr-
"jp your Jewish Roots" on
(Thursday, April 21, at 8 p.m.,
Congregation Bet Breira.
Lo-authorofthe "Encyclopedia
f Jewish Geneology," Weiner
w a national columnist and lec-
turer and a consultant to the
American Gathering of Jewish
Holocaust Survivors.
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only, Plain or Seeded #%*.
RYE BREAD IS 79*
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only. Topped with Chocolate Icing
Brownies..............each 25*
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only, Assorted Varieties
Available at All Publix Stores and Fresh Danish
Bakeries. A Delicious Assortment. Family Pack
Cake Donuts.........^x $ 159
Half T
Layer Cake
each
$199
Available at All Publix Stores and Fresh Danish
Bakeries. A Breakfast Favorite, Maple Walnut
Coffee Cake.......... 2 $1"
Publix
where shopping is o pleasure.
Prices effective Thurs.. April 14 thru Wed..
April 20, 1988. Quantity Rights reserved. Only in
Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie,
Indian River and Okeechobee Counties.


The Point East No. 698 and
Ladies Auxiliary of the Jewish
War Veterans of the U.S.A.
recently held a joint installa-
tion. Bob Herman was sworn
in as Commander for another
term, and Betty Katzman is
the auxiliary's new president.
Also installed by County
Commander Norman Levine
were Morris Lessner, senior
vice commander; Morris
Goldstein, junior vice com-
mander; Georjje Nelken,
Page 22 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 15, 1988
Phone Home
To Israel
Free telephone calls to Israel
will be donated by AT&T dur-
ing the celebration of Israel's
40th anniversary sponsored by
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation on Sunday, April
17, at Miami Dade Community
College, Wolfson Campus. The
"Israel 40" community wide
celebration will feature
American and Israeli art,
music, dance, food and
entertainment.
A phone bank with ten units
will be set up at the special
AT&T pavilion at the college.
Each person will be limited to
one completed, two-minute
phone call to Israel during the
day. AT&T will also run a free
raffle for a telephone answer-
ing machine.
"Israel 40," which is free to
the public, is coordinated by
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation in cooperation with
Miami Dade Community Col-
lege and the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami
with the support of the
Metropolitan Dade County
Cultural Affairs Council and
Board of County
Commissioenrs.
JWV Joint Installation
AMIT Women
**<***.******
ON OPEN
24 HOURS
chaplain; Harry Katzman, of-
ficer of the day; Hal Kreiker,
judge advocate; Abe Albert,
quartermaster; Louis Hanes,
adjutant; George Nelken,
publicity; Sam Rabin, surgeon
general; Murray Morris,
Milton Reiss and Harold
Ossias, trustees; and Milton
Reiss, past commander.
Along with the president,
the new auxiliary officers are
Rita Ossias, senior vice presi-
dent; Goldie Eisen, junior vice
president.
The Chai Chapter of Amit
Women will be holding their
Annual Charity Bazaar on
Sunday, May 1, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
at the Executive National
Bank.
Gift items, toys, clothing,
household items, plants and
other miscellany will be sold.
Proceeds will be earmarked
for education and rehabilita-
tion of children in the schools,
youth aliyah villages, day care
centers and orphanages that
are maintained in Israel.
.fD!?r*,Ch*Pt will honor
its Mother of the Year, Rita
Sherr, at a luncheon on
Wedensday, April 20, at noon
at the Royal Hungarian
Restaurant in the Cadillac
Hotel. The affair will be hosted
by Chapter President Shirley
Z. Kaufman. J
The Florida Council will
hold its executive board
meeting on Monday, April 18
at 10:30 p.m. in the council of-
fice in N. Miami Beach.
Have a problem
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Community Corner
Art Gala "88, an art show and sale to benefit scholar-
ship funds at the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Com-
munity Center of North Miami Beach, will be held Sun-
day, April 24, at 6:30 p.m. at the Hyatt Coral Gables at
the Alhambra. The evening includes a reception; a
show and sale of original paintings, sculpture and
graphics; a collection of Judaica and jewelry; an art-to-
wear fashion show; music and dinner.
The Association for Jewish Special Education and
the Jerusalem Club will present their Tenth Annual
Passover Seder on Sunday, April 24, 1:30-3:30 p.m. at
the Greater Miami Federation Building. Rabbi Solomon
Schiff will officiate.
Rrandeis University National Women's Committee,
Miami Beach Chapter, will celebrate both the Annual
installation of Officers and Brandeis University s
"ioth" birthday, with a Gala Luncheon and Designer
Fashion Show by Cache on Tuesday, April 26, noon, in
the Sen Roc Hotel. For information, 861-1836 or
866-2079..
Israel Bernbaum, artist and author, will give a lec-
ture/slide presentation on "The Story of the Holocaust
an Important Lesson on Brotherhood, Tolerance and
Equality," on Friday, April 22, at 1:30 p.m., at the Miami
Beach Public Library. Bernbaum is the author of the
children's book, "My Brother's Keeper The
Holocaust Through the Eyes of an Artist."
Jewish genealogist Miriam weiner will speak on "Ex-
ploring Your Jewish Roots" on Tuesday, April 19, at
7:30 p.m. at the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Comunity
Center, Miami Beach. Sponsored by The Children of
Holocaust Survivors and the Central Agency for Jewish
Education, the program will cover the most effective
method of tracing and verifying Jewish family roots.
Jewish War Veterans Auxiliary, Harry H. Cohen No.
723 will meet Sunday, April 17, at 10 a.m., at Surfside
Community Center.
The North Dade Chapter, Women's Division of tech-
nion. Israel's Institute of Technology, will hold its last
meeting of the season on Thursday, April 21, at noon at
Temple Adath Yeshurun. A closing luncheon on Thurs-
day, April 28, at noon, at the Jockey Club, will include
entertainment by the Highland Oakes Singers.
The Women's Committee of Jewish Family Service
of Greater Miami (JFS) will host its "May Day Bruch At
The Biltmore" at 11 a.m. on Sunday, May 1 at the
Biltmore Hotel, Coral Gables. Entertainment at the
Bruch will feature a musical variety show by enter-
tainer Lynn Mitchell. For information 445-0555.
Calendar: The Council of Jewish Organizations,
sponsored by the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
South Dade branch, will hold a meeting on Thursday,
May 12 at 7:30 p.m. at the University of Miami Hillel
House.
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center
will hold its third Annual Art Gala on Sunday, April 24,
at 6:30 p.m. at the Hyatt Coral Gables at the Alhambra.
The event will benefit the center's scholarship funds
for children.
The Robyn Tubin Chapter of the City of Hope will
hold its regular meeting on Thursday, April 21 in the
Community Room 3rd floor, 163rd St. Mall. A Medical
Center film will be scheduled.
Biscayne Chapter Women's American ORT will hold
its Installation of Officers on Wednesday, April 27, at 1
p.m.
In commemoration of Yom Hashoah the Miami
Beach Children's Community Theatre will present "I
Never Saw Another Butterfly," at Temple Beth
Shalom's 9 p.m. services Friday, April 15, and for Shab-
bat School on April 16, at 9:15 a.m. The play, tells the
story of the more than 15,000 Jewish children, who
Passed through Terezin on their way to the gas
chambers of Auschwitz.
Dr. Asher Rivlin, National Director of the Department
of Education and Culture of the Wdrld Zionist
Organization, will conduct workshops for day schoo
teachers on "New ADproaches in Teaching Classical
Texts," on Sunday through Tuesday, April 24-27. He will
meet with teachers at the Beth Shira Solomon
Schechter Day School, Hillel Community Day School
Lehrman Day School and Hebrew academy of Greatei
Miami.
Friday, April 15, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 23
Notables to Host
Unforgettable Luncheon
The Alzheimer's Care Com-
mittee/NOTABLES, last
year's fledgling group, have
raised almost a half-million
dollars in one year. This
season, they will sponsor a se-
cond Unforgettable "Lun-
cheon to Remember" at the
Fontainebleau Hilton on April
20 beginning at 11 a.m. More
than 800 guests and local
media celebrities are expected
to attend this event, co-chaired
by Claudia and Alan Potamkin.
All proceeds will benefit
Alzheimer's care and treat-
ment programs administered
by the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged at
Douglas Gardens.
Highlighting the program
will be an awards ceremony
for the NOTABLE honorees:
Claudia and Alan Potamkin,
Dorothy Ash, Vivian and
Harold Beck, Clara K. and
Myron Behrman, Yetta Frid-
man, Lillian and Bob Gusman,
Roslyn and Elmer Hurwitz,
Magda and George Z. Lefton,
Bella Goldstein,
president.
Notables
Dottie and Julie Miller,
Hildene and Jerry Potashnick,
Frosene and Egmont Sonderl-
ing, Meta and Robert Weiser
and Sonja S. Zuckerman.
Presenting awards to the
honorees will be media
celebrities Jill Beach and Steve
Dawson, co-anchors, WSVN
Channel-7 Weekend News;
Dwight Lauderdale, co-
anchor, WPLG Channel-10
News; Susan Lichtman, co-
anchor, WTJV Channel-4;
Frank Robertson, co-anchor,
"Live-at-Five", WSVN
Channel-7; Fred Tasker and
Jane Wooldridge, columnists
for The Miami Herald and
Daisy Harris, lifestyle editor
for The Miami News.
Following the awards
ceremony, the audience will be
treited to a show of stand-up
comedy by "The Comedy
Woom."
For information 751-8626.
Violinist Itzak Perlman and Kivpy ben Kipod.
will join Sesame Street regulars Big Bird
and Oscar the Grouch on Shtilom Sesame, an
English adaption of Rechov Sunuum, its
Israeli version. Five half-hour programs will
be shown on WPBT/2, at 8:30 a.m. April
18-22. This will be the first time that an
overseas version is being brought back to
America to introduce this country's families
to different people, places and cultures, in this
case Israel and Israelis.
Kippi Ben Kipod
Comes to Miami
Kippi Ben Kipod, the six foot
tall, pink porcupine, who lives
on Rechov Sumsum (Sesame
Street) in Israel and stars in
the Children's Television
Workshop production of
"Shalom Sesame" is being
flown into the United States
by the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation as one of the many
events leading up to Israel In-
dependence Day on Sunday,
April 17.
On Friday, April 15 Kippi
Ben Kipod and Israeli actress
Sarai Tzuriel (who portrays
Kippi) will perform for two
groups of children at the
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center from 10
a.m.-ll a.m. and at Miami
Children's Hosptial from 2:30
p.m.-3:30 p.m.
Political Briefs
Steve Remsen has announc-
ed his candidacy for the Dade
County Commission, District
5. Remsen, who ran unsuc-
cessfully in the November,
1987 election for Miami Beach
Commission, says he is part of
a movement called "SADCO"
(Sweep All Dade Commis-
sioners Out).
Northern Trust Record Earnings
For the first quarter ended March 31, 1988, Northern
Trust of Florida Corporation announced quarterly income
of $1,815,000, an increase of 30 percent from first quarter
1987 income of $1,392,000. This represents a return on
equity of 20.50 percent and a return on assets of 1.21
percent.
At the same time, total assets reached $637,000,000, up
32 percent from a year ago; total deposits reached
$592,000,000, up 35 percent from the previous year, total
loans reached $368,000,000, up 31 percent from the
previous year.
Northern Trust operates nine banking and trust locations
in Florida at Miami, Coral Gables, Palm Beach, Boca
Raton, Sarasota, Venice, Longboat Key, Naples and Park
Shore. Its private bank approach has gained the company
significant market share in the highly competitive South
Florida marketplace since it began its private banking
operation in late 1982. In addition, Northern Trust has one
of the largest Trust and Investment Management opera-
tions in Florida.
Post Retirement
Heal Estate
Moving out of state and must sell two adja-
cent plots at Lakeside Memorial Park.
Call 382-2198 anytime and leave message on
answering macnine.


Page 24 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 15. 1988
Happenings
The Center for Business and Industry of Miami-Dade
Community College Wolfson Campus will present a
"Positive Negotiations" featuring Herb Cohen, author of
"You Can Negotiate Anything" on Thursday, April 21 8:30
a.m.-l p.m.
The Tropical Cancer League will hold a luncheon meeting
on Friday, April 15 at 11:45 a.m. at the Ocean Pavillion.
The League is a chapter of AMC Cancer Research center in
Denver.
Arnold Geier, a Kendall insurance executive, will be
guest expert on "Talk About Money" on Sunday, April 17,
on WFLX. TV29, from 10 to 11 a.m.
The League of Women Voters of Dade County will hold a
luncheon meeting on Thursday, April 21, noon, at the Doral
Hotel. Chuck Rosen, of the Sunny Isles Resort Association,
and Alexander Stone, American Littoral Society, will
speak on "Economic Benefits vs. Environmental Costs of
Beach Renourishment."
The Sunflower Society willl hold its Installation Dinner
Dance Sunday, April 30, at 7:30 p.m., at the Doral Beach
Hotel.
Affiliated with the Miami Children's Hospital, the
Sunflower Society supports the Respite Care Center as
well as vocational programs for the handicapped. For infor-
mation, 864-2251 or 932-0421.
The Center for the Fine Arts will present its fourth
"Close Encounters With Music" concert of the season,
under the direction of cellist Yehuda Hanani, on Saturday,
April 30, at 8 p.m., sponsored by Pat and Dr. Manny
Papper.
Metro Dade County Mayor Stephen Clark will speak on
Dade's program for progress in 1988 at a meeting of the
Presidents Club of South Florida on Tuesday, April 19, at 7
p.m. at the Surfside Community Center. The meeting is
open to officers, directors and members of the social and
community clubs of Dade's high rise condominium
buildings and rental apartments.
The Philharmonic Orchestra of Florida, conducted by
Yoel Levi, will play in concert at the Gusman Center for the
Performing arts on Saturday, April 16, at 8:15 p.m. The
Yuval Trio, a native Israeli ensemble, is also on the
program.
the third annual All-Star Celebrity Roast and Golf
Tourney which benefits the Miami Project/Marc Buoniconti
Fund to cure paralysis, will be held Saturday and Sunday,
May 7-8. The "roast," at the Radisson Hotel, will begin
with cocktails at 6:30 p.m., followed by dinner and an op-
portunity to meet sports celebrities and other mystery
guests.
The First Annual Beth Torah Golf Tournament and
Awards Dinner Dance will be held on Sunday, May 1, at
Turnberry Isle. The tournament is being played as an
18-hole scramble. All proceeds benefit the Beth Torah
Scholarship Fund, which underwrites the cost of students,
five through 17 years old, in programs such as high school
in Israel.


,s*
11
^2
<*&
sS
i*


. c t i '. ft
Mount Nabo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel 261 7612
Rabbi Pinchas Weberman, president of the Orthodox Council of
Rabbis of South Florida, inters "Shamos" unusable worn-out
religious articles, holy scrolls and books at Lakeside Memorial
Park in a pre-Passover "Geniza" ceremony. Rabbi Weberman
also re-dedicated a granite monument designating the resting
place of religious objects. More than 1,000 tattered books, taleism,
tfillin, yarmulkes and other ritual objects were brought to
Lakeside by synagogues, memorial chapels, private individuals
and schools.
Business Notes
M. Stephen Jackman, presi-
dent of Seitlin & Company, In-
surance, announces that the
company has joined the Coali-
tion for Vehicle Inspection,
Inc.
The Coalition, a Tallahassee-
based organization, supports
the establishment of motor
vehicle safety and emission in-
spection as a prerequisite for
vehicle registration in Florida.
Seitlin spokesman Ed
Gillman said the Coalition also
supports "the separation of
the inspection function and
any repairs which might be re-
quired as a result of the inspec-
tion, to provide the greatest
degree of consumer
protection."
Michael D. Stern of Miami
has been appointed vice presi-
dent of sales and marketing
for coommercial and invest-
ment property at Kendar Real-
ty, Inc. He willl be marketing
an $8.5 million ocean front site
across from the Bal Harbour
Shopping Center. Previously,
a native Floridian, Stern was
with Merrill Lynch and had
been president of his own real
estate brokerage firm in Coral
Gables.
Emanu-El
Flea Market
A flea market will hfeMu*
El and Lehrman Day Schnni
PTA on Wednesday, April 5?
at the Miami Beach
congregation.
The luncheon will betrin at
noon with the officers and
board of directors to be install-
ed by Dr. Irving Lehrman, rab-
taof Temple Emanu-El since
The flea market will con-
tinue after lunch. Information-
535-3132.
Traditional Jewish
funerals can
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Find out how the grascside service
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and still preserve the best of Jewish
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Friday, April IS, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 25
Sinai Academy
erf Tfemple Sinai
erf North Dade
Share the Experience!
Temple Sinai of North Dade offers the most
exciting educational alternative at North
Dade's only Liberal Jewish Day School.
FULLY ACCREDITED BY THE
Florida Council of Independent Schools
YOUR CHILDREN DESERVE THE BEST!
Register now for Fall '88 Kindergarten
through Sixth Grade.
Call RABBI COOK at 932-9010 for details
Sinti Actdtm, dot* not discriminate on the basis ol fc. color, nitionil or tlnnie origin
(UNERAl DIRECTOR
Past President je*isn Funeral
Directors 0' America
?0SEvENTv FiRSI STREET

A seminar series on Estate Planning was con-
ducted by the Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies of the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion. Members of the Foundation's Profes-
sional Advisory Committee, from left, at-
Deaths-----
RAP0P0RT. David, 83. of Miami Beach, on
April 2 Services in Sharon. Mass
(Riverside).
SMITH. Murray, of Miami Beach, on April
4. Funeral services held. Interment at
Star of David Memorial Park.
BLl'MENTHAL, Murray, on April 4. Inter-
ment in New York.
GROSS, Ruth H., 70, of Miami, on April 5.
Memorial services held.
K1ERSON. Mark, of North Miami Beach, on
April 4. Funeral services at The Riverside.
EDWARDS, Natalie, of Golden Beach, on
April 6. Services at the Riverside.
R1ESE. Murray, 76, of Miami Beach, on
April 7. Services at Levitt-Weinstein. In-
terment at Lakeside Memorial Park.
ZAHLER. Sanford F MD, 54. of Miami, on
Apr,; 7. Funeral services at Temple Israel
of Greater Miami. Interment at Lakeside
Memorial Park.
AMDL'R, Eli, on April 7. Funeral services in
Montreal (Blasberg).
BARL'SCH. Edward, 73, of Miami, on April
7 Services were held, followed by inter-
ment at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
BINNICK, Evelyn, of North Miami Beach,
on April 6. Services at The Riverside.
COHEN Ann, 95. of Miami, on April 6.
Graveside services and interment at Star
I M.nional Park.
EHRI.K HMAN, Irma. of Miami Beach.
rvices at Lakeside Memorial
Park (The Riverside).
LEFT Sally C, 80, of North Miami Bech,
on April 7. Services at The Riverside.
followed by entombment at Lakeside
Memorial Park.
MEYER. Ernst, 80, of North Miami, on
April 7 Services at Lakeside Memorial
Park (Eternal Light)
SCHWARTZ. Gussie, 90, of Ft. Lauderdale.
on Apnl 6. Funeral services held, followed
by interment at Star of David Memorial
Park.
SOLOMON. Catherine Anne, of North
Miami Beach. Funeral services at
Menorah Chapels.
COOPERMAN. Jack David. Services held in
Rockville Centre.
SEGALL, Ephraim Sidney, of Miami
Beach, on April 8. Services and interment
in Baltimore, MD.
SACHS. Arthur, on April 10. Services at
The Riverside. Interment at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
SILVER, Joseph, of Miami Beach. Services
at Rubin-Zilbert.
WEISS, Joan, of Miami Beach. Services at
Rubin-Zilbert.
GEORGE, Sophia. 87. of Miami, on April
10. Graveside services and interment at
Lakeside Memorial Park.
LEVER, Winifred (Winnie). Services
private.
PRIED. Anna, of Miami Beach. Services at
""hinZilbert.
GREENBERG. Esther. 84, of Homestead,
mi April 12. Funeral services were held
Wlowed by interment at Mount Nebo
<<*metery.
LEV! Anna, 103, of Miami Beach, on April
."Services at The Riverside. Interment
'n New York.
WE V Joseph. 97, of South Miami, on April
i Graveside services at Star of David
cemetery (Levitt-WeuuUin).
torneys Michael A. Dribin, Jeffrey A. Kern,
Marta Goldberg, Barry A. Nelson, Judge
Theodore R. Nelson, and A. Jeffrey Barash,
covered the topics of trusts, probate, in-
competency and the protection of assets.
Through years ot dedicated service,
we have become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
zS/oU^m ^funeral wna/M+
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH "THE ASSURED PLAN"
LARRIES BLASBERG IRA M. BLASBERG MICHAEL C BLASBERG
Funeral Direclor
865-2353
Funeral Oi'eclo-
MiAMi BfcACM FlORiDA
When a loss occurs
away from home.
SCHWARTZ MOTHERS
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service
Dade County
532-2IKM)
Broward County
Represented by Riverside Memorial Chapel, Inc.
New York: (718) 268 7600 Queens Blvd. & Ttith Rd Forest Hills. N V
Which of these men
would you choose to plan
your family's funeral service?
There is no
Mr. Riverside
There is no
Mr. Menorah
i
Mt Levitt
Mr. Weinstein
There are very few things in this world more personal,
more sensitive than taking care of the details of a traditional
Jewish funeral.
Special attention is required to respect the honoring and
burial of the deceased. And the wishes and consolation of
family and friends require a deep sensitivity best offered by
those who are willing to put their name on the line every day.
This is the type of attention we give at Levitt-Weinstein
Memorial Chapels... where the care and traditions are the
everyday responsibility of Mr. Levitt and Mr. Weinstein.
The Levitt family has been taking care of traditional
Jewish funerals since 1968; the Weinstein family, since 1900.
Through all these years, there always has been a Mr. Levitt
and a Mr. Weinstein working daily to insure that personal,
caring services are beneficially provided.
However, at the other two funeral chapels, the situation is
different. There is no Mr. Riverside; there is no Mr. Menorah.
So if you prefer a traditional Jewish funeral with a personal,
family touchbacked by the men whose names are on the
door.. .call Levitt-Weinstein for pre-need orat-need services.
After all, you can really count on Mr. Levitt and Mr.
Weinstein to be there.
GELB .
MONUMENTS INC.
P*n E,e,y Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888
... because the grief is enough to handle.
1-800-343-5400
Levitt Weinstein
MEMORIAL CHAPELS
. North Miami Miami Miami Beach Hollywood North Fort Lauderdale Boca/Deerfield West Palm Beach


Page 26 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 15, 1988
THE GARDENS AT MOUNT NEBO
Miami's most beautiful exclusively Jewish Cemetery

A, \




Nowhere is the Jewish concept of life eternal expressed with more
dignity love and beauty than in Mount Nebo. Lush landscaping,
combined with more than 50 years of devoted care creates
at Mount Nebo a lasting tribute to loved ones in the highest
tradition of Judaism.This tradition is continued in the Gardens
Mount Nebos latest expansion
VISIT OR CALL US AT: 261-7612
MOUNT NEBO
Mount Nebo Cemetery 5505 N.W. 3rd Street. Miami, FL 33126


Community Notes
Bob Levy, president of Robert M. Levy and
Associates, Public Relations, has been appointed to
the Dade County Fire Prevention and Safety Appeals
Board by unanimous vote of the Metro-Dade County
Commission following a nomination by Comm. Harvey
Ruvin.
Residents of the Royal Bahamian condominium in
association with the Greater Miami Israel Bonds will
celebrate Israel's 40th Anniversary with a brunch on
Sunday, April 17, at 10 a.m. in the Royal Bahamian club
house, N. Miami Beach. Jerome Gleekel, a Mid-East
political scientist, who is associated with the Israel
Consulate in Miami, will speak.
Rabbi Rubin R. Dobin, of Young Israel of Sunny Isles
will join the Washington White House Mission being
held April 19-20. The 200-member Mission, sponsored
by the Orthodox Jewish Political Coalition, will attend
a White House briefing and hold seminars with
senators and congressmen in order to lobby for issues
of concern.
Gerald Schwartz has been appointed publicity chair-
man of the Presidents Club of South Florida, an
organization of officers of high rise condominium
buildings and rental apartments. Schwartz, who is
president of a Miami Beach public relations agency, is
past president of the Miami Beach Lodge of B'nai
B'rith, former president of the Civic League of Miami
Beach and past president of Tiger Bay Political Club.
Lillian Rubin and Jack Katz, two long time volunteers
for the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, accepted an
honorary award on behalf of the volunteer department
from Elton J. Kerness, Federation associate executive
vice president. The plaque was presented at a special
luncheon held by the Federation in honor of its corps of
volunteers.
Cancer Link, a local organization dedicated to rais-
ing research funds, low-cost screening, education and
treatment, recently sponsored an International Night to
benefit breast cancer research. Cancer Link local presi-
dent Marlene Berg and her husband David, a Miami at-
torney, greeted those attending the affair at the
Sheraton Brickell Point.
Student artists from the Beth Am Day Schol, Kendall
are exhibiting their work in the lobby of the Profes-
sional Savings Bank's South Dixie office, with the help
and cooperation of their art teacher Suzzi Glaser and
Peggy Rizzotto, the bank's professional vice president
and assistant branch manager respectively.
Richard J. Feinstein, MD, has been elected president
of the Florida Conference on Dermatology and Der-
matologic Surgery. Dr. Feinstein, a clinical professor of
dermatology at the University of Miami School of
Medicine, is on the staff of Mercy Hospital.
Former Florida Supreme Court Chief Justice Arthur
J- England, Jr. was honored by the Court at a
ceremonial session organized by Chesterfield Smith,
president of the Florida Supreme Court Historical
Society. More than 400 people attended the
ceremonies at which tributes to England were offered
by Chief Justice Parker Lee McDonald; attorney Hugh
F. Culverhouse; Martin Fine; former governor of Florida
Reuben Askew; Randall C. Berg, Jr.; and Dean Talbot
D'Alemberte, of the Florida State University College of
Law.
This year, Batsheva Schochet's third grade class at
the Hebrew Academy raised more than $1,100 for the
giving of 'Maot Chittin' to needy, Miami-area Jewish
families for Passover. The 20 students sold raffle
tickets to collect the funds to provide 110 packages of
Passover food and money and then packed the boxes
themselves.
Friday, April 15, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 27
FORECLOSURE SALES-PUBLIC NOTICES
WANTED
CANTOR
FOR CONSERVATIVE TEMPLE
TELEPHONE 891-5508
*****+M+***1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
UN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Cue No. 88-15530 (27)
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS,
Plaintiff
vs.
WILKERSON JOSEPH, et ux.,
etal.,
Defendants.
TO: EDDIE GARCIA,
GARY E. GARCIA
and
MARIA E. CAMACHO
Residence unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against EDDIE
GARCIA, GARY E. GARCIA
and MARIA E. CAMACHO,
and all parties having or claim-
ing to have any right, title or
interest in the property herein
described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
The West "A of Lot 18, All of
Lot 19, and the East 15 feet
of Lot 20, in Block 31, of
Seaboard Park, according to
the Plat thereof, recorded in
Plat Book 14. at Page 31, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida, a/k/a 310
N.E. 172nd Street, North
Miami, FL
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
May 20, 1988, and file the original
with the clerk of this court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter,
otherwise, a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 12th day of April,
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By T. Casamayor
As Deputy Clerk
18443 April 15,22, 29;
May 6,1988
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 46
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 88-796
SEC. 15
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION,
United State* corporation.
Plaintiffs)
vs.
MARION COONEY, et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above. I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami, Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M., on the 2ND
day of MAY, 1988, the following
described property:
Lot 31, Block 5, FIRST ADDI-
TION TO CAROL CITY, accor-
ding to the Plat thereof, aa
recorded in Plat Book 60. Page
19, of the Public Record, of Dade
County. Florida.
DATED the 13TH day of APRIL,
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Sea!)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Roaenthal Yarchia
Suite 2300, (entrust Financial
Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami. Florida 33131-2198
Published 4/15-22
d Street
Miami, Florida 33131-2198
Publi.hed 4/15-22
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-2141
Division 02
Florida Bar No. 027363
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SALAMON WEISZ,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of SALAMON WEISZ, deceased,
File Number 88-2141, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on Aprill5, 1988.
Personal Representative:
ISAAC WEIS
4747 Collins Avenue No. 302
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HYMAN P. GALBUT, ESQ.
Galbut, Galbut and Menin
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
18445 April 15, 22,1988
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. W AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-53148
SEC. 02
CENTRUST SAVINGS BANK, a
state chartered saving* bank.
Plaintiffs)
vs.
JACK RIZZI and RIZZI. hi.
wife, if married, et al.,
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M.. on
the 2ND day of MAY, 1988, the
following described property:
Unit No. 417, in PLAZA OF THE
AMERICAS PART IV, a Con-
dominium, according to the Con-
dominium thereof, recorded in
Official Records Book 10609,
Page 363, of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida, together
with all appurtenances thereto,
including an undivided interest in
the common elements of said Con-
dominium.
DATED the 13TH day of
APRIL, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal A Yarchin
Suite 2300, One Centrust Financial
Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami. Florida 33131-2198
Published 4/15-22
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-46621
SEC. 03
FIRST NATIONWIDE BANK.
formerly known as Fir*t Na-
tionwide Savings, a Federal Sav-
ing* and Loan A**oeiatioa,
Plaintiffla)
NOEL HERRERA and MIRIAM
HERRERA. hi* wife, et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County -
Courthouse in Miami, Dade Coun-
ty, Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M.,
on the 2ND day of MAY, 1988, the
following described property:
Lots 17, 18 and 19, in Block 50, of
SILVER BLUFF ESTATES
SECTION "C", according to the
Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book
10, at Page 65, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida.
DATED the 13TH day of
A P R I L 1 9 8 8 .
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Joseph M. Paniello, Esquire
One Tampa City Center
Suite 2720, 201 North Franklin
Street
Tampa, Florida 33602
Published 4/15-22
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-51219
SEC. 11
ALLIANCE MORTGAGE COM-
PANY, a Florida corporation.
Plaintiffs)
vs.
DENNIS J. SMITH, et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 2ND day of MAY.S of the
following described property:
Lot 4, in Block 14. of LEISURE
CITY SECTION ONE, according
to the Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 50, at Page 88, of the
Public Records of Dade County,
Florida.
DATED the 13TH day of
APRIL, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin
Suite 2300, One Centrust Financial
Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami, Florida 33131-2198
Published 4/15-22
Legal Notes
Nancy Schleifer, formerly
with Sparber, Shevin, Shapo
and Heilbronner, has started
her own law practice, limited
to appelate law, litigation sup-
port and administrative law.
Offices are at 801 Brickell
Avenue.
John E. Tober, a Kendall
area resident, has opened law
offices at 9200 South Dadeland
Boulevard. Suite 609. and
4001 N.W. 97th Avenue, Suite
202, in Miami. A 1986 Univer-
sity of Miami School of Law
graduate, Tober was the
associate general counsel for
Wolper Ross & Company and a
securities associate for
Sparber, Shevin, Shapo and
Heilbonner, before branching
out on a his own. He also has a
degree in accounting and prac-
tices general corporation law,
securities law, real estate and
commercial litigation.


Page 28 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 15, 1988
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-2025
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
YETTA ALEXANDER
a/k/a ETTA ALEXANDER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of YETTA
ALEXANDER a/k/a ETTA
ALEXANDER, deceased. File
Number 88-2025, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is Dade County
Courthouse, 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate is ROBERT J. ALEX-
ANDER, whose address is 136-53
- 71st St. Road. Flushing, N.Y.
11367. The name and address of
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
April 15, 1988.
ROBERT J. ALEXANDER
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
YETTA ALEXANDER
a/k/a ETTA ALEXANDER
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
HERBERT S. SHAPIRO
1666-79th St. Cswy., Ste. 608
Miami Beach. Florida 33141
Telephone: (305) 864-2369
18440 April 15. 22, 1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Case No. 88-12416-24
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
NORMA R. TUCKER,
Petitioner/Wife,
and
JAMES TUCKER,
Respondent/H usband.
TO: JAMES TUCKER
Respondent
Residence: Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and there is a demand
in the Petition that the Court
award that certain property owned
by you and your wife, NORMA R.
TUCKER as tenants by the entire-
ty, located at 2960 N.W. 68th
Street, Miami, Dade County,
Florida, and more particularly
described as:
Lot 4. Block 5. MARILINDA, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof, aa
recorded in Plat Book GO, Page 32
of the Public Records of Dade
County, Fla.; to your wife, NOR-
MA R. TUCKER, and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to the Petition
on the Petitioner's Attorney.
EUGENE LEMLICH. whose ad-
dress is 2720 W. Flagler Street.
Miami. FL. on or before April 29,
1988. and file the original with the
clerk of this Court either before
service on Petitioner's attorney or
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 88-15532 12
NOTICE OF ACTION
mmediately thereafter; otherwise MELLON BANK (EAST) N.A.
a default will be entered against f/k/a GIRARD BANK
you for the relief demanded in the puuntiff
petition. y.
DATED this 23 day of March. GUILLERMO SAN MARTIN, et
1988. at Miami. Florida.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: BARBARA HARPER
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EUGENE LEMLICH. ESQ.
2720 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33135
Phone:(305)642-5231
Attorney for Petitioner
18397 March 25;
April 1,8.15.1988. propertv:
ux., et al.,
Defendants.
TO: GUILLERMO
SAN MARTIN
and
MARIA C.
SAN MARTIN,
his wife
3082 Strawberry Hill
Pebble Beach, CA 93953
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 88-147*8 (30)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
NO. 003473
IN RE: The Marriage of
VERNON GRAHAM
and
DORIS GRAHAM
TO: DORIS GRAHAM
5 Windy Way
Harbour View
Kingston, 17, Jamaica
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
CONDOMINIUM UNIT NO.
1321, in SAMARI LAKE
EAST, a Condominium
located in the City of Hialeah
Gardens, Dade County,
Florida, pursuant to the
Declaration of Condominium,
recorded in Official Records
Book 9831 Page 1411 of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida; a/k/a 10090 N. W.
80th Court. Unit 1321,
Hialeah Gardens, FL.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
May 20, 1988, and file the original
with the clerk of this court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter,
against you and you are required otherwjae \ QefauJt ^ ^ entered
to serve a copy of your written ^^ fm fc ^
2Ek y" p 3 the complaint.
BARKAN attorney for Petitioner^ wmiZSS my hand and the seal
whose address is 2020 N.E 168rd of ^ ^ ,g ^ ^ of AJJ
Street. North Miami Beach, ,m v '
1988.
Florida 33162, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before May 13, 1988;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand- x,. -
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published--------
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 7 day of April, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Barbara Harper
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18439
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By T. Casamayor
As Deputy Clerk
April 15, 22, 29;
____________May 6,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Caae No. 88-03935 CA 10
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR
TGAGE ASSOCIATION, an
April 15, 22,29; association organized and existing
May 6,1988 under the laws of the United
NOTICE UNDER Sute8 f Amer>ca,
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW Plaintiff,
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN rAFAFI FeTRHr^
that the undersigned, desiring to "r^^ ESTRUGO. et ""
engage in business under the fie
titious name Style in Tile at 18409
W. Dixie Hwy, N.M.B. Fl. 33160
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Lily Attas
PaulOz
18442 April 15. 22. 29;
______________May 6,1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name CONTINENTAL
TRAVEL at 3310 Ponce de Leon
Blvd.. Coral Gables, Florida in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Continental Travel of Coral
Gables. Inc.
CHERN AND SEVTN
Attorneys for Continental Travel
of Coral Gables. Inc.
18436 April 15. 22,29;
May 6. 1988
Defendants.
TO: LUISA ESTRUGO
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against LUISA
ESTRUGO, and all parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the
property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Condominium Unit No. 102,
in Building 13, of SWEET-
WATER VILLAS WEST
NO. TWO, a Condominium,
according to the Declaration
of Condominium thereof,
dated the November 1, 1982,
recorded March 2, 1983 in Of-
ficial Records Book 11713. at
Page 2486 of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida, and amended by in-
strument dated May 27, 1983
in Official Records Book
11802. at Page 2486 of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida, a/k/a 143 S.W.
113th Avenue, No. 102,
Sweetwater, Florida 33174.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to hw been rued'agaln'st^ou" and you
engage m business under the fie are required to serve a copy of
ADVFRT^Mr ?nNpENTAi: y0Ur Writt ADVERTISING at 3310 Ponce de 0n Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Leon Blvd., Goral Gables, Florida Plaintiff. whoae address is Suite
intends to register said name with 214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
"^SS&S&i m May 13. 1988, and file the original
rurtfv \AJL^?J,ACHS derk f courted
CHERN AND SEVTN Mort aeryioe on py^, at.
*2"W for SuMn F*r Sachs tomey or immediately thereafter,
18435 April 15, 22, 29; otherwise, a default will be entered
___________ ***>"6-1988 against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 7th day of April,
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
18438 April 15,22. 29;
May 6.1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-1384
Division (04)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ESTHER DRESCHER,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ESTHER DRESCHER, deceas-
ed, File Number 88-1384, is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida. Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street, Third Floor,
Miami, Florida 33130. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice was
begun on April 15, 1988.
Personal Representative:
SUSAN DRESCHER
8528 E. Sutton Drive
Scottadale, Arizona 85260
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Sylvan Holtzman
Holtxman, Krinzman and Equels
1500 San Remo Avenue, Suite 200
Coral Gables, Florida 33146
Telephone: (305) 662-7700
18441 April 15. 212,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-1964
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HELEN G. LUX,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of HELEN G. LUX, deceased. File
Number 881964, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Probate Division, Room
307, Miami. Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on April 15, 1988
Personal Representative:
OLGA MACDONALD
3165 Prairie Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
WAYNE A. CYPEN
CYPEN & CYPEN
P.O. Box 402099
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
Telephone: (305) 532-3200
W THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No.84-30085 (CA 29)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
OF MIAMI,
a United States Corporation,
Plaintiff,
v.
JOSE AMENEIRO. et al.,
Defendants.
To: HOME MORTGAGE and
NANJU ENTERPRISES,
and the unknown assignees,
successors in interest,
trustees, heirs, devisees,
grantees, lienors, creditors,
and all other claimants by,
through, under or against
HOME MORTGAGE and
NANJU ENTERPRISES,
organizations which operated
or did business under a name
or title which indicates that
the same may be corporations
or other legal entities.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Unit No. 202, of PLAZA OF
THE AMERICAS, PART II,
a Condominium, according to
the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof, as record-
ed in Official Records Book
10281, at page 2101, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida, as amended;
together with all im-
provements, appliances and
fixtures located thereon
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis, Allison &
Cohen, Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address is HI N.E. 1st
Street. Miami, Florida 33132, on
or before May 13, 1988, and file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court this 6th day of April,
1988
RICHARD P. BRrNKER
Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
18432 April 15. 22. 29;
May 6,1968
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Caae No.M-MOM (CA 2
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLE R FEDERAL
SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
OF MIAMI,
a United States Corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOSE AMENEIRO, et al..
Defendants.
To: JOSE AMENEIRO; NANCY
WALCH; JUAN
RODRIGUEZ; ROBERTO
RODRIGUEZ; ZOILA
CASTRO. CARLOS SANG;
FRANK VEGA; AMELIA
GATTORNO; ROSA
RODRIGUEZ; CARMEN
GARCIA; JOSE HERIBER-
TO ACOSTA, residences
unknown, if they are living
and, if they are dead, all of the
unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees,
lienholders, creditors,
trustees or otherwise, claim-
ing by, through, under or
against the said JOSE
AMENEIRO; NANCY
WALCH; JUAN
RODRIGUEZ; ROBERTO
RODRIGUEZ; ZOILA
CASTRO. CARLOS SANG;
FRANK VEGA; AMELIA
GATTORNO; ROSA
RODRIGUEZ; CARMEN
GARCIA, JOSE HERIBER
TO ACOSTA. and all other
parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or in-
terest in and to the property
under foreclosure herein.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Unit No. 202, of PLAZA OF
THE AMERICAS. PART II.
a Condominium, according to
the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof, as record-
ed in Official Records Book
10281, at Page 2101, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida, as amended:
together with all im-
provements, appliances and
fixtures located thereon
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis, Allison &
Cohen, Plaintiffs attorneys,
whoae address is HI N.E. 1st
Street, Miami, Florida 33132, on
or before May 13. 1988, and file
the original with the Clerk of thu
Court either before service J
Plaintiffs attorneys or ,m^
atfEfiEAS!*?'*
will be entered against you for ,J
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this court this 6 day of April 19a.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguw
Deputy Clerk
18433 April 15,22,29;
___________________May 6.1988
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JCDICIAI
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-47956
SEC. 20
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION. a
United States corporation
J'laintiff(s)
vs.
ANDRES CASTILLO, at al
Defendant^)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, Die
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock AM on
the 2ND day of MAY. 1988, tat
following described property:
Lot 10, and the West 21.83 feet
of Lot 9. in Block 4 of
GRATIGNY PLATEAU, accor-
ding to the Plat thereof, as record-
ed in Plat Book 25, at Page 27, in
the Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida. Also known as the
North W of Tract 4, less the East
538.17 feet of Revised Plat of
GRATIGNY PLATEAU, accor-
ding to the Plat thereof, recorded
in Plat Book 41, at Page 15, of the
Public Records of Dade County,
Florida.
DATED the 13TH day of
APRIL, 1*88.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin
Suite 2300, Centrust Financial
Center
100 S.E. Second Street
Miami, Florida 33131-2198
Published 4/15-22
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-53161
SEC 12
CENTRUST SAVINGS BANK, a
state chartered savings bank.
Plaintiffs)
vs.
JACK RIZZI AND KIZZI. hi
wife, if arried. et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above. I
will sell to the highest and bMt
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M.. on
the 2ND day of MAY. 1988. the
following described property:
Unit No. 717 in PLAZA OF THE
AMERICAS PART IV. a ton
dominium, according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, recorded in Official
Records Book 10509. Page 363. ot
the Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida, together with all ap-
purtenances thereto, including "
undivided interest in the common
elements of said Condominium.
DATED the 13TH d. of
APRIL. If88.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal A Yarchin,
Suite 2300, Centrust
Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami. Florida 33131-2198
Published 4/15-22
Financial


FORECLOSURE SALES-PUBLIC NOTICES
Friday, April 15, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 29
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
ijat the undersigned, desiring to
Mflge m business under the fie-
3m names of (1) International
Computer Graphics and (2) ICG at
523 N.E. 26th Street, Fort
Uuderdale, FL intends to register
said names with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida. m
SCG, INC.
By Nelson C. Keshen, Secretary
NELSON C. KESHEN, ESQ.
Attorney for SCG, INC.
18404 April 1,8,15,22, 198*
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-07585
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
MARGINE A.
MOLINA GUZMAN,
Petitioner/Wife
and
HORACE C. GUZMAN,
Respondent/Husband
TO: HORACE C. GUZMAN
Residence Unknown:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on RAUL G.
DELGADO. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 1835 West
Flagler Street, Suite 200, and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
April 22,1988; otherwise a default
tII be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 21 day of March, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
' Dade County, Florida
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
RAIL G. DELGADO, ESQUIRE
1835 West Flagler Street,
Suite 200
Miami. Florida 33135
Telephone: (305) 643-5636
Attorney for Petitioner
March 25;
W389 April 1,8,15,1988.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-12188
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
No. 003473
MRS:
ANDY ETIENNE
and
CYNTHIA SMITH
TO: CYNTHIA SMITH
Residence Unknown:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
CED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
gainst you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
Menses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner,
hose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street. North Miami Beach,
Honda 88162, and file the original
ith the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 29, 1988;
otherwise a default will be entered
8amst you fr the relief demand-
M in the complaint or petition.
his notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
nive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
M said court at Miami, Florida on
*" 22 day of March. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: CLARINDA BROWN
(P. As Deputy Clerk
Ljfcuit Court Seal)
JOY BARKAN
N.E. 163rd Street
North Miami Beach
rionda 33162
Attorney for Petitioner
March 25;
April 1, 8,16,1988.
18395
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 88-04688 CA23
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS.
Plaintiff
vs.
DAVID E. JOHNSON,
etal.,
Defendants.
TO: DAVID E. JOHNSON
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against DAVID rJ.
JOHNSON, and all parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the
property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 27 Block 19,
PALMLAND HOMES SEC-
TION, 6 according to the Plat
thereof, recorded in Plat
Book 90, Page 67, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
April 22, 1988, and file the original
with the clerk of this court either
before service on Plaintiff's at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 17th day of
March, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
18381 March 25;
April 1,8,15.1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Caae No. 88-10086 FC 06
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
IN RE: The Marriage of
CECIL COOPER, JR.,
Petitioner
and
SHEREE A. COOPER,
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Sheree A. Cooper, c/o Ware,
346 Grand St, Newburgh, NY
12550
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
was filed against you; you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses upon: I.J. GRAFF, at-
torney for Petitioner, 633 N.E. 167
St. N.M.B. Fl. 33162 on or before
April 22, 1988 and file the original
with the clerk of this court other-
wise a default will be entered
against you.
Filed 3-16-88.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
I.J. GRAFF
633 N.E. 167 St.
N.M.B., Florida 33162
Attorney for Petitioner
March 25;
18378 April 1.8.15. 1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Caae No. 88-5350-FC-10
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
NELLY MALDONADO.
Petitioner
and
JAIME O. MALDONADO.
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Jaime O. Maldonado, 34-06
34 St. L.I.. NY 11106
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
was filed against you; you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses upon: I.J. Graff, at-
torney for Petitioner, 633 N.E. 167
St. N.M.B. Fl. 33162, on or before
April 29, 1988 and file the original
with the clerk of this court other-
wise a default will be entered
against you.
Dated: 23 March. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18402 April 1,8,15,22,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, rN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Caw No. 88-00793 (CA 20)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States
Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GEORGE LEYKIN, et al..
Defendants.
TO: SOPHIA SAPOZHNIKOVA,
residence unknown, if alive,
and if dead, to all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against said SOPHIA
SAPOZHNIKOVA, and all
other parties having or claim-
ing to have any right, title, or
interest in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Unit 90 of TROPICAL
PARK VILLAS CON-
DOMINIUM, according to
the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof, as record-
ed in Official Records Book
10826, Page 183, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida, as amended:
together with all im-
provements, appliances and
fixtures located thereon
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis, Allison &
Cohen, Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address is 111 N.E. 1st
Street, Miami, Florida 33132. on
or before April 22, 1988, and file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 18th day of
March. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
18391 March 25;
April 1.8.15. 1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-11885
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
No. 003473
IN RE:
JACQUELINE DONDERO
and
KENNETH DONDERO
TO:
KENNETH DONDERO
Residence Unknown:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street, North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 22, 1988;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 18 day of March, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: DANA CAMPBELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOY BARKAN
2020 N.E. 163rd Street
North Miami Beach
Florida 33162
Attorney for Petitioner
March 25;
18382 April 1,8,15,1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Caae No. 87-472*6 CA 24
NOTICE OF ACTION
STOCKTON, WHATLEY,
DAVTN & COMPANY, a Florida
corporation,
Plaintiff,
v.
NORMA PETERSON and
PETERSON, her husband, if mar-
ried; GERALD DAVID SMITH,
CHARLES PETNICK, ROBERT
J. JAFFE, BERNICE JAFFE,
and the unknown spouses, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, or
other parties claiming by, through,
under or against them; SANDRA
M. KAY, Individually and as
Trustee, L.G. GATTER, as
Trustee for PUBLIC FINANCE
SERVICE OF FLORIDA. INC.. a
dissolved Florida corporation, suc-
cessor by merger to PUBLIC
FINANCE SERVICE OF
WILTON MANORS, INC.; ALL
FLORIDA DISTRIBUTORS,
INC., a Florida corporation; and
MODERN HEALTH CARE SER-
VICES, INC., a Florida corpora-
tion f/k/a NORTH MIAMI
GENERAL HOSPITAL;
Defendants.
To: Gerald David Smith, Charles
Petnick, Robert J. Jaffe and
Bernice Jaffe, whose
residences are unknown, and
the unknown parties who may
be spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees and all par-
ties claiming interest by,
through, under or against said
Defendants, who are not
known to be dead or alive, and
all parties having or claiming
to have any right, title, or in-
terest in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 4. in Block 9, of RUCKS
PARK, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 44, at Page 97, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Albert C. Galloway, Jr., Es-
quire, of Rosenthal & Yarchin,
P.A., Attorneys for Plaintiff, Suite
2300, CenTrust Financial Center,
100 Southeast Second Street,
Miami, Florida 33131-2198, on or
before April 22, 1988, and to file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on 16th March, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By: Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
BMC No. 181002-2-575
VA No. 262527
18379 March 25;
April 1,8. 15, 1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-42374 (28)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
No. 003473
IN RE:
ULRICA PAREMORE
and
REGINALD McQUEEN
TO: REGINALD McQUEEN
Residence Unknown:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street, North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 22, 1988;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 21st day of March, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOY BARKAN
2020 N.E. 163rd Street
North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162
Attorney for Petitioner
18388 March 25;
April 1,8,15,1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Anchor Repair Ser-
vices at 679 NW 156 St., Miami
33169 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Gary R. Lang
President
Accurate Cash Register, Inc.
Mark B. Slavin P.A.
Attorney for
Accurate Cash Register Inc.
18410 April 1,8, 15, 22, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO.: 88-12402-FC 30
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
DEBRA BUTTON.
Petitioner
and
ISAAC BITTON.
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ISAAC BITTON,
Residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
was filed against you; you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses upon: I.J. GRAFF, at-
torney for Petitioner, 633 N.E. 167
St. N.M.B. Fl. 33162 on or before
April 29. 1988 and file the original
with the clerk of this court other-
wise a default will be entered
against you.
DATED: March 23, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: S. BOBES
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18396 March 25;
April 1,8,15,1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Criteria Recording
Studios at 1755 N.E. 149th Street,
North Miami, FL 33181 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Criteria Recording
Studios, Inc.
a Florida corporation
Paul M. Marmish, P.A.
Shea and Gould
1428 BrickeU Avenue, 7th Fl.
Miami, FL 33131
18392 March 26;
April 1.8. 15, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Caae No. 88-07433 (CA 24)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States
Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RAFAEL FONG, et al..
Defendants.
TO: RAFAEL FONG and
GRACIELA FONG,
his wife
Calle 12, No. 17
Reparto La Soledad
Maracay, Etdo. Aragua
Venezuela
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Condominium Unit No. PH-3,
of 5060 CONDOMINIUM, ac-
cording to the Declaration of
Condominium thereof, as
recorded in Official Records
Book 10337, at Page 293, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida, as amended,
together with all im-
provements, appliances and
fixtures located thereon
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis, Allison &
Cohen, Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address is HI N.E. 1st
Street, Miami, Florida 33132, on
or before April 22, 1988, and file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 18th day of
March. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
18390 March 25;
April 1.8.15.1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-11345-19
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
No. 003473
IN RE:
BARRY CARROLL
and
ANNETTE CARROLL
TO:
ANNETTE CARROLL
Residence Unknown:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street, North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 29, 1988;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 22 day of March, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOY BARKAN
2020 N.E. 163rd Street
North Miami Beach
Florida 33162
Attorney for Petitioner
18398 March 25;
April 1.8,15,1988.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-4931 (13)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
No. 003473
IN RE: JUDY MYERS
and
RICHARD C. MYERS
TO: RICHARD C. MYERS
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street North Miami Beach, Florida
33162, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before April 29, 1988; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 23 day of March, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18400 April 1,8,15,22,1988


Page 30 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 15, 1988
Foreclosure Sales-Public Notices
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
(ml Acttoa No. 87-15694
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CLARENCE BUTTS.
Husband
and
BEVERLY BUTTS
Wife
TO: CLARENCE BUTTS
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Bruce N.
Crown, Esquire, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 15490
N.W. 7th avenue, Suite No. 205.
Miami, Florida 33169, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before May 6,
1988; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 31 day of March, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Bruce N. Crown, Esquire
15490 N.W. 7th Avenue
Suite No. 206
Miami. Florida 33169
Telephone: (306) 687-3900
Attorney for Petitioner
18417 April 8,16,22,29,1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Artie. No. 88-14025
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CANUTE SIMPSON
Petitioner, Husband
and
VETA MAUD SIMPSON,
Respondent, Wife
TO: VETA MAUD
SIMPSON
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on BRUCE
N. CROWN, ESQUIRE, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
15490 N.W. 7th avenue, Suite No.
205, Miami. Florida 33169, and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
May 6, 1988; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 1 day of April, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: C.P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
BRUCE N. CROWN, ESQ.
15490 N.W. 7th Avenue
Suite No. 206
Miami, Florida 33169
Telephone: (306) 687-3900
Attorney for Petitioner
18416 April 8,16,22,29.1988
W THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Naaber 86-1793
DrrisieaM
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RUTH STARR
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of RUTH STARR, deceased, File
Number 88-1798, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which ia Courthouse, 78
West Flagler Street. Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and ad-
of the personal
tative and the personal represen
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on April 8, 1988.
Personal Representative:
DINAH STARR
1500 Bay Road Apt. No. 743
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MARTIN STARR
9703 South Dixie Highway
Miami. Florida 33156-2812
Telephone: (305) 666-9520
18427 April 8,15,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nuber 88-1M1
Diviiion 04
IN RE:ESTATE OF
JACK E. DAVIS
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of Jack E. Davis,
deceased. File Number 88-1661, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami.
Florida 33130. The personal
representative of the estate is
Mary R. Davis, whose address is
820 Raymond Street, Miami
Beach, Florida 33141. The name
and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
April 8, 1988.
Mary R. Davis
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Jack E. Davis
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Richard I. Kroop. Esq (128023)
Kwitney, Kroop. A Scheinberg.
PA.
420 Lincoln Road,
Suite 512
Miami, Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-7675
18425__________April 8,15,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOE
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-531MC A 14
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION, a United
States corporation.
Plaintiff,
v.
MOLIERE JOSEPH; MARY C.
JOSEPH; ENRIQUE SAN-
TIAGO, PEDRO INFANTE, and
the unknown spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, or
other parties claiming by, through,
under or against them. FLORIDA
INSURANCE GUARANTY
ASSOCIATION; RESOURCES
LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY,
a Florida corporation, a/k/a
RESOURCES INSURANCE
COMPANY; CEDARS MEDICAL
CENTER, INC., a Florida
corporation;
Defendants.
To: Enrique Santiago and Pedro
Infante, whose residences are
unknown, and the unknown
parties who may be spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors. creditors,
trustees and all parties claim-
ing interest by, through,
under or against said Defen-
dant, who are not known to be
dead or alive, and all parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title, or interest in the
property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 4. in FIRST ADDITION
TO SUMMERLAND, accor-
ding to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 58, at
Page 13, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Albert C. Galloway, Jr., Es-
quire, of Rosenthal and Yarchin,
Suite 2300, CenTrust Financial
Center, 100 Southeast 2nd Street,
Miami. Florida 33131-2198, on or
before May 6, 1988. and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on April 4, 1988.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk
By: Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
Albert C. Galloway, Jr., Esquire
Rosenthal and Yarchin
Suite 2300
CenTrust Financial Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami, Florida 33131-2198
Telephone: (306) 374-6600
AMC No. 622671-297
CMIC No. 255061-015
18423 April 8, 15.22, 29, 1988
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Gitliti, Esq., At-
torney for Plaintiff, whose address
is Suite 214, 1570 Madruga
Avenue, Coral Gables, Florida.
33146 on or before May 13. 1988.
and file the original with the clerk
of this court either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise, a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 5 day of April.
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By C.P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
18430 April 8, 15,22,29,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
WAND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 88-14446 24
NOTICE OF ACTION
MELLON BANK (EAST) N.A.
f/k/a GIRARD BANK,
Plaintiff
vs.
ORLANDO C. PIEDRA, et ux.,
at si.,
Defendants.
TO: All unknown persons claiming
interest by. through, under or
against Orlando R. Piedra
and/or Obdulia Piedra. his
wife, both deceased
Residence Unknown
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
CONDOMINIUM UNIT NO.
1344 in SAMARI LAKE
EAST, a Condominium
located in the City of Hialeah
Gardens, Dade County,
Florida, pursuant to the
Declaration of Condominium
for Samari Lake East, a con-
dominium, recorded in Of-
ficial Records Book 9831, at
Page 1411 of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida, as amended by the
First Amendment to Declara-
tion of Condominium of
Samari Lake East, a con-
dominium, recorded in the
aforesaid office in Official
Records Book 10139, at Page
1178; a/k/a 10090 N. W. 80th
Court, Unit 1344, Hialeah
Gardens, FL
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 88-14624 29
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States
Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
STAFFORD MISSICK, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: STAFFORD MISSICK and
OTHELLA MISSICK, his
wife, residence unknown, if
they are living and, if they are
dead, to all parties claiming in-
terest by, through, under or
against the said STAFFORD
MISSICK and OTHELLA
MISSICK. his wife, and all
other parties having or claim-
ing to have any right, title or
interest in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Unit No. C in Building 27 of
SNAPPER VILLAGE
PHASE II, SECTION
THIRTY FIVE, a Con-
dominium, The Declaration
of which was filed October
11, 1979, under Clerk's File
No. 79R288392 and recorded
in Official Records Book
10539, at Page 2010 of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida; as amended,
together with the Mor-
tgagors undivided share in
the common elements ap-
purtenant thereto
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis, Allison and
Cohen, Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address is 111 N.E. 1st
Street, Miami, Florida 33132, on
or before May 13th, 1988, and file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 6th day of April,
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By John Brands
Deputy Clerk
18429 April 8,15,22,29,1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE 8ERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Artie* No. 88-11886
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
FLA. BAR NO.: 181204
IN RE: The Marriage of
OSMANI PASTRANA
Petitioner/Husband
and
BEATRIZ JIMENEZ
PASTRANA
TO: BEATRIZ JIMENEZ
PASTRANA
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dfcaaohi
tion of Marriage has bean Sad
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on ALAN J.
HODIN, P.A., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 1500 San
Remo Avenue, Suite 286, Coral
Gables. Florida 33146. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before May 6,
1988; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 4 day of April, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By E. Le Sueur
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ALAN J. HODIN, P.A.
1500 San Remo Avenue
Suite 236
Coral Gables, Florida 33146
Telephone: (306) 665-0075
Attorney for Petitioner
18421 April 8.15,22, 29,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-498
DiviaioaM
FL BAR 368016
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALLAN F. SMITH,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of Allen F. Smith
deceased, late of Dade County,
Florida, File Number 88-498-04, is
pending in the Circuit Court in and
for for Dade County, 78 West
Flagler St., Miami, FL 33130. The
name and address of the personal
representative of this estate is set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: all claims against
the estate and any objection by an
interested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, venue, or jurisdiction of the
court,
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
First publication of this notice of
administration on the 8 of April,
1988.
Personal Representative:
Jessie R. Smith
17630 NW 13 Ct.
Miami, FL 33169
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
1. JEROME GRAFF, ESQ.
633 N.E. 167th St.,
Suite 1015
Miami, Fla. 33162
Telephone: 661-3343
18418 April 8,15.1988
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
DM AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 88-06378 CA 13
NOTICE OF ACTION
ENSIGN BANK, FSB. f/k/a COM-
MUNITY FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff
vs.
ALEXANDER L. PEREZ,
etal.,
Defendants.
TO: ALEXANDER L. PEREZ
Residence Unknown and
DANIEL PEREZ
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against ALEX
ANDER L. PEREZ and
DANIEL PEREZ, and all par-
ties having or claiming to have
any right, title or interest in
the property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
LOT 11, BLOCK 90 OF
FIFTH ADDITION TO
PALM SPRINGS SUBDIVI-
SION SECTON TWO, AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, AS RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 60, AT
PAGE 87, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA, a/k/a
5391 West 10th Avenue,
Hialeah, FL
has been filed a>- ainst you and you
are required to serve a copy of
vour written defenses, if anv. to it
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Esq., At-
torney for Plaintiff, whose address
is Suite 214. 1570 Madruga
Avenue, Coral Gables, Florida.
33146 on or before May 13, 1988,
and file the original with the clerk
of this court either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney m
*hate)y thereafter; ^
default will be entered Z7V'*
WITNESS my hand ^^
oftiuscourtthisSdayof^
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
iiusi a5K Clerk
18*31 AprJjU5,22,29, m
NOTICE OF ACTlfftT~
CONSTRUCTIVE sJBL
.JK nwraRTY)
DTTHE CIRCUIT COURT ft.
THE ELEVENTH JUDfru.
CIRCUIT OF FLORlR
AND TOR DADE COUNT?
Civil Action
No. 88-03872 FC 23
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
IV re. ST "ARRIAGE
in Kt. The Mamaee of
MIRYAMRODGERSCLAVERO
Petitioner/Wife UAVt"0
and
CARLOS A. CLAVER0
Respondent/Husband
TO: CARLOS A. CLAVERfj
Residence unknown
FTPnU,K^E HEREBY NOTI
MED that an action for Dissohi-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on ALAN J
HODIN, P.A., attorney forftfr
tioner, whose address is 1500 San
Remo Avenue, Suite 235 Coral
Gables, Florida 33146. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before May 6
1988; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 4 day of April, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ALAN J. HODIN, P.A.
1500 San Remo Avenue
Suite 235
Coral Gables, Florida 33146
Telephone: (305) 666-0075
Attorney for Petitioner
18422 April 8,15,22.29,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 88-14270 06
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United
States of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
ORLANDO DIAZ, et ux
etal..
Defendants.
TO: INTERSTATE
FINANCE CO.
P.O. Box 386
Kansas City 41.
Missouri 64141
YOU ARE NOTIF1KD that an
action for Foreclose of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 5. Block 112-B. AMEND-
ED PLAT OF THE
AMENDED PLAT OF THE
THIRTEENTH ADDITION
TO HIALEAH. according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 34 at Page 26. of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida a/k/a 826-828
East 22nd Street. Hialeah,
Florida 33012
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy or
your written defenses, if any. toil
on Stuart H. Gitliti, Esq M_
torney for Plaintiff, whose addle*
is Suite 214, 1570 Madruga
Avenue. Coral Gables. Honda.
33146 on or before May 6. im
and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise,
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in *
complaint. ^
WITNESS my hand and the seai
of this court this 4th day of April.
1988
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By John Brands
As Deputy Clerk
18424 April 8. 15.22.29. KM


FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
NOTICE OF SALE
Friday, April 15, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 31
JURISDICTION

PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
MR ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
IR( 1 IT. IN AND FOR DADE
,01 NTY, FLORIDA
GENE
DIVISION
USE NO. S7-52945
SEC U
BAM BOSTON MORTGAGE
CORPORATION, Florida cor-
nnntii.n. nucceor by merger to
Stockton, whatley.
iuYIS ft, COMPANY.
plaintiff! si
djCKI D. (JARNER. et al..
S HEREBY GIVEN
in Order or Final
ntered in this case
aid Court, the
ndicated above, I
the highest and best
PHE SOUTH
. |< i lounb Cour
Dude County,
i dock A.M.. on
! APRIL. 1988. the
(allowinK described property:
i of COUNTRY
. IRS TOWNHOMES
INE, according to the
Plt thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 128, at Page 48. of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida.
DATED the 6TH day of APRIL,
IMS.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Roaenthal & Yarchin, P.A.
Centrist Financial Center, Suite
2300
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami. Florida 33131-2198
Pibliihed 4/8-15_______________
NOTICE OF SALE
PI RSI ANT TO CHAPTER 46
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-2785
SEC. 30
FIRST NATIONWIDE BANK.
former I > known aa First Na-
tionwide Savings,,
Pluntiffisi
vs.
TOLLER EAST, JR. and
MELVINA P. EAST, hit wife.
Defendant*:,)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
jdpni-nt entered in this case
m [lending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above. I
ill sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
BTEPSof the Dade County Cour-
*ou* in Miami, Dade County,
Honda at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the25 111 lay of APRIL. 1988. the
fallowing described property:
Lot 3, in Block 16, of SO. MIAMI
HEIGHTS MANOR, according to
ihe Plat thereof, as recorded in
Ht Book 68, at Page 70, of the
Public Records of Dade County,
Flonda.
DATED the 6TH day of APRIL,
m.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Coart
ICircait Coart Seal)
ky MARIA SAMA
"?put v Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Joseph M. PanieUo, Esquire.
P0. Box 2347
^pa, Florida 33601
frbliihed 4/8-15
the 25TH day of APRIL. 1988. the
following deacribed property:
Lot 1, in Block 3, of GREEN
VILLE MANOR, according to the
Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book
53. Page 79. of the Public Record!
of Dade County, Florida.
DATED the 6TH day of APRIL
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Joseph M. Paniello. Esqiore
201 North Franklin Street
Tampa, Florida 33602
Published 4/8-15
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 88-0*379 C A 13
NOTICE OF ACTION
ENSIGN HANK FSB,f/k/aCOM
Ml MTV FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff
vs.
ALEXANDER L. PEREZ,
et al.,
Defendants.
TO: ALEXANDER L. PEREZ
Residence Unknown and
DANIEL PEREZ
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against ALEX-
ANDER L. PEREZ and
DANIEL PEREZ, and all par-
ties having or claiming to have
any right, title or interest in
the property herein deacribed.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
LOT 11, BLOCK 90 OF
FIFTH ADDITION TO
PALM SPRINGS SUBDIVI-
SION SECTON TWO, AC-
CORDiNG TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, AS RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 60, AT
PAGE 87. OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA, a/k/a
5391 West 10th Avenue.
Hialeah. FL
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Esq.. At-
torney for Plaintiff, whose address
is Suite 214, 1570 Madruga
Avenue. Coral Gables, Florida,
33146 on or before May 13, 1988.
and file the original with the clerk
of this court either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise, a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 5 day of April,
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
18431 April 8. 15,22,29, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Caae No. 88-14051
NOTICE OF ACTION
PROPERTY
ROSINA MORGAN,
Plaintiff,
vs.
THE HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES
OR HEIRS-AT-LAW OF FRANK
KLEIN IF LIVING, AND THEIR
RESPECTIVE HEIRS AND ALL
CLAIMING BY.
THROUGH AND UNDER
NOTICE OF SALE
WIIWUANT TO CHAPTER 45
"THE CIRCUIT COURT OF PERSONS
g ELEVENTH JUDICIAL THROUG..
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE AND/OR MAY BE INFANTS, IN
BOUNTY, FLORIDA COMPETENTS OR OTHER
WIRAL JURISDICTION WISE SUIT JURIS,
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-29273
SEC. 07
"REMANS FUND MOR-
2* CORPORATION.
raterty known aa Maaafac-
'" Hanover Mortgage
r*nuff(S)
vs.
gNTER.M.wife.et.1.,
uefendant(s)
J0TICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
Entto an Order or Final
2E*t entered in this case
"7 Pending in said Court, the
**of which is indicated above. I
JJJ o the highest and beat
SSL'1?' > on THE SOUTH
'tPSof the Dade County Cour-
fe Miami, Dade County.
flond 11:00 o'clock A.M ..on
Defendants.
TO: THE HEIRS,
BENEFICIARIES OR
HEIRS-AT LAW OF FRANK
KLEIN, if alive, and if dead
their unknown spouses, heirs.
defendant; and all claimants,
persons or parties, natural or
corporate; or whose exact
legal status is unknown, claim-
ing to have any rights, title or
intrest in and to the lands
ribad.
ADDRESSES UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED thai anai
tion to Quiet Title on the following
property In Dade County, Florida:
Lot 2 in Block 109 of OCEAN
BEACH ADDITION NO. 8,
according to the Plat thereof,
recorded in Plat Book 2, at
Page 81, of the Public
Records .if Dade Count.,
Florida,
lias been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if an)
on HYMAN P GALBUT, ES
QUIRE, Galbut, Galbul
Menin. Plaii whose
addre 19 i Wasl ngton
Aven Beach. Florida
33139
and file the original with thi
either before
mi Plaintiffs attorney! or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise, a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Complaint or Petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on April 1. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Court
By: CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
HYMAN P. GALBUT, ESQUIRE
Galbut, Galbut and Menin
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Phone: (305) 672-3100
18419 April 8.15,22,29,1988
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 88-14111 15
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ANDRE RIGAUD,
Petitioner,
and
LISA L. RIGAUD. Respondent.
TO: LISA L. RIGAUD
Residence Unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon: ANTHONY CAR-
BONE. P.A., 612 N.W. 12th
Avenue, Miami. Florida 33136.
and file original with Clerk of the
Court on or before May 13, 1988,
otherwise a default will be entered.
April 1. 1988
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By: C.P. Copeland
18420 April 8, 15, 22,29, 1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-143*503
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
NO. 003473
IN RE: The Marriage of
DIANE PAPPAS-KHAN
and
SHAKIL A. KHAN
TO: SHAKIL A. KHAN
142-13 37 Avenue
Flushing. New York
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street, North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before May 13,1988;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 5 day of April, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: C.P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
LIENS HAS IN ITS POSSES-
SION THE FOLLOWING
DESCRIBED PROPERTY: LOT
3003
HOUSEHOLD GOODS AS THE
PROPERTY OF:
EUGENE M. BRAVI. last known
address- 4217 Washington Street.
Hollywood, FL 33021; and that on
the 28RD DAY OF APRIL, 1988
DURING THE LEGAL HOURS
"I SALE MAINLY BETWEEN
10:00 FORENOON AND 2:00 IN
THE AFTERNOON AT 2136 NW
24 AVE., MIAMI. FLA. THE
UNDERSIGNED SHALL OF-
FER FOR SALE TO THE
HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH
IN HAND THE ABOVE
DESCRIBED PROPERTY.
DATED THIS 8 DAY OF r
APRIL, 19C
Aprils, 1.
will he entered against you for the
relief demanded In the Complaint
WITNESS mj band and tl
of this Court the daj "r Mai
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk oi the i lourl
By: E LE si I
lerk
18415 April 1,8,15,2!
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAV.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
IN THE CIRCCIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 88-13069
NOTICE OF ACTION
FINANCIAL FEDERA1
SAVINGS AND I
ASSOCIATION OF
DADE COUNTS
Plainl
that the undersigned desiring b
engage in business under tin
titious name Criteria at 1755 N.E.
149th Street, North Miami, El.
33181 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Criteria Recording
Studios, Inc.
a Florida corporation
Paul M. Mannish, P.A.
Shea and Gould
1428 Hnckell Avenue, 7th El,
Miami. FL 33131
18393 March 25;
April 1.8.15,1988
ALLAN E SIMn\ .
Defei ..
. LAN E. SIMON
ANITA SINK i.N. hi.- *
139-15 83rd Avenue
Jamaica, New York 1141)5
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclose of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Unit No. 1021 of SOUTH
LAKE VILLAS CON-
DOMINIUM, according to
the Declaration thereof,
recorded in Official Records
Book 10564 at Page 2049, of
the public records of Dade
County, Florida; a/k/a 8435
S.W. 156th Court. No. 1021,
Miami, FL
NOTICE UNDEK
FICITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to has been filed against you and you
engage in business under the fie- are required to serve a copy of
titious name PHYSICIANS OP- your written defenses, if any. to it,
TICAL at 4300 Alton Road, Miami 0n Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Beach, Florida 33140 intends to Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
register said name with the Clerk 214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun- Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
ty, Florida.
Physicians Optical, Inc.
Rosenthal & Yarchin
Attorney for Physicians Optical,
Inc.
18407
April 29, 1988 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
April 1,8,15,22,1988 against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this day of March 28,
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By: CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
18413 April 1.8. 15.22. 1988.
devisees, grantees, creditors
and all other parties claiming
by, through, under or against (Circuit Court Seal)
them; and all unknown natural 18428 April 8,15, 22, 29,1988
persons if alive, and if flead or -----_
not known to dead or alive,
their several and respective
unknown spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees and
creditors, or other parties
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name A-l-A IDEAL
BUSINESS MACHINES at 3672
Coral Way Miami, Florida 33145
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Ideal Office Equipment
Company. Inc.
FERDIE & GOUZ
Attorney for APPLICANT
18414 April 1.8. 15.22, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 11th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 88-00793 (CA 20)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI,
a United States Corporation,
Plaintiff,
v.
GEORGE LEYKIN. et al.,
Defendants.
To: GEORGE LEYKIN
BETOYA LEYKIN, also known as
BETYA LEYKIN, his wife
1119 Ocean View Avenue
Apartment 1
Brooklyn, New York
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Unit 90 of TROPICAL
PARK VILLAS CON-
DOMINIUM, according to
the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof, as record-
ed in Official Records Book
10826, Page 183. of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida, as amended;
together with all im
provements, appliances and
fixtures located thereon.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 88-13070
NOTICE OF ACTION
FINANCIAL FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF DADE
COUNTY.
Plaintiff,
vs.
COSIMO SOTTILE, et ux., et al.,
Defendants.
TO: COSIMO SOTTILE and
OFELIA SOTTILE.
his wife
Ave Vargas Entre 21-22
Barquisineto Venzue VE
00000
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Condominium Parcel No. 205
of LAKE AND TENNIS
VILLAS CONDOMINIUM,
according to the Declaration
of Condominium thereof, as
recorded in Official Records
Book 10808 at Page 1277 of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida; a/k/a 8450
S.W. 154th Circle Court, No.
205, Miami, FL
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it,
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
April 29. 1988 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
NOTICE
WAREHOUSEMAN'S SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
WAREHOUSEMAN AND
WAREHOUSES RECEIPTS
WHEREIN. A.B. VAN LINES, A
FLORIDA CORPORATION BY
VIRTUE OF ITS WAREHOUSE
per-
and
those unknown nstural
sons; and, the several
respective unknown assigns,
successors in interest,
trustees or any corporation or
other legal entity named as a
has been filed against you and you torney or immediately thereafter;
are required to serve a copy of otherwise a default will be entered
your written defenses, if any, to it against you for the relief demand-
on Keith, Mack. Lewis, Allison & ed in the complaint.
Cohen. Plaintiff's attorneys, WITNESS my hand and the seal
whose address is 111 N.E. 1st 0f this Court this 28 day of March,
Street, Miami, Florida 33132, on 1988.
or before May 6. 1988, and file the RICHARD P. BRINKER
original with the Clerk of this As Clerk of the Court
Court either before service on By CLARINDA BROWN
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate- As Deputy Clerk
ly thereafter; otherwise, a Default lMl2 April 1,8,15. 22. 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Caae No. 88-9149 CA 16
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND loan ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United Si
Corporal
Plaintiff
VI
JAIME OSVALDO PRISANT, if
he is alive and if he is dead, all of
the unknown heirs, deA
enholders,
creditors, trustees or otherwise
claiming by, through, under or
JAIME OSVALDO PR]
r partial h
or claiming to have any right title
or interest in and to the property
al.,
Defi
VLDOPRISAN1
and MARTHA LI NGIN
lence unknown, if alive.
and if k ill partiet
claiming interest by, through.
under or against the said
JAIME OSVALDO PRISANT
and MARTHA LUNGIN, and
all other parties having or
claiming to have any right, ti-
tle or interest in the property
herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a Mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Condominium Unit, Designed
as Unit No. 5-F, of THE EX-
ECUTIVE, a Condominium
according to the Declaration
thereof, recorded in Official
Records Book 10652, at Page
208, of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida;
together with all im-
provements, appliances, and
fixtures located thereon,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack. Lewis & Allison,
Plaintiffs attorneys, whose ad-
dress is 111 N.E. 1st Street.
Miami. Florida 33132. on or before
April 22, 1988, and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torneys or immediately thereafter;
otherwise, a Default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 15th day of
March, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
18380 March 25;
April 1. 8,15, 1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-12982 06
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
No. 003473
IN RE:
EDGAR D. KEENE
and
SILVIA R. LARRAIN KEENE
TO: SILVIA R. LARRAIN
KEENE
Del Manzano 3170 Dep 21
Miraflores Alto
Vina De Mar, Chile
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street North Miami Beach, Florida
33162, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before April 29, 1988; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 25 day of March. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA HARPER
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18409 April 1. 8, 15,22,1988


Page 32 The Jewish Floridian/Friday. April 15, 1988
SB
!Neil Simon On The War Years*
By HERBERT G. LUFT
Neil Simon's "Biloari Blues,"
the second chapter of the
trilogy dealing with the
author's early experiences in
life, now has been transposed
from the stage to the screen
without breaking new ground
in the cinema, in spite of the
direction by Mike Nichols, who
normally is known for his in-
novations. The background, a
boot camp in the deep South,
doesn't lend itself to much
excitement.
There was a certain charm in
the milieu of "Brighton Beach
Memoirs," which introduced
the character of Eugene Mor-
ris Jerome to the audience.
Here was a lower-middle-class
Jewish family emerging from
the depression, struggling to
make ends meet, with the
youngest son, coming of age.
only concerned with his own
world of make-believe, football
and girls, while jotting down
his wistful, whimsical
observations.
The current episode, now set
during World War II. takes
Eugene with other rookies of
diverse origin and tempera-
ment into an army training
camp. There are no women in-
volved, except a few from the
other side of the tracks, and
there is only a ripple of
tension.
Eugene still believes that
one day he will become the
great American writer. He
searches the souls of his fellow
recruits, without hinting that
they may become future
characters of his plays. The
film, reflecting tedious hours
during the training period, in
itself is tedious to watch.
An overdrawn Jewish type
in the group is not much to our
liking. The meek fellow
behaves like gentiles may have
seen us before the State of
Israel was established.
In sketching the drill
sergeant. Neil Simon goes to
the other extreme, with a
hateful and spiteful character.
Matthew Broderick, who
created the character of
Eugene, remains the same
precocious kid, only grown to
size, a likeable fellow no one
among his buddies can really
make out. Christopher
Walken, normally on the
heroic side, is the sergeant.
The third chapter of Neil I
bimon s memories of w\
youth, "Broadway Bound''8J
which we see Eugene wiri, i.-
radio writers in the late 1940?
is opening in Los Angel?
after a long run in New YoJ
No doubt it also will go beW
the cameras one of these dayV
New York Jewish Expo
With just three months re- Jewish Experience will take
maining until the third Inter-
national Kosher Foods and
Jewish Life Expo, tickets are
now being sold: by the show
managers, Nancy Neale
Enterprises. The Expo, which
is being billed as 'The Big
place June 17-21 at the Jacob
K. Javits Convention Center in
New York City. It will be four
times the size of the first show
in March, 1987 which at-
tracted more than 50,000
visitors.
Bonn--------
Aid to Syria
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) West Ger-
many will resume financial
assistance to Syria, frozen
since 1986 because of Syria's
involvement with international
terrorism, it was reported
here from Damascus.
The promise was made by
the West German minister for
economic cooperation, Hans
Klein, who was on a four-day
visit to Damascus. Klein
visited several development
projects in Syria financed by
the Bonn government for
which it will make available
some $87 million this year.
According to Klein.
Damascus is serious in its ef-
forts to resolve the hostage
crisis.
Klein reported that he was
assured by President Hafez
Assad that Syria would do
everything in its power to help
free Rudolph Cordes. a West
German businessman being
held hostage by extremists
linked to the Hezbollah (Party
of God) in Lebanon.
A court in Duesseldorf is
currently hearing the case of
Abbas Ali Hamadei. a
Lebanese accused of master-
minding the kidnapping of
Cordes and another West Ger-
man. Alfred Schmidt. Schmidt
has since been released.
A Frankfurt court is
scheduled to hear the case of
Mohammed Ali Hamadei. Ab-
bas' brother, who is accused of
hijacking an American airliner
in 1985 and killing one of its
passengers.
Reporters accompanying
Klein said the minister ex-
pressed understanding for
Syria's position toward Israel.
The newspaper Die Welt
quoted Klein as saying that
many of the "alleged" illegal
activities of the Syrian secret
services in West Germany
were based on "absurd accusa-
tions" made by the Americans.
West Germany joined the
United States and other
Western European countries
two years ago in downgrading
diplomatic ties with Damascus.
A West German court found at
the time that Syrian agents
were involved in promoting
terrorism here.
Klein, a well-known sup-
porter of the Arab cause, has
maintained a basically friendly
attitude toward Israel. He has
frequent contact with Israeli
officials in Bonn.
Presemw 9, "* Create* Mam. jewsn
ftotrtaor Miami Daoe
Community Coleqe Mctll Mo*s pus and Ow Rabomcai Association of
Greater Miami n the support 0* the
MetmpoHar rjaoe County Cultural Affairs
Councn and me Metropoan Oaoe County
Board of County Commsswners
SCSi Gf^MiinujtwihFBtrmr,
ATtJ
The right choice
ft
rwvtii >!
MIAMIDADF.
.
.ilt.K1 jn:pil
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Invites you to a communitywide celebration
of Israelis 40th Anniversary
SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 1988
Miami Dade Community College. Mitchell Wolfson Campus
300 NE 2nd Avenue-ione block West of Bayside)
11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Admission is free and open to the public.
Enjoy Israeli food, music, community expo. Israeli dancing featur-
ing Yusi Yanich. arts, crafts and jewelry, face painting, model kib-
butz with live animals, mimes, children's games, youth carnival and
lots more.
Featured performers include:
"The Mamas and The Papas" 4 p.m.
The Dudaim Duo (the Simon and Garfunkel of Israel) 3 p.m. and
the Hebraica Dancers. Hollies Follies. Shajar. Magain Miami and a
special cantorial concert at 1:45 p.m.
There will be a community march on Sunday. April 17. at 11 a.m.
commemorating Israel's 40th anniversary. Call 932-4200 for details.
AT&T will set-up a special pavilion at Israel 40. offering the opportunity to
place a free two-minute phone call to friends or relatives in Israel
All food will be under strict Kosher supervision.
Co-chairmen: Charlotte Held and Norman Lieberman
For more information: Contact Israel 40 at 576-4000
4200 Biscayne Boulevard. Miami. Honda 33137
Please call the Israel 40 volunteer hotline at 576-7401 to help us celebrate.
Parking:
A S2 Dartong rate win be available icourtesy of Miami Parking System) at the folomring lots
Mumapai Garage # 1 40 NW 3rd Street Municipal Garage *3 190 NE 3rd Street
Municipal Garage #9 100 NE 3rd Street
Pick-up the special parking coupon at the information booth when leaving the Israel 40 celebrate
receive a special rate
There w* be a S4 tee for parking at Centnrst Tower
To get to the celebration use Metromover and stop at the College Station Metrorail wil be operating
every 15 minutes Metromover every 2 minutes
Buses unload and toad passengers at NE 4th Street and NE 1st Avenue Buses will be dire"
panung space when unloaded


Full Text
Page 4 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 15, 1988
Viewpoint
Miami's Israel 40
While the actual observance of Yom Ha'atz-
maut falls on the English dates of May 14 and
15 and the Hebrew date coincides with next
Friday, April 22, Greater Miami will share in a
communitywide celebration of Israel In-
dependence Day on Sunday, April 17.
At that time, thousands are expected to
celebrate vicariously with other Diaspora and
Israeli Jews as nearly 70 Miami agencies, coor-
dinated by the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, co-sponsor all-day festivities at Miami-
Dade Community College-Mitchell Wolfson
Campus.
It is to be hoped that amid the local celebra-
tions from cantorial choirs to pop music,
from representational to performance arts,
from food and street fair to medical screenings
that the substantive message which Israefs
anniversary connotes will notbe lost.
Greater Miami has been, since before there
was a State of Israel, Zionist to its communal
core.
This Year in Jerusalem
Even though the State of Israel will
celebrate its 40th anniversary of independence
this spring, only a fourth of American Jews
have visited the Jewish State.
Last year, tourism in Israel rose as the
number of international terrorist actions
decreased and as the cost of travel to Europe
and the Far East soared.
With the hoopla of the 40th anniversary,
Israel looked forward to shattering all tourism
records in 1988.
The tremendous publicity attendant to the
Palestinian disturbances in the administered
territories, however, has served to curb such
optimism.
With the streets of Israel still as safe as, if
not safer, than those of Miami and almost any
American city, it is incumbent on the Jewish
community to emphasize the need to help
Israel celebrate its birthday in Israel.
Travel to Israel on missions, in groups or
individually is informative, entertaining and
exciting. Hotels and restaurants offer good
values and good products.
One can hardly imagine the lure of the
Western Wall, of Masada, of the Tel Aviv
beaches or the majestic views of Haifa harbor
being dimmed by large headlines about
violence in Gaza and the West Bank.
Next year in Jerusalem has been a dream for
millenia.
This year it can be reality.
Restraint and Return to Modesty
Temple Ner Tamid
In a joint celebration this Sunday, Temple
Ner Tamid will officially mark its 30th year
and Rabbi Eugene Labovitz will observe, as
well, his founding-rabbi status with the Nor-
thshore Miami Beach congregation.
Since those first set of High Holy Day ser-
vices in 1957, Ner Tamid nas grown to a
synagogue of 400 families that has maintained,
by choice, a family/Aarurah atmosphere.
Among those being honored Sunday evening
m the congregation s Sklar Ballroom will be
five pioneer presidents. That those early ac-
tivists still call Ner Tamid their spiritual home
says much about the synagogue's participatory
nature.
Maintenance of a congregation demands
commitment, support ana idealism. We con-
gratulate Ner Tamid's lay and rabbinical staff
on all three.
Bv RABBI
MARC H. TANENBAUM
The recent dosage of sex
scandals involving politicians,
preachers and other instant
celebrities is sickening to any
sensitive moral conscience.
But the scandals assume
greater importance if viewed
as a dramatic illustration of
the declining sexual morality
in America and its devastating
human consequences.
For much of American
history, the Puritan moral
code dominated our society.
Stringent Puritanism con-
demned sex as sinful, leading
to repression and sexual guilt.
Then with the counter-culture
of the 1960's, a rebellion took
place and the pendulum swung
in the opposite direction.
Everything became permissi-
ble, and self-indulgence
became the new idolatry.
"If it feels good, do it'* was
the motto. Never mind its
moral or human consequences.
Men and women felt free to
exploit each other as sex ob-
jects, playthings for instant
gratification. Pre-marital and
extra-marital relations,
menage-a-trois and incest were
all justified by the new nar-
cissism as "recreational sex."
Sexual freedom became
perverted into license whose
consequence has been much
unhappiness and human
degradation an assault on
the dignity of the human
person.
Jewish morality has always
advocated the golden mean,
the avoidance of both repres-
sion and mindless indulgence.
Sexual relationships. Judaism
teaches, must be an expression
of genuine love and respect
between two people within a
monogamous marriage. Tzniut
modesty, self-restraint -
must characterize all healthy
sexuality.
These sex scandals, not to
speak of the terror of AIDS.
may yet return all of us to the
balanced and healthy sexual
codes which humane religions
have long advocated.
Rabin Mare H. Tanenbawn i
tor of international ratal
Ameritan Jewish Commi"-
Letters Forum
Palestinian Alternative
Editor:
I have been reading the
"views" of many people, who
imply that they know about
the existing conditions in the
Mideast area. None of these
seem to base their statements
on facts from their ex-
periences while in Israel. How
many times were they there,
how long, and in how many
areas did they travel?
First, let me state mv
qualifications. I am a U.S".
Government retiree. I served
as a Foreign Service Officer,
and was in AID. The Agency
For International Develop-
ment. I have been required to
visit Israel many times, in
even- area, in order to verify
the need of items for their
development programs.
Where did all the people who
are now living on the West
Bank of Israel come from?
1) Were they citizens of
Floridian
Fred K. Shochet
Editor end Publisher
Suzanne Shochet
Executive Editor
Arabia, Jordan, Iraq, Iran,
Egypt, etc., and did they get
permission and assistance
from their so-called country's
government to migrate? Is it a
fact that they were Nomads
from a desert, and that their
so-called country had/has no
record of their existence, and
in no way did they try to con-
trol their migration?
2) When these migrants
heard that Israel was expan-
ding into a country, and that
they could use their help, they
packed their tents on their
heads, and walked with their
families through the desert to
the border of Israel.
3) Why did they leave their
so-called homeland? a) Did the
so-called government of their
country for the past thousand
years ever consider them as
citizens of their country? b)
Did these migrants, in the past
thousand years, receive any
consideration from their coun-
try as to their existence regar-
ding housing, water, food,
health care, transportation,
etc. No! No!
4) So what did the Israelis do
transportation for work, into
their towns and back; c) per-
mitted them to spend their
wages in their stores; d) helped
them build houses so they
would not have to live in tents;
e) provided water for their
homes; f) provided the first
electric power for their homes;
g) built the first schools for
their children; h) they provided
them with their first health
care, and hospitals.
They did not receive one
cent from their so-called
governments to provide for
these needs.
When these people came to
settle along the borders oi
Israel, they never made a
claim that this land belonged
to their country; first they
were desert migrants, and se-
cond, their country had no in-
terest in them.
All of the above mentioned
services are still being provid-
ed! Has Israel shut off these
facilities, had them move back
to their tents, shut down the
water, power, schools,
health care
Maybe they
services? No!
should ask the
Norm* A Orovttz
Manegtng Editor
Joan C. Teglas
Director o Advertising
Friday, April 15, 1988
Volume 61
28 MS AN 5748
Number 16
/ v !, uiu ure ismeus ao auiyoe uiey snuuiu >
when they saw these people Palestinians to provide these
gather on their border? They services, or tell the countries
noted their condition and need, to take back their desert
and: a) built roads to their set- people!
tlements; b) provided SOLH.BROWN,MIAMI


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FILES


Analysis.^
Israeli Arabs'
Creeping Binationalism
Friday, April 15, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 5
Jerusalem As the even
split between the left and the
right in Israeli politics con-
tinues to become more and
more fixed and unbridgeable,
the significance of the Israeli
Arab vote as a pontential fac-
tor in coalition building in-
creases, said a visiting
American professor at the
Hebrew University of
Jerusalem.
Prof. Ian Lustick, author of
"Arabs in the Jewish State"
and a forthcoming book on the
Gush Emunim, spoke on
"Arab Political Mobilization"
at a program sponsored by the
Hebrew University's Leonard
Davis Institute for Interna-
tional Relations and the
Department of Political
Science. Lustick is professor
of government at Dartmouth
College in New Hampshire.
There existed previously a
basic assumption in Israeli
society that Jews of whatever
political shading had more in
common with each other
politically than with the Arabs,
said Lustick. Therefore, he
said, there was no real pursuit
of the Arab vote by the
mainstream parties.
This began to change after
1967, with the development of
sharper divisions within
Israeli politics that brought
about a pulling away from the
center toward left and right,
resulting in a near 50-50 split
in the vote. The result, he said,
is that Israeli Jews on the left
of the political spectrum have
begun to see the possibility of
forming political alliances with
"progressive" Arab political
elements more readily than
with the Jewish right.
This, naturally, would give
the Arabs a great deal more
political leverage within the
Israeli political system than
they have enjoyed until now.
Already, Lustick feels, Arab
political interests are being
treated more gingerly by the
political establishment even
by right-wing politicians
than in the past.
Lustick raised the possibility
of a Labor-left coalition
government that would in-
clude even the predominantly
Arab communists following
the next elections. This would
require, of course, that the
Arabs realize the political op-
portunities that await them
and seize them, he cautioned.
Lustick stated that growing
political influence by the Arabs
would lead to a situation
within Israel that could be
described as "creeping bina-
tionalism" in which the Arab
voice and Arab interests would
be felt much more strongly
than in the past.
Coming out of literal rather than figurative
deep water. Secretary of State George Schultz
climbs out of a swimming pool beside a sign
warning of the same. Following his early-
morning laps, Shultz renewed his Mideast
peace talks with Israeli Prime Minister Yit-
zhak Shamir in Jerusalem. AP/Wide World
Photo.
A 60-Year-Old Update: Killing Tor the Thrill of It'
By Robert E. Segal
Bobby Franks of Chicago
was only 14 years old in 1924
when he was murdered "for
the thrill of it." The killers
were acquaintances, Richard
Loeb, 17, and Nathan Leopold,
18.
Shaum Ouillette was about
Bobby Frank's age in
November 1986 when he was
beaten to death in Canton,
Mass. The 15-year-old killer, a
schoolmate, confided to young
friends that he wanted to kill
Shaum "just for the heck of
it."
Leopold and Loeb were sav-
ed from execution by skillful
defense attorney Clarence
Darrow.
Ouillette's killer, Rod Mat-
thews, was tried recently as an
adult because of the
viciousness of that crime. A
jury found him guilty of
second-degree murder. He
may win parole in the year
2003.
The slaying of Franks was
labeled nationwide as "the
crime of the century" even
in the epoch of mob leader Al
Capone because of its
outrageous nature and the pro-
minence of the Franks, Loeb
and Leopold families.
Franks' father was highly
respected and had acquired
wealth in real estate in-
vestments and watch manufac-
turing. Loeb's father was a
vice president of Sears and
Roebuck. The senior Leopold
had amassed a fortune in ship-
ping, copper mining and paper
manufacturing companies.
Messrs. Loeb and Leopold
were active in charitable af-
fairs and esteemed as civic
leaders.
Richard Loeb was the
youngest graduate of the
University of Michigan.
Nathan Leopold had a similar
record at the University of
Chicago. Influenced strongly
by the philosopher Nietzche's
contempt for what he con-
sidered the decadence of
Western civilization and his
call for breeding are a race of
supermen, they entered life's
"fast lane."
But bred with that opulence
and uncaring about conse-
quences, they plotted a murder
for "the sake of the thrill."
Cruising in their own
neighborhood, where they
knew youngsters of wealthy
families, they failed to spot the
lad they had intended to kid-
nap, but soon enticed Bobby
Franks to go for a ride.
In short time they stripped
him of his clothing, bludgeoned
him with a chisel, tossed his
body in a culvert, doused his
face with hydrochloride and
demanded $10,000 ransom.
The perfect crime? Not
quite. Leopold carelessly drop-
ped his horn-rim glasses near
the scene of their wanton
deed.
Wise in the ways of the law,
attorney Darrow did not have
the conniving pair plead in-
sanity. Instead, he had the pair
plead guilty and insisted their
crime could be traced to im-
mature and diseased minds.
So eloquent and powerful
was Darrow's appeal that the
judge wept openly. Loeb and
Leopold avoided execution,
but moved from their lux-
urious mansions to narrow
cells in Joliet Prison.
Twelve years later, Loeb
was killed in a fight with a
fellow convict. Leopold fared
better. He put his "diseased"
mind to work, participated in a
successful effort to test
prisoner-volunteers in a search
of a malaria cure, won a parole
after 33 years in prison and
died in Puerto Rico, where he
had studied to find a cure for
leprosy.
The heartless slaying of
Franks occurred in a
somewhat peaceful era. The
State of Illinois responded by
passing a law prohibiting
minors to read crime stories,
trying to spare the young from
lives of crime.
By contrast, Rod Matthews
was free in this era of
brutalization to view video
tapes celebrating high-voitage
crime and see peep shows
featuring sexual weirdness.
Children are growing up in
age of violence on television
and conveniently available
drugs, of loneliness, unconcern
and anonymity. With their up-
bringing increasingly the
school teachers' responsibility,
their problems slip through the
cracks. Signs of depression go
undetected, suicide rates rise
alarmingly.
Let us hope that the depth of
hurt and sorrow now engulfing
Canton, Mass., may jolt
thousands into new resolve to
be more vigilant, wise and
tender in their relations with
their children.
Robert E. Segal is a former
newspaper editor and director of the
Jewish community councils of Cincin-
nati and Boston.
A Poignant Letter from Germany
EDITOR'S NOTE: JTA
Jerusalem correspondent Gil
Sedan received this letter from
an uncle, a former Israeli who
has lived in West Germany for
the past three decades.______
Dear Gil,
When you visited us, I pro-
mised you to tell you about
German Jewry, particularly
the community of Hanover.
Presently, some 25,000 to
30,000 Jews are registered in
the communities, some 40 per-
cent of them pensioners -
some emigrants, some former
Germans. Among the younger
generation there is a lot of in-
termarriages. Obviously, they
are indifferent to their
Jewishness, and their children
are even more likely to marry
non-Jews.
Why do Jews come to live in
Germany? Why don't they live
in Israel or the USA?
Most of the elderly Jews
here do not have a vocation.
The local social services help
them out. This way they incor-
porate themselves into the
framework of a German
fatherland, although most of
the Jews here are not "Ger-
man Jews" with a German
heritage.
Our father, for example,
came here from Jassi,
Romania, in 1905. My
mother's parents came here in
1907 from Posnan, a town on
the border between Germany
and Poland, which changed
hands from time to time. My
grandparents from both sides
spoke Yiddish. My father
received German citizenship
only in 1925. Thus, most of the
Jews who arrived in Germany
remained Russians, Poles, etc.
Presently, the German
government has a political in-
terest that Jews should live
here. The Jews serve as an
alibi. On top of personal
reparations, the government
pays large sums to the Jewish
communities; otherwise the
communities could not have
survived.
Thus, the officials in the
communities get accustomed
to a sort of a Jewish establish-
ment which works in close
cooperation with the govern-
ment. I attach an invitation by
the local community, asking
members of the community to
attend the annual memorial
services for the fallen in the
wars. Of course, this includes
German soldiers, as well as
war criminals.
This mentality is catching
growing circles. The backbone
of the Jews here has been
broken. I have a lot oi
arguments with members oi
the community and other Jews
but in vain. Employment
and money kill the right mind.
For the Jews the questions is
is it worthwhile fighting to
preserve local Jewry? As far as
I am concerned, the answer is
definitely yes. Those who do
not care chose the path of
assimilation. The only avenue
left is that of tradition, which
does not necessarily mean go-
ing back to Orthodoxy.
Continued on Page 14