The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03087

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
Jewislbi Flor idiao
*JA*X
Volume
61 Number 14
Miami, Florida Friday, April 1, 1988
Frtd Shochtt
Price 50 Cents

**
*
\
*
Illustration courtesy Jewish National Fund Almanac
5748 A Happy Passover 1988
THE MODERN MIRACLE
AND THE DISTANCE
THAT REMAINS
page 5
ELLIS ISLAND:
THE OTHER
PROMISED LAND
page 12


Page 2 The
FtoridJan/FricUy, April 1,1988
This ark is the prize exhibit at the Jewish museum just set up at
the Landesmuseum in Brunswick, Federal Republic of Germany.
It testifies to centuries of Jewish life in Germany. DaD/dpa/
Brunswick Museum:
Testament to
German Jewry
By SIGRID SCHWARZWALD
BRUNSWICK (DaD) The
Jewish Museum, a new depart-
ment at the Brunswick
Landesmuseum in the north of
the Federal Republic of Ger-
many, is a significant new ven-
ture based on what may well
have been the oldest Jewish
museum in the world. In the
first half of the 18th century
Alexander David, 1687-1765,
an agent to the Duke of
Brunswick, built up a collec-
tion of Jewish art and ar-
tifacts. Much of his collection
survived the persecution of the
Jews in the Third Reich and
still testifies to Jewish life in
days gone by.
An outstanding exhibit is the
restored interior of a
synagogue, the social center of
the Jewish community where
Jews prayed and the Torah
* Jewish fkjkiirtr
Phon: (305) 373-4605
Published weekly every Friday
since 1927 by The Jewish Ron
dun Office and Plant 120 N.E.
6th St., Miami, Fla. 33132. Phone
(305) 373-4605.
Second-Class Postage paid in
Miami, Fla. USPS 275320.
Postmaster: Form 3579 return to
Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box
012973, Miami. Fla 33101.
The Jewish Floridian does not
guarantee the Kashruth of the
merchandise advertised in its
columns.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: In ad-
vance (Local Area) One Year
$9.00 (Anniversary Special). Out
of town, country, upon request.
By Mall $1 45 per copy.
was read and studied.
Religious objects hold pride of
place in the collection of
Judaica at the Brunswick
museum, but a wide range of
objects and documents
testifies to the whole gamut of
German Jewish life over the
past 200 years. They include a
silver pointer used to read the
portions of the Torah, so that
they were not touched by
hand.
Other valuable exhibits are a
Torah roll and curtain with a
dedication dated 1770 and
Hebrew manuscripts and
printed works. Prayer or-
naments such as the prayer
coat and cord are further
centuries-old features of
Jewish religious ritual. Other
artifacts testify to Jewish
holidays, such as the shofar, a
ram's horn sounded to mark
the Jewish New Year festival.
The first post-war work by
Jewish artists at the nearby
Bergen-Belsen concentration
camp deals with the Holocaust
(which the artists themselves
survived) in the Third Reich,
Tens of thousands of Jewish
detainees were killed at Belsen
during the Nazi reign of
terror.
The Brunswick
Landesmuseum sees its role as
more than merely collecting
and keeping testimony to
Jewish culture, religion and
history and scientifically
evaluating its material. It aims
to disseminate knowledge
about Judaism and the leading
role it played in German
culture, thereby contributing
toward tolerance and
understanding.
Reform Argue Galut-Diaspora
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The 99th annual convention of
the Central Conference of
American Rabbis ended here
with a spirited defense of the
principle that one can be a true
Zionist without living in Israel.
The CCAR is the rabbinical
organization of Reform
Judaism in the United States.
Its convention created a stir
here, and an angry reaction
from some government circles,
when the rabbis delivered a
letter to Premier Yitzhak
Shamir deploring "the policy
of deliberate beatings ordered
by Defense Minister (Yitzhak)
Rabin as beyond the bounds of
Jewish moral values."
The protest was against the
Israel Defense Force policy of
pursuing and beating Palesti-
nian demonstrators in the ad-
ministered territories. In re-
cent weeks, the policy has been
greatly modified to forbid us-
ing beatings to punish
demonstrators after a riot
takes place.
Rabbi Eugene Lipman
president of the CCAR, stated
in his address that it is not
necessary to live in Israel to be
an authentic Zionist. Rabbi Si-
meon Maslin of Philadelphia
differentiated between galut
and Diaspora.
"Galut is not a place, galut is
the abandonment, willingly or
unwillingly of the Jewish mis-
sion" and therefore, authentic
Jewish life in America is not
necessarily galut, he said.
Passover
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' sJewislhi Floif idliaim
iSfiLA,
Tm*x
Friday. April 1, 1988/
Page 3
Extreme Measures for Land Day
By HUGH ORGEL
and GIL SEDAN
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Israel Defense Force sealed off
the West Bank and Gaza Strip
for three days to prevent an-
ticipated disturbances linked
to Land Day from spreading
into Israel proper.
Israeli Arabs assured the
authorities they would main-
tain order on the Palestinian
day of protest Wednesday
marking the 12th anniversary
of the expropriation of Arab
lands in Galilee.
But an extraordinary
blockade was enforced in the
administered territories,
where Arab-orchestrated riots
have continued for nearly four
months. There was a general
ban on travel between the ter-
ritories and Israel proper. The
West Bank and Gaza Strip
were closed military zones.
Reporters were not allowed
into the territories without
special permission and needed
to be accompanied by an escort
of IDF officers. Residents of
the territories were not per-
mitted to leave them via the
Jordan River bridges, though
the bridges were open for
entry.
Israeli Arab leaders earlier
assured the government that
Land Day would be marked
peacefully as long as Israeli
police did not enter Arab
towns and villages on the
occasion.
The assurances were given
as President Chaim Herzog,
Premier Yitzhak Shamir and
Police Minister Haim Barlev
urged the Arab population not
to resort to violence.
Shehade Shehade, an Arab
priest who heads the National
Committee for the Protection
of the Land, organizers of
Land Day observances, pro-
mised there would be no
disturbances as long as the
police stayed away.
But in response to Herzog's
call, "Jewish guests" were to
be welcomed in Arab villages
to demonstrate Arab-Jewish
coexistence, Shehade said.
Six Arabs died in the
violence that erupted on the
original Land Day, March 30,
1976, when the Israel Defense
Fonv expropriated Arab-
owned lands in Galilee.
Since then, there has been a
tacit understanding that the
police would stay out of Arab
population centers during the
annual observance and the
Arabs would refrain from
disorderly conduct.
Israel to Cooperate On
Iran-Contra Investigation
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Israel has signed a secret
agreement with the special
prosecutor in the Iran-contra
affair, pledging Jerusalem's
continued cooperation in the
investigation on a
"government-to-government
basis,' it was announced here.
The agreement was signed
recently and approved by the
Israel Cabinet, according to a
statement made by the Israel
Embassy.
"The government of Israel
and the independent counsel
expressed their hope and
desire that with the attain-
ment of the agreement their
cooperation will continue in ac-
cordance with the agreement
to their mutual satisfaction,"
the statement said. "The
terms of the agreement are
classified."
Although the embassy would
not go beyond the statement,
the agreement apparently
"leans that Israel will turn
over to special prosecutor
Lawrence Walsh the same in-
"rmation it presented to the
congressional committees that
lnvestigated the secret sale of
arms to Iran and the illegal use
t profits to fund the
wicaraguan rebels, known as
cntra.
wlsh angered the Israeli
government last year when he
cr'ed to subpoena David Kim-
che, the former director
general of the Israel Foreign
Ministry, and Al Schwimmer,
a businessman with dual
Israeli-American citizenship
who was instrumental in the
transfer of U.S. missiles to
Iran.
The Israeli government
threatened to cut off all
cooperation with Walsh. Israel
has stressed that the involve-
ment of any Israelis in the
shipment of arms to Iran was
on behalf of the Israeli govern-
ment and not individuals.
Throughout the Iran-Contra
investigation, Israel has been
reluctant to allow any of the
Israelis involved, inside or out-
side the government, to be
questioned by the United
States. However, it did allow
some of them to be questioned
inside Israel. The Israeli
government also has provided
written information to the
various probes on the affair.
It was not clear whether the
agreement between Walsh and
Israel would include written
replies to questions from the
Israelis involved in the case.
Nor was it clear whether the
Israeli information would be
used at the trial of the four
persons already indicted as a
result of Walsh's investiga-
tion: Rear Adm. John Poindex-
ter, former national security
adviser; Lt. Col. Oliver North,
Continued on Page 22

Two-year-old Jamal Heacock, the son of
teacher Roger Heacock from Philadelphia who
is currently living in Ramallah, walks his
bike down a street as an Israeli Army patrol
passes by. Though calm, the street is the fre-
quent scene of violent anti-Israel demonstra-
tions. APAVide World Photo
Shuttle Diplomacy On For Shultz
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Cabinet sources seemed at a
loss to explain what U.S.
Secretary of State George
Shultz hopes to achieve on his
upcoming return visit to the
Middle East, having failed on
his two previous visits this
month to sell his peace
package to the Israeli and
Arab leadership.
Shultz's trip, announced by
the U.S. State Department, is
set to begin Sunday.
After hearing a report by
Premier Yitzhak Shamir at the
weekly Cabinet meeting, some
top Israeli policy-makers said
they could not understand the
purpose of-the visit, unless
Shultz has new ideas or facts
he has not yet shared.
Barring that, his intention
may be nothing more than to
demonstrate the American ad-
ministration's determination
to maintain the momentum of
its peace initiative, they said.
The sources said they have
no indication that Shultz made
progress in his talks in
Washington with Soviet
Foreign Minister Eduard
Shevardnadze. The super-
powers remain at odds over
the proposed international
conference.
Moscow wants a conference
that would be the centerpiece
of Middle East peace negotia-
tions. Shultz's idea is for an in-
ternational umbrella for direct
Arab-Israeli talks, with no
power to impose solutions or
veto agreements.
Shultz so far has received no
response to his peace plan
from the Arab states, except
Egypt, which supports it. The
Israeli government is divided
between the Labor Party,
headed by a foreign minister
who backs the American in-
itiative, and Shamir and his
Likud bloc, which vehemently
oppose it.
The cool response to the
news that Shultz was return-
ing to the region was not
shared by the Laborites, who
welcomed his trip. Shamir,
however, reiterated his objec-
tions to Shultz's idea.
Shamir Stands Firm
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Yitzhak Shamir pic-
tured Israel as standing firm
against the Palestinian upris-
ing and efforts to maneuver it
into unacceptable diplomatic
scenarios, despite a hostile
press abroad and signs of
faithlessness by the United
States.
In a statement to the
Knesset opening a political
debate, Shamir offered a dour
assessment of developments
since his return from the
United States and the an-
nouncement that U.S.
Secretary of State George
Shultz will visit the region
again, starting April 3.
But he spoke glowingly of
the American Jewish com-
munity, which he said has
"come out in their masses to
express support and solidarity
Continued on Page 22


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 1, 1988
Viewpoint
Next Year in Jerusalem
When the Passover seder ends with the mes-
sianic wish for "Next year in Jerusalem ..."
there is the Diaspora hope that peace and
freedom will be known across the varied lands
in which Jews live.
This year, that catch-phrase will have special
emphasis and meaning for Israeli and world
Jewry.
There will be no seder table that will not be
marked, implicitly or explicitly, by the events
ongoing in Greater Israel. That the season that
marks our freedom as a people is blemished
this year by the conflict between two Semitic
peoples each seeking its homeland can only br-
ing into sharper focus the import of Passover.
The symbolic leavetaking of bondage that
we, the children of that earlier generation, re-
count this weekend, will be interpreted on a
variety of levels. The renewal of life, of spring
and modern symbols of an ancient Temple
sacrifice all suggest the positive hope that this
period of unrest will soon end. The bitterness
of the maror cannot be lost on the recurrent
battle for the homeland, the Jewish state, that
needs be won again and again and again. And
the "tears" of salt water are spilt for any life
lost, on any side of the "green line."
The individual characters of family celebra-
tions are melded into one seamless ceremony
by the communal dream of freedom, expressed
for the 3,300th year.
And for that significant commemoration,
Diaspora Jewry can do no less than continue to
work for those who are not yet free, in the
Soviet Union, in Ethiopia, in Syria.. .
And, to hope, that next year in Jerusalem,
there will be peace.
AJCongress Anniversary
Seventy years after Rabbi Stephen S. Wise
helped to found it, the American Jewish Con-
gress remains one of the most outspoken and
effective defense organizations in the nation.
Created to help press for the rights of
thousands of displaced Jews in the wake of the
First World War, AJCongress voices an agen-
da for Jews embracing human rights, religious
liberty and civil rights.
A strong ally of the Zionist Movement in ad-
vocating the establishment of the State of
Israel, Congress recently broke with the tradi-
tion of mainstream American Jewish agencies
in publicly urging the Israeli Government to
seek peace through an international
conference.
At its 70th annual national convention in
Philadelphia, delegates overwhelmingly en-
dorsed their leadership's decision to support
the Shultz-Reagan peace initiative endorsed by
Israel's Labor Party.
In Florida, AJCongress represents a Jewish
family in the small Panhandle town of
Crestview who seek to have religious practices
of the local school district ended.
Nationally, the organization took a promi-
nent early role in the fight to reject the
nomination to the Supreme Court of Judge
Robert Bork, supported the passage of the
Civil Rights Restoration Act and spoke out
forcefully against Pope John Paul IPs meeting
with Austrian President Kurt Waldheim.
Rabbi Wise would be proud of the ongoing
efforts of an organization which is one of his
major legacies to American Judaism.
s/TA
-Another Jackson Coalition-
Michigan's Democratic caucus results of last
weekend touched off speculation on two
separate fronts. The Reverend Jesse Jackson's
decisive victory more than 50 percent of the
popular vote for the moment ended talk that
Governor Michael Dukakis is the inevitable
presidential nominee of his party. It also ended
the aspirations of Rep. Richard Gephardt,
whose blaze of glory rolled steadily downhill
after his Iowa triumph.
The Reverend Mr. Jackson also addressed a
gathering of "Arab Americans for Jesse
Jackson" at the Islamic Center of America in
Detroit only hours before the Michigan voting.
A photograph of Jackson with his arm around
Imam Mohamed Chirri was distributed na-
tionally by the Associated Press, and included
in the pictures made available to Anglo-Jewish
publications which are eligible to reproduce AP
photos.
Thus Jackson not only chose to solicit sup-
port from the large Arab American population
in the Detroit area, but also may have decided
to write off the Jewish American vote in
Michigan and in remaining key primaries such
as New York, California and Pennsylvania.
His decision to so openly court the Arab
Americans at the Islamic Center, even though
his address merely stated that peace is at-
tainable in the Middle East, evoked bitter
memories of his campaign four years ago.
Jackson's efforts to place his closeness to PLO
Chairman Arafat and to Minister Farrakhan in
the past seemingly not are over.
It will be interesting to see if the seemingly
small segment of liberal Jews who have joined
Jackson's "Rainbow Coalition" stands silent in
the face of what must be regarded as a major
policy decision on the part of one of the
Democrats' two biggest vote-getters and
delegate winners to date.
And those Democrats who are the biggest
workers, contributors and fund raisers for
their party around the nation, and also are
Jewish, also will be looked to for reaction.
Even silence has untold significance in the
days and weeks ahead towards a convention
which may acutally select the nominee after
the gavel drops for the first time.
Jesse
Jackson
Anschluss Commemoration Reveals Austria
By RABBI
MARC H. TANENBAUM
The observance this month
of the 50th anniversary of the
Anschluss, Nazi Germany's an-
nexation of Austria, is reveal-
ing the worst and the best of
Austrian society.
The worst is reflected in the
appalling fact that for the*past
40 years most Austrians have
imagined themselves the "first
eJewish Floridiati
Fred K. Shochel
Editor and Publisher
Suzanne Shochet
Executive Editor
Norma A. Orovitz
Managing Editor
Joan C Teglas
Director of Advertising
Friday. April 1.1988
Volume 61
14NISAN5748
Number 14
victims" of Nazi aggression
and have systematically denied
or repressed any knowledge of
their massive involvement.
But the historic truths brought
to the fore during this com-
memoration can no longer be
denied.
When Hitler and his Nazi
hordes marched into Austria
on March 13, 1938, they were
greeted deliriously by some
200,000 Austrians* in Vienna.
Austria provided three-
quarters of the death-camp of-
ficers, including Adolf
Eichmann and SS Commander
Ernst Kaltenbrunner.
Bitter political anti-
Semitism was incubated by
Vienna's Mayor Karl von
Lueger in the 1870s and other
politicians, and heavy traces of
that pathology remain.
But the best of Austria is
also surfacing today. Young
Austrians by the thousands
are holding vigils-
demonstrating for Waldheim s
resignation and spoMOTO
seminars on Austria's Nazi
past. And most reassuring is
the leadership of Chancellor
Franz Vranitzky. who em-
bodies the now democratic
Austria. Vranitzky gave mean-
ing to the Anschluss, on Marcn
12, in these words:
we
"We must never forget and
-e must insure there i-
nothing in today's society U
could lead us into an abyss, *>
happened in 1938."
Rabbi Mart H Tanrnbaum S#*
tor of international rtlatw-< l" "
American Jevisk Commxttee


Friday, April 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 5
Modern Miracle-
Distance Remains
By MITCHELL BARD
Every year around
Passover, when I see the
television broadcast of Cecil B.
DeMille's film "The Ten Com-
mandments," I can't help but
wonder how the Hebrews
could lack faith.
Don't you think that after
witnessing contemporary ver-
sions of the Passover miracles
vou would have faith in God?
What if drinking fountains ran
red with blood, or the sun did
not come out during the day?
What if you were driving down
the freeway during rush hour
and the cars ahead of you were
suddenly pushed aside, allow-
ing you to pass?
Instead, we do lack faith to-
day. We are cynics, though
probably not any more than
our forefathers who lived in
Egypt. Some people say that
we have reason to be cynical
because we are living in the
generation after the
Holocaust.
But I ascribe to the belief
that rather than cite the
Holocaust as proof that God
does not exist, I see the
miracle of Israel as evidence
that God does exist.
Think for a moment about
the probability of fruition of
Theodor Herzl's 1897 declara-
tion that the Jewish state
would arise within 50 years. It
was not inevitable that the
Jews would have a state,
despite what the conspiracy
theorists would have us
believe.
It was not the alleged power
of the "Jewish lobby" that con-
vinced President Truman to
support the creation of a
Jewish state. When Eddie
Jacobson became Harry
Truman's best friend he did
not know that his haber-
dashery partner would become
president of the United States.
When the British partitioned
Palestine, it was not at all ap-
parent that one day the Jews
would rule the land.
Couldn't the creation of Mitchell Bard is a foreign policy
Israel be considered a miracle? analyst living in Washington.
We are quick to lament
Israel's economic problems,
the threat of terrorism, the
damage to U.S.-Israel rela-
tions from the Pollard es-
pionage affair. But we are
even quicker to forget the
staggering accomplishments
of this small country in its
brief, 40-year history.
Since its creation on May 14,
1948, Israel has prevailed in its
six wars, usually outnumbered
and outgunned.
The pioneers who settled in
Palestine turned malarial
swamps and desert sand into
an oasis of agriculture and in-
dustry. While most young na-
tions languish in poverty and
delayed development, Israel
has become one of the most
technologically advanced
societies in the world.
During most of its early
years, Israel's economic
growth rate exceeded that of
all other industrial nations, in-
cluding Japan! Today, Israel is
recognized as a leader in
energy and agricultural
technology and its people en-
joy a standard of living far
greater than that of the other
newly independent nations.
The Jewish people still have
problems. There is still anti-
Semi ism and intermarriage.
And Israel still has problems.
Her neighbors, with the excep-
tion of Egypt, still want to
destroy her and there are ten-
sions within the country.
Just as the memory of the
miracles that God performed
in Egypt quickly faded, so, too,
have the modern miracles fad-
ed from our consciousness.
The murmuring of the people
grows louder with each new
settlement and each devalua-
tion of the shekel, but we must
not allow our current dif-
ficulties to obscure the
distance we have traveled
since we first left Egypt or the
distance that remains.
An Israeli soldier gives television camera
crews orders to leave an area near a mosque in
Ramallah, where a violent demonstration took
place. The army has recently been closing off
many areas to the press and this week ordered
the entire West Bank and Gaza area sealed to
the public. AP/Wide World Photo
The Media As Messenger;
An Israeli Dilemma
By ASHER NAIM
In recent weeks, the media
has focused much attention on
the disturbances in the ter-
ritories. This press coverage
has, in turn, focused attention
on the media itself. The
graphic descriptions on the
pages of newspapers and
magazines, and especially the
violent scenes that are daily
portrayed on TV screens
around the world have pro-
mpted judgments on the basis
of immediate impressions.
Some of the reporting and
editorializing has been balanc-
ed and has sought to place the
events in perspective.
However, most coverage has
been excessive in playing up
certain specific aspects of the
events, while often ignoring
others. This out-of-context
reporting has dismayed many
Israelis who feel that Israel is
receiving superficial and un-
fair treatment. The issue is be-
ing debated at length in Israel,
and representatives of the
media have taken part in such
discussion. The subject, in-
cluding the role of the media in
an open society such as Israel,
has also been addressed
abroad.
The following points are
worthy of consideration in ad-
dressing the media's role in
the recent events:
1. Israel is a democracy, an
open society where freedom of
the press is cherished. The
Israeli press is an active com-
ponent of a free society, and all
viewpoints find expression.
Alongside the local media, 350
resident foreign cor-
respondents are permanently
posted in Israel, while 250-300
visiting correspondents, not
counting crews, are now in the
country on temporary
assignments. In terms of
foreign correspondents, only
the two superpowers host
more journalists. Members of
the media in Israel may go
Continued on Page 23
Contemporary Interpretation Plagues of Our Time
By RABBI
WILLIAM BERKOWITZ
For most people, what is
past is past, never to be heard
or seen from again. However,
for Jews, the past is eternally
present. Yesterday is found in
today and they are both the in-
troduction for tomorrow.
Nowhere does that reality
become as boldly clear as in
the Passover experience. The
entire seder ritual is an exam-
ple of the past as present. For
this Jew, living in 1988, the
ten Plagues inflicted on an-
cient Egypt are a striking in-
stance of this reality.
While the Haggadah relates
tne plagues as happening
thousands of years ago, the
careful observer will
nonetheless notice their
Presence in our midst, confron-
ting us with their power, and
caning for our response. Let us
examine the plagues:
Blood One does not have
0 look too far to see the
^emendous violence confron-
ting our world, whether in the
street of our cities or on the
battlefields where wars rage.
The most frightening prospect
is the nuclear annihilation that
continually hangs over our
heads.
Frogs The Jewish com-
mentator S.R. Hirsch saw the
ancient plague of frogs as a
way of disrupting the homes of
the Egyptians, driving them
out of bed and board, thus
making them sense the
Israelite condition of
homelessness. Our society con-
tinues to struggle with the
moral crisis of the homeless in
our cities. How do we help
them? How must our govern-
ment respond? And how
should the Jewish community
react?
Vermin This plague was
the one of small insects that
conveyed a sense of constant
nuisance. Who needs to cite
the constant nuisances of
modern urban life?
Wild beasts The Jewish
community is increasingly con-
cerned by the recurring
presence of anti-Semitism and
bigotry, bearing witness to the
bestiality in humankind. The
growth of neo-Nazi and other
racist organizations seems
even in this post-Holocaust era
to have resulted in greater
hatred and violence against
Jews and minorities.
Pestilence Thisplague of
infectious diseases affected an-
cient Egypt's animals and
livestock. And as they died,
the food supply was disrupted.
Passover is when we
remember "all those who are
hungry." Even in our world of
plentiful, food surpluses,
millions still go hungry each
night.
Boils Not long ago, a vic-
tim of AIDS recounted how at
a Passover seder he wept at
this plague, identifying it with
his own malady. AIDS is kill-
ing thousands.
Hail Passover 1988 will
be remembered as a time when
Palestinian rioters bombarded
Israeli troops with a hail of
stones. Who would have
believed it could cause so much
death, grief and anguish for
Jew and Arab alike?
Locusts Traditional com-
mentators have seen in the
locusts that darkened the
horizon of Egypt a metaphor
for confusion and inability to
see clearly. Americans who
have watched television news
reports of Palestinian riots
have been plagued by confu-
sion and a lack of clarity,
which has caused much harm
for the Jewish state and the
Jewish people.
Darkness A famed
Hasidic rabbi explained that
the plague of darkness was
that "people could not see
their brothers and share their
needs." In other words, the
darkness was disunity. As we
survey the Jewish community,
the battles between religious
and secular, Orthodox and
non-Orthodox, Israel and
Diaspora serve to divide us,
weakening our resolve and
threatening our future.
Death of the first born
The final and ultimate plague
was the loss of Egypt's first-
born children and thus the call-
ing into question of its future.
As the Jewish community
grapples with the issues of a
low birth rate, intermarriage,
alienation and assimilation and
Jewish illiteracy, it must
remember that the ultimate
plague is that which destroys
our future as a community.
The Haggadah reminds us
that in each and every genera-
tion there are those who would
destroy us, but that God saves
us. Our tradition also declares
that God could not split the
Sea of Reeds until someone
jumped in the water.
While God will ultimately
save us. each and every Jew
must resolve to fight the rag-
ing waves which threaten us.
Rabbi William tierkouitz is national
president of the American Jewish
Heritage Committee.


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 1, 1988
By RUTH E. GRUBER
ROME (JTA) The
rediscovery of a pro-Hitler,
anti-Semitic letter by pre-war
Italian physicist Ettore Ma-
jorana has added to the
mystery surrounding him.
Majorana, who disappeared
without a trace in 1938, was
one of a group of young Italian
physicists who, working with
Enrico Fermi, initiated studies
on energy that eventually led
to the development of the
atomic bomb.
At least two books have been
written about Majorana's
disappearance, with one
author claiming the physicist
either committed suicide or
entered a monastery due to
guilt after realizing the poten-
tial destructive capacity of the
atom.
Majorana was doing
research in Leipzig, Germany
when he wrote the pro-Nazi
letter to future Nobel physics
laureate Emilio Segre, in
March 1933 two months
after Hitler came to power. In
1966, physicist Edoardo
Amaldi, who had worked with
Majorana and Segre in the
1930s, mentioned for the first
time that Majorana had great-
ly admired Germany and had
written to Segre to defend
Nazi policies.
Segre in 1975 confirmed he
had received such a letter, but
claimed that it was lost when
the ocean liner Andrea Doha
sank in the Atlantic.
U.S. Denies
PLO Meet
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) A
report that the U.S. am-
bassador to the United Na-
tions met in Tunisia with a
senior leader of the Palestine
Liberation Organization was
denied by the envoy, Vernon
Walters, as well as the State
Department and the U.S. Mis-
sion to the United Nations.
CBS News reported that
Walters met a PLO leader in a
private home in a coastal town
near Tunis, the Tunisian
capital. CBS attributed the in-
formation to top PLO officials.
Walters, arriving in Geneva
to address the UN Human
Rights Commission,
categorically denied the alleg-
ed meeting. "I deny it, it is a
lie. I have not met a PLO
representative in Tunis. I am
not authorized to speak with
the PLO," Walters said in
response to questions by
reporters here.
He added: "It's absolute
nonsense. I never saw anybody
in Tunisia but Tunisians and
Americans ... No
Palestinians."
In Washington, Charles Red-
man, a spokesman for the
State Department, said the
CBS report "is a complete
fabrication. Somebody's been
had."
The U.S. assured Israel in
September 1975 that U.S.
government officials would not
meet or negotiate with
members of the PLO.
However. Andrew Young,
then U.S. ambassador to the
United Nations, held a
15-minute meeting with a PLO
official in New York in 1979.
He subsequently resigned
under pressure.
Mystery of Missing Physicist
Adds Intrigue to Nazi Letter
Only in recent months has
Segre admitted that the letter
still was in his possession. It
will be published in full in the
magazine Storia Contem-
poranea (Contemporary
History), but the newspaper
La Stampa printed excerpts.
Publication came when con-
siderable attention has been
focused on Jews in Italy in the
wake of the continuing clashes
in Israel's administered ter-
ritories, in reaction to the Kurt
Waldheim affair, in response
to shifting relationships bet-
ween Jews and the Vatican
and in a re-examination of the
Jewish experience in Italy dur-
ing World War II.
American historian Susan
Zuccotti's book on the
Holocaust in Italy is just being
issued now in Italian transla-
tion and is being treated as a
major literary event.
Majorana's letter to Segre,
dated May 25, 1933 from Leip-
zig, was an apology for Hitler's
anti-Semitic policies and a
defense of the Nazi philosophy,
with which the writer ap-
parently knew his friends were
not in agreement. He wrote:
"It may appear that the pro-
portion of Jews in Germany is
tiny in light of the false
statistics (one percent).
"In reality, they dominate
finance, the press, the political
parties and in Berlin they were
even in the numerical majority
in some professional fields, for
example, prosecutors. But
neither religious motives nor
racial prejudice is enough to
explain by itself the im-
possibility of coexistence.
"In Italy we are used to con-
sidering the Jews as a
historical survival to which we
do not deny our full respect
and we don't object if any of
them feels proud of his
origin," he wrote.
"... In Germany, the situa-
tion was very different and,
without analyzing the causes,
one can say with certainty that
there existed a Jewish ques-
tion that did not show any
signs of resolving itself spon-
taneously," he continued.
He said "Jews had no desire
to assimilate and that it's in-
conceivable that a population
of 65 million should allow itself
to be guided by a minority of
600,000 who openly declared
that they wanted to constitute
a people by themselves."
"Some affirm that the
Jewish question would not ex-
ist if the Jews knew the art of
keeping their mouths closed."
Majorana also wrote that the
situation of the Jews in Ger-
many at the time was not as
bad as it seemed from outside,
and he accused new Jewish im-
migrants into Germany "the
dangerous Jewish immigration
from primitive communities in
Slavic countries, mainly
Poland" of fomenting
troubles.
' Among those new jm
migrants are provocateur rah-
bis who, so they say, invite
persecutions in order to
solidify the unity of their neo
pie," he wrote. |W
In making public the letter
Segre said he had been surpnj!
ed that "a mind as acute and
critical as that of Ettore could
have accepted all that pro
poganda of Goebbels he read in
the newspapers, without
realizing that even if some of
the criticism (very few) were
not completely without f0Un.
dation, the entirety had an ini-
quitous and sinister scope and
were only a prelude to terrible
horrors."
He said he previously had
not made the letter "public
because he did not believe Ma-
jorana would have wanted to
see it in print.
"I want to believe that if Et-
tore Majorana had lived
longer," Segre said, "he would
have seen things very dif-
ferently and would have
repudiated what he wrote."
Segre said Majorana had
several close Jewish friends in
Germany, and it is strange
that Majorana did not unders-
tand the situation better.
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Palestinians Testing
Limits of Disobedience
Friday, April 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 7
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM -.(JTA) -
Palestinian nationalist circles
were apparently caught in an
internal debate on just how far
their civil disobedience cam-
paign should go.
The mass resignation of
some 300 police officers seem-
ed to have struck some parts of
the Palestinian political com-
munity as going too far, leav-
ing the streets to the rule of
the underworld.
An influential Palestinian,
Dr. Haidar Abdul Shafi, the
head of the Red Crescent in
the Gaza Strip, went as far as
to say that the resignation act
should be the prerogative of
each and every individual.
Some 40 police officers in the
Hebron region reversed their
earlier decision to resign and
showed up for duty.
But at the same time, seven
Arab officers in the Jerusalem
Temple Mount police force an-
nounced their resignation say-
ing others would follow suit.
Local inhabitants questioned
on the Voice of Israel Radio
said they could do without the
Arab police and could take
care of themselves further
affirmation of rumors that na-
tionalist circles are trying to
establish in the territories
alternative services to those
provided by the government.
Shmuel Goren, coordinator
of government affairs in the
administered territories,
warned that the defense
establishment would not allow
any alternative frameworks to
operate.
The question remained
whether the Palestinians
would force a showdown,
which would probably entail
further sanctions by the
authorities against the local
population.
Some of the measures taken
by the authorities include
reducing the fuel supply to the
territories, preventing exports
to Jordan, preventing trips to
Jordan and visits from the
Arab countries to West Bank
trouble spots, forcing mer-
chants to open up businesses
during strike hours and close
them during business hours.
Nazi Guards Added
To Watch List
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The Justice Department asked
the Immigration and
Naturalization Service to place
the names of 9,800 suspected
former concentration camp
guards on its "watch list."
Those individuals, whom the
department determined
assisted or otherwise par-
ticipated in Nazi-sponsored
persecution, would be barred
from entering the United
States under the Holtzman
Amendment.
The names were compiled
from captured war records,
post-World War II wanted and
detention lists and extradition
requests.
Neal Sher, director of the
Justice Department's Office of
Special Investigations, which
searches for and prosecutes
Nazi war criminals living in
the United States, said he ex-
pects the list to be broadened
once additional archival
documents are searched.
While OS I has previously
supplied the INS and State
Department with the names of
thousands of suspected war
criminals, the listing of 9,800
former concentration camp
guards was compiled with the
aid of a new sophisticated com-
puter database.
Sher said in an interview
that from now on, OSI's
listings of suspected war
criminals will be "more
systematic" than ever before.
He added that preventing
alleged Nazi persecutors from
entering the United States is
an important aspect of OSI's
mandate, along with the
denaturalization or deporta-
tion of those illegally residing
here.
OSI currently is in-
vestigating 700 suspected war
criminals, has brought to trial
about 70 and has lost just one
verdict.
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Greek Generals Support PLO
Nations resolutions."
The group includes
the
ATHENS (JTA) A group
of 30 retired Greek generals
and admirals from the army,
navy and air force announced
they are prepared to put their
technical expertise at the
disposal of the Palestine
Liberation Organization in its
struggle against Israel.
The declaration was issued
in Tunis, where the retired of-
ficers met at length with PLO
chief Yasir Arafat, affirmed
their solidarity with the
Palestinian cause and con-
demned Israel for its "barbaric
acts against the Palestinians
and refusal to abide by United
former top-ranking officer in
the Greek navy, Vice Admiral
Nikos Pappas.
Another retired naval com-
mander, Andonis Naxakis,
assisted the PLO last month in
its attempts to sail a shipload
of several hundred Palestinian
deportees and their sym-
pathizers to Israel.
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 1, 1988
Yeshiva University student Bechor Davidov,
left, a Bukkarian native, dons an em-
broidered, silk traditional Bukharian garb,
worn by his Sephardic ancestors, to enact the
Passover Seder. Davidov, 17, was born in
Chitrishi, a city next to Bukharia now in the
Soviet Union. He arrived in the United States
nearly two years ago and is now a pre-med
student at Yeshiva College. Shirin Siony,
right, a 22-year-old Iranian student, holds the
matzoh. This Passover seder will be the first
Siony will celebrate with her parents, who
recently arrived here from Iran.
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Israel Defense Force plans to
take punitive action against
journalists who file what it
contends are false reports of
events in the administered
territories.
This was confirmed by the
IDF's chief spokesman, Brig.
Gen. Ephraim Lapid, who said
the measures would be applied
against both Israeli reporters
and foreign correspondents.
But the National Federation
of Israeli Journalists has vow-
ed to fight any government at-
tempt to punish reporters
whose copy it dislikes.
The federation noted that
the IDF has recourse to the
Press Council or the federa-
tion's own ethics committee if
it feels there has been a
misrepresentation of facts.
But the journalists profes-
sional association said it would
not allow the government to be
"both the accuser and the
judge."
According to Lapid, the
IDF's purpose is to combat
what it claims is an increasing
number of false news reports
from the West Bank and Gaza
Strip that do damage to its
image.
An example cited was a
report that Palestinians have
been thrown out of
helicopters. The IDF
spokesman said there is "ab-
solutely no truth" to such
reports. He said there have
been exhaustive investigations
of every rumor.
The question of local press
coverage may become moot if
the Press Workers Union car-
ries out its announced plans to
strike Israeli newspapers "for
an indefinite period.
The issue is a threat by the
Publishers Association to in-
sist on separate wage negotia-
tions at each newspaper, in-
stead of the collective bargain-
ing in force until now.
German Solidarity
Chancellor Helmut Kohl
wished Israelis "security and
peace for the further suc-
cessful construction" of their
country in an advertisement
by the Christian Democratic
Party which appeared in the
German-language newspaper
Israel-Nachrichten in Tel Aviv.
Several cities and institutions
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Wishes Friends & Customers
A Happy and Healthy Passover
British Concert Canceled
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) The
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
has canceled a concert tour in
Israel that was to have been a
centerpiece of Israel's 40th an-
niversary celebrations.
A spokesman for the or-
chestra confirmed the move,
explaining that the orchestra
"had to review our undertak-
ing to the 125 musicians
because contractual payments
had not been honored."
But there seemed to be
unspoken political
implications.
The orchestra was to have
played in a performance of
Verdi's opera "Nabucco,"
which concerns King
Nebuchadnezzar and the
Jewish return from exile in
Babylon.
The opera ends with the im.
mortal "March of the Hebrew
Slaves," which was to have
been sung in Hebrew by a
choir of several hundred
British singers.
The performance was
scheduled to be held at the
walls of the Old City of
Jerusalem, a symbolic celebra-
tion of the "return to Zion."
Unless alternative ar-
rangements are made. the
cancellations will doubtlessly
be seen as a gesture of protest
against Israel's handling of
three months of Palestinian
unrest in the West Bank and
Gaza Strip.
in the Federal Republic also
stressed their ties to Israel in
ads in the newspaper
celebrating "Brotherhood
Week" in the 40th anniversary
year of Israel's birth as a state.
The West German am-
bassador to Israel, Wilhelm
Haas, wrote that Brotherhood
Week commemorated the
"unimaginable achievement
and untiring commitment of
all those without whom Israel
never would have become a
reality." It is painfully ap-
parent at present that the in-
ternal and external peace has
not yet been won, Haas
observed. The Jewish people
need peace afer a 3000-year
history of persecution
"probably more than any other
people," he concluded.
In a related show of support
in Germany, a series of plays,
readings and art exhibits con-
centrating on the views of the
children of both victims and
perpetrators of the Nazi
persecution of the Jews forms
the focus of the 1988 Jewish
Literature and Theater Weeks
currently being held in
Frankfurt.
The head of the city's
cultural department, Hilmar
Hoffmann, declared that the
city of Frankfurt and its
Jewish community want to
"give a signal against the sup-
pression and denial of
history." The events began
with the performance of Nobel
Peace Prize laureate Elie
Wiesel's play The Trial of God.
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The Difference:-
Friday, April 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 9
On Being Free and Being Freed
Bv RABBI BERNARD S.
RASKAS
Moses is mentioned but once
in a stray passage during the
seder service, but nevertheless
he is the towering figure of the
Haggadah as well as the entire
Passover.
His lack of emphasis during
the seder is for two reasons
his rather obvious centrality in
this great drama are the con-
cern of the rabbis who compil-
ed the Haggadah that he might
become idolized or worshipped
as a deity.
Moses' impact is exemplified
in the following story. The pro-
phet was tending his sheep in
the wilderness when he saw
that wonderful burning bush.
Now, according to the story,
Moses turned aside, but then
he heard God call his name.
"Yes," said Moses. "What
do you want?"
"Well," said God, "I have
good news and bad news for
you."
Nu, Moses said, "start off
with the good news."
And God replied: "I have
heard the cry of my oppressed
people in Egypt. I am going to
rescue them. But the Pharaoh
will refuse to let them go, and I
will have to smite Egypt with
terrible plagues: blood, frogs,
vermin, cattle disease, boils,
hail, locusts and the slaying of
the first born.
"I will have to drown the
whole Egyptian army in the
Red Sea horses, chariots,
troops everything. But in
the end. you will lead the
Hebrew people to freedom."
"That sounds great," said
Moses. "Now what is the bad
news?"
"You," said the voice from
the bush, "will have to write
the environmental impact
study."
Behind this story lies the
profound question of why the
elaborate scenario? Why did
God not directly intervene and
take the people out? Why did
God leave the decision up to
Pharaoh with all its concommi-
tant pressure? Why didn't God
smooth Moses' way and simply
have him lead the people to
Mount Sinai?
The answer lies in a
midrash, a rabbinic story: On-
y a few years later, after the
Israelites had left Egypt and
had received the Torah, they
stood on the border of Canaan,
ready to invade. It was God's
plan that those who had been
liberated from Egypt would
conquer Canaan and settle the
land.
But, as the Bible informs us,
Jhe recently liberated
Israelites backed off, fearing
defeat, and were condemned
y God to live out their lives in
Jhe desert. After they died,
weir children entered the Pro-
mised Land.
why, asked the rabbis, did
^ese former slaves who had
witnessed God's great power
refuse the opportunity to fulfill
* redemption? Why did they
'ear to take the land which
^od had promised them?
The answer of the rabbis is
simple, basic and classic: "You
could take the Jews out of
^gypt, but you can't take
Egypt out of the Jews." It
takes time to prepare for
freedom.
In other words, there is a dif-
ference between "being freed"
and "being free," between be-
ing merely released from
repression and acting like free
independent human beings.
God chose to have the Jews
wander in the wilderness for
40 years in order to help
diminish their slave mentality
and to prepare them for the
challenges and risks of living
in freedom.
Indeed, this points out the
three sides of the triangle of
freedom: physical freedom, in-
tellectual freedom and emo-
tional freedom.
Most important, of course, is
physical freedom. In contem-
porary terms, this means
freedom for the Jews in the
Soviet Union and Arab coun-
tries, to practice Judaism and
to emigrate as they wish.
It relates to the freedom of
blacks, in South Africa to be
treated as equal citizens, to
vote, to live wherever they
wish. It relates to
Afghanistan, which is
dominated by Soviet military
forces. One could wander the
world and discover that
freedom is a dream that many
cheri.-h, but that so many are
denied.
All the natures and cultures
should remember the words of
Ralph Waldo Emerson: "If you
put a chain around the neck of
a slave, the other end fastens
itself to your own arm."
Or to put it in more graphic
terms: Freedom is like a bag of
sand. If there is a hole
anywhere in the bag, all the
sand will run out. If any
groups of people is denied its
rights, sooner or later all
groups will be denied their
rights. Freedom is indivisible:
It is for all or it is for none.
The second aspect of
freedom is intellectual. We can
be free physically, but bound
intellectually. It is what the
Hebrew writer Ahad Ha'am
termed "avdut betoch cherut"
slavery amidst freedom.
This means that unless a
minority culture is vigilant,
committed and aware, it can
slowly slip into the majority
culture.
The situation of contem-
porary U.S. Jewry is an ob-
vious illustration of this
thought. We must be deter-
mined not to be intellectually
lazy, but continue tp practice,
study and preserve our tradi-
tions. The growth of the
Hebrew day school, the expan-
sion of Hebrew studies on cam-
puses, the steady stream of
new Jewish books and
magazines are assertions of
Jewish intellectual freedom.
On the other hand, assimila-
tionist tendencies are far too
many and too obvious to men-
tion. They demonstrate that
many of us are still in intellec-
tual slavery. But the one sure
way to keep Jewish intellectual
freedom is through Jewish
education.
A non-Jew was attending a
Jewish fund-raising meeting.
Afterward, he approached the
two Jewish co-chairmen, who
were his friends, and asked,
"How are you able to raise
such a fantastic sum?"
One co-chairman replied,
"First you start with 2,000
years of persecution." The
other co-chairman interrupted
him and said, "Wrong. First
you start with 3,000 years of
education." In persecution
there is slavery, but in educa-
tion there is freedom.
The final side of the freedom
triangle may be termed
psychological. We live under
the constant threat of a
nuclear holocaust. We are
paralyzed by an inability to
handle social problems such as
hunger, drugs and crime. Our
own personal problems, pre-
judices and hang-ups do not
allow us to think clearly, much
less find peace of mind.
Here, too, we must make
every effort to free ourselves
of our real fears and imaginary
phobias. Admittedly, it is not
easy, and there are no simple
solutions, but we must not give
up and we must not give in.
Through negotiations, through
thoughtful planning and ex-
perimentation, through
therapy and proper guidance,
we can make significant ad-
vances toward psychological
freedom. If we are determin-
ed, it can be done.
This is exactly the point of
Pesach. We became free Jews
over a period of time, not in an
instant. The Bible tells us
there were moments of dispair
some of the wandering
Hebrews even lost hope and
gave up and wanted to return
to slavery in Egypt but
those who stuck with it, those
who were determined, those
who worked at it eventually
became a free people.
Pesach teaches their legacy
and in their ways can we find
the promise and joy of
freedom. Even though the
temptation to return to
slavery is luring and beguiling,
we must avoid the pitfall.
There is an episode that oc-
curred shortly after Abraham
Lincoln issued the Emancipa-
tion Proclamation, which freed
the slaves. One day, a liberated
slave met his former master in
the street.
The once-master asked,
"Are you as well off as you
were before you were free?"
The black, former slave admit-
ted that his clothes were
frayed, that the roof of his
house leaked and that his
meals were nothing like the
food on the old plantation.
"Well," said the old master,
"wouldn't you rather be a
slave again?"
"No." was the firm reply.
"There is a sort of looseness
about this freedom that my
family and I like."
Yes, to be free gives us a cer-
tain looseness the oppor-
tunity to choose, the chance to
be ourselves, the pleasure of
expanding our minds intellec-
tually and our souls
emotionally.
The pleasure of freedom is
one of the great jobs of being.
That is why at the seder we
sing the song Avadim hayinu
atta bnai chorin Once we
were slaves, now we are free.
Rabbi Bernard S. Raslcas serves
Temple of Aaron Congregation, St.
Paul. Minn., and is author of the
trilogy Heart of Wisdom.
Austrian Accused
Of Inciting Bias
LONDON The Director
General of the Austrian
Foreign Ministry on a visit to
Kuwait said his country would
not bow to "Zionist threats" in
the case of Kurt Waldheim.
The World Jewish Congress
office here denounced the
remarks as blatantly anti-
Jewish and an effort to divert
attention from the condemna-
tion of Waldheim's Nazi past
made by Austria's own com-
mission of historians.
"This is a shocking attempt
to incite anti-Jewish hatred in
an Arab country and a blatant
effort to draw attention away
from the fact that Austria's
own commission concluded
that Waldheim had con-
tinuously lied about his war-
time activities and had per-
sonally facilitated Nazi war
crimes," the WJC statement
said.
Last month, the interna-
tional panel of historians
which handed its report to the
Austrian government conclud-
ed that during the Second
World War, Waldheim
"repeatedly assisted in con-
nection with illegal actions and
thereby facilitated their
execution."
The Austrian official,
Thomas Klestil, the former
Austrian Ambassador to the
United Steves, quoted the
Kuwaiti le.der, Sheik Jaber
Al-Ahmed Al-Sabah as exten-
ding an invitation for
Waldheim to visit Kuwait
"with all appreciation and
welcome," according to the of-
ficial Kuwait News Agency.
Waldheim, who was formally
banned from entering the
United States, has been in vir-
tual diplomatic isolation since
the revelations of his Nazi past
and has received no invitation
to visit any Western country.
Klestil said that Austria
"will not succumb to Zionist
threats and pressures to
remove President Kurt
Waldheim from his office," the
official text of the Kuwait
News Agency stated.
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Page 10 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 1, 1988
Preventive and Proactive Response to Hate Crimes
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) The
battle against bias and the up-
surge of related violence in the
United States requires in-
creased government interven-
tion, continued vigilant
monitoring and innovative pro-
grams to encourage interper-
sonal exchanges between
victims.
These were the recommen-
dations of experts speaking at
the Northeast Regional Con-
ference on Prejudice and
Violence recently at the Omni
Park Central Hotel here, at-
tended by 270 people.
The conference, which
gathered officials of state and
city human relations agencies
with representatives of black,
Jewish, Hispanic, Asian and
gay organizations, was
organized by the National In-
stitute Against Prejudice and
Violence. The Baltimore-based
institute addresses violence
and intimidation motivated by
racial, religious or ethnic
bigotry.
"Imagine," said keynote
speaker Gov. Mario Cuomo of
New York, "what a miracle
this place would be if we could
get over the stupidity of racial
prejudice, if we could live up to
our potential."
Rabbi Murray Saltzman of
the Baltimore Hebrew Con-
gregation and a former
member of the U.S. Commis-
sion on Civil Rights, blamed
the Reagan administration for
having willingly abdicated its
leadership role in civil rights
by stressing a policy of non-
governmental interference, in
contrast to preceding
administrations.
"The underlying theme of
the new policy was the
disengagement of the federal
government," said Saltzman,
who was dismissed from the
commission by President
Reagan in 1983. "The motto
was not permanent progress,
but 'Let's get the government
off our backs.' "
That policy reduced civil
rights to a concern of special
interest groups, he continued,
allowing for the "reemergence
of bigotry, the growth of peo-
ple in opposition to harmony,
pluralism and the pursuit of
civil rights justice."
The rabbi said bigotry and
violence should be challenged
by a "great idea that we don't
have to be fearful."
He said "It is astounding
that the president should
threaten a major civil rights
legislation with a veto because
it's 'intrusive.' The fact is the
13th, 14th, and 15th amend-
ments to the Constitution
mandated the intervention of
the federal government. This
administration doesn't seem to
understand this."
New York City Police Com-
missioner Benjamin Ward
echoed Saltzman, adding that
the police must provide
"preventive and proactive"
responsiveness in direct liaison
to the local communities.
Police are being trained in
New York to identify and
locate specific problems and to
then turn them over to the
relevant agencies, Ward said.
Sally Greenberg, director of
civil rights for the Northeast
region of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, recom-
mended new laws during the
workshop on litigation and
legislation.
"We (at ADL) have
developed several pieces of
model legislation to counteract
those who perpetrate hate
crimes by punishing them.
We're in a continuing
challenge to try to get the
state to try to deal effectively
with the problem of bias-
related hate crimes," she said.
Greenberg emphasized the
importance of an accurate ac-
counting of bias nationwide
which she said would be
assisted tremendously by hate
crimes reporting and ap-
propriate punishment for the
acts.
"There has got to be a law
that says to perpetrators of
racial violence, 'If you commit
a hate crime, we're going to
punish you for it.' It's not just
a swastika, for example, it's
not just a graffiti, it's
something far more
psychologically dangerous if
your punishment will be
greater," she said.
The increased violence and
new tactics of extremist
groups was addressed by Irwin
Suall, director of ADL's fact-
finding department; Leonard
Zeskind, research director of
the Atlanta-based Center for
Democratic Renewal; and Pat
Clark, director of Klanwatch
of the Southern Poverty Law
Center.
Zeskind pointed out that
since 1982, hate groups have
concentrated on a new
stratagem that encompasses
stalking, surveillance, plann-
ing and the use of young peo-
ple to perpetrate violent acts.
Prior to this, he said, groups
Nazi Series Triggers
Belgian Protest
BRUSSELS (JTA) A
storm of protest has been rais-
ed here over the broadcast of a
three-part television series
about Belgium's most
notorious Nazi collaborator,
Leon Degrelle, who is still a
neo-Nazi activist.
The first part, aired by
RTBF, the French-language
television station, featured a
1977 interview with Degrelle,
82, who lives in Malaga, Spain!
It was accompanied by com-
mentary from historians and
World War II specialists.
Nevertheless, patriotic groups
protested vigorously and the
Auschwitz Foundation, an
association of death camp sur-
vivors, tried to bring legal ac-
tion against RTBF, but was
stymied by jurisdictional
problems.
They argued that the series
gives a platform to a Nazi who
still denies the Holocaust and
the existence of gas chambers
to exterminate Jews. A Chris-
tian Democratic member of
the Belgian Parliament, Paul-
Henry Gendebien, asked
RTBF to cancel the series on
grounds that the publicity of-
fered Degrelle would trigger a
revival of rightwing extremist
propaganda.
such as the Ku Klux Klan
resorted to more haphazard at-
tacks without a general plan.
Many extremist organiza-
tions including the Klan and
the Aryan Nations have taken
on a new foe. Zeskind said at-
tacks on gays have doubled in
recent years.
He emphasized the need to
watch legally sanctioned ac-
tivities such as meetings,
rallies and politically
sophisticated activism. He said
there seemed to be a direct
correlation between violent
hate crimes and gatherings of
members of hate groups in
given areas, particularly in
North Carolina.
He said that although the
federal prosecution of 14 hate
group members in the trial
now taking place in Fort
Smith, Ark., "certainly made a
big dent," a proliferation of
underground activities
remains.
Zeskind cited the Populist
Party, an offshoot of the anti-
Semitic Liberty Lobby, which
has absorbed some of the
former members of the Klan.
He also urged watching the
National Alliance, head-
quartered in Phildelphia, and
its leader, William Pierce. He
wrote "The Turner Diaries," a
fictional memoir of a member
of a racist, anti-Semitic
underground network that
perpetrates violent crimes and
thereby achieves power in the
United States and eventually
the world.
Zeskind and Suall, as well as
other observers of hate
groups, feel this work is the
basis for the alleged seditious
conspiracy for which the 14
Fort Smith defendants are
now standing trial and for
which other hate group
members have been tried in
Seattle, Las Vegas and Tucson
in the last two-and-half years.
Clark, Suall and Zeskind and
others during the conference
added that it was important to
watch the activities of Tom
Metzger, former Klansman
and former candidate for Con-
gress from Fallbrook, Calif.
His cable television program
"Race and Reason" and use of
violence-prone young people,
such as Skinheads, appear to
be expanding the ideology and
methods of the extremist
groups, the speakers warned.
Alex Rodriguez, chairman of
the Massachusetts Commis-
sion Against Discrimination,
said an effective stratagem
would be to cut off funding for
communities that ignore bias
He emphasized that all
cultures have hate crimes "it
does not belong to any one
group. We are all racists," he
said.
Speakers in a workshop on
educational and community
programs called for the crea-
tion of programs in which
members of different ethnic
groups could present their per
sonal stories to each other and
learn in the classroom what
the meaning of American
pluralism is all about.
"What we have to do now is
change the culture." said
Rodriguez.
Barry University
and I he
Anti-Defamation league of B'nai B'rith
Present The Highth Annual
Matthew B. Rosenhaus Lectureship
on Roman Catholic Jewish Relations
"Anti-Semitism and Roman Catholicism"
April 25. 1988
7:30 p.m.
"Anti Semitism; Anti-Judaism in the New Testament'
The Rev. John F. OGrady. S.T.D., S.S.D
"Anti-Judaism in the New Testament"
Rabbi Yehuda Shamir. PhD.
"Anti-Semitism in the History of
"Roman Catholicism"
The Rev. Lawrence Milby. S.T.D.
Barry University
Wiegand Lecture Hall Room 116
For further information:
Department of Religious Studies and Philosoph>
Barry University
(305) 75X-3342. Ext. 474
11300 N.E. Second Avenue
Miami Shores. Florida 33161
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Friday, April 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 11
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK -(JTA)- The
Jewish community of Panama
is wary of the potential of an
anti-Semitic backlash to the
political and financial crisis
boiling in the Central
American country, according
to Jewish officials who have
been in touch recently with
some of the 1,800 Jews there.
Rabbi Morton Rosenthal,
Latin American affairs direc-
tor for the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, said a
dozen congregational leaders
told him, during his fact-
finding mission there, that
they feared a recurrence of the
events of last June and July.
The National Civil Crusade,
the Panamanian opposition
movement, called a general
strike in June, which many
Jewish store owners in
Panama City declined to
honor. Rosenthal said.
Although non-Jewish
shopkeepers also failed to com-
ply, a campaign of anti-Semitic
leaflets and death threats
followed in July. The rabbi said
Crusade leaders tacitly con-
ceded to him that members of
their group mounted the drive.
Rosenthal said the Crusade
has since instituted controls to
identify fliers that were
authorized by their members.
The Crusade leaders "assured
us that they opposed anti-
Semitism and would take steps
to stop its recurrence from
within their ranks," he added.
Rabbi Marc Tanenbaum, in-
ternational affairs director for
the American Jewish Commit-
tee, agreed in a separate inter-
view that "Given the history of
anti-Semitism there, and the
ease with which people move
to single Jews out, now it can
be much more serious."
The AJCommittee assessed
the situation based on informa-
tion obtained from Sergio
Nudelstejer of Mexico City, a
staffer in charge of Central
American Jewish affairs for
the organization who has made
several recent visits to
Panamanian Jews Fear Backlash

Panama's Civic Group
Denies Anti-Semitism
NEW YORK, N.Y. Leaders of the Panamanian National
Civic Crusade have assured the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith that the organization rejects the anti-Semitism that
erupted during its general strike in Panama last June and will
take steps to prevent a repetition.
Flyers distributed by Crusade members during the strike
focused on Jewish merchants who had refused to close their
shops.
Aurelio Barria, head of the National Civic Crusade, and other
leaders of the group, gave the reassurances during a meeting in
Panama City last week with ADL representatives.
The ADL mission found the majority of Jews favor a quick end
to the current political and economic crises and a return to
democratic government. While investigating reports of last
year's outbreak of anti-Semitism, they learned that owners of
clothing shops along Panama City's Central Avenue shopping
thoroughfare, who are primarily Jews, had been pressured by
both sides in the political struggle. When the strike was called,
government representatives visited many stores and warned the
owners of dire consequences if they closed. When they remained
open, anti-Semitic flyers were widely distributed and some Jews
received threatening phone calls.
Semitism." Rosenthal agreed,
however, that there could be
no overall discounting of
future references to Delvalle's
Jewishness.
Tanenbaum said that based
on the potential for conflict,
and the fact, for example, that
"Jewish landlords were at-
tacked after the Mexican ear-
thquake," the AJCommittee
had alerted the (U.S.) State
Department to "the possibility
that Delvalle might be
scapegoated."
Panama has been politically
tense for more than a year, but
the situation was exacerbated
with the deposal of Delvalle by
Noriega. It followed Delvalle's
attempt to depose Noriega,
who was indicted in the United
States for drug trafficking.
Panama and has continual
telephone contact with Jews
there.
Tanenbaum said that in addi-
tion to Jews' "dispropor-
tionate percentage" among
the merchant and professional
ranks, Jews are involved in
various ways in running the
Panama Canal. The United
States has placed in escrow $7
million earmarked to Panama
from canal revenues.
Rosenthal said he learned
that Jews are cooperating with
the Crusade, which supports
deposed Panamanian Presi-
dent Eric Arturo Delvalle and
calls for the ouster of military
leader Manuel Noriega.
He said that the ADL
representatives met with
Jewish business people who
are "taking a very active role
in the Crusade. The Jews are
supportive of a return to
democratic government."
Rosenthal and Tanenbaum
differed in their emphasis on
Delvalle's Jewishness. The
ADL official said that Delvalle
attends a Reform synagogue
in Panama City, but that "You
hear virtually no mention of
the fact that Delvalle is
Jewish."
But Tanenbaum said, "In
the face of a crisis, there is no
telling if Delvalle's Jewishness
might become a focus of anti-
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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 1, 1988
Ellis Island:
The Other
Work on the Great Hall, or Registry Room, in
the main building of Ellis Island to be com-
pleted for the scheduled reopening of the
building to the public in 1989. These restora-
tion activities include cleaning of the
thousands ofGuastavino ceiling tiles, repair-
ing the special plaster on the balcony walls
and original tile floors, restoring the heating
and lighting systems. Created and protected
on the floor of the Great Hall (center) are the
original chandeliers which already have been
restored.
Ellis Island stands as a cons-
tant reminder of our young na-
tion's immigrant saga.
Located just a few hundred
yards, north of Liberty Island
in New York Harbor, Ellis
Island is a monument to the
great traditions of freedom
and opportunity in America.
Ellis Island was the major
federal immigration facility in
America. It processed 17
million men, women, and
children who came to the
United States from 1892 to
1954, when the facility closed.
This was the largest human
migration in modern history,
and today, more than 40 per-
cent, or over 100 million, of all
living Americans can trace
their roots to an ancestor who
came through Ellis Island.
Through the years, Ellis
Island grew almost as
dramatically as the nation. Its
land area expanded from three
acres of slush, sand, and oyster
shells to 27 man-made acres
housing 33 buildings. The land-
fill was provided from the
ballast of the very same ships
that brought the immigrants
and from the excavated
materials removed from the
New York subway tunnels dur-
ing its construction.
In 1965, Ellis Island was
designated part of the Statue
of Liberty National Monu-
ment, which is administered by
the National Park Service
(NPS) of the Department of
the Interior. Ten years later,
Congress authorized funds to
clean up and renovate a small
portion of the island, but the
years of neglect had taken
their toll.
Ellis Island Restoration
In 1982, President Ronald
Reagan asked Lee Iacocca to
set up an organization, The
Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island
Foundation, that would raise
funds and oversee construc-
tion for the restoration and
preservation of the Statue of
Liberty and Ellis Island and
plan for the centennial celebra-
tions of each.
The restoration of Ellis
Island, which began in 1984,
will cost $140 million and is the
largest restoration project of
its kind in American history.
Its scope is comparable to the
restorations done on the
Palace of Versailles and Len-
ingrad's Hermitage. Work is
scheduled to be completed in
1989, when Ellis Island will
reopen and once again receive
millions of visitors from
around the world.
The Ellis Island Museum
The Ellis Island Museum will
be the major institution
dedicated to the promotion,
advancement, and understan-
ding of America as a nation of
immigrants. The new museum
will be located in the
200,000-square-foot Main
Building the most historical-
ly significant structure on Ellis
Island. It was here, in various
To our forefathers, the Main Building of Ellis Island, pictured in
1905, represented opportunity, freedom and hope. Today, the ma-
jestic brick structures symbolize our country's spirit, heritage
and ethnic pride. (National Park Service, Statue of Liberty National
Monument)
rooms of the building, where
new arrivals many fearful of
rejection were processed
and inspected and ultimately
granted permission to enter
the country. Many of the
rooms are being restored and
others are being renovated to
meet the needs of the museum.
Half of the museum's space
will be devoted to telling the
story of Ellis Island, and the
migrant experience. The Great
Hall, with its soaring barrel-
vault ceiling and clerestory
windows, will be restored to its
1918 to 1924 condition and will
be exhibit-free.
Reliving the Immigration
Experience
When visitors disembark
from the ferry at Ellis Island,
they will find themselves
directly in front of the Main
Building, standing under the
recreated historic canopy
the same point where im-
migrants began the process
towards American citizenship.
Upon entering the museum,
visitors will walk in the
footsteps of their ancestors as
they enter a glass-enclosed
vestibule that opens to the
Baggage Room, where
displays and audiovisual pro-
grams will begin the re-
creation of the Ellis Island ex-
perience. Included in this room
will be a visitor orientation
area, and NPS guides will be
on hand to provide museum in-
formation, organize tours, and
make arrangements for the
handicapped.
Four Distinct Themes
The museum will house four
permanent displays that
recreate the Ellis Island ex-
perience. Displays include:
original manuscripts,
photographs, and microfiche
materials that detail immigra-
tion through Ellis Island as
well as general patterns of im-
migration in the United
States.
Dancers of the Israel Ballet
"And he has
brought us forth
from bondage
to freedom and
from slavery
to redemption!'
(From the Passover Haggda|
^T-fc
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Israel Discount Bank takes this holiday occasion to extend
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Friday, April 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 13
Ellis Island Museum will
house two theaters that
feature the continuous
ring of the film "Island of
!, Island of Tears," which
unts the immigrant ex-
ence at Ellis Island
nigh contemporary and
oric footage, old stills, and
ration.
American Immigrant
of Honor
he American Immigrant
of Honor is a special ex-
. that is expected to evoke
deepest emotional impact
trillions of Americans who
Ellis Island. The exhibit
feature the names of those
tstors who first came to
.'rica.
e Peopling of America
bit, which will include
terous freestanding
lays that place the historic
i Island site within the
er context of American im-
ration history. Large
lated charts, oversized
s and graphs and interac-
displays describe the
Dry of American immigra-
over 400 years. This ex-
is located in the original
N) square foot Railroad
;et Office.
>e Ellis Island Processing
i. a 14-room major exhibit
that will highlight various
cts of the immigrant pro-
ling as revealed in historic
ographs, diaries, oral
ories. and artifacts.
mes covered will include
"Arrival," the "Medical
pection," "Mental
ting," the "Board of
ial Inquiry," and "Free to
a" Visitors will also see a
Jial section, "Isle of Hope,
ofTears," which poignant-
counts the story of the few
>rtunate immigrants less
itwo percent of those pro-
w who were refused ad-
sion and sent back to their
leland.
he Peak Immigration
'<> 1892-1824, covering a
y of themes dealing with
immigrant experience.
exhibits are as timely to
tys new immigrants as
; *ere at the turn of the
tur,y- Exhibits include
,av>ng the Homeland,"
ross the Land," "The Clos-
er and "At Work in
erica."
t!nE!Li8 l8,and Galleries,
" three major stories:
.government Property,"
history of Ellis Island;
f^res from Home/W
i "grants from the old coun
In addition to the exhibits,
visitors will be invited to make
use of two study areas to fur-
ther explore the subject of im-
migration. Study areas
include:
The William Randolph
Hearst Oral History Studio,
where taped reminiscences of
immigrants will be available to
visitors for listening.
The Library for Immigra-
tion Studies, to include books,
Arriving at Ellis Island in 1910 with only a
few possessions, immigrants take their first
steps toward a new life in America. Approx-
imately 17 million immigrants began the pro-
cess of gaining American citizenship at Ellis
Island between 1892 and 1954. Today, more
than 100 million Americans can trace their
roots to Ellis Island. (National Park Service, Statue
of Liberty National Monument)
If you turn
40 this year too,
youcan
winafree
trip to Israel.
If, like us, you were born in 1948. this sweepstakes
is for you.
In honor of Israel's 40th Birthday, the Israel Gov-
ernment Tourist Office, El Al Israel Airlines, Dan Hotel
Corporation and Galilee Tours, are offering you a chance
to win a one-week trip for two to Israel.
Any U.S. citizen bom in 1948 is eligible. There's
no purchase necessarv, just send in the coupon no later
than May 31,1988. Then, in the fall, if you're one of
the 20 winners, you and your guest are on your way.*
You'll fly on El Al and stay in the luxurious
five star Dan Panorama hotel in Tel Aviv. It'll be a
wonderful trip you'll remember all your life.
Enter today. What better year for two 40-year-
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Win a one-week trip for two to Israel.
Please enter me in your Happy 40th Birthday
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Israel Government Tourist Office g g
350 Fifth Avenue, New York. NY lulls |5f"Q|
One pn per household. ._. /


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 1, 1988
Skinhead Gangs Expand In Number and Violence
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Skinhead youth gangs are con-
tinuing to expand their
membership, attack members
of minority groups and van-
dalize synagogues, according
to a recent survey conducted
by the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith.
"The Skinheads An Up-
date on 'Shaved for Battle' is
a follow-up to an ADL report
about the racist youths,
primarily boys, who shave
their heads, wear Nazi insignia
and harass and attack
members of racial and
religious minorities.
Gangs are composed over-
whelmingly of teenagers, in-
cluding children as young as 13
and 14, according to the
report.
However, the ADL and
others note not all youth who
have adopted Skinhead haircut
or garb are racist or neo-Nazi,
instead wishing only to show
defiance of their elders.
The survey details the
criminal activities in which the
Skinheads have been involved
in the past four months, in-
cluding synagogue vandalism,
anti-Semitic graffiti and ter-
rorizing or attacking
individuals.
The revised report claims
that 20-25 Skinhead groups
operate in 12 states, with a
combined membership of bet-
ween 1,000-1,500. The report
also indicates inactivity in
some places where Skinhead
activity was previously
reported.
In the Orlando, FL area, for
instance, Russell Penrose,
identified as a leader of a
Skinhead group, has been con-
victed for battery and robbery
and other Skinheads have been
arrested on weapons charges.
In addition, eight Skinheads
appeared at a recent KKK
rally.
Skinheads have recently ap-
peared on television programs,
such as the "Morton Downey
Jr. Show" in New York and
the "Oprah Winfrey Show" on
ABC. In each case, the youths
behaved uncontrollably.
After her telecast, Winfrey
acknowledged that she
"should have listened to ad-
vice" that she could not con-
trol them on the air, according
to Leonard Zeskind, research
director of the Center for
Democratic Renewal, an
Atlanta-based group that
monitors racist hate
movements in America.
At a recent conference here
examining prejudice and
violence, Zeskind and Suall
Appeal on Behalf
Of Anne Pollard
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Israel Medical Association has
appealed to the American
Medical Association to ensure
proper medical care for Anne
Henderson Pollard, wife of
Jonathan Jay Pollard, an
American convicted last year
of spying for Israel.
Anne Pollard, serving two
. concurrent five-year prison
sentences as an accessory to
her husband's espionage, is
reportedly seriously ill with a
stomach disorder.
agreed that Skinhead gangs
have the potential to attract
disaffected youth, chiefly of
the working class, who feel
malice toward minorities.
Harold Applebaum, now
retired from the American
Jewish Committee, has cited
historical precedence for the
Skinhead philosophy in the
Nazi movement in Germany in
the 1920s.
Brothers Otto and Hugo
Strasser counseled Hitler to
develop the socialism aspect of
national socialism to appeal to
a working-class base.
"A lot of neo-Nazis today
have discovered Nazism, and
they are consciously trying to
work to reach the young,
white, working-class people,"
Applebaum said recently, ad-
ding that the Strassers' works
have been republished.
In the latest ADL report,
Suall said it was too early to
gauge whether the Skinheads
will continue to grow or
gradually decline. But he add-
ed that ADL is concerned that
Skinheads are graduating into
the network of adult white
supremacist groups.
The problem extends beyond
American borders.
The Skinheads seemed to
surface suddenly in Euroi*
with the death of Rudolph
Hess in August. Within two
weeks, three major European
news magazines reported in
simultaneous issues on the
same phenomenon.
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n News -
Roundup
Lawmakers: Ban
Media From Territories
NEW YORK (JTA) Twenty-one members of the
New York State Legislature have signed a letter to Israeli
Premier Yitzhak Shamir urging a media ban in the West
Bank and Gaza Strip, calling television news cameras a
contributor to the violence.
Jewish Bulletin
Launched In France
PARIS (JTA) A French-language daily news
bulletin based on the worldwide services of the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency was launched here.
The four-page publication, titled "Jour J." (The Jewish
Day) and subtitled "Jewish Telegraphic Letter," will ap-
pear five days a week. It is owned by a private company
and edited by veteran journalist Samuel Minsk.
Diaspora Leaders Tap Meir Shitrit
NEW YORK (JTA) Diaspora leaders representing
half of the 74 members of the Jewish Agency Board of
Governors have approved Knesset member Meir Shitrit, of
Likud's Herut wing, to be the next treasurer of the Jewish
Agency.
The move virtually assures the former Yavne mayor's
election to the post. His candidacy is contingent on the ap-
proval of the Herut Central Committee in Israel, which is
expected.
Canadian Centenarian
MONTREAL (JTA) Dr. Joseph Joffre, a retired
chemist and one-time amateur boxer born in Riga, Latvia,
recently celebrated his 113th birthday at Maimonides
Hospital here. If Joffre had documentation of his birth date
- March 10, 1875 he would be recognized as the world's
oldest person.
IDF Arrests Underground Members
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israeli security forces have ar-
rested the distributors of a leaflet calling for a general
strike by Palestinians in the administered territories,
Police Minister Haim Barlev announced.
He said the detainees, members of the Palestinian na-
tionalist underground directing the unrest in the ter-
ritories, are residents of the West Bank and East
Jerusalem who allegedly support various terrorist
organizations.
Negotiate, Says Bar Ilan Letter
TEL AVIV (JTA) About 620 students and faculty
members of Bar Ilan University presented a letter to Presi-
dent Chaim Herzog calling on the government to enter im-
mediately into peace negotiations with Palestinian
representatives.
Bar Ilan, a religiously oriented institution in Ramat Gan.
is known to have rightwing nationalist elements. Student
spokesman Aharon Samson said the signatories of the let-
ter represented an unusual mix of Orthodox and secular
Jewish students and faculty as well as Arabs.
Palestinian Twin Plan Defeated
BERKELEY, Calif. (JTA) Supporters of a defeated
sition for this city to twin with a Palestinian refugee
camp say they will resubmit the proposal to the City Coun-
cil >>r attempt to place it on the November ballot as a
referendum.
The measure would have established a sister-city rela-
tionship with Jabalya, a refugee camp of some 60,000 on
the tiaza Strip. It was proposed by the city's advisory
Peace and Justice Commission.
AIPAC Founder
I.L. Kenen Dead At 83
WASHINGTON (JTA) I.L. (Si) Kenen, the founder
and former longtime executive director of the American
Israel Pubic Affairs Committee (AIPAC)), died of a heart
attack at his home here. Funeral services and burial were
held in Washington.
Kenen, who was 83, began his long career of lobbying in
support of a Jewish state in 1943, when he was director of
the American Emergency Committee on Zionist Affairs in
New York. He was the Jewish Agency's information direc-
tor at the United Nations in 1947 and 1948, and then in
J949, was a member of the first Israeli delegation to the
United Nations.
Kenen moved to Washington in 1951 and established the
American Zionist Committee to lobby Congress in support
i Israel. Three years later the committee became AIPAC,
the only official lobby for Israel in the United States.
Friday, April 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 15
Japan Ducks Boycott In Car Sales
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Japanese manufacturers,
especially the automakers!
want to sell to Israel, but
neither the government nor
any leading company is willing
to openly buck the Arab
boycott, according to a Tokyo
business magazine.
In an article called "Under
the Arab Thumb," the March
issue of the English-language
publication Business Tokyo
notes that, unlike the United
States and West European
countries, Japan has not pass-
ed any legislation to bar com-
pliance with the boycotts.
"Many leading U.S. and
European countries called the
Arab bluff by continuing to
trade openly with Israel," the
magazine points out. "They
have not, in most cases, suf-
fered because of the decision.
Japanese companies, however,
have not even tried." The
magazine says the companies
justify this policy by pointing
to the problems Japan ex-
perienced during the 1973 oil
crisis. Japan is nearly 100 per-
cent dependent on Arab oil,
and if it was cut off, its
economy could be destroyed.
"This apparently, is ample
justification to the Japanese
mind to allow them to boycott
trade with Israel," Business
Tokyo observes.
Japanese companies do buy
Israeli products, particularly
diamonds, with Israeli
diamonds making up 25 per-
cent of Japan's diamond im-
ports, according to the
magazine.
The article noted that the
situation is changing, par-
ticularly in the auto industry,
where research has shown that
Israel could be an important
market for Japanese cars. Fuji
Heavy Industries Lt., the only
Japanese carmaker that ex-
ports openly to Israel, sold
20,000 Subaru cars in Israel in
1987.
The article goes on to point
out that while Arab countries
are a good market for the
larger Japanese cars, the
Israeli demand is for smaller
cars. "The Japanese, who ex-
cel in small-car production, are
eying the market hungrily,"
according to the magazine.
The magazine points out
that Daihatsu and Suzuki have
sold about 2,000 cars annually
in Israel, imported through a
third country, and the Mit-
subishi Corp. is planning to do
the same thing.
"Directly or indirectly, it ap-
pears that Japanese cars will
soon be readily available in
Israel," the magazine notes.
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Sculptures of The Menorah and
The Wailing War by Salvador
Dali and photographs of birds
of Israel by Israeli Mayer Mar-
tin, will be part of the art ex-
hibit at the community-wide
celebration of Israel's UOth an-
niversary, on Sunday, April
17 at the Miami-Dade Com-
munity College-Mitchell
Wolfson Campus. Limited edi-
tions of the works will also be
available for purchase. The
Israel U0 celebration is spon-
sored by the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
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Page 16 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 1, 1988
ACLU Move to Halt
Religious Funding
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) In
a move that could eliminate
U.S. government funding of
Jewish schools in Israel, the
American Civil Liberties
Union is attempting to sue the
Reagan administration to
challenge the constitutionality
of providing government funds
to sectarian groups abroad.
The action arose during the
now-resolved controversy sur-
rounding the $8 million provid-
ed for French Jewish schools
under the auspices of the New
York City-based Orthodox
organization Ozar Hatorah in
the $600 billion federal spen-
ding bill approved last
December. That expenditure,
roundly criticized, was later
rescinded at the request of its
sponsor, Sen. Daniel Inouye
(D-Hawaii).
But it was learned during
the controversy that the
government has been sending
tens of millions of dollars over
the past decade to religious
groups abroad through an
Agency for International
Development program called
American Schools and
Hospitals Abroad.
The ACLU originally plann-
ed to sue to stop the Inouye ex-
penditure, but amended its
suit to challenge the ASHA
program as well. Later, after
Reagan signed Inouye's rescis-
sion measure, the ACLU again
revised the suit to challenge
ASHA only. The revised
lawsuit argues that such fun-
ding violates the separation of
church and state mandated by
the First Amendment.
Should the suit succeed, it
would cut off U.S. government
funding to various yeshivas in
Israel. Since 1983, ASHA has
provided $2 million to Ohr
Somayach, a girls' affiliate of a
Jerusalem yeshiva; $400,000
to Shaalvim Teacher's College;
$500,000 to the American Col-
lege of Belz, a Hasidic college
in Jerusalem; and $750,000 to
the Beth Rivka Comprehen-
sive School, a girls' school.
In the latest development,
the government moved in the
U.S. District Court in New
York to have the suit dismiss-
ed. It argued that the plaintiffs
do not have "standing" to sue
the government because the
funding does not impinge on
their constitutional rights.
C. Edwin Baker, an ACLU
attorney, said the hearing on
that motion will be held on
either March 24 or 31. He add-
ed that the ACLU at some
point will seek a preliminary
injunction to cut off all U.S.
government aid abroad to
Jewish and Catholic schools.
Conservative Women
Invested as Cantors
By BEN GALLOB
The Cantors Institute of the
Jewish Theological Seminary
i.JTS) voted to admit women
candidates for the first time
only a year ago February, yet
four women already have
received diplomas as the first
Conservative women cantors
and have secured cantorial
positions. One's hometown is
Pompano Beach and another
was elected to serve in Delray
Beach.
The issue of training women
as cantors under Conservative
auspices has been debated for
years, though with less con-
troversy than during debate on
whether to admit women to
the JTS rabbinical school.
But Dr. Ismar Schorsch, JTS
chancellor, explained that "ad-
mitting women to the Cantor's
Institute is simply a further
application of the principles
applied to the decision to admit
women to the rabbinical school
in 1983."
He said the decision was
"both in full accord with
halacha (Jewish religious law)
and the culmination of a
century-long evolution of the
status of women under the
law."
Under that decision,
diplomas can be awarded to
women who agree to accept
the obligation of daily prayer
and other commandments
obligatory for men. For exam-
ple, such women candidates
were taught to don
phylacteries and to recite the
required prayers.
Rabbi Morton Leifman, the
Cantors Institute dean, told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agen-
cy that the Conservative can-
torial school had been admit-
ting women for several years
to study for the degree of
bachelor of sacred music. In
addition, he said, the institute
grants advanced degrees to
men and women trained in
non-cantorial fields, such as
musicology.
Thus the first Conservative
cantorial diplomas awarded to
women were retroactive.
Maria Rosenfeld Barugel of
Merrick, N.Y., and Erica Lip-
pitz of Evanston, 111., received
their diplomas at JTS gradua-
tion ceremonies last May.
They also received the degree
of bachelor of sacred music.
Having enrolled in the Can-
tors Institute preceding the
decision to grant cantorial
diplomas to women, Barugel
and Lippitz were interviewed
for the degree by Schorsch,
Liefman and Cantor Max
Wohlberg, professor of liturgy
and hazzanut.
Two other students at the in-
stitute, Linda Shivers of Pom-
pano Beach, Fla., and Elaine
Shapiro of Waltham, Mass.,
were later interviewed on the
same basis and accepted.
Lippitz is serving Congrega-
tion Oheb Shalom in South
Orange, N.J. Barugel is cantor
at B'nai Israel in Rumson, N.J.
Shivers is serving Congrega-
tion Neveh Shalom in
Portland, Ore. Shapiro is serv-
ing Temple Sinai, a Reform
congregation in Delray Beach,
Fla.
No other women candidates
are retroactively eligible to
receive the diploma of cantor
from the JTS, JTA was told.
No women are part of the
senior class of the Cantors In-
stitute, but two are in the
junior class, three in the
sophomore class and nine in
the freshman class.
Israel Denies Threat
To Saudi Missiles
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The reported threat by a top
aide to Premier Yitzhak
Shamir of a possible Israeli
pre-emptive strike to destroy
Chinese-made intermediate
range missiles sold to Saudi
Arabia is seen as ruffling
Israel's relations with the
United States.
Yosef Ben-Aharon, director
general of the Prime
Minister's Office, denied he
had made such a threat, and
Premier Yitzhak Shamir lost
no time in affirming that
denial when he returned to
Israel from the United States.
The Israeli media reported
that the United States has
complained about Ben-
Aharon's reported remark,
pointing out that it hampered
Washington's efforts to find a
diplomatic solution to the
conflict.
In Washington, State
Department spokesman
Charles Redman confirmed
Wednesday, "We expressed
our concern about those kinds
of statements (to the Israeli
government). We don't believe
that they are helpful."
The sale of the 2,000-mile-
range missiles to the Saudis
was publicly disclosed in the
United States. Israeli
reporters insist that Ben-
Aharon said in a taped inter-
view with Voice of Israel Radio
in Washington that "Israel has
acquired a reputation of not
waiting until a potential
danger becomes actual."
This was a clear reference to
Israel's 1981 air strike that
destroyed an Iraqi nuclear
facility in which, according to
the Israelis, an atomic bomb
was being manufactured.
Israeli military analysts have
pointed out that while the
Saudi purchase is surely in-
tended for defense and deter-
rence against Iran, it could
have serious repercussions on
the Arab-Israeli balance of
power, especially after the
I ran-Iraq war ends.
The analysts noted also that
the Chinese-made missiles, the
CSS-2, also known as Dong
Feng-3, are designed to carry
nuclear warheads. The
Chinese government insists it
has not equipped the missiles it
sold to Saudi Arabia with
nuclear capability and that it
believes the Saudis will keep
their promise to use the
missiles only in defense.
The United States raised no
objections to the missile sale
Experts at Tel Aviv Univer-
sity's Jaffee Center for
Strategic Studies have noted
that the CSS-2 could create
havoc if armed with nuclear
warheads.
But with conventional
warheads they pose little
danger. According to the ex-
perts, the CSS-2s are obsolete
and often miss their targets by
as much as two miles. Israeli
jet bombers can deliver far
greater payloads with pinpoint
accuracy.
Nevertheless, the CSS-2s
are the first intermediate-
range missiles to be introduced
in the Middle East, Haaretz
military correspondent Zeev
Schiff wrote, and can be view-
ed as a step toward building up
an intermediate-range arsenal.
Clearly they give the Saudis
the potential to make war on
Israel and hit population
centers. But Schiff thought the
Israelis should pay more atten-
tion to Iraq's emerging long-
range missile capability, an
outgrowth of its eight-year
war with Iran. The Iraqi
missiles can be equipped with
chemical weapons.
EPA Bars Use
Of Nazi Data
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The administrator of the U.S.
Environmental Protection
Agency decided to bar scierv
tists from including data on
World War II Nazi ex-
periments in a forthcoming
report on a deadly toxic gas,
an EPA spokesman said.
The gas, known as phosgene,
is used in manufacturing
plastics and pesticides, The
New York Times reported. It
had been deployed as a
poisonous gas in World War I
by the Germans, said John
Kasper, the agency
spokesman.
He said EPA Administrator
Lee Thomas received a letter
from agency scientists Monday
questioning whether it was
ethical to use data from Nazi said he could not recall any
doctors, and that Thomas case where Nazi scientific data
decided later that day to ex- has been used in an EPA
elude the information. Kasper study.
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Reserve Officers
Politicize Unrest
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) High-
ranking reserve officers of the
Israel Defense Force seem to
be as divided as the govern-
ment over Israeli policies in
the administered territories
and how to deal with Arab
unrest.
A group of 96 reservists,
holding ranks from majors to
brigadier generals, sent a let-
ter to Premier Yitzhak Shamir
urging him to choose peace
over holding on to the
territories.
But 50 other reservists of
AJC Pursues
Peace Plan
PHILADELPHIA (JTA)
- Delegates to the national
biennial convention of the
American Jewish Congress
voted overwhelmingly here for
a resolution urging Israel to
welcome and pursue
energetically the new
American peace initiative in
the Middle East.
The resolution, adopted by a
show of delegate voting
credentials, supports the com-
ponents of the peace plan ad-
vanced by Secretary of State
George Shultz, which include
an international conference
and, implicitly, the principle of
trading territory for peace.
It reaffirms the position
taken by the AJCongress
Governing Council in
September 1987 considered
unprecedented for a
mainstream Jewish organiza-
tion which warned that if no
political adjustments are made
with respect to the West Bank
and Gaza Strip, "demographic
imperatives will force Israel to
choose between becoming a
non-Jewish state or a non-
democratic state," neither
choice being acceptable.
The resolution adopted at
the convention states that
"the status quo in the Middle
East cannot realistically be
maintained and morally ought
not to lie maintained."
similar rank met to demand a
harder line against Palestinian
rioters and leftist Israelis who
support their cause. They also
urged politicians and the news
media to "stop using the army
as a political tool and allow
soldiers and their commanders
to do their jobs as they see fit."
The letter to Shamir was
almost identical to one sent 10
years ago to Premier
Menachem Begin by reserve
officers who formed the
nucleus of the Peace Now
movement. The earlier letter
stated that "ruling 1 million
Arabs is liable to harm the
Robert K. Lifton, a business ex-
ecutive and lawyer, was elected
president of the American
' rngrea8 at the
lion's National Bien-
nial Convention. He succeeds
ntodore R. Mann, a
rkxladelphia attorney who
'" io-year terms. The
p'cf'"" took place in
nuadelphia where some 400
e representing
AJlongress' chapters and divi-
ww around the nation con-
vened to decide policy for the
* two years and to celebrate
ine organization's 70th
anniversary.
Jewish democratic nature of
the state." The current letter
differs only by referring to
"1.5 million Arabs."
Some 800 other officers,
mainly of lower ranks, signed
it. Most belong to elite units of
the IDF and some hold various
IDF decorations and
commendations.
The meeting of the hard-line
officers, who expressed sharp-
ly different views, was
organized by Michael Ratzon,
leader of the Herut party's
"young guard."
Ratzon called on the IDF to
take a tougher stand against
Arab rioters to prevent "an in-
definite continuation of the
disturbances, which would
lead to much greater loss of
life among the Arabs."
Friday, April 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 17
Israelis Demand
Guns for Defense
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
There has been an upsurge in
applications for gun licenses
by the general public, a
development linked directly to
the continuing unrest in the
West Bank and Gaza Strip and
the escalation of terrorist in-
cursions against Israel.
The head of the Interior
Ministry's firearms licensing
department, Moshe Weiss,
said that the ministry's strict
licensing policy is under
review and may be relaxed. It
has generally favored Jewish
settlers in the administered
territories, while residents of
Israel proper have a tough
time obtaining a license.
Weiss spoke to security of-
ficials from northern Galilee,
who urged a more liberal
policy in the wake of pressure
from citizens of that area.
They are concerned about re-
cent terrorist infiltrations and
attempted infiltrations from
Lebanon.
Gun dealers in Jerusalem
report a doubling of consumer
interest in firearms. But this
has not translated into greater
sales, because of the difficulty
of obtaining a license. Beer-
sheba gun dealers also report
rising demand since terrorists
hijacked a bus in the Negev,
killing three and wounding 10.
Publix
Joyous
Rassover Wishes
from Publix.
May the spring festival of Passover
bring a bounty of happiness
to your Seder table.


Page 18 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 1, 1988
KVBTCHI
TM
"Where is it written that I can't bring
antacids to your mother's Seder?"
Arab Boycott Case Ends in Settlement
By WINSTON PICKETT
SAN FRANCISCO (JTA)
Safeway Stores Inc., is
claiming a victory in agreeing
to pay $995,000 to the U.S.
Commerce Department to set-
tle charges that the super-
market chain cooperated with
the Arab boycott against
Israel.
But an American Jewish
Congress boycott expert is
calling the record settlement
the actual victory as well as
further proof that the govern-
ment's Office of Anti-Boycott
Compliance is doing its job.
Peter Magowan, board
chairman and chief executive
officer of Safeway, based in
Oakland, Calif., said the cash
settlement, a fraction of the
one originally levied, "is a vic-
tory for us and in no way con-
stitutes an admission by the
company that we violated the
law."
Moreover, he said,
Safeway's conduct has been
vindicated by the fact "that its
practices did not merit the
harsh penalties the govern-
ment previously sought."
Last August the Commerce
Department charged Safeway
with 449 violations of the Ex-
port Administration Act of
1977, imposed a $4.5 million
fine on the supermarket chain
and sought a two-year suspen-
sion of the company's export
privileges.
Besides reducing the fine in
the settlement, the govern-
ment dropped its demand to
keep Safeway from doing
business overseas.
Nevertheless, the penalty is
the largest of its kind. Will
Maslow, AJCongress legal
counsel and author of its mon-
thly Boycott Report, called the
agreement "a victory for the
OAC (Office of Anti-boycott
Compliance) and shows how
strong its case was from the
very beginning."
The Commerce Department
originally charged Safeway
with supplying approximately
10 stores in Kuwait and Saudi
Arabia between 1981 and 1986
with a list of the company's
suppliers, some of whom were
Israeli. According to the OAC,
that list subsequently enabled
the Arab-run grocery stores to
boycott certain Israeli-
manufactured products.
The Arab stores were licens-
ed to operate under the
Safeway name, but were not
owned by the company.
Safeway claims it no longer
sells products to the Arab
stores.
Safeway also was accused of
requiring one of its
wholesalers to submit the
names of its manufacturers to
an office in Kuwait for boycott
clearance and of answering a
Kuwaiti government question-
naire regarding its relation-
ship with Israel and Israeli
companies.
U.S.-Soviets Fail
To Bridge Gaps
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Secretary of State George
Shultz said Wednesday night
that he and Soviet Foreign
Minister Eduard Shevard-
nadze disagreed sharply in two
days of meetings on the struc-
ture of an international peace
conference on the Middle East.
The United States views
such a conference as
ceremonial and leading to
direct negotiations between
the parties, Shultz told
reporters after 12 hours of
talks with Shevardnadze.
But he said the Soviets view
a conference as having
authority to impose a solution.
Such a conception "is really
sharply different from ours, '
Shultz said.
The current U.S. Middle
East peace initiative contains
a provision for an international
peace conference to be conven-
ed prior to the first round of
direct negotiations between
Arab countries and Israel.
Under the U.S. formula, the
five members of the United
Nations Security Council
would chair the conference,
which could not impose
solutions.
Israeli Prime Minister Yit-
zhak Shamir opposes both an
international peace conference
that could impose solutions, as
well as a purely ceremonial
one, while Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres supports a
ceremonial conference, as con-
tained in the U.S. plan.
Shamir said that Shultz had
convinced him last fall to agree
to an international conference
chaired by the two super-
powers, and said he would be
willing to go to Moscow. But
such a conference could not
impose solutions.
Jordan reportedly rejected
that idea, insisting on wider in-
ternational involvement.
45th Anniversary For
Warsaw Uprising
By MILTON JACOBY
NEW YORK (JTA) Up
to 4,000 Jews from some 20
countries are expected to con-
verge on Warsaw during the
third week of April for obser-
vance of the 45tn anniversary
of the Warsaw Ghetto
Uprising.
Zbigniew Unger, director of
the Orbis Congress Bureau in
Warsaw and a major organizer
of the convocation, estimated
during a recent visit here that
Israel would send more than
1,000 delegates and that
Jewish youth groups would
send more than 1,500, in-
cluding 300 from the United
States and Canada.
Soviet Jews also have been
invited, he said, and groups
from Australia, Eastern
Europe, South Africa and
South America also will
attend.
About 2,000 people attended
the 40th anniversary com-
memoration in 1983.
The major events of the an-
niversary are planned for
April 18 and 19, the Polish of-
ficial said.
A monument paying tribute
to the ghetto heroes, who kill-
ed hundreds of better-armed
German troops over two mon-
ths, will be dedicated. The
monument is being completed
at the site of the
Umschlagplatz, where the
Nazis put 300,000 Jews on
trains bound for the Treblinka
death camp.
At the commemoration
buses will take the visitors 90
miles north to Treblinka,
where a vast plain now covers
the bodies of the victims, for
recitation of the Mourner's
Kaddish.
The April 19 ceremonies will
include the laying of wreaths
at the Warsaw Ghetto Monu-
ment and the Tomb of the
Unknown Soldier by Jewish
visitors and non-Jews.
Officials from the Yad
Vashem Holocaust memorial
and museum in Jerusalem will
honor more than 100 Polish
citizens for risking their lives
to aid Jews fleeing the Nazi
forces.
Leaders of Poland and other
nations will speak about the
commemoration at the Con-
gress Hall of the Palace of
Culture and Science.
Polish Jewry numbered
three million people before the
Holocaust, and the community
now comprises 5,000 to 10,000
Jews. Yet, the government
sponsors the Warsaw Ghetto
commemorations every five
years and protects the rem-
nants of Jewish life in War-
saw, Lublin and Krakow.
The bright way to bank.
Member FDIC A SunTrust Bank


Friday, April 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 19
Fourth Summit for
Reagan and Gorbachev
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
President Reagan announced
that he will go to Moscow May
29 to June 2 for his fourth sum-
mit with Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev.
Reagan made the announce-
ment to reporters as he was
meeting in the White House
with Soviet Foreign Minister
Eduard Shevardnadze.
Morris Abram, chairman of
the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry, immediately
urged that the upcoming sum-
mit achieve "significant pro-
gress" to alleviate the plight of
Soviet Jews. He said no mean-
ingful progress occurred dur-
ing the summit in Washington
last December.
Senators' Letter
Promotes Confrontation
By MORRIS J. AMITAY
It was a classic "man bites dog" story 30 U.S. Senators
writing a letter widely interpreted as being critical of Israel.
And, predictably, the usual gaggle of critics were quick to ap-
plaud this unique occurrence and exaggerate its significance.
Notwithstanding the preponderance of positive statements in
the letter, the media pounced on the "dismay" expressed by the
Senators over Prime Minister Shamir's refusal to publicly an-
nounce, (in advance of any negotiations) that Israel should give
up territory for "peace." It should also have been predictable
that the reaction to the letter from pro-Israel activists would
cause additional dismay to the signers of the letter.
Some of the Senators who signed the letter were obviously
impressed by the religious affiliation of the letter's originator,
Sen. Carl Levin of Michigan, and three other signers, Senators
Boschwitz, Lautenberg and Metzenbaum. By hindsight most of
the signers now question the wisdom and timing of having sent
such a message. In fact, in its aftermath, not a single signer
would agree to a televised debate with Sen. Arlen Specter of
Pennsilvania who had refused to sign the letter. Although
Specter is regarded as one of the brightest members of the
Senate, it should not have taken a genius to foresee the negative
effect of having the letter on the front page of The New York
Times a day before Shamir arrived in this country for his talks
with the Administration on the Shultz peace plan.
With the best of intentions, the letter injected 30 American
Senators directly into the internal politics of a fellow democracy
and displayed a degree of naivete of the realities of the Middle
East and the significance of the Camp David Accords.
The Camp David Accords, which all the Senators had sup-
ported, wisely dictated an interim period of five years in which
intentions could be divined and human contact developed prior
to final agreement over the disposition of the territories. The let-
ter, however, not only short circuited the Camp David process, it
cut the ground out from under Israel's eventual negotiating posi-
tion in direct talks with Jordan and Palestinian representatives.
It is important to note that Shamir, as the democratically elected
head of his government, spoke for Israel and criticism of
Shamir was widely interpreted as a rebuke to Israel.
The motivation behind the letter's author, Sen. Carl Levin,
was to try to change a status quo he regarded as intolerable, and
also provide support for Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres.
But change for the sake of change without knowing where it will
lead can be dangerous. No one questions the right of the
Senators to be critical. But unhappiness over Israel's reactions
to violence in the territories, or over Shamir's positions, could
have been delivered to him directly as friends usually do. In-
stead, the letter could actually be seen as promoting confronta-
tion between Israel and the United States. Despite Levin's long-
standing support of Israel and his good intentions, it is difficult
to see how the letter advanced the peace process. Not known
particularly in the Senate as a foreign affairs or Middle East ex-
pert, and never having spearheaded any Israel-related initiatives
previously, Levin, however, was obviously a good persuader.
Not heeding the objections of the American Israel Public Affairs
Committee's, Tom Dine, (but also without the knowledge of
other pro-Israel activists), Levin succeeded in qickly attracting
29 others to his initiative and saw to it that it received max-
imum publicity.
What did the letter accomplish? Did it give aid and comfort
to Israel's critics? Certainly. Will it affect Israel's ties to the U.S.
"the long run? Probably not. Will the signers cease to be sup-
portive of Israel in the future? Definitely not.
It is also fairly certain that there will be more circumspec-
tion and less haste in the future in judging these issues. In this
regard, it is worth noting that besides Senator Specter, such
outstanding and veteran friends of Israel in the Senate as bob
Jackwood of Oregon, Bill Bradley of New Jersey, John Heinz of
Pennsylvania, David Durenberger of Minnesota, Paul Sarbanes
of Maryland, and Jim Sasser of Tennessee would not join in the
letter, aware its inappropriate timing and judging, correctly,
now it would be perceived.
. Down the road there will be foreign aid and arms sales votes
'n the Congress and, hopefully, at some point, peace negotia-
tes. It is safe to say that solid majorities in both Houses of Con-
fess will continue to be supportive of Israel because in a very
real sense, Israel's successes or failures are also our own.
"We expect that the issue of
Soviet Jewry will be on the
agenda of the Moscow sum-
mit," Abram said. Saying the
"plight of Soviet Jews is high
on the list of human rights
abuses in the USSR," Abram
called on the Soviet Union to
fulfill a promise, made in an
October 1987 statement prior
to the Washington summit,
that "significant headway"
would be made on the issue of
human rights.
"We regret that significant
progress was not forthcoming
prior to, and following, the
Washington summit," he said.
"If the deliberations in
Moscow are to be considered
fruitful, and if we are to be
able to believe Soviet promises
on the whole range of issues,
the Moscow meeting must
result in the adoption by the
Soviet Union of a program
that will lead to sustained,
systematic and substantial
Jewish emigration."
Jewish emigration totaled
1,452 during the first two mon-
ths of 1988.
A Molotov cocktail throvm at a Binyamin Regional Council bus
just outside Ramallah, resulted in near disaster. The bus was
badly burned, but no one was injured. JTA/World Zionist News Photo
Service
Poll Shows Palestinian Support
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Israel continues to enjoy solid
support among Americans as a
whole, but Palestinians appear
to be winning greater sym-
pathy among the better-
educated and higher-income
groups, according to an in-
dependent national survey
released by the Wirthlin
Group, headed by Richard
Wirthlin, President Reagan's
pollster.
The results showed that 42
percent of college-educated
Americans said their sym-
pathies lay more with the
Palestinians compared to 38
percent who sympathized
more with Israel. The margin
for error was plus or minus
three percent.
Americans as a whole
favored Israel over the Palesti-
nians by a margin of 43 to 26
percent. College graduates
were evenly divided in their
sympathies at 39 percent each.
But among holders of post-
graduate degrees, 50 percent
felt more sympathy for the
Palestinians, while 34 percent
favored the Israelis.
Neil Newhouse, vice presi-
dent of the Wirthlin Group,
said the results were a disturb-
ing sign for Israel, because
better-educated, higher-
income Americans "represent
this nation's opinion leaders
and potential financial support
for Israel."
Broken down by yearly in-
come, Americans earning
$30,000 to $40,000 sympathiz-
ed most with Israel by a
margin of 46 percent to 30 per-
cent for the Palestinians. But
those earning over $40,000
favored the Palestinians over
Israel by 43 to 36 percent.
Israel was favored 45 to 15
percent by Americans who
earn less than $15,000 a year
and 44 to 28 percent by those
earning between $15,000 and
$30,000.
Sympathy for the Palesti-
nians did not translate into
sympathy for the Arab states
in their conflict with Israel, ac-
cording to the survey. Israel
was favored over the Arab na-
tions by 49 to 17 percent, while
26 percent favored neither and
eight percent had no opinion.
Newhouse observed that
while the results of the survey
"do not show a great deal of
erosion of support for Israel in
general terms in the Middle
East, they do indicate that
fewer Americans are willing to
give Israel the benefit of the
doubt in that country's dealing
with the Palestinians."
UJA's Boycott
Disturbs Shamir
JERUSALEM (INB) -
Senior aides to Prime Minister
Yitzhak Shamir say that he is
"unhappy" over the refusal of
the United Jewish Appeal to
finance Jewish charitable pro-
jects in Judea, Samaria and
the Old City of Jerusalem.
Although Shamir is reluc-
tant to personally intervene,
these aides say, he does believe
that the United Jewish Appeal
and the Jewish National Fund
"have committed a grave er-
ror" by restricting their ac-
tivities to within the pre-1967
parts of Israel.
Both the UJA and JNF had
until recently maintained that
any funding outside of the
pre-1967 "Green Line" was
contrary to the wishes of the
State Department and could
therefore jeopardize the
groups' tax-deductible status.
The Murphy letter proves
"that there are no legal or
other barriers preventing UJA
and JNF from funding projects
in areas beyond Israel's 1967
borders, according to
Hadassah Marcus,
spokeswoman for an ad-hoc
group that has been lobbying
for a change in the policies of
the two philanthropies.
Pipeline Scandal
Damages Labor
JERUSALEM (INB) -
There is little doubt that the
burgeoning Iraqi pipeline scan-
dal will damage the Labor
Party's electoral chances
the only question is how much
damage it will do.
Likud Members of Knesset
are pressing Prime Minister
Yitzhak Shamir to dismiss
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres from the national unity
government if Peres continues
to refuse to provide a full
disclosure of his role in the
pipeline affair.
MK Haim Kaufman, head of
the Likud's Knesset bloc, said
that there are three pressing
questions that Peres has yet to
address: the extent of the
financial dealings between
Labor and millionaire Bruce
Rappaport, who allegedly
negotiated to bribe Labor in
exchange for its support of the
pipeline project; the refusal of
Labor spokesmen to deny the
contents of a Rappaport memo
suggesting that Labor prefers
Ashkenazi immigrants over
Sefardic immigrants, because
Ashkenazim are more likely to
vote for Labor; and whether or
not the Rappaport memo was
based on opinion surveys com-
missioned by Labor.


Page 20 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 1, 1988
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-N B > a a 5 : I -
Moving
Nobel Peace Prize recipient Elie Wiesel, left, presents the Jewish
National Fund's Tree of Life Award to Parade Magazine editor
Walter Anderson. Upon receiving the award in recognition of his
professional and humanitarian leadership, Anderson referred to
Wiesel, stating, "It is because of this man that I have learned such
a great deal about the JNF, Israel and the Jewish people. Pro-
ceeds from the New York event will go toward the establishment of
the Walter Anderson Forest in the American Independence Park,
near Jerusalem.
Mengele
Case Open
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV -(JTA)- Israel
is still not satisfied that human
bones exhumed in Brazil on
June 6, 1985 are the remains
of Josef Mengele, the
Auschwitz death camp doctor,
a Justice Ministry official said.
The ministry's director
general, Haim Klugman, said
it has not yet been accepted
here that the remains have
been conclusively identified as
Mengele's and as long as some
doubt exists, the case of the
Nazi war criminal will not be
closed.
Klugman said Israel would
continue its contacts with
Brazil, the United States and
West Germany on the matter.
Those countries, along with
Israel, sent teams of
pathologists and forensic ex-
perts to Brazil to examine the
skeleton buried at a cemetery
in Embu, near Sao Paulo.
The bones were unearthed
after a German couple living in
Brazil, Wolfram and Liselotte
Bossert, claimed they had
sheltered Mengele for 10
years, during which he assum-
ed the name of Wolfgang
Gerhard. Gerhard was drown-
ed while swimming in 1979.
The experts determined,
mainly on the basis of dental
records, that Gerhard was
Mengele. But those records
have been called into question
recently.
Mengele's family, which
runs a prosperous farm
machinery business in Gunz-
burg, the Bavarian town
where Mengele was born in
1911, admitted after the ex-
humation that it had been in
touch with Mengele in Brazil
over the years and that his
son, Rolf, had visited him
there in 1977.
But the family has refused to
have the remains brought to
West Germany for reburial.
Some sources said they feared
his grave would become a neo-
Nazi shrine or a target for
thieves.
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Israeli-Arab Dialogue
At Belgian Forum
By YOSSI LEMPKOWITZ
BRUSSELS (JTA) A
three-day dialogue between
Israelis and Palestinians ended
here with the participants in
general agreement over the
need for an international con-
ference to facilitate peace
negotiations in the Middle
East. The role of the Palesti-
nian Liberation Organization,
however, remained
problematic.
The dialogue on the theme
"Give Peace a Chance" was
organized by David Susskind,
honorary president of the
Jewish Secular Community
Center here. Held in the
building that houses European
Community headquarters, the
forum drew about 20 Israelis
and Palestinians, all con-
sidered moderates and, as
Susskind pointed out, "willing
to speak to each other without
any prejudice."
The most prominent of the
Israelis was Abba Eban, a
Labor Party member of the
Knesset and chairman of its
Foreign Affairs and Defense
Committee. The best known of
the Palestinians was Hanna
Siniora, editor of the East
Jerusalem Arabic daily Al-
Fajr, who is close to the PLO.
Eban argued forcefully for
an international conference,
which Premier Yitzhak Shamir
vigorously opposes.
But contrary to several
other Israelis who called on
Israel to negotiate with the
PLO, Eban noted that Yasir
Arafat's organization has a
serious credibility problem.
He recalled that on March 7,
while Israel was debating the
new American peace plan,
PLO terrorists hijacked a bus
in the Negev, resulting in the
death of one Israeli and the
wounding of 10.
Nevertheless, Eban said he
discerned an evolution in the
PLO's position and suggested
that Israel rescind its law barr-
ing contacts between Israelis
and PLO officials.
Siniora claimed the PLO
represents five million Palesti-
nians in the Israeli-
administered territories and
abroad. "I am certainly willing
to speak about the security
needs of Israel, but the Israelis
have to speak about a national
identity for the Palestinians,"
he said.
Yael Dayan Urges
Compromise and Dissent
By
ANDREW SILOW
CARROLL
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Israeli writer and politician
Yael Dayan is urging
American Jews to take sides in
Israel's internal debate on the
future of the administered
territories.
Otherwise, said Dayan, 49,
daughter of the late Israeli
Defense Minister Moshe
Dayan, "I have to come to
American Jews and tell them
to compromise on everything
they stand for in order to pro-
duce the facade of solidarity."
Dayan, Brig. General (Res.)
Giora Furman and Mark
Rosenblum, director of North
American Friends of Peace
Now. spoke with reporters
here.
Along with Menachem
Brinker, a literature professor
at the Hebrew University of
Jerusalem, they are trying to
spread the message of the
10-year-old Peace Now move-
ment, which calls for ter-
ritorial compromise and
mutual recognition by the
Israelis and the Palestinians as
a solution both to the present
unrest and Israel's long-term
security concerns.
"There isn't a unified Israel,
and why should they
(Americans) support
everything but what they
believe in?" said Dayan, a
member of the Foreign Rela-
tions Committee of the Labor
Party and a candidate for the
Knesset.
"There are two options, and
Israel is facing them, the
Jewish world is facing them,
the State Department is facing
them, Arafat is facing them.
You take a position according
to your political stance," she
said.
Dayan argued that Israelis
who accept American financial
support and political backing
cannot demand an end to other
forms of "interference."
Beyond the question of tak-
ing sides, Dayan defended
Peace Now's position that
Israel's security needs can be
reconciled with Palestinian
self-determination.
She urged Americans to dis-
count the claims of Shamir
that relinquishing all or part of
the territories would present a
threat to Israel's survival.
She said that argument "is
really taking away our tremen-
dous military achievement of
'67 and not counting the enor-
mous development that we
have undergone since then
militarily." Dayan served in
the Six-Day War as an officer
and war correspondent.
After a break of 21 years, Israel and Hungary have ataMuhed
limited diplomatic ties whereby Israel will maintain an "intert
office" in Budapest and Hungary will maintain one in Tel-An v.
The agreement went into effect when the head of the Hungarian
interest office, Jeno Gyenis, left,, called on Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres recently. JTA/World Zionist News Photo Service
Ontario Jews Marry Out
There is a growing trend
towards intermarriage among
Ontario Jews but there is still
more opposition to intermar-
riage among Jews than among
other communities.
According to a Canadian
Jewish Congress study by
Prof. Stuart Schonfeld, nearly
20 percent of Jews marry out.
The Jews who are more like-
ly to intermarry are: Cana-
dian, American or Western.
males, university-educated.
Jewishly unaffiliated or divorc-
ed. Usually where the n>n-
Jewish spouse converts to
Judaism they raise the level ol
Jewishness in the family.
(Dateline: World Jewry'
According to Siniora both
sides must pay a price for
peace. The Israelis must
withdraw from the territories
and the Palestinians must ac-
cept the existence of the
Israeli state, he said.
He proposed an interna-
tional conference that would
include the PLO. mutual
recognition, a Palestinian
state to exist alongside Israel
and a moratorium on violence
to be declared by both parties
on the day the international
conference begins.
Susskind stressed that the
participants came here in their
personal capacities, not as
representatives of Israel or the
PLO. It was assumed,
however, that the Palestinians
had prior approval from the
PLO to take part in the
dialogue.
The meeting divided the
Belgian Jewish community.
Many Jews who support
Shamir's opposition to an in-
ternational conference called
the dialogue meaningless.
because, they argued, peace
can be achieved only by direct
negotiations between Israeli
and Arab leaders.


By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
"There is a tremendous pain,
daily pain," says Baruch
Tegegne about his community,
the 15,000 Ethiopian Jews in
Israel.
"There is hardly an Ethio-
oian family in Israel today that
is not a divided family, with
close members of the family
unit fathers, mothers,
brothers, sisters still living
in Ethiopia and unable to join
their loved ones in Israel," he
explained in fluent Hebrew
during an interview here.
"This constant pain is harmful
to the Ethiopian community as
a whole and to the process of
integration into Israeli
society"
The 44-year-cld leader of
Ethiopian Jews in Israel con-
tends that as long as they have
family members remaining in
Ethiopia, their absorption into
Israeli society will not be
Friday, April 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 21
5The Unfinished Exodus of
complete.
The Ethiopians in Israel suf-
fer strong guilt feelings, he
said, because "they left their
dear ones in Ethiopia where
they are persecuted, hungry
and ill-treated by their
neighbors."
According to Tegegne,
10,000 to 15,000 Jews main-
ly women, children and the
elderly are still trapped in
Ethiopia's Gondar region. All
of them, Tegegne stressed,
have immediate family in
Israel, but Ethiopia's Marxist
government forbids their
emigration.
About, 15,000 Ethiopian
Jews live in Israel as well,
most having arrived as part of
Operation Moses, the airlift of
Ethiopian Jews to Israel
Operation Moses-
through the Sudan in late 1984
and early 1985.
Tegegne lives in the town of
Herzliya near Tel Aviv. A
founder of the Association of
Ethiopian Immigrants in
Israel, he has been working for
the last few years for the Na-
tional Committee for Ethio-
pian Jewry based in Tel Aviv.
He has been touring Canada
and the United States this past
month on behalf of the
American Association for
Ethiopian Jews to urge North
American Jews and Jewish
organizations to intensify their
struggle on behalf of the re-
maining Jews in Ethiopia.
"Operation Moses is not
over yet. It will not be over as
long as the Jewish community
of Ethiopia is trapped and
denied the right to emigrate,'
he said. Their need for rescue,
he emphasized, is urgent, and
should be arranged with
Ethiopia on the humanitarian
grounds of family unification.
Tegegne himself has a
mother and a number of
brothers and sisters still living
in Ethiopia. Other brothers
and sisters and his father ar-
rived in Israel in the last few
years.
Tegegne was the first Jews
of Ethiopia to set foot on
Israeli soil. He came first to
Israel in 1954 at age 10 as part
of a special Jewish Agency
program in which is Ethiopia
children were educated in
Israel. At age 18 Tegegne
returned to Ethiopia as a
teacher "after eight wonderful
years in Israel, despite the dif-
ficulties and the longing for
my family that was in
Ethiopia."
But once in Ethiopia he
found that the school in his
village, Wozaba in the Gondar
region, had burnt down. He
worked on a farm until 1974,
when the Marxist revolution
took place. He then owned a
farm on the Sudanese border,
which he said was burned
down and looted by bandits.
He decided to flee to Israel
through the Sudan, a journey
that ended in 1976 after two-
and-a-half years and which
was fraught with hardship: He
faced starvation, execution by
the Sudanese police and
murder by hostile border
smugglers.
When he finally reached
Israel, he recalled, "I knew in
my heart that I was mistaken
to believe that there is no God.
I knew that God is there and
miracles can happen."
Is Israel the Promised Land?*
An Authentic Israeli-American Dialogue
By RABBI BERNARD S.
RASKAS
ST. PAUL, Minn. (JTA) -
Recent troubling events have
caused many American Jews
to question the centrality of
Israel in Jewish life. But
before judgments are made, if
they can be, the issue must be
placed in the historical context
of the Jewish people's unique,
curious ambivalence toward
possession and occupation of
land.
No people has maintained
over so long a period so emo-
tional an attachment to a par-
ticular corner of the earth's
surface. But none has shown
so strong and persistent an in-
stinct to migrate, such courage
and skill in replanting its
roots. For more than three
quarters of their existence, a
majority of Jews have always
lived outside the land they call
their own.
Abraham migrated from Ur
Chaldes to Canaan, and at the
call of God was the first to
receive the Divine promise, "I
give you all the land you see to
you and your offspring
forever" (Genesis 13:15). Yet,
he wandered to Egypt. His
nephew, Lot, wandered away
from him. His grandson,
Jacob, took his whole family
and wandered to Egypt.
When the First Temple was
destroyed in 587-6 B.C.E. and
the Jews were exiled to
Babylon, some pledged in sor-
row, // / forget you, 0
Jerusalem, let my right hand
wither, let my tongue stick to
ny palate if I do not keep
Jerusalem in memory even at
ny happiest hour" (Psalms
127:5).
Yet, the prophet Jeremiah
counseled the exiles, "Build
houses and live in them, plant
gardens and enjoy their fruit"
(Jeremiah 29:28).
Just prior to the destruction
f the Second Temple, the
total Jewish population was
e|gnt million. Approximately
six million of them lived out-
side of Palestine.
Whether by choice, chance
P7 force, Jews have always
Deen a nomadic people, and to
a considerable degree were
shaped by the forces surroun-
a'ng them. But wherever they
roamed, the centrality of
Israel was before them, and
the yearning to return to Zion
was within them.
The liturgical calendar was
based on the seasons of Eretz
Yisrael. When the Jews built a
home, they left part of it un-
finished to remind themselves
of their perpetual obligation to
finish the task of rebuilding
their ancient homeland.
At a marriage, a glass was
broken to remind them of
Israel, and at death pious Jews
were buried with some earth
from the Holy Land. At the
end of Yom Kippur and the
seder, two of the most sacred
events in Jewish observances,
they shouted, "Next year in
Jerusalem!"
Almost every major Jewish
book except the Bible was
written outside of Eretz
Yisrael.
However, even as they
remembered Zion, they lived
in their environment, in-
teracted with it and were in-
fluenced by it. At times they
were assimilated by it and in
other instances they rejected
it, but generally they learned
to absorb its best elements and
"made" them Jewish.
The Jewish genius was in
recognizing those elements
that were hostile to it. But in
either event, the challenge of a
foreign environment con-
tributed to the continued
growth of Judaism.
Indeed, Jewish history and
direction were strung between
the poles of the yearning to
return to the homeland and of
living in a foreign environment
with all of its benefits as well
as impediments. When the
Jewish state was declared in
1948, Jews had to face the
choice between living as a
minority or being part of the
majority.
The contemporary challenge
of the Jew began to take shape
in the 19th century. When
Theodor Herzl converted
Zionism (the centrality of
Eretz Yisrael) into a political
movement aiming to solve "the
Jewish problem," he was ar-
ticulating a basic premise of
Judaism.
But he clashed directly with
another basic Jewish view that
maintained Judaism was a
religion that thrived on the
challenges of the non-Jewish
environment and would sur-
vive in it.
Of course, fundamentalist
Jews did not wish to be in-
tegrated into the general
society, but believed that only
through Divine intervention
(the Messiah) could Jews
return to Israel. Woven among
these basic approaches was a
whole variety of movements
and combinations of
movements. But, essentially
they were variations on the
bipolar nature of the Jewish
struggle nationalism and
autonomy versus universalism
and religion.
The Holocaust seemed to put
an end to the conviction that
Jews could live safely
anywhere outside of Israel.
Even among American Jews
there lurks the specter of anti-
Semitism. A democracy is
ultimately based on public op-
nion, and public opinion can be
a fickle master. It can happen
here.
On the other hand, Jews are
beginning to question whether
Israel has not turned out to be
a form of false messianism. In
the wake of so many scandals,
from the army to the business
world to the decline of the kib-
butz, is the Zionist dream
fading?
Did the creation of Israel
end Jewish powerlessness, or
is there more anti-Semitism in
the world than ever before?
Did Israel unify Jews, or did it
exacerbate the conflict bet-
ween political extremes the
cultural Jews and the ter-
ritorial Jews? Why is immigra-
tion to Israel given way to
emigration?
In the wake of these ques-
tions and emboldened by its
growth in numbers, power and
affluence, American Jewry is
beginning to question the cen-
trality of Israel.
Although vulnerable to
charges of intermarriage and
assimilation, American Jewry
can point to a great Jewish in-
frastructure including signifi-
cant advances in Jewish educa-
tion, intellectualism, pro-
fessorships and courses in
Judaica on the campuses and
an astounding number of
books by Jewish authors on
Jewish subjects.
Where, then, shall we pro-
claim the center of Jewish life
in our time Israel or the
American Jewish community?
Is Israel still the Promised
Land or is Israel the Jewish
people wherever they choose
to reside? Proponents are lin-
ing up on both sides and the
duel is beginning.
But is it not possible to offer
a third alternative? Have there
not always been two foci of
Jewish life? Can there not be a
partnership in parity? Can not
Israel and the American
Jewish community (as well as
all Jewish communities) live as
a duet?
The key words here are to be
found in the classic phrase klal
Yisrael the whole communi-
ty of Israel. Was this not
suitably expressed in Mordecai
Kaplan's use of the term
"peoplehood" and emphasis on
kehilla the whole
community?
In truth, the creation and
maintenance of Israel would
not have been possible without
Diaspora Jewry. Equally so,
the failure of Israel (Heaven
forbid) would shatter every
Jew living today and would af-
fect generations to come.
Is it not ingrained in the
Jewish psyche that "all Jews
are responsible for one
another"?
Perhaps our generation
should consider itself most for-
tunate. It may experiment liv-
ing in both cultures.
We should have discussion,
friendly debate, constructive
criticism and honest dif-
ferences. But there is no need
for acrimony or confrontation,
no need for a duel and every
reason to have a duet. We all
need each other and we all
need to help each other fulfill
the purpose of Judaism.
In the end, should not Jews
heed the admonition of
Hohelet: "It is best that you
grasp the one without letting go
of the other" (7:18)? Or in the
words of Dr. Alice Shalvi, pro-
fessor of English literature at
the Hebrew University of
Jerusalem, "Two people may
not agree on everything, but
they should work together in
those areas where they do
agree, on that which binds and
unites us."
Rabbi Bernard S. Raskas serves
Temple of Aaron Congregation, St.
Paul, Minn., and is author of the
trilogy "Heart of Wisdom. "
Peace Prize Nomination
To Neve Shalom
JERUSALEM Neve
Shalom/Wahat Al-Salam
(NS/WAS), Israel's only
Jewish-Arab cooperative
village, has been nominated
for the 1988 Nobel Peace
Prize, it was announced here
by Abed el-Salaam, secretary
of the village.
The village, which is located
on the hillside mid-way bet-
ween Jerusalem and Tel Aviv,
was nominated for the award
by Honorable Eline Bager and
the Honorable Kerstin Ekman,
members of the Swedish
Parliament, who are authoriz-
ed to make nominations to the
Nobel Peace Prize committee
in Oslo.
In making the nominations,
Bager and Ekman cited the
work of Father Bruno Hussar,
one of the original founders of
NSW AS. They stated that
awarding the prize to
NS/WAS would "spread his
(Father Hussar's) message of
cooperation and coexistence in
justice and peace ... to the
world."
Former American Am-
bassador to Israel Samuel
Lewis, a member of NS/WAS
Advisory Board, praised the
organization and its unique
School for Peace, which brings
together young Jewish and
Arab high school students for
special educational training
classes and seminars.
NS/WAS was founded in
1975. It has 70 Jewish and
Palestinian Israeli residents,
in approximately equal
numbers.


Page 22 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 1, 1988
White Supremacist Trial
Witnesses an Acquittal
Shamir Stands Firm
By BARBARA BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) The
judge presiding over the Fort
Smith, Ark., trial of 14 white
supremacists charged with
plotting to overthrow the U.S.
government has granted one
of the defendants his motion
for directed verdict of acquit-
tal, because of insufficient
evidence in the case.
U.S. District Court Judge
Morris Arnold ruled that there
was insufficient evidence to
continue to try Robert
Smalley, 32, who was charged
with seditious conspiracy, ac-
cording to Larry Lee, a
reporter for the Southwest
Times Record in Fort Smith.
Lee said there is a possiblity
that defendants William
Wade, 69, and David McGuire,
25, also will be acquitted of the
charges of conspiring to kill a
federal judge and special FBI
agent in Arkansas in 1983.
Either party in a trial may
receive a directed verdict in its
favor if the opposing party
fails to present a necessary
defense.
Lee, who has been covering
the trial since it began Feb. 16,
said that Judge Arnold has
"persistently asked the
government prosecuting at-
torneys to pare their case
down because a lot of the
evidence was repetitive."
On March 10, Judge Arnold
reportedly told the pro-
secuting attorneys that he
might have to call a mistrial
because they had presented
too much "hearsay" evidence
that was not subseqently cor-
roborated. The judge has had
to frequently instruct the jury
to ignore evidence during the
proceedings, Lee said.
Smalley, who wa tried in the
September 1985 Seattle trial
of a group called The Order,
served about eight months in
prison for selling illegal
weapons to Randall Rader, 36,
a former weapons specialist
for The Order and another
white supremacist group, The
Covenant, the Sword and the
Arm of the Lord (CSA). Rader
was called as a government
witness in the trial.
People who monitor the ac-
tivities of hate groups were
concerned at the turn of
events in the trial. Irwin Suall,
director of the fact-finding
department of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, who has observed some
of the trial, said, "My impres-
sion was that the government
had a very strong case."
But Leonard Zeskind,
research director of the
Atlanta-based Center for
Democratic Renewal, said he
was "concerned" by three fac-
tors in the trial: "the fact that
the government cut in half its
witness list of over 200 names;
the directed verdict of acquit-
tal; and the fact that Judge Ar-
nold told the prosecuting at-
torneys there was a possiblity
of a mistrial because of the
lack of corroborative
evidence."
Zeskind explained that the
conspiracy charge "hinges on
the difference between free
speech advocacy and speech
which engenders imminent ac-
tion. The government's case
rests on proving that immi-
nent action was either the in-
tended or even the unintended
result of the defendants'
activities."
The government is expected
to rest its case Monday, with
the defendants beginning their
case following that. Aryan Na-
tions leaders Robert Miles,
Richard Butler and Louis
Beam are planning to take the
stand on their own behalf.
Continued from Page 3
for the State of Israel and its
prime minister" despite ef-
forts to split U.S. Jewry by
"hostile elements" he did not
identify.
The debate concluded with a
vote to refer the peace issue to
the Foreign Affairs and
Defense Committee. But there
was no vote on the premier's
positions. The Labor Party
and Likud agreed in advance
on this matter to prevent fur-
ther exposure of the deep rift
between the two principal
components of the unity coali-
tion government.
Shamir was particularly in-
dignant over the meeting in
Washington between Shultz
and two members of the
Palestine National Council,
which Israel considers part
and parcel of the Palestine
Liberation Organization.
The Palestinian-born
American academicians with
whom Shultz conferred, Pro-
fessors Edward Said of Colum-
bia University and Ibrahim
Abu-Lughod of Northwestern
University, "are members of
the PLO to all intents and pur-
poses," Shamir said.
He noted that the council
was "the body that approved
the infamous Palestine Cove-
nant," which calls for Israel's
destruction. "It is the supreme
body of the terror organiza-
tions," Shamir said.
He called the meeting a
breach of the 1975 memoran
dum of understanding bet
ween Israel and the United
States in which the Americans
pledged to have no contact
whatever with representatives
of the PLO until it met specific
conditions, including the
recognition of Israel's right to
exist.
That view appears to be
shared by Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres, leader of the
Labor Party.
Shamir said that during his
visit to the United States,
American Jews urged him not
to surrender to pressure or to
cave in to "the media which
are hostile to Israel." He said
they also fully support the
government's actions to sup-
press violence in the West
Bank and Gaza Strip.
"The vast bulk of the great
Jewish community identifies
with Israel and supports us."
Shamir said. "This is a vital
wall of support for us and we
must guard it and preserve it."
With respect to the Arab
uprising, Shamir said Israel
would stand firm "until the
rabble-rousers realize that
they cannot achieve anything
by these means, apart from
suffering and bereavement."
Shamir sent greetings to the
Jewish settlers in the ter-
ritories, urging them "to be
strong and firm."
Labor Party Re-Elects Peres
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres was re-elected
unanimously as leader of the
Labor Party and thus its can-
didate for prime minister in
the next elections.
His re-election at a special
session of the party's Central
Committee was in fact a for-
mality, as he was unopposed.
Peres drew warm applause
when he said in his acceptance
speech that his election was "a
mandate not for me the man,
but for the political path I
represent."
He dwelt on the burning
need, as he saw it, to pursue
the peace process. "Despite its
painfulness there is a solu-
tion," Peres declared. But
"first the politicians must not
dodge the issues or foist them
on the army. They must tell
the people the truth."
In a related development,
the moderate wing of the Na-
tional Religious Party won a
narrow but significant victory,
Israel to Cooperate
Continued from Page 3
a former National Security
Council aide; and Richard
Secord and Albert Hakim,
both involved in the transfer of
arms to Iran and the use of
profits from the arms sale to
supply the Contras.
Walsh has indicated that
there would be further
indictments.
The special congressional
committees that investigated
the Iran-contra affair found no
involvement by Israel in the
transfer of funds to the con-
tras, but concluded that Israel
played a major role in opening
and continuing the initiative to
Iran.
when the party's central com-
mittee endorsed the Knesset
candidacy of Religious Affairs
Minister Zevulun Hammer,
with 60.3 percent of the vote.
Party rules require that any
member who has served two
consecutive terms in the
Knesset must be endorsed by
60 percent of the Central Com-
mittee before he can stand for
re-election. Out of more than
900 votes cast, Hammer
squeaked through by a margin
of only two.
Senator Inouye To Be Honored
The National Council of Young Israel will honor Senator
Daniel K. Inouye (D., Hawaii) as the recipient of the
"Legislator of the Year Award" at the National Council's
76th Anniversary Banquet to be held in Manhattan on
April 17.
Senator Inouye who has served in the Senate since 1963
has consistently championed issues affecting Israel's
security on Capitol Hill. He has served as a member of the
Senate Watergate Committee, Senate Select Committee
on Intelligence and as the chairman of the Senate Select
Committee investigating the Iran-Contra connection.
INTEGRITY LOYALTY CHARACTER
RELIABILITY COMMITMENT
Tenets of Faith
Backbone of JIM REDFORD
HE STANDS ALONE
HE WORKS FOR US!
HAPPY HOLIDAY from a man of faith.
A man you can believe in.
A man you can....
Re-elect Jim Redford County Commission District 6
COUNTY WIDE VOTE- NON PARTISAN
REDFORD
PD. POL. ADV.


Friday, April 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 23
The Media as Messenger;
An Israeli Dilemma
Continued from Page 5
anywhere to meet with anyone
at anytime, although occa-
sionally, due to considerations
of security and military opera-
tions, access to certain areas
may be temporarily limited.
Furthermore, although apply-
ing for press credentials is a
norm applied in all, including
the most democratic, coun-
tries, some of the visiting cor-
respondents on temporary
assignment do not even re-
quest such accreditation, thus
taking advantage of Israel's
openness.
2. Israel is a democracy
fighting for its survival. The
freedom of movement and ac-
cess enjoyed by the media in
Israel is unique, even when
compared to other democratic
nations that have at times
completely closed their areas
of conflict to the press. Cen-
sorship is applied in Israel only
in those cases where security
matters are at risk. In con-
trast, the Arab nations that
are still in conflict with Israel
are societies that place the
severest restrictions on the
media. Like other
authoritarian regimes, their
actions are virtually never sub-
ject to public scrutiny TV
cameras and journalists do not
have the freedom to record
whatever developments take
place. Thus, there is little or no
press coverage of government
reaction to attempted protest,
and the Arab states enjoy a
built-in advantage over Israel
in avoiding unfavorable media
attention.
3. When complex and long
term problems are presented
without reference to their in-
tricacies and background, cur-
rent events may end up being
covered superficially. Many of
the journalists in Israel on
temporary assignment have no
in-depth knowledge of the
region's history, and, conse-
quently, events are frequently
reported as if everything
began just yesterday. Lack of
elaboration presents an even
greater problem on television.
Although the scenes on the TV
screen are vivid, they may
often only be a sliver of reality,
since comprehensive analysis
is seldom provided by the elec-
tronic media. The few seconds
of imagery are often the pro-
duct of a 10-12 hour workday
during which one or several
TV crews tape segments at dif-
ferent locations and, after-
wards, condense them into an
action-packed newsworthy
piece. Thus, scattered in-
cidents may be magnified far
beyond their true proportions.
Moreover, since the report on
television is subject to time
limits and other constraints,
elements that are vital to an
accurate understanding of the
situation may be omitted
because they are considered to
be less "newsworthy."
4. An issue often raised in
connection with the media is
the degree to which it may in-
fluence events rather than
simply report them. There
have been several instances,
some of them noted by other
journalists, in which the sud-
den appearance of a TV news
crew into a relatively calm
area is exploited by local
elements to trigger a
demonstration and, thereby,
conveniently make their point.
The ongoing disturbances have
not just been covered by the
media, but to a certain extent
have also been spurred on by
it. Encouraged by criticism of
Israel, the rioters and ex-
tremist elements feel that con-
tinued turmoil serves their in-
terests, for it ensures more
media attention and thereby
brings even more criticism on
Israel's efforts to end the
violence and to enhance the
prospects for peace.
Asher Nairn is Minister for Informa-
tion for the Embassy of Israel stationed
in Washington, D.C.
Miami Police Chief Clarence Dickson, right,
with Israel Minister of Police Chaim Bar Lev
at the national police headquarters in
Jerusalem. Dickson was in Israel with a
delegation of six law enforcement officials
representing major metropolitan areas in the
U.S. The delegation visited national and
border police units throughout the country
and toured the administered territories.
JTA/World Zionist News Photo Service
Chief Dickson On Israeli Inspection
JERUSALEM, Israel -
"We expected smoke, tanks,
and gunfire, but saw safe and
peaceful streets," said Miami's
Chief of Police Clarence
Dickson at the end of a week-
long visit to Israel. His percep-
tion? "Streets in Israel are
safer than in the U.S."
Dickson was one of sue
American law enforcement of-
ficials in Israel for an ex-
change of views and techni-
ques with that country's na-
tional police force. Comprised
of police chiefs and sheriffs
from major cities in Arizona,
California, Florida, Louisiana,
Missouri and Texas, the
delegation's visit in the last
two weeks was under the
auspices of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, which has an office in
Jerusalem.
Dickson described the coun-
try's police as "humane and
concerned about the delivery
of services under very difficult
conditions." His views, ex-
pressed at a news conference,
were shared by the other
members of the delegation.
The focus of the visit was an
exchange of views on anti-
terrorist activities, criminal in-
vestigation and security pro-
cedures. It was the second
delegation of law enforcement
officers organized by ADL in
cooperation with Israel's
ministry of police. Their
itinerary included Jerusalem,
the West Bank, and visits with
anti-terrorist and border con-
trol units.
Miami Chief Dickson was im-
pressed by some of the
technology demonstrated by
the Israelis and said his
department would send an ex-
pert to Israel to study the
equipment, in particular that
used for scaling high walls and
buildings.
Most of the police chiefs had
never before visited Israel.
After high level security brief-
ings, witnessing public
demonstrations and being ex-
posed to the close-knit coor-
dination among the various
security branches in Israel and
to Israeli society in general,
they all expressed greater
understanding of the country
and the complexity of the
region's issues.
General Assembly Votes Against PLO Closure
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
JTA) The General
Assembly voted 148 to 2 for a
resolution deploring the U.S.
order to close the Palestine
Liberation Organization's
observer mission to the United
Nations.
Only the United States and
Israel voted against the resolu-
tion. There were no
abstentions.
The vote comes a day after
J.S. Attorney Rudolph
^luliani filed a complaint in
JJderal district court in
Manhattan against the PLO's
refusal to comply with a U.S.
Justice Department order to
e|ose and vacate its observer
m'ssion office by March 21.
7{/^ PLO representative,
iehdl Terzi, was served with a
summons giving the PLO 20
^ys to appear in court to
answer the complaint. Terzi
w>d that the PLO "will not
dlsregard the summons."
The resolution was the se-
,u"d I month condemning
! L"!ted States- action
gunst the PLO observer mis-
Sln. It deplored what it said
was the U.S. failure "to comp-
ly with its obligations under
the Headquarters Agree-
ment," which established in
1947 the legal relationship bet-
ween the United Nations and
the United States, the host
country.
The resolution also called on
the UN secretary general to
take adequate legal action to
prevent closure of the PLO
mission. It would require him
to invoke the arbitration
machinery provided for under
the Headquarters Agreement
to resolve disputes with the
host country.
The United Nations an-
nounced it has retained Keith
Highet, president of the
American Society of Interna-
tional Lawyers, to work on a
possible UN response to the
suit against the PLO. The PLO
reportedly will be represented
by former U.S. Attorney
General Ramsey Clark in its
legal battle with the Justice
Department.
The Justice Department suit
against the PLO cites the U.S.
Anti-Terrorism Act.ptf 1987.
U.S. Ambassador Herbert
Okun explained to the General
Assembly before the vote that
the American legal system
obliged the attorney general to
move to close the PLO mis-
sion. But he added that it pro-
vides the PLO every oppor-
tunity to raise relevant legal
defenses before final action is
taken.
Until the courts determine
whether the law requires
closure of the PLO observer
mission, Okun said, the United
States contends it is
premature to consider
arbitration.
He said the United States
will take no further steps to
close the PLO office until the
court decides on the attorney
general's right to order
closure under the act.
Israeli Ambassador Johanan
Bein told the General
Assembly before the vote that
"the real question before the
General Assembly is the in-
tegrity of this organization."
Calling the PLO "the prin-
cipal terrorist organization of
our time," Bein claimed it
could not invoke the UN
Charter for protection because
its "own avowed principles
contradict that very charter."
Terzi of the PLO denounced
the American move. He charg-
ed the United States wants to
create "more Palestinian
refugees. They want to throw
us into the street," he said.
The International Court of
Justice in The Hague is ex-
pected to meet April 11 to con-
sider the closure order. A
resolution adopted by the
General Assembly earlier re-
quested an advisory opinion
from the World Court.
Diplomats here pointed out
that the opinion would not be
binding.
The General Assembly is ex-
pected to discuss the observer
mission issue one more time
before April 11, which also is
the deadline for the PLO to ap-
pear in federal district court
here.
IDF Ordered To Return Film
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Supreme Court Justice
Aharon Barak ordered the
security authorities to return
film footage confiscated from
foreign journalists when Israel
Defense Force reserve Sgt.
Moshe Katz was shot to death
near his guard post in
Bethlehem.
Barak permitted the securi-
ty forces to develop the film,
but they were under strict in-
structions not to damage it.
Time and Newsweek
magazines and the Reuters
news agency, had been urging
return of the film.
In a related story, Premier
Yitzhak Shamir ordered the
closure for one week of the
Arabic daily Al-Ittihad,
Israel's only Arabic daily and
an affiliate of the Rakah (Com-
munist) Party. Shamir used his
authority as acting interior
minister.
The week-long closure
means no Arabic daily was to
be published in Israel on March
30, Land Day, the anniversary
of the confiscation of Arab
land in the Galilee by the Israel
Defense Force in 1976.
Land Day has been marked
annually by Arab protests.
Authorities feared more
violence this year.


Page 24 The Jewish Ftoridin/Friday, April 1, 1988
The Individual Nature
of a People's Passover
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
By SOL H. MARSHALL
By using a Passover theme,
the Federation of Jewish
Men's Clubs has released the
second volume in its series of
books to strengthen the quali-
ty of religious observance by
Jewish families.
"The Art of Jewish Living:
The Passover Seder" is a wor-
thy successor to "The Art of
Jewish Living: The Shabbat
Seder." Both were written by
Dr. Ron Wolfson of the
University of Judaism, Los
Angeles, although the newer
book was written and designed
in collaboration with Joel
Grishaver.
Wolfson points out that
Passover is a festival of
freedom, yet its observance is
bound by a rigid ritual. As we
know, the word "seder"
means order: There is suppos-
ed to be the reading or the
Haggadah; the entire house
must be made kosher for
Pesach; and only foodstuffs
prepared especially for the
holiday may be used.
Part One of the book gives
an outline of the complete
seder ritual by dividing the
elements of the Haggadah into
four "acts": the beginning, the
tellings, the feast and the
redemption. It is designed for
people who need a structure to
understand the meaning of
Passover.
Part Two is devoted to the
preparations and actual con-
ducting of the seder.
The book is also noteworthy
for its haimish presentation.
"We cannot return to the
lessons of that first seder night
in Egypt without its being
enriched by the memories of
our own Seder celebrations,"
Wolfson writes in the
foreword.
"As I sit to write of seder
traditions and customs, I
return in my mind to Omaha.
Such is the Jewish way. Fami-
ly history and national history
are interwoven. I cannot
prepare to experience the
spiritual liberation from Egypt
without first returning in
memory to Nebraska."
He brings us into his large,
three-generation and extended
family and the happy ex-
periences at the sedarim and
other holiday observances in
Omaha. He called the gather-
ings "seders" as a youth, he
writes, and in his mind that is
what they will always be
although today he insists that
his students use the proper
Hebrew plural sedarim.
Readers fearful of holiday
observances because of what
they feel are inadequate
religious backgrounds will be
more at ease after they meet
the eight family groups whose
experiences are quoted
throughout the book.
Jerry Weber, from a
"chaotically observant" home,
and Sally, from a non-
traditional home, have two
children. They give their
guests homework assignments
several weeks before the
seder.
Victor Sabah, whose parents
came from Turkey, and Rica,
whose family lived in
Jerusalem for more than 500
years, and three children are
immersed in an Ashkenazic
setting in their synagogue
school. They have developed
integrated Sephardic-
Ashkenazic observances.
Dan and Carol Karsch and
their three children are involv-
ed in synagogue and com-
munal activities. They share
seders with their neighbors
and university students. Their
rituals combine traditional
texts with creative segments
relating to current religious
and community issues.
Judy and Louis Miller are an
empty-nest family. They hold
one seder for their three mar-
ried children and five grand-
children, which is short and
snappy to accommodate the
youngsters. Then they hold a
"super seder," a longer, more
relaxed, yet intensive session
for friends who appreciate the
extended commentaries of-
fered by all the participants.
Miriam Prum is a single pro-
fessional woman, born in Mex-
ico City to a traditional, Euro-
pean family. She holds one
seder for her family and spon-
sors another for a group of
friends, single and married.
Lorin Fife had Mormon
grandparents, a Methodist
father and a Christian Science
mother. As a youth he attend-
ed a Presbyterian Sunday
School, but was drawn to
Judaism while reading a book
on comparative religions en
route to Vietnam. His interest
in Judaism grew while dating
Linda, and he converted when
they were married. His
parents have attended their
seders.
Keren Goldberg grew up in a
Reform congregation and
celebrated holidays with her
family at home. Her former
husband was not religious, and
they held only one seder while
married. Following the bar
mitzvah of her son, John, she
held her first seder.
Barry and Marlene Horwitz
are active in their congrega-
tion and their three sons have
had a good Jewish education.
Both sets of grandparents
followed the Horwitzes from
Chicago and the seders
replicate the traditional three-
generation family
observances.
In conversations with
Wolfson, all eight family
groups related their feelings
about being Jewish and obser-
ving Passover, and told of
their preparation for the
holidays and how they carried
on the seder itself.
The format personal ex-
periences interwoven with the
more formal descriptions
make this a most enjoyable
book to read straight through
or to browse, now or
throughout the year.
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Friday, April 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 25
Community
Sews
Whimsical clay figures gather around the seder table to tell the story of Passover in 'The Animated Haggadah.'
A Host of Haggadot
By SANDY DIX
Although it's not used very
often, no religious work in
Jewish literature, except for
the Torah, has been translated
into more languages than the
Passover Haggadah.
Commandment, not casual
custom, accounts for its begin-
nings. Twice a year, every Jew
was instructed to relate the
story of the Exodus, once at
the Havaat Bikkurim, or br-
inging the first fruit to the
Temple in Jerusalem, and
again at the seder. Scripture
commands "And thou shalt tell
thy son in the day, saying: It is
because of that which the Lord
did for me when I came forth
out of Egypt." More than
3,000 years after liberation.the
biblical dictate is taken at its
word.
Yet, because no specific text
is mandated for the seder,
there has been an unrestricted
development of Haggadot. To-
day, there are literally hun-
dreds of variations in
circulation.
Despite differences in style
and substance, they all bear
the label "Haggadah." The
word itself translates from the
Hebrew as "narration," "tell-
ing," "tale," or "recital."
Each version tries to fulfill its
definition. Pages are most
often filled with narrative ex-
cerpts from Exodus, inter-
pretive opinions from the
Talmud, prayers, psalms,
songs, and special hymns writ-
ten by medieval liturgists.
Original commentary and ar-
tistic illustration are modern
adjuncts.
It is not known precisely
when the first official Hag-
gadah was written. It was dur-
ing the period of the Second
Temple that the conventional
Haggadah took shape. By the
year 200 C.E., it had assumed
a standard form. Thereafter,
changes and additions
occurred.
Early Haggadot were writ-
ten by copyists, many of whom
were calligraphic experts. The
oldest Haggadah yet
discovered is on a parchment
from before the 8th century,
found in the genizah or
repository for worn-out scrip-
tures of a Cairo synagogue.
Approximately two dozen
Haggadot from medieval and
Renaissance times still adorn
the museum of Europe. The
original "Sarajevo" survives
in Yugoslavia, while the "Se-
cond Haggadah" is in the Ger-
manic Museum of Nuremberg.
The "Darmstadt" and
"Crawford" Haggadot, pro-
duced during the 13th and
14th centuries, can be found in
the John Ryland Library in
Manchester, England.
It was the introduction of
printing during the fifteenth
century that made elaborate il-
Continued on Page 34
Communal Efforts
Combat Bigotry .
And Clean Up Graffiti
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
* Floridian Staff Writer
Several Jewish organiza-
tions, hoping to combat
bigotry, prejudice and
incidents such as last month's
desecration of Bet Shira Con-
gregation, are planning new
courses of action.
Formal charges against the
tour teen-agers arrested in
connection with the synagogue
vandalism are still pending.
Meanwhile, the American
^wish Committee has offered
j create a human relations
laming program for the four
youths and their families that
would cover ethnicity, racism,
Juaaism and the Holocaust,
said AJC Southeastern
Regional Director William
Gralnick.
"I want to stress that this of-
fer is not being made to sup-
plant punishment, but to sup-
plement it," said Gralnick.
"And if the synagogue and the
courts are amenable, we'll be
happy to do it."
The AJCommittee also in-
tends to distribute within the
next few weeks, a handbook on
combatting anti-Semitism and
extremism to churches,
synagogues, religiously-
affiliated community centers
and community action
agencies.
THE organization already
' Continued on Page 29
Dade County residents,
some saying they are
"mad as heck and not
going to take it anymore," are
planning to raise their paint
brushes to wipe out graffiti.
Saturday, April 23, is being
targeted as "Graffiti Paint-out
day." A wide spectrum of com-
munity residents is represen-
tative of a growing movement
to crack down on the graffiti
artists whose works are
costing property owners and
city government clean-up
crews time and money.
Until recently, the targets of
graffiti grumbled that the
kids, if caught, received little
more than a handslap. And so,
the number of incidents rose.
This caused Jean Simon, a
Dade County Realtor, to get
annoyed. Simon, who says she
had never been an activist or
involved in civic projects,
helped organize a group of
fewer than 10 people. They
called themselves TaskForce
Against Graffiti (TAG). Tag is
also the word with which the
graffiti artists or youth gang
"painters" sign their work.
Simon says she was
pessimistic when she began to
organize the taskforce. Only
eight people attended initial
meetings and the prevailing
attitude was skepticism that
anything significant could be
done. Now, with a force of
about 70, backed by com-
mitments for cooperation and
support from various law en-
forcement agencies, Simon is
more optimistic.
TAG is approaching the pro-
blem on several fronts: its
members have met with Dade
State Attorney Janet Reno
and received a commitment
from Reno that she would
notify all Dade County law en-
forcement agencies and re-
quest that graffiti cases be
called to her attention.
TAG members are also
pushing to have graffiti crimes
raised from misdemeanor to
felony status. They have met
with juvenile chief Judge
Seymour Gelber to urge the
courts to be harsher in their
treatment of graffiti-
offenders.
The group is planning: to
Continued on Page 29


Page 26 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 1, 1988
Abba Eban To Cap Forum
Temple Emanu-El closes out
its 1987-88 Forum Series
Tuesday evening with a major
address by Israel leader Abba
Eban at 8 p.m. in the main
sanctuary of the Miami Beach
congregation.
The former Deputy Prime
Minister and longtime Foreign
Minister of the State of Israel,
Eban has been among the
most vocal supporters of an in-
ternational peace conference
leading to face-to-face negotia-
tions with the Jewish state's
neighbors.
Now chairman of the power-
ful and prestigious Foreign Af-
fairs and Defense Committee
of the Knesset, Israel's Parlia-
ment, Eban is a leader of the
Labor Party- in Israel and is
one of the Founders of the
State of Israel.
Abba Eban
His speech here will mark
the beginning of a month-long
observance by South Florida
Yiddish Culture Winkle
Yom Hashoa Program
The "Yiddish Culture
Winkle" will hold its Yom
Hashoa commemoration on
Thursday. April 14 at 10:30
a.m.. at Temple Ner Tamid.
Moishe Becker will speak on
the Holocaust, "A Tribute to
the Six Million Jews Who
Perished Under Hitler."
Cantor Leon Yudoff will sing
songs of the Holocaust and
recite the El Mole Rachamim.
Kaddish will be said by
Menasha Feldstein and Rosa
Luski will recite poems.
The program will be of-
ficiated by Menasha Feldstein.
president of the group.
Certified Poultry &
Egg Co., Inc.
Passover Greetings
763 West 18th St.-379-0675
Edward Don & Co.
2200 SW 45 St. Ft. Lauderdale
(Broward) 983-3000 (Dade> 374-3121
Happy Passover To All
Holbert Electric
1434 Alton Road
Miami Beach 672-6611
Passover Greetings To All
Hearne Electric
14801 NE20th Ave.
No. Miami Beach 944-7799
We Wish The Entire Jewish Community
A Very Happy Passover
Dorwin's
1574 Washington Ave., Miami Beach 532-4061
Happy Passover To Our Friends and Clients
Ocean Electric
741 5th St.. Miami Beach
672-7233
Happy Passover
Fulton Pest Control Co.
Dwde MS4&25 Broward 763-5860
Philip S. Van Dam. Pmideal
Termite Control Lawn Spraying Fertilizing
1961 N.E 153rd Street. PO. Box 600066. North Miami Beach. FL 33160
Kane's Masterbuilt
Furniture
5851 NW 35 Ave.-633-0542
Passover Greetings To Everyone
Jewry of the State of Israel's
40th anniversary of
independence.
Author of several best-
selling books, including "The
New Diplomacy" and
"Heritage: Civilization and the
Jews," Abba Eban speaks
fluent Arabic and is one of the
most respected Israeli
diplomats among the 22 in-
dependent Arab nations.
As Minister of Foreign Af-
fairs for eight years, Eban
played a decisive role in
Israel's development as a ma-
jor force in the Middle East
which forged a powerful
alliance with the United
States. He also served as
minister of Education and
Culture and as president of the
Weizmann Institute of Science
in Israel.
Judy Drucker, president of the
Concert Association of Greater
Miami, has been named
Woman of the Year by the
Greater Miami Israel Bonds
Organization and will receive
a special award at a dinner on
Sunday, May 15, at the Omni
International Hotel.
Illustration Credits
Frontpiece of Section
A of this edition of The
Jewish Floridian is from
the JNF Almanac
reprinted with permis-
sion of the Jewish Na-
tional Fund. The illustra-
tion pictured on the front
of Section B is from "The
Animated Haggadah."
produced by Steimatzky
Publishing of North
America. Inc. and
reprinted with
permission.
Serving the Advertising-
Publishing Industry since
1967 and now with the
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left, is joined by 12th grader Yossi Nuri, formerly of Miami
Beach and now of California, and their tennis instructor while on
the courts near Yeshiva Ohr Elchonon Chabad, Los Angeles. 1%
is one of nine Miami area students currently attending the
Chabad high school in California.
Venzer's Florida Forecast
1663 Collins Ave., Miami Bch.531-9068
Dina Rothbart. Owner
A Very Happy Passover To All
PURITY PEST CONTROL
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Wishes All His Clients and Friends
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Women's Conventional Rights
Are for Men Only!
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
Let the 1988 presidential
candidates beware.
Rosalyn Carter, Betty Ford,
Lady Bird Johnson and Pat
Nixon stand with the
thousands of women who have
made it clear that they are go-
ing for the gold at the 1988
party conventions, battling for
the rights so long delayed for
women.
The four former first ladies
all were sponsors of the recent
Atlanta conference on
"Women and the Constitution:
A Bicentennial Perspective"
attended by more than 1,500
women who want the promise
of the 14th Amendment to
quickly come to its eventual
fulfillment.
That 120-year-old amend-
ment assures that no state
shall abridge the privileges or
immunities of U.S. citizens,
deprive any person of life,
liberty or property without
due process of law, or deny to
any person the equal protec-
tion of the law.
In 1972, Congress approved
a proposed 26th Amendment
proclaiming that equality of
rights under the law shall not
be denied or abridged by the
United States or any state on
account of sex.
Ten years later, after bitter
debate in state houses, 38
states had approved the Equal
Rights Amendment. The pro-
posal needed three more states
to become part of the Constitu-
tion, but luck had run out.
Three of every four of the
men and women participating
in polls favor ERA, but the
reactionary forces in Southern
and Midwestern state houses
and in neo-conservative think
tanks have impeded progress.
Meanwhile, the number of
women in the labor force has
increased, partially because
middle-income families need
two incomes. Thousands of
women have won important
battles in seeking full equality
in employment, when deserv-
ing of promotion, in applying
for credit, when buying in-
surance and in many other
avenues.
Women also have won ad-
mission to a number of men's
clubs whose social agenda
naturally provide oppor-
tunities to close business deals.
Women are now being admit-
ted to Rotary and other lun-
cheon clubs.
And the Boy Scouts of
America, with its 500,000
women volunteers, finally will
allow women to serve as scout-
masters. Many a former Cub
Scout den mother may now
move up the ladder.
All of these women have
come a long way since Myra
Bradwell tried to become an
attorney. Professor Elizabeth
Schneider of the Brooklyn
University Law School has
written recently about that ex-
perience. Married in 1852,
Bradwell studied law under
her husband's guidance and
passed the examination for the
Illinois bar, but was denied ad-
Spec's Music
Happy Passover

Lear School
11211 Biscayne Blvd. No. Miami 893-5351
3a/t/iy 9k*A*m* &<>jffl
Golden Touch Beauty
6981 Collins A ve.
865-6428
Happy Passover
Farm Fresh Products
1672 Alton Road, Miami Beach
672-1725
Happy Passover To All My Customers
New Deal Strictly Kosher
Meat & Poultry Market
1362 NE 163 St., No. Miami Beach 945-2512
Wishes A Happy Passover To The Jewish Community
Dade Pipe & Plumbing
975 NE 163rd St.
No. Miami Beach 949-0801
Happy Passover To All
mission in 1869. A born
fighter, she carried her case to
the Supreme Court.
She lost. Justice Joseph
Bradley, concurring in the opi-
nion that went against her, lec-
tured the gallant lady thus:
"The natural and proper
timidity and delicacy which
belongs to the female sex
evidently unfits it for many of
the occupations of civil life.
The constitution of the family
organization founded in
the divine ordinance ... in-
dicates the domestic sphere as
that which properly belongs to
... the functions of
womanhood ...
"A woman has no legal ex-
istence separate from her hus-
band ... A married woman is
incapable, without her hus-
band's consent, of making con-
tracts .. binding on her or
him .. The paramount
destiny and mission of women
are to fulfill the .. offices of
wife and mother. This is the
law of the Creator."
Former U.S. Rep. Barbara
Jordan, now a University of
Texas professor of public af-
fairs, offered an eloquent reply
to such sentiments. She told
the Atlanta Conference of her
vision of better government in
which men and women join to
make decisions based on the
experience and common con-
cern for the welfare of their
families.
She deplored the shunting
aside of values that women
have to offer. "This must not
be," she insisted. "Our task is
too great, our hold on the
future too tenuous, our time
too short; the space we occupy
too small. And life too great to
hang out a sign: 'For Men
Only.' "
Robert Segal is a former newspaper
editor as well as former director of the
Jewish community councils tn Cincin-
nati and Boston.
Seth Werner, above, is chair-
man of the 1988 Anti-
Defamation League Network
Leadership Award dinner to be
held at the Omni International
Hotel, Thursday, April 28, at
6:80 p.m. The Network, a group
of young ADL leaders, will be
honoring Harry, Joseph and
David Smith.
Arthur Courshon
Friday, April 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 27
Jefferson Bancorp
Jefferson Bancorp, Inc.
hosted a champagne luncheon
at Hemingway's Restaurant in
Hollywood last week to in-
troduce city and state
representatives to its three
recently acquired branches in
Broward County.
Jefferson acquired the
former Broward Bank and its
branches in Lauderdale Lakes,
Fort Lauderdale and
Hollywood. Last year, it ac-
quired a bank in Boca Raton,
giving it a total of 10 banking
offices.
Arthur H. Courshon,
founder of Jefferson Bank 25
years ago and the current
chairman of the board of Jef-
ferson Bancorp, Inc., made
brief remarks during the
luncheon.
"We have never sought size.
Size isn't always safety," said
Courshon, a lawyer and long-
time Miami Beach resident. "I
have a service disability from
World War II called 'no guts.'
I'm concerned about the
return on your money."
He called Jefferson Ban-
corp's capital base "probably
the strongest in the country."
The corporation, started with
one bank and assets of $1
million, now has $315 million
and a ratio of capital over
assets of about 12 percent.
Issuing a good-natured war-
ning to the dozen or so govern-
ment officials present, Cour-
shon said: "We get involved in
issues. We don't believe in
neutrality. We're here and we
want to get involved with the
issues of the town whether it's
daycare or health care for
senior citizens. One of my
closest associates and partners
is (U.S. Rep.) Claude Pepper.
He's been my mentor. I know
the needs of the senior
citizens."
Courshon also told the
guests that the bank, "is not
here to take money out of the
community and lend it
elsewhere."
Leonard Grand, one of the
founders of Broward Bank,
was the only member of his
board to join Jefferson Ban-
corp after the merger. Grand,
now vice chairman of the
board of Jefferson Bank, said,
"Jefferson was 10 times our
size. So, as a consequence of
that, it can provide a much
higher level of expertise and a
variety of services."
PAMPERED LADY
1589DADELAND MALL MIAMI 232-5239
GLOBAL HERITAGE INC.
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT & BROKERAGE
Steven J. Spec tor
575 S.W. 22 Ave. Miami 541-7770
Happy Passover
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
Chrmn. JNF Fdtn.
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Chrmn JNF Exec Board
Ernest Samuels
V.P. JNF Gr. Miami
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 353
Miami Beach, Fla 33139
Phone 538-6464
BQQQQOOQOO
OOOBOOQOBQOOPOPOI


Page 28 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 1, 1988
Alex and Mary Abramowitz proudly display the Israel UOth An-
niversary Award they received from the Greater Miami Israel
Bonds Organization during a recent luncheon at the Port Royale
condominium.. Making the presentation were Jack Finn, left, co-
chairman of the Port Royale Israel Bonds Committee, and David
Pretner, chairman.
Del Amo Plumbing
7223N.W.8St.
Miami 264-9712
Happy Passover
Congregation Mag en David
Sephardic Jewish Center of
17100N.E. 6th Ave.
North Miami Beach, Fl 33162
wishes one
and all a very
Temple Beth Am
Laonard A Schoolman, tenter H.bc Mart s Kram, Associate Rabbi
Hsrbsrt M. Baumoara. Rabbi Emarttus Lynn H. OoWstete. Associate Rsbbi
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Miami Phone 667-6667
Wishes The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy Passover
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 N.E. MIAMI GARDENS DRIVE
RABBI SIMCHA FREEDMAN
947-1435
CANTOR ZVI ROZEN
Congregation President. Isaac Franco / Executive Director. Harry J Sdverman
Sisterhood President. Marilyn Ladis Men's Club President. Glen Koch
Education Director. Rochelle Bahuch Early Childhood Director. Joan Bergman
Youth Director. Mark Sykes
HAPPY
PASSOVER
Temple Emanu-El
of Greater Miami
Dr. Irving Lehrman
Rabbi
Lawrence M. Scnantz
President
Happy Passover To All!
Temple Israel
of Greater Miami
Miami's Ptonaar Rtlorm Conoraganon
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr. 595-5055
RABBI DR. HASKELL M. BERNAT
Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Jacob G. Bornstein, Emeritus
Dr. Jack L Sparks, Director of Education
Ethel S. Lee, Administrator
Wishing The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy Passover.
GeraldK. Schwartz, President
Florida Supreme Court
Justice Gerald Kogan will ad-
minister the oath of office to
Dade County Court Judge
Juan Ramirez, Jr., above, at
noon Friday, April 8, at Judge
Ramirez's investiture. The
swearing in ceremonies will be
held at the Dade County Cour-
thouse. Chief Judge Gerald T.
Wetherington will preside as
Judge Ramirez, selected by the
Judicial Nominating Commis-
sion and appointed by Gover-
nor Robert Martinez, takes
office.
Cantor Rachelle Nelson
Temple Israel
'Stars' Concert
A musical collage of Grand
Ole' Opry, Broadway themes
and Jewish folk music will be
the focus of the "Stars-A-
Poppin" concert at Temple
Israel of Greater Miami on
Saturday, April 30, 8 p.m.
Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson
will produce, choreograph and
participate in the production
which is to feature The Univer-
sity of Miami Performers.
Prior to the concert, Rabbi
Rex D. Perimeter will conduct
an Havdalah service at 7:15
p.m.
In addition, there will be a
champagne reception follow-
ing the performance. For in-
formation, 573-5900.
Demonstrators Test
Embassy Protests
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Two Soviet Jewry activist
organizations demonstrated in
front of the Soviet Embassy
here and gave local police pass-
ing marks.
The Union of Councils for
Soviet Jews and the Student
Struggle for Soviet Jewry had
gathered to "test the waters"
of the Supreme Court's deci-
sion limiting enforcement of a
law banning demonstrations
within 500 feet of a foreign
embassy.
The 8-0 decision by the court
would still allow the police to
break up a group of three or
more people if they disrupted
the activities of the embassy or
threatened security. But the
decision bans police action
against ''peaceful
congregations."
About 30 people participated
in the test, including Sens.
Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.)
and Dennis DeConcini (D-
Ariz.). They sang "Hatikvah"
and other songs in front of the
embassy fence, using
bullhorns, and even sat on the
sidewalk.
they did not block?
sidewalks or bar people &
entering or leaving theZ
bassy, according to Set cT
Nelson of District of ColuS
police. He added that 2
had not decided what lewE
noise would be tolerated.
The Supreme Court deciaor
was in two parts. By a fiVe;
three vote, the court stnri
down a section of the 50-year
old law that made it illegal to
display any sign within sn
feet of an embassy that wouij
bring a foreign government it
to 'public odium" Ml
"disrepute."
Justice Sandra Day O'Con-
nor, who wrote the decisicm,
said the ban on the signs wasi
violation of the First Ameni
rnent "by prohibiting peti-
tioners from engaging in
classically political speech" oo
public sidewalks.
O'Connor said she agreed
that the government must pro-
tect foreign embassies, but she
said the 1938 law was too
broad.
Beth law GdncrecaTtOn
Br^WROKC/MRJS
1051 North Miami Beach Boulevard / North Miami Beach FL 33162
Phone 947-7528
Wishes The Entire Community and Members
A Happy and Healthy Passover
Dr Mai A Ilairyu. RaaM
Harvay L. Bran. Eimtiv* Daractar
** Aroai. Caatar lUv MorriaehaJ AaTer. Ritaal Director
IU Vk.truWa. llajila. Sraill Director
Shalaau l Gitutm. Early CWUkmd Dirartar
Davia- Break. Vaalk Dinner
Suphaai* Fag.lb.ra,. Acti*. Adaha Dirartor
Robert Billi. Praaidaal
Miami Beach Region of
Hadassah
Wishes The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy Passover
RICKIIGRA. President
-<=---
vO*1
H*
fl*
^3
JEWISH VOCATIONAL SERVICE
318 N.W. 25 St. 920 Alton Rd. -12550 Bisc. Blvd.
576-3220 672-2184 891-9832
Temple Zion Israelite Center
A CARING CONSERVATIVE CONGREGATION
Wishes Our People Everywhere A Happy Passover
> N Shapiro. Rabbi Mlchaai M UHbtn. to**"
Norman S. Pollack. EKut 1**"
Da.KJ Roaanthal. Aui. Cantor
Of Norman N Shapiro. RabM
Banjamm Adlar. Cantor
Happy Passover
Ami t Women
(Formerly American Mizrachi Womenl
633 N.E. 167th St.. Suite 815. N. Miami Beach. 331b.
651-1444
Shalom Happy Passover Members and Friends
Temple Beth Moshe
2225 NE 121 St. No. Miami
891-5508
A Happy and Healthy Passover
Temple Bnai Zion
200 178th St. Miami Beach. Fla. 33160
Phone-932-2159
Wishes The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy Passover


Communal Efforts Combat Bigotry
n t iniipd from tiHUC 25 aoi/4 *
Friday, April 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 29
Continued from page 25
has contacted the two schools
which the youths involved in
the vandalism had attended,
inviting them to become active
in the "Hands Across Cam-
pus" program, a multi-ethnic
teaching program that is co-
sponsored by the AJCommit-
tee and the Cuban American
National Council.
Approaching the problem
from a law enforcement angle,
the Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith and police
representatives announced the
formation of a tri-county youth
gang task force to detect
trends and gather statistics on
juvenile crime.
The task force will consist of
law enforcement officials from
Dade, Broward and Palm
Beach Counties, said Arthur
Teitelbaum, southern area
director of the ADL.
A "multi-agency" computer
system will be made available
for the program, Teitelbaum
said. The name of the agency
providing the computer ser-
vice will not be revealed, he
said
ADL officials will help set up
the task force but it will be run
by the law enforcement of-
ficials. Teitelbaum hinted that
the task force is desperately
needed. But speaking in
general terms, he said: "This
will provide a resource which
does not currently exist a
tri-county computer-supported
information center. It will also
encourage the cross-county
cooperation between law en-
forcement agencies."
The ADL has been monitor-
ing youth gang activity, par-
ticularly when it has com-
ponents of anti-Semitism,
racism, and anti-immigrant
ideology, Teitelbaum said. The
ADL has noted in its recent
reports activities involving the
Skinheads, a neo-Nazi youth
gang that has been associated
with anti-black and anti-
Semitic violence around the
country. Skinhead gangs have
recently been identified in
South Florida.
Vandalism has also been in-
creasing as the number of
Continued from page 25
cover bases from Tallahassee
to local municipalities, in-
cluding supporting a state
measure that would limit the
sale of spray paint and items
such as markers to minors
without parental permission.
The Dade County League of
Cities is involved, as well. The
League will ask cities and the
county government to pass
strict ordinances against
graffiti.
"Laws have to be passed.
We'll be encouraging our
members, which include all the
cities. Metro-Dade and the
School Board, to really join in
the fight against graffiti,"
says Russ Marchner, executive
director of the League.
School children can expect to
see a film still in production
- whose message will, in
essence, start a say-no-to-
graffiti campaign.
. And Clean Up Graffiti
youth gangs increase in the
area, according to Metro-Dade
Police Detective Charles Fer-
rante. The detective recently
told The Jewish Floridian that
10 years ago he knew of only
two youth gangs in the area.
Last year, there were an
estimated 46 gangs, he said.
This year, there are approx-
imately 73 active gangs in
South Florida with some 1,300
to 1,500 members.
IN a related development,
The Florida Department of
Education has appointed a
commission to review social
studies curriculum and create
a model course on Holocaust
education, the Florida Associa-
tion of Jewish Federations
reports.
Several Federation Com-
munity Relations Councils
have been involved in an effort
to include the Holocaust
education as a part of the re-
quired curriculum of public
schools to show what happens
when prejudice runs riot in
society. Public testimony will
be taken later this year by the
Department's commission.
Debra Sari Linn
TAG began as a project of
the Board of Realtors in Miami
but has since joined forces
with Keep Dade Beautiful, a
county-sanctioned committee.
The task force is now seeking
support from homeowners and
some of the major victims of
graffiti such as Florida Power
and Light and bus bench
advertisers.
"Then we got people who
read about us who were plain
'Mad-as-heck-not-going-to-
take-it-anymore,' says Liz
Hubbart, spokesman for the
Board of Realtors and member
of TaskForce.
THE realtors became involv-
ed because the graffiti was, in
effect, in their back yards. Ex-
plains Hubbart: "It is a pro-
blem that effects every person
in Dade County whether they
own, rent or are just visiting
here. It costs the owners of
property a lot of money to
repair the damage. The pro-
perty owner has to pass these
so the tenant/lessor
cost passed on to
costs on,
gets the
him."
Real estate is Simon's
specialty, yet she doesn't cite a
lack of parks or recreational
facilities for youths as the root
of the problem.
"The problem is parental
neglect," Simon says. "They
don't know their kids are do-
ing it and they don't care a lot.
It's a social problem and .
middle class America is just as
guilty as any other part.
"Do your thing!" Simon
urges parents. "Watch your
kids."
ELLEN ANN STEIN
The Response is Education
By DEBRA SARI LINN
A giant swastika covers the wall of a
synagogue. The time and place is not
Nazi Germany.
In fact, the time is February 27, 1988,
and the synagogue is Bet Shira Con-
gregation in South Dade. Four high
school students defaced the temple's
newly constructed buildings. These
students are not gang members. They
are not teens with police records. They
are actually good students and members
of their high schools' football teams.
The question that naturally arises
after hearing this information is why.
Why would seemingly model teenagers
exhibit such a display of violence and
anti-Semitism? What could have caused it? Does it spawn from
latent feelings of hatred and prejudice in the ethnically interm-
ingled community of South Florida?
Every public high school in Dade has its shaven-head members
of the Skinheads and its violence prone members of ethnic
gangs. These, however, are problems in themselves. The damage
done to Bet Shira Congregation is an example of mainstream
anti-Semitism.
The first step to combat this frightening problem must be in
the high schools themselves. Reverting back to the tactics of the
1960s, many schools attempt to rectify the troubling situation
with "rap" groups. If these groups represent the diverse popula-
tion of the schools and are not self-contained discussion groups
for already close friends, then such a plan of action might work.
The sessions could act as a catharsis of emotions and deep-seated
hatred.
Rap groups are just a beginning. As is the case with most
forms of prejudice, ignorance is the cause of the hatred. Schools,
as institutions of learning, should try to do what they do best:
teach. Perhaps county-wide classes in ethnic and religious
culture and history would eradicate some age-old myths.
After education, community involvement is necessary. Adults,
civic and religious leaders must join in the fight against pre-
judice. Programs like "A World of Difference" and Miami Beach
Senior High's ethnic awareness programs are starting points but
were not far-reaching enough in their attempts.
In light of the recent display of anti-Semitism and vandalism,
the South Florida community must band together. Now is the
time for decisive action, and the best place to begin is in the
beginning: in the schools with education.
Debra Sari Linn is a senior at Miami Beach Senior High School.
We wish you a Happy Passover
Synagogue Defacements
Two Palm Beach County synagogues were defaced with
anti-Semitic graffiti this past weekend. Spiritual leaders of
the synagogues, Temple Beth El in West Palm Beach and
Temple Beth David in Palm Beach Gardens said they will
leave the graffiti on the walls of the synagogues' religious
schools until the Passover seders are concluded to remind
the children that they are not immune to prejudice.
"...and grant us joy on this feast
of Passover. "/**,.,,*.
\nri nvxipn in tfn unafcn..."
n*w >r .tw
;i **m
Fine Distributing Co.
3485 NW 65th St.
Miami-691-0231
Happy Passover To All
KIMBERL Y FURNITURE
1014 E. 29th St., Hialeah. Fla. 33013
691-1481
Happy Passover
. nam.TJO .yrv. oj*o.yrm
irrm-yiD.-iriQ. nao x"s\o.,
[ abiyn -|bo uw Mnnx -yro
01
Joe's Stone Crab Restaurant
227 Biscayne St. Miami Beach
673-0365
Happy Passover
Yffn.nnK."vw yrw
l 1>J >
Bank Hapoalim:
Endurance Floors
18460 NE 2 Ave.. Miami-652-6481
Happy Passover
Head Office 50 Rothschild Blvd. 65124 Tel Aviv. Israel
Overseas Offices Rockefeller Cemet. New York* Plaza Branch. New York Queens. New York*
Huntinglon, New York* Miami. Florida* Boston. Massachusetts* Los Angeles. California*
Encino. California* San Francisco. California* Chicago. Illinois* Philadelphia. Pennsylvania*
London West End. England London, City. England Manchester. England Zurich.
Switzerland Luxembourg Paris. France Georgetown. Grand Cayman Toronto. Canada
Montreal. Canada Buenos Aires. Argentina Sao Paulo. Brazil Rio de Janeiro. Brazil Caracas.
Venezuela Punta del Esle. Uruguay Montevideo. Uruguay Santiago. Chile Panama City.
Panama Mexico City. Mexico And 340 branches of the group in Israel.
Regional Management USA: I Rockefeller Plaza. Suite 1025. New York, New York.
Member F D.I.C.


Page 30 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 1, 1988
A reception honoring Senator Jack D. Gordon
for his 16 years of leadership in the Florida
legislature brought together, from left, Harvey
Kramer, Jefferson National Banks' Chair-
man of the Board Arthur H. Courshon, Carol
Courshon, Sen. Gordon and Eli Feinberg,
former senior administrative aide to U.S.
Sen. Richard Stone. Among those on hand
were Senate President-delegate Robert B.
Crawford, Senator Margolis, Rep. Elaine
Bloom, Rep. Susan Guber, Sen. Larry Plum-
mer and numerous former state legislators.
Golden West Tours
Delray Beach FL
(305)496-1898 1-800-330-7285
Hoping to see you on our special Western U.S. Tours
Wishes Friends, Clients A Family
Associated Photographers
19 SW 6th St.
Miami 373-4774
Happy Passover
Coastal Towers
Beauty Salon
400 Kings Point Dr., No. Miami 944-7527
A Very Happy Passover
To Our Friends and Customers
Rothman's Shoe Salon
9700 Collins Ave., Miami Beach866-1172
Happy Passover
Twin City Glass Co.
1220 16th St.
Miami Beach 673-2967
Happy Passover To All
Mr. Carmen Beauty Shop
1604 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach 534-2900
Happy Passover
Reliatex Inc.
2201 NW 72 Ave.
Miami-592-3220
Happy Passover
Mario Chuy Hair Salon
HAIRCUTTERS DESIGNERS UNISEX
19062 NE 29 Ave.
No. Miami Beach 932-4247
Happy Passover To All
China: No Ties
To Israel
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
People's Republic of China will
not establish diplomatic rela-
tions with Israel until it alters
its policies, Haaretz reported
from London quoting the
Chinese foreign minister, Wu
Xueqian.
"The time is not right at pre-
sent to establish diplomatic
ties with Israel, given the ex-
isting situation," the minister
said, according to Haaretz's
London correspondent.
He said China is interested
in participating in an interna-
tional conference as a solution
to the Middle East conflict.
But he would not say whether
the Beijing government would
recognize Israel as a precondi-
tion for its participation,
Haaretz reported.
Defense Dept.
Holocaust
Material
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Department of Defense is
distributing a 96-page book en-
titled "Days of Remem-
brance" to assist members of
the U.S. armed forces in
organizing Holocaust educa-
tion programs and ceremonies
as part of this year's national
Holocaust remembrance.
The book, produced in con-
junction with the International
Center for Holocaust Studies
of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, is in-
tern ed for more than five
mil ion members of the
American military around the
world.
Included in the guide are
statements from President
Keagan and Secretary of
Defense Frank Carlucci and a
variety of suggestions on how
to organize an observance.
The book also contains
Historical information on the
Holocaust.
Marwin S. Cassel has been ap-
pointed president of the
Greater Miami Chapter of the
American Society for
Technion-Israel Institute of
Technology. A lifetime resident
of Florida and an attorney,
Cassel is a member of the State
of Florida Hospital Cost Con-
tainment Board
Norma A. Orontz. presided
the Southeast Region J
American Jewish (W
and managing editor of"fl.
Jewish Floridian" was eUcM
to the post of national i*.
president of AJC at ft
organization's ?oth anniver-
sary convention it
Philadelphia.
T
Chez Philippe
13505 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami 945-5807
Passover Greetings
Open For Lunch Mon. to Fri.
Dinners Mon. to Sat.
Federal Discount
Pharmacy
1120 West 49 St., Hialeah 556-5270
Happy Passover
Elsie Undergarment Co.
8295 W. 20th St.
Hialeah -822-6981
Isaac and Elsie Silverberg
Happy Passover To All
Hi Grade Food Co.
240 NE 71 St., Miami-758-0516
Happy Passover
I. Brown Sales Corp
4380 East 11 Ave., Hialeah-685-7622
Passover Greetings
Cye's Lounge & Restaurant
444 Brickell Ave.
Miami 358-9100
Passover Greetings
North Miami Beach Florist
487 NE 167th St.
No. Miami Beach 651-2040
Happy Passover
$
Holiday Inn at golden glades
148 NW 167 St.
No. Miami Beach 949-1441
Happy Passover
Ms. Gall Spier
__________ Marketing Director


Community Corner
The Miami Beach Chapter, Women's Division,
American Technion Society, will honor Jean Rosenthai
for her philanthropy, at a luncheon meeting on Thurs-
day, April 14, at noon at the Shelborne Hotel.
"Who Ran Away With The Afikomen?" will be
discussed by William F. Saulson at a meeting of the
Wilshire West Social Club, Miami Gardens Drive, on
Sunday, April 10, at 11:30 a.m. A family consultant,
Saulson is a vice president of the Riverside Memorial
Guardian Chapels.
A series of workshops on job stress, parenting, com-
municating with teens about sex and AIDS, blending
stepfamilies, women's issues, and retirement planning
are being offered by Jewish Family Service (JFS) of
Greater Miami beginning the week of April 11. Con-
ducted at four locations in Dade County, each
workshop meets for four sessions and is taught by ex-
perienced JFS clinical staff professionals. For informa-
tion, 445-0555.
Women's American ORT-Greynolds Park Chapter
will meet on Tuesday, April 12, at 11:30 a.m. at Bobby
Rubino's Restaurant, W. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Sophie Weissman will review "Dr. Ruth, her
Biography."
American Jewish Congress Justine-Louise Wise
Chapter will meet Thursday, April 14 at noon at the
American Savings and Loan Association Bank building
at Alton and Lincoln Roads. A film and discussion on
Israel are planned.
Friday, April 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 31
A new production of the Tony award-winning Broadway show,
"The Music Man, "will be in Miami Beach for one show April 8 at
8:30 p.m. in the Jackie Gleason Theatre of Performing Arts. The
new production comes from the producers of "Man of La Man-
cha." "Ain't Misbehaving," and ""A Chorus Line."
With over thirty years of dedication to
innovating and improving the insurance
services provided our clients.
' v.'.-..^'. >.
14750 NW 77lt> Cl.
Suite 320
Mami Lakes. FL 33016
(305)364-7800 Dade
(305)524-1141 Broward
Lilyan Cortez
6700 NW 77 Ct.
Miami 592-8000
Happy Passover
Charade Res tauran t
2900 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables 448-6077
Happy Passover
Captain John Callan of
The Helen C
16375 Collins Ave. 947-4081
Happy Passover
Observance of Israel Independence Day
Jews worldwide will
celebrate Yom Ha'atzmaut,
Israel Independence Day,
marking the day in 1948 when
David Ben-Gurion stood in
front of a portrait of Zionist
leader Theodor Herzl in the
Tel Aviv museum and
declared: "The State of Israel
has risen."
The Greater Miami Jewish
community is planning to
begin its pre-Israel 40 celebra-
tion with a splash. Israeli
swimsuit designer Gideon
Oberson's fashions will be
displayed in a show at the
Miami Seaquarium's Whale
Bowl on Sunday, April 10 at
1:30 and 3:30 p.m.
A special attraction at the
Seaquarium that day will be an
exhibit of tropical fish native
to the waters of the Red Sea
that will be brought to Miami
from Eilat, Israel.
In downtown Miami on Sun-
day, April 17, thousands of
festival-goers are expected to
gather at the Miami-Dade
Community College Mitchell
Wolfson campus to participate
in "Israel 40."
Festivities begin at 11 a.m.
and continue through 5 p.m.
Some of the highlights include:
1:45 p.m. Cantorial Choir,
consisting of 20 local cantors.
The performance will close
with "Jerusalem of Gold" sung
by Cantor Rachelle Nelson of
Temple Israel of Greater
Miami.
3 p.m. The Dudaim Duo, a
popular Israeli group that has
been likened to Simon and
Garfunkel.
4 p.m. The Mamas and the
Papas, surviving members of
the popular '60s folk-rock
?roup.
A number of local groups
will perform throughout the
day including Magain Miami, a
four-member musical group
that performs Klezmer,
Hasidic, Israeli, Yiddish and
Jewish rock; the Shajar Band,
an Argentinian pop and rock
band; Hollies Follies, a musical
group led by entertainer Hollie
Berger; Hebraica Dancers, a
troupe of young Latin
American Jews between the
ages of nine and 22; Bracha
and Menachem Lavee and
their felt art; Yaacov Heller,
sculptor; Hannah Miller, a
native Israeli who will display
Israel Bombs
Facilities
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel
Air Force jets attacked ter-
rorist targets in southern
Lebanon for the fourth time
this month.
Pilots reported direct hits on
buildings used to store am-
munition and equipment nor-
theast of the Lebanese port ci-
ty of Sidon. The bases and am-
munition dumps were used by
Abu Nidal's Fatah Revolu-
tionary Council and other ter-
rorist organizations, a military
spokeman said.
Reports from Beirut said
nine people were killed and
five injured. Ten deaths were
reported in an attack earlier in
the week.
The Mamas and The Papas
her sculptures, jewelry,
Judaica and acrylic paintings;
Meir Martin, a photographer
who has captured color photos
of Israel's birds and Yusi
Yanich, local Israeli folk
dancer.
Other highlights will include
Israeli merchandise exhibitors;
kiddie rides and a games ar-
cade run by local youth groups.
Israeli-style cafes will offer
Middle Eastern desserts and
kosher Israeli foods.
The University of Miami
Medical School's Tay Sachs
Prevention Program will con-
duct screenings.
Central Taxi
740 Alton Rd.
Miami Beach 532-5555
Happy Passover
Biscayne Miracle Mile Cafeteria
147 Miracle Mil-
Coral Gables 444-9005
A Happy and Healthy Passover
Centro Vasco
2235 SW 8 St., Miami
643-9606
Wishes A Happy, Hearty Passover
To The Entire Jewish Community
A-l-A Employment
1325 NE 1st Ave., Miami 379-8401
Happy Passover
Simons & Rose Agency
2901 Bridgeport Ave., Miami443-4886
Passover Greetings
Farr Tours
2323 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach 531-5327
A Very Happy Passover To All
The Forge Restaurant
432 Arthur Godfrey Rd.
Miami 538-8533
Happy Passover
Happy Passover
Westchester General Hospital
2500 SW 75 Ave.
Miami 264-5252


Page 32 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 1, 1988
The American Friends of the
Hebrew University, in coopera-
tion with the Sephardie Con-
gregation of Florida; Temple
Moses and Hebraica Miami
Community Center, presented
"An Evening With Dr. Ber-
nard Cherrick," vke president
of the Hebrew University of
Jerusalem, at Temple Moses,
Miami Beach. Top left w
Salomon Garazi, past presi-
dent, Temple Moses and Dr.
Bernard Cherrick. From lower
left is Eugenia Credi co-
chairperson; Reina C. Maya,
president, "Victoria Adouth
Women's Committee; Dr. Ber-
nard Cherrick; and Esther
Garazi, past president, Temple
Moses Women's Committee.
Pictured during a planning meeting for
"Four Mondays in March" are seated, left to
right, Ellie Gam and Gert Kartzmer. Stan-
ding are Norma Wilson, Meryle Loring, Joan
Smith and Etta Barnett. The sixth annual
financial seminar series was sponsored by the
Women's Division of Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and the Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies. Theme of this year's meeting
was "Invest in Yourself."
Frank B. Hall & Company
of Florida
2600Douglas Road- 448-2211
Passover Greetings
Miami Tobacco
& Candy Co.
8601 NW 61 St. Miami 594-0063
Happy Passover
The Palette
125 NE 26 St.. Miami-573-0980
Happy Passover
Jerusalem Symphony
To Play Miami
A concert performance in
Miami Beach on Tuesday,
April 12, begins the Jerusalem
Symphony Orchestra's 20 city
United States tour, which will
celebrate the State of Israel's
40th anniversary as well as the
symphony orchestra's own
50th season.
The 8 p.m. concert at the
Jackie Gleason Theatre of the
Performing Arts will be con-
ducted by Sergiu Comissiona
and feature violinist Alex-
ander Markov.
The official symphony or-
chestra of Israel National
Radio, the ensemble has 96
players, many of whom are im-
migrants from throughout the
world. It plays over 100 con-
certs throughout Israel, from
the remotest settlements to
the largest cities, and from
contemporary to traditional
musical programs.
Alexander Markov, who
emigrated to the United States
from the Soviet Union at the
age of 13, won the Avery
Fisher Career Grant in 1987
and was Gold Medalist at the
1982 Paganini International
Violin Competition. The
25-year-old musician, an
American citizen, made his
New York recital debut at
Carnegie Hall and has been
playing with leading or-
chestras in this country and in
Europe.
Sergiu Comissiona has con-
ducted virtually every major
orchestra in 25 cities on six
continents over the past 30
years. This season he is con-
ducting with the New York Ci-
ty Opera, where he has been
Music Director since January,
1987. He has also been Music
Director of the Houston Sym-
phony and is Conductor
Laureate of the Baltimore
Symphony. Bom in Romania
Sergiu Comissiona. a Roma-
nian born American citizen.
will conduct the Jerusalem
Symphony Orchestra on its
American tour celebrating
Israel's ifOth anniversary, The
96-piece orchestra will perform
in concert on Tuesday evening,
April 12, at the Jackie Gleam
Theatre of the Performing
Arts. _________'
in 1927, Comissiona was a
violinist with the Romanian
State Ensemble before turning
to conducting. In 1959, despite
his rapid rise to Principal Con-
ductor of the Romanian State
Opera, he emigrated to Israel.
He became an American
citizen on July 4, 1976 at
bicentennial ceremonies at
Fort McHenry, Baltimore.
The Jerusalem Symphony
will go on to play at Fort
Meyers, Clearwater. Palm
Beach and Sarasota, Florida
before meeting dates later in
April and in May, in
Baltimore, New York, New
Jersey, and the New England
area.
Furniture Artist & Upholstery
30 Years Experience In Upholstery
783 N.E. 125 St., Miami, Fla. 33161
895-6951
_______ Happy Passover
C.U. Associates
P.O. Box 523534 Miami
551-4700
Happy Passover
Miami Rug Co.
11150 NW 32 Ave., Miami 685-8444
Happy Passover
Cynthia Apts.
2115 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach-531-3143
Happy Passover To All
The Studio Restaurant
2340 SW 32 Ave., Miami445-5371
Happy Passover
Robert L SodoJfMD, of Hun-
tington Valley, Pa., was elected
national president of
American Red Magen David
for Israel (ARMDI). Dr
Sadoff, a forensic psychiatrist,
w a former Miami resident He
w married to the former Joan
Handleman.
American Plumbing
& Electric Supply
1735 Alton Rd. Miami Beach 532-3446
Jack Katz & Max Gross and Families
____ Happy Passover
Bay Harbor Fine Foods
107795th St., Miami Beach
865-0331
Happy Passover To Our Friends & Customers


Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
6:17 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Mridin Avanue
Miami Beach. Fla. 531-2120
Rabbi Dow Rozencwatg
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor: Zvl Rozen Conservative
Executive Director ^^
Harry J. Sllverman (W)
Frl. no 8 p.m. aarvica
Daily Mlnyan 7 30 m
no (p.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kandall Dr.
S. Miami 667-4667
Leonard Schoolman, Sr. Rabbi
Mark Kram, Associate Rabbi
Lynn Goldstein, Assistant Rabbi
Frl. S: 15 p.m.!
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Sbrnuel
2MSh,>H ftS?Mlami Bch
534-7213-534-7214
Barry J. Konovitch, Rabbi //"K^
Sirolo Grower, President If)
Sholom EpettMum, ProsWent^
Religious Committee
TEMPLE EMANUEL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
QD
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Bergsr
Assistant Rabbi Ronnie Cahan
Yehuda Shitman, Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
Frl. 8 a.m. Sanica tor Flrtt-Born; 8:30 p m
P.i.o,., Sarvlca let 9 a.m. .nd 7 p.m.;
Sun. 9 a.m. Dr. lahrman will p.Ch
Cantor Shlfman will chant.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH EL CONGREGATION
2400 Ptnetree Drive, Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schifl
Dally 7: JO a.m. (Men. 4 Thyra. 7:15) 7 p.m.
Frl. 7 p m Sat. 8 a.m.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854-3911
Jack Riemer, Rabbi
Robert Albert, ,-Sjr.
Cantor IWJ
Rev Milton Freeman, -^
Ritual Director
ShabbalSon.Sal.9a.rn.
Mlnchah 8:15p.m.
Dally tanlcaa. Mon. and Thura. 7:30 a.i
Tuoa., Wad and Frl. 7:45 a.m.
Sun. 8a.m. Evonlnga 5:50 p.m.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF SUNNY ISLES
17274 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach Fl. 33160 947 1196
Hlllel Price, President
Rubin R. Dobtn, Rabbi
Frl. 7:30 a.m. Faat Ol Flrit Born.
6 30 p.m. Paaaovor Son. Rabbi Oobln
on "Paaaovor Lore"
Sal 8:45a.m. Rabbi Dobln -
Tho RaaponolMIHloa ol Froooom"
630 p.m. Paaaovor Sen.
Sun 8:45 am Rabbi Dobln
Asking QuaaHons": 7:30 p.m. Son
WoakdayaSam and 7 30p.m.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St.. N. Miami, FL 33161
6915508 Conservative
Dr Israel Jacobs. Rabbi
Or Joseph A. Gorfinkel,
Rabbi Emeritus
Moshe Friedler, Cantor
C*
Frl. 8 p.m.
Sat. 4 45a.m.
Waakday Sor Won Fri 8 a.m.
Mon Thura. 5 p.m. Sun. 8:30 am
Sat. (:45 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
15451 Jefferson Ave., M.B., FL 33139
Tel 538-4112
Rabbi Alvadla Rosenborg
Cantor Moshe Buryn
Dally Sanica 8 a.m. and S p.m.
Saturday 8:30 a.m.
BE i SHIRA CONGREGATION
J500S.W 120th Street
2382801 ,v
Rabbi David HAuerbach \^)
Cantor Stephen Freedman "*
sTtV^ iff* p m ""W "*!;
" rm.PaaaoorSonlco; Sun. 9:30 a.m.
Paaaonyr Sonlca; Thura. 8 p.m.
LoM m
, "n).HUISI Llboral
oJay^^f !!PN,8M Founding Rabbi
DAVID CONVISER. Cantor Emorllu.
Sat. 10:46 a.m. Poaach
Family WoraMp Sonlca
^T,H TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
Wl N. Miami Besch Blvd. &S%
* Max A. Lipschitz, Rabbi !")
ee Aroni. Cantor V-S-'
| "arvey L. Brown. Exec. Director
aarvtcaa Monday through Friday
cH 'JOa.m.and 1:80p.m.
r J .MilaanrtcM ( p.m. Singioa Shabbot
Sun Samoa. ( am and 5:30 p.m
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miam I
fin? P*ii*LH*!wm Co*rai,on
137 N.E 1tth St. MlamlT73-5900
MMNJtendaH Dr., 966-5055
Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Centor Recheile F. Nelson
Cantor Emorttus:
Jacob 0. Bornateln
Downtown:
Frl. 5:45 p.m. Paaaovor Sonlca
Sat. 11 a.m. Paaaovat Sonlca
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Grsnada Blvd.
Coral Gables 667-5667
Michael B. Eisenstat. Rabbi
Frl. 5 p.m. Paaaovor Sanica
Sat. 10 a.m. Paaaovor Sanica
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Snoshanah Raab, Cantor
SarvtOMFrl.7:S0p.m.
Sat. 9:30 a.m.
Ones Shabbat ami rowow.
TEMPLE MENORAH
620- 75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowttz .-..
Ari Fridkis, Assoc Rabbi ft)
Cantor Murray Yavnen %X"
Sat.8am Sabbathaontee.
Dally Mlnchah Sunday Friday
8 a.m. ana 8 p.m
Sal. 9 a.m. and 8:18 p.m.
TEMPLE NER TAMID 6684345
7902 Cartyle Ave., 886-9633
Miami Beach 33141 conaonativo
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz ,-n
Cantor Edward Klein fi
Dally Son loon. Frl. 8 a.m. 8:30 p.m. '-H.'
Sal Mlncha 8:15 p.m. Sun. 8:30 a.m..
830 p.m. Sal.. 8:45 a.m. aan. by Rabbi labovlti.
Cantor Kloln
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung
SHAARE TEFILLAH
TORAH CENTER OF KE"OALL
7860 SW112 Street
232-8633
Rabbi Hershel Becker
Dally San. 7 a.m. Frl. 10 mln altar candla
llghtlng lima. Shabboa 9 a.m. Shabbot
Mlncha 10 mln. balora candla lighting llmo.
Sun. 8:30 a.m.
attwaaaaaV
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dade's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kingsley, Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administrator
Frl. 8 p.m. Paaaovor Sonlca
Sat. 10: Jo a.m. Paaaovor Sonlca
Thura. 8 p.m. Sonlca
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
2712311 .'>.
Dr Norman N Shapiro, Rabbi WJ!
Benjamin Adler, Cantor *
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Sat. 8 a.m. and Sun. 8 a.m. Paaaovor Sanrlcaa
Mon. and Thura. 7 a.m. Mlnyan Sanlcaa
Conducted by Rabbi Shapiro and Cantor Adlor
Na'amat
Recipient of the Felice and
Gerald Schwartz Scholarship,
granted through Na'amat
USA, for 1988 is Ruth Ziton.
The perpetual scholarship was
established five years ago by
the South Florida Council of
Na'amat USA in recognition of
the contributions to Israel by
the Miami Beach couple.
Ruth Ziton, 23, is a resident
of Netanya, who served in the
Israel Defense Forces for two
years. She is studying in-
struments technology at ORT
College in Israel.
Frieda D. Leemon of
Detroit, national chairman for
perpetual scholarships, said
"this scholarship assistance is
most important because it
enables an academically
qualified young woman to com-
plete her education and
achieve her career goals."
Felice Schwartz is vice presi-
dent of the South Florida
Council of Na'amat USA and a
member of the organization's
national board.
A Passover mini-lunch will
be followed by games at the
Tuesday, April 5, 11:30 a.m.
meeting of the liana Chapter
of Na'amat USA in the civic
room of Winston Tower 300,
Sunny Isles.
Lillian Hoffman, president,
will relate a story on the
Passover holiday.
Anne Hanken will speak on
"The Relationship Between
Israel and America for Peace
and Democracy" at a meeting
of Beba Idelson Chapter of
Na'amat on Wednesday, April
13, at 11:30 am. in the civic
auditorium of the 100 Lincoln
Road Building.
A celebration of the 40th an-
niversary of the State of Israel
will be commemorated with
songs in English, Hebrew and
Yiddish led by Leon Yudoff.
The Eilat Chapter will
celebrate Passover on Mon-
day, April 4, 1 p.m. in the
auditorium of Financial
Federal Savings and Loan
Association, Washington Ave.
Leah Benson, former na-
tional board member and vice
president of membership of
the South Florida Council, will
discuss the current crisis in
Israel. Ida Kovalsky will relate
the story of Passover and
Frieda Levitan will entertain
with holiday songs.
Bridging the
Cultural Gap
What is the current reality
behind the much-discussed
Ashkenazi-Shephardi divide?
New studies by Shlomo Yit-
zhaki and Shmuel Amir give a
mixed picture. Education
levels of both groups have
grown and the gap in average
income has narrowed.
Discrimination against
Sephardis has declined and
there are considerably more
Sephardi Jews in positions of
influence than ever before.
However, while educational
levels have improved for
everyone, those of Ashkenazis
have improved faster, thus the
gap has widened.
Friday, April 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 33
Happenings
Miami Youth Museum is offering a "Writer's Workshop" for
seventh to 10th graders on research papers, reports, use of
reference books and vocabulary and grammar skills Eight or four
week sessions are available For information. 661-ARTS.
Beth Torah Singles (ages 35-50) will present Letting Go: Liv-
ing Through Divorce. Separation, and Loss" by Deborah
Grayson on Thursday. March 17. 730 p.m. at Beth Torah
Congregation.
"The Jewish Quarter: Maxwell M. Chayat Retrospective" will
be on exhibition at the Carefully Chosen Gallery. Miami Beach.
March 20-April 14. Reception on Sunday. March 20. 2-6 p.m.
The Miami Beach Senior High Schol Classes of January and
June '53 will hold a 35th reunion June 3-5. For information:
Leonard Hollander. 371-6669
The Irvine C Spear Democratic Club will meet Tuesday, April
5. at 7:30 p.m. at the Surfside Community Center Rosa Castro
Feinberg. Dade County School Board member, will discuss the
schools and the effects of the recently passed bond issue.
An exhibition of new paintings by Pat Lipsky Sutton will remain "
open until April 21 at the Gloria Luria Gallery. Bay Harbor
Islands. After 15 years as an abstract painter. Sutton has emerg-
ed with a series of representational an called "unstill lifes."
"The Return: A Jewish Renewal." airing April 5. at 9 p.m. on
WPBT2. will explore the balei teshuva. movement or "those who
have returned" to Orthodox Judaism. The program focuses on
David and Vivian Relkin in their journey back to traditional
Jewish roots and the implications it has had on their lives.
The Adlai Stevenson Democratic Women's Club will hold a
membership tea on Thursday, April 14, at 11 am at the home of
Elayne Weisburd. For information, 673-2015.
Presented by the Miami Beach Community Concert Associa-
tion, the 50-year-old Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra will play
the first concert of its U.S. tour celebrating the 40th anniversary
of Israel on Tuesday, April 12. at 8 p.m. at the Jackie Gleason
Theater of the Performing Arts. For information. 538-2121.
R.E.A. Air Conditioning
8860 S.W. 82 St.
266-6627
Happy Passover
TEACHING IS TOPS
If you are committed, creative and love kids,
there is a place for you in a progressive Jewish
educational environment. Positions available
for Fall/1988 in Day School, Early Childhood,
Sunday and Hebrew Schools. Apply now to
Temple Sinai of North Dade, 9329010.
Passover.
A celebration off freedom.
The historical event marking the escape from slavery of the Jewish
people held in bondage in Egypt.
Now, the symbolic observance of the Seder that brings family and friends
together in a commemoration of prayer, song, poetry, food and wine.
An event of thanksgiving for the spiritual freedom of all mankind,
transcending time and geography. The reading of the Haggadah, a story
of inspiration throughout history to all men who long to be free.
At this special time, Menorah Gardens a Funeral Chapels extends every
good wish for the blessings of freedom to all peoples
Gardens and Funeral Chapels
20955 Biscayne Blvd.. NORTH MIAMI BEACH
21100 W. Griffin Road. FORT LAUDERDALE
6800 w Oakland Pant Blvd., SUNRISE
5915 Park Drtve at U.S. 441, MARGATE
2305 W. Hillaboro Blvd.. DEERFIELD BEACH
9321 Memorial Park Road, WEST PALM BEACH
935-3939
434-1531
742-6000
975-0011
427-4700
627-2277
Cemetertea. Funeral Chap*!* Mausoleums. Pr. Need Planning


Page 34 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 8, 1988
A Host of Haggadot
Continued from Page 25
lustrations possible. The
"Prague Haggadah" of 1526
used fine wood engravings to
decorate its borders, letters,
and artwork. The first printed
Haggadah carries the date
1505.
The Passover service
became so long during the
Middle Ages that it was even-
tually divided into two parts,
narration and explanation of
symbols dominating the first
half followed by grace and holi-
day songs after the meal. Re-
cent adaptations have not been
so drastic, but change goes on
nevertheless. Shape, size, col-
or, style, and perspective have
all been affected.
What follows is a sampling
of Haggadot currently on the
market. These and others
even one where kids can color
while they pray are all
available at Judaica Enter-
prises, N. Miami Beach.
Paperbacks
There are those Haggadot
created with large groups in
mind. If budget is a factor,
then popular paperback edi-
tions would probably suffice.
They employ no gimmicks and
are well-suited to the needs of
"igious schools and
re
synagogue seder celebrations.
"The Passover Haggadah"
revised in 1986 by Morris
Silverman (Prayer Book
Press, 88 pages, $6.60) utilizes
bold type which makes it easy
to follow. There is an English
transliteration of all Hebrew
blessings and songs.
Similarly, "Passover Hag-
gadah" by Shilo Publishing
House (84 pages, $1.25) ex-
periments with color only on
the cover. Dark print
dominates, while black and
white illustrations are found
on almost every page.
The paperback Haggadah
released by Shulsinger Press
in 1981 (64 pages $2.50) has
done its own experiment with
color. Exceedingly bold print
renders it practical, while the
effective use of lavender print
and sketches proves that
special touches need not be
sacrificed when books are pro-
duced in large quantities.
"The Haggadah" prepared
by Ktav Publishing House (49
pages, $1.25) was first publish-
ed in 1949. Four editions exist,
including the latest by Rabbi
Nathan Goldberg. Despite a
minimum of illustration and
total lack of color, the book is
well designed and easy to read.
Not all Passover paperbacks

"V
accomplish what they inte,
"An Israel Ha^adah^
Mey.erkLevin (Harry Ab j
Publishers, 128 pages uZ
uses 70 scenic illustrations J
Israel interspersed wi,k
English, Hebrew 3
"The Diasporah Haggadah" (Yaniv Enterprises, Tel
Aviv, 64 pages, $29.95) employs striking illustrations and
elaborate typeset. Effective art is probably the reason it
will, in the words of its publishers, "reach out to our fellow
Jews in many lands throughout the world." Already "The
Diaspora Haggadah" has been released in Spanish, Por-
tuguese, French, German, Italian, and Russian.
In this version, prayers, songs, and explanations in
Hebrew, English and transliteration take the reader step-
by-step through the seder process. Yet, the hardcover text
is probably too cumbersome for most seder tables, and or-
nate print makes it difficult to read. It is recommended as a
collectable.
"The Artscroll Youth Haggadah" (Mesorah Publishers,
62 pages, $13.95).. Don't let the title mislead; this one is
not for kids alone. In fact, the publishers seek "a partner-
ship of all generations" at the family seder.
No doubt they'll succeed if only for a format that is
visually pleasing. This is the only Haggadah which employs
large and easy-to-read multi-color or print. Detailed text is
softened by illustrations on almost every page. A new
translation deviates from the text to clarify difficult
passages. Boxed commentary at the bottom of many pages
explains some of the more provocative sections. There is no
age gap here.
"The Golden Haggadah of Jerusalem" (Palphot Ltd.,
Herzlia, Israel, 80 pages, $31.95). This is probably one of
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Aster and Family
Wish All Their Friends A Very Happy Passover
Dr. Zalman Bachelkov DDS and Staff
Wish Everyone A Very Happy Passover
Dr. and Mrs. Jack H. Brenner
wish Friends, Family
And the entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy Passover
Dr. Leonard Cantor and Family
Wish Their Friends A Very Happy Passover
Dr. and Mrs. Maxwell Dauer
Dr. and Mrs. Edward A. Dauer
Mr. and Mrs. Roger A. Dauer
Wish All A Very Happy Passover
Mr. and Mrs. George Feldenkrels and Family
Wish All Our Friends A Happy Passover
the most expensive Haggadot on the market. But, cost in
this case does not connote value. Its long, horizontal shape
and excess weight make it hard to handle. A boxed cover no
doubt will protect but also adds to its unwieldy nature.
The emphasis here is on text rather than explanation.
The Hebrew is done in calligraphy and its not particularly
legible. Dramatic, full-page illustrations of celebrants then
and now are probably its best feature. It might better be
found on a coffee table than Passover table.
"Passover" (Israel. 143 pages, $14.95) is no doubt the
most striking of all Haggadot on the local market. Clearly it
fulfills its claim as "the Haggadah for all year round." On
several counts, it makes the perfect gift.
Small and square, the book is very easy to handle. Yet,
size in no way diminishes its splendid effect. In fact, the
overall product is so appealing that the reader might very
well put up with small print. Black pages are covered with
distinctive white and gold print. Imposing illustrations
from the paintings of Rabbi Yossi Rosenstein complement
the text.
"Yeshiva University Haggadah" (Steven Cohen and
Kenneth Brander, 1985, 111 pages, $11.95). It's not sur-
prising that the only Haggadah with elaborate footnotes
was bom on a college campus. An anthology of commen-
tary affirms its academic origin. Ten articles examine sub-
jects such as "The Irony of Passover" and "When the Hag-
gadah Is Not the Haggadah."
Mr. and Mrs. Ainslee Ferdie
Marshall, Meredith and Deborah
Wish All A Very Happy Passover
Mr. and Mrs.Gary Gerson
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy Passover
Ms. Rosalind Getlis
Wishes Her Friends A Very Happy Passover
Mr. and Mrs. Barton S. Go Id be rq
W,sh Family and Friends A Happy Passover
W,sh All Thetr Fnends A Very Happy Passover
Mr. and Mrs. Eleazer Greenstein
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy Passover
Despite its serious <.
text is well-spaced andi
pictures. This,
participants.
"The Haggadah" Q|
$18) is probably the h
home. The book is comn
any coffee table.
Colorful ilustrations,!
tings, are printed on L^.
counterpoint to the bladj
"Mah Nishtanah: AI
(Shaul Mazlish, Adamat
be no doubt that this 1
children in mind, esp
fluently. Liberties have b
than translating literally.l
answers, and precise defi
ings of holiday ritual i
the text on the melom
No doubt this book s
many other juvenile Hi{
difficult to use in an on
classroom or at home <
"The Animated
book: $14.95, video t_
ly scribes could ever h
this. Now Passover has i
tion cassette and bookp
unique encounter with
The first animated flu
child's imaginative per
years. A half-hour's inj
the biblical story.
they nevertheless have in
cartoon.
The book itself seeks to|
terness of slavery, then*
of freedom are all treaty
orful images and lar
story. Subjects are i
whelm the student witl) |
The combination of sig
tive tool when used at!
deny its innovative valuM
to make history come aw
animated Haggadah I
Mrs.eH
M
VWs/iA
A Very'

AH
appytt*]
Dr.a^d
Wish TH9&2
A Happ1*m


Friday, April 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 35
iterated text.
aphy was used, accor-
the publishers, to give
to the Exodus
Jut the result is a
jlv simplistic pictorial
jack, gold, and maroon
expected, there are no
ended for students; not
Jerusalem, 98 pages,
) decorate the Jewish
> find a place on almost
; of Arthur Szyk pain-
aper and are a vibrant
small-print text.
jgadah for Children"
?es. $9.95). There can
produced with only
t don't read Hebrew
[in paraphrasing rather
ktions, straight-forward
its pages. Simple draw-
fcphs of children soften
frtant market. But, like
available, it would be
r; better saved for the
eks of preparation.
eimatzky Publishing,
It's unlikely that ear-
a Haggadah such as
so age. A combina-
i an expensive though
I-
presented from a young
pe journeys back 3,000
flay figures to portray
ers may seem bizarre,
fassover to the world of
nent the film. The bit-
ties, and the marvel
_,' readers in mind. Col-
illuminate the Passover
i space and don't over-
iformation.
fid can make an effec-
ie. Critics can hardly
i not to secularize but
Sucational device, "The
this.
teuerand
sa//e
fiends
issover
W
Isan
family
yPassover
toenvaes
Community
snd Family
Passover
Talking over success of the Scholarship Ball, which raised more
than $j25,000for the Lehrman Day School, are Temple Emanu-
El leaders Stephen and Maureen Muss and Pat and Dr. Phillip
Frost.
The "Yehuda and Friends" concert co-sponsored by Temple
Emanu-El and the Gila and Haim Wiener Foundation for the
Advancement ofCantorial Art found master cantors joining Can-
tor Yehuda Shifman on stage at Temple Emanu-El recently.
From left, Cantors Aaron Shifman, Yakov Motzen, Baruch Shif-
man Yehuda Shifman and Benzion Miller.
George Goldbloom, right, is congratulated upon receving the
coveted Maimonides Award Temple Emanu-El's highest honor
at the 20th Annual Lehrman Day School Scholarshipo Ball
held at the Miami Beach congregation. From left are Robert
Blum, former Scholarship Ball chairman, and escort Linda
Volker and Jack Bernstein.
Dade County Judge Milton Starkman, left, presents David
Chaiken with an award citing his 50 years of membership in
B'nai B'rith during a 25th anniversary dinner-dance of Har-
mony Lodge. Judge Starkman, a member of the lodge, gave
Chaiken a plaque, a certificate from District 5 and the 50-year
citation of B'nai B'rith International.
Flo and Ben Kram
Print-Rite Co., 748 NE 79 St., Miami691-5452
Wish Everyone A Very Happy Passover
Mr. and Mrs. Howard N. Pelzner and Family
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy Passover
Mrs. Joseph Landsman
Wish Friends, Family and
The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy Passover
Mr. Lester Rogers
Wishes Clients and Friends
A Happy and Healthy Passover
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Lawrence
Wish All Family, Friends and Clients
A Very Happy Passover
Dr. Morton Rosenbluth
Wishes Patients, Friends and Family
A Happy Passover
DR. AND MRS. BENJAMIN LEIGH
WISH FAMILY AND FRIENDS
A HAPPY PASSOVER
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Sures
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy Passover
Councilman and Mrs. Ted Nelson
Bay Harbour Island
Happy Passover
,7tii/i/ip Mwwiw* &i>dtf//
JUDGE AND MRS. DAVID L TRASK
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Palmer
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy Passover
Dr. and Mrs. Hugh Unger
Wish Patients and Friends
A Happy Passover


Page 36 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 8, 1988
Coca-Cola
BOTTLING COMPANY OF MIAMI, INC.
EXTENDS GREETINGS ON THE
PASSOVER HOLIDAYS
TO THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
OUR PASSOVER PRODUCTS
IN SPECIALLY MARKED
2 LITER NR'S
"KOSHER 88"
AND
"GOLD TOPPED"
12 OZ. CANS
WE'RE PREPARED WITH
STRICTLY KOSHER FOR PASSOVER INGREDIENTS
WITHOUT THE USE OF CORN SWEETENERS
UNDER THE PERSONAL SUPERVISION OF
RABBI TIBOR H. STERN.
Foreclosure Sales-Public Notices

PROFESSIONAL
PROFESSIONAL BANCORP
I
from
your friends
f
PROFESSIONAL SAVINGS BANK
SECURITY SAVINGS BANK
PROFESSIONAL BANCORP
MORTGAGE COMPANY
Member fSUC
iqujl Houting lender
Member I .-il.nl Hr.me loin Bjnl Hiuril
NOTICE UNDER
FICITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Anchor Repair Ser-
vices at 679 NW 156 St., Miami
33169 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Gary R. Lang
President
Accurate Cash Register, Inc.
Mark B. Slavin P.A.
Attorney for
Accurate Cash Register Inc.
18410 April 1,8, 15,22,1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name A-l-A IDEAL
BUSINESS MACHINES at 3672
Coral Way Miami, Florida 33145
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Ideal Office Equipment
Company, Inc.
FERDIE A GOUZ
Attorney for APPLICANT
18414 April 1,8,15,22,1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name SUCCESS PRIN
TING at 7167 SW 8th Street,
Miami, Florida 33144 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
DAVID FLORES-OWNER
18372 March 18, 25;
_ April 1,8, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 88-13069
NOTICE OF ACTION
FINANCIAL FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF
DADE COUNTY,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ALLAN E. SIMON, et ux.,
etal.,
Defendants.
To: ALLAN E. SIMON and
ANITA SIMON, his wife
139-15 83rd Avenue
Jamaica, New York 11435
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclose of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Unit No. 1021 of SOUTH
LAKE VILLAS CON
DOMINIUM, according to
the Declaration thereof,
recorded in Official Records
Book 10564 at Page 2049, of
the public records of Dade
County, Florida; a/k/a 8435
SW. 156th Court, No. 1021,
Miami, FL
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida, 33146 on or before
April 29, 1988 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this day of March 28,
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By: CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
18413 April 1.8,15.22,1988.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 11th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 88-00793 (CA 20)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI,
a United States Corporation.
Plaintiff.
GEORGE LEYKIN. et al..
Defendants.
To: GEORGE LEYKIN
BETOYA LEYKIN, also known as
BETYA LEYKIN, his wife
1119 Ocean View Avenue
Apartment 1
Brooklyn, New York
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Unit 90 of TROPICAL
PARK VILLAS CON-
DOMINIUM, according to
the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof, as record-
ed in Official Records Book
10826, Page 183, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida, as amended;
together with all im-
provements, appliances and
fixtures located thereon,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis, Allison &
Cohen, Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address is 111 N.E. 1st
Street, Miami, Florida 33132, on
or before May 6, 1988, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court the day of March 29.
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: E. LE SUEUR
Deputv Clerk
18415 April 1.8, 15,22, 1988.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 88-13070
NOTICE OF ACTION
FINANCIAL FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF DADE
COUNTY.
Plaintiff,
vs.
COSIMO SOTTILE, et ux., et al..
Defendants.
TO: COSIMO SOTTILE and
OFELIA SOTTILE,
his wife
Ave Vargas Entre 21-22
Barquisineto Venzue VE
00000
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Condominium Parcel No. 205
of LAKE AND TENNIS
VILLAS CONDOMINIUM,
according to the Declaration
of Condominium thereof, as
recorded in Official Records
Book 10808 at Page 1277 of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida; a/k/a 8450
S.W. 154th Circle Court, No.
205, Miami, FL
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
April 29, 1988 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 28 day of March,
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
18412 April 1.8, 15,22. 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 88-59
Division: 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ELSA FISHER.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED THAT the administra-
tion of the Estate of Elsa Fisher,
deceased, late of Dade County,
Florida. File Number 88-59 (03). is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33130. The name and ad-
dress of the personal represen-
tative and his attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate and all
interested persons are required to
file with this court. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE: (1) all claims against the
estate; and (2) any objection by an
interested person on whom this
notice was served that challenges
the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on April 1, 1988.
Personal Representative:
CLINTON A. ANDERSON
9050 Ridgeland Drive
Miami, Florida 33157
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
ALAN H. BASEMAN.
ESQUIRE
Richard S. Cotler. P.A.
2435 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood. Florida 33020
Telephone: (305) 921-1000
18411 April 1,8. 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-1464
Division 04
IN RE:ESTATE OF
MORRIS SHAPIRO.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of MORRIS SHAPIRO, deceased,
File Number 88-1464. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on April 1. 1988.
ANITA FRANCES HERMAN
3350 Fryman Road
Studio City, California 91604
ANNE ROGOVIN
f/k/a ANNE SHAPIRO
6770 Indian Creek Drive
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HERBERT S. SHAPIRO
1666-79th St. Cswy.. Ste. 608
Miami Beach, Florida 33141
Telephone: (305) 864-2369
l***____________April 1,8, 1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
E. C,RCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Si!?.1 Actio" No- 88-12982 it
AOTONFORDlSSOLutt
OF MARRIAGE "
IN RE: "mm
EDGAR D. KEENE
and
SILVIA R. LARRAIN KPPwp
Del Manzano 3170 Den 21
Miraflores Alto
Vina De Mar, Chile
YOU ARE HERerv
NOTIFIED that an actkm V
Dissolution of Marnage Jl'
filed against you and you U7Z
quired to serve a copy of yourw^
ten defenses, if any. to u on JOY
BARKAN. attorney for Petitioner
whose address is 2020 \" E iai
^9tNo^fM^'Heach,Floh2
33162, and file the ngiil with
the clerk of the al.,ve styled coun
on or before April 29, 1988 other-
wise a default will he entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN. "
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 25 day of March. 1988
RICHARD I' BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Count v. Florida
By BARBARA HARPER
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18409 April 1.8.15,22.19J8
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-1485
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROSE LAUBSTKIN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the adminhm-
tion of the estate of ROSE
LAUBSTEIN, deceased. File
Number 88-1485. i* [lending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which ii V:> West Flagler
Street, Miami. Florida 38180.TW
personal representative of the
estate is MELVIN B. LAUBS-
TEIN. The name and address of
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE HON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court i written state-
ment of any clam: or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the credit' ir i H his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is net yel due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security sW
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of U*
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per
sonal representative
All persons interested in
estate to whom a copy of W
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are requir^. ITH
THREE MONTHS FROM TO
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF Jim
NOTICE, to file any object*"
they may have that challenge UK
validity of the decedents will, tw
qualifications of the pew*
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court -M
ALL CLAIMS DWgjJ
ANDOBJECTI(NSNOTS0nL
ED WILL BE FOREUR
^H the fir,, jtfgg
this Notice of Administrate
April 1, 1988.
Melvin B. Laubstein
As Personal Representative
oftheEsUteof
ROSE LAUBSTEIN^
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE.
PAUL B. STEINBERG.
ESQUIRE tnl PA
STEINBERG & MERLIN. V"
767 Arthur Godfrey Road.
Miami Beach, FL 33140
Telephone: (305) 5382344
18406 April'' L-


Community Notes
Herbert L Bergen was elected Commander when
The Abe Horrowitz Post 682, Jewish War Veterans held
elections of new officers for the 1988-1989 term at
which the Post presented awards to N. Miami Beach
Police Officer Oliver B. Bosworth and Isaac
Rogozinsky.
Herbert Katz of Hollywood, recently elected presi-
dent of the American Friends of the Hebrew University,
has been appointed by President Reagan to a five year
term on the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council.
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center
in North Miami Beach has received the Jewish Welfare
Board's "National Award for Excellence" for outstan-
ding work providing continuity care for Parkinson's pa-
tients. The program operates three hours per day, three
days per week. _____
. Irving Kaplan, a vice president of the Southeast
[Region of American Jewish Congress was presented
with a Regional Achievement Award for his efforts on
behalf of the elderly and drafting nursing home
[policies. The presentation was made at the AJC 70th
[anniversary convention held in Philadelphia.
Delegates of the National Council of Jewish Women,
Greater Miami Section, who will attend the Southern
District Convention in Atlanta, April 21-24, are Myra
IFarr, Diana Feibelman, Carol Qrunberg, Esther
(Horowitz, Cindy Lerner, Nan Rich, Anna Mae Ross and
[Annette Zipper.
Dade County attorney Herbert C. Zemel was honored
by the Judea Lodge of B'nai B'rith as "Man of the Year"
[at the annual installation dinner, at which he was also
[installed for his third consecutive year as president of
[the lodge. Zemel is a past president of the Miami
iBeach Optimist Club, Civic League of Miami Beach,
iTemple Emanu-el Men's Club and the Florida Region of
[Federation of Jewish Men's Club.
Sandy Geiger, chairman of the "Just Say No" cam-
paign for her Optimsit chapter is the first winnner in a
new project of Miami's for Me, a civic organization.
Geiger, who visits elementary schools every Tuesday
Ito perform puppet shows on the dangers of drugs, is
[also the organizer of the Manic Depressive Mental
[Health Group, first woman in the North Miami Beach
[Optimist Chapter, and first woman assistant football
[coach in the Optimist International league.
Dade County Court Judge Melvia B. Green has
[assumed the bench of the Miami Beach branch court in
[the city's new Justice Center located in the Old City
[Hall on Washington Avenue. Judge Green, who last
[year was appointed by Governor Robert Martinez after
[her selection by the Judicial Nominating Commission,
[is filling the unexpired term of Judge Arthur
|Rothenberg, elevated to the circuit court.
Samuel Scheck Hillel Community Day School
[students receiving recognition for projects submitted
Ito the Dade County Youth Fair, include sixth grader
[Heidi Korn, whose essay on "The Hazards of Smoking"
[was selected by the American Lung Association of
IDade and Monroe Counties as the best essay in the
[elementary division. Gideon Baig, ninth grade, won
jthird place honors in the grade 9-12 Biology Division for
[tos project on "The Effects of 3-lndo-Phenol on Root
prowth in Plants."
Sheila Kurte, a free lance artist and past co-
hairman of the Miami Beach Fine Arts Board has been
lected head of the board for the 1988-89 year. The Fine
rts Board coordinates the annual Miami Beach
estivasl of the Arts.
Public Safety Devices
322 NE 80th Terr.
Miami, FL 33138 754-1928
We Wish Everyone A Very Happy Passover
Andalusia Bake Shop
248 Andalusia Ave.
Coral Gables 445-8196
Happy Passover
Spector's & Sons Realty
575 SW 22nd Ave.
Miami 642-3153
Happy Passover
Friday, April 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 37

The Founders of Mount Sinai Medical Center
acknowledge the birthday plateaus (birthdays
ending in a zero or five) of members at their
dinner meetings. Pictured celebrating the bir-
thday ofHelene Koretzky are, from left, Sylvia
and Arti Rothenberg, Joe and Harold
Rothenberg, Helen and Murry Koretzky, Cin-
dy Kaye, and Beverly and Ernest Rolls.
Seven employees of the Jewish National Fund
were honored for their years of service, in a
ceremony at the JNF House in New York City.
Present at the ceremony were, from left, Ben
Waldman, director, JNF New Jersey region
honored for 23 years of service; Dr. Samuel I.
Cohen, JNF executive vice president, who
made the presentations; Eli Shwartz, direc-
tor, JNF Philadelphia, 23 years; Roslyn
Unger, administrator, Miami Beach region,
Political
Briefs
Miami Beach attorney Ivar
M. Starr is a candidate for
Dade County Judge, Group 13,
in the September election. He
was a law clerk and research
assistant to Circuit Court
Judge Herbert M. Klein in
1979-80, and has been in
private practice since 1982. He
is on the board of the Miami
Beach Bar Association.
Dade County Commissioner
Jim Redford was to be guest of
honor at a Thursday breakfast
at the Tarleton Hotel, hosted
by his re-election campaign
committee. A fund-raising
event was held at the Biltmore
Hotel recently, drawing
former Sen. Paul Steinberg,
Marvin Rosen and former Rep.
Barry Kutun.
State Rep. Art Simon
(Dem.-116) will kick off his re-
election campaign Thursday,
March 31, at Signature
Gardens. He was named chair-
man of the Insurance Commit-
tee for the 1988 session. An at-
torney, Simon also chairs the
General Government Subcom-
mittee and is a member of the
Education (K-12), Rules and
Calendar Committees.
The Women's Division of the Grater Miami Jewish
Federation will hold its installation of officers on
Thursday, May 19. Judy Adler and Debby Edelman are
are chairwomen.
The Hillel-ORT Computer Center has named Naftali
Ben-Ami as its new Director. Ben-Ami previously in
computers and electronics in education and industry in
Israel. The Computer Center, which is part of Hillel
Community Jewish High School, is presently creating a
program to teach computers to teachers as well as
students.
"HIRING!"
Government Jobs your
area. Many immediate
openings without waiting
list or test. $15,000 $68,000.
Cad (602) 8384885. Ext 9036
Consider West Coast of
Florida Director of New
Temple, Early Childhood
Program in Naples. Bene-
fits, Good Salary. Rabbi
Tuffs 813-597-8158
The Officers and Staff of
BARNETT BANK
Wish All Of Our
Friends
A Happy Passover
arnett
lanK
Member FDIC
Barnett Bank of
South Florida, N.A.


Page 38 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 8, 1988
Deaths
Author Philip Birnbaum
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Funeral services were held
here for Jewish author and
editor Dr. Philip Birnbaum of
New York who died here of
natural causes at age 83.
Responsible for about 75
works in Hebrew and English,
Birnbaum is probably best
known for his version of the
Hebrew prayerbook "Ha Sid-
dur Hashalem," also known as
the Birnbaum siddur. Original-
ly published in 1949 by the
Hebrew Publishing Co. of
Brooklyn, NY, it was the first
to include prayers for daily as
Marc el la S. Kanner
Marcella S. Kanner, former
president of the Sisterhod of
Temple Israel of Greater
Miami, died March 26, at
Mount Sinai Medical Center
after a short illness.
Mrs. Kanner, who was 79
years old, actively presided for
many years over the
Sisterhood and over the
Southeastern Federation of
Temple Sisterhoods.
Born in Chicago, she moved
to Miami in 1924 and, a year
later, entered the University
of Miami as a member of its
first graduating class.
She is survived by her hus-
band. Aaron, a Miami lawyer
whom she married in 1928. her
sons Richard (Regina) and
Lewis (Marcia); and her grand-
children. Jacqueline, Sam.
Sharon, Sandra and Ellen.
Services were held at Tem-
ple Israel, followed by inter-
ment in Graceland Memorial
Park.
Minerva Traeger
Minerva Traeger, of Ken-
dall, died on March 23 at the
age of 78.
A former resident of
Chicago, she had lived in
Florida for the past 64 years.
She was the wife of David;
the mother of Carol (Harry)
Roisman of Kendall and Bar-
bara Traeger of North Miami;
well as holiday use in one
volume.
Three major Birnbaum sid-
durs are in use worldwide: the
"Daily Prayer Book
(Hashalem)," the "High Holy-
day Prayerbook" and the
"Prayer Book for Sabbaths
and Festivals." The siddurs
were published independently
of any religious affiliation.
Although Birnbaum was Or-
thodox, his works have been
used by the Conservative
movement, as well.
Birnbaum wrote, edited and
translated in Hebrew and
English. He was considered to
be profoundly interested in
education and in opening
Jewish learning to the Jewish
masses.
Born in Kielce, Poland, Birn-
baum came to the United
States in 1923. He was an ac-
tive member of the Association
for the Advancement of
Hebrew Language and
Culture in North America,
Hahistadruth Haivrith
B'America, and belonged to
the Zionist Organization of
America and the National
Council of Jewish Education.
TRAGASH. Elizabeth (Betty). 80. of
Sunrise Club, of Kendall. March 27. Ser-
vices and interment at Star of David
Memorial Park
WACHMAN. Sylvia, of North Miami Beach.
Services private. The Riverside.
HWORKIN. Tillie. Graveside services at
Mount Sinai Cemetery (Eternal Light I
EPSTEIN. Seymour iCyi. of North Miami
Beach. Services at Lakeside Memorial
Park (Menorah Chapelsl.
GOLDSTEIN. Ham M. 92. of Coral Gables.
on March 28.
GOODFR1END. Harry. 68, of North Miami
Beach, on March 29. The Riverside.
GHEENBERG, Irving, 90. of North Miami
Beach on March 28. Menorah Chapels.
MOSER. Sol, of Bay Harbor Island, on
March 27. The Riveside. Interment at
Lakeside Memorial Park.
WEIL. Abraham, 92, of Bal Harbour, on
March 25. Services were held in Wood-
WEISS. Albert, of Miami, on March 28. The
Riverside.
the sister of David Fine of
Hallandale, Lillian Pinsky of
Hallandale, Mary Sork of Ken-
dall and Isabell Baker of
Philadelphia; and the grand-
mother of Rebecca, Andrew
and Brian.
Graveside services and inter-
ment were held at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery
CLARK. William, of Miami, March 22. Ser-
vices in Philadelphia. Blaaberg Chapel.
COON, Lillian Rose, of Bal Harbour, March
22. Menorah Chapels. Interment Long
Island.
GALE, Patricia, 57, of Miami. March 22.
Blaaberg Funeral Chapel. Interment at
Lakeside Memorial Park.
BAZELON. Miriam E. 79. March 23. The
Riverside.
KAGAN, Doris, 72, of Kendall. March 24.
Graveside services and interment at Star
of David Memorial Park
OBOLER, Leonard, of Key Biscayne and
Lima. Peru. March 24. '
SANULKK, Laurette, 78. of Miami, March
24. Services and interment at
Graceland/Tenple Israel Cemetery
SCHIMMtL, Gertrude. 80, of North Miami,
March 24. Graveside services at Mt.
Hebron. Flushing, N.Y. (The R>verside^
SWEET Dr Harold. 77, on March &. ^er-
vices 'Lakeside Memorial Park (The
Riverside). .
\NGARD. Sara, of North Miami Beach.
March 24. Menorah Chapels.
BAZELON. Miriam E.. 79. March 23. The
Riverside. .
FLEEK0P. Joseph. 77. of Miami. March a.
Services at Temple Samu-El Interment
at Star of David Memorial Park (Rubin-
SCHIMMEL. Gertrude. 80, of North Miami.
March 24. Graveside services at Mt.
Hebron. Flushing. N.Y. (The Riversidel
STETTIN. Leo, 88. of North Miami Beach.
March 25. The Riverside. Interment in
Lakeside Memorial Park.
FENSTER. Aileen, 85. Private graveside
services.
RUTSTEIN, Edward A 85, of Miami. Ser-
vices private. Menorah Chapels.
WISE, Albert, 89. of Miami, March 25. The
Riverside. Interment at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery. mm
RUDNICK, Florence K., 79, of North Miami
Beach, on March 27. The Riverside. Inter-
ment in New York.
MORRIS, Gertrude S. Funeral services in
Brooklyn.
GELB
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Business Notes
Seth Fellman of Miami
Beach has been promoted to
assistant vice president of
General Development Cor-
poration's Commercial Divi-
sion. He is now responsible for
the sales and development of
General Development's com-
mercial properties throughout
Florida. The 28-year-old
Fellman is active in Leader-
ship Miami. Temple Israel and
United Way._
The Florida Public Service
Commision approved Florida
Power and Light Company's
request to reduce charges for
the utility's 2.9 million
customers this summer.
Beginning April 1, an FPL
1,000 kilowatt hour residential
bill will total $80.20, a
decrease of 41 cents over cur-
rent winter bills of $80.61.
FPL said the lower charges
would be in effect through
September 30.
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Exhibit Traces
Ethiopian Exodus
Friday, April 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 39
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
here is something dif-
ferent about the picture
of the Ethiopian Jewish
Bid.
fit has the traits of the photos
f the famine-struck Ethiopian
ition that Americans have
seeing in recent years
^nourished, bare feet, tat-
Ired clothes. But on second
lance, it is evident that the
hild is holding something,
it's a Carnation milk bar,
Ihich has the equivalent of
V-half cup of milk in it.
hey're high-protein, high-
Jorie snacks," says Rabbi
|ynn Goldstein, assistant rab-
at Temple Beth Am, who
nuggled in the candy during
[visit to Ethiopia.
Goldstein has assembled 41
|ch color photographs as well
i artifacts made and used by
ihiopian Jews in an exhibit
at will be on display in the
le Beth Am gallery
oiigh April 20. The artifacts
elude toothbrushes, pottery,
prayer book, children's toys,
lives, ghourds and utensils.
he exhibit also features a
rsonal slide show and a
oklet edited by Goldstein, in-
articles on Ethiopian
vs and a history written by
aenum Berger, considered
grandfather of help-
tiiopian Jews movements
the founder of the
lerican Association for
hiopian Jews. The photos
kre selected from a collection
|ren by Goldstein and New
City photographer Har-
I Edward Weberman.
pe exhibit was planned to
ncide with Passover, the
of freedom. "We
nted to remind people that
I all Jews are free," says
lldstein.
fhe exhibit also initiates an
pensive project of the
"orm South Dade
jogue on behalf of Ethio-
Jews. The project in-
ves the day and religious
>S
school children in collections of
food, money, medical supplies,
toys and other items. Golds-
tein says the synagogue is also
hoping to lead the first con-
gregational mission to
Ethiopia in the fall.
The title of Goldstein's ex-
hibit: "Abandon Me Not The
Jews of Ethiopia," comes from
an old Ethiopian Jewish
prayer: "Do not separate me 0
Lord from the chosen, from
the joy, from the light, from
the splendor. Let me see 0
Lord, the light of Israel. Aban-
don me not!"
Goldstein's visit to Ethiopia
and her work with Ethiopians
who were fortunate enough to
make it to Israel, moved her
deeply.
"The Jews in Ethiopia are
starving to death. They're not
only beleagured by anti-
Semitism and not allowed to
emigrate," she says. "They
face all the prejudices that
Jews in other countries face,
like Soviet Jews. The wild card
in Ethiopia is they are starv-
ing. They're not going to live.
They have to have help now."
Goldstein also found an in-
credible story about the nature
of the estimated 15,000 to
20,000 Jews remaining in
Ethiopia.
"UNTIL 100 or so years
ago, the Ethiopian Jews were
unaware that there were other
Jews left in the world. They
thought they were the last
Jews and that they had been
preserving Judaism.
"We don't know where they
come from. The only thing that
we do know for sure is that
they're Jewish, that they've
been separated from
mainstream Judaism for at
least 2,000 years and that
many of them are practicing
Judaism at the risk of their
lives."
Ethiopian Jews see their
plight as a modern day
Exodus.
When two of the Ethiopian
Kes', or priests, discovered
?v.
J^Se "Kes" or priest. Ethiopian Jews follow pre-raAbinw
'" and do not have rabbis. Behind the priest are prayer
Goldstein was a rabbi, they in-
vited her to their huts, where
they keep the Torah. Their
Torahs are in book form, writ-
ten in Ge'ez, an ancient Semitic
language.
"When they finished reading
the story of Exodus, one of the
Kes' turned to me and said,
'Now it's time for God to bring
us home to Israel.' "
Goldstein says she found it
"incredible" that Judaism has
been so important to these
Ethiopians that they have car-
ried on the traditions as best
they could even though
Hebrew was lost to them
thousands of years ago.
The way in which they prac-
tice their Judaism is a
phenomenon in itself.
"In terms of Judaism, the
Ethiopian Jews are pre-
rabbinic," says Goldstein.
"They were separated from
mainstream Judaism before
the onset of rabbinic Judaism.
They base their Judaism solely
on what's in the Torah as op-
posed to what's in the Talmud
and codes and later rabbinic
writing."
FOR example, an Ethiopian
Jew will observe all the
holidays that are in the Torah
such as Sukkot, Shavuot, Yom
Kippur and Rosh Hashanah.
They do not observe the rab-
binic holidays such as Purim,
Chanukah or Tu B'shevat. On
the other hand, the Ethiopian
Jews are the only Jews left
who observe Rosh Chodesh, or
the advent of the full moon, as
a full holiday.
"There are fascinating
theories of where they came
from," says Goldstein, who
wrote a paper on Ethiopian
Jews during her years of rab-
binic study in Israel. "There
are people who claim they
were descendants of the lost
tribe of Dan. There is one per-
son who claims that when
Moses and the Jews were leav-
ing Egypt, somehow a group
of people got lost and ended up
in Ethiopia instead of the
Sinai. Personally, I don't see
how you could lose 600 people
in the desert."
THE Jewish population in
Ethiopia has been decimated,
according to Goldstein. There
used to be some 500,000 Jews
in Ethiopia. Today there are
estimated to be fewer than
20,000. At one point among
the ruling class, the Jews ir
Ethiopia have fallen frorr
power and have not been abU
to own land for the past 300
years.
Negative publicity about the
Ethiopian government has "no
doubt hurt the Ethiopian Jews
there." says Goldstein. On the
other hand, she adds, the
awareness of the worldwide
Jewish community has been
raised.
In November and December
of 1984, a secret airlift
evacuated Ethiopian Jews
from Sudan to Israel. The
airlift was initiated when
Ethiopians who had managed
to get to Israel some, by
walking from Ethiopia to
Eilat, the resort on Israel's
southern tip urged officials
to help them get their people
out. Publicity about the airlift
put a halt to it. And the plight
of the Ethiopian Jews
An Ethiopian Jewish child poses in his village with the Carna-
tion milk bar which Rabbi Goldstein smuggled into Ethiopia. The
bar has the equivalent of one-half cup of milk, a lifesaving com-
modity in this poverty-stricken nation.
worsened.
"Operation Moses was not
airlifting people out of
Ethiopia," explains Goldstein.
"They were lifted from Sudan
and first had to walk to Sudan.
So the first priority was you
had to have strength, stamina
and the health to get out. The
older people, women and
babies who were sick were all
left behind in Ethiopia. That
means the ones left behind
now are much more
vulnerable. They're the ones
not strong enough to go."
LIFE was not always easy
for the Ethiopian Jew who
made it to Israel. Because they
had lived by pre-rabbinic stan-
dards, there was no way to
determine their background as
Jews, and Goldstein says many
were considered non-Jews and
had to undergo conversion to
Judaism.
Rabbi Lynn Goldstein
"Here are people who risked
their lives to get to Israel,"
Goldstein says with disgust at
the policy of forced conver-
sion. "That has changed.
There have been protests by
Ethiopian Jews and non-
Ethiopian Jews all over the
country. Now they are
recognized as Jews until the
point when they get married
then they have to prove they
are Jewish."
Their adjustment to life in
Israel has been difficult, but
under the circumstances, they
are doing extremely well. The
Ethiopian Jews had never seen
modern conveniences in their
African nation and had put
their children on shelf-like per-
ches to sleep in shacks and
huts made of sticks and mud.
"THE Talmud teaches us
that all Jews are responsible
for one another," says Golds-
tein. "Hillel taught: 'If I'm not
for myself, who will be for me;
If I am only for myself, what
am I? If not now, when?'
"This teaches us that we
have to care for ourselves and
others as well. But the last
sentence in particular is very
frightening when applied to
the situation of the Ethiopian
Jews; because it really is a
question of, if we don t help
now, there won't be a future
for the community.
"Every year at Passover we
say, 'Next year in Jerusalem!'
And as we say that, we should
remember there are Jews in
Ethiopia for whom that's a
lifesaving prayer."
India Won't
Send Team
TEL AVIV (JTA) The In-
dian government, reversing an
earlier decision, announced it
will not send its Davis Cup ten-
nis team to play in Israel next
month, even though it means
India will be barred from the
Davis Cup matches next year.
Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi
told the Parliament in New
Delhi that the Indian team will
not be allowed to play the
Israelis in the qualifying mat-
ches, due to be held in the
Ramat Hasharon Tennis
Center from April 7 to 9.


Page 40 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 8, 1988
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nutter 88-1532
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JACK FELDMAN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of JACK
FELDMAN, deceased, File
Number 88-1532, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagier
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate is ZELDA FELDMAN,
whose address is 12500 NE 15th
Avenue, Apt 406, N. Miami, FL
33161. The name and address of
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
JULIUS SFARTI, ESQ., 2020 NE
163rd St, Ste. 300, N. Miami
Beach. FL 33162.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
March 25, 1988.
ZELDA FELDMAN
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
JACK FELDMAN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
JULIUS SFARTI, ESQ.
2020 NE 163rd Street
Suite 300
N. Miami Beach, FL 33162
Telephone: 305 944-9100 Dade
18377 March 25;
April 1,1988.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Case No. 88-12416-24
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
NORMA R. TUCKER,
Petitioner/Wife,
and
JAMES TUCKER,
Respondent/Husband.
TO: JAMES TUCKER
Respondent
Residence: Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and there is a demand
in the Petition that the Court
award that certain property owned
by you and your wife, NORMA R.
TUCKER as tenants by the entire-
ty, located at 2960 N.W. 68th
Street, Miami, Dade County,
Florida, and more particularly
described as:
Lot 4, Block 5, MARILINDA, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 50, Page 32
of the Public Records of Dade
County, Fla.; to your wife, NOR-
MA R. TUCKER, and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to the Petition
on the Petitioner's Attorney,
EUGENE LEMLICH, whose ad-
dress is 2720 W. Flagier Street,
Miami, FL, on or before April 29,
1988, and file the original with the
clerk of this Court either before
service on Petitioner's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
petition.
DATED this 23 day of March,
1988. at Miami. Florida.
RICHARD P. BRJNKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: BARBARA HARPER
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EUGENE LEMLICH, ESQ.
2720 West Flagier Street
Miami, Florida 33135
Phone: (305) 642-5231
Attorney for Petitioner
18397 March 25;
April 1,8,15.1988.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-11345-19
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
No. 003473
IN RE:
BARRY CARROLL
and
ANNETTE CARROLL
TO:
ANNETTE CARROLL
Residence Unknown:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street, North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 29, 1988;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 22 day of March, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOY BARKAN
2020 N.E. 163rd Street
North Miami Beach
Florida 33162
Attorney for Petitioner
18398 March 25;
____________April 1,8,16,1988.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-4931 (13)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
No. 003473
IN RE: JUDY MYERS
and
RICHARD C. MYERS
TO. RICHARD C. MYERS
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street North Miami Beach, Florida
33162, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before April 29, 1988; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 23 day of March, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18400 April 1,8,15,22,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-1494
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BETTY WEISENBERG
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of Betty
Weisenberg, deceased, File
Number 88-1494, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dres of which is 73 West Flagier
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate is Harry Blufarb, whose ad-
dress is 202 Commercial St. N.
Sidney Nova Scotia, B2A 1B7
Canada. The name and address of
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands, against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
April 1. 1988.
Harvey Blufarb
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Betty Weisenberg
I)vH'(kRJUHl
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Richard I. Kroop, (128023)
Kwitney, Kropp & Scheinberg,
PA.
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 512
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-7575
18401 April 1,8. 1988
provided by 28 U.S.C. Section
2410(c) for the period provided
therein, running from the date of
the Ceriticate of Title issued
herein.
DATED the 30th day of March,
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Cowl
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
JOSEH M. PANIELLO,
ESQUIRE
ONE TAMPA CITY CENTER,
SUITE 2720, 201 NORTH
FRANKLIN STREET
TAMPA, FLORIDA 33602
Phli.hi 4/1-8
Attorney for Plaintiff
Joseph M. Paniello, Esquire
Suite 2720, 201 North Franklin
Street
Tampa, Florida 33602
Published 4/1-8
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-21870
SEC. 33
SOVRAN MORTGAGE
CORPORATION,
PlainUffls)
vs.
JUANITA HOOKER, a single
wouua, et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 18th day of April,! the De
following described property:
LOT 76, BLOCK 8, THE LAKES
OF ACADIA UNIT SIX, ACCOR-
DING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF. AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 121. PAGE 49. OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
The United States of America
shall have the right of redemption
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-28386
SEC 08
STOCKTON, WHATLEY.
DAVIN A COMPANY, a Florida
corporation,
Plaintiffls)
vs.
RAUL OSPINA, FLOR OSPINA.
and the unknown spouses, et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 18th day of April. 1988. the
following described property:
Lot 18, in Block 28, of KINGS
GARDENS SECTION THREE,
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 95, at Page
30, of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
DATED the 30th day of March.
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin, P.A.
Suite 2300, Centrust Financial
Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami, Florida 33131-2198
Published 4/1-8
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
Ui THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-44232
SEC. 13
THE PRUDENTIAL IN-
SURANCE COMPANY OF
AMERICA,
Plaintiffls)
vs.
JUSTO ASENJO and CARMEN
ASENJO, his wife, ct al.,
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 18th day of April, 1988, the
following described property:
CONDOMINIUM UNIT
NUMBER 211, OF BUILDING
210. FONTAINEBLEAU BLVD.
OF THE GREENS CON
DOMIN1UM, ACCORDING TO
THE DECLARATION OF CON-
DOMINIUM THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN OFFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 10912 PAGE
402 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
AND ALL AMENDMENTS
THERETO; AND TOGETHER
WITH AN UNDIVIDED IN-
TEREST IN THE COMMON
ELEMENTS DECLARED IN
THE DECLARATION OF CON-
DOMINIUM TO BE AN AP-
PURTENANCE TO THE ABOVE
DESCRIBED DWELLING UNIT.
DATED the 30th day of March
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-28390
SEC. 27
BANCBOSTON MORTGAGE
CORPORATION, a Florida cor-
poration, successor by merger to
STOCKTON, WHATLEY,
DAVIN COMPANY,
Plaintiffls)
vs.
WAYNE FLOWERS, et al.,
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami. Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M.. on
the 18th day of April. 1988, the
following described property:
Lot 14, in Block 29, of MEADOW
WOOD MANOR SECTION
FOUR, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
100, at Page 45, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida.
DATED the 30th day of March,
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
bv Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal 4 Yarchin,
Suite 2300. Centrust Financial
Center,
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami. Florida 331-2198
Published 4/1-8
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Cum No. 88-5350-FC-lO
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
NELLY MALDONADO.
Petitioner
and
JAIME O. MALDONADO,
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Jaime 0. Maldonado. 34-06
34 St. L.I.. NY 11106
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
was filed against you; you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses upon: I.J. Graff, at-
torney for Petitioner, 633 N.E. 167
St. N.M.B. Fl. 33162, on or before
April 29, 1988 and file the original
with the clerk of this court other-
wise a default will be entered
against you.
Dated: 23 March, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18402 April 1.8.15.22.1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-1402
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ELIZABETH SMITH
LEIGH.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ELIZABETH SMITH LEIGH,
deceased. File Number 88-1402
(02), is pending in the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street, Miami. FL
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on April l, \^
Personal Represent,^
R^P^'WAveno, I
Bal Harbour Fl ,,. I
BY:PAULIREssLS|
TRUST OFFICeF'
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
1135 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands FL,J
Telephone: 865-5716 ^ I
18405 ...,,
IN THE CIRCUTKomtiM
DADE COUNTY, FLOtol
PROBATE DIVM?1
File Number 87-73(1
Division (04)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOSEPH LAWRENCE'
NOTICE TO CREDiroSI
(Suauaary Adaiiutno-
TO ALL PERSONS Hfflf
CLAIMS OR DEMASi
AGAINST THE AB01
ESTATE: '
Please be advised that ant,
of Summary Adminisuiooi |
been entered by the above mk
Court and that the total rife]
the above estate is 323.7I7.0Jg
that said assets have been tag
to EMMA D. NORDSTROII
Within three months fm|
time of the first publication of I
notice you are required to Hi
the clerk of the Circuit Covt]
DADE County. Florida, h
Division, the address of wtudi'
W. Flagier Street. Miami.._
33130. a written statement oti
claim or demand you miy I
against the estate of
LAWRENCE SMITH, dc.
Each claim must be in i.
and must indicate the basis for!
claim, the name and address of]
creditor or his agent or attona
and the amount claimed. II |
claim is not yet due. the date i
it will become due shall be a
If the claim il contingent or i
quidated. the nature of the n
tainty shall be stated. If thee
is secured, the security shal |
described. The claimant i
deliver a copy of the claim u(
clerk who shall serve the con j
the personal representative.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMA
NOT SO FILED WILL
FOREVER BARRED
Dated March 22,1988.
ALBERT WGIFFANTI.PJ
2701 S. Bayshore Drive
Suite 305
Miami, Florida 33133
Telephone: (3051858-04M
18403 April 1.8.1!
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME U*J
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIT
that the undersigned, desrajl
engage in business under u* i
titious names of (1) Interatt
Computer Graphics and(2) 1C
523 N.E. 26th Street.
Lauderdale, FL intends tor
said names with the Clerk of |
Circuit Court of Dade Co
Florida.
SCO. INC.
By: Nelson (" Keshen. I
NELSON CKESHEN.ESQ
Attorney for SCG, INC
18404 April 1.8.1**'
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAM
NOTICE IS HEREBY CIJ
that the undersigned, damn
engage in business under Wl
titious name Cntens '1
N.E. 149 Street. North H
33181 intends W ''prL
name with the Clerk of Utet"
Court of Dade County.""
Criteria Record
Studios, Inc
a Florida corpora*"1
Paul M. Marmish. PA
Shea and Gould -i
1428 Brickell Avenue, 7" I
Miami. Fl 33131 ^j
18393 Apnl'W
NOTICE UNDER ,
FICITIOUSNAMELAJI
NOTICE IS HERfjnji
that the undersigned."*' 1
engage in business"^ I
titious name "'x"id
TICALrt 4300 Alton "JJj
Beach, Florida 331 J
register ** ^f&F
of the Circuit Court of i*
ty. Florida. ^ lnc.
Physicians Opt**.
Rosenthal 4 Y^1" r
Attorney for Phyac**1
Inc. 15.22.4
18407 Apnll.^


:QRECLOSURE SALES-PUBLIC NOTICES
Friday, April 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 41
NOTICE OF ACTION
IcONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
lrj THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
Cam ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
[riRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
1 ANi) FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 88-4224 (21)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
NO. 003473
I RE: The Marriage of
MLINE BELL
hLLIE BELL
y. WILLIE BELL
Residence Unknown
lYOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
|ED that an action for Dissolu-
Inn of Marriage has been filed
oinst you and you are required
'. serve a copy of your written
fcfenses, if any. to it on JOY
ARKAN. attorney for Petitioner,
hose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
kreet. North Miami Beach,
lorida 33162, and file the original
|jth the clerk of the above styled
art on or before April 15. 1988;
herwise a default will be entered
linst you for the relief demand-
i in the complaint or petition.
(This notice shall be published
lice each week for four con-
icutive weeks in THE JEWISH
[ORIDIAN.
[WITNESS my hand and the seal
| said court at Miami, Florida on
kis 14th of March, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
fcircuit Court Seal)
1.167 March 18, 25;
April 1,8,1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
ICONSTRI'CTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
I THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
HE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
I CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
I AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 88-10185 14
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
k RE: The Marriage of
(AYE VERMONT a/k/a
ARR0L VERMONT,
I Petitioner'Wife
id
0NALD D VERMONT,
I Respondent/Husband.
0: DONALD D. VERMONT
15 Arcadia Drive
Kingston 8
Jamaica. West Indies
lYOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
lon of Marriage has been filed
linst you and you are required
) serve a copy of your written
kfenses. if any, to it on JULIUS
7ARTI. ESQ., attorney for Peti-
oner, whose add'ess is 2020 NE
53rd Street, Suite 300, N. Miami
ich, Florida 33162, and file the
final with the clerk of the above
Wed court on or before April
pth 1988; otherwise a default will
entered against you for the
Hief demanded in the complaint
Jr petition.
[This notice shall be published
ce each week for four con-
rutiv*- weakl in THE JEWISH
ILORIDIAN
I WITNESS my hand and the seal
i said court at Miami, Florida on
Ns 9 day of March. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: John Branda
As Deputy Clerk
fircuit Court Seal)
jLTJUS SFARTI. ESQ.
pomey for Petitioner/Wife
2020 NE 163rd Street
Me 300
'' Miami Beach. FL 33162
March 18.25;
April 1,8,1988
|!LTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
I THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
1 CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
| DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Cue No. 88-5353 -FC- 09
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
"rethe marriage of
KOSE A. WALTERS,
I Petitioner
I ALFRED S. WALTERS,
wspondent
ttv .^?T,CE 0F ACTION
P": Alfred S. Walters
Thompsontown P.O.
vn,!arandon' Jamaica
TU ARE NOTIFIED that an
*n for dissolution of marriage
nttiJf ag*inst yo0; you re-
Tz?serve a C0Py of your writ-
oefenses upon: I. J. GRAFF,
attorney for Petitioner, 633 N.*,.
167 St. N.M.B. Fl. 33162 on or
before April 8, 1988 and file the
original with the clerk of this court
otherwise a default will be entered
against you.
Dated: 4th March, 1988
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
18349 March 11, 18,25;
April 1,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
Cue No. 8843943 CA
NOTICE OF ACTION
CENTRUST SAVINGS BANK,
etc.,
Plaintiff,
v.
CARLOS A. ZAPATA, MARIA
VICTORIA ZAPATA, and the
unknown spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors or other
parties claiming by, through,
under or against them;
INTERNATIONAL FIDELITY
INSURANCE COMPANY, a
New Jersey corporation; PLAYA
LAGO CONDOMINIUM
ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida
corporation; VICTORIA
HOSPITAL. INC., a Florida
corporation; JOHN DOE and
JANE DOE;
Defendants.
To: Carlos Zapata and Maria Vic-
toria Zapata, whose
residences are unknown, and
the unknown parties who may
be spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees and all par-
ties claiming interest by,
through, under or against said
Defendants, who are not
known to be dead or alive, and
all parties having or claiming
to have any right, title, or in-
terest in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Unit A-6, in Building 4, of
PLAYA LAGO, PHASE I, a
Condominium, according to
the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof and Ex-
hibits thereto, as recorded in
Official Records Book 11722,
at Page 1732, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida, together with an un-
divided interest in the Com-
mon Elements appertaining
thereto,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Albert C. Galloway, Jr., Es-
quire, of Rosenthal & Yarchin. At-
torneys for Plaintiff, Suite 2300,
CenTrust Financial Center, 100
S.E. 2nd Street, Miami, Florida
33131-2198. on or before April 22.
1988, and to file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torneys or immediately thereafter;
otherwise, a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on March 15. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
By: E. LE SUEUR
Deputy Clerk
18374 March 18,25;
April 1.8, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Caae No. 87-29163 CA 04
NOTICE OF ACTION
BANCBOSTON MORTGAGE
CORPORATION, a Florida
corporation, successor by merger
to STOCKTON. WHATLEY,
DAVIN & COMPANY,
Plaintiff.
DOUGLAS WILLIAMS
PHILLIN WILLIAMS, and the
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other
parties claiming by, through,
under or against her; CYRIL
FULLERTON; EDITH
DOROTHY FULLERTON;
METROPOLITAN DADE
COUNTY; UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA; AMERICAN
EXPRESS COMPANY, a New
York corporation; MARCUS
JONES and BEVERLY MAJOR
JONES;
Defendants.
To: PWIlin Williams, whose
residence is unknown, and the
unknown parties who may be
spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees and all par-
ties claiming interest by,
through, under or against said
Defendant, who are not
known to be dead or alive, and
all parties having or claiming
to have any right, title, or in-
terest in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 6, in Block 40, of FAIR-
WAY ESTATES, SECTION
SEVEN, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 98, at Page 67, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Albert C. Galloway, Jr., Es-
quire, Rosenthal & Yarchin, Suite
2300, CenTrust Financial Center,
100 Southeast 2nd Street, Miami,
Florida 33131-2198, on or before
April 15, 1988, and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on March 9, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER. Clerk
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
Albert C. Galloway. Jr., Esquire
Rosenthal & Yarchin
Suite 2300
CenTrust Financial Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami, Florida 33131-2198
Telephone: (305) 374-6600
BMC No. 190345-1-575-L
FHA No. 092-196471-203-13
18360 March 18,25;
April 1,8,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Caae No. 87-31398 CA 06
NOTICE OF ACTION
BANCBOSTON MORTGAGE
CORPORATION, a Florida
corporation,
successor by merger to
STOCKTON, WHATLEY,
DAVIN & COMPANY,
Plaintiff,
v.
CHARLES E. WILLIAMS;
VALERIE A. WILLIAMS;
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT
EMPLOYEES FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION, a federally
chartered credit union;
FLAGLER SALES
CORPORATION, a dissolved
Florida corporation; CITY
STORES, INC.; CONVENIENT
LOAN & FINANCE CORP., a
dissolved Florida corporation, and
the unknown assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees or others
claiming by, through, under or
against such corporations;
WAUSAU UNDERWRITERS
INSURANCE COMPANY, a
Wisconsin corporation, successor
by merger to VOLKSWAGEN
INSURANCE COMPANY; THE
CROMER COMPANY, a Florida
corporation, f/k/a CROMER
WHOLESALE. INC.;
HOUSEHOLD FINANCE
CORPORATION, a Delaware
corporation; GOVERNMENT
EMPLOYEES INSURANCE
COMPANY, a District of
Columbia corporation;
GENERAL FINANCE
CORPORATION OF FLORIDA,
a Delaware corporation;
GENERAL MOTORS
ACCEPTANCE
CORPORATION, a New York
corporation; OSVALDO SOTO;
HAMILTON INSURANCE
COMPANY, a District of
Columbia corporation; FORUM
FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, a
federally chartered credit union,
f/k/a PANTRY PRIDE
FEDERAL CREDIT UNION,
f/k/a FOOD FAIR FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION OF FLORIDA;
and METROPOLITAN DADE
COUNTY, a political subdivision
of the State of Florida;
Defendants.
Address Unknown
To: City Stores, Inc., Convenient
Loan & Finance Corp., a
dissolved Florida corporation
and Flagler Sales Corpora-
tion, a dissolved Florida cor-
poration, and the unknown
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees, or others claiming
by, through, under or against
such corporations.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 3, Block 1, BERK
HEIGHTS, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 66. Page 3. of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Barry S. Yarchin, Esquire, of
Rosenthal & Yarchin, Attorneys
for Plaintiff, Suite 2300, CenTrust
Financial Center, 100 Southeast
2nd Street. Miami. Florida
33131-2198, on or before April 15,
1988, and to file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torneys or immediately thereafter;
otherwise, a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on March 9, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER, Clerk
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
Barry S. Yarchin, Esquire
Rosenthal & Yarchin
Suite 2300
CenTrust Financial Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami, Florida 33131-2198
Telephone: (305) 374-6600
BMC No. 092-285783-221
SWD No. 249352-1-323-N
18359 March 18,25;
April 1,8,1988
Of THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-54451 CA-03
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS,
Plaintiff,
vs.
VAN A TAYLOR, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: VANA TAYLOR and
JIM JONES
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against VANA
TAYLOR and JIM JONES,
and all parties having or claim-
ing to have any right, title or
interest in the property herein
described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 21, less the North 5 feet
of Block 6, EAST LIBERTY
CITY SECTION "A", accor-
ding to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 39.
Page 19, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
April 15, 1988, and file the original
with the clerk of this court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter,
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 10 day of March,
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18363 March 18, 25;
April 1,8, 1988
QUIRE, attorney for Husband,
whose address is 999 Washington
Avenue. Miami Beach, Florida
33139. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before April 15, 1988; other-
wise default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 10 day of March, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: T. Casamayor
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HOWARD N. GALBUT, ESQ.
Galbut. Galbut & Menin
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: 305-672-3100
Attorney for Petitioner
18365 March 18,25;
April 1,8,1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 88-9431 FC 05
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
NO. 003473
IN RE: The Marriage of
GLADYS NKOLIKA
EMEKEKWUE
and
ARTHUR JAMES STEWART
TO: ARTHUR JAMES
STEWART
352 Ridge Road
S.E. Washington,
D.C. 20019
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for Dissolu
tion of Marriage has been filec
against you and you are requirec
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street, North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 22, 1988;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 15 day of March, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: E. Le Sueur
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18376 March 18,25
April 1,8,198*
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 88-10373 (21)
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
TRACIE L. DUDRICK.
Petitioner/Husband
and
MARTHA SANTIAGO
DUDRICK,
Respondent/Wife
TO: MARTHA SANTIAGO
DUDRICK
c/o MIGUEL SANTIAGO
123 La Quinta Drive
Pharr, Texas, 78577
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an actin for Divorce has
been ffled against you and you are
required to serve a oOpy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
HOWARD N. GALBUT. ES-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-47960 CA 24
NOTICE OF ACTION
BANCBOSTON MORTGAGE
CORPORATION, a Florida cor-
poration, successor by merger to
STOCKTON, WHATLEY,
DAVIN & COMPANY,
Plaintiff,
v.
GEORGE ROBINSON;
OMADELL ROBINSON;
GOLDOME CREDIT CORPORA-
TION, a Delaware corporation;
UNIVERSAL SYSTEMS AC-
CESS, INC., and the unknown
assigness, lienors. creditors,
trustees, or others claiming by,
through, under or against such cor-
poration; ALL STATES MOR-
TGAGE AND INVESTMENT
CORP., a Florida corporation;
AMERICAN RISK ASSURANCE
COMPANY, a Florida corporation;
and METROPOLITAN DADE
COUNTY;
Defendants.
To: Address Unknown.
Universal Systems Access, Inc.,
and the unknown assignees,
lienors, creditors, trustees, or
others claiming by. through,
under or against such
corporation.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 17, Block 4, of GOLDEN
HIGHLAND ESTATES, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Hat Book 53,
Page 55, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Barry S. Yarchin, Esquire, of
Rosenthal & Yarchin, Attorneys
for Plaintiff, Suite 2300. CenTrust
Financial Center, 100 Southeast
2nd Street, Miami, Florida
33131-2198, on or before April 22,
1988, and to file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torneys or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and sea! of
this Court this 15 day of March,
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
Barry S. Yarchin, Esquire
Rosenthal & Yarchin
Suite 2300
CenTrust Financial Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami, Florida 33131-2198
Telephone: (305) 374-6600
BMCNo. 332124-1-575-H
FHA No. 092-318230-203
18375 March 18,25;
April 1,8, 1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT CF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-33133
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
LIBIA GARCIA.
a/k/a LIBIA PIZARRO.
and
JOSE GABRIEL GARCIA.
TO: Mr. Jose Gabriel Garcia
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on EM1LIO
C. PASTOR, attorney for Peti
tioner, whose address is PH I
155 South Miami Avenue, Miami.
Florida 33130, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 15, 1988;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 11 day of March, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: E. Le Sueur
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EMILIO C. PASTOR, P.A.
PHI 155 South Miami Avenue
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 372-0088
18368 March 18, 25;
April 1,8,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO.: 88-12402-FC 30
FL BAR 3(8016
In re the marriage of
DEBRA BITTON,
Petitioner
and
ISAAC BITTON,
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ISAAC BITTON,
Residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
was filed against you; you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses upon: I.J. GRAFF, at-
torney for Petitioner. 633 N.E. 167
St. N.M.B. Fl. 33162 on or before
April 29, 1988 and file the original
with the clerk of this court other-
wise a default will be entered
against you.
DATED: March 23. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: S. BOBES
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court,Seal)
183% March 25;
April 1,8,15,1988.


Page 42 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 8, 1988
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, DO AND FOB DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-34447
SEC. 17
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION.
Uaited State* corporation,
Plaintiffis)
vs.
KAREN BETHEL, ft al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 11TH day of APRIL, 1988. the
following described property:
Lot 13, Block 3. ofGLENWOOD
HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION, accor-
ding to the Plat thereof, as record-
ed in Plat Book 16, at Page 76, of
the Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida a/k/a 5225 N.W. 30th
Court. Miami. Florida 33142.
DATED the 23RD dav of
MARCH. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Cferk of Circuit Court
(Circait Coart Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin
Centrust Financial Center, Suite
2300
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami, Florida 33131-2198
PmMaaMd VK 4/1______________
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-23531
SEC. 14
GLENFED MORTGAGE COR-
PORATION, formerly known ma
Merrill Lynch Mortgage Cor-
poration, formerly known as
United Firat Mortgage
Corporation,
Plaintiffs)
vs.
ESTILJTA CHAVIA.NO. if liv-
ing, including any unknown
sponae of said Defendant, if ake
has married, et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 11TH day of APRIL, 1988, the
following described property:
Condominium Apartment Unit No.
606 West of EL CID, a con-
dominium according to the
Declaration of Condominium
recorded in Official Records Book
10527 at Pages 1992 through 2039
of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida, and in Official
Records Condominium Plan Book
82, Page 14, as maintained in the
Public Records of Dade County,
Florida, together with all ap-
purtenances thereto and the ex-
clusive right to use the limited
common element designated in the
Declaration of Condominium as
Parking Space No. 197.
DATED the 23RD day of
MARCH, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Conrt
(Circuit Coart Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Joseph M. Paniello, Esquire
One Tampa City Center, Suite
2720
201 North Franklin Street
Tampa, Florida 33602
Published 3/25 4/1
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-28383
SEC. 29
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
OF MIAMI, AS TSU8TEE
UNDER THE INDENTURE OF
TRUST, DATED AS OF 1
APRIL 1980. BETWEEN THE
HOUSING FINANCE
AUTHORITY OF DADE COUN-
TY, FLORIDA, AND SUCH
TRUST,
Plain tiffls)
FRANCIS C. ALEXANDER, et
al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County.
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 11TH day of APRIL. 1988. the
following described property:
Lot 1. Block 14, RANDALL
PARK FIRST ADDITION, accor-
ding to the Plat thereof, as record-
ed in Plat Book 56, at Page 46, of
the Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida a/k/a 12845 N.W. 18th
Court, Miami, Florida 33167.
DATED the 23RD day of
MARCH, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin
Centrust Fnancial Center. Suite
2300
100 Southeat Second Street
Miami. Florida 33131-2198
Published 3/25 4/1
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-30554
SEC. 13
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR
TGAGE ASSOCIATION. a
United Statea corporation,
Plaintiffts)
vs.
BELIZAIRE JOSEPH, et al..
Defendant(8)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the HTHday of APRIL. 1988, the
following described property:
Lot 5, and the South % of Lot 6,
Block 5, CARTER'S ADDITION
TO COCONUT GROVE, according
to the Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 2. at Page 101, of the
Public Record of Dade County.
Florida.
The United States of America
shall have the right of redemption
provided by 28 U.S.C. Sec.
2410(c) for the period provided
therein, running from the date of
the Certificate of Title issued
herein.
DATED the 23RD day of
MARCH, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin
Centrust Financial Center, suite
2300
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami, Florida 33131-2198
Published 3/25 4/1_____________
NOTICE OF SALE
PUR8UANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-2*422
SEC. IS
BANCBOSTON MORTGAGE
CORPORATION, a Florida cor
poratiou. anmmunJf by merger to
STOCKTON, WHATLEY
DAVTN COMPANY,
Plaintiffs)
vs.
WILLIE J. BLACK. ANNA
BLACK, and the unknown
apeuses, et al.,
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bdder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dude County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 11TH day of APRIL, 1988, the
following described property:
Lot 8-A. in Block 2. of WINSOR
MANOR SECOND ADDITION,
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 122, at
Page 54, of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida.
DATED the 23RD day of
MARCH, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Roeenthal A Yarchin
('entrust Financial Cetner, Suite
2300
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami, Florida 33131-2198
Published 3/26 4/1______________
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-07585
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
MARGINE A.
MOLINA GUZMAN.
Petitioner/Wife
and
HORACE C. GUZMAN.
Respondent/Husband
TO: HORACE C. GUZMAN
Residence Unknown:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on RAUL G.
DELGADO, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 1835 West
Flagier Street, Suite 200, and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
April 22, 1988; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 21 day of March. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
RAUL G. DELGADO, ESQUIRE
1835 West Flagier Street,
Suite 200
Miami, Florida 33135
Telephone: (305) 643-5636
Attorney for Petitioner
March 25;
18389_________April 1,8,15.1988.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-42374 (28)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
No. 003473
IN RE:
ULRICA PAREMORE
and
REGINALD McQUEEN
TO: REGINALD McQUEEN
Residence Unknown:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on JOY
BARKAN. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street, North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 22, 1988;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 21st day of March, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dude County, Florida
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOY BARKAN
2020 N.E. 163rd Street
North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162
Attorney for Petitioner
18388 March 25;
April 1,8, 15, 1988.
1988; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 11 day of March. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: B.J. Fox
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LAW OFFICES OF ADRIAN D.
FERRADAZ
2655 LeJeune Road
Penthouse II
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone: (305)) 441-2655
18369 March 18.25;
April 1.8, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-31357 (09)
NOTICE OF ACTION
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY.FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-21469
SEC 22
BANC ONE MORTGAGE
CORPORATION.
Plaintiffls)
vs.
OSCAR YARINI. if living, and
KAROL I. YARINI. hia wife, if
living, including any unknown
spouse of said Defendants, if
either has remarried, etc., et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County.
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 11TH day of APRIL, 1988, the
following described property:
Lot 15 in Block 49, of VISTA
TOWNHOUSE SECTION E, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 94, at Page
69, of the Public Records of Dade CORAL GABLES EDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI, a
United States Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ALBERTO ALBERTY, if he is
alive and if he is dead, all of the
unknown heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienholders. creditors,
trustees or otherwise claiming by.
through, under or against
ALBERTO ALBERTY. and all
other parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or interest in
and to the property under
foreclosure herein; et al.,
Defendants.
TO: ALBERTO ALBERTY,
residence unknown, if alive,
and if dead, to all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against said ALBER-
TO ALBERTY and all other
parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or in-
terest in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a Mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Unit No. 221, of THE
HORIZONS WEST CON-
DOMINIUM NO. 1, accor-
ding to the Declaration
thereof, as recorded in Of-
ficial Records Book 11003, at
Page 1873, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida, as amended,
together with all im-
provements, appliances and
fixtures located thereon.
County, Florida.
DATED the 23RD day of
MARCH, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Joseph M. Paniello, Esquire
One Tampa City Center, Suite
2720
201 North Fraklin Street
Tampa, Florida 33602
Published 3/25 4/1______________
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-31059
SEC. 18
HOMESTEAD SAVINGS, a
Federal Savings and Loan
Aaaociation,
Plain tifffs)
vs.
YIGANY RODRIGUEZ
DECESPEDES now known aa
YIGANY ALVAREZ, a single
woman, et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cuur- has been filed against you and you
thouse in Miami, Dade County, are required to serve a copy of
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on your written defenses, if any, to it
the 11TH day of APRIL, 1988. the on Keith, Mack. Lewis & Allison,
following described property: Plaintiffs attorneys, whose ad-
Unit 1-16 PHASE I SPANISH dress is 111 N.E. 1st Street.
TRACE, a Condominium accor-
ding to the Declaration of Con-
dominium recorded in Official
Records Book 10535, at Page
1361, of the Public Records of
Miami, Florida 33132, on or before
April 8. 1988, and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate
Dade County, Florida, together ly thereafter; otherwise a Default
with parking space no. 480. will be entered against you for the
DATED the 23RD day of relief demanded in the Complaint.
MARCH, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Joseph M. Paniello, Esquire
201 North Franklin Street, Suite
2720
Tampa, Florida 33602
Published 3/28 4/1_____________
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87-31971 (19)
ACTION FOR ADOPTION
IN RE: THE MATTER OF:
Adoption of a minor
TO: Miguel Guillermez
Residence Unknown:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Adoption
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Adrian D. Ferradaz, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
2655 LeJeune Road, Penthouse II,
Coral Gables, Dade County!
Florida, U.S.A. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before April 15,
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 3rd day of March,
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
18348 March 11,18, 25;
___________________April 1,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE No. 88-01224 CA-02
NOTICE OF ACTION
GREAT FINANCIAL
FEDERAL,
Plaintiff,
vs.
OSKAR VIDAURRUE, et al..
Defendants.
TO: OSKAR VIDAURRUE,
ALVARO GUIDO and
JAVIER LOPEZ
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against OSKAR
VIDAURRUE. ALVARO
GUIDO and JAVIER LOPEZ,
and all parties having or claim-
ing to have any right, title or
interest in the property herein
described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a morwj
the Plat thereof ^
in Plat Book 1,9,SS
of the Public Record. ofD*
County. Florida
has been filed against you am,,
are required to serve a aJzl
your written defenses, ifanVll
on Stuart H. Gitlitz. AttS
Plaintiff, whose address isli
214USTOMadruga Avenue' fj
GaWes,Flonda,33U6onor|-
Apnl 15, 1988. and file the onS
with the clerk of this court S
before service on Plaintiff, -
torney or immediately thereaftT
otherwise a default will be enuZ;
against you for the relief denW
ed in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the wi
1988ISCOUrtth'S8day0fMlr*l
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18354 March 11,18,25; I
_____________ April 1,190 I
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OP
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-09889
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
FELIPE JUVIER.
Petitioner,
and
MIRELLA JUVIER.
Respondent
TO: MIRELLA JUVIER
4300 Broadway
Apt. 6-C
New York. NY 10033
YOU ARE HEREBYl
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has bees
filed against you and you are l |
quired to serve a copy of your wit
ten defenses, if any. to it a I
MELVIN J. ASHES, ESQ., ft
tomey for Petitioner, whose at
dress is 825 South Bavshore Drite,
Suite 543. MIAMI FL 33131.and ]
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or beta I
April 15. 1988; otherwise a defaak
will be entered against you forth
relief demanded in the compluS |
or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the sol I
of said court at Miami, Florida on |
this 8 day of March. 1988.
RICHARD P, BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Cout
Dade County, Flonda
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seail
18355 March 11,18,*
April 1.19 |
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT Of
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA^
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Actioa
No. 88-10123 -a*
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
NO. 003473
IN RE: The Marriage of ,
CHARLOTTE GENESE HARRIS |
and
WILLIAM HARRIS
TO: WILLIAM HARRIS
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for IMsw
tion of Marriage has been nw
against you and you are ream*
to serve a copy of your *
defenses, if any. to it on W I
BARKAN, attorney for PeuW*
whose address is 2020 N.EJ6W
Street, North Miami **M
Florida 33162, and file the OWJ
with the clerk of the above s^W
court on or before ApnM5JM
otherwise a default wiDbMg
against you for the relief*^
ed in the complaints peWj^
This notice shall F~2
once each week for fcjg
secutive weeks in \nc'" I
FLORIDIAN. ^.hejeJ
WITNESS my hand and ui
of said court at Miamaio"" |
this 9 day of March, lw*
RICHARD P. BRIBER
As Clerk, CircUltWJ1
Dade County. Fonda
By: C.P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal) ^A*l
April l,*"
18868


rQRECLOSURE SALES-PUBLIC NOTICES
Friday, April 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 43
hN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
'CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
HADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Cut No. 88-007S3 (CA 20)
NOTICE OF ACTION
LaGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
> LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
IIAMI, a United States
orporation,
[ plaintiff.
tEORGE LEYKIN, et al.,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-11885
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
No. 003473
IN RE:
JACQUELINE DONDERO
and
KENNETH DONDERO
TO:
KENNETH DONDERO
SOPHIA SAPOZHNIKOVA. Residence Unknown:
residence unknown, if alive, YOU ARE HER
and if dead, to all parties FIED that an action for Dissolu-
claiming interest by, through, tion of Marriage has been filed
under or against said SOPHIA against you and you are required
SAPOZHNIKOVA, and all to serve a copy of your written
other parties having or claim- defenses, if any, to it on JOY
ing to have any right, title, or BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner,
interest in the property herein whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
described. Street, North Miami Beach,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on March 25, 1988.
Personal Representative:
HYMAN P. GALBUT
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MARTIN W. WASSERMAN.
ESQ.
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
HEREBY notI-telephone: (305) 672-3100
18387 March 25;
April 1,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-653
Division 04
Y0UARE NOTIFIED, that an Florida 33162, and file the original IN r? [?^.^ % 27363
on to foreclose a mortgage on with the clerk of the above styled '
following described property in court on or before April 22, 1988;
. County, Florida:
Unit 90 of TROPICAL
PARK VILLAS CON-
DOMINIUM, according to
the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof, as record-
ed in Official Records Book
10826, Page 183, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida, as amended;
together with all im-
provements, appliances and
fixtures located thereon
i been filed against you and you
required to serve a copy of
our written defenses, if any, to it
i Keith. Mack. Lewis, Allison &
Eohen, Plaintiff's attorneys,
(hose address is 111 N.E. 1st
et, Miami, Florida 33132, on
' before April 22, 1988, and file
I original with the Clerk of this
either before service on
ntiff s attorneys or immediate-
r thereafter; otherwise, a Default
1 be entered against you for the
ef demanded in the Complaint.
| WITNESS my hand and seal of
Court on the 18th day of
,1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
91 March 25;
April 1,8,15,1988
MARY NATHANSON,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of MARY NATHANSON, deceas
s^utive weeksTn THE*JEWISH J* ff *"* *** P*"^
FLORIDIAN Circuit Court for Dade
WITNESS my hand and the seal J^J "^ **"* Don;
the address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 18 day of March. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: DANA CAMPBELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOY BARKAN
2020 N.E. 163rd Street
North Miami Beach
Florida 33162
Attorney for Petitioner
18382
I THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
I ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
| DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Cur No. 88-07433 (CA 24)
NOTICE OF ACTION
AGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
|ND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
IAMI, a United States
oration.
| Plaintiff,
AFAEL FONG. et al.,
| Defendants.
0: RAFAEL FONG and
GRACIELA FONG.
his wife
Calle 12, No. 17
Reparto La Soledad
Maracay, Etdo. Aragua
Venezuela
|TOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
on to foreclose a mortgage on
e following described property in
! County, Florida:
I Condominium Unit No. PH-3,
of 5050 CONDOMINIUM, ac-
cording to the Declaration of
Condominium thereof, as
recorded in Official Records
Book 10337, at Page 293, of
* Public Records of Dade
Cwty, Florida, as amended,
together with all im-
provements, appliances and
| ^"ures located thereon
been filed against you and you
' required to serve a copy of
'written defenses, if any, to it
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
March 25- wnom 'his notice was served that
. .,. o .- ,QflB' challenges the validity of the will,
April I, a, 15,198B. ^ qu^ifj^tjong of Ae pem^
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on March 25, 1988.
Personal Representative:
PEARL FREEDLAND
2305 East 63rd Street
Brooklyn. New York 11234
FRANCES GROSSBERG
9506 N.W. 73rd Street
Tamarac, Florida 33321
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HYMAN P. GALBUT, ESQ.
GALBUT, GALBUT & MENIN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
18386 March 25;
April 1,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT DM AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 88-10086 FC 06
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
IN RE: The Marriage of
CECIL COOPER, JR.,
Petitioner
and
SHEREE A. COOPER,
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Sheree A. Cooper, c/o Ware,
346 Grand St, Newburgh, NY
12550
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
was filed against you; you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses upon: I.J. GRAFF, at-
torney for Petitioner, 633 N.E. 167
St. N.M.B. Fl. 33162 on or before
April 22, 1988 and file the original
with the clerk of this court other-
wise a default will be entered
against you.
Filed 3-16-88.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
I.J. GRAFF
633 N.E. 167 St.
N.M.B., Florida 33162
Attorney for Petitioner
March 25;
18378 April 1.8,15,1988.
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File NMtber 87-7007
Division 04
Florida Bar No. 251143
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ESTELLE M. SCHROEDER,
a/k/a
ESTELLE MARGARET
SCHROEDER,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of A BAIL BONDS
BY PHIL RONCA at number 6201
S.W. 70th Street, Suite 301 in the
City of Miami, Florida, Intends to
register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Dated at Plantation, Florida,
this 10th day of March, 1988.
RONCA BAIL BONDS INC.
d/b/a
A BAIL BONDS
BY PHIL RONCA
6201 S.W. 70th Street
Suite 301
Miami, Florida 33143
Ronca Bail Bonds, Inc.
(OWNER'S NAME)
STEVEN D. TISHLER.
Attorney for Applicant
1133 South University Drive
Suite 209
Plantation, Florida 33324
Telephone: (305) 476-2001
18373 March 18,25;
April 1. 8.1988
The administration of the estate
*eith, Mack, Lewis, Allison & Qf ESTELLE M. SCHROEDER,
M. Plaintiff's attorneys, ,/k/a ESTELLE MARGARET
address is 111 N.E. 1st SCHROEDER, deceased, File
Mil
m Miami, Florida 33132. on Number 87-7007, is pending in the
wore April 22, 1988, and file Circuit Court for Dade County,
original with the Clerk of this Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
inimther before ^^ce on dress of which is 73 West Flagler
u" s attorneys or immediate- street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
Wter; otherwise, a Default names and addresses of the per-
lu!lU'r?i f?""31 you for *' sonal representative and the per-
Wrteded '"^ Complaint, sonal representative's attorney are ADMINISTRATOR OF
WITNESS my hand and seal of m* forth below. VETERANS AFFAIRS..
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
DM AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 88-04588 CA23
NOTICE OF ACTION
the 18th day of
Plaintiff
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court Y- m mHNSON
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF DAVID E. JOHNSON,
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF et al
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims DrfndanU;
A, mam ysfmtssllis.t ;==", p^.
Court on
*h, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
under or against DAVID E.
JOHNSON, and all parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the
property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 27, Block 19.
PALMLAND HOMES SEC-
TION, 6 according to the Plat
thereof, recorded in Plat
Book 90, Page 67, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
April 22,1988, and file the original
with the clerk of this court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 17th day of
March, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
18381 March 25;
April 1.8,15,1988
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, DM AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-47295 CA 24
NOTICE OF ACTION
STOCKTON, WHATLEY,
DAVTN & COMPANY, a Florida
corporation,
Plaintiff,
v.
NORMA PETERSON and
PETERSON, her husband, if mar-
ried; GERALD DAVID SMITH,
CHARLES PETNICK, ROBERT
J. JAFFE, BERNICE JAFFE,
and the unknown spouses, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, or
other parties claiming by, through,
under or against them; SANDRA
M. KAY, Individually and as
Trustee, L.G. GATTER, as
Trustee for PUBLIC FINANCE
SERVICE OF FLORIDA, INC., a
dissolved Florida corporation, suc-
cessor by merger to PUBLIC
FINANCE SERVICE OF
WILTON MANORS, INC.; ALL
FLORIDA DISTRIBUTORS,
INC., a Florida corporation; and
MODERN HEALTH CARE SER-
VICES, INC., a Florida corpora-
tion f/k/a NORTH MIAMI
GENERAL HOSPITAL;
Defendants.
To: Gerald David Smith, Charles
Petnick, Robert J. Jaffe and
Bernice Jaffe, whose
residences are unknown, and
the unknown parties who may
be spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees and all par
ties claiming interest by,
through, under or against said
Defendants, who are not
known to be dead or alive, and
all parties having or claiming
to have any right, title, or in-
terest in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 4, in Block 9, of RUCKS
PARK, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 44, at Page 97, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Albert C. Galloway, Jr., Es-
quire, of Rosenthal & Yarchin,
PA., Attorneys for Plaintiff, Suite
2300, CenTrust Financial Center,
100 Southeast Second Street,
Miami, Florida 33131-2198, on or
before April 22, 1988, and to file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on 16th March, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By: Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
BMC No. 181002-2-575
VA No. 262527
18379 March 25;
April 1,8, 15.1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nuaber 88-1066
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MOLLIE ABEL
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of MOLLIE ABEL, deceased. File
Number 881066, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice was
begun on March 25, 1988.
Personal Representative:
PAUL ABEL
2047 NE 121st Road
Miami, Florida 33181
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Sylvan Holtzman
HOLTZMAN, KRINZMAN &
EQUELS
1500 San Remo Avenue
Suite 200
Coral Gables, FL 33146
Telephone: (305) 662-7700
18384 March 25;
April 1,1988.
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-1653
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JULIAN E. NEWBAUER,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMDnSTRATION
The administration of the estate
of JULIAN E. NEWBAUER,
deceased, File Number 88-1653, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on March 25, 1988.
Personal Representative:
JUNE NEWBAUER
1800 N.E. 14th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33181
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HERBERT S. SHAPIRO
1666-79th St. Cswy., Ste. 608
Miami Beach, Florida 33141
Telephone: (305) 864-2369
March 25;
18383 April 1,1988.
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. DM AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 88-9149 CA 16
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States
Corporation,
Plaintiff.
V8.
JAIME OSVALDO PRISANT, if
he is alive and if he is dead, all of
the unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienholders,
creditors, trustees or otherwise
claiming by, through, under or
against JAIME OSVALDO PRI-
SANT, and all other parties having
or claiming to have any right, title
or interest in and to the property
under foreclosure herein; et al.,
Defendants.
TO: JAIME OSVALDO PRISANT
and MARTHA LUNGIN,
residence unknown, if alive,
and if dead, to all parties
claiming interest by. through,
under or against the said
JAIME OSVALDO PRISANT
and MARTHA LUNGIN, and
all other parties having or
claiming to have any right, ti-
tle or interest in the property
herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a Mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Condominium Unit, Designed
as Unit No. 6-F, of THE EX-
ECUTIVE, a Condominium
according to the Declaration
thereof, recorded in Official
Records Book 10652, at Page
208, of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida;
together with all im-
provements, appliances, and
fixtures located thereon,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis & Allison,
Plaintiffs attorneys, whose ad-
dress is HI N.E. 1st Street,
Miami, Florida 33132, on or before
April 22,1988, and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torneys or immediately thereafter;
otherwise, a Default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 15th day of
March, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
18380 March 25;
April 1,8,15.1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, DM
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 88-12188
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
No. 003473
IN RE:
ANDY ETIENNE
and
CYNTHIA SMITH
TO: CYNTHIA SMITH
Residence Unknown:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street, North Miami Beach.
Florida 33162, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 29, 1988;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each weok for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 22 day of March, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOY BARKAN
2020 N.E. 163rd Street
North Miami Beach
Florida 33162
Attorney for Petitioner
18395 March 25;
April 1,8, 15,1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Criteria Recording
Studios at 17555 N.E. 149 Street,
North Miami, Fl. 33181 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Criteria Recording
Studios, Inc.
a Florida corporation
Paul M. Marmish, P.A.
Shea and Gould
1428 Brickeil Avenue, 7th Fl.
Miami, Fl 33131
18392 March 25;
April 1, 8,15.1988


Page 44 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 8, 1988
Orlando Synagogue Surveys For New Rabbi
By
ANDREW SILOW CARROLL
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Bernard Rosen takes a dim
view of the way most
synagogues select a new rabbi.
"Most of the time it's the
board saying, 'You'll take
what we give you and you'll
like it.' Period. Exclamation
point," he said.
But when Temple Israel in
Orlando, Fla., where Rosen is
congregation president, need-
ed to succeed the resigning
Rabbi Chaim Rozwaski, Tem-
ple Israel's Rabbinic Search
Committee decided to take its
search for a new rabbi directly
to the congregants.
Now, as the result of a
survey answered by more than
300 families, or 60 percent of
the congregation, Rosen has a
pretty good idea what type of
rabbi the membership has in
mind.
The survey asked questions
about level of observance, the
role of women in the
synagogue, how much Hebrew
should be in the service, and
what the members wanted in a
rabbi.
Some of the questions in-
vited dissent: How old should
the new rabbi be? Should he or
she speak out on issues?
Should he or she be highly visi-
ble in the community? Should
he or she be a he or a she?
Other questions were not
quite as controversial, such as
the one that asked if the new
rabbi should be a strong
orator.
The return rate of the
survey, which took at least 20
minutes to complete, was
"overwhelming," said Rosen.
Temple Israel still wants a
Conservative rabbi at its helm,
although separate minorities
of congrejrants called for one
more Orthodox or more
Reform.
The new rabbi should be 36-
to 45-years-old, said the
plurality, narrowly edging out
the backers of ages 46-55.
And in keeping with a desire
for total recognition of women
in the synagogue, most con-
gregants would "strongly
agree" to hiring a female
rabbi.
After further demographic
investigation by the Question-
naire Committee, chaired by
Stuart Farb, it was determin-
ed that the new rabbi should
observe the Sabbath, but he
willing to ride to synagogue
for Saturday morning
services.
"We don't have adequate
housing to accommodate a rab-
bi and his familv near the
synagogue," explained
The survey results,
part of a profile that h.
sent to the United Sv^
of America, the Con*
congregational organ*
which will then buom
ble candidates fof
Israel.
Rosen and the
Search Committee plan
candidates
request
Da
these
or to
terview
phone
videotape, and then toU
the finalists to Orlando fofjl
sonal interviews.
They hope to .hoose a,
rabbi by the summer.
ffiHmg!
Vanunu Sentenced
for Treason
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Mordechai Vanunu was
sentenced to 18 years in prison
by a Jerusalem district court
that found him guilty of es-
pionage and treason.
The panel of three judges
who presided at the year-long
trial of the former nuclear
technician said their sentence
took into account extenuating
circumstances. These included
the accused's complete
cooperation and the fact he
had been held in solitary con-
finement before and during
the trial, and will probably be
subject to such treatment in
the future.
Considering that each of the
counts on which Vanunu was
convicted carries a maximum
penalty of life imprisonment,
the sentence was considered
lenient.
Vanunu, 34, who once work-
ed at the Dimona nuclear
facility and later left Israel and
Sephardi
House Planned
converted to the Anglican
faith, was found guilty of pro-
viding a British newspaper,
The Sunday Times of London,
with information and
photographs that seriously
compromised Israel's security.
The court rejected appeals
by the defense to reduce the
sentence because Vanunu
acted out of ideological motiva-
tions, rather than financial
gain. The judges replied that
ideological motives do not
sanctify criminality. They
observed that, in fact,
ideologically motivated
criminals are more dangerous
than others.
Vanunu's sentence will be
calculated from Oct. 7, 1986,
when he was formally ar-
rested. He was reported miss-
ing from London on Sept. 30,
1986. He claims he was lured
to Rome, then drugged and
kidnapped by Israeli agents
who brought him to Israel
against his will.
PEsrconnKXCQmMm
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r
NEW YORK (JTA) The
World Sephardi Federation
has adopted plans to establish
Sephardi House, a cultural and
educational center, in
Jerusalem.
The federation's board of
governors decided Wednesday
that the new center would be
created to promote knowledge
and pride in Sephardi heritage
and culture, enhance tolerance
among Jews, promote
economic growth and stability
for Sephardim and advance
the cause of Israeli-Arab
peace.
The world population of
Sephardi Jews who
originate from around the
Mediterranean is about 1.5
million. Sephardim from
Argentina, Brazil, Canada,
France, Israel, Mexico,
Switzerland, Turkey and the
United States attended the
board meeting.
1^ J[
ROSE AND IRVING NEWMAN
AND SONJEFFERYM. OF THE
Newman Insurance Agency, Inc.
1558 NE162 St.
North Miami Beach, Florida
Dade 940-7515 Broward 921-0616


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