The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03077

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
Campaign
]TewI]b Floridllaini
1.61 Number 4
Miami Friday, January 22,1988
Price 50 Cents
I
^

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\\\\
el Foreign Minister Shimon Peres, left,
with UN Undersecretary for Political Af-
Marrack Goulding at the Foreign
Violence Waning
After Clash at
Temple Mount
Ministry, Jerusalem. Goulding was in Israel
to determine the status of the unrest in the ad-
ministered territories.
United States Vetoes
United Nations Vote
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
An Arab commercial strike
paralyzed East Jerusalem on
Monday. But few incidents of
unrest were reported in the
administered territories, giv-
ing rise to cautious optimism,
after a weekend of relative
quiet, that the worst of the
disturbances may be over.
Curfews were gradually
lifted at refugee camps in the
West Bank. But they were
strictly enforced at most
camps in the Gaza Strip which,
combined with inclement
weather, kept demonstrators
off the streets.
Arabs confined to the
By YITZHAK RABI
INITED NATIONS -
- The United States
sd a Security Council
Uution deploring Israel for
Ian. 2 air raids on terrorist
jets in Lebanon.
ie vote in the 15-member
icil was 13 in favor, with
[United States against and
iin abstaining.
casting the veto, U.S.
ssador Vernon Walters
that the resolution is un-
ited and does not address
legitimate security con-
of Israel.
^e British ambassador, Sir
:>in Tickell, who is also this
tth's president of the
Irity Council, said that the
lution is "one-sided" and
therefore his government
led to abstain.
Arab-sponsored move
on the Security Council
to deplore strongly "the
repeated Israeli attacks
against ..Lebanese territory
and all other measures and
practices against the civilian
population.'
This is the fourth time in a
month that the Security Coun-
cil has met to take action
against Israel. The earlier ses-
sions were devoted to com-
plaints against Israeli
measures to quell unrest in the
West Bank and Gaza Strip.
Benjamin Netanyahu,
Israel's ambassador to the
United Nations, charged that
the Security Council is "being
abused" by being repeatedly
convened to condemn Israel
"to a point of irrelevance."
Netanyahu delivered an impas-
sioned defense of Israel's ac-
tions against terrorist bases in
Lebanon.
The Jan. 2 air raids included
strikes on bases of Al Fatah,
the terrorist wing of the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion; the Popular Front for the
Liberation of Palestine-
General Command, headed by
Ahmed Jabril; and Hezbollah
(Party of God), the pro-Iranian
Shiite fundamentalist group.
Reports from Lebanon after
the raids put casualties at 32
dead and many more injured.
The Lebanese government
lodged a formal complaint with
the Security Council on Jan. 7.
The United States then sought
to persuade Lebanon to
withdraw its request for a
Security Council meeting in
connection with its complaint.
Continued on Page 6-A
Benjamin Netanyahu
refugee camps in Gaza were
unable to go to their jobs in
Israel, leaving farms and fac-
tories in the southern region
seriously understaffed.
Residents of towns not under
curfew did show up for work,
unhindered by rock-throwing
youths who had turned manv
back in recent days.
But young Palestinian ac
tivists were apparently
responsible for the total strike
in East Jerusalem. Israeli
authorities, trying to persuade
merchants and shopkeepers to
open for business, were con-
fronted by a wall of solidarity
and fear.
A well-known money-
changer on Saladin Street,
East Jerusalem's main
thoroughfare, had his shop
burned down Sunday night for
breaking the strike. The
message was clear to others
who might have considered
business as usual.
Authorities are considering
issuing emergency regulations
against the merchants if they
do not open their shops. The
Jerusalem police have given
them 48 hours to consider the
matter, Davar reported
Monday.
The strike was a response to
the violent confrontation bet-
ween police and Palestinian
demonstrators on the Temple
Mount last Friday, the Moslem
sabbath.
The police action stirred
Arab passions in both Israel
and the territories. Leaders of
Continued on Page 14-A
Begun Finally Free
By
>REW SILOW CARROLL
EW YORK (JTA) -
f Begun, a Soviet Jewish
fist and Hebrew teacher
Inted permission to
.rate in September, after
pears of harassment by
et authorities, arrived in
el early Tuesday morning.
e 55-year-old electrical
fieer and former prisoner
Ion left Moscow on Monday
] his wife, Inna; son, Boris;
T wife, Anya; and their
ren, the Student Struggle
oviet Jewry and the Long
Island Council on Soviet Jewry
reported. Neither group was
certain whether Anya's
mother was accompanying the
family.
Begun arrived in Tel Aviv
after a stop in Bucharest.
The news from Moscow br-
ings to an end weeks of uncer-
tainty about Begun's inten-
tions. After receiving permis-
sion to emigrate, Begun con-
founded OVIR emigration of-
ficials as well as Soviet Jewry
activists by not leaving im-
Continued on Page 16-A
Territorial Rift Further
Tears At Unity
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) The fundamental political and ideological dif-
ferences that divide the Labor Party and Likud emerged at Sunday's Cabinet
meeting to fracture the appearance of solidarity the two coalition partners have
managed to maintain during five weeks of violent disturbances in the ad-
ministered territories.
According to leaks to the news media, angry exchanges erupted over the text
of a Cabinet communique expressing the government's support for the measures
taken by the security forces to enforce law and order in the territories.
Premier Yitzhak Shamir of Likud proposed the standard statement, such as
those published in past weeks denoting Cabinet approval of the military's ac-
tions. Foreign Minister Shimon Peres of Labor insisted on a reference to the
need for a negotiated political solution to the Palestinian problem.
The statement finally read by the Cabinet secretary to the news media
asserted, among other things, that the Cabinet "expressed its esteem and sup-
port for the actions by the security forces and Israeli police, notwithstanding its
internal disputes on topics related to the political process."
Continued on Page 16-A


D
Pfg 2-A The Jcwiah noridian/Friday, January 22, 1988
Budget
il and Dismay
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
$29.9 billion national budget,
approved by the Cabinet, has
been sent to the Knesset
Finance Committee, from
which it is expected to emerge,
after long and probably un-
dramatic deliberations, more
or less intact.
The Cabinet handed Finance
Minister Moshe Nissim an im-
portant personal and political
victory when it voted 18-2 to
endorse his budget package
after more than five weeks of
behind-the-scenes wrangling
among the ministers. There
were two abstentions and one
minister demonstratively
refused to participate in the
vote.
The budget, though $5
billion over the 1987 level, calls
for cutbacks in government ex-
penditures of $463 million, on-
ly about $8 million short of the
reductions originally proposed
by Nissim on Nov. 30.
The finance minister, a
member of Likud's Liberal
Party faction, told reporters
afterward that he hoped the
economic unity demonstrated
by his Cabinet colleagues
would outlast the Labor-Likud
coalition government, whose
term will expire after the
general elections in
November.
The two negative votes were
cast by Education Minister
Yitzhak Navon and Health
Minister Shoshana Arbeli-
Almoslino, both of Labor.
They objected strenuously to
Nissim's cuts in subsidies for
health and education. The
health budget will be reduced
Restitution Ordered In
Kosher Fraud Case
By
ANDREW SILOW CARROLL
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Illinois attorney general's of-
fice forwarded $100,000 to the
Union of Orthodox Jewish
Congregations, the first in-
stallment of a $236,000
restitution to be paid by a
Chicago poultry processor and
distributor accused of falsely
labeling products kosher.
The restitution, along with a
$14,000 civil penalty for
violating Illinois consumer
protection laws, is part of a
judgment late last month by
the Cook County Circuit Court
against Shelat Kosher Foods
Inc. and United Poultry Inc.;
the companies' president,
Sheldon Terman; and their
secretary, Michael Terman.
Both men were ordered
removed from the businesses.
. The defendants were
I ordered to pay the remainder
I of the restitution in three addi-
i tional yearly payments. The
judgment did not preclude ad-
| ditional suits that may be
j brought against the companies
| by dealers or consumers who
purchased the falsely labeled
! poultry.
I
i

Phone: (305) 373-4605
Published weekly every Friday
since 1927 by The Jewish Flori-
dian. Office and Plant 120 N.E.
6th St.. Miami. Fla. 33132. Phone
(305) 3734605.
Second-Class Postage paid in
Miami. Fla. USPS 275320.
Postmaster Form 3570 return to
Jewish Floridlan, P.O. Box
012073, Miami. Fla. 33101.
The Jewish Floridlan does not
guarantee the Kaahruth of the
merchandise advertised In its
columns.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: In ad-
vance (Local Area) One Year
$9 50 (Anniversary Special). Out
ot town, country, upon request.
By Mall SI.45 per copy.
According to Dave Curry, a
spokesman for Attorney
General Neil Hartigan, Shelat
was ordered dissolved as a
business, while United may
continue to do business, pro-
viding the kosher food it
handles is stored separately
and shipped in sealed
containers.
The court also ruled that
Sheldon Terman be prohibited
from ever again engaging in
the processing or distributing
of kosjier foods in Illinois,
while Michael Terman may not
be allowed to serve in a super-
visory capacity in a kosher
food business in Illinois, Curry
said.
The court dismissed a
similar suit against Aspen
Foods, a company with ties to
Shelat and United, citing lack
of evidence.
The attorney general filed
suit against the companies
Nov. 4 following complaints by
the OU that kosher "shieldsr'
were being applied in a facility
other than the one supervised
by rabbinical authorities.
According to Curry, the
restitution money will be used
by the OU to help alleviate pro-
blems caused by the violations
and to "help preserve the in-
tegrity of the process" of certi-
fying kosher foods.
by $40.6 million from last year
and the education budget by
$6.25 million.
But Navon said after the
Cabinet meeting that the past
weeks of negotiations narrow-
ed the gap between his
ministry's demands and the
Treasury's position. He said
there was therefore no cause
for him to resign, as he had
threatened at one point when
negotiations were at a
stalemate.
Navon said last month he
would quit if the budget ended
free high school education in
Israel. Apparently he won on
that point. But a major con-
troversial element in Nissim's
package remains the
postponement for two years of
free pre-kindergarten for
children aged three to four.
The Health Ministry, despite
its protests, will have to live
with a substantial rise in
hospital fees. They will be
passed on by the government
to the health insurance funds,
and from them to the public.
But Nissim withdrew an
earlier proposal to charge for
each visit to a doctor. Visits to
doctors are free to members of
Histadrut's health care agen-
cy, Kupat Holim, to which the
majority of Israelis belong.
Both Navon and Arbeli-
Almoslino expressed hope that
some of the cuts in their
ministry budgets will be
restored by the Knesset
Finance Committee. But a key
figure on the committee,
Likud-Liberal Ariel Weinstein,
vowed that he and his Likud
colleagues would block any at-
tempts by Labor members to
tack on additional funds for
health and education.
Another feature of the
budget is abolition of the 52
percent surtax on income tax,
which some Labori tes see as a
benefit for the rich. Nissim
fought hard for it on grounds
that it would pump more
money into investment. The
top personal income tax rate
now stands at a universal 48
percent and there are long
term plans to lower it.
There will be sizeable cuts in
government subsidies for
transportation, which spell a
hefty increase in bus fares
beginning next April.
The two abstainers in the
Cabinet vote were Laborites
Aryeh Nehamkin, the minister
of agriculture, and Yaacov
Tsur, minister of immigration
and absorption. Both are
dissatisfied with cuts in the
agriculture budget.
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developed this relatively
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El Al Skies Friendly
To Messianic Jews
Friday, January 22, 1968/The Jewish Floridimn Page 3-A
By
IRILYN S. LIEBERSTEIN
'Come Celebrate Israel's
th Birthday," announces the
lorful travel brochure bear-
__ the distinctive El Al logo
th its Israeli flag. "Shavuot
Israel, History in the
ing."
Lnd, in smaller print: "A
lay Messianic Jewish tour
>turing a three-day Shavuot
ference of Messianic Jews
| Jerusalem. Be part of the
rest gathering of Jewish
Jievers in Jerusalem since
Book of Acts."
the face of it, El Al Israel
rlines, the national carrier
the Jewish state, appears to
lending its name and
primacy to a tour sponsored
a group of messianic
sionaries.
fit's a glossy brochure,"
David Gotfib, executive
rector of the Jewish
surce Center of Overlook
|rk, Pa., a counter-
sionary agency. "It makes
look very official. My ma-
Iconcern is that El Al is in
[ertently lending its name
these groups, whose
late aim is the destruction
lour Jewish heritage and
fish people."
response, representatives
11 Al emphasized that the
ne is a commercial, not a
ious entity, and that it
mot and will not
Criminate against any
rious group that wants to
, Israel.
El Al is a commercial
ie owned by the govern-
of Israel," said Aviva
El Al's public relations
tor in New York. "We're
isiness to make money. If
oup coming in wants to fly
\k\ whatever their
ious beliefs we take
ri explained that the El Al
lure started as a tour shell
\r a basic El Al brochure
each touring group can
to advertise its own
kific itinerary. El Al
Hbutes tour shells to every
Pel group the airline
es.
lo El Al representative
out and looks for these
ps," Lavi said of the mes-
cs, but, she added, "it's
Cl Al district managers'
accept these groups."
don't turn down
less," she
wn line
added. "Our
is to make a
fchal Guttmann, the El Al
lional manager in
lungton, who accepted the
less of the messianic
sponsoring the Shavuot
said the group approach-
~ airline.
hey wanted us to go to
I. and they asked us to
I them the tour shells in
to promote their tour,"
tplained. "What can I tell
V! As a company, we can-
discriminate against
>ody. We must not
iminate unless it's a
ity risk.
isically," she continued,
[in the Jewish community
to relate to (the mes-
) like to a Moslem group
ICatholic group or a Bud-
group or I don't know
We may have problems
with this kind of cult, but that
doesn't mean we can
discriminate."
But doesn't El Al appear to
be lending its name and
legitimacy to messianic
missionaries?
"I never thought about it,"
Guttmann said."But if you're
talking about the public rela-
tions aspect of it,
discriminating against a group
because of religious belief is
also a public relations problem.
It's more than a public rela-
tions problem."
Joseph Shoval, director of
the Mid-Atlantic States Israel
Government Tourist Office,
acknowledged the sensitivity
surrounding the issue of, as he
put it, "Jews who are Chris-
tians or Christians who are
Jews."
"It's a special case with mes-
sianic Jews," Shoval said in an
interview from his
Washington office. "The fact
that they play with names
creates a lot of confusion.
He said that although "peo-
ple might think (the messianic
tour brochure) has the blessing
of the Israeli government, the
Israeli government is not sup-
portive of messianic Jews. We
are not and we won't be."
The real point, he said, is
that Israel is doing its utmost
to guarantee free access to ho-
ly places for the different
denominations.
If El Al denies its tour shells
to the messianics, Shoval add-
ed, "it's not that they won't
come to Israel. They will come
to Israel anyway. They might
fly Pan Am or TWA. We will
not be off the hook by preten-
ding they don't exist. It's a
kind of 'Catch-22.' "
Gotlib of the resource
center, who pointed out the
brochure, reported that it is
being circulated around the
country by various messianic
groups: Messianic Visions in
ethesda, Md., the Messianic
Jewish Movement Interna-
tional in Kensington, Md., and
Petach Tikvah in Rochester,
N.Y.
Although it is not clear
which messianic group is coor-
dinating the tour, Gotlib said,
the Shavuot brochure is almost
an exact copy of a brochure
put out in 1986 by a messianic
magazine Progressive Visions.
The messianics, Gotlib said,
"use any means at their
disposal, any institution, to
lend respect to their cause
as they are doing in this case
with El Al."
"It's necessary for all of us
including El Al to make a
distinction between sincere
and honest Christians .. and
those people whose only in-
terest is a delegitimization of
Judaism."
Gotlib's concerns are shared
by Dr. Philip Abramowitz,
head of the Task Force on Mis-
sionaries and Cults of the
Jewish Community Relations
Council of Greater New York,
and Michael Miller, the
JCRC's executive director.
The task force has just
created a subcommittee of na-
tional Jewish leaders to ex-
amine this issue during the
next few weeks, Abramowitz
said in an interview.
"Basically, these (messianic)
organizations, in our estima-
tion, are making a mockery
out of Judaism," Abramowitz
said. "They're neither Chris-
tian nor Jewish. And they're
very divisive and destructive.
We must protect Jews in Israel
and the United States against
the onslaught of groups we
perceive to be deceptive."
Said Miller, "The Israeli
government has to make a
firm decision on how it wants
to handle its relationship with
fundamental Hebrew-
Christian groups in America."
"There is a lot left open to
question when messianic
groups advertise with
Co.ti.ued ob Pa**. 14-A
Find out how good
we really are
in the US.
TWA
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St. Louis
Kansas City-
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Portland
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Las Vegas
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San Francisco
Pat Chiamtti, Flight Attendant
TWA is one of the most convenient ways to fly all over the US. You can
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YouTI also save money on TWA. We have affordable fares to everywhere
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So call your travel agent or Today's TWA at 371-7471
KOSHER MEALS ARE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST
TODAY'S TWA. FIND OUT HOW GOOD WE REALLY ARE.


Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 22, 1988
Viewpoint
Signs of Resolution
The suggestion by Israel Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres that his nation move to early
elections in the wake of the ongoing crisis in
the administered territories is welcome news.
It shows that Peres is disregarding the polls
which indicate a national closing of the ranks
relative to the Palestinian uprising in Gaza and
in the West Bank (Judea and Samaria). Peres
further has reinstated the use of the term
West Bank, another indication that he is mov-
ing towards the peace table irrespective of
politial considerations.
On the other hand, Prime Minister Yitzhak
Shamir also has been forthcoming in his an-
nounced support of autonomy for the Palesti-
nians. Clearly, Israel has been losing the pro-
paganda war, and the coverage of democratic
elections in the Jewish state could be a big
plus.
Shamir and Peres both deserve the credit for
this week's announcement by Moscow that an
Israeli team of diplomats will visit the Soviet
Union for the first time since the USSR broke
off relations with Jerusalem after the 1967
war.
Delaying the Isreli elections until November
can only give the PLO and others fomenting
the violence in the territories the opportunity
to maintain an unfortunate and undeserved
edge in the public relations battle for world
support.
GMJF A Weil-Earned Salute
All South Florida joins in saluting the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation on the 50th
anniversary of its founding, and on the concur-
rent half-century observance of the Federa-
tion's annual Combined Jewish Appeal.
From an initial campaign overseas needs in the neighborhood of
$100,000, Federation has surpassed the $20
million mark in annual proceeds for the CJA.
But the growth and progress of the central
fund-raising and planning agency of our com-
munity must be measuredin more than dollars.
The number and diversity of member and
beneficiary agencies in the Federation family
has multiplied again and again.
Founding President Stanley C. Myers has
noted that what we have done and will do for
Federation and the Combined Jewish Appeal
will determine in no small measure what
legacy we impart to our children and
grandchildren.
As the community spread from its 1938 con-
centration in close-in Miami and Miami Beach
to a suburban sprawl which reaches the expan-
ding limits of Kendall, South and North Dade
today, Federation has widened its services
and facilities to match the geographical moves.
Central to the steadily increasing importance
of Federation and the CJA has been the
development of the State of Israel and its at-
tendant challenges and problems.
The historic events of the Six-Day War in
1967 and the Yom Kippur War in 1973 rallied
the Jewish community together as never
before. Today, as the new crisis of the Palesti-
nian disturbances emerges, Federation is posi-
tioned to respond in a timely and effective
manner.
And the needs of a Greater Miami Jewish
population which still has a high concentration
of poor and aged demand that Federation
moves forward in both its planning and fund-
raising roles with little more than a pause to
mark this meaningful milestone.
vTTA
King's Covenant of Christian and Jew
By RABBI
MARC H. TANENBAUM
On Jan. 18, the entire
American nation observed the
birthday of the late Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr.
King's family did me the
high honor of inviting me to
address that observance in
Atlanta. I attached especial
importance to this event, par-
ticularly in light of the ugly
racist eruptions in New York
City and elsewhere in recent
days.
King was one of the greatest
moral prophets of our century.
Like the Hebrew prophet
Isaiah, he was an extraor-
dinary statesman. King made
towering and permanent con-
tributions to advancing civil
rights and social justice for
black people and for all
Americans.
The power of King's moral
magnetism rested on his con-
viction that justice was a
seamless web. Anti-Semitism
and anti-Catholic prejudice,
like racial bigotry, were
anathema to him.
In March 1968, King
declared to the nation: "We
cannot substitute one tyranny
for another, and for the black
man to be struggling for
justice and then turn around
and be anti-Semitic is not only
a very irrational course, but is
a very immoral course.
Wherever we have seen anti-
Semitism, we have condemned
it with all our might."
The nation justly honors
King because, unlike others,
he saw the civil rights revolu-
tion not as a cause for hatred
and prejudice, but as covenant
of white and black. Christian
and Jew, standing together for
decency and justice.
Rabbi Mare H. Tanenbaum u dinr
tar of international relations for tkt
A meriean Jewitk Committee
The PLO After the Storm
By JEFF RUBIN
After a year spent in virtual
obscurity, Palestinian Arabs,
the PLO with them, are back
at center stage. All but ig-
nored at an Arab League sum-
mit just two months ago,
Palestinian Arabs have forced
their way into the spotlight
through a series of violent
demonstrations on the West
Bank and Gaza.
In a recent interview with
the Washington Post, Arafat
praised "the continuous waves
of uprisings" by Palestinian
Arabs which, he said,
"definitely washed up" plans
to exclude the PLO from a pro-
posed international conference
on the West Bank.
Arafat was optimistic
enough to resuscitate the
15-year-old idea of creating a
Palestinian Arab
"government-in-exile." "If we
have a provisional govern-
ment, it will open some gaps in
this dogmatic American Ad-
ministration policy," Arafat
said. Declaring himself neutral
toward such a provisional
government, Arafat cautioned
that the Administration might
look favorably on such a plan.
One analyst suggested that
the creation of a government-
in-exile would enable the PLO
to separate its terrorist and
political functions. It would
also allow Arafat to undertake
a campaign to win worldwide
diplomatic recognition at i
time when elections in the
United States and Israel seem
to preclude new initiatives
from either quarter.
But the creation of a provi-
sional government might ex
acerbate existing tensions bet-
ween Arafat's Fatah faction
and more radical PLO group
who would see in this plan "the
Coatiaeed ob Page 13-A
True Measure of Glasnost
The eagerly-awaited departure of Josef
Begun and his family for Israel, and Andre
Sakharov's meeting with Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev are additional upbeat items in
measuring the impact of Glasnost on Soviet
Jewry.
How Gorbachev responds to the Sakharov
identification of some 200 dissidents is yet to
be determined.
And the long delay between announcement
of Begun's release and his actual arrival in the
Jewish state forges more uncertainty about
the USSR chairman's true intentions.
While the dramatic increase in emigration of
Soviet Jews in 1987 was most welcome, the
total still fell far short of the figures of just a
few years ago.
The chart for 1988 now is taking shape, and
upon the actual figures of those who are per-
mitted to depart will a true measure of
Glasnost be capable of analysis.
Fred K. Shochet
Editor and Publisher
Jewish Floridian
Norm* A. Orovltz
Managing Editor
Suzanne Shochet
Executive Editor
William T. Brewer
Director of Operations
Joan C. Teglas
Director of Advertising
'

',
Friday, January 22,1988
Volume 81
3SHEVAT5748
Number 4


Friday, January 22, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
[The Challenge of Gaza Making a Miracle?
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
As Israel answered with
[firepower the rocks and
Molotov cocktails heaved by
I Palestinians in the Gaza Strip,
I Israel's critics lashed out in the
media. Some of it is to be
I expected.
But some is harsh and some
[reflects a convienent forget-
fulness of Arab intransigence,
[terrorism and attempts to an-
nihilate Israel.
One logical explanation of
the riots and the unexpected
general strike by Israeli Arabs
the decision at the recent
irab summit meeting to con-
centrate on the Persian Gulf
situation while indicating little
jr no concern for the fight for
Palestinian self-determination.
Lacking traditional riot-
control equipment and obliged
to engage the Gaza rock-
throwers and tire-burners,
Israel counter-attacked with
puch force that gunfire left, as
f last week, 23 Palestinians
Jead and 158 wounded. Con-
inced that masked organizers
entered schools and forced
pupils against their will to riot,
ie Israelis provided soldiers
pith arrest warrants and
B' :-red the deportation of
[ewer than a dozen
Palestinians.
The true magnitude of the
Baza disturbances was at first
ot recognized. After all, those
uonitoring Israeli-Palestinian
Nations in the troubled, oc-
lpied area recorded an
foerage of 3,000 demonstra-
lons annually since Israel's
|982 move into Lebanon aimed
destroying PLO bases in
Bfugee camps.
But the Dec. 9 eruption had
be classified as not just
aother expression of discon-
Kit. A cautious Thomas
riedman, reporting for the
few York Times out of troubl-
Jerusalem, compared the
encounter to Bull Run,
lie historic 1861 Civil War
sh, described by Walt Whit-
as "One bitter, bitter
hour perhaps proud
America will never again know
such an hour."
Boston Globe Columnist
David Nyhan came out smok-
ing Dec. 14. He expressed
outrage over Israeli actions.
He saw oppression of Palesti-
nians and their living condi-
tions as "approaching" those
"of blacks in South Africa."
He lauded President Reagan
for "daring" to scold Israel.
He stated that no major white
politician dares criticize Israel.
He deplored U.S. grants for
Israel, contrasting them with
small U.S. financial aid for
Palestinians.
He offered the impression
that the American Israel
Public Affairs Committee is
the only lobby in Washington.
He attributed George
McGovern's defeat in his 1972
run for president to his call for
American even-handedness in1
the Middle East. Topping off"
his lamentations was his claim
that Israel had dictated policy
to the United States in the
Iran-contra venture.
Myopia seems to prevent
Nyhan from recalling that the
Arabs were awarded Gaza in
the United Nations Partition
Plan in 1947, but chose instead
to unleash the dogs of war
against Israel at birth.
He fails to realize that
American political leaders
have a grasp of history, have
beheld the struggle and
courage of the Israelis by visits
there; that they know AIPAC
is duly registered in
Washington as required by law
and has as much right to ad-
vance Israel's alliance with the
United States as Madison
Avenue public relations and
advertising firms with Arab oil
accounts have the right to-
champion Arab aspirations.
American political leaders
also know that as many, if not
more, Jews were driven out of
Arab lands where their
families had lived for centuries
than the 500,000 Arabs who
left their homes in what is now
Israel at the urging of Arab in-
vaders who opposed the Parti-
tion Plan.
The major reason for the
1972 defeat of McGovern was
his courage in criticizing
American policy in Veitnam.
Many Jews voted for him and
were bothered not at all by his
views on Israel. And surely,
Nyhan ought to know that Lt.
Col. Oliver North, a key actor
in the Iran-contra tragedy, is
now reported to have urged
Israel to take the rap for that
debacle.
Rebuttal to media people
now targeting Israel for con-
demnation seems necessary.
But far more important is the
challenge to obtain for Israel
the security and peace package
it has long sought in its
readiness to negotiate face-to-
face with responsible Arab
leaders.
The United States could be
the catalyst for that heroic
undertaking. Now that the
U.S.-Soviet summit is past, the
time is ripe for fresh efforts to
work for peace, justice and
secure national boundaries in
the Middle East. Miracles can
happen.
Robert E. Segal is a former newspaper
editor and director of the Jewish com-
munity councils of Cincinnati and
Boston.
Bible Belt is Jewish Safety Belt
By BEN GALLOB
A leading Reform rabbi who
fled to the United States short-
ly after the Nazis took over
Austria contends that the
Holocaust cannot happen in
this country.
America's "Bible Belt," he
contends, is a national "safety
belt' and "enduring
guarantee" of the fundamen-
tal rights and freedoms of all
Americans.
The argument was set forth
by Rabbi Joshua Haberman,
formerly senior rabbi of the
Washington Hebrew Con-
gregation and now a visiting
professor at Washington
Theological Union and presi-
dent of the Foundation for
Jewish Studies.
Haberman expressed the
conviction in an essay in
"Policy Review," a publication
of the Heritage Foundation, a
conservative think-tank in the
nation's capitol.
Haberman made it clear that
he was using the term "Bible
Belt" as a metaphor for his
belief, derived from wide
travels in the South, that
Americans generally possess
"biblically-grounded moral
standards and faith in God,
deeply rooted in and reinforc-
ed by all levels of activity."
This acts "as barriers against
the excess of governmental
power that can lead to
totalitarianism."
That commitment, he wrote,
goes back to the pilgrims, who,
he declared, "were steeped in
the Bible." The rabbi asserted
that, like the ancient Hebrews,
"the Pilgrims saw themselves
as in covenant with God, a
covenant spelled out in the
Bible."
That "veneration of the
Scriptures as supreme law,"
he argued, "was the germ of
all-important political
philosophy the very heart of
our democracy which
recognizes a 'government of
laws and not of men.' "
Contending that "the Bible
has been our foremost armory
in the struggle for political in-
dependence and human
rights," the rabbi said that this
religiously grounded outlook
animated the Founding
Fathers. He said they "could
not have mobilized a revolu-
tionary army if the people had
not come to believe that liberty
was their birthright and that it
was mandated by Holy Writ."
Haberman agreed that
Americans owe the birth of the
United States to George
Washington, "but it was
(President Abraham) Lincoln
who made the issue of human
rights co-equal with political
freedom." Lincoln's "idealism
and rhetoric are biblical
throughout," he added.
To suspend biblical morality
makes possible "all the
atrocities of Hitler, Stalin and
other totalitarian rulers." the
rabbi contended. He insisted
that "it is no accident that the
Soviet State and Hitler's Third
Reich both identified the Bible
and its teachers as primary
enemies."
Haberman said many critics
of the "Bible Belt" as "right-
wing fundamentalists" are
wrong to blast their "alleged
insensitivity to social justice."
Haberman stressed he was
aware of the liklihood that this
use of the term "Bible Belt" as
a kind of shorthand expression
that American democracy is
grounded in religious commit-
ment, might be considered
naive, considering the low
levels of education and rightist
beliefs of many
fundamentalists.
But he insisted that "far
greater than these differences
and objections is the common
moral and spiritual frame of
reference I share with Chris-
CoatiBMd OB Pag* 14-A
Prophetic Move to Old City for Ariel Sharon
By DAVID LANDAU
Four dozen policemen will be
iployed in round-the-clock
to guard Minister of In-
istry and Trade Ariel
ron's new apartment in the
foslem Quarter of the Old Ci-
here, according to Knesset
ember Haim Ramon of the
>r party.
[Ramon has asked the
lesset Finance Committee to
^consider its 1.7 million
kekel ($1.1 million) allocation
fr guarding the minister,
Dinting out that the force of
lards is about the same size
a police force in a small
^raeli town.
Sharon already has security
Jards, at an annual cost of
[bout 400,000 shekels
1250,000), at his ranch in the
fegev. His new home, a two-
>m apartment in an old
[uilding spanning Hagai
/alley) Street that the
minister and his wife Lily have
sn renovating over the past
frw weeks, will need stricter
curity.
In fact, the security force
,. v -
------ ,M
was used by Sharon to justify
his move. The minister said
that his guards would add to
the security of the few Jewish
residents in the Moslem
Quarter, encourage more Jews
to live there and protect people
using Hagai Street route to
reach the Western Wall.
Hagai was the scene of
several knife attacks against
Jews recently. Last year,
yeshiva student Eliyahu
Amedi was fatally stabbed
nearby.
Safeguarding the area is a
complex undertaking.
Although the nearby Lions
Gate along the east wall of the
Old City can provide vehicle
access to Hagai Street, a small
car can easily block the
flagstoned, three-yard-wide
Old City artery. Sharon's
guards will have to rely on foot
patrols along Hagai, one of the
few flat streets in the Old City,
and along the narrow-stepped
alleys leading to it.
Sharon is the first Israeli
political personality to live in
the crowded streets of the
Ariel Sharon
Moslem Quarter, although two
yeshivas have been established
there in recent years.
One of them, Shuvu Banin,
teaches newly observant Jews,
many of them former convicts.
The yeshiva has been noted for
its provocative and hostile
behavior toward its Moselm
neighbors.
The students at the second
yeshiva, Ateret Cohanim,
which specilizes in esoteric
studies concerning the priestly
rites in the yet-to-be-built third
Temple, coexist peacefully
with the local Arabs.
The Old City has been for-
mally divided into separate
quarters for different religious
groups for hundreds of years,
but there has always was some
blurring of the separation.
Moslems owned buildings in
the Jewish Quarter, and Jews
established homes in the
Moslem section.
Sharon's new home is in
such a building, and the
minister was at pains to point
out that his Chanukah house-
warming party was not a
religious dedication ceremony,
since that ceremony, Sharon
said, had been held a hundred
years ago by the first owner, a
Jew called Wittenberg.
The house has been held by
the Wittenberg Trust ever
since, with the proceeds from
the rent donated to charity.
Some of the local Moslems
joined demonstrations pro-
testing ir neighbor last
month a.- the violent unrest in
Gaza and the West Bar.a
spread to East Jerusalem.
Others acquiesced, murmuring
traditional words of Arab
hospitality.
Many of the local residents
rely on quiet in their quarter;
Hagai Street is lined with cof-
fee houses and souvenir stores
to catch the trade from Chris-
tian pilgrims walking the sta-
tions of the cross on the Via
Dolorosa that cuts Hagai at
right angles.
Sharon held his house- .
warming party on the first ?
night of Chanukah. Premier
Yitzhak Shamir was guest of
honor, but many invitees
demonstratively stayed away,
terming the apartment a
"provocation."
Notable among them was
Jerusalem Mayor Teddy
Kollek, who explained that
while he theoretically supports
the right of every Jew to settle
anywhere in the land of Israel,
Sharon's move would create
trouble in the city.
The mayor's words proved
to be prophetic.


Paf 6-A The Jewish FVndkn/Friday, January 22, 1988
,
Artukovic Dead in Yugoslavia
ANDREW SI LOW CARROLL
NEW YORK (JTA) An-
drija Artukovic, the former
Croatian interior minister con-
victed of murdering 700,000
Jews, Croats, Serbs and Gyp-
sies during World War II, died
Saturday in a prison hospital
in Zagreb, Yugoslavia.
Artukovic, 89, was deported
there from the United States
Yugoslavia Increases
Ties To Israel
By TAMAR LEVY
GENEVA (JTA) -
Yugoslavia must resume full
diplomatic relations with
Israel, contends the Yugoslav
ambassador to the United Na-
tions here, Marko Kosin.
"Yugoslavia recognizes the
fact that Israel should have a
right for her sovereignty,"
said Kosin in the first official
interview given by a high of-
ficial from his country to an
Israeli journalist.
"Israel is a main factor in
the Middle East and there can
be no solution to tbe problem
without Israeli consent and
participation. Therefore, we
have to improve our relations
with Israel."
He said Yugoslav public opi-
nion and most members of
Parliament favor re-
establishing relations with
Israel. The government,
however, is not unanimous on
the subject. "We had prior to
1967 full diplomatic relations
and therefore will re-establish
them as before," be said. The
relations were broken follow-
ing the Six-Day War.
Reports on Israel in the
Yugoslav press are favorable,
in contrast to the past, and the
Yugoslav press agency, Tan-
jug, placed a correspondent in
Israel last summer, he said.
Kosin said a new foreign
minister will be appointed at
the beginning of 1988, most
likely Budimir Loncar, who
will be less likely to protect
Arab interests than the cur-
rent minister, Rais Dizdarevic,
who is Moslem.
The envoy did not hide the
fact that his country would
?refer contact with leaders of
srael's leftist Mapam Party.
He also pointed out that
Yugoslavia had good economic
relations with Israel about
(35 million in combined trade a
year, a sum very important to
Yugoslavia and that
Yugoslavia is ready to increase
the economic ties.
His country also is in-
terested in tourism from
Israel; the national Yugoslav
airline, Jat, opened a line to
Israel earlier this month.
Kosin noted that many
Israelis of Yugoslav origin
kept in touch with their former
homeland. And he was op-
timistic about further cultural
exchanges.
U.S. Veto in UN Vote
Continued from Page 1-A
but to no avail, according to
diplomatic sources here.
Last Thursday, Lebanon re-
jected a compromise proposal
that called for a statement of
concern by the president of the
Security Council, instead of a
formal resolution.
The resolution would have
called on Israel to "cease all
acts of encroachment of land,
construction of roads and set-
ting up of fences that violate
the border, and any attempts
to occupy or change the status
of Lebanese territory or to im-
pede the return of the effective
authority of the government of
Lebanon in sovereign
Lebanese territory."
Netanyahu, in his speech to
the Security Council,
reiterated Israel's position
that it has no territorial claims
whatsoever on Lebanese ter-
ritory, respects the sovereign-
ty of Lebanon and wants it
restored to the Lebanese
government.
The Israeli envoy described
the Jan. 2 air attacks as part of
Israel's "ongoing measures for
self-defense."
He claimed that between
Sept. 16. and Jan. 2. there
were 17 armed terrorist at-
tacks on Israel: soil by the
PLO, Hezbollah and Syrian-
-.cd terrorist groups
"They use Lebanon's ter-
ritory as a base for terrorist at-
tacks against Israel,"
Netanyahu said, adding that
actions against their bases are
therefore legitimate self-
defense.
two years ago, after a 36-year
battle with U.S. and Yugoslav
authorities.
The Yugoslavian news agen-
cy Tanjug said Artukovic died
of "an illness," but did not
elaborate.
Artukovic was already in
frail health in 1986. when U.S.
marshalls spirited him from his
home in Seal Beach, Calif, to
stand trial in Yugoslavia for
war crimes that earned him
the nicknames "Butcher of the
Balkans" and "Himmler of
Croatia."
Heinrich Himmler headed
Germany's Gestapo and SS ex-
termination units during
World War II.
The Yugoslav court sentenc-
ed Artukovic to the firing
squad, but the sentence had
been postponed indefinitely
because of his poor health.
Artukovic was the first Nazi
war criminal to be extradited
from the United States follow-
ing the establishment of the
U.S. Justice Department's Of-
fice of Special Investigations
in 1979. As a high-ranking of-
ficial of the fascist Ustashi
regime, established as a Nazi
puppet state between 1941 tc
1945, Artukovic was responsi-
ble for the operation of the
concentration camps in
Croatia.
After the war, Artukovic
entered the United States
under an assumed name.
Yugoslav officials first re-
quested his extradition for
trial on 22 counts of murder in
1952, but it was not until 1986
that Artukovic, then an
established member of a Croa-
tian community south of Los
Angeles, used up the last of his
appeals, this time to Supreme
Court Justice William
Rehnquist.
The Yugoslavian court found
the elderly Artukovic guilty of
four specific charges, three of
which included mass murder.
Artukovic and his wife Ana-
Maria raised five children. Ac-
cording to Taniug, his body is
to be cremated and his ashes
disposed of secretly.
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Richard F. Schubert, right, president of the American Red Cross
recently insited Magen David Adorn in Israel for the express pur.
pose of further developing bilateral cooperation between the two
Societies. He is greeted by Prof Arieh Harell, president of Magen
David Adorn.
Netanyahu Dismisses
Arafat Pledge
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) A reported statement
by Palestine Liberation
Organization chief Yassir
Arafat, that he is willing to ac-
cept United Nations resolu-
tions recognizing Israel's right
to exist, was dismissed as
"doublespeak" by Israel's am-
bassador to the United
Nations.
Asked at a news conference
to comment on the report, Am-
bassador Benjamin Netanyahu
said he had not seen Arafat's
exact words. But the reports
he did see said the PLO leader
was prepared to accept all
resolutions on the Middle East
adopted by the United Na-
tions, but not Resolutions 242
and 338, which stipulate the
right of all countries in the
region to exist within secure
and recognized boundaries,
Netanyahu said.
Most U.N. resolutions on the
Middle East adopted over the
vears, in fact, "contradict"
Resolutions 242 and 338 and
call for the demise of the
Jewish state, the Israeli envoy
claimed.
He said Arafat is "talking
from both sides of his mouth."
Netanyahu also rejected out
of hand a proposal made by the
Soviet ambassador to the
United Nations, Aleksandr
Belonogov, at another news
conference here. Belonogov
said his country would support
sending U.N. troops to the
West Bank and Gaza Strip to
maintain peace there.
"It is not acceptable to us."
Netanyahu said. "The U.N.
does not intervene in internal
security matters. Would great
Britain agree that the UN.
would send troops to Northern
Ireland to supervise the peace
there?" the Israeli envoy
asked.
He insisted that Israel is ac-
ting in accordance with inter-
national law in the measures it
has been taking to restore
calm in the administered
territories.
Asked if Israel would con-
tinue to deport Palestinian
troublemakers, Netanyahu
replied. "That is a means we
will continue to resort to."
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Pope Silent on Italian Bias
Friday, January 22,1988/The Jemtk FloridJan Page 7-A
By RUTH E. GRUBER
RQBCR tfTA) The. chief
rabbi 6i Rdme.'Elio Toaff, has
I criticized Pope John Paul II for
[failing to speak out against
(anti-Semitism at a time when
[anti-Semitic threats, graffiti
[and, in a few cases, violence
[are spreading here and in
ather major Italian cities.
Toaff, whose remarks ap-
eared in the newspaper La
te-pubblica, also lashed out
gainst the Italian news media
pr their coverage of Israeli
oldiers battling Palestinian
loters in the West Bank and
kza Strip. He claimed it was
lased against Israel and
rgely responsible for inflam-
|g anti-Semitic passions in
ily in recent weeks.
[Toaff said he himself has
ceived hate mail. "We hoped
at the pope would have said
[word to restore peace and
Btice, but it didn't happen,"
chief rabbi said.
resurgence of anti-Jewish
itiment has alarmed the
Jewish community. Graffiti
has appeared in Rome, Milan
and Bologna with such slogans
as "Israelis kill Palestinians^'
Jews will pay" or ."Dirty Jew,
we kick you out/'
Five youths were arrested
for putting up posters here
reading "Zionist assassins free
Palestine." They admitted
membership in the neo-fascist
Italian Social Movements.
Earlier in the week, three
Jews trying to remove
swastikas spray-painted on the
entrance to their stores were
jostled by youngsters who spit
at them and shouted "filthy
assassins."
Police are now guarding
synagogues, Jewish schools
and the Israeli Embassy here
and have stepped up vigilance
at the borders to prevent the
entry of suspected anti-Israel
terrorist.
Toaff said the hate mail he
has received since the distur-
bances began in the Israeli-
occupied territories last month
"all have the same motif. They
Jewish Commando
Group Attacks Le Pen
By EDWIN EYTAN
>ARIS (JTA) A self-
oclaimed commando group
|Jewish youths raided the or-
here of a publication of the
treme right-wing National
font, smashing furniture,
iring out telephone lines and
stroying part of its archives.
The group, consisting of a
zen young people, left
lets signed "Jewish Corn-
Organization Section
condary Schools," and say-
it will not "tolerate the
^-Semitic propaganda of a
Hum like Jean Marie Le
It warned anti-Semites
f'tremble with fear."
le editor of the publication,
land Gaucher, said the
^up burst into the offices of
tional Hebdo, with faces
Bked by scarves and wear-
helmets. He said the raid
less than five minutes
that the group left long
>re the police arrived.
lational Hebdo is a relative-
ly obscure weekly supporting
Le Pen's bid for the French
presidency and generally close
to his extreme right-wing
political movement.
A communique issued Dec.
30 to Agence France Presse
said, "We shall not go into
details with a man who termed
the Holocaust a historic detail
and who dares deny the ex-
istence of the Shoah."
The communique warned
that the combat organization
will continue to prevent the
National Front and "all other
anti-Semitic organizations"
from carrying out their work
throughout the presidential
campaign. The elections are
due to be held in May.
Jewish organizations have
refused to comment on the in-
cident while studying the
facts, but Jewish leaders
privately say they oppose
violence in spite of their op-
position to Le Pen and all he
stands for.
say we (Jews) are CO-
responsible for what Israel is
doing to the Palestinians, and
for this they will kill us and
send us to extermination
camps."
According to Toaff, this
crude anti-Semitism is a direct
outcome of media coverage of
clashes in the administered
territories. He charged that
the news was presented in
"inappropriate, ideological,
preconceived language."
Specificially, he paid, "I saw
with my own eyes television
reports based day after day on
the same pictures, the most
bloody ones. However, I saw
no mention of deaths on the
Israeli side, not even that
30-year-old woman with a
four-year-old child, who died in
her car because of a Molotov
cocktail."
He was referring to an
Israeli woman from Alfei
Menashe in the West Bank
who was burned to death with
her child when the familiy car
was fire-bombed last spring.
Toaff said the news media
were using the same condem-
natory language against Israel
as they did at the time of the
September 1982 massacres in
the Sabra and Shatila refugee
camps in Beirut. "The situa-
tion, whether you like it or not,
is different," he said.
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Simcha Dinitz, left, newly elected chairman of the World Zionist
Executive, receives congratulations from NA'AMAT USA Na-
tional President Gloria Elbling, right, who as head of her
organization's delegation to the Slst World Zionist Congress,
backed his election. Elbling was also re-elected to the General
Council of the World Zionist Organization.
"I am not a Jew with a
persecution complex," Toaff
said, "but reports like this kin-
dle the flame of anti-Semitism,
which here, like anywhere, is
smoldering under the ashes."
He added, "This time I hope
reason prevails before there
occurs another tragedy,
another death."
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Pfe 8-A Bg Jewish Flondian/Friday, January 22, 1968
KSL Jews
Questions and Quagmire
By ANDREW SILO W
CARROLL
NEW YORK, (JTA) As
violence in the Gaza Strip and
West Bank continues to pit
Israeli soldiers against Palesti-
nian youths, American Jews
are examining their relation-
ship to Israel to an extent
perhaps not seen since the
Lebanon War.
Quietly and with some
discomfort, American Jews
are heard asking:
Is it a duty to defend Israel's
actions when it is "set upon"
by the news media? Is it fair
for Diaspora Jews to criticize
Israel? Must all criticism of
Israel be kept "in the family"
and not shared with the non-
Jewish majority? And will im-
ages of unrest erode support
for Israel, or even lead to anti-
Semitism?
"The concern is comparable
to what it was during the
Lebanon war and the Pollard
(spy) affair," remarked Martin
Raff el, director of the Israel
Task Force of the National
Jewish Community Relations
Advisory Council. He said he
based his evaluation on the
dozens of calls he has received
from local community rela-
tions councils.
He said "the primary com-
plaint beyond the events
themselves, the loss of life is
with media coverage, which
many feel has been excessively
Canada Harbors Palestinian Terrorist
By MICHAEL SOLOMON
MONTREAL (JTA) -
The Canadian government
faces potentially embarrassing
questions in Parliament this
week on why a convicted
Palestinian terrorist, whose
background allegedly was
known to the authorities,
managed to enter Canada on
an immigrant visa a year ago
and was given permanent resi-
dent status.
According to a report Mon-
day in the Toronto Globe and
Mail, Mahmoud Muhammad
Issa Muhammad, 46, received
the visa from the Canadian
Consulate in Madrid in
January 1987 and now lives
with his wife and three
children in Brantford, Ontario.
Issa Muhammad was con-
victed in Greece for the 1968
bombing of an Israeli airliner
at Athens airport, in which one
man was killed. In 1970, a
Greek court sentenced him to
17 years and five months in
prison for manslaughter, ar-
son, illegal possession of
firearms and explosives, and
obstructing air navigation.
But he was released a year
later in a hostage exchange
and deported to Lebanon. The
Globe and Mail said it has
documents which show that
the Canadian Security In-
telligence Service's screening
system failed to identify Issa
Muhammad as a member of
the terrorist Popular Front for
the Liberation of Palestine
when he applied for his visa in
Madrid.
By the time his identity was
confirmed, he was aboard a
plane bound for Canada.
Although immigration officials
in Canada were alerted by the
Canadian Embassy in Madrid
to intercept him when he land-
ed in Toronto, Issa Muham-
mad managed to slip through,
The Globe and Mail said.
According to the documents
the newspaper says it has in its
gossession, government of-
cials fear that if Issa Muham-
mad is deported to an "un-
friendly country," particularly
Israel, "Palestinian terrorists
may be tempted to take Cana-
dian hostages abroad."
If he is deported to an Arab
country, the Israelis might try
to seize or assassinate him, the
documents say.
No Early Vatican Recognition
By HENRIETTA BOAS
AMSTERDAM (JTA) -
Vatican recognition of the
State of Israel cannot be ex-
pected soon, according to Car-
dinal Johannes Willebrands,
president of the Vatican's
Commission for Religious
Relations with the Jews.
Miami'
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The Dutch-born Willebrands
conveyed that message to
Dutch Catholic bishops visiting
Rome last week, according to
reports reaching here.
Willebrands had been asked
about the prospects of
Catholic-Jewish dialogue. He
replied that a sharp distinction
must be made between
religious and political dialogue.
A religious dialogue must
take priority. But a political
dialogue is not to be expected
soon, nor is Vatican recogni-
tion of Israel, the cardinal said.
He added that by no means do
all Jews in the world identify
with the State of Israel.
Cornell
Goes Kosher
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Unlike most Ivy League
schools with large Jewish
populations. Cornell Universi-
ty is not near a city with a
substantial Jewish community.
In fact, Cornell's 3.000
students comprise the bulk of
the Jewish community of
Ithaca, N.Y.
The school traditionally has
been at a disadvantage in
recruiting students to observe
kashrut. In addition to having
no kosher butchers or
restaurants within a 40-mile
radius, its only kosher dining
plan, operated by the National
Council of Young Israel, can
feed only a few dozen
students.
Alumni are trying to change
this with a $600,000 campaign
to build a 300-seat kosher din
ing facility as well as renovate
the Young Israel House, a
21-room facility.
harsh."
"I also think there's some
real frustration at speaking
out," he said. Because the
situations in Gaza and the
West Bank "are ugly, and the
Israelis themselves have said
that not all situations have
been handled with utmost
restraint," how to interpret
the unrest publicly is "difficult
and complex."
A case in point is Los
Angeles, where, according to
Steven Windmueller, there are
"certain frustrations" among
some Jewish leaders with
Israeli policy in the ad-
ministered territories. But
because so much of the local
coverage of the unrest is
negative Windmueller calls
the Los Angles Times'
coverage "very harsh" most
leaders have agreed not to air
those frustrations.
Windmueller, executive
director of the Community
Relations Committee of the
Jewish Federation Council in
Los Angeles, said that among
the city's Jewish leaders, "the
theme is that Israel is in a dif-
ficult situation and that
(negative) public and private
comments are not helpful."
Steven Cohen, professor of
sociology at Queens College in
New York, said that when
Israel is involved in an un-
popular conflict and seems to
be under attack by the press,
the short-term reaction by
American Jews is to close
ranks behind Israel.
The long-term, however, is
"the sharing of the doubts
towards Israeli policy as they
have been expressed by
others," he said.
Those doubts, said Cohen,
will center on the viability of
Israel's presence in the ad-
ministered territories. "'I think
for the first time, American
Jews are able to peer inside
the occupation and see how
dangerous it is for Israel," he
said.
Neither Cohen nor Raffel
sees the unrest leading to an
anti-Semitic or strongly anti-
Israel backlash in the United
States.
The causes of the unrest are
too complex for others to place
blame on Israel alone, accor-
ding to Richard Straus, editor
of the Middle East Policy
Survey.
"There are too many forces
at work here." said Straus,
referring to the role of other
Arab nations, and the Palesti-
nians themselves, in creating
the stalemate in the ad-
ministered areas. As a result,
the Reagan Administration,
the State Department and, in
turn, the general public, are
allowing Israel "a lot of rope"
in terms of handling the riots
as it sees fit.
He indicated that the inter-
national pressure on Israel will
ease. ''Unless things
automatically escalate, the
issue will begin to fade away "
said Straus.
Nevertheless, communal
leaders feel statements by
U.S. officials have been unduly
critical, which when combined
with television images of
Israel as omipying power
could erode the emotional and
financial support American
Jews provide to Israel.
Cohen traces that anxiety tn
the Lebanon war, which he
said was the first Arab-Israeli
conflict that did not generate
an increase in donations to the
United Jewish Appeal.
Cohen, who has conducted
demographic studies of
American Jewry, said there is
"some evidence" that the
popularity of Israeli actions af
fects giving, although recent
shortfalls also can be traced a
lack of identifiable Israeli
heroes of the stature of Golda
Meir or Moshe Dayan.
Since the war in Lebanon in
1982, American Jews have had
to learn to live with the real,
imperfect Israel, as opposed to
the mythic one of Meir and
Dayan, according to Leonard
Fein, visiting scholar at
Reform Judaism's Religious
Action Center in Washington
DC.
Fein, the former editor of
Moment magazine, said
American Jews still love the
"metaphysical" Israel, but
distinguish between that and
their feelings for the Israeli
government of the day. "I
don't have to praise Shamir or
Peres ... to say I love Israel,"
said Fein.
When he delivered that
message to American Jews in
the wake of the Lebanon war,
Fein recalled, the words he
often heard were, "Thank
you so much for saying out
loud the things I've been
feeling.'
".. The left said, 'Thank you
for saying I could love Israel
even though I think its actions
are reprehensible.' The right
said. 'Thank you for saving
Israel's actions were reprehen-
sible even though I still love
her.' "
OwSionp>y Thw cwg**


Shultz Denies Request To
Close JDL Offices
Friday, January 22, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
micHi
TM
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Rep. Nick Rahall II (D., W.V.)
has asked Secretary of State
George Shultz to consider clos-
ing the offices of the Jewish
Defense League, but Shultz
has rejected the idea, an aide
to Rahall said.
Rahall's request followed the
State Department's Sept. 15
decision to close the Palestine
Liberation Organization's
Washington office on the basis
that it is a terrorist
organization.
Jerry Burkot, Rahall's press
secretary, said that in a Nov.
20 letter to Shultz, Rahall
noted JDL terrorist activity,
saying three JDL members
pleaded guilty Aug. 13 to ter-
rorist bombings and were later
sentenced.
The three are Victor Van-
cier, Jay Cohen and Murray
Young. Vancier said he had
been the JDL's national chair-
man until November 1986,
while Cohen and Young were
JDL board members.
They admitted responsibility
for at least five other bomb-
ings over the last three years
and a scam to divert to JDL
money raised ostensibly on
behalf of New York Gov. Mario
Cuomo.
Rahall told Shultz that if the
State Department is concern-
ed about terrorist organiza-
tions on U.S. soil, it should try
to close the JDL's U.S. offices,
Burkot said.
Shultz's response, received
Jan. 6. stated that the State
Department was powerless to
close the JDL offices because,
unlike the PLO, JDL is not a
foreign mission that can be
closed under the Foreign Mis-
sions Act.
But the aide said Rahall is
considering introducing
legislation when Congress
reconvenes Jan. 25 that would
close the JDL offices.
Irv Rubin, JDL national
chairman since August 1985,
argued against closing the of-
fice as well as the charges in
Rahall's letter. He said that
the three men were not JDL
members.
Rubin asserted that the
three were members of a New
York organization called
Jewish Direct Action, which
had no ties to the JDL.
Barry Greenspan, who runs
the JDL's Los Angeles office
along with Rubin, said that
Vancier was "thrown out" of
the JDL in 1982 and Vancier
"was using our name
illegally."
Greenspan noted that Rahall
is a member of the American
Arab Anti-Discrimination
Committee's National Ad-
visory Committee, which he
said is "pro-PLO."
Meanwhile, three left-wing
Jewish organizations have
signed on to a "friend-of-the-
court" brief defending the
PLO's right to operate its
Washington office.
The three Jewish organiza-
tions among the 56 signatories
are New Jewish Agenda, the
International Jewish Peace
Union and Washington Area
Jews for an Israeli-Palestinian
Peace.
1967 Oavid S. Boxerman and Mark Saunters. All rights reserved.
"We did it, we did it--we hit three bagels!"
Wiesel Leads Laureates to Auschwitz
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Elie
Wiesel, the Nobel Peace Prize
winner and Holocaust
chronicler, paid a memorial
visit to Auschwitz on Sunday,
before returning here Monday
to open an international con-
ference of Nobel laureates,
who will discuss the future of
humanity at the turn of the
21st century.
Before leaving for Poland,
Wiesel, himself a former in-
mate at the Nazi death camp,
where his father and most of
his family perished, said the
visit was necessary "to
meditate, to say a silent
prayer, to close our eyes and
pledge to do better."
Several of the 75 Nobel
laureates expected to attend
the Paris meeting were
scheduled to accompany him
on his visit to Poland.
The Paris Nobel conference
was convened at Wiesel's in-
itiative by French President
Francois Mitterrand to study
"The 21st Century: Its
Threats and Promises. It will
be attended by close to 80
Nobel laureates, including 30
from the United States.
In spite of the heavy Jewish
participation in the meeting,
amounting to more than half of
the participants, it is
nonetheless feared that a com-
munique critical to Israel
might be issued after the final
session.
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This Is Southern Bell!


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Frid^y, January 22, 1988
Hate-Crimes Laws Needed
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
A study of crimes triggered by
prejudice tallied 3.000 such in-
cidents in the United States
between 1980 and 1986.
The study, released at a
news conference here by an
Atlanta-based public policy
group, the Center for
Democratic Renewal, is based
largely on unofficial sources.
since i Ij three states
Virginia, Maryland ;nd Penn-
sylvania keep statistics on
hate cri explaired Rabbi
A. James Rudin, director of in-
:erreligious affairs for the
\merican Jewish Committee.
Rudin said Congress needs
o approve a bill sponsored by
lep. John Conyers (D., Mich.)
j.nd Sen. Howard Metzenbaum
( )., Ohio) that woulc for the
f.rst time require the Justice
Department to compile
statistics on crimes motivated
b> bigotry.
"It's like tracking a
disease," he said, mentioning
that the profile of the person
vho commits hate crimes is
still unclear, except for the
'youth factor." He mentioned
that no one know;; whether the
crimes occur BOPn often in ur-
ban than in rural ireas, or at a
certain time of y^ar.
He also called for "education
campaigns" targeted at
youths, and stricUr penalties,
should official statistics find
that the crimes do not occur
"randomly."
Rudin participated in the
news conference along with
Leonard Zeskind, research
director for the Center for
Democratic Renewal; Dr. Ke-
nyon Burke, associate general
secretary for church and socie-
ty of the National Council of
Churches; and Cedrick Hen-
dricks, a congressional aide
representing Conyers.
While the report did not
categorize the 3.000 incidents
into compartments such as
"anti-Semitic." it said that
"people of color, as well as
Jews, remain the single
largest target of organized
hate violence."
It also found that the 1980s
have been marked by "cross-
fertilizations of the (Ku Klux)
Klan with neo-Nazi group-
ings," making anti-Semitism
"increasingly significant."
"Jew-hating has always been
a part of nativist and racist
movements in this country,"
the report noted.
Rudin said that such crime
"is not a regional issue as
some might have thought some
years ago it is a national
issue." He noted that anti-
Semitic or anti-black acts are
not indigenous to any one part
of the country.
He said the most important
message of the study, which is
titled "They Don't All Wear
Sheets," is that "words do
kill" even if those who utter
the words don't carry out the
acts.
Woman Can't Choose Chief Rabbi
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVTV (JTA) -
Mayor Shlomo Lehat and the
Tel Aviv City Council have
been ordered by Israel's
Supreme Court to show cause
why a woman should not be
allowed to sit on the local com-
mittee that will nominate the
city's next Ashkenazic chief
rabbi.
Lehat had originally favored
a woman on the committee,
but reversed himself under
pressure from Likud party
headquarters and Orthodox
leaders. The high court issued
its injunction at the request of
the Center Movement, a new
moderate political party that
Lehat founded before re
joining his original party.
Likud.
His vote was crucial in
preventing the election of a
woman to the nominating com-
mittee. The committee cannot
act until there is a final ruling
by the*Supreme Court.
The rabbinical authorities
refuse even to consider a
woman participating in the
election of chief rabbis,
however indirectly, even
though the nominating com-
mittee has no religious or rab-
binical functions.
Chief Rabbi Lau of Netanya,
who is considered somewhat
liberal, is the favored can-
didate for the Tel Aviv post.
He said he would not accept it
if there was a woman on the
committee that nominated
him.
i
Zaire Gets Hospital
With Israeli Help
KINSHASA A brass band was playing and the choir sang
African hymns in French as Zaire's Minister of Health cut a
bright yellow ribbon to formally dedicate this capital city's
newest hospital a unique joint project of an American Jewish
women s group, a Christian church and the governments of the
United States. Israel and Zaire.
With the arrival of a team of highly skilled and experienced
medical volunteers from Israel, the 180-bed facility in Kin>
S5fe* iS?1* of Kinshasa, has opened its outpatient clinics
to the 150,000 local residents it will serve when it is fully opera-
tional later this year.
The new hospital was established by Hadassah, the Women's
Zionist Organization of America.
Letters Forum
The Ftoridimm welcomes ripid letters to the editor.
include tow address aad daytisse pfcoste hrr for
verification Letters suit be edited, condensed and/or cor-
rected las rranimatieal errors. Address all letters to The
Jewish FTortdssa, PO Box 01-2*73. Miami. FL SS101.
A group of 80 Jewish volunteers, all members
ofB'nai B'rith and Hadassah in the U.S. ar-
rive in Israel for a three month stay, to help
out in hospitals and army bases throughout
the country. The program is run by the Aliya
and Absorption Department at the Jewish
Agency.
Peres' Testimony Restricted
In Vanunu Trial
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres took the stand in
Jerusalem district court as the
final witness in the trial of
alleged nuclear spy Mordechai
Vanunu.
The trial is being held behind
closed doors and no part of
Peres' testimony was released.
He was reported to have spent
an hour on the witness stand
and to have told the court that
Vanunu had done great harm
to the country's security.
Vanunu's attorney, Avigdor
Feldman, told reporters later
that he was severely restricted
in his direct examination of the
foreign minister, because
several lines of questioning
were banned for security
reasons. He charged this was
an obstruction of justice.
Premier Yitzhak Shamir had
listed five areas related to the
trail on which Peres could not
be questioned by either the
defense or prosecution. These
areas were specified in order
to avoid embarrassing Peres
Deportation Hearings Halted
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Deportation proceedings
against four Gaza residents
temporarily halted Sunday,
when a Supreme Court judge
issued an order preventing the
Palestinians' expulsion.
Justice Shlomo Levin issued
the interim injunction, pen-
ding the outcome of their
appeal.
The four have petitioned the
court to overturn their depor-
tation orders, arguing that
there is no basis to the charges
that they have links with Al
Fatah, the terrorist arm of the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
HIAS Will
Weather Cuts
NEW YORK (JTA) The
anticipated shortfall in U.S.
State Department funds to
private U.S. refugee organiza-
tions this year will not serious-
ly affect HIAS, the interna-
tional Jewish resettlement
organization.
"If we are going to be af-
fected, it will be later in the
year." said Karl Zukerman,
executive vice president of
HIAS, the Hebrew Immigrant
Aid Society. "But if there is
not a change, there will not be
enough money for the govern-
ment to bring in all the people
it would like to bring in."
The shortfall is due to the
unanticipated increases in the
flow of refugees from East to
West, including Jews and
...Anowjqos ton>,the'.-wt
l nion.
tion, and with the Islamic
Jihad movement.
The four are among nine
Palestinians ordered deported
from the administered ter-
ritories on Jan. 3.
Last week, Israel deported
four West Bank Palestinians
to Lebanon. Those four waived
their right to appeal to the
Supreme Court, noting that
the high court had rarely over-
turned deportation orders.
Deportation orders have not
yet been implemented against
a fifth Palestinian from the
West Bank.
should he have to decline to
answer questions or volunteer
information that might en-
danger the security of the
state.
The foreign minister was
summoned as a witness by the
defense, because of his long
association with Israeli scien-
tific and technological work in
the defense field,. Peres began
his career in the defense
establishment, later serving as
defense minister and has
always supported the introduc-
tion and use of new
technology.
Vanunu, a former technician
at the Dimona nuclear facility,
is accused of espionage and
treason, because of informa-
tion he gave the Sunday Times
of London about Israel s alleg-
ed nuclear weapons capability.
According to some reports,
an American expert who
testified for the defense main-
tained that Vanunu's revela-
tions contained nothing that
was not freely available in pro-
fessional journals.
The trial, which began last
year, is now in its final stages.
The defense and prosecution
are expected to deliver their
summations this week.
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Friday, January 22, 1988/The Jewish Floridim Page 11-A
In one of the few positive aspects ofglasnost
for Russian Jews, unofficial educators in dis-
tant Baku received government permission to
conduct classes publicly. In a photo obtained
by the Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry,
teachers point to one of their announcements
on "year-long courses of Hebrew," with infor-
mation, phone numbers, address of the classes
and tram directions.
Questionable Federal Funds
Go To French Yeshivas
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Ozar Hatorah, a New York-
based Jewish educational
organization, will receive $8
million in U.S. federal funds to
build yeshivas in and around
Paris primarily for, the
organization says, Jewish
refugees.
The expenditure, opposed by
the State Department, was
sponsored as an amendment to
the $600 billion 1988 spending
authorization bill by Sen.
Daniel Inouye (D-Hawaii),
chairman of the Senate Sub-
committee for Foreign Opera-
tions and a noted ally of Israel.
Like other federal agencies,
the State Department tradi-
tionally resists "earmark-
ing." whereby members of
(ongress allot money to a
specific project even though
the affected government agen-
cy has not requested that
designation.
The department's Bureau of
Refugee Programs, referring
to the Inouye amendment, said
that "particularly during a
time of low-budget resources,
earmarking can have a
dangerously negative and
possibly discriminatory impact
on the U.S. ability to maintain
a balanced response to the
humanitarian needs of
refugees."
State Department
spokeswoman Phyllis Oakley
said that "we opposed this par-
ticular earmark, among
others, in a letter" in mid-
December to House-Senate
negotiators considering the In-
ouye amendment. An aide to
Inouye declined to comment
and the senator was
unavailable for comment.
Ozar Hatorah board
members, including New York
real estate developer Zev
Wolfson and Rabbi Berel
Wines, principal of the
Orangetown-Monsey Hebrew
School in Suffern, N.Y., said it
was they who brought their
cause to Inouye's attention.
Because of his subcommittee
chairmanship, "he's the most
obvious person to contact," ex-
plained Wolfson.
Wines said in a telephone in-
terview that he spoke with In-
ouye twice in the last few mon-
ths. He said Inouye "did his
own research" on Ozar
Hatorah over the last year.
Wolfson said in an interview
that he contributed $1,000 to
Inouye's 1985 primary cam-
paign, but asserted "he was
100 percent sure" that Inouye
knew nothing about it when
reaching his decision. He said
Inouye is the "greatest friend"
Jews have in Congress and
said he found it "insulting"
that the allocation was being
criticized.
Wines said it is not unusual
for U.S. taxpayers money to
be spent on French schools,
since the beneficiaries primari-
ly are refugees. He emphasiz-
ed that the U.S. government
provides aid to refugees in
various countries.
However, the Associated
Press, reported that although
the bill states that the reci-
pients, French Sephardic Jews
in Paris, are refugees, many of
them have lived in France for a
decade or more and are well-
off. The report also noted that
the French government and
the United Nations High Com-
mission for Refugees do not
consider the Sephardic Jews to
be refugees.
The money will not be used
entirely for refugees, the
organization officials noted.
But Wolfson said that the
"predominant majority" of
French Jews in Ozar
Hatorah's yeshivas are im-
poverished refugees.
Ozar Hatorah's yeshivas
educate 10,000 students
overall, 3,000 of whom attend
its 13 schools in France.
Rabbi Heshy Augenbaum,
executive director of Ozar
Hatorah, said that while Ozar
Hatorah generally builds
yeshivas for refugees in poor,
unsettled areas, its purpose in
France is simply to build them
in "pockets where the Jewish
population is substantial."
Augenbaum said the
yeshivas were necessary
because of France's "limited
Jewish infrastructure," and
said intermarriage among
Jews in some areas of France
exceeds 70 percent.
But the Inouye amendment
came under fire in a
Washington Post column by
Rowland Evans and Robert
Novak, who have often taken
stands critical of Israel in the
past. They cited an unfulfilled
$23 million request that
Secretary of State George
Shultz made to Congress a few
months ago that would
upgrade the "quality of life" of
Palestinians on the West Bank
ind the Gaza Strip.
Labor Chair Quits
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Labor Party was thrown into
consternation by the surprise
resignation of its secretary
general, Uzi Baram, at the
start of an election year.
Baram, a member of
Knesset, said he was leaving
his party post for "personal
reasons without first con-
sulting Labor Party chairman
Shimon Peres, the foreign
minister. Baram explained
that he did not want "to pro-
voke pressures on me to
relent/'
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Pagg 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 22, 1988
n News jm
Koilll4lll|*
Israeli Inflation Hits Record Low
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel's inflation rate for 1987
was 16.1 percent, the lowest figure in 15 years, the Central
Bureau of Statistics reported. The figures were released
after the bureau reported that the cost-of-living index rose
1.3 percent in December.
Beginning this month, the Central Bureau of Statistics
will be using a new "representational basket" as the basis
of its price comparisons. The new method takes into con-
sideration such items as the purchase of video cassette
recorders and the purchase and rental of video cassettes.
Jewish Adult School to Open in
Frankfurt
A Jewish school for adult educatioin will soon be opened
in Frankfurt. The city will thus become the second West
Germany after Berlin to establish such a school. The in-
stitution will focus its instructional efforts on topics rang-
ing from the Jewish religion to the history of the Jews and
their cultural development. The school will devote its ef-
forts to educating non-Jews as well in order to deepen their
understanding of Jewish life.
Italians Demonstrate for Palestinians
ROME (JTA) Some 5,000 people marched through
the streets of Rome on Saturday in a demonstration in sup-
port of Palestinians in the Gaza Strip and West Bank.
The march was organized by student groups and left-
wing political parties. Similar demonstrations were plann-
ed for Milan on Monday, for Genoa on Tuesday and within
the next few days in such other Italian cities as Venice,
Perugia, Bari and Cagliari.
In Rome, the protesters, many of them wearing the Arab
kaffiyeh scarf, carried a banner reading, "Is our civilization
founded on the massacre and oppression of peoples? Free
Palestine."
French Honoree
PARIS Former French Chief Rabbi Jacob Kaplan. 93.
has been promoted to the highest rank in the French
Legion of Honor, the grand cross. The award, generally
reserved for former French presidents, ambassadors, com-
manders in chief and thinkers and writers, has less than
100 living recipients. In addition, Jean Paul Elkan, presi-
dent of the Central Jewish Consistory, has been promoted
to the rank of legion commander, the third highest. At-
torney Daniel Jacoby. head of the International Federation
for the Rights of Man, has been awarded a knighthood in
the legion.
Schindler Named Milender Fellow
WALTHAM Rabbi Alexander M. Schindler, president
of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, has been
named the Milender Fellow in Jewish Communal Leader-
ship by Brandeis University's Benjamin S. Hornstein Pro-
gram in Jewish Communal Service.
The program, entering its 14th year, brings outstanding
leaders of the North American Jewish community to
Brandeis to meet with graduate students and alumni of the
Hornstein program for a three-day seminar to be held Feb.
28-March. 1.
Greek Leader Calls For Israeli
Recognition
By JEAN COHEN
ATHENS (JTA) The leader of Greece's largest op-
position party called on the government Monday to extend
full diplomatic recognition to Israel immediately, or cer-
tainly before Greece assumes the rotating presidency of the
European Economic Community on Jury 1.
Konstantinos Mitsotakis. head of the New Democratic
Party, said if the government fails to do this, his party
would recognize Israel the moment it comes to power.
Europeans Wait on Israel Vote
STRASBOURG (JTA) -
Israel won a tactical victory on
a technicality Monday, when
the Parliament of Europe
decided to postpone its vote on
ratification of a series of new
economic and financial
agreements Israel signed with
the 12-nation European
Community.
Israeli diplomats have been
lobbying furiously to defer the
vote to a more auspicious time.
They feared the tough
measures taken by Israeli
I

security forces to quell the re-
cent rioting in the West Bank
and Gaza Strip would adverse-
ly affect the outcome.
A failure to ratify the
agreements, normally a
routine procedure, would be a
serious blow to Israel's
prestige throughout Western
Europe. But while Israel won a
respite on that matter, the
Knesset delegation attending
the current session of the
Parliament faced tough ques-
tions on Israel's actions in the
administered territories
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Europe Moves Against
Peace
Friday, January 22, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 18-A
(JTA) Western European
nations, having criticized
Israeli handling of Palestinian
riots in the administered ter-
ritories and Israeli deportation
orders against nine Palesti-
nians, seem to be considering
renewed involvement in settl-
ing the Arab-Israeli conflict.
Foreign Minister Hans-
Dietrich Genscher of West
Germany will visit Syria this
month and possibly Israel as
well. West German diplomats
Bay Genscher will explore
whether and how the Euro-
pean Community could ad-
vance peace prospects. The
EC has urged the convening of
an international Mideast peace
conference.
The heads of the 12 EC na-
tions are expected to issue a
statement on the Middle East
at their special February
meeting in Brussels. West
Germany this month assumed
the rotating chairmanship of
the EC's political institutions.
Delegations of Arab am-
bassadors have met with vir-
tually every European govern-
ment over the past weeks to
demand strong condemnation
of the deportations and the
handling of the unrest.
And European criticism of
Israel mounted last week. In
The Hague, Israeli Am-
bassador Zeev Suffoth was
summoned by Dutch Foreign
Minister Hans van den Broek.
Vand den Broek expressed
his government's "extreme
concern" about the deporta-
Israeli Buried as Christian
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
A former mayor of Beersheba,
Israel was buried in a Chris-
tian cemetery in Falls Church,
Va., culminating a legal strug-
gle over whether he was Chris-
tian or Jewish when he died.
The body of Haviv Schieber,
74, who left Israel for the
I United States in 1958, had
been sitting in an Arlington,
Va., hospital since his death
Dec. 31, while a Baptist
I minister and a Lubavitch rabbi
[argued in Arlington Circuit
Court over Schieber's religious
status.
On Monday, Judge Benjamin
Kendrick ruled that "there is
no question (Schieber) was
born a Jew but became a
Christian."
According to the book "The
Campaign to Discredit Israel"
by the American Israel Public
Affairs Committee, Schieber
founded the one-man Holy
Land State Committee in
1968, which advocated a
democratic, secular,
demilitarized state for Jews,
After the Storm
Continued from Page 4-A
revolution going soft," accor-
iing to one observer. The
reunification of Fatah with
'LO splinter groups at the
'alestine National Congress
*NC) meeting last April has
Survived, thanks to the strong
pupport of the Soviet Union.
4ow Arafat's leadership is be-
ag challenged from within the
?rritories themselves.
The recent disturbances in
le West Bank and Gaza have
lemonstrated the PLO's
Operational irrelevances to
lome Palestinian Arabs.
Israeli Defense Minister Yit-
lak Rabin recently explained
lat while PLO operatives
ttlayed a role in fanning the
lames of protest, much of the
inrest ignited spontaneously.
Nevertheless, PLO officials
Claimed responsibility from
far, unwilling to concede
fteir lack of control over the
Vest Bank Arabs. Earlier this
[ear, Walid Khailidi, a Palesti-
nian observer at the PNC
leeting said that in 1982
srael succeeded in severing
ie ties between the PLO
-aders, then based in
ebanon, and their supposed
onstituency in the territories,
toreover, aging PLO leaders
1 fallen out of touch with the
lew generation of Palestinian
krabs born since Israel cap-
ired the West Bank Arabs
'ith Abu Nidal, whose
ithlessness is attractive to
any young Palestinian
trabs, according to Arab and
IS. sources. He must also
intend with continued Syrian
jpport for PLO splinter
sups such as Ahmed Jibril's
[opular Front for the Libera-
fon of Palestine-General Com-
*nd, the sponsor of the
November hang-glider assault,
ind Jordan, in an attempt to
?sert its influence in the ter-
"ories, recently announced
tot it would provide financial
' stance to families which
lost members during the re-
cent riots.
Israel, too, has attempted to
restrict Arafat's influence
through the expulsion of PLO
operatives and air raids
against terrorist bases in
Lebanon. The U.S. Congress
sent Arafat a message by pass-
ing legislation closing the
organization's offices in
Washington and its observer
mission to the UN.
Although the President sign-
ed this measure into law, the
administration has declared
that the law usurps the Presi-
dent's right to direct foreign
policy and may violate the UN
headquarters agreement. But
the Washington Times
reported that a classified UN
legal memo states that the
United States has the power
under headquarters agree-
ment to close the PLO's UN
office.
Nevertheless, Arafat's
resilience is well-known; the
PLO still has bases and offices
and financial assets
around the world.
Jeff Rubin is assistant editor
of Near East Report, from
which this article is reprinted.
Moslems and Christians in the
Holy Land.
The minister, the Rev. Dale
Crowley Jr., had testified that
Schieber fully converted to
Christianity, and noted that he
had taken care of Schieber for
more than two years.
Schieber's son, Daniel Reveh
of Israel, had filed an affidavit
claiming his father wanted a
Jewish funeral. Reveh was
represented by Rabbi Shmuel
Kaplan of the Rockville, Md.,
Chabad House, who argued
that Reveh as next of kin
should decide how to bury
Schieber.
Father and son had not seen
each other for 25 years.
In an interview, Kaplan said
the trial was replete with
"hearsay as to what (Schieber)
may have thought."
Kaplan's attorney, Donald
Chaiken, had contended that
the deceased was Jewish
because "once a Jew, always a
Jew," according to press
reports.
Kendrick reportedly
responded that "Jewish law
has about as much standing in
this court as Chinese law.'
Testifying on Crowley's
behalf, noted Jewish anti-
Zionist Alfred Lilienthal said a
Jew can change religions. In
an interview, Lilienthal said
Schieber had requested a
funeral "that would lead him
to Jesus" when he last saw
Schieber alive Dec. 27.
Lilienthal also testified that
the argument of "once a Jew,
always a Jew" is racist. He
told the court that Adolf Hitler
was the "ultimate racist" in
calling for the extermination
of anyone born from a Jewish
mother regardless of that per-
son's religious convictions.
One of Kaplan's Chabad col-
leagues, Rabbi Bentzion
Geisinsky, said that Reveh
would not appeal the decision.
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CALL FOR BROCHURE A RESERVATIONS
TlTiKl
tion orders issued against nine
Palestinians and about Israel's
action in the territories in
general. He also urged Israel
to enter into an international
Mideast conference.
The French Socialist Party
also appealed to Israel to drop
the deportations and
"condemned the brutal op-
pression against
demonstrators." The party,
led by President Francois Mit-
terrand, is France's friendliest
toward Israel.
The party's executive com-
mittee noted that the deporta-
tions are "contrary to interna-
tional law" and warned that
transgression of the Geneva
Conventions may adversely af-
fect Israel's image in France
and Western Europe.
A fellow traveler, German
Social Democrat Party leader
and parliamentarian Hans-
Juergen Wischnewski, also
recently protested to Israeli
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres over the use of live am-
munition by Israeli security
forces during demonstrations
by Palestinians.
The highly publicized protest
by Wischnewski, who heads
the Middle East Committee of
the Socialist International,
was seen as a direct affront to
a "brother party" in Israel.
A French investigatory com-
mission also criticized Israel's
riot control. Three French at-
torneys, headed by Jean-Louis
Weil, a Jew, said that during
their recent tour of the ter-
ritories they saw dead and
wounded hit by large-caliber
bullets.
The commission, which is
linked to various left-wing
movements, claimed that
many of those arrested "were
severely beaten" before they
were takne to court.
A British Foreign Office of-
ficial, David Mellor, had said
during a tour of the Gaza Strip
that conditions were "appall-
ing" and "an affront to civiliz-
ed values."
Israel's ambassador to
Belgium and the EC, Avi
Primor, reacted on Belgian
radio with a message of
understanding.
He said it was "normal" that
Mellor was "shocked by what
he saw in the refugee camps of
the Gaza Strip" during his
first trip to Israel.
But he added that Israel has
"built new cities and new hous-
ing" in Gaza, ... but this
move has been opposed for
political reasons, by the Arab
countries."
He noted that the British
supported the PLO-backed UN
Security Council resolution.
"The British should make a
decision: Do they want us to do
something to improve the life
conditions of these refugees,
or do they condemn us for do-
ing this?'r
In Rome, the Vatican's new-
ly invested Latin rite patriarch
of Jerusalem, Monsignor
Michel Sabbah, a Palestinian,
said that he could not foresee a
speedy end to the tension in
the Middle East.
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ftgt 14-A The Jewish Florkfiaa/Friday, January 22, 1968
Violence Waning
Continued from Page 1-A
Israel's Arab community plan-
ned to gather at Shefaram
Monday to protest what they
called the "desecration of the
Moslem shrines."
They referred to police in-
tervention when a group of
youths emerged from the Al
Aksa mosque after prayers,
shouting religious and na-
tionalist slogans. They burned
Israeli and American flags and
displayed the Palestinian flag,
which is forbidden by Israeli
law.
The police fired tear gas at
the demonstrators. At one
point, a border policeman,
Ofer Spitzer, was dragged in-
side the mosque by youths who
snatched his weapon and beat
him. Police entered the mos-
que to rescue Spitzer, who was
hospitalized for a broken jaw
and other injuries.
Several other policemen
were hurt in the melee. The
demonstrators were said to
number about 500.
Between 50 to 70 people
were reported treated at
hospitals for injuries inflicted
by police clubs and tear gas.
Two press photographers
were beaten by police. Eight
demonstrators were arrested.
Police Minister Haim
Barlev, who briefed the
Cabinet on the incident Sun-
day, was criticized by some
fellow ministers for the alleged
failure of police spokespersons
to correct news media reports
of the clash.
The ministers stressed that
while the police were careful
not to enter Islamic holy sites,
media reports gave the op-
posite impression.
A Cabinet statement issued
late Sunday declared that "the
Israel Defense Force and
Israel police do not as a rule
enter mosques. Such was the
case this past Friday, and will
be the practice in the future as
well. No act was carried out
which could be construed as
being offensive to the sanctity
of the mosques."
The statement called media
reports that tear gas was fired
into mosques "totally unfound-
ed." According to the Cabinet,
El Al
CwtUMd frMB Page S-A
recognized symbols for their
Purposes of missionizine
ews." *
The JCRC executive said he
hoped the Israeli government
would cease encouraging the
messianic groups to come to
Israel.
"They may come anyway,"
he said, "but does the Israeli
government have to be their
travel agent?
Bible Belt
Continued from Page 5-A
tians, including
fundamentalists."
Reiterating that the Bible
"gave our nation its moral vi-
sion," he declared that
"America's Bible Belt is our
safety belt, the enduring
guarantee of our fundamental
rights and freedoms."
tear gas was used against
rioters outside the houses of
worship.
(A report in Monday editions
of The New Yvrk Times,
however, claimed that "televi-
sion footage of the clashes
clearly shows the police throw-
ing tear gas canisters in the
door of the mosque and one be-
ing thrown back out.")
The act of dragging a
policeman into the mosque
"was intolerable behavior, of-
fensive to the very character
of the holy places," the
Cabinet statement also said.
It added, "The policeman
defended himself and saved his
life. The persons responsible
for this severe offense will be
brought to trial."
Premier Yitzhak Shamir
visited Spitzer in the hospital
Monday and called him "a real
hero."
Members of the Peace Now
movement demonstrated out-
side the Prime Minister's Of-
fice Sunday. They planned a
series of activities this week to
protest the situation in the ad-
ministered territories.
In other incidents over the
weekend, stones were thrown
Sunday at the car of Police
Chief Superintendent Yigal
Golan, deputy commander ot
police in the Gaza Strip. Tw0
of the stone-throwers were ar
rested. No one was hurt.
At the Jabalya refugee camn
in the northern Gaza Strip
meanwhile, Israeli officials
found 40 residents of the came
inside a United Nations Relief
and Works Agency (UNRWA)
truck that had been allowed to
distribute food and supplies to
the residents during the
curfew.
Senior UN officials in Israel
are investigating.
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Friday, January 22, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
Nazi-Past Forces German Celebrity Resignation
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN tators and observers are
listing any number of reasons
for the downfall of Werner
Hoefer, for 35 years one of
West Germany's best-known
television journalists, who
resigned Dec. 22 because of
new revelations about his Nazi
past.
The question was raised
because Hoefer's journalistic
endeavors for the Nazis were
exposed many times over the
years and it was no secret that
he was a Nazi party member
from 1933, when Hitler came
to power, through the end of
World War II in 1945.
Hoefer, 74, quit two weeks
after the latest expose of his
past appeared in the mass-
circulation weekly Der Spiegel.
He lost the confidence of the
41-member board of the
Cologne-based WDR television
station, which broadcast his
popular Internationale?
Fruehschoppen (International
Eye-Openers) interview show
at noon every Sunday since
1952.
The press and public are ask-
ing, why now? According to
leading commentators, the
decisive factors were the re-
Convictions Questionable For Suspected Nazis
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) Pro-
ceedings have begun against
4.000 suspected war criminals
as a result of information ob-
tained from the recently open-
ed United Nations war crimes
archives in New York, the Of-
fice for the Prosecution of Nazi
War Criminals in Lud-
wigsburg announced.
But it is unlikely at this late
date that more than a few of
the suspects will be brought to
trial and, if so, convicted. A
spokesperson for the Lud-
wigsburg office told reporters
that the UN files came much
too late for effective investiga-
tions and proceedings that
could result in convictions.
The files, compiled by the
Allied War Crimes Commis-
sion after World War II, con-
tain dossiers on more than
40,000 suspected war
criminals. They were placed in
custody of the UN in 1947 and
remained sealed to all but the
governments of UN member
German Cites Gas Chamber Efficiency
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) A West
German official who cited the
killing of Jews in gas chambers
as an example of improperly
applied efficiency was cen-
sured by the Ministry of
Defense. The outraged Jewish
community wants him fired.
Heinz Galinski, chairman of
the Jewish community in West
Berlin, called on Defense
Minister Manfred Woerner to
immediately dismiss Dr.
Rainer Reinhart, who is vice
president of the Munich-based
Bavarian Regional Civilian Ad-
ministration of the armed
forces, known as Wehrberich
6.
A ministry spokesman said
that the matter is under study,
but did not indicate whether
further action is contemplated.
Rabbis to Study Divorce Law
NEW YORK-(JTA)-Ten
Conservative rabbis are enroll-
ed in a training course to write
gittim, the plural of get,
legal Jewish divorce papers
which must be prepared in-
dividually to meet strict
halachic standards.
The program, conducted by
the Rabbinical Assembly of
American and the Jewish
Theological Seminary of
America, was formed to meet
the shortage of Jewish divorce
experts, the organizations
said.
The class teaches the
historical codes covering
divorce law, the form of a get,
proper spelling of Hebrew
names, rules concerning
witnesses, divorce in the State
of Israel, codes and commen-
taries in the Talmud and com-
prehension of civil divorce law.
The 10 rabbis, who are
scheduled to conclude about
150 hours of study in August
1988, will be qualified to work
alongside the current aging
ten Conservative gittim
writers and fill a gap in the
Midwest created by a death.
Rabbi Gerald Zelizer of
Metuchen, N.J., secretary of
the Rabbinical Assembly and
program conductor, also noted
a void in smaller communities
and regions in the Southwest.
Reform Jews also will be in-
vited to utilize the gittim
writers.
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Earlier, a ministry official call-
ed Reinhart's example
"deplorable."
In a publication used by of-
ficials of his administration as
well as by troops, Reinhart
hailed the principle of efficien-
cy, but said it was not always
proper to apply. As an exam-
ple, he said that while it was
more economical to exter-
minate Jews by gas than to kill
them individually, it certainly
was not the right thing to do.
Reinhart's article appeared
in an official publication of his
administration called
Unterichtsblaetter.
A spokesman for the
Defense Ministry admitted
that the ministry and the army
ordered thousands of copies of
the leaflet, but said their cir-
culation has been stopped.
states. They were opened last
month after a year-long cam-
paign by Israel to make the
files available to scholars,
historians, researchers, jour-
nalists and other members of
the public.
The Ludwigsburg
spokesperson said the United
Nations "told us for years that
they could not release the files
for legal or political reasons
and that has made our job
much more difficult and cer-
tainly contributed to certain
disappointments.''
Nevertheless, after receiv-
ing the files, the Ludwigsburg
office added ten experienced
prosecutors to its staff and
opened proceedings.
Most of the files refer to per-
sons who are either deceased,
missing or already convicted.
Of the 4,000 who were traced,
most are aged and may be too
sick to be put on trial, the
spokesperson said.
Moreover, witnesses are
either dead or too old and ill to
stand the emotional and
physical hardships of giving
testimony. Under the cir-
cumstances, it would be ex-
tremely difficult, if not im-
possible, to obtain convictions,
the spokesperson said.
cent changes in consciousness
about tiie Nazi era and Der
Spiegel's focus on the Hoefer
story.
The magazine piece dealt
with Hoefer's writings in the
Berlin Nazi daily 12 Uhr Blatt
in 1943, and specifically his
praise of the execution by the
Nazis of a Jewish pianist,
Karlrobert Kreiten.
Hoefer has claimed
repeatedly in the past that the
most offensive parts of the ar-
ticle were written by someone
else and inserted by Nazi
zealots.
But Der Spiegel, published in
Hamburg, quoted from other
articles written by Hoefer to
show his comments on the
Kreiten case were not atypical.
The magazine also interviewed
experts who questioned
Hoefer's claim that his article
was rewritten.
Paradoxically, Hoefer's
politics, like Der Spiegel, have
been left-liberal for years. The
show he moderated was a
forum on controversial issues
for foreign journalists, in-
cluding a number of Israelis, of
all political hues. Hoefer fre-
quently came under attack
from the right wing.
He was also vigorously at-
tacked in the past by the
Vienna-based Nazi-hunter
Simon Wiesenthal. But a
leading French-Jewish
political scientist, Alfred
Grosser, has been among his
most ardent defenders.
The WDR board gave
Hoefer until March 21 to
"clarify" the charges contain-
ed in the Der Spiegel story.
But Hoefer, who will be 75
that month, chose instead to
resign. Some observers believe
his resignation is what WDR
had in mind and used the latest
expose to force the issue.
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Pf 16-A The Jewish FToridJan/Friday, January 22, 1988
Increased Territorial Rift
Continued from Page 1-A
According to sources quoted
by the news media, Peres told
Shamir, "There is a yawning
gulf between us You can-
not draft Cabinet statements
as though the government was
your private property .
What is happening today in the
West Bank and Gaza is under-
mining our international
standing."
Peres reportedly infuriated
Likud ministers by stating
flatly that from now on, he in-
tends to refer publicly to the
administered territories as the
"West Bank and Gaza Strip,"
instead of "Judea, Samaria
and the Gaza district" which
has been the standard form us-
ed by Israeli officials at home
and abroad.
Judea and Samaria are the
biblical names of the southern
and northern regions, respec-
tively, of the West Bank. Their
usage has strong political and
emotional connotations
because of the implication that
they are an integral part of
modern Israel as they were of
the ancient Israelite kingdoms.
Josef Begun Emigrates
!
Continued from Page 1-A
mediately. Among the reasons
for his reluctance were that
Anya had not yet received per-
mission, his declaration that
the Soviet Jewish community
would be without a leader and
his intention to pursue a
slander suit against a Soviet
television commentator who
Begun alleges called him an
"Israeli spy."
Begun first applied for an
exit visa to Israel in April
1971. In the next 16 years, he
was arrested and sentenced to
exile in Siberia three times for
teaching Hebrew and Jewish
culture, most recently in 1983.
He had served four years of
that 12-year sentence when he
was released from a labor
camp in February of last year.
Following his release, Begun
continued to agitate on behalf
of Soviet Jews who have not
requested permission to
emigrate but are dedicated to
Jewish life within the Soviet
Union.
Soviet Jewish groups
welcomed the news of Begun's
departure, even as they voiced
concern for those still wishing
to leave the Soviet Union.
A statement by the SSSJ
said that Begun's departure
"comes tragically not at a time
of loosening restriction on
Soviet Jewish emigration, but
further tightening of the
noose."
The statement referred to a
year-old Soviet regulation that
allows only those Jews with
"first-degree" relatives in
Israel to apply for emigration.
That regulation, the statement
said, "denies emigration ap-
JNF Campaigns
Over 1,500 schools, resource
centers, Jewish community
centers and boards of Jewish
education throughout the
country are participating in
the Jewish National Fund
Education Department's com-
prehensive educational pro-
gram, "The Land and its
Blessings."
This annual Tu bi-Shevat
program has been developed
to cover the entire spectrum of
the Jewish formal school set-
ting, from nursery to high
school. Some units of the pro-
gram are produced in Hebrew
for day schools, yeshivot and
intensive Hebrew classes of
the supplementary schools.
In a related story, the
Jewish National Fund of
America has commenced a $10
million national campaign to
meet Israel's increased fire-
fighting needs.
plications to
Soviet Jews."
90 percent of
The National Conference on
Soviet Jewry said in a state-
ment that it was "delighted"
at Begun's departure, but call-
ed on the Soviets "to allow the
tens of thousands of Jews who
have indicated a similar desire
to exercise their basic human
right of freedom of
emigration."
This is the view held by Likud
and other right-wing and
religious factions.
But foreign governments
and the international news
media refer to the territory as
the West Bank. Peres, in a lec-
ture Sunday night at the
Hebrew University's Truman
Institute, said hereafter he will
conform with that
nomenclature. He spoke at a
seminar examining the effects
of 20 years of Israeli rule over
the administered territories.
He stressed to the audience
the basic differences between
Labor and Likud over a
political settlement with the
Palestinians.
According to the media
reports, Peres was attacked
and defended at Sunday's
Cabinet meeting over that
issue. Labor and Welfare
Minister Moshe Katzav of
Likud's Herut wing asked
Peres. "Can't you wait eight
months?" a reference to the
Knesset elections scheduled
for next November.
Transport Minister Haim
Corfu, also of Herut, asked,
"What benefit will accrue
from political references?"
Energy Minister Moshe
Shahal, a Laborite, stood by
the foreign minister. "This
government is divided bet-
ween those who believe that a
diplomatic initiative is an ex-
istential need for our country
and those who believe that the
present situation is itself the
solution," Shahal declared.
Apart from the verbal
fireworks, the Cabinet session
was reportedly a bleak debate
over the situation in the ter-
ritories. Ministers on both
sides of the political divide
were said to be deeply con-
cerned that there is no
guarantee the unrest will not
erupt again once the curfews
are lifted from the re!
camps.
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ESIX


Campaign Marks Federation's
50th Anniversary
It is a time of celebration for
lie Greater Miami Jewish
federation as the organization
narks its historic Golden An-
niversary this month.
In its 50 years of existence,
le Federation has grown as
liami has grown, becoming
ie central address of the
Jewish community. The
Federation raised $21 million
iring its annual Combined
swish Appeal fundraising
impaign in 1987, an increase
$700,000 over the previous
ear. The funds are allocated
35 local social service agen-
ts and programs in Dade
unity and to similar social
ervice programs and agencies
iirrored in Israel and Jewish
jmmunities in 33 countries
liroughout the world.
"Super Week," scheduled
>r Jan. 24-30, will highlight
ie Federation's 50th anniver-
iry through several events.
Super Sunday, on Jan. 24
egins at 9 a.m. and runs to 9
i.m. It is the Federation's
eighth annual fundraising
phonathon and headquarters
are at Temple Israel, 137 N.E.
19th Street in Miami.
"We are able to accomplish a
tremendous amount of phone
calls on Super Sunday, tradi-
tionally raising close to $2
million," said Paul Berkowitz,
Super Sunday chairman. "The
people of this community real-
ly turn out on this day to do all
they can to help out.
"The Rabbinical Association
of Greater Miami has declared
Jan. 22 and 23 as 'Combined
Jewish Appeal Shabbat.' ac-
cording to Rabbinical Associa-
tion President, David B.
Saltzman. "The special Shab-
bat is planned to precede
Super Sunday on Jan. 24."
In addition to Super Sunday,
a Golden Anniversary Gala
celebration will be held on
Thursday, Jan. 28 at the Fon-
tainebleau Hilton Hotel on
Miami Beach. Aside from
cocktails and dinner, the event
will feature the folk group
Peter, Paul and Mary in con-
cert, performing "Light One
Candle," from which the
Federation derived its 1988
campaign theme, "Don't Let
the Light Go Out." In addition,
the Golden Anniversary film
that documents the past 50
years of the Federation and of
the Jewish people, will be
premiered.
"We can be very proud of
how far this Federation and
this community have come in
50 years. The gala is a special
time for us to celebrate and
look ahead to another equally
successful 50 years," said
Robert H. Traurig, who with
his wife Jackie, are co-
chairmen of the gala, together
with Davida and Harry A.
"Hap" Levy, the overall
Golden Anniversary
Chairmen.
Reservations are still
available for the Jan. 28
Golden Anniversary Gala. For
information, 576-4000, ext.
207.
Lior and Ayal Hod, Yeshiva's "Turin Towers."
Yeshiva MACS in Miami
0 Years of Community Growth
Prior to 1938, the year the
Jreater Miami Jewish Federa-
aon was established, Miami's
lewish community was made
Bp primarily of pioneers who
irst arrived in the area in the
fate 1890's. As Miami slowly
developed from a swampy
frontier to an established com-
munity, the Jewish population
rew as well. By 1938 several
jynagogues, a Jewish
newspaper, The Jewish Flori-
lian. and a variety of local in-
dependent Jewish organiza-
pon had been established.
On May 7, 1938, a group of
prominent Jewish community
eaders united to form a cen-
ral organization known as the
federation of Jewish Welfare
funds, to coordinate common
and-raising interests. That
leeting set the course for the
jture of Jewish Miami.
"The community was grow-
ing very quickly. We needed
some sort of organizational
structure. We never imagined
that 50 years later the struc-
ture we formed would develop
and grow to be as successful
and strong as it has become,"
recalled Stanley C. Myers, who
served as the first Federation
president from 1938-1941 and,
again later on, from
1954-1956. Myers, along with
his wife Martha, is serving as
Honorary Golden Anniversary
chairman.
The early years were an ex-
citing and historic time for the
community. The creation of an
organized local Jewish federa-
tion was received with en-
thusiasm and commitment.
The cataclysmic events of the
Holocaust and the establish-
ment of Israel united the com-
munity as never before. Fund-
raising goals were reached and
surpassed and the formation of
several local agencies provided
much needed services to the
community. These included
the Bureau of Jewish Educa-
tion (which later became the
Central Agency for Jewish
Education), the Miami Beach
YMHA (which later became
the Miami Beach Jewish Com-
munity Center), the Jewish
Home for the Aged (now the
Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged at
Douglas Gardens), and the
establishment of the Women's
Division of the Federation.
With the situation in Europe
and the Middle East improv-
ing, Federation leaders
refocused their attention on
the needs of the community.
As the Jewish population
rapidly grew anti-Semitism
grew along with it, demanding
immediate attention on the
part of Jewish leaders.
It was during the 1950's that
Mount Sinai Hospital opened
its doors, Jewish Vocational
Service and Jewish Family
Service were established, and
the Federation received a
Continued on Pag* 4-B
The Yeshiva University Mac-
cabees ranked fifth in the
nation behind Georgetown in
team defense will do some
playing and praying when they
arrive in South Florida Jan. 22
for a four-day Sabbath
weekend and game against
Miami Christian College.
The 7-5 Maccabees, the
basketball squad of Yeshiva
College the undergraduate
division of liberal arts and
sciences for men of the univer-
sity in New York City is
ranked third in the country in
team defense, according to the
recent NCAA Division III
statistics, allowing a mere 53.2
points a game.
The team, known as the
Yeshiva "MACS," are led by
the team's co-captains and
"Twin Towers," brothers
Ayal and Lior Hoa of Atlanta,
Ga. Ayal Hod is ranked fourth
in the country in field goal
percentage, having connected
with 70.2 percent of his shots.
The team will be hosted by
alumni of the University and
members of Congregation
Shaaray Tefilah of North
Miami Beach. The team
members will be the guests of
Rabbi Yaakov Sprung,
spiritual leader of the con-
gregation, and Dr. Gary
Bloom, president.
On Monday evening, Jan. 25,
the Yeshiva MACS will
square-off against Miami
Christian College at 7:30 p.m.
at Victory Park, North Miami
Beach.
On Jan. 4, Lior Hod, the 6'5"
forward, moved into fifth place
on Yeshiva's all-time scoring
list against Molloy College. He
now has 1,275 points. His 17
field goals that evening is also
a Yeshiva record.
That same evening against
Molloy, 6'5" center Ayal Hod
became the 15th player in
Yeshiva's history to score
1,000 points.
Russian Family Complete
The Selective Service 'Kid'
>n Other Side of Draft Board
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jeunsk Florxdian Staff Writer
RONALD Albert Jr., one ol
the nation's youngest draft
oard members, admits that
["in many ways, I feel that il
[the draft starts up again, I will
I be the conscience of my
[board."
The 24-year-old law student
born and raised in Southwest
I Miami, has been chairperson of
the Florida Local Board No. 60
of the Selective Service
System since 1984.
He has been a member of the
board, which would consider
requests for deferment or ex-
emption from service in the
armed forces in the event of a
national emergency, since he
was 18 years old, the minimum
legal age. At that time, he was
the youngest board member in
the country.
When you're a citizen
of a country, you
have rights and
obligations. They
come together you
can't pick and choose.
Albert, who will join a local
law firm upon graduation, is
himself still eligible to be
drafted if war should break
out.
If the draft were to be
reinstated, young men born in
1968 would be the first to be
called. This is because there is
a high rate of registration
among 20 year-olds, Albert ex-
plains, and also because that
age group is considered to be
more mature than the 18 year-
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
WHEN Lyudmila Vassersh-
teyn and her family arrived in
Miami last May after eight
years of being refuseniks in
the Soviet Union Lyudmila
told resettlement workers
they were delighted to be here.
Her only concern was whether
she would ever see her mother
again.
Less than a year later, that
fear is about to be transformed
into joy.
As The Jewish Floridian
went to press, Lyudmila's
mother, Rozalia Ruvinskaya,
was en route from Rome to be
reunited with her family in
South Florida.
"The mother coming out (of
Russia) means the entire fami-
ly is now here in Miami," said
Shuli Schickman Stock, coor-
dinator of Resettlement Ser-
vices for the Jewish Family
Service.
"It's a real good feeling, con-
sidering there were so many
years when refuseniks weren't
coming," Stock said. "Lyud-
mila is an only child and her
son is an only child. For her to
have left her mother behind
was a real difficult thing to her
and the mother just about rais-
ed the little boy."
And, as Stock observes:
"This is a family that's come in
Continued on Pafe 5-B
Oiui
Ronald Albert, Jr.
olds, but burdened with fewer
family responsibilities than the
21-26 year old.
After the 20 year olds, the
Continued on Page 2-B
Community
- Friday, January 22,1988 The Jewish Floridian Section B


Page 2-B The Jewish FToridkn/Friday, January 22, 1988
ARMDI To Fete Brown
Board Drafts Albert
CMtiBed frw Page 1-B
21-26 year olds would be the
next age groups to be called,
followed by the 19 and 18 year-
olds.
"That's why I got on the
board in the first place." says
Albert, who calls himself a
liberal Democrat. "I knew
who'd be sitting on the
registrants' side of the table
(18-26 year-old men) and I
knew who'd be sitting on the
other side of the table." mainly
people of about 50 years of age
and older, according to
Albert's estimate. "Knowing
those two numbers. I thought
it very important that there be
somebody on the draft board
side of the table that's the
same age as the registrant,"
Albert explains.
"PEOPLE who are 50
years-old don't see things the
same way and it's also im-
portant for the registrants to
see someone their own age on
the other side of the table," he
adds.
Albert, who admits that
"every time a Jan. 1 goes by, I
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With 2U0 million
people in America,
you can't allow each
one to form his own
foreign policy.
breathe a sigh of relief,
because I move into a lower
priority group" nevertheless
has little sympathy for young
men who choose not to
register for the draft.
"Registration does not
equate to volunteering for ar
my service it's putting your
name in the government's list
of 18 year-old men. Not 18
year-old men willing to serve,
not even 18 year-old men
available to serve they ma>
be able to get exemption, '
notes Albert.
But "if you don't register,
the government doesn't know
about you. If you break the
law, face the consequences,
make people see the conse-
quences." contends Albert
who would himself consider
You can have your
moment of
''crystallization"
while reading your
draft notice.
mmmmmmm
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ing your problem and include the
address label Also, address
changes are handled more
efficiently by mail However,
should you need to reach us
quickly the following number
is available
373-4605
Jewish Floridian
P.O Boa 012973. ttawt. Re 33101
civil disobedience.
Faced with a situation where
he was forced to fight against
Israel, Albert admits that he
would choose to go to jail
rather than obey the law.
Yet, Albert fully agrees with
the government's decision to
link financial #id for college
with registration for the draft,
a practice which some say
discriminates against the poor.
"It does discriminate aid
(goes) only to poor people. It's
the nature of financial aid," he
admits. "But (college financial
aid) is a perfect benefit to tie in
with draft registration"
because of the age of the in-
dividuals concerned, Albert
contends.
"When you're a citizen of a
country, you have rights and
obligations. A right to finan-
cial aid and an obligation tor
register and fight if necessary,
unless you have a valid objec-
tion. Rights and obligations
come together you can't
pick and choose." Albert
notes.
WHAT IS considered a valid
objection has changed since
the 1960's, when "many peo-
ple took ten years to get
through college." according to
Albert.
In the 1960s, for example,
conscientious objector status
was available only to those in-
dividuals whose religious
beliefs or convictions
prevented them from taking
part in any war.
Nowadays, "it can be based
on ethical or moral beliefs, not
just religious. I'm not a very
religious person but I have
some very deep beliefs based
on what I believe is right."
Albert reveals.
In order to qualify as a cons-
cientious objector, a person
must show that he would not
fight in any war, excepting
perhaps a theocractic one,
where the forces of good battle
those of evil, according to
Albert.
"It would really have to be
something religious, almost
supernatural," comments
Albert. "You can't be a selec-
tive objector (objecting to a
particular war) because there
are approximately 240 million
people in America and you
can t allow each one to form
his or her own foreign policy.
We have a representative
government. If everyone
makes their own government,
that's anarchy."
Conscientious objectors
must be able to report on their
moment of "crystallization,"
when they realized that they
could not serve in the armed
forces.
"YOU CAN have it while
reading your draft notice,
because a lot of people just
haven't done the very serious
thinking you have to do to
know if you're a conscientious
objector," Albert explains.
Students may find that they
can receive a deferment for
the current semester, or to
complete a senior year of high
school or college, but the in-
definite student deferments of
years-gone-by are a thing of
the past.
Albert, who is engaged to be
married this August, thinks
that women ought to be eligi-
ble for the draft, too.
"I think women can serve a
useful function in the armed
forces women are just as
much citizens of this country
as men are, and should have
the same obligations, (though)
not necessarily in armed com-
bat." Albert asserts.
"There are headquarters
with administrations, hospitals
We have a
representative
government. If
everyone makes their
own, that's anarchy.
and kitchens a lot of non-
combat roles," he notes.
"I'm not for the draft now
I don't think we need it,"
Albert concedes. "But I'm for
registration, because it makes
us safer."
In any case, if war were to be
declared tomorrow, and if, as
in the '60s, young men being
drafted into the armed ser-
vices expressed a view that
"no one over 30 can be
trusted." Ronald Albert. Jr.
will be one member of the
draft board that those young
men cam trust.
Lillian Brown, founder and
chairman of Brown's Resort
Hotel in New York's Catskill
Mountains, will be honored by
the American Red Magen
David for Israel (ARMDI) at
its Southeast Region Annual
Awards Luncheon, which will
be held on Tuesday, Feb. 23 at
Beth Torah Congregation,
North Miami Beach.
Brown will be the recipient
of the Samuel Reinhard
Humanitarian Award in
recognition of her commit-
ment to Israel and Jewish
causes.
Often referred to as the
"Pearl Mesta of the Moun-
tains" and unanimously
regarded as the "Queen of the
Catskills," Lillian Brown and
her husband Charles establish-
ed the legendary Brown's
Hotel in Loch Sheldrake 44
years ago.
For the thousands who flock
to the Catskills each year,
Lillian Brown is synonymous
with Brown's. Although she
winters in Bal Harbour, come
season, the dynamic great-
grandmother is visible
everywhere, offering informa-
tion, taking reservations and,
Judge Martin D. Kahn
Kahn
Investiture
Investiture of Dade Circuit
Court Judge Martin D. Kahn
will be held Friday, Jan. 29, at
noon at the Dade County
Courthouse.
Judge Kahn, former city at-
torney of North Miami was ap-
pointed by Governor Bob Mar-
tinez to the new circuit court
seat created by the 1987
Florida legislature session. He
was selected by the Judicial
Nominating Commission to fill
the new seat, and was assign-
ed to serve in the criminal
court division.
Mayor Xavier Suarez will of-
fer the invocation, with Judge
Kahn's wife, Joan, enrobing
the new jurist. Speakers at the
invocation will be Judith Kor-
chin, president of the Dade
County Bar Association; Steve
Zack. member of the board of
governors of the Florida Bar;
State Rep. Elaine Bloom
(Dem.-Miami Beach); and
Carlos Salman, chairman of
the Dade County Republican
Party.
Judge Kahn, 55, was a
member of the executive com-
mittee and of the board of the
Dade County Bar Association
at the time of his appointment.
He was serving as chairman of
the DCBA's Committee on
Continuing Legal Education
and is a member of the Florida
Bar Committee on Continuing
Legal Education.
Lillian Brown
above all, fulfilling her major
role, that of hostess. Lillian
Brown and three generations
of the Brown family have
greeted three generations of
guests, for whom coming to
Brown's is like coming home.
For information on ARMDI
and the awards Luncheon,
947-3263.
Public
Publication
Publix Super Market has
scored a Florida first with the
sponsorship and publication
of THE GOOD BOOK OF
NUTRITION, a cookbook
consisting of over 400 recipes
developed to reduce the risk
of cancer. Produced as a joint
educational effort with the
American Cancer Society,
Florida Division, the book will
be available only in the 332
Publix stores throughout the
state, beginning this week.
The proceeds from the
book, priced at $7.99. will be
donated to the American
Cancer Society. Florida Divi-
sion's Cancer Control Pro-
gram, and will be utilized
primarily for education on
cancer prevention.
"We are extremely pleased
and proud to sponsor such a
timely publication for the
American Cancer Society in
the state of Florida," states
Howard Jenkins, chairman of
the Executive Committee of
Publix Super Markets. "We
take pride in our role to help
raise the level of awareness
and public education regar-
ding matters in nutrition and
health." Jenkins continued.
"By underwriting this impor-
tant project, Publix will help
great numbers of residents
and visitors in Florida com-
munities benefit by increased
knowledge about healthful
diets."
Dr. Michaela Scott of Vero
Beach. Florida, president of
The American Cancer Socie-
ty, Florida Division, said,
"We are in the business of
saving lives and THE GOOD
BOOK OF NUTRITION is an
excellent means of educating
millions of Floridians about
the ways they can reduce
their risks of cancer."
it is a great privilege to
team up with Publix Super
Markets in this significant
educational venture." Scott
added, noting that the risks
of cancer "can be reduced as
much as 35% just by eating
right."


Friday, January 22, 1988/Tne Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
AJCongress Honors Lewis
Florida's Comptroller,
Jerald Lewis, will be the 1988
fames Madison Award reci-
pient of the American Jewish
Congress' Fund for Religious
jiberty. He will receive the
iward at a dinner on Wednes-
y, March 30 at the Omni In-
jrnational Hotel.
The event will be co-chaired
Elliott B. Barnett, senior
irtner of the law firm of
luden, Barnett, McClosky,
|mith, Schuster, and Russell;
li M. Feinberg, president of
CMF and Associates, Inc. a
[overnmental affairs con-
sulting firm; George
firestone, former Florida
ecretary of State and Marvin
losen, senior partner of
[reenberg, Traurig, Askew,
Joffman, Lipoff, Rosen and
jentel.
[The Fund for Religious
[iberty was established in
985 by the American Jewish
angress to oppose efforts to
Gerald Lewis
erode constitutional
guarantees of religious
freedom and church-state
separation.
Ackerman To Be Honored
Residents of the Point East
ndominium in North Miami
ach will celebrate two bir-
ays on Thursday, Feb. 4, in
ociation with the Greater
ami Israel Bonds Organiza-
n. Being recognized is
ael's 40th Anniversary as a
te and Point East residents
ne Ackerman's "39th plus"
thday. The celebration,
ich will begin at 7:30 p.m.,
1 be held in the con-
minium's Rose Samuels
sm.
|The Point East residents are
honoring Ackerman's birthday
to show their appreciation of
her dedicated and devoted ser-
vices to the community, as well
as for her staunch support of
Israel through the Israel
Bonds program.
Sponsoring the birthday
celebration is the Point East
Israel Bonds Committee, with
Sol and Eleanor Osheroff serv-
ing as co-chairpersons and
Ernest Samuels serving as
honorary chairman.
For information, 531-6731.
Jaycees Honor
Lehrman, Daoud
| Dr. Irving Lehrman, rabbi of
emple Emanu-El of Greater
liami, and Miami Beach
favor Alex Daoud will be
anored Saturday night, Jan.
at the Deauville Hotel by
ke Miami Beach Jaycees.
The organization will
elebrate its 53rd year with a
distinguished Service Banquet
which Dr. Lehrman will
ceive an award as the com-
lunity's "outstanding
eligious leader."
Mayor Daoud, a Miami
peach Attorney, will be
ssented with the Jaycees'
Government Award. A
cktail reception at 7 p.m.
ill precede dinner at 8.
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
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Cypen Heads NCCJ Dinner
Irving Cypen, senior
member of the law firm of
Cypen and Cypen, and former
circuit court judge, is
spearheading the 36th Annual
Brotherhood Awards Dinner
of the National Conference of
Christians and Jews (NCCJ).
The dinner will be held on
Thursday evening, Feb. 18 at
the Omni International Hotel.
Cypen presided at the NCCJ
Dinner Committee where
some sixty of the more than
one-hundred committee
members met at Hotel River-
pare. The meeting was the
"kick-off' event for the 1988
effort to raise funds for the
work of the NCCJ in Dade
County. Present at the
meeting were NCCJ Board
Chairman, Judge C. Clyde
Atkins; 1988 Awards Commit-
tee Chairman, Judge Peter T.
Fay; and, 1988 National
Headliner Award Chairman,
Hank Meyer, who are assisting
Cypen with this year's ar-
rangements and program.
Irving Cypen has a long-time
record of service and dedica-
tion to philanthropic and com-
munity endeavors. He is cur-
Abrams at
Bench and Bar
The B'nai B'rith Bench and
Bar Chapter will be hosting its
monthly dinner meeting on
Wednesday, Jan. 27, at the
Biscayne Bay Marriott Hotel,
Miami, beginning at 6:30 p.m.
Michael I. Abrams,
Democratic Representative of
North Miami Beach will be the
featured speaker discussing
the topic "Is Anyone Safe
When the Legislature is in
Session?" A look at the
malpractice special session and
other legislative
developments.
The relatively new Bench
and Bar Chapter is rapidly
growing and encourages new
membership. For information
or reservations, 223-2391.
Cedars Elects
Medical Officers
Dr. Aron Ary, cardiologist,
recently took over as president
and chief of staff of the
Medical Staff at Cedars
Medical Center, and Dr. Her-
nan Carrion, urologist, has
been elected president for the
next term, 1988-89. Dr. Philip
Grossman, gastroenterologist,
is past president.
Other officers of the Medical
Executive Committee elected
include Dr. John Jennings, or-
thopaedic surgeon as
secretary-treasurer; Dr.
Howard Lessner,
hematologist/oncologist as
chief of medicine; and Dr. Aldo
F. Berti, neuro-surgeon, as
chief of surgery.
Dr. Isaac Egozi, general
surgeon, is the new vice chief
of surgery, and Dr. Eric A.
Lang, pulmonologist is the
new vice chief of medicine.
Cedars Medical Center is a
not-for-profit, acute care
hospital with 680 licensed
beds.
Irving Cypen
rently chairman of the board
for the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged. In
recognition of his service over
the past 37 years, he has been
honored by having a 102-unit
Adult Congregate Living
Facility named the Irving
Cypen Tower. He was honored
by the NCCJ in 1985 with the
Silver Medallion "for service
to brotherhood." He has been
vice president, founder,
trustee and member of the Ex-
ecutive Committee for Mount
Sinai Medical Center, and has
served on the boards of the
United Way, University of
Florida Foundation, Cedars of
Lebanon Hospital and Miami
Beach Bar Association.
AMIT Women
Chai Chapter will hold its
fund-raising membership lun-
cheon on Wednesday, Jan. 27,
noon, at Temple Beth Tov, to
be hosted by Stella "fydor.
Geula Chapter meets on
Wednesday, Jan. 27 at 7:30
p.m. in the Social Hall of
Tower 41.
Shoshana Chapter holds its
luncheon meeting on Tuesday,
Jan. 26 at noon, Seacoast
Towers South, State Room.
Simcha Chapter meets on
Monday, Jan. 25, noon, in
Winston Towers Building 200
for a luncheon meeting.
A special "AMIT Women
Shabbat" will be celebrated in
synagogues across the country
on Shabbat Shirah, Jan. 30 in
continuation of AMIT
Women's strong 1988
Membership Campaign.
The celebration will include
sermons by rabbis and "Oneg
Shabbat" gatherings focusing
on the educational and child
care provided by AMIT
Women's network of 20
facilities in Israsel, as well as
its active role in Jewish com-
munal life in the United
States.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
OF GREATER MIAMI
In Association With
The Gila and Haim Wiener
Foundation for the Advancement
Of Cantorial Art in Tel-Aviv
Are happy to present
In honor of Jewish Music Month
YEHUDA AND FRIENDS
With Master Cantors
DAVID BAGLEY
Toronto, Canada
YEHUDA SHIFMAN BENZION MILLER
Miami, Florida Brooklyn. N.Y.
BARUCH SHIFMAN YAACOV MOTZEN
Columbus. Ohio Montreal. Canada
At the Piano Cantor Daniel Gildar
Philadelphia, Pa.
Chairpersons, Gila and Haim Wiener
THEATER OF PERFORMING ARTS
Thursdat, February 25,1988 8 P.M.
Tickets: $35, $30, $25, $15, $10
For Tickets and Further Information
Tel: 538-2503


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 22, 1988
Stanley Myers Cross -
Generational Role Model
A special Golden Anniver-
sary film has been put
together, highlighting the past
50 years of the Greater Miami
Jewish people. The ten minute
film, narrated by the Federa-
tion's founding president
Stanley C. Myers and his
grandson, Robert Gilbert,
features scenes of Miami, local
Federation beneficiary agen-
cies as well as historic archive
footage and photos. A portion
of the film also features the
song "Light One Candle" by
the famous folk group Peter,
Paul and Mary from which the
Federation's 1988 campaign
theme "Don't Let the Light Go
Out" was derived.
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion founding president
Stanley C. Myers.
The film will be premiered at
the Federation's Golden An-
niversary Gala, scheduled for
Thursday, Jan. 28 at the Foun-
tainebleau Hilton Hotel on
Miami Beach.
As narrator of the Golden
Anniversary film, Myers and
his grandson are symbolic of
the purpose of the theme of the
Federation campaign "Don't
Let the Light Go Out!" to keep
the flame glowing from
generation to generation.
As one of the founders of the
Federation, Myers served as
the first and, in later years, as
the tenth president of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion. But, his story starts
before that historic night, 50
years ago in 1938, when the
Federation was officially
established.
It was in 1925 that Myers, an
attorney, first arrived in
Miami having left his native
New York. Although too
modest to admit it, he has
since become a major force in
the Jewish community, locally
and internationally, and within
other local civic groups as well
as within the legal community.
"When I first came here
Miami was almost void of
Jewish leadership so it wasn't
difficult to establish oneself as
a leader," Myers recalled. "I
had heard about other existing
federations in several cities
around the country, so I wrote
to them asking for information
that we ultimately based our
organization on."
Also a leader on the national
level, Myers served as third
president of the Council of
Jewish Federations and as vice
president of the United
Synagogue of America. His
numerous accomplishments
have resulted in a listing in
"Who's Who in World Jewry."
At 82, Myers is a community
activist. He and his wife Mar-
tha, also active within the com-
munity, are currently serving
as Honorary Chairmen of the
Federation's Golden Anniver-
sary Celebration, and Stanley
Myers is also chairman of the
Project Renewal/Or Akiva
commiee.
"The central theme of our
lives has been helping others.
It is also where we have found
our greatest happiness and
self-esteem," Myers
explained.
Super Sunday Donor Test
Blood testing to find a donor for a bone marrow
transplant that is needed to save the life of a woman dying
from leukemia, will be done at a special drive from 9 am. to
2:30 p.m., Sunday at Temple Israel of Greater Miami, head-
quarters for Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Super
Sunday Phonathon.
The drive is being underwritten by relatives of Elsa
Glazer. 48, who has been told that she must find a donor
within the next few weeks or she may be too ill to undergo
the transplant operation. Glazer has been unable to find a
suitable match among relatives. Doctors estimate the
chances of finding a suitable donor are one in 20,000.
Glazer, a former Miami Dade Community College
psychology professor, is married to North Miami Senior
High principal Leonard Glazer. The couple have two
From left: Sam Blank,* Joseph M. Lipton,
Robert Russell,* Stanley C. Myers and Max
Orovitz,* all past Greater Miami Jewish
Federation vresidents, at the SOth Annual
Meeting and Dinner Dance at the Deauviik
Hotel on Miami Beach in 1968.
'deceased
Myra Farr, Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion board member, stands between two local
children, during the 1960 Combined Jewith
Appeal Youth Rally at Bayfront Auditorium.
Golden Year of Growth
Dade Circuit Court Judge D.
Bruce Levy, 41, hat been ap-
pointed by the Chief Justice of
the Florida Supreme Court to
the Child Welfare Training
Council of the Department of
Health and Rehabilitative Ser-
vice of the State of Florida.
Judge Levy represents 6t cir-
cuit court judges in Dade and
Monroe counties on the ex-
ecutive committee of the
Florida Conference of Circuit
Court Judges. He is currently
assigned to the juvenile divi-
sion of-the circuit court:.....
Jedge D. Brace
Coatiaied trvm Page 1-B
special United Jewish Appeal
award for one of the most
outstanding campaigns in the
country.
the Jewish community of
Miami continued its
remarkable growth and with it
the need for services increas-
ed. The Federation marked its
25th anniversary and at the
same time came to the aid of
Cuban Jewish refugees who
had fled the Castro regime.
Israel's 1967 Six-Day War pro-
mpted the Jewish community's
immediate assistance.
Accomplishments during the
1960's included the building of
additional facilities for the
Jewish Home for the Aged, the
expansion of the Bureau of
Jewish Education, the hosting,
for the first time, of the Coun-
cil of Jewish Federation's
General Assembly, and the
raising of over three million
dollars for the Israel Emergen-
cy Fund.
The 1970's raised the com-
munity's support for the local
resettlement of Russian Jews
as well as for Israel's 1973
Yom Kippur War. Miami's
Jewish community also came
to the aid of the Jewish com-
munity in Wilkes-Barre, Penn-
sylvania, who were victims of
destructive floods.
A Federation Community
Relations Committee was
established during these years
as well as a renewed Young
Leadership Program, the
building and occupation of new
Federation headquarters at
4200 Biscavne Boulevard, the.
formation of High School in
Israel, the launching of the
Jewish Vocational Service
Nutrition Project, and the
building of the Michael-Ann
Russell Jewish Community
Center in North Miami Beach.
In the last 10 years the
achievements within the
Jewish community have been
many. Several services were
formed including the Informa-
tion and Referral Service with
the cooperation of the United
Way, the creation of the South
Dade Jewish Community
Center, the opening of the new
branch of Jewish Family and
Children's Service, the open-
ing of a new branch of Federa-
tion Towers and Federation
Gardens, the opening of the
Jewish High School, the par-
ticipation in Project Renewal,
providing support to Miami's
twin Israeli community, Or
Akiva, the establishment of
Jewish Federation Cable
Television, the creation of the
Young Leadership Council,
and the raising of funds for
Operation Moses, the resettle-
ment of Ethiopian Jews.
After many years of dedica-
tion and achievement, Uk|
Jewish community of Miam
has flourished beyond expect*
tion and gained a mainstream |
position in American Jewii |
ife. The Federation and io
beneficiary service agencies
have become the lifeline to j
Miami's Jewish community,
which now numbers 247,000,
and to Jewish communities 1
throughout the world. Witt]
the suport of the community,
Federation leaders helped
establish an invaluable net-1
work of health and welfare
agencies over the years th*
today provide various servics
for tens of thousands of people
of all ages.
"This community has reajj
come a long way since its earlr
days and we can be proud aw
thankful of our many ac-
complishments," said Air*
Podhurst, current Federate
president and an active
member of the Jewish com-!
munity for the past 15 ye*
"But this is also a time to W
ahead to the future and con-
tinue on with the same
strength that was so prevalent
these past 50 years"
(305)935-0203
BARRY D. SILVERSTEIN
A ttorney at Law
Suite 838 Concorde Centre
2875 Northeast 191st Street
North Miami Beach. Florida 33tW


Friday, January 22,1988/The Jewish Floridian Page Ml
Community Corner
The Jewish Culture League will hold a discussion
on "Gorbachev's Russia" on Friday, Jan. 22, 7:30 p.m.
at 100 Lincoln Road. Canadian singer Brucha Shlaen
will offer a mini-concert.
orth Dade Chapter of Women's Division of Israel In-
stitute of Technology, will holding its Luncheon/Card
Party on Thursday, Jan. 28 at the Bayswater Cafe
(Hemispheres) Hallandale. Tickets per person $7.50
Reservations must be made prior to Jan. 28. For reser-
vations and information, call Miriam Lamkav 948-6518
or Celia C. Mandel 651-8545.
The Landow Yeshiva will sponsor a showing and sale
of Baruch Nachson's oils and lithographs on Satur-
day.Jan. 23, 9 p.m. at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Aron
Minkowitz, 540 37th St., Miami Beach. Nachson, a resi-
dent of Hebron, Israel, is known for his interpretations
of traditional themes of exile and redemption. For infor-
mation, 673-5664.
North Dade Chapter of Women's Division, Israel In-
stitute of Technology will hold a luncheon and card
party at the Hemispheres Bayswater on Thursday, Jan.
28, 11:30 a.m. For reservations, 653-3375 or 945-6518.
For Ner Tamid Congregation's 30th anniversary, the
Sisterhood will hold its annual Eternal Light Luncheon
on Sunday, Jan. 31, noon, in the Eden Roc Hotel, to
honor Sarah Klausner, as the "Woman of Valor." For in-
formation, 866-8345 or 866-9833.
Delta Players, Inc. presents "Siz Schver Ysu Zein A
Yid," directed by Cantor Moshe Friedler and assisted
by the choreographer, Eber Lobato at 2 p.m. on Sunday,
Jan. 31 at the Moorings1 Condominium and on Feb. 14
and Feb. 28 at the Alexander Gross Hebrew Academy.
Information, 940-3197 or 945-9016.
The South Dade Jewish Community Center will pre-
sent Dr. Brian Weiss, chairman of Psychiatry at Mt.
Sinai Medical Center who wilt lead an informal discus-
sion on parapsychology, and past-life regression. For
information, 251-1394.
The Sisterhood of Temple B'nai Zion, Sunny Isles,
will sponsor an Annual White Elephant Sale and
Bazaar 10 a.m.-4 p.m. from Sunday, Jan. 24 through
Tuesday, Jan. 26.
The second annual Heart to Heart Luncheon recep-
tion for the Auxiliary of Miami Heart Institute will offer
"fashion and flair" Wednesday, Feb. 3,11:30 a.m. at the
Doral Hotel Starlight Roof. For advance registration in-
formation, 672-1111, ext. 1120.
The Jews For Jews Organization has been selected
by the Wexner Foundation to serve as local area spon-
sors for its Graduate Fellowship Program which pro-
vides free tuition and an annual living allowance of up
to $15,000 for those eligible to join the program.
Leadership areas include the rabbinate, Jewish com-
munal service, and Jewish education. Fellowships will
be awarded to college graduates entering a graduate
program for careers in the above mentioned profes-
sions. Wexner Foundation Fellowships are limited to
those who have not yet begun their professional
training.
The annual "Tri-Ethnic Women's Conference" is be-
ing held on Wednesday, Jan. 27 at Mount Sinai Medical
Center, 4300 Alton Road, Miami Beach. The con-
ference, including dinner, will feature such medical
topics as breast disease, coping with stress and
plastic surgery.
The Samuel Scheck Hillel Community Day School
will host its annual Luncheon-Fashion Show on Tues-
day, Feb. 9 at the Fontainebleau Hilton, at 11 a.m.
Peshe Dennis, founder of the school will be honored in
the school's 18th year. A fashion show will be
presented by Bonwit Teller. For reservations and infor-
mation at 931-2831.
The South Dade Jewish Community Center Singles
Havurah offers small, intimate group activities, din-
ners, boat trips, etc. Three groups have been establish-
ed for all ages. For information, 251-1394.
Mildred Riesenberg, president of Miami Region of
Hadassah, along with Charlotte Wolpe, Helen
Weisberg, Linda Minkes, Diane Issenberg and Sylvia
Herman all national board members are atten-
ding the Mid-Winter Conference of national Hadassah
in New York City.
m...........!
I M'M
Starkman To Conduct
Mock Trial
Dade County Court Judge
Milton I. Starkman will con-
duct a mock trial of a drunk
driving case Saturday, Jan. 23,
at 9 a.m. at Florida Interna-
tional University's North Dade
campus.
The case will take on realism
with Eric Gruman, assistant
Dade State Attorney, serving
as prosecutor and Karen Bar-
banell, another assistant state
attorney, acting as the defen-
dant. Rick Freedman, former
assistant Dade Public
Defender, will serve as the
defense attorney. Bob Forman
of the Metro Dade police
department will portray the
arresting officer.
Judge Starkman is an in-
structor at FIU in legal
writing and the American
legal system, under the legal
assistant program. He recent-
ly prepared a manual, "DUI
Trial manual," which is being
distributed to Dade's 36 coun-
ty court judges and which is
being studied for use by county
judges throughout the State of
Florida.
Judge Milton Starkman
Na'amat USA Russian Family
Two Miami Beach civic and
religious leaders, Evelyn
Rothman and Ethel Bergman,
will be honored at the Annual
Spiritual Adoption Luncheon
of the Beba Idelson Chapter of
Na'amat USA Sunday, Jan. 24
at 11:30 a.m. at the Eden Roc
Hotel.
Rothman is a past president
of B'nai B'rith women, a life
member and a member of the
board of the Beba Idelson
Chapter of Na'amat and has
been a member of Na'amat for
more than 50 years.
Ethel Bergman, a life-long
Zionist, is a vice president of
the Beba Idelson club and is a
life member of Na'amat. She
was chosen to be honored for
dedicated and charitable
deeds.
Harriet Green, national vice
president of Na'amat USA and
a member of the national
board of the American Zionist
Federation will be keynote
speaker. Cantor Moshe Buryn
of Temple Beth Raphael will
render a repertoire of Hebrew
English and Yiddish songs.
For information, 532-3739.
A card party and luncheon
has been scheduled by the
Golda Meir Chapter of
Na'amat USA on Thursday,
Jan. 28, noon, in the communi-
ty room of the 100 Lincoln
Road Building.
For information, 538-6213.
Continued from Page IB
bits and pieces over the past 10
to 12 years."
IN 1977, Lyudmila's
brother-in-law, Edward
Vassershteyn, his wife, Zina,
and their daughter Anna, im-
migrated to their first
American home in Baltimore.
The following year, Edward's
parents, Mikhail and Feyga,
were permitted to emigrate
from Russia, also to Baltimore.
In 1980, they all moved to
Miami.
For eight years, Edward's
brother Vladimir, his wife,
Lyudmila, and their son,
Yevgeny, were refused per-
mission to leave the Soviet
Union. Finally, in May 1987,
Yevgeny's bar mitzvah year,
they were permitted to
emigrate.
Now, the planned arrival of
Ruvinskaya, 64, will end years
of separation. This Sunday,
Lyudmila said, they will all
hopefully gather for a festive
family reunion dinner.
While the family was to meet
at the airport Wednesday
night, Stock said that Ruvin-
skaya was to meet at her office
Thursday "and that's when
the work begins."
For at least the next year,
Jewish Family Service will
work closely with Ruvinskaya
to help her adjust economical-
ly, culturally, and socially to
life in the United States. For
the next four months, Ruvin-
skaya will be offered full finan-
cial support. That, according
to Stock, includes a budget for
housing, food, clothing, per-
sonal needs, an amount that
Stock said is a "minimum
sustenance amount." She will
also receive any needed
medical treatment and will be
registered in English language
courses.
SHE IS expected to live
with her daughter and son-in-
law for the time being on
South Beach, where Stock
estimates there are about
1,200 Soviet Jews.
"I (have not) seen my
mother in 10 months," Lyud-
mila told The Jewish FUyridian
in a broken English that she is
still learning. "When I left
Russia, I (could not) believe
that the Russian government
would send my mother to
America, too. I was nervous.
Now we are happy, very hap-
py. I think (Soviet Premier
Mikhail) Gorbachev changed
politics in Russia," she said.
Her husband, Vladimir, an
architect in Russia, now is
working as a draftsman while
continuing his study of the
English language. Their son is
a student at the Rabbi Alex-
ander S. Gross Hebrew
Academy. Lyudmila is hoping
to return to her career as a
piano teacher as her command
of the English language
improves.
GLADYS LANGWALD MEMORIAL
SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM
PHILIP LANGWALD
BENEFACTOR
ADATH YESHURUN ANNOUNCES A SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM FOR
CHILDREN INTERESTED IN THE USY ISRAEL PILGRIMAGE OR THE
USY ON WHEELS PROGRAM FOR THE SUMMER OF 1988. FOR
FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT, HARRY J. SILVERMAN,
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 947-1435.
?
^+^****m
-**


Page 6-B The Jewish Flondian/Friday, January 22, 1988
Chabad Mid-Winter Convention
Bar Mitzvah
"Torah: The Light of Our
Life" will be the theme of the
26th Annual Mid-Winter
Regional Convention for the
General Asembly or "Hakheil''
year sponsored by N'shei Ub-
nos Chabad.
Scheduled for Feb. 5-8 at the
Castle Premier Hotel, the con-
vention is expected to attract
well over 1,000 women
delegates from across North
America, according to its coor-
dinators Rivka Korf and Tirtza
Schapiro.
Rabbi David M. Lieberman,
chief rabbi of the Jewish com-
munity "Shomrei Hadath,"
Antwerp, Belgium will ad-
dress the main session on Sun-
day, Feb. 7 at 1 p.m. In his
keynote speech, Lieberman
will discuss, "Hakheil: Essen-
tial Unity, the Essence of
Redemption." At the same
session, a message from the
Lubavitcher Rebbe Menachem
Mandel Schneerson will be
presented.
Rabbi David Lieberman
Among the various
workshops planned, there will
be discussions on "Education
by Emulation," "Family Rela-
tions," "Seven Noachide
Laws," "Who is a Jew?" and
"Family Purity."
For information, 673-5664.
The Greater Miami Israel Bonds Organization will honor Harry
and Beatrice Yablin, of South Miami, Saturday, Feb. 6, 7:30 p.m.
at the El Conquistador Condominium. The Yablins will receive
the Israel Freedom Award. Guest speaker will be Jerome Gleekel,
Middle East expert and political scientist.
.
Synopti* Of The Weekly Torah Portion
... "And ye shall eat it in haste -it is the Lord's passomr"
(Exodus lt.ll).
. "The Lord smote all the first-born in the land of Egypt"
(Exodus UM).
BO
BO God sent Moses to Pharaoh once more with the following
words: "Go in unto Pharaoh ... and tell ... him: '.. If thou
refuse to let My people go, behold, tomorrow will I bring locusts
unto thy border' (Exodus 10.1-i). Pharaoh would not be moved.
Then God punished Egypt with a thick darkness. Yet Pharaoh re-
mained adamant. Finally, Moses warned the King of Egypt that
God would send the most fearful plague on all, the death of all the
first-born in the land, both of men and beasts. The Israelites were
given the ordinance of the Passover, so named because God pass-
ed over the homes of the Israelites when he killed the first-born of
the Egyptians, on midnight of the fifteenth day of the first month
(Nissan). Pharaoh was shaken, at last. He sent the children of
Israel from the land. They consisted of "about six hundred thou-
sand men on foot, beside children." In their haste to leave Egypt,
the Israelites baked matsoh from dough that was not leavened.
Hence the prohibition against eating leavened bread on Passover.
(TIM recounting of the Weekly
upon Tha Qrsphtc History of She
Tsamtr, US. pobtlatwd by Ski
Laos, Nw York. N.Y. 10038
distributing the volume.)
of the Law it extracted end baaed
Javjteh Heritage," edited by P WoNrnan
The volume Is available at 78 MsMan
Schlano Is preeldont of the society
Seth Nunberg, son of Victor
and Ilene Nunberg, will be call-
ed to the Torah as a Bar Mitz-
vah on Saturday, Jan. 23 at
Beth Torah Congregation in
North Miami Beach. He will be
reading his Haftorah on behalf
of his Russian twin, Daniel
Odula, of Katukova, Moscow,
USSR.
Seth is a student at the
Samuel Scheck Hillel Day
School and is a member of
Beth Torah Children's Choir
and Youth Group.
Special guests in attendance
will include his grandparents,
David and Beatrice Nunberg
and Frederick and Marilyn
Zeiger.
Sean Michael Wright
Sean Michael Wright, son of
Barry and Cookie Wright will
be called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah Saturday, Jan. 23 at
Temple Samu-El Or-Olom.
Sean is in the seventh grade
at South wood Junior High. He
has been active in Howard-
Palmetto Khoury league
baseball for six years and is
currently first vice president
of Temple Samu-El/Or-Olom
Kadima.
Relatives from New York
and Santo Domingo are ex-
pected to share in the
celebration.
Tomlinson at
Emanu-El
Bob Tomlinson, a newspaper
and television reporter who
was responsible for the in-
troduction of an act in the
British Parliament to pro-
secute Nazi war criminals in
Great Britain, will speak on
Wednesday, Feb. 3, at 8 p.m.
at Temple Emanu-El, Miami
Beach.
The lecture, which is open to
everyone in the community, is
sponsored by the Simon
Wiesenthal Center's Southern
Regional office.
Tomlinson, named "jour-
nalist of the year" in the Scot-
tish Press Awards, produced
the documentaries "Britain
A Nazi Safehouse" and "Nazis
in Britain Crimes of War."
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
5:37 p.m.
1700 Michigan Avs.. Mismi Beach
534-7213-534-7214 W
Barry J- Konovitch. Rabbi /fi>
SargtoGrobiar, President \W)
Sttotem EpaftMum. President,"^
FWHqkhm CommittM
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridisn Avenue
Mismi Bssch. FIs. 5312120
Rsbbi Dow Rozencwsig
AOATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Mismi Gsrdens Drive
North Miami Bssch 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Fraadmsn
Cantor Zvf Rosen Conssrvstiva
Executive Director Harry J. Sllvarman ffSj
OaM. ajanyan r:* ""J J/-"
Sal. Service HO amiand;**
Fit p.m Sat.fcJO aj. StrtJidey Sfcabbat.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Mismi Bssch
a*-
Dr. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Assistsnt Rsbbi Ronnie Cahin
Yehuda Shlfman, Cantor
Maurice Klein. Rltusl Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
KabbeiatShebbatSpm
law Frt Sen. S p.m Rabat Ranrua C**m
~li There SSS Beauty In Oar Cantor vvhm,
SMhaanwetchantSat San 9a.m.
Vet* HSSaSMl In honor of out taacnara
TEMPLE BETH AM
M60N.Kendall Or.
8. Miami -OfT-OOfT
Leonard Schoolmsn, Sr. Rabbi
Mark Kram. Associate Rabbi
Lynn Gotdstain. Assistant Rsbbi
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Oil
Frt 0:15 p.m
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W 3rd Avenue
Jack Rlsmsr, Rsbbi
Robert Albert.
Cantor
Rav. Milton Freeman.
Ritual Director
854-3911

HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetree Drive, Mismi Beach
532*421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schitt
OaSy rJM am (StaN. S naaa. rti) a r pat
Frt 7pm Sal lam
neCaafraaaoen
1ST NE 10th St. Miami. S73-S9O0
tatO N. Kendall Or.. 5O5-S065
Rabbi Rax 0. Perimeter
Cantor: Racrtef le F. Nelson
warrior EmarHua;
Jacob O. Bornstain
Frt. S p.m. Rabbi Rax 0. Rarimatar
Mabtaaj Sunday Swear
OeOut
! Don'I Lat tha LioM
Lrbanjy: Carrier Rechena f Naiaon
Daily iir.icti Mon and Than. 7: JO am.
Tuas Wad. and Frt. 7:46 am
Sun. S a.m. E vaningt S 30 p.m
YOUNG ISRAEL OF SUNNY ISLES
17274 Collins Avenus
Miami Beech Fl. 33160 947 1196
Hillel Price. President
Rubin R. Dobin. Rsbbi
bsim
Rabbi DoNn
Jawiih lorn Sat San. I 4S am
Waakdaya S a.m. and S:4a pjn
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
222S NE 121 St.. N. Mismi. FL 33181
8915508 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs. Rsbbi
Dr. Joseph A Gorfinkei, /
Rabbi Emeritus .
Moshe Friodler, Cantor

Fn Spm
Sat. S:4S m
Waefcday aan Mon -Frt. ajm.
ion Thur* I p.m Sun t JO am
Sal S 4S a.m
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1S46 Jefferson A vs.. MB.. FL 3J1:
Tei. 53*4112
Rabbi Arvaoia Roasnbarg
Cantor Moshe Buryn
Oatty SantoaSam andp.m
Saturday S: JO am
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W 120th Strsat
238-2001
Rabbi David H. Auerbach
Cantor Stephen Fraadmsn

CJA tbabbatCraaWva Servtea
FrtSarvtoatp.m.
Sal JO am
Sal Mltxvab ol Ertn Rutti Qoldborg
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Relorm
Coral GabtoS 667-5657
Michael B. Elsenstst. Rsbbi
Frt.
i.JOpm
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tai 534-9776
Rsbbi Marvin Rosa
ShoshanSh Raab. Cantor
I Frt 7:10 p.m
Sat. 0:30 a.m
Oaaj Shebbet mm leBea
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St.. Miami Bssch 33141
Rabbi Msyer Abrsmowitz aja.
Art Fridkls. Assoc Rabbi & l
Cantor Murray Yavneh v**
Sat am sabbath aerate*
OaSy ISXioltab Sunday F nea.
a m and S p.m
SatiamaaditSpm
TEMPLE NERTAMID 86>345
7902 Cartyie Ave 666-9M3
Mlsmi Bssch 33141 "-*-
Rabbi Eugene LabovlU
Cantor Edward Kietn
OaySaii.bJaa. frt Saja SJOpm -.'
Sal bHnohaStlpm Sun I JO m
aJ0j m Sat. 0: 4S a m aan frr "at* LabanU

SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Mismi Bssch
971 Northeast 172nd St
North Mlsmi Beach
661 1562
Yaakov Sprung
SHAARE TEFILLAH
TORAH CENTER OF KE*'0ALL
7880 SW 112 Street ^
232-6833
Rabbi Harshai Becker
Oaaty San 7 am Frt lOmtn *m*t*
HaiMM lima Shabboa la mJ^*^,
aMBsl* babaraeandia SyMSSJ **
Sun JO am
on iinin
Founding SabW
-lujJbl
M. LCON KIJXMHSM, Santo, r
OAHY A.OltCKSTBM. Santo. -
HAJWV JOLT, iVirtlarr Rabei
JASOf. Q*AiOO*n~Z RM*.
Mt ALPCRN, Cantor *"*
OAVIO CONVI8CS. CaMor Eaaarttua
Frt. 7:30 p.m. Rabbra Qltokatotn and Owaadofl
Sat. 10 5 a.m. Sanrtea
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N Mismi Bssch Blvd.
Or Msx A. Lipschitz. Rabbi
Z Hsrvey L. Brown. Exec Director

Oatry aanioaa Monday Mrouab Friday
,J 7:0aj. and i:J0 pm
S^jaSajm Sa. Mltnah SatK Munoanj
Mlncha S JO p.m Sun t a m and S.S0 pTn
TEMPLE SINAI 16801 NE 22 A
North Dads's Ratorrn CongfSjsWJ
Ralph P. Kingsiey. Rsbbi "
JuUan I. Cook, Associate Rsboi
Irving Sholkes. Cantor
Barbara S. Ramssy. AdminHtfitor
Frl San
Shaooaia*
-.S.alalJJ^Jf',-
teSaajlat aanr. Sat. s'na" tn*
Seat Zanaa and Adam Baumoam
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CEMJ
BOOOMUierOr. Conservitr*
271 2311 fit)
Or. Norman N. Shapiro. Rsbbi XW/
Benismin Adlsr. Csntor
David Rosenthsl. Auxihsry Cnic
Wnvaa 7 .... Ianda and alSSW
jfflKawy--
Cantor Adtor o"*',**, **
Sana Ctub Otnnar tobowlno f" "* _


Heidi Howard Is 'On Air'
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
IEIDI Howard, just turned
insists that she is not suf-
ing from career bum-out.
['For me, it's exciting to be
Vht on the ball," she says.
Vs exciting to be reading the
(Associated Press) wires
knowing the Howard
iich verdict before it was
badcast. And I love having
opportunity to tell people
Mit it."
Joward, a Miami Beach
>ior, who attends Ransom
erglades School, loves the
Ivs. She fell in love at the
of 14, when she decided
, wanted to be a journalist
er reading Linda Ellerbee's
kk. "And So It Goes."
before Howard was 15, she
working as an intern at
?n Scene," a cable televi-
show on JFTV, Jewish
jeration Television.
\y the age of 16, Howard
i producing the show, which
lured four teenage guests,
expert, and the show's
, and dealt with topics
nng from High School in
I to divorce to drug addic-
and AIDS.
helped out with graphics,
/as occasionally stage
lager, and I would
ketimes help the hosts with
.piling the questions, if I
pted a topic to go in a cer-
direction," says Howard
ler duties.
)ccasionally we had some
istrophes where people
Id cancel on me at 10 a.m.,
before taping then I
Id run around school look-
for someone. I had one or
friends always willing to
!in for me at the last
|ute," recalls Howard,
jlf a guest on two episodes
he show.
TEEN Scene" aired locally
in Philadelphia, Los
les, Boston, New York,
cell as in other selected
|ish markets, according to
Card.
was at Tufts University
pummer school, and on the
day we were all telling
(it ourselves, what we had
Howard recounts.
fcn she mentioned produc-
["Teen Scene," "two kids
totally different parts of
[country said, 'Oh, that's
show where kids sit
|ind and talk about really
I subjects.'
It felt really strange but
|y good," Howard admits,
to be recognized for
elf but for something I had
that they enjoyed."
bese davs. Howard, who is
"It didn't matter that no one knew that I
wrote it became I knew I wrote it, and I
knew that it was good enough that they
used it."
Heidi Howard
no longer with "Teen Scene,"
has a radio show, "Young
Ones," along with three other
teenagers.
The show, which broadcasts
Saturday nights at 6 p.m. on
Public Community Radio,
WDNA 88.9 FM, includes
reviews of television shows
and movies, music, and inter-
views with guests such as
Brett Easton Ellis, young
author of Less Than Zero,
recently released as a motion
picture.
"On Halloween, I interview-
ed a witch," says Howard.
"That was wonderful, not the
usual thing we do on radio."
Every month, Howard does
a college report, including tips
on how to apply to prospective
universities, and a profile of a
selected school.
"I'm not a reporter for this
show," Howard asserts. "I
can't be a reporter because we
don't have news services or
UPI (United Press Interna-
tional). We do a thing called
the calander, (but) we get
everything out of the
newspaper."
If Howard is not a reporter
for her radio show, then she is
"almost" a reporter for
WSVN-Channel 7, where she
handles anchorwoman Sally
Continued on Page 12-B
The 'Mothers March'
More than 7,500 "Mothers
Marchers" in Dade, Broward,
Palm Beach and Martin coun-
ties will ring doorbells in most
South Florida neighborhoods
the weekend of Jan. 22-24 in
the 38th annual March of
Dimes "Mothers March
Against Birth Defects."
The South Florida Mothers
March is part of a national
drive carried out in 700 cities
nationwide each January by
the March of Dimes Birth
Defects Foundation. Officials
point out this is the only time
in the year the March of Dimes
"comes calling" in a neighbor-
to-neighbor fashion.
Money collected supports
programs in birth defects
research, medical services and
public and professional health
education programs. 1988
marks the 50th anniversary of
the March of Dimes, founded
in 1938 as the National Foun-
dation for Infantile Paralysis.
The March of Dimes funded
the development of the Salk
and Salii n vaccines to combat
polio and spearheaded the
mass efforts in the 1950s to in-
oculate every American child.
Help-a-Child will train advocates for Abused Children in
Juvenile Court. The Guardian Ad Litem Training begins Satur-
day. Jan. 23 at 9 a.m. For information. 638-6861.
On Thursday. Feb. 11, at noon, the Hope Center will hold its
annual luncheon and fashion show at the Fontainebieau Hilton
with this year's fashions by "Barbara Katz." For information.
545-7572.
Kendall Area Singles will start the New Year with a rap night
on Friday. Jan. 29 in the Kendalttown Club house. A discussion
on sexuality and relationships featuring Dr. Laura Ross and Mar-
tin S. Hodes has been planned. For information. 448-8600.
The Barbara Gillman Gallery of Miami will launch an exhibition
of recent works by artist Stephen Bird with an opening reception
Friday. Jan. 29. from 7-9 p.m. Bird will be present at the opening:
the exhibit runs through Feb. 12. For information. 573-4898.
Temple Beth Shmuel
The Cuban Hebrew Congregation of Miami
1701 Lenox Ave. Miami Beach
presents a
CANTORIAL CONCERT
Sunday, January 24,1988 at 7:30 P.M.
Chaim Adler
Chief Cantor
rreat Synagogue
Of Tel-Aviv
Moshe Schulhof
Cong. Shaarei Tefila
Los Angeles, Calif.
David Katzenstein
Temple Beth Shmuel
Miami Beach, FT.
TICKETS: $10.00 & $25.00
For Information Call 534-7213
Tickets for sale at Mike's Cigars 465 Arthur Godfrey Rd. (41st.)
_______Kontrol Men's Wear 1633 Washington Avenue
Friday, January 22, 1988/The Jewiah Floridian Page 7-B
Men's Clubs To Meet
The International Officers
and Members of the Executive
Board of the Federation of
Jewish Men's Clubs will meet
in Miami, on Jan. 22-25.
Leading the officers and ex-
ecutive Board members will be
Dr. Jerome Agrest of Chicago,
Illinois, president of the 35,000
member men's club
organization.
The Federation of Jewish
Men's Clubs is comprised of
some 350 member synagogue-
affiliated clubs situated
throughout the United States,
Canada, and Israel. Its prin-
cipal goal is to strengthen the
Conservative movement
through the development of
strong leadership for its clubs,
their synagogues, and other
parts of the Conservative
movement. The local region
will host Friday evening ser-
vices and dinner at Temple
Zion Israelite Center. On
Saturday, the visitors will at-
tend services at the several
Conservative congregations in
Greater Miami. Saturday
afternoon will be devoted to a
Torah study session. The
working sessions for the
weekend will begin Saturday
evening and extend through
Monday afternoon.
The Officers and members of
the Florida Region Federation
of Jewish Men's Clubs, Inc.
will participate in a Regional
Leadership Training Seminar
Dr. Jerome Agrest
on ''Developing and
Strengthening Leadership" to
be held at the Miami Airport
Lakes Holiday Inn, on Sunday,
Jan. 24, from 9 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. For information,
271-2311.
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Hot Water
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454-9210
WINSTON TOWERS 100
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to temple. For tale or rant.
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FRIDAY IWGHT AMD SHABBAT LUNCH BY
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FRI.BY PREPAYMENT ONLY 3925 COLLINS AVE.
______________________wbs> fam*.v nonutran since )9*t
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This Man is a Master."
Peter Clayton Miami/South Hondo Magazine
CnefRaumamdo
MADR6 CUCINfi
(formerly of 79th Street Roimoodo's)
Gourmet Italian
12350 N.. 6 Five.
North Miami
Reservations 893-6071
Volet Parking Closed Mondays


rggj b-tt The Jewish Ftoridian/Friday, January 22, 1988
Deaths
,
A.J. Harris
Services were held last Fri-
day for A.J. Harris, who was
active on the Mount Sinai
Medical Center board of
trustees for 30years and presi-
dent of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation from 1961
to 1962. Harris died at Mount
Sinai. He was 88.
Born in St. Louis, Harris
was successful enough in the
real estate market during the
early years of the Depression
to purchase the John A.
Wathen distillery in Kentucky.
In 1947, Harris moved to
niami with an eye on semi-
etirement, but opened instead
I he Midwest Mortgage Co. He
liter acquired controlling in-
t?rest in the Metropolitan
Pank of Miami and the
Everglades Bank in Fort
Lauderdale. After a tew years,
he opened the Bank of Dade
County in North Dade, retir-
ing several years ago.
During his term with the
Jewish Federation, the Jewish
Community Foundation for
Legacies and Bequests was
established.
His service with Mount Sinai
began in 1957 when he joined
the hospital's board of
trustees. He served as the
organization's treasurer,
secretary and vice president
before being named a life
trustee in 1970.
Harris is survived by his
wife, May; sons.Marvin, L.J.
and David; daughter,
Rosemary Green; and 11
grandchildren.
Educator Dorothy Lear
Dorothy F. Lear, a devoted
educator who for years in-
spired students as principal of
ihe Lear School, died Sunday.
Lear was always striving to
expand her own education at
the same time that she was a
guiding force to 1 er students.
She had earned e ght Masters
degrees in the fild of educa-
tion and received her doc-
torate degree ir education
from the University of Miami
in 1986.
She was the first woman to
be elected to membership in
the Miami Chapter of Phi
Delta Phi in 1972.
Lear, the widow of the late
Richard E. Lear, had been a
resident of Miami Beach for
the past 48 years. She is sur-
vived by her brother and
sister, Frank and Susan
Freeman; nephews, Michael
and Jeffrey Freeman; niece,
Elizabeth Freeman; mother-in-
law, Mrs. Ida Lear Friedman;
and brother-in-law, Dr. Walter
Lear.
Poet Hannah Kahn
Hannah Kahn, an award-
winning poet whose works
mirrored her lifetime, died last
Thursday of cancer. She was
76.
Kahn had more than 400
works published, her first ap-
pearing in Good Housekeeping
when she was 28. In subse-
quent years, her poems ap-
peared in such publications as
Saturday Review, Harper's,
The New York Times, Poetry,
Literary Review and she
authored two books of poetry,
"Eve's Daughter" and "Time,
Wait."
A native of New York, who
moved to Miami in 1938, Kahn
was nominated to be Florida's
Poet Laureate in 1976. Widow
of the late Frank Kahn, Han-
nah Kahn worked in a fur-
niture showroom for more
than 40 years. She was also
The Miami Herald's poetry
editor in the 1960s. She won
numerous poetry awards.
Kahn is survived by her two
sons, Melvin and Daniel, and
daughter Vivian.
BUSCH. Julius, 93. of North Miami Beach,
January 19. Services and interment held
at Star of David Memorial Park.
GOLDBERGER. Leon. 80, of North Miami,
January 19. Eternal Light. Lakeside
Memorial Park.
BURDEEN. Sylvia, of Miami Beach,
January 18. The Riverside. Lakeside
Memorial Park.
COLTUN, Herbert, 68, of Miami, January
17. The Riverside.
ROSTHAL, Robert 62 of Miami. Jan. 12.
The Riverside.
ZIMMERMAN. Harry, 92, of North Miami
Beach, Jan. 12. Levitt-Weinstein.
AZORSKY. David. Services in New York.
LUNDY, Leon M 66. of Miami Lakes. Jan.
15. The Riverside. Interment at Lakeside
Memorial Park.
TOREM, Harry of Hal Harbour Menorah
Chapels.
KAHN, Hannah A 76. of Miami. January
14. The Riverside.
WIDRICH. Warren C. 50. Services were
held in Boston.
GILLMAN, Charles, Jan. 13 Menorah
Gardens.
LACHER, Dorothy of Miami Beach Rubin
Zilbert.
VOLCH. Mayti, 77, of Miami. Jan. 14. Ser-
vices were held. Interment at Star of
David Memorial Park.
LEVIN. Herman of Miami. Eternal Light.
Interment at Lakeside Memorial Park.
DREISPUL, Roy S.. 78. of North Miami,
Jan. 15. The Riverside Lakeside Memorial
Park.
JAFFE, Dr. Marc, 36 of Coral Gables, Jan.
16. Services and interment held at Mt.
Nebo Cemetery.
LEAR, Dorothy. F.. Jan. 17. Blasberg
Funeral Chapel. Interment at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
SEYMOUR. Sylvia, of North Miami Beach.
December 31. Services in New York.
WILSON, Rom Renay. of Miami Beach.
January 10. Levit-Weinstein.
WERTCHAFTER, William, of Miami
Beach, January 11. The Riverside.
LANDSMAN, Lotus, of Miami Beach.
Menorah Chapels
DROSNES. Eve, of Miami Beach, January
8. Blaaberg Chapel
RICHMOND, Gilbert. 59, of Miami. Ser-
vieea ware hekJ.
BYKOFSKY. Herman, 71. of North Miami
Beach, January 7. Levitt-Weinstein.
SOODMAN, Michael S of North Miami
Beach, January 7. The Riverside. Inter-
ment at Star of David Cemetery.
BENNETT. Samuel A., 71. of Reddick,
Fla., January 7. Services and interment at
Lakeside Memorial Park.
ROSSMAN. Lillian Weinatock, of Miami
Beach. Blaaberg Chapel
GREENBERG. Joseph. 96, of Surfnde.
January 8. Levitt-Weinstein Lakeside
Memorial Park.
BOBROW, Esther, of Miami Beach
Menorah Chapel.
CHAPMAN. Martin Robert, of North
Miami Beach, Januarys. Blaaberg Chapel
WEINER, William (BUI), of Miami Beach.
January 8. The Riverside
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Public Notice
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-43148
SEC. 22
STOCKTON. WHATLEY.
DAVIN A COMPANY, Florida
corporation,
Plaintiffs)
vs.
GLENN E. GUISE, et al.
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and beat
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County.
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 8th day of February. 1988,
the following described
property:
Lot 10, in Block 3, of
HIGHLAND PARK ESTATES,
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 66. at Page
12, of the Public Record of Dade
County, Florida.
DATED the 20th day of
January, 1188.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sams
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal A Yarchin
('entrust Financial Center. Suite
2300
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami, Florida 33131-2198
Published 1-22-29
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-35866
SEC. 18
ALLIANCE MORTGAGE COM-
PANY, a Florida corporation,
Plaintiffls)
vs.
ARTHUR C. WELLS. JR.. et a!..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above. I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami. Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M.. on the 8th day
of February. 1988. the following
described property:
The South 75 feet of the East 193
feet of the North 320 feet of the
East 393 feet of the East % of the
Northeast V of the Southwest Vt
of Section 35. Township 52 South.
Rane 41 East, less the East 35 feet
thereof, lying and being in Dade
County, Florida.
DATED the 30th day of
January. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Klerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
D*Pty Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin
Centrust Financial Center, Suite
2300
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami, Florida
Published 1-22-29
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SUN INVESTORS at
number 201 Crandon Boulevard, in
the City of Key Biscayne, Florida,
33149 intends to register said
"me with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 23
day of December, 1987.
A] Richter
33-1/3 interest
Doris Okonaky
38-1/3 interest
Joseph Tuminello
33 1/3 interest
Attorney for Applicant
ALBERT W. GUFFANTI, PA.
ATTRNEY AT LAW
COCONUT GROVE BANK
BLDG. SUITE 306
2701 S. BAYSHORE DRIVE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 38138
18200 January 1,8.16,22,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OK
THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT W AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
Cues Ne. 87-7917-CA-el
SKO-FED MORTGAGE
CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,
-TS-
ANTONIO ALVARADO and
MARIA J. de ALVARADO,
Husband and Wife, if bring and if
dead, all unknown parties
deiming by, through, under or
against the named Defendants
who are not known to be dead or
aim whether said unknown
parties claim as heirs, devisee*.
grantees, assignees, benors,
creditors, trustees or other
claimants against the aatd
ANTONIO ALVARADO and
MARIA J. de ALVARADO.
Husband and Wife. ZAIDA T.
GARCIA, a single woman, if
living and if dead, all unknown
parties claiming by, through.
under, or against the named
Defendants who are not known to
be dead or alive whether said
unknown parties claim as heirs,
devisees, grantees, assignees,
Benors, creditors, trustees of
other claimants against the said
ZAIDA T. GARCIA, MIRASOL
OCEAN TOWER
CONDOMINIUM. INC.,
CENTRAL ADJUSTMENT
BUREAU. rNC. and HIALEAH
HOSPITAL, rNC,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
ZAIDA T. GARCIA, if living
and if dead, all unknown par-
tial claiming by, through,
under, or against the named
Defendant who are not
known to be dead or alive
whether said unknown par-
ties claim as hers, devisees,
grantees, assignees, benors.
creditors, trustees of other
claimants against said Defen-
dant, ZAIDA T. GARCIA
RESIDENCE: UNKNOWN
LAST KNOWN MAILING
ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to russrshhsh a Promissory
Note and Mortgage and an action
to foreclose a Mortgage on the
following pi opart y in Dade Coun-
ty. Florida:
Unit 1804 according to the
Declaration of Condominium
of MIRASOL OCEAN
TOWERS CONDOMINIUM
dated February 17, 1976,
recorded on February 24,
1976. in the Official Record
Book 9244. Page 104. in the
Official Record Book 9244,
Page 104, amended on
February 17, 1976 and
recorded on March 80. 1976
in Official Record Book 9279,
Page 61, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida
has been filed against you and you
are I squired to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on JEFFREY W. LEASURE,
Plaintiff's attorney, whose address
is P.O. Box 061169, Fort Myers,
Florida 83906-1169. on or before
February 12. 1988, and (He the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint
or petition.
WITNESS nay hand and seal of
this Court on January 6,1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18224 January 16, 22,29,
February 5, 1988
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASK NO: 87-66396
IN RE: The Marriage of:
GUYLNAT BREEDLOVE,
Petitioner,
and
THOMAS Z. BREEDLOVE,
Respondent.
TO: THOMAS Z. BREEDLOVE.
Residence unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney, 612 Nor-
thwest 12th Ave., Miami, Florida,
33136, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before February 5,
1988, otherwise a default will be
entered.
December 29, 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: Clarinda Brown
18209 January 1.8,16,22,1988
Ui THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-69467 CA 16
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATION OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS,
Plaintiff
vs.
DANIEL J. CHERY. et al.,
Defendants.
TO: DORISE M.
BERNADOTTE, 0km
DORISE B. CHERY
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
her, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right,
title or interest in the
property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 56, Block 96, THIRD AD-
DITION TO CAROL CITY,
according to the Plat thereof,
recorded in Plat Book 66,
Page 98, PUBLIC
RECORDS of Dade County,
Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve s copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
February 5. 1988, and file the
original with the clerk of thos court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 31 day of
December. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18214 January 8, 15,22,29, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 87-42094 -FC- 29
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
JAMES M. OLIVER
Petitioner
and
DEBRA A. OLIVER
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Debra A. Oliver,
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
was filed against you; you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses upon: I.J. GRAFF, at-
torney for Petitioner, 633 N.E. 167
St., N.M.B. Fl. 33162 on or before
February 26, 1988 and file original
with the clerk of this court other-
wise a default will be entered
against you.
Dated January 19, 1988.
RICHARD BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
18242 January 22, 29;
February 5,12, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-46176 CA 04
Fla. Bar Ne. 476402
NOTICE OF ACTION
STOCKTON. WHATLEY,
DAVIN A COMPANY, a
Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
CARLOS A. SANCHEZ;
MARIA C. SANCHEZ a/k/a
MARIA P. SANCHEZ, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: William N. Irvine. Patricia Ir-
vine f/k/a Patricia L. Piccolo,
Susan Fenster, Eduardo Raul
Grodsinksy, Nicholas San
Juan and Daisy Cantillo,
whose residences are
unknown, and the unknown
parties who may be spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assign nm, benors, creditors,
trustees and all parties claim-
ing interest by, through,
under or against said Defen-
dants, who are not know to be
dead or alive, and all parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title, or interest in the
property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foredeee a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Friday, January 22, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Lot 4, Block 41. of FAIR-
WAY ESTATES. SECTION
SEVEN, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 98, at Page 67, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Albert C. Galloway, Jr., Es-
quire, of Rosenthal A Yarchin, At-
tomeya for Plaintiff, Suite 2300,
CenTrust Financial Center, 100
Southeast Second Street, Miami,
Florida 33131-2198, on or before
January 29, 1988. and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on December 24, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER, Clerk
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
18206 January 1,8.16,22,1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Artie. Ne. 67-61448 FC (28)
FAMILY DIVISION
ALIAS
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ERMA MOORE,
Petitioner,
and
JEAN ROBERT NELZY,
Respondent.
TO: JEAN ROBERT NELZY
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve s copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
MELVTN J. ASHER, ESQ. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 825 South Bayshore Drive,
Suite 643, Miami. FL 88131, and
file the original with the derk of
the above styled court on or before
February 5, 1988; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 29 day of December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18213 January 8.16. 22.29.1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-46981 CA 18
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS
Plaintiff,
vs.
MICHAEL L. CHAPMAN, et
ux., et al.,
Defendants.
TO: MICHAEL L. CHAPMAN
and
VIRGINIA L. CHAPMAN,
his wife
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against them, and all
parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or in-
terest in the property herein
described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 5, in Block 10, of
PALMLAND HOMES
SOUTH, NO. FOUR, accor-
ding to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 86, at
Page 72, of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida 33146 on or before
February 19, 1988. and to file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorneys or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 15th day of
January, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
18238 January 22, 29;
February 5. 12,1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH CIRCUIT,
04 AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Civil Actioa N.: 88-01644-19
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
EARL WEBSTER
and
PAMELA WEBSTER
TO: PAMELA WEBSTER
1136 Evergreen Avenue
Bronx. N.Y. 10472
A Petition for Dissolution of
your Marriage has been filed in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses on Alec Roes, attorney
for Petitioner, at 160 SUNNY
ISLES BLVD. N. MIAMI, FLA.
and file the original with the derk
of the above court on or before
February 19, 1988; otherwise a
default will be entered against you.
Dated in Miami on 13th January.
1988.
RICHARD BRINKER,
Clerk
Dade County, Florida
By: T. Casamayor
As Deputy Clerk
18225 January 15.22,29;
February 5,1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICmOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Business Consultants
and Mailing Service at 3660 Coral
Way Miami FL 83146 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Antonio Vasano
18218 January 8,15,22,29,1988
PUBLIC NOTICE
The annual report of Victor Posner
Foundation, Inc. is available for
public inspection at 6917 Office
Building, 6917 Collins Avenue.
Miami Beach, Fl. 866-7771, for 180
days from this date, January 14,
1988. '
18240
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-10
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
EVELYN ROSENBERG,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Evelyn Rosenberg, deceased,
File Number 88-10, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is Dade County
Courthouse, 73 West Flagier
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice is served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 22, 1988.
Personal Representative:
ARTHUR S. ROSENBERG
1320 Squire Drive
Ambler, PA 19002-1516
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Sparber, Shevin, Shapo and
Heilbronner, P.A.
One Southeast Third Avenue
Miami. FL 33131
Telephone: (805) 3474700
18237 January 22,29.1988
NOTICE UNDER
ncTrnous name law
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name L'ESSENCE at 8160
SW 8 St No. 118 Miami. FL 88144
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Edgar A. Valencia
.....10921 SW 87 Ct
Miami, FL 88167
18207 January 1,8.16, 22.1988


Psf, 10-B The Jewiah Ftoridian/Friday, January 22,1988
__.__-^ INthbcncurrCOUBTOF
FORECLOSURE SALES-PUBLIC NOTICES jsr

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
DMriNtt
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SULM ACKERMAN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING1
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE: i
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that the administration of
the estate of SULIM ACKER
MAN. deceased. File Number
87-6906 (02). is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County.,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33130. The:
personal representative of the.
estate is Eugene J. Weiss, whose]
address is 407 Lincoln Road. Pen-,
thouse N.E. Miami Beach. Florida
33139. The name and address of
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS i
NOTICE, to file with the dark of
the above court a written state-.
meat of any daim or demand they:
may have. Each daim moat be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the daim. the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount dawned I
If the daim m not yet due, the date '
when it w* become due shall be!
stated If the daim is contingent or !
iiniqtjrtwtei the nature of the;
uncertainty shall be stated. If the |
dan is ssuued the security shall
be described The claimant shall'
del n swTVtmt conies of the
daim to the dark to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per
AH parsons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed an required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that rhsflsngf the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
itis. earn latin, or the venue or
juriadsctioa of the court
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
thia Notice of Araawiiiari atiiwi
January 16. 1988.
EUGENE J. WEISS
As Personal Representative
ftlw Batata of
SULIM ACKERMAN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
Eugene J. Weiss
407 Lincoln Road. PH-N.E
Miami Beach. PL S3139
Telephone: (306) 534-4721
18234 January 15. 22. 1988
NOTICE UNDER
FKTTTTOCS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
to
thafie-
. of SUN INVESTORS-
t nuaiber 201 Crandon
Boulevard, m th* City of Key B
cays*. Florida, 33149 intends to
isgistst the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida,
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 23
day of December 1987.
ALAN RICHTER 100% interest
Attorney for Applicant
ALBERT W. GUFFANTI. P.A.
ATTORNEY AT LAW
COCONUT GROVE BANK
BLDG SUITE 306
2701 S. BAYSHORE DRIVE
MIAMI. FLORIDA 33133
18200 January 1.8.15.22. 1988
NOTICE I'NDEB
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the underagned. deamng to
engage in buesneas under the fie
titioas name CAPITAL VIDEO at
11743 SW. 13 Street. Miami. Fl
33184 munda to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Jorge Pintado
1*22}- January 15. 22. .
February 5, 1988
US THE CIRCUIT COUBT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case Ne. 17-477 C A -30
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organised and
existing under the laws of the
United States of America.
Plaintiff,
va.
PEOPLES EQUITY
MORTGAGE. INC et al.,
Defendants
TO: JUDE SMITH and
JOAN SMITH, his wife
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by.
through, under or against
JUDE SMITH and JOAN
SMITH, his wife, and all
parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or
interest in the property
herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County. Florida:
CONDOMINIUM UNIT NO.
622. OF BENT TREE
PARCEL SIX. CON-
DOMINIUM NUMBER 6,
ACCORDING TO THE
DECLARATION OF CON-
DOMINIUM THEREOF. AS
RECORDED IN OFFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 10698 AT
PAGE 2081 OF THE
PUBLIC REC0RD8 OF
DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Grthto. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1670 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Floods, 33146 on or before
February 6, 1988. and file the
oogmal with the derk of this court
either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwiee s default will
be entered agamst yon for the
rehef daaaanded in the mrnplarnt
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court thia SI day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18215 January 8.15.22. 29, 1988
Cavcurr court or
COMPANY,
L. KOLL, at al..
TO ROGER L K0LL
No. 413
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that aa
oa the following described
CONDOMINIUM UNIT!
NUMBER 411 OF LAGO DEL
RET CONDOMINIUM NUMBER
TWO ACCORDING TO THE
DECLARATION OF CON-
DOMINIUM THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN OFFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 10*73. AT
PAGE 1946. OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
ha* been filed agamst you and you
to esrve a copy of
defenses if any, tort.
Attorney for
i Suite
214. 1670 Martnaaj* Avasase. Cor-
al Gables. Florida 33146 oa or
February 5. 1988 and fist
with the Clark of thai
IN AND FOB
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case N*. 87 49633 CA-24
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS.
Plaintiff
THEODORE PRESSLEY,
etal..
Defendants.
TO: CAROLYN REDDICK
Residence Unkonwn
If alive, and if dead, all par
tie* claiming interest by,
through, under or against
CAROLYN REDDICK, and
all parties having or claiming
to have any right, title or in-
terest in the property herein
described.
You are hereby notified that an
action for foreclosure of mortgage
on the following described proper
ty in DADE County. Florida:
Lot 9. Block 8, of NICHOLS
GOLF ESTATES, according
to the Plat thereof, as record-
ed in Plat Book 50 at Page
38, of the Public Records of
Dade County. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defense*, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Gitliu, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1670 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
February 5. 1988 and file the
original with the derk of this court
either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately
thereafter: otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
rehef demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of thia court thia 29th day of
December. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
18211 January 1.8.16.22,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 6840439 (11)
NOTICE OF ACTION
LINCOLN SERVICE
CORPORATION.
Plaintiff
GREAT FINANCIAL
FEDERAL, et al.,
Dafandanta.
TO: GUARDIAN BANK, N.A.
49 N. Franklin Street
Hampataad,
New York 11660
Attn: Edward Lang
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclose of Mortgage
on the following described
ptupsity.
Lot 10, in Block 8. of SE-
COND ADDITION TO KEN
DALL POINT, according to
the plat thereof, recorded in
Plat Book 80. at Page 75. of
the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Gitlitx, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
m I 214. 1670 Madruga Avenue. Coral
^! ""l** Z )<*** F1orid- 33146 on or before
a 'February 12. 1988 and file the
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-63098 CA 15
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS
Plaintiff,
va.
ALLEN G. ADAMS, etal..
Defendant*.
TO: ALEX S. EDWARDS
and
MARTHA P. EDWARDS,
his wife
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by. through,
under or against them, and all
parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or in-
terest in the property herein
described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foredose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County. Florida:
Lot 2. in Block 58. LESLIE
ESTATES SECTION FIVE,
according to the Plat thereof.
as recorded in Plat Book 96,
at Page 79. of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida 33146 on or before
February 19. 1988. and to file the
original with the derk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorneys or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 15th day of
January. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
18239 January 22.29;
February 5. 12,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA EN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-49304 CA 19
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERAN'S AFFAIRS.
rULintin
V*.
KENSWOBTH LLOYD
McLENNON. et al..
Defendant*
TO: KENSWORTH LLOYD
MCLENNON
Ressdence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parti** claiming interest by.
through, under or agamst
KENSWORTH LLOYD
MCLENNON. and all parties
havmg or dainung to have
any right, utle or mtereat in
the property herein
be entered agesaat yea for the
Imthe
WITNESS my head aad the seal
of thai Court thai 31 day of
Decasabar 1967
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clark of the Court
By BARBABA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy dark
1S217 Jamsarvs. 15.22.29 1988
the folowmg property in DADE
County. Florida:
Lot 16. in Block 7. of
GOLDEN HIGHLAND
ESTATES, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 63. at page 56. of
the Pubbc Records of Dade
County. Florida.
ha* been filed sgamat you and you
to esrve a copy of
iefensea. if any, to it
Faber, Attorney for
PlasBtiff. whose address is Suite
214, 1670 Madruga Avaaue. Coral
Gables. Florida. S3146 on or before
5. 1988. and fist the
with the dark of this court
before service on Plaintiff i
attorney or immediately
adafauhwfll
be ......1 agamst you for the
the seal
day of
WITNESS ary
of thai court thai 31
Daeasaber. 1937.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Aa Chart of th* Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Aa Deputy dark
13216 January 8. 15. a. 29. 1988
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 6th day of
January. 1988.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Jennis L. Russell
As Deputy Clerk
18232 January 15. 22. 29:
February 5.1988
EN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
EN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 17-64461
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS.
Plaintiff
vs.
VANA TAYLOR, at al..
Defendants.
TO: HOUSEHOLD
FINANCE
CORPORATION
OF HIALEAH. I
a dissolved Florida
Corporation
c/o D.D. GARDNER -
Director
621 Rolling Lane
Arlington Heights,
Illinois ___
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 21, leas the North 5 feet
of Block 6, EAST LIBERTY
CITY SECTION "A." accor-
ding to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 39,
Page 19, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Gitlitz. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida. 33146 on or before
February 5, 1988 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff s attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 29th day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clark of th* Court
By Barbara Rodnguei
Aa Deputy Clerk
18210 January 1.8, 15.22. 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-66181
NOTICE OF ACTION
COWGER A MILLER
MORTGAGE COMPANY. ENC.
Plaintiff
va.
CHERYL FRASER, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: SECURITY PACIFIC
EXECUTIVE/
PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES. INC.. f/k/a
POSTAL EXECUTIVE
FINANCIAL SERVICES.
ENC.
14201 East Fourth Avenue
Aurora, Colorado 80011
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 12. in Block 20. of COR-
AL REEF ESTATES SE-
COND ADDITION, accor-
ding to th* Plat thereof, aa
recorded in Plat Book 81 at
Page 74 of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Stuart H. Githtt. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose addreaa is Suite
214.1670 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
January 29. 1988 and file the
original with the Clark of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwiee a default will
be entered against you for the
rehef demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court thia 28 day of
December, 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By CLARENDA BROWN
Aa Deputy Clerk
18202 January 1.8.16.22.1988
EN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
EN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case Ne. 87-62231 (A-06
NOTICE OF ACTION
ALLEN R GREENWALD
and
JILL F GREENWALD.
his wife.
Plaintiff
va.
JOHN LEE UPSON.
etal..
Defendants
TO JOHN LEE UPSON
and JESSIE GLADDEN
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
dainung interest by. through,
under or acainst JOHN LEE
UPSON and JESSIE GUrt
DENandaJlpartie.^
d^ungtohaveanyng^*
tie or mtereat in the nZz
harem described ^Pm',
You are hereby notified that u
action for foreclosure of mortal,
on the following described prS?
ty in DADE County, FVidaT
Lot 11, Block 18 f
AVOCADO PARK,
ding to the Plat thereof
recorded in Plat Book 6
Page 11, of the Public
Records of Dade County
Florida. "
has been filed against you and aa
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to j
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue Con|
Gablea, Florida, 33146 on or before
February 5. 1988, and ffjj the
original with the derk of this com
either before service on Plainuffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default wj)
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the sal
of that court this 29th day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
Aa Deputy Clerk
18212 January 1.8,15,22,1988
EN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. EN AND FOB
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 37-34940 CA li
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION,
a United States corporation.
Plaintiff
v.
EDDIE E. ANGUL0, KAIV
ANGULO. and the unknon
spouses, heirs, devisees, grant**
creditors, or other parties daimaj
by, through, under or agmc
them; PEOPLES EQITTY MOB
TGAGE. ENC. a Florida corpon
Don. I.J. MANAGEMENT COM
PANY. ENC. and the unknon
assignees, lienors. creditor!.
trustee*, or others claiming h
through, under or against such
poration. JOHN DOE r.'u
FREDERICK DUGGAN, isi
JANE DOE: n/k/a MURIEL
DUGGAN;
Defendant*
TO Eddie E. Angulo. lurj
Angulo. I.J. Managsaat
Company, Inc.. whoit
nili mes are unknown, al
the unknown parties whoa*
be spouses, heirs, devasa
grantees, assignees, bean
creditors, trustees, sad i
pertiee riaiming interest ty
through, under or against a*
Defendants, who arc at
known to be dead or alive, aa
al partial having or denial
to bav* any right, utle, ora j
tereat in the property hera
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
action to foreclose s mort8H*f
the following property in Dak
County, Florida:
Lot 19. in Block 56. of NOB
WOOD FOURTH ADDI
TION, according to the Pht
thereof, as recorded in Pal
Book 57. at Page 93, of tat
Pubbc Records of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
has been filed against you and "'
are required to serve s copy
your written defenses, if any.
Albert C. Galloway. Jr., E*
Rosenthal A Yarchin, Suite B
CenTruat Finaiwal Center W
Southeast 2nd Street. Mu
Florid* 33131-2198. on or beW
February 19. 1988. and *
original with the Clerk of *
Court either before ****? \
Plaintiff's attorney or immedaw
thereafter: otherwise a default" i
be entered against you &J"
rehef demanded in the <- WITNESS my hand and ts*
of thia Court tha 12th January. 1988. ,.,cb
RICHARD P. BRINtt*
By Barbara Rodnguei
Deputy Clerk
Albert C. Galloway. Jr-E^
Rosenthal A Yarchin
Suite 2300
CenTruat Financial Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami. Florida 33131 -2198
Telephone: (306) 374-6600
SWD No. 214974-1-216-^
FHA N. 092-245471-221
18233 January .**
February
5.W


Friday, January 22, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
JENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-17867
BEC. 11
.LLIANCE MORTGAGE COM-
PANY, A Florid* corporation
flaintiffls)
V8.
;RVI0 FRAGA. etc., et |L,
efendantfs)
INOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
ursuant to an Order or Final
bdgment entered in this case
pw pending in said Court, the
vie of which is indicated above, I
(ill sell to the highest and best
dder for cash on THE SOUTH
TEPSof the Dade County Cour-
ouse in Miami, Dade County,
orida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
1ST day of Febraary, 1M8,
|c followiag described
pt 23, Block 34, KINGS
IRDENS SECTION THREE.
ording to the Plat thereof, as
orded in Plat Book 95, Page 30,
the Public Records of Dade
unty, Florida.
)ATED the 13th day of January,
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
nit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
ey for Plaintiff
enthal & Yarchin, P.A.,
ntrust Financial Center, Suite
i Southeast Second Street
Florida 33137
shad 1/15-22
\ THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
: ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
[CASE NO. 87-48377 CA 04
NOTICE OF ACTION
'MINISTRATOR OF
TERANS AFFAIRS,
ttatiff
VARD S. DUMO, JR., et al.,
lefendants.
: CENTURION BAIL
BONDS, AGENT
2301 North weat
Seventh Street
Suite I
Miami, Florida 88126
|OU ARE NOTIFIED that an
on for Foreclosure of Mortgage
the following described
erty:
ot 3 and the Northeast 19
et of Lot 2. Block 74. of
REVISED PLAT NO. TWO,
DPA LOCKA, according to
lie Plat thereof, as recorded
) Plat Book 34, at Page 67 of
Public Records of Dade
nty, Florida.
| been filed against you and you
| required to serve a copy of
r written defenses, if any, to it
[Stuart H. Gitlitx, Esq., At-
.' for Plaintiff, whose address
[Suite 214. 1570 Madrugs
nue. Coral Gables, Florida.
1 on or before February 12,
| and file the original with the
< of this Court either before
[ice on Plaintiffs attorney or
diately thereafter, otherwise
rfault will be entered against
I for the relief demanded in the
J>lint.
TTNESS my hand and the seal
'Ms court this 7th day of
try 1988
| RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
January 15,22,29
February 5. 1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
INSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
[THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
P ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
pCUrr OF FLORIDA, IN
"ID FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 88-00886 (22)
ION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
No. 001473
. E: The Marriage of
[-IANCE BLANC
TA SHERRICE BLANC
IBENITA
[SHERRICE BLANC
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street, North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before February 12,
1988; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 8th day of January, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Jennis L. Russell
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18231 January 15,22, 29;
February 5,1988
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, UN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 84-47144
SEC. 26
SOVRAN MORTGAGE COR-
PORATION, successor in in-
terest to VNB Mortgage Cor-
poration by Merger with and in-
to F 4 M Mortgage Corporation
on December 31. IMS, as
simultaneous name change fro*
F A M Mortgage Corporation to
Ssvraa Mortgage Corporation,
Plaintifffs)
vs.
ELADIO LOPEZ and CARMEN
LOPEZ, his wife, et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 1ST day of February, 1988.
the followiag described
property:
Lot 5 less the West 15 feet. Block
3, 2ND AMENDED PLAT OF
PART OF BUENA VISTA PARK,
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 4, Page
170 of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
DATED the 13th day of
January, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clark of Circait Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Joseph M. Paniello, Esquire
One Tampa City Center, Suite
2720
201 North Franklin Street
Tampa, Florida 33602
Published 1/16-22
Di THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nesessr 87-7302
DrriaisaOl
IN RE: ESTATE OF
TEDDY BEIN,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
(Fieri*. Bar Ne 048124)
The administration of the estate
of TEDDY BEIN, deceased. File
Number 87-7302, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami. Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice waa served that
challenge* the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 15, 1988.
Personal Representative:
ROSE COHEN
20811 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Apt 28, Building J
North Miami Beach. Fla. 33179
ALAN R. LORBER, P.A.
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
By: ALAN R. LORBER
1111 Lincoln Road, Suite 680
Miami Beach, Florida 88189
Telephone: (305) 588-1401
18226 January 16.22,1988
W THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 88-00444 (04)
Florida Bar No. 082676
NOTICE OF ACTION
HELEN VAUGHAN,
a free dealer,
Plaintiff
vs.
ELIZABETH FENNELL, as
Trustee in trust for KATHRYN
NELL EMILE. and also all other
persons unknown claiming any
right, title, estate, lien or interest
in the real property described in
plaintiffs complaint adverse to
plaintiffs ownership, or any cloud
upon puuintiff s title thereto,
Defendants.
TO: ELIZABETH FEN-
NELL, as Trustee in trust for
KATHRYN NELL EMILE,
and also all other persons
unknown claiming any right,
title, estate, ben or interest in
the real property described in
plaintiffs complaint adverse
to plaintiffs ownership, or
any cloud upon plaintiffs title
thereto
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an ac-
tion to cancel a lease on the follow-
ing property in Dade County,
Florida:
Lot 11 and 12 in Block 1 of
COLLEGE PARK ADDI-
TION according to the Plat
thereof, recorded in Plat
Book 9 at Page 127 of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on HAROLD A. TURTLETAUB,
Plaintiffs attorney, whose address
is 99% Sunset Drive, Suite 108,
Miami, FL 33173. on or before
February 12. 1988, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
DATED this 8th day of January,
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
18229 January 15,22, 29
February 6.1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
, File Nusaeer 87-4006
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SULIM ACKERMAN,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS'
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of SULIM
ACKERMAN, deceased, File
Number 87-6906(02), is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
florid*. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which u 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate is Eugene J. Weiss, whose
address is 407 Lincoln Road. Pen-
thouse, N.E., Miami Beach,
Florida S3189. The name and ad-
dress of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands sgainst the estate are re-
quired, WITHING THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FHtST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the dark of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
daim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE? to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of tiie personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
January 16, 1988.
EUGENE J. WEISS
Aa Personal Representative
of the Estate of
SULIM ACKERMAN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Eugene J. Wain
407 Lincoln Road, PH-N.E.
Miami Beach, FL S8189
Telephone: (806) 634-4721
18227 January 16.22.1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
DI THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Artiest No. 87-4404O 24
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
W RE: THE PETITION OF
MARIA MAGDALENA
CHALCO.
Petitioner/Wife,
and
RAMON A. CHALCO.
Respondent/Husband.
TO: RAMON A. CHALCO
Respondent
Residence UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an -action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
EUGENE LEMLICH, ESQ., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 2720 West Fbigler Street,
Miami, Florida SS1S6, and file the
original with the derk of the above
styled court on or before January
29, 1988; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 23 day of December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By JENNIS L. RUSSELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EUGENE LEMLICH. ESQ.
2720 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33136
Attorney for Petitioner
18201 January 1,8,15. 22,1988
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DAM COUNTY. FLORIDA
FC CASE NO: M WOIJ 11
IN RE: The Marriage of
ROSALIE JOSEPH.
Petitioner/Wife,
VB.
CIUS JOSEPH,
Respondent/Husband
TO CIUS JOSEPH
Residence Unknown
shall serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of Mar
riags upon ANTHONY CAR
BONE, Attorney, 012 N.W. 12th
88186. Miami. Florida with Court
Clerk on or before February 12,
1988. otherwise a default will be
entered.
January 6, 1968.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
18226 January 16, 22, 29;
February 6,1968
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-66382
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVTNGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI,
a United States Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RITA BARR, individually, and as
Personal Representative of the
Estate of RICK BARR. deceased,
etal.,
Defendants.
TO: All of the unknown heirs,
devisees, grantees, assignees,
lienholders, creditors,
trustees, or otherwise claim-
ing interest by, through,
under or against RICK
BARR, deceased, and all
other parties having or claim-
ing to have any right, title, or
interest in the property
foreclosure herein.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Condominium Unit C of
PINEBROOKE CON-
DOMINIUM V. a Con-
dominium, according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, filed for record July
21, 1977, in Official Records
Book 9747. at Page 2120, of
the Pubbc Records of Dade
County, Florida, as amended;
together with the Mor-
tgagor's undivided interest in
the common elements ap-
purtenant thereto and
together with parking space
assigned to said unit
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis, Allison and
Cohen, Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address is 111 N.E. 1st
Street, Miami. Florida 38182, on
or before February 5, 1988, and to
file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 29th dsy of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: Clarinda Brown
Deputy Clerk
18208 January 1,8,15,22,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-7239
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HELEN WARTELS.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of HELEN WARTELS, deceased,
File Number 87-7239. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is Dade County
Courthouse, 73 West Flagler
Street. 3rd Floor. Miami, Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 22. 1988.
Personal Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler Street.
Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler St..
Suite 1201
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (305)374-3116
18241 January 22. 29, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Civil Action Case
No. 87-7017-CA-01
SKO-FED MORTGAGE
CORPORATION,
Plaintiff.
-vs-
ANTONIO ALVARADO and
MARIA J. dc ALVARADO, Hus-
band and Wife, if living and if
dead, all unknown parties claiming
by, through, under or against the
named Defendants who are not
known to be dead or alive whether
said unknown parties daim as
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees or other claimants against
the said ANTONIO ALVARADO
and MARIA J. de ALVARADO,
Husband and Wife, ZAIDA T.
GARCIA, a single woman, if living
and if dead, all unknown parties
claiming by, through, under, or
against the named Defendants
who are not known to be dead or
alive whether said unknown par-
ties daim as heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees of other
claimants against the said ZAIDA
T. GARCIA. MIRASOL OCEAN
TOWER CONDOMINIUM. INC.,
CENTRAL ADJUSTMENT
BUREAU. INC.. and HIALEAH
HOSPITAL. INC.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ANTONIO ALVARADO
and MARIA J. de
ALVARADO. if living and if
dead, all unknown parties
claiming by, through, under,
or against the named Defen-
dants who.are not known to
be dead or alive whether said
unknown parties claim as
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees of other claimants
against said Defendants, AN-
TONIO ALVARADO and
MARIA J. de ALVARADO
RESIDENCE
UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to reestablish a Promissory
Note and Mortgage and an action
to foreclose a Mortgage on the
following property in Dade Coun-
ty, Florida:
Unit 1804 according to the
Declaration of Condominium
of MIRASOL OCEAN
TOWERS CONDOMINIUM
dated February 17, 1976,
recorded on February 24,
1976, in the Official Record
Book 9244. Page 104, amend-
ed on February 17, 1976 and
recorded on March 30, 1976
in Official Record Book 9279.
Page 61, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on JEFFREY W. LEASURE,
Plaintiffs attorney, whose address
is P.O. Box 061169. Fort Myers,
Florida 33906-1169, on or before
February 26. 1988, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint
or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 19th day of
January. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
18243 January 22.29;
February 5. 12. 1988
notice under
fictitious name law
notice is hereby given
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of SUNCO
DEVELOPERS at number 13382
SW. 128 Street, in the City of
Miami. Florida. 33186 intends to
register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 23
day of December, 1987.
PETER SCOTT PARKER
50% interest
ALAN RICHTER 50* interest
Attorney for Applicant
ALBERT W, GUFFANTI, P.A.
ATTORNEY AT LAW
COCONUT GROVE BANK
BLDG. SUITE 305
2701 S. BAYSHORE DRIVE
MIAMI. FLORIDA 38133
18199 January 1,8.15,22,1988


Paf 12-B The Jewwh FToridian/Friday, January 22, 1968
idi Howard On Air
Caatiaaed froai Paf* 7-B
Kitz' fan mail, goes along on
stories with other reporters,
and even, on occasion, writes
the news.
"She's terrific," says Fitz.
"She's a great help and has
made order out of chaos as far
as my fan mail goes."
Fitz says she gets about five
letters a day, some of them
asking her for a date. She and
Heidi discuss what the
response will be.
Fitz says the news depart-
ment does not take interns as
young as Howard and it was
Fitz who created the helper's
position for her.
"I think it helps her to learn
more about the business,"
notes Fitz. "She gets to see it
first-hand, to know what the
upsides and downsides are."
The arrangement seems to
be beneficial to both Fitz and
Howard.
"I like to help young women
out and in this case I'm getting
help too," says Fitz.
"I'VE been on six shoots
with three different
reporters," says Howard, who
met Sally Fitz when she came
to dinner as a family friend.
Hadassah Events
The Stephen S. Wise
Chapter of Hadassah will hold
a luncheon meeting on Mon-
day, Feb. 1 at noon at the
Ocean Pavilion.
Highlighting the meeting
will be a talk on the subject of
Nutrition by Bess Masino from
the Nutrition Medical Center
of Hallandale.
For reservations, 861-5909
or 866-0966.
Albert Einstein Chapter will
hold its general meeting on
Monday, Feb. 8 at noon in the
meetroom of Adath Yeshurun.
A book review will be given by
Sophie Weissman.
The Hannah Senesch
Chapter will hold its next
general meeting at noon, Tues-
day, Feb. 2 at the Shelborne
Hotel. For informatin,
538-2111.
Adath Yeshurun's
It felt really strange but really good, not
to be recognized for myself but for
something I have done."
"I've written practice
stories," Howard recounts,
"and I have a (video) tape with
my own voice-overs," compos-
ed of the out-takes of another
reporter's story.
But Howard's greatest op-
portunity came when she was
scheduled to go out on a story
with a reporter, but did not.
"Michael (Williams) had to
go out on a breaking story and
he hadn't time to stop and get
me in the van with them, so 1
was just sitting there waiting
for the news to start," Howard
recalls.
"Then the producer asked
me if I wanted to try my hand
writing about Nicaragua, and
how they were going to have a
ceasefire for Christmas."
Late-breaking information
on the Nicaraguan cease-fire
meant that Howard's story
had to be re-worked, but
Howard went on to write two
more stories that, she says,
"were used almost exactly as I
had written them."
At an age when many kids
do not even bother to turn on
the evening news at all.
Howard was "listening to Sal-
ly Fitz, and she was reading
what I had written.
"It felt so good it didn't
matter that no one knew that I
wrote it. because I knew I
wrote it, and I knew that it
was good enough that they us-
ed it."
Howard plans to attend the
University of Pennsylvania,
where she will probably major
in political science, and even-
tually go on to law school, to
augment her journalistic
ambitions.
"THEY like you to have a
specialty now," explains
Howard of her decision not to
attend a communications
school. "You can't just learn
how to write in complete
sentences and tell the who,
what, where, why and that's
it. anymore."
Howard says that her in-
terest in the law stems from
two main sources; the first is
her father, an attorney, who
told Howard about legal cases
as she was growing up.
The second, perhaps, is
ambition.
"I just think that the law and
knowing how the law works
can be very helpful to a
reporter especially if I go
national," Howard admits.
Calling her early success n
journalism "an accident, beW
in the right place at the ritrh.
time," Howard contends tha
she is not "a whiz kid. I think
I've been very luckv to have
these jobs and I make the most
of my opportunities.
"I know why I'm working so
hard at it too," Howard S
fides. I ve always loved
knowing what is going on right
when it happens. When there
was a fatal accident on the
turnpike, I was in the
newsroom when they were
sending the helicopter out."
Howard, who subscribes to
"eight or nine news magazines
from America, Canada, and
England," and watches all the
news stations, says that jour-
nalism "just seems to be right
in the middle of everything, I
guess."
Someday soon, maybe
Howard will be right in the
middle of everything, too. Ask-
ed where she wants to be ten
years from now, she promptly
replies:
"I hope I'm going to be on
the air."
Adult Ed
Classes will begin Monday,
Jan. 25, and Tuesday, Jan. 26
for Adath Yeshurun's new
semester of Adult Education.
From Jan. 25-March 7, Roz
Seidel will teach "Living
, Jewishly" and Rabbi Simcha
Freedman will teach "Biblical
Exegesis."
From Jan. 26-March 8, Rab-
bi Freedman will lecture on
"Jewish ethics: Beyond
Halacha (Jewish Law)," Rabbi
Pinchas Klein will discuss
"The Philosophy of Judaism,"
and Cantor Zvi Rozen will con-
duct a class in reading
Hebrew.
For information, 947-1435.
Available at PubJix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only. Great for Sandwiches
KAISER
ROLLS........6(, 99*
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only. With Rich. Chocolate Icing
Brownies..............4 for $1
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only. Perfect for a Light Dessert
Angel Food Cake "2? *119
Available at All Publix Stores and Fresh
Danish Bakeries.
Danish
Pecan Strip...........*2*&9
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only. Topped with Whipped Cream
Fruit Tarts............ each 69*
where shopping is o pleasure
Publix
Prices effective Thurs.. January 21 thru Wed..
January 27. 1988. Quantity Rights reserved. Only
in Dade. Broward. Palm Beach. Martin. St. Lucie
Indian River and Okeechobee Counties.


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