The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03075

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
T J ,+***<
Volume 61 Number 2
Miami, Florida Friday, January 8,1968
Price 50 Cents
U.S. Vacillates On Israeli Judgments
if!
M
'^Sh
ib
i.j
An armed Israeli soldier stands near a group of angry and chanting Arab women demonstrating against fresh arrests out-
ndi the Nablus Military Headquarters. AP/World Wide Photo
Retaliation In Question In Air Raids
By HUGH ORGEL
[TEL AVIV (JTA) -
[ilitary sources said that
kturday night's extensive air
lids on terrorist targets in
buthern Lebanon were not
Italiation for the hang glider
ack of Nov. 25 in which six
lei Defense Force soldiers
?re killed at a military base
upper Galilee.
The sources said "the IDF
abandoned the policy of
fvenge." The air raids, they
ud, were intended to keep
various terrorist groups in
tmthern Lebanon off balance
id were the result of "good
itelligence information"
fhich made them opportune.
he targets hit included
es of Al Fatah, the terrorist
ing of the Palestine Libera-
Organization, the Popular
^ront for the Liberation of
alestine-General Command,
[leaded by Ahmed Jabril; and
lezbollah, the pro-Iranian ex-
tremist group.
Druze positions were also
it, but Israel has apologized
the Druze, saying they were
1 intended targets, Maariv
eported.
Jabril's bases received the
heaviest pounding, which ap-
parently gave rise to news
media reports that the raids
were Israel's belated response
to the attack by one of Jabril's
terrorists, who used a motoriz-
ed hang glider to scale the
Israel-Lebanon border and
struck at the IDF base nearly
two months ago.
The retaliation scenario also
was given credence by the fact
that Israel has mounted no air
raids in Lebanon since the
Nov. 25 incident, whereas in
the past it has always respond-
ed swiftly to terrorist attacks
inside Israel.
According to the IDF, air
force jets and helicopter gun-
ships scored hits on buildings
in 5ie Ein Hilwe refugee camp
south of Sidon, on Hezbollah
positions in Mayoun and Ein-
El-Tin, on the small harbor at
Jiyeh, halfway between Sidon
and Beirut, and on Barja
village, near Jiyeh in the
foothills of the Shuf
mountains.
The planes and helicopters
encountered anti-aircraft fire
and rocket-propelled
grenades, but all returned
safely to their bases, the IDF
reported.
Jiyeh and Barja, and posi-
tions near Damour in the
Sidon area, are controlled by
Druze militia. According to
Maariv, senior defense of-
ficials advised the Druze that
the attacks were not directed
against them. The Druze are
not targets for Israeli attacks,
even though they are known to
be cooperating with terrorists
in the region, the officials said.
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON State
Department spokesman
Charles Redman said that the
United States welcomes the
recent reduction in violence in
the West Bank and Gaza Strip.
"Overall, we have seen a
general lessening of violence
and that we welcome," the
spokesman said.
That positive response,
however, did not prevent the
United States from subse-
quently joining in a unanimous
UN Security Council resolu-
tion Tuesday night condemn-
ing Israel's deportation of
Palestinian civilians.
That vote was the first in sue
years by the U.S. against
Israel.
Redman previously faced a
Continued on Page 3-A
Debate On
Deportations
Continues
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Security authorities cracked
down on Israeli Arab militants
and continued to round up
Palestinian activists in the ad-
ministered territories as the
Inner Cabinet met to consider
the deportation of
troublemakers.
Government sources, mean-
while, denied reports that the
Defense and Foreign
ministries are split over the
issue of deportations. They
said Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres and Defense Minister
Yitzhak Rabin are working in
close coordination on that and
other matters.
But the Foreign Ministry is
Continued on Page 6-A
Community Questions Honor
British Chief Rabbi Gets Peerage
LONDON (JTA) Sir Immanuel Jakobovitz, chief rabbi of the British Com-
monwealth, has been elected to the House of Lords. But Britain's normally close-
knit Jewish community is of different minds over the singular honor bestowed
upon its official religious leader and mentor.
Jakobovitz, who will be 67 next month, was one of only three new barons on the
Queen's New Year Honors List announced Friday. He will sit in the
1,200-member upper house of Parliament, along with the archbishops of Canter-
bury and York, the leaders of the Church of Scotland, the Methodists and other
free churches.
He is the first chief rabbi so honored. But this has raised charges in some
Jewish and non-Jewish quarters that his accession was due to a political and
social outlook shared by Britain's Conservative Prime Minister Margaret That-
cher. It is Thatcher who compiles the yearly honors list on behalf of Queen
Elizabeth n.
Differences of opinion have arisen within the Board of Deputies of British
Jews, the overall representative body of Anglo-Jewry. Its president. Dr. Lionel
Kaplowitz, hailed the new Lord Jakobovitz as a spokesman for the nation. In his
21 years as chief rabbi, Jakobovitz has "changed the face of British Jewry,"
Kaplowitz declared.
Continued on Page 9-A


Pagea-A TW
a.i
State Deputy Secretary Says
Soviets Are In A "Listening Mode'
By ELLEN AXN STEIN
J*mk F\mmmi Stmf *-**
wfiM A globe fuE of bcmar.
r^z-^ .saoes a iea. r
Robert W Fvnad. Depcnr
Ass:s:an: Secretary for
Hactc R gh:s tod
aaacarr^anac AiEairs n *j>e
U-S Sate Deparaner.:. a aat-
ed durag ac ame witr.
TV /raw* FWieaaa. how
aaadi time devoted to the
pfcgat of Sonet Jewry
TW Soviet L'naoc stands
or at die top
j on the tiu. ume
of oar eoaceras >, it comes
to deaing won raatioaa tha:
have a perxste-:: rec:r: ::'
: rights abuses he sars
There are groups other thar
world Jewry preaaanaj the
Sonet Union m area* of
family reunification but.
"frankly." says Farrand.
"they have not oaapiayed the
focused
"Grrer. the wave of amagia-aon from Europe and the Sonet Ubbqc by Jewish pec-
pie. there liirini m are more the weat wnacs
creates a rery targe ^terest
group to re^r^Sai bring about
'"TTe had ao many conrersa-IIiM i^-: rx>r-r-: this _ssje
Ma* that iTsa cot mncec
Sharon-for-Mayor Rumors Rife
JERUSALEM iTNB. -
There are persLSten: rv
here that Minister of Trade
and Industry Anei Sbaror. is
coeaadermg i ouaaug for mayor
at Jeraaaient next year.
It it wider/ laaniimi here
that Mayor Teddy Kolek wfll
not seek re eieebon. although
Kolek bamaeif has so far sax:
oatj that he has "not yet decid-
ed" if he wiE ran.
If Koflek retzrea the Lind
wfl for the first ome have a
reaaoeatbie *hartr of capturing
the fcaaaaaaa" MoniczpaxTty
if it can find a wmahie
oe sz>: wr tra: rte would mm to
be the Likud nominee for
mayor. Bat Likod Party ac-
trhstz fear that Otmert wowd
be too uw shatter a candidate tc
win. and there has been tafc of
drafting the popular And
Sharon
ME Ehud Ounert has let r.
The Labor Party dairy Dnmr
poBBted out this week that
Sharon's recent <**^rrt" to
take op residence in
Jerusalem s Old City makes
ban ehgdbie to compete in the
1968 "' <\nt ftf^tintat if
he so chooaea.
Sharon, for has part, has
(iwliiwwJ to comment on the
rumorv
Sharon's Apartment No Home-Base
By HUGH OBGEL
TEL AVIV .JTA) The
apartment Anei Sharon ac-
OBBred reeer-7 m the Moaiean
garter of Jerisa-ec: 5 Did C-
ty is appareutij ooiy a pied-a-
terre. The z*rjpoken Hers:
has not spent one
: there, Htamz reported
Sharon did throw a
houaewai uaug and Chanukac
party at the new fiat on Dec
15. whick^ was attended by
Premier Yitzhak ^^'^^ mnri
taca. Aceorr to crrtjcs, it
was scSaec: to trigger two
days of noting by Arabs in
fiat only "on those nights tha:
we ja x Jen
who is
and industry and a
former defense naniwe' cwns
a iarge farm in the Negev. He
sa>d he was monng xto the
Mosiem Quarter to encourage
other Jews to do the same and
to make the area in genera,
more secure for Jews walking
to and from the Western Wall.
A permanent seuimv guard
has been posted outside the
bunding, where workers are
of the
b a fleam of Jewish peo-
pie in the world to come
together And the U.S. sup-
ports that.*"
In some cases, other groups
do not have to try as hard as
world Jewry to get the Soviets
to let their people go.
For example, says Farrand:
"There is a reluctance in
genera] on the Sonet part to
let people go. but it has not
been as great m the case of
Sonet Armenians-'"
ASKED tc rrpiaT reasons
for the harwrip faced by
Sonet Jewry for example.
whether they are bemg held as
i. pawns. Farrand
assert* that it is "difficult to
aractenae m a distilled way
what the Sonet attitude is. We
seek to the degree we can to
analyze things by what they do
rather than by what they say.
Ard .: appears to us
(Sonet deader Mikhail 1 Gor-
bachev rai said It himflf
there are concerns about a
bram dram' at the USSR. The
Sonet dozens of Jewish faith.
origin, of Jewish-sounding
they tend to be weC
. and they're not
to see these people
"leave."
In some cases, these Soviet
Jews are highly trained. In
other cases, they had worked
in areas where they have had
access to Sonet state secrets
The State Department has
"obviously dissented" from
the Soviet view that its
ciiueus who worked in these
sensitive areas 15 to 20 years
before they requested to
emigrate from the Soviet
Union should not be refused
to leave.
Speaking just weeks after
the GorbachevReagxc sumst.-t
in Washington. whx was
preceded by 1 raZy :f m:re
than 200.000 supporters of
freedom for Soviet Jewry.
Farrand discusses some
results of the diplomatic ex-
change that are already
Brwtz quoted Sharon s
wife. Liry. as saying th? the
a- howsf lining was taned for
- the honday bat she and her
I husband wfl make ae of the
f
a

S
.
Rov
dra-i20ME.
15 0WCOO,
Soviet officials have ap-
parently sgjeed to grant a
w-^ran s^ffer-.."^ tnu rraj-.
tamor. Isolde Tufeld. permis-
sion to leave the Soviet Union
for three naoalhi in order to
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notes that Tufeld's husband
has been granted pernuasion
to travel with his wife. This
Soviet action marks a depar-
ture from cases in recent years
in which Soviet ctoens have
died because they were refus-
ed permission to leave the
country for treatment or in
which'an ailing spouse was
allowed to leave while the
other was not. resulting in a
separation that lasted until
death.
"THIS CASE." Farrand
says, referring to Tufeld. "was
specifically raised at the
summit."
Farrand's boss. Asst. Sec. of
State Richard Schifter, met
with Soviet officials during the
summit. Schifter gave the
Soviets a "representation
list." with "hundreds of
cases." Farrand says, but
declines to go into further
detail.
Farrand notes that the presi-
dent raised the human rights
issue directly with Gorbachev
and discussed "religious in-
tolerance" in the Soviet Union
and the Jewish emigration pro-
blem. There was a group head-
ed by Schifter which "ex-
plored" these issues in more
detail with the Soviets, Far-
rand says, and adds: "That's
not something I can get into.
They are confidential.
diplomatic exchanges."
Farrand. addressing th.
rewto of these talks. J!
"We have agreed periodic!
to meet with the S<3
Ministry of Forgn Affairs,;
Moscow and review the*
cases with them in a rZ
systematic way than in tk 1
past In the past, as we go back
some time, the Soviets did m
necessarily want to hear about
these cases. They are now in, I
listening mode."
The Soviets apparently wer?
not in a "listening mode" in
the 70s when the Trade Act of
1974 was passed linking the
Jackson-Vamk Amendment to
the granting of most-favored
nation (MFN) tariff status to
communist bloc countries.
According to the Jackson-
Vanik Amendment, the United
States was to receive
assurances from these "ma.'
market" economies aboot'
emigration before they could
receive the MFN status. Na
tions that do not receive this
special status are charged high 1
import tariffs.
"Once this was put in phu.,
emigration from the Soviet
Union plummeted." Farrand
says. It appears that the
Soviets reacted to the Jackson-
Vanik amendment."
ALTHOUGH repeal of the
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U.S. Vacillates
On Judgments
Friday, January 8, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
Continued from Page 1-A
of questions at the daily
ing on Israel's decision
iday to deport nine Palesti-
is, the killing of a Palesti-
woman in the territories
Israeli soldiers and Israel's
ekend air raid on terrorist
^gets in southern Lebanon.
Commenting on the deporta-
is, Redman said "Israeli
iers are well aware of our
Jws." The State Department
frequently mentioned that
[objects to deportation of
lestinians. He noted that
here is a judicial appeal pro-
ks that is apparently still in-
fved in these cases."
n Sunday, Foreign
lister Shimon Peres defend-
the deportations while
baking on ABC's "This
.ek with David Brinkley."
res said that Israel was
lowing Jordanian law when
Beported the Palestinians.
feres explained that since
ael does not use capital
lishment, "the most we can
[is to deport in accordance
kh the law." He stated that
fce Jordanian law is the
Availing law on the West
nk."
reres also noted that last
skend passed by "in a quiet
iner" in the territories,
Sough he said he regretted
iday morning's killing of
Palestinian woman.
ted man confirmed that "the
irernment of Israel has ex-
ssed its regret and has
snded soldiers and the
ipany commander involved,
kding an investigation by
fteli authorities."
^e also expressed sympathy
any "innocent victims" of
iday's Israeli air strike in
thern Lebanon.
|ut he added that the at-
ts "also demonstrate vivid-
le importance of security
Israel s northern frontier
stability in southern
ion. Those can only be
^ught about through a pro-
of political reconciliation
long Lebanon's warring
tions."
i Sunday, Peres was asked
ether real progress in the
ce process is possible since
ny Israeli leaders oppose
urning land seized during
Six-Day War of 1967.
Hebrew U.
DBegal Settlement?
JERUSALEM (INB) A
"ding East Jerusalem Arab
eek'y has described the
ount Scopus campus of
ebrew University as an
Megal settlement/
an editorial complaining
out the settling of Jews in
erusalem's Old City, the Al-
ayader Assiyasi newspaper
Muded Hebrew U. in its list
/'.'''legal Jewish settlements"
Inich have been created "in
fe occupied Arab territory of
last Jerusalem since 1967."
1 Although Hebrew U. is
Ituated on land captured in
W7, local Arab militants have
enerally refrained from em-
hasizing that point, because
the friendly relations bet-
en local Arabs and dovish
fculty members of the
diversity.
He responded, "I don't think
that we have to divide
Jerusalem. And I don't think
we have to return to the 1967
frontiers."
Peres said he believes that
"the negotiation will result in
some solution that nobody has
suggested until now."
He explained that "in addi-
tion to the partition of the
land, you can have other solu-
tions, like a federation, a con-
federation, sharing the
government, a transitional
period."
He said the emphasis should
first be to "open a negotiation
between equals, with full
respect, with good faith to
look for a solution."
He repeated his support for
an international peace con-
ference, as long as it does not
impose a solution and leads to
direct negotiations between
Palestinians and Israelis.
Tires burn at a road block in the Arab village
ofA-Ram, north of Jerusalem, one of the many
scenes of violent demonstration during the
past fortnight.
Find out how good
we really are
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 8, 1988
Viewpoint
Israel's Public Relations War
Although the .deaths in Gaza and West Bank,
at press time, were reduced in the past two
weeks, world media attention on Israeli-
Palestinian confrontations has remained at
fever pitch.
In spite of obvious orders for far greater
restraint on the part of the Israeli military
forces, and a sharp reduction in the number
and magnitude of clashes, both the front pages
of newspapers and the evening television
newscasts play the stories to the hilt.
Simply put, Israel is losing the public rela-
tions war to an extent that rivals its setbacks
which came on the heels of the Christian militia
massacres of Palestinian refugee camps in
Lebanon in 1982.
While rejecting much of the advice of both
the United States government and of the
American Jewish community about its "handl-
ing" of the Arab disturbances, Israel should
find no difficulty in asking for assistance in its
public relations efforts.
Rarely is the public reminded that the PLO
was formed three years before the Six-Day
Way in 1967 which resulted in Israel taking the
administered territories. And seldom does
Israel get across the point that in the 19 years
preceding that war, the West Bank and Gaza
were occupied by Jordan and Egypt, which
made no effort to establish a Palestinian
homeland.
Constant cries of Israel's critics that the
United States and its allies pressure the
Jewish state to intensify its drive for peace are
seldom matched by calls for Arab governments
to agree to negotiations.
While we cannot condone the deaths of
Palestinians, we can do a better job of noting
that not a single Palestinian would have died if
unlawful uprisings had not been attempted.
Waldheim's Questionable Move
While his reported comments in no way
acknowledged his past association with Nazi
war crimes, Austrian President Kurt
Waldheim's recent attack on the racism
associated with German's forced annexation of
Austria was a welcome surprise.
Whether his reminder to the Austrian people
was prompted by the 50th anniversary of
Anschluss, Hitler s 1938 takeover which ex-
tended official anti-Semitism and worse, or by
the growing opposition within Austria to his
continuation in office, is questionable.
But just as the worldwide protestations of an
aroused Jewish community have helped to
release Soviet Jews, unrelenting objections to
Waldheim's high official status are clearly hav-
ing effect.
More evidence linking Waldheim to
atrocities in the occupied Balkans has been un-
covered by the new access to the United Na-
tions files on war crimes evidence. That news
was released at virtually the same time as
Waldheim's remarks were made public.
Coincidence?
South Dade JCC
Groundbreaking ceremonies for the South
Dade Jewish Community Center, scheduled for
Sunday, Jan. 10 at the site of the new JCC, are
a significant milestone with the life of Greater
Miami Jewry.
Major share of the funds which the South
Dade community was required to pledge prior
to approval of the project has been raised.
With the commitment already displayed by
hundreds of volunteers at the new JCC, an im-
portant role in the development of South Dade
seems assured.
T^ "^^ boom in synagogues and temples
in Kendall and it? neighboring communities
now will be supp.emented by a community
center which matches the needs of the vibrant
residents it will serve.
Sacrifice On The Altar Of Disarmament
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
As the dramatic U.S.-Soviet summit ended, Kipl-
ing's memorable lines came to mind:
"The tumult and the shouting dies/The captains
and the kings depart."
The outlook for President Reagan's closing mon-
ths has brightened, but despair darkens the ranks
of those who had pinned hopes for Soviet advance-
ment of human rights.
The 250,000 American Jews who gathered Dec. 6
in Washington on the eve of the sessions comprised
the largest such assemblage of our time. They had
heard half of the summit agenda would deal with
arms reduction, half with human rights. That ex-
pectation was far off the mark.
President Reagan kept his word to urge Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev to allow hundreds of
refuseniks to emigrate. But the general-secretary
of the Soviet Communist Party, whose nation has
signed the Helsinki human rights accords, was
sharp and quick with rebuke: "Don't be my
prosecutor."
Later, meeting with top American media
leaders, he fumed: "If a bunch of refuseniks or
other malcontents are making noise so what?
You've got even more malcontents."
This Soviet stance prompted Elie Wiesel to point
out that if Jews and others see human freight
sacrificed on the altar of nuclear disarmament,
then the cause of peace itself will suffer. Former
Secretary of State Cyrus Vance, the epitome of
reasonableness, said, "We seem to talk past each
other regarding human rights, so deep in our
hearts and our marrow."
It took years, but Andrei Sakharov. Yuri Orlov,
Natan Sharansky and others less prominent have
benefited by the power of Helsinki. The Soviets
relented to the world crying out. But with KGB
thugs breaking up demonstrations by Soviet Jews.
we behold a fresh example of hard hearts in action.
Meanwhile, advocates of the U.S.-Soviet agree-
ment on medium- and short-range missiles may
soon awaken to the fact that some of those
weapons are obsolete. And it is not certain that an
agreement will be reached later on long-range
missiles. Moreover, any hope for an early Soviet
pull-out from Afghanistan has dwindled.
It appears Moscow won more than it lost during
the summit sessions. The stakes were high for Gor
bachev. Judging by reports of experts, the Soviet
economy is not robust. Some even regard the
Soviet nation as not far removed from developing-
country status.
But Gorbachev returned fresh from triumphs on *
American TV. He is a master public relations prac- Ot
tiu'oner. Consider his stunt of emerging from his
limousine in Washington to press the flesh of car
Americans on the sidewalk. he
Back in Moscow, he can chortle over Reagan's V*i<
idea that the leaders should call each other by first
names. wl
All these developments darken the outlook of the
American right, discouraged that their White
House buddy, who once raised their fondest expec
tations, now enables Gorbachev to bask in the glow
of mutual acknowledgement that a bright era of
understanding reigns.
Robert E. Segal u a former newspaper editor and director of At
Jewish community councils of Cincinnati and Boston
Michael Deaver With An Updated 'Vicuna Coat'
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
Remember Bitburg, the site of the cemetery
where President Reagan equated the fate of the 47
members of Hitler's Waffen SS with millions of in-
nocents sent to nameless graves by the Holocaust0
In the White House, that May 1985 misadventure
became known as the "Deaver Debacle."
Michael Deaver was advance man for the Bitburn
blunder. Twenty years of solid friendship with
Ronald and Nancy Reagan had hoisted him to the
post of deputy chief of staff of the White House
with immediate access to the president.
Now this Reagan image-maker, the energetic
and devoted aide who arranged so many presiden-
tial photo opportunities, faces sentencing Feb 25
after his conviction by a federal jury on three
aT^lobb at* UIMler ^ COncernin* *"* influence
Deaver left the White House in 1985, but even
beforeshw departure he had laid strong lines to
potential clients. And in his glory days of represen-
ting Rockwell International, Trans World Airlines
Boeing, Philip Morris International, Canada.
Korea and other lucrative sources for fees of nearly
$5 million, he was privileged to keep his White
House pass and to receive a copy of the president's
daily agenda.
As reports of his old friend's wheeling and deal
ing mounted, the president said, "I think the whole
thing's ridiculous." Along the way, the president
said Deaver had never sought any influence from
him since he had been out of government.
On the day of Deaver's conviction, a guarded
Reagan said that the man whose claim of innocence
had been disproved was a long-time friend who had
served with distinction.
All of which recalls former President Dwight
Eisenhower's agonizing over revelations that Ber- J
nard Goldfine had presented Sherman Adams,
Ike s devoted and faithful top aide, with a $500
vicuna coat and other gifts.
Continued on Page 6-A
Fred K. Shochet
Editor and Publisher
Jewish Floridian
Norma A. Orovltz
Managing Editor
William T. Brewer
Director ot Operations
Suzanne Shochet
Executive Editor
Joan C Teglas
Director ot Advertising
Friday, January 8,1988
Volume 61
18TEVETH5748
Number 2


Friday, January 8,1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
More than SO Palestinian prisoners just before trials begin at
Military HQ, Nablus, occupied West Bank last week. Most of the
Arabs tried were teenagers. Reportedly, at least 900 detainees
will stand trial following the past weeks violent clashes in
Israel s occupied territories. AP/Wide World Photo
The Threat of A Binational State
By ERIC ROZENMAN
'Mideast Violence Alarms
Jews," said a New York
es headline. The subhead
'Anxious and Concern-
,' Say Some of the Groups
"lers Defend Israel."
.S. Jews Express Con-
the Washington Post
ladlined. "Continued
Dlence Could Erode Support
Israel, Leaders Say, the
bhead added.
the two weeks beginning
c 9, Israeli troops killed 21
lestinian Arabs, wounded
res more, and arrested hun-
is to quash violent protests
Gaza Strip and West
nk. More than 50 Israelis
re hurt. It was the worst of
eruptions since Israel
ned control of the ter-
ies illegally occupied by
pt and Jordan, respective-
in the 1967 Six-Day War.
Jut it was not the worst
fig to happen to Israel in the
t 30 years. A moment's
Election of the 1973 Yom
War or the Lebanese
cksand from 1982 to 1985
attests to that.
However, perceptions of
violence especially when
provided long-distance by
television carry their own
proportions. The civilian
throwing a rock or Molotov
cocktail, wielding an iron bar
or knife, is rarely photograph-
ed. The soldier responding
with gunfire almost always is.
New York Times correspon-
dent Tom Friedman, speaking
at a Tel Aviv University sym-
posium last summer on media
coverage of Israel, said that, if
seen on their own, the Palesti-
nian Arabs would bulk no
larger than the Kurds. "Their
great advantage," Friedman
observed, "is that their enemy
is the Jew." He added that "in
the Middle East there are no
good guys and bad guys, only
civilians and soldiers."
In that formulation soldiers
always lose especially
Jewish soldiers, and perhaps
especially among Jewish au-
diences. Judging by last
month's dismay calls to the
Israeli Embassy doubled, the
majority critical those wedd-
ed to the narrow-focus reality
of television might have quit if
confronted at the time with
videotapes showing the blood
shed of 1948.
Arab riots in the 1920's and
1930's in which hundreds of
Jews died did not "erode"
support for Jewish settlement
in Palestine. Neither did wars
between Arab states and
Israel in each of the four
following decades.
Neither should the present
trouble, unless one fantasizes
that Israel can resolve the
underlying problems
unilaterally. In reality, it must
have partners: Palestinian
Arab interlocutors as commit-
ted to Israel's needs as Israel
is to theirs.
And Israel is committed. In
the Camp David Accords it
pledged itself to seek a solu-
tion which would "recognize
the legitimate rights of the
Palestinian people and their
just requirements."
Yet after seven decades of
intercommunal conflict, there
exists no remotely comparable
Palestinian Arab declaration.
The PLO, "sole, legitimate
representative of the Palesti-
nian people" as designated
by the Arab League remains
officially committed to the
Continued on Page 16-A
Rabin Stands Firm On Territories
By ERIC ROZENMAN
Outside, two dozen pro-
testers, most wearing the
black-or red-checked kefxyah
headdresses long a symbolic
part of Yasir Arafat s war-
drobe, chanted "Long life the
PLO!" "Long live Palestine!"
Inside, Defense Minister
Yitzhak Rabin defended Israeli
policies in the West Bank and
Gaza Strip, territories ad-
ministered by Israel since the
1967 Six-Day War. Referring
to the deaths which have
resulted as police and the army
dealt with repeated rioting in
the areas, he said: "It is pain-
ful to both sides, the Palesti-
nians ... to the soldiers and
policemen who had to maintain
law and order, to come into
confrontation ... We are
sorry about the loss of life of
anyone."
Nevertheless, Rabin said,
"My conscience is clean." He
was not responding to the
Washington demonstrators,
nor even so much to his au-
dience at the Brookings In-
stitution, but to U.S. officials.
Some had expressed concern
during Rabin's mid-December
visit about "harsh" Israeli
methods used to deal with the
mostly young Palestinian Arab
rioters.
Standard procedure calls for
the use of rubber bullets, tear
gas and warning shots before
firing at rioters. But Israel,
the Defense Minister asserted.
Continued on Page 13-A
?king Back and Forward With Pro-Israeli Perspective
By MORRIS J. AMITAY
|At year's end and another's beginning is an
7propriate time to reflect on what lessons
ight be learned from the previous twelve
Months from a pro-Israel perspective.
i the positive side, the U.S. Congress' con-
iued support for Israel remained a strong
id consistent thread, despite fallout from the
Pollard case and Israeli involvement in
rangate. In addition to approving $3 million in
:onomic and military aid, and modifying arms
les to Saudi Arabia, funding was provided
a number of "made in Israel" programs for
ie U.S. Defense Department which will
Jnefit Israel's economy in future years. In the
fake of the Lavi cancellation, cooperation in
ie military sphere between the two countries
ras also institutionalized.
On a less optimistic note, the Gorbachev visit
and summit did not appear to signal a change
in Soviet emigration (or for that matter any
other) policies. While the unexpectedly large
turnout in Washington energized the
American Jewish Community, its benefits for
Soviet Jews remain to be seen. The change in
style from previous Russian leaders, which the
media found irresistible, is so far just that. The
release of a select group of refuseniks has not
been accompanied by a significant increase in
overall emigration. What can be hoped for is
more pragmatism and less ideology on the part
of the new Soviet leadership in dealing with
Jewish emigration. As a practical matter, it
would seem that permitting 50-100,000 Rus-
sian Jews to emigrate over the next two or
three years could pay enormous dividends,
literally, in terms of trade and economic
benefits that could follow. If this is so, one can-
not help but wonder whether Soviet Jews are
being held as a diplomatic card for Russia to
play in order to be able to play a major role in
any future Middle East peace negotiations.
The lure of permitting a considerable number
of Jews to leave the USSR could be considered
irresistible to Israeli leadership, according to
Soviet thinking. Otherwise, a policy that con-
tinues to antagonize and galvanize opposition
from an influential and activist American
Jewish community makes little sense from
Russia's point of view, particularly if Gor-
bachev is serious about improving the perfor-
mance of Soviet economy and satisfying con-
sumer demand.
A disturbing trend which intensified during
Continued on Page 6-A


Page 6-A The Jewiah yibridian/Friday, January 8, 1988
Palestinian Named Patriarch Of Jerusalem Church

By RUTH GRUBER
ROME (JTA) Pope
John Paul II's appointment of
a Palestinian as Catholic
patriarch of Jerusalem is being
viewed here as a political as
well as religious move, despite
Vatican denials of any such
motives.
No one has expressed doubts
about the ability of the new
patriarch, 54-year-old Michel
Sabbah, who was born in
Nazareth.
The Israeli Embassy in
Rome said "the nomination is
a choice of the church. We, on
our part, wish the patriarch-
designate active success and
we hope for a profitable and
constructive cooperation, like
that already existing with the
other authorities of the various
churches in Israel."
Sabbah will be the first Arab
to head his church, which
number 67,000 worshippers,
85 percent of whom are Arabs.
Sixty-five of the 78 priests
under him also are Arabs.
Sabbah, replaces 77-year-old
Italian Giacomo Giuseppe
Beltritti, who is retiring
because of age. Vatican
sources called Sabbath "the
right person for the right job."
Nonetheless, coinciding as it
did with the current unrest in
the administered territories
and the controversy over
tough Israeli measures against
Palestinian protesters, the ap-
pointment of Sabbah was
greeted by supporters of the
Palestinian cause as a
demonstration of papal
understanding and support for
the Palestinians.
"We greatly appreciate this
appointment," the Rome office
of the Palestine Liberation
Organization said in a state-
ment which noted that the
move came "in a particularly
delicate moment for the
Palestinians."
"It is often forgotten that
many Palestinians are Chris-
tian," the statement said.
"The pope's choice is a
recognition of this religious
presence among our people."
Even more enthusiastic than
the PLO in his reaction was
Monsignor Hilarion Capucci,
the Melchite Catholic ar-
chbishop of Jerusalem and
Palestine National Council
member living in exile in Rome
Debate On Deportations Continues
sinnliis expulsion from 1^
in 1977 for his PLO links
"It is a marvelous and sdW
did thing," said Capucci *1
for a week has been statin,,
hunger strike in support 5ft!
Palestinian protesters in Z
Gaza Strip and the West Bank
c?L?U#tte!Ppointine<]f
Sabbah, "an objective moral l
support for the Palestinian
people, adding that "I've I
always followed with pleasure
every initiative of the pope and i
I greet this new initiative with
extreme pleasure as a great
gift to the Palestinian people."
Orazio La Rocca, a
Continued from Page 1-A sugpects ^ ^ for up to ^
known to be concerned about months without filing formal
foreign criticism of the possi- charges, and can be extended
ble deportations, while Rabin for longer periods.
*2 record,in favr ofjjje Meanwhile, 40 more ac-
speedy expulsion of alleged tivists were arrested in the ad-
agitators.
Rabin issued administrative
arrest orders against two
Israeli Arabs, Raslan Maha-
jneh and Raja Agbriya, for
their alleged role in violent
demonstrations at Umm el-
Fahm village during the Arab change lor three Israeli in the Palestinian nationalis of Israeli Arabs that reruses to
general strike in Israel on Dec. soldiers held captive by Ahmed camp in the administered ter- recognize Israel. The group is
* Jabril's Popular Front for the ritories." Arah rsHin stations believed to have been the
Administrative arrest allows
the authorities to hold
ministered territories and may
face deportation. Some of
them are former security
prisoners who were among
more than 1,000 Palestinian
and Lebanese offenders
The latest arrests have rais-
ed apprehension in the West
Bank and Gaza Strip.
Relatives and friends of the de-
tainees have not been inform-
ed why they were arrested and
fear they will be deported.
Israeli authorities have not
confirmed or denied that this
is intended.
Haaretz quoted Palestinian
sources as saying the de-
released from jail in 1985 in ex- tainees are "prominent figures
change for three Israeli in the Palestinian nationalist
soldiers held captive by Ahmed camp in the admini
Jabril's Popular Front for the ritories." Arab radio stations
Liberation of Palestine- reported that Israel intends to
also reviewing the situation in
Israel's Arab community
those living within Israel's
pre-1967 borders. The general
strike on Dec. 21 in solidarity
with the Palestinians in the
territories raised serious con-
cern that the country's
750,000 Arab citizens are
becoming radicalized.
Attention has been focused
on the Sons of the Village
movement, an extremist group
of Israeli Arabs that refuses to
General Command.
Pro-Israeli Perspective
Continued from Page 5-A
1987 had led some here in Washington to ask
whether we are again getting "hooked" on
foreign oil. According to the latest figures, we
are importing 43 percent of the oil we are con-
suming, and guess which country is now our
number one source? No, not neighboring
Canada or Mexico but Saudi Arabia. At the
same time that domestic oil production has hit
a new low point, we are importing more Arab
oil while still placing unnecessary restrictions
on off-shore and Alaskan oil drilling. Without a
coordinated national energy policy consisting
of greater exploration, conservation, and the
development of alternative energy sources, we
may be placing our heads in a noose of our own
making. It is the kind which is being tightened
so slowly that its consequences will not be
realized until our foreign policies in the Middle
East could be stifled.
Arab unrest in Gaza and the West Bank at
the end of 1987 produced the inevitable
statements from our State Department, plac-
ing the blame for the violence on lack of pro-
gress in finding solutions to the Arab-Israel
conflict. These kinds of statements, of course,
play right into the hands of the rioters by put-
ting the onus on Israel for somehow failing to
be more flexible. These simplistic utterances
overlook the fact that there are very difficult
questions that must be dealt with through pa-
tient face-to-face negotiations. Until this pro-
cess can be started, the status quo is 1ar more
preferable than having Israel give in to ex-
tremist violence by unilaterally making conces-
sions in advance of such negotiations. Rioting
and bloodshed have beset many democracies
including our own, in recent years. And while
not control does not seem to be the forte of the
Israel Defense Forces, the alternatives, anar-
chy and terrorism are far less desirable.
Looking to 1988, there will be national elec-
tions in both Israel and the United States giv-
ing rise to hopes that those changes which'take
place will benefit both countries, and move
Israel closer to the genuine peace she has
sought for almost forty years. starch
Act
expel hundreds of Palestinians
from the territories.
Israeli security sources said
if deportations are ordered,
they will not be carried out
"like thieves in the night." All
legal procedures and regula-
tions required by law will be
strictly observed, the sources
said.
The Inner Cabinet, the govern-
ment's top policy-making
body, consisting of five Labor
and five Likud ministers, is
Deaver's
Vicuna Coat
Continued from Page 4-A
An incredulous and grieving
president, who asserted that
those serving close to him had
to be as clean as a hound's
tooth, watched with an aching
heart as Adams, burned by the
flame of public outcry, left the
White House.
Deaver, son of a struggling
gas station owner, played
Cio to put himself through
Jose State University.
Republican political life soon
found him to be a high-
powered worker.
By 1967, he was a staff man
for Reagan, who then was
governor of California. The
girl he married was not only a
State House secretary but one
much admired by Nancy
Reagan. Horatio Alger could
not have fashioned a better
plot.
Along the way, Deaver
charged the special pro-
secutor, Whitney North
Seymour Jr., with seeking
vengeance against the defen-
dant, challenged the validity of
an act making it possible to ap-
point a special prosecutor and
set the nation to wondering V
the time has come to put new
in the Federal Ethics
prime mover behind the Umm
el-Fahm demonstrations,
which closed the main Afula-
Hadera highway for two hours g^yj
Several Sons of the Village
members demonstrated out-
side the Haifa district court to
protest the administrative ar-
rests of Mahajneh and
Agbriya, who are alleged to be
leaders of the movement. The
court building was sprayed
with graffiti demanding the
release of Mahajneh and
Agbriya and an end to the
"Israeli occupation."
Ronni Milo, a Likud deputv
minister without portfolio 2H Xto. ^ ?t\*
blamed the National 'comr^ rt^'l^ hV S
tee of Arab Mayors for the ^^^ ?* nS
Dec. 21 violence and demand *2 5 *5 Utm fil
ed that the government have P*"*"1 f ^ are of Arab
nothing more to do with it. But fift* ,'" the *m 2"
Peres warned that cutting ties lmel' Jordan i"d CyprUS-.
with the mayors would ''leave He added. "Any criteria
the Arab sector to the based on political opportunity
extremists." was simply not taken into
account.
correspondent for the leading
Italian newspaper Lt
Republita, said it was difficult
not to view the appointment as
"an explicit, even if indirect
political signal" on the part of
the pope.
"Only a week ago." La Roc-
ca noted, the pontiff asked, in
the course of a prayer in Si
Peter's Square, for "the end of
killing in the land of Christ.'
According to the Vatican cor-
respondent, the pope was
referring to the Gaza Strip and
the West Bank, "expressing
himself clearly in favor of i
homeland for the
Palestinians."
He observed that the appeal
was launched in the presence
of 13 Arab ambassadors at
credited to the Holy See who,
responding to an initiative of
the PLO's Rome office.
20 in St
to silently
protest against Israeli aggres-
sion in the Palestinian ter-
ritories and to urge a direct in-
tervention by the pope.*'
Vatican spokesman Joaquin
Navarro-Valls, however,
denied deliberate political
overtones in the pope's ap-
pointment of Sabbah
"The criterion followed for
the selection of the new
patriarch," he said, "was
strictly religous and pastoral.
taking into account the local
AT
THE
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Friday, January 8, 1988/The Jewish Floridian. Page 7-A
tinian Who's Who
By SHELDON KIRSHNER
The first biographical dic-
ionary on leading Palestinian
Sgures has been compiled by a
of Israeli scholars at the
lebrew University.
Scheduled for publication in
by New York University
ess, the dictionary will con-
un 189 entries on Palesti-
ians from the late Ottoman
jriod to the present.
The biographies will range in
ength from several hundred
rords to 5,000, depending on
he importance of the subject.
According to co-editor Alex-
nder Bligh, the longest ones
ill be on Yasir Arafat, chair-
man of the Palestine Libera-
jon Organization, and Haj
kmin aT-Husseini, the late
mfti of Jerusalem.
Bligh, a lecturer in Middle
Cast history, co-edited the dic-
ionary in conjunction with
loshe Maoz, a professor of
Islamic and Middle East
Studies.
It was financed by private
donations and the Harry S.
Research Institute for
lie Advancement of Peace, on
It. Scopus. Cost of the dic-
^onary was $100,000.
Bligh, until recently a
jisiting professor of political
cience at the University of
Joronto, said no dictionary of
kind exists today. The
losest such publications in the
world list prominent
personalities, but not
Palestinian Arabs exclusively.
1 Asked why the Hebrew
Iniversity undertook the tak,
fligh explained that the
research institute has
pig held something of a
lonopoly on Palestinian
iidies in Israel.
"For us, this is a vital ques-
lo n, to get to know the
Palestinians better. It is a
ust for us," he added.
Bligh said it would have been
[more difficult" for the PLO-
irted, Kuwait University-
liated Institute of Palestine
Studies to have published such
dictionary.
Given the fierce factionalism
rithin the PLO, Palestinian
cholars would probably have
to leave out Palestinians
Jo longer in favor with the cur-
rent PLO leadership, he
iggested.
And, he added, they might
lave had to delete the names
bf Palestinians opposed to
Arafat's leadership, such as
Um Nidal, and pro-Jordanian
>r pro-Israeli Palestinian
eaders as well.
Bligh said that the dic-
ionary he and Maoz have pro-
luced is bias-free. Value
udgements have been banned
id "colorless terminology"
been employed. The 1948
far of Independence is called
Ihe "1948 war"; phrases like
"occupied territories" or "ad-
Imini8tered territories" are
I conspicuously absent; and the
[term "terrorist activities" is
[used only to refer to acts
I against civilians rather than
[military personnel.
Moreover, unsubstantiated
I information has been com-
pletely eliminated. "We list
|the facts in a straight-forward
'ay," Bligh said. "And, when
necessary; we make some
observations."
When he became involved in
the project, two years ago,
there were 2,000 Palestinian
names on file. But financial
and publishing constraints
forced the editors to cut back
drastically. In the end, they
compromised. They collected
facts on 500 Palestinians and
prepared profiles on 180, with
the hope that the remainder
would be included in future
publications.
Each entry is based on inter-
views and secondary sources.
Bligh said that about 100
Arabs consented to be inter-
viewed. PLO leaders did not
figure in any of the interviews.
Asked why, he smiled sar-
donically, saying, "I don't
know."
Twenty Hebrew University
students, some of them Arabs,
carried out the actual
research. The writers, besides
Bligh and Maoz, were Israeli
academics and retired
diplomats.
Blight admits that, at the
outset, more than a few Arabs
greeted the project with a
measure of skepticism and
suspicion. "It may have looked
as if we were doing something
they could not benefit from,
something that would reflect
an Israeli bias," he said.
But Bligh expects Arab
criticism. "We are in a state of
conflict with the Palestinians,"
he said. "But I should tell you
that several nationalist leaders
on the West Bank who asked
to see their biographies were,
in general, satisfied. They
wanted to make some changes
and, when we could find cor-
roboration for their
statements, we made them."
Bligh hopes that the dic-
tionary will stimulate the
growth of Palestinian studies
in Israel and abroad.
As far as he is concerned,
this branch of Middle East
studies generally has been
neglected, even in Israel.
"We haven't done enough,"
he said, pointing out that
relatively little is known about
current Palestinian politics
and the interrelationship bet-
ween the Palestinian move-
ment and Arab governments.
Bar Kochba's Name Unearthed Again
TEL AVIV (JTA) Twenty-seven years ago, the
name of Shimon Ben Kosiba also known as Bar Kochba
was found for the first time at an archaeological dig in
Israel. Two months ago, it was found again.
The first reference to Bar Kochba, who led the Jewish
revolt against the Roman emperor Hadrian from 132 to 135
C.E., was found in 1960 on a papyrus document unearthed
in the Nahal Hever region. The second was found deep in a
cave in the Lachish region, hist north of the Negev, which
apparently served as a hideout for Jews fighting the
Romans.
A team of archaeologists headed by Dr. Amos Kloner un-
covered a bronze weight bearing the inscription: "Shimon
Ben Kosiba, prince and leader of Israel."
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Page 8-A The Jewish Flondian/Fridty, January 8, 1938
The Wannsee villa on the outskirts of present-day West Berlin where the Final
Solution was detailed in 194.
Film Recreates Conference
On 'Final Solution'
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
"On Jan. 20,1942, at a house
in the quiet Berlin suburb of
Wannsee, a meeting was held.
It lasted 90 minutes. There
was only one item on the
agenda."
With these words alone, the
film "The Wannsee Con-
ference" launches into one of
the most chilling forays into
the history of the destruction
of European Jewry, and into
the permanent memory of the
viewer.
The meeting was like none
other, and yet disarmingly like
any other business meeting.
Amidst the clinking of glasses
served by obsequious young
waiters against a backdrop of
expensive wall tapestries, 14
men met with Reinhard
Heydrich, head of the Nazi
Security Police and designated
successor to Adolph HiSer, to
carefully outline and solidify
the 'Final Solution,' the
precise plans for the killing of
the Jews.
The maker of the film, a Ger-
man Jew named Manfred
Korytowski, first read about
the Wannsee Conference five
years ago at the Yad Vashem
Holocaust memorial in
Jerusalem while researching:
another documentary. Finding
the original notes of the con-
ference, Korytowski felt im-
pelled to reconstruct the
precise details of the infamous
parley. He was overwhelming-
ly successful.
Indeed, "The Wannsee Con-
ference" is so perfect in its
reconstruction of the facts and
in the portrayal of the con-
ferees that there is a dreadful
feeling of not seeing a movie at
all, but rather footage of the
actual conference.
Under the immensely skillful
direction of Heinz Schirk, ac-
tors chosen for their close
resemblance to their real-life
counterparts simply become
on screen their characters.
Korytowski, who was in
New York for the film's open-
ing here Nov. 18, told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
that his intention was to tell
the world, specifically West
German youth, the truth about
the 'Final Solution.' He said he
was particularly careful not to
make a "commercial" film.
Korytowski, 50, maintains
residences in both West Ger-
many and Israel, where he
served in the army. He arrived
in Israel in 1953 from Brazil,
where his family had spent 16
years, and returned to West
Germany in 1958 to visit his
father, who was ill. He remain-
ed there, becoming a notable
television producer.
Korytowski believes West
German youth are anxious to
learn about their country's
true history. "No one ever told
us about it," he quoted them as
saying about the 'Final Solu-
tion.' However, in America he
has noted ignorance of the
Nazi era and a lack of interest
in finding out the truth.
Korytowski said he paid
careful attention in the film to
small details that would reveal
the German's bizarre dedica-
tion to trite interests. Thus, he
purposefully included atten-
tion to a hungry dog by one of
the German officers, to the
playful taunts of his col-
leagues, all the while that they
were assembling to discuss the
destruction of millions of
human beings.
Likewise, he included a
scene in which the young
female telephone receptionists
interrupted their work to
marvel at the military
paraphernalia and decorations
A Memorial to 'Natural Wastage
and Natural Selection'
By UWE SCHLICHT
On 20 January 1942, senior
officials from the Nazi
ministries, the SS and the
security service assembled in a
patrician villa overlooking the
Wannsee in Berlin. The
meeting has become known as
the Wannsee Conference.
The meeting was chaired by
SS Obergruppenfuhrer
Reinhard Heydrich. The
organizers had chosen this
harmless recuperation home
for SS officers as the scene for
settling the bureaucratic and
organizational details of the
Final Solution to the Jewish
question.
The house was built in 1914
and, as was then common,
featured a confusion of styles.
There were Ionic and Doric
columns from the classical era;
the stairway was rococo; the
ceiling bays on the ground
floor were renaissance; and
the wintergarden was 19th
century romantic.
It was here that, almost as
an intermission to festivities
taking place in the house at the
same fame, that the future of
11 million European Jews was
discussed. They were discus-
sions that eventually led to the
death of six million of them.
The minutes of the con-
ference say: "Within the
framework of the final solution
and under appropriate leader-
ship, Jews should be deployed
in suitable ways in work
groups in the East. Without
doubt, the majority of those
capable of work and who
engage in tasks in the streets
will eventually depart through
natural wastage. The re-
mainder would, through
natural selection, be the most
resistant and, therefore, must
be treated in an appropriate
manner because they would
comprise the germ from which
a regeneration of Jews would
take place."
So what should be done with
this building which, since 1952,
has belonged to the inner-city
borough of Neukolln which
uses it as a retreat for
schoolchildren?
Heinz Galinski, the head of
the Berlin Jewish community,
has for years been campaign-
ing for it to be turned into a
memorial. Under Social
Democrat mayors, he had little
success, but under the present
Christian Democrat ad-
ministration, a broadly based
plan has been drawn up under
which the Wannsee Villa
forms just one part.
Klaus Schutz, a Social
Democrat mayor of West
Berlin in the 1960s and a
"The Wannsee Con-
ference, in German, with
subtitles in English, is
unrated. It is being shown
at the Intraeoastal
Theaters.
former German ambassador to
Israel, explained this month to
an international meeting of
scientists and politicians from
the U.S.A., Poland, Israel,
Austria and West Germany
that the Social Democrats had
resisted the idea of a memorial
on the grounds that places the
Nazis had used should vanish
from the face of the earth.
Schutz said, however, that
when he was mayor, Jews
from all over the world spoke
to him about the Wannsee
Villa, and it became clear to
him pust how important the
building was to them.
So Schutz supported what
Galinski told the conference he
wanted: the house to be
regarded as a place of Euro-
pean significance and not
somewhere which belonged to
Berlin or to West Germany.
Galinsky said this was not a
place the Jews had sought out.
It had been forced on them by
National Socialism. It
therefore should become a
memorial to European Jews.
But he warned against what
had happened in West Ger-
many where memorials had
been erected in memory of
both victims and their
persecutors. He said Berlin
had the chance to create a
memorial exclusively for the
victims.
The question is: what form
should the memorial take?
Anti-Semitism has a long
history; and not only Jews but
also gypsies and the mentally
ill were killed. And under the
policy of Lebensraum, millions
of Russians and Poles lost
their lives. Germans who op-
posed the regime, both left-
wing and conservative
became victims.
The restricted space of a
house would make it difficult
to tell the entire story. Such a
memorial would also be visited
more by young people and
teachers than anyone else so
it would be necessary to ex-
plain contexts and answer
questions about National
Socialism up until it was
defeated.
Galinski would like the villa
to be, above all, a place where
the achievements of European
Jewry would be remembered^
where it could be shown just
how much European cultiire
Continued on Page 16-A
of the officers and ask tho*
flirtatiously about 5
assignments.
Similarly, the German recor
ding secretary was played as a
pretty, charming youn.
woman with whom Heydrich
openly enjoyed flirting, as was
his documented wont.
The film, in German with
English subtitles and English
voice-over introduction, shows
the Wannsee Villa itself, intact
and splendid in its serenity
The interiors were filmed in j
studio. All costumes were
original, down to the wristwat-
ches and pens.
Most engrossing is the
fastidious characterization of
the behavior and thought pro-
cesses of the architects of
doom. Eichmann is seen as
charming, concerned abou,
procedural mishaps, question
ing each step in the operation
He was worried, it seems
about the failure of the ex
haust fumes in the sealed
transport trains to complete
the iob. "There were women,
children and the elderly," he
says, ironically appearing to
have some lingering
humanitarian concerns.
One of the officers, posted to
the Baltic states, gleefully tells
his comrades the "good
news": "Estonia is Judenrtxn
(free of Jews)." Their first
"success." They then com-
ment on the fluid procedure
taking place in the eradication
of Jews in the other Baltic
states. "We're getting there,"
says one.
The 14 men. representing
different offices and services,
sit at a long table, with
Heydrich at one end. and the
recording secretary at the
other. "We are now shifting
from the casual to the
precise," one declares.
Heydrich reads Hermann
Goering's plans: "I hereby in-
struct you to take all necessary
steps toward a solution of the
Jewish problem in Europe and
to submit a detailed outline.,,
Please attach a copy to the
minutes."
There is every inclination to
believe that these are highly
successful chief operating of-
ficers of a well-structured cor-
poration going through the
necessary procedures to en-
sure their business functions
as effectively as possible. The
metaphor is appropriate, but
for one detail: This plan will
exceed the success of mere
corporations. These are techni-
cians of the highest
magnitude. "One day. the
whole world will thank us,"
says one.
Throughout the parley, they
discuss the probability of
assistance by friendly states in
deporting their Jewish popula-
tions. Notice is made of the
French eagerness to accom-
modate the Nazis, the Italians
refusal "to give up their
Jews," and the humorous
nature of the papal nuncio, a
pushover who "didn't want to
touch the matter."
There is serious concern
about the plan's feasibility
Two men are noticeably wor-
ried. They debate the fate
the half-Jews. There is one
remark that "You're about to
divide up the cake. But how do
you intend to bake it?"
At the end of the conference.
which technically took only J
minutes from gavel to gave1.
the participants concur: IWj
has been an historic day- Ana
we were there."


A Visit to the Russia of
Glasnost and Perestroika
Friday, January 6, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
By STEVEN M. FREEMAN
As I sat in Pavel (Pasha)
Lbramovich's Moscow apart
ient a small Jewish oasis in
gray Soviet desert my
thoughts turned back to Oc-
ober 1982. It was exactly five
years ago that I sat in this
ia.ll living room, looking at a
nap of Israel prominently
li splayed on the wall and the
Judaica lining the bookcases. I
recalled discussing major
(issues of the day with Pasha
ind his wife Marta: Poland,
Afghanistan, Israel's invasion
)f Lebanon, Brezhnev's failing
wealth. I recalled Pasha's
courage, his determination, his
commitment, his burning
iesire to emigrate to Israel
i-hieh had not diminished in 11
|ong years of "refusal."
Now I was again with Pasha
ind Marta in the same
cramped apartment, with the
ame map of Israel on the wall.
lad anything changed? The
Steven M. Freeman, assis-
tant director of the Legal Af-
fairs Department of the Anti-
Defamation League's Civil
Rights Division, traveled to the
Soviet Union in October under
the auspices of the Lawyers
Committee for Human Rights.
answer was yes and no. Yes,
Brezhnev was gone, to be
followed by Andropov,
Chernenko and now Mikhail
Gorbachev and his policy of
glasnost, commonly translated
as "openness." Yet, for Pasha
personally, the bottom line had
not changed. He was still
waiting, 16 years after he had
first applied to emigrate to the
Jewish state.
Pasha acknowledge the
Soviet Union is showing some
signs of improvement under
Gorbachev. Glasnost is not
merely a mirage; the city of
Moscow feels genuinely less
oppressive. Last time around,
when we wanted to talk
Rabbi Becomes 'Lord'
(Ontinued from Page 1-A
But Dr. Geoffrey Alderman,
an Orthodox university don
nd member of the Board of
)eputies, took another view.
Speaking for a small but vocal
roup, who contend that the
Jewish community made an
unacceptable concession on
shehita (ritual slaughter),
following a recent government
report on animal welfare,
Alderman said by giving
Jakobovitz a peerage, the
prime minister delivered a
'slap in the face" to the
Jewish community.
It is generally believed
lakobovitz owes his barony
i to his work for the Jewish
community than to his public
pronouncements and writings
)n secular matters that
endeared him to Thatcher. He
appears to embody many of
the Victorian values on family
purity and the work ethic
:herished by the prime
"ninister.
His opinions on homosexuali-
ty, acquired immune deficien-
cy syndrome, urban poverty
nd terrorism were in many
es more to her liking than
se by leaders of the Church
i England.
While Jakobovitz's admirers
}r\ and out of the Jewish com-
nunity are many, his critics
fear that from now on, he will
be viewed by the world as the
spokesman of British Jewry on
all issues.
The chief rabbi has been con-
troversial in the past, mainly
because of his outspoken
criticism of some Israeli
policies, notably during the
Lebanon war, which alienated
many Jews. Now he may have
earned envy if not resentment,
among Roman Catholics,
whose bishops are currently
excluded from the House of
Lords.
Born in 1921 in
Koenigsberg, East Prussia,
Jakobovitz came to England as
a refugee, shortly after the
outbreak of World War II. The
son of Rabbi Julius Jakobovitz,
he continued his studies here
at Jews College, London and
Etz Chaim.
He served as chief rabbi of
Ireland from 1949 to 1958 and
then spent nine years in New
York as rabbi of the Fifth
Avenue Synagogue. He
returned to Britain as chief
rabbi of the United Hebrew
Congregations of Great Bri-
tain and the Commonwealth in
1967. He is due to retire as
chief rabbi when he reaches
age 70, unless the United
Hebrew Congregations
changes its rules.
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seriously about strategies for
helping Soviet Jews, we walk-
ed outside to avoid the bug
Pasha was convinced the KGB
had planted in his apartment.
He had good reason to fear the
KGB in their investigation
of his activities, they had in-
timidated him, threatened him
with arrest, searched his
apartment and harassed his
family.
This time, Pasha told me, it
was okay to talk in his living
room; his fear of arrest or
harassment has diminished.
He was not concerned about
the KGB monitoring our
conversation.
"I have my job," he said,
"which is to talk. They have
their job, which is listening."
But despite its positive at-
mospherics, Pasha said,
glasnost has yet to produce
systemic changes. Certainly on
the question of emigration, the
fact that his applications con-
tinue to be denied
demonstrates that the process
is as arbitrary as ever. Any
"state secrets he might have
been exposed to in his work as
an electronics engineer prior
to 1971 can no longer
legitimately serve as a basis
for denying him a visa.
Countless others, whose work
was in more sensitive areas,
have long since emigrated.
Of course Pasha and his
fellow refuseniks are delighted
at the emigration of such
heroes of the movement as
Anatoly (Natan) Sharansky,
Ida Nudel and Vladimir
Continued on Page 13-A
Galxna Glotzman Michelson, 66, puts her cheek to the hand of
Richard Sckifter, assistant secretary of state for human rights,
after she arrived at the Dulles International Airport from the
Soviet Union to be reunited with her husband, Anatoly Michelson,
69, of Naples, Flo. Behind Mrs. Michelson is her daughter, Olga
M\cheleon, t8. The reunion ended a Si-year separation of Anatoly
from his wife and family. AP/Wide World Photo
Pollard Seeking Medical
Treatment, Early Releeue
WASHINGTON (JTA) Lawyers for Anne Hender-
son Pollard have filed suit with the U.S. Court of Appeals
in Washington in an attempt to reverse federal district
court Judge Aubrey Robinson's Dec. 6 ruling denying
Pollard medical treatment by her family doctors.
Pollard, who claims to be suffering from various
digestive disorders, is serving a five-year prison sentence
for being an "accessory" to a scheme in which her husband,
Jonathan Pollard, a former U.S. Navy intelligence analyst,
paaaed classified documents to a renegade Israeli es-
pionage team.
The lawsuit also seeks a reduction of Anne Pollard's
sentence on humanitarian grounds.
The Israel Histadrut Foundation
cordially invites you to attend a
Pre-Banquet Brunch
Ushering in the Foundation's $100 Million Year
Wednesday, January 20th, 1988 at 12:00 P.M. (Noon)
At the Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel
4441 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach
Special Guest Speaker.. .WOLF BLITZER
Washington Bureau Chief of the Jerusalem Post and Noted Author
Who will be addressing the topic
"Between Washington and Jerusalem A Reporters Notebook"
MUSICAL PROGRAM.. .DIRECT FROM ISRAEL
ARIE BRAUN, Chief Cantor of the Israeli Army
(Courtesy-Gila and Haim Weiner Foundation for the Advancement of Cantorial Art)
Join with us in "Rejoicing" the $100 Million achievement of the
Israel Histadrut Foundation
Chairperson
State Representative
ELAINE BLOOM
DR. SOL STEIN
President,
Israel Histadrut Foundation
Participants
Greetings
AMBASSADOR RAHAMIM TIMOR,
Consul General
RABBI MORTON MALAVSKY
Chairman IHF
Board of Directors


Page 10-A The Jewish Floriduui/Friday, January 8, 1988
Letters Forum...
Neve Shalom Loses Support
Waldheim Evidence Continues To Mount
EDITOR:
I had considered myself a
supporter of the Jewish-Arab
village, Neve Shalom until I
read the shocking statements
by a Neve Shalom represen-
tative, in your Dec. 25 issue.
Rayek Rizek, an Arab resi-
dent of Neve Shalom, and
Yaakov Sonnenschein, a
Jewish resident, were in
Miami to gather funds for their
village. I certainly would have
helped them but was ex-
tremely disturbed when I read
that Mr. Rizek and the other
Arabs at Neve Shalom ob-
jected to their Jewish
neighbors' desire to celebrate
ndependence Day. According
to your reporter, the Arabs'
opposition to Independence
Day celebrations wu so in-
tense that "Jewish members
who so desired went to
Jerusalem or Tel Aviv to par-
take in the nationwide
celebration."
If the Arabs of Neve Shalom
were objecting to celebrations
of the Six Day War, then that
might be legitimate, since one
can argue either way about
keeping the territories won in
that war. But for the Arabs to
object to Independence Day
itself means that they do not
accept the very concept of
Israel's existence. If they were
truly loyal to Israel, they
would join in the celebrations,
since presumably all Israelis
are happy that Israel won the
1948 war. Someone who is
unhappy that Israel won
that Israel exists is, in my
opinion, unworthy of
American Jewish financial
support. If the price for having
Jews and Arabs live together
at Neve Shalom is that the
Jews must sacrifice the basic
ideology of Zionism that
price is too high a price to pay.
DINAH KAHN
North Miami Beach
Making Tutu Accusations
EDITOR:
In your editioi. of Dec. 25,
^South' African rabbi Selwyn
Franklin is quoted as saying
that he was "dis.urbed" about
reports that Archbishop Des-
mond Tutu, the Siuth African
black leader, is ; nti-Semitic.
Franklin said "he mows Tutu
is not anti-Semitic."
Perhaps we should famine
Tutu's statements about Jews,
and then let the Jewish public
decide for itself whether or not
he should be considered anti-
Semitic:
Tutu spoke at the Jewish
Theological Seminary in New
York in November 1984, and
to quote from the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency report
accused Jews of exhibiting "an
arrogance the arrogance of
power because Jews are a
powerful lobby in this land and
ail kinds of people woo their
support."
Speaking in Connecticut in
1984, Tutu said that Jewish at-
titudes towards non-Jews
were comparable to the apar-
theid system in South Africa.
The Jewish Community Rela-
tions Council of Hartford con-
demned the speech as being
anti-Semitic.
In The Jerusalem Post of
July 26, 1985, Tutu is quoted
as complaining about "the
Jewish monopoly of the
Holocaust."
Tutu spoke at a luncheon
sponsorec by the South
African Jewish Board of
Deputies in June, 1986, and
said that he savored the irony
of eating "this Jewish fish
cake" (gefilte fish) because
when his mother "was a ser-
vant in a Jewish home, the
Jews would only give her table
scraps to eat."
ROYNISKIN
North Miami Beach
On The Loss of Rabbi Heber
EDITOR:
The tragic death of Rabbi
Josef "Yossi" Heber, principal
of the Fana Holtz High School
of the Rabbi Alexander S.
Gross Hebrew Academy gives
us cause to consider the addi-
tional responsibilities we each
must shoulder in doing our
share to make this world a bet-
ter world.
Devastated and stunned as
all of us are at the untimely
loss of 31-year-old Yossi, we
must look ahead and go on
with the process of living. We
must somehow find the
strength to console ourselves
with the admirable goals he
tried to achieve.
As an Orthodox Jewish
educator, Yossi loved all peo-
ple as he sought to bring them
closer to the highest levels of
human concern and regard. As
a true friend to young and old,
he portrayed the quintessence
of comradeship and
sensitivity.
Yossie always held high his
personal torch of concern and
commitment. Our hopes for
the future can only be
strengthened by his courage
and enthusiasm.
RABBI RUBIN R. DOBIN
Saaay Isles
Reaffirming the Robertson Stand
EDITOR:
Just a short note of reaffir-
mation on your position on the
editorial regarding the Robert-
son candidacy.
Unless the Jewish Communi-
ty opens its eyes to realities of
what is going on, the
possibilities of Robertson's
views becoming the policy of
America is a distinct
possibility.
A Jewish press dedicated to
separation of church and state
is essential.
FRANKLIN D. KREUTZER
International President
United Synagogue
of America
By SUSAN BIRNB AUM
LOS ANGELES (JTA) -
Yugoslav documents accusing
Austrian President Kurt
Waldheim of war crimes and
allegedly used to blackmail
him while he was secretary
general of the United Nations
were presented here by
Chicago-based journalist
Charles Ashman.
Ashman displayed a
Yugoslav government docu-
ment, dated Dec. 26, 1947,
written by Dr. Dusan Nadel
Jkovic. president of a state
commission. In English
translation from Serbo-
Croatian, it "declares and con-
firms" Waldheim, then an of-
ficial of the Austrian Foreign
Ministry, "as a war criminal.''
The document recommends
that the Foreign Ministry
"transmit our report to the
UN War Crimes Commission
in London for his registration
and inclusion into the German
war criminal list, with mention
of specific importance for the
registration."
Ashman appeared at a news
conference at the University of
California at Los Angeles at
the conclusion of the three-day
Conference on Jewish Identity
in the 21st Century, sponsored
by the International Network
of Children of Jewish
Holocaust Survivors.
He also showed a Dec. 12,
1947 memo from the Yugoslav
Interior Ministry to the
Foreign Ministry. The transla-
tion mentions the presence in
Germany Army Group E of
"First Lieutenant Waldheim
whom a German
witness/prisoner confirmed
... was involved in the
reprisal decision-making pro-
cess for executing hostages
Ashman said he had obtain-
ed the documents two weeks
ago in Zagreb, Yugoslavia,
from the Foreign Ministry,
and that their authenticity was
verified by a Yugoslav
historian last week.
The journalist said the chief of
the Yugoslav Foreign
Ministry, Anton Kolendic,
claimed in an interview in The
Washington Post last year and
again in a statement last week
in Yugoslavia that he gave ail
of his nation's documents on
Waldheim's Nan past to the
Soviet Union in 1968 for the
purpose of blackmailing him.
He was UN secretary
general from 1972 to 1982
Ashman said the blackmail oc-
curred during Waldheim's
first two years as secretary
general, when Soviet and
Eastern Block UN secretariat
employees increased ten-fold
He also claimed that Waldheim
repeatedly met with Soviets in
Ottawa, which he said is a
known KGB center.
Ashman also presented an
Austrian Foreign Ministry
personnel file that lists
Waldheim's active service as a
first lieutenant in the German
Army from 1939 to 1945.
This adds to the evidence,
acknowledged by Waldheim,
that he incorrectly asserted in
his autobiography that he left
the army due to injury before
his Balkans service began in
1942.
Some Austrians Are 'Anti-' Anti-Semitism
By RABBI
MARC H. TANENBAUM
Political turmoil broke out in
this imperial city late last
month when Michael Graff
was forced to resign as general
secretary of the Austrian Peo-
ple's Party.
Graff, who played a key role
in the election of Kurt
Waldheim as president of
Austria, created a storm as a
result of an interview he gave
to a French newsweekly. In
that interview, the feisty,
argumentative Graff said
there was no problem with
Waldheim's Nazi past "so long
ADL Charges
Priestly Bias
NEW YORK The Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith today condemned anti-
Semitic remarks made by a
Roman Catholic priest, the
Rev. Lawrence Lucas, at a ral-
ly in Brooklyn.
Daniel R. Ginsberg, chair-
man of ADL's New York
Regional Board, asked John
Cardinal O'Connor to
disassociate the Archdiocese
of New York from the New
York clergyman's statements
and to take disciplinary action
against him.
Ginsberg said that in recent
years Lucas has made a
number of public anti-Semitic
remarks, claiming that Jews
"control" the press, wield "so
much influence" on U.S.
domestic and foreign policy,
and said that Hitler's
Holocaust took place ...
against a group of people who
were exercising a great degree
of economic influence if not
control."
Lucas, also charged in the
past, as he did last week, that
Jews have too much influence
over the New York school
system.
as it's not proved that he
strangled six Jews with his
own hands."
Major government and
political leaders led by
Chancellor Franz Vranitzky in-
stantly condemned Graffs
outrageous statements and
demanded his resignation.
During my meetings here
with government and Jewish
leaders, I learned there was a
dramatic outpouring of reac-
tions from people in many
walks of Austrian life who said
they were appalled by Graffs
horrible anti-Jewish
statements. There was also a
widespread welcoming of the
simultaneous resignation of
the deputy mayor of Linz, Karl
Hoedl, who earlier made other
vicious anti-Semitic
comments.
As upsetting as these
episodes are, it is significant
that increasing numbers of
Austrians, especially younger
people, are speaking out in re-
jection of these traditional
anti-Jewish cliches.
In mid-January, the
American Jewish Committee
will sponsor a major sym-
posium with Austrian leaders
in Vienna on Austrian-Jewish
relations. It is clear that there
is a rising momentum against
anti-Semitism and that needs
encouragement and support,
to help the good drive out the
evil.
Rabbi Mare H. Tanenbaum
is director of international
relations for the American
Jewish Committee.
Letters Forum
The Floridmrn
Please iaehkie ymmr
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Milton Tobin, Managing Director Murray Engel, General Manager
r mm,wi"



. .
Honeymoon Over For East
Berlin And New Rabbi
Friday, January 8, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) A con-
troversy has surfaced within
East Berlin's tiny Jewish com-
munity over how to approach
the several dozen young Jews
vho lately have shown interest
n Judaism and in seeking their
Jewish roots.
Peter Kirchner, chairman of
the community, believes they
must be confronted with the
choice of "joining in or staying
out" of the official community.
But the new rabbi of East
Berlin, Isaac Neumann, its
first rabbin in 22 years, insists
that no pressure be brought to
bear on young people attracted
to Judaism.
The quarrel involves a
Jewish community that is
minuscule. There were 400 of-
ficially registered Jews in all of
East Germany in 1985, about
half of whom lived in East
Berlin. In 1984, the communi-
ty numbered 800, half in East
Berlin.
Neumann, writing in the
West Berlin leftist daily
Tageszeitung, said his primary
concern was that the young
men and women grasp
Judaism and practice
whatever they understand.
"Whether one is a member of
the community or not, this is
certainly not decisive," he
said. He added that it was up
to the rabbi to decide.
Neumann, 65, was born in
Lodz, Poland and after years
in Nazi concentration and
labor camps, immigrated to
the United States in 1950. He
was ordained there in 1958
and served as a rabbi in Cham-
paign, 111.
He assumed his rabbinical
post in East Berlin last
September after prolonged
negotiations between
American Jewish organiza-
tions and the East German
authorities. He is presently
vacationing in the United
States.
Some sources in East Berlin
said his visit abroad during
Chanukah was due to friction
with the community chairman
and some of his closest col-
leagues. He hinted in his
Tageszeitung article that their
differences are broader than
the question of young Jews
seeking their heritage.
Neumann wrote: "I insist on
free access, I am not in-
terested in this community."
Netanyahu Blames PLO
For Children's Deaths
TEL AVTV (JTA) Ben-
jamin Netanyahu, Israel's am-
bassador to the United Na-
tions, charged the Palestine
Liberation Organization with
responsibility for the death of
Arab children shot by Israel
Defense Force soldiers during
the recent rioting in the West
Bank and Gaza Strip.
"Fresh bodies even if they
are of Arab children are ex-
actly what the PLO wants in
order to prevent a peace set-
tlement, Netanyahu told
reporters after delivering a
lecture at Bar Ilan University.
Asked if the PLO deliberate-
ly planned to have children
shot, Netanyahu said there
may have been some spon-
taneous elements in the recent
disturbances, but they would
not have lasted so long or been
so violent if there were no
organization behind them.
"Masked PLO operatives
went into schools and forced
boys and girls out into the
streets," the diplomat charg-
ed. "Once you create such a
situation, the rest can be
spontaneous."
Netanyahu defended plans
to deport Palestinian activists,
despite protests in Israel and
abroad and it would be a viola-
tion of international law. He
said the critics "forget that the
Geneva Convention (of 1949)
was formulated against the
background of World War II,
when mass populations were
deported and displaced.
"Here, we are talking about
deporting a few individuals,"
Netanyahu said.
Killing of Woman Triggers Unrest
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Trouble erupted anew in the
West Bank on Monday in reac-
tion to the fatal shooting of a
Palestinian woman by Israeli
security forces and deporta-
tion orders issued against nine
Palestinian activists.
Soldiers used tear gas to
break up a violent demonstra-
tion in the Al-Ram
neighborhood, north of
Jerusalem, where the shooting
occurred. Unrest spread to the
nearby Kalandriya refugee
camp, Bir Zeit and Ramallah in
the West Bank.
The Tulkarem refugee camp
was placed under curfew after
demonstrations. Arab shops
and businesses were closed in
most West Bank towns. The
commercial strikes spread to
East Jerusalem, but shops
there began to reopen
Monday.
The Israel Defense Force,
meanwhile, is investigating
the death of Haniye El-
Zarawneh, 25, during a clash
near Al-Ram on Sunday bet-
ween the IDF and Palestinian
youths.
According to eyewitness ac-
counts, about 20 Arab
youngsters wearing veils or
masks stoned Israeli vehicles
at an intersection of the
Jerusalem-Ramallah highway.
A small IDF unit chased them
into the Al-Ram neighborhood.
One soldier pursued a 14-year-
old Arab boy into the cour-
tyard of the Zarawneh family
home while firing into the air.
The soldier seized the boy,
eyewitnesses said, but con-
tinued to fire his weapon, hit-
ting the Zarawneh woman,
who was hanging laundry on a
roof.
Police fire tear gas to disperse protesters at
the Arab village ofAnata, north of Jerusalem.
The Arab villages surrounding the capital
have been centers of waves of violent distur-
bances in recent weeks.
Arizona's Mecham Offends .. Again
PHOENIX (JTA) A
local coalition of mainstream
Christian denominations has
joined Arizona Jews in ex-
pressing dismay over Gov.
Evan Mecham's remarks to a
Jewish audience here Dec. 13
that "Jesus Christ is the God
of the Land."
A public protest is planned
by the Bishops' Executive
Round Table, the Greater
Phoenis Jewish News reported.
The Round Table includes
American Baptists,
Episcopalians, Lutherans,
Methodists, Presbyterians,
Roman Catholics, Society of
Friends, Unitarians, United
Church of Christ members said
Universalists.
Mecham, who is facing a
vigorous recall campaign, is a
Mormon. He astonished and
offended Jews when he spoke
at the December monthly
men's club breakfast at
Ahavat Torah Congregation.
According to Jewish News
editor Leni Reiss, Mecham's
strongly implied rejection of
religious pluralism in the
United States came when he
was asked by a congregant to
explain a story in the Arizona
Daily Star about his recent
speech at the National Center
for Constitutional Studies ban-
quet in Salt Lake City.
"I want you to recognize
tonight on this 200th an-
niversary (of the U.S. Con-
stitution) that this is a great
Christian nation that
recognizes Jesus Christ as the
God of the land," he was
quoted as saying.
Asked if he indeed said that,
Mecham replied, "From my
standpoint, Jesus Christ is the
God of the land. I said it and
I probably will say it again. If
that is a problem for anyone,
then it is their problem."
Bruce Jones, regional
minister of Christian Chur-
ches' Disciples, told the Jewish
News that the Round Table
plans to write a letter pro-
testing Mecham's remarks,
circulate it and send it with as
many signatures as possible to
The Arizona Republic as a let-
ter to the editor.
The Rev. Gary Skinner of
the Presbyterian Church
U.S.A. will draft the letter.
"Our concern is to express
solidarity with the Jewish com-
munity as well as our convic-
tion that the United States is a
pluralistic country," Skinner
told the Jewish News.
Sen. John McCain of Arizona
said of his fellow Republican
Mecham, "I think the gover-
nor's remarks were at best un-
fortunate, at worst offensive,
to most Americans, not just
those who happen to be of the
Jewish faith.'
Joel Breshin, regional direc-
tor of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, main-
tained that the governor is not
anti-Semitic, ''just
insensitive."
Mecham responded that he
is "not at all insensitive," has
"many good Jewish friends"
and is represented by a Jewish
lawyer in his fight against
recall.
Surgeons Implant
Silicon Vertebra
TEL AVTV (JTA) Doc-
tors at the Hadassah-Hebrew
University hospital at Ein
Kerem have replaced a middle-
aged woman's cancerous
vertebra with a hand-sculpted
silicon facsimile.
The surgeons said they
believed this was the first time
this procedure has been per-
formed anywhere in the world.
The partially paralyzed
woman had been bedridden
before the operation because
the vertebra, in the lower part
of her spine, was so damaged
by cancer that her backbone
was unable to hold her body
up.
She now can sit up in a
wheelchair and has been
discharged from the hospital.
The silicon replacement was
crafted by a team at
Hadassah's facial rehabilita-
tion unit to form an exact
match of the wasted vertebra.
LIVING JUDAISM SCHOLARS FORUM
Sponsored By Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute Of Religion A lecture program tor the Florida community
DR. HERBERT H. PAPER, DR. NORMAN J. COHEN, Professor of Linguistics Professor of Midrash and Near Eastern Languages and Director of the Rabbinic School in New York. DR. ABRAHAM J. PECK. Administrative Director of the American Jewish Archives.
Sholom Aleichem as a Social Critic: A Re-Reading of his Genius." including the reading of stories never before translated into English. WILL SPEAK ON "A Modern Encounter with the Midrash," a journey through the legends of the rabbis. The American Jewish Experience; Survival Strategies," exploring whether the painful memories of the holocaust and the optimism of the State of Israel can keep American Jewry afloat.
Monday, January 11,8 PM Temple Judea 5500 Granada Boulevard Coral Gables (305)667-5657 Wednesday, January 13,8 P.M Temple B'nai Israel 1685 S Belcher Road Clearwater (813)531-5829 ADMISSiONFRCE Thursday, January 14,8 P.M. Temple Beth Israel 567 Bay Isles Road Longboat Key (813)383-3428


Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 8, 1988
Jewish Prisoner Services
Coalition Elects New Chairman
A volunteer who has worked for more than 15 years to
help jailed Jews and their families has been elected chair-
man of the International Coalition for Jewish Prisoner
Services.
Martin J. Hochberg, past president of B'nai B'rith In-
diana State Association, succeeds Rick Ross of Phoenix,
Arizona.
The coalition is an umbrella organization that coordinates
and aids persons providing assistance to Jewish prisoners
and their families before, during, and after incarceration.
The organization was established in April 1986 during the
first National Conference on Service to Jews in Prisons, a
meeting that was convened by B'nai B'rith.
Cantor To Succeed Handle man
Louis Cantor of Garden City, NY, has been elected na-
tional chairman of the American Red Magen David for
Israel, succeeding Joseph Handleman of Miami. Dr. Robert
Sadoff of Huntington Valley, Pa., has been elected national
president of the organization, succeeding Louis Rosenberg
of Kings Point. NY.
Textile Firm Cites Sabotage
TEL AVTV (JTA) The management of a major in-
dustrial plant has accused its Arab employees from the ad-
ministered territories of sabotage and willful absenteeism
resulting in significant damage and financial losses.
The complaint was contained in a secret memorandum
from Dov Pollak, chairman of the Polgat textile mills in
Kiryat Gat, to Minister of Commerce and Industry Ariel
Sharon. The memorandum was prepared three months
ago, Haaretz reported, long before the latest wave of
disturbances in the West Bank and Gaza Strip.
According to Haaretz, Polgat officials initially refused to
confirm the memorandum, but Pollak later told the
newspaper that it had been prepared at his request to be
forwarded to state agencies.
Two IsrmelU Injured By Bombs In
Envelopes Mailed From Istanbul
TEL AVTV (JTA) For the first time in 15 years,
Israel has been hit by a wave of letter bombs. Two
residents of Or Yehuda, near Tel Aviv, were slightly in-
jured by one such device.
It was one of 10 letter bombs, all posted from Istanbul,
that arrived in Israel last week, the other nine were
detected by postal employees before delivery to the ad-
dressees and safely defused.
Vo Ivovsky Family To Emigrate
(JTA) Leonid Votvosky, a leader of the Soviet Union's
Jewish cultural movement who spent 16 months in a
Siberian labor camp for "slandering the Soviet state," has
received permission to emigrate to Israel.
The news was first reported in Israel and later confirmed
by the Long Island Committee on Soviet Jewry.
Volvovsky, 45, a computer scientist, and his wife, Lud-
mila, a radio engineer, plan to join their 19-year-old
daughter Kira in Jerusalem, where she has been living
since receiving permission to emigrate in November.
8,155 Soviet Jews Emigrated In 1987
NEW YORK (JTA) More than 8,000 Jews
emigrated from the Soviet Union during 1987, a nine-fold
increase over the 914 Jews who were permitted to leave in
1966, and the largest amount since 1981, when 9,500
Soviet Jews emigrated.
But Soviet Jewry activist groups expressed disappoint-
ment over the figure, noting that in the year in which
glcunomt was introduced the number of Jewish emigres
comprised only a small fraction of the 400.000 Soviet Jews
who wish to emigrate.
Coalition To Aid "Homeland*"
NEW YORK In an effort to help relieve the
widespread hunger and malnutrition m the black
"homelands" of South Africa, the American Jewish Com-
mittee and the American Jewish World Service announced
a grant of $60,000 earmarked for eight villages in Lebowa,
SouthAfrica.
The joint grant of the Jewish agencies will help provide
local residents with tools, supplies and expertise to grow
food sufficient to sustain themselves.
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Glasnost and Perestroika
Continued front Page 8-A
Slepak. They are pleased, too,
that for the first time in many
years there are no Soviet
Jewish Prisoners of Cons-
cience. Yet Pasha is still wary
restrictive laws are still on
the books and the basis for
emigration decision remains as
mysterious as ever.
The theme Pasha sounded
was echoed throughout my
week in Moscow by a dozen
other refuseniks. For Soviet
Jews, the test of glasnost, of
perestroika (restructuring),
will be whether any change is
institutionalized. Will the pro-
cedures for applying for an ex-
it visa be standardized and the
obstacles removed? Will so-
meone starting a new job be
told if that job involves ex-
posure to state secrets? Will
there be rules establishing how
long after exposure to state
secrets an individual who
wishes to emigrate must wait?
Will the Soviets develop a
meaningful process for appeal-
ing visa denials?
The state secrets issue is
Pasha's main focus; he is
organizing a refusenik seminar
on the subject to highlight the
differences between the Soviet
and Western approaches to
state secrets. By so doing, he
expects to prove that Soviet
preoccupation with secrecy as
a reason from denying Jews
exit visas is irrational and in-
consistent with international
law and practice.
My traveling companions,
Judge Marvin E. Frankel and
Lewis Kaden, both of New
York, and I were briefed on
the irrationality of Soviet
emigration procedures before
we left New York. While in
Moscow, we raised the issue at
a meeting with Yuri Rechetov,
deputy chief of the Division of
Humanitarian Problems,
Department of Humanitarian
and Cultural Relations at the
Soviet Ministry of Foreign
Affairs.
The meeting, arranged with
the assistance of the U.S. Em-
bassy, was noteworthy in part
simply because Rechetov
received three American at-
torneys traveling as tourists.
It was also fascinating
substantively. We talked at
length about emigration ques-
tions and about other possible
reforms of the Soviet legal
system.
Rechetov informed us that a
special commission of the
Supreme Soviet is reviewing
appeals of visa denials and that
emigration procedures are in
th* process of revision.
When we pressed him, he
provided several examples. In-
vitations to emigrate could
now come from distant
relatives or even friends, not
just immediate family
members. According to the
refuseniks, while OV1R offices
in Moscow have been acceding
to such invitations, the change
has yet to be written into the
January 1987 emigration
decree. The decree provides
that invitation must come
from a parent, child, sibling or
spouse living abroad.
We pointed out to Rechetov
that international legal in-
struments such as the Interna-
tional Covenant on Civil and
Political Rights, which the
USSR has ratified, say nothing
about invitations and provide
that everyone has the right to
leave any country including his
own. His response was: "I get
your message," adding that he
foresees the day when every
Soviet citizen will be free to
leave temporarily and return,
and fewer will wish to
emigrate.
As to secrecy, Rechetov
volunteered that the Soviet
government perceives a need
to formulate clear rules and
that the process is underway.
Rechetov noted that Gor-
bachev himself has said that,
with a few limited exceptions,
no one should have to wait
longer than 10 years.
Rechetov's words were
welcome, but we knew and
he knew that many
refuseniks have been waiting
much longer.
Our conversation also includ-
ed such issues as reform of the
Soviet judiciary, revisions in
the Soviet criminal code and
the Soviet desire to host a
human rights conference in
Moscow.
Through it all, the tone of
Rechetov's remarks was as in-
teresting as their content. He
seemed to be trying hard to
convince us that real change is
taking place. Indeed, if some
of the reforms he described
such as repeal of certain
criminal code sections com-
monly used against refuseniks
and dissidents actually oc-
cur, they will reflect important
positive steps. The fact that
such possibilities are even be-
ing openly discussed is signifi-
cant, but as we conveyed to
Rechetov, actions speak louder
than words.
Moscow was different from
what I remembered in 1982. It
was easier to get around, to
Dinitz Defends Import Of Diaspora
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
[Simcha Dinitz, the new chair-
pan of the World Zionist
Organization Executive, of-
fered two axioms to members
f the combined WZO-Jewish
Agency staff at a meeting
I here.
He said the very existence of
the Jewish state in the future
will depend on its links with
Diaspora Jewry. And he said
the existence of the WZO-
| Jewish Agency will depend on
turning it into an efficient
[organ, so that we do not find
ourselves in the future all
[together on a sinking ship."
Dinitz, a Labor member of
[the Knesset and a former
United States, was elected
head of the WZO at the 31st
World Zionist Congress held
here Dec. 6 to 10. In his
keynote address, he stressed
the need for efficiency and
restructuring.
Only confidence and close
cooperation between manage-
ment and staff can achieve
these goals, he told the
staffers.
As for the ties binding Israel
with Jews overseas, Dinitz
observed that four million
Jews in Israel cannot ensure
the state's survival indefinitely
without being a part of the
worldwide Jewish experience
talk to people, to pursue a
human rights agenda. In five
days we met a large number of
refuseniks including
distinguished scientists
Aleksandr Lerner, Naum
Meiman and Yakov Alpert;
community leaders Aleksandr
Ioffe, Yuli Kosharovsky,
Viktor Fulmakht and Natasha
Khassina; former Prisoner of
Conscience Vladimir Kislik,
and Vladimir and Maria
Slepak, who were permitted to
emigrate a week after our
visit, and with a Soviet law
professor, dissidents,
American Embassy officials,
and the Moscow cor-
respondents for The New York
Times and The Washington
Post.
We spent an hour and a half
with Andrei Sakharov and his
wife Yelena Bonner. Everyone
.including Sakharov, talked
about Gorbachev and glasnost.
Sakharov's message of
special note because of his
stature and the respect he
commands was basically
consistent with that of the
refuseniks. The West should
support the current Soviet
move toward reform, he said,
with particular emphasis on
the need for changes in
emigration policy and in the
criminal justice system. No
one in the West should expect
such changes to occur over-
night, nor, he cautioned,
should anyone misinterpret
the release of a Nudel or a
Slepak as representing a fun-
damental shirt.
Nevertheless, according to
Sakharov and everyone else
we met, there is a greater
potential for fundamental
change today in the Soviet
Union than has existed in a
long time. We in the West
should encourage it with
whatever leverage we have.
This article is reprinted from the
December 1987 issue of the "ADL
Bulletin." national publication of the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith.
Friday, January 8, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Rabin Stands Firm
On Territories
Continued from Page 5-A
cannot allow "use of public
disorder and terror to show
that those who want, and
carry them out, can achieve
their goals by these means ...
We have to make it clear that
the only way to solve the pro-
blem is through peace negotia-
tions with Jordan, with
Palestinians who are not
PLO."
Newspaper and television
photos of Israelis shooting at
Paletinian Arab civilians
even if the latter are throwing
rocks and Molotov cocktails
"might be painful, it might
leave here and there damaging
public images. But we have to
cope with basic problems and
... we learned the hard way
not to give in to the use of
force and to the use of terror."
After gaining the territories
in the 1967 war for survival,
Israel had three options, Rabin
said:
It could have annexed them
unilaterally, extending Israeli
citizenship to those Arabs who
would accept it. Or, Israel
could have withdrawn
unilaterally from Judea,
Samaria and Gaza
redividing Jerusalem and
returning to a condition of ex-
treme geographic vulnerabili-
ty. It chose the third option: in-
stituting a military govern-
ment legal under interna-
tional law and holding the
status of the areas open pen-
ding negotiations.
If Palestinian Arabs and
some Arab states have grown
increasingly frustrated with a
political impasse which breeds
economic and social troubles
as well, the fault is theirs,
Rabin said. He pointed out
that the Arab side first re-
jected partition of Mandatory
Palestine in 1948, launching
and losing a war against the
newborn Jewish state.
Every year from 1949 to
1967 Israeli governments pro-
posed peace on the lines that
existed, when the West Bank,
Gaza and east Jerusalem were
in Arab hands. The offers were
rejected, Rabin noted. And "if
the heart of the Arab-Israeli
conflict is the Palestinian pro-
blem why was there no de-
mand then to make a Palesti-
nian state" of the West Bank
and Gaza, he asked.
Israel's peace with Egypt
showed what can be achieved
by Arab leaders with courage,
Rabin said. Meanwhile, the
police and military authorities
will use "whatever is needed"
to try to preserve order for all
residents of the territories.
One of those in the audience,
Anthony Lewis, wrote in his
Dec. 17 New York Times col-
umn that "anyone who hoped
for new light on the problem
must have heard Rabin's
answers with despair." Lewis
claimed that "the obstacle to
negotiation now is the divided
Israeli government" and he
charged that the country real-
ly has chosen a fourth option
de facto annexation through
settlement.
But the week before Anwar
Sadat's trip to Jerusalem,
most Israelis could not have
envisioned returning the Sinai
for peace with Egypt. Because
of the asymmetrical nature of
the conflict, it remains up to
the rest of the large Arab side
to make a bold, convincing
move for peace.
As for Jewish settlers, Lewis
advanced a sort of racist
presumption that it is all right
for hundreds of thousands of
Arabs to live in Israel, but all
wrong for Jews to live in the
West Bank and Gaza.
Eric Rozcnman is editor of the
Near East Report from which this arti-
cle is reprinted.
'Create Land From Sand'

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Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 8, 1988 .
Archaeologists Dig
At Philistine Enigma
JERUSALEM An
historical mystery who were
the Philistines? is being
unraveled slowly and carefully
on a rural mound near Kibbutz
Revadim just off the
Jerusalem- Gaza road by ar-
chaeologists from the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem and
the WF Albright Institute of
Archaeological Research.
Although the existence of
the Philistines, tracing back
more than 3,000 years, is
known to readers of the Bible
all over the world, little is
known with certainty as to the
life patterns of these in-
dustrious "Sea People," who
came unexpectedly from the
Mediterranean to Israel's
southern coastal region in the
12th century CE, and disap-
peared from the area some 600
years later.
The Philistines were present
in the land to witness the rise
and decline of the Israelite and
Judean kingdoms, and indeed
were their rivals. But beyond
that, historians and ar-
chaeologists know precious lit-
tle else about them. Whom did
they worship, how did they
earn their living, and what
were their cultural ac-
complishments? The problem
is seriously compounded by the
fact that the Philistines left no
known written records.
But they did leave unwritten
"records' in the form of their
houst-s, artifacts and ritual and
manufacturing installations. It
is these records that the ar-
chaeologists from the Hebrew
University and the Albright
Institute have been uncover-
ing so painstakingly at Tel Mi-
qne, the site of Ekron, one of
the Philistines' five capital
cities (the others were Ashdod,
Ashkelon, Gaza and Gath).
Tel Miqne is the largest
biblical period archaeological
site yet discovered in Israel,
covering more than 50 acres.
First surveyed by the famed
American archaeologist, WF
Albright, in 1923-24, actual
major excavations only began
in 1984. It is located about 10
miles inland from the Mediter-
ranean seaport of Ashdod.
Heading the staff of some
105 professionals and
volunteers from Israel and
abroad working at the site are
Prof. Trude Dothan of the
Hebrew University Institute
of Archaeology and Prof.
Seymour Gitin of the Albright
Institute.
"It is like trying to solve a
huge puzzle," says Dothan of
the attempt to learn from
Ekron some of the secrets of
the Philistine way of life and
culture. She feels that what
she and her colleagues have so
far revealed at Tel Miqne
represents the major moments
in the life of a large, urban,
border city the beginnings
and the "last gasp" of
Philistine culture, which
flourished in the time of Kings
David and Solomon and came
to an end with the Babylonian
conquest of 603 BCE.
What still needs to be learn-
ed in the ife of Ekron is
something of its middle years,
when it was a small, fortified
town under the shadow of a
powerful Judean Kingdom.
In the recently completed
excavation season, as well as
in the three previous seasons,
the archaeologists uncovered a
great many artifacts of stone,
faience, ivory and ceramics, in-
cluding lovely, tiny animal
figures reminiscent of those
found at other sites in the
Mediterranean that were in-
habited by people of Aegean
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Archaeologists Prof. Trude Dothan, left,, and
Prof. Seymour Gitin examine Philistine ar-
tifacts found in excavations at Ekron.
origin.
Of special note in Ekron are
remnants of its huge olive oil
industry of the 7th century
BCE. Over 100 olive oil in-
stallations have been
discovered. In surveys of the
rooms of the excavated in-
stallations, four-horned altars
were found, indicating some
sort of cultic relationship to
the olive oil production. Also of
interest are the rich findings of
ceramic vessels, made in
distictive Philistine style, near
kilns discovered on the site
that date back to the 12th cen-
tury BCE.
In this year's dig, extensive
progress was made on ex-
cavating a monumental
building in the city center
dating back to the 11th cen-
tury BCE, which might have
been the palace of a ruling
figure, or perhaps a building
devoted to public assemblies,
or even both. It has well
preserved walls more than one
meter high still bearing their
original plaster, a rare find in
archaeological excavations of
such antiquity.
Although the building is
believed to extend to a total of
more than 130 square meters,
what has been uncovered so
far are two rooms and a cour-
tyard. The rooms appear to
have been shrine or "cult
rooms," in one of which was
found a large "bamah" or altar
installation. In the courtyard
onto which the two rooms
open, a round hearth or fire pit
was found, which already has
yielded remains of utensils and
bones of animals. Similar
palaces with hearths of this
type have been found in
Mediterranean countries oc-
cupied by Aegean peoples, in-
dicating the connection bet-
ween them and the Philistines,
said Dothan.
Ekron was the farthest in-
land Philistine city in Israel,
located on the border with
Judah. Therefore,
distinguishing between the
Philistine and Judean struc-
tures, artifacts, town planning
and even diet (the Philistines
raised and ate pork, for exam-
ple, unlike their Israelite
neighbors) offers the most
striking of contrasts in the
region. "They were an entirely
distinct ethnic group from the
neighboring Canaanites and
Israelites," noted Dothan.
One of the intriguing ques-
tions facing the archaeologists
in what has been discovered so
far at Ekron is why olive oil
production was such an impor-
tant part of the economy, par-
ticularly in the latter period
(the 7th century BCE).
Gitin offers a possible ex-
planation: The period was
marked by an Assyrian enforc-
ed peace in the region, enabl-
ing the Philistines to concen-
trate on "home- industrial
development" rather than on
warring with hostile
neighbors. Furthermore,
Ekron was centrally located in
terms of north-south (Assyria-
Egypt) and east-west (coastal-
hill region) trade routes.
But what, then, of the many
four-horned altars? What of
the finely sculpted animal
figures? Who were the god or
gods that the Philistines wor-
shipped? And what happened
to the Philistines after the
Babylonian conquest? Were
they carried off into slavery, or
were they assimilated into the
local culture?
It is next to certain that
somewhere under the rubble of
Ekron, more secrets of the an-
cient Philistines still remain to
be discovered.
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Soviets Are In A 'Listening Mode
Friday, January 8, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
Contiaaed froai Page 2-A
Jackson-Vanik amendment "is
a long way off," Farrand says,
the measure is "not a very big
lever," because trade between
the two countries fluctuates
around one percent.
Asked what the biggest
lever the United States has to
sway the Soviet Union to im-
prove its human rights record,
Farrand answers: "I think the
desire on the part of the
Soviets to improve relations
with the United States where
they can and we have made
this a condition of those im-
proved relations."
In dealing with the Soviets,
the U.S. basically has a four-
part agenda, Farrand says:
arms control and disarma-
ment; human rights; bilateral
issues such as construction of
embassies; and regional issues
such as Nicaragua, Cuba and
Afghanistan.
"Human rights is one of
those four pillars and if we're
going to advance in the other
three areas then we've got to
advance in the areas of human
rights," Farrand says.
"We have been able to
secure from the Soviets a basic
agreement that these issues
are to be discussed and on the
table and are to be discussed in
detail. We are hopeful that
through these talks and
through other channels that
are constant and continuing
that we will have what I think
will become a continuing and
important impact which we
are hopeful will bring about an
improvement in this aspect."
But.. "It is a very big pro-
blem. It is not one to be
underestimated," he cautions.
THE PROBLEM? "This is
the essential difference bet-
ween a robust and open
democracy that has learned
over two centuries to accom-
modate many differing in-
terests, ethnic groups,
religions, social and cultural
variations between people
and, for all our flaws, we're a
stable republic where people
feel free to criticize the
government and to pursue
happiness as best they can.
"The Soviet Union is a
system which has virtually
none of those characteristics.
The Soviet Union is run by a
single party. The Soviet Con-
stitution is not practiced in life
and therefore the Soviet
government does not interact
with its people in the same way
the American government
does."
But the seriousness with
which the United States is ap-
proaching these issues is "now
registered and understood by
the Soviets," Farrand asserts.
"It should have been
registered for the past 20
years," he adds. When asked if
it had, he answers, "Yes, but
now they are approaching it
with a seriousness and in a
more businesslike way."
The pressure from the
United States is "at a high
Pitch now and it will continue
at the same level," he says.
Soviet emigration was ex-
pected to reach 8,200 in 1987,
^Pared to less than 1,000 in
1986. "We certainly expect
that there will be a continuing
increase in emigration and we
I are increasingly hopeful that
the Soviets will seek to resolve
these cases of persons who are
seriously ill inside the USSR,"
he says.
Despite Farrand's optimism
in the area of emigration,
leaders of world Soviet Jewry
movements are critical and say
many longtime refuseniks are
still not permitted to leave
Iron Curtain countries.
Farrand says his involve-
ment with Soviet Jewry
human rights issues goes back
to 1968 when he was an
American consul in Moscow.
That was before Jewish
emigration was a public issue,
says Farrand. "There has been
a steady turning up over the
years of the flame on these
issues," he observes.
STILL he says, the Soviet
Union is viewed as either the
second most powerful nation
or the other superpower.
"You're dealing with a coun-
try that's exceptionally con-
cerned with its sovereignty,
that views this kind of question
(human rights) as an internal
question. And despite the
agreements and the accords
which it has signed in the
human rights sphere, persists
in raising these issues that we
are somehow meddling in the
internal affairs of the Soviet
Union."
But the United States "re-
jects totally," the notion of
meddling, Farrand maintains.
"The UN Declaration of
Human Rights signed in 1948
and the Helsinki Final Act
in both those cases they made
certain commitments which
we are seeking to hold them to.
We have a perfect right
because we have signed on too
(and) have obligations under
those agreements. Clearly, we
hold that they have not (con-
formed to the basic human
rights commitments)" he says.
In summary, Farrand says:
"It's a long slog."
i
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Page 16-A The Jewiah Floridian/Friday, January 8, 1988
Wannsee Solution
KWCH!
TM
Continued from Page 8-A
lost through the genocide
policies of the Nazis.
Berlin used to have 173,000
Jews, which made it the fifth
largest Jewish city in the
world. Today it has just 6,200.
But how can the deaths of
six million people be presented
in a manner which can be fully
grasped?
These are the questions be-
ing discussed by represen-
tatives of Aktion Suhnezeichen
and leaders of memorials in
the concentration camps in
Dachau and Mauthausen, of
the Yad Vashem in Israel and
of the Holocaust memorial
which is being built in
Washington.
They all agree that the im-
portance of an authentic loca-
tion, the strength of effect of a
place created by history,
should not be underestimated.
There are fewer and fewer
people to tell about the era,
therefore bricks and stones
and space must tell the tale.
As long as concentration
camp survivors are alive, their
stones must be recorded on
film and soundtrack. History
often only comes alive for
young people when efforts ae
made to present it effectively.
Next to documents and
photographs and eye-witness
reports, teachers are also im-
portant. They must know ex-
actly what people of what age
they should show which parts
of the memorial.
All delegates at the con-
ference agreed that the Wann-
see Villa should fulfil a
teaching role so that young
people could be told again and
again about the Final Solution
so that nothing like it would
ever happen again.
It was agreed that the
memorial should encompass
both the shocking and the
positive. There is an another
aspect that was made clear.
Schutz explained it like this: it
must be demonstrated that the
murder machinery of the Na-
tional Socialists could have
been stopped by an interna-
tional campaign.
The Jews who set up Israel
must be able to see in the Wan-
nsee Villa that the National
Socialists did not have the law
on their side.
Rabbi Asher, from San
Francisco, wanted to make it
clear that the various Jewish
traditions that had developed
in Germany, the modern, the
Orthodox, the mystical, had
survived in America and
Israel.
The example of the influence
of Jews on the culture of oc-
cidental nations demonstrated
what had been destroyed by
genocide and what, in the way
of ideas, could not be
destroyed.
And he said it could be
shown that it would have been
quite possible for some Ger-
mans, with courage and cons-
cience, to help Jews and pro-
tect them from annihilation.
How all this can be incor-
porated into the Wannsee Villa
is still not known. Some
aspects really belong to a
Jewish museum, an idea Galin-
ski has been pushing, in vain,
for 15 years. Still other
aspects could better be realiz-
ed in a wider memorial concept
such as the Berlin administra-
tion is trying to establish.
This includes the rest of the
Gestapo headquarters in Prinz
Albert Strasse within sight of
the Berlin Wall snowing just
what the terror led to, the divi-
sion of Germany and Europe.
Other aspects are better
covered in the memorials to
the German resistance in
Stauffenberg, Strasse and the
execution centre by the
Plotzensee.
The Berlin administration is
considering whether to bring
all this together and possibly
put it under the control of a
government-sponsored
foundation.
(Der Tageupiegel)
Binational State
Continued from Page 5-A
destruction of Israel. Camp
David's practically open-ended
autonomy provisions go
begging.
The recent violence may
have delayed, not advanced,
prospects for mutual recogni-
tion. The mother of one Gaza
fatality was quoted as saying,
"We want to live in peace and
we want the Jews out of our
land. I don't care whatever
happens as long as we get our
But she was a refugee 39
years .ago from a village near
A&hkelon; the land she refer-
red to was not the Gaza Strip
or the West Bank but pre-1967
Israel.
Meanwhile, there was
widespread, sometimes violent
support for the demonstrators
in Gaza and the West Bank
among Israel's Arabs. This
reaffirmed sociological studies
indicating that the overwhelm-
ing majority define their na-
tionality as Palestinian, not
Israeli.
This trend among Israeli
Arabs, who comprise one-sixth
the population inside the 1967
"green line" and will total
more than one-fourth in
another generation means
that Israel faces the danger of
becoming a binational state
even without the West Bank
and Gaza.
And precipitate withdrawal
from the territories would pro-
tect neither Israel's security
nor Jewish rights. Who would
see to Palestinian Arab rights
in such an event impotent
Palestinian Arab moderates or
the PLO and Islamic fun-
damentalists, with help from
Moscow and Tehran?
Obviously, the status quo is
not on Israel's side; so its
friends should be concerned
but not demoralized.
Near East Report
Erie Rozewnan u editor of Near
East Report from wk\ch this article is
reprinted.
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Goldberg
'Street Guy' Goldberg Is
Color Man on Any Field
By SANDY DIX
IOM BOARD room to
room, the strategy's the
\. To Hank Goldberg,
rtising executive and
Goldberg, celebrity
ster, presentation is
^ey. The message comes
jh loud and clear: To
land clients alike, Hank
It like it is.
Itally frank, witty, often
live, Goldberg brings ex-
ent to the workplace. He
rnp of hard sell. Nearly
[decades on the South
scene point to an all-
lia blitz. No time slot is
illed. Long hours and
standards defy commer-
"T and gimmickry which
ponly spell success. A feis-
rit ignores what is trendy
chic in pursuit of
hing more genuine.
mission begins daily at
eber Silverstein Adver-
Agency, then continues
WTVJ-Channel 4 late
sports segments, bi-
^y broadcasts on WIOD's
iline, and radio commen-
[ throughout the Dolphin
season. Behind the
or on the air, Goldberg
takes his jobs seriously. It all
adds up to more than a game.
The path to big ratings and
bigger profits is clearly his
passion. After all, explains
Goldberg, "everything I do, I
do with gusto." He wears the
label of workaholic proudly,
citing "lots of stamina."
THOUGH a bit rough
around the edges, Goldberg
makes it seem so easy. That
"That a football strike
surpasses coverage oj
bombing in the Per-
sian Gulf is absurd."
earthy quality lets him get
away with frequently ir-
reverent remarks. Realizing
that he might "go farther than
the average person," Goldberg
still pledges "not to be afraid '
even when live programming
Srevents the luxury of editing.
y now he has learned to
"laugh at errors." He claims
never to have been nervous
during a broadcast except first
time out when Howard Cosell
was in the press box with him.
Experience has taught him
that occasional controversy
comes with the territory. But,
where careless words and un-
bridled opinion have
sometimes wrought grave pro-
fessional consequences for
other public figures, this is not
true in Goldberg's case.
Ironically, his disregard for
popularity has made him more
popular.
A rumpled look and less than
polished delivery have
generated positive audience
reaction and led local sports
fans to wait for his picks
before placing their bets. They
forgive him when he occa-
sionally loses control with a
radio caller or berates Dolfans
in no uncertain terms for in-
cessant complaints. Office col-
leagues respect him even when
he trims excess expenditure
from advertising budgets.
Even the powers-to-be at the
networks and ad agency have
hired him back in separate in-
cidents. Somehow he seems
like family. They simply feel
comfortable with this self-
proclaimed "street guy."
GROWING up in Newark.
Continued on Page 2-B
Coral Gables CC
Opens Its Doors Officially
THE CORAL Gables Coun-
try Club is seeking new
members.
And the club, which was
once considered to be
discriminatory, has, for the
first time, publicly stated that
it is an equal access club.
An item on page eight of its
newsletter, "Country Club-
ber," captioned "Non-
Discriminatory Policy of the
Club," says:
"An applicant for member-
ship will not be turned down
because of race, color, religion,
etc. The applicant must be of
good moral character and have
the financial ability to pay our
dues."
Ollie Bright, who took office
as club president in October,
said the notice appeared in the
club's in-house newsletter,
which is mailed to the club's
1,800 members.
"This has always been the
policy of Coral Gables Country
Club. However, the newness
came out of publishing it. The
board of directors voted
unanimously to print and
publish and post the anti-
discrimination policy we've
always had," Bright said.
Arthur Teitelbaum, regional
director of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, applauded the move.
"WE'RE very pleased by
the affirmative step of the Cor-
al Gables Country Club to
state publicly its commitment
to non-discrimination in its
membership policies and prac-
tices. We appreciate their
leadership in taking this step
Continued on Page 2-B
South Dade JCC
Groundbreaking
A full-service South Dade
Jewish Community Center will
be built at last, according to its
organizers, who say that the
groundbreaking ceremony of
the South Dade Jewish Com-
munity Center, to be known as
the Dave and Mary Alper
Jewish Center, will take place
as scheduled, on Sunday, Jan.
10.
Originally, construction on
the new center was not to
begin until the project's
organizers had raised $7.6
million 80 percent of the
estimated total cost.
But the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, which
owns the 21-acre site at S.W.
112th Avenue and 112th
Street, decided to put their
faith in the new center, which
had instituted a major fund
drive.
Just $800,000 shy of the $7.6
million figure, the center's
organizers asked local Jewish
residents for contributions.
The response was sufficient to
enable Federaton officials to
give the "all clear" signal to
the groundbreaking ceremony
for this capital fund building,
although construction will be
limited to the project's current
funding.
"I can't tell you how
delighted we are," says
Michael Adler, campaign co-
chairman. "This is a very pro-
ud moment for the South Dade
Jewish community."
The center is in part the
Continued on Page 3-B
Local Author Retells
Latvian Horror
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewuh Floridian Staff Writtr
HANNELORE TEMEL
does not speak of her ex-
periences in Latvia's Nazi
work camps at schools
anymore. She does not want to
frighten the children the way
she did the last time.
"Eyes of blue, five-foot-two
. five-foot-two had no
chance. You had to be bigger,"
says Temel, who "hand-picked
those who would have passed
the selections" from trie au-
dience of young students
assembled to hear her speak.
"I shocked them, so I never
speak anymore. That's the
most horrible thing I look at
someone and think, 'You
wouldn't have lasted a day.' "
But Temel, a Czech who was
deported to the Riga ghetto,
and later to the Sophienwald
work camp, has found a way to
share her memories of World
War II; by joining with other
Jewish survivors of Latvia
who contributed to the book
"Muted Voices."
The book, edited and col-
lected by Gertrude Schneider,
a wartime friend of Temel's, is
a compilation of the ex-
periences of Jews who recall
the failed attempt at
resistance in the Riga ghetto,
the murders which occurred
along the beach at Libau, the
Stutthof concentration camp,
and more.
Continued on Page 4-B
Our
Community
Friday, January 8,1988 Tha Jewish Floridian Section B


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 8, 1988
Hank Goldberg Offers Color Commentary
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I
Continued from Page 1-B
New Jersey gave him an un-
sophisticated but far from
humble start. As the son of
Newark News sports colum-
nist, Hy Goldberg, he found
himself linked early on to the
world of sport. With dad on
deadline, Hank would tag
along to the Marciano or Sugar
Ray Robinson fight. He recalls
being pulled out of school to at-
tend baseball spring training
in St. Petersburg. There he
would sit on the lap of Joe
DiMaggio.
Nor will he forget the thrill
of sitting in the booth with
Yankee announcer Mel Allen
or watching his own father
cover the World Series. Today,
the roles are reversed, as dad,
a retired Bal Harbour resi-
dent, can listen to or watch the
son he trained so well.
Those early lessons were
refined when Goldberg
entered the job market. After
attending college, first at
Duke, with graduation from
New York University, he made
his debut on Madison Avenue.
The year 1962 was just the
beginning of what was to turn
into a medley of careers.
FROM advertising, the
focus shifted to sport when in
1976 he did public relations
work for Jimmy "The Greek"
Coral Gables CC
Opens Its Doors Officially
Continued frem Page 1-B
and believe it can serve as a
model for other private clubs
in our area."
Private club discrimination
is an old and destructive issue
Amit Women'8 annual fund-
raising Child'8 Day Campaign
has begun this month and will
continue until March 1988.
Solicitations throughout Bade
County will focus on the Amit
orange "pushka." Funds rais-
ed through this effort helps
maintain more than ff pro-
jects in Israel which house and
educate over 18,000 orphaned
and needy children. Shown is
Laura Vogel, Child's Day
chairman
e
Paul Berkowitz, pictured,
Super Sunday chairman said
volunteers are needed to man
the three hundred phones which
will be set up at Temple Israel
of Greater Miami. Prior to the
hour shifts, from 9 a.m. to 9
p.m., short training sessions
instructing participants on
solicitation procedures will be
held. For information,
576-1*000, ext. tlS.
in Dade County, said
Teitelbaum, although he added
that he doesn't know of any
current lawsuits pending in
this area.
"There are clubs in this com-
munity that are generally
recognized to retain restrictive
membership policies,"
Teitelbaum said. These include
the Surf, Bath and Bal Har-
bour clubs, Indian Creek Coun-
try Club and Riviera Country
Club, he said.
IT IS the legal right of a
private club to choose its
members in any way it so
desires, Teitelbaum said.
"But should it be
condemned?
"Yes," he said. "When per-
sons of substance and leader-
ship in the community are in-
volved, then their association
with an institution which
discriminates on racial and
religious grounds is
abhorrent."
Bright said the two-sentence
policy was drafted by senior
Dade Circuit Court Judge
Milton Friedman, a Jewish
jurist who has been a member
of the Coral Gables Country
Club for the past 24 years.
Bright said the policy was
motivated by a letter from a
member, whom he declined to
identify. "The letter indicated
that they understand we had a
non-discriminatory policy, but
they never saw anything in
writing," Bright said.
Friedman, while presenting
his report to the board, in-
dicated that there also had
been some opposition to the
club's policy requiring a pro-
spective member to submit a
photograph with the
application.
BRIGHT, demurring on a
question of why photographs
were not requested until after
an applicant becomes a
member, said that the use of
pictures are widespread and
for many purposes. For exam-
ple, if a member does well in
the swim program, his or her
picture may be in the club
newsletter, Bright said.
The club is located on pro-
perty owned by the city of Cor-
al Gables. Membership fees in-
clude an initiation fee of $600
plus $30 in tax. Annual dues
are $600. The club's facilities
include tennis, swimming, din-
ing area and lounge.
Ellen Ann Stein
Snyder, Las Vegas odd-
smaker. Unhappy with his
subordinate role, Goldberg
returned to advertising, this
time in the South Florida firm
where he works to this day.
His resume during the 70s fil-
ed with public relations work
in the Dolphin press box,
sports phone-in shows for
WGBS and WKAT, football
commentary for the Universi-
ty of Miami Hurricanes, and
eventually as "colorman" for
Dolphins radio. But, along the
way to the big time, he took on
the part of short-order cook,
fountain attendant, country
club food concessionaire, and
bartender.
From one job to the next,
Goldberg never considered
changing his name. Unlike
Howard Cosell whose birth
certificate reportedly reads
"Cohen," Henry Edward
Goldberg has never relied on
image to promote career or
disguise his identity as a Jew.
Basic Hebrew school training
was received at Ohev Shalom
in Newark where he became
bar mitzvah 31 years ago. To-
day he considers himself a
Reform Jew who attends
synagogue only on high
holidays and a local seder each
Passover. Twice he made the
decision to work in the football
broadcast booth on Rosh
Hashanah but won't do "talk
shows which can get
substitutes."
True, he says, "Koufax
wouldn't pitch on Yom Kippur.
I know what tradition and
rules state. But, take a look at
Aquaduct's handle on Yom
Kippur, then talk to me about
hypocrisy."
PRESENTLY Goldberg's
commitment to things Jewish
is minimal, though on occasion
he has reduced fees for local
charities. "But," he explains,
"I'm not doing anything for
free unless it's a fund-raiser I
really believe in." Never-
theless he admires the re-
awakening of Cosell, who after
witnessing the Munich
"When two college
kids flunked drug
tests, what's so
sacred? Is this going
to affect anything?"
Massacre first-hand, became a
committed Jew for the first
time in his life.
Meanwhile, career remains
Goldberg's focus. To high
school students, he recom-
mends work in the broadcast
field, especially with the ad-
vent of cable. "It's healthy to
like sports as long as kids
realize that other values come
into play. We must take sport
for what it is and treat it as
such. But, we live in a nation of
hero worship. That a football
strike surpasses coverage of
bombing in the Persian Gulf is
absurd.
"When two college kids
flunked drug tests, what's so
sacred? Is this going to affect
anything?"
KEEPING it all in perspec-
tive is no small task for either
students or media specialists.
Goldberg realizes that he
works in more than one "ego
business" where insecurity
and rejection reign. Thus he
has learned to say what he
thinks without fear of reprisal.
So, after the final game of the
regular football season,
Goldberg assessed the Dolphin
performance in disgust.
"To play like that in front of
paying customers if it had
been a theater, they would
have thrown eggs." During
the same weekend he criticized
those who had hired a female
announcer in Kansas City.
"They should have put her in
the stands and let her talk to
the cheerleaders and wives,"
he asserts.
Outrageous or unconven-
tional, such ideas rarely go un-
noticed. It is passion for what
he says and does tw I
brc-ughtGoldberglhi^y
one has ever XSfctP
being shy or subdued. ,
He clearly likes to work J
and play even harder >|
time permits. Per**,, I
bachelor, Goldberg, **\
enjoys the late-night J
It's just his natJre S
everything to the fullest
"When I go out," he J
plains, "I just stay out Hi
a.m." Or he'll manage "2
a jaunt to the local race a*
or nearest casino. Win loTJ
to defy odds. The enthusu*
of a kid has more times tk
not paid off well.
And to those who obgen,
that perhaps is what's n
refreshing of all.
Paul Berkowitz. chairnmi
the Super Sunday phonea&i*
will be the guest Small Voice" to axr thxtm]
ing week. The host will beRcbl
David B. Saltzman. pietm]
above, president of the W
binical Association ofGrt&\
Miami. "The Still Seal
Voice" is scheduled to a\r*i
Sunday, Jan. 10 at ?:S0 on WSVN channel 7. and\
Jewish Federatvm TeUviml
(JFTV) on Monday. Jan. 111\
6:30 p.m. and on 77irda|
Jan. U at 7 p.m.
JJ
TEMPLE SHIR AMI PRESENTS ...
"BREAKING FROM THE KGB!
the first annual Sam 4 Lillian Slmonhoff memorial lecture
KKilKSH "I" reCOUnt h,$ ,alM ,dMt,ty Soviet dominated
Pollen KQB, and how he managed to survive.
WjjI^YlVPilNQ, JANUARY 15th at 8 P.M.,
TEMPLE SHIR AMI, 7205 S.W. 12th Avenue
PHONE 279-7311
Author Maurice Shainberg
Rabbi Brett S. Goldstein


Friday, January 8, 1988/The Jewish Florkiian Page 3-B
Hadassah Nightline's Koppel On Miami Beach
late Dave and Mary Alper at an Eastern Star installation.
South Dade JCC
Continued from Page 1-B
y of Dave and Mary
sr. whose estate provided
million in cash and pro-
ty. The Alpers, who both
finally came form Russia,
It when Dave Alper's
edale Delicatessen was
to relocate after the
ricane of 1926.
le deli's new location was
it next door to a drug store
led by Mary's brother. The
lie, who became partners
business as well as in mar-
;, went from owning and
rating the deli to investing
?al estate.
their bequest, they in-
in the future by re-
sting that a Jewish building
[Dade County bear their
He.
foday, son, Bill Alper is in-
itely involved in the plann-
ing, grandson, Jonathan
Alper, serves on the JCC
Board of Directors, and is
chairman of the personnel
committee. The Alpers' great-
grandchildren are enrolled in
the center'8 pre-school.
The 1 p.m. groundbreaking
ceremony, which will take
place at the site of the Dave
and Mary Alper Jewish Com-
munity Center, will include
Congressman Dante Fascell as
featured speaker, and a pro-
clamation on behalf of the
Dade County Commission, to
be presented by the county's
Vice Mayor Barry Schreiber.
Other events will include "a
day in the life of a JCC," with
pre-schoolers, teens and
seniors participating.
Alisa Kwitney
I
Events
r. Samuel Penchas Ruth Popkin
Hadassah to Host Penchas
a visit to South Florida to bring the latest medical news
m Israel, Prof. Samuel Penchas, director general of the
iassah Medical Organization, Jerusalem, will be introduced to
iers inthe Miami Jewish community through a series of
nts being held from Thursday, Jan. 21 thrugh Sunday, Jan.
He will be joined by Ruth Popkin, National Hadassah
Bident.
Penchas, Rumanian-born, became director general of the
iassah Medical Organization, in 1981, at the age of 42 and
guided HMO through a period of explosive growth and ex-
ordinary contributions to medical science worldwide.
le is a graduate of the Hebrew University, Hadassah Medical
bool and holds degrees in electrical engineering and
roomies from London University. He served as director of
earch and development on the staff of Israel s Surgeon
neral and later was medical officer of an armored division in
Israel Defense Forces. He is currently chairman of the
Jciation of Hospital Directors in Israel and a member of the
ate of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Ministry
lealth's National Council on Hospitalization.
For information on specific functions, 576-4447.
The Eleanor Roosevelt
Chapter of Hadassah an-
nounces that William F.
Saulson will be its guest
speaker for a noon meeting in
the Marlin Gardens
Auditorium, North Miami
Beach, on Monday, Jan. 11.
Forte Towers Chapter of
Hadassah will meet Monday,
Jan. 11, 1 p.m. at the 1200
West Ave. Auditorium. The
program will be the Forte
Towers Choral Group. For in-
formation, 673-1134 or
672-5572.
Financial consultant Eric
Stein will address the Ko'ach
Chapter of Miami Beach
Hadassah when the group
meets Wednesday, Jan. 13, 8
&m. in the Cadillac Hotel,
iami Beach. His topic will be
"Prudent Investing." For in-
formation, 864-8363.
Hatikvah Hadassah will be
having its Progressive Cham-
pagne Dinner Brunch Satur-
day, Jan. 23 at 7:30 p.m. at an
"appetizer home," "brunch
home" and a "dessert house."
For information, 665-3775.
The first rummage sale
sponsored by the Shoshanah
Chaper of Hadassah will be
held on Sunday, Jan. 17 from
7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 1070 NE
178th Terrace, North Miami
Beach.
First and second hand
brand-name goods will be sold
and all purchases are tax
deductible.
The Henrietta Szold Chapter
of Hadassah will have its next
meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 12,
11 a.m. at Jenny Behar's
home, Jefferson Towers.
Renanah Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its first
meeting of 1988 on Monday,
Jan. 11, 11 a.m. at 300 71st
St., Room 430.
Karen Wolstein, aqua exer-
cise instructress at Fon-
tainebleau Spa will
demonstrate and instruct on
general and special-needs ex-
ercise and will also spaek on
nutrition.
The Golda Meir Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its monthly
meeting on Monday, Jan. 11 at
the Ocean Pavilion Restaurant
at noon. Attorney Usher Bryn
will speak on "Wills and
Bequests."
The Torah Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its first
meeting of the new year, Mon-
day, Jan. 11 12:30 p.m. at
Temple Zamora, Coral Gables.
Speaker will be Dr. Michael
Newman and his subject is
"Holistic Health." For infor-
mation, 271-9490.
Engagement
SHANE-LINDER
Elaine and Martin Shane
and Sylvia (Chip) and David
Lander announce the engage-
ment of their children Susan
Shane to Michael Linder on
Dec. 25, 1987. An Aug. 1988
wedding is planned.
Ted Koppel will mark his
25th anniversary with ABC
News Sunday, Jan. 10, when
he speaks at the second event
of the Cultural Series of Tem-
61e Emanu-El of Greater
[iami. His talk, in the main
sanctuary of the Miami Beach
congregation, is scheduled for
8 p.m.
Koppel joined ABC News in
New York in 1963, but achiev-
ed national visibility in March,
1980 when "Nightline" began
as a nightly feature on ABC
Television, then highlighting
daily reports on the Iran
hostage crisis.
Today, he is probably the
most-quoted on-air reporter
and interviewer in the world,
and continues as anchorman of
television's first late night net-
work news program.
Koppel is not stranger to
Miami, having served as ABC
News bureau chief in 1968,
with his beat covering Latin
America as well as Florida and
the Caribbean.
Koppel also anchors View-
point, an ABC news broadcast
which quarterly provides a
forum for criticism and
analysis of broadcast
journalism.
Recipient of two George
Foster Peabody Awards, five
Alfred I. du-Pont-Columbia
University Journalism
Awards, four Overseas Press
Club Awards, 10 Emmys and
two George Polk Awards,
Koppel has received honorary
degrees from 11 colleges and
universities. For information
on the series, 538-2503.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
OF GREATER MIAMI
Adult Education Program
Jan. 10,17,31 thru
Feb. 7,14,21,28
PROF. CHAIM SHAKED, Ph.D.
"A History of the Relationship
of Islam & Judaism"
Gumenick Chapel -137 NE 19th St.
9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Tuesdays Jan. 5,12,19,26, Feb. 2,9
On the Beach Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
"Studies In Medieval Jewish Philosophy"
At Kendall Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson
"Jewish Music: From Chant to Jazz"
Call 573-5900 for information & registration
"This Man Is a Master."
Peter Clayton Miami/South Florida Magazine
MRDR CUCINfl
(formerly of 79th Street Roimondo's)
Gourmet Italian
12350 N.. 6 flve.
North Miami
Reservations 893-6071
Volet Parking Closed Mondoys


Page 4-B The Jewish noridian/Friday, Janutfy 8, 1988
Author Temel Retells Latvian Horror


IE WISH SURVIVORS OF LATVIA REMEMBER
Collected and Edited by Gertrude Schneider
l
Coatiaaed frMB Page 1-B
In all, there are twenty-one
vignettes of ghetto and work
camp life in Latvia. Temel,
whose- chapter is entiteld "A
Sad Time To Be Young," says
that''most of the things in the
book (are things) went
through even if I didn't
write it."
In her interview with The
Jewish Floridian, Temel
spoke of her experiences, some
of which had been included in
her chapter, many of which
had not.
A long-time resident of
South Florida, currently living
in Davie, Termel explains that
the story of Latvian Jewry has
not been fully told, despite the
attention paid to the Holocaust
in recent years.
"WHAT ALL of us feel
from Riga is we are being
overlooked. The big camps
were horrible, horrible but
our camps were horrible, too. I
was at Yad Vaahem (the
Holocaust memorial museum
in Israel) and there was no
mention of Riga or of the
massacre in Riga and Libau,"
Temel asserts.
Unconscious in the Sophien-
wald hospital during a time
when many of the patients
there were taken to the forest
and shot. Temel recalls that in
order to survive, one had to be
more than just the fittest. One
had to be in the right place at
the right time while the killing
was on-going.
"They hanged one guy in my
building (in the Riga ghetto)
for possessing a little can of
anchovies," Temel recounts.
Everyone in the ghetto was in
the business of acquiring con-
traband foodstuffs and goods,
she adds, even though
discovery of the items meant
almost certain death.
When Temel's mother was
working "on a detail which
sent clothing and jewelry" out
of Latvia, another woman on
the detail purloined a skein of
wool, and was caught by the
guards.
Temel's mother was an at-
tractive woman, and her looks
had saved her in the past.
"But they lined up the
women and shot (the one who
stole the wool), and then they
shot every fourth woman.
When the guard went to the
end, he came back again. At
that point, my mother could
have been as beautiful as
Elizabeth Taylor it wouldn't
have saved her," says Temel.
LUCK, however, did. The
women standing on either side
of Temel's mother were killed;
she was not.
Often, Temel says, survival
depended upon the mercurial
good humor of the S.S. guards.
"One day, when I was not
even 15,1 was called on a work
detail," Temel recalls. "The
S.S. man was very young and
homesick," Temel reveals.
"He told me to make a fire,
and I didn't know how. He
said, 'You must be an only
child,' and gave me something
to eat, because we were always
starving. I had a great after-
noon he made the fire, and
he said, 'You are going to sur-
vive, but the Russians are go-
ing to loll all of us."
Yet this same S.S. guard,
whom Temel says was pro-
bably no more than 22-years-
old, showed a very different
side to Temel a short time
later.
The punishment for stealing
one of the potatoes which
Temel and the other prisoners
were ordered to gather was
death, but hunger made many
of the inmates take that
chance.
On the day that Temel
recalls, "on Jewish woman
plucked out one (potato) and
the guard the nice guy
shot her, and she died and fell
right at my feet and her brains
spilled on my shoe.
"I fainted right away and it
was like dominoes; she fell, I
fell, Everyone thought he shot
me, too."
Temel reflects for a moment,
and then she adds: "We were
all alone. No one was watching
him. He didn't have to shoot
her."
The fact that the S.S.
guards, capable of committing
atrocities without blinking an
eye, also had a human face, is
what "still puzzles me," says
Temel. Perhaps even more
puzzling was the ambivalent
attitude of the Nazis toward
the Jews.
"They thought we had
supernatural powers," Temel
contends. "An S.S. woman
said to my mother that her
mother had told her, 'Never
put a hand on a Jew,' because
of their powers.
THE S.S. woman had in-
sisted to Temel's mother that
she followed this advice
faithfully! "I always kick
Jews," the Nazi guard
explained.
"You feel all this contempt
for them, but they have power
over you," muses Temel.
What would horrify another
young girl was merely amus-
ing to Temel. When she put on
a coat allotted to her at the
work camp, "suddenly, a rat
jumped out, and was running
all round. I thought it was fun-
ny; those were the funny
incidents."
Even when the Russians
liberated the camps, the Jews
continued to suffer, according
to Temel.
"We thought the Russians
were great guys, liberators
we didn't know they were go-
ing to rape girls who (were to
weak to) look up," she says.
"You want to know the
worst?" Temel asks. "The
worst thing was, after the
Dr. Irving Lehman, rabbi of
Temple Emanu-El, will return
to the pulpit for late 8 p.m. ser-
vices Friday, Jan. 8. He will
speak about the ongoing crisis
involving Israel and its
administered-territories for
this sermon at the Miami
Beach .congregation.
humiliation, the typhus, the
hunger, if you went through it
all, and came back, scraped
your life together the
(Czech) government said,
'Well, who needs you? Why did
you come back? I thought you
were dead.' "
After the war, a 16-year-old
Temel and her mother joined
an aunt and uncle, who had
managed to emigrate from
Czechoslovakia to Colombia in
1940. Temel lived there for 17
years, marrying husband,
Max, a German immigrant.
In 1963, the Temels moved
to Miami from Colombia. Their
three children were raised and
schooled here, two of them at
the Hebrew Academy.
Seven years later, Temel's
daughter Sofia, then 15, was
on a TWA plane hijacked by
terrorists and taken to Jordan.
Sofia was held for a week in
the desert, according to
Temel.
"They asked who was
Jewish, and took the non-Jews
to a hotel in Amman. My
Hannelore Temel
daughter could have said ah.
wasn t Jewish, she could W
said that she was Colombian
"But she said, 'My mother
was in the concentration
camps. I'm Jewish,' Teme
recounts.
!2H^i *merKed physically
unscathed despite the fact that
the terrorists blew up g
TWA plane along with two
other hnacked planes.
Temel doubts that she would
have been able to hold onto her
sanity had her daughter not
returned safely.
Still, Temel says she is not
plagued by her memories, not
of the 1970 hijacking, nor of
the difficult years of her own
childhood. Her only lapse, she
says, is that as a young
mother, "when the children
were small, it burned me up
when they didn't eat."
To eat is to survive, but
more than that, to have hope is
to survive.
"When you get so hungry
you can't sleep, you can't do
anything because you are so
weak, then we were marching
to work, we were singing
They (the S.S.) objected to our
singing German songs, so we
sang others," Temel recalls.
"On the death marches, we
were not singing anymore."
Instead, in Czech, the Jews
recited a chant: "We are
holding on, we are holding
on."
Those who were too young
and those who were too old
died first in the brutal world of
the Nazi ghettos and camps.
"My grandmother was killed
when she was one year older
than I am now," says Temel,
amazed. She, herself, had been
considered almost too young to
survive during the war.
"I always thought I'd sur-
vive, though. I'm an optimist
and a Pisces. I swim with the
current."
Cedars Re-Elects Rutstein
Sara Rutstein has been re-
elected president of the
430-member Auxiliary of
Cedars Medical Center. In the
past, Rutstein has served on
the Auxiliary board in a
number of positions, including
administrative vice president.
Elected as administrative
vice president was Mindy
Lampert former ways and
means vice president. Serving
as auxiliary services vice presi-
dent is Sadie Milberg.
Belle Berlin was re-elected
vice president, geriatric ser-
vices. She also won the 1987
volunteer award of merit.
For the second year, George
Mildoff and Carol Feibush
were elected vice presidents
for membership.
Eve Zinner thrice past presi-
dent, was re-elected vice presi-
dent of the Cedar Chest gift
shop. Bea Rosenthal and Jane
Spivack were elected ways and
means vice presidents.
Grave Tavss was re-elected
treasurer. Dorothy Sagman
was re-elected recording
secretary.
Beverly Mueller was re-
elected corresponding
secretary, and Anne Slule was
re-elected financial secretary.
Refusenik-Rabbi at Goldstein Forum
Rabbi Leonid Feldman, the
first Soviet Jewish refusenik
to be ordained as a conser-
vative rabbi by the Jewish
Ideological Seminary, will be
the guest speaker for the San-
dra C. Goldstein Jewish Public
Affairs Forum. The forum
sponsored by the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's
roung Leadership Council, is
scheduled for Tuesday, Jan
Hotel** ** Hyatt Regencv
Ordained in Mav 1987
and internationally on Soviet
Jewry, human rights and
Judaism. His topic for the
forum will be "From Marx to
Moses: The Personal Odyssey
Of A Soviet Refusenik."
In its seventh year, the
forum was established by San-
dra C. Goldstein's parents,
Sam and Miriam, in memory of
their daughter who passed
away at the age of 30 after a
sudden onset of meningitis.
vQr^QqnafiQ^ .v7MQO0..
,


Friday, January 8, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Reform Sisterhoods to Convene Here
Dolores Wilkenfeld, of
Houston, Tex., president of
National Federation of
smple Sisterhood (NFTS),
ill address the joint
Bterhoods of this area from
?mple Israel, Beth Am,
idea and Beth Sholom, on
Wednesday, Jan. 20, at Tem-
Israel of Greater Miami to
bnmemorate the 75th An-
irersary year of NFTS.
kn affiliate of the Union of
lerican Hebrew Congrega-
jns (UAHC) and the World
lion for Progressive
iaism, NFTS unites more
100,000 women in 600
tform Sisterhoods in the
sited Stb.es and other na-
tms throughout the world.
Miami Bands
Invited to Israel
The Rabbi Alexander S.
[ross Hebrew Academy of
[reater Miami is among 13
jh schools that were selected
Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez
participate in Israel's 40th
fear of Independence celebra-
>n in April 1988.
I The invitational letters were
Hit to 13 schools that have
rching bands. Suarez's of-
was approached by
's Government Tourist
ice and asked to assit in the
^lebration, at which the
Torld Youth Peace Parade
ill be introduced in the
reets of Jerusalem, Tel Aviv
ad Haifa.
I The cities of Miami and
ersheba in Israel are "sister
ties." Suarez was told the
!iami group will be "warmly
elcomed for a special perfor-
nce in Beersheba."
Delores Wilkenfeld
Wilkenfeld, who has held the
NFTS presidency since 1985,
will speak on "Sisterhood The
Soul of Judaism." Cantor
Rachelle F. Nelson will offer a
musical presentation following
lunch.
Chairing the day's program-
ming which begins at 10 a.m.
with registration is Harriet
Bulbin.
Co-chairing are the
residents from area
ynagogues Judith Solomon,
Temple Beth Am; Belle Bloom,
Temple Beth Sholom; Candace
Ruskin, Temple Israel;
Ernestine Richman, Temple
Judea. For information,
573-5900.
Anglo-Hispanic Forum at Judea
"Only In America," a forum
on South Florida's Latin
Jewish community and its rela-
tionship with the Anglo-Jewish
Community, will be held Sun-
day, Jan. 17, at 7 p.m., at Tem-
ple Judea, Coral Gables.
The program will feature a
panel of five Latin Jews, who
will discuss their experience as
Jews in Cuba and Latin
America, and problems as im-
migrants in the United States.
Such issues as the lack of com-
munication between South
Florida Anglos and Hispanics
will be discussed. Aaron
Kelton, executive director of
the Cuban-Hebrew Congrega-
tion in Miami Beach, will
moderate the panel. Par-
ticipating will be Sender
Kaplan, Alicia Oberstein,
Maurice Raisman, Yossi
Teitlebaum, and Juan
Matalon.
Amit Women
Shalom Chapter will hold its
monthly meeting Tuesday,
Jan. 12, 11:30 a.m. in the Club
Room of 100 Lincoln Road. A
book review, entitled "Riv-
ington Street" will be
presentd by Saundra
Rothenberg, Regional Field
Consultant for Amit Women.
Hatikvah-Miami Beach
Chapter will hold its meeting
on Thursday, Jan. 14 at noon
in the Morris and Anna
Eisenberg Social Hall at 1415
Euclid Ave., Miami Beach. The
luncheon will be sponsored by
Mr. and Mrs. Lou Rosenberg
in honor of their anniversary.
P'ninah Lipsky, American
Jewish humorist will
entertain.
a-
Biscayne Boulevard Site Available
On Jan. 2, a prime corner retail building in
the heart of downtown Miami at 900 Biscayne
Blvd. became available for a new use. That is
the day when Miami attorney and developer,
Thomas R. Post, took over the 33,000 square
foot retail structure which for years had been
one of downtown Miami's landmarks as the
Goodyear Tire and Service Center.
According to Post, the property had
become too valuable to Goodyear for use as a
tire store. "Its million dollar purchase price
was too good for Goodyear to turn down."
Now the site is available for other uses.
The Biscayne Blvd. site adjoins a six story
office building owned by Post at 901 N.E. Se-
cond Ave. Together the two properties en-
compass an entire half block ol Biscayne
Blvd. property.
Post sees the two properties being used by
a single user or a number of different users.
"These properties offer tremendous visibili-
ty to any company or companies that might
rent them.
"They could give a bank, savings and loan,
mortgage company or other financial institu-
tion, which is now currently located in
downtown, a tremendous presence here,"
-
states Post.
"Remember, the property is sandwiched
between the Omni and Flagler St. areas and
is only two blocks from Bayside and the city's
new arena. Moreover, it is highly visible not
only from Biscayne Blvd. but from Interstate
836, the Port of Miami and all of downtown.
"Likewise, it would make a great site for an
insurance company, cruise Tine, school or
other company that needs a lot of space.
Together, there is over 90,000 square feet of
space in the two buildings, witn plenty of
parking on adjoining lots and on a number of
nearby Municipal parking lots."
When asked if he would be willing to rent
out parts of the building for smaller
businesses, Post replied: "Sure, I would be
willing to divide the space up for smaller
users if that is what people want."
"The place would be a great site for a
restaurant, health club, clouting store, auto
dealership appliance center, furniture outlet,
convenience store, or fast food outlet."
In reviewing possible uses, Post suggested:
"In fact, tell everyone to come be and take a
look at the space. If they have a use for it,
they should call me at 379-1500."
Happenings
The next regular luncheon meeting of Tropical Cancer League
will take place on Friday. Jan. 15 at the Ocean Pavillion at 11:45
a.m. Vocalist Lila Rose will entertain, sponsored by the Savings
Bank of America. For information. 865-5233 or 672-8243
The fourth annual dinner dance of the South Florida Shomrim
Society will be held on Saturday. Jan. 30. 8 p.m. at Signature
Gardens. For information. 652-7279
American Ballet Theatre will present its production of "The
Sleeping Beauty" Monday. Jan. 25 Saturday. Jan. 30. under
the sponsorship of the Concert Association of Greater Miami
(CAGM) in cooperation with the Northern Trust Bank and wtth
the assistance of the Miami Beach Visitor and Convention
Authority.
ABT will dance six evening performances and two matinee* at
the Miami Beach Theater of the Performing Arts (TOPA), accor-
ding to Judy Drucker. president of the CAGM. the not-for-profit
presenting organization.
Dr. Henry A. Green, director of the Judaic Studies Program
and associate professor of Sociology and Religion at the Universi-
ty of Miami will address the Egyptology and Asian Civilization
Society on Friday. Jan. 8. at 8 p.m. at the Museum of Science.
Dr. Green's lecture, based on his dissertation. "The Economic
and Social Origins of Gnosticism." treats the phenomenon of the
absence or private property in land, the key to the whole of the
East, wherein lies its political and religious history.
______
The Smulovrtz Jewish-Christian Lecture will be held Sunday.
Jan. 17 at 2 p.m. at the Andreas Building of Barry University.
Miami Herald columnist Bea Mines will discuss "Keeping the
Dream of Dr. Martin Luther King. Jr.. Alive."
Ida Garazi's paintings and prints and Shirley Loeffler's pain-
tings will be on exhibition at the opening reception. Friday. Jan.
15. 7-11 p.m. at the SFAC Gallery on Lincoln Road.

"Celebrate the Dance" will be the theme of a series of pro-
grams illustrated with films and video tapes at the N. Miami Beach
Library on Saturdays at 1 p.m. Jan. 9. 16. 23. 30. and Feb. 6.
For information. 948-2970.
PRINCIPALS EADM ASTER
Akiva Hebrew Day School, located to suburban Detroit,
is searching for a Principal/Headmaster, commencing
with the 198*89 school year. He/she should have strong
administrative skills appropriate to a school that
includes grades N-12, with extensive training in Judaic
and General Studies. The school is an Orthodox,
Zionist, co-educational institution conducting Judaic
studies in Hebrew. Salary negotiable.
Please send resumes to Search Committee TJF,
Akiva Hebrew Day School, 27700 Southfield Road,
Lathrup Village, Michigan 48076.
TEMPLE EMANUEL
OF GREATER MIAMI
1710 Washington Ave., Miami Beach
LATE FRIDAY EVENING
SERVICES
at 8 p.m.
JANUARY 8,1988
1
DR. IRVING LEHRMAN WILL PREACH ON
"Status or Stature
A Challenge to the American Jew"
CANTOR YEHUDA SHIFMAN WILL CHANT
Assisted by the Temple Choir
SABBATH MORNING SERVICE 9 a.m.


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 8, 1988
i
Community Corner
The Miami Beach Chapter, Women's Division,
American Technion Society, will hold its MEP Lun-
cheon Meeting on Thursday, Jan. 14, noon, at the
Shelborne Hotel, Miami Beach. For information,
531-0005 or 538-4756.
The Forte Forum will hear Dr. Janet Martin on Tues-
day, Jan. 12 at 1 p.m. She will discuss "Mikhail Gor-
bachev and the Prospects for Reform in the Soviet
Union." The forum is held at 1200 West Ave. Miami
Beach.
"Yiddish Culture Winkle" will hold Its cultural
gathering Thursday, Jan. 14 at 10:30 a.m. at the Temple
Ner Tamid. Yacov Blank, academician and lecturer, will
speak about "Moshe Hes, Prophet of Zionism." Bracha
Shiien of Canada will sing a cycle of Hebrew and Yid-
dish songs. Menasha Feldstein, chairman will
officiate.
Beth David Sisterhood will hold its annual Kallah
weekend, Friday, Jan. 15, with services at 8 p.m.
proceeded by a Sabbath dinner, and 9 a.m. Saturday
morning services, Jan. 16. Dr. Jeremiah Unterman,
chairman of the graduate Jewish Studies at Barry
University will discuss 'The Prophets and Their Effect
on our Lives Today." For information, 854-3911.
Adlai Stevenson Democratic Women's Club will hold
a General Membership Meeting Thursday, Jan. 14, 11
a.m., at the Surfside Community Center. For Informa-
tion, 758-3368 or 873-0597.
Florida Friends Annenberg Research Institute for
Judaic and Near East Studies will hold its Luncheon
Meeting Thursday, Jan. 14 at noon at the Ocean
Pavillion Restaurant. Rabbi Norman Lipson will be the
guest speaker. For information, 866-5842.
The West Miami Auxiliary 223 and Post of Jewish
War Veterans will sponsor a Ward Party at the Miami
VA Medical Center on Saturday, Jan. 9 at 7 p.m. For in-
formation, 271-7727.
"The News Behind The News" will be the subject of
the forthcoming Workshop offered by the National
Council of Jewish Women, Greater Miami Section, on
Tuesday, Jan. 19. The first of eight sessions to be
presented weekly from 10 a.m. to noon at the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation. Discussion will be
facilitated by Marian Shoshuk. For information,
5784747.
The Jewish War Veterans South Dade Post 778 is
having a speaker from the IRS talk on the changes in
the 1987 taxes on Thursday, Jan. 14,8:30 p.m., at Tem-
ple Israel's Kendall Branch. For information, 3850456.
B'nai B'rith Women's Chai Chapter will be holding its
next meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 12 at The University of
Miami's Hillel House at 7:30. Topic will be "Jap
Baiting." For information, 279-0659.
Once again, Nancy Jane Greene, life chairman of the
Board of the Women's Cancer League of Miami Beach
and luncheon chairman, will underwrite the luncheon,
cocktail hour and decorations for "Joy in January."
This year her co-chairman is Roz Kovens, honorary vice
president. The event will take place at the Fon-
tainebleau Hilton Hotel on Monday, Jan. 11, at 11 a.m.
For information, 674-2464.
The Hug Tanch the Bible study group of Greater
Miami, began its fourth decade of study this season
with sessions being held each Tuesday morning, at
9-10:30 a.m., at the Cuban Hebrew Congregation,
Miami Beach. This group conducts its sessions in
Hebrew. Class is led by Rabbi Jehuda Melber, spiritual
leasder of the Jacob C. Cohen Community Synagogue.
For information, 576-4030.
The Jewish Culture League will present a literary
evening on Friday, Jan. 15 at 100 Lincoln Road. Jacob
Blank will lecture on "The Love and Pltty" by Abraham
Relsen. Victor Weltzman will entertain with Yiddish
songs, accompanied by Oscar Shapiro at the piano.
The Commerce and Professions Division of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Combined Jewish
Appeal, has Joined the United Jewish Appeal, Florida
Region In a Leadership Outreach Mission to Israel
f-eo. 8-17. The mission, aimed at professionals and
business people, will include meetings with top Israeli
leaders and visits to unusual sites as well as historic
and religious locales. For Information, 576400, ex!.
Dr. Samuel Cohen to Speak At
JNF 'Israelis Are Coming Concert'
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz,
chairman, Jewish National
Fund Executive Board and
Abraham Grunhut, president,
Jewish National Fund Greater
Miami have announced that
Dr. Samuel I. Cohen, National
Executive vice president of
JNF America will speak at the
JNF-lsraelis Are Coming Con-
cert to be held on Wednesday,
Jan. 20 at 8 p.m. in the
Theater of Performing Arts.
The concert is dedicated to the
establishment of a JNF Forest
in Israel in honor of Maestro
Shmuel and Ahuva Fershko.
Dr. Samuel I. Cohen is a na-
tionally recognized authority
in the fields of education and
social work. He traveled the
gamut of Zionist life with ser-
vice in the leadership capacity
in the American Jewish Con-
gress, B'nai B'rith, Zionist
Youth Activities, and Young
Judea Programs. Since assum-
ing the helm of the Jewish Na-
tional Fund of America, Dr.
Cohen has quadrupled its in-
come in the last ten years, and
has shown the way to a more
dynamic, and pragmatic way
of fulfilling the JNF Zionist
dream of redeeming and
reclaiming the land of Israel.
The Master of Ceremonies of
the concert will be Rabbi
Mayer Abramowitz, chairman
Durenberger to
Address NACPAC
Sen. David Durenberger, of
Minnesota, will be a guest of
NACPAC at a breakfast to be
held at the Omni Hotel on Jan.
14, 7:45 a.m. The breakfast is
intended to introduce new
members to NACPAC, and is
not a fund-raiser.
The National Action Com-
mittee, NACPAC, is a Miami-
based, non-partisan political
action committee which raises
money to support congres-
sional candidates who support
Israel, America's vital ally and
the only democracy in the Mid-
dle East.
Samuel I. Cohen
of the JNF Greater Miami Ex-
ecutive Board, and spiritual
leader of Temple Menorah.
Rabbi Abramowitz is a former
national chaplain of the Jewish
War Veterans. He was a very
active member and leader of
Aliya Bet, serving as joint
distribution and immigration
officer in Italy in charge of li-
quidating D.P. Camps in
Europe.
Appearing in concert are:
Maestro Shmuel Fershko,
foremost Israeli composer,
Rabbi Mayer Abnunowitz
?ianist, producer and director
affa Yarkoni, recognized by
Israel as their national singer;
Claude Kadosh, interpreter of
Morrocan and Israeli music;
Miriam Jacobi, Israeli top
Yemenite singer and Danny
Tadmore, Israeli radio and
television humorist.
Co-chairpersons of the con-
cert are Haim and Gila Wiener
and Bianca Rosenstiel. For
tickets please call the Theater
of Performing Arts box office
at 673-7302.
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GLADYS LANGWALD MEMORIAL
SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM
PHILIP LANQUARD
BENEFACTOR
cm?D*ll .t?UNCES A SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM FOR
Ss! ?T*i Ju,RcSToE^IN THE USY ISRAEL P'LGRIMAQE OR THE
RlpT22pIcErEDLLrRi,QRAM F0R THE SU"MER OF 1988. FOR
FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT HARRY J qil VFRMAN
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 947-1435 WNTACT' HARRY J' SILVERMAN,


Friday, January 8, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Conservative Women Back
Cuomo In Straw Survey
NEW YORK (JTA) It
vas not a straw in the wind,
iardly even a feather, but a
ajority of the leadership of
ie Women's League for Con-
ervative Judaism said they
rould like to see New York
jv. Mario Cuomo as the
jmocratic Party's candidate
for president in 1988, accor-
ding to the results of a poll
lade public here.
The canvassing was done at
the organization's national
fconference and board meeting
held in Atlanta, Ga., Dec. 13 to
15. Of the 175 women atten-
ling, 105 responded.
Among the Democrats, 34
supported Cuomo, who has not
jeclared himself a candidate
for nomination. Gov. Michael
io dared candidate, was
)referred by 15, followed by
Sen. Paul Simon of Illinois,
/ho had ten backers, and Sen.
Libert Gore Jr. of Tennessee,
.ho had six.
None of the respondents
supported Rev. Jesse Jackson,
/ho presently ranks second
I among registered Democrats
[nationwide, or former Gov.
I Bruce Babbitt of Arizona.
The poll was taken before
I Sen. Gary Hart of Colorado re-
entered the presidential race
to edge oi't Jackson for first
place arrung Democrats. But
several women questioned
about Hart's candidacy ex-
pressed strongly negative
odnions.
Among Democrats not runn-
ing for president, Sen. Sam
N'i'nn of Georgia was sup-
ported by two respondents.
One each backed Sens. Ed-
ward Kennedy of
Massachusetts, Bill Bradley of
New Jersey and Joseph Biden
of Delaware.
Sen. Robert Dole of Kansas
was the Republican favorite,
winning six votes against two
for Vice President George
Bush. There was one vote for
former Secretary of State
Alexander Haig, but none for
Rev. Pat Robertson or former
Gov. Pierre du Pont of
Delaware.
Among undeclared
Republicans, Jeanne
Kirkpatrick, the former U.S.
ambassador to the United Na-
tions, was backed by two
respondents and former
Transportation Secretary
Elizabeth Dole by one.
Much stronger than support
given any of the declared or
undeclared candidates was the
perception that women are not
given an equal opportunity to
run for political office on a na-
tional, state or local level.
Among the respondents, 76
agreed with that statement, 21
disagreed and eight had no
opinion.
Those who disagreed tended
to be over 45 and "old fashion-
ed" in the sense that they felt
women should not assert
themselves in the political
arena, the Women's League
explained.
The survey was conducted
by Dr. Marcia Katz, an
associate professor of the
nuclear engineering faculty at
the University of Tennessee,
Knoxville. The Women's
League for Conservative
Judaism represents 200,000
members in the United States,
Canada, Puerto Rico and
Israel.
Na'amat USA
"The 49th Anniversary of
the State of Israel The Past
and Future" w'ii be the topic
of a talk by Snirley Bogen of
New York at the Kinneret
Chapter of Na'amat USA's
Monday, Jan. 11 meeting to be
helH. at noon in the auditorium
rl Temple Ner Tamid, Miami
Beach.
Bogen is a former vice presi-
dent of the Brooklyn Council
of Na'amat and former na-
tional board member and is a
winter visitor in the Miami
Beach area.
Entertainer Tony Simone
will head the musical portion
of the program.
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
"And he looked, and, behold, the bush burned with fire, and the
bush was not consumed"
(Exodus 8.2).
"And Moses hid his face; for he was afraid to look upon God"
(3.6)
SHEMOT
SHEMOT The children of Israel increased and multiplied and
the land of Goahen was filled with them. But a new king arose in
Egypt; one who had not known Joseph. He said to his people: "The
children of Israel are too many and too mighty for us; come, let us
deal wisely with them, lest they multiply, and it come to pass,
that, when there befalleth us any war, they also join themselves
unto our enemies, and fight against us, and get them up out of the
land" (Exodus 1.9-10). The new Phiuaoh made slaves of the
Hebrews. He also mnuruuiaed that every new-born male infant
was to h- zmM into the River Nile. However, Moses was saved
rom this infanticide by the king's daughter and grew up in
Pharaoh's court. He was forced to flee Egypt after slaying an
Egyptian whom he foond mistreating a Hebrew slave. Moses
went to Midian, where he tended sheep for his father-in-law
Jethro in the desert near Mount Horeb. God appeared to Moses in
a burning bush and told him to return to Egypt, for it was his mis-
sion to liberate the children of Israel and lead them to the land of
Canaan. With the help of his brother Aaron, Moses united the
Hebrew slaves into a people. Then he came before Pharaoh with
God's demand the he "let My people go."
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law It extract** and based
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewleh Heritage," edited by P. Wollman
Tsamlr, 815, published by Shengold. The volume Is available st 75 Maiden
ns, New York, NY. 10038. Joseph Schlang Is president of the society
dUtrfNitlng the volume.)
B'nai Mitzvah
Alan Roth
Alan Brian Roth, son of
Mr.and Mrs. Kenneth Roth,
will be called to the Torah as a
bar mitzvah at Temple Emanu-
El on Saturday, Jan. 9 at 10:30
a.m.
Alan is a student at Nautilus
Middle School, where he is in
the eighth grade. He is school
representative to the United
Way, and is on the yearbook
staff. Alan also attends Tem-
ple Emanu-El's afternoon
religious school.
Out-of-town guests who will
attend Alan's Bar Mitzvah will
include Mr. and Mrs. Sam
Roth and family, and Mr. and
Mrs. Richard Cummings and
family.
Jordan Hullman
Jordan Hullman, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Geoffrey Hullman,
will be called to the Torah as a
bar mitzvah at Temple Sinai on
Saturday morning, Jan. 9.
Jordan's mother, Bonnie
Bloom Hullman, will also mark
the anniversary of her own bat
mitzvah at Temple Sinai. Ac-
cording to the Jewish calen-
dar, Bonnie Hullman became a
child of the Commandment at
the age of 13 on the same day
that her son will become bar
mitzvah, and read from the
same Torah portion that he
will read.
Accordingly, Bonnie
Hullman will read from the
beginning of the Book of Ex-
odus at the temple's Saturday
morning services.
Jordan's grandparents, Mr.
and Mrs. Sam Bloom, have
been members of Temple Sinai
since its inception over 30
years ago.
Larisa Grosh
At Sababth services on
Saturday, Jan. 9 Larisa Grosh,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Nor-
man Grosh will be called to the
Torah as a Bat Mitzvah at
Temple Beth Sholom, Miami
Beach. She will represent her
cousin, Dimitry Poisik, son of
Mrabha and Ilya Poisik of
Chernovtsy, Russia and Zhan-
neta Malaev, daughter of Hale
and Rena Malaev of Dushanbe,
Russia.
Rabbis Gary A. Glickstein
and Jason Gwasdoff will of-
ficiate at the 10:45 a.m.
Service.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
5:26 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 (Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach. Fla. 531-2120
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig
AOATH YESHURUN
102S NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Zvi Bonn Conservative
Executive Director:
Harry J. Silver man
Dally Mlnyan 7:10 a.m. and 5 pm
sat Sarvtoa l 30 a.m. and 445p. m
Fit a p.m. Sal 1 30 a.m. Bar Mttxvah
Nadav Dror. Uttrytn Emaato Schaohnor
and Mteneal atom Frt ( p.m. Award* Shabket
TEMPLE BETH AM
5850 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 697-9997
Leonard Sohooiman, Sr Rabbi
Mark Kram, Associate) Rabbi
Lynn Goldstein, Aeeiaterrt Rabbi
Fri. 7 30 p.m Family Sank*
RabM Lynn OMdataln "Yhay Satd No -
Fri 1:15pm Adult aarv
Rabbi Schoolman will apeak.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuei
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami Beach
53* 7213 534-7214 _
Barry J. Konovitch. Rabbi ('M\
Sergio Grobier. President If/
Sholsm EpsttMum, Prssldsnt,
>* U I___f* lhuilIM*-
nVftytOUS UOfTKTiin**
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue ,
Miami Beach

Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Bsrger
Asalatant Rabbi Ronnie Cshan
Yehuda Shllman, Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
KabbalalShabbal5p.m
Lett Frt. San. ( p.m. Rabat Irving Lanrman
rill preach. Cantor Shllman wTll chant.
Sat.aan. lam
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Ptnstree Drive. Miami Beach
532-4421
Canto. Rabbi Solomon SoMH
Dotty 7:10 a.m. Man. a There. 7 1 i, 4 7 p.m
Frt.7p.mBatla.m
fEmErBiWl
Of I
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854-3911
Jack Riemer. Rabbi
Robert Albert. ,-S2r*
Centor ( >
Rev. Milton Freeman.
Ritual Director
Daily aanricaa. Mon and Thura. 7:30 a.m.
Tuaa.. Wad and Frt. 7 45 a.m.
Sun 1 am F vainnga 5:30 p.m.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF SUNNY ISLES
17274 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach Fl. 33160 947-119B
HIHel Pries, Prssldsnt
Rubin R. Dobin, Rabbi
Frt. 5:30 p.m. aan. Sat. 1:46 a.m.
Rabbi Dobin topic
"Torah aa tha Etamal Optlmlat
Waakday aan. I a.m. and S:30 p.m
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St.. N. Miami. FL 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Or. Israel Jacobs. Rabbi
Dr. Joseph A. Qorfinkel. fl
Rabbi Emeritus v
Moshe Friedter. Cantor
fl
Fri 8 p m
Sal 8 45 a m
Waakday tan Mon.-Fri. S am
Mon Thurt Sp.m Sun 1:30 am
Sat. 8 45 am
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave.. M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 5384112
Rabbi Alvadla Rosenberg
Cantor Moshe Buryn
Dally Sarvtca 1 a.m. and S p.m.
Saturday 1:30 a.m.
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
2382601 f
Rabbi David H. Auerbach \
Cantor Stephen Freedman
I
Frt. Sarvtca I p.m Family aaortca
Qrada 2 ol Day School rHI partIclpata
Sat ton. 4 30 a.m. Bar Mitzvah
Matthew Dannla Graham and
Dlmltry Pyatataky ol tha USSR In abaantla
SBdHUffft6" Hah.
OR LEON KRONISH, Sartor Fouodmg Raobl
GARY A GLICKSTEIN. Sartor RabM
HARRY JOLT, Au> Hlary Rabat
JASON OWASOOFF. AaakMant Rabbi
IAN ALRCRN, Cantor
OAVIO CONVISER. Cantor Emarttua
Frt 115 Rabbi Qwaadoll "Bloaainga "
Sat. 10 45 a.m.
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd. ^r-.
Dr. Max A. Lipachitz. Rabbi '. W )
Zvee Aroni, Cantor sZi-
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Dally aarvlcoa Monday through Friday
7:30 a.m. and 5 30 p.m.
Frt. I p.m.
MtnchaSp.m. Sun.lam andS30p.m.
Bar Mitzvah Sat 1:30 am Scott Flachar.
'--- I I caaa ii...
9990 N KeneVaM Dr.. BOS-SOU
Reboi Rex D. Part......,
Centor lUcnoNe F Neieor,
Centor Emerttue
Jacob G. Bernstein
Frt. 1 p.m. RabM Rai D. Rarlmalar
"BRHIcal Obakttrtca:
Caring for tha Community."
Canter RachaHa F. Nekton.
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Btvd. Reform
Coral Gabies 997-5967
Michael B. Eiaanatat. Rabbi
Fri.aarty aorvtcatSOp m
TEMPLE KINO SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Ross
Shoshansh Rsab. Cantor
SaretoaaFn. 7:p.m.
Sat. Si jo a.m.
Onog Bhabbat vHB leNear.
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowltz
Ari Fridkia, Assoc. Rabbi
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sat.Sa.m Sabba
Dally Mmchah Sunday Friday
Sam and 1pm
Sat 1 am and HI p.m
%
TEMPLE NER TAMID 898-9345
7902 Csriyte Ave.. 996-9933
Miami Beech 33141 Conaanativa
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz ,.=>.
Cantor Edward Klein Jt\
DaUySan Mon.-Frt ta.m OOpm1^.'
Sal Mmcha 1 15 p m Sun 8 30am
1:30pm Sat.: 1 45 a.m. aarv. by RabM LabovtU.
Cantor Kloln
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
ol North Miami Bssch
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung
SHAARE TEFILLAH
TORAH CENTER OF KENDALL
7880 SW 112 Street
232-6833
Rabbi Hershef Becker
Dally San. 7 a.m. Frt. to nun. altar candta
Ikjnllngtlma ShabboaSa.m Shabboa
Mlncha 10 mm batora candla liohimg lima
Sun 1 30 m
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dads's Reform Congregation
Ralph P Kingsley. Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I. Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administrator
Fri. Sarvtca Sp.m. Sat. San. 10 30 a m
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
2712311 dj*-Be.
Or. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi 'SM
Benjamin Adler, Cantor v3>
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Mlnyan 7 a.m. Mondavi and Thuradayt
Sunday S a.m. Frt. 1:30 p.m
Sat. San. 9 a.m. RabM Shapiro and
Cantor Adlar officiating


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 8,1988
Rabbi Josef Heber, Hebrew Academy Principal
Students, faculty, parents
and administrators at the Rab-
bi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew
Academy in Miami Beach this
week are grieving the death of
junior and senior high school
principal, Rabbi Josef "Yossi"
Heber.
Heber was 31-years-old
when he died New Year's Eve
on a road outside Jerusalem,
where he had traveled to
secure a grant for the
academy. Heber's car,
reportedly swerving to avoid a
stopped vehicle on .he road,
hit another car head-on. Heber
was enroute to a dinner with
academy students who were to
ipend their senior year in
Israel.
Heber's wife Deborah, an
academy graduate, pregnant
with their sixth child, flew to
Israel last week to tv at her
husband's burial in the Mount
of Olives cemetery.
'We're just very torn," said
Shirley Gross, wife of the late
Hebrew Academy founder
Rabbi Alexander Gross.
Heber, who began teaching
Jewish studies at the Hebrew
Academy in 1JT8, became
p-incipal of the Fana Holtz
High School of th t academy in
1985 the youngest principal
of a major day school in the
United States.
On the cutting edge of
education and cult iral trends,
Heber helped t.ie school
establish nationally recognized
humanities programs nd, just
this year, for the first t me, he
initiated a course on human
sexuality.
He also developed a com-
munity service requirement
that served as a grade on a stu-
dent's report card.
In Israel, although Heber
had no relatives there, more
than 500 people attended his
funeral. Heber's students, stu-
dying at the various schools in
Israel, brought their teachers
and classmates and were join-
ed by rabbis and other heads of
educational institutions who
knew Rabbi Heber either by
name or reputation.
In addition to mourning, the
entire academy faculty was
called to the school on Sunday,
and two psychologists spent
the day working with them so
that the staff could be better
prepared to work with the
MUUM
Stuart A., suddenly puirt away on January
4. Husband of Harriet for 33 years. Father
of Scott (Tracey), Richard and Brett; grand-
father to Anna Periman; brother to Marilyn
TredweU and Clifford Periman Funeral ser-
vicea were held at Temple Ner Tamid on
Miami Beach with entombment at Lakeside
Memorial Park. The Riverside in charge of
arrangements.
ALPERT. Louis E.. 70, of Miami, January
4. Eternal Light. Lakeside Memorial
Park.
KOPELMAN. Philip, of North Miami.
Menorah Chapels.
RICHMOND. Gilbert. 59. January 4.
Lakeside Memorial Park.
DULBERGER. Ira. of Miami Beach. Rubin
ZUbsrt
SHAPIRO. Joseph. 73, of North Miami
Beach, January 4. Leritt-Weinstein.
I aksakis Memorial Park
BLOOMSTON, Abe, 70. of Miami. January
4. The Riverside
VOGEL, Joel. 60. of Miami. January 4. The
Riverside. Lakeside Memorial Park.
JACOBS, Soevah, January 4. The
Riverside.
RABINOWITZ. William S.. of Miami
Barach. Rubin-Zilbert.
GOODHART, Sophia (Shireiy), 80, of North
Miami, December 30. Services were held.
SILVER. Morris. 70. of Coral Gables.
December 31. The Riverside. Interment at
Star of David Memorial Park
STUBINS, Leonard. 59, of Miami.
December 31. The Riverside. Interment at
Star of !)avid Memorial Park.
JOFFE. '.alman. of Miami Beach. Rubin-
ZuDsrt.
MIASNICK. Ida, 84. of Miami Beach.
December 30. Menorah Chapels. Lakeside
Memorial Park.
JACOBSON. Henry L. (Hank). 38. of
Miami, January 2. Services were held. In
tannant at Star of David Memorial Park.
KLEDCAN, Bertha Matter. 80. of Tampa.
formerly of Miami Beach. Services held in
Tampa. Beth David Chapel
KLEINMAN, Sara R 77, of North Miami.
January 2. Eternal Light. Lakeside
Memorial Park
PAPPAS, Elsie D of North Miami Beach.
December 31. Eter a) Light. Lakeside
Memorial Park.
FRANK. Zelda, of Miami Beach, December
30. Blashsrg Chapel.
KELLER, Mrs. Sylvia, of Miami Beach.
Rubin-Zilbert.
FREEDMAN. Melvin. 71, of Miami Beach.
Eternal Light Lakeside Memorial Park.
JWvKK.rrrnfirld K<)
Oak Park. MirhiKan 4H2.17
(313) 543-1622
Hebrew Memorial Chapel
of Greater Detroit
Kffirienl. Reliable. Traditional
with
I >i^nii> and Understanding
l Hiiiplili' Shipping St\ < Kriiin I I'Tid.i \rvu
Your First Call to Us will
Handle All Funeral Arrangements
When a loss occurs
away from home.
n
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service
Dadc County
5.I2-2IK)!)
Broward County
5.I2-2.I9H
Htpmnrtcii by Riverside Memorial Chapel. Inr.
New York:(7lK)^{7WMiyuwnsBlv students this week.
Rather than commence with
studies in classes earlier this
week, teachers were to lead
small discussion groups with
their students about these
issues and a "gradual re-
entry" into studies was ex-
pected the latter part of the
week.
Rabbi Heber
Heber's own scholarly works
were in progress at the time of
his death. He was writing two
doctoral themes; one in educa-
tional administration at
Florida International Univer-
sity and a final paper in Jewish
philosophy was being prepared
for the Hebrew Theological
College in Skokie, 111.
Born in Toronto, Heber
studied Judaica at Ner Israel
there and at Yeshiva Bais Ha
Talmud in Israel before conti-
nuing his rabbinic studies at
Talmudic University of Miami
Beach.
In 1979, he was ordained an
Orthodox rabbi and served the
congregations of Etz-Chaim
and Knesseth Israel in Miami
Beach. He also founded the
Educators Council of Or-
thodox Jewish Day Schools, a
clearinghouse foundation that
provides educational informa-
tion to Hebrew schools across
the country.
A community-wide memorial
service will be held Sunday,
Jan. 10 at 7:30 p.m. in the
school auditorium.
In addition to his wife,
Deborah Seif Heber, the rabbi
is survived by children:
Nathanel, Shaindee, Yisroel,
Chava and Tzvi, who turned
one-year-old this week; his
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Mosha
Heber; and brother, Dr. Allen
Heber.
Ellen Ann Stein
GELB
MONUMENTSINC.
Open Every Day-Closed Sabbtth
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888
An important message
to anyone who has a
loved one in a Soutn
Florida nursing home.
enrar5Korywho should be
1, vou ate like some peoe e
seLled someone; anyone ^
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For example. tle'ni =h namcd
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someone else in, the^^ ,hat piaces
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funeral director you sera ^
L Kenneth Kav. Director C/; I
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17020 VVD** Highway
North Miam. Beach. Fl ^ ,
Dade 948-9900 Broward 761 tw
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Please call for a tour of k
our Garden of Heroes, an %
in notation in above-ground
burial modeled after the IV JJJ
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10301 A W25th Street ^Stf?
Miami, Florida Urj JjCTK
Dade (305) 592-0690
Broward (305) 525-9339


i


Matthew Kass Remembered
A memorial service for Mat-
hew David Kass, son of Karen
nd Mortimer H. Kass, will be
. on Sunday, Jan. 17 at
Temple Beth Am at 10:30 a.m.
Herbert Baumgard, rabbi
Emeritus and founding rabbi of
Temple Beth Am will officiate,
latthew's family and close
iends will also participate in
he service.
Matthew has been missing
ince Aug. 10, when he left a
iuth hostel in the Swiss Alps
ski for the day and did not
eturn. After an investigation
several months, which in-
volved Swiss officials, the U.S.
Jtate Department, and Swiss,
Jian and English embassies,
is thought that Matthew
light have fallen into a
revasse, (a deep crack in a
glacier).
Matthew, who had finished
first year as a student at
it- University of Miami Law
chool, was traveling abroad
IT completing summer
Studies at the Institute on In-
rnational and Comparative
iw at Oxford University in
London.
"He was a skier, we were all
tiers, and it was his dream to
? in Europe," says his
Mother, Karen Kass. "He
[orked out a trip that allowed
km to ski for two days in Zer-
kont, Switzerland."
I Matthew was then supposed
i join friends from law school
[ho had chosen to see Greece
Ihile Matthew was skiing. But
Jatthew, who was due to ar-
ve back in the United States
Aug. 25, six days before his
birthday, has not been
en since.
I Matthew received his BA in
lilosophy from George
[aahington University. While
] college, he worked as an in-
in Sen. Edward Ken-
iy's office.
le was also a graduate of
Temple Beth Am day
NOTICE OP ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OP FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Artie* No. 87-S4MO 24
ACTION FOB DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
i RE: THE PETITION OF
aria magdalena
:halco,
Petitioner/Wife,
ON A. CHALCO,
Respondent/Husband.
"RAMON A. CHALCO
Respondent
Residence UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
dissolution of Marriage has been
iled against you and you are re-
luired to serve a copy of your writ-
en defense*, if any, to it on
EUGENE LEMLICH. ESQ., at-
Itorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
Idress is 2720 West Flagier Street,
Miami, Florida 33136, and file the
I original with the clerk of the above
Istyled court on or before January
129, 1988; otherwise a default will
I be entered against you for the
Irehef demanded in the complaint
I or petition.
This notice shall be published
I once each week for four con
Isecutive weeks in THE JEWISH
|FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
lof said court at Miami, Florida on
this 23 day of December. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By JENNIS L. RUSSELL
As Deputy Clerk
KCircuit Court Seal)
IEUGENE LEMLICH. ESQ.
12720 West Flagier Street
I Miami, Florida 33136
I Attorney for Petitioner
18201 January 1,8, IB, 22.1988
Matthew Kau
school, where he later coached
basketball.
"I talk about him in the past
tense, but to me, it's not in the
past tense," says Karen Kass
of her son. "He wrote poetry
and loved sports and travel.
He was funny and fun to be
with.
"It has been a very difficult
five months," says Karen
Kass. "We just felt we wanted
to do something to
acknowledge Matthew, that
he's not here, and hope for the
best."
Remembering Matthew in
addition to his parents is his
sister, Ronni Kass, a
sophomore at the University of
Michigan; his grandparents,
Leah and Harold Busch of
Tamarac and Ruth Kass of
Boca Raton; and cousins,
aunts and uncles.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 874*182
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI,
a United States Corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
RITA BARR, individually, and as
Personal Representative of the
Estate of RICK BARR. deceased,
etal..
Defendants.
TO: All of the unknown heirs,
devisees, grantees, assignees,
lienholders, creditors,
trustees, or otherwise claim-
ing interest by, through,
under or against RICK
BARR, deceased, and all
other parties having or claim-
ing to have any right, tide, or
interest in the property
foreclosure herein.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Condominium Unit C of
PINEBROOKE CON-
DOMINIUM V, a Con-
dominium, according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, filed for record July
21, 1977, in Official Records
Book 9747, at Page 2120, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida, as amended;
together with the Mor-
tgagor's undivided interest in
the common element* ap-
purtenant thereto and
together with parking space
assigned to said unit
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis, Allison and
Cohen, Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address is 111 N.E. 1st
Street, Miami, Florida 33132, on
or before February 6,1988. and to
file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter, otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 29th day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: Clarinda Brown
Deputy Clerk
18208 January 1,8,15.22,1988
Business Note
Audrey Lieberman, 53, has
been chosen branch manager
of SunBank/Miami's office in
Bay Harbor Islands. Lieber-
man joined SunBank/Miami in
1979 as a new accounts
representative, and most
recently served as customer
service officer and platform
manager.
Lieberman is an active
member of the Goldcoast
Chamber of Commerce, past-
president of B'nai B rith
Women and a member of the
Florida Women's Caucus.
Friday, January 8, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Segal Taxpayers' Prexy
Harold J. Segal, member of
the Jefferson National Bank
advisory board, has been
elected president of the Miami
Beach Taxpayers Association,
and will be sworn in Jan. 15,
Sidney Weisburd
Wei8burd at
Morton Towers
Vice Mayor Sidney
Weisburd of Miami Beach will
install officers of the Morton
Towers Men's Social Club Sun-
day, Jan. 10, during a 6 p.m.
dinner in the Morton Towers
auditorium.
Mayor Alex Daoud will be
the guest speaker at the event,
at which Bill Corbin will be
sworn in by Weisburd to suc-
ceed Mac Presberg.
Weisburd is an official of
both the Dade and Florida
League of Cities and the na-
tional organization of
municipal legislators.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-48510 CA-02
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS.
Plaintiff
vs.
PHILIP MOTT, et ux.. et al..
Defendants.
TO: PHILIP MOTT and
VIRGINIA MOTT. his wit.
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
PHILIP MOTT and
VIRGINIA P. MOTT, his
wife, and all parties having
or claiming to have any right,
title or interest in the
property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 18, in Block 1, of FAIR-
WAY, according to the Plat
thereof, recorded in Plat
Book 7, at Page 28, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 38146 on or before
January 15, 1988. and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court his 10 day of
December. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18178 December 18.25.1987;
January 1.8.1988
The Consul General of Israel in
Miami, Rahamim Timor, will
be the speaker at the luncheon
of National Council of Jewish
Women (NCJW), Greater
Miami Section on Tuesday,
Jan. 26 at 11:30 a.m. at the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion. He will discuss recent
news from Israel. Chairwoman
for the luncheon is Joy Henry.
For information, 576-U7U7.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Naatber 87-7417
DWiaio.04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
IRVING M. SHAPIRO
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of IRVING M. SHAPIRO, deceas-
ed, File Number 87-7417, is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for
DADE County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street, Room 307,
Miami, Florida 33130. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 8, 1988.
Personal Representative:
BARRY MANDINACH
84 Yorkshire Road
Rockville Center,
New York 11670
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
WAYNE A. CYPEN
CYPEN A CYPEN
P.O. Box 402099
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
Telephone: (306) 532-3200
18222 January 8,16, 1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of SUNCO
DEVELOPERS at number 13382
S.W. 128 Street, in the City of
Miami, Florida, 33186 intends to
register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this 23
day of December, 1987.
PETER SCOTT PARKER
60* interest
ALAN RICHTER 50* interest
Attorney for Applicant
ALBERT W. GUFFANTI, PA.
ATTORNEY AT LAW
COCONUT GROVE BANK
BLDG. SUITE 305
2701 S. BAYSHORE DRIVE
MIAMV FLORIDA 33133
18199 January 1,8.15, 22,1988
Harold J. Segal
during a noon installation lun-
cheon at the Alexander Hotel.
Segal, past president of the
Miami Beach Board of
Realtors and former president
of the Temple Emanu-El
Men's Club, moves up from
vice president. A member of
the City of Miami Beach
Budget Advisory Board, he
has served the public body
since its inception a decade
ago.
He is past director of the
Florida Association of
Realtors and former vice
chairman of the Housing Ap-
Sals Board of the City of
iami Beach.
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COUBT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-56315
IN RE: The Marriage of:
GUYLNAT BREEDLOVE,
Petitioner,
and
THOMAS Z. BREEDLOVE,
Respondent.
TO: THOMAS Z. BREEDLOVE,
Residence unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for DiasoJu- ., y,
tion of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney, 612 Nor-
thwest 12th Ave Miami, Florida,
33136, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before February 6,
1988, otherwise a default will be
entered.
December 29. 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: Clarinda Brown
18209 January 1,8.15.22.1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 87-7430
DMilwM
IN RE: ESTATE OF
NATALIE MARGOLIS,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
(FLORIDA BAR NO. 884707)
The administration of the estate
of Natalie Margolis, deceased. File
Number 87-7430 (03), is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagier
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 8, 1988.
Lynn Nusbaum
Personal Representative:
12966 S.W. 103rd Court
Miami. Florida 33176
LOUISE J. ALLEN
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Stearns Weaver Miller Weissler
Alhadeff & Sitterson. P.A.
Museum Tower. Suite 2200
150 West Flagier Street
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (300) 789-3200
18223 January 8.15, 1988


Page 10-B The Jewiah Floridian/Friday, January 8, 1988
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Actioa
No. 87-53*32 (04)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
FL Bar No. 003473
IN RE: The Marriage of
GODWIN ONORIOBE
and
REMELDA KYLER CHERRY
TO: REMELDA KYLER
CHERRY
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street, North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162, and file the original
with the drk of the above styled
court on or before January 22,
1988; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDLAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 15 day of December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Barbara Harper
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18182 December 18. 25,1987;
January 1,8,1988
D* THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-40M4 CA 10
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERAN'S AFFAIRS,
Plaintiff
vs.
KENSWORTH LLOYD
McLENNON. et al..
Defendants
TO: KENSWORTH LLOYD
MCLENNON
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
KENSWORTH LLOYD
MCLENNON, and all parties
having or claiming to have
any right, title or interest in
the property herein
described.
You are hereby notified that an
auction to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 16, in Block 7, of
GOLDEN HIGHLAND
ESTATES, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 58. at page 56, of
the Pubbc Records of Dade
County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, SS146 on or before
February 6, 1988. and file the
original with the derk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise s default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 31 day of
December, 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Aa Deputy Clerk
18216 Januarys, 15,22, 29, 1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICmOt NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, deaiiing to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Business Consultants
and Mailing Service at 3660 Coral
Way Miami FL 33145 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Antonio Vasano
18218 January 8, 15.22.29. 1988
W THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case Ne. 87-47879 CA-30
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organised and
existing under the laws of the
United States of America.
Plaintiff,
vs.
PEOPLES EQUITY
MORTGAGE, INC. et al..
Defendants.
TO: JUDE SMITH and
JOAN SMITH, his wife
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
JUDE SMITH and JOAN
SMITH, his wife, and all
parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or
interest in the property
herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
CONDOMINIUM UNIT NO.
622, OF BENT TREE
PARCEL SIX. CON-
DOMINIUM NUMBER 6.
ACCORDING TO THE
DECLARATION OF CON-
DOMINIUM THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN OFFICLAL
RECORDS BOOK 10598 AT
PAGE 2081 OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve s copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida, 33146 on or before
February 5. 1988, and file the
original with the derk of this court
either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise s default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 31 day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18215 January 8,15, 22, 29.1988
Hi THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
TO ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-47H7 CA-30
NOTICE OF ACTION
WEYERHAEUSER
MORTGAGE
COMPANY,
Plaintiff
vs.
ROGER L. KOLL, et al..
Defendant*
TO: ROGER L. KOLL
8820 8.W. 149th Avenue
No. 418
Miami. FT*
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
CONDOMINIUM UNIT,
NUMBER 418. OF LAGO DEL
REY CONDOMINIUM NUMBER
TWO ACCORDING TO THE
DECLARATION OF CON-
DOMINIUM THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN OFFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 10878, AT
PAGE 1946. OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1670 Madruage Avenue. Cor-
al Gables, Florida. 33146 on or
before February 5. 1988 and file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's sttorney or immediately
thereafter: otherwise s default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 31 day of
December. 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18217 January 8.16.22.29.1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Namber 87-47*4
Division (01)
IN RE:ESTATE OF
MAXIMILIAN WONSCH.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of MAXIMILIAN WONSCH.
deceased, File Number 87-6766, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 8. 1988.
Personal Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler Street.
Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler St.. Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 374-3116
18219 January 8,15.1988
NOTICE UNDER
Ficrmous name law
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of SUN INVESTORS
at number 201 Crandon
Boulevard, in the City of Key Bis-
ceyne, Florida, 33149 intends to
register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this 23
day of December. 1987.
ALAN RICHTER 100% interest
Attorney for Applicant
ALBERT W. GUFFANTI, PA.
ATTORNEY AT LAW
COCONUT GROVE BANK
BLDG. SUITE 305
2701 S. BAYSHORE DRIVE
MIAMI. FLORIDA 33133
18200 January 1,8.15,22,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Namber 87-6182
Division 01
Fla. Bar No. 058319
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HAROLD L. GERSHEL,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of HAROLD L. GERSHEL,
deceased. File Number 87-6182, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami, FL
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WTTHrN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 1, 1988.
Personal Representative:
ROBERT H. SPANG
104 Winter East
Wilhamsburg, VA 23185
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
NELSON A FELDMAN. PA.
1135 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands. FL 33154
Telephone: 865-6716
18206 January 1.8,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-49533 CA-26
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS,
Plaintiff
vs.
THEODORE PRESSLEY,
etal.,
Defendants.
TO: CAROLYN REDDICK
Residence Unkonwn
If alive, and if dead, all par-
ties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
CAROLYN REDDICK. and
all parties having or claiming
to have any right, title or in-
terest in the property herein
described.
You are hereby notified that an
action for foreclosure of mortgage
on the following described proper-
ty in DADE County, Florida:
Lot 9, Block 8, of NICHOLS
GOLF ESTATES, according
to the Plat thereof, as record-
ed in Plat Book 50 at Page
38, of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your writtea defenses, if any. to it
on Stuart H. Gitlitz. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
February 5, 1988 and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise s default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 29th day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
18211 January 1.8, 15.22, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Namber 87-7241
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ERNA ROTHSCHILD.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ERNA ROTHSCHILD, deceas
ed, File Number 87-7241, is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street, 3rd floor, Dade
County Courthouse, Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal represen
tative and the personal represen
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 8, 1988.
Personal Representatives:
HENRY NORTON
19 West FUgler St., Suite 1201
Miami, Florida 33130
GERARD G. MOSS
1196 N.E. 126th Street
North Miami. Florida 33161
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler St.. Suite 1201
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 374-3116
18220 January 8.15.1988
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-64451
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS.
Plaintiff
vs.
VANA TAYLOR, et al..
Defendants
TO: HOUSEHOLD
FINANCE
CORPORATION
OF HIALEAH.
a dissolved Florida
Corporation
c/o D.D. GARDNER -
Director
621 Rolling Lane
Arlington Heights.
Illinois
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 21. less the North 5 feet
of Block 6. EAST LIBERTY
CITY SECTION "A," accor-
ding to the Plat thereof, aa
recorded in Plat Book 39,
Page 19, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Gitlitz. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida. 33146 on or before
February 5. 1988 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 29th dav of
December. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
18210 January 1.8. 15. 22. 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-66182
NOTICE OF ACTION
COWGER A MILLER
MORTGAGE COMPANY. INC.
Plaintiff
vs.
CHERYL FRASER. et al..
Defendants.
TO: SECURITY PACIFIC
EXECUTIVE/
PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES. INC., f/lt/a
POSTAL EXECUTIVE
FINANCIAL SERVICES,
INC.
14201 East Fourth Avenue
Aurora, Colorado 80011
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 12, in Block 20, of COR-
AL REEF ESTATES SE-
COND ADDITION, accor
ding to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 81 at
Page 74 of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Stuart H. Gitlitz. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1670 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
January 29. 1988 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise s default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 28 day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
18202 January 1.8,15. 22.1988
W THE CIRCUiT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case Ne. 87-52231 CA-06
NOTICE OF ACTION
ALLEN R. GREENWALD
and
JILL F. GREENWALD.
his wife.
Plaintiff
vs.
JOHN LEE UPSON,
etal..
Defendants.
TO: JOHN LEE UPSON
and JESSIE GLADDEN
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
churning interest by, through,
under or aninst JOHN LEE
UPSON and JESSIE GI .hi
UeormtorestmtheJM
herein described. ^1
You are hereby notified t^.l
ct>on for foreclosure of moZ!l
***"'" described wSfl
tymDADFCoimty.noridV*1
Lot 11. Block 18 ..
AVOCADO PARK, ^
dmg to the Ptat thereof I
recorded in Plat Book |
P*e 11, of the Pub,ic
R^rd. of Dade **,
has been filed against you m,-
are required to serve a com^rf
your written defenses, a* an/l"
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney k
Plaintiff, whose address i, \Z ,
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue 2
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or has. I
February 5. 1988, and file 2
original with the clerk of this eourt
either before service on Plaintiff,
attorney or immediate!!
thereafter, otherwise a default wj
be entered against you for th,
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the i
of this court this 29th day 0i
December, 1987.
RICHARD P, BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
18212 January 1,8.15.22 W
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Namber S7-4883 (04)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ABRAM M. WASERSTEIN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the admirustra
tion of the estate of Abram M.
Waserstein, deceased. File
Number 87-6883 (04), is pending ir
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the ad
dress of which is 73 W. Flagler
Miami. Fla 33130. The personal
representative of the estate is Liba
Waserstein. whose address is 9195
Collins Ave. (PH-K) Surfside Fla
33154. The name and address of
the personal representative's at
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
January 8, 1988.
Lma Waserstein
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Abram M. Waserstein
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Manuel Zaiac
150 SE 2nd Ave Suite 610
Miami Fla 33131
Telephone: 358-4580
18221 Januarys. 15,1988


Friday, January 8, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF j
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOB DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-4215* CA 13
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United
| States of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
I ANTONIO E. ALONSO, et ux..
let al.,
Defendants.
| TO: ANTONIO E. ALONSO and
GLADYS ALONSO, his wife
9720 Southwest Sixth Street
Miami, Florida 33174
YOU ARE HEREBY
[NOTIFIED that an action for
I Foreclosure of Mortgage on the
(following described property:
Lot HI, Block 2 LES
CHALETS II according to
the Plat thereof as recorded
in Plat Book 119 at Page 26
of the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida.
has been filed against you and you
re required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
814, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
lables, Florida, 33146 on or before
January 22, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately
hereafter: otherwise a default will
entered against you for the
elief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
\{ this Court this 17 day of
ember, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
189 December 25, 1987;
January 1,8,16,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA DM AND
FOB DADE COUNTY
| GENEBAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-61139 CA-26
NOTICE OF ACTION
)MINISTRATOR OF
ETERAN'S AFFAIRS.
Plaintiff
s.
pRIA J.M. HEARD, et al..
efendants.
I GLORIA J. M. HEARD
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
I through, under or against
GLORIA J.M. HEARD, and
I all parties having or claiming
I to have any right, title or
I interest in the property
I herein described.
pu are hereby notified that an
bn to foreclose a mortgage on
[following property in DADE
Vty, Florida:
pt 6, Block 6, MIAMI
^RDENS MANOR SEC-
|0N ONE according to the
at thereof, as recorded in
at Book 92. Page 63. of the
'die Records of Dade Coun
\. Florida,
en filed against you and you
to serve a copy of
written defenses, if any. to it
H. Gitlit*, Attorney for
puff, whose address is Suite
1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
1, Florida. 33146 on or before
22, 1988. and file the
1 with the clerk of this court
ft before service on Plaintiffs
orney or immediately
" er, otherwise a default will
fcntered against you for the
I demanded in the complaint.
[ITNESS my hand and the seal
his court this 17 day of
fcmber. 1987.
[RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
' BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
December 26, 1987;
January 1,8, 16, 1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
TICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
the undersigned, desiring to
* in business under the fie-
I name L'ESSENCE at 8150
I St. No. 118 Miami, FL 33144
nds to register said name with
[Clerk of the Circuit Court of
I County, Florida.
Edgar A. Valencia
16921 SW 87 Ct.
Miami. FL 33157
January 1,8,15, 22, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-33370 CA-17
NOTICE OF ACTION
WEYERHAEUSER
MORTGAGE
COMPANY,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOSE A. SARDON, et. al.,
Defendants.
TO: JOSE A. SARDON
4606 S.W. 189th Court
Miami, Florida 33176
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
CONDOMINIUM UNIT
NUMBER 812, OF BENT
TREE PARCEL SDC, CON-
DOMINIUM NUMBER
EIGHT. ACCORDING TO
THE DECLARATION OF
CONDOMINIUM
THEREOF. AS RECORD-
ED IN OFFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 10721 AT
PAGE 1666, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy ol
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
January 29, 1988 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 22 day of
December, 1987.
RICHAD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18195 December 25.1987;
__________January 1.8.16.1988
m THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. DJ AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-4*175 CA 04
Fla. Bar No. 475602
NOTICE OF ACTION
STOCKTON. WHATLEY.
DAVIN & COMPANY, a
Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
v.
CARLOS A. SANCHEZ;
MARIA C. SANCHEZ a/k/a
MARIA P. SANCHEZ, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: William N. Irvine, Patricia Ir-
vine f/k/a Patricia L. Piccolo,
Susan Fenster, Eduardo Raul
Grodsinksy, Nicholas San
Juan and Daisy Cantillo,
whose residences are
unknown, and the unknown
parties who may be spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees and all parties claim-
ing interest by, through,
under or against said Defen-
dants, who are not know to be
dead or alive, and all parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title, or interest in the
property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 4. Block 41, of FAIR-
WAY ESTATES, SECTION
SEVEN, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 98, at Page 67. of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Albert C. Galloway, Jr., Es-
quire, of Rosenthal & Yarchin, At-
torneys for Plaintiff. Suite 2300,
CenTrust Financial Center, 100
Southeast Second Street, Miami,
Florida 33131-2198, on or before
January 29, 1988, and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on December 24, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER, Clerk
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
18205 January 1,8,15,22, 1988
DN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-7343
Division 04
FLORIDA BAB NO. 210889
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOSEPH WEISHAUS,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of JOSEPH WEISHAUS, deceas-
ed, File Number 87-7343, is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street Miami, Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 1, 1988.
Personal Representative:
HELEN WEISHAUS
4011 North Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT,
ESQUIRE
GALBUT, GALBUT & MENTN,
P.A.
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
18204 January 1,8.1988
U4 THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5381
Diviaioa 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ELAINE NUSSBAUM,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Elaine Nussbaum, deceased.
File Number 87-5381, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 W. Flagler
Street, Miami. Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 1, 1988.
Personal Representative:
1. Herbert L. Lerner
801 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Fl. 33140
2. Cheryl Silverman
319 Minorca Avenue
Coral Gables. Florida
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
1. Herbert J. Lerner
801 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Telephone: 306-673-3000
2. Cheryl Silverman. Esq.
319 Minorca Ave.
Coral Gables. Fl.
Phone: 305-446-4851
18203 January 1.8. 1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name STRUL PROPER
TIES at 7464 Rexford Road. Boca
Raton, Florida 33434 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, florida.
STRUL PROPERTIES
H. ALLAN SHORE, ESQ.
Attorney for
STRUL PROPERTIES
18180 December 18. 26, 1987;
January 1,8, 1988
D* THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-47890 CA-31
NOTICE OF ACTION
COWGER & MILLER
MORTGAGE COMPANY, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DANIEL NOOKS, et al..
Defendants.
TO: DANIEL NOOKS
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
DANIEL NOOKS, and all
parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or
interest in the property
herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
Count\ Florida:
Lot 40, Block 10, OVER-
BROOK SHORES SUBDIVI-
SION No. 2, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 60, Page 31, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1670 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
January 22, 1988. and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded :'n the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 17 day of
December. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18188 December 26.1987;
__________January 1.8.16.1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-50457 CA 16
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATION OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS.
Plaintiff
vs
DANiJLJ. CHERY, etal..
Defendants.
TO: DORISE M.
BERNADOTTE. f/k/a
DORISE B. CHERY
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
her, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right,
title or interest in the
property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 65. Block 96, THIRD AD-
DITION TO CAROL CITY,
according to the Plat thereof,
recorded in Plat Book 65,
Page 93, PUBLIC
RECORDS of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1670 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
February 5. 1988. and file the
original with the clerk of thos court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 31 day of
December, 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18214 January 8, 15, 22. 29, 1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Artie* No. 87-61448 FC (28)
FAMILY DIVISION
ALIAS
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ERMA MOORE.
Petitioner,
and
JEAN ROBERT NELZY,
Respondent.
TO: JEAN ROBERT NELZY
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
MELVIN J. ASHER. ESQ. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 826 South Bavshore Drive,
Suite 643, Miami. FL 33131. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
February 5, 1988; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 29 day of December, 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18213 January 8,15,22,29,1988
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
cmcurr of Florida m
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-49166 CA 28
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS,
Plaintiff
vs.
ANDREW LEE CARTER, et ux.,
etal.,
Defendants.
TO: ANDREW LEE CARTER
and
ELOISE CARTER, his wife
and TIMOTHY E. CRAPPS
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
them, and all parties having
or claiming to have any right,
title or interest in the
property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to forclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 14, Block 31, of REVIS-
ED PLAT OF A PORTION
OF CAROL CITY, according
to the plat thereof, recorded
in Plat Book 57. Page 63, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
January 15, 1988, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 10 day of
December. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18177 December 18, 25, 1987;
January 1,8, 1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name ORLANDO AUTO
REPAIRS at 1266 OPA LOCK
BLVD. OPA-LOCKA FL 33054 in
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
ORLANDO RODRIGUEZ
18181 December 18, 25, 1987;
January 1.8,1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name LA FAMILIA
RESTAURANT at 1633-35 N.E.
8th Street. Homestead, FL 33030
intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
LAZARO MARTINEZ
REINALDO MARTINEZ
MELVIN J. ASHER
Attorney for Applicants
825 South Bayshore Drive
Suite 643
Miami, FL 33131
Tel. 541-2586
18184 December 25. 1987;
January 1,8.15, 1988
UN THE CIRJUIT OO'JBI OF
THE ELEVENTH JU> ICHL
CIRCUIT OF FLORI 'A IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURI8DH TION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-50214 CA-15
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERAN'S AFFAIRS,
Plaintiff
vs.
LEONARD LOSITO II. et ux.. et
al.,
Defendants.
TO: LEONARD LOSITO III and
FRANCES MARIE
LOSITO, his wife
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
LEONARD LOSITO II and
FRANCES MARIE LOSITO,
his wife, and all parties
having or claiming to have
any right, title or interest in
the property herein
described.
You are hereby notified that ar.
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 9, Block 11, FIRST AD-
DITION TO ANDOVER, ac-
cording to the plat thereof,
recorded in Plat Book 72 at
Page 36 of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuat H. Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 38146 on or before
January 29, 1988, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 22 day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRDNKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18194 December 25,1987;
__________January 1.8,15,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-43317 (CA 16)
NOTICE OF ACTION
ALLEN R. GREENWALD. and
JILL F. GREENWALD, his wife
Plaintiff,
vs.
HARVARD/OXFORD
ASSOCIATES. LTD., a Florida
limited partnership, et. al..
Defendants.
TO: MURRAY WEINBERG,
residence unknown, if living
and, if dead, to all of the
unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees,
lienholders, creditors,
trustees or other parties
claiming by, through, under
or against the said MURRAY
WEINBERG, and all other
parties, having or claiming to
have any right, title or
interest in and to the
property under foreclosure
herein.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Lot 86 through 46, Block 63.
FULFORD BY THE SEA.
SECTION "D." according to
the Plat thereof, recorded in
Plat Book 8 at Page 68 of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida, together with the
buildings and improvements
thereon, tenements,
hereditaments and ap-
purtenances thereto
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis, Allison &
Cohen, Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address is 111 N.E. 1st
Street, Miami. Florida 33132, on
or before January 22, 1988, and
file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 18 day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: DIANA CAMPBELL
Deputy Clerk
18192 December 25, 1987;
January 1.8. 16. 1988


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 8, 1988
Soviet-Israeli Visits Up

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18218
By HUGH ORGEL
And
ANDREW SILOW CARROLL
(JTA) Soviet emigration
officials are allowing Soviet
Jews to apply for tourist visas
to visit Israel and have eased
restrictions on Israelis wishing
to visit relatives in Moscow,
the Israeli daily Maariv
reported.
Maariv quoted reports from
Moscow saying that an an-
nouncement was posted on the
doors of the OVIR emigration
agency there last week, an-
nouncing that "those wishing
to visit Israel may now apply
to do so."
Israelis wishing to visit
relatives in Moscow, mean-
while, may now apply to
Moscow via the diplomatic
missions of Eastern European
countries, who pass on the en-
try tourist visas.
Previously, such requests for
visas to visit the Soviet Union
had to be made through
Rakah, the Israel Communist
party. The new procedures
have been confirmed by the
U.S. Sen. Bob Packwood,
Oregon, will fly to Miami to
board the DeWitt Clinton with
the South Dade New Leader-
ship Division of the Greater
Miami Israel Bonds Organiza-
tion and act as guest speaker of
the division's Bond Voyage
Dinner/Dance on Saturday,
Jan. 23. The Dinner/Dance
will begin with cocktails at 7:30
p.m. with the boat leaving for
the cruise at 8:15. The DeWitt
Clinton is docked at the Hyatt
Regency Hotel. Acting as
chairpeople for the Bond
Voyage Dinner/Dance are
Howard Goldstein, David and
Mona Abramowitz and Marcy
Taubenkimel. For informa-
tion, 531-6731.
Veteran Dade County Court
Judge Richard V. Margolius
has been appointed Acting Cir-
cuit Court Judge in the
Criminal Division of the llth
Judicial Circuit, for the period
through March 19. Judge
Margolius, U5, was executive
assistant Public Defender of
Dade County when he was ap-
pointed to the bench in 1982. He
was re-elected in 1986 without
opposition.
Israeli Public Council for
Soviet Jewry, which also says
that the number of mutual
visits has increased recently.
Maariv quoted a Soviet resi-
dent now visiting his family in
Israel as saying that when he
applied to OVIR for a tourist
visa he was told, "No problem.
Make an application.'
He was granted permission
for the visa after a three-
month wait and a payment of
200 rubles, he said. The visa
itself arrived two weeks later
through the Dutch Embassy in
Moscow, which looks after
Israel's diplomatic interests in
the Soviet Union.
Soviet Jewry activists in the
United States said that the
eased restrictions are related
to diplomatic strategies in-
itiated by the Soviets this sum-
mer, when Soviet emigres in
the United States were
granted brief visas to visit
relatives in the Soviet Union.
The Jeane Kirkpatrick Forum for Public
Leadership and Public Policy met recently at
Tel Aviv University. The third conference of
the Forum had as its theme "UO Years After
Independence Israel and the U.S." Par-
ticipating are Jeane Kirkpatrick, former [' < i
Ambassador to the United Nationi
podium, historian Shabtai Teveth and ft*
Yoram Dinstein, pro-rector of Tel An
University.
Available at All Publix Stores and Fresh
Danish Bakeries. Healthy and Nutritious
APPLE
BRAN
MUFFINS.....t:*l49
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only. Egg Custard or
Pumpkin Pic.........*Zh*l"
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only. Topped with Icing or
Powdered Sugar
Fruit Stollen......... $2"
&arse asms,ores and Fresh Danish
Coffee Cake.......... each $p9
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only. Baked Fresh Daily
Raisin
Pumpernickel
"*e shoppng Q pieosue
JanJarylr'l^^"".^"*^ 7 *W Wed..
iBE3B55B9F&*


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Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 8, 1988
Wannsee Solution

Continued from Page 8-A
lost through the genocide
policies of the Nazis.
Berlin used to have 173,000
Jews, which made it the fifth
largest Jewish city in the
world. Today it has just 6,200.
But how can the deaths of
six million people be presented
in a manner which can be fully
grasped?
These are the questions be-
ing discussed by represen-
tatives of Aktion Suhnezeichen
and leaders of memorials in
the concentration camps in
Dachau and Mauthausen, of
the Yad Vashem in Israel and
of the Holocaust memorial
which is being built in
Washington.
They all agree that the im-
portance of an authentic loca-
tion, the strength of effect of a
place created by history,
should not be underestimated.
There are fewer and fewer
people to tell about the era,
therefore bricks and stones
and space must tell the tale.
As long as concentration
camp survivors are alive, their
stories must be recorded on
film and soundtrack. History
often only comes alive for
young people when efforts ae
made to present it effectively.
Next to documents and
photographs and eye-witness
reports, teachers are also im-
portant. They must know ex-
actly what people of what age
they should show which parts
of the memorial.
All delegates at the con-
ference agreed that the Wann-
see Villa should fulfil a
teaching role so that young
people could be told again and
again about the Final Solution
so that nothing like it would
ever happen again.
It was agreed that the
memorial should encompass
both the shocking and the
positive. There is an another
aspect that was made clear.
Schutz explained it like this: it
must be demonstrated that the
murder machinery of the Na-
tional Socialists could have
been stopped by an interna-
tional campaign.
The Jews who set up Israel
must be able to see in the Wan-
nsee Villa that the National
Socialists did not have the law
on their side.
Rabbi Asher, from San
Francisco, wanted to make it
clear that the various Jewish
traditions that had developed
in Germany, the modern, the
Orthodox, the mystical, had
survived in America and
Israel.
The example of the influence
of Jews on the culture of oc-
cidental nations demonstrated
what had been destroyed by
genocide and what, in the way
of ideas, could not be
destroyed.
And he said it could be
shown that it would have been
quite possible for some Ger-
mans, with courage and cons-
cience, to help Jews and pro-
tect them from annihilation.
How all this can be incor-
porated into the Wannsee Villa
is still not known. Some
aspects really belong to a
Jewish museum, an idea Gal in-
ski has been pushing, in vain,
for 15 years. Still other
aspects could better be realiz-
ed in a wider memorial concept
such as the Berlin administra-
tion is trying to establish.
This includes the rest of the
Gestapo headquarters in Prinz
Albert Strasse within sight of
the Berlin Wall showing just
what the terror led to, the divi-
sion of Germany and Europe.
Other aspects are better
covered in the memorials to
the German resistance in
Stauffenberg, Strasse and the
execution centre by the
Plotzensee.
The Berlin administration is
considering whether to bring
all this together and possibly
put it under the control of a
government-sponsored
foundation.
(Der Taoeaspiegel)
Binational State
Continued from Page 5-A
destruction of Israel. Camp
David's practically open-ended
autonomy provisions go
begging.
The recent violence may
have delayed, not advanced,
prospects for mutual recogni-
tion. The mother of one Gaza
fatality was quoted as saying,
"We want to live in peace and
we want the Jews out of our
land. I don't care whatever
happens as long as we get our
But she was a refugee 39
years .ago from a village near
Aahkelon; the land she refer-
red to was not the Gaza Strip
or the West Bank but pre-1967
Israel.
Meanwhile, there was
widespread, sometimes violent
support for the demonstrators
in Gaza and the West Bank
among Israel's Arabs. This
reaffirmed sociological studies
indicating that the overwhelm-
ing majority define their na-
tionality as Palestinian, not
Israeli.
This trend among Israeli
Arabs, who comprise one-sixth
the population inside the 1967
"green line" and will total
more than one-fourth in
another generation means
that Israel faces the danger of
becoming a binational state
even without the West Bank
and Gaza.
And precipitate withdrawal
from the territories would pro-
tect neither Israel's security
nor Jewish rights. Who would
see to Palestinian Arab rights
in such an event impotent
Palestinian Arab moderates or
the PLO and Islamic fun-
damentalists, with help from
Moscow and Tehran?
Obviously, the status quo is
not on Israel's side; so its
friends should be concerned
but not demoralized.
Near East Report
Erie Roxenman it editor of Near
East Report from wkxck tkie article ie
reprinted.
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