The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03074

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
T eJewlslfo Floi-idiami
^iT*
Voluma61-Number1
Miami FloridaFriday, January 1,1988
Price 50 Cants
Israelis Defend Justifiable Position
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Two high-level Israeli Cabinet
members defended their
government's handling of the
recent unrest in the ad-
ministered territories and, in
separate appearances on Sun-
day morning television talk
snows, called on Arab nations
to join the peace process to
determine the future of those
areas.
DEFENSE MINISTER Yit
zhak Rabin, speaking on
NBC's "Meet the Press,"
observed that Israel could
have annexed the West Bank
and Gaza Strip years ago, but,
instead of unilaterally deter-
mining the fate of those ter-
ritories, has left them open for
future negotiation.
"Obviously today it's clear,
more than ever before, that
only a political, peaceful,
iiplomatic settlement" can
-esolve the Arab-Israeli con-
lict, Foreign Minister Shimon
"*eres said on the CBS pro-
gram "Face the Nation."
Peres also played down the
sympathy strike and protests
staged by Arabs living in
Israel on Dec. 21. The foreign
minister said he met recently
with a group of Israeli Arabs
who told him that violence
would accomplish nothing.
"They, like us, understand
that we should not turn to riots
and hatred and violence, which
will lead to nowhere," he said.
Peres confirmed that he
recently suggested that Israel
demilitarize the Gaza Strip. "I
do feel that one of the solu-
< onlinued on Page 1-t-A
Hundreds of Iranian demonstrators protest in Tehran in support
of rioting Palestinians who clashed with Israeli forces in the
Israeli-held West Bank and Gaza Strip. The march was called by
Ayatollah Hussein-AH Montazeri, chosen successor to Ayatollah
Khamenei, according to Iran's official news agency. AP/Wide World
Photo
Mass Trials Beg Fairness Question
By GIL SEDAN courts in the West Bank and
JERUSALEM (JTA) Gaza Strip, on charges of
The dozens of Palestinians be- rioting and other acts of
ing brought before military violence, cannot possibly have
i Human Rights Agenda:
Beyond The Summit's 'Tid-Bits'
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) An
agreement endorsed Oct. 30
l>y President Reagan and
Soviet leader Mikhail Gor-
Itfchev had importance beyond
sitting up last month's com-
pleted summit meeting, accor-
ding to Morris Abram, chair-
man of the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry.
"This was the first time the
issue of human rights has ever
been on the agenda of a sum-
uiit meeting, and the general
rsecretary signed it," Abram
told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency between meetings
I onvened to evaluate the suc-
cess of the massive Dec. 6
,Soviet Jewry rally in
Washington and the subse-
quent summit.
Abram, who also chairs the
^Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish
Organizations, is convinced
the Reagan administration will
not allow the Soviets to forget
that signature or others on in-
ternational documents that en-
dorse the right of citizens to
emigrate from their country.
He said Gorbachev "took
Continued on Page 16-A
"fair and just" trials, in the
opinion of an Israeli lawyer
with experience in the military
courts.
Yaron Rabinowitz, a former
military prosecutor in Gaza,
said in an interview published
Monday in Haaretz that when
large numbers of defendants
are made to appear in court at
the same time, there is no way
the judges can give their atten-
tion to each individual case.
"I witnessed trials in which a
group of 40 defendants were
brought before a judge. Those
who pleaded guilty had to step
forward and raise their hands.
This is no way to hold a trial,"
Rabinowitz said.
He also said there are simply
not enough lawyers to defend
the many Palestinian youths
arrested during nearly three
weeks of rioting in the ad-
ministered territories.
"Even if the lawyers in the
Gaza Strip rally to represent
Continued on Page 16-A
Was Brooklyn Murder Ethnically Biased?
By
ANDREW SILOW CARROLL
NEW YORK (JTA) -
New York Police have
assigned a detective from
the Bias Crimes Unit to
the investigation of the
murder Friday of a
30-year-old Orthodox
Jewish postal worker in
the Borough Park section
of Brooklyn, N.Y.
Police announced the
assignment following a
Sunday afternoon rally in
which 300 Hasidic Jews
gathered in front of the of-
fices of the Council of
Jewish Organizations in
Borough Park to voice
their concern that the at-
tack on Eli Wald was anti-
Semitic.
"If enough people feel
that there is a basis to call-
ing a crime racially
motivated, we will look in-
to it," said Inspector
Michael Markman, com-
manding officer of the bias
unit.
In an interview, Captain
Michael Scagnelli, com-
mander of the 66th
precinct, said that the bias
unit would confer with
homicide detectives
despite "every indication
that the stabbing death of
Wald was the result of "an
attempted robbery that
went bad."
Scagnelli, who shared a
makeshift podium at the
rally with State
Assemblyman Dov Hikind
of Brooklyn and Borough
Park City Councilman
Noach Dear, called Sun
day's event "very
peaceful" and said no
uniformed police were
assigned.
Hikind, however, said
those in attendance were
"furious, angry people."
"The anger I saw yester-
day I haven't seen in a
long time," he added.
On Sunday evening, ma-
jor rabbinical figures from
a number of Hasidic sects
met at the home of
Solomon Halberstam,
rebbe of the Bobover sect,
to discuss ways of
"rebuilding" the dormant
Borough Park Community
Patrol, according to
Hikind. Armed patrol
members have been paid
to monitor the streets of
Borough Park from 3 p.m.
Continued on Page 9-A


Pagc2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 1, 1968
Sharon, Again, Centered in Controversy
By HUGH OBGEL
And GIL SEDAN
TEL AVTV (JTA) Ariel
Sharon, the outspoken Herat
hardliner, is embroiled in
another angry war of words
with Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres. He has also been
criticized by Mayor Teddy
Kollek of Jerusalem for
demonstratively moving into
an apartment in the Old City's
Moslem Quarter two weeks
ago.
Sharon, who was defense
minister during the war in
Lebanon and is presently
minister of commerce and in-
dustry, accused Peres of
creating a "worldwide panic"
by his constant warnings of
the demographic dangers of
Israel by its continued rale
over 1.5 million Arabs in the
West Bank and Gaza Strip.
Addressing a Likud party
meeting, Sharon also blasted
Peres for proposing that the
Gaza Strip be demilitarized.
Peres, who is Labor Party
leader, in addressing high
school students in Kiryat Gat,
denied proposing a one-sided
withdrawal from Gaza.
He said th*c as part of peace
negotiations with Jordan, the
Palestinian question would
have to be raised. In this con-
text, he said, Israel should
unilaterally propose disarming
the Gaza Strip.
Referring to right-wing
policies, Peres said, "When
they talk of Gaza being an in-
tegral part of the Land of
Israel, they mean incor-
porating both land and people.
What do they want another
largely engineered by Sharon,
which cost Israel several thou-
sand casualties without achiev-
ing its objectives.
In Jerusalem, too, Sharon
demonstrated a lack of
wisdom, according to Peres.
"Is this the time, and that the
Slace, to go and live in the
[oslem Quarter of the Old Ci-
ty of Jerusalem?" he asked.
Mayor Kollek, also a
Laborite, made the same point
in a speech to the City Council.
While Sharon made clear his
move was intended to en-
courage other Jews to live in
the Moslem Quarter, Kollek
said, "We do not aspire to in-
tegration, but rather to
neighborly relations. Co-
existence does not mean love,
but rather neighborly relations
with as few as possible distur-
bances," the mayor declared.
Sharon's housewarming and
Chanukah party in his Moslem
Quarter flat on the night of
Dec. 15 is considered partly
responsible for the outbreak of
Arab rioting in East Jerusalem
that followed.
Although Kollek at the time
called the two days of rock-
throwing and tire-burning the
worst ever to hit the capital, he
played down its importance in
his address to the council.
"What happened in East
Jerusalem 10 days ago was
child's play," he said "There
were no casualties. I don't
want to underplay the
seriousness of the situation,
but there was a lot of exag-
geration and hysteria," he
said.
The disturbances in East
Jerusalem coincided with some
of the worst rioting in the Gaza
Strip and West Bank. In the
opinion of many Israelis, the
East Jerusalem disturbances
were chiefly a carry-over from
the riots in the territories,
through possibly fueled by
Sharon's move.
Vietnam As Practiced By
A Jewish Flight-Surgeon
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON, DC Carl
Bancoff, a physician turned
novelist, has added a Jewish
Israeli border police on guard outside Minister of Trade and In- ES^wnrTof nOfdTSbrat
dustry Ariel sQron's new home in Jerusalem's Moslem Quarter, T^C!ZSvuZ
near the Damascus Gate. Many see the move as a provocative act
on the part of Sharon.
650,000 Arabs?" Peres asked.
"By the year 2000, the Arabs
will form 50 percent of the
country's population."
Sharon has no monopoly on
wisdom in Lebanon, the
foreign minister said in a
reference to the Lebanon war.
Canada Stands Out by Its Support
(JTA) Israel came under
sharp criticism from European
leaders and church groups for
measures it took to quell
rioting by Palestinians in the
administered territories.
Meanwhile, Premier Brian
Mulroney of Canada emerged
as one oi the few, if not the on-
ly, major national leader to ex-
press understanding of Israel's
situation. He said that Israel
has exercised "visible
restraint" and "political
responsibility" in dealing with
o disturbances in the territories.
Z Canadian Foreign Minister
^ Joe Clark had told Parliament
that "Canada has informed the
$ Israel government of its con-
2 cern regarding the use of live
ammunition and deplores the
loss of life."
I
i
>U^istlUrkMatn
'CM
Phone (305) 37*4605
Published weekly every Friday
since 1927 by The Jewish Florl
dlen. Office and Plant -120 N.E
6th St., Miami, Fla. 33132. Phone
(306) 37*4805.
Second-Class Postage paid in
Miami. Fla. USPS 275320.
Postmaster: Form 3579 return to
Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box
012873. Miami. Fla. 33101.
The Jewish Floridian does not
guarantee the Kasttruth of the
merchandise advertised In Its
columns.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: In ad-
vance (Local Area) One Year
$8.50 (Anniversary Special). Out
of town, country, upon request.
By Mail $1 45 per copy
In Brussels, Foreign
Minister Leo Tindemans com-
municated his government's
"deep uneasiness" over the
situation in the territories at a
meeting with the Israeli am-
bassador to Belgium, Avi
Primor.
Tindemans, who summoned
the Israeli envoy to the
Foreign Ministry, urged Israel
to refrain "from doing
anything that might harm its
image" in the international
community. He stressed that
the Israeli security forces
should not use firearms to con-
tain demonstrations and called
on Israel to observe the
Geneva Convention with
respect to the protection for
civilian populations. Primor,
who only recently began work
in Brussels, asked the Euro-
pean community to adopt a
"more balanced position if it
wants to exert any political in-
fluence in the Middle East. He
was referring to the pressure
brought to bear on Israel by
the 12-member states of the
European Economic Com-
munity since the disturbances
began in the territories more
than two weeks ago.
In Geneva, the World Coun-
cil of Churches and the
Lutheran World Federation
issued separate statements ap-
pealing to the Israeli govern-
ment to make every effort to
end oppressive measures and
restore calm through
reconciliation.
The World Council of Chur-
ches, an umbrella organization
of Protestant denominations,
addressed its statement to
Israeli Premier Yitzhak
Shamir. "As we have received
shocking reports of the
widespread violence that has
produced the killing and injur-
ing of scores of Palestinians in
Gaza, the WCC expresses its
deep concern about the violent
events actually taking place
there," the statement said.
It called on Israel to eschew
the use of force and to "im-
mediately undertake all
necessary and effective
measures for the cessation of
violent actions against the
civilian population of Gaza"
and urged Israel to initiate
political negotiations aimed at
protecting the inhabitants of
the occupied territories and
"preventing a continuing cycle
of violence."
the
war.
"A Forgotten Man" (Seth
Press, Ardmore, Pa., 324 pp.
$15.95), his first novel,
describes the experiences of
Herb Klein from his days as a
medical student in
Philadelphia to his service in
Vietnam as an Air Force flight
surgeon.
Klein is a decent man. As a
medical student he tutors the
teenage son of his fraternity's
black housekeeper, helping
him turn away from drugs and
crime and eventually become a
successful lawyer.
But Klein's decency is a han-
dicap in Vietnam, where he
arouses the ire of some
Americans for providing
medical service and other help
to the Vietnamese.
Klein is also a young Jew in
search of his religion. Born in-
to to an Orthodox family, Klein
loses his faith when his mother
dies. When he marries a nurse,
a Catholic from a small Penn-
sylvania mining town, she tries
unsuccessfully to bring him
back to Judaism. But his ex-
periences in Vietnam restore
his belief.
As to be expected in a first
novel, Bancoff s life is similar
to that his protagonist. Like
Klein, he was born in the
working-class section of west
Philadelphia; was graduated
from Cornell University,
although he also received his
medical training at Cornell,
rather than in Philadelphia, as
Klein does; and like Klein, in-
terned at a Philadelphia
hospital.
Bancoff also was a flight
surgeon in Vietnam, who like
Klein went on combat mis-
sions, provided medical care
for Vietnamese civilians and
was among the first physicians
to provide medical care for the
Montagnard tribes.
Perhaps this is why so much
of what happens to Klein as a
medical student and then a
flight surgeon rings true.
But the novel is also the
story of a young man sear-
ching for meaning in the
American involvement in Viet-
nam at a time when many of
his friends and colleagues at
home oppose the war.
Bancoff provides no pat
answers, as indeed there are
none, despite the feelings of
those who want to see the still-
divisive debate over Vietnam
in simple black-and-white
terms. Instead, Klein finds
meaning only in helping the
Montagnards. Hated by the
Vietnamese on both sides, they
try to survive, as did the Jews
throughout history.
To be truthful, the first
Continued on Page 14-A
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Traditional Jews
Take On Conflict
of Condom Use
Friday, January 1,1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
1
,
By
ANDREW SILOW CARROLL
NEW YORK (JTA) As
Catholic theologians debate
whether to approve instruc-
tion about the use of condoms
in Catholic educational pro-
grams on AIDS, American
Jewish religious leaders are
clarifying their own
movements' positions on the
issue.
At the December monthly
executive meeting of the Rab-
binical Council of America, for
instance, rabbis representing
mainstream Orthodox Judaism
passed a resolution that ad-
vocates monogamy in mar-
riage and abstinence from
premarital sex, rather than the
use of condoms, to prevent the
spread of acquired immune
deficiency syndrome.
Condoms are "definitely
against Jewish law," accor-
ding to Rabbi Binyamin
Walfish, executive vice presi-
dent of RCA, who said the
resolution would instead focus
on the "positive aspects of
faithfulness and fidelity."
By contrast, the Union of
American Hebrew Congrega-
tions, the central congrega-
tional body of Reform
Judaism, while also advocating
abstinence and monogamy as
both Jewish values and
preventive measures against
AIDS, recommends that
educators "talk about condom
use and provide (age-
appropriate) instruction on
how to use a condom proper-
ly," according to Dr. Boris
O'Mansky, chairman of
UAHC's Committee on AIDS.
Similarly, a policy paper
issued earlier this month by
the United States Catholic
Conference said providing in-
formation about condoms
could be permitted if
presented within the context
of Roman Catholic teachings
that advocated "abstinence
outside of marriage and fideli-
ty within marriage, as well as
the avoidance of intravenous
drug use."
Some Catholic bishops, in-
cluding New York's CardinsJ
John O'Connor, have voiced
their opposition to the policy
paper.
American Jewry has no body
analogous to the Catholic Con-
ference, the administrative
arm of the National Con-
ference of Cathoic Bishops,
which is responsible for all
Roman Catholic teachings.
The Synagogue Council of
America includes Orthodox,
Conservative and Reform
representation, but only plays
a coordinating role and does
not speak for the Reconstruc-
tionist and some ultra-
Orthodox movements within
Judaism.
Thus within and among the
various Jewish branches, there
are no expectations of the kind
of theological consensus
sought by the Catholic clergy.
According to David Zweibel,
director of government affairs
of Agudath Israel of America,
strict interpretation of Jewish
law forbids the use of condoms
because of biblical injunctions
Continued on Page 13-A
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Richard Schubert, president of the American
Red Cross, views the interior of a Magen
David Adorn (MDA) Mobile Intensive Care
Unit during a visit to the MDA emergency
first-aid station of Tel Aviv. Schubert was in
Israel to further develop bilateral cooperation
between the American Red Cross and MDA,
which is Israel's emergency
medical'disasterihealthcar-e>'ambulance/blood
service.

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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 1, 1988
Viewpoint
Lest We Forget.. .
The numbers defy comprehension: United Na-
tions War Crimes Files numbering 8,178;
dossiers on alleged war criminals tallying
35,000!
The lost and found nature of the files since
the UN decision to make them available to
reputable researchers has compounded the in-
trigue even 42 years after the end of the war.
That the files range across the former Axis-
powers and include suspects from Norway and
Japan, Yugoslavia and Poland; that the in-
nuendo affects the living and the no-longer-
alive, politicos and former soldiers in the last
Great War as well as now-innocuous townspeo-
ple creates a sense of ubiquitous involvement,
a pervasiveness across the face of the earth.
Again.
Reportedly, there are instances of mis-
information, blatantly faulty "facts" involving
former prisoners being accused of atrocities of
which they themselves were victim.
No doubt, there are more, rather than fewer,
Kurt Waldheims hidden among the raw data.
And, surely, the expediencies dictated by a
then frosting Cold War which allowed
naturalization laws to be flaunted and ignored
will be exposed just as once-nefarious war
criminals are exposed in their retirement com-
munities and efficiency apartments, retired
scientists respected in their golden years.
The prospect is overwhelming; the numbers,
the years, the scope. The questions are natural:
Is it too late to pursue crimes against mankind?
Will the efforts expended be met with too little
success to warrant the initiative? Will
memories be hazed by time? Will the cost, in
man-hours and dollars or Deutsch Marks, be
legitimately spent?
Even if all the answers are in the negative,
the response must be a resounding and positive
"yes" on the search and on the research.
Should the United Nations, should the
United States collectively say that there are
reasons to forget, then mankind is saying that
there is reason to forgive.
And if we either forget or forgive, we are
party to the neutralization, the revisionist
philosophy, of the Holocaust.
The lesson must always be, "Lest we forget
The Dinitz Presidency
The decision by former Ambassador Simcha
Dinitz to accept a draft for the chairmanship of
the World Zionist Organization and of the
Jewish Agency augurs well for the improved
effectiveness of both bodies.
Dinitz, who has served both as a leader of the
Labor Party in Israel and as a respected
representative of the Jewish state in
Washington, certainly is equal to the challenge
of his new position. His service as the in-
termediary between President Richard Nixon
and Prime Minister Golda Meir during the
decisive days of the Yom Kippur War attests
to his ability under fire.
Dinitz's candidacy permitted the coalition
among Labor, the Confederation of World
Zionists, and the Reform and Conservative
Movements in the United States to taste
triumph, and hopefully to work together in the
common interests of Zionism and the State of
Israel.
True, the feelings of the other possible Labor
Zionist candidates were ruffled by the ap-
parent endorsement of the so-called fund
raisers. But the partnership between those
who are active in the Zionist Movement and
those who help to raise funds for Israel is one
which cannot fall apart because of judgments
of individuals.
Certainly, Simcha Dinitz is a fresh face who
can give new life to both the WZO and the
Agency after the dullness of the Dulzin regime.
And Dinitz's experience on both governmental
and political levels should immediately be
transferable into a positive Zionist program.
Increased aliyah from the West, improved
Jewish education in the Diaspora and efficien-
cy in the operation of a budget of approximate-
ly half a billion dollars are goals of a revitalized
Zionist Movement and a dynamic new leader.
Continuing the Tradition
As The Jewish Floridian continues its 60th
year of continuous service to South Florida,
the Jewish community joins in welcoming Nor-
ma A. Orovitz as our managing editor.
A dedicatedjournalist whose writings have
appeared in The Miami Herald, The Miami
News, The Los Angeles Times and other na-
tional publications, she brings a distinguished
record to the Floridian.
Norma Orovitz, an honors graduate of the
University of Miami, serves as president of the
Southeast Region of the American Jewish Con-
gress, vice president of her synagogue and as a
successful consumer and civil rights advocate.
Returning to this newspaper after 10 years,
she already has contributed to further expan-
ding our coverage of local, national and world
events impacting on Judaism and Jewry.
In both writing and editing, Norma Orovitz
adds to the perspective we offer to our
readers, who have been our most important
partners for six exciting decades of growth.
WSBSSftftHSKSMft^^......................................
From Little Rock Through 1987: Not Far Enough
D. DMICDT C OEOll hoortUoc f Antunlli. -' 1____l_ i.. ,i ... C
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
You may have read about them in October.
They were "The Little Rock Nine," the black
children selected to end the all-white student
policy of the Little Rock, Ark., Central High
School in 1957.
With a smiling Gov. Bill Clinton looking on,
they returned to mark the 30th anniversary of
their conquest over then-Gov. Orval Faubus's
National Guardsmen.
In related events since October, Lt. Gen. Col-
in Luther Powell, the highest ranking black of-
ficer in the U.S. Army, has been named by
President Reagan to serve as director of the
National Security Council, and Ross Barnett,
the governor of Mississippi 25 years ago who
failed to prevent James Meredith from enroll-
ing in the University of Mississippi, has died at
age 89.
This is an auspicious hour to learn anew what
the civil rights struggle has done to enhance
the moral fiber of America and to examine new
challenges confronting blacks in this perilous
era of the American economy.
As Martin Luther King, the black Moses
declared about negative reaction to the
Supreme Court decisions overturning
desegregation of public schools, "Legislation
cannot change the heart, but it can control the
heartless." (Actually, legislation has by now
changed the habits of millions.)
It is clear that few blacks will soon achieve to
the degree that Powell has. but as inspiration
to those reaching for success in careers, a look
at what has been accomplished by the Little
Rock Nine is encouraging.
Continued on Pag* M-A
PLO Incited Recent Violence
By RABBI
MARC H. TANENBAUM
If you relied only on the general media
coverage of the violence in Gaza, Judea and
Samaria and elsewhere in Israel, you could not
but help believe that this was a Palestinian
spontaneous "uprising" against "20 years of
Israeli oppression."
But the authenticated facts prove otherwise.
From beginning to end, this entire bloody
scenario was conceived and orchestrated by
PLO's Fatah and Islamic fundamentalists.
On Dec. 10, the day after an Israeli
salesman, Shlomo Sakal, was murdered in
Gaza by Arafat's Force 17, and following the
death of four Arabs in an automobile accident,
the PLO radio from Baghdad broadcast a
message from Arafat urging Palestinians to
"increase the disturbances" and "teach the
enemy an unimaginable lesson."
Numerous other PLO broadcasts and
telephone calls to Palestinians called on women
and children to attack Israelis. That would
Continued on Page M-A
Fred K. Shochet
Editor and Puoltaher
Jewish Flo]
Norm* A. Orovitz
Managing Editor
William T. Brewer
Director of Operations
Suzanne Shochet
Executive Editor
Friday, January 1,1968
Volume 61
Joan C. Teglas
Dtrector oi Advertising
11TEVETH5746
Number 1


....... .
Friday, January 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 6-A
,
Vicarious Protests Increase Threat From Within
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Israelis pondering the un-
precedented wave of Arab
violence have discerned new
elements and patterns that are
causing them deep concern for
the future.
The lastest and most serious
of these was the spread of
rioting to East Jerusalem on a
scale as bad as any in the West
Bank or Gaza Strip.
Second, there is presence
and potential threat of sym-
pathetic unrest among Israel's
normally quiescent Arab
population, whose expressions
of solidarity with their fellows
in the administered territories
have already been heard.
Finally, and possibly most
dangerous in the long-term, is
the religious fervor that seems
to have joined Palestinian na-
tionalism as the driving force
behind the disturbances.
Although Premier Yitzhak
Shamir has consistently played
down the significance of these
events, many in his own
political camp view the situa-
Arai> youths riot in the Kalandia refugee camp near Ramallah. Samaria, in protest
against Israeli rule in the territories.
tion with alarm.
Violence and unrest are not
new phenomena in the ter-
ritories Israel captured during
the 1967 Six-Day War. Always
simmering, they usually erupt
on dates significant to Palesti-
nians Nov. 2, the anniver-
sary of the Balfour Declara-
tion; Nov. 29, the anniversary
of the United Nations resolu-
tion to partition Palestine into
Jewish and Arab states; and
Jan. 1, the anniversary of the
founding of Al Fatah, the ter-
rorist branch of Yasir Arafat's
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion. The unrest usually abates
within a few days after these
anniversaries.
Last month, the rioting was
almost continuous. Fierce con-
frontations occurred in the
streets of East Jerusalem bet-
ween young Palestinians and
Israeli police. It even spread to
Bethlehem, the only major
town in the West Bank that
until now was spared the con-
vulsions elsewnere in the
Continued on Page 11-A
Jewish-Christian Relations: The Papal Meeting and More
By RABBI
MARC H. TANENBAUM
The most apt metaphor to
summarize the state of Jewish-
Christian relations during
1987 would have to be a roller
coaster.
There were strong, steady
ascents in overcoming
theological misunderstandings
and in embarking on new con-
ceptions of mutual apprecia-
tion and respect between
Christians and Jews. These
were best typified by the
serious affirmative declara-
tions issued by the
Presbyterian Church USA and
the United Church of Christ,
among others.
But there were also deeply
upsetting and periodically
threatening turns. The last of
them, amounting to an an-
noyance, was the regression of
Southern Baptist pastor
Bailey Smith to his earlier
primitive theological ut-
terances that doom Jews to
eternal perdition unless they
become his kind of Christian.
But the most serious and
potentially damaging threat to
the course of Jewish-Christian
relations centered around the
incomprehensive audience that
Pope John Paul II granted to
Kurt Waldheim, the man who
lied for 40 years about his Nazi
past and still became president
of Austria.
Many informed Jews finally
understood that the Pope had
to receive Waldheim because
Austria is a predominantly
Catholic country, and both for
internal political and religious
reasons, the Pope had to yield
to Waldheim's official request
for an audience.
But it was, and still is, in-
comprehensible that the
supreme pontiff of the Roman
Catholic Church would receive
an unrepentant Nazi and utter
not a syllable about his morally
miserable past.
For Jews and many Chris-
tians who communicated with
us, the danger of that silence
was that it was becoming a
message to millions of Catholic
youth in Germany, Austria,
Poland and elsewhere that the
Nazi Holocaust apparently
became so irrelevant that it did
not even deserve mention by
the Pope in the presence of the
world's most highly publicized
former Nazi. No wonder
Waldheim beamed to the
world's press that the papal
audience "far exceeded my
highest expectations."
The moral damage that
emerged from that encounter,
as many Jews and Christians
saw it, was that the pope, the
embodiment of absolute moral
standards of good and evil,
was contributing to the moral
relativism that he so often
condemns.
If Waldheim receives the
same treatment as President
Reagan; if President Botha of
South Africa, an architect of
apartheid and oppressor of
blacks, is equal to Margaret
Thatcher; if Idi Amin, who
massacred an estimated
500,000 black Christians, is
received in the apostolic palace
with full presidential honors; if
super terrorist Yasir Arafat is
even allowed on the premises
of Vatican City, then the
ground of moral judgment
ultimately crumbles.
Clearly that policy,
dramatized by the absurdity of
the Waldheim visit, needs
rethinking by serious people in
the Holy See. There must be
another method for talking
with tyrants, brutal dictators
and unrepentant former Nazis
without providing them with a
papal cover for their anti-
human deeds.
But the good news that
emerged during the terribly
hot summer of 1987 was the
extraordinarily supportive role
of the Jewish position by
American Catholic hierarchy.
Without the leadership and the
regular intervention of Ar-
chbishop John May of St.
Louis, Cardinal John O'Con-
nor of New York and Bishop
William Keeler of Harrisburg,
Pa., among others, the papal-
Waldheim meeting could well
have resulted in a fundamental
rupture in the relationship bet-
ween the Vatican and world
Jewry.
Their sensitive and con-
sistently positive support was
another testimony to the
strength of the Catholic-
Jewish solidarity and friend-
ship that has been achieved
during the 20 years since the
end of Vatican Council II. That
augurs well for the growth of
American Catholic-Jewish
relations in the years ahead.
But the conflict with the
Vatican at the same time
revealed a division between
those Jews who have been in-
volved in the fundamental im-
provement in Catholic-Jewish
Continued on Page 13-A
Carter Oversees Peace Conference Rehearsal
By ERIC ROZENMAN
Last month's "Middle East
Consultation" at the Carter
Presidential Center in Atlanta
was described as a rehearsal
for the proposed international
conference on the Middle East.
It lived up to that billing in at
least one respect, drawing am-
bassadors and other
diplomatic specialists from
Israel, Jordan, Egypt, Syria,
the United States, the Soviet
Union, China, Great Britain
and France. In short, most of
the countries mentioned as
conference participants were
there as were Palestinian
Arabs, represented by AUFajr
editor Hanna Siniora.
Without intending to, the
consultation demonstrated
how an international con-
ference might intensify
pressure on Israel. With the
predictable exception of Israeli
Ambassador Moshe Arad (not
Pres. Jimmy Carter
on the same panels with
Siniora or the Syrian am-
bassador), speakers and ques-
tioners from the audience
seemed to share an implicit
assumption.
The goal of a conference
would be not much to arrange
an Arab-Israeli compromise
territorial, functional or other-
wise but to supervise
Israel's return to the boun-
daries it held before 1967. But
it was just those 1948 ar-
mistice lines attenuated and
vulnerable that bolstered
the pan-Arab dream of
crushing the Jewish state with
a sudden blow, contributing to
the decades of intransigence
and to the 1967 Six-Day War.
Jordanian Court Minister
Adnan Abu Odeh, in outlining
what was termed the
moderate Arab approach,
pointed to his country s effort
to convene a conference as
"the only acceptable venue for
achieving a comprehensive,
just and durable peace ... on
the basis of implementing
(U.N. Security Concil) Resolu-
tions 242 and 338."
He interpreted 242 -
adopted just after the 1967
war as calling for Israeli
withdrawal from all territory
occupied in the war, an inter-
Erotation not shared by the
'.S. or British diplomats who
helped draft the resolution nor
by Israel, then or at any time
since.
Odeh noted that the Labor
alignment's half of Israel's
coalition government accepts
the idea of a conference but
remained silent on Labor's
refusal to endorse a prospec-
tive abandonment of all of the
West Bank, Golan Heights and
Gaza Strip. Instead, ignoring
his own maximalist view of
242, he castigated Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir, who
has vowed not to give up any
of Eretz Yisrael.
Former President Jimmy
Carter expressed his "deepest
disappointment" that Jordan
did not join the Camp David
Accords he mediated between
Israel and Egypt. However,
Carter praised the 1982
Reagan plan as "a major step
Continued on Page 10-A
Letters Forum
The Floridian welcomes signed letters to the editor.
Please include yonr address and daytime phone number for
TeriJfkatioB. Letters may be edited, eaadmmd and/or cor-
rected for grammatical errors. Address all tetters to The
Jewish Floridian, PO Box 01-2173, Miami. FL 33101.


Page^A, The Jewish FTowdiafl/Frtday, January 1, 198ff
Land-For-Peace
Gaining Slight Edge
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
percentage of Israelis opposed
to yielding any land for peace
is declining, according to an
opinion poll published in
Maariv. The survey's findings
percent last April and 36.6
percent in October 1986.
In the most recent survey,
5.6 percent said they would be
prepared to give up all of the
West Bank and East
Jerusalem; 13.6 percent said
sssaaaa s^fk^-k
Left wing Israelis protested Saturday night in
Tel Aviv against the government's policies in
the occupied territories. An estimated crowd
of three thousand demonstrators took part in
the rally led by the anti-war group Peace Now
and parliament's leftist Citizens Rights Move-
ment. AP/Wide World Photo
IDF Stems Terrorist Infiltration
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Israel Defense Force is getting
high praise for the swift, effi-
cient way it dealt with the first
terrorist infiltration of Israel
from Jordan in 10 years.
Especially pleased are the
residents of Bet Shean
township and the surrounding
villages and kibbutzim south of
the Sea of Galilee, who were
alerted to the infiltration
minutes after a breach was
discovered in the electronic
border fence. The alert enabl-
ed them to take immediate
security measures.
An IDF reserve unit is
credited with capturing the
three heavily armed in-
filtrators without loss of life.
One of the terrorists was
wounded in a brief shoot-out in
a cornfield. There were no
Israeli casualties.
The hole in the fence was
discovered along the banks of
the Jordan River, some 650
yards from Kibbutz Maoz
Haim. A Bedouin tracker led
the IDF patrol to the spot
where the infiltrators were
hiding.
The terrorists opened fire
with automatic rifles and
threw five hand grenades at
the soldiers before they were
overcome. The three were
dressed in civilian clothes
under which they wore IDF
uniforms. Had they managed
to evade detection, they could
have caused serious damage
and casualties.
The terrorists were carrying
steel spikes, which they ap-
parently intended to scatter on
roadways to halt vehicles that
would come under fire. Accor-
ding to military sources, the
terrorists are members of the
Palestine Liberation Front,
which is based in Iraq and
headed by Mohammed (Abul)
Abbas.
The terrorists entered Jor-
dan from Iraq four days earlier
and crossed the country to the
Israel border without being
halted by Jordanian
authorities. Nevertheless,
Israeli officials still believe
Jordan is doing its best to pre-
vent terrorist acts against
Israel from Jordanian soil.
The speedy capture of the
terrorists has done much to
restore confidence in the IDF.
It suffered gravely after a
single Palestinian entered
Israel from Lebanon by hang
glider on the night of Nov. 25
and, even though detected,
managed to infiltrate a
military base and kill six
soldiers and wound seven
before he was shot to death.
polls taken in October 1986
and April 1987.
At the same time, the
percentage of Israelis ready to
give up all of the West Bank
and East Jerusalem for peace,
through a small minority, has
increased successively in the
last three polls.
The poll, conducted by Dr.
Micah Hof of the Modiin
Ezrachi organization, asked
the question "Do you support a
peace agreement with Jordan
in which Israel would have to
make a commitment to
evacuate areas of Judaea and
Samaria?"
In response, 44.4 percent of
the respondents said they
were not prepared to yield any
land, compared to 46.4 percent
last April and 47.7 percent in
October 1986.
But 5.6 percent said they
were prepared to yield all of
Judaea and Samaria, including
East Jerusalem, which Israel
has annexed. The comparative
figures are 4.4 percent for last
April and 3.1 percent for Oc-
tober 1986.
A related question was "Are
you prepared to evacuate
(Jewish) settlements in Judaea
and Samaria in exchange for
peace with Jordan?" In
response. 34.1 percent said
they were not prepared even
to "freeze" new settlements in
the territory, compared to 37.9
tions of the West Bank; 44.4
percent said they would not
give up any land; and 4.3 per-
cent had no response.
On the question of Jewish
settlements in the West Bank,
10.7 percent favored
evacuating all of them; 27.2
percent favored evacuating
some of them; 22.1 percent
favored freezing new set-
tlements only; 34.1 percent
favored no freeze on new set-
tlements; and 5.9 percent did
not respond to that question.
YOUR CAR
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HAIfA ASMKEION EILAT
Grunwald Confirmed as Envoy
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The Senate confirmed Henry
Grunwald to be U.S. am-
bassador to Austria. He was
confirmed by voice vote
without debate.
Senate Majority Leader
Robert Byrd (D-W. Va.) called
the confirmation of Grunwald,
who is Jewish, "one more
goody" for President Reagan.
Byrd was referring to
Reagan's many recent nomina-
tions, many of which, including
those for posts in Yemen and
Iraq, were not acted on before
the Senate adjourned.
Grunwald, who resigned in
August as editor in chief of
Time Inc., said in a telephone
interview that, he could not
comment on his appointment
"until after I have taken up my
post in Vienna."
He did not give a date when
Austrian President Kurt
Waldheim would receive his
credentials, but Grunwald said
he is "planning to leave the
United States for Vienna in
the middle of January."
Grunwald, 65, was born in
Austria, and left Vienna in
1940 to flee the Nazis.
His appointment comes at a
time when U.S. relations with
Austria are strained over
Washington's decision to bar
Waldheim from the United
States in the wake of charges
linking the Austrian president
to atrocities committed in the
Balkans during World War II:
I
The Israel Histadrut Foundation
cordially invites you to attend a
PreBanquet Brunch
Ushering in the Foundation s$100 Million Year
Wednesday, January 20th, 1988 at 12:00 P.M. (Noon)
At the Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel
4441 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach
Special Guest Speaker.. .WOLF BLITZER
Washington Bureau Chief of the Jerusalem Post and Noted Author
Who will be addressing the topic
"Between Washington and Jerusalem A Reporters Notebook"
MUSICAL PROGRAM.. .DIRECT FROM ISRAEL
ARIE BRAUN, Chief Cantor of the Israeli Army
(Courtesy-Gila and Haim Weiner Foundation for the Advancement of Cantorial Art)
Join with us in "o-..~~-..- .,,..,_
Chairperson
State Representative
ELAINE BLOOM
Rejoicing" the $100 Million achievement of the
Israel Histadrut Foundation
Greetings
AMBASSADOR RAHAMIM TIMOR,
Consul General
Participants
DR. SOL STEIN
President,
Israel Histadrut Foundation
RABBI MORTON MALAVSKY
Chairman IHF
Board of Directors


I
A
3
r
Z
r
ffl'P HP
Friday, January 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
xwooooooooooooooooooc
iimumuiiatai
Jewish National Fund To Establish A Forest In Israel
In Honor Of Maestro Shmuel and Ahuva Fershko
Mr. and Mrs. Haim Wiener tendered a gala
Cocktail Party in their beautiful home for the
Planning Committee of the Jewish National
Fund Concert to be held on Wednesday
January 20th, 1988 at 8:00 P.M. in the Theatre
of the Performing Arts, for the purpose of
establishing a JNF Forest in Israel in honor of
Maestro Shmuel and Ahuva Fershko.
For Concert tickets prease call the Topa Box
Office 673-7302.
^ Haim Wiener, Host of the Cocktail Hon. David Cohen, Israeli Consul Hon- Alex Daoud, Mayor of Miami Maestro Fershko greets Rose
i Party. congratulates Maestro Fershko. Beach, congratulates Maestro Shmuel Friedland.
and Ahuva Fershko for their devotion
to the Jewish National Fund.
Left, to right: Charming Host and Hostess, Unger, Administrator JNF Gr. Miami, Left to right: Dahlia Taines, Ahuva Fershko, Gila Wiener]
Haim and Gila Wiener, Abraham Grunhut, Maestro Shmuel Fershko, Honoree. Maestro Shmuel Fershko, and Alona Sherman.
Pres. JNF Gr. Miami, Arthur Unger, Roslyn
Haim and Gila Wiener with Mr. and Mrs. Joe Abetow.
Left to right: Zev W. Kogan, Pres. JNF
Southern Region, Ahuva Fershko, Haim and
Gila Wiener, Host and Hostess, Comm.
Sidney Weisburd, Maestro Shmuel Fershko,
Mayor Alex Daoud.
Left to right: Dahlia Taines, Haim and Gila Wiener, Dr. and
Mrs. Elias Herhsman.
Left to right: Ahuva Fershko, Gila Wiener, the hostess, Tanya
Freedman, and host, Haim Wiener.
Right to left: Haim and Gila Wiener with Judge and Mrs.
Herbert Shapiro.
Mayor Alex Daoud, and Comm. Sidney Weisburd flank the
gracious host and hostess, Haim and Gila Wiener.
Abraham Qranhut
Prat. JNF Or. Miami
Zm W Kogan
Praa. JNF Southarn Raglon
Rabbi Irving Lahrman
Chrmn. JNF Fdtn.
Ernast Samuala
V.P. JNF Qr. Miami
Rabbi Mayar Abramowltz
Chrmn. JNF Exac. Board
Jewish National Fund 420 Lincoln Road, Suite 353, Miami Beach, Fl. 33139 Tel. 538-6464
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCSOOOOOQO


Page^A TVJe^FLoridin^kUyfJnu>iyil,X988
*h
Explosive Demographic Danger in Gaza
By DAVID TWERSKY
NEW YORK (JTA) -
With a Palestinian death to
"be rising in the weeks of
rioting, world attention has
converged on the Gaza Strip,
where most of the violent
demonstrations and shootings
have occurred.
There appear to have been
several factors involved in ig-
niting the riots. A rumor
spread that a traffic accident
in which several Arabs were
killed was a deliberate act of
revenge for the Dec. 5 stabb-
ing of an Israeli soldier,
Shlomo Takal.
The Palestine Liberation
Organization is believed to be
behind many of the acts of
anti-Israeli terror. Its intent
appears to be to prove that
despite setbacks at the Arab
summit in Jordan and the
PLO's low profile in Lebanon,
the Palestinian organization
can still control events.
The Gaza Strip also has been
the focus of an intense strug-
gle between various
ideological factions, including
a strong Islamic fundamen-
talist movement. The recent
arrest by Israeli authorities of
a leader of the Islamic Jihad
organization in the territory
may be another factor in the
recent unrest.
Gaza is one of the most
densely populated areas in the
world. It is 40 miles long and
from six to 14 miles wide. Its
350 square miles are home to
almost 650,000 Palestinian
Arabs representing almost
one-eighth of the total Palesti-
nian population and 2,500
Jews. Refugees, who fled to
the Strip in 1948, and their
descendants make up more
than half of the population; the
others are original Gazan
Arabs.
Although the Strip was
under Egyptian control from
1948 to 1967, residents never
received Egyptian passports.
West Bank Arabs, who lived
under Jordanian rule until
1967, routinely use Jordanian
passports to travel to Arab
Gulf states in search of
employment, especially when
oil prices are high. This outlet
for demographic and economic
pressures is not available to
Gazans.
There are about 3,864 people
per square mile in the Gaza
Strip a population density
resembling Hong Kong's as
opposed to 426 people per
square mile in the West Bank.
Fayez Abu-Rahma, chairman
of the local lawyers associa-
tion, has said that the Strip is
so crowded, "Soon we won't
have where to bury our dead."
Some 7,500 acres of the land
in the Strip is state land con-
trolled by Israel. The Jewish
settlers in Gush Katif, a group
moshavim in the southern
of
part of the Strip, live on state
land.
Despite Israeli rehabilitation
efforts resulting in permanent
housing for some 8,000
refugees, more than 170,000
are still crowded into eight
refugee districts. (The com-
parable figure for the West
Bank is 80,000.) Most of the re-
cent fighting took place in and
around refugee camps.
Between 45,000 and 65,000
Gazans commute to work in
Israel every day, but under
Israel's Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin, se-
cond from right, just after his return from the
United States, visits Gaza, City in the occupied
Gaza Strip. On Rabin's left is a soldier armed
vnth an assault rifle, to the right is a security
man carrying an Uzi submachine gun, and a
third soldier brings up the rear.
Israeli law they must return to restored only when it is made
clear that Likud policy will be
the one to determine the
their homes in Gaza in the
evening. The Strip's citrus-
based economy has suffered
Palestinian positions.
from Israeli regulations
designed to protect its own en-
dangered citrus exports, which
prevent the marketing of Gaza
citrus in Western Europe. In
1967, 18,000 acres of local or-
chards produced 250,000 tons
of fruit; in 1984, they yielded
only 120,000. The reasons for
the decline include low returns
on sales in Eastern Europe.
The "war of words" over
how to identify recent events
reflects the contradictory
political agendas of those at-
tempting to affix the labels. A
United Nations official in the
Gaza Strip described them as
"total lawlessness or a popular
uprising," that is, as either a
breakdown in Israel's ability to
control events or a mass
political movement.
Yehuda Litani, Arab affairs
editor for the Jerusalem Post,
wrote that the tumult is still in
the category of "civil strife,"
that is, a spontaneous,
unorganized affair.
Prime Minister Yitzhak
Shamir dismissed the
perpetrators as "terrorists
and delinquents," that is,
agents of the PLO or kids-
gone-bad.
And Ezer Weizman, a
Cabinet minister without port-
folio, said that "whoever
thinks this is a passing thing is
making a very serious mistake.
It is a result of the failure to
find a political solution, and
the lack of a desire even to
look for one."
The reactions in Jerusalem
underlined the absence of an
Israeli consensus as to the
future of the Gaza Strip.
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres, speaking to the Knesset
Foreign Affairs and Defense
Committee, proposed that
Gaza be demilitarized and
handed over to an Arab
authority, and that the Jewish
settlements be disbanded.
( Likud leaders asserted that
"quiet and security will be
future of Judea, Samaria and
Gaza."
Likud seeks the permanent
retention of the territories
under Israeli control. Reports
that Likud figures, such as UN
Ambassador Benjamin
Netanyahu, support a
withdrawal were denied as
soon as they appeared in print.
Shamir accused Peres of
"defeatist reactions," and said
that if the Israeli army were to
abandon its responsibilities in
Gaza, the PLO would take
over, emphasizing his view of
Gaza's significance to Israeli
security.
In fact. Gaza has been the
subject of several proposals 111
advance the Arab-Israel peace
process which envision neither
Israeli nor PLO rule.
Gaza's unique demographic,
historical and geographic
situation makes it a more like-
ly prospect for compromise
than the West Bank. Gaza's
"advantages" include the lack
of a national consensus regar-
ding its future; the relative
weakness of Jewish set-
tlements in the area; and the
fact that a potential Arab part-
ner to a solution, Egypt, is
already publicly committed to
peace with Israel.
Peres' position on Gaza
began to change as a conse-
quence of the peace treaty
with Egypt. With Sinai, in-
cluding the strategic Rafiah
separating Gaza from Sinai,
returned to Egyptian control,
Peres is said to feel that Cairo
might be persuaded to help im-
plement some form of
autonomy in Gaza first (that is,
before the more intractable
West Bank). Just as Peres
seeks Jordanian involvement
in the day-to-day administra-
tion of the West Bank, he
seeks Egyptian involvement in
Gaza.
This involves de-coupling
Gaza from the West Bank,
which flies in the face of tradi-
tional Likud, Labor and
set-
and
In Peres' view, Jewish
tlements in Gush Katif
Rafiah, built to help ensure
Israeli security by blocking
Egypt from launching a
coastal invasion, made sense in
the context of the return of
Gaza to Arab control.
With the return of Rafiah,
and the dismantling of the
Jewish settlements there, that
approach is seen as less viable.
Furthermore, the remaining
settlements undercut the
possibility of involving Egypt
in the administration of the
Strip. At its 1984 convention,
Labor dropped support for the
Gush Katif settlements.
Likud believes that the set-
tlements in Gaza continue to
reinforce the Jewish claim to
the area.
Deputy Minister of
Agriculture Avraham Katz-Oz,
who lives on a kibbutz adjacent
to the Gaza border, believes
the Strip represents an ex-
plosive demographic danger to
Israel.
According to Katz-Oz, the
traditional Labor view that
Gaza will go to Jordan in a
peace treaty along with the
bulk of the West Bank -
makes no sense from either a
political or a security point of
view. Linking Gaza eastward
to the West Bank and Jordan
would necessitate giving Jor-
dan a land corridor across the
Negev, cutting Israel in half.
Furthermore, if Israel
doesn't open an Egyptian op-
tion to the south for the
population, "it will of necessity
explode north and east into
Israel."
Either way, Katz-Oz sees the
Jewish settlements as having
no constructive role to play. If
Gaza goes to Egypt, the set-
tlements will be sandwiched
between two parts of Egypt. If
it goes to Jordan, he asks,
"will the settlements protect
Egypt from Jordan or Jordan
from Egypt?"
Such local Gaza politicians as
Rashid A-Shawa do not rule
out a "Gaza first" approach in-
volving Egypt. But A-Shawa,
a former mayor of the city of
Gaza, rejects "isolating Gaza
from the West Bank forever."
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Friday, January 1,1988fTheJewish Tforidian Page 9-A
1
Coexistence In Gaza and West Bank Brooklyn
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jeunsh Floridian Staff WrxUr
Before widespread strikes
and rioting sent ripples of
violence through the Israeli-
administered West Bank and
Gaza, Motti Isaak and Zvi
Slonim, two representatives of
the Council of Jewish Set-
tlements in Judea, Samaria,
and Gaza were in Miami to ex-
plain their stand on the con-
troversial issue of the
territories.
Isaak spoke with The Jewish
Floridian just prior to the un-
precedented protest by both
Palestinian Arabs from the
territories and Israeli Arabs.
His call for increased Jewish
settlement in the West Bank
and Gaza, however, may raise
ever more impassioned
responses as the long-
simmering debate over the
lands won in the Six-Day-War
comes to a boil.
"Things (were) not as bad as
(people) hear," asserts Isaak.
"People are getting facts from
newspapers and TV and
there are many people who
don't approve of what we are
doing."
'We,' to Isaak, are the
Jewish settlers who come to
live in the Israeli-occupied ter-
ritories. Some come for
religious reasons; the West
Bank, also called by its biblical
names of Judea and Samaria,
is part of the "Greater Israel,"
promised to the Israelites in
the Bible.
Some come for idealistic
reasons; they believe that
Israel needs to remain within
her present borders for securi-
ty reasons, and they know that
if Jewish settlements, towns
and cities dot the region, Israel
will be hard-pressed to relin-
quish them.
Still others come for prac-
tical reasons, much as people
eave cities and move to
suburbs in countries all over
orld.
ugh recent rioting and
have shown all too
that the West Bank is
not just a quiet, rural place to
raise a family, Isaak asserts
that he and his family "have
never felt unsafe in the area."
He and his wife and their five
Children live in a small settle-
ment, Kamei Shalom, which
lies along the Kalkilya-
Shechem Road.
It was on this road that a
Jewish woman, Ofra Moses,
was killed when a molotov
cocktail was thrown at her car
last year.
"Besides this, and one or
two other events, it's general-
ly a quiet road," says Isaak.
Throughout 2,000 years of
galut (Diaspora), the Gentiles
don't like us but in my
philosophy, in Israel, I could
never feel unsafe."
Also for the first time in
.000 years, Jews find
lemselves in the position of
being the occupier instead of
the occupied, a situation which
some Israelis say is corrupting
the Jewish people.
"We never use the term 'oc-
cupying force,' notes Isaak.
We are a 'freeing force.'
(The) Arabs live in the areas
we freed in '67."
. Palestinian Arabs in the ter-
ritories "have all social rights,
a civilian military government
climb,
. all hoys.
playground qf Ml mostly Orthodox Jewish
Gaza Strip settlement where 500 families in-
habit the 15-settlenient Gush Katif complex in
the occupied land. The settlers say that out-
breaks oj Arab rioting will not deter tt
although th Palestinians say Uu
8,000 Jewish m ttlers is one of the causes fin
cent violence that has claimed at least tt <
AP/Wide World Photo
has been set up this is not
Afghanistan, not military oc-
cupation," Isaak contends.
"Why are (people) so wor-
ried about the Palestinians?
We have built eight univer-
sities, brought electricity to
(their) villages, built roads I
dare to say most of the Arabs
living in Judea and Samaria
would not want to be back
under the Jordanian king," he
adds.
Some Israelis have sug-
gested that while relinquishing
the West Bank in peace
negotiations to Jordan might
not make the issue of a Palesti-
nian state disappear, it would
put the problem in someone
else's lap.
Isaak disagrees. "We don't
believe in peace for pieces
we don't see why we have to
give pieces of our homeland to
anybody, because of two
reasons; we have Jewish
biblical rights to this country,
and second, we have security
problems today. We cannot
lave (terrorists) sitting two
kilometers from our babies'
homes in Kfar Saba," a Jewish
settlement.
Palestinians often contend
that Israelis such as Isaak
want to push Israel's borders
"yama vi kedma, tsafona vi
negba," (West, East, North
and South, from a biblical por-
tion which became a Jewish
folk song).
That is not the case, accor-
ding to Isaak, who says, "We
are not fanatics. We are
realistic. We don't talk about
making war to get all the lands
of the biblical promise; the '67
war was forced upon us. We
Continued on Page 13-A
Murder
Continued from Page 1-A
to 3 a.m. in marked cars.
Community members are
asked to contribute funds
for the service, said
Hikind.
Police and community
leaders support the patrol,
as opposed to that an-
nounced Sunday by
members of the Jewish
Defense League. Hikind, a
Borough Park resident,
called the JDL's patrols
"counterproductive," and
said that he "resents some
of these people who don't
live in the community com-
ing in here to stir up the
community even more."
Yakov Lloyd,
spokesman for the JDL,
acknowledged that neither
he nor members of his
patrol live in Borough
Park.
Wald was stabbed at
least 11 times near his
home while walking from
die subway at 1:10 a.m. in
the predominately Or
thodox Jewish
neighborhood.
His wristwatch, knap-
sack and wallet containing
$2 in cash were found on
his body, police said.
Hasidic Jews attending
Sunday's rally had
responded to privately
printed handbills displayed
in the neighborhood.
Hikind said that no
organization claimed
responsibility for conven-
ing the rally.
Besides their demands
to the police, some of those
attending the rally said
that Wald had been buried
hastily as part of a "cover-
up" of the murdi
Rabbi Morns Shmid-
man, executive director of
the Council of Jewish
Organizations, denied the
charge. He said Wald's
funeral was held Friday
before sundown, soon
after his body was released
by the police, at the re-
quest of his widow.
Said councilman Dear:
"I don't think you can
answer" whether Wald's
murder was racially
motivated. He praised the
police department, and
said he had spoken with
Mayor Ed Koch, who ex-
pressed his sympathies to
Wald's family and all
concerned.
ju$r in cA*e r win, r
4HOIALDHAVE
AN ACCEPTANCE
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MOMMA'. T MlSrHT
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Momma by Mell Lazarus. Court* of MM Lanarus and North Amerion Syndicate


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 1, 1988
Rome Airport Terrorist Implicates Abu Nidal
By RUTH GRUBBR
ROME (JTA) The lone
surviving gunman of the 1985
airport attack here that killed
16 people has claimed ties with
terrorist leader Abu Nidal and
that Syria was behind the
mission.
In pre-trial testimony read
at his trial, 20-year-old gun-
man Ibrahim Mohammed
Khaled said that the orders for
the mission came from
Damascus, and that Abu
Nidal's Al-Fatah Revolu-
tionary Council was based
there.
Khaled also told in-
vestigators that he and his
three companions, as well as
the Palestinian commandos
that carried out the
simultaneous attack at
Vienna's airport, had left for
their missions from Syria.
They had been technically
and ideologically trained for
weeks and were given $2,500
apiece, air tickets, maps and
false passports, the testimony
said. He also revealed informa-
tion about hidden arms caches
and organizers of terrorist at-
tacks, including Abu Nidal.
Khaled's trial opened Dec.
15, almost two years after the
Dec. 27, 1985 attack on the
crowded El Al and TWA
check-in counters at Fiumicino
Airport here. A 90-second
shootout ensued with security
guards in which Khaled's com-
panions died. Eighty-nine peo-
ple were injured.
The trial is being held in a
fortified courtroom in Rome's
Rebibbia Prison. Abu Nidal
and his right-hand man, Al
Hamieda Rashid, are charged
with Khaled for organizing the
massacre and are being tried
in absentia.
Khaled used his legal right to
stay away from court during
the second session, but issued
a statement read by his
lawyer, Epifano Ales. In it,
Khaled claimed Israeli security
men were as guilty as he was
for the massacre.
The court was adjourned un-
til Jan. 15 amid concern by the
prosecution that should Khal-
ed continue to refuse to ap-
pear, he would not shed light
on the Abu Nidal guerrilla
group.
In an interview on Italy's
state-run television last
March, Khaled accused Israeli
security guards of firing first
on him and his fellow gunmen,
sparking off the shootout in
which the indictment says 280
shots were fired: 102 by the
Palestinians, 62 by Israeli El
Al security guards and 16 by
Italian security men.
"The order was to carry out
a different mission," he said in
the interview. "We were to
commandeer a jetliner of the
Israeli airline.
"I and a comrade who later
fell in the shootout were going
to the bar to have a drink. At
that moment, an Israeli agent
. pulled out a pistol and
fired. So I opened my bag, took
out my Kalachnikov and fired
back. The Israelis fired first.
We did not want to act inside
the airport at all."
Carter Conference
Continued from Page 5-A
forward that was not at all in-
compatible with Camp David."
But then-Prime Minister
Menachem Begin spurned the
Reagan plan, which asserted
that Israel possessed no rights
of sovereignty at all over the
territories including not on-
ly the Golan and Gaza but
Judea and Samaria as well.
Syria's Adeeb al-Daoudy,
Ambassador to the UN in
Geneva, lamented at length
"the great injustice inflicted
on the Palestinian people" and
the Arab nation as a whole
"since the creation of Israel
.. "The cure for "Israeli ex-
pansionism and aggression
against the Arab homeland,"
according to al-Daoudy, would
be "complete Israeli
withdrawal from all, I repeat,
all occupied Arab
territory..."
He implied that "all ocucpied
Arab territory" included
either land settled by Jews
since the 1917 Balfour
Declaration or all territory
under Israeli control in excess
of the statelet envisioned by
the 1947 UN Partition Plan.
The means to complete
Israeli withdrawal, al-Daoudy
made clear, would be the inter-
national conference. Syria re-
jects Israeli Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres' idea of a con-
ference leading to direct
bilateral talks as 'a ceremonial
shell."
In The Geopolitics of Israel's
Border Question, a study spon-
sored by Tel Aviv University's
Jaffee Center for Strategic
Studies, Saul Cohen notes that
"insisting upon holding on to
too much of the territories
gained in 1967 could under-
mine the prospects for a suc-
cessful peace agreement. Re-
taining too little of the land
that was acquired could en-
danger future generations
should a peace agreement pro-
ve ephemeral."
The consultation should have
consulted Cohen.
Eric Rozenman is editor of
Near East Report, from which
this article is reprinted.
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He added: "What happened
is not my fault. I only did what
any Paletinian boy would have
done."
The indictment against
Khaled, however, cites
ballistics reports that the four
Palestinians did start the at-
tack by hurling three
Bulgarian-made hand
grenades into the early morn-
ing crowd and then opening
fire with Kalachnikov assault
rifles, manufactured in
Poland, Bulgaria and the
Soviet Union.
Authorities had hoped
Khaled's courtroom testimony
would be the centerpiece of the
trial and the basis for the
state's case.
In the statement read by his
lawyer, Khaled described the
Christmas massacre as an "un-
pardonable disaster" and "an
action full of horror." He call-
ed on Israelis and Palestinians
to "put down their damned
arms and negotiate a peace
settlement.
"I don't have anything to ex-
pect from life. I have nothing. I
want my death to arrive as
soon as possible," Khaled's
statement said. "Because ours
was a suicide mission I don't
intend to defend myself. I in-
tended to die."
In a separate letter read by
the court president, Khaled
asked forgiveness from the
families of the victims, saying
he feared that if he appeared
in court he would inflict more
pain on them.
"I hope that the light of god
touches also my Palestinian
people, who suffer and mourn
their dead women, elderly,
children," his emotional letter]
written in Italian, said.
"May the Israeli and Palesti- %,
nian people put down their
damned arms and sit together
at a peace table," said the let-
ter, which told of his upbring-
ing in Palestinian refugee
camps in Lebanon that he
described as cruel and
hopeless.
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Continued from Page 5-A
territory.
The timing, just days before
Christmas, compounded the
gravity of the situation. Arab
rioters apparently gave little
thought to the massive
damage they were doing
themselves with respect to
tourism and pilgrimages to the
seat of the Christian faith.
But the worst fears of
Israelis were realized in
Jerusalem, the proud capital of
Israel, its showpiece to the
world. "We have had commer-
cial strikes and demonstra-
tions here before, but nothing
like this," Mayor Teddy Kollek
noted.
The outbreak in the Arab
sector of the city appears to
have had two converging
causes: the contagion of
violence from the Gaza Strip
some sources said the rioting
is Protests Increase
Threat From Within
Friday, January 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
peace
violence" and "Begin
negotiations now."
Posters at the rally said
peace was preferable to the
territories. Others, displayed
at an earlier Communist Party
march, called for "two states
for two people." A large
detachment of police kept
count erdemonstrators
representing the militant
Betar youth movement from
disrupting the gathering.
Diplomatic sources in
Jerusalem said the distur-
bances there over the past two
days were "directed from
joined the ranks of the martyrs
Even if we lose all our
sons, the struggle will
continue."
The other troubling question
what will happen among
Israel's 750,000 Arab citizens
was answered. A one-day
general strike was called, a
demonstrative act of solidarity
with the Palestinians in the ad-
ministered territories.
This was an unprecedented
act of vicarious protest. It re-
mains to be seen whether the
feelings of solidarity have
penetrated more deeply than a
Palestinian youths.
In Washington, the Council
of Presidents of National
Arab-American Organizations
met with U.S. Deputy
Secretary of State John
Whitehead and Richard Mur-
phy, assistant secretary of
state for Near East and South
Asian affairs. They urged the
United States to take concrete
action against Israeli actions
to protest its handling of the
unrest in the territories. The
United States abstained from
such action in the United Na-
tions resolution. But, the
governments of the United
States, Britain, France and
West Germany expressed
their displeasure to Israel.
And, the 12-member states
of the European Economic
Community called on the
Israeli authorities "to secure
the protection of the in-
habitants in the occupied ter-
ritories in conformity with in-
ternational law and the stan-
dards in the human rights
field."
That message followed a
resolution to the same effect
adopted by the Parliament of
Europe in Strasbourg.
above They may be right, in formal stoppage of work, ser-
a spiritual
sense.
as well as literal
Israeli experts have noted
the growing role of the Islamic
faith among Arabs in the ter-
yices and schools might
indicate.
Some Israelis believe there
has been a blurring of iden-
tities in the minds of Israeli
Barbados Synagogue Reopened
for World Jewish Congress
ritories and in Israel proper. Arabs especially the young
The "return tn relimnn" ka, ~___*;_ ...iT. __J_ B
The "return to religion"'has
been an important feature of
ij. .. o ^ umui tui important ieature ot
WlSSgr,TC Ef*-*h K for some year,.
and the high-profile move by
Commerce and Industry
Minister Ariel Sharon into an
apartment in the Moslem
Quarter of the Old City on Dec.
15, the first night of
Chanukah.
Sharon insisted his move
would only enhance security
for Jews in the Old City and
expressed hope it would en-
courage other Jews to move in-
to the Moslem Quarter.
Many politicians, including
members of his own Herut fac-
tion, disagreed and called his
move provocative. Mayor
Kollek said at the time it would
raise tensions in the city and
his prediction proved to be an
understatement.
The latest controversy sur-
rounding Sharon underscores
the deep divisions in Israel.
The right wing is more deter-
mined than ever to hold on to
the West Bank and Gaza Strip.
The left is more convinced
than ever of the need to reach
a settlement that would divest
Israel of a hostile, bitter,
resentful and ever more
\ ii 4ent Arab population in the
territories.
Now it seems to be merging
with nationalist motifs.
It is an ironic development,
because Israeli policy up to
now has been to encourage
religious groups, especially in
the volatile Gaza Strip, while
cracking down hard on purely
nationalist and politically
radical elements in the Arab
high schools and universities.
The religious leaders, the
Israelis believed, were conser-
vative and, therefore, less
hostile.
But conservatism has
become indistinguishable from
Islamic fundamentalism. The
lines between religion and na-
tionalism are fading. The PLO
flag flew from the minarets of
mosques in Gaza during the
worst of the rioting last week.
The muezzins those who
call the faithful to prayers
used their loud-hailers to rally
Palestinian youths to the bar-
ricades with their rocks and
gasoline bombs. The calls to
holy war continued until the
IDF cut off the mosques' elec-
tric supply.
The same intermingling of
Thousands of supporters of religious and nationalist senti-
the dovish Peace Now move-
ment braved rain and cold
Saturday night to demonstrate
outside the Tel Aviv museum.
They chanted. "Give peace a
chance now," "An end to the
ment was evident at the Balata
refugee camp near Nablus.
There a mother, mourning her
eldest son, who was shot to
death by the IDF last week,
declared that "Ibrahim has
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generation who may see
themselves less as Israeli and
more at one with the Palesti-
nians across the "Green Line"
the imaginary demarcation
between Israel and the ter-
ritories. And if this is true,
Israelis wonder, does it con-
tain the same propensity for
violence?
Finally, Israelis are deeply
worried by reactions abroad
from friend and foe alike
which have become increasing-
ly critical of Israeli behavior
since the rioting began in the
Gaza Strip early this month.
The Palestinians are making
the maximum possible political
capital of the unrest. Their
propaganda machine has had a
field day and Israelis believe
the PLO wants to prolong the
violence even though the dead
and wounded are mostly
BRIDGETOWN Barbados
- (JTA) Sabbath eve ser-
vices were held for the first
time in more than 100 years in
the synagogue of Congrega-
tion Nidhei Israel here on Dec.
18, the World Jewish Congress
reported.
They marked the opening of
the four-day biennial con-
ference of the Commonwealth
Jewish Council and the
reconsecration of what is
possibly the oldest Jewish
house of worship in the
Western hemisphere.
Rabbi Israel Singer,
secretary general of the World
Jewish Congress, officiated at
the rededication and Prime
Minister Erskine Sandiford of
Barbados was the honored
guest.
The Commonwealth Jewish
Council represents Jewish
communities in 24 countries of
the British Commonwealth. Its
president, Greville Janner, a
Labor member of the British
Parliament, formally opened a
special exhibition on the
history of "Jewish settlement
in the Caribbean" at the Bar-
bados Museum, under the
auspices of the Barbadan
government.
There are about 27 Jewish
families in this island nation of
a quarter million. Jews arrived
here shortly after the first
British settlement in 1627.
Congregation Nidhei Israel
was founded in 1654. The
synagogue was partly
destroyed by a hurricane in
1831. It is now undergoing
restoration, expected to be
completed late next year.
The 110 delegates and
observers at the conference in-
cluded representatives from
Jewish communities in such
Third World countries as India
and Zambia. Resolutions
adopted at the gathering in-
clude a strong condemnation
of apartheid and a call to bring
to justice Nazi war criminals
still at large and living in Com-
monwealth countries.
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 1, 1988
Classic Regained
The works of the Russian Jewish writer, Isaac Babel,
have long been considered classics. A lost story of his, The
Jewess, has now been discovered and published in a
Soviet Yiddish publication. Many of Babel's stories were
mislaid after his death and, according to Tass (the Soviet
News Agency), a commission has now been set up to find
them.
Babel wrote stories of Jews in the time of the Revolution,
many of them set in Odessa. He was exiled to Siberia and
died there in 1941. He was partly rehabilitated under
Khruschev, but his works are not generally available to the
Soviet public.
Poles Apart
Since March 1987 a debate has been raging in parts of the
Polish press over whether Poland should take any respon-
sibility for the crimes committed on its soil against Jews
during the war. The debate was opened up in the liberal
Catholic weekly, Tygodnxk Powszechny, whose editor, Jer-
zy Turowicz, published a ground-breaking article by the
writer Jan Blonski. B Ion ski distinguished between guilt
and moral responsibility and claimed that while the Poles
were not guilty for the Holocaust they should accept "co-
responsibuity" for it.
This article provoked a strong response. Many agreed
with Blonski that Poles did ignore the suffering of the
Jews; one writer said that Poles came to see Jews as
"beyond the pale of human solidarity." Another claimed
that only few Poles helped the Jews, many of them only in
return for payment. Others maintained that Poland did all
it could to help Jews.
A well-known lawyer accused Blonski of pandering to the
foreign media and claimed that Poles had no reason to feel
shame. But he couched some of his defence of Poland in
classic anti-Semitic terms. Jews, he said, are an "alien in-
telligentsia." Debate has so far been confined to the
Catholic intelligentsia and the official government press
has kept silent on the whole controversy.
An Affair To Remember
Reverberations of the Dreyfus Affair still live on. The
scandal, which split late nineteenth century France, is in
the news again as the original manuscript of Emile Zola's
impassioned defense of Alfred Dreyfus, J'Accuse, goes on
auction. Alfred Dreyfus was a Jewish army officer accused
of treason: Zola claimed (rightly as it turned out) that he
had been the victim of a frame-up. The 39-page document
has been described by the French Minister of Culture as a
"classified historical document." The minister added that it
must not be allowed to leave France even if it finds a
foreign buyer.
And in New York an exhibition has been mounted at the
Jewish Museum entitled "The Dreyfus Affair: Art, Truth
and Justice." Films, paintings, documents, newspaper ar-
ticles and literature are some of the materials used in the
exhibition, which intends to recreate the ambience of turn
of the century France.
Former Maryland Gov. Hughes Is
Holocaust Liaison To Governors
Former Maryland Governor Harry Hughes has been ap-
pointed to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council to serve as
Campaign to Remember liaison to the nation's 50 state
governors.
As governor in 1986, Hughes sponsored a reception at
which more than $2 million was raised for the Museum.
Maryland leads the states in donations to the Museum with
more than $12 million.
Observant Recruiting Drive
NEW YORK Ohel Children's Home and Family Ser-
vices in Brooklyn, N.Y., is seeking Orthodox Jewish
families in the New York area for foster care of observant
Jewish Children and such families throughout the country
for adoption.
Ohel director Lester Kaufman says the shortage of foster
care for strictly Jewishly observant children has reached
critical proportions in the New York area.
Corporate Studies At Cardozo
NEW YORK A Center on Corporate Governance,
dealing with a wide range of business, ethical and legal
issues relating to corporate accountablity and responsibili-
ty was established at Yeshiva University's Benjamin Car-
dozo School of Law.
The Heyman Center on Corporate Governance believ-
ed by the university to be the first of its kind was
established with a $1 million gift from Samuel and Ronnie
Heyman both lawyers.
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Coexistence In Gaza
Friday, January 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Continued from Page 9-A
don't ask for holy wars to get
more (but) we cannot afford
smaller borders."
Israelis who support
negotiating with the West
Bank say that smaller borders
might be safer ones, if the
threat of terrorism were
eradicated. Isaak replies that
Israel has always had
terrorism.
"Before we had Judea and
Samaria, before '67, we didn't
have terrorism? Why wasn't it
solved then? They didn't want
us in the Middle East," he
asserts.
Besides, says Isaak, "We
have a Palestinian state
already Jordan. The British
mandate of Palestine included
what is today Greater Israel,
and the Jordan state. Judea
and Samaria were open ter-
ritory conquered by Hussein in
1948."
Isaak, who was 16 when he
emigrated to Israel from Den-
mark, says that he does not
believe there is any safe haven
for the Jews, save Israel. His
parents came from Germany,
and Isaak admits that he feels
that what happened there
could happen in the United
States, as well.
Isaak denies that there will
be a problem if, by retaining
the fast-growing Arab popula-
tion of the West Bank within
her borders, Israel faces a
future where Palestinians
comprise the majority of the
Jewish state.
"There were almost two
times as many Arabs as Jews
when we founded the Jewish
state now we are two times
as many and people are still
saying, 'what will be with the
demographic problem?' Isaak
asserts. "We believe in
aliyah," or Jewish immigra-
tion to Israel.
Another argument against
Jewish settlement in the West
Bank states that the isolated
Jewish communities, situated
in the midst of a mainly Arab
population, pose a security risk
to Israel.
"There would be more
soldiers in Judea and Samaria
if there wouldn't be settlers
there, because we are a part of
f^the security force of Israel,"
[isaak retorts. "We want a low
I profile of forces."
Isaak does not approve of
the settlers taking the law into
their own hands, as occurred
on occasion in the past, usually
in response to terrorist activi-
ty against members of the
Jewish population in the
region.
Asked how he feels about the
risk factor to him and his fami-
ly, Isaak's response if
fatalistic.
"Our children are going
every day in buses from
smaller settlements to larger
settlements through Arab
villages. Many of our wives go
to Arab settlements alone to
buy things for a very prosaic
reason, because it's cheaper,"
he says.
"Of course I think about (the
danger), but I am not afraid. I
cannot explain it. One of our
best friends was almost killed
in an Arab (market) by an axe
three strikes in the head. He
survived. The next day,
everyone went to Shechem
(the Arab town where the at-
tack took place) and bought
things," Isaak recounts.
Isaak's wife, however, does
not go alone to the outlying
Arab villages: She does not
have a driver's license, Isaak
explains, because "she is
afraid of driving a car."
Even if a terrorist attack oc-
curred to a member of Isaak's
own family, he contends that
he would not leave the West
Bank.
"That's my home. I can't
leave my home," he says.
Isaak and his family have
friends among the Arab
population which also calls the
West Bank home. The Isaak
family visits their Palestinian
friends in Nablus and
Shechem.
While Isaak's Palestinian
friends may not approve of
Jewish settlement in the West
Bank, "they are also realists. I
don't know if they love (the
Jewish presence), but we are
good friends. We are proving
co-existence with the Arabs,
not talking about it."
Yet as the delicate balance of
forces in the West Bank and
Gaza tilt in the direction of
Palestinian protest and discon-
tent, realists from both the
Palestinian and Israeli camps
may discover that, in the pre-
sent political climate of the ter-
ritories, friendship may not be
enough to stem the tide of
change.
Jewish-Christian
Continued from Page 5-A
relations and those who have
had virtually no contact with
it.
Those who knew little or
nothing about the positive ties
and the deep changes that
have taken place changes in
textbooks, liturgy, teacher
SSr'ft 8emin*y education,
ladult dialogues persist in
sewing the Catholic church
ut>ugh the optic of 1,900
years of pogroms, crusades, in-
quisitions, teachings of con-
tempt. Hence, the rage against
two millennia of anti-
^enutism.
Those Jews who have ex-
perienced the bracing climate
of mutual respect and increas-
KlL knowledge between
catholics and Jews refused to
"ow Waldheim to jeopardize
this extraordinary
achievement.
Finally, the issue of Israel
and diplomatic relations bet-
ween the Holy See and the
Jewish state will undoubtedly
undergo a different kind of
discussion in the months
ahead.
It is now clear to many Jews,
and growing numbers of
Catholics, that if the Vatican
intends to be a serious player
in the Middle East peace
game, it will require de jure
diplomatic relations.
Rabbi Marc H. Tanenbawn u chair-
man of the International Jewish Com-
mittee on InterreUgioue Contultatieni
and ie director of intematvmal nata-
tion* for the American Jewuh
Committee.
MUCH!
TM
JL
INTERNATIONAL C***
soo?
Welcome, frrano
' O
1987 David S Boxerman and Mark Saunders. All rights reserved.
Conflict On Condom Use
Continued from Page 3-A
against the "destruction of
seed," or onanism. (Excep-
tions have been allowed by
some rabbis, said Zweibel,
when a marriage partner had
tested positive tor AIDS.)
Thus Agudath Israel, a con-
gregational body of strictly Or-
thodox Jews, "does not teach
abuot (condom use) and makes
no bones about it," said
Zweibel.
"We stress abstinence out-
side of marriage and that drug
abuse is not healthy. Our type
of education contributes to the
type of lifestyle least suscepti-
ble to the disease," he said.
Zweibel pointed out that the
New York State Department
of Education mandates in-
struction about AIDS in both
public and private schools. But
because the regulations call for
instruction "consistent with
community standards,"
Zweibel said that Agudath
Israel was able to support
them.
Rabbi Haskel Lookstein, im-
mediate past president of the
New York Board of Rabbis and
principal of the Ramaz School,
an Orthodox secondary school
in Manhattan, said that
students there are informed
about the uses of condoms in a
sex ethics course taken during
the sophomore year.
"From a Jewish and a health
point of view one should abs-
tain from premarital inter-
course. But one should make
available the information that
if one is going to do that, a con-
dom is better than nothing,"
said Lookstein.
The United Synagogue of
America, representing 850
Conservative organizations
around the world, recently
adopted a resolution on AIDS
that "goes counter to what the
cardinal (O'Connor) believes,"
according to Rabbi Benjamin
Kreitman, executive vice
president.
The resolution, adopted at
United Synagogue's biennial
convention in November, calls
for congregations to "convey
whatever information is
available for (AIDS) preven-
tion," said Kreitman.
"Without endorsing their use,
congregations should make
available information about
condoms."
Jewish groups are
unanimous, however, in ex-
pressing concern about the
treatment of AIDS sufferers.
The Union for Traditional Con-
servative Judaism, for in-
stance, recently issued a
"responsum" (Jewish legal
opinion) on the subject, saying
that people with AIDS "are
entitled to full medical treat-
ment and the unstinting com-
passion of the Jewish
community."
Non-denominational Jewish
education organizations,
meanwhile, are pulling
together AIDS information
and allowing educators to
make their own choices as to
whether or not to include con-
Continued on Page 16-A
Jewish National Fund
PrBd1 (Keren Kayemeth Leisrael)
Redeems, Reclaims, Rebuilds the Land of Israel
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FOR ALL OCCASIONS
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420 Lincoln Rd Suite .153. Miami Beach. FL33139
Phone 5384464
IOOOOCOOOP


Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 1, 1988
From Little Rock Through 1987: Not Far Enough
Continued from Page 4-A
Ernest Green is a vice president of
Shearson-Lehman Brothers.
fJeff Thomas is a U.S. Defense Depart-
ment Staffer.
Terrence Roberts is a college dean in
Pasadena, California.
Carlotta Walls Lanier is a real estate
broker in Colorado.
Melba Patiio Beats is a San Francisco talk
show hostess.
Gloria Ray Karlmarks edits a computer
magazine in the Netherlands.
Minniejean Brown Trickey is a writer in
Canada.
Elizabeth Ann Eckford is a Little Rock
social worker.
Selma Mothershed Wair is a Belleview, Il-
linois, home economics teacher.
Increasingly, leaders in the black community
conclude they must rely on their own resources
to achieve more and better housing and jobs
for the many millions in their fold.
John Jacob, president of the National Urban
League, has said a deepening appreciation of
education helps in the fight against racists who
want to keep blacks in poverty.
Benjamin Hooks, NAACP director, speaks
of the 20-year effort to gain equality of oppor-
tunity through the courts and legislatures as
mere prelude to the battle against poverty,
drug abuse, teenage pregnancy and violence.
The Rev. William Gray III, who has served
five terms in Congress and holds the key post
of chairman of the House Budget Committee,
encapsulates the black dilemma clearly: "The
question is not whether I can check into the
Hyatt or Regency hotels, but whether (I have
the money) to check out."
Robert E. Segal is a former newspaper editor and director of
the Jewish community councils of Cincinnati and Boston.
Recent Violent Uprisings Incited By PLO
Continued from Page 4-A
elicit an Israeli military response, and the TV
images would make perfect propaganda
Israeli guns firing on "innocent" Palestinian
civilians.
Arafat's PLO suffered a major political set-
back at the recent Arab summit meeting in
Amman. The Iran-Iraq war forced the Israeli-
Palestinian struggle onto the back burner.
The current Palestinian violence is PLO's
classic method of demonstrating that it is not
politically dead. The tragedy is that Arafat's
PLO is trying to buy life at the expense of the
lives of Palestinians and Israelis.
The media and American political opinion
must not give him such an ignoble victory for
such a murderous course. Peaceful negotia-
tions and the renunciation of violence are the
only guarantees of life and security both for
Palestinians and Israelis.
Rabbi March H. Tanenbaum is director of international rela-
tions for the American Jewish Committee.
Letters Forum: Responses to Leonard Luria and Jerusalem Post Flap
EDITOR:
In the issue of Dec. 11, you
print the answer of Mr. Jim
Shipley to Mr. Leonard Luria.
I agree 100 percent with Mr.
Shipley and I would like to
know why you don't reproduce
the letter to The Jerusalem
Post, as it appears in the issue
of October 24. If you don't do
so, many readers will not
understand what Mr. Shipley
is talking about when he refers
to the following paragraphs:
"If the State of Israel
prepares its own destruction
by alienating American Jewry,
you will not receive support
from my family or friends.
Despite my feelings and sup-
port over the years, I and
others who have been equally
prominent and helpful will
turn our backs on those of you
who will remain in Israel.
American Jews are not
afraid or dependent upon the
Israelis for their health and
well-being, quite the contrary,
Israelis need American Jewry
as well as all Jewry or you will
fail in the experiment of
Zionism."
It seems that, with your
comment, you are trying to
put Mr. Luria's words in a bet-
ter perspective. I don't agree
with that. Although he is a
steadfast Israeli supporter,
Mr. Luria is, for me, the kind
of person that supports Israel
only with money and not with
love, and then he wants Israel
to do what he wants just
because of that, money.
As for myself, I intend not to
buy anything else at Luria's
stores. I hope others will do
the same. In doing so, he will
have less money to give to
Israel, at least on conditional
terms.
Until Mr. Luria goes to live
in Israel, he doesn t have any
right to complain about the
Israeli government and its at-
titudes. Only Israelis have that
right, because only they are
fighting and dying for us.
RUTH LIDJI
Miami
Editors Note: The letter
published by "The Jerusalem
Post" was a composite of three
others. The "Post" did not have
permission to include portions
of other correspondence in Mr.
Israelis Defend Position
Continued from Page 1-A
tions for the future of those
areas is demilitarization," he
said.
RESPONDING TO U.S.
criticism of Israel's use of live
ammunition to quell the riots,
Peres said that Israeli soldiers
are permitted to open fire only
when their lives are in danger.
"I see that use of live ammuni-
tion as an accident, not as a
policy," he emphasized.
He expressed regret over
the deaths of some 22 Palesti-
nian rioters, saying he feels
"responsible for the safety of
the Arab people" under Israeli
jurisdiction.
Rabin, in his NBC ap-
pearance, however, rejected
the idea of creating a special
force to control riots, citing
Israel's limited resources. But
he, too, said that Israeli
soldiers are only authorized to
use live ammunition when
their lives are in danger.
Rabin also criticized
parallels being drawn in the
news media between the situa-
tions in Israel and South
Africa. Noting that blacks are
the overwhelming majority in
South Africa, the defense
minister pointed out that even
if Israel annexed the ter-
ritories and accorded "full civil
rights" to all residents, Jews
would still be in the majority,
numbering 3 million, com-
pared to 2 million Arabs.
APPEARING on the same
program as Rabin, former
U.S. Ambassador to Israel
Samuel Lewis criticized the
State Department for issuing
scolding statements on the
unrest last week that went
"right to the edge of being a
mistake. No country likes to be
lectured about how it keeps
peace and order. And you
react defensively."
"And that is exactly what
the Israelis are doing,,r Lewis
said. "They are blaming the
press, they are blaming the
foreign spokesmen, instead of
focusing on what they can do
about the issue."
Lewis said the "best
substantive approach" to
peace that has yet been pro-
posed was President Reagan's
Sept. 1, 1982 plan that sets a
high-level of autonomy for the
territories. But he dismissed
the possibility of a political
solution before the U.S.
presidential elections and
Israel's next round of elec-
tions, both in November 1988.
Flight-Surgeon
Continued from Page 2-A
chapter of the book, a sort of
preface, is disappointing. In
addition, there are many
cliches in both characters and
incidents, and what eventually
happens to Klein is predic-
table. The ending is somewhat
contrived and less than
satisfactory.
But the novel is nevertheless
enthralling, both serious and
funny, entertaining and
ultimately very moving.
Klein, who has given up
medicine to devote himself to
writing, provides rare insight,
not only on the issue of Viet-
nam, but also in how American
Jews come to terms with their
Judaism in this country.
"A Forgotten Man"
deserves a much wider au-
dience than I fear it will
receive.
Luria's "letter to the editor."
In fairness, we printed Mr.
Luria's letters as originally
written.
EDITOR:
As a visitor to Miami, I have
been enjoying your excellent
paper.
Surely, a Jewish-American
who has been successful in
business deserves the admira-
tion of many, but as an
American-born Jew, I am
resentful of such an individual
if he purports to represent the
opinion of all American Jews
in a religious matter! Such was
the tone of Leonard Luria's
communications with Prime
Minister Shamir and Deputy
Minister Shimon Peres as
reported in your Dec. 11 issue.
It is the height of un-
mitigated chutzpah to set
himself up as a spokesman for
American Jewry when he was
never elected to that position.
How could he dare to say, "If
the Orthodox are attempting
to tell us who is a Jew,
legitimately a Jew, and change
the Law of Return, they will
lose the support of American
Jews."
When did Luria or anyone
else poll American Jews to ar-
rive at such an assumption? He
certainly did not poll me or
thousands of other Jews, who
feel that now that we have
regained the Holy Land, we
have a long-wished for oppor-
tunity to return to original
Judaism and to shed the
numerous barnacles which
some Jews have attracted on
the American scene. The tradi-
tions of Torah-Judaism, as
observed for several millenia,
will not be discarded or
distorted for alien accretions
of a mere 200 years and an im-
agined permanancy by Mr.
Luria and his sympathizers.
Can he and his ilk foist their
secularist tendencies on the
Torah-true adherents and so
bring chaos to the erstwhile
unity in Judaism?
How will our offspring of
future generations know of
their potential marriage-
mate's Judaism if the latter's
ancestry as a Jew is regarded
as questionable because of the
current temporal com-
promises? The marriage of a
convert or a descendant of a
convert whose conversion was
certified by an Orthodox rabbi
will always be recognized by
all "branches" of Judaism;
marriages which will arouse
questions of Jewish authentici-
ty can only perpetuate com-
plications, quarrels and
disputes.
Let not those whose hands
reek of secularism presume to
regulate sincere candidates for
conversion, who seek religious
guidance toward lives of
idealism, morality and ethic?
for themselves and their
descendants.
SUSAN S. KAUFMAN
RegoPark.N.Y.
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Phone 538-7811


Friday, January 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
ay-Jewish Community Demands Social Justice
By BEN GALLOB
The achievements of the
Jewish gay and lesbian
movements have not received
their due in the Jewish com-
munity, when one considers
"the prophetic and historical
Jewish commitment to social
justice." So contended
Lawrence Bush, editor of the
Boston-based independent
Jewish quarterly Genesis, in an
essay this past autumn.
During the past few years,
Bush wrote, Jewish homosex-
uals have established "signifi-
cant visibility for gay people
and gay issues" in "the liberal
sector" of the Jewish
community.
Bush listed among the move-
ment's achievements "the
establishment of more than 20
lesbian and gay synagogues;
the vigorous response of
Jewish organizations, in par-
ticular the Reform movement,
to the plague of AIDS; the
reconstructjonist movement's
decision to ordain openly gay
and lesbian rabbis; the wide
distribution of Evelyn Torton
Beck's 'Nice Jewish Girls, A
Lesbian Anthology'; and
several articles and brochures
that have been published since;
and the inclusion of lesbian
and gay issues at mainstream
Jewish conferences."
Bush asserted that "this
Jewish openness is praisewor-
thy" especially in an American
society "that is deeply afraid
of and violent" toward gays
and lesbians. But measured by
the yardstick of the kind of
Jewish commitment ex-
emplified by "the vigor of
Jewish civil rights activism in
the 1960s," Bush contended,
the "pro-gay" aspects of
Jewish communal policy
"seem rather shallow."
He noted that "tokenism is
prevalent and widely accepted
on the boards of Jewish in-
stitutions" and that lesbian
and gay Jews "remain
marginal and invisible in the
lives of most (Jewish)
j, congregations."
He cited the decision of
delegates to the 98th conven-
tion of the Central Conference
of American Rabbis (CCAR),
the association of Reform rab-
bis, in June 1986, to postpone
consideration of a report on
the admission and ordination
of gays as Reform rabbis.
I( On the other hand, he said
a deepened Jewish (com-
munal) commitment to lesbian
and gay liberation" would in-
clude acceptance of gay and
esbian families; a change in
'turgy; respect from the
Jewish press; Jewish organiza-
J".opposition to anti-gay
attitudes and activity; and sup-
port by Jewish parents of their
children's gay or lesbian
Westyles.
A day of affirmation for
"ttny gay and lesbian Jews
was the Sunday before Sukkot,
when they joined a national
iiarch for lesbian and gay
nghts in Washington, D.C.
I***' Yoel Kahn, spiritual
le*der of Congregation Sha'ar
Zahav, the oldest gay-lesbian
congregation in San Fran-
cisco, wrote in the synagogue's
November bulletin that the
crowd at the march was larger
than anyone had imagined it
would be, probably "half a
million."
However, he charged, the
media "did their best to
trivialize the size and
significance of the event." He
repeated that "AIDS victims
were the focus of coverage to
the exclusion of gay ana les-
bian people and their friends,
many with AIDS, who were
marching to demand their
rights."
Kahn reported that the most
popular t-shirt at the march
was black with a pink triangle
with the imprint "Silence
Equals Death." He added that
"we have learned for our
history, as Jews and as gay
and lesbian people, that silence
in the face of oppression leads
to death."
Care Kinberg, coordinator of
the feminist task force of New
Jewish Agenda told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that the
marchers included relatives,
supporters and a total of about
15,000 Jews.
Kinberg said more than 500
men and women attended a
Havdalah service held in con-
junction with the march. Bush
said several hundred Jewish
participants had to be turned
away from the ceremony for
lack of room.
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******* ** *******>*'****<******0*>*<*'** ********** ******
.


Page 16-A The Jewiah Floridian/Friday, January 1,1968
Human Rights Agenda:
Beyond the Summit's 'Tid-bits'
Continued from Page 1-A
note" when Reagan stressed
to him that the Soviet Jewry
movement was a continuing
"American commitment" and
pressed home the strength of
the demonstration.
Abram said he, too, remind-
ed Soviet officials of "what
was represented on that
stage" major governmental
figures, representatives of
church groups, civil rights
leaders. One of the Soviets
"turned his back on me, in-
furiated," he added.
Even more important,
Abram said, was "the tremen-
dous impact on the Jewish
population of the Soviet
Union. The Voice of America
was broadcasting that rally
live into the Soviet Union ...
and it had an unbelievable kind
of impact on the Jews of the
Soviet Union."
Likewise, said Abram, the
rally had an "immeasurable
unifying effect on American
Jews, particularly on the
youth." Added NCSJ
spokesman Jerry Strober, "It
may mean the difference bet-
ween assimilation and
identification."
Where to go from here?
Abram wants to keep up the
fight. "Our movement should
not be directed only towards
family reunification," he said.
"Our goal is to keep the
Soviet Union to its obligation
under the Helsinki Accords"
to allow free emigration.
The recent emigration of
well-known refuseniks "should
Mass Trials
Continued from Page 1-A
the latest detainees, every
lawyer would have to repre-
sent at least 10 defendants,"
Rabinowitz said. "Even the
most competent lawyer cannot
perform his duty properly,
especially in a system of quick
trials."
At present, few of the de-
tainees are represented by
legal counsel. Lawyers in the
Gaza Strip are boycotting the
trials to protest the alleged
mistreatment of the suspects.
They say the arrests were so
fast and so numerous that they
had no time to prepare their
clients' cases.
But Israel Defense Force
Judge Advocate General Am-
non Streshnov has rejected
those arguments. He said Sun-
day that while the military
courts will seek speedy trials,
the prisoners would not be
denied their full rights under
the law.
Condom Conflict
Continued from Page 13-A
dom -education in classroom
instruction.
The Coalition for the Ad-
vancement of Jewish Educa-
tion is readying a lesson plan
and bibliography for Jewish
educators, and the Jewish
Education Service of North
America makes resource
material on AIDS available to
federations and education
bureaus through its National
Educational Resource Center.
not dampen the Soviet Jewry
movement," said Abram.
"We must not come down
from this high, but move for-
ward to new highs. We must
use the new contacts in
cultural exchange and trade."
Abram said be did not favor
such exchanges, but also did
not advocate boycotts.
He stressed, rather, that
"every American should do
what the president has done,
and have no contact, no matter
how friendly, without raising
these issues in a profound and
determined way. That's the
American responsibility."
He said he was distrubed
that American business
leaders cajoled Gorbachev
with ideas for U.S.-Soviet
trade.
"They cannot operate in
isolation from the context of
American principle ... There
can never be normalization of
our relationship with the
Soviet Union in any area until
the Soviet Union normalizes
the human rights pacts and
shows a decent respect for
mankind," he contended.
He asserted that the
codification of emigration
regulations of last January is
"the end of it" when it comes
to Soviet permission to
emigrate. Of the approximate-
ly 8,000 Jews who left the
Soviet Union this past year,
.
only a small number were
known refuseniks, he noted.
This trend indicates two
things to Abram: that emigra-
tion is possible without strict
compliance with written
regulations and that
refuseniks, many of them long-
term, remain waiting while
others leave.
It is impossible to count ac-
curately the number of
refuseniks, agreed Abram and
Strober. The names of many
refuseniks do not appear on
the computer lists kept by
Soviet Jewry groups, and
other Soviet Jews may fear to
apply.
Abram urged "every Jew in
the Soviet Union who wants to
leave to apply without invita-
tion, regardless of family
elsewhere, to exercise the
rights that were guaranteed
by his own country."
He disputed Gorbachev's
statement during the inter-

view with NBC-TV ancW
Tom Brokaw that emiSl
was creating. "bramK.
JSUFSLchairman *
phaaksd tjat.many highly
trained professionals whohS
applied to emigrate sub*.
quenthy lost their jobs.
Abram also atressed that the
Soviet Jewry movement
as interested in the rehgjL
and cultural lives of Jews I
naming in the Soviet Union as
in those who wish to emigrate
But he dismissed efforts to
import small numbers of
prayer books and Bibles and to
set up kosher restaurants as
"tidbits" that deceptively at-
tempt to portray the Soviets as
compliant with Jewish needs.
"If they really want to
revive Jewish life in the Soviet
Union, let them do what the
Romanians do. Let them form
Jewish federations, Jewish
schools, Jewish clubs," he
stated.
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Local Bat Mitzvah Truly Twinned to Soviet Teen
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
When 13-year-old Roberta
Schweitzer of Kendall became
bat mitzvah in late May, she
could not know that Marina
Drigant, the Soviet girl assign-
ed to be her "twin," would
emerge from behind the iron
curtain.
But, roughly half-a-year
after Roberta recited a haiku
poem written in Marina's
honor at bat mitzvah services
held by the Reconstructionist
Congregation Temple Beth Or,
Marina and Roberta stood
side-by-side, each receiving
her certificate of bat mitzvah.
"Well, I never imagined it
would happen but I was hop-
ing," says Roberta, who
visited with her Soviet twin in
Detroit and spent a week with
her last week.
"I hadn't seen anyone (who
j came from Russia) but I im-
| agined her in my mind and she
looked exactly like I imagined
her," she adds.
Marina and Roberta, who
held a teenager's post-
Chanukah party on Thursday,
Dec. 24, belatedly celebrated
their "shared" bat mitzvah in a
special religious service
dedicated to Soviet Jewry.
During the service, which
took place at the Unitarian
First Church last Friday, Rab-
bi Kami Shapiro addressed ap-
proximately 100 people.
After the background of the
Drigant family's eight-year
struggle to emigrate from the
Soviet Union was recounted by
Roberta's father, Mark
Schweitzer, Marina and
Roberta lit the Sabbath
candles and performed the
ritual blessing over them. The
girls then received their cer-
tificates of bat mitzvah from
the temple's president.
Uncertain about her com-
mand of English, which she
learned in school in Russia,
Marina nevertheless spoke to
the assembled crowd, which in-
cluded a number of teenagers.
The young Soviet emigre at-
tempted to answer questions
about the Soviet Union. The
queries, presented to Marina
earlier that week, were from
some of her American peers,
who asked about Russian
music, school, and whether the
Soviet Union had punks and
blue jeans.
"I think that it is hard (for
Americans) to understand,"
says Marina, whose parents,
Boris and Natasha, finally
received permission to leave
the USSR this summer.
Marina's grandmother was
allowed to emigrate eight
years ago, and established
residency in Israel.
The Drigants originally
thought that they would be
able to join her quickly; now,
after the years of waiting, the
Drigants have decided to live
Bat Mitzvah twins finally meet first in Detroit and then in Miami. From left, Roberta Schweitzer
and Marina Drigant.
in Detroit, where, in the in-
terim, another Russian
relative has set up residence.
Earlier this year, before the
Drigants were released, the
Schweitzers corresponded
with the family in Moscow, as
well as with the grandmother
in Israel.
"We were always told, keep
writing to them in Moscow,
(though) the chances of your
letters getting through are
very slim," recalls Mark.
Because letters like the
Schweitzers', containing men-
tion of religious observances
are often censored in the
Soviet Union, the Schweitzers
did not mention that Marina
was to be a bat mitzvah twin in
their letters to Moscow. The
Drigants only learned about
the Schweitzers when the
Penthouse Magazine Lures Miamian
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
THE YEAR 1969 wasn't a
very good year for journalism
pchool graduates. So, Miami
ieach-born Marcia Orovitz
the first job that seemed
reasonable writing advertis-
ing copy for Jordan Marsh's
lingerie and shoe department
|n Boston.
Writing about shoes did not
fcause a problem. Writing
pout lingerie did.
"It was challenging writing
ttngerie ads," she says matter-
bf-factly. "We had a lot of
rguments over it. I was a 60s
liberal. And I just couldn't
lieve it you could use the
Marcia Orovitz
word brassiere but you
couldn't use the word bra.
(And) they weren't allowed to
show cleavage either. I had a
lot of fights about that."
Orovitz could not have
known back in those early days
of her struggle to succeed in
the business world that she
would become a vice president
of one of the nation's largest
circulation magazines, Pen-
thouse. Nor that she would
become an outspoken defender
of First Amendment rights,
arguing that Penthouse's sex-
ually explicit photos are
neither obscene nor
pornographic.
Returning last week to visit
family in Miami, she spoke
with The Jewish Floridian
about Penthouse's First
Amendment clashes and about
Penthouse's exclusive story in
the January issue that claims
Jessica Hahn, the woman
who said former PTL
Ministries leader Jim Bakker
raped her and took away her
innocence, was actually work-
ing in a house of prostitution
many years before the PTL
saga became a national
refuseniks arrived in Italy;
'one of their transit points.'
It was in Italy that, carrying
only seven suitcases and the
equivalent of $90 a person,
Boris, a mechanical engineer,
Natasha, an editor who lost
her job following the family's
request to emigrate, and
Marina met with Boris'
mother, who told them about
Continued on Page 3-B
scandal.
IT'S HARDLY the kind of
stuff Orovitz was involved
with when she was editor of
the Palmetto High School Pan-
ther. In fact, when she left
Miami in 1964 for college in
Chicago she had in her posses-
sion the prestigious Silver
Knight journalism award. She
was headed for Northwestern
University to pursue the
dream she says she had since
she was 13, to become "Bren-
da Starr, reporter."
Now, at 40, she works close-
ly with Penthouse editor and
publisher Bob Guccione, who
she says will soon marry Pen-
Continued on Page 4-B
\ i
Koch Dies Despite Bone Marrow Battle
Israeli Women Use Bogus
Marriages to Dodge Army
TEL AVIV-(INB)-Many
secular Israeli women are ar-
ranging fictitious marriages in
order to evade Army service,
according to the weekly
\oteret Raishit.
Married women are
automatically exempt from Ar-
P my duty, and if a woman weds
while in the Army she is im-
mediately released from the
I remainder of her service.
"I had a very difficult time in
basic training," one young
woman told the Koteret
\Kaishit reporter. "At the
time, I had been dating my
boyfriend for only about two
months, but he agreed to
marry me so that I could get
ut of the Army early." The
woman said that her father
was upset by her action. "He
served in the Army for many
years, and our home was a
Zionist home, love of the
'homeland' and all that... My
father was hurt both by the
fact that I left the Army and
by my attitude towards the
idea of marriage in general."
Bogus marriages are a
popular tactic because the Ar-
my has no way of determining
their authenticity. There are
no regulations that stipulate
how long a woman must be
married in order to be exempt.
All that is required is a legal
marriage certificate and
about $1,000, which is the go-
ing rate for men who agree to
participate in a fictitious
marriage.
One such man interviewed
by Koteret Raishit said he
Continued on Page 12-B
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Ann Weinstein Koch did not
go gently into that good night.
The 31-year-old woman, whose
battle with leukemia led to one
of the largest bone marrow
drives ever, woke the cons-
cience of the Miami communi-
ty with her courageous at-
tempt to fight the disease
which eventually claimed her
life last Friday, Dec. 25.
Over 2,000 South Floridians
responded to Koch's desperate
search to find a matching bone
marrow donor, including a
television news reporter, high
school students, synagogue
members, and people from all
walks of life in the community.
None of the 2,000 who
registered with the Second
Generation Deed Club match-
ed Koch's bone marrow type.
The odds had been against
Koch from the start; the
chances of finding a bone mar-
row donor from a non-relative
are approximately 1 out of
20,000.
But Koch had never been
one to give up on life. First
diagnosed with the disease
eight years ago, she went on to
marry, have a child, travel and
remain involved with the local
community.
A special education teacher,
Koch worked with the City of
Miami Beach as a Senior
Citizen Community Center
director, and was involved
with charitable organizations
such as Mt. Sinai Medical
Center, Young Presidents
Club, the Greater Miami Heart
Institute, the Miami Heart In-
stitute Second Generation, and
Continued on Page 12-B
Our
Community
Friday January 1,1988- The Jewish Floridian Section B


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 1, 1988
Courshon Re-Elected
South Pointe Chairman
Living Judaism Scholars Forum
Arthur Courshon
Arthur H. Courshon, chair-
man of the board of Jefferson
Bancorp, Inc., has been re-
elected chairman of the South
Pointe Advisory Board of the
City of Miami Beach
Redevelopment Agency. His
election followed his appoint-
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ment and that of nine other
Miami Beach business leaders
to the advisory board by the
Redevelopment Agency, which
is comprised of Mayor Alex
Daoud and the other members
of the Beach city commission.
In addition to Courshon,
South Pointe board appointees
are Tony Goldman, hotel
owner and investor in the
Ocean Drive area of the
Beach's Art Deco historic
preservation district; Abel
Holtz, chairman and president
of Capital Banks; Jack Pen rod,
owner of Penrod's restaurant
which has announced construc-
tion plans in the South Pointe
area; Jo Ann Sawitz-Bass, co-
owner of Joe's Stonecrab
restaurant, an historic land-
mark in South Pointe.
Also Judy Clayton, a South
Beach investor; John Hinson,
managing director and co-
owner of South Pointe
Towers; Jerry Mintz, an area
investor; William Lewis, at-
torney for South Shore
Developers, Inc., which owns
prime property in South
Pointe; and James Silvers, an
architect who owns property
in South Pointe.
The "Living Judaism
Scholars Forum,' encompass-
ing three lectures by faculty
members of Hebrew Union
College-Jewish Institute of
Religion, will take place in
Coral Gables, Clearwater, and
Longboat Key on Jan. 11, 13,
and 14, respectively. This new
endeavor by the College-
Institute is part of an effort to
expose the Florida community
to the resources that are uni-
que to America's oldest in-
stitution of higher Jewish
scholarship.
The first lecture, "Sholom
Aleichem as a Social Critic: A
Re-Reading of His Genius"
will be presented by Dr.
Herbert H. Paper, professor of
linguistics and Near Eastern
languages. A leading authority
on Sholom Aleichem, Paper
will evaluate the career of the
Yiddish author and read from
stories never before translated
into English on Monday, Jan.
11, at Temple Judea, Coral
Gables.
"A Modern Encounter with
the Midrash" will be the sub-
ject addressed by Dr. Norman
J. Cohen, professor of midrash
and director of HUC-JIR's
Rabbinic School in New York.
He will speak on the literature
of the rabbi, providing models
and values for contemporary
living on Wednesday, Jan. 13,
at Temple B'nai Israel,
Happenings
"A Captivating Evening With Julie Andrews." will launch
South Florida's 1988 theatrical season with a limited two-week
run. in a preview performance. Wednesday. Jan. 6. to be follow-
ed by the official opening night, Thursday. Jan. 7. as the second
show of producer Zev Bufman's five-play subscription season at
The Jackie Gleason Theater of the Performing Arts.
Pianist Leonid Kuzmin will appear at the Jackie Gleason
Theatre of the Performing Arts on Monday, Jan. 18. at 8 p.m.
To celebrate the Dance Art. Friends of the North Miami Beach
Library will present performer and choreographer Bilie Kirpich
for a tour behind the scenes in the dance world. Programs will be
at the library, at 1 p.m beginning Saturday. Jan. 9. for five con-
secutive weeks. For information, 932-6398
Israeli Folk Dancing is held at McDonald Center. No. Miami
Beach on Wednesday nights A beginners' class is held from
8-8:30 p.m.. intermediate and advanced at 830 to 1030 p.m.
For information. 652-9738
On Monday. Jan. 11, the Seventh Annual B'nai B'rith/ADL
Golf Tournament, sponsored by Lake Carmel Unit No. 5342. will
be held at The Jockey Golf and Racquet Club (formerly the
California Country Club) For information. 651-1581 or
651-8443.
Israel to Own VOA Transmitter
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel will eventually own the
Voice of America radio
transmitter the United States
is building in the Arava region
of the Negev.
Under the agreement with
the United States formally en-
dorsed by the Cabinet on Aug.
3, 1986, the facility will revert
to Israeli ownership 25 years
after it goes into operation, at
no cost to Israel.
But Israel will reap
economic advantages long
before then. The transmitter
will be completed within four
to five years, Communications
Minister Gad Yaacobi told the
Cabinet.
During this time, the United
States will invest approx-
imately $300 million in the pro-
ject. Under the agreement
with Washington, half that
amount must be spent on local
purchases of equipment and
jobs for Israeli workers.
The VOA transmitter, in-
tended for broadcasts to the
Soviet Union and Eastern bloc
countries, will consist of 16
antenna towers, each over 700
feet high. Its location in Israel
will make the broadcasts less
prone to jamming than VOA
transmissions from Europe.
The project, which Israel
joined at the request of the
Reagan administration,
generated considerable con-
troversy here.
Clearwater.
"The American Jewish Ex-
perience: Survival Strategies"
will be the topic of Dr.
Abraham J. Peck, ad-
ministrative director of the
College's American Jewish Ar-
chives. Peck will explore
whether the painful memories
of the Holocaust and the op-
timism of the State of Israel
can keep American Jewrv
afloat. This lecture will take
place at Temple Beth Israel
Longboat Key, Thursday, J^
14.
All three lectures in the
Scholars Forum begin at 8
p.m.
Lipoff Re-Elected to CLAL
Norman Lipoff has been re-
elected as a vice chairman of
CLAL, the National Jewish
Center for Learning and
Leadership. The announce-
ment was made by Herschel
Blumberg of Washington,
DC., immediate past national
chairman.
The election took place at
CLAL's Annual Leadership
Shabbaton in Tarrytown, N.Y.
on Dec. 4 and installation was
held during the Shabbat Torah
service on Dec. 5. Ben Zion
Leuchter of Vineland, N.J.,
CLAL's founding chairman,
was the installing officer.
Lipoff is a national vice
chairman of the United Jewish
Appeal and sits on the boards
of directors of both the Council
of Jewish Federations and the
United Israel Appeal. Lipoff
also serves on the Board of
Directors of the United Way of
Norman Lipoff
Dade County. As a Vice Chair-
man of CLAL, he holds the
organization's Endowments
Portfolio.
Beth Sholom Series Begin
Temple Beth Sholom
Sisterhood will feature a se-
cond session of Current
Events to begin on Thursday,
Jan. 7, at 10 a.m. with Marian
Soshuk.
The Adult Studies Program
will resume on Monday, Jan. 4,
at 10:30 a.m.
Courses are offered at 10
a.m. and at 11 a.m. Early
course is conducted by Rabbi
Harry Jolt in "Wisdom -
Where Can It Be Found an
in-depth study of the Pirke
Avot The Ethics of the
Fathers."
The later course is con-
ducted by Rabbi Gary A.
Glickstein on "What You
Always Wanted To Know
About Judaism, But Were
Afraid To Ask."
For information, 538-7231.
"This Man is a Master."
Peter Clot/on Miami/South Florida Mooozine
eWBcimmdo
MflDR CUCINfl
(formerly of 79th Street Roimondo's)
Gourmet Italian
12550 N.. 6 five.
North Miami
Reservations 8954071
Volet Parking Closed Mondays


\
Soviet Twin
Continued from Page 1-B
Friday, January 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridiar. Page 3-B
the letters from the
Schweitzers and the twinned
bat mitzvah.
Now, after a journey from
the USSR which included four
months of bureaucratic delay
in Austria and Italy, Marina
has found her way to her
American bat mitzvah twin.
"She just doesn't believe all
this is happening," says
Roberta's mother, Arlene
Schweitzer.
\ reception held at the
weitzer's home last Sunday
x crowds of well-wishers,
who ate "all American Jewish
food" and brought presents
for Marina.
It was the culmination of a
week of shopping (Marina
ioves anything pink, according
to Arlene) and sightseeing.
"She had never seen a zoo
without cages before," Arlene
recalls of their visit to
Metrozoo. One of the things
which Arlene recalls is that, in
the car leaving the airport,
Marina exclaimed, "in the
The Men's Club of Temple Beth
Moshe has selected Jack and
Gussie Levine as their
honorees for the current year.
At a Sabbath eve dinner Fri-
day, Jan. 8, at 6 p.m. the
Leifines will be recognized for
their many years of service to
Men's Club and to the con-
gregation. For reservations,
891-5508.
Amit Women
Coral Gables Chapter will
hold a luncheon meeting on
Tuesday, Jan. 5 at noon at
Zamora Temple.
Galil Chapter holds its paid
up membership luncheon on
Monday, Jan. 4 at noon in the
Young Israel Synagogue,
North Miami Beach. Special
guest will be a TV anchor-
woman, who just returned
from Israel and will give a
firsthand report.
Moorings Chapter will meet
on Tuesday, Jan. 5, noon, in
the auditorium of Moorings
Towers, North Miami Beach.
Soviet Union, you can't own
cars it's machinery. But the
United States is one big park-
ing lot!"
Arlene says she asked
Marina, "Why did your father
want to leave the Soviet
Union? The answer was sim-
ple: "He wanted to be a Jew.''
Roberta remembers when
her Soviet twin was "like one
big question mark." Now the
girls are going to write each
other and visit again, she
asserts.
Marina would like to take
Roberta for a visit to her coun-
try, but "only to visit Russia
... not to live."
"I like my new school, new
friends, this country," says
Marina, who admits to missing
something she left behind in
Russia; "my grandparents."
The big difference between
Soviets and Americans, accor-
ding to Marina, is that "the
people in America, when I ask
about something, they have a
smile and they always answer.
In Russia, no. They do not
smile and they can't say a bad
word when I ask them.
Marina returned to Detroit
on Monday, Dec. 28. But she
may have more than memories
to remind her of the ex-
perience of being a bat mitzvah
twin.
"We had no idea, but 30
families were twinned with
Marina," says Arlene. "A few
girls met her when she first ar-
rived in New York, some came
to her house in Detroit, but I
don't think she has met more
than ten."
And so, the little girl who
might not even have had one
bat mitzvah in the Soviet
Union may share in many
more.
The second speaker on the Om-
nibus Lecture Series at Temple
Beth Sholom will be Anne
Roiphe, on Sunday, Jan. 10, at
10:80 a.m. Roiphe, author of
the novel "Loving Kindness"
will speak on: Zionism Is
Racism: What that slogan
means and how to undo its
dangerous effects.
The Greater Miami Israel Bonds Organiza-
tion recently held its annual AventuraJTurn-
berry Isle Israel Bonds Brunch in the Garden
Room of Turnberry Isle to honor Ruth and
Ben Marks of Turnberry Isle and Ruth and
Jacob Cohen of Aventura. Pictured at the
brunch were, from left. Jack Bellock, honorary
Kosher Expo
Winners
Announced
Lisa Jordan, of Temple Beth
El, West Palm Beach, and Ur-
sa Noelle Gil, of Temple Beth
Sholom, Miami Beach, won
first prize in the Senior and
Junior Divisions, respectively,
at the International Kosher
Foods and Jewish Life Expo,
held recently at the Miami
Beach Convention Center. The
contest attracted entries from
religious school students
throughout South Florida, ac-
cording to Irving Silverman,
Expo manager.
Laura Moskowitz, of Temple
Beth El. and Nessa Blum and
Nisa Kubiliun, of Beth Torah
Congregation, North Miami
Beach, won second prize in the
Senior and Junior Divisions,
respectively.
Third prize winners, Senior
and Junior Divisions respec-
tively, were Cindy Goldberg of
Temple Beth Israel, Sunrise;
and Johanna Kertesz, of Beth
Torah Congregation, North
Miami Beach.
In the Junior Division, the
following received honorable
mention: Stacy Kaytes, of
Beth Torah Congregation,
North Miami Beach; Melanie
Beth Goldstein, Sunrise
Jewish Center, Sunrise; and
Jonathan Kleinman, of Temple
Beth Israel, Sunrise.
Temple Beth El, Temple
Beth Sholom, Beth Torah Con-
gregation, and Temple Beth
Israel, will receive collections
of records, and/or books for
their libraries.
And Mr. and Mrs. Samuel B.
Lindenberg of West Palm
Beach were the winners of the
round trip tickets to Israel via
El Al Airlines, at the Interna-
tional Kosher Foods and
Jewish Life Expo.
chairman of the AventurajTurnberry Isle
Israel Bonds Committee: Joseph Handler.
Turnberry Isle chairman: Ben and Ruth
Marks: Ruth and Jacob Cohen; and Berne
Weiser. Aventura chairman. Also chairing
the event were Harry Gampel and Fred
Hirsch (not pictured).
Outreach Classes In Basic Judaism
The Rabbinical Assembly of
America which is the umbrella
organization for Conservative
Rabbis has announced that its
"Basic Introduction to
Judaism" classes for adults
will begin in January. The
course is designed for non-
Jews who are interested in
learning more about Judaism
as well as Jews who have a
weak background in the
teachings of Basic Judaism.
Classes will meet in North
Miami Beach and South Dade.
In North Miami Beach they
will begin on Tuesday night,
Jan. 12 at 8 p.m. at Congrega-
tion Beth Torah and in South
Dade on Wednesday night Jan.
13 at 8 p.m. at Congregation
Bet Shira. Classes meet once a
week for two hours for 15 con-
secutive weeks. For informa-
tion, 382-3668.
Maestro Shmuel Ferakko
Roberta joins her Soviet twin and family. From left, Boris Drigant, Roberta Schweitzer, Manna
Drigant, and Natasha Drigant. ________
Jewish National Fund 'Israelis Are Coming'
Concert Dedicated To Establish A Forest
In Israel In Honor Of
Maestro Shmuel and Ahuva Fershko
The Jewish National Fund, by popular demand, is reintroducing
the traditional Jewish National Fund Concert "The Israelis Are
Coming" produced and directed by Maestro Shmuel Fershko.
"The Israelis Are Coming"
concert this year is studded with
international stars and
dedicated to honor Maestro
Shmuel and Ahuva Fershko by
establishing a JNF Forest in
Israel in their honor. Co-
chairpersons are Haim and Gila
Wiener and Bianca Rosenstiel.
Appearing with Maestro Fer-
shko is Yaffa Yarkoni, recogniz-
ed by Israel as its national
singer. Also appearing are
Claude Kadosh, interpreter of
Oriental and Morrocan songs,
Miriam Jacobi, a top Yemenite
singer, and Danny Tadmore,
master of Israeli humor in
English.
The Jewish National Fund is the sole institution of the Jewish
People entrusted with the task of the land redemption, reclama-
tion and afforestation of the land of Israel. It was established in
1901 by the 5th Zionist Congress in Basel, Switzerland by Prof.
Herman Shapira, and Dr. Theodore Herzl, the founder of Zionism
and the father of the National rebirth of the Jewish People which
led to the establishment of the Jewish state.
The JNF, since its inception, has been transforming the mar-
shes and deserts of Israel into liveable and cultivated land.
Since Statehood the JNF has planted over 165 million trees, br-
inging the total trees planted in Israel to 185 million.
"The JNF has transformed over 40 percent of Israel's land, and
despite all its efforts, over 60 percent of Israel is still desert. The
Negev, where the future of Israel lies, remains practically a
desert. In the Galil the JNF is establishing Mitzpim, Wat
chtowers, with a cluster of a few families living there to establish
political reality so that the Arabs cannot settle on the land which
belongs to the Jewish people and the Jewish state," stated a JNF
official.
They continued, "the JNF is engaged in building roads for
security and preparing land for all the Frontier settlements, and
is the basis for the State of Israel, for on JNF land stand all the
developments of Israel, the Kibbutzim, the Moshavim, the
Hospitals, Universities, the schools."
Among the chain of achievements will be added the Maestro
Shmuel and Ahuva Forest as a deserved tribute to the foremost
composer of Israel, whose songs give courage and inspiration to
past generations as well as to generations as yet unborn.
The Concert will take place on Wednesday, Jan. 20, in the
Theatre of the Performing Arts at 8 p.m. Tickets may be obtained
at the Box Office 673-7300.



Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 1, 1988
Penthouse Lures Miamian
Continued from Page 1-B
tkouse Vice-Chairman Kathy
Keeton. Keeton will be Guc-
cione's third wife.
Of Penthouse, "The Interna-
tional Magazine for Men,"
Orovitz says: "It wasn't a
magazine I ever looked at par-
ticularly. But at that time in
my life (when she joined the
magazine in 1983) I was
already committed to business
and from that perspective, the
product is somewhat irrele-
vant." Yet, she quickly adds,
"I don't think I could work for
a widget company."
When Orovitz first went to
work for Penthouse and the
company's other publications
- OMNI, Four-Wheeler,
Saturday Review and a hand-
ful of "men's sophisticate
magazines" she noticed that
every business appointment
she set up wanted to meet at
her office.
"And I couldn't unders-
tand," she says.
Now she does.
"It's because they thought
there'd be naked women runn-
ing around. (But) it's a
business. It's like any other
business. All of the
photography (of the nude
women) is done outside the
office."
Orovitz, a businesswoman,
worked her way through the
ranks of Penthouse quickly to
become vice president of
newsstand circulation. That is
an important position in a
publication such as Penthouse,
because its focus is on newss-
tand sales as opposed to
subscriptions and advertising,
Orovitz says.
SHE WAS at the helm of
newsstand circulation at a
time when her sales were be-
ing hurt. That became a
challenge.
"It has been an interesting
time period since I've been
there because of the govern-
ment push at the urging of the
fundamentalists to abolish por-
nography," Orovitz says.
"And what I've spent most
of my time doing in the past
few years is explaining to the
public what these religious
groups were really after
which is anything they don't
like, shouldn't exist. They're
opposed to all free speech
unless it is their own."
To begin with, says Orovitz,
there are no legal definitions
of what is pornographic.
"What is pornographic to you
is not necessarily por-
nographic to me," she says.
There are, however, laws
against obscenity and obsceni-
ty is not protected by the First
Amendment rights (to
freedom of speech and expres-
sion), she said. Penthouse,
although challenged in court
several times since it was
founded in 1965, has not been
ruled obscene, she says.
While opponents of the
magazine have a right to voice
their opinion, Orovitz says, the
problems in recent years faced
by Penthouse and other similar
magazines, stem from the
government, "especially our
attorney general (Edwin
Meese)/
Starting in 1985, the Meese
Commission on Pornography
held hearings that lasted about
a year. While Guccione was
busy representing his point of
view to the media, Orovitz was
busy representing the com-
pany's point of view to the ven-
dors who distributed the
magazine.
The Meese Commission
wrote 20 companies, including
the Southland Corporation
which owns 7-Eleven stores,
letters which said the com-
panies had been named in the
commission's interviews as be-
ing among the largest
distributors of pornography in
the country. Did the com-
panies have a response?
AT THAT point, Southland
and other companies stopped
carrying magazines such as
Playboy and Penthouse.
"That hurt my sales," pro-
tests Orovitz.
Penthouse, she says, "is a
mainstream magazine. It has
lots in it besides nude women."
A recent issue for example,
has articles on Soviet Jewry,
pop-star Michael Jackson, fic-
tion by William F. Buckley,
Jr., and commentary by Har-
vard Law School professor
Alan M. Dershowitz.
Orovitz says she spent much
Community Notes
Cantor Rachelle Nelson, of Temple Israel of Greater
Miami, has had published her original wedding com-
position "Ana Dodl" for solo voice and keyboard bv
Transcontinental Music Publication.
v.H?d.!8h M*** c,rcte of ^nt E*t will present a
Yiddish program on Thursday, Jan. 7,1 p.m. In the Row
SamueJRoom. Jacob Blank will speak on "The Ufe of
the Author of the Hatlkvah." Leon Yudoff and Oscar
Shapiro will entertain. Admission Is free.
r^S? t? If un?y F60^6" m*y tne conclusion
reached by the B'nai B'rlth Key Biscayne Lodge
[nsfnpers and guests as they laugh with Bob
Handeisman on an odyssey of observation, story and
?iS^^fr?!!^.bor^t t0 tn KS5 during
^9&L**J?" f"*MP? are Pissed to announce
he birth of twin daughters Elans Sara and Meryl
8 Z i5 P6/?66' ^ Proud grandparents are
aSySSfSS ^U,man f SH""SH and Gwen
and Morton Weinberger of Kendall.
of her time explaining to the
companies named in the Meese
Commission report that the
letter it distributed was not
legal. Since then, she notes, a
federal court in Washington,
D.C. has ruled that the Meese
Commission letter must be
retracted.
"But there was so much
publicity, damage was already
done," Orovitz contends. "I
had to make sure the stores
understood Penthouse
magazine had never been
found obscene and the com-
plaints were from a small
group of people who were not
representative of their
customers."
Southland Corporation has
still not restored distribution
of Penthouse in its stores
although other independently
owned 7-Eleven franchises did
not stop distributing the copies
from the start, she said. In the
past year, the trend among
retailers has been to reinstate
Penthouse," she says.
In further insight into Pen-
thouse, Orovitz points out that
"these women (who pose)
aren't forced into doing this.
They are paid for it. And it br-
ings them a fair amount of
fame which they hope fortune
will follow. And if you find it
offensive, don't buy it. Nobody
is forcing anybody to pose or
buy it. And I don't think it's
degrading to the women. If
anything, it elevates them to
being famous."
Orovitz said she wouldn't see
anything wrong with posing
for the magazine herself,
although she never has.
"Let me say, I'm too old and
my body's not what it used to
be," says Orovitz, whose con-
servative dress and business-
like comportment belie her
willingness to pose.
WHAT WOULD HER rabbi
say about all this, she is asked?
"One of the reasons I found
out rabbis were human, is
when I was 16,1 went to SEF-
TY (the Reform Southeastern
Federation of Temple Youth)
Camp. And I walked into a
faculty lounge and there were
four or five of them reading
Playboy. And I remember
questioning one of them about
how he could be a rabbi and
read Playboy. He said, 'We're
people like anyone else.
There's nothing wrong with
sexuality.' He explained that
he had a wife and children."
Orovitz says she and her
younger brother saw the
magazines as children and that
she does not believe they can
sexually pervert youth.
"There's never been a
sociological study that showed
a clear connection between
sexual violence and any kind of
nudity," she says. "The same
studies tha these religious fun-
damentalists use to make their
point, I use to make mine."
Penthouse does "advocate
strongly that no one underage
be sold this magazine," she
says. "And if lads are getting
hold of it, they're doing it by
parental choice."
Asked why the magazine has
sexually explicit pictures of
women, Orovitz explains: "It's
a sexually-oriented magazine
It's intended to explore sex
ualitjr and hopefully to make
their own sexuality.
"If you have a religious
belief that's against sexuality
then this is certainly nothing
for you. I have no idea of what
the statistics are (but) most
women do not have religious
taboos."
Orovitz draws from an
analogous situation that she
finds offensive: the rise of
Nazism and Nazi demonstra-
tions in the past five to 10
years. "But I also think they
should be able to voice their
opinion," she says.
"I MEAN, it's a tough one.
It's that gray area as to
whether you are harming
another person. I believe my
magazines are not harming
any human being. I am not so
sure about the concept of
Nazism."
Penthouse was itself the
target of national media again
in recent weeks but not
because of the First Amend-
ment issue. The reason for the
attention is an exclusive cover
story in its January issue, call-
ed, "I was Jessica Hahn's
Madam."
"The story says Hahn claim-
ed she was a virgin when she
was raped by Bakker," Orovitz
says. "We broke the story that
she worked for a madam on
Long Island as a prostitute
long before" the Bakker scan-
dal decimated televangelism.
Hahn denied the story,
Orovitz said, and her attorneys
called Penthouse prior to its
publication threatening legal
battles if it was run.
It was the madam who came
to Penthouse magazine with
the story, Orovitz confides.
And she points to a certain
irony about the whole situa-
tion. "We are denigrating the
truthfulness of a woman who
brought down a right-wing
fundamentalist group which
preaches against us."
Orovitz says she was let in
on the story before it ran
because it was her job to help
decide whether the article
warranted extra copies for
distribution. "I didn't feel it
was necessary," she says.
Hahn, she adds, is now living
at the Playboy mansion and is
doing a third story for Playboy
Magazine. Penthouse was in
the bidding for the Jessica
Hahn story itself.
"We dropped out of the bid-
ding because we felt she didn't
have anything to say that
hadn't already been reported.
And it was not worth the
money she was asking." The
asking price, reportedly, was
upwards of one million dollars.
MARCIA Orovitz was born
in Miami Beach and moved to
South Miami with her family
when she was in the seventh
grade She was graduated
from Palmetto Senior High.
After graduating from Nor-
thwestern University with a
bachelor of science degree in
journalism in 1969, Orovitz
went to Boston hoping to find
a job on a newspaper.
"It was a bad economic time
and there weren't many iobs
EftMfv recalls. US,
took the job at Jordan Marsh
and shared an apartment with
a female friend to help reduce
uvmg expenses. Their mat-
tresses were on the floor, they
SJJJ* P**ic forks and fJ
niture was sparse.
'.'/.friend of my father's
said, 'Does your father kr?ow
yes, Orovitz recounts. "I waj
Then came the conflicts over
the company's refusal to show
cleavage and use the word bra.
Besides, Orovitz says, after
two and a half years she
couldn't get the job she wanted
with the company, and so she
quit. Today, Orovitz has a mor-
tgage on a New York apart-
ment, but the 70s were days
when she had no financial
obligations and the world was
hers for the shaping.
She had quit her job at Jor-
dan Marsh without having
another lined up. "As luck
would have it," she secured a
position thereafter as advertis-
ing director for an alternative
weekly newspaper called
Boston After Dark. It was
1971. The paper was five-
years-old and it was similar in
stature to New York's ViUaat
Voice. ^
She admits now she fibbed a
bit to get the job, telling them
she knew how to type. She
paid for that fib by working
after hours finger-pecking her
work at a painfully slow pace.
She would have learned to
type if the typing course she
signed up for in the eighth
grade had not been full. So she
chose another elective -
journalism.
BUT SHE never did work as
staff writer for Boston After
Dark. She worked in the
business end and did it well.
She worked her way through
jobs as assistant to the
publisher and managing
editor. Her company eventual-
ly bought out a failing Cam-
bridge paper called the Cam-
bridge Phoenix and renamed
the paper to The Boston
Phoenix.
In 1974, she returned to
Miami to open up a new paper
modeled after the Boston
paper. For one year, she work-
ed as editor and publisher of
The Miami Phoenix.
"There just wssn't the in-
terest," she explains of its
shut-down after 12 months.
"It couldn't get national
advertising and people were
just not that interested."
She returned to Boston and
the Phoenix and subsequently
stayed there for a total of 13
years. Working at the paper,
which had s 125,000 weekly
circulation that has since in-
creased, she worked her way
up to associate publisher and
vice president.
"It was s labor of love. I
should have left years earlier
for financial reasons but I
didn't. Since I've left there,
I've done much better finan-
cially," she says.
It had been an exciting place
to work and many of the
writers moved on from the
Phoenix to publications such as
the New York Times.
THEN ONE day, she was
discussing s career change and
move to New York with a
family friend. The friend said
she knew someone in
publishing in New York but ex-
plained the contact was at Pen-
thouse magazine. After three
different interviews with sue
Penthouse officials, the com-
Emade an offer that ap-
d to Qrovitz director of
llation, Planning and
Promotion.
"My father is not at all un-
comfortable with my working
at Penthouse," she now says of
her business-world journey.
"He says i'm successful in
business. I have relatives who
would rather that I work for
Vogue or Time, Inc. but that
wouldn't change" tt


Friday, January 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
_ .1
Twenty-two top biomedical researchers from
the U.S. and Israel shared new findings on the
process of infection when they -met at the se-
cond annual Rockefeller University Weiz-
mann Institute of Science symposium, held in
I New York in early December. Shown here bet-
ween sessions on the Rockefeller campus are
cell biologist Prof. Varda Rotter, left, and
parasitologist Prof. David Mirelman, center,
both of the Weizmann Institute, and
bacteriologist Prof. Vincent A. Fischetti,
right, of Rockefeller University.
><^
Weizmann Institute of Science's Florida
Region Dinner/Dance was attended by Weiz-
mann officials, from left, Gottlieb Hammer,
one of die original founders of the Institute,
who received the 1987 Weizmann Award in
Sciences and Humanities; Norman D. Cohen,
chairman emeritus of the American Commit-
tee; Hanan Bar-On, vice president for Inter-
national Operations and Public Relations;
and Bernard N. Samers, executive vice presi-
dent of the American Committee.
Extremists Win University Seats
GAZA (INB) Moslem
fanatics last week won a
[sweeping victory in women's
jstudent elections at the
[Islamic University here.
The extremist Islamic Bloc
captured all of the seats on the
women's student council, tak-
ing more than 75 percent of
the vote.
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torak Portion
.. "And Israel stretched out his right hand, and laid it upon
Ephraim's head, who was the younger, and his left hand upon
Manasseh's head"
(Genesis 48. U)
VAYEHI
VAYEHI Jacob lived in Egypt 17 years. On his death bed, he
blessed his sons, predicting the destiny of the tribes that were to
descend from each of them. Ephraim and Manasseh, Joseph's two
sons, were included in the roster of Jacob's sons, the heads of
future tribes. Jacob died; the Egyptian physicians embalmed his
body, after the custom of the country. Jacob was buried in the
land of Canaan, in the Cave of Machpelah, together with his
ancestors. Joseph continued to provide for his brothers after their
father's death. Before his own death, Joseph made his brothers
swear that when they returned to Canaan they would take his
bones with them to the Promised Land; Joseph died; meanwhile,
his embalmed body was placed in a coffin, awaiting the return to
Canaan.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion ol the Law It extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History ot the Jewish Heritage." edited by P. Wollmen-
Ttamlr, $15, published by Shengold. The volume la available at 75 Maiden
lane, New York, N.Y. 10036 Joseph Schlang Is president ot the society
distributing the volume.)
A party known as the Rafik
Salimi Bloc named after an
Arab terrorist killed during an
attack on Israelis won 17
percent of the vote. Leaders of
the Salimi group have followed
in their idol's footsteps:
former Salimi Bloc head
Mustafa Abu-Ghuleh is serving
a five-year prison term for
PLO activity, and the current
head of the Bloc, Mohammed
Dahlan, was expelled from
Israel earlier this year because
of his ties to a terror cell.
All of the parties that cam-
paigned in the Islamic Univer-
sity election endorsed the PLO
and the need for violence
against Israel. The election
campaign focused primarily on
points of religious ideology.
The election results seem to
confirm the growing trend
towards Islamic nationalist ex-
tremism in the Gaza Strip. In
recent months, underground
Moslem terror cells have
recruited many young Gaza
Arabs and stepped up their
terrorist attacks against
.Israel. -.-,., -, ,'. .... i w
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
5:21 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Metid.an Avenue
Miami Beach, Fla.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig
531-2120
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947 1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Zvi Roien Conservative
Executive Director
Harry J. Sllverman
m
DaHy Mlnyen 7:30 a.m and 5 p.m
sat Service ; 30 m. and **8 p.m
Frl 1p.m. Sat i:30a.m Sar Mrtnah
Oary Okrent, Soviet twin
AJeianderPysktleky "
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendell Dr.
S. Miami BS7-BBI7
Leonard 9cNeolmen, Sr. Rabbi
Mar* Kram, Associate Rabbi
Lynn Goldstein, Assistant Rabbi
Frl irt 5 p.m. Adult Senrfce.
Rabbi Lynn OoMsMe win speak.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S W 3rd Avenue
Jack Riemer. Rabbi
Robert Albert.
Cantor
Rev. Milton Freeman.
Ritual Director
854-3911
Dally eentcee. Mon. and Thura. 7:30 a.m.
Tuee.. Wed. and Frl 7:46 a.m.
Sun. ( a.m. Etenmga 5:30 p.m.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Sftmuet
1700 Michigan Ave., Miami Beach
534-7213 534-7214
Barry J. Konovitch, Rabbi '*>
r
i Epetbeum, President
Soroto Probes. Preekooni
SnONHTl I
m
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Mismi Beach


Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Assistant Rabtol Ronnie Cahan
Yehuda Shltmsn. Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
UkaFn.Sscv.tMLl
< Cento.
Sat sere. St-aa.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Flnetree Drive, Miami Beach
532-4421
Cantor, A abb. Sosomon ScMrf
7:3
Frl
|tm a Traere. 7:11, a 7 sa
7p.m Set Be.m
TWKI4>Wl
of r
Ft.
rat**
sVl7>8fM0
117 N.I. 19*91
IBBN.ltasalsJ.Or.
D.
.erkseVeF.
Cantor Emerttue
Jacob G Bernstein
Frl S p.m. BabM Be> 0. Ferlmeter
"Qeneela and January: Looking Both Waya.'
Cantor Jacob 0. Bomateln
YOUNG ISRAEL OF SUNNY ISLES
17274 Colllne Avenue
Miami Beach Fl. 33180 947-1191
HHlel Price, PreeMent
Rubin R. Dobln.
Sat. Service 5 a.m.
Rabbi Dobln arlll apeak
TEMPLE JUDEA
5600 Granada Brvd
Corel Gabies
Michael B. Easenetat,
Frl. aerty eentce 8:30 p m
M75M7
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Ad Tel S14-9779
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Shoananeh Raab, Cantor
iFri. 7:J8p.m
SaifcSeaja. _
OOsjej 9t%6k6)>6Mt W*M fwBBsaj
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami, FL 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs. Rabbi
Dr. Joseph A. Gortinkel, if
Rabbi Emeritus \
Moshe Frledter, Csntor
m
Fri 8 p.m.
Sat 3:45em
Weekday aer. Kon.-Frl. S a.m.
Mon. Thura 5 p.m. Sun 3:30 a m
Sal 8 45am
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Aivadla Rosenberg
Cantor Moshe Buryn
Dally Service a.m. and S p.m.
Saturday i:30 a.m.
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W 120th Street
238-2801 r.A
Rabbi David H Auerbach { W )
Cantor Stephen Freedman
Batafttnah
pm Sat
Amende
Butt) Ma talon
wzmm
OM 536-7231
OH LEONKBOftNSH.S
0ABV A. OLrCKSTUN,
MABB Y JOLT, AuxSkary Babel
JASON QWAS0OFF. Aaelelant BabM
IAN ALPEBH. Canto.
DAVID CON VISE B. Canto, Emortlue
Frl. 8:15 BabM Ovaaedefl
Sat. 1*48 a.m.
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Mismi Beach Blvd.
Or Max A. Lipschitz. Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director

Dally aentcea Monday through Friday
7:30am and5:30p.m.
Fit. p m
atlncne 5 p.m. Sun. Sam. end 5 30 p m
TEMPLE MENOMAH
620-7Sth St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowlti
Ari Frtdkls, Assoc Rabbi (
Cantor Murray Yavneri
Sat. Be* SateaSh eentoe.
Oeay kaVtcneb iiisj Filda
S a.m. sad (p.m
Sat. la.m and Hip m
m
9833
TEMPLE NER TAMtD
7902 Cartyte Ave.,
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz ^>
Cantor Edward Klein f tt)
0efc> Sen. kten,Frl. 8 a.m 8:30 p.m -^ '
Sot Mtoche 8:15 p.m Sun. S'30s.m.
B30p.m. Set.: i. 45 a.m aarr bv Babbl LabovlU.
Canto. Klein
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
861-1562
Yaakov Sprung
SHAARE TEFILLAH
TORAH CENTER OF KE-OALL
7880 SW 112 Street ,t^ .
232-6833 X2^
Rabbi Her she I Becker
Dotty Son. 7 a.m. Frl 10 earn, aftor
Hgfrttoa time Shebboe t a.m "
MfcachelO
Sun 8:30 am
TEMPLE SINAIi 19901 NE 22 Ave.
Mortt> DtKto % Rtvfotin Cooof^Qaiftof>
Ralph P. Kingsley. Rabbi 9329010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrstor
Fii. Sbrvlce p m. Sat Sen. 10:30 a.m.
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Or. Conservative
271-2311 ^j.x
Dr Norman N Shapiro. Rabbi 'f J
Beniamin Adler. Cantor *Mr
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Mlnyan 7 am Mondaya and Tburadaya
Sunday a.m. Frl. kit p.m
Sal San t am. Babbl Shapiro arxl
Cantor Adtor olllclallng


Page 6-B The Jewiah rToridlan/Friday, January 1,1968
Community Corner
8'nai B'rtth Sholem Lodge 1024 will install Its of-
ficers and trustees Sunday, Jan. 10 at 10:30 a.m. at the
Hiiiei Jewish Student Center at the University of Miami.
Beth Israel Congregation will continue its Cultural
Series on Sunday, Jan. 3, at 10 a.m. with guest speaker
Joseph Rsckman, who will discuss "An American Jew
Visits Germany of Today."
The Nachman Ariuck Cultural Club will meet Mon-
day, Jan. 11,1:30 p.m., in American Ssvlngs Bank. Lec-
turer Moishe Becker will discuss Saul Chemichovsky.
Rosa Lusky will read and recite from the Yiddish
Masters. Reglna Beilln will sing Yiddish and Hebrew,
with Helen Skolnick as accompaniment.
The South Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry will
meet on Tuesday, Jan. 12, 7:30 p.m. at the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation to hear first person reports
and view video tapes of Summit Sunday.
The Women's Division of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation is offering women In the community an op-
portunity to see firsthand, some of the community
agencies the Federation helps to support. On Wednes-
day, Jan. 27, from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., a bus tour will
visit the Douglas Gardens Community Mental Health
Center and the Miami Beach Jewish Community
Center. For Information, 578-4000, ext. 230.
The Miami Beach Jewish Community Center, for the
sixth year, is sponsoring a series of lectures by Rabbi
Dr. and Mrs. Melr Felman, on "Great Jewish Per-
sonalities of the Holocaust." The one-hour lectures will
be held on alternate Wednesday mornings at 10:30
beginning Jan. 6.
Yiddish Branch No. 679 Workmen's Circle will hold a
gala Concert on Sunday, Jan. 17, at 1 p.m. at the Seville
Beach Hotel. Guest entertainers will be Jaime Brons-
tein Klezmer Band, featuring Canadian singer Bracha
Shlien, in a program of Yiddish songs. For reservations.
947-7889 or 931-1622.
The Parents of Suicides meet the second Monday of
each month at the South Dade Jewish Community
Center at 7:30 p.m. For information, 251-1394, 595-5583.
Rabbi David Saltzman's Thursday morning Bible
Seminar will begin Jan. 7, at 9:30 a.m. at the Aventura
Tumberry Jewish Center. No Hebrew knowledge is re-
quired. For information, 935-0666
Temple Menorah Sisterhood's regular meeting will
be held on Wednesday, Jan. 13, at noon, at the temple.
A Beauty Fair and Mini Lunch will be held. For informa-
tion, 865-6568
David Shneyer Is a teacher and singer of Hassidic,
Israeli, Yiddish, Ladino, and American Jewish folk
music and a funder of the Fabrengen Community In
Washington, DC. He will be at Havurah of S. Florida
Saturday morning, 9:30-noon, at the Hlllel House of the
University of Miami and on Saturday evening at 8 p.m.
home of Rabbi Mitchell Chefttz. For information,
086-7349.
A cantorial concert featuring Cantors Ane Braun and
Jeffrey Nadel will be held at the Hebrew Academy on
Monday, Jan. 18 at 7:30 p.m. Braun serves as chief can-
tor of the Israel Defense Forces. For information,
532-6421.
Winter Semester of Adult Education classes at the
Hebrew Academy will begin on Jan. 19 and continue
through March 8. Classes ranging from computers to
cooking and from Talmud to Yiddish are being offered
to the public. All classes will be taught by Instructors
of the Hebrew Academy. Registration is in person or bv
calling 532-6421. '
The Young Israel of Sunny Isles will accept and
dedicate an historic Torah Scroll to Its use on Sunday
Jan. 3, at 12:30 p.m. The Torah Scroll had been in the
possession of a rabbinic family in Hungary for close to
200 years. When the Hungarian Jews were taken to the
Nazi concentration camps the head of the family decid-
ed to secrete the Torah and take It with him to the
camps. The Torah concentration camps of Dachau
Matthausen, and Majdanek. After the defeat of the Nazi
armies the surviving members of the family brought the
Torah Scroll with them to Israel. It is being presented to
the Young Israel of Sunny Isles as a memorial to the
late Shimon Blatman.
. 'Y.V.
-''> ....-. .
BERGMAN-BAREN
Milton and Gloria Baren and
Philip and Shelley Bergman an-
nounce the marriage of their
children Michelle Baren and
Steven Bergman.
The couple were married on
Saturday, Nov. 28, at Temple
Zion, Miami. Officiating were Rab-
bi David Auerbach and Cantor
Stephen Freedman of Bet Shira
Congregation.
The bride was attended by her
sister, Susan Nelson, and by Cara
Nation. Best man was David
Bergman, brother of the groom.
Steven Singer and David Presnell
served as ushers.
Following a honeymoon trip to
London, England, the couple will
reside in West Kendall.
Mr. aad Mrs. Steven Bergman
Traveling with a Yuppie
Match Service
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
"Single people may be suc-
cessful, fulfilled and happy,
but they're probably not happy
being single," states Dr.
Mordechai Friedman, himself
unmarried, who has founded
an organization to help Jewish
singles all over the world.
Friedman, a 42-year-old
Israeli, runs a movement call-
ed Tandu (Aramaic for
"together"), which he believes
uses a professional approach
to introduce young Jewish peo-
ple to each other.
"In this world of profes-
sionalism you would consult a
engineer for an engineering
problem," Friedman aays.
'Yet the most important issue
for the future of the Jewish
people founding a family
ib left to chance."
Friedman cites Jewish inter-
marriage figures, the low
Jewish birthdate and forecasts
of the decline of the world
Jewish population to illustrate
his concern.
Eventually he hopes local
Jewish federations will come
to involve themselves directly
in matchmaking.and that Tan-
du will coordinate their ac-
tivities. "It is really the burden
of the Jewish community to
save its own," he says.
Friedman does not see his
world Jewish singles club as a
conventional matchmaking
organization. For a start, he
says, it is non-profit, and its
aim is to form friendships
through group activities.
Friedman's first Tandu ven-
ture was last August a tour
of Poland and Hungary for
single Jews aged 24-45. The
trip was planned for "max-
imum interaction," Friedman
recalls.
Friedman selected 24 unat-
tached Jews from among the
people who had responded to
M newspapers and tmmmm in
the United States. Britain,
Switzerland and Israel. They
joined him in on an 18-day tour
in search of their roots.
The tour's rigorous schedule
included daily seminars on the
Holocaust. Zionism, Hasidism
and Jewish humor. The group
members ate together and
became acquainted, so that by
the time they visited
Auschwitz, deliberately late in
the program, they knew each
other well enough to be able to
share the experience.
Four couples grew out of
that group, Friedman says
with satisfaction.
Friedman plans more Tandu
tours for the coming year, with
trips to Egypt, Kenya and
Turkey already detailed in
Tandu's winter-spring '88
brochure. Tne unifying factor
in the vacations will also be
their Jewiah content, Fried-
man says.
And in addition, Tandu is of-
fering an Israeli add-on
package trip for vacationers
who want to extend their holi-
day with a week's stay in
Israel. During that week, Tan-
du arranges standard sightsee-
ing trips as well as meeting
with Israelis in similar profes-
sions to those of the tour
members.
Tandu tours are Jewish in
orientation and content, but
are not religious although
the individual religious prac-
tices of the participants r
respected. Kosher and
vegetarian foods are available
and no out-of-town traveling is
planned for the group on the
Ssbbath. "That is pluralism,"
r nedman states.
But the emphasis on one of
Tandu s activities this year
will be religious. The organiza-
tion is planing a singles
Passover in Israel with trips
Partaes and sporting activities!
and two "seders" conducted
Ll^rS^?d Fried,nM
^k^^'* *dd*OD
tuMthero^rkatioM,iaan
accomplished cantor.
With a doctorate from Col-
umbia University in organiza-
tional behavior and a master's
from Brandeis in Jewish com-
munal services, Friedman is
well-equipped for his new task.
An education officer during his
army service. Friedman later
expanded his interest in young
people during four of his years
in the United States, when he
headed the Institute of
Students and Faculty on Israel
explaining Israel's case at
campuses across the country.
But he is most excited by
Tandu's latest venture,
scheduled to start in February
He ia planning to embark on a
more direct form of mat-
chmaking in addition to the
group vacations.
Tandu has hired experienced
interviewers and psychologists
to screen applicants from
Jewiah communities all over
the world. They will try to
match people according to age
and background, but will in-
troduce them in informal
gatherings of four to sue
people.
'Many single people need to
be given a push to meet other
singles," Friedman says, "but
they don't want to be patroniz-
ed or pressured." He also
stresses the importance of
follow-up meetings.
Membership dues will be
enough to cover the costs, but,
Friedman insists, he is not in
the business to make money.
He has already been approach-
ed by Jewish social groups for
single people, and his com-
puter lists are swelling.
Gordon Roofing
and Sheet Metal
Works, Inc.
1450 NW21$t Street
Phone 325-8287
Havt your roofrtpairtd nou .
you uiU taut on a ntu roofUtttr
Satisfactory Work by .
Enperieneed Men
n


Na'amat KS4 Hadassah Events
Friday, January 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
A film depicting the af-
_station, reclamation and
velopment of the land of
_ 1 and a talk on a personal
it to Israel will take place at
e Monday, Jan. 4, 1 p.m.
ting of the Eilat Chapter
Na'amat USA in the civic
_ditorium of Financial
ederal Savings and Loan
iation, 755 Washington
ve., Miami Berach.
Leo Kacew, a member of
iends of Na'amat (men's
ivision) will speak about his
urs to the Na'amat
stallations.
The new film on the reclama-
tion of the land will be
[resented by the Jewish Na-
tional Fund.
Musical entertainment will
light the Annual Sunday
irunch hosted by the liana
Chapter of Na'amat USA Sun-
ay, Jan. 10,10:30 a.m. in the
cial club room of Winston
Tower 500.
A Jewish humorist will be on
ap at the regular monthly
neeting of the Dana Chapter
tf Na'amat USA to be held
iiesday, Jan. 5 at 11:30 a.m.
at the social auditorium of
/inston Tower 300, Sunny
llsles.
For information on all
levents, 935-0361.
Hatikvah Hadassah will be
having its chapter meeting
Thursday, Jan. 14 at 7:30 p.m.
at Temple Israel of Greater
Miami, Kendall branch.
Speaker Dr. Glenn Salkind will
discuss PMS-syndrome.
Hatikvah's Woman of the Year
will be announced. For infor-
mation, 255-7120.
Morton Towers Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its next
regular meeting on Monday,
Jan. 11 in the Auditorium of
1500 Bay Road, 1 p.m. For in-
formation, 534-5754.
Renanah Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its first
meeting of 1988 on Monday,
Jan. 11 at Hadassah Region
Headquarters, 300 71st St. at
11 a.m. with a break for mini-
lunch at noon.
Karen Wolstein, aqua exer-
cise instructress at Fon-
tainebleau Spa will
demonstrate and instruct on
general and special-needs
exercise.
Bay Harbor Chapter of
The Miami Region of Hadassah celebrated its
annual Big Gifts Brunch at the Doral On the
Ocean, Sunday, Dec. IS, in honor of Israel's
40th Anniversary. Seated, from left, Emma
Retchin, guest speaker; Mildred Riesenberg,
Region president; Saul Riesenberg, Lillyan
Peckett, Region Founders chairman, and
Sidney Peckett. Standing, from left, Maurice
Noble, Pearl Noble, Shirley Grossman and
Arthur Grossman.
Hadassah will have its regular
monthly meeting on Tuesday,
Jan. 12 at Bay Harbor Town
Hall, 12:30 p.m.
An Eye Bank Luncheon and
Card Party will be held at
Carlton Terrace, Tuesday,
Jan. 26 at noon. For informa-
tion, 864-3203.
Jewish Education Day will
be held at Eden Roc Hotel,
Monday, Jan. 25. For reserva-
tions, 864-9252.
The I.R. Goodman Chapter
of Hadassah will hold its
regular monthly meeting on
Tuesday, Jan. 12 at 1 p.m. at
the American Savings Bank
Building, Lincoln and Alton
Roads.
The project
"Hanhachar/Young Judaea"
will be featured.
The next Oneg Shabbat will
be held on Saturday, Jan. 9.
Bessie Lepow will host the
function at the Forte Towers
Building No. 1200.
You'll Laugh" "You'll Cry" "You'll Kvell" "You'll Love It" Don Nelson Daily News
Xt^23 "88"
acclaimed INTERNATIONAL
YIDDISH-ENGLISH-REVUE
it
State Rep. Elaine Bloom,
Deputy Majority Leader of the
Florida House of Represen-
tatives, has been appointed
chairman of the Alliance Divi-
sion for the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation'* 1988 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal This
Federation division concen-
trates on the coordination of
high-rises, condominiums and
UniHrise complexes throughout
Dade County.
O "Sheer Delight Arnold Fine, Jewish Press
O "Refreshing" .Martin Schaeffer, Back Stage
*> Acclaimed by N.Y. Daily News & New York Post
TiniiiitiillllllflflllliHrTTTTT^
STARRING THE ONE AND ONLY
JACKIE JACOB
FAMOUS YIDDISH "BOMBSHELL"
and an ALL STAR CAST IN COMEDY SONG DANCE!
also featuring THE L'CHAIM CHILDREN!
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COSTUME DESIGN, CHOREOGRAPHY & DIRECTION by EBER LOBATO
at the NOTOWITZ AUDITORIUM
21st ST. RECREATION CENTER
21st ST. & WASHINGTON AVE.
MIAMI BEACH
EVERY WEDNESDAY
MATINEE PERFORMANCES ONLY AT 2P.M.
JAN. 6th & 20th Feb. 3rd & 17th
Mar. 2nd & 16th
TICKETS MAY
BE PURCHASED BY PHONE
call: 947-8575
c
ALL TICKETS $10.00^
ONLY pluttax^4
Group Rates Available
TICKETS WILL ALSO BE AVAILABLE
AT THE BOX OFFICE DAY OF PERFORMANCE
Nancy Lipoff, a vice president
of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, has been installed
os a vice-chairwoman of the
Women's Division of the Coun-
cil of Jewish Federation (CJF).
CJF is the central organiza-
tion providing consultation
o-nd support to local federa-
tions throughout North
A1

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UNCH OR DINNER & THEATRE SPECIAL!
SAVE $3.00 OFF ANY COMBINATION
OF LUNCH OR DINNER AT WOLFIE'S
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anoiiMJillaliP lariJoejdjd -".civ-'.


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 1, 1988
Deaths
Dr. Joseph Lichten
Dr. Joseph I. Lichten, head
of the Anti-Defamation'
League of B'nai B'rith's
liaison office to the Vatican
from 1971 until his retirement
in the fall of 1986, died of
natural causes at his home in
Rome. He was 81.
Lichten was designated by
Pope John Paul II in August
1986 as "Knight Commander
of the Pontifical Equestrian
Order of St. Gregory the
Great" for his more than four
decades of leadership in
building mutual understanding
between Catholics and Jews.
Canadian War
Crimes Trial
Postponed
By MICHAEL SOLOMON
TORONTO (JTA) A
hearing on war crimes charges
against Imre Finta, the first
Canadian citizen to face pro-
secution in Canada for crimes
committed on foreign soil, has
been postponed until Jan. 13.
The Hungarian-bom Finta
appeared briefly in federal
court here Dec. 18, when the
postponement was announced.
He was arrested Dec. 9 in
Hamilton, Ontario, and is free
on $100,000 (Canadian) bail.
Finta, identified as a former
captain in the Honveds, a
police force in Nazi-controlled
Hungary during World War II,
is accused of confining 8,615
Jews in concentration camps
and also of manslaughter in
the deaths of an unspecified
number in the Hungarian city
of Szeged, between April 7 and
July 15, 1944.
The Order, founded by Pope
Gregory XVI in 1831, rewards
individuals regardless of their
religious beliefs "for con-
spicuous virtue and notable
accomplishment on behalf of
the Roman Catholic church
and society."
Dr. Lichten joined the
League in 1945 in New York
as director of the agency's In-
tercultural Affairs Depart-
ment. In that capacity, he in-
itiated the first Catholic-
Jewish interfaith dialogue in
the United States.
FINKEL, Mayer, 72 of North Miami Beach.
December 29. Levitt-Weinstein. Inter-
ment at lakeside Memorial Park.
GOULD. Anna. 93 of North Miami,
December 29. Service* and interment at
Mt. Nebo Cemetery
Jl'DIN. Philip E.. 78 of Miami. December
28. Eternal Light Interment at Lakeside
Memorial Park.
BONISKE, Morris. 67 of North Miami
Beach, December 28. Levitt Weinstein
Interment at Mt Nebo Cemetery.
SOBLE, Fay of Miami Beach. Rubin-
ZUbert. Interment at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
Gulfstream
Upgrades
Three Gulfstream Park
stakes have been upgraded
from their ranking in 1987 and
another stakes was added to
Graded status to bring to 14
the number of Graded stakes
to be contested during the Jan.
8-March 5 racing season.
Gulfstream leads all Florida
tracks in number of Graded
stakes.
The action was taken at the
Dec. 1 meeting of the Graded
Stakes Committee in New
York.
The revisions include the
Donn Handicap elevated to a
Grade I, the Bonnie Miss to
Grade II and the Rampart
Handicap to Grade II. Addi-
tionally, the Shirley Jones
Handicap will be a Grade III
for the first time in 1988.
Through years o! dedicated service,
we have become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH "THE ASSURED PLAN"
LARRIE S. BLASBERG IRA M. BLASBERG MICHAEL C BLASBERG
FUNERAL DiRECtOR
Pasi PrejiOem Jemisn f unerai
Directors o< Ametic*
/20SEVEN! FIRST STREET
Funeral Director
865-2353
Funeral Director
MIAMI BE ACM FLORIDA UM

oA
ie\
*1
FRANK, Cidell of North Miami Beach.
December 26. Menorah Chapels.
CALIS, Mrs. Sylvia of Miami Beach. Rubin
ZUbert
KOSEINGER, Veronika. 64 of Miami
Beach, December 25. The Riverside.
FIRST, Ruth, 93 of North Miami. December
26. Eternal Lifht.
KELMAN, Joseph. 80 of North Miami
Beach, December 27. Levitt-Weinstein.
Interment at Lakeside Cemetery.
NEEDLE. Mildred of Miami Beach. Rubin
ZUbert
PEROFF, Sam of Miami. Rubin-ZUbert.
RABE. Dora Aaron, 103 of Miami,
December 26. Graveside services and in-
terment were held at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
GOLDBERGER, Sam, 78 of Miami,
December 26. The Riverside.
KOCH, Ann Weinstein. December 25.
Blasberg Chapel.
MORA, Sally Ann, 61 of Miami, December
26. The Riverside. Interment at Star of
David Memorial Park.
WALDMAN, Lillian of Nianu. Menorah
Chapels. Lakeside Memorial Park.
MINES, Irvine, 87 of North Miami Beach.
Services held in New Jersey.
HALBERG. Eita, 84 of Miami. December
27. The Riverside. Interment at Mt Nebo
Cemetery.
SIRESKY, Arlene, 39 of Miami. Services
were held.
DON, Bertha of Miami Beach. Rubin
ZUbert.
LEVITT. Stanley I., 66 of Miami, December
22. The Riverside.
LUBOW, Nathan, of North Miami,
December 21. Services in New Jersey.
PEARL, Barnett, 87 of Miami, December
22. Services were held.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dadc County
5.12 2(H)*,
Broward County
532-28W
Represented by Riverside Memorial Chapel, Inc.
New York: (718) 268-7600 Qu*M Blvd. & Trith Kd.. Forest Hills. NY
RUBIN-ZILBERT
DADE
538-6371
BROWARD
920*6660
ZILBERT-RUBIN
The Spirit
Of Our Tradition
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Dignity simplicity' andeconomy aret/.x- mandates
of Scripture Lakeside Memorial Park upl.X)lds the tra-
ditions ofJeuisJ.) burial in a Ix-autiful, intelligent l\
designed setting
lakeside the only memorial park in tt* south that
was created to meet the needs of eivry Jewish family.
Please call for a tour of A
our Garden of Heroes, an W
innoi ation in aboi e-ground
hunal modeled after tin.- BwL J
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Telephones: Dade 305/948-9900 Broward 305/761,8800
Sponsored in cooperation with Lakeside Memorial Park


Soccer Slurs
Friday, January 1, 1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
AMSTERDAM (JTA) -
I Four fans of a Rotterdam soc-
|cer team have been fined the
[equivalent of $75 to $200 each
for shouting anti-Semitic
[epithets during a match played
(last March.
The fans, supporters of the
"evenoord soccer club, also
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name L'ESSENCE at 8150
SW 8 St. No. 118 Miami, FL 33144
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Edgar A. Valencia
16921 SW 87 Ct.
Miami. FL 33157
18207 January 1,8,15, 22.1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of SUN INVESTORS
at number 201 Crandon
Boulevard, in the City of Key Bis
cayne, Florida, 33149 intends to
register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this 23
day of December, 1987.
ALAN RICHTER 100* interest
Attorney for Applicant
ALBERT W. GUFFANTI, P.A.
ATTORNEY AT LAW
COCONUT GROVE BANK
BLDG. SUITE 306
2701 S. BAYSHORE DRIVE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33133
18200 January 1,8.15.22,1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
uuous name STRUL PROPER-
TIES at 7464 Rexford Road, Boca
Raton, Florida SS4S4 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, florida.
STRUL PROPERTIES
H. ALLAN SHORE, ESQ.
Attorney for
STRUL PROPERTIES
18180 December 18.26,1987;
___________January 1,8,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case Ne. 87-4*533 CA-M
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS,
Plaintiff
vs.
THEODORE PRESSLEY,
etal.,
Defendants.
TO: CAROLYN REDDICK
Residence Unkonwn
If alive, and if dead, all par-
ties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
CAROLYN REDDICK, and
all parties having or claiming
to have any right, title or in-
terest in the property herein
described.
You sre hereby notified that an
action for foreclosure of mortgage
on the following described proper-
ty in DADE County. Florida:
Lot 9, Block 8, of NICHOLS
GOLF ESTATES, according
to the Plat thereof, as record-
ed >n PhU Book 60 at Page
38. of the Public Records of
Dade County. Florida.
h*" been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. GiUitx, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214,1670 Madruga Avenue. Coral
OaNea, Florida, 33146 on or before
February 6, 1968 and file the
"nginal with the clerk of this court
ther before service on Plaintiffs
ttorney or immediately
[wefter; othenriae a defauh wiD
bt entered against you for the
re"ef demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
f this court this 29th day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRTNKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Dewitv Clerk
were barred from attending
six consecutive matches of
their favorite team.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-54461
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS,
Plaintiff
vs.
VANA TAYLOR, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: HOUSEHOLD
FINANCE
CORPORATION
OF HIALEAH,
a dissolved Florida
Corporation
c/o D.D. GARDNER -
Director
621 Rolling Lane
Arlington Heights,
Illinois
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 21. less the North 5 feet
of Block 6, EAST LIBERTY
CITY SECTION "A," accor-
ding to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 39,
Page 19, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Gitliu, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
February 5, 1988 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 29th day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRTNKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
18210 January 1,8,15,22, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-62231 CA-06
NOTICE OF ACTION
ALLEN R. GREENWALD
and
JTLL F. GREENWALD,
his wife.
Plaintiff
vs.
JOHN LEE UPSON.
etal..
Defendant!!.
TO: JOHN LEE UPSON
and JESSIE GLADDEN
Residence Unknown
If ali ve, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against JOHN LEE
UPSON and JESSIE GLAD-
DEN, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, ti-
tle or interest in the property
herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action for foreclosure of mortgage
on the following described proper-
ty in DADE County, Florida:
Lot 11. Block 18. of
AVOCADO PARK, accor-
ding to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 6. at
Page U, of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Shepperd Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1670 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida. 33146 on or before
February 5. 1988, and file the
original with the derk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demsnded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand snd the seal
of this court this 29th day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-66382
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI,
a United States Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RITA BARR, individually, and as
Personal Representative of the
Estate of RICK BARR, deceased,
etal..
Defendants.
TO: All of the unknown heirs,
devisees, grantees, assignees,
lienholders, creditors,
trustees, or otherwise claim-
ing interest by, through,
under or against RICK
BARR, deceased, and all
other parties having or claim-
ing to have any right, tiUe, or
interest in the property
foreclosure herein.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Condominium Unit C of
PINEBROOKE CON-
DOMINIUM V, a Con-
dominium, according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, filed for record July
21, 1977, in Official Records
Book 9747, at Page 2120, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida, as amended;
together with the Mor-
tgagor's undivided interest in
the common elements ap-
purtenant thereto and
together with parking space
assigned to said unit
has been filed against you snd you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis, Allison and
Cohen, Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address is 111 N.E. 1st
Street, Miami. Florida 33132, on
or before February 5,1988, and to
file the original with die Clerk of
this Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter, otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 29th day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: Clarinda Brown
Deputy Clerk
18208 January 1,8,15.22,1988
04 THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOB DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-65182
NOTICE OF ACTION
COWGER & MILLER
MORTGAGE COMPANY, D4C.
Plaintiff
vs.
CHERYL FRASER, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: SECURITY PACIFIC
EXECUTIVE/
PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES. INC., f/k/a
POSTAL EXECUTIVE
FINANCIAL SERVICES.
mc.
14201 East Fourth Avenue
Aurora, Colorado 80011
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 12. in Block 20, of COR-
AL REEF ESTATES SE-
COND ADDITION, accor-
ding to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 81 at
Page 74 of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you snd you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. GiUitx, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 38146 on or before
January 29, 1988 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 28 day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By CLARINDA BROWN
.......A-Deputy Clerk
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-28079
SEC. a
NATIONAL MORTGAGE COM-
PANY, a Tennessee corporation,
PlainUffls)
vs.
EDWARD WILLIAM EASLEY,
JR., et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 11th day of Jamary. 1*88,
the following described
property:
Lot 21, of DOUGLAS CIRCLE,
according to the Plat thereof,
recorded in Plat Book 7 at Page
69, of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
DATED the 22nd day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney far Plaintiff
Roosenthal A Yarchin, P.A.
3050 Biscayne Boulevard,
Suite 800
Miami, Florida 38187
PabUabad 12716 1/1____________
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-55395
04 RE: The Marriage of:
GUYLNAT BREEDLOVE,
Petitioner,
and
THOMAS Z. BREEDLOVE,
Respondent.
TO: THOMAS Z. BREEDLOVE,
Residence unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney, 612 Nor-
thwest 12th Ave., Miami, Florida,
38186, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before February 5,
1988, otherwise a default will be
entered.
December 29. 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: Clarinda Brown
18209 January 1,8,15,22.1988
04 THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA DM
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-48690 CA-02
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS,
Plaintiff
vs.
PHILIP MOTT, et ux., et al.,
Defendants.
TO: PHILIP MOTT and
VTRG041A MOTT, his wife
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
PHILIP MOTT and
VIRGINIA P. MOTT, his
wife, and all parties having
or claiming to have any right,
title or interest in the
property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
U-w"ty, Florida:
Lot 18, in Block 1, of FAIR-
WAY, according to the Plat
thereof, recorded in Plat
Book 7, at Page 28. of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Shepperd Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
January 15. 1988, and file the
original with the derk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise s default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court his 10 day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
'" \8f78' '' DecembeVlBiSo, 1987,'
NOTICE UNDER
FICTTTIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fir
titious name of SUNCO
DEVELOPERS at number 13382
SW. 128 Street, in the City of
Miami, Florida, 33186 intends to
register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 23
day of December, 1987.
PETER SCOTT PARKER
50% interest
ALAN RICHTER 50% interest
Attorney for Applicant
ALBERT W. GUFFANTI, P.A.
ATTORNEY AT LAW
COCONUT GROVE BANK
BLDG. SUITE 305
2701 S. BAYSHORE DRIVE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33133
18199 January 1,8,15, 22,1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
04 THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, 04
AND FOB DADE COUNTY
Civil Action Na. 87-54940 24
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OK MARRIAGE
D4 RE: THE PETmON OF
MARIA MAGDALENA
CHALCO,
Petitioner/Wife,
and
RAMON A. CHALCO,
Respondent/Husband.
TO: RAMON A. CHALCO
Respondent
Residence UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
EUGENE LEMLICH, ESQ., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 2720 West Flagier Street
Miami, Florida 38136, and file the
original with the derk of the above
styled court on or before January
29, 1988; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 23 day of December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRTNKER
Aa Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By JENNIS L. RUSSELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EUGENE LEMLICH, ESQ.
2720 West Flagier Street
Miami. Florida 33136
Attorney for Petitioner
18201 January 1,8, 15, 22, 1988
04 THE CIRCUIT COURT FOB
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FUe Naaiber 87-4182
Division 01
Fla. Bar No. 068319
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HAROLD L. GERSHEL,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of HAROLD L. GERSHEL.
deceased. File Number 87-6182, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street Miami, FL
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are act forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT 80 rTLED WTLL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 1, 1988.
Personal Representative:
ROBERT H. SPANG
104 Winter East
Williamsburg, VA 23185
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
NELSON & FELDMAN, P.A.
1186 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands. FL 33154
Teephone> 886-57-16..........
189015 Wnnsrv I g ltJRS.


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 1, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
_-._. ,_, DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES 'JffSZ^SS
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. DS AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-1785t
SEC. M
STOCKTON. WHATLEY.
DAV1N A COMPANY. A Floridm
orporation.
Plaintiffls)
vs.
SANDRA D. PALMER, et al..
Defendant)?)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
.'udgment entered in this case
tow pending in said Court, the
^tyle of which is indicated above. I
vill sell to the highest and best
.idder for cash on THE SOTTH
-TEPSof the Dade County i our
nouee in Miami. Dade County,
-londa at 11:00 o'clock A.M.. on
ne lit* day of Jaaearv. 1988.
'.he following described
Lot 18. in Block 4. of NORWOOD
HEIGHTS, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
66. at Page 146. of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida.
DATED the 22nd day of
December, IM7.
RICHARD P. BUNKER
Clark ef draft Cent
(CiraM Ceart Seal)
hy Maria Sama
DapatjrCtek
AHaf for Plaatlff
Roaaothal A Yarehin
3060 Biacayne Boulevard
Soita 800
Miami, Florida 3S137
11/16 1/1
in not encurr court of
THl BLKVKNTB JUDICIAL
circuit or Florida in
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. S7-MBM CA-li
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS.
rTamun
vs.
LEONARD LOSITO H, et ux., et
at.
Defendants
TO LEONARD LOSITO HI and
FRANCES MARIE
LOSITO, his wife
Residence Unknown
If ahve, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
LEONARD LOSITO II and
FRANCES MARIE LOSITO.
his wife, and all parties
baring or chiming to have
any right, title or interest in
the property herein
deecribed
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Floridm:
Lot 9, Block 11, FIRST AD-
DITION TO ANDOVER, ac-
cording to the plat thereof,
recorded in Plat Book 72 at
Page 86 of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to nerve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuat H. Gitliti, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whoa* address is Suite
214, 1670 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 38146 on or before
January 29, 1988, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiff
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court thia 22 day ol
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Aa Deputy Clark
18194 December 26,1987;
January 1,8,16,1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in hnajneas under the fie
titious name ORLANDO AUTO
REPAIRS at 1266 OPA LOCK
BLVD. OPA-LOCKA FL 38064 in
tends to regiater said name with
the Clark of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
ORLANDO RODRIGUEZ
18181 December 18,26,1987;
January 1,8,1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-52403-04
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: LORINE JONES
and
NORMAN JONES
TO: NORMAN JONES
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HERf
NOTIFIED that an action for
>Lirriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of you:
fans at, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petit

Street North Miami Beach. Florida
3S162 and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before January 8. 1988;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 7 day of December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18161 December 11, 18, 25, 1987;
January 1,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OK
THE ELEVENTH CIRCUIT
OF FLOnUDA IN AND
FOB DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-611M CA-16
NOIKE OP ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERAN'S AFFAIRS,
Plaintiff
vs.
GLORIA J.M. HEARD, at al..
Defendants
TO. GLORIA J. M. HEARD
Rseidenci Unknown
If alive, and if dead, ail
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
GLORIA J.M. HEARD, and
all parties having or claiming
to have any right, title or
interest in the property
herein deecribed.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 6, Block 6, MIAMI
GARDENS MANOR SEC
TION ONE according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 92, Page 68, of the
Pubbc Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Gitliti, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose ad dress is Suite
214, 1670 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
January 22, 1988, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
rehef demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of thia court thw 17 day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRJNKER
Aa Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clark
18187 December 26,1987;
January 1,8,16,1988
NOTICF UNDER
FICTITIOUS (AME LAW
NOTICE IS HLREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name FLORIDA WEST
AGENCY, INC. d/b/a FLORIDA
WEST at 2100 N.W. 94 Avenue.
Miami, Florida 83172 intends to
regiater said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida,
ABELARDO BETANCOURT
President of FLORIDA
WEST AGENCY. INC.
LAW OFFICES OF
MARIO QWNTERO JR., P.A.
Attorneys for FLORIDA
WEST AGENCY, rNC.
18162 December 11,18,26,1987;
January 1,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nambcr 87-2318
Division CP-03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
N1ANYA COROMOTO AVILA
RINCON DE SANCHEZ a/k/a
NIANYA A. SANCHEZ,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of NIANYA
COROMOTO AVILA RINCON
DE SANCHEZ a/k/a NIANYA A
SANCHEZ, deceased. File
Number 87-2318 CP-03. is pending
in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida. Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street. Miami. Florida
33130. The personal represen
tative of the estate is ENRIQUE
BASCUAS, whose address is
10316 S.W. 92nd Street, Miami.
Florida 33176. The name and ad-
dress of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FTOST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad
drees of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed
If the claim is not yet due, the date
whan it will become doe shall be
stated. If the daim is contingent or
iirihqiarlaled, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
daim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver uflhiwt copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
dark to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persona interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
December 26. 1987.
ENRIQUE BASCUAS
Aa Personal Representative
of the Estate of
NIANYA COROMOTO AVHA
RINCON DE SANCHEZ a/k/a
NIANYA A. SANCHEZ
Deceased '
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
AINSLEE R. FERDIE
717 Ponce de Leon Blvd.,
Suite 216
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
Telephone: (306) 446-8667
18198 December 26,1987;
January 1,1988
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 87-41269 FC 18
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JEAN C. DUPEROUX,
Petitioner,
and
LINDA B. DUPEROUX, a/k/a
LINDA B. NELOMS,
Respondent.
TO: LINDA B. DUPEROUX
s/k/a, LINDA B. NELOMS
Residence Unknown, you shall
serve a copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar
nag* upon: ANTHONY CAR-
BONE, PA., 612 N.W. 12th
Avenue, Miami, Florida 33136,
and file original with the Clerk of
the Court on or before January 8
1988, otherwise a default will be
entered.
December 2, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER, Clerk
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
18168 December 11,18,26,1987;
January 1,1988
Division 04
Fla. Bar No.: 251143
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BENJAMIN COLEMAN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of BENJAMIN COLEMAN.
deceased. File Number 87-7258. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street, Miami.
Florida 33160 The names and ad-
dresses of the personal represen-
tavie and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) am ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 26, 1987.
Personal Representative:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
SUN BANK/MIAMI N.A.
1111 Lincoln Road Mall
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MARTIN W. WASSERMAN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 672-3100
18191 December 26.1987;
January 1.1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLOnUDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nnnsher 87-72*8
Fla. Bar Ne.: Ml 141
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BENJAMIN COLEMAN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of BENJAMIN COLEMAN,
deceased. File Number 87-7268, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street, Miami,
Florida 33160. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal repreaen-
tavie and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are net forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-1
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of thia Notice has
begun on December 26, 1987.
Personal Representative:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
SUN BANK/MIAMI N.A.
1111 Lincoln Road Mall
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MARTIN W. WASSERMAN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 672-3100
18191 December 26,1987;
January 1,1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTTTIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
"Rsg* in business under the fie
titious name "DESTINATION
PLANNERS INTERNA-
TIONAL" at 9660 E Bay Harbor
Drive, Bay Harbor Islands, Ft
33154 intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
Managing and Marketing
Professionals, Inc.
By Larry Cbff, President
Theodore R. Nelson.
Nelson A Fddman, P.A.
Attorney for Managing and
Marketing Profeasionala. Inc.
18167 December 11,18,26,1987-
January l, yjj
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-47890 CA-31
NOTICE OF ACTION
COWGER A MILLER
MORTGAGE COMPANY. INC..
Plaintiff,
vs.
DANIEL NOOKS, et al..
Defendants.
TO: DANIEL NOOKS
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by.
through, under or against
DANIEL NOOKS, and all
parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or
interest in the property
herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County. Florida:
Lot 40. Block 10 OVER-
BROOK SHORES SUBDIVI-
SION No. 2. according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 50, Page 31, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Gitlitz. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida, 33146 on or before
January 22. 1988, and file the
original with the clerk of thia court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of thia court thia 17 day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clark of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Aa Deputy Clerk
18188 December 26,1987;
January 1,8, 15, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-4M17 (CA li)
NOTICE OF ACTION
ALLEN R. GREENWALD, and
JILL F. GREENWALD, hk wife
Plaintiff,
vs.
HARVARD/OXFORD
ASSOCIATES, LTD., a Florida
limited partnership, et al.,
Defendant*.
TO: MURRAY WEINBERG,
residence unknown, if living
and, if dead, to all of the
unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, usignees,
beriholders, creditors,
trustees or other parties
daiming by, through, under
or against the said MURRAY
WEINBERG, and all other
parties, having or claiming to
have any right, title or
interest in and to the
property under foreclosure
herein.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Lot 36 through 46, Block 63,
FULFORD BY THE SEA,
SECTION "D," according to
the Plat thereof, recorded in
Plat Book 8 at Page 68 of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida, together with the
buildings and improvements
thereon, tenements,
hereditaments and ap-
purtenances thereto
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis, Allison &
Cohen, Plsintiffs attorneys,
whose address is 111 N.E. 1st
Street. Miami. Florida 38182, on
or before January 22, 1988, and
file toe original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or immediate
ly thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
retisfdemanded in the Complaint
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 18 day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clark of the Court
By: DIANA CAMPBELL
Deputy Clark
18192 December 25, 1987;
January 1,8, 15, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLOR|Da
PROBATE DIVISION
File Naaiber 87-705^
Division 02
Fla. Bar No. 058319
IN RE: ESTATE Or
SHIRLEY COHEN.
Deotaiad
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estan-
of SHIRLEY COHEN, deceased
File Number 87-7058, is pending m
the Circuit Court for Dade CoaSti
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagier
Street. Miami. FL 33130 The
names and addresses of the per
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's atton
set forth below
All interested persons ,
quired to file with this
WITHIN THREE MONTI
THE FIRST PUBLIC AT!
rHIS NOTICE: (1) all
against the estate and (2]
a by an interested pa
whom this notice was sen
challenges the validity of the will
the qualifications of the pel
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BF
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 26, 1987
Personal Representative:
MR. SAUL COHEN
18041 Biacayne Blvd.. No. 1605
No. Miami Beach. FL 33160
MRS. FERNE BERGER
4467 Woodfiald Blvd.
Boca Raton, FL 33434
PERSONAL REP.
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
NELSON A FELDMAN. PA.
1136 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands, FL 33154
Telephone: 866-6716
18197 December 25,1987;
January 1,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOB
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nasassr 87-72M
DMaksaM
FLORIDA RAR Ne. 027J*3
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANNA RUBIN,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ANNA RUBIN, deceased. File
Number 87-7269, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Drrsson. the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagier
Street Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addressee of the per
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
AD interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FTR8T PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdk-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE,
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 26, 1967.
Personal Representative:
EDWARD RUBIN
401 Ocean Drive
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
SELMA NISSMAN
130 N.W. 163rd Street
North Miami Beach, Florida 33169
Attorney for Personal
Repreaen tative:
HYMAN P. GALBUT, ESQUIRE
GALBUT, GALBUT MENIN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (806) 672-3100
18196 December 26.1987;
________________January 1.1M
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fir
titious name LA FAMILIA
RESTAURANT at 1633-36 N.E
8th Street. Homestead. FL 33030
intend to regiater said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
LAZARO MARTINEZ
RE IN ALDO MARTINEZ
MELVIN J. A8HER
Attorney for Applicants
826 South Bayshore Drive
Suite 648
Miami, FL 83131
Tel. 641-2686 M,
18184 Dstasnbar26.1987;
January 1.8, 15, "


Friday, January 1,1988/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
FORECLOSURE SALES-PUBLIC NOTICES
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87 52694 13
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI, a
United States Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JAIRO ALBERTO SALAS. et
al..
Defendants.
TO: JAIRO ALBERTO SALAS,
residence unknown, if he is liv-
ing and, if he is dead, all
unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees,
lienholders, creditors,
trustees or otherwise, claim-
ing by, through, under or
against the said JAIRO
ALBERTO SALAS, and all
other parties having or claim-
ing to have any right, title or
interest in and to the property
under foreclosure herein
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a Mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Unit No. 318, of FOX
CHASE CONDOMINIUM
NO. 2, according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, as recorded in Of-
ficial Records Book 10940. at
Page 2197, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida, at amended;
together with all im-
provements, appliances and
fixtures located thereon
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis, Allison &
Cohen, Plaintiffs attorneys,
whose address is 111 N.E. 1st
Street, Miami, Florida SS182, on
or before January 16, 1988, and
file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 8 day of
December. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: JENNIS L. RUSSELL
Deputy Clerk
18170 December 11.18. 25, 1987;
January 1, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-421M CA 13
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organised and existing
under the laws of the United
States of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
ANTONIO E. ALONSO, et ux.,
et al..
Defendants.
TO: ANTONIO E. ALONSO and
GLADYS ALONSO, his wife
9720 Southwest Sixth Street
Miami. Florida 33174
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Foreclosure of Mortgage on the
following described property:
Lot HI, Block 2 LES
CHALETS II according to
the Plat thereof as recorded
in Plat Book 119 at Page 26
of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
baa been filed against you and you
re required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose addreas is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Cables. Florida, 33146 on or before
January 22. 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 17 day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
December 25, 1987;
January 1.8,15. 1988
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
m THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-3*146
SEC. M
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION.
Plaintiffs)
vs.
NEIL M. GONZALEZ, JR., aa
tarried person, et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami, Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M., on the 11th day
of Jaaaary. 1M8, the following
described property:
Unit 114 of PRINCE CON
DOMINIUM I. s condominium ac
cording to the Declaration of Con-
dominium filed in Official Records
Book 11388 Psge 23, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida
together with an undivided in-
terest in the common elements ap-
purtenant thereto as set forth in
the Declaration of Condominium.
DATED the 22nd day of
December, 1*87.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Cireait Comrt
(Circuit Cewt Seal)
By Maria Sama
Dapatj Clerk
Atteraey for Plaintiff
William P. McCaughan
Suite 2803 World Trade Center
80 S.W. Eight Street
Miami. Florida, 33130
PaMiabed 12/26 1/1
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Aetioa
No. 87-63632 (04)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
FL Bar No. 003473
IN RE: The Marriage of
GODWIN ONORIOBE
and
REMELDA KYLER CHERRY
TO: REMELDA KYLER
CHERRY
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street, North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before January 22,
1988; otherwise s default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court st Miami, Florida on
this 15 day of December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Barbara Harper
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18182 December 18, 25,1987;
January 1.8.1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name GALACTIC TOW
ING. at 3230 N.W. 42nd St.,
Miami. Fla. 33142, intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun
ty, Florida.
Galactic Towing Service, Inc.
By Estanislao R. Hermandet,
a/k/a Ramon Hernandez
ROBERT M. JASINSKI. ESQ.
Attorney for Applicant
The Roney Plata. Suite M-8
2301 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach, FLA. 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-4421
19150 December 11.18, 25.1987;
JanuaryU98
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASK NO. 87-44175 CA 04
Fla. Bar No. 475402
NOTICE OF ACTION
STOCKTON, WHATLEY,
DAVIN & COMPANY, a
Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
v.
CARLOS A. SANCHEZ,
MARIA C. SANCHEZ a/k/a
MARIA P. SANCHEZ, et al..
Defendants.
TO: William N. Irvine, Patricia Ir-
vine f/k/a Patricia L. Piccolo,
Susan Fenster, Eduardo Raul
Grodsinksy, Nicholas San
Juan and Daisy Cantillo,
whose residences are
unknown, and the unknown
parties who may be spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors. creditors,
trustees and all parties claim-
ing interest by, through,
under or against said Defen-
dants, who are not know to be
dead or alive, and all parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title, or interest in the
property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 4, Block 41, of FAIR-
WAY ESTATES. SECTION
SEVEN, according to the
Plat thereof, aa recorded in
Plat Book 98, at Page 67, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Albert C. Galloway. Jr., Es-
quire, of Roaenthal & Yarchin, At-
torneys for Plaintiff, Suite 2300,
CenTruat Financial Center, 100
Southeast Second Street, Miami,
Florida 38131-2198, on or before
January 29, 1988, and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on December 24, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER, Clerk
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
18205 January 1.8.15,22,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5381
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF '
ELAINE NUSSBAUM.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Elaine Nussbaum, deceased,
File Number 87-5381, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 W. Flagier
Street, Miami, Florida 33180. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of thia Notice has
begun on January 1, 1988.
Personal Representative:
1. Herbert L. Lerner
801 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach, Fl. 33140
2. Cheryl Silverman
319 Minorca Avenue
Coral Gables. Florida
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
1. Herbert J. Lerner
801 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Telephone: 305-673-3000
2. Cheryl Silverman. Esq.
319 Minorca Ave.
Coral Gables, Fl.
Phone: 305-446-4861
18203 January 1.8,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-33J70 CA-17
NOTICE OF ACTION
WEYERHAEUSER
MORTGAGE
COMPANY.
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOSE A. SARDON. et. al..
Defendant*.
TO: JOSE A. SARDON
4606 S.W. 139th Court
Miami, Florida 33175
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
CONDOMINIUM UNIT
NUMBER 812, OF BENT
TREE PARCEL SIX, CON-
DOMINIUM NUMBER
EIGHT. ACCORDING TO
THE DECLARATION OF
CONDOMINIUM
THEREOF. AS RECORD
ED IN OFFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 10721 AT
PAGE 1666, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy ol
your written defenses, if ny, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1670 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida, 33146 on or before
January 29, 1988 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of thia Court thia 22 day of '
December, 1987.
RICHAD P- BRINKER
Aa Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Aa Deputy Clerk
18195 December 26,1987;
January 1,8,15,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File NsuBher 87-4*44 (02)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
YATR JACOB CHUCHANI.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of YAIR JACOB CHUCHANI,
deceased. File Number 87-6046
(02), is pending in the Circuit Court
for Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the sddress of which is 73
West Flagier Street Miami.
Florida 33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (l) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 26, 1987.
Personal Representative;
DAVID FELDMAN
Financial Federal Bldg- PH
407 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
JUAN J. RODRIGUEZ. ESQ.
Shea A Gould
801 Brickell Avenue Suite 1401
Miami, Florida 33131
Telephone: (306) 872-2047
18185 December 26, 1987;
January 1.1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name TELEPHONE
REPAIR SERVICE at 954 West
31 St. Hialeah FL 33012 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
VICTOR GODOY
954 West 31 St.
Hialeah, FL 33012
18163 December 11,18, 25.1987;
t^m
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nuaber 87-7207
Division 02
Fla. Bar No. 0273C3
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LEO HERSHKOWITZ,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of LEO HERSHKOWITZ. deceas-
ed. File Number 87-7207. is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the addreas of which is 73 West
Flagier Street Miami, Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with thia court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 26, 1987.
Personal Representative:
GERTRUDE SIEGEL
Bridle Path Lane
Mill Neck, New York 11763
ROBERT HERSKOVICH
664 East 86th Street
Brooklyn, New York 11236
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HYMAN P. GALBUT
Galbut, Galbut A Merun
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 672-3100
18190 December 26.1987;
January 1,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE UTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. Di AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 87-4963
DIVISION: 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
GUY EDWARD IRWIN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Guy Edward Irwin, deceased,
File No. 87-6963, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad
dress of which is Dade County
Courthouse, 73 West Flagier
Street. Miami. Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this Court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
repreentative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the Court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 26, 1987.
Suzanne L. Irwin,
Personal Representative
666 N.E. 129th Street
North Miami, Florida 33161
Gerald B. Cope. Jr.
Attorney for Personal
Representative
4870 Southeast Financial Center
200 S. Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33131
(306) 579-0060
18186 December 26.1987;
January 1.1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name "HOTEL BANK" at
9660 E Bay Harbor Drive, Bay
Harbor Islands. Fl 33154 intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Managing and
Marketing Professionals, Inc.
By Larry Cliff, President
Theodore R. Nelson.
Nelson & Feldman, P.A.
Attorney for Managing and
Marketing Professionals Inc.
18168 December 11,18, 25,1987;
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Kile Naaaber 87-7343
Division 04
FLORIDA BAR NO. 210889
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOSEPH WEISHAUS.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
Of JOSEPH WEISHAUS. deceas-
ed. File Number 87-7343. is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the addreas of which is 73 West
Flagier Street Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 1, 1988.
Personal Representative:
HELEN WEISHAUS
4011 North Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT.
ESQUIRE
GALBUT. GALBUT & MENIN.
PA.
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 672-8100
18204 January 1,8.1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name RIAZANO IN-
TERIORS at 18300 N.E. 7 CT.,
N.M.B.. FLA. 33179 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
SHEILA POLSKY
18300 N.E. 7 CT.. .
N.M.B. FL. 33179
18157 December 11. 18. 25, 1987;
January 1. 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-49155 CA 28
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS.
Plaintiff
vs.
ANDREW LEE CARTER, et ux..
et al..
Defendants
TO: ANDREW LEE CARTER
and
ELOISE CARTER, his wife
and TIMOTHY E. CRAPPS
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
them, and all parties having
or claiming to have any right,
title or interest in the
property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to forclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 14. Block 31, of REVIS-
ED PLAT OF A PORTION
OF CAROL CITY, according
to the plat thereof, recorded
in Plat Book 57, Page 63, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
January 15, 1988. and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 10 day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18177 December 18, 25. 1987;
Januarv 1.8. 1988


Page 12-B The Jcwab FVridian/Friday, January 1,1988

Charlotte Jacobson Center Groundbreaking

City of Brotherly Love
Votes Along Racial Lines
PHILADELPHIA While
a substantial majority of
Philadelphia's Jewish voters
voted for Frank L. Riso a
white in their city's recent
mayoral election, Jews never-
theless gave a far larger
percentage of their votes to in-
cumbent Mayor W. Wilson
Goode a black than did
other white ethnic voters.
This was one of the key fin-
dings of a study of the election
sponsored by the Philadelphia
Chapter of the American
Jewish Committee. The
research was done by Dr. San-
dra Feather-man. a Temple
University political scientist
who conducted a similar study
in Philadelphia after the city's
1983 mayoral election.
"Given the closeness of the
1987 race, with only 17,000
votes (2.6 percent of the total
vote) separating the two can-
didates, said Featherman "it
is evident that the Jewish vote
was critical in this election.
"Those Jews who did sup-
port Goode may well have pro-
vided the margin by which he
won, even though three out of
four voted for Rizso."
Featherman's analysis of the
election data showed that 97
percent of the city's black
voters, and 17 percent of the
white voters, voted for Goode.
The mayor won just under 25
percent of the Jewish vote, she
said, and 14 percent of the
Irish vote. 13 Dercent of the
Vet School
Welcomes Yanks
JERUSALEM American
students will be admitted for
the first time next year to the
Hebrew University's Koret
School of Veterinary Medicine
in Rehovot, Israel.
Ten students from outside
Israel, including Americans,
will be admitted with the
fourth upcoming class. They
will be part of a four-year pro-
gram leading to a Doctor of
Veterinary Medicine.
Marriages
Continued from Page 1-B
agreed to many "because I am
totally in favor of getting out
of the army. I do not think
there is anything sacred about
the army, and I think the
taboos that surround it should
be undermined." The girl he
married, however, had no such
ideological motivations. "She
simply wanted those two years
for herself," he said.
Polish vote, and 7 percent of
the Italian vote.
"While Jews for the most
part did vote like other
whites," stressed Feather-
man, "nevertheless, in
Philadelphia and in many
other cities across the nation.
Jews have apparently been
more supportive of black
mayoral candidates than other
whites have been."
"In an exit poll on Election
Day." she said, "more than 90
percent of the voters stated
that race had not been a factor
in their voting decision, yet the
vote clearly split along racial
lines."
"In electoral contests where
race is an emotional issue,"
she continued, "I believe that
voters are not totally honest
about their voting intentions."
Koch
Coatiaaed from Pace 1-B
the Second Generation Deed
Club, which opened up a
registry in Koch's name in con-
junction with her family.
Ann Weinstein Koch is sur-
vived by her husband, Dr.
Howard Koch; daughter,
Gillian; parents, Henry and
Norma Weinstein; sister, An-
drea Siassipour; brother, Dr.
David Weinstein and maternal
grandmother, Mrs. Paula
Sheer.
The funeral was held Sun-
day, Dec. 27 at Blasberg
Funeral Chapel on Miami
Beach.
i rW a
* Charlotte Jacob*)*, Jewish National Fund
treasurer, participates in recent ground-
breaking ceremonies in Israel for the
Charlotte Jacobson Center, to comprise a din-
ing room, kitchen, clubhouse and store, at Kib-
butz Ketura. A past president of both
Hadassah and JNF, Jacobson was instrumen-
tal in establishing the Kibbutz in the Arava
desert.
Publix
tr

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i*


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I' ,
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only. Healthy and Nutritious
BRAN
MUFFINS ...6 ,, H39
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only. Topped with Streusel. Plain
Individual Danish. 4 !
(EHect.ve Only on Sunday. December 27
and Sunday. January 3. 1988)
Available at PuNix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only. Fresh Baked
Sandwich Rye...... { %\n
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Bak^Only. For Your New Year. Party Platter*
Miniature Danish JJ *5
*UabW a, All Publix Stores and Frh D,i*
Danish
Cherry Strip........ ^h $1"
ffflfe3WSt
JndianRi^arKlC^eec^c^rj!; l "*


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