The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03072

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 18, 1987
Israel Has The Blahs'
By MORRIS J. AMITAY
A long-time American friend
of Israel recently returning
from a visit there describee
the local mood as a national
case of "the blahs." To put it
another way, the country
seems to be struck in a rut, but
not a particularly uncomfor-
table one. Inflation is in check,
with decent economic growth,
but there is certainly no
economic boom. In fact,
shrinking budgets have placed
such disparate institutions as
the Hebrew University and the
Israeli Air Force in dire
straits, the former, Israel's
foremost educational institu-
tion, faced with burgeoning
debt, was barely able to open
its academic doors at the end
of October. The latter, perhaps
the best air force plane for
' plane in the world, has been
mothballing Kfir aircraft
squadrons because it simply
cannot afford the expense of
keeping them flying.
The good news is that the
peace with Egypt is holding,
and the Iran-Iraq war goes on
tying down Israel's second-
most formidable foe after
Syria. But the bad news is that
the terrorist threat and unrest
on the West Bank and Gaza
continue.
While the recent Arab sum-
mit meeting in Jordan put the
conflict with Israel on the
back-burner, does anyone
doubt that this is only tem-
porary? And although the
price of oil has again slipped
below $20 per barrel, thereby
blunting the Arab oil weapon,
a look at where the world's oil
reserves are located should of-
fer little solace.
On the domestic political
scene, the Israeli elections
next November are uniformly
predicted to produce a
stalemate between Labor and
Likud, with no alternative
other than the resurrection of
the present two-headed form
of government.
But the current status quo in
the economic, strategic and
political spheres should not
prevent some hard thinking
about some very raal problems
not that far off over the
horizon.
Assuming an end to the Iran-
Iraq war with both nations re-
maining relatively intact,
Israel will be facing Moslem
fundamentalism of the most
virulent kind from Iran on one
hand, and geographically
closer to home, an enlarged
and better-seasoned Iraqi ar-
my with an experienced air
force.
+Jmit>fk>rAMaf7
'OMIMM
Phoo: (305) 37*^605
Published weekly every Friday
since 1827 by The Jewish Fion
dian Office and Plant 120 N E
6th St.. Miami. Fla. 33132 Phone
(305) 373-4605
Second-Class Postage paid in
Miami, Fla. USPS 275320
Postmaster Form 3579 return to
Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box
012973. Miami. Fla 33101
The Jewish Floridian does not
guarantee the Kashruth of the
merchandise advertised in its
columns
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: In ad
vance (Local Area) One Year
$9 50 (Anniversary Special) Out
of town, country, upon request.
By Mail SI 45 per copy
This could come at the same
time a new American ad-
ministration in 1989 will be
unveiling its own Middle East
peace plan which most pro-
bably will call for Israeli con-
cessions since we have little
leverage over the Arab coun-
tries. This same new ad-
ministration will also have to
come to grips with our budget
deficits, making foreign aid a
most inviting target, and
Israel's three billion dollars in
U.S. annual support no longer
inviolate.
Further down the road, as
U.S. domestic oil production
continues to decline along with
the fall-off in worldwide ex-
ploration as a result of the
"glut," OPEC could be coming
back into the driver's seat.
The anticipated confluence
of these events means that
Israel does not have that much
time to get its act together,
revive its national spirit and
decide how to meet these
challenges. A business-as-
usual attitude with its internal
bickering, catering to ex-
tremist fringe parties, and
uninspiring leadership could
be disastrous.
While Israel's American
friends can continue to provide
financial, political and moral
support, in the end it is what
Israelis decide to do for
themselves that will be crucial.
If Israel's brief history as a
nation is any guide, somehow
the problems will be sur
mounted but the question
which has to be asked is at
what cost?
No Extradition For Japanese Terrorist
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir said
recently that Israel was not
contemplating asking Japan
for the extradition of Osamu
Maruoka, reportedly the No. 2
man in the Japanese Red Ar-
my who helped plot the
massacre at Lod Airport in
1972.
Japanese police arrested the
37-year-old Maruoka Nov. 21
as he entered Japan from
Hong Kong. Twenty-seven
ople were killed in the blood-
ith at the Israeli airport, now
named Ben-Gurion Interna-
tional Airport.
Japanese authorities, who
waited several days before an-
nouncing Maruoka's apprehen-
sion, did not explain how they
had tracked and captured the
terrorist leader. They said,
however, that when caught he
had about $37,000 on him and
a passport in the name of so-
meone living in Okinawa. They
believe Maruoka may have
been planning an attack on the
Seoul Olympics to be held next
September.
The Israel airport attack was
perpetrated by three ter-
rorists, one of whom died in
the shoot-out with Israeli
police. The third, Kozo
Okamoto, who was released by
Israel in a 1985 prisoner ex-
change involving 1,150 ter-
rorists incarcerated in Israel,
went to Libya. Okamoto had
been sentenced to multiple life
terms for his part in the
massacre.
The Japanese Red Army sur-
faced in the 1960s, supporting
Palestinian groups. Since the
Lod massacre, it has mounted
several attacks, including the
hijacking of a Japan Air Lines
flight from Amsterdam to
Tokyo in 1973, a 1975 attack
on the Japanese Embassy in
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and
another hijacking of a Japan
Air Lines plane from Bombay
to Dhaka, Bangladesh, in 1977.
The current Red Army
leader is believed to be a
woman, Fusako Shigenobu,
42, thought to be living in
Lebanon's Bekaa Valley.
Japanese police said about 40
members of the terrorist
organization remain active,
many in the Middle East.
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T ]Tew]L]fo Floifidiiami
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Vol. 60 No. 51
Miami Friday, December 18,1987
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Violence in Territories As Murders Mount Hussein
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
One Arab was killed and nine
were wounded as violence con-
tinued in the Gaza Strip and
West Bank. But Israeli
authorities said the situation in
the administered territories
was relatively calm and under
control after a week of rioting
that some officials described as
a civil revolt.
The disturbances of the past
week are acknowledged to
have been the worst in recent
years and politicians of the
Labor Party and Likud are
each accusing the other of
responsibility for allowing con-
ditions to deteriorate so
precipitously.
In Washington, the U.S.
State Department expressed
"serious concern" over the
situation and blamed the trou-
ble on the lack of a peace
agreement in the region and
Israel's "occupation" of the
West Bank and Gaza Strip.
At the United Nations,
meanwhile, the Security Coun-
cil prepared to meet for the se-
cond time in four days, to
discuss the situation.
While Israeli authorities
sought to ease tensions, Arabs
rioted in the northern Gaza
Strip town of Khan Yunis. An
unidentified Arab of about 25
was shot to death after he at-
tacked an Israel Defense
Force patrol with a gasoline
bomb. Four other rioters were
wounded.
The IDF has been under
orders since late last week to
exercise maximum restraint.
Continued on Page 14-A
Nazi hunter Beate Klarsfeld staged a protest
against Austrian President Kurt Waldheim
in front of his presidential offices. A police of-
ficer tore uv posters she had attached to the
building with a tape she had cut with the
scissors in her hand. Klarsfeld was questioned
by police and later released. AP/Wide World
Waffles On
Peace Meet
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) King
Hussein of Jordan told a
Beirut newspaper that he re-
jected an offer to meet with an
Israeli leader during the
Reagan-Gorbachev summit
meeting in Washington last
week, Davar reported.
Davar quoted the newspaper
A-Safir, which said Hussein
explained that he turned down
the idea because it would lead
only to interim settlements,
rather than a comprehensive
settlement of the Arab-Israeli
conflict by means of an inter-
national conference.
He would not confirm
reports that he plans to have
secret meetings with Israeli
leaders. He insisted he is
prepared to hold a political
dialogue with Israel only
within the framework of an in-
ternational conference.
The Jordanian monarch is
rumored to have held secret
talks in London earlier this
year with Shimon Peres,
Israel's foreign minister. Dur-
ing a speech earlier this month
to the World Sephardi Federa-
tion, Peres made reference to
the talks, appearing to confirm
for the first time that they
took place.
Hussein expressed hope that
Egypt would participate in
such a conference to dramatize
its disassociation from the
Camp David agreement calling
for autonomy for Palestinian
Arabs.
Florida Witness Disputes
Demjanjuk ID Card
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
problematic identification card
appears to be the crucial piece
of evidence in the trial of alleg-
ed war criminal John Demjan-
juk, now in its 10th month in
Jerusalem district court.
The prosecution says it pro-
ves the 66-year-old Ukrainian-
born, retired automobile
worker from Cleveland, Ohio
is the brutal Treblinka death
camp guard known as "Ivan
the Terrible," who operated
the gas chambers.
The card bears a
photograph, allegedly of Dem-
janjuk at about age 22. It is
said to have been issued to him
at Trawniki, an SS camp in
Poland where volunteer
prisoners of war from the Red
Army were trained for guard
duty at Treblinka and other
camps.
The card was obtained from
Soviet sources. Defense
Continued on Page 10-A
Pensacola Gas Station
Pumps 'Jesus Discount'
By ANDREW
SILOW CARROLL
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Exxon Corp. has so far been
unable to convince a Pen-
sacola, Fla., gas station owner
to remove a sign that adver-
tises a 10 percent discount on
abor to those whom Jesus
loves."
. The sign replaces an adver-
tisement posted in November
y the owner of the Cordova
Mall Exxon station, Jerry Har-
rison, 45, which read, "Notice:
For Christians only, 10 per-
cent discount on labor."
According to a spokeman for
Exxon's consumer and
regulatory affairs office in
Houston, Harrison changed
the original wording of the
sign after the oil company in-
formed his attorney, Paul
Shimek, that they would com-
mence legal action under the
1964 Civil Rights Act.
The corporation has not yet
received a response to a letter
written to Shimek requesting
removal of the second sign,
and is "reconsidering legal op-
tions," said the spokesman.
The Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith mean-
while, has filed complaints
with the Florida attorney
Continued on Page 13-A
Jordan's King Hussein listens to Egyptian president Hosni
Mubarak on his arrival at Cairo airport for a brief visit. The two
leaders have met numerous times since 198U when Jordan re-
established diplomatic links with Egypt, severed in a pan-Arab
move after the Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty. Their talks have
focused on bilateral relations and the Middle East peace process
AP/Wide World Photo


Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 18, 1987
Rededication to Freedom
Chanukah the Festival of Rededication
the Festival of Lights.
As we prepared to kindle the first light of
Chanukah Tuesday night, the story of the
victory of the ancient Maccabees had never
been more relevant.
The ongoing plight of Soviet, Ethiopian,
Syrian, Iraqi and other Jews reminds us that
we must redouble our efforts on their behalf.
At the same time, we note with pride that
this is the 40th year in which Chanukah
lights are kindled in a free State of Israel.
And it is the 21st year in which the
Chanukah Menorah at the Kotel, the
Western Wall, is lit in a reunited Jerusalem.
Therefore we rejoice in the freedoms that
we enjoy in this country, in Israel and in
many nations, but vow to either extend
those freedoms to those lands in which Jews
are second- or even third-class citizens, or to
see that they are permitted to leave.
Chag Sameiach!
Terrorism in Gaza
The sudden upsurge in violence in the
Gaza Strip warrants an immediate review of
Israeli policy towards the narrow piece of
territory along the Mediterranean which has
been the scene of warfare for the past 3,500
years.
Unlike Judea and Samaria or the West
Bank, Gaza has no demonstrable link to
Jewish sovereignty. Part of the British man-
date over Palestine for 31 years, Gaza was
occupied by Egypt in 1948. During 29 years
of Egyptian occupation, interrupted for a
few months by the Sinai Campaign when
Israel seized the territory, Cairo made no
move to incorporate Gaza into its
boundaries.
It has been more than 20 years since Israel
won the 26-mile long strip in the Six Day
War, and Gaza has done little to make its oc-
cupation worthwhile during the two
decades. Hundreds of thousands of Palesti-
nians, ignored and neglected by their Arab
neighbors, make Gaza more of a tinder box
than Israel needs.
While there is ambivalence toward
American Jewry dictating resolutions and
while the solution may not be as simple as
simply moving out and erecting a 50-foot
high wall to separate Gaza from Israel, it is
hard to present a case for the drain on both
Israeli manpower and reputation which the
fighting between rebellious youths, tough
troops and border police brings about.
Certainly the 3.000 Jewish settlers in the
Gaza strip can be relocated in nearby parts
of Israel which literally beg for additional
inhabitants.
It may be time to transfer the problems of
Gaza to an Arab state, and to do so quickly.
Welcome Tax Repeal
Repeal of the five percent service tax, ef-
fective January 1, is good news for Florida.
Already, forthcoming national conventions
which had decided to cancel Florida ap-
pearances have rescheduled dates.
It would have been irresponsible for the
state legislature to have repealed the tax,
which has no counterpart in other states,
without substituting a source of revenue for
our continued growth.
The addition of a penny, bringing Florida
on February 1 to the six percent level now in
effect in California, probably is the best solu-
tion which could have been achieved within
the time constraints of this month's special
session.
Neither Gov. Bob Martinez nor the
legislature deserve particular praise,
because their precipitous action in enacting
the services tax was equally of their doing.
The state should have learned from its un-
fortunate experiment with the unitary tax a
few years ago that a tax which punishes
business is not good for anyone. Let us hope
that the services tax issue is put to bed per-
manently, at the same time that a long-
range plan for increasing revenues is
carefully mapped out.
Politics the American Way?
Is it a trickle-down theory having nothing
to do with Reagan-omics? Is it possible that
rather than an attrition of religiously in-
fluenced politics as Pres. Reagan ap-
proaches his lame-duck last year in office,
Americans, and American Jews especially,
now note with alarm an increase in the fun-
damentalists functioning within the system?
Begin at the top: When the president lit
the "national Christmas tree*' last week
from the Truman Balcony, he remarked that
this year's "pageant of peace" had special
significance at this (Summit) season. He
closed with a quote from the Gospel accor-
ding to Luke, chapter 10, verse 5; "Peace be
to this house."
Would that the biblical allusion was ap-
propriate to all in some non-particularistic
way. Would that there were no religious
allusion to the anticipation of the INF treaty
and the Gorbachev summit meetings.
Switch to the candidacies of Jack Kemp
and Pat Robertson (he who dropped the
honorific Rev. before his name). Each con-
servative Republican has in the last days
made news again because of flirtations and
outright liaisons with religious and fun-
damentalist activities.
That Kemp named Tim and Beverly
LaHaye as his national co-chairmen raises
the specter of a Jackson-Farrakhan union.
The LaHayes have espoused, through their
mainline connections, that Jewish prayers
can't be heard in this 'Christian nation.'
While questioning the validity of Judaism,
Beverly LaHaye has affirmed her belief that
only Christians deserve to hold public office.
Although candidate Kemp apologized for
Tim LaHaye's anti-Semitic and anti-Catholic
writings and accepted his resignation,
Beverly LaHaye has kept her post,
reportedly, and will do so, until she surfaces
as a political liability.
The question that needs to be asked is why
a serious candidate, assuming he wants to be
attractive enough to a wide electorate,
would associate himself with such narrow
and prejudiced co-chairmen.
The answer probably lies within the
Robertson campaign philosophy. With even
die-hard Republicans beginning to bemoan
the fundamentalist bent of the Robertson
agenda, we note the conscription of Chris-
tian foot soldiers into his 1988 battalion.
In a paradoxical move, then. Robertson
maneuvered to include the entire Conser-
vative movement into his fold. Apparently,
the pastor suggested that much of his sup
port will emanate from the Conservative
Jewish Community.
This community's own Franklin Kreutzer.
international president of the two million
member United Synagogue of America, de-
nounced any association and reaffirmed that
his organization would never support the
candidacy of a Christian televangelist.
Kreutzer warned that "the melding of
religious doctrine with public policy is an-
tithetical to church/state separation."
Which, we should remind candidates both
past and present, is not the American way.
Chanukah and Human Rights
By RABBI
MARC H. TANENBAUM
Eight lights for human
appropriate
ft
for
Jewish Floridian
Fred k Shochet
Editor and PuWianer
Norm* A. Orovitz
Managing Editor
Suzanne Shochet
Eecuti* Editor
William T. Brewer
Director o Operations
Joan C Teglas
Director ol Advertising
Friday. Decfmbtr 18.1M7
Volume 60
27 KISLEV 5748
Number 51
rights. No more ai
theme could be found
Chanukah 1987.
Chanukah commemorates
the victory of Judah the Mac-
cabee over the massive in-
vading armies of the Syrian
Empire, and then the rededica-
tion of the Holy Temple in
Jerusalem, which the Syrians
had defiled. The story of
Chanukah is a superlative Bi-
ble narrative and its meaning
today is profound and
universal.
tory was the first successful
triumph in the struggle for
human rights, particularly for
freedom of conscience and
pluralism, in the history of
humankind. Had the Syrians
defeated the Maccabees in the
epic struggle for the right of
every group to be itself, in its
own terms, Judaism might
have perished and, quite con-
ceivably, Christianity and
Islam would never have
emerged. That's how fateful
Chanukah was for the whole
In effect. the Maccabean vie- Continued on Page 13-A


Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5 A
Movie 'Reel' Conflict Bends Status Quo
By LARRY MANDELL
The status quo is the term
used to describe the unofficial
agreements, made in the early
years of the state, between the
government of Israel and the
leaders of its Orthodox
religious population, regarding
the public observance of
halacha, Jewish religious law.
Not decided were any
sidelines on how the status
aid could be adjusted to a
oung, dynamically changing
riety.
The result has been a series
I continuing conflicts over
hese issues, fought sometimes
!i the halls of the Knesset and
at other times in the streets.
These controversies have bent,
ather than broken, the status
quo. The most recent of these
i ontroversies the struggle
i >ver the screening of movies in
Jerusalem on the Sabbath is
posing perhaps the greatest
threat yet to the delicate
balance between an Israeli
secular majority which wishes
to live and enjoy itself and a
religiously observant minority
determined to see halacha
observed in the public sphere.
Not surprisingly, the majori-
ty of these conflicts have been
centered in Jerusalem where
27 percent of the Jewish
population is ultra-Orthodox
(haredim).
In principle and action, the
haredim reiect the secular
authority of Israel's govern-
ment. Occasionally, as in the
Ultra-orthodox Jews protesting against movies on the Sabbath.
struggle by the haredim to ban
Saturday traffic on public
roads, or end archaeological
excavations near the Western
Wall, these issues snowball in-
to violent confrontations
which become national
political issues.
That movies should not be
screened publicly in Jerusalem
on Sabbath has been a long-
time fixture of the status quo;
a municipal ordinance forbids
such screenings unless they
are part of a "cultural event.
Friday night films were
screened for many years in
Tzavta, the left-wing Mapam
party's private club in the city.
Last May, the non-profit
Jerusalem Cinematheque,
followed shortly by a commer-
cial cinema at Beit Agron. also
began to screen Friday night
movies. They were responding
to an opinion issued at the time
by municipal attorney Shabtai
Zvi, who maintained that films
aualified as cultural events if
ley were preceded by a
lecture.
The city's ultra-Orthodox
population at first reacted
slowly to this new twist to the
status quo, and waited to see
how the municipality would
react. Mayor Teddy Kollek
threatened legal action against
Beit Agron, but stood behind
Putting Christ In Chanukah
Adding Insult To Assimilation
By RABBI
WILLIAM. BERKOWITZ
"The December Dilemma"
confronts the Jewish com-
munity yet again. On one level,
it arises in issues of separation
of church and state. Many
Jews are concerned about the
symbols of Christmas that ap-
pear on public property and
the songs of Christmas sung in
public schools.
However, more crucial than
these symbols in the public
realm is the disturbing dilem-
ma of the creche and
Christmas tree to say
nothing of other Christian
symbols of the Christmas
season in the private Jewish
home. As more Jews have ac-
culturated into the fabric and
lifestyle of America, they have
also accepted the Christmas
symbols.
How often have you heard
Jews speaking about a
"Chanukah bush" or disucss
their plans of giving gifts on
Christmas day or holding
Christmas parties? In too
many Jewish homes are
children raised with the notion
that they should celebrate
Christmas in addition to
Chanukah. The rationale?
They are told Christmas, is
after all, only a national holi-
day and secular festival.
Nothing could be further
from the truth. Jews who com-
memorate Christmas as a na-
tional holiday or secular occa-
sion are not only doing a great
disservice to their own
heritage, but also to the Chris-
tian community by misinter-
preting the true meaning of
this important Christian
festival.
Moreover, those Jews who
would dress Chanukah in
Christmas symbolism are
disrespectful to the meaning
and message of both faith com-
munities, as they trivialize two
distinct festivals.
This attitude is not really
surprising. The holiday season
is replete with music, advertis-
ing and a general attitude
which might lead many Jews
and Christians to take
"Christ out of Christmas."
But Christmas is a religious
holiday filled with theological
importance. It is the day which
commemorates the birth of the
Christian man/god, the Chris-
tian messiah. Even the
Christmas tree, the tinsel and
bells, the carols, the giving of
gifts and a host of other obser-
vances are rooted in Christian
messages.
Why, then, would Jews
secularize a religious festival
and insult our Christian
neighbors by demeaning and
denuding one of their great
if not greatest of festivals?
Perhaps, those Jews feel an
anachronistic sense of in-
security about their own
Jewishness. At one time,
America was viewed as a
melting pot in which everyone
from every background blend-
ed into a general whole.
However, that view is long
gone. As the recent Statue of
Liberty commemoration
declared, America instead is a
"salad bowl" in which every
ethnic group has its contribu-
tion to make. We Jews need
not pretend to be Christian or
choose the path of assimilation
in the name of acculturation.
America is stronger if we are
proud of being Jews.
Moreover, we will gain tht
respect of our Christian
Continued on Page 16-A
Landmark Moment For American Jews
By RABBI
MARC H. TANENBAUM
Freedom Sunday Dec. 6 in
Washington, D.C. was one
of American Jewry's finest
hours. The massive rally of
250,000 Jews and non-Jews in
support of the human rights of
Soviet Jewry was a uniquely
American and uniquely Jewish
experience.
Its uniquely American quali-
ty rested in its powerful
analogy to the 1963 march on
Washington led by the late Dr.
Martin Luther King. The civil
rights songs sung by Pearl
Bailey and Peter, Paul and
Mary including "We Shall
Overcome" stamped this ex-
traordinary demonstration
with the character of
America's profound commit-
ment to human dignity and
freedom.
Hundreds of Jews sang
those songs recalling their own
involvement in the 1960s civil
rights movement, now
transferring their fervor to the
cause of their brothers and
sisters in the Soviet Union.
The day's uniquely Jewish
quality rested in the dramatic
energizing presence of the
pantheon of contemporary
Jewish heroes and heroines
Ida Nudel, Vladimir and Maria
Slepak, Natan Sharansky, Yuli
Edelshtein. American Jews
made clear their determina-
tion to restore the two million
Soviet Jews within the
household of the Jewish
people.
Freedom Sunday was a
milestone movement in the
cause of liberating Soviet
Jews. It was also a moment for
rekindling the authentic lights
of freedom and justice at this
Chanukah season in the depths
of the convictions of American
and world Jewry.
Rabbi Marc H. Tanenbaum
is director of internatuyi:'
relations for the Amer\e>\
Jewish Committee.
screenings at the Cinemathe-
que, and stressed the need for
more Friday night cultural
events to keep Jerusalemites
from journeying to Tel Aviv.
(In fact, many Jerusalemites
Not decided were any
guidelines on how the
status quo could be
adjusted to a young,
dynamically changing
society.
are moving permanently to Tel
Aviv, in part, to escape from
what one has referred to as
"the oppression of religious
coercion.")
By mid-July the haredim
protesters outside Beit Agron
numbered in the thousands,
and this sparked a counter-
reaction from segments of the
city's secular population that
regarded Sabbath movies as a
crucial issue in drawing the
line against the ultra-Orthodox
religious influence in
Jerusalem. A coalition of
young activists from Mapam,
the Citizens Rights Party, the
Reform Judaism movement
and Jerusalem community
organizations, held counter-
demonstrations, managed to
expand the number of screen-
ing locations, and succeeded in
filling the theaters. Some of
the city's secular residents felt
motivated for the first time to
take part in demonstrations.
"I'm not political at all," said
one young Jerusalemite out-
side Beit Agron. "But I live
here, I work here, and I want
to enjoy myself out here."
This prompted greater
measures from the haredi
community. "As in the
Torah," said Agudat Yisrael
City Councillor Meir Porush,
"we shall follow a strategy of
gifts negotiation, prayer and
war."
On August 24, over 20,000
haredim gathered for a special
"pray-in at the Western Wall
directed against what they
saw as a desecration of the
Sabbath. This was followed by
several weekends of often
violent encounters in the
Continued on Pajre 16-A


Page 6-A The Jewish FloridUn/FricUy, December 18, 1987
Oasis of Peace ...
Offers Small Separate Peace
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
To many Israelis, Palesti-
nians are the enemy within, a
hostile presence inside the
state's borders. To many
Palestinians, Israelis are the
interlopers who occupy what
they consider to be their
country.
In the small community of
Neve Shalom, however,
Israelis and Palestinians con-
sider each other neighbors. It
is not just that they live side-
by-side, for Jews and Arabs
live in tense proximity
elsewhere in the country.
The residents of Neve
Shalom, however, have chosen
to live together in an attempt
to whittle away at the mutual
predjudice, distrust, and
alienation which has sprung up
between the two peoples over
the last four decades.
"To speak frankly, there
was a question whether we
would survive," admits
longtime Neve Shalom resi-
dent Yaakov Sonnenshein, an
Israeli Jew. Sonnenshein,
whose family moved to Neve
Shalom nine years ago, is one
of the community's first
members.
Although Neve Shalom was
initially founded in 1971, it has
only existed in its present form
since 1978.
"People said it was a nice
idea, but (said), 'Let's see it,' "
Sonnenshein recalls. For many
years the treasurer of Neve
Shalom, which operates as a
cooperative living community
and runs an educational in-
stitute for peace, Sonnenshein
is presently on sabbatical.
He and fellow Neve Shalom
resident Rayek Raizek, who is
Palestinian, were recently in
Miami to publicize the newly
founded Friends of Neve
Shalom, and to educate
Americans about their
community.
Raizek, who studied at the
University of Austin, moved to
Neve Shalom in 1984 with his
wife, but says that he "was
looking for" just such a living
situation since his high school
years.
Like the other Palestinians
residing at Neve Shalom,
Raizek is an Israeli citizen.
"In the beginning, there
were many more Jews than
Arabs at Neve Shalom," says
Sonnenshein. "Now, we are
approaching fifty-fifty."
There are not many inter-
faith families, however, Son-
nenshein explains that "many
mixed (Arab and Jewish)
families applied, but we didn't
want to encourage intermar-
riage in Neve Shalom."
Rather, harmony between
distinctly Arab and Jewish
families is the goal.
Neve Shalom is not trying to
create a separate peace; its
educational institute is design-
ed to provide an atmosphere
where Jewish and Arab
teenagers can encounter each
other on neutral or friendly
ground.
In Israel, many Jews come
face-to-face with Palestinians
only after they enter the army,
and their meetings often take
place on opposite ends of a
run. b
each other.
In the end, Jewish members
who so desired went
Yaakov Sonnenshein
"We also train counselors in
Arab-Israeli relations, and run
encounter workshops for
adults," says Sonnenshein.
"We have ongoing projects
where groups meet several
times over a year, and the en-
counter workshop (for Jewish
and Arab teenagers) which
meets for four days."
The programs, which are
funded by New Israel Fund
and other United States foun-
dations, may produce a stream
of liberal thinkers on both
sides of the Arab-Israeli equa-
tion. But that stream may be
running against a tide of in-
creasing polarization taking
place in Israel today.
"People are escaping to ex-
tremes," Sonnenshein con-
tends. "You listen to what (ex-
treme right winger) Meir
Kahane has to say, you would
think a Nazi was speaking."
Raizek points to a different
aspect of the problem. "I think
that the change in the last ten
years, is that the conflict has
moved from the borders to in-
to
Jerusalem or Tel Aviv to par-
take in the nationwide celebra- blamed an Arab child for tak-
that "some Jewish kids
brought a chain, 'just in case.'
"The first night, there were
problems, rhe (Jewish) kids
tion, according to Raizek.
After returning home to
Neve Shalom, "They made a
campfire out where they
couldn't be heard," he adds.
Israeli Independence day
was "not a big party" at Neve
Shalom, but it was not a cause
for mutual antagonism, either.
Newcomers visiting Neve
Shalom also learn to resolve
their differences without
resorting to aggression.
Sonnenshein, recalling an in-
itial meeting between Arab
and Jewish teenagers, says
ing a watch.'
One Jewish boy who had
come prepared to do battle
'just in case,' was so ag-
gressive in his accusations of
the Arab child suspected of
having stolen the watch, that
"the other children decided
this boy had to leave," Sonnen-
shein recalls.
As it turned out, it was the
Jewish boy who had stolen the
watch.
"It started so badly, but end-
ed so well. The kids didn't
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side (the country). Egypt and
Jordan are safe, (there is) a
stalemate with Syria, but in-
side, more polarization."
But inside the boundaries of
Neve Shalom, whose name in
Hebrew means "oasis of
peace," Arab and Jewish
children are growing up
together "with no problem,'
according to Raizek.
"Of course, we have most of
the problems of any small com-
munity living intensively,"
Sonnenshein concedes.
And, perhaps, a few pro-
blems that other small com-
munities in Israel do not share.
Raizek recalls the conflict
over Israeli Independence
Day, usually marked by danc-
ing, parties, bonfires and the
singing of patriotic and trium-
phant songs by Jewish Israelis.
"There was discussion for
three or four days, and a lot of
emotions on both sides," he
recalls. "They understood why
we didn't want to celebrate,
we understood why they did
we were not trying to convince
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Supervising Rabbi
Rabbi Adath Yeshurun Congregation


want to leave they were all
in tears," says Sonnenshein of
the conclusion of the four-day
intensive workshop.
No matter how idealistic
people like Sonnenshein and
Raizek are, they still hear the
news reports of terrorist at-
tacks by Palestinians against
Israelis, of the Israeli
reprisals, and of conflicts in
the West Bank and other areas
of unrest inside Israel.
"Sometimes thinjjs happen
Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Rayek Raizek
Canada Pursues Nazi Cases
By MICHAEL SOLOMON
TORONTO (JTA) Justice
Minister Ramon Hnatyshyn is
negotiating to allow Canadian
investigators to take sworn
testimony in the courts of nine
nations that can be used to
prosecute 22 alleged Nazi war
criminals in Canada.
The new Criminal Code
allows Canada to try its
citizens for crimes committed
on foreign soil, but only after
sworn testimony is collected in
the countries concerned, ac-
cording to William Hobson of
the Justice Ministry. The
testimony, on video tape, may
be presented as evidence in
Canadian courts.
He said the justice minister
is negotiating with the govern-
ments of Austria,
Czechoslovakis, Hungary,
Israel, the Netherlands,
Poland, Romania, the Soviet
Union and West Germany for
permission to take testimony
about the suspects.
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to give you optimism,
sometimes things happen to
bring you down," says Raizek.
"But you don't need optimism
to live in Neve Shalom. You
need to combat the other side
(extremism)," he contends.
Sonnenshein asserts that he
and other Neve Shalom
residents "do no have the illu-
sion that all Israel will be like
Neve Shalom." His dream, he
says, is far more modest.
"To establish a guest house,
and a campus for the school for
peace with an academic
research institute on coex-
istence ... to have fifty
families living in Neve Shalom
with most earning their living
from within the communitv."
that would be the ideal, accor-
ding to Sonnenshein.
Raizek's aspirations for
Neve Shalom are even more
modest in scope.
"Just for us to succeed more
and more, as it is. With all its
potential, it is good enough to
be there."
Canadian War Criminal Indicted
By MICHAEL SOLOMON
TORONTO (JTA) Imre
Finta, a 71-year-old Toronto
restaurant owner of
Hungarian origin, was indicted
for war crimes in federal court
here. He is the first naturaliz-
ed Canadian citizen to face
prosecution under a recently
enacted law that allows Cana-
dian courts to try suspected
war criminals for crimes com-
mitted on foreign soil.
Finta was identified by
Sabina Citron, head of the
Holocaust Remembrance
Association, and several other
Holocaust survivors as a
former captain in the
Honveds, a police force in
Nazi-controlled Hungary dur-
ing World War II. He is said to
have tortured and murdered
Jews and looted their
possessions.
The indictment charges him
with crimes committed in the
Hungarian city of Szeged bet-
ween April 7 and July 15, 1944
and later in Austria and
Hungary. He is accused of kid-
napping and confining 8,615
Jews in concentration camps
and of manslaughter in the
deaths of an unspecified
number. He is believed to have
personally murdered 34 Jews
for their valuables.
Bail was set at $100,000
(Canadian). No trial date has
been announced.
The indictment of Finta has
an ironic twist. Three years
ago, he sued Citron for libel in
civil court for publicly denoun-
cing him as a war criminal. His
suit was rejected by the court.
Finta's name was the first to
be made public out of a list of
22 suspected Nazi war
criminals against whom a na-
tional government commission
found sufficient evidence to
warrant legal action.
The commission, headed by
Quebec Superior Court Justice
Jules Deschenes, spent more
than a year investigating
suspected Nazi war criminals
living in Canada.
The commission's report
named another 212 possible
suspects who warrant further
investigation.
DO YOU WANT THIS MAN AS
SECRETARY OF STATE?
\ ^-agaaakj^ Jesse Jackson s primary campaign has stirred apprehension
among many in ihis country. Problems with Jackson s candi-
dacy range from bigotry to questionable character, from per-
sonal foreign policy initiatives criticized by our own State De-
partment to support given by Jackson to pro-communist revo-
lutions and revolutionaries
Jackson's nomination as the Democratic Party's Presidential
candidate is unlikely. The real concern is the extent to which
Jackson's influence will prevail in the convention and the very
real possibility that, should the Democrats win in 1988, Jesse
Jackson will become a member of a Democratic Cabinet. Jack
Anderson, of the Washington Post, reported on November 2,
1987 that several party leaders believe that Jackson hopes to
be Secretary of State Jackson's record speaks for itself:
Jackson has denied all responsibility for knowledge about large contributions from
Khadaffi of Libya to his PUSH organization.
In 1984, Jackson called New York City "Hymietown." It took him two weeks of repeated
denials before he acknowledged making the statement.
e Jackson refuses to denounce Louis Farrakhan, an associate, who has called Hitler a
"very great man" and called Judaism a "dirty religion."
e Jackson has condemned Zionist philosophy and applauded the P.L.O.'s Yassir Arafat
with such statements as:
"To the extent to which the prophesy of Judaism is made silent by the politics of Zion-
ism, it is a threat to the glorious flower of Judaism."
"I am opposed to Zionism because its premise is built upon race."
About Arafat he said "Arafat is educated, urbane and reasonable. I think his commitment
to Justice is an absolute one."
e Jackson has condemned U.S. foreign policy from within the borders of Cuba and Nica-
ragua. He attacked the U.S. retaliatory bombings of Libya as "international terrorism."
A national grass-roots organization, the Coalition for a Positive America (CPA), has been
formed to address the concern raised by the Jackson candidacy. Its goal is to educate the pub-
lic about Jackson and make the public's concern known to the leadership of the Democratic
Party. It is aitparatfre that it be made clear that bigotry and anti-semitism cannot be legitimized
as part of the agenda of any political figure tent it time you got invoked?
JOIN WITH US NOW TO MAKE A TRULY HISTORIC DIFFERENCE
I strongly support your campaign to prevent Jackson s Domination ot the Democratic Convention and Administration
Enclosed Or my contribution ol
$18 $25 $36 $50 $100 $500 $1,000 Other
I wish to volunteer my time in your campaign
Please mtorm me about future coalition activities
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY ____
STATE
ZIP
PLEASE MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO
COALITION FOR A POSITIVE AMERICA (CPA)
P.O. BOX 520, BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 11219
Assemblyman Dov HikindChairman
Paid for by CPAPolitical Action Committee
Bob Abraham
Rabbi Louis Bernstein
Vincent Dougherty
Paul Draghi
Rabbi Gilbert Epstein
Sam Fox
Guy Granato
Hon Dov Hikind
Bob Jacobs
Rebetzin Esther Jungrels
Rabbi Arthur D Kahn
Rabbi Ellmelech Naiman
Rabbi Milton Polin
Dr David Sadorsky
Peter Schneider
Rabbi Fabian Scrtonfeid
Rabbi David Singer
Rabbi Phillip Singer
Shirley Singer
Louis Weiser
Steve Zakheim
'' .'.'.v.'.V. "."'.".'.
>


>age 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 18, 1987
'Simcha' Tax Feeds The Hungry
MAZON
Mazon, the organization that
irovides food for the hungry
>y asking American Jews for a
elf-imposed three percent
'tax" on the cost of weddings,
or- and batJmitvahs, anniver-
saries and other happy occa-
sions, says the idea has caught
>n so quickly that contribu-
ions have tripled in a single
'ear.
To date, Mazon the
iebrew word for food has
listributed a total of 44 grants
,o established community
igencies, both Jewish and non-
Fewish, that feed poor people
n this country and abroad.
Founded two years ago by
jeonard Fein, former editor of
Moment magazine, Mazon
eported total contributions of
5163,000 during its first year,
which ended November 1986.
>onations for the second year,
which has just ended, showed a
Iramatic jump to $550,000. In
iddition, the number of gifts
Theodore R. Mann
has more than doubled clim-
bing from 3.850 for 1985-86 to
^W^^ Only Hebraic symbols can
I flV truly express the intensity of
meanms of kosher, one of the most ancient
of dietary practices At Hotel Sofitel, we
understand the sanctity of the concept and
the strictness of kosher food preparation
The chef and staff of our kosher kitchen
banquet facilities are skilled and experi-
enced in the high standards of the tradition,
bot" here and in Europe, and they ensure that
those standards are met.
Our kosher kitchen is of course entirely
separate from our regular food service facil-
ities, and is fully certified All kosner meals
are prepared with separate utensils, and all
kitchen implements, china and serving dishes
are dedicated for kosher service only Dish
washing facilities likewise are separate
For weddings, Bar Mitzvahs, banquets or
special occasions, the kosher kitchen of
Hotel Sofitel is prepared to accommodate
any gathering And you may be well assured
that we know how to keep kosher For
information call 264-4888

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9,975 for 1986-87.
Theodore R. Mann, chair-
man of Mazon and president of
the American Jewish Con-
gress, says the organization
will make a stepped-up appeal
during the current holiday
season "because the need
keeps growing and Mazon is
one of the most direct and ef-
fective ways to help the
hungry and the homeless."
Among the agencies that
have received grants from
Mazon are Project Ezra, which
conducts a food kitchen for
elderly Jews on New York's
Lower East Side; the
American Jewish World Ser-
vice of Boston, which trains
local volunteers for an
agricultural development pro-
gram in Sri Lanka; and the
Wilkinson Emergency Service
Center in East Dallas, Texas,
which stocks a food pantry for
recent immigrants from Asia.
The Mazon concept of asking
Jewish families celebrating
happy events, or simchos, to
add a voluntary "tax" to the
cost of the function has proved
to be particularly appealing,
says Mann, because it adds to
the joy of the occasion.
"Giving three percent of the
cost of a party or other
celebration makes it more
meaningful and reflective of
the ancient Jewish imperative
to love one's neighbor and feed
the hungry," he notes.
According to Mazon's
founders, every gift is signifi-
cant, whether it is a $90 dona-
tion based on a $3,000 bar
mitzvah or a $600 gift pro-
mpted by a $20,000 wedding.
"The gifts are not only im-
Letter To Editor:
A JEWISH RESPONSE TO
HUNGER
portant for the food they buy,
but for the meaning they pro-
vide, both to the giver and the
receiver," Mann says. Hardly
a check arrives in the Mazon
office in Los Angeles that does
not include a note of thanks
from the donor for the oppor-
tunity to "make a difference,"
he points out.
Mazon has received the en-
dorsement of the Central Con-
ference of American Rabbis,
the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations, the
Rabbinical Assembly, the
United Synagogue of America,
the Federation'of Reconstruc-
tionist Congregations and
Havurot, the North American
Federation of Temple Youth.
Mazon's board is made up of
Orthodox, Conservative,
Reform and Reconstructionist
rabbis and laymen.
Hundreds of synagogues
throughout the United States
have established relations with
Mazon, and more than 1,000
rabbis are now urging their
congregants to adopt the prac-
tice of imposing a "Mazon tax"
on themselves and their
families when celebrating hap-
py occasions.
Irving Cramer, executive
director of Mazon, expects the
organization to become an
even more potent force in the
future by helping bring food
and life to additional
thousands of needy people and
by spreading the concept of
taxing oneself to help the poor.
Mazons' office is located at
2940 Westwood, Blvd. Los
Angeles, CA 90064; (213)
470-7769.
Peres Encourages
U.S.-USSR Initiatives
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Israeli Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres said Sunday
night he hopes President
Reagan and Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev will follow
up the progress made at their
historic summit meeting last
week by joining efforts to
reach peace in the Middle
East.
''It is essential to
demilitarize not only
warheads, but also war roots
to settle conflicts, global
and regional, diplomatically,
peacefully," Peres declared in
an address to Yeshiva Univer-
sity's 63rd annual Chanukah
convocation and dinner at the
Waldorf-Astoria Hotel here.
"We do not expect President
Reagan or Chairman Gor-
bachev to negotiate for us,"
Peres said, "nor do we expect
them to impose solutions upon
the parties. They should con-
tribute, not dictate. They
should legitimize the opening
of negotiations between the
parties."
Brandeis Controversy
EDITOR:
In its editorial addressing
the so-called "menu controver-
sy" at Brandeis. The Jewish
FUrridiftn was guilty of several
inaccuracies. The most unfor-
tunate of these is contained in
the opening paragraph, which
includes a statement that pork
and shellfish are "being servei
in the same (food) line as a
more traditional Jewish diet '
This is simply not true. The
kosher dining facility at
Brandeis, which is under the
supervision of a nuuhgioek, la
in a completely separate
building. Students wishing to
observe knuhrut can do so
without difficulty.
I would also take issue with
the editorial's suggestion that
Brandeis is seeking to "shrug
off its Jewish identity. While
achieving first-rank status as a
nonsectarian university in a
mere 40 years, Brandeis has,
nevertheless, remained
faithful to Jewish values and
Jewish learning. It is a leading
force internationally in Judaic
scholarship, in studies and
teaching that bear upon the
Middle East and in the
preparation of the next
generation of leaders in Jewish
communal affairs. In fact,
Brandeis boasts the largest!
university-based Jewish
studies program outside
Israel.
However, the real
significance of Brandeis
transcends the more parochial
concerns addressed above.
Brandeis stands as an
awesome testament to the
American Jewish community's
realization that ultimately.
Jewish survival and well-being
are predicated upon the expan
sion and nurturing of
knowledge and intelle
curiosity in a pluralistic -
ty. In this context, I'm remind
ed of a comment by A. Bar
llama;!i. a Porn
of Vale University and a
trustee of Bi who said
that "... Brandeis is ro
sanctuary from American
society but a tributary to it."
And what a tributary it is!
Brandeis is the youngest major
research university in the
United States. In 1961 it
became an authorized Phi Beta
Kappa chapter the youngest
independent institution to be
so honored in more than 100
years. In 1985 it was elected to
membership in the distinguish-
ed Association of American
Universities, one of only 56
research universities in the
country to achieve this status.
So, as Brandeis University
prepares to celebrate its 40th
anniversary, it continues to
strive towards an ideal syn-
thesis of the unique and the
universal. In so doing, it mir-
rors the still evolving Jewish
community that created it.
BRUCE B. LITWER
Brandeis University
Class of 1961
Isn't there
you'd
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Waldheim Denies New Charges
Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewufa Floridian Page 9-A


By RICHARD ENGEL
And SUSAN BIRNBAUM
jXA) Austrian President
fft Waldheim has denied
w allegations about his per-
involvement in atrocities
mitted against Yugoslav
;isans during World War
though he has admitted
wing of them.
le has also moved to sue an
strian periodical for
dishing a story about his
^uted acceptance of bribes in
[change for sparing the lives
hostages in Yugoslavia in
Ui and 1944.
Hie new allegations surfac-
as an international commis-
in meeting in Vienna, which
ildheim himself convened,
oadened the scope of its in-
stigation against him after
ceiving testimony from his
irtime colleagues.
Articles alleging Waldheim's
u\ activities in Yugoslavia
ere published in two German-
minee matrazines. the West
Germifr Stern and the
Austrian Wiener magazine.
The Stern article contended
that the German army unit in
which Waldheim was serving
as a lieutenant was directly in-
volved in massacres and depor-
tations in the area of Kozara,
Yugoslavia, during the sum-
mer of 1942.
A spokesman for Waldheim
denied reports in Stern linking
the Austrian president per-
sonally to the Kozara
atrocities, in which some 4,000
Yugoslavs were killed and
10,000 others were sent to
forced labor camps, where
thousands died.
Waldheim initiated legal
proceedings against Wiener
for an article, written by
American journalist Chuck
Ashman, which charged that
Waldheim, as an intelligence
officer in the Wehrmacht dur-
ing World War II, accepted
gifts of coins and gold jewelry
in exchange for sparing the
lives of hostages in Yugoslavia
in 1943 and 1944.
The Austrian Press Agency
was quoted as saying that the
Wiener article was intended to
incite "feelings against the
Austrian head of state by un-
qualified and untrue allega-
tions. In view of the publica-
tion and the recognizable in-
tention of defamation, the
president has decided to em-
power the Vienna public pro-
secutor to begin criminal
proceedings."
The Chicago Tribune
reported that Waldheim ad-
mitted in an interview with
that paper that he knew of
Nazi reprisals against
Yugoslav partisans, but insists
he was not involved in carry-
ing them out.
"Orders to carry out
reprisals exiaML" he told the
Tribune, but ^ey came from
the highest war office in
Berlin. That was well known
by everyone. Only I was not in-
volved in it."
Waldheim said in the inter-
view that he was a victim of "a
defamation campaign."
H^pyHanukkah
*i'*i**4
SS Guard Faces Denaturalization
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
blEW YORK (JTA) The
S. Justice Department has
hated denaturalization pro-
edings against Stefan
ger. 65, an alleged SS guard
the Auschwitz-Birkenau
hcentration/death camp dur-
;WorldWarII.
"he .Justice Department ac-
l^s Reger, a resident of
rdville. N.J., of lying about
alleged SS past to immigra-
i> officials when he entered
(K'nited States in 1952. He
e a citizen in 1957.
According to the Justice
tment, Reger, a native
of Filipovo, Yugoslavia, was
an SS guard at Auschwitz-
Birkenau between March 1943
and January 1945. Reger had
said he served in the 91st
Grenadier Regiment of the
German Army between 1943
and March 5, 1945, and from
then until April 29, 1945 as a
private in the Waffen SS, the
combat arm of the SS.
Reger reportedly told an
agent of the U.S. Army
Counter Intelligence Corps in
1952 that he received the
blood-typing tattoo given by
the SS. These tattoos were0"*7
generally placed under the
arm.
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 18, 1987
*
ID Card Questioned
Continued from Page 3-A
lawyers insist it is a KGB
forgery and have produced ex-
pert witnesses to back them
up. The latest is a Turkish-
born American anthropologist,
Professor Yasser Mehmed
Iscan, a specialist in the
human skeleton from the
University of Florida.
Iscan was called to refute
the testimony of an expert
witness for the prosecution,
Professor Patricia Smith, who
was questioned several months
ago. At that time, Smith show-
ed the court a video montage
to demonstrate that the card is
authentic. She said there was a
very high possibility that the
photograph is genuine.
Iscan who disputed this,
showed the court how
superimpositions on the
Trawniki photograph of recent
photographs of the accused in-
dicated difference. He said he
used this method when called
on by the Florida police to
compare an unidentified skull
with a photograph on a
driver's license.
Iscan spent most of his time
on the stand establishing his
professional credentials. He
said he was called upon
regularly by reputable journals ^
of anthropology to scan ar*^
tides submitted to them for
their expertise.
The professional standing of
another expert witness for the
defense, Anita Pritchard. was
cast in doubt earlier this year
when she collapsed under
cross examination by the pro-
secution. She later attempted
to commit suicide.
J
Se|
a G
lift
lei
th<
mo
reli
the
DM
iivi
m
fed
the
me
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Ml
Court martial is possible for those responsible
for guarding the camp near Kiryat Shemona
which was attacked when three hang gliders
took off from South Lebanon and one managed
to reach its objective. All the PLO pilots were
killed.
TOP CASH PAID
Hang Glider Court Martial Possible
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Disciplinary action, including
possible court-martial pro-
ceedings, may be taken
against Israel Defense Force
personnel for dereliction of du-
ty when a lone terrorist in-
filtrated Israel by hang glider
on the night of Nov. 25. The at-
tack killed six IDF soldiers and
wounded seven at a military
base in upper Galilee.
IDF Chief of Staff Gen. Dan
Shomron spoke of the possible
disciplinary action upon the
completion of a series of in-
quiries into the incident by the
IDF. The investigation ap-
parently found evidence of
negligence on the part of the
chief operations officer at the
camp and a sentry who
allegedly deserted his post.
Shomron and other senior
IDF officers met with Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin to
brief him on the results of the
investigation. Shomron
reportedly decided to transfer
the commander of the Nahal
brigade to which the unit that
came under attack belonged.
Nahal is the Hebrew
acronym for "Pioneer
Fighting Youth," soldiers who
combine agricultural work
with military training. Some
members have already com-
plained that publicity surroun-
ding the incident has unjustly
tarnished Nahal's reputation.
But the ability of a single
terrorist to inflict serious
casualties on a heavily armed
IDF unit has severely shaken
Montreal Campaign Tops $30M
MONTREAL Montreal's Combined Jewish Appeal at-
tained $30,237,192 last month, becoming the first Jewish
community outside of the United Stated to raise more than
$30 million in its annual campaign.
The figure represented an increase of more than $2
million over the 1986 Campaign on a gift-for-gift basis. The
Women's Division also attained a record total of
$3,599,538.
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Israelis' confidence in the
IDF's defense capabilities. The
public and the military are all-
the-more astonished because
the unit had at least 20 to 30
minutes' advance warning of a
terrorist infiltration by air.
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Sephardic Congress Votes Down Extremism
Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
JERUSALEM The World
Sephardi Congress ended with
a call to renew the spirit and
lift the aspirations of Sephardi
Jews in Israel, to strengthen
the Sephardi role as a
moderating force in Israel's
religious wars and to intensify
the search for Arab-Israel
peace.
Nessim Gaon, an Egyptian-
'} i>rn businessman who now
lives in Geneva, Switzerland,
was re-elected president of the
federation by acclamation at
the conclusion of the three-day
meeting.
of
he
as
ar
er
ro-
ed
In a series of resolutions,
some 400 delegates from
Israel and 16 countries around
the world voted to condemn
religious extremism, to help
overcome "mistrust between
Arab and Jew and to act "as a
force for religious tolerance."
In response to reports of
"acute distress" and "crisis"
in Israel's development towns,
where larger numbers of
Sephardi Jews from North
Africa and Oriental lands now
live, the WSF voted to create
new economic and educational
opportunities for young people
through a council of develop-
ment town mayors.
The centerpiece of the pro-
gram will be the establishment
of Sephardi House, which will
serve as headquarters for what
treasurer Stephen Shalom of
New York called "an un-
precedented self-help program
designed to have major and
long-range repercussions in
Israel."
As proposed by Shalom,
Sephardi House will "offer
programs of legal assistance
and advocacy, initiate pro-
grams to re-establish Sephardi
pride, provide a way for
Sephardim to express their
distinctive culture and
preserve the culture for future
generations and thus enhance
the Sephardi contribution to
the life of the Jewish people,
the cause of Jewish unity and
the State of Israel."
Fascell Cops Drug Funding
I Congressman Dante B.
Fascell (D-FL) has joined in
sponsoring legislation to
authorize the appointment of
an assistant attorney general
LLfor State and Local Law En-
forcement within the Depart-
ment of Justice.
aw enforce-
are heard by
"Coordinated law enforce-
ment efforts are crucial to
anti-drug efforts in Florida,"
Fascell said. "This legislation
state and local
ment officials
federal officials at the front-
end of the narcotics strategic
planning process."
The new assistant attorney
general would focus on
criminal and civil forfeiture ac-
tions involving state and local
law enforcement agencies, as
well as state and local law en-
forcement task force pro-
grams carried out with the
would enhance those efforts by Department of Justice.
ensuring that the concerns of The Congress approved $225
Israel Has NATO Status
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Israeli Defense Minister Yit-
zhak Rabin and Defense
Secretary Frank Carlucci sign-
ed a memorandum of
L Understanding that boosts
^Israel's status to the
equivalent of a NATO ally of
the United States.
The agreement, signed at
the Pentagon at the beginning
of Rabin's three-day visit here,
irovides for the United States
and Israel to carry out joint
military research and develop-
ment programs. It also allows
Israel to bid on military sales
to the Pentagon on the same
basis as NATO members.
Israel joins a select group of
five major non-NATO allies of
the United States that also
comprises Australia, Egypt,
Japan and South Korea.
The memorandum takes on
new importance in the wake of
Israel's agreement, under
pressure from the United
States, to cancel development
of the Lavi jet fighter. The
new pact is expected to help
save many of the Israel Air-
craft Industry jobs lost by the
cancellation.
Pentagon sources noted that
the memorandum is the latest
in a series of cooperating
agreements with Israel since
the 1970s, including the four-
year-old memorandum on
strategic cooperation.
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million in grants for state and
local law enforcement
assistance grants as part of
the 1986 Omnibus Anti-Drug
Abuse Act. Citing the Reagan
Administration's reluctance to
release this grant funding,
Fascell added, "Intelligence
sharing among federal, state
and local authorities could
stand improvement. Better
coordination of efforts among
all levels of law enforcement,
at both the planning and im-
plementation stages, will
enable us to have greater suc-
cess in the war on drugs."
At the World Sephardi Congress Nessim Gaon of Switzerland,
left, president, chats with, from left, Jacques KhafifofSao Patdo,
Brazil; Stephen Shalom of New York; and Yitzhak Navon,
Israel's former president, now Minister of Education.
AG MC VISA AMEX .AM MEZUZA$450 1 W IVI Touch Me Menorah-$2500 Original Limited Edition Graphics Sculpture A Agamographd ^ms At Studios he. ^*MMmr isio Pone* D*L*on Coral Gbi, r 44a-eere
Tis the season
to be cautions.
We joyously supply the power that lights up
your holiday season. And we ask you -
please use it carefully. Always read
and follow instructions that come with gifts
that are powered by electricity. For example, use
only grounded extension cords, don't trim hedges
when the ground is wet and keep electric cords
out of the way of cutting edges.
Christmas lights also should be used with care.
Keep them away from flammable decorations.
cluck for worn or broken sockets, cracked insulation
and frayed cords, turn them off when you go out
and use no more than three sets of lights
on an extension cord. And. of course.
never put lights on a metal tree.
Make safety your first New Years resolution.
And have a most joyous holiday season.



Page lfrA The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 18, 1987
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E. 1st Avenue, Miami, Florida

School-Time Religion
Jewish studies in Britain's schools may be drastically af-
fected by government plans to change the education
system. Concerned at low standards, the government is
planning to introduce a compulsory national curriculum
comprising ten "foundation" subjects. This means that
"soft" subjects such as religion will, it is feared, be almost
removed from the classroom.
Jewish schools at present devote 25-30 percent of their
curriculum to Jewish studies, but with the government pro-
posing to assess each school's performance and publish the
results, the pressure to abandon these studies may be too
great.
"Faith" In The Country
There has long been controversy in Israel over the fact
that Orthodox girls are not required to undergo military
training. Much of the heat has now been taken out of the
debate by the growing success of the Sherut Leumi (na-
tional service) campaign.
Three thousand observant girls are currently working in
hospitals, hostels for the elderly or for children, prisons,
the police force and underprivileged areas. Placement is ar-
ranged through the Israel Volunteer Association and de-
mand for the girls' services is increasing.
On A Knife Edge
Tension has been rising in Britain over a campaign to ban
shechita (Jewish ritual slaughter). Various groups
dedicated to animal welfare have attacked Jewish (and
Muslim and Sikh) ritual slaughter on the grounds that it is
cruel and inhumane.
But Jewish leaders whether lay or religious hit back
hard. They published much scientific evidence to show that
the animal does not suffer; indeed, they argued, because of
the high skills reauired of a shochet (ritual slaughterer) the
animal is less likely to suffer than under any other method.
The government has now intervened. A new type of pen
must be introduced which will involve the Jewish com-
munity in considerable expense. But it has firmly rejected
proposals to ban skechita, recognizing that a basic tenet of
faith would be compromised.
Synagogue Complaint
In Yugoslavia the Jewish community of Subotica, north
of Belgrade, is protesting against the misuse of its former
synagogue. The 200-strong community objects to the ex-
synagogue building being used to stage performances by a
theatrical company in which an actor is required to perform
unseemly acts.
The community donated the 1,000-seat synagogue to the
town some years ago but it retained the right to decide to
what purpose the building should be put. Now the com-
munity says its feelings are being ignored by the town.
Auschwitz Center Host To Youth
An international youth center near the site of the former
Nazi extermination camp at Auschwitz, Poland, housed
some 1,300 guests during its first year of operation and is
almost constantly filled to capacity during the vacation
season. The center was built with West German funds on
the initiative of Aktion Suhnezeichen.
Speaking on the first anniversary of the center's open-
ing, a spokesman said the majority of the guests were
groups of young people from the Federal Republic of Ger-
many and Poland. Two school classes from the German
Democratic Republic as well as young people from Israel
and Denmark also stayed in the center's three buildings,
which can house 70 people. While the primary goal of many
young German visitors is to face the history of their own
country, young Poles are primarily interested in learning
more about daily life in the Federal Republic.
Bomb Threat Thwarts Dutch Meeting
AMSTERDAM (JTA) A bomb threat emptied a
meeting hall hert of some 800 people, mainly non-Jews,
who gathered to protest the recent upsurge of anti-
Semitism in Holland.
The anonymous telephone warning was found, but the
threat seemed to underscore the reason for the gathering.
Tanenbaum Elected Chairman
NEW YORK The International Jewish Committee for
Interreligious Consultations (IJCIC) has elected by
unanimous vote Rabbi Marc H. Tanenbaum, director of in-
ternational relations of the American Jewish Committee as
its chairman. He succeeds Rabbi Mordecai Waxman of
Great Neck, L.I., who served as Jewish spokesman during
the meetings with Pope John Paul II and Vatican
authorities in Rome on Sept. 1, and later in Miami, Sept.
11.
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Pumping A Discount
Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Continued from Page 3-A
general's office, the U.S.
Justice Department and the
state attorney in Escambria
County. All are investigating
whether the sign violates local,
state and federal laws
regulating discriminatory
advertising and fair trade
practices.
"In Florida, you may not
Jrpost an advertisement that
suggests a person is
unwelcome in your place of
business because of his
religion," said Arthur
Teitelbaum, Southern area
director of the ADL.
Although Harrison main-
tains that Jesus loves
everyone, and everyone is thus
entitled to the discount, the
sign would still have a "chill-
ing effect" upon a potential
customer, said Teitelbaum.
"we are impatient at this junc-
ture with the length of time it
has taken Exxon to seek its
legal options."
Harrison, who has leased the
kfas station from Exxon since
T968, told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that he
"has taken a lot of heat" from
the Exxon business counselor
who represents the company
in his area.
"I've been getting a lot of
hassles from Exxon, but I am
the sole proprietor of my
business. I pay all the taxes,
rent and bills. I don't tell them
low to run their business and
they can't tell me," he said.
Harrison explained that he
'accepted Jesus Christ as his
Virtuoso Violinist
Heifetz Dead At 86
NEW YORK (JTA) -
I Heifetz, universally ac-
claimed as the greatest
iolinist of this century, died
ate Thursday night in Los
Angeles, of complications
resulting from a fall. He was
Heifetz, who performed con-
liroughout the world un-
73, was best known for
vhnical mastery of the
violin, the elegance and fine
'ietail of his playing, his in-
sistence on perfection and his
1 ,'sinterest in publicity. He was
we quoted as saying that
there was nothing to write
ibout his life other than the
iates of his birth and premier
performances.
In 1917, in the wake of the
Russian Revolution and
heightened persecution of
Jews, Heifetz left Russia and
jettled in the United States.
He made his American debut
Carneige Hall on Oct. 27 of
Jiat year an event one critic
ailed a "turning point in the
"usical history of the
ountry."
Heifetz first visited
Palestine in 1926 and donated
gj at the time to build a
^wish music conservatory
Jere. The Jascha Heifetz Hall
*as later built in Tel Aviv, the
* Wy music hall in the world to
*u his name.
Heifetz was married twice,
{.' to Hollywood star
Jlorence Vidor, whom he
forced in 1945, and then to
JJJJg; Spiegelberg, whom he
*med one year later and
forced in 1963.
savior" in July and posted the
sign as a way of advertising
Jesus name.
He said that "some, not a
tremendous amount" of
customers have taken advan-
tage of the discount, although
his support in the community
is "99 percent."
(,"I,run my station, live within
the law and have paid my debt
to society like anybody else. I
dont need Exxon breathing
down my neck," said Harrison.
"Jesus Christ represents
me and he's bigger than Exx-
on, he added.
According to attorney
Shimek, he has received Ex-
xon's letter and "will get to
it." Shimek said he suggested
the rewording of the original
sign and that it "boggies my
mind how (the second one) can
be offensive."
"If six percent of the people
in this country who are
atheists are offended, does
that mean 94 percent who
believe in a creator have to
bow down?" he added.
Avtong the politicos and activisits who march-
ed on "Summit Sunday," were from left, Con-
gressman John Lewis (D-Ga.), Martin Stein,
national chairman of the United Jewish Ap-
peal, Senator Gore, his son Albert Gore III,
his wife Tipper and daughter Kristin.
'Poor Relative' Refuseniks May Apply For Visas
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) Soviet
emigration officials told an
unspecified number of Moscow
Jewish refuseniks to reapply
to emigrate even though their
relatives have refused to sign
waivers of financial obligation.
But it was unclear whether
the waiver, known by
refuseniks as the "poor
relatives" clause, was officially
rescinded.
New York City Councilman
Noach Dear said it was. He in-
formed the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency that a spokesperson in
the office of Konstantin Khar-
chev, chairman of the Soviet
Council of Religious Affairs,
told him by telephone from
Moscow that the requirement
of a financial waiver from
relatives was being
abandoned.
He said the spokesperson
related that the emigration of-
fice was calling refuseniks and
telling them to reapply for
visas. Dear estimated that up
to 500 people could be
affected.
The waiver, clause 24 of the
codified rules for emigration
published in January, has been
an integral part of the process
of obtaining emigration visas,
and its absence has prevented
many refuseniks from receiv-
ing exit visas.
Relatives who do not wish
their relatives to emigrate fre-
quently refuse to sign the
waiver even if financial obliga-
tions are not at issue.
'Delay Tactic*
However, a long-time
Moscow refusenik told the
Long Island Committee for
Soviet Jewry that only
members of a seminar group
founded by Alia Zonis had
been notified they may reapp-
ly, and that refuseniks were
largely considering it a "delay
tactic' at the time of the
U.S.-Soviet summit meetings.
But Dear said refusenik
Vladimir (Zeev) Dashevsky of
Moscow, who is not part of
Zonis' group, said he received
a phone call from the Moscow
emigration office telling him to
reapply for a visa. Dashevsky
added that some of his friends
had also received similar calls,
and that the news had been an-
nounced in the media.
He told his daughter, Irina
Dashevsky Kara-Ivanov, a
former refusenik living in
Israel since May, by telephone
that he would reapply. But she
said she was not sure he or
other refuseniks would actual-
ly receive visas.
"I hope this is a good sign,"
she said, "but I will believe it
only when I see my father in
Israel We would like to
believe that there are positive
changes in the Soviet Union
and that there is real glasnost
and democracy."
Chanukah
Continued from Page 1-A
human family.
Let us hope Chanukah 1987
will heighten the con-
sciousness of the Jewish peo-
ple, and that of many others,
to rekindle the Maccabean
spirit in today's troubled
world: to refuse to stand by id-
ly, to resist capitulation to
modem-day tyrants the
Ayatollah Khomenis of the
world. These fanatics
desecrate the dignity of human
beings created in the sacred
image of God by denying
religious and political
freedoms. Instead of cursing
the darkness, Chanukah is a
time to light a candle for life
and hope.
Who Needs It?
We Do!
ouglas Gardens
Thrift Shops
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A division of the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged at Douglas Gardens


Page 14A Tlie Jewish noridian/Friday, December 18. 1987
Territorial Violence Mounts
Contain
Aninv
Yunis
held
found to
ly" in th<
from Page 3-A
ion into the Khan
ent was promptly
(the soldiers were
ve "acted proper-
circumstances.
In a bizarre aftermath, the
dead man's body was snatched
from the hospital morgue,
displayed in the streets by
demonstrators and returned to
the morgue.
Elsewhere in the Gaza strip,
soldiers at a roadblock wound-
ed four young Arabs who at-
tacked them with rocks.
One Arab was slightly
wounded in a clash with the
IDF in the West Bank. Youths
hurled rocks at army patrols in
the narrow alleys of the
Nablus casbah. They were
dispersed by tear gas. Mean-
while, a curfew was lifted at
the Balata refugee camp near
Nablus, only to be reimposed
later when rioting broke out in
the camp.
Officials of Israel's civil ad-
ministration in the territories
met with local Arab leaders to
try to calm the unrest. But
Arab municipality officials ap-
parently have little control
over what happens in the
refugee camps where pro-
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion activists are said to be the
source of unrest.
The authorities are hoping to
convince merchants in the ter-
ritories to reopen their shops,
which have been closed for
several days, and to prevail
upon Arab workers in the
West Bank and Gaza Strip to
return to their jobs in Israel.
About 60,000 Arabs from
the territories have failed to
show up for work in Israel, ac-
cording to a report in Al
Hamishmar. The paper said
the effects of the strike are felt
mainly at construction sites
and in municipal services, such
as street cleaning and garbage
removal, in which many Arabs
are employed.
Tax Loss
WASHINGTON A Jewish
defense organization has ask-
ed Maryland's highest court to
rule that the state can deny
tax benefits to a country club
which refuses to accept women
members.
The case involves the Burn-
ing Tree Country Club of
Bethesda, Maryland, which
challenged the legality of a
Maryland statute that denies
tax breaks to clubs that prac-
tice race, ethnic or gender
discrimination.
In an amicus curiae (friend
of the court) brief filed in early
December in the case of State
of Maryland v. Burning Tree
Club, Inc., the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith asserted that the club's
"right of association" is not
violated by the Maryland law.
Meyer Eisenberg, chairman
of ADL's National Legal Af-
fairs Committee, said "were is
a difference between the en-
joyment of the constitutional
right of association and that
state's responsibility to pay for
that enjoyment. The state is
not requiring Burning Tree to
admit women, but only to
forego a tax benefit if it
chooses to continue its
discriminatory membership
policy."
Meanwhile, the coalition
partners continued to clash
over short-term and long-term
policy in the territories.
Leaders of Likud's Herat fac-
tion accused the Labor Party
of aggravating the ferment in
the West Bank and Gaza by its
"low profile," "know-nothing"
policies.
They claimed that "quiet
and security will be restored
only when it is made clear that
Likud policy will be the one to
determine the future of
Judaea, Samaria and Gaza."
Laborites responded sharp-
ly, charging that Likud policies
were hindering any advance
toward negotiations for peace.
But Premier Yitzhak Shamir
got in the last word. He at-
tributed the unrest to the
"defeatist reaction of certain
circles" and charged that
"there are those among us
who believe that if we return
to the 1967 borders, the Arab
world will embrace us with
love." The premier spoke at a
meeting of Rafi, a dissident
faction that split from the
Labor Party long ago when it
was headed by Premier David
Ben-Gurion.
A dispute arose on another
front. According to a report in
Haaretz, Uri Porat, director
general of the Israel Broad-
casting Authority, charged
that television coverage of
disturbances in the territories
was abettng Arab propaganda.
Porat spoke at a meeting
with senior TV news depart-
ment personnel. He criticized a
segment of newscast in which
an Arab interviewee claimed
that "the army is to blame for
everything" and an army of-
ficer was asked repeatedly by
the reporter, "if it was not
S)ssible to prevent incidents,"
aaretz reported.
The paper also said there
was wide agreement at a
Cabinet meeting that the news
media were "inflating" the
situation in the territories.
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iaudi Sale Won't Fly miCHt
Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
TM
:'
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
,e Senate voted unanimously
prohibit the sale or tansfer
F-15E aircraft to Saudi
-abia, although it permitted
,e sale of earlier, less
phisticated models of the
15.
The amendment, sponsored
[Sen. Howard Metzenbaum
Ohio), also stipulated that
udi Arabia may not have
3re than 60 F-15s at any one
ne.
The House of Represen-
tives approved identical
islation last month as part
:he foreign aid authorization
president Reagan is ex-
cted to receive the bill later
month, after the Senate
id House bills are approved
final form.
n a related matter, the
nate Appropriations Com-
ttee voted to ban the sale of
^.'
Stinger anti-aircraft missiles
to Bahrain or any other Per-
sian Gulf state for one year.
The House had approved such
a ban last month.
Key supporters of Israel, in-
cluding Rep. Stephen Solarz
(D-N.Y.), Sen. Daniel Inouye
(D-Hawaii) and Sen. Robert
Kasten Jr. (R-Wis.) favored
selling Stingers to Bahrain,
arguing that it is a key ally,
since it provides the United
States with access to military
facilities.
The administration also sup-
ported selling Stingers to
Bahrain, with Defense
Secretary Frank Carlucci
leading the effort. It could in-
voke special emergency
powers to implement such a
sale. In 1984, President
Reagan imposed such powers
to sell Stingers and launchers
to Saudi Arabia. However, in
1985, Congress killed
Reagan's proposed sale of 72
Stingers to Jordan.
'!
E. German Town Remembers Shul,
W. German Town Refurbishes One
ONN (JTA) The East German town of Meiningen will
ct a memorial at the site of the former synagogue, destroyed
(th many other Jewish edifices in Germany and Austria during
ristallnacht," Nov. 9, 1938.
his first local memorial to the destruction will be a sign of
pect and gratitude to the town's former Jewish community
Id be used as an educational tool, according to a town
ikesman.
he Meiningen decision is consistent with a pattern of
^erstanding of Jewish appeals in the nation, observers point
Authorities have indirectly admitted the existence of neo-
izi groups in this country, a dramatic deviation from previous
icy, ana are conducting the first-ever trial of such a group.
md the Bavarian town of Ichenhausen. home to no Jews since
turned a 207-year-old synagogue building into a
fcural and social center. The baroque building, considered one
must In-autiful of its type in Germany, had been used as a
house since 1953.
SOME PEOPLE LIVE THEIR
ENTIRE UVES WITHOUT EVER
TASTING WATER.
Some people have never tasted water
that s fresh and pure as a spring Water
without sodium, pollutants, or cartxxiation
Water with nothing added, nothing taken
away Some people have never tasted
>1 'dean clear Mountain Valley Water from a
natural spring in Hot Springs. Arkansas
If you're one of those people, try
Mountain valley Water You'll be tasting
water tor the very first time
MOUNTAIN VALLEY WATER
SPRING WATER FROM HOT SPRINGS ARK
Purely for drinking.
DADE
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Water j
mi imikm. aam.y
> OZ.CIPT.IW
1987 David S Boxerman and Mark Saunders All rights reserved
"Has the Cohen-Ettinger Wedding been released on video
yet?!"
Israeli Arab Gets Life for Death
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) An
Israeli Arab convicted of kill-
ing a soldier narrowly escaped
the death penalty in a Nablus
military court.
Ahmad Ali Abu-Jabar, of
Kfar Kassem near Petach
Tikva, was sentenced to life
imprisonment for the murder
of IDF soldier Akiva Shealtiel
on April 6, 1985.
Two of the three judges
hearing the case favored the
death penalty, but it was not
imposed because the pro-
secutor failed to demand
capital punishment and one of
the judges dissented. The
death penalty cannot be impos-
ed without a unanimous vote
of judges trying a case.
Col. Yehoshua Halevy, presi-
dent of the court, in fact
reprimanded the prosecutor.
He said the death penalty was
called for in this case because
the accused ia a citizen of
Israel who betrayed his coun-
try by killing a soldier.
According to the authorities,
Abu-Jabar belonged to an AJ
Fatah terrorist gang, which
tried several times to kidnap
Israeli soldiers, finally suc-
ceeding with Shealtiel. After
his murder, they fired at a bus
and tried to kill a local leader
in the Arab town of Kalkilya
whom they suspected of col-
laboration with the Israeli
authorities.
Announcing
THE
EDGAR M. BRONFMAN
YOUTH FELLOWSHIPS
IN ISRAEL
1988
Tnis summer a group of out-
standing Jewish teenagers
in the U.S. and Canada, com-
ing from a variety of secular and synagogue backgrounds and entering
their senior year of high school, will spend a stirring month of study,
travel and dialogue in Israel.
They will be recipients of the Edgar M. Bronfman Youth
Fellowships,* a fully-endowed program based not on need but on
merit. The program begins July 10 and ends August 16. All meals will
be kosher, and Sabbath activities will be in the spirit of the day.
The Bronfman Fellows will be mature, talented and curious,
with proven qualities of leadership, intellect and character. Based in
Jerusalem, they will spend their time intensively exploring the land,
culture and customs of Israel. .taking part in seminars with some of
the country's most prominent political and cultural figures, debating
ideas and seeking answers on the different ways of defining oneselt as
a Jew today, in an atmosphere of mutual respect and earnest and
open dialogue.
They will be led by a team of educators and counselors of
rich Jewish background with a wide variety of Jewish perspectives,
And they will return home with /( 4eu,,,., ,,,. ,, application
a new understanding ofand ,, ;,/,,,s, call o\ write lit once to:
commitment to-the Jewish peo- E[)GAR M BR0NFMAN Y0LTH FELl0WSHirs in isiaj i
pie, the Jewish state and the 375 ftrk Avenue New York M 10152
building Of Jewish Unity Telephone (212) 7M>-152b
'fellowships covei .ill expenses including roundtrip tr.mspori.in.in from home room and board
travel m Israel and incidentals 1 mpleted applications must be 1


? MV *%. 1
>
MM .UHIimilHIHMJI, AscKxuurci 10, 1JOI
'Reel' Conflict On Status Quo
Continued from Page 5-A
streets of Jerusalem between
haredi protesters shouting
"Shabbos!" and sometimes
throwing bottles and stones,
and police determined to con-
tain their illegal
demonstrations.
There were also political
repercussions. Prime Minister
Yitzhak Shamir came out
against Sabbath screenings in
the city, and local Likud
members wearing shirts say-
ing "Shabbat Peace Now" (a
play on the name of the left-
wing movement. Peace Now)
briefly joined with t e haredi
demonstrators. P esident
Chaim Herzog sp -;e out
against the screenii S, and
held meetings with al sides of
the conflict in order to help
resolve it. All of the religious
party representatives on the
Jerusalem city council from
Shas, Agudat Yisrael and the
National Religious Party
dropped out of the city's ruling
coalition. This was not enough
to topple Kollek's One
Jerusalem party coalition,
which runs the city, but it left
him with a scant three seat
majority.
"I'm not political at
all," said one young
Jerusalemite outside
Beit Agron. "But I
live here, I work here,
and I want to enjoy
myself here."
The high holidays brought a
break in both the screenings
and the protests. Top level
negotiations over the movie
issue continues, and some
political analysts hopefully
suggested that a compromise
was in the works that could
defuse the issue. One high
municipal official said a solu-
tion to the Sabbath movie con-
troversy could be tied to a
resolution to Jerusalem's long-
awaited soccer stadium.
Because of religious party
pressure. Prime Minister
Shamir has been fearful of
signing the final go-ahead for
the stadium's construction. A
possible trade-off of the two
issues is being seriously
discussed in some quarters.
Veteran observers of
Jerusalem's religious wars
have predicted that when the
tear gas clears, the Sabbath in
the nation's capital will return
to its accustomed peace and
quiet, with a few additional
non-commercial Friday night
film showings. Teddy Kollek
may indeed once again suc-
cessfully patch up the fabric of
his culturally divided city. But
even he cannot repair the
damage done to the tottering
foundation of the status quo by
this latest evidence of the ever-
widening fault line between
Israel's secular and ultra-
Orthodox
populations.

Heinz Eppler. right, president of the American Jn
Distribution Committee examines the high quality (tfthit
sorghum crop in Gondar province in Ethiopia. The agricultural
recovery project, which was assisted by $1.3 million
religious from the United States Agency for International Dr.,
(AID), has resulted in the best crops in the last twenty y>
As usual, all eyes turned tc
the mayor to arrive at a com-
promise that would hold back
the forces that continually
threaten to undo the tenuous
tapestry of tolerance with
which Jerusalem's peace is
maintained. Though he has ex-
pressed sympathy for Sabbath,
movie-goers, the city's legal
action against Beit Agron con-
tinues, and will eventually be
decided in the courts.
Respect
Chanukah
and
Christmas
Continued from Page 5-A
neighbors by viewing their
festival as a special and holy
occasion to them.
To those Jews for whom the
Christmas season presents a
dilemma, remember: You have
a great and grand festival in
December Chanukah. It is a
festival which speaks of liberty
and freedom, with the
beautiful symbols of the
menorah and candles for eight
days, with special foods and
games. All of which bespeaks
the great miracle of religious
liberty and distinctiveness
which took place thousands of
years ago, and which can be
renewed even in our own
times.
This holiday season, may
Jews celebrate the miracle of
religious distinctiveness and
cultural identity, a dream
which America makes possi-
ble. To the Christian communi-
ty, a Merry Christmas. And to
the Jewish community, a Hap-
py Chanukah.
Rabbi William Berkowitz is
national president of the
American Jewish Heritage
Committee.
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11
:> c

By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
It was not exactiy a
Chanukah miracle when the
eight-foot menorah was lit at a
Florida Turnpike toll booth
location, despite numerous
obstacles.
Neither the Department of
Transporation nor the
Broward Circuit Court had
granted permission for Rabbi
Aron Lieberman of the
Lubavitch Synagogue of Inver-
rary Chabad to erect the
menorah on the publicly owned
site, so Lieberman hoisted the
large candelabrum onto the
roof of a car. And if he has his
way, Chanukah lights will
shine at toll booth plazas
throughout the eight nights of
the holiday.
"We will continue to do this,
and, at the same time, our suit
against the Department of
Transporation still remains,"
says Lieberman, whose
synagogue was initially
granted permission to erect
menorahs at five toll booth
plaza sites by the DOT.
When the DOT withdrew
permission amidst protests by
the Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith and American
Jewish Congress, Lieberman
decided to file suit.
Last week, Lieberman said
that he would "also sue ADL
and AJC for interfering with
our civil rights," but is now
demurring.
Lieberman maintains that
his suit against the DOT is still
active, despite the fact that a
Menorahs No Miracle On Turnpike
judge decided on Monday not
to allow Lieberman to display
his menorahs.
Stanley Broder, Lieber-
man's attorney, says that the
state has to answer our com-
plaint in thirty days or so .
(but) it will be quite a while
before we actually, physically
get back in court.
Broder, who is president of
Inverrary B'nai B'rith and co-
chairman of its ADL commit-
tee, attends ADL civil rights
meetings in Miami once a
month.
"I'm certainly not against
the ADL," he says of his posi-
tion as a member of the very
organization whose views he is
opposing in court. "ADL does
fine work. It's just this issue."
Broder says he has written
Arthur Teitelbaum,southeast
regional director of ADL,
"that they have been doing a
disservice to the Jewish com-
munity in the position they're
talking. They're causing
divisiveness in the Jewish
community."
Broder is not the only figure
associated with ADL who ap-
proves of Lieberman's stance
on this issue.
State Rep. Peter Deutsch,
who serves on a legal commit-
tee for ADL of Broward Coun-
ty, initially helped arrange for
Lieberman to publicly display
his menorahs. The ADL
discovered the toll booth plaza
plan when Deutsch announced
Continued on Page 5-B
-,
K
Menorahs Muddy
Church-State Waters
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
The controversy over whether or not menorahs can be
appropriately placed on public sites may still be burning,
despite the fact that a federal district court in Tampa, ruled
this Tuesday that two Lubavitch groups, from Sarasota
and Tampa, will not be permitted to erect menorahs on
public property.
The American Jewish Congress, along with the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, filed an amicus brief in
support of city officials of Tampa and Sarasota, who were
sua when they refused to grant Lubavitch groups permis-
sion to erect menorahs on city-owned sites.
New Arthur Teitelbaum, regional director of the ADL,
and Mark Freedman, regional director of AJCongress,
have voiced their approval over Judge Elizabeth
Kovachevich's decision.
Much of the controversy hinges on the definition of a
menorah. Lubavitcher Rabbi Yossi Dubrowski testified in
Tampa that it "definitely is not a religious symbol," argu-
ng that the menorah is a religious symbol only when it is in
'i home for ritual purposes.
But Arthur Teitelbaum of the ADL insists that a
menorah is a religious symbol, whether it is in the home, in
the backyard ... or on public property.
'The cross, the star, the creche and the menorah are all
religious symbols in the eyes of the courts and of the
faithful," Teitelbaum explains. "Christmas trees, represen-
tations of Santa, and dreidels are symbolic of the various
holidays, but are not themselves religious objects."
Creches, however, may be legally displayed when sur-
' "unded by other festive holiday decorations according to a
1984 Supreme Court ruling. Some people argue that
menorahs should be displayed in similar fashion.
Counters Fred Levine, associate director of the ADL,
"Just because there has been some murkiness in the ap-
plication of church-state separation to specific cases,
doesn't mean we should further muddy the waters by
throwing in all sorts of competing religious symbols into
'he public arena."
It appears, however, that the symbols are in the arena,
and the battle may be a long one. Predicts AJCongress'
Mark Freedman of the Tampa and Sarasota lawsuits:
"There will probably be a full trial next summer."
Reprinted by permission from "Time To Rhyme Jewish
Holiday Book." Art by Conduce Ruskxn.
Feminists Study 'Supermom'
Contrary to previous
research, which has suggested
that, in the non-Jewish popula-
tion, the most successful
career women are single,
divorced or childless, Jewish
career women seem to com-
bine marriage and childbear-
ing with successful careers. At
least, this is one finding which
has emerged from a study of
approximately 1,000 Jewish
business and professional
women, sponsored jointly by
American Jewish Committee
and Lilith magazine.
Less positive findings of the
study were that more than half
of those surveyed felt that the
Jewish community does not
give support to women as they
try to juggle their obligations
as wives, mothers and
businesswomen, and that
single women in the sample
"had definite and often
negative stereotypes about
Jewish men," whom they
viewed as being "caring, in-
telligent, achieving, and with
good potential as fathers," but
also "more dependent and
traditional and less sexy and
'macho' than non-Jewish
men."
The study, conducted by
Professor Rela Geffen Monson
of Gratz College in
Philadelphia and entitled
"Jewish Women on the Way
Up: The Challenge of Family,
Career and Community," was
based on 944 responses to a
questionnaire that was
distributed to two groups of
women: subscribers to Lilith,
a Jewish feminist quarterly,
and business and professional
women identified by several
major Jewish organizations.
Profiling the respondents,
Monson reported that approx-
imately half were over 40 and
a third between 30 and 40; 90
percent had at least some col-
lege education and 60 percent
had completed graduate
school; 31 percent of their
fathers were professionals and
another 43 percent managers,
and nearly half of their
mothers worked outside the
home while the respondents
were in high school.
The sample included at-
torneys, judges, bankers,
business people, physicians,
rabbis, cantors, journalists,
college professors, social
workers, school teachers,
elected officials, and others.
Some 70 percent of the sam-
ple came from homes where
their parents were involved in
two or more Jewish communal
activities, 80 percent had had
some formal Jewish education
and about two-thirds had had
informal Jewish educational
experiences, such as a move-
ment, summer camp, or trip to
Israel as youngsters. Almost
all had at least some ex-
perience with Jewish rituals in
their childhood homes.
For the women in this study,
by and large, participation in
the labor force did not lead to
avoidance of childbearing. Of
the 603 women sampled who
had ever married and had
children, 19 percent had one
child, 44 percent had two, and
33 percent had three or more.
Monson stated that "Because
they did not avoid or delay
childbearing. most of the mar-
ried Jewish career women
were embedded in a 'super-
woman' syndrome, daily juggl-
ing multiple role obligations."
About three-fourths of the
married respondents said their
husbands were "very suppor-
tive" of the women's efforts to
Continued on 1'ajje fi-B
Oiuii
Community
Friday, December 18, W The Jewish Floridian -Section B


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 18, 1987
Happenings
James Madison High School. Brooklyn. NY. alumnae and
alumni are forming a committee for a reunion of graduation
classes from 1927 to date. Graduates, former students, or former
members of the James Madison faculty are requested to submit
their names and addresses. For information. 498-1564
498-9375.
or
The Annual Yiddish Session of the Israel Histadrut Foundation
in Miami Beach will take place at a Dessert Luncheon on Sunday.
Dec. 27 at 130 p.m at the Fontainebleau Hihon Hotel. This
year's session will feature a Cantorial Video Tribute to Sidor
Belarsky by the following Cantors: Arie Braum. Chief Cantor of
the Israeli Army. Isaac Goodfriend from Atlanta. Ga.. Saul
Meisels from Cleveland. Ohio. Ben/ion Miller, from Brooklyn.
N.Y. and Yaakov Motzen. from Montreal. Canada. For reserva-
tion. 531-8702
The Two Timer Club, wekomes all married couples, second
time around or more, make new friends, which includes dining,
dancing, shows and travel A holiday party will be held Wednes
day. Dec. 23 at 8 p.m. at the Beach Federal Savings and Loan.
1110 Hallandale Beach Blvd For information. 931-3912
BETH lORAH GONOEGATON
BENTNfYRDKOVva^
1051 North Miami Baach Boulevard/North Miami Beach, FL 33162
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz, Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Rev. Mordechai Adler, Ritual Director
Robert Billig, President
Harvey L. Brown, Executive Director
Happy Chanukah
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 N.E. Miami Gardens Drive Miami, Florida 33179
PHONE 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Zvi Rozen
Executive Director Harry J. Silverman
Congregation President. Isaac Franco
Sisterhood President. Marilyn Ladis
Men's Club President. Glen Koch
Religious School Principal. Rochelle Baltuch
Early Childhood, Joan Bergman
Youth Director. Mark Sykes
Happy Chanukah
Temple Beth Am
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Miami
Phone 667-6667
Happy Chanukah To All Members & Friends
Temple Emanu-EI
1701 Washington Ave., Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
Phone 538-2503
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi Lawrence M. Schantz, President
Wish All Members and Friands A Happy and Haalthy Chanukah
Temple B'nai Zion
200 178th Street Miami Beach 33160
Phone 932-2159
Happy Chanukah
Temple Moses
1200 Normandy Dr.
Miami Beach, Florida 33141
Happy Chanukah
Mogen David Congregation
9348 Harding Ave. Surfside, Fla. 33154
Phone 865-9714
Wishes All Members and Friends A Happy Chanukah
Happy Chanukah from
Amit Women
(Formerly American Mizrachi Women)
633 N.E. 167th St., Suite 815
North Miami Beach, FL 33162
Dr. Irving Lehrman ivill speak
on "A Salute to the Maccabees"
Friday evening, Dec. 18, dur-
ing the opening late Friday
evening service of Temple
Emanu-EI of Greater Miami.
During his Friday night ser-
vice, Lehrman will recount the
story and messages of
Chanukah, the eight-day
Festival of Lights and Festival
of Dedication.
y
Sandra Quinn, a native of
Miami Beach and an alumna
of Yeshiva University's Stern
College for Women, has ac-
cepted the position of founding
chairman of Stern College's
Board of Directors. Quinn, a
Jewish communal leader in
Great Neck, N.Y., where she
now resides, is heading a group
of business, communal, and
educational leaders who will
chart the course for Stern Col-
lege, the University'8
undergraduate division of
liberal arts and sciences for
women.
Young Judaea
To Form Knesset
Young Judaea is holding its
Regional Winter Convention
at Camp Owaissa Bauer Dec.
18-22. Approximately 150
Jewish teenagers from Florida
and Puerto Rico are expected
to attend.
According to David London,
regional director, the theme of
the convention is "Israel To-
day." After a brief orientation
session on how the Israeli
parliament works, the at-
tendees are campaigned about
joining different political par-
ties; and there is a "general
election." Following the elec-
tion, they have to form a coali-
tion government where the
bigger parties try to convince
the smaller parties that they
share common interests.
The culmination of the four-
day convention is on Monday,
Dec. 21 from 3-5 p.m. when the
government will be formed.
For information, 947-0637 or
247-6016.
Chase Federal Savings
and Loan Association
Extends
Chanukah Greetings
To All
>c
"Helping you in monaty ways"
SEYBOLD BUILDING
36 NE 1st. Street Miami
374-7932
Wishes All Their Friends
And Customers
A Happy Chanukah
Lilyan cortez
of wall-co
6700 NW 77 Court
592-8000
Happy Chanukah To All Our Friends
Wishes All Its Friends A Very Happy Chanukah
GM FORD AMC
LEASING & SALES
CARS and TRUCKS -
All At Special FLEET DISCOUNT PRICES.
i iTAUiDCru Division of PEXI Overseas
MU II \JT lOUr 3755 N.W. 78 Ave., Miami 33161;
592-9260
Take 86 Sir W to 79 Ave Turn left and first left Utter 38 Str
(Behind pink bldg.l
lilt I Ml
Del Amo Plumbing Inc.
7323 N.W. 8th St.. M.am. 264-9712
Wishfs All Their Friends Ami Customers
A Happy Chanukah


No Conflict Seen ..
Fri<^^^n^rj^i987m Jewish FJoridian Page 3-B
XC
Hf
.
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
THE NUMBER of public
schools that have Saturday
learning programs has increas-
ed from three to over 30 in re-
cent months and there are in-
dications that the popularity of
Saturday school will grow.
Yet because these courses
are being offered to students
and teachers on a voluntary
basis, school and union of-
ficials told The Jewish Flori-
dian there is no conflict
created for Jews who observe
the Sabbath. Members of the
Seventh-day Adventist faith
also observe a Saturday
Sabbath.
Earlier this year, the con-
cept of Saturday school was
limited to three inner-city
schools that were conducting
pilot programs known as Part-
ners in Education (PIE), in
which students having trouble
with their studies could use the
extra morning hours on the
weekend to brush up on skills
in subjects such as reading and
math.
When The Jewish Floridian
spoke with school board
members and school officials
- including Superintendent
Saturday School Programs Flourish
Joe Fernandez it was told
the program was limited to a
few schools and that Jewish
students were simply not
affected.
But last month, the school
system implemented Saturday
morning programs in 27 so
called "Chapter One" elemen-
tary schools with funding for
low-achievers.
Some teachers who are
Jewish don't mind working on
Saturday and have even
volunteered for the program.
IT'S NOT objectionable to
me or I wouldn t do it," said
Meryl Hersch, a third grade
teacher at Charles Drew
Elementary School, which
pioneered the Saturday school
program.
Sherry Krubitch, an assis-
tant principal at Drew, said
she is Jewish, but not Or-
thodox, and works on Satur-
day. "From the principal on
down to the custodian,
everyone is asked whether
they want to work on Satur-
day,' Krubitch said.
"And I think it's excellent to
have this program on Satur-
day. The kids come on Satur-
day because there's no
pressure. The teachers can
Mr. and Mrs. Bernardo Batievsky
Wish Friends, Family and
The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy Chanukah
Mr. and Mrs. G. Feldenkrels and Family
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy Chanukah
Mr. and Mrs. A. Ferdle
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy Chanukah
Dr. and Mrs. Morry Fox and Family
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy Chanukah
Mr. and Mrs. Gary R. Gerson and Family
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy Chanukah
Mr. and Mrs. Barton S. Goldberg
Wish All Friends
A Happy Chanukah
Mr. and Mrs. Howard W. Gordon and Family
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy Chanukah
The Isan Family
Wish All Friends and Family
A Happy Chanukah
have their own freedom, their
own teaching styles and they
can do more things in depth.
While six days a week may
be allowable for classroom
drills, even Krubitch agrees
that seven days of school
would be pushing it. "I don't
think they'll have school on
Sunday, too," she said.
"Everybody has to have a day
of rest."
The Jewish Floridian did
receive a call from a teacher at
a middle-school at which forms
were circulated asking
teachers if they wanted a
Saturday program in their
school.
"I would really like to see
weekends left as weekends,"
said the woman, who identified
herself as an observant Jew,
but requested anonymity for
fear of reprisal.
"But if they want to offer it
on weekends, why is Saturday
singled out? Why not Sunday,
and then see where it would go
from there."
THE TEACHER, who has
worked in the Dade school
system for 20 years, added,
"More hours in school doesn't
necessarily make it better. If
they were doing more in school
hours and if the money they
were spending to teach on
Saturdays would be used to
put aides in the classroom,
then there wouldn't be a need
for Saturday school."
"I object to the fact that the
schools have become a babysit-
ting institution for working
parents."
Some teachers also point out
that many courses teachers
need to attend for advanced
certification are held on
Saturday.
Murray Sisselman, president
of United Teachers of Dade
classroom teachers union, said
he would welcome any calls
from teachers who are con-
cerned about Saturday classes.
"Not one person that I know
of has called this union about
the question you're bringing
up," Sisselman said. "At this
time, since it hasn't come up,
the union hasn't taken any
stance on this thing because
you have to understand, to
work on this Saturday pro-
gram is above their regular
contract and no individual has
to come in."
The Saturday school pro-
grams, in general, are being
examined by the union,
Sisselman said, adding that
the issue of religion will be
reviewed.
"The union has many
members who are Seventh-day
Adventists and since I'm the
former educational director of
Temple Sinai of North Dade
and I was also the principal of
Temple Emanu-El in Fort
Lauderdale, I do have an em-
pathy for these things," he
said.
But Sisselman and most
school officials and educators
seem to agree that the needs
and wants of a majority of
students should not be
neglected in order to accom-
modate the needs and wants of
a small group of individuals.
AT NORTH Beach Elemen-
tary School, which has a 20-25
percent Jewish student enroll-
ment, there is no Saturday
school program. Yet, prin-
cipal, Dr. Michael Kesselman,
said he would support it.
"I would personally welcome
it. I'm Jewish and I'd be the
first one here," Kesselman
said.
"My basic bottom line is that
the more education that we
can give our children, the bet-
ter By making programs
available we're not penalizing
anybody if they don't attend.
The majority out there should
have the opportunity to par-
ticipate. Those Jews who are
ultra-Orthodox probably don't
go to public schools anyway. If
we would have a massive in-
flux of very religious students
it might be a new ball game."
Kesselman noted that he
would explore the option of
having the additional school
program during weekday after
school hours.
Herbert Weinfeld, director
of the Chapter One program
for the Dade County school
system, said the extended lear-
ning program has been
operating in 68 elementary
schools since November. Each
school decided which option to
choose, afterschool or
weekend. Twenty-seven of the
schools opted for the Saturday
program, which runs for three
hours, while 41 of the schools
chose to have the program dur-
ing the regular school week,
which runs one hour a day.
three days a week.
THE PROGRAM concen
trates on reading skills and
content development. Another
component will include
computer-assisted instruction.
General program guidelines
instruct principals to select
teachers for the extra learning
program from their staffs
unless there are none willing
to participate. Weinfeld said
he knows of no case in which a
teacher has been ordered to
work the extra hours. The
number of teachers par-
ticipating in the program is
Continued on Page 20-B
Dr. Bruce A. Julian
Dr. Arthur J. Schatz
Wish Everyone A Happy Chanukah
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Lawrence
of
Lawrence Plumbing
Wish Everyone A Happy Chanukah
Howard and Sandy Mesh
Ronna and Beth
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy Chanukah
Councilman and Mrs. Ted Nelson and Family
Bay Harbour Island
Happy Chanukah
Mr. and Mrs. L. Rogers
Wish All Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy Chanukah
Dr. and Mrs. Hugh Unger
Wish All Patients and Friends
A Happy and Healthy Chanukah
Mr. and Mrs. Irving Mark Wolff
Extend Seasonal Greetings
To Their Many Friends and Relatives
Mr. and Mrs. Sigmund Zilber and Martin
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy Chanukah



Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 18, 1987
Jews In Nursing Homes-The Financial Dilemma
By MARTIN HOCHBAUM
Jews, like other Americans,
are living longer. How aging
Jews pay for necessary nurs-
ing home care may become a
crisis for our community.
Already, it is a reason for
significant concern.
It is clear that paying for
nursing home care has par-
ticular significance for the
Jewish community. Approx-
imately 90 percent of nursing
home patients are 65 or older.
In 1980, when 11.3 percent of
Americans were in this age
group, it included 15.5 percent
of American Jews, a percen-
tage more than one-third
higher than the figure for the
general population.
Our higher percentage of
elderly helps explain why Jews
are more likely than the rest of
the population to reside in nur-
sing homes. In 1976, Jews
represented less than 3 per-
cent of the American popula-
tion. However, a survey that
year of nursing home patients'
religions concluded that 4.2
percent of them were Jewish.
Jews also overwhelmingly
reside in metropolitan areas,
areas in which the cost of nurs-
ing home care is considerably
above the national average.
For example, it is not unusual
for nursing homes in the New
York metropolitan area, a
region in which about one-
third of all Jews live, to cost
$45,000 a year, or more than
twice the national average.
The combination of costly
care and limited resources
makes long-term institu-
tionalization out-of-reach of
most individuals.
According to a study
published last year by the U.S.
House of Representatives
Committee on Aging, within
but a few months of institu-
tionalization, most single
elderly patients become in-
digent and are enrolled on
Medicaid. This is not surpris-
ing since the average nursing
home patient is about 80, an
age by which savings are
usually severely depleted and
both pension and social securi-
ty benefits are low because
they are based on the lower
earnings of past decades.
By default. Medicaid often
becomes the patient's
"choice" of paying for nursing
home care. However, most pa-
tients prefer an alternative
mechanism since Medicaid re-
quires both patient and spouse
to become virtually im-
poverished in order for the pa-
tient to qualify. Perhaps more
troubling to the elderly is that
although entering a nursing
home is a frightening pro-
spect, the latter is exacerbated
by fears of not having the abili-
ty to put aside sufficient funds
to cover the cost of such a
possibility (how much, for how
long?).
Since Jews take enormous
pride in our impact on public
policy, our collective ignorance
of this subject is especially ap-
palling. Generally, informed
people believe that "the local
Jewish federation home will
take care of me.' This may be
true if a bed is available. But it
will still require payment for
this care, usually through
private funds. Medicaid or
Medicare (the latter's
coverage for nursing homes is
very limited).
Latelv. a more common
response is that the
catastrophic health insurance
proposal recently adopted by
the Senate and House of
Representatives will cover
these costs. Unfortunately,
and contrary to common
perception, the recent
catastrophic health insurance
legislation does not cover nurs-
ing home care.
Our community must
carefully examine the private
and public alternatives to the
current system so that a com-
munal response can be
developed to deal with an im-
portant issue, one that is of
growing importance. For ex-
ample, private sector alter-
natives include nursing home
insurance policies and In-
dividual Medical Accounts
(modeled after Individual
Retirement Accounts), pro-
posal more useful to the more
affluent. A public sector ap-
proach, possibly linked to
Medicare or a new section of
the Social Security Act, would
have the potential advantages
of universal coverage and
spreading the cost among
beneficiaries.
It is obvious that a serious
examination of how we pay for
nursing home care is needed so
that we may come up with a
policy affecting tens of
thousands of elderly Jews and
their families. To fail to
engage now in the required
long range planning will
minimize our influence on the
emerging debate on the issue.
The Jewish community's
success in the public arena is
often undermined by our in-
ability to plan rather than
react. Nursing home care is an
issue that requires more of our
focused attention. Ultimately,
it will have a direct or indirect
effect on each of us as we have
to pay or seek payment for the
nursing home care of a friend,
relative, spouse, or, ourselves!
Martin Hochbaum is direr-
tor of the American Jeunxh
Congress' Commission on Na-
tional Affairs.
Review Of Catholic-Jewish Jolts
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The ongoing dialogue between
Catholics and Jews has proven
strong enough to withstand
several shocks that jolted rela-
tions between the two faiths
during the past year, a leader
of the Roman Catholic Church
in the United States said.
"While 1987 was a turbulent
year in Catholic-Jewish rela-
tions, nevertheless, the
delicate fabric of the new rela-
tionship that Catholics and
Jews have been weaving in pa-
tient dialogue for the past 20
years, in this country and
throughout the world, remain-
ed intact," according to Dr.
Eugene Fisher, executive
secretary of the Secretariat
for Catholic-Jewish Relations
of the National Conference of
Catholic Bishops.
Fisher, speaking before the
American Jewish Committee's
Interreligious Affairs Commis-
sion, mentioned among other
events, the audience Pope
John Paul II granted Austrian
President Kurt Waldheim last
June.
The Catholic leader also
referred to "the recent con-
Continued on Page 16-R
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Parkland Posts Copycat Menorah
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridtan Staff Writer
While Rabbi Aron Lieberman of the Lubavitch
synagogue of Inverrary Chabad fights in and out of the
courts for what he believes should be his right to erect
menorahs by turnpike plazas his notoriety is spreading
across the state.
But Lieberman may be spreading controversy, as well.
"I had seen in the newspaper that (Lieberman) was try-
ing to erect menorahs along the Florida turnpike, and that
the Department of Transportation was not going to allow
him to do that," says Pugliese, commissioner for the city of
Parkland, in north west Broward County.
"Now, I had been trying for over a year to find a com-
pany that would be able to make an outdoor menorah for
the outside of city hall, and had been unable to find one. So
when I saw Rabbi Lieberman's name in the paper (and
heard about) the excess of menorahs, I contacted him, and
he was very receptive," Pugliese continues.
Lieberman promised Pugliese that his group would
donate a menorah to the city of Parkland. A candlelighting
ceremony was subsequently planned.
Pugliese relates that a Christmas tree was donated the
previous year.
"Parkland hasn't had a menorah, and I feel that it's
about time it did," she asserts.
Pugliese, who is Jewish, says she understands the poten-
tial conflicts which can arise during the holiday season, as
her husband is Catholic. Still, she insists, she does not an-
ticipate difficulty with the placement of a menorah at
Parkland's city hall.
"Parkland is a very small community; we have about
2,000 residents. I haven't heard any negative feedback
about the Christmas tree at city hall, so I don't expect any
about the menorah," Pugliese reveals.
Neither does Pugliese believe that the issue of church-
state separation is at stake.
"All the cities (display) some sort of religious symbol at
this time of year. I see it as being a symbol of goodwill to
the residents who live in our community. Any religion that
would like some sort of symbol for a particular holiday is
fine I don't have a problem with that." she contends.
Even if the winds of controversy blow Parkland way,
Pugliese says she will not back down.
"I would stand up and fight for what I feel the people of
Parkland deserve. I feel if they allow a Christmas tree, they
should allow a menorah."
Balogh Jewelers
Wishes His Clients & Friends
A Happy & Healthy Chanukah
Federal
Discount Pharmacy
Happy Chanukah
m
45 NE 1st Ave.
Miami
358-5165
Federal Precious Metal
Depository Corp.
250 NE 17th Terrace Miami. Fla. 33132
Phone 379-5772
Wish All Customer- A Happy di Health v Chanukah
Jeannette's Dresses
42;J Arthur Godfre) Rd
Miami Beach,PI.. 531-7562
Wishes You A Happy Chanukah
JOSE VENTURA
Renee de Paris Jewelry
6608 Collins Ave
Miami Beach
Happy Chanukah
865-7131
Turnpike
Menorahs
Continued from Page 1-B
it at a meeting.
"I said that I had problems
with (ADL's) position and had
actually helped arrange for a
Lubavitch group to erect
menorahs on the Florida Turn-
pike," Deutsch admits. "I
think it's appropriate in terms
of the Jewish community as
well as a matter of constitu-
tional law to have menorahs on
public property.
"I think the ADL does very
important, significant things,
and I can understand why they
take their position absolute
separation of church and state.
But the reality of the law in the
United States is not an ab-
solute separation of church
and state," Deutsch contends.
"You have creches on public
property, and Christmas trees,
and the star of Bethlehem on
top of them that's the state
of the law, even if Arthur
Teitelbaum doesn't like it."
Says Teitelbaum, "Equality
of religion is best protected
when government does what
the constitution requires, (that
is) remain neutral on the mat-
ter of religion. Church-state
separation in America is the
best protection all religions
have against government
abuse of religion."
But Lieberman believes that
"in the long run, the ADL will
be happy for what we are do-
ing. They think not putting up
my menorah will mean that the
crosses and creches will even-
tually go down but they are
there with or without the
menorahs."
Lieberman says that "real
problem" is that "there are
Jews who are embarrassed by
any public attention to the fact
that there are Jews in the area
who are proud of it."
This, he contends, goes
against the very essence of
Chanukah.
"The miracle of Chanukah is
supposed to be publicized.
ADL did a very great service,
because no way would
Chanukah have (received) the
publicity it deserves without
this attention."
Lieberman, who sees the
Lubavitch movement as conti-
nuing in the tradition of the
Maccabees, who fought for
religious freedom, adds that
"it is ironic that the result of
all this publicity even
though the menorahs are not
on public property is that
Chanukah has been publicized
far beyond what I even could
have imagined."
Na'amat
Chai Chapter will meet on
Wednesday, Dec. 23 at 8 p.m.
at the home of a member.
Refreshments will be served.
Shoshana Chapter will meet
on Tuesday, Dec. 22 at noon at
the Seacoast Towers South.
State Room. This will be a lun-
cheon meeting and entertain-
ment will be presented.
Rishona Chapter presents a
gala Chanukah holiday at the
Saxony Hotel from Friday,
Dec. 18 to Monday, Dec. 21. To
make reservations, 651-1444
Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Rabbi Aron Lieberman
Stanley Broder
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Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 18, 1987
Kreutzer .
Conservative Movement
Gained Momentum
Feminists Study 'Supermom'
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
"The reality is that pluralism
is alive and well," said
Franklin D. Kreutzer, the
Miami-based international
president of the United
Synagogue of America, the
two millon member association
of Conservative
congregations.
Kreutzer, who returned this
week from Israel where he at-
tended the World Zionist Con-
gress, declared that, "Narrow-
minded orthodoxy is relegated
to a minor role in the World
Zionist Organization and the
Jewish Agency."
Kreutzer went to the
Jerusalem congress as a
delegate of MERCAZ, the
Conservative movement's
Zionist organization. It was
the first time the Conservative
movement had representatives
at the congress which brought
together representatives of
various movements of world
Jewry, previously dominated
by Orthodox movements.
The World Zionist Congress
passed a resolution over-
whelmingly in favor of the
rights of Conservative and
Reform Jews, Kreutzer said.
But, he added, while the sway
of non-Orthodox world Jewry
gained momentum at the con-
gress, "in the state of Israel,
Orthodoxy still (constitute) the
swing votes in the coalition
government and they
therefore exercise a political
role far in excess of their
numbers."
During his stay in Israel,
Kreutzer said he met with Eli
Rubenstein, Israeli Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir's
chief-of-staff, to discuss the
controversial "Law of
Return" legislation which
would invalidate conversion of
non-Jews by non-Orthodox
rabbis. "He's not too op-
timistic that the Law of
Return issues can be resolved,
Kreutzer said.
Kreutzer was attending his
first Zionist congress, but he
had told The Jewish Floridian
before his departure for Israel
that he had heard that such
gatherings of world Jewry had
a tendency to break down "in-
to fisticuffs."
That tradition was maintain-
ed this time around. "At
times," Kreutzer reports,
"they were throwing flower
pots at each other. It wasn't a
riot, but Israelis are very
heady people who take thier
politics seriously."
Singles
CHARMING Jewish woman
35 never married wants to
meet a Jewish man 35-40
for future marriage. Write
P.O.B. 600395. North Miami
Beach. Fl 33160-0395
Franklin D. Kreutzer
Continued from Page 1-B
fill multiple roles, while
another 15 percent called their
husbands "somewhat suppor-
tive." These women "express-
ed interest in workshops on
stress for dual-career couples,
not because their spouses were
unsupportive but because both
husband and wife needed help
in working out this new set of
roles," Monson reported.
Single women were "par-
ticularly bitter about the
organized Jewish communi-
ty," which, they said, "wanted
their talent" but did not
welcome them as singles or
give them "meaningful help"
in finding mates.
Among the single women,
Jewish education, parental
communal involvement, home
ritual observances, involve-
ment in Jewish student life in
college, a trip to Israel, and
Jewish friendship circles were
positively associated with
more positive feelings about
Jewish men and more negative
attitudes toward
intermarriage.
Although nearly all of the
respondents "felt positively
about their Jewish identities."
less than half (46 percent) felt
that the Jewish community
was supportive of them, and
more than a third (38 percent,
characterized the community
as unsupportive.
Married respondents said
that the services a supportive
community might provide in-
cluded day care, transporta-
tion to religious school, family
support groups, and stress
workshops. Unmarried
respondents listed events for
singles, and help in finding
Jewish mates.
On a brighter note, a third of
the women said that Jewish
ethical and moral teaching had
influenced them in their choice
of careers. Nearly a fourth (22
percent) said that religious
observances enriched their
lives and thus relieved some of
their stress. Over a third said
the Jewish communal in-
volvements provided "net-
working" that facilitated their
careers.
Talmudic University of Florida
f ->

r
Alfred and Sadye Swire
The Talmudic University of
Florida, Alfred and Sadye
Swire College of Judaic
Studies, celebrated their An-
nual Gala Banquet which
took place on December 13,
1987 at the Castle Hotel,
Miami Beach, Florida.
Over five hundred in-
dividuals gathered, unified in
their display for a Center of
advanced Jewish education.
The dinner manifested a
wonderful feeling of commit-
ment and dedication for the
sake of Torah and Judaism.
This year, as the University
celebrated its thirteenth
"Bar Mitzvah" year, Rabbi
Yochanan Zweig, Dean and
Rosh HaYeshiva was
honored. The honorary Presi-
dent, Dr. Alfred E. Swire,,
spoke of Rabbi Zweig as an
individual who has
transformed the Community
into an oasis of Torah
through the many outreach
programs and classes carried
on each week at the Yeshiva
for all members of the Com-
munity, in addition to the
regular outstanding cur-
riculum offered to the full
time students.
Mr. and Mrs. Abraham
Hirschfeld and Count and
Countess de S. George
Elkaim were honored with
the Talmudic University
Community Service Awards
for their unselfish support
and devotion on behalf of
many Jewish causes. A Doc-
torate of Laws was conferred
upon the world renowned
philanthropist, Mr. Joseph
Tanenbaum for his un-
paralleled support of Jewish
Learning Centers throughout
the world.
Mr. Joseph Tanenbaum
Mr. Murray Berkowitz, Chair-
man of the Board Talmudic
University of Florida; Rabbi J.
Burstyn and Rabbi Yochanan
Zweig.
One of the highlights
following Dr. Swire's presen-
tation of the Celia A. Swire
Memorial Fellowship was his
heartfelt pledge without
hesitation, to the Special En-
dowment Fund he has set up
for the School. This gesture
enbodied belief that actions
speak louder than words,
with his commitment Dr.
Swire inspired all present to
extend their own commit-
ment to support Jewish
education.
The University was founded
at a time when a new wave of
Jewish youth had completed
the Hebrew Day School
system, and approached col-
lege age and there was a need
for an advanced Jewish
Educational Center. The
University was able to fill
this void. In 1974, the Miami
Community enlisted Rabbi
Yochanan Zweig to help
found a school of advanced
Torah Study in Miami. By
August 18, 1974, this Institu-
tion became a reality. Rabbi
Zweig's inaugural lecture
had been given and a sense of
history excited the Communi-
ty. Students from Seattle,
Tel Aviv, London, Toronto,
and New York had made
Miami Beach a meca of
higher Jewish education.
The University provides an
Left to right, Prof. Jaquin Bierman, Mr. Joseph Tanenbaun.
Abraham Hirschfeld. Rabbi J. Burstyn, Zipora Hirschfehi.
Count Elkaim and Rabbi Yochanan Zweig.
intense program in Judaic
Study with a traditional em-
phasis on the study of
Mishna. Talmud. Bible,
Prof. Jaquin Bierman, Vice
Chairman Board Talmudic
University.
Philosophy and Halacha.
Whether students will
become Rabbis or laymen,
the traditional Yeshiva at-
mosphere instills within the
students a sense of Com-
munity responsibility as an
integral part of the Program.
In addition to this Pro-
gram, in 1978, the University
started the Ohr Chodosh In-
stitute. This Program was
designed to serve the needs
of motivated students with a
limited background in Judaic
studies.
Over the years, the College
has reached out to the Com-
munity in providing many
adult classes such as contem-
porary issues from a Torah
perspective, principals of
Left to right Mr. Joseph Tanen-
baum, Rabbi J. Burstyn ami
Rabbi Yochanan Zweig.
Jewish faith and Talmud
classes that are all open to
the public. The classes are all
under the guidance of our
Rosh HaYeshiva and Dean,
Rabbi Yochanan Zweig.
Over this past year, with
the help of the Community,
the University has merited to
add many new and netting
programs to their rapidly ex-
panding list of popular Com-
munity events and college
programs from previous
years, and invites the public
to join. For further informa
tion call 534-7050. The
Yeshiva is located at 1910
Alton Road, Miami Beach,
Florida.
Abraham and Zipora
Hirschfeld
Pd Ad.
HMflfll^l^BHfl^l^^^^^^HHI


Banker Finances A Hot Movie Property
Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Pace 7-B
14" r^"'-------- iii -----.7-------^
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
WITH precisely fifteen
minutes to spare for an inter-
view with The Jewish Flori-
dian, Joseph Kanter, ex-
ecutive producer of the new
film, Ironweed, is a man con-
strained by a tight schedule.
But that may be because he
is making up for lost time;
after forty years in real estate
development and banking,
Kanter, who is chairman of the
board of the Bank of Florida,
has embarked on the movie
business. "I just decided a cou-
ple of years ago that I wanted
to be involved in the creative
world, rather than just
business," he explains of the
career change.
Kanter, who has acquired
some of Hollywood's top
names for his first venture into
the world of film-making, is
not awed by Ironwood's stars,
Jack Nicholson and Meryl
Streep.
"You don't go into the movie
business to be a star-
worshipper," he asserts. "The
reason I managed to get these
stars was because I bought the
right material. It's the same
thing with a bank if you get
the right location, the right
idea, (you have) no problem
financing the lease."
Kanter also credits his direc-
tor, Hector (Kiss of the Spider
Woman) Babenco, with draw-
ing Ironweed's stars to the
picture.
What initially drew Kanter
to the picture, however, was
his friend Francis Ford Cop-
pola. Coppola, who owns
Zoetrope Studios, met Kanter
when Zoetrope became a client
of Kanter's bank.
"I became (Coppola's) unof-
ficial financial advisor," says
Kanter.
Joseph Kanter
Coppola, whom Kanter says
was at one point "on the verge
of bankruptcy," introduced
Kanter to William Kennedy,
who was collaborating with
Coppola on the script for "The
Cotton Club."
Kanter bought Kennedy's
book, Ironweed, soon after,
despite discouragement.
"THE BOOK is very
depressing, and Dino
DeLaurentiis told me he
wouldn't even spend $3 million
to make this movie, because
Community Notes
Barton S. Goldberg, president of Jefferson National
Bank, has been named master of ceremonies for the
annual installation luncheon of the Miami Beach Tax-
payers Association, scheduled Friday, Jan. 15, at noon
at the Alexander Hotel, 5225 Collins Ave. Harold J.
Segal, a member of the Jefferson National Bank Ad-
visory Board and a Miami realtor, will be sworn in as
president, succeeding Joy Alschuler.
Pvt. Kenneth M. Berman, son of Harold B. and Myrna
J. Berman of North Miami Beach, has completed the
station technical controller course at the U.S. Army
Signal School, Fort Gordon, Ga.
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nobody would spend $5 to see
it," Kanter recalls.
Kanter went on to make the
movie for $27 million.
"I have been successful in a
number of other businesses,"
he comments on the source of
his confidence. "This has been
my fifth career. I saw no
reason why I shouldn't be suc-
cessful in this."
Yet Kanter would be the
first to admit that movie-
making is not a business like
any other.
"Producing a movie is an art
form, not a business. You can't
evaluate the return on your in-
vestments, and you can't make
market studies. Also, it's more
satisfying, and it's very inspir-
ing," says Kanter.
Reading scripts and books to
see whether they might be
possible movie ^properties and
"seeing the movie in your
mind, seeing what goes where,
who can do the role," is the
most rewarding aspect of
movie producing, according to
Kanter.
But budding screenwriters
with scripts about bug-eyed
monsters or beautiful
teenagers-in-distress had best
look elsewhere; Joseph Kanter
won't be buying.
"I PLAN to just work on
films that include Pulitzer
prize winning books and im-
portant writers," he explains.
"The reason for my interest in
producing is that life sup-
posedly imitates art. And by
producing creative movies it
:
<
:
;<
Saundra Rothenberg, a cor-
poration executive for the past
17 years, has been named as
Amit Women's Regional Field
Consultant for the state of
Florida. Rothenberg is listed
in "Who's Who of American
Women;" "Who's Who of
Business and Professional
Women," and "Who's Who of
Emerging Leaders in
America."
makes it possible for people to
better understand themselves
and life in general."
What Kanter says he has
learned from the movies about
life in general is that you don't
have to be tortured to be an
artist.
"I think that I have learned
that businessmen can also be
creative, (although) not every
individual is creative, and cer-
tainly not every businessman,
creativity, imagination, and
new ideas you can have
those, whether you're a
lawyer, doctor, writer ... or
businessman."
Already at work on a film
based on a Kurt Vonnegut
novel, Kanter's creative side
will soon have another outlet.
Kanter has not forgotten
how to be an efficient
businessman, however.
"I promised you fifteen
minutes," he says politely at
the close of the interview,
which took precisely fifteen
minutes from beginning to
end.
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Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 18, 1987
Scientific Reconciliation With Torah
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jeuith Ftoridian Staff Writer
Put a scientist from the
purist school of thought in a
scholarly discussion and he
might argue that the origin of
the universe is tied to some
scientific theory, perhaps the
"Big Bang" concept.
Put a religious scholar in the
discussion and he may argue
that science should keep its
metaphorical microscopes
away from the area of origin
and leave that issue to faith.
So what is about to happen
in Bal Harbour beginning this
Sunday could be billed as a
paradox. Sixteen international
scientists and thinkers who
will gather for the first con-
ference of its kind are also
religious Jews, many of them
Hassidic. They will discuss
"Absolute Standards in a
World of Relativity."
This is the first time that a
conference of this nature will
be open to the public's par-
ticipation, according to Rabbi
Sholom B. Lipskar who, will
co-chair the conference with
Professor Herman Branover, a
former Soviet refusenik who
was finally granted a visa to
emigrate to Israel in 1972.
As a youth growing up in
Riga, Branover said his en-
vironment was secular and
that his father was a great
believer that science refuted
religion. "He worshipped
science," Branover recalls of
his father, who was killed in
World War II when Branover
was only nine. But Branover
adopted his father's thinking.
"I was a great believer in the
theory of evolution that man
developed from an ape," he
said.
But that changed. In
1948-49, when Branover was a
student in Leningrad and anti-
Semitism was wide-spread, he
was searching for knowledge
of his Judaism. He was subse-
quently introduced to
Hasaidim who began to teach
him Torah and Hebrew and
Branover, now 56, remembers:
"On the human side, it was
warmth, brotherhood and ge-
nuine friendship in this hostile
Soviet atmosphere."
For 15 years Branover was a
refusenik. When he was per-
mitted to leave, he was con-
sidered the highest ransomed
Jev to that date because he
hi to pay the Soviet Union
the cost of his and his wife's
extensive education some
$40,000.
Branover lives in Beer-
Sheva and teaches at Ben
Gurion University of the
Negev, where he has become
known for his breakthrough in
the field of energy by construc-
ting a laboratory for develop-
ment of liquid-metal magneto-
hydro-dynamics (MHD).
During his stay in Miami,
Branover has already par-
ticipated in the Conference on
Alternative Energy Sources,
where more than 400 resear-
chers from five countries
discussed energy and the
threat of burning fuel to the
biosphere.
Branover said his MHD
item produces one-third
more energy than other
systems that use the same
amount of fuel, which means
one-third less pollution is
thrown out into the
atmosphere.
The professor is also chair-
man of a group called.
"Shamir." It is an organiza-
tion of Jewish scientists and
intellectuals who have
emigrated from the Soviet
Union to Israel. The group
works behind the Iron Curtain
to distribute 134 titles on dif-
ferent Jewish subjects to the
Jews still in the Soviet Union.
The Shamir group also began
last April an absorption pro-
gram for Soviet emigrants.
Branover said it is the first
time that former Soviet Jews
have taken an absorption pro-
gram into their own hands in
an attempt to provide housing,
religious orientation, and jobs
in science and engineering to
Soviet Jews, over half of whom
are in the fields of medicine
and science.
"The universities (in Israel)
are all filled. They have no
openings. We've created a sort
of think-tank," Branover said.
In his autobiography, called,
"Return," Branover discusses
his return to Judaism and his
reconciliation of the concepts
of science and the teachings of
Torah.
' 'Everybody,'' says
usually completely ignorant in
Torah, or in science, or in
both," he said.
Branover said the Lubavit-
cher Rebbe, Menachem
Schneerson, once pointed out a
mistake in the calculations
related to his liquid metal
machine. "He did it in a few
seconds, whereas we used
computers and months of
work. He came to the conclu-
sion with his own (Torah) in-
sights," Branover said.
The conference will run
through Tuesday at the Bal
Harbour Sheraton. The Shul of
Bal Harbour is sponsoring the
conference in cooperation with
The Aleph Institute.
Some of the topics which will
be addressed during the con-
ference include: "Contem-
porary Astro-Physics and
Emunah," by Prof. George
Schlesinge-; "Adolescents
Facing Mocernity." by Rabbi
Zalman Posner; "Application
of Mathematical Infinity to
Torah," by Dr. Victor Sa
and "The Holocaust A New
perspective. Where was (; Where was Humanity?" by
Rabbi Nissan Mangel.
Rabbi Sholom Lipskar
Branover, "believes that
science is able to reduce man
to the laws of physics. It turns
out the real last word in
science says the opposite.
Science, more and more, is
converging to the Torah
views."
As a scientist of some 35
years, Branover said he has
not found any example in
which science refutes the
Torah. "Those who claim that
there are contradictions are
Yeshiva Exemptions
Under Scrutiny
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Public attention was focused
on the sizable number of
yeshiva students exempted
from military service. Premier
Yitzhak Shamir and Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres agree
it is unfair and does not serve
the national interest.
Shamir said that "the
wholesale exemption of
yeshiva students from service
is splitting the nation in two."
Peres proposed that exemn-
Vocational Aid For Russians
The Russians are able to
leave in significantly in-
creased numbers but will
they pick up the option to go,
and to what destination? In
order to help many decide, a
program has been launched by
former refuseniks and
Western investors to make
successful careers in Israel
possible in 1988 for Russian
Jewish scientists, engineers
and technicians.
The new science-based
enterprise, called SATEC, was
recently established in
Jerusalem by an Israeli
management team working
with a cadre of former Russian
scientists, headed by Professor
Herman Branover of Ben-
Gurion University, an authori-
3' on energy conversion, with
ie support of American and
Australian businessmen.
It is geared to provide a
Western level of opportunity
on a free enterprise basis for
many highly-trained Jewish
professionals who may now be
hesitating to apply for exit
visas from Russia and
emigrate to Israel because of
doubts as to their economic
future, it was reported this
week. Through SATEC, they
Prof H
Branover
will be engaged in
development-oriented projects
from Israel and abroad, with
emphasis on new product ven-
tures in hi-tech areas. The
company, which is leasing
facilities in a science-based in-
dustry park is currently study-
ing several projects offered by
industrial enterprises in Israel,
the United States and Brazil.
"In the current climate of
Glamo8t we must provide the
means by which top level
academicians and scientists.
Call to Convene Senior Congress
WASHINGTON Chair
man John Melcher has in-
troduced a resolution in the
Senate to convene a Silver-
Haired Congress in
Washington, D.C.. in 1989.
I'nder the resolution (S
Con Res. 88). the Silver-
Haired Congress would mirror
the United States Congress
with seniors in each state elec-
ting ''senators'' and
"representatives" according
to their state congressional
formula. A total of 535 elected
members then would travel
here to focus attention on the
many issues and problems fac-
ing the elderly.
"The convening of a first-
ever National Silver-haired
Congress would permit senior
citizens to come together to
express their concerns, debate
possible solutions and in-
fluence legislation and the ac-
tions of the federal govern-
ment," the Montana Democral
said.
"All states have senior
citizen advisory groups that
lobby legislatures, we need
their input here."
Melcher said the represen-
tatives would serve "as a na
tional grassroots forum to
shine the national spotlight on
the problems facing the
elderly."
who have considerable
economic advantages in
Russia, are inspired to make
their move now, while it is still
possible," Branover declared.
The birth of this practical,
commercially-oriented ap-
proach to Russian aliyah has
been funded through an invest-
ment initiated by Joseph Gut-
nick of Melbourne, chairman of
the Australia Wide Industries,
Ltd., a major conglomerate. In
addition, a $4.5 million project,
funded in part by Revlon
Group Chairman Ronald
Peretman, has helped develop
a new housing community
designed for ex-Russian
academicians, in the
Jerusalem suburb of Ramot
near the SATEC head-
quarters. In its first stage, 52
family units are being
completed.
Procecutor
Protests
Sentences
BONN (JTA) The state
prosecutor in East Berlin has
appealed against the relatively
light sentences given by a
district court there to four neo-
Nazi thugs convicted of acts of
violence last week.
The prosecutor contended
that the one-to-two-year
prison terms were not consis-
tent with the nature of their
offenses.
The four, members of a
"skinhead" group, broke into
the Zion Church in East Berlin
Oct. 17, shouting "Jewish
pi^s" and "send the .lews to
the gas chamlMTs." They in-
jured several congregants,
some seriously, and damaged
property
The Zion Church a Protes-
tant denomination, is friendly
io Kast Berlin's tiny Jewish
community with which it main-
tains a running dialogue. The
prosecution had demanded
sentences of up to four years.
tions should be reduced to the
number necessary to maintain
the religious schools, not make
them a haven for draft
dodgers.
He told the Knesset's
Foreign Affairs and Security
Committee Monday that "the
criteria for exemptions have
apparently changed since
1977, and we ought to examine
the reasons why."
Israeli law requires that all
able-bodied citizens serve in
the armed forces when they
reach the age of 18. Men are
required to serve for three
years and women for two
years. But yeshiva students
are excused as long as they
pursue their religious studies.
A Knesset subcommittee
study of Israel Defense Force
documents showed that ex-
emptions for yeshiva students
increased after Likud came to
power in the 1977 Knesset
election. Ezer Weizman, then
a Likud defense minister, rais
ed the number of exemptions
because the first Likud
government depended upon
the ultra-Orthodox Agudat
Israel party for its Knesset
majority.
Peres recalled that in 1948,
when he was director general
of the Defense Ministry, David
Ben-Gurion, who was premier
and defense minister, put him
in charge of military exemp
tions. The number of requests
then was for ISO to 200
Jeshiva students out of a total
ewish population of 50,000.
"If today, the number of
students exempted is 17,000.
it's a very serious matter,"
Peres said.
Rabbi Menachem HaCohen
of Labor, who chairs the
Knesset subcommittee in-
vestigating the issue, said the
IDF's figures "prove that
20,000 yeshiva students of
military age are today exempt
from regular and reserve
service."
Another subcommittee
member, Yossi Sarid of the
left-wing Citizens' Rights
Movement, said that the ex
emptions law has enabled
"60,000 healthy yeshiva
students to Income battlefield
deserters" since the state was
founded.
Recently the rabbinical c
in Jerusalem refused to ap
point K/ra Basri. a Candidate
for judge because he had f<
ed mental illness to evade
military duty in 1967. It was
also disclosed that many of the
recently appointed military
chaplains never did their com-
pulsory military service.


Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Lubavitch
'General Assembly'
Steven Schiff left,, son of Rabbi and Mrs.
Solomon Schiff is pictured at his recent
graduation from Yeshiva University. He is be-
ing congratulated by the University's presi-
dent Rabbi Norman Lamm, right. Schiff
received his Bachelor of Arts Degree in com-
puter science, with an Associate in the Arts
Benjamin Meed
Degree in Hebraic Studies. He was president
of the Student Council of Yeshiva's Isaac
Breuer College, received the Hyman B. Grins-
tein Memorial Award and was the recipient of
the Masmid Award for outstanding service to
the student body. Schiff is currently employed
at the J.P. Morgan bank in New York.
tiliiiiu
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
More than 500 emissaries of
the Lubavitcher Hasidim
returned to Brooklyn last
month from literally the four
corners of the Earth. The occa-
sion was the international
Kinus Hak'hel gathering of
shlichim from large and small
Jewish communities in
America and throughout the
world.
The roster called during a
Sunday night banquet was im-
pressive. Rabbis stood en
masse from points as far-flung
as Wyoming, Hawaii, Spain,
Paraguay and Uruguay,
cheered in team spirit by their
colleagues.
The gathering, which
Lubavitchers compare to
similar gatherings that occur-
red at the time of the Temple
on the year following Shmitta
(the sabbatical year), revealed
a picture of Jewish life in ex-
otic and distant places, as well
as that in mainstream, large
Jewish communities, and of-
fered insight into the thinking
of a devoutly religious com-
munity intent, they repeatedly
say, on maintaining ties with
the entire Jewish community
as am echad (one people).
Rabbi Avraham Shemtov of
Philadelphia addressed the
controversial issue of "who is a
Jew" in Israel by saying that
one "must not confuse the
halachic with the legislative."
He maintains that Israel alone
must deal with the legislative
process. And he criticized
those who reprimand the
Lubavitch movement for its
strong stand on the issue in
Israel as though "to tarnish
the ties the Lubavitchers have
always sought to unite Jews
everywhere, not divide us."
Shemtov said that the per-
son who originally brought up
the questions was Israel's fist
premier, David Ben-Gurion,
who received two letters on
the subject from the Lubavit-
cher rebbe. The first one, said
Shemtov, was concise and con-
cerned "who is a Jew." The se-
cond addressed the question
"what is a Jew?" "That one
was much longer," said
Shemtov.
Shlichim personally involved
in programs for Soviet im-
migrants mingled and shared
thoughts in workshops with
those who work with Jewish
prisoners, drug and alcohol
abusers and married couples
working through problems.
One British Lubavitcher,
A.I. Gluck, spoke about
greeting royalty. He is the of-
ficial Lubavitcher emissary to
the world's kings, having met
last year with King Juan
Carlos of Spain.
In public addresses at the
Sunday night banquet and at
workshops, the shlichim
boasted much success in work-
ing with Jewish, non-
Continued on Past 20-B
Yitzchak Rabin
!'h. third annual National Holocaust Survivors Dinner will be
held on Sunday, Dec. 20, at the Fontainebleau-Hilton Hotel in
Miami Beach. At the dinner, which will be attended by several
thousand surrieors from all over the United States and Canada.
Benjamim Meed of New York. President of the Warsaw Ghetto
Retnstanes Organization and of the American Gathering and
Federation of Holocaust Survivors, will receive the F.lie Wiesel
Remembrance Award. Israel Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin
trill address the National Holocaust Sunnvors Dinner. The din-
ner is being held in association with State of Israel Bonds.
Federation to Erect Wall of Honor
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation will inscribe the
names of individuals who show
their concern for the Jewish
community through a gift at
the Pacesetter, Vanguard or
Summit level for the 1988 and
subsequent campaigns on a
special wall in the lobby of the
Federation building at 4200
Biscayne Boulevard.
"The Wall of Honor, as it is
called will display the names of
all individuals who contribute
$10,000 or more to the 1988
Combined Jewish Appeal,"
said Donald E. Lefton, chair-
man of the Federation's cam-
paign. "It will be updated each
year to reflect the current
year's campaign."
Lefton explained that there
will also be a duplicate wall in
Israel located in Or Akiva, the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's "sister city," and each
person who is honored will also
receive a unique plaque to
display in their home or office.
Partners In Giving
Now is the Time
To S-t-r-e-t-oh
Your Dollars
When the sixth graders from
Alexander S. Gross Hebrew
Academy celebrate Chanukah
with their adopted "grand-
Parents" at the Pointe
nayside, they'll be baking
cookies, making presents and
decorations for a group of
retarded children who can not
do these activities themselves.
"We call this program 'Part-
ners m Giving,' because our
residents and the 11-year-olds
ar* working together to
prepare the gifts for the
Jewish retarded students at
Landmark Learning Center, a
state institution in Opa
Locka," explained Karen Den-
nis, adminstrator of the Pointe
Bayside, an adult congregate
living facility located on Nor-
mandy Isle.
On Monday, Dec. 21, several
Pointe residents will present
the cookies and gifts to the
children at the Landmark
Learning Center, located in
Opa Locka.
THERE ARE ONLY 12 DA YS LEFT
To take advantage of 1987 maximum charitable deductions
to fund present and future gifts.
The Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies offers you the opportunity to:
turn non-productive assets into tax deductions
take tax deductions at this year's maximum rates
of 38.5% before rates drop
establish a philanthropic fund in your family name
provide gifts to charities of your choice
now and in the future.
Start a fund now with gifts of cash. Israel bonds, appreciated assets, real estate or
shares of a closely held corporation.
Contact your personal financial or tax advisors for information on your situation
For information on philanthropic funds, contact the
A
<-ftxl\|VVnO\OF JfcNVI^I^PHILANrHROPItS
" iv ijnutei Miami 1eu*Jt hM-nuwi
4200 Biscayne Boulevard Miami Florida 33137
M.iitm K.ilb Chairman
KXX)
I', nnv Mariin Dm; w>


-
Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 18, 1987
Ethical Wills Leave Philosophical Legacy
...,..,,,.,. .....(, ..V: ,.,-. ., .;..; .":'.' =S*> '..v :
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
MANY PEOPLE associate
wills with the divvying up of
property, money and posses-
sions. Yet, for some, the most
valuable will that could ever be
written, is that which one
generation passes down from
the heart to the next
generation.
than gambling; for before ont
becomes aware of it, one may
become an inveterate gambler
. Much as 1 criticize the ex-
cessive reading of novels,
which damages one's sen-
sibilities and the heart, and
makes one weak and woman-
like, if time must be killed
which could be used for so may
pleasant and useful occupa-
The third section of the book
is made up of wills from Israel.
They are written by both
famous and ordinary people,
Riemer said. "You don't have
to be a professional writer to
write an ethical will," Riemer
notes. "Words that come from
the heart, enter the heart."
The last section of the book
is made up of letters, by
American Jews to their
children.
Riemer began his journey of
". Do not say, 'The times have changed, 'for ive have our
Father of yore, blessed be his name. Who has not changed and
Who will not change. No evil shall befall you, and you will be Riemer began his journey of
blessed from Him Who is our eternal dwelling place... Rab- collecting wills, he said, after a
hi. Mniws Snfor n7K9.ia9Qi m/>o th* mU.' '.,," D*..,.,..k..-.. f~ oo friend wrote one and left a
copy for his wife, each of his
children, and one for Riemer.
bi Moses Sofer (1762-1889), was the rabbi of Pressburg for 88
years, when it was the foremost Jewish community in Hungary.
These so-called "ethical
wills" are usually of the ut-
most privacy and intended on-
ly for family. Thus it is rare
that dozens of these wills from
some of the greatest and
simplest Jews from the 18th
century until modern day, can
be viewed.
Rabbi Jack Riemer, spiritual
leader of Miami's Beth David
Congregation and Nathaniel
Stampfer, a professor of
Jewish Education at Chicago's
Spertus College of Judaica,
have collected these wills in a
book called: "Ethical Wills, A
Modem Jewish Treasury."
"There is a lovely Jewish
custom that goes back to the
Bible of sitting down while you
are well and telling your
children what you've learned
about life and what you want
from them and for them after
you're gone," said Riemer.
"The Jewish belief is that
you're not completely dead
when you die if you leave
behind children who unders-
tand what you stood for and
will continue your character."
In some instances there are
impassioned pleas, particularly
from the wills that come from
the Holocaust victims: "To
every man and woman!" one
such will begins. "They
treated us like animals in the
forest. Seven days and nights
we hid in an attic with no foods
or water. The heat was fierce
. Brothers! Avenge us! We
were once more than 50,000
souls in Kovno and now there
remain but a few. We too
await the end. Our revenge
will come when you distroy the
very last of the wild beasts."
SOME WILLS left specific
instructions about how the
writer was to be buried.
Solomon Kluger, the rabbi of
Brody for nearly 50 years, who
lived from 1785 to 1869, left
these instructions:
"When those who stand near
me sense that the departure of
my soul is imminent, let them
assemble ten pious men, and
let them prevent anyone, in-
cluding my wife and children,
from approaching my bed
closer than four cubits ..."
Still, other wills, reflect not
only advice that has carried
through the ages, but words
that show how times have
changed.
"Avoid gambling; and seek
to occupy your time with
useful things," one father
wrote in 1854 to his son who
was leaving Germany for
America. "Any occupation is
better and more honorable
tions, such reading is
preferable to gambling."
Some of the wills consist of
'Do's and Don'ts:'
"Don't become involved in
flattery even when it seems
permissible; it stupefies the
feelings of a person," one
father wrote. "Keep your
possessions out of sight. Learn
a trade that is honest and
simple.
"If there should befall some
"I found his such a moving
document that I wanted to
share it with others. One of the
things he says to his wife is
'you re too young to be left
alone.' This woman was able to
marry without the problem of
guilt because in the will, he
gave her permission" Riemer
said.
AND YES, he admits, there
is the factor of creating guilt
by leaving some of these
"When a child is born to you, be very careful the first SO days
when the infant sleeps in his mother's bed, to prevent the sleeping
mother from rolling over the child and suffocating it. Similarly,
prevent the infant from sleeping face down or having a pillow fall
on its face. Also, alert the nurse to keep watch over the child at
night. After SO days the child can be put to sleep in its own crib
..." David ben Meir Friesenhausen (1750-1828), author and
scholar.
anxiety or difficult cir-
cumstance, God forbid, im-
mediately eliminate anguish
from your heart and thoughts,
and think instead how in-
significant this is compared to
all the troubles that are possi-
ble, God forbid. For instance,
having to go begging from
door-to-door, naked and lack-
ing in everything; having
creditors while lacking even
necessities; illness; being tor-
tured with iron instruments
tf
ASKED HOW this book fits
in with a generation that
seems to be heading away
from parental influence,
Riemer said, "I don't want a
veto in the lives of my
children. But I want to vote. If
my children are willing to ac-
cept my property after I'm
gone, then they should at least
be willing to hear what I stand
for, who I am and what means
the most to me."
The book is divided into four
sections. The first is a collec-
tion of wills from traditional
Jews. "These are beautiful
wills," said Riemer, "which
reflect the piety and the
spirituality of that generation;
the concern for books, for
values, for charity, for the
Jewish way of life and
faithfulness of the Torah."
The second section of the
book contains wills that come
out of the Holocaust. "These
are extraordinary documents
because they show the resilien-
cy, the determination to sur-
vive and the way in which peo-
ple responded- under stress
during the Holocaust," Riemer
said.
"Many of these letters," he
added, "were smuggled out
without any knowledge of
whether they would survive or
not."
messages and instructions.
But he figures it this way:
"Leonard Fein, in commen-
tary on American Jewry, jok-
ingly said, 'Guilt is to the
American Jewish community
what oil is to Saudi Arabia
and we need an alternate
source of energy.'
"So there is the risk of im-
posing guilt," Riemer said.
"But on the other hand, I think
that if you stand for something
and you feel deeply about
something and if you have con-
victions about something, then
you have both the right and
one can ever take them away
from you.
"I am leaving you the
fragrance of a Jerusalem mor-
ning unforgettable per-
fume of thyme, sage and
rosemary that wafts down
from the Judean hills. The
heartbreaking sunsets that
give way to Jersualem at night
. splashes of gold on black
velvet darkness. The feel of
Jerusalem stone, ancient and
mellow, in the buildings that
surround you. The piquant
taste of humus, tehina, felafel
foods we never knew about
before we came to live here.
"I AM leaving you an ex-
tended family the whole
house of Israel. They are your
people They will celebrate with
you in joy, grieve with you in
sorrow. You will argue with
them, criticize them, and
sometimes reject them (that's
the way it is with families).
"I am leaving; you the faith
of your forefathers. Here, no
one will ever laugh at your
beliefs, call you 'Jew' as an in-
sult.. "
Writing ethical wills today is
becoming increasingly popular
on one hand. Yet, there are
three basic reasons Riemer
believes, why people do not
routinely write ethical wills.
"One, people don't know
about this custom," Riemer
said. "For example, when this
book came out, the congrega-
tion had a party to dedicate the
book and someone came to my
door and said, 'I'm a therapist
and use this with working with
terminal patients or in marital
conflicts. Why didn't someone
tell me this was a part of
Judaism when I was
Jewish.'
"The second reason people
don't write them is we live in a
very relativistic culture,"
Riemer said. "That is, you're
entitled to your opinion, I'm
entitled to my opinion (and) if
everything's a matter of opi-
nion, you can't write an ethical
late William Lewis
Abramowitz, a prominent
scientist and industrialist.
To his wife, Abramowitz
wrote: "You are too much of a
woman to live alone, and the
children will mature and go
their own way. Look for a man
you can respect and love and
know that I only want you to
be happy."
Rabbi Jack Riemer
To his children, Abramowitz
wrote: "In material things 1
have seen to it that you will not
want. These are the least im-
portant things Remember
to be Jews, and the rest will
follow as day follows night.
Our religion is not ritual but a
way of life. To us as Jews, life
is its own raison d 'etre, its own
self justification; we await
neither heaven nor hell. Ritual
is only a tool to remind us who
we are and of the divine com-
mandments. Jews do not lie.
steal nor bear false witness. .
"Marry within your faith,
not to please me, but so that
you may be happy, not because
gentiles are inferior they
are not but because mar-
riage is complex enough
without complicating variables
of different viewpoints .
"Don't forget Israel. You
can be a builder of the
"As soon as I have passed away my students may do me the homelanf f^T the remnants of
kindness, for the uplift of my soul, to study (Torah) from the mo- ?ur PePle- There is no conflict
ment of my death until the purification rite. But I do not request between your obligation as a
that they do this at the place where I expire because I do not wish c,t,zen of ur eountry *"<* yur
to impose a burden on anyone. So they may do this in their own concern for ,srael- 0n tne con-
homes. From the time of purification until returning from the t.rary'- a good Jew 1S a
cemetery, two of my students may remain to study; therefore they
need not go along ... Samson M Nathan (1820-1906), an in-
structor of Bible and Talmud as well as mathematics and physics
at the Talmud Torah-Realschule in Hamburg.
the duty to try to convey it to
your children."
Some of the wills that came
out of Israel, explain what
Israel is about better than any
Zionist tract, Riemer said.
Dvora Waysman and her
family were olim, settlers in
modern Israel. She wrote a let-
ter to her children from her
balcony in Jerusalem. She
began by explaining that her
posessions were limited and
had the family stayed in
Australia, there would be
much more to leave her
children when she was gone.
But she said. "For now you
are Israelis, and I have dif-
ferent things to leave you. I
hope you will understand that
they are more valuable than
money in the bank, stocks and
bonds and plots of land, for no
will. You have to have convic-
tions that you feel so strongly
about that you want your
children to value and respect.
"The third reason why it's
hard to write an ethical will is
because in order to do so you
have to come to terms with
your own mortality and there's
a great deal of denial in con-
temporary culture."
OF THE 75 wills in the book,
Riemer says the one he con-
siders to be the best and most
powerful is the one that says
everything he would like to say
to his children.
That will was written by the
American."
More traditional, and sexist,
attitudes toward women
prevail in such testimonies as:
"... THE SOUL is pleased
when relatives are nearby at
the time of death, but only if
they do not wail. Therefore on-
ly those men who know they
will not break down should be
there. Women should not be
allowed in for it is their nature
to weep uncontrollably,"
wrote one rabbi who was born
in Galicia in 1867.
"... Do not become ac-
quainted not to mention
closer relationships with
women," one father wrote his
sone in the 1800s. "Consider
them like a sharp, pointed toy.
Continued on Page 1 lit
" .. I am a daughter of Israel, twenty-years-old. O hou- hm-ly
w the uKrrld about us! Why should they destroy us when
everything within me desires and yearns for life. Have my last
minutes really arrived? Vengeance! Come and avenge
whoever reads this last request of mine The will of a
young woman written on a synagogue u>all during the HoUkhus'
X


V
>

*
f>

Principals in the Tuesday, Dec. 22 life membership champagne
luncheon of the South Florida Council ofNa 'amat USA are, from
left, council president and national vice president Harriet Green
and Leah Benson, membership vice president of the council and a
former national vice president of Na'amat USA.
Na'amat USA Luncheon
Cantor Moshe Buryn of
Temple Beth Raphael and the
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy Choir will
present a special Chanukah
musical program Tuesday,
Dec. 22, at the annual life
membership champagne lun-
cheon of the South Florida
Council of Na'amat USA.
The noon event at the
Deauville Hotel in Miami
Beach also will feature a
report on the just-concluded
''1st Zionist Congress in
Jerusalem, Israel. Harriet
Creen, president of the South
Florida Council and national
vice president of Na'amat
USA, was one of three South
Floridians who served as
delegates to the Zionist
Congress.
Members of more than 20
Dade and Broward county
chapters and clubs will hear
her report on a congress which
elected former Israel Am-
bassador to the United States
Simcha Dinitz chairman of the
World Zionist Organization
and of the Jewish Agency for
Israel.
Leah Benson of Miami
Beach is chairman of the lun-
cheon, which will honor all new
life members of the South
Florida Council.
Piano Competition At UM
The First Murray Dranoff
Two Piano Competition is
designed to identify and en-
courage young performers
who are prepared for a concert
career as duo-pianists. It will
t>e held at Gusman Hall, The
1 Diversity of Miami, on Dec.
20, 21 and 22. The competition
is open to all duo-pianists ages
18 to 35. First Prize is $10,000;
Second, $5,000; Third. $2,000.
The winner will also appear in
concert performances, both in
recital and with orchestra.
The first of its kind in the
United States, the two-piano
competition has been
established by Loretta Dranoff
in memory of her husband and
with whom she performed in a
nationally known piano team
during the 1950's. For infor-
mation, 758-8700.
<'al Kovens, left, was the recipient of the Tel Aviv University
Friendship Award at a ceremony held in Los Angelas honoring
industrialist Dr. Armand Hammer and philanthropist Nathan
Shapell. Kovens, who is Southeast Regional Chairman of
American Friends of Tel Aviv University, was recognized for his
'outstanding efforts on behalf of the Kovens Center for Health
systems Management which is on the TAU campus. The award
was presented by TAU President Prof. Moshe Many, right.
Hadassah
Events
Hatikvah Hadassah will be
having their annual family
Chanukah party Sunday, Dec.
20 from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. at
Continental Park, 10000 SW
82nd Ave. For information,
255-2265.
Hannah Senesch Chapter of
Hadassah will host its annual
Hadassah Medical Organiza-
tion luncheon at noon Wednes-
day, Dec. 23 at the Shelborne
Hotel. For reservations,
538-2111.
(Jhai Chapter of Hadassah
will hold its monthly meeting
on Monday, Dec. 28 at 8 p.m.
at Port Sonata. A Chanukah
Party will be featured.
Masada Chapter of
Hadassah, will hold its
meeting on Monday, Dec. 28 at
noon, at Adath Yeshurun.
Songstress Ann Parker will
entertain and refreshments
will be served. For reserva-
tions, 651-8299.
Minhagim and Mishagaos
will be shared by William F.
Saulson and the Hadassah
women during the luncheon
meeting Tuesday, Jan. 5 at the
Shelborne Hotel. Saulson, vice
president and a family consul-
tant with Riverside Guardian
Memorial Chapels is active in
the Jewish and secular com-
munities of South Florida.
Na'amat Women
A talk by Harriet Green, na-
tional vice president and a
delegate to the World Zionist
Congress on "My Impression
of Na'amat in Israel and the
Zionist Congress" will be
presented at the Annual
Chanukah luncheon of the
Golda Meir Chapter of
Na'amat USA Sunday, Dec. 20
at noon at the Shelborne
Hotel, Miami Beach.
Singer Michael Skorr, who
plays the cordovox, will head
the entertainment portion of
the luncheon. His repertoire
will include songs in Yiddish,
Hebrew and English. For
reservations, 538-6213.
The celebration of Chanukah
and Israel's 40th anniversary
will be held by the Chair
Chapter of Na'amat USA Sun-
day, Dec. 20, 1 p.m. at a lun-
cheon meeting at the home of
president Eva Kaufman.
The entertainment portion
will be led by the Chai Musi-
cians and Singers.
For information, 538-6213.
Ethical Wills
Continued from Page 10-B
with which one can play only
occasionally and then with
the greatest of care ..."
Words against drinking
alcoholic beverages were
issues for one father who lived
in the 1700s: "Above all: Let
one guard against intoxicating
drink, for this is a vile disease
that can lead to extreme
degradation."
Riemer said that deciding
which of the wills to use was so
difficult that a second volume
may be forthcoming.
Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Community Corner
The YIVO Committee of Greater Miami invites a
select number of the Yiddish-speaking community to
join a luncheon at the 100 Lincoln Road restaurant on
Thursday, Jan. 7 at noon. Yitzhak Korn, former Knesset
member and president of the World Council of Yiddish
and Jewish culture, will offer an update on the latest
events. For reservations, 672-7296.
"Moses Left 10,000 Jews Behind!" is the essence of
a film and discussion that will be led by William F.
Saulson during the Senior Assembly of Bet Shira Con-
gregation, at 2 p.m., Tuesday, Dec. 29. Mr. Saulson, a
family consultant, is widely active in the Jewish and
secular communities of South Florida. He is a vice
president of the Riverside Guardian Memorial Chapels
and the director of their public service Speakers
Bureau. For information, Mae Schreiber 274-0103.
Temple Israel will sponsor a Singles Service Friday,
Dec. 18 at 5:30 p.m. at the downtown synagogue. A
Chanukah dinner will follow immediately after the ser-
vice. For information, 573-5900.
The Abe Horrowitz Post No. 682, Jewish War
Veterans have an on-going membership the first Sun-
day of each month 9:30 a.m. at NE 160th Street and NE
19th Place, North Miami Beach. For information,
651-3317.
The Nachman Arluck Cultural Club will host a
Chanukah Celebration Monday, Dec. 21, 1:30 p.m. in
American Savings Bank, Alton and Lincoln Road. Lec-
turer Moishe Becker will discuss Chanukah, David
Jacob! will read about the 'Festival of Lights,' Jacob
Gorelick will sing Yiddish and Hebrew songs.
Shaare Zedek Hospital South Florida Women's Com-
mittee will meet Wednesday, Dec. 23 at 11:45 a.m. at
Tower Suite 41 Restaurant, Miami Beach. Guest
speaker will be Rabbi Meir Felman. Reservations,
531-8329.
The Dade County B'nai B'rith Bench and Bar Chapter
will be hosting Its monthly dinner meeting and
Chanukah celebration on Wednesday, Dec. 16 at the
Biscayne Bay Marriott Hotel, Miami beginning at 6:30
p.m. Rabbi Solomon Schiff will be the featured
speaker. For reservations, 223-2391.
Agudath Israel Hebrew Institute, Miami Beach, will
be having a Gala Chanukah Party on Monday, Dec. 21,
at 7 p.m. Entertainment will be provided by Dick Sterl-
ing, comedian and humorist. For information, 866-5226.
The next meeting of the Alzheimer's Disease support
group, sponsored by the ADRDA of Greater Miami, will
be held on Wednesday, Dec. 23 at 1 p.m. in Mount Sinai
Medical Center's Chernin Auditorium. This free support
group meets regularly on the fourth Wednesday of
each month.
Adath Yeshurun will hold an Aleph Consecration at
late services on Friday, Dec. 18, 8 p.m. The classes will
perform a short Chanukah cantata dedicated to
brethren in the Soviet Union.
Young Israel of Greater Miami will honor its founders
at an annual dinner on Sunday, Jan. 17 at Temple
Emanu-EI, Miami Beach. For reservations, 651-3591.
The Miami-Coral Gables-Dade Chapter, Women's
Division, American Society for Technion, will have a
luncheon at the University of Miami Faculty Club,
celebrating Chanukah on Monday, Dec. 21 at 11:30 a.m.
A 'Boutique Sale' will be featured. For information,
443-5369 or 382-0128.
The Eighth Annual Cultural Series of Beth Israel Con-
gregation will commence Sunday, Dec. 20, at 10 a.m.
Guest speaker Rabbi Dr. Bernard Berzon, past presi-
dent of Rabbinical Council of America will address the
subject "The Chanukah Message For Our Day."
Israel Dance, led by Yusi Yanich, will be featured at
"Chanuka 8th Night" Dance Party to be held Tuesday,
Dec. 22, 8 p.m. at the Hebrew Academy High School. All
dancers are invited to attend. Refreshments will be
served. For information, 685-1783.
The South Florida Chug Aliyah Group will hold a
meeting on Sunday, Dec. 27, 7 p.m., at the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation to discuss "Challenges and
Rewards" of Aliyah.


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 18, 1987
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
JIM STEINER
Jim Steiner, son of Wilma
and Arthur Steiner will
become a Bar Mitzvah at Tem-
ple Beth Moshe Saturday.
Rabbi Israel Jacobs will of-
ficiate and Hazzan Moshe
Friedler will chant the Sab-
bath Liturgy.
Jim is a seventh grade stu-
dent at Mc Glannon School,
and has his own business of
collecting sport cards.
Honored guests will be arriv-
ing from New York; Aunt and
Uncle Ellen and Dr. Fred
Elsas from Alabama.
In Jim's honor his parents
will sponsor the kiddush
following the services in the
Clara and Seymour Smoller
Ballroom.
SCOTT BLUMBERG
Scott Gary Blumberg, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Charles
Blumberg will be called to the
Torah as Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday, at 8:30 a.m. at
Adath Yeshurun Congrega-
tion, North Miami Beach.
The celebrant is a student in
the Judaica High School at
Adath Yeshurun. He attends
Highland Oaks Junior High
School and is in the eighth
grade.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles
Blumberg will host the Kid-
dush following the services in
honor of the occasion.
Special Guests will include:
Grandparents, Mr. and Mrs.
Abraham Pasteraack and Mrs.
Fannie Blumberg.
Rabbi Simcha Freedman and
Cantor Zvi Rozen will
officiate.
LIOR DEMBURG
Lior Demburg, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Boris Demburg will
be called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday at 10:30
a.m. at Temple Emanu-El,
Miami Beach.
The celebrant is a student in
the Lehrman Day Schol, where
he is in the eighth grade. Lior
enjoys assembling model
airplanes and some of his other
interests include swimming,
fishing and reading.
JUSTIN F. PARDES ,
Juftin F\ Pardes. son of Mr.
and' Mrs. Abram (Mike)

Justin F. Pardes
Pardes, will be called to the
Torah as a Bar Mitzvah, on
Saturday at 6 p.m. at Temple
Emanu-El, Miami Beach.
The celebrant is the great-
grandson of the late Samuel N.
Friedland who served as presi-
dent and chairman of the
board of Temple Emanu-El for
many years.
Justin is a student at North
Miami Beach Junior High
School, where he is in the
seventh grade, and is active in
baseball and football.
TALI FIELD
Tali Rachel Field, daughter
of Rabbi and Mrs. Philip Field,
of Overland Park, Kansas, will
celebrate her Bat Mitzvah the
28th of Kislev, 4th day of
Chanukah, Dec. 19, 9 a.m. at
Congregation Agudath Achim,
North Miami Beach.
Tali will share her Bat Mitz-
vah with her Soviet Twin,
Lior Demburg
Asva Elena Vaisman of the
Ukraine, who has been denied
her Jewish heritage.
Tali will also celebrate her
Bat Mitzvah on Dec. 26, at
8:15 a.m. at Congregation
Hazvi Yisrael, Jerusalem,
Israel.
The celebrant is attending
Hyman Brand Hebrew
Academy in Overland Park,
Kansas, participates in the
School Activities; in the
United Synagoue Youth
(Kamimah Pre USY) and in the
activities of the Youth Group
in her Synagogue, Kelilath
Israel, Overland Park, Kansas.
Tali is the granddaughter of
Mrs. Ann Field, and the late
Herman Field of North Miami
Beach, and Dr. and Mrs. Ber-
nard Resnikoff of Jerusalem,
Israel.
USA Plans Chanukah Relay
Franklin D. Kreutzer, Inter-
national President of the
United Synagogue of America,
has announced Hanukkah
torch-lighting ceremonies
under the auspices of United
Synagogue Youth in major
communities throughout the
United States, to mark the
75th Diamond Jubilee An-
pi.versary of United
Synagogue.
Hanukkiyot constructed by
United Synagogue youth
groups in designated cities will
be illuminated from a torch
which will be brought from
Modi'in, the historic city in
Israel in which the Maccabean
revolt began over two thou-
sand years ago. which led to
the victory of Hebraism over
Hellenism Hanukkah
commemorates.
The Miami Hanukkivot will
be lit Sunday, Dec. 20.
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
. "AndJoseph was the governor over the land And Joseph's
brethren came, and bowed down to him"
(Genesis US.6).
MIKETZ
MIKETZ Two years later. Pharaoh dreamt a dream in two
slightly different versions. The dream terrified the king of Egypt;
but none of his sages could explain it satisfactorily. Pharaoh's
butler remembered Joseph's masterly interpretations of dreams,
and informed Pharaoh. Joseph was brought before Pharaoh and
explained the dream as forecasting seven years of plenty that
were to come to the land of Egypt, only to be succeeded by seven
years of famine. He advised Pharaoh to appoint a wise overseer to
collect wheat during the years of plenty and distribute it during
the years of famine. Pharaoh appointed Joseph himself to this
post as his viceroy. As Joseph had forecast, the Egyptian stores of
wheat were in great demand during the seven years of famine.
Among those who came to buy wheat in Egypt were Joseph's
older brothers. Joseph recognized them, but they did not know
him. Joseph so contrived that the brothers came to Egypt a se-
cond time, bringing Benjamin, Joseph's full brother with them.
Joseph received them cordially; but then he made it seem as
though Benjamin had stolen a goblet, and insisted that he stay
behind as a servant. The brothers refused to abandon Benjamin,
and all decided to return to Joseph's home.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman-
Tsamlr. $15. published by Shengold The volume Is available at 75 Maiden
Lane, New York. NY 10038 Joseph Schlang is president of the society
distributing the volume)
!>a^y?v!w!v!7. >rw>MK*xx,>iKK,xo? -
Ruthie Asraf-Bani has been
elected the first woman
chairperson of the Ben-Gurion
University Student Associa-
tion here. Her husband, Aimer,
a fellow student, was her cam-
paign manager.
?????^???????e
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
5:13 p.m.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami Beach
534-7213 534-7214
Barry J. Konovitch. Rabbi /S?\
Sergio Grooler, President \W)
Sholem Epelbaum, President
Religious Committee
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach. Fla. 531-2120
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig
ADATHYESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947 1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Canton Zvl Rozen Conservative
Executive Director ^-.
Harry J.Silverman 'St)
Daily mlnyan 7:30 a.m. and 5p.m.
Sat Sarvica 8:30 m. and 4:45 p.m.
Fri. ( p.m Alapn Conaacratlon
i Mltnah Scoll Blumbarg
Sat 8:30 a.m. Ba
Ullfylun Bruca Bloch
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 667-6667
Leonard Schoolman, Sr. Rabbi
Mark Kram, Associate Rabbi
Lynn Goldstein, Assistant Rabbi
Frt. 1:15 p.m. Chanukah Santca
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854-3911
Jack Riemer. Rabbi
Robert Albert,
Cantor
Rev. Milton Freeman.
Ritual Director
)
Daily arvict j Mon and Thure 7 30am
Tuai Wad. and Fri. 7:45 am
Sun. 8 a.m. Evanings 5 30 p.m.
??
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
f)
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Assistant Rabbi Ronnie Cahan
Yehuda Shifman, Cantor
Maurice Klein. Ritual Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
Kabbalat Shabbat 5 p.m
Opanlng Lala Frt. San 8 p.m
Dr. Irving lahcman will praach on
A Salula To Tha Maccabaoa
Canlor Shifman will chant Chanukah Sabbath
9 am Bar Mltnah Lior Damburg
And Jualln Pardaa
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive. Miami Beach
5326421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schifl
DaHy 7:30 a.m. (Mon. 4 Thure. 7:15) t 7 p.m.
Frt. 7 p.m. Sat. 9 a.m. Raaan lor High Holiday
Daya.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Miami'a Monoar ftaform Congregation
137 N.E. 19th St. Miami, 573-5900
9900 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob G Born stein
5:30 p.m. Chanukah Son lor alnglaa
Frt. 8 p.m. Downtown:
Rabbi Ra> D Parlmatar will apaak on
"Chanukah Through Tha Agai "
Liturgy will ba conducted by
Cantor Rarhall* F Nalaon.
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667-5657
Michael B. Eisenstat. Rabbi
Fri. party seonca 8:30 p.m
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Shoshanah Raab. Cantor
SanlceaFri 7 30 p.m
Sat .:30 a.m.
Onag Shabbat will follow
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St.. N. Miami. FL 33181
8915508 Conservative
Dr Israel Jacobs. Rabbi
Dr. Joseph A. Gorfinkel. ,'^S\'
Rabbi Emeritus if J
Moshe Friedler. Cantor
Fri 8pm
Sat 8:45am
Waakdayaary Mon-Fn Sam
Mon Thuis 5pm Sun 6 30am
Sat 8 45 a m
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave., M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Alvadia Rosenberg
Cantor Moshe Buryn
Daily tanicea 8 am 7 p.m.
Sal 8:15am
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
2382601
Rabbi David H. Auerbach ',
Cantor Stephen Freedman
Frt. 8 p.m Guni Spaakai Arthur Taitalbaum
Sal 9:30 a m. San Bar Mltnah
Aaron Alan Ollckan and David Kaaperoyaky
in abaantla
^MPL|beTHsH6L6M 533-7231'
Lhasa Ava. & 41st St ijfeani
roL.E?1KR0N,SH' S*** Founding Rabbi
GARY A QLrCKSTEIN. Senior Rabbi
HARRY JOLT, autiNare M*.
JASON OWASDOFF. Aatlatent Rabbi
IAN ALPERN. Cantor
DAVID CONVISER. Cantor Emerttue
Frt. 7:30 p.m. Chanukah Ceieoiaiion
Sat San 1045 a m
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz ,__%
An Fridkis. Assoc Rabbi '$)
Cantor Murray Yavneh K&
Sat 9am sabbath eenlce
Dally Mlnchah Sunday Friday
Sam and 8pm
Sat 9 a.m. and 5:15 p.m
>r
TEMPLE NERTAMID 866 8345
7902 Carlyle Ave.. 866 9833
Miami Beach 33141 conunat
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz ^~
Cantor Edward Klein St1)
Daily San. Mon.-Fn.8a.m. 6 30pm '-Ti,'
Sal Mlncha 8:15p.m. Sun.8:30a m. -
6 30 p m Sal. 8 45 a.m. pare, by Rabbi LaboviM.
Cantor KMn
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
ol North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung
SHAARE TEFILLAH
TORAH CENTER OF KENDALL
7830 SW 112 Street .
232-6833 *
Rabbi Hershel Becker
Daily San. 7 a.m. Frt. 10 min attar candla
lighting lima Shabboa 9 am Shabboa
Mlncha 10 min. balora candla lighting lima
Sun. 8:30 a.m.
BETHTORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N Miami Beach Blvd. ^~~
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz, Rabbi ( $t)
Zvee Aroni, Cantor VX'
Harvey L. Brown. Exec. Director
Dally aantcaa Monday through Friday
7:30 am and 5 30 p.m
Naw Membership Shabbat Frt 8 p.m.
*daph Corner Sat 8 30 am
I 5p.m. Su,8 a m and 5:30 p.m
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave
North Dade's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kirtgsley. Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administrator
Frt Serv Rabbi Ralph P. Kingalay
Sat Sat. 10 30a m
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
2712311 jO*
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi f W )
Benjamin Adler. Cantor >^*'
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Mlnyan 7 a.m. Monday!
and Thuradaya
Sunday 9 a.m. Frt. 8:15 p.m
Now mambar Sabbath
Sal sere, t a.m. Rabbi Shapiro and
Cantor Adter orHoiallng


.. .
Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
>
Jack Gordon To Lead Select Committee
Senator Jack D. Gordon (D-
Miami Beach) has been ap-
pointed chairman of the
Florida Senate Select Commit-
tee on Business Development.
This select committee will
consider and analyze Florida's
economic development pro-
grams, assess Florida's finan-
cial institutions including their
ability to foster economic
development, and recommend
a strategy for establishing ap-
propriate programs designed
to strengthen and stimulate
the Florida economy into the
21st century.
Senate President, John W.
Vogt also named to the com-
mittee Sen. Gwen Margolis (D-
North Miami), Sen. Toni Jenn-
ings (R-Orlando), Sen. George
Stuart (D-Orlando), Sen.
Marlene Woodson (R-
Bradenton) and Sen. Arnett
iirardeau (D-Jacksonville).
Gordon noted that economic
development is central to the
future growth of Dade County,
which has leveled off in popula-
tion increase during the past
few years. "And the City of
Miami Beach needs economic
development assistance, to
maintain its recent turn-
around" the veteran legislator
said. He has served Miami
Beach, Miami, Key Biscayne
and Coral Gables in the senate
for the past 15 years.
He is former chairman of the
City of Miami Beach Tourist
Development Authority.
Recently arrived Soviet Jewish immigrant
Faina Glukhova lights the first Chanukah
candle as teenage son, Gregory, left., and other
new immigrants look on while Rabbi Ronnie
Cahana, right, recites the blessing.
Soviet Settlers Celebrate Chanukah
New Soviet and Iranian
Jewish immigrants gather this
week to celebrate their first
Chanukah in America. The
Refugee Resettlement Pro-
gram of Jewish Family Service
of Greater Miami sponsored
the Chanukah party which was
attended by more than 40
adults and their children.
"These families," explains
Shuli Stock, coordinator of the
!FS program, "are among the
most recent Jews to be
franted exit visas from the
wiet Union and Iran. Our
program has resettled them in-
to the Miami area during the
; 1 year some as recently
to last week helping them
with job placement, housing,
'"'1 English training."
, The most recent immigrant
family attending the party was
Faina and Gragon Glukhova,
er and son who had been
"'l emigration from the
' Union shut 1974. They
"rived in Miami last week U>
''in FainaGlukhova'a brother.
All of the families at the party
participated in Israeli dancing
*na a Chanukah candlelighting
j'eremony with Rabbi Ronnie
< ahana of Temple Emanu-EI.
"It has been the first
Chanukah most of these
families have ever celebrated,
but certainly not the last,"
says Stock. "We hope to be
able to sponsor a First
Chanukah party every year for
new Jewish immigrants. Let's
just hope that the number of
new Jewish immigrants com-
ing to freedom continues to
grow with every year."
?i ^ fJKl Glott Kosher
.J Passover
Deauville
ON THE OCEAN AT 67th STREET MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA
AT
THE
HOTEL
BEACH &
TENNIS
CLUB
8-9*10
NIGHT PACKAGES
_#
$
Irom
.
One ol Miami BaoctVs
largest and Most
Luxurious Hotels
New Heated
Pool Side Jocuhi
Aerooic Classes
600 Kino Size
Accommodations
Wide Ocean Beocti
2 Pools Children s
Recreotion Room On
Premises Tennis
Ooncing Enter
toinment & Snows
Delicious Cuisine
Complimentary lea
Room
m
Giatt Kosher
For Information & Reservations Call
649
INCLUDING
3 MEALS
DAILY
'ae< person aouNe occ
Pius Ta & lips
STRICTLY GLATT KOSHER
Under Supervision of National Kashruth
Headed bv RABBI YACOV LIPSCHUTZ
SEDURIM SERVICES
WILL BE CONDUCTED
BY CANTOR
ASHERSCHARf
1-531-3446
or write Pastover'88 Deauville P.O. Box 402868
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Principals in the annual Miami Beach Chamber of Commerce in-
stallation dinner, held at the Fontainebleau-Hilton Hotel, in-
clude, from left, Stuart Blumberg, president-elect of the chamber;
Stephen Muss, former Chamber honoree; Dade County Comm.
Harvey Ruvin, this year's "Man of the Year;" and Robert Blum,
chamber president.
1 W ^ U i 1 I<->JH
J a* m m
1 1
1 1
All smiles at the success of the Miami Beach Chamber of Com-
merce dinner at the Fontainebleau-Hilton are: from left, Barton
S. Goldberg and Jan Pfeiffer, past chamber presidents; A. An-
thony Noboa, chamber treasurer; and Gerald Schwartz, former
chamber vice president who was re-elected to a three-year term on
the Board of Governors.
>
i i
i i i r -
III I I
riTHE NEW;-
jHIRSCHFELD:
i?* THEATRE!;*;
! in the Castle Hotel and Resort. Proudly Presents
Greg Thompsons
il. iL.
m):
BJetmajej
A DAZZLfNG SONG AND DANCE
SPECTACULAR!
Featuring More than 50 of Broadway's Greatest Hits!
Sizzling and Sentimental... Warm and Wonderfull
A "Best of Broadway'' Masterpiece.
FOR TICKETSOne Call Sets the Stage!
BOX OFFICE 865-PLAY
Ticket Prices From $8.00 to $18.00
Discounts for Groups of 20 or more and Senior Citizens.
Tickets also available through BASS
734 BASS in Palm Beach County
The Hirschfeld Theatre Is in the Castle Hotel and Resort
5445 Collins Avenue. Miami Beach


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 18, 1987
Deaths
USA Celebrates Chanukah and Sabbath
FEINBLOOM
Abe, 86. of Bay Harbor Island, passed away
Monday. December 14. He is survived by his
son. Harold (Joan) Feinbloom of Rochester,
N.Y., grandsons David P. of New Jersey
and Stephen of Rochester. Mr. Feinbloom
was on the board of Douglas Gardens and
Michael Ann Russell JCC. He was a benefac
tor of Temple Sinai of North Dade and
Barry University and a member of the Hal
Harbour Rotary Club where he was a Paul
Harris Fellow. Member of B'nai B'rith and
on the National Board of Directors, U.S.
Committee for Sports in Israel. Services
were held at Temple Sinai of North Dade
with interment at Lakeside Memorial Park.
The Riverside in charge of arrangements.
SASSOWEK
Helen. 83, November 29. She served many
times as the president of the Brooklyn
Chapter of Pioneer Women, now known as
Na'amat USA. She retired to Miami Beach
in 1968. The Mayor of Miami Beach
presented her with the "Woman of the
Year" award in 1986 for her work with
Na'amat. She is survived by her daughter
Frances Neas and son George Sassower.
grandchildren and greatgrandchildren
Services were held in Rego Park, N.Y.
ZEEMAN
Harold, famous restauranteur. Mr. Zeeman.
former president of the Florida Restaurant
Assn. and owner of Biscayne Cafeteria,
passed away December 12. He was 77 years
old. He was a founding member of Temple
Shir Ami and active in the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. He is survived by his
wife Beth, daughter. Peggy (Jon) Gordon;
sister. Vivian Zeeman; brother Bernard
Zeeman and grandchildren Lisa and Danny
Gordon. The Riverside. Interment at Mt.
Nebo Cemetery.
BERKEY. Arthur, of Miami Beach.
December 8. The Riverside.
FORSTER. Simon H., 75, of North Miami.
December 8 The Riverside.
KRONGOLD. Lena. 93. of Miami Beach,
December 8. Eternal Light. Lakeside
Memorial Park.
KRUGLY. Mariene. 50, of North Miami
Beach. December 9. Menorah Chapels.
BEN, Arthur, of Coral Gables Rubin
Zilbert.
LITTMAN. Samuel, of North Miami Beach.
December 10. Services were held.
WASSERMAN. Samuel, 82, of Miami and
Miami Beach, December 9. Services were
held. Interment at Star of David Memorial
Park.
BOOKBINDER. Beatrice, December 12
Blasberg Chapel.
DUBROW, Bella. December 11 Services in
New Jersey.
BLOCK. Morris, of Miami Beach, December
11. The Riverside.
CALDWELL, J. George. 81, of Atlanta and
Miami, December 12. Services were held.
Interment at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
COWEN, Gennee. 94. December 11 The
Riverside. Interment at Lakeside
Memorial Park.
DAVIS, Jack E., Rubin-Zilbert.
GAYLE. Jules M. NHA, DC. 71, of North
Miami Beach. December 10. Menorah
chapels.
MANSHEL. Milton M. Sr December 11
Services held in New Jersey.
LEVINE, Samuel H. 82. of North Miami
Beach. The Riverside.
KIPNIS. Shire, of Miami Menorah Chapels.
LIPSHITZ. Esther, of Miami Beach.
December 13 Eternal Light. Lakeside
Memorial Park.
MARGOLIS. Natalie. 63. of Miami.
December 14. The Riverside. Interment at
Star of David Memorial Park.
STILLER, Naomi, of Coconut Creek.
December 13. Services were held.
HOROWITZ, David. 67. of North Miami
Beach. December 13. Levitt-Weinstein.
Interment at Lakeside Memorial Park.
KAPLAN. Gertrude E., 791 of North Miami
Beach. December 12. Levitt-Weinstein.
HOROWITZ. Solomon, of North Miami
Eternal Light. Lakeside Memorial Park.
GINSBERN. Ruth. December 14. Services
in New York.
SALES, Daniel, 66. of North Miami Beach,
December 14. Levitt-Weinstein. Lakeside
Memorial Park.
ROSENTHAL. Ferdinand H., 77. of Miami.
December 14. The Riverside.
The Jerusalem Experience
Opened With Chanukah
the display staff that created
"The Israel Experience."
Years in the planning, the pro-
duction started over a year
ago, requiring sculptures,
woodcuts, panels and pain-
tings to protray the ancient
settings of the city in diaramas
coordinated by David Gafni,
exhibit designer of the
Diaspora Museum.
"The Jerusalem Ex-
perience" will be shown in the
auditorium of the Aspeclaria
Gallery. The auditorium,
dating back to the Crusades,
has been specially equipped for
the exciting effects of hun-
dreds of visuals from 16 pro-
jectors surrounding the
audience.
Adjacent to the auditorium,
a large illuminated model of
the Beit Hamikdash (the Se-
cond Temple) occupies the
center of the floor, encircled
by carpeted steps for comfor-
table seating. Students will
have a compelling view of all
sections of the Temple and the
opportunity to acquire authen-
tic knowledge of the structure
and workings of the Temple
from an Halachic perspective.
On the first night of
Chanukah, Israel will have
celebrated the grand opening
of a new "Light-o-Rama"
show called "The Jerusalem
Experience," illuminating
4,000 years of Jewish history.
Each night of Chanukah, an
Israeli official will have lit the
candles preceding the public
showing in Jerusalem. All
shows will be admission free
during the festival week.
"You feel that you are ac-
tually in the midst of events as
they occur, witnessing the
trials and triumphs of the
Jewish people in Jerusalem
throughout our history," en-
thused Menachem Bar-
Shalom, spokesman for the
Jerusalem Reclamation Pro-
ject, a division of American
Friends of Ateret Cohanim,
sponsors of the show. "This
multi-media spectacular
averages a century a minute,
covering 4,000 years in 45
minutes. Educationally geared
for teens and adults, the
schedule alternates Hebrew
and English shows.
The high-tech, audio visual
"Light-o-Rama" was built by
The United Synagogue of
America is making available
two new kits. The Shabbat Kit
and the Chanukah Package are
both designed to enhance the
experience of youth in their
observance of these days on
the Jewish calendar.
Rabbi Jerome M. Epstein,
United Synagogue senior vice
president and chief executive
officer, stated that "for a long
time, we have been concerned
with enabling our young
Jewish population, no matter
where they are, to live a
Jewish lifestyle. These kits
provide them with the oppor-
tunity to observe these special
days and it is our hope that
they may be motivated to do
so. We do not believe in an 'all
or nothing at all' approach.
Every mitzvah observed
strengthens the individual and
thereby strengthens the
Jewish community."
The Shabbat Kit comes com-
plete with candlesticks,
candles, challah cover, grape
juice, silver-plated kiddish cup,
havdallah candle, United
Synagogue calendar, and a
USY songster. The total cost
for the entire kit, including
mailing, is $15.00.
"The Chanukah package is
another essential means of
communicating to our young
people the vital message that
being away from home and
family does not preclude obser-
vance of Jewish holidays and
festivals," according to United
Synagogue International
President, Franklin D.
ICreutzer. "We must utilize
every means at our disposal to
equip our youth to combat
those influences they en-
counter which would lure them
from the practice of Judaism."
Both the Shabbat Kit and
the Chanukah Packages are
available from the Department
of Youth Activities of the
United Synagogue of America.
Prepaid orders and inquiries
may be sent to: United
Synagogue Youth, 155 Fifth
Avenue, New York, NY 10010
(212) 533-7800.
How do you find out
about advance
funeral planning?
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Business Notes
Newman Insurance Agency
is opening a subsidiary, to be
called Newman-Sapoznik In-
surance Agency, to better ser-
vice their clients in the area of
Life, Health. Group and
Pensions.
Rachel Sapoznik, who has
had many years of experience
will be handling this company
and will be coordinating her ef-
forts with Jeffrey Newman.
A special limited pre-need offer: PHif*iNCH
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Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
Ted Koppel will mark his 25th
anniversary with ABC News
Sunday, Jan. 10, when he
speaks at the second event of the
Cultural Series of Temple
Emanu-El of Greater Miami.
His talk, in the main sanc-
tuary of the Miami Beach con-
gregation, is scheduled for 8
p.m. Koppel joined ABC News
in New York in 1963, but
skyrocketed to national fame in
March, 1980 when "Nightline"
began as a nightly feature on
ABC televison, then
highlighting daily reports on
the Iran hostage crisis.
Thrift Shop-Center Of Confusing Suit
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged has filed
a lawsuit against a for-profit
shop that it claims is infringing
on its established business
rights.
The dispute follows the
opening of Jewish Thrift Shop
on Hallandale Beach
Boulevard in the same location
that the Jewish Home Thrift
Shop had previously occupied.
The Miami Jewish Home
Thrift Shop is a non-profit
business that uses funds from
its thrift shops in Dade and
Broward counties to finance
healthcare and services to the
elderly and the indigent at the
40-year-old, 600-bed Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged at Douglas Gardens.
The Jewish Thrift Shop was
opened by Thrift Shops of
West Broward Inc. The Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital's
suit says the for-profit shop's
location and strikingly similar
name as well as misleading
advertisements are responsi-
ble for a drop in revenues.
Henry Roth, author of the classic best selling
novel, "Call It Sleep" returned to New York to
celebrate the publication of his second book,
"Shifting Landscape." Pictured at a press
reception held by The Jewish Publication
Society are, from left, author Chaim Potok, ac-
tress Tovah Feldshuh, and Roth.
Another Response To
'Who Wrote the Bible?'
K1HTOR:
The Jewish Floridian is
hardly justified in publicizing a
book (Wh WroU The Bi-
'i by Prof. Richard E.
Friedman) which, inap-
propriately, challenges the
authenticity of the Torah
because of alleged inac-
curacies, while giving little
mention of the fact that the re-
hashed, contrived "evidence"
offered by the author has long
been disproven by numerous
venerated and erudite rab-
binical authorities. Even a
number of non-Jewish scholars
'lemolished the conten-
tions of the so-called "modern
Bible critics" or "higher Bible
critics" on each and every
question of the Bible's
credibility.
ludged by The Jewish Flori-
i recent report, the book,
which admits to being only
theoretical in its premise, rais-
ed several audacious questions
*hich, without instant refuta-
'ins, were patently
sacreligious and could only
mislead and weaken the
religiosity of certain gullible
readers. Similarly, portions of
the book could seduce other
Perfunctory readers who could
oe influenced away from our
faith because of their inade-
quate Jewish education. In-
deed, the Hebraic schooling of
some readers may have been
insufficient to meet charges
.Jfcsed on the misinterpreta-
tions of irrefutable scripture
^ause of the shallow scholar-
sh'P of some impugners of the
oible.
The little-known author, a
professor of Judaic Studies at
e San Diego campus of the
1 niversity of California, chose
M intriguing title for his opus
proudly includes the
and
following among his im-
pressive credentials: his ability
to rewrite in more popular
form the repeatedly exposed
theories, inferences and phan-
tasies of the "Bible critics;"
his inspiration by a Baptist
minister in a Miami school; his
attendance at Harvard and a
Conservative seminary; and
his claim to a knowledge of the
Akkadian and Ugarit
language.
The book's contents, were
largely based on the conjec-
tures of the 19th Century Ger-
man theologian, Johann
Wellhausen. They were con-
tradicted by recognized Bible
analysts of many denomina-
tions and nationalities. One
such essay, published by Rabbi
Joseph H. Hertz, the late Chief
Rabbi of the British Empire, is
readily available in many
synagogues, including Conser-
vative ones. Rabbi Hertz in-
cluded a brief but ample list of
books by his leading fellow-
refuters in repudiating the
"critics."
Is there so much importance
to the question of whether or
not Moses wrote the Five
Books called by his name? The
strongly opinionated author of
the critical book under discus-
sion tells us that what is impor-
tant is not who wrote the Bi-
ble, but who reads it. This lay
writer feels that what is far
more important is who abides
by Moses' sacred heritage, and
that, as Shakespeare would
say, "is the rub." Can a would-
be iconoclast lead his readers
to observance? The author con-
tends that his book will in-
crease the number of readers
of the Bible and more of them
could be led to more scholarly
study of the Bible. Perhaps.
Much more likely, they will
be led in logical sequence to
more skepticism, disobedience,
agnosticism, atheism, cultism,
deviation and, inevitably, to
inter-marriage by readers who
will be persuaded that Judaism
is a useless and outmoded com-
modity for this englightened
age, for many millenia. I hope I
am wrong but am I? Can the
book possibly increase and en-
courage religiosity since it
challenges Moses' veracity and
seemingly "proves" that
Moses was a fraud and not a
profound influence away from
licentiousness, immorality and
materialism?
The absolute veracity of the
Torah needs no defense; it can
never be successfully refuted
because, as a poet wrote:
There is no quarrel between
the old and new
The contest is only between
the false and true.
SIDNEY J.SIMON
N. Miami Beach
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Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 18, 1987
Catholic-Jewish Jolts
Composer John Duffy, left, and Abba Ebban
Eban and Mehta Set Heritage to Score
An Irish composer, an Israeli statesman and a Parsee Indian
have gotten together with the Israel Philharmonic to help create
in music and words a first of its kind: a musical history of the
Jewish people Heritage a 50-minute recording that captures
a 5,000-year-old common tradition shared by Christians and
Jews.
The powerful music is based on one of television's most trium-
phant success stories: Heritage: Civilization and the Jews and
captures all the drama of the series with a moving text narrated
by Abba Ebban, statesman and diplomat. Performed by the
Israel Philharmonic and conducted by Zubin Mehta, the recor-
ding is a unique creation. John Duffy wrote the score.
Hadassah Research
JERUSALEM A team of
researchers at the Hadassah-
Hebrew University Medical
Center here report they are
close to developing a pill that
will enable diabetics to get dai-
ly doses of insulin by mouth.
Dr. Hanoch Bar-On, head of
the Diabetes Research Unit at
the medical center, said his
team currently is experimen-
ting with both a pill and soft
gel capsule that would free
diabetics from the necessity of
daily insulin injections.
The pill's formula which
combines insulin, bile salts and
soybean extract has been
patented in the United States
and Europe. Bar-On said the
team's research showed that
insulin combined with bile salts
was readily absorbed through
the lining of the intestine and
produced a significant drop in
blood sugar levels within half
an hour.
Bar-On said the soft gel cap-
sule would contain the team's
formula in liquid form. The
capsule would release its con-
tents when it reached the
small intestine. The insulin
would then be absorbed
through the intestinal wall and
transported to the liver where
it would regulate the sugar
level of the blood.
The researchers did not
predict how soon insulin in pill
or capsule form might be
available.
Continued from Page 3-B
troversy" touched off by
remarks attributed to Cardinal
Joseph Ratzinger, head of the
Vatican Congregation for Doc-
trine of the Faith, in an inter-
view published Oct. 24 in the
Italian weekly magazine II
Sabato.
The cardinal was quoted as
saying that while the basis of
Catholic dialogue with
Judaism is respect between
the two religions, Catholics
must also pursue the
"theological direction" that
"the faith of Abraham ..
finds its fulfillment" in the
reality of Jesus Christ.
The interview outraged
Jewish leaders and prompted
the Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith to demand a
clarification from the Vatican
last month.
In a telegram to Cardinal
Johannes Willebrands, head of
the Vatican Commission for
Religious Relations with the
Jews, the ADL's national
presidents, Abraham Foxman,
and Rabbi Leon Klenicki,
director of its interreligious af-
fairs department, protested
that Ratzinger's "expressions
take the dialogue (between
Catholics and Jews) back to
Former Governor Reubin Askew presented the Americanism
Award to Robert F. Ehrling, president of General Development
Corporation at the Anti-Defamation League dinner/dance earlier
this month. Ehrling was the honoree at the event attended by up-
wards of 1*00 guests at the Omni International Hotel.
AMENDED
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name AMPAC PROPER
TIES at 4906 SW 8th Street. Coral
Cables. El 33134 intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade Countv.
Florida.
PASTOR DE LA TEJERA
RENE MONTEAGUDO. JR
ERNESTO GUERRA
FRANK 11 CABEZA
MELVIN J. ASHER
Attorney for Applicants
825 South Bayshore Drive
Suite 543
Miami. FL 33131
Phone: 541-2585
18101 November 20. 27;
December 4, 11.1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-30005
SEC. 30
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION. >
United State* corporation.
PlainUfffs)
vs.
MATILDA HODGE, JOHN
FARRINGTON. GWENDOLYN
FARBINGTON. and the
unknown spouses, et al.,
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County
Courthouse in Miami, Dade Coun-
ty, Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M.,
on the 4th day of January,
1987. the following described
property:
Lot 16. Block 3.
STONEYBROOK ESTATES, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 65, Page 30,
of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
DATED the 16th day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin. PA..
3060 Biscayne Boulevard, Suite
800
Miami. Florida 33137
Published 12/18-25
the Middle Ages and appear
contrary to the spirit of
Vatican II and Pope John Paul
IPs statements on Judaism."
A statement released shortly
afterward by Willebrands' of-
fice said the intention of Ratz-
inger's remark was to expound
the view that Christians should
acknowledge their Old Testa-
ment heritage and that the
Catholic Church respects Jews
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
87-473C1
FLORIDA BAR NO: 018468
NOTICE OF SUIT OF
PETITION OF DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
ARNOLD CALABRIA,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DOROTHY ANN CALABRIA.
Defendant.
TO: DOROTHY ANN
CALABRIA
12 HEMSTEAD AVENUE
ROCKVILLE CENTER.
LONG ISLAND.
NEW YORK, 11570
YOU, DOROTHY ANN
CALABRIA, are hereby notified
that a Notice of Suit has been filed
against you. and you are required
to serve a copy of your Answer on
Plaintiffs ARNOLD CALABRIA,
c/o Ronald L. Davis, PA., At-
torney for Plaintiff, Suite 406,
Sky lake State Bank Building. 1550
N.E. Miami Gardens Drive. North
Miami Beach, Florida 33179.
Telephone (305) 940 2352. and file
the original Answer or Pleading in
the Office of the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court on or before the 28 day
of December, 1987. If you fail to do
so, judgement by default will be
taken against you for the relief
demanded in the Notice Of Suit
THIS NOTICE shall be publish
ed on week fur (41 consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
Dated November 18. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER, Clerk
Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
BY BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
I k'puty Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18128 November 27;
December 4. 11. 18. IM7
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-50443 22
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
"ETERANS AFFAIRS,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GERTRUDE TOUSSAINT,
et ux., et al.,
Defendants.
TO: AMERICAN SAVINGS
AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION
131 Oyster Creek Drive
Lake Jackson. Texas
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
The North 100 feet of the
South 200 feet of Tract "C."
Block 91. REVISED PLAT
OF PORTION OF GOLF
PARK, SECTION TWO. ac-
cording to the Plat thereof.
as recorded in Plat Book 34,
at Page 36. of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it.
on Stuart H. Gitlitz. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1670 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida. 33146 on or before
December 28, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 20 day of
November. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By E. LE SUEUR
As Deputy Clerk
18133 November 27;
December 4.11. 18,1987
and their "own faith and
expectations."
Fisher told the AJCommit-
tee commission that "the real
story of the events surroun-
ding Cardinal Ratzinger's in-
terview" is that "a clarifica-
tion was needed. A clarifica-
tion was asked for, and within
days, a clarification was
given."
Fisher maintained that "The
recent months of controversy
have deepened the entire
Catholic-Jewish encounter,
and, indeed, ironically, have
strengthened the entire
endeavor."
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87-53632 (04)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
FL Bar No. 003473
IN RE: The Marriage of
GODWIN ONORIOBE
and
REMELDA KYLER CHERRY
TO: REMELDA KYLER
CHERRY
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street. North Miami Beach.
Florida 33162. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before January 22
1988; otherwise a default will he
entered against you for the relict
demanded in the complaint *
|>etition.
This notice shall lie published ODCC
each week for four consecutive
B THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 15 dav of December. 1
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: Barbara Harper
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18182 December 18.." 1087;
January 1.8, 1988
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-33752
SEC. 13
STOCKTON. WHATLEY.
DAVIN A COMPANY, a Florida
corporation.
Plain tiffls)
vs.
EDWARD ALDER, et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above. I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on the SOUTH STEPS of the
Dade County Courthouse in
Miami, Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock AM, on the 4th day
of January. 1987. the following
described property:
North 98 feet less north 54 feet of
Lots 11 and 12. Block 1, TRAN-
QUILLA. according to the Plat
thereof, recorded in Plat Book 4.
Page 55, of the Public Records of
Dade County. Florida
DATED THE lHth day of
December. 1987
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal!
By Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin. PA
One ('entrust Financial Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street, Suite
2300
Miami. Florida 33131-2198
Pahlished 12/18-15
V '


Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 17-B
FORECLOSURE SALES-PUBLIC NOTICES
"'
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Naaaber 87-6052
Division 01
FL BAR No. 058319
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LEW D. MARTIN
a/k/a LOUIS D. MARTIN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of LEW D. MARTIN a/k/a LOUIS
D. MARTIN, deceased, File
Number 87-6062 (01), is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 3rd Floor, 73 W.
Flagler Street Miami, FL 33130.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
liersonal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 11, 1987.
Personal Representative:
DORA SIMON
750 North Ocean Blvd., Apt. 2009
Pompano Beach, FL 33062
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
THEODORE R. NELSON, ESQ.
NELSON & FELDMAN. PA.
1135 Kane Concourse
Hay Harbor Islands. FL 33154
Telephone: (306) 865-5716
18166 December 11.18, 1987
IN THE CIRCUOT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
'.KNERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87 52694 13
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI, a
I'mted States Corporation,
Plaintiff.
'AIRO ALBERTO SALAS. et
ll
I k'fendanU.
TO JAIRO ALBERTO SALAS,
residence unknown, if he is liv-
ing and. if he is dead, all
unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees,
lienholders. creditors,
trustees or otherwise, claim-
ing by, through, under or
against the said JAIRO
ALBERTO SALAS. and all
other parties having or claim
mg to have any right, title or
interest in and to the property
under foreclosure herein
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
'lion to foreclose a Mortgage on
tin- following described property in
I ade County, Florida:
Unit No. 313. of FOX
CHASE CONDOMINIUM
NO. 2. according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, as recorded in Of-
ficial Records Book 10940. at
Page 2197, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida, as amended;
together with all im-
provements, appliances and
fixtures located thereon
lias been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
our written defenses, if any, to it
Ml Keith, Mack, Lewis. Allison &
1 "hen. Plaintiff's attorneys.
hotl address is 111 N.E. 1st
Street. Miami, Florida 33132, on
or before January 15, 1988. and
file the original with the Clerk of
urt either before service on
ffl attorneys or Iwoitillci
after; otherwise, a Default
-ntered against you for the
lemanded in the Complaint
w ITNESS my hand and seal of
1 "urt on the 8 day of
1 ''emtier, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
Bj JENNIS L. RUSSELL
Deputy Clerk
December 11, 18, 25. 1987;
January 1, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-51154
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS.
Plaintiff,
vs.
TORRY Y. PERPALL, et al..
Defendants.
TO: All unknown heirs, creditors,
devisees or other persons
claiming by, through, under
or against Duke Ellington
Perpall, deceased
Residence Unknown
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 22, Block 30. FIRST AD-
DITION TO MYRTLE
GROVE, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 57 at Page 2 of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Stuart H. Gitliu. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
January 8, 1988, and file the
original with the Clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this court this 25 day of November,
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
18148 December 4.11.18. 26.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5937
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
VERA GORFINE,
formerly known as
VERA ZELTZER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of VERA GORFINE. formerly
known as VERA ZELTZER.
deceased. File Number 87-5937, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, 3rd Floor,
Miami, Florida 33130. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
, the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice was
begun on December 18, 1987.
Personal Representative:
LILLIAN HOROWITZ
8306 Meadowbrook Lane
Chevy Chase. MD 20815
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
SYLVAN HOLTZMAN
HOLTZMAN, KRINZMAN
&EQUELS
1500 San Remo Avenue, Suite 200
Coral Gables, Florida 33146
Telephone: (305) 662-7700
18175 December 18. 25. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN
that the undvtigMd desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name RIAZANO IN-
TERIORS at 18300 \ I
N.M.B.. FLA. 33179 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
SHEILA POI.SKV
18300 N.E 7 CT,
N.M.B. FL M
18157 December 11,18. 25, 1987;
January 1. 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-45169 CA 04
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS,
Plaintiff
vs.
JOHN A. MCFARLAND, et al..
Defendants.
TO: ROMAN MUDRYK
2262 Bourgoin Street
St. Laurent,
Montreal, Canada
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 11, in Block 1, and Lot
13, in Block 2 of BISCAYNE
LAKE VIEW according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 61, at Page 20,
of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
January 4. 1988 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plainiff s attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 25 day of
November. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18146 December 4,11.18, 25. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-48590 CA-02
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS,
Plaintiff
vs.
PHILIP MOTT, et ux.. et al..
Defendants.
TO: PHILIP MOTT and
VIRGINIA MOTT. his wife
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by.
through, under or against
PHILIP MOTT and
VIRGINIA P. MOTT, his
wife, and all parties having
or claiming to have any right,
title or interest in the
property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 18, in Block 1, of FAIR-
WAY, according to the Plat
thereof, recorded in Plat
Book 7, at Page 28. of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
January 15. 1988. and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court his 10 day of
December, 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18178 December 18. 25. 1987;
_______January 1.8.1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Joel Brazeman Leas-
ing at 740 Arthur Godfrey Rd,
Miami Beach, FL intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
JOEL BRAZEMAN
740 Arthur Godfrey Rd
Miami Beach. FL 33140
18138 November 27;
December 4.11,18, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-48977 CA 08
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATION OF
VETERAN'S AFFAIRS,
Plaintiff
vs.
ELLANDER CHRISTINE
HALIBACK.
Defendants.
TO: ELLANDER CHRISTINE
HALIBACK
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against ELLANDER
CHRISTINE HALIBACK, and
all parties having or claiming to
have any rights, title or interest
in the property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an ac-
tion to foreclosure a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 12, Block 96. THIRD AD-
DITION TO CAROL CrTY.
according to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 65,
at Page 93, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Gitiitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida, 33146 on or before
January 4. 1988, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this court this 25 day of November,
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18147 December 4. 11, 18,25. 1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-7671
SEC. 24
BUFFALO SAVINGS BANK, a
New York corporation.
Plaintiffisi
vs.
GIDEON PELEG. et al..
Defendant^)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now-
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami, Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M.. on the 4th day
of January, 1987, the following
described property:
Unit No. 144A, in Building No. 4A,
ROYALE GREEN CON-
DOMINIUM 2, according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, as recorded in Official
Records Book 8511, at Pages
2104-2141, of the Public Records
of Dade County. Florida; together
with all the appurtenances thereto,
all according to said Declaration of
Condominium.
DATED the 16th day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin, P.A.
Centrust Financial Center. Suite
2300
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami, Florida 33131-2198
Published 12/18-25
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name Joel Brazeman
Distributors at 740 Arthur God
frey Rd. Miami Beach. FL 33140
intends to register said name with
tisl Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida
Joel Brazeman
740 Arthur Godfrey Rd
Miami Beach, FL 33140
18139 November 27;
December 4, 11. 18, 1967
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NUMBER: 87-4845
DIVISION: 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BERNARD WEISS,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estati
of BERNARD WEISS, deceased.
File Number 87-4845, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representatives and the per-
sonal representatives' attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (!) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representatives, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 18, 1987.
Personal Representative:
DAVID WEISS
86 Rockford Road
Willowdale, Ontario M2R 3A8
BERNAT ROSENSCHEIN
2765 Ekers
Montreal, Quebec H3S 1E2
Attorney for Personal
Representatives:
ROBERT M. HERMAN, ESQ.
ROBERT M. HERMAN, P.A.
2435 Hollywood Boulevard,
Suite 201
Hollywood, Florida 33020
(305)947-4011
p308BW
18176 December 18, 25.1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
W THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. VH AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-19132
SEC. 18
NATIONAL MORTGAGE COM-
PANY, a Tennessee corporation.
Plaintifflsi
vs.
RICHARD EARL BOOK, et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour
thouse in Miami, Dade County.
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 1th day of January. 1987.
the following described
property:
Lot 7. in Block 1. of GRIFFIN
GARDENS, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
39. at Page 73. of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida
DATED the 16th day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Depaty Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin, P.A
('entrust Financial Center, Suite
2300,
100 Southeast 2nd Street,
Miami, Florida 33131 2198
Published 12/18-25
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name "DESTINATION
PLANNERS INTERNA-
TIONAL" at 9660 E Be) Harboi
Drive Baj Harbor Islands. Fl
88154 intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade ( ounty. Florida
Managing and Marketing
Professionals. Inc.,
By Larry Cliff. Pre|
Theodore R. Nelson,
Nelson & Feldman, P.A.
Attorney for Managing and
Marketing Professionals, Inc.
18167 December 11, 18.25, l;87
January 1. 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-8873
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MURIEL STRANZ RAFFO,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of MURIEL
STRANZ RAFFO, deceased. File
Number 87-6873, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130 The
personal representative of the
estite is RUTH MURIEL CASCIO
a/k/a RUTH MURIEL RAFFO,
whose address is 14730 N.W. 6th
Court. Miami, Florida. The name
and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured the security shall
be described: The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date ot the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
December 18. 1987
Ruth Raffo Cascio
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
MURIEL STRANZ RAFFO
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
SILVER & SILVER
150 S.E. 2nd Avenue.
Suite 500
Miami, Florida 33131
Telephone: i'305) 374-4888
By: MAX R SILVER
18183 December 18,25, 1987
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-50859 05
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ALMELIDA A. LIVAS, wife
and
ERNEL LIVAS, husband
TO: Mr Ernel Livas
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ
ten defenses, if any. to it on AR
THCR H LIPSON. attorn.
Petitioner, whose address is 801
N.E. 167 Street. Miami, FL 33162,
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
(.-fore January 4. 1988 Otherwise
lull will be entered against
you for the relief demanded ii
complaint or petition
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 24 day of November. 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: E BEIDL
As Deputy Clerk
{Circuit Court Seal)
18142 November 88;
December 4. 11. 18. 1987;



Page_18-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 18, 1987
FORECLOSURE SALES-PUBLIC NOTICES ---,,

NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
Uiat the undersigned, desiring to
ei gage in buisness under the fic-
titious name CORKY'S JR. OF
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
MAKGATEV 0* South'^ Cl^fA.e1to0N TOR8A'wVmONFC
Highway. Coral Gables. Florida ACTION FOR ADOPTION
3314f intends to register said IN RE: In the matter of the Adop-
name with the Clerk of the Circuit Uo" B.ynv PlrHF, RFRrrR
Court of Dade County. Florida. GLADYS ESmTtH
New Deli Restaurant Corp. TO: GROVER SMITH
LA^vA?orSHRE V ^Tr^Tr E B Y
NEW DELI RESTAURANT NOTIFIEDi that an action, for
CqrP Adoption of a minor has been filed
18137 November 27; ** vou re December 4, 11, 18, 1987 W of vour *"" *?*' ,f
any, to it on Joshua s. uautzer,
---------------- ._.... Esq., attorney for Petitioner.
NOTICE OF ACTION who8e llMTela ig m0i N.E. 6th
CONSTRUCTIVE SERV'CE Avenue North Miami Bauili fu.
(NO PROPERTY) 33152 ^^ fi|e the original with
IN THE CIRCUIT COUR OF the clerk of the above styled court
THE ELEVENTH JUDICiAL on or Mon December 28, 1987;
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. N otherwise a default will be entered
AND FOR DADE COUN IT agajngt you for ^ re|ief demand.
Civil Action No. 87-50142 15 ^ in the compiaim or petition.
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION m> noticeKshall ^ published
OF MARRIAGE once eme^i wee^ for four con-
No. 003473 secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
IN RE: FLORIDIAN.
GLADYS HILL a/k/a WITNESS my hand and the seal
AMBROZINE of g^y court t Miami, Florida on
GLADYS FRANCES HILL Ma 19 ^y of November. 1987.
and RICHARD P. BRINKER
ROBERT IVAN HILL As clerk Circuit Court
TO. ROBERT IVAN HILL p^ County. Florida
Residence Unknown gy. g j poY
YOU ARE HEREBY ^ rjeputy Clerk
NOTIFIED that an action for (Circuit Court Seal)
Dissolution of Marriage has been joghua S. Galitaer, Esq.
filed against you and you are re- 17,0, N E 6th Avenue
quired to serve a copy of your wnt- No|th Miamj Reach. Fla. 33162
ten defenses, if any, to it on JOY 53.3535
BARKAN. attorney for Petitioner Att0mey for Petitioner
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd lgl20 November 27;
Street North Miami Beach. Florida December 4, 11,18,1987
33162, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court NOTICE UNDER
on or before December 28, 1987; FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
otherwise a default will be entered NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
against you for the relief demand- that the undersigned, desiring to
ed in the complaint or petition. engage in business under the fic-
This notice shall be published titious name Little David Produc
once each week for four con- tions at 770 Northwest 195th
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH Street. Unit 210. N. Miami Beach.
FLORIDIAN. EL intends to register said name
WITNESS my hand and the seal with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of said court at Miami, Florida on of Dade County, Florida
this 19 day of November, 1987. Little David Music. Inc.
RICHARD P. BRINKER Douglas D. Stratum. Esq.
As Clerk. Circuit Court Attorney for
Dade County, Florida Little David Music, Inc.
By E. SEIDL 18129 November 27;
As Deputy Clerk December 4. 11, 18. 1987
(Circuit Court Seal)
18126 November 27; IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
December 4,11, 18. 1987 THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE No. 87-40178 CA 09
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL ANTIRFW I FF CAR TFR et u*
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, an AtN?RE LEL tK' '
association organized and existing Defendants
under the laws of the United ANDREW LEE CARTER
States of America, ^^
PU,ntiff ELOISE CARTER, his wife
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-4*155 CA 28
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS,
Plaintiff
EDUARDO M ANTITNA, et ux..
.t ill Defendants
TO: PETER ORDWAY
Sligo Road
K F.D. No. 1
Dover,
New Hampshire 03820
WMJ ARE NOTIFIED that u
f< r F( irii'losure of Mortgage
on the following described
property
Lot 22, Block 2. of
OAKRIDGE ESTATES
SECTION THREE, accor-
ding to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 57.
Page 10, of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, W AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name PHARMATECH IN-
TERNATIONAL at 633 N.E.
167th ST. SUITE NO. 624 N.
Civil Action No.: 87-49440 FC 18 MIAMI B.. FL 33162 intends to
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF register said name with the Clerk
YONI YAAKOV 0f the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
and ty, Florida.
ETTY B. YAAKOV STAR SERVICE
TO: ETTY B. YAAKOV CORPORATION
Residence Unknown a FLA. CORPORATION d.b.a.
A Petition for Dissolution of PHARMATECH
your Marriage has been filed in INTERNATIONAL
this court and you are required to CORPORATION
serve a copy of your written 18155 December 4. 11,18. 26. 1987
defenses on Alec Ross, attorney -----------------------------------------
for Petitioner. 160 SUNNY ISLES
BLVD. N. MIAMI BEACH. FLA NOTICE UNDER
and file the original with the clerk FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
of the above court on or before NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
January 4, 1988; otherwise a that the undersigned, desiring to
default will be entered against you. engage in business under the fic-
Dated in Miami on November 24. titious name "HOTEL BANK" at
1987. 9660 E Bay Harbor Drive. Bay
RICHARD BRINKER, Clerk Harbor Islands. Fl 33154 intend to
Dade County. Florida register said name with the Clerk
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
As Deputy Clerk ty, Florida.
(Circuit Court Seal) Managing and
18144 November i.7; Marketing Professionals, Inc.
December 4. 11. 18,1987 By Larry Cliff. President
Theodore R. Nelson.
Nelson & Feldman. P.A.
Attorney for Managing and
Marketing Professionals Inc.
8168 December 11, 18.25. 1987;
January 1. 1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name ORLANDO AUTO
REPAIRS at 1266 OPA LOCK
BLVD. OPA-LOCKA FL 33064 in
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
ORLANDO RODRIGUEZ
18181 December 18.25,1987;
January 1,8.1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-51500-05
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
No. 003473
IN RE:
YVES DORCE
and
ALOURD DORCE
TO: ALOURD DORCE
118 E. 95th Street No. 1
Brooklyn, New York
YOU HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action for Dissolution of Mar
and TIMOTHY E. CRAPPS
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
V em, and all parties having
01 claiming to have any right,
tit 1 or interest in the
pri>|xTty herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to forclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County. Florida:
Lot 14. Block 31. of REVIS-
ED PLAT OF A PORTION
()F CAROL CITY, according
to the plat thereof, recorded
in Plat Book 57. Page 63, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
are required to serve a copy of ^ ^ of
your written defenses if any^ to it itten M tf ^
on Sheppard Faber Attorney for Attor^ for
PU",U/^hT "d<^"* r ^ Pla.nt.ffThose addreas is Suite
S^lT0^*' ,7 Z u ?kI Gables. Florida, 33146 on or before
D^er>SiJnV?h2ro >W 15. 1988, and file the
onginal with the Clerk of this court ^ court
ether before service on Plaintiffs ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^
Vt0r*ey.Kr If,d Jin attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default wd! ^^^'otherwl8e a defau|t will
be entered against you for the ^^ ^ for ^
refal2?fad w *? T,Pk 1 relief demanded m the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and Uie seal WITNt:sS my hand and the seal
of Uus Court tlu. 18 day of >f ^ M'^ ,0 ^ of
November, 1987 December 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER RICHARD P BRINKER
A? f ^noln I 7 As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk Ag t nerk
18123 ,. ^.m'TXbt 8177 December 18.26. 1987;
December 4. 11. 18, 1987 January 1. 8, 1WX
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name M & G IN-
VESTMENTS at 13170 N.W. 43rd
Avenue Opa-Locka, Florida 33054
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
GERALD A. MERLO
SI SAN A MERLO
MIGUEL GRILLO
MARIA A. GRILLO
riage has been filed against you HARVEY D. ROGERS. ESQ.
and you are required to serve a 1401 N.W. 17th Avenue
copy of your written defenses, if Miami. Florida 33125
any. to it on JOY BARKAN, at ign9 November 27;
tomey for Petitioner, whose ad- December 4. 11. 18. 1987
dress is 2020 N.E. 163rd Street --------------------
North Miami Beach, Florida IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
33162. and file the original with IN AND FOR
the clerk of the above styled court DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
on or before January 15. 1988; PROBATE DIVISION
otherwise a default will be entered FILE NO. 87-4967
against you for the relief demand- DIVISION 01
ed in the complaint or petition. (Florida Bar No. 032230)
This notice shall be published IN RE: ESTATE OF
once each week for four con- RALPH DAVID HANKEL.
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH a/Wa RALPH D. HANKEL.
FLORIDIAN. a/k/a RALPH HANKEL.
WITNESS my hand and the seal Deceased
of said court at Miami. Florida on NOTICE OF
this 1 day of December. 1987. ADMINISTRATION
RICHARD P. BRINKER TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
As Clerk, Circuit Court CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
Dade County. Florida AGAINST THE ABOVE
By C.P. COPELAND ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
As Deputy Clerk PERSONS INTERESTED IN
(Circuit Court Seal) SAID ESTATE:
18154 December4,11.18. 1987 YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of RALPH
DAVID HANKEL. a/k/a RALPH
D HANKEL. a/k/a RALPH
HANKEL, late of Dade County
Florida. File Number 87-6957. is
pending in the Circuit Court foi
Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33130. The name and ad-
dress of the personal represen
tative and the personal represen
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons interested in the
estate are required to file with this
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-39829 FC 01
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
CORRINA A. DEESON
Petitioner,
and
LARRY DEAN DEESON
Respondent.
TO: LARRY DEAN DEESON
28201 S.W. 152 Avenue
(Last known address)
Lot No. 278
Leisure City. Fla. 33033
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
STANLEY E. GOODMAN, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 909 East 8th Avenue.
Hialeah, Florida 33010. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
January 4, 1988; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall he published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 24 day of November, 1987
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
STANLEY E. GOODMAN
909 East 8th Avenue
Hialeah, Florida 33010
Attorney for Petitioner
18143 November 27;
December 4. 11,18, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
W THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-52403-04
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: I.ORINE JONES
and
NORMANJONFS
TO: NORMAN JONES
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY court. WITHIN THREE MON
NOTIFIED that an action for THS OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
Dissolution of Marriage has been TION OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
filed against you and you are re claims against the estate and (2)
quired to serve a copy of your writ- any objection by an interested per
ten defenses, if any, to it on JOY son on whom this notice was serv
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner, ed that challenges the validity of
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd the will, the qualifications of the
Street North Miami Beach, Florida personal representatives, venue.
33162, and file the original with or jurisdiction of the court,
the clerk of the above styled court ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
on or before January 8, 1988; AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
otherwise a default will be entered ED WILL BE FOREVER
against you for the relief demand BARRED,
ed in the complaint or petition. Personal Representative
Thia notice shall be published NANCY HANKEL
once each week for four con 530 31st Street
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH Miami Beach, Florida 33140
FLORIDIAN. First publication of this notice of
WITNESS my hand and the seal administration on the 18 day of
of said court at Miami. Florida on December, 1987.
this 7 day of December. 1987 Moms J. Grundwerg
RICHARD P BRINKER Of Law Offices of
As Clerk, Circuit Court M( ISES J. GRUNDWERG, P.A.
Dade County. Florida 44 West Flagler St. Suite 600
By T CASAMAYOR Miami. Florida 33130
As Deputy Clerk (306) 371-4419
(Circuit Court Seal) Attorney for Personal
18161 December 11. 18. 25, 1987; Representative
January 1. 1988 18173 In, ember 18. 25, 1987 '
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-50061 (12)
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
BRUNA VASCOS PENAYO
Petitioner/Wife
and
ALBERTO PENAYO
Respondent. Husband
TO: ALBERTO PENAYO
Respondent
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of your Marriage hs
been filed and commenced in this
court and you are required to serve
a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Robert I Spiegelman.
Attorney at Law. Suite 518. 19
West Flagler Street, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is
Miami. Florida 33130 and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
December 28. 1987; otherwise
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 18 day of November, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By JENNIS L. FARRELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Robert I, Spiegelman, Esq.
Spiegelman & Spiegelman
19 West Flagler St. No. 518
Miami, FL 33130
(Phone) 371 2508
Attorney for Petitioner
IKIL'1 November 27;
December 4, 11, 18. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nuber 87-6942
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FREDA ALIBER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of FREDA
ALIBER, deceased, File Number
87-6942, is pending in the Circuit
Court for DADE County, Florida.
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 W. Flagler St, Miami,
Fl. 33130. The personal represen-
tative of the estate is Herbert J
Lerner, Esq., whose address is 801
Arthur Godfrey Road. Miami
Beach, Fl. 33140 The name and
address of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re
quired, WITHIN THREE MoN
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state
ment of any claim or demand the)
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate th.
for the claim, the name and id
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed
If the claim is not yet due, the dat.
when it will become due shall U
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated: If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable thi
clerk to mail one copy to each pet
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of toil
Notice of Administration has beet.
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objection-
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will tin
qualifications of the pat
representative, or the MOM '
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANI-
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FII
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration
December 18. 1987.
Herbert J. Lerner
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
FREDA ALIBER
Doo
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
HERBERT J LERNER
801 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Fl. 33140
Telephone: 305 673 3000
18174 December 18. 25. 1'.'.-
?
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY C,I\ I
that the undersigned, tail
engage in business under
titious name 8TRUL PRO!
TIES at 7464 Rexford Road B
Raton. Florida 88484 intends I
register said name with thl
of the Circuit Court of Dade '
ty. flonda.
STRUL PROPERTIES
H. ALLAN SHORE. ESy
Attorney for
STRUL PROPERTIES
18180 December 18. 26
January 1.8, 1888
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME I.AH
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, taring engage in business under the fic-
titious name FLORIDA WEST
AGENCY. INC. d/b/a FLORIDA
WEST at 2100 N.W 94 Avenue,
Miami. Florida 33172 in''
register said name with tbi
of the Circuit Court of Dade I
ty. Florida.
ABELARIX) BETAS" (URT
President of FI.OHM'\
WEST AGENCY !N<
LAW OFFICES OF
MARIO QUINTERO JR.. I A
Attorneys for FLORIDA
WEST AGENCY IM
18188 December 11 1
January'' 1


FORECLOSURE SALES-PUBLIC NOTICES
Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 19-B
><
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 87-41259 PC 18
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JEAN C. DUPEROUX,
Petitioner,
and
LINDA B. DUPEROUX. /k/a
LINDA B. NELOMS,
Respondent.
TO. LINDA B. DUPEROUX
a/k/a, LINDA B. NELOMS
Residence Unknown, you shall
serve a copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar
nage upon: ANTHONY CAR
BONE, P.A., 612 N.W. 12th
Avenue, Miami, Florida 33136,
and file original with the Clerk of
the Court on or before January 8,
1988, otherwise a default will be
entered.
December 2, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER, Clerk
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
18158 December 11, 18, 25, 1987;
January 1, 1988
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-35858
SEC. 13
STOCKTON. WHATLEY.
DAVIN COMPANY, a Florida
corporation,
I'laintiffls)
vs.
EUSTAQUIO ACEVEDO. et al..
Defendant^)
No l ICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
' idgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
.ash on the SOITH STEPS of the
Dad* County Courthouse in
Dade County, Florida at
i clock A.M.. on the 4th day
January. 1987. the following
described property:
12, in Block 26. of ICINGS
GARDENS SECTION THREE.
I Dg u> the Plat thereof, as
ltd in Plat Book 95, at Page
30 of the Public Records of Dads
1 ounty, Florida
DATED THE 16th day of
Decembir, 19*7
RICHARD P BRINKER
< 'lerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Utorney for Plaintiff
thai* Yarchin. P.A
Centruat Financial Center. Suite
2300
-outheast 2nd Street
Miami, Florida 33131-2198
Published 12/18-15
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-28384
SEC. 19
ALLIANCE MORTGAGE COM
PANY, a Florida corporation.
I'laintiffis)
vs.
ANDREW M. MITCHELL.
VBLVAT. MITCHELL, and the
unknown spouses, et al..
Defendant^)
'' 'TICK IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
idgBMBl entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
hich is indicated above, I will sell
'" the highest and best bidder for
n THE SOITH STEPS of
"ie County Courthouse in
Miami, Dade County, Florida at
I ""o'clock A.M o'nthc4th January. 1987. the following
described property:
Block 86, SECOND ADD!
'"'* TO SIERRA Mil. A. ac-
wding to the Plat t. f. as
W in Plat Book 64. Page 81
Public Records of Dade
' ""My, Florida.
DATED the 16th day of
'"''mber, 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
< lerk of Circuit Court
" WCUil Court Seal)
By Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Kosenthal 4 Yarchin, P.A.
100 southeast 2nd Street
Ur>e Centrust Financial Center.
Suite 8800
Miami, Florida 33131 2198
"Wished 12/18-28
NOTICE OF SALE
PUR8UANT TO CHAPTER 46
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-18832
SEC. 09
FEDERAL HOME LOAN MOR-
TGAGE CORPORATION, a
United States corporation,
Plamtiffls)
vs.
NESTOR FERNANDEZ, et al..
Defendant^)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami. Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M., on the 4th day
of January. 1987, the following
described property:
Unit 101-B TANGLEWOOD, a
Condominium, according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof as recorded September 10,
1981 in Official Records Book
11209, at Page 1547 of the Public
Records of Dade ("ounty, Florida.
The United States of America shall
have the right of redemption pro-
vided by 28 U.S.C. Sec. 2410(c) for
the period provided therein, runn-
ing from the date of the Certificate
of Title issued herein.
DATED the 16th day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin. P.A.
("entrust Financial Center, Suite
2300
100 Southeast 2nd Street.
Miami. Florida 33131-2198
Published 12/18-25
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-636
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OP
DAVID M. TAMEN,
also known as
DAVID TAMEN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of DAVID M TAMEN a/k/a
DAVID TAMEN. deceased. File
Number 87-6636, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami. Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1)) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 11, 1987.
PeraonaJ Rauieeaiilarhre:
8ULA ELLEN TAMEN
720 Fort Washington Avenue
Apt. IT
New York, New York HHI40
Attorney for Persons!
Representative
HERBERT S SHAPIRO.
ESQUIRE
SHAPIRO AND WEIL
~Mb St. Cswy Ste
Miami Beach. Florida 33141
Telephone: i.ior.) 864-2369
18140 December 11,18, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name (1) AVERBOOK
( COMMUNICATIONS (2) NEW
BUSINESS SYSTEMS at 20445
N.E. 19th CT MIAMI, FL 33179
intends to register said names with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Arthur S. Averbook
18156 December 4, 11, 18, 25.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name J. SANCHEZ, CORP.
D.B.A. FAMILY MOTORS at
9550 NW 79th AVENUE
HIALEAH GARDENS.
FLORIDA 33016 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
ELIO SANCHEZ-PRESIDENT
1820 W 53rd STREET
(APT. 508)
HIALEAH, FLORIDA 33012
18135 November 27,
December 4,11,18,1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-52815 (01)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
WOON RUKKARNPAET,
Petitioner/Wife,
and
PIRAPOL RUKKARNPAET,
Respondent/Husband,
TO: Mr. Pirapol Rukkarnpaet
1627-8 Takhli Road
Takhh. Nakhonsawan
Thailand 60140
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on
STEVE POLATNICK, Esq., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 10691 Kendall Drive, Suite
101. Miami. FL 33176, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before January
4, 1988; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 30 day of November, 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Flonda
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seai)
STEVE POLATNICK. Esq.
10691 Kendall Drive. Suite 101
Miami. FL 33176
(305) 595-0424; 595-0438
Attorney for Petitioner
18153 December 4, 11,18,25,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-6721
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SHELDON LEIDER.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of SHELDON LEIDER. deceased.
File Number 87-6721, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per
sonal representative and the per-
sona] representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all clam..-
IgaiDCl the estate and (2) any 00
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will
tin- qualifications of the personal
antativa venue or furiadk
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
>Kgun on December 11. 1987
Personal Representative
BETTY LEIDER
lOtli West Broadview Drive
Bay Harbour Island. Florida
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT.
ESQUIRE
Galbut. Gal but A Memn, P.A.
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (30b- Florida Bar Nc (889
18160 Decen.oerll, 18, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FL. BAR NO. 06897*
File Number 87-6584
IN RE: ESTATE OF
IRVING KLEIN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of IRVING
KLEIN, deceased, File Number
87-5584, is pending in the Circuit
Court for DADE County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, FL 33130. The personal
representative of the estate is
KATIE KLEIN, whose address is
1866 79th Street Causeway, Apt.
6C. N. Bay Village, FL 33141. The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amoung claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
December 11. 1987.
KATIE KLEIN
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
IRVING KLEIN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
BARRETT M.ROTHENBERG
9690 West Sample Road
Coral Springs, FL 33065
Telephone: (305) 945-2211
18165 December 11, 18, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name TELEPHONE
REPAIR SERVICE at 954 West
81 Si Hialeah FL 33012 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade (dun
ty. Flonda.
VICTOR GODOY
8M Wrst 31 Si.
Hialeah, FL 88012
18161 Daeamber II, 18.85,1987;
January 1, 1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
ngage in buaineaa under tha fie
litmus name GALACTIC TOW-
ING, at 8880 \'W 42nd St..
Miami, Fla. 33142, intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade ("oun-
ty, Flonda.
Galactic Towing Service. Inc
By Estamslao R. Hermandez,
a/k/a Ramon Hernandez
ROBERT M JASINSKI. ESQ.
Attorney for Applicant
The Roney Plaza, Suite M-8
2301 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach. FLA. 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-4421
19150 December 11, 18, 26. 1987;
January 1.1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-30491 (CA 27)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States
Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LUIS A. TURIEL. et al.,
Defendants.
TO:AMPARO A. TURIEL,
residence unknown, if living,
and if dead, to all the unknown
heirs, devisees, grantees,
asignees, lienholders,
creditors, trustees or other
parties claiming by. through,
under or against the said AM
PARO A. TURIEL, and all
other parties, having or claim-
ing to have any right, title or
interest in and to the property
under foreclosure herein.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an ac-
tion to foreclose a mortgage on the
following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Unit 235, of TIERRA DEL
SOL, a Condominium, accor-
ding to the Declaration of
Condominium thereof, as
recorded in Official Records
Book 10865, at Page 1375. of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida, as amended:
together with all im-
provements, appliances, and
fixtures located thereon
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack. Lewis. Allison and
Cohen, Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address is 111 NE 1st
Street. Miami. Florida 33132, on
or before January' 4. 1988 and file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or immediate
ly thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 25 dav of
November, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
18151 December4. 11. 18, 25. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-39836 (CA 29)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States
Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SIDNEY NAGIOFF. et al.,
Defendants.
TO: SIDNEY NAGIOFF and
ROSSLYN NAGIOFF.
his wife
42 Lyttleton Court
London. England N20EB
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following descrilied property in
Dade County, Florida:
Unit No 1002. of VEN-
DOME PLACE CON-
DOMINIUM, a Condominium
according to the Declaration
of Condominium thereof,
dated January 18, 1980, and
Had for word July 7. 1881
under Clerk's File No
81R180394. in Official
Records Book 11151. at Page
186 of the Public Recordi of
Dade County, as amended;
together with ;!! in;
provements, appliances, and
fixtures k*
I,as ban filed against you and you
are required to KrVI I COpJ of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Keith, Mack, Lev, i.-. Aliisoii and
Cohen. Plaintiff's attorneya,
whose address is 111 N.E 1st
Street, Miami, Florida 33132, on
or before .'anuary 4. 1988. ami file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate
ly thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 25 day of
November, 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
18152 December 4,11, 18, 25. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-3118
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ELIZABETH CALIGER,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of ELIZABETH
CALIGER. deceased. File Number
87-3116, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida.
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami. Florida 33130. The per-
sonal representative of the estate
is Max R. Silver, whose address is
150 S.E. 2nd Avenue, Suite 500,
Miami, Florida 33131. The names
and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not j et due, the date
when it will becon.e due shall be
stated. If the claii- s contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described.. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient
claim to the cler
clerk to mail one
sonal representat .'
All persons ii.:. rested
estate to whom .
Notice of Admin;-'
mailed are req;
copies of the
to enable the
py to each per-
in the
. copy of this
ion has been
;:red, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIi NS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
December 18. 1987
Max R Silver
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ELIZABETH CALIGER
Deceased
SILVER & SILVER
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
Suite 500
180 8.E. 2nd Avenue
Miami. Flonda 33131
Telephone: (305) 374-4888
By: Ira S. Silver
18172 December 18, 25. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name A & A BROTHERS.
IM D H A LOS PINARENOS
at 1864 SW hth STREET MIAMI.
FLORIDA 3313;") intends :.
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun
ty. Florida.
ARSENIO RODRIGUEZ
PRESIDEN1
11139 NV\ 6 TERRACE
MIAMI n, IUDA ...
Attorney for
\ .. A BROTHERS INC
ARSENIO RODRIGUEZ-PRE8
18130 November 27;
December4, 11, is 1887
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS N \ME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name OR1CHAS
BOTANICA INC DBA
ORICHAS BOTANICA at 2742
SW 8th STREET (UNIT 10)
MIAMI. FLORIDA 33135 intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
ALBERTO RODRIGUEZ
1500 SW 16th AVENUE
MIAMI, FL 33145
18131 November 27;
December 4, 11.18.1987


Page 20-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 18, 1987
Brooklyn: The General Assembly of Lubavitch
Continued from Page 9-B
Lubavitch communities.
However, in interviews with
shaliarh after shaliach, one
answer was echoed despite an
overwhelming eagerness to
repeat. "We don't have pro-
blems; we have challenge."
The uniform response was that
intermarriage is a critical pro-
blem. This, accompanied by
the overall problem of
assimilation, appeared to trou-
ble nearly everyone.
One shaliach claimed "total
success" at Chabad; Russian-
born Rabbi Yehuda Leib
Raskin, for 28 years the
Lubavitcher rabbi of Casablan-
ca, Morocco.
"We have no problems,"
said Raskin. "There is a great
Jewish tradition in Morocco,
very happy. And the govern-
ment is with the Jews." He
cited three Chabad schools in
Casablanca and cooperation
between several Jewish com-
munities throughout Morocco.
"We have no problems,"
said Raskin. "There is a great
Jewish tradition in Morocco,
very happy. And the govern-
ment is with the Jews." He
cited three Chabad schools in
Casablanca and cooperation
between several Jewish com-
munities throughout Morocco.
Raskin's North African
neighbor, the Lubavitch rabbi
of Tunisia, was unable to at-
tend, however, because of in-
ability to get a visa.
Other Lubavitcher rabbis,
while claiming success in
outreach to the Jewish com-
munity in general, cited
"problems with assimilation."
This included rabbi Chaim
Gromer of Melbourne,
Australia, who cited the
special need for Jewish
education.
Rabbi Itchik Krasnjansky of
Honolulu admitted, "We don't
have a lot of identifying Jews.
There's a tremendous request
for anything Yiddish from the
community.'
In Dallas, said Rabbi Mendel
Dubrowsky, the problem of
assimilation goes with a "very
materialistic community, and a
great divorce rate.''
Dubrowsky said Chabad has
established "very successful"
programs for teen-agers, and
support groups for drug and
alcohol abusers. "Those who
don't want to do drugs find it
very difficult to socialize," he
said. Shemtov's son, Rabbi
Eliezer Shemtov, has for the
past two-and-half years been
the emissary in Montevideo,
Uruguay, where there are an
estimated 20,000 Jews. When
this Shemtov is asked how
many Jews are in the
Lubavitch community, he
answers "20,000."
"We belong to the same
movement," said the amiable
younger Shemtov, "the move-
ment that doesn't recognize
movements."
He cited two overriding pro-
blems in Uruguay's Jewish
community; 50 percent mixed
marriages and "children born
without proper education,
therefore vulnerable to
anything. They don't know
what it means to be Jews,
what differs them from other
people."
Shemtov said the "solution
is education." He added that
the community itself had
originally requested that an
emissary be sent to
Montevideo.
Rabbi Mordechai Avtzon, a
native of Detroit, has been ser-
ving as Lubavitch emissary in
Hong Kong for the past two-
and-a-half years. Avtzon says
there are about 1,000 identify-
ing Jews living there, "but at
least 1,000 or 2,000 unidentify-
ing. We're finding them
slowly."
He said they had just set up a
Talmud Torah with 20
students, and his goal now is to
establish a center in the middle
of the city "where local and
transient Jews can get under
one roof all their Jewish
needs."
Two more isolated
emissaries present were Rabbi
Yehoshua Forma, who within
the last month has set up a
Chabad House in Asuncion
Paraguay, where between 700
and 1,000 Jews live, and Rabbi
Yitzhak Goldstein, who for 10
lonely years has tried to bring
to life a Chabad House in
Madrid.
Goldstein cited the non-
Lubavitch Talmud Torah and
Jewish center in Madrid, and
the availability of kosher food
and a mikveh. But because
Lubavitcher Hasidim maintain
their own standards of
kashrut, he and his family have
had to depend on visiting fami-
ly and friends bringing in
meat. For milk, to meet their
own strict standards, they go
to the farm themselves to
observe the milking process,
and do all their baking at
home.
Goldstein admitted no takers
so far in Madrid, but emphasiz-
ed that they are "constantly
overrun with tourists and
American students." Still, he
has hopes of "working with
the community."
Goldstein, who with his wife
teaches their children at home,
says they are "admired by the
Spaniards. They say, 'We have
to wait years (in the Catholic
religion) to wear such a hat
(kippa). You get to wear them
always.'" He claimed his
neighbors ask to be advised
when Jewish holidays are com-
ing, "so they can watch televi-
sion in another room."
One of the more unusual
shlichim at the gathering was
Rabbi Shmuel Rodal of Milan,
a diminutive, Montreal-born
rabbi who talks and jokes ef-
fusively with typical Italian
gestures after 17 years in that
country.
"There is a great percentage
of assimiliation; the people are
very estranged from Torah,"
said Rodal. "I'm not primarily
interested if they are religious.
Right now, in Milan, 'Tutto e la
moda' (fashion is everything).
"There is too much super
ficiality," he continued. "First
of all, one has to find out what
it's all about to be a Jew.
Essentially, our task is to
enlighten people about
Judaism."
Saturday
School
Continued from Page 4-B
small, he added. Each school
uses only two teachers for the
program, which has a max
imum capacity of 60 students
per school.
Drew's Krubitch said she
feels that anyone complaining
about school being held on
Saturday is "making a moun-
tain out of a molehill."
"When ever something
comes around positive, I feel
people have to find a
negative," she said.



Of Tannenbaum Trees and Mauthausen
By NORMAN JACOBSON
Sometimes the most pro-
found lessons are the least
expected.
After completing a lunch
hour errand recently, I hopped
into a waiting cab to return to
my Manhattan office.
I make a point of being
friendly to cab drivers, but
during the routine exchange
with this driver, I noticed he
was interested in more than
the usual chat.
I was taken by his soft-
spoken Eastern European ac-
cent and the lively eyes I saw
in the rearview mirror. After
exchanging pleasantries, he
said that "everything seems to
tie just wonderful, but it's
not."
I wondered what he was get-
ting at.
"The ozone layer is being
destroyed by industrializa-
tion," he explained. "In
Kurope, the trees of the
Srhwartzwald (Black Forest)
are being yellowed. The same
>un which brings us the beauty
.iiid warmth which we are en-
ding is also destroying the
nmenbaum trees."
I agreed with his en-
vironmental lecture, but I
wondered why he chose the ex-
amples from Germany. Then I
realized he was testing to see if
I was conversant with the Ger-
man words.
"Yes, the destruction of the
Schwartzwald is a real
shame," I said, trying to let
him know that I knew at least
a little about such things.
"How do you know about
that? Are you a hor-
tK-ulturalist?" he asked, glanc-
ing at me in the rearview
mirror.
"No," I replied, "I'm a
psychologist by training, but
now I work in real estate." I
still hadn't explained my
knowledge of the German en-
vironmental problem. I felt he
wanted to know more about
me.
"Where are you from?" he
asked.
"I'm from Brooklyn," I
replied. But still his searching
eyes looked at me. Finally, he
asked, "Are you Jewish?'
"Yes," I answered. I could
see his eyes light up with my
answer.
Smiling confidently at me in
the rearview mirror, he
retorted, "I'm also Jewish, I'm
from Czechoslovakia and a
'graduate' of Mauthausen. My
wife is a survivor of
Teresogenstradt." His banal
use of the word "graduate"
took me by surprise. Although
I have never been in a concen-
tration camp, our shared
ethnicity put us on somewhat
common ground.
He seemed eager to tell me
his story. "My name is Mr.
Mathias," he began. "Prior to
Mauthausen I worked in a
slave labor camp in Germany
upholstering car seats. The
day I arrived in Mauthausen,
another group also was
arriving.
"They were wealthy Jews
from Budapest. It was the day
before Christmas, and a driv-
ing sleet was coming down
from the dark gray sky. The
weather foretold a much
greater darkness."
In a strange way, I suddenly
felt myself to be no longer in
the cab, or Manhattan. I had
entered a different realm
where stories mattered most. I
didn't feel completely under
his control, yet he had a cer-
tain hold on me.
"The Budapest group stood
huddled together for shelter
from the bitter, damp cold," he
continued. "They wore jewelry
and expensive Persian lamb
coats. My group from the labor
camp stood in our striped rags,
a little more hardened to the
weather and the treatment.
"We had had a taste of the
treatment of the Nazis and
knew what to expect, but the
Budapest group was utterly
naive to the horrific
possibilities. They honestly
thought that they had come to
be interned for a short period
of time after which they would
be allowed to return home.
"What was so horrible was
to see them get shot down on
the spot for the most trivial
breaches of the Nazi camp
rules. That evening, when the
Continued on Page 15-C
A twenty-minute slide show, "Creating Jewish Memories: What
Do We Pass On To Our Children?" is a documentary-style pro-
gram, which explores how we shape our Jewish values and pass
on those values to our children. See story, page 7C
The Chanukah Legend And Modern Miracle
By DVORA WAYSMAN
(WZPS) Chanukah, known as the Festival of
Lights, or more correctly the Festival of
Dedication, is the only important Jewish festival
that is not mentioned in the Bible. The story is re-
counted in the First and Second Books of the Mac-
cabees, which form part of the Apocrypha. It oc-
curs each year on the Hebrew date of 25th Kislev,
with candles being lit each night for eight days as a
symbol of the miracle which occurred in 165 BCE.
The story is well-known: Chanukah com-
memorates the victory of Judah the Maccabee ana
his tiny band of loyal followers over the forces of
the Syrian king Antiochus, who tried to subdue
Palestine by wiping out the Jewish religion. The
Greek language, gods and customs were introduc-
ed and giant sports stadiums built; the temple was
defiled and a giant statue of the Greek god Zeus
was placed there, with the Jews ordered to worship
it. When Judah the Maccabee's army triumphed
and he re-established an independent Jewish
government, his first priority was to purify the
Temple.
The miracle of Chanukah is acknowledged as be-
"g that of the cruse of oil. There was just once
cruse of pure oil left in the Temple, but instead of
burning for just one day, as it was meant to do, it
burnt for eight days until the Jews had time to ac-
quire more. It was also something of a miracle for
such a small army to have been victorious against
great battalions, but we are not told that it was due
to any supernatural phenomena. It was not a
miracle in the sense of other Biblical miracles .
the partin gof the sea in the crucial moment after
the Exodus from Egypt; the staying of the sun in
the days of Joshua; or when the great walls of
Jericho came tumbling down at the blast of a
trumpet. The Jewish victory in the Chanukah story
was evidently due (as in the modern Six-Day War)
to superior military tactics and strategy, and a
strong motivation on the part of the Jews that their
ancestral faith should survive.
Nevertheless, the victory of the Maccabees ap-
pears to be the visible and perceptible enactment of
God's will. The festival possesses human
significance and is far more than a Jewish national
celebration it is a festival of liberty which
glorifies the right of freedom of worship for all
peoples.
This fight for the right to practice Judaism did
not vanish with King Antiochus. The Jews of the
Soviet Union are still denied this right, and
"refuseniks" continue to dwell in the darkness of
oppression. Similarly, Syrian and Ethiopian Jews
long for the right to worship without fear of
reprisal and the right to make aliya to Israel.
The true relevance of the Festival of Lights can
be felt in Israel, particularly in Jerusalem where
the events of the Chanukah story took place more
than 2,000 years ago. In Israel, one's loyalty is not
divided, and there is nothing to compete with our
own national and religious holidays. Almost every
Jerusalem home is bedecked with a Chanukah
menorah during the eight days of the festival, and
each evening the little candles are a beacon of light
as voices all over the city sing Maoz Tsur.
The miracle we are proclaiming is not an act of
supernatural grace. Our miracle is that the Jewish
people and the State of Israel continue to survive,
and that our Light will never be extinguished.
Jewish Floridian
Miami. Florida
Striiori ('


Page 2-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 18, 1987
A Visit to the Jewish Venice
By WALTER REISENDER
Standing in St. Marks
Square is an unforgettable ex-
perience. It may be in the
winter, when the lines of the
Doge's Palace and St. Marks
Church are softened by the
faint mist drifting in from the
nearby water and colors are
muted pastels.
Or it may be summer, in
which case the light is bright,
outlines razor sharp, and the
square filled to capacity with
tourists from every corner of
the world.
Above the sound of flapping
pigeon-wings you hear that of
the two St. Mark's Square "or-
chestras" alternating in an
ongoing competition to see
which can play the operetta
hits of the 1930s more out of
tune for the tourists who
patronize these two overpriced
open-air cafes. Around you the
hum of voices is reminiscent of
a modem day Tower of Babel.
Tour groups from Germany,
England, Japan, the United
States, Austria, Canada, Hong
Kong, Australia and even Italy
stand around their own guide,
who gives his own version of
Venice's fascinating past.
For here is the best preserv-
ed historic city in Europe
one where time seems to have
stood still for the last 400
years from an era when
Venice was the most wealthy,
feared, admired and cultured
nation in the area and the
super-power of the eastern
Mediterranean.
Much of the atmosphere and
romance remains, and Venice,
which has been an essential
part of the "grand tour" for
cultured Europeans and
Americans during the last 200
years, is today more of a
magnet for the world's
tourists than ever. Sadly, this
often leads to an exploitation
of the visitor. Sadly also, many
return home without really
knowing the full possibilities of
what they have missed in this
utterly magnificent city.
Ashkenazic Jewish traders
and merchants from Germany
can be traced back here to as
early as 1290. They settled on
the island opposite to San Mar-
co known as Giudecca, (Island
of the Jews), where the famous
Cipriani Hotel now stands. In
1516, an edict gave the Jews
10 days to move into an area
surrounding an old abandoned
munitions foundry. The word
for 'foundry' in Italian is
"geto," and the 700 persons
who moved there found
themselves in the world's first
ghetto.
The 16th and 17th century
saw the Jewish community
grow and, in an age of cultural
and artistic development, con-
tribute to the style and
knowledge of the Venetian
state. When Napoleon invaded
Venice in 1797, the Jewish
community was made free
citizens and stayed in Venice
until the 1940s, when all those
who had not escaped were kill-
ed by the Nazi occupiers. They
left behind them, however, one
of the richest and most
unusual heritages in Jewish
Europe that no Jewish visitor
to Venice should miss.
Today only a handful of Jews
live in Venice, mostly ones
who hid during the war or had
emigrated then and returned
later. This city has, however,
restored much of the old
Jewish quarter, including its
character and ambience.
To reach the ghetto: From
Venice's Grand Canal, leave
the vaporetto (water bus) at
San Marcuola landing stage,
walking away from the canal
past the church until you reach
the Rio Terra S. Leonardo, a
wide shopping street. There
you will see yellow street signs
in Italian and Hebrew direc-
ting you to the synagogues and
the ghetto.
Calle di Ghetto Vecchio: This
is the second Jewish area in
which Sephardic Jewish
traders lived next to the
original ghetto in 1541. A pla-
que beyond the portico lists the
limitations to which Jews had
to submit at that time and the
penalty for disobeying the
laws. On the left, past the por-
tico, is the building that once
housed Talmud Torah of the
Ponentini.
The Spanish Synagogue and
School: Go to the Campiello
delle Scuolo, the large square
facing the Spanish School
Here you will find the well
which was the only source of
fresh water for the whole ghet-
to. The Spanish School was
built by Marrano Jews who fl-
ed the Inquisition in Spain.
They built their synagogue in
1554. In 1635, it was substan-
tially rebuilt by Baldassare
Longhena, the great Venetian
architect who was responsible
for many of the churches and
public buildings. During the
summer months, Sabbath and
festival services are conducted
here in Orthodox Sephardic
ritual, During the remainder
of the year, services are held in
the Levantine School across
the square.
The Levantine School,
founded in 1538, contains a
plaque in honor of the visit of
Sir Moses Montefiore in 1875
and holds a small study, prayer
hall and the Luzzato Yeshiva.
Don't miss the bimah made in
baroque style by Andrea
Brustolon, a famous Venetian
wood sculptor.
Another interesting site is
the Calle Del Forno, site of a
matzoh factory still opera-
tional today. Along the Ghetto
Vecchio at Number 1222 is the
former study of Leon de
Modena. a noted Jewish
scholar in Venice, and opposite
his house was the Midrash
Vivante, founded in 1853.
Over the bridge is the foun-
dry site of the original Ghetto
Nuovo, where the German and
Italian Jews were confined in
1516. In the main square were
the three water wells that
served the original 700 in-
habitants. Look for the Italian
School, the last synagogue
built in the ghetto in 1575,
where the great Rabbi Leon de
Modena gave his sermons.
There is also the Ashkenazi
Canton Synagogue, no longer
in use, built by the Canton
family, rich German bankers
Look for the German School
built in 1528, recognized by its
five windows in white stone,
three of which are now walled
up.
The Jewish Rest Home with
its adjoining small chapel
house a 17th century ark. This
chapel is used for daily prayers
and arrangements can be
made on Fridays for Sabbath
afternoon meals at the Jewish
Rest Home. Telephone
716-002. Very early booking is
recommended. Kosher wine
can also be purchased there.
Next to the Jewish Rest
Home is a Holocaust Memorial
- seven sculptural memorial
plaques commemorating the
six million Jews who died of
Nazi cruelty, including 200
Venetians and 8,000 Italians.
The Jewish Cemetery is
found on Lido Island on land
acquired in 1386. The ancient
Jewish cemetery is at Riviera
San Nicolo 2, at the corner of
Via Cipro. Keys are with the
keeper of the Via Cipro
Cemetery.
Jewish articles and artifacts
can be found in ordinary shops
around Venice. There is a
specialty shop run by
Mordechai Fusetti, ghetto
Vecchio 1219, 714-024. Ex
cellent glass figurines of
Jewish interest are also blown
at Tosi Gianni, Ghetto Nuovo
2884.
Walter Reisender is Australian businessmen and
travel writer.
Newman Insurance
Agency, Inc.
!! linn i
A Happy Chanukah To All
ROSE AND IR VING NE WMAN
JEFFREYM. NEWMAN
1558 NE 162 Street
North Miami Beach, Florida
Dade 9407515 Broward 9210616
"V


On the Rock:
Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-C
J '
Gibraltar Jewish Piety And Secular Worldliness

By DAVID LANDAU
As in most synagogues, the
gossip in Nefutsot Yehudah
centers on whether the man
sitting in the front row will run
for office yet again.
But in Nefutsot Yehudah,
the office in question is not
, gabbai (or pamas,(as it is call-
ed there), but of chief minister
of the government.
An Israeli reporter recently
visiting was reluctant to
trespass on the special Sab-
hath ambience by asking Sir
Joshua Hassan straight out
about his plans. Next morning,
however, at the delectable
Jewish patisserie around the
corner, the reporter seemed to
have his answer.
The chief minister, dapper in
Sunday cravatte and tweeds,
amiably kissed each of the
shop girls as they wrapped his
bread and cakes. A bodyguard,
lour and discreet, followed
him out.
But Gibraltar's politics are
apparently not so easily
deciphered. The shop girls,
quite unflustered, made it
clear to the newsman that they
expect the weekly kisses to
continue whether or not Sir
Joshua decides to prolong his
30-year rule over this rock.
They simply like him.
Everybody seems to like
everybody in Gibraltar, which
makes it such a pleasant place
to visit and to live on, too,
n spite it tininess, 2.1 miles in
area and 1,396 feet high.
On Shabbat morning, after
services have ended at the four
\fjT' ftnagogues and the youth mi-
>iy entire Jewish community
(about 600 souls) seem to be
out on Main Street, strolling
and exchanging smiles and
small talk with their non-
Jewish friends. About 30.000
people live on the rock.
At the Convent, the official
residence of the British gover-
nor, they may pause to inspect
the solitary guard, marching
up and down in his mirror-
polished boots. Rachel
Benisso, whose husband
Abraham is a cantor famous
throughout the Sephardi
world, remembers when her
son Isaac was in the army (the
Gibraltar Regiment) and took
his turn to stand guard there.
She would bring him a pot of
steaming hamim (cholent) to
the guard room across the
street.
Gibraltar is unique in many
ways. A last bastion, literally
and metaphorically, of the
British Empire, the British
feet and army still stand
guard there over the entrace
to the Mediterranean Sea. On
Main Street, Marks and
Spencer and British Home
Store ensure that this corner
of the continent shall be
forever England.
This doesn't stop housewives
from hopping across the
border to La Linea, Spain for
^, shopping, and rich men's
yachts ply casually from
Gibraltar s fine marina to the
jet-set playground of Marbella,
on Spain's southern coast. But
political relations are still
sometimes tense, and the
Gibraltarians are fierce in
their allegiance to London.
For the Jewish traveler min-
ing the famous cities of
southern Spain in search of the
Golden Age, Gibraltar's uni-
queness lies in the special at-
mosphere of coexistence of
which the Jewish community is
so proud, and in which it has
flourished for centuries.
A visit to Cordoba, bir-
thplace of Maimonides; to
Seville, with its massive
cathedral; and to the Alham-
bra in Granada is a feast for
the eye, but a strain on the im-
agination. The remarkable
rivalry and interplay of the
Moorish and Catholic cultures
in Spain are clear to see in
the architecture, in the
gardens and museums. But of
the great flowering of Jewish
life, so fully reported in extant
literature, almost nothing
tangible remains.
The great Alhambra itself,
the guidebook tells us, was
originally built by a Jewish
minister as his own place. Cen-
turies later, King Ferdinand
and Queen Isabella, the
Catholic monarchs who drove
out the Moslem Moors, sat in
the breathtakingly beautiful
building and turned a deaf ear
to Don Isac Abardanel's pleas.
He and his whole Jewish
community were banished
from the laand and the society
in which they and their
forbearers had been totally in-
tegrated culturally,
economically, politically. Yet,
they had totally preserved
their own identity as Jews.
This fusion was probably uni-
que in the Diaspora ex-
perience. Even in America to-
day it is arguably not yet
matched.
Wandering through the
Juderia (Jewish section) of
Seville or the single surviving
and unused synagogue in Cor-
doba, it is hard to conjure up
those centuries of Jewish
vitality and mutually enriching
coexistence with the wider
world.
Gibraltar, in its own tiny
way, can help. Not just
because the popular chief
minister happens to be Jewish,
or the mayor, or the head of
the bar, or the chairman of the
chamber of commerce.
But also because the Jewish
shops on Main Street are all
closed on the Sabbath and
festivals, and that seems
perfectly natural to everyone.
Because the Israel flag flies
from the honorary consul's of-
fice from sunset Friday to
nightfall Saturday. Because
the Catholic archbishop at-
tends a brit milah and the
governor attends synagogue
on Hanukkah.
Because in order to ascer-
tain the extend of the erui
(area in which it is permissible
to carry during the Sabbath),
the visitor need only ask In-
spector Moses Benggio of the
Gibraltar Police, whom he will
encounter in the kosher goods
shop, just opposite the
cathedral.
Because a leader of the local
British Legion is Capt. (Ret.)
Solomon Levy, whose booming
bass rings out at services at his
synagogue.
Levy, until his recent retire-
ment from the local ter-
ritorials, commanded the
massive naval guns that look
out over the straits. They were
fired on the Queen's birthday
until Sir Joshua persuaded
Levy that the cost in broken
window panes was too high.
The captain had asked for a
Continued on Page 5-1

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Page 4-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 18, 1987
The 'Jewish'
Arch of Titus
By ROBERT SANDLER
Before leaving for a two-
week vacation in Italy, I made
a list of places I wanted to
visit. I had never been to Italy
before. I wanted to see some of
the historical antiquities of the
Roman Empire and some of
the great artistic works of the
Renaissance. I particularly
wanted to see the great works
of Michelangelo as well as the
works of Bernini, Botticelli,
and Raphael, among others.
As an English professor, I had
been teaching the literature
and culture of Western
Civilization virtually all of my
adult life. I wanted to see the
Colosseum, the Forum, and
Pompeii. I did see all of these
things and more.
One of the places I felt I ab-
solutely had to go to was the
Roman Forum. Rome, two
thousand years ago, was the
virtual capital of the world
in so far as the world was
known to Europe, to the Mid-
dle East, and to northern
Africa at the time. In the
Forum the ancient Romans
could see and feel the
physical manifestation of
Rome's power and glory. As a
student of history I wanted to
stand amid the ruins of that
Forum and touch, vicariously,
the history of one of the import
chapters in the saga of
Western Civilization. As a
Jew, I particularly wanted to
see, to stand in the presence
of, and to touch the Arch of
Titus, which is located in a pro-
minent place amid the ruins of
the Roman Forum.
Why the Arch of Titus? Why
would the Arch of Titus be of
interest to a Jew? The answer
take some back to the ancient
and present capital of the
Jewish people ... to
Jerusalem. The Romans had
occupied Jerusalem in the year
63 BCE. For a hundred years
the majority of Jews, especial-
ly the upper, ruling classes, liv-
ed in more or less peaceful co-
existence with the Roman
military contingent and with
the Roman political ad-
ministrators. Some taxes had
to be paid to the Romans, but
the Jews were free to conduct
their religious activities, as
well as their economic and per-
sonal affairs, as they pleased.
In the year 67 CE, in response
to Roman attempts to place
the emperor's statue in the
Holy Temple of the Jews, the
Zealots, a radical, fanatically-
religious group, sharply in-
creased their terrorist acts of
violence against Roman of-
ficials. Roman repressive
measures provoked further
terrorist acts which eventually
sparked an organized armed
uprising. The Roman general
who was given the responsibili-
ty of putting down this upris-
ing in Jerusalem was Titus the
son of the Roman emperor
Vespasian. Although there is
documented evidence (in the
writings of the Roman
historian, Tacitus) that Titus
had given orders to the effect
that the Temple in Jerusalem
was not to be destroyed, the
violent and bloody struggle
between the attackers and
defenders of Jerusalem
generated its own brutal
momentum, leading to excess
on both sides, and resulting in
the complete destruction and
burning of the Temple. Only
the outer wall the Western
Wall remained standing.
That wall has remained stan-
ding to this day. At the time,
Titus in Jerusalem and his
father, Vespasian, in Rome
concluded that Jerusalem,
Judaism, and the Temple had
been destroyed forever.
Jewish slaves were taken to
Rome. Whatever, of value
could be saved from the burn-
ing Temple gold and silver
religious articles, for example
was taken back to Rome as
spoils of war.
At the death of Vespasian in
79 CE, Titus was elevated to
the position of Emperor of the
Roman Empire. Titus' brief
reign ended with his death in
81, CE at which time his
younger brother, Domitian,
became emperor. One of Domi-
tian's first acts as emperor
77ie Arch of Titus depicts the sacking of
Jerusalem.
was the commissioning of an
arch in honor of his widely
revered older brother, Titus.
This Arch of Titus was con-
structed in the Roman Forum.
To commemorate the most
prominent achievement of
Titus that is, the defeat of
the Jews and the destruction
of the Temple in Jerusalem
sculptured figures were carved
just below the curve on the in-
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Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 6-C
side of the arch depicting
Roman soldiers carrying ob-
jects taken from the Temple in
Jerusalem.
Three hundred years later,
Rome itself was sacked and
burned. The Roman Empire
was defeated and destroyed,
the remains of what was once
the glory and splendor of
Rome deteriorated steadily
throughout the centuries. The
Arch of Titus needed minor
repair early in the nineteenth
century but otherwise has re-
mained virtually intact.
Judaism, of course, had not
been destroyed. The Jewish
people, even without
Jerusalem, without a function-
ing country, were not blown
Prof. Robert Sandier
1
Modern-day graffiti on the ancient Arch of Titus.
\
away into historic oblivion, as
the once invincible Roman Em-
pire had been. The Jews strug-
gled throughout many long
centuries, and they survived.
They suffered the hardships of
dispersion and expulsion, of
the ghettoization and forced
conversion, of burnings at the
stake and mass murder. As the
events of later European and
Middle Eastern history unfold-
ed, the living spark of Jewish
thought, feeling, faith, and
commitment, which had never
been extinguished, broke forth
into a bright flame, and in
1948 the Jewish national
homeland was re-established
in its ancestral capital,
Jerusalem!
The Roman Empire is long
gone. The Arch of Titus, built
to commemorate the defeat of
the Jews and the destruction
of Jerusalem, stands today
amid the ruins of that empire.
On the inside of that Arch of
Titus, on the wall directly op-
posite the sculptured figures of
the Roman soldiers earring the
candelabrum and other
"spoils" of war from the Tem-
ple in Jerusalem, someone has
scratched the following words
with a stone in Hebrew:
"Am Yisrael chai l'olam"
"The nation, Israel, alive
forever."
Robert Sandier, who is an
associate professor of English
at the University of Miami,
teaches in the Judaic Studies
Program and was its first
director.
Gibraltar Worldliness
Continued from Page 3-C
Jewish legal ruling about fir-
ing on the Sabbath.
"What's your job?" the rabbi
asked.
"I shout, 'fire!' "
"No problem then," was the
reply.
But the guns at the top of
the rock, and Levy, in his dress
uniform, had to march up
there on foot for a firing dur-
ing the Sabbath. His troop,
gentiles all, could have driven,
but they insisted on marching
up with him.
Levy's brother James is
president of the Gibraltar
Jewish community. He is a
senior partner in Sir Joshua
Hassan's law office. He is also
active with accountant Moses
Garson and other businessmen
in Gibraltar's flourishing new
enterprises as an "offshore"
financial center. People say
James Levy is tempted to run
for political office, and that he
could one day become chief
minister, too.
Like his brother, James
loves Gibraltar with a passion.
But he is torn, he says, and
may soon move away
because there is no Jewish
high school.
He himself went to a local
monastery-school where the
monks, he recalls, would cut
down branches for the Jewish
children to take home for the
sukkahs. His education imbued
him with the fusion of Jewish
piety and secular worldliness
that is the hallmark of
Gibraltar's Jewry. Yet he feels
he can no longer sustain it and
transmit it to his growing
children. He has sent his eldest
daughter off to an Orthodox
grammar school in London.
The community would be
truly sorry to see him go. Part-
ly to keep him and others like
him from leaving, they are con-
sidering the founding of a
Jewish school in Gibraltar, so
that learned young men would
come and live on the rock, and
teach the younger generation.
"But they would have to be
men with a smile," Levy
warns. "No extremism can
succeed here."
He says the children today
are somehow less confortable
with the non-Jews than he and
his generation are. He be-
moans it yet he recognizes
that it is a manifestation of
that certain xenophobia in
modern Orthodoxy that has
been reincarnated from the
ashes of Eastern Europe and
now sets the tone among Or-
thodox Ashkenazim and
Sephardim the world over, in-
cluding in Israel.
It is the antithesis of the
Golden Age of Spain, and it
threatens to dull the special
brilliance of the gem that is
Jewish Gibraltar.
,|r-
Joseph H. Kanter
Chairman of the Board
Bank of Florida
WISHING YOU and YOUR FAMILY
PEACE, HEALTH & HAPPINESS,
FOR
CHANUKAH
From the Board of Directors, Officers and Staff of the
BANK of FLORIDA
........? -.
FDK
6101 Sunaet Dr. South Miami Phone: (306) 666-1106
&


Page 6-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 18, 1987

Jewish History In Postage Stamps
Collecting stamps of Jewish
interest can be a fascinating
way to learn Jewish history,
according to philatelic expert
Henry B. Stern.
Stern, who covers the
world of stamp collecting as a
newspaper columnist, writes:
"Philately goes beyond the col-
lecting of postage stamps.
Philatelists want to know how
stamps were used, why they
were designed in a 'particular
way, what may be significant
about the government that
produced them, what kind of
postal markings were utilized,
and generally how the stamp
may be related to world
history."
For example, during the
darkest days of the Holocaust,
Jewish concentration camp in-
mates and ghetto residents
managed to maintain mail
systems whose distinctive
postmarks are today highly
prized by collectors. The ghet-
to postal organization in Lodz,
Poland even issued its own
stamps until they were con-
fiscated by the Gestapo.
Before the 1967 Six-Day
war, Egypt designed a victory
stamp showing a triumphant
Abdel Gamal Nasser, the
Egyptian leader, with a throng
oi cheering followers
celebrating the destruction of
Israel, shown burning in the
background. Egypt lost the
war, but Nasser issued the
stamp.
A number of Arab countries
have recently used their postal
services as propaganda
vehicles by issuing stamps con-
taining scurrilous anti-Semitic
and anti-Israel slogans.
Articles in the current issue
of "Keeping Posted" include
"Jewish Themes in U.S.
Message of Ancient Chanukah
In Modern Israel
By JOSEF BEN
SHLOMO HAKOHEN
(WZPS) Of all the traditional
Jewish holidays, Chanukah
most embodies the spirit of
modern Israel, for it was born
out of an armed struggle by
Jews fighting for freedom
against an enemy more
numerous and militarily
stronger than itself. It one
travels to kibbutzim and
moshavim throughout the land
during this eight day festival,
one will hear teachers tell their
students, "we are the heirs to
the Maccabees."
There is another side to the
Chanukah celebrations in
Israel, and that, of course, is
the religious aspect. In homes
and synagogues throughout
the country, Jews light the
' menorah, the symbol of the na-
tion's inner strength the
light of the Jewish spirit. The
portion of the prophets said for
this holiday reads, "Not by
might, nor by power, but by
my spirit, says the Lord of
Hosts." And in the yeshivot,
the traditional centers of
Torah study, rabbis tell their
students, "we are the heirs to
the Maccabees, for it is we who
are continuing the struggle
against assimilation."
These two sides of Chanukah
in Israel have come to reflect a
growing and bitter conflict
over the very definition and
purpose of the Jewish state. To
many secular Jews, the
yeshiva world is betraying the
very spirit of the Maccabees by
not serving in the army and
participating in the defenses of
the country, with the excep-
tion, of course, of the religious
Zionists. And to the spiritual
leaders of these yeshivot,
secular Israelis are abandon-
ing the values that inspired the
Maccabees to begin the strug-
gle. "Did not the Maccabees
fight to preserve the Sabbath
when the Greeks forbade the
Jews to obey the Sabbath
HappM ChanuhaiiQ
laws?"
Of course, yeshiva students
forget that the Zionist move-
ment has always made strong
efforts against assimilation,
and that if there were Zionist
ideologists who wanted the
Jews to become a nation like
any other, then there were
many who called on Israel to
become a light unto the na-
tions in the spirit of the an-
cient prophets and sages.
Secular Jews also forget that
religious Jews began building
the new neighborhoods outside
the Old City walls even before
the modern Zionist movement
began, and that some even at-
tempted agricultural set-
tlements, such as Petah Tikva.
Yet somehow, Chanukah has
come to represent the dif-
ferences, rather than the
similarities, between the two
camps.
Are the two different ways
of viewing Chanukah mutually
exclusive: Surprisingly, the
ancient prayer that the sages
wrote for Chanukah provides
an answer. "And for the
miracles, and for the salvation,
and for the mighty deeds, and
for the victories, and for the
wonders .. and for the bat-
tles which you performed for
our forefathers at this time."
A clear reference to the Jewish
military struggle is evident.
But the prayer continues,
"You delivered the strong into
the hands of the weak, the
many into the hands of the few
. the wicked into the hands
of the righteous, and the in-
solent into the hands of
diligent students of your
Torah." And so the prayer also
reminds us of the ethical and
moral victory of the Jewish
people. Perhaps Chanukah can
therefore be seen as a celebra-
tion of both the physical and
spiritual rebirth of the nation.
And perhaps in the spirit of
this prayer, known as the Al
HaNisim, each side of the two
debating camps in Israel will
one day turn to the other and
say "Shalom, my brother, you
too are a Maccabee."
Yosef Ben Shlomo HaKohen
is the former director of the
Martiv Steinberg Center for
Jewish Artists, and currently
working for Ohr Torah in
L. .....Isrwei:
Stamps," "Israel's Postal
History" and "The Bible in
Stamps." This issue, say its
editors, is especially designed
to appeal to beginning stamp
collectors and those who may
be considering taking up the
hobby.
enhance interest in
Jewish philately, the UAHC,
the congregational arm of
Reform Judaism in the United
States and Canada is making
available a "Jewish Stamp Col-
lecting Starter Kit," contain-
ing a collection of mint Israeli
and Jewish National Fund
stamps, hinges, magnifying
glass, tongs, stock sheets and
other philatelic essentials,
along with information on the
fundamentals of stamp
collecting.
The "starter kit," may be
ordered from UAHC Stamps.
838 Fifth Avenue. New York.
NY 10021.
- IU
Happy Chanukah
Joseph Nevel
Pershing
Auto
Leasing
1545 Alton Road,
Miami Beach
Phone: 538-5313
:!'


Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-C
' V
'?
Soviets 'Right-To-Life' Is Limited By Refusal
By SUSAN ROSENBLUTH
Rather than benefiting ill
refuseniks, glasnoat may ac-
tually be complicating their
plight, according to seven
American Jewish doctors who
returned last month from an
unofficial trip to the Soviet
Union.
With the new Soviet policy
of openness, the doctors said,
the refuseniks are encouraged
to reapply for permission to
emigrate. Most don't receive
it, causing severe tension,
followed by depression. This in
turn exacerbates any pre-
existing medical conditions,
they said.
Furthermore, the new open-
ness has encouraged the
Soviet citizenry, including
physicians, to openly display
expressions of anti-Semitism.
The seven American doctors
all but a Nashville physician
from Bergen County, NJ
participated in a pioneering ef-
fort to establish a medical link
with the Jewish refusenik com-
munities in Leningrad and
Moscow.
Although for many years, in-
volved American Jews, in-
cluding physicians, have fre-
quently visited with individual
refusenik families, providing
moral support and
demonstrating solidarity with
the plight of their Soviet
brothers and sisters, this was
the first coordinated mission
to evaluate the health needs
and status of this beleagured
people.
During their four-day stay in
Leningrad, followed by three
in Moscow, they diagnosed and
evaluated more than 150 men.
women and children. Their pa-
tients suffered from a wide
variety of disorders, ranging
from untreated psychiatric
disturbances in children to
congenital, metabolic, cardiac
and neoplastic (cancer)
diseases.
The patients formed long
lines at various "clinics," set
up extemporaneously in
several refuseniks'
apartments.
The physicians also visited
homes, discovering Jewish
paraplegics who, without ac-
cess to wheelchairs, are virtual
prisoners in their small, dreary
apartments; children, who
without access to the wide
variety of antibiotics taken for
granted in the West, lie ill for
weeks with ear and throat in-
fections; and older Jewish pa-
tients to whom Soviet physi-
cians deny life-saving surgery.
Overall, they found medical
care in the Soviet Union varies
from appropriate to "decided-
ly substandard."
The physicians discovered a
number of individuals who,
they said, would definitely
benefit from Western pro-
cedures, technology and know-
how currently unavailable to
them in the Soviet Union. In
some instances, the doctors
said, the need for medical in-
tervention is urgent.
Among the patients they
said fall into that category is
80-year-old Viktor Flaksman
of Leningrad, a refusenik for
many years.
Flaksman, a diabetic with
peripheral vascular disease, is
Continued on Page 8-('
Jewish Memories:
What We Pass On
To Our Children
A B'nai B'rith Women pro-
gram which explores the ques-
tion of how parents can
transmit Jewish values to their
children is now available in
videotape.
Originally produced as a
-( minute slide show,
"Creating Jewish Memories:
What Do We Pass On To Our
Children," has been widely us-
ed by Sunday schools, Jewish
community centers, senior
citizen homes and Jewish
organizations. The new ver-
sion, suitable for Chanukah
gift-giving, now makes the
program readily available to
families for home viewing as
well.
''Creating Jewish
Memories" features 12 men
and women, ages 15 to 88, who
describe their Jewish
memories, attitudes and con-
flicts and share photos from
their personal albums. Their
beliefs and practices are
diverse, but they all seek to
learn what shaped their
Jewish identity and their
Jewish values.
"We have found that this
program, wherever it has been
used, has served as an effec-
tive trigger for discussion
about Jewish values," said
BBW President Irma Gertler.
"Regardless of age or lifestyle,
the program strikes a respon-
sive note in the viewer.
Because of the increasing de-
mand for the program from
many sources, we have in-
troduced this videotape
version."
A discussion guide including
sample questions and follow-
up activities accompanies the
program, to encourage
viewers to explore their own
Jewish memories and values.
Sample questions are also pro-
vided for interviewing loved
ones, so that families can pro-
duce their own permanent
record of Jewish memories.
''Creating Jewish
Memories" is available for $15
including postage and handl-
ing, from B'nai B'rith Women,
Program/Public Affairs
Department, 1640 Rhode
Island Ave. N. W ,
Washington, D.C. 20036. For
further information, (202)
857-6675.

we Wish You A
very Happy
Chanukah
Executive Offices:
801 NE 167th St.
North Miami Beach, FL 33162
305/651-7110
County Dank
COUNTY NATIONAL BANK MOf SOUTH FLORIDA
651-7110
-r.tr
Member
FDIC


Page 8-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday.
18, 1987
Curacao Charm and Jewish Community
The Mikve Israel-Emanuel
Synagogue in Willemstad
Curacao, the oldest
continually-operated house of
worship in the Western
Hemisphere, will be the focal
point of January's Curacao
Caribbean Jewish Festival, a
unique program honoring
Curacao's 300-year-old Jewish
community as a haven offering
religious freedom.
Dedicated in 1732, the tem-
ple is one of Curacao's most
popular attractions. The struc-
ture has an exterior reminis-
cent of Amsterdam's Por-
tuguese Synagogue and an in-
terior rich with mahogany
wood, brass candeliers, and a
sand-carpeted floor.
Interesting legends and
theories account for the use of
the sand:
Symbolically, the sand
represents the Sinai Desert in
which the Jews sojourned
enroute to the Promised Land.
The interior of the Synagogue
is patterned after an ancient
Israeli encampment with the
Tabernacle in the center and
the Israelites encamped on the
perimeter.
Some prefer to think the
sand represents a blessing to
the patriarchs which declared
that their descendants would
be as numerous "as sand
which is upon the seashore."
A historical version of the
sands' use follows the premise
that the ancestors of its
original members fled to the
Curacao temple from Spain
and Portugal, placing sand on
the floors of their secret
synagogues to muffle the
sounds of prayer.
From a more practical stand-
point, the thick layer of sand
served as a carpet to cover the
hollow, woodenplank floor to
* minimize the sounds of
footsteps during the service.
Those footsteps resound
nonetheless, "Today, when
religious intolerance and
fanaticism dominate so much
of the news, we felt it was im-
portant to honor the people of
Curacao and the Netherlands
who have made such historic
contributions to upholding
respect for all peoples, and, in
particular, the Jewish people,"
says Rabbi Marc Tannnebaum,
director of International Rela-
tions, American Jewish Com-
mittee, on the meaning of the
Curacao Jewish Festival.
The Curacao Jewish Carib-
bean Festival, running from
January 3 to 21, centers
around the origins of the
Mikve Israel-Emanuel
Synagogue and offers visitors
the opportunity to participate
in a cultural experience while
vacationing in Caribbean
resort.
According to Tannenbaum,
the reason that Curacao's
Jews have thrived both
materially and spiritually was
that in 1652 Curacao adopted
the earliest known charter
guaranteeing religious liberty
for Jews and other minorities
in the New World.
He adds that the Dutch
leaders on this Caribbean
island were simply following
the precedent of the
Netherlands motherland,
which, in 1579, became the
first country in Europe to
establish religious tolerance as
a way of life.
Visitors to the Curacao
Jewish Festival will ex-
perience cultural and spiritual
enrichment as well as the
island's beautiful vacation
facilities and amenities.
Because it is just 20 miles off
the coat of South America,
Curacao enjoys a sun-drenched
climate tempered by the
prevailing tradewinds, white
beaches and warm, tranquil
waters for swimming, fishing
and scuba diving.
Curacao is the largest of the
Netherland Antilles, a 38-mile
tropical resort reflecting the
traditions of its Dutch origins,
offering the vacationer diverse
culture, restaurants, enter-
tainment, water and land
sports, and shopping.
Curacao's Caribbean Jewish
Festival, a series of events
centered around the origins of
Mikve Israel-Emanuel
Synagogue, taking place bet-
ween Jan. 3-21, 1988, has been
organized by the Curacao
Tourist Board in cooperation
with the island's Jewish com-
munity, the philanthropic Bnai
Zion organization and
American Airlines.
Soviet Medicine
Continued froa Page 7
now suffering from gangrene
of the right foot. His daughter,
Olga Gershun, told the doctors
that a Soviet surgeon refused
to perform the necessary am-
putation because general
anesthesia the only type
readily available in the Soviet
Union would be too risky for
a cardiac patient. Without
surgery, however, her father
will almost certainly die of
infection.
In the West. Flaksman's
surgery could be performed
under far-safer local
anesthesia. Then, after
surgery, he could be fitted
with a suitable prosthe
making his chances of walking
excellent.

Two of the d have ar-
for the surper.



free of charge, if only the
Soviets can be persuaded to
release Flaksman.
Among the other refuseniks
the doctors say must be releas-
ed for medical reasons are
32-year-old Irina Gorjunova of
Moscow (breast cancer), Naum
Meiman of Moscow (chronic
leukemia and prostatism) and
Benjamin Charney of Moscow
(vascular disease and
melanoma).
The doctors are seeking to
establish lines of communica-
tion with the medical establish-
ment of the Soviet Union.
They said they are willing to
return with other American
>rs to continue seeing
el patients and to share
American know-how with
hysicians. Tl

4bJ&'

i
1

,J
Immaculate streets lined with colorful
narrow-gabled, Dutch-style structures add to
the unique storybook texture of Willemstad,
capital of Curacao, home of the Curacao
Caribbean Jewish Festival, which celebrates
one of the oldest Jewish communities in the
Western Hemisphere the first three weeks in
January, 1988.
The Officers and Staff of
Barnett Bank
Wish All of our Friends
a Happy Chanukah
i *
arnett
anK
Member FDlC
Barnett Bank
of South Florida, N.A.

"


Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-C
Rabbi Aaron Peller points to replicas of the
oldest and most elaborate gravestones (dating
hack to 1659) from Beth haim Cemetery in
Curacao, on display in the courtyard museum
of Mikve-Israel Synagogue, the oldest in con-
tinuous use in the Western Hemisphere. A
highlight of the 1988 Curacao Jewish Festival,
January 8-21, will be Friday night services
and a reception hosted by the Curacao Jewish
community.
*
IIIIIIIH
3vi/ifou XDAeWUldMA
Ufcte Making Vteves Respectfully.
mm
KANE OONCOl'RSI MIAMI BEACH'DAW 864-22" 1 BRCMAF
The Christmas Conflict
A Guide for Jewish Parents Regarding Christmas, issued by
the Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami is a response to in-
quiries by Jewish families in the community, intended to help
relieve some of the confusion this time of the year can create ac-
cording to Rabbi David B. Saltzman, president of the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami.
Q. Isn't Christmas a national holiday which all Jews can
observe in good conscience?
A. Banks and government agencies do close, but above all
things, Christmas is a major Christian holy day which celebrates
the birth of Jesus, the Christian Messiah.
To suggest to our Christian friends that Christmas is anything
else would be presumptuous. Christmas is not in the same
category as Thanksgiving Day, Fourth of July, Declaration Day,
or any other American holiday, since we do not regard Jesus as
our savior, we can not in good conscience observe Christmas. To
do so is to violate our religious principles.
Q. How do Christian clergymen and the responsible Christian
laiety regard the problem?
A. Responsible Christian leaders bemoan the perversion of the
Christmas season and are trying to do something about it. Chris-
tian clergymen and laymen constantly speak out against the
commercialization of the Christmas celebration. It is a religious
holiday, and should be regarded as such.
Q. Would it not be the better part of discretion to "go along"
with our Christian neighbors, even it it means observing
Christmas?
A. No matter involving violations of strong religious convic-
tions can be regarded as trivial or minor. The true spirit of
Americanism would never compel anyone to act in conflict with
his freedom of conscience. Our early American forebearers came
to these shores precisely for the opportunity to worship God ac-
cording to the dictates of their hearts.
Q. What about the Christmas tree?
A. The Christmas tree is distinctively a Christmas symbol.
Since Christmas is for Christians, the Christmas tree is ap-
propriate for Christians only. The Christmas tree has no place in
the Jewish home, nor should any Jewish child be compelled to
participate in observances involving Christmas trees.
Q. Should Jewish children participate in Christmas parties in
the public schools?
A. Parties designated as Christmas parties or having the ap-
pearance of Christmas parties, have no place in public schools.
Winter or year-end parties of a general nature are acceptable.
Q. Is it appropriate to give gifts to Christian friends?
A. It is appropriate to give Christmas gifts to our Christian
friends. However, it is not appropriate to present Christmas
gifts to Jews.
Q. Should Jewish children participate in Christmas plays in
public schools?
A. No. Christmas plays generally portray religious themes
which have no place in a public school. On the other hand, some
schools hold a so-called "Winter Festival" in which an attempt is
made to avoid all religious connotations. But it is sometimes dif-
ficult to draw the distinction. If the parents feel that the perfor-
mance is free of all religious overtones, children may certainly
participate.
Q. Should Jewish children sing Christmas carols?
A. No. carols, being religious hymns, do not belong in the
public school. Jewish children should not be required to sing
hymns which embody a theology they do not accept. Neutral
songs that have no religious references, however, are
acceptable.
Q. Do we harm our children by directing them not to
participate?
A. No. The classroom is one among many places which reveals
the existence of differences. We further our children's personal
growth and maturity by teaching them that they can respect the
faith of their neighbor without embracing that faith. We can
clearly mark these differences by such simple statements as,
"This is what we do," and "This is what we do not do."
Q. What about other Jewish children who participate in
Christmas observances in the public schools?
A. There are now, as there always have been, parents who do
not accept the viewpoint of responsible Jewish leadership. They
proceed on their own when they permit their children to par-
ticipate in Christmas observances. This confuses the children of
parents who do follow the throughtful recommendations of
Jewish leadership.
Jewish parents will help their children most if they (1) accept
diversity in the ranks of Jewry as a normal condition in the
American environment; (2) kr.ow and understand the thinking of
responsible Jewish leadership and recognize that most parents
are anxious to follow it; and (3) assure their children that despite
the participation of some Jewish children, Jewish leaders have
taken a strong position for non participation in observances of a
holiday not their own. and that this is also their position.
Q. Would not the entire problem he solved in the public school
by joint Christinas and I'hanukah celebratioi
A. No. To do so violates the < Constitution, uses the ta>.
tarian put ind jeopardi p i
ion of Church and State without i be
m.


Page 10-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 18, 1987
Second Generation Gives No Jewish Guarantees
By BEN GALLOB
Descending from Holocaust
survivors is no guarantee of
identifying Jewishly, a
pioneering, but limited, study
has found.
The study, "Patterns of Out-
marriage and Inmarriage
among the Children of Jewish
Holocaust Survivors," was
reported in abstract in a recent
issue of the Journal of Reform
Judaism by Vera Obermeyer, a
psychologist and refugee from
Nazi Germany. The study was
her 1985 doctoral dissertation
for the California School of
Marital and Family Therapy at
San Rafael, Calif.
Her findings were based on a
sample of 96 Jews from sur-
vivor families nearly half of
whom had intermarried liv-
ing in the San Franscisco area.
She reported applying her fin-
dings to a number of
hypotheses about Holocaust
survivor children, all in one
way or another presumed to
bear on the ultimate proposi-
tion: Would the third genera-
tion remain Jews?
One hypothesis was that
Jewish identification could be
expected to be significantly
higher in children of Holocaust
survivors who married Jews
than in such children who mar-
ried non-Jews. That proved
true, confirming "common
sense expectations." Another
was that a negative identifica-
tion with Judaism, transmitted
by the survivors' frequent
discussion of the Holocaust,
would be associated with
greater outmarriage by the
children, but she found "there
was no significant difference."
Though Obermeyer conclud-
ed that the Jewish partner's
gender made no significant dif-
ference in the rate of conver-
sion by the non-Jewish spouse
she noted that her findings
were consistent with the
"historical trend" of more con-
version when the Jewish part-
ner was a male.
Obermeyer's data also
idicated that nine of the
children of survivors had
mixed-married parents. She
reported that "not one offspr-
ing of the nine mixed-married
survivors married a Jew; none
of the spouses converted to
Judaism; and all of their
children are being or will be
raised as gentiles.
Asked whether the offspring
Trade Accord
Calling the document
historic, M. Ronald Krongold,
general chairman of the
reater Miami Israel Bonds
campaign, credits Jeb Bush,
Secretary of Commerce of
Florida, with being a "guiding
light" in helping make the
trade accord Florida-Israel
Cooperative Venture between
the State of Florida and Israel
a reality.
FICV which was signed by
officers representing both
governments on Oct. 28 at the
Omni International Hotel prior
to the Israel Bonds' Israel 40th
Anniversary Dinner honoring
Leland C. "Bud" Hunter,
senior vice president of the
Florida Power and Light Com-
pany. Florida is the second
state, after Massachusetts, to
sign a trade agreement with
the Jewish nation.
of mixed-marrieds would also
be lost to Judaism, as in the
previous generation,
Obermeyer declared it was
more likely than for the
American Jewish community
in general.
She began her study with
126 Jews, selected by the
"snowball" method, in which
the researcher finds
respondents among friends
and acquaintances, synagogue
membership and other Jewish
group members, who then pro-
vide names of other possible
respondents. Obermeyer, in a
footnote, wrote that findings
from the "snowball technique
. cannot be generalized" to
all members of the group
studied.
As absence of footnotes to
any similar study suggested
that the Obermeyer study was
the first of its kind. Indeed, a
spokesperson at the YIVO In-
stitute for Jewish Studies in
New York told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that, as
far as she knew, the study was
unique.
Each of the 96 respondents
has at least one parent who fl-
ed Nazi tyranny between 1939
and 1941, or had been
liberated from Nazi camps,
fought in the underground or
hid in Nazi-occupied Europe.
The 96 were divided into two
groups an outmarried group
of 46 subjects and an inmar-
ried group of 50 subjects.
Every fourth person who
returned the questionnaire
was asked for an interview,
and their spouses also were in-
terviewed. A total of 20 inter-
views were held.
The study found that the
Holocaust was rarely or never
discussed in families of 33
respondents, occasionally
discussed in families of 42 and
frequently or always in
families of 21.
She found 93 of the 96 were
married for the first time.
Three were divorced. Of the
respondents, 58 were women
and 38 men. Eighty were born
in the United States, 11 in
Europe, including three born
in displaced persons camps.
Four were born in Israel, one
in Shanghai. Of the 46 non-
Jewish spouses, seven con-
verted to Judaism, yet
Obermeyer calls those couples
intermarried. Thirty-nine gen-
tile spouses did not convert,
and Obermeyer calls their
unions mixed marriages.
On Background:
Auschwitz Convent Compromise
LONDON The establish-
ment in 1984 of a Carmelite
convent on the site of the
former Auschwitz concentra-
tion camp provoked a wave of
protest amongst Jews. The
Polish Catholic authorities in-
itially justified the establish-
ment of the convent on
theological, moral and
historical grounds. But they
were not insensitive to Jewish
objections and after extensive
dialogue and negotiations the
dispute was resolved earlier
this year in a way which met
the needs of all parties
concerned.
In a Research Report now
published, Alan Montague of
the Institute of Jewish Affairs
provides the first comprehen-
sive survey of the affair. He
covers its background and the
issues involved, from Pope
John Paul IPs sermon at
Birkenau in 1979, which
described Catholic martyrdom
at Auschwitz and Polish suf-
fering under the Nazis, to the
meeting between Jewish and
Catholic leaders at Geneva in
February 1987 when an agree-
ment was finally reached. He
shows that the dispute over
the convent's existence, which
was at first characterized by
misunderstanding and lack of
communication, ultimately
revealed fundamental dif-
ferences between Jewish and
Catholic perceptions of the
Holocaust, both as a symbol
and as an historic event.
Catholics have seen the con-
vent as a place for meditation,
a place where 'charity and
hope' could counter the 'face
of evil.' Poles have seen it as a
symbol of their own suffering
under the Nazis and believe
that their attitude towards the
camp is revealed by their plac-
ing it on UNESCO's World
Heritage List. Jews, on the
other hand, while recognizing
that many non-Jews perished
at Auschwitz, see the site as
the ultimate symbol of the
Holocaust. Jewish leaders felt
that the uniqueness of this
symbol would be lost if part of
the camp were to be
transformed into a denomina-
tional institution. Similarly
they objected to the dedication
of the convent to two Catholic
martyrs of Auschwitz
Father Maximilian Kolbe. who
had been openly anti-Semitic,
and Edith Stein, a Jewish con-
vert to Catholicism.
Protests were not confined
to Jewish groups. Many
Catholics, particularly in
Western Europe, expressed
deep misgivings. The Catholic
authorities eventually
responded by emphasizing
their awareness of the sym-
bolic and historical importance
of Auschwitz to the Jews and
their desire not to do anything
to detract from that. Over 18
months of high level negotia-
tions took place and in
February 1987 it was decided
to remove the convent and to
set up, on a location just out-
side of the camp (the exact
perimeter of which had also
been a matter of dispute), an
ecumenical 'centre of informa-
tion, education, meeting and
prayer.'
Montague quotes extensive-
ly from speeches, articles and
documents on the affair and in-
cludes the full texts of the
Geneva Declarations which
marked the resolution to this
'test-case' in Catholic-Jewish
relations.
MERCHANTS
BAM
OFMiAMi
950 SW 57th AVENUE / MIAMI, FLA 33144 / Phone 266-1000
Branches: 6600 SW 8th Street, 11401 SW 40th Street (Bird Rd.)
Member FDIC/An Equal Housing Lender/An affiliate of Flori-
da Commercial Banks, Inc., a registered bank holding company.
Happy Chanukah
Southgate Towers
900 West Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Phone 672-2412
Wish Tenants and Friends
A Happy and Healthy Chanukah
.


Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-C
Jewish Pioneers of Deadwood Gulch
By AL ALSCHULER
Fred and Moses Manuel, two
Jewish brothers, staked the
famous Homestake claim in
Deadwood Gulch, Dakota Ter-
ritory, on Apr. 9, 1876. In
June, 1877, the Manuel
brothers sold the Homestake
mine to George Hearst, the
father of William Randolph
Hearst. News of the rich
deposits brought some 18,000
avid gold seekers, even though
it wasn't until Feb. 1877, that
Congress approved the treaty
with the Sioux Indians which
opened up the territory to set-
tlement. The gold discovery in
187*i wasn't the first, there
ha\ ing been a find in the area
as early as 1834, and in 1874 a
Custer reconnaissance expedi-
tion had found gold on French
Creek. The headlines in the na-
tion's newspapers which
resulted from the discovery of
the Manuel brothers, who had
had extensive mining ex-
perience in Montana and
elsewhere, also brought my
great-grandfather, Nathan
Colman.
Cilman was born in Kassel,
Germany in 1850. He came to
America as a young man in
1871. He lived "briefly at Fort
Sumner in New Mexico Ter-
ritory, before settling in
Denver, Colorado. There he
met and married another Ger-
man immigrant, Amalia Op-
penheimer (born 1852), in
1874. In Feb. 1877, just a little
over a century ago, Nathan
Oilman went to bustling Dead-
wood and opened a tobacco
store. His wife and their infant
daughter, destined to be my
grandmother, joined Nathan in
'April. Family tradition retains
the memory of an Indian at-
tack on the stagecoach which
brought Amalia Colman and
her baby to Deadwood. In addi-
tion to his Deadwood store,
Colman had some kind of
branch store at the nearby set-
tlement of Beaver, where he
was appointed postmaster on
Mar. 4, 1978.
In addition to my great-
grandfather and his family a
number of other Jews settled
in Deadwood. One of the most
prominent was Sol Star who
founded the Deadwood Flour-
ing Mill. He had been a pioneer
m Montana, and served as
^ < Deadwood's mayor for twenty-
one years. He was first elected
to the town's city council in the
fall of 1876, having arrived
Aug. 2 of that year. Benjamin
Bser, who had been born in
Paris, arrived in the Black
Hills in Aug., 1876. For a time
he was president of the First
National Bank, and he had ex-
tensive cattle interests in the
range country to the north.
Harris Franklin came to Dead-
wood in Mar., 1876. and he
engaged in the wholesale li-
jjuor business at first. Later,
ike Baer, he served as the
president of the First National
Bank, into which the other ear-
ly banks were merged. The
town's leading hotel, built in
15*02, was named for him, and
[ is still the Franklin Hotel to-
> -^ay. His son, Nathan, a phar-
macist, succeeded his father as
the manager of his mining and
banking interests upon his
death in 1923. Jacob Goldberg
came to Deadwood from
Helena, Montana in Aug.,
TO. and purchased the first
grocery store in town, known
as the "Littfe" Big Horn."
Goldberg headed the board of
library trustees of Deadwood
for many years. Paul Rewman,
an English-born Jew, came to
town in 1876, and in 1878 he
organized the Deadwood
Telephone Company, which is
still actively functioning in
South Dakota. Other early
Jewish residents included Sam
Schwarzwald, Charles and
Jonas Zoellner, Max and
Adolph and Louis Fishel,
Joseph and Aaron Hattenbach,
Sol Bloom, Morris Liebman,
David Goldbloom, Jacob and
Louis Wertheimer, Benjamin
Blumenthal and Simon Jacobs.
By the time of the High Holy
Days of 1877 the Jewish com-
munity of Deadwood and near-
by Lead were holding services.
Rented halls and private
homes were used, with Nathan
Colman officiating, in the fron-
tier tradition of the educated
laymen leading in worship.
The Colmans had seven
children, but four died of
various maladies. They preced-
ed their parents in being inter-
red in the Mount Zion section
of the historic Mount Moriah
Cemetery in Deadwood. The
three who survived were
Anne, born in Denver, and
Teresa and Blanche, who were
born in Deadwood. The latter
two did not marry. Nathan,
referred to by everyone as
Judge Colman, became a pro-
minent Republican and he was
a member of the election board
at the territorial election of
1889.
Morris Niederman, who was
to become my maternal grand-
father, was born in Hungary
and emigrated to America as a
youngster. At age fourteen he
was employed washing dishes
in Omaha. Then, as an
itinerant peddler, he canvass-
ed the West, living for a time
in Ardmore, Oklahoma. At the
beginning of the century he
came to Deadwood and mar-
ried Anne Colman. The wed-

%jfi
'-
7V late Blanche Colman was the last full-time Jewish resident in
the area.
ding of my maternal grand-
parents took place on Dec. 27,
1903, at the new Franklin
Hotel, with the father of the
bride officiating.
Morris Niederman opened a
liquor store in Deadwood in
June, 1904, with his father-in-
law notarizing his license ap-
plication. The business was
known as "The Family Liquor
Store," Niederman also in-
vested in mining claims.
The wedding of his oldest
daughter was not the first one
at which Nathan Colman had
officiated. He had performed
the ceremony at the marriage
of David Holzman and Rebecca
Reubens on Sunday, Nov. 2,
1879. This was described as
"the first Hebrew wedding in
the Hills." The contemporary
account of the affair noted that
Holzman was "one of our
bonanza clothing dealers, and
Miss Rebecca Reubens (was)
the beautiful and accomplished
daughter of Mr. Louis
Reubens ..." The ceremony
took place "in the presence of
sixty ladies and gentlemen of
our best Hebrew society and of
other nationalities."
Amalia Colman passed away
on Apr. 1, 1939, and is interred
next to her husband. The Col-
man's second daughter, Blan-
che, graduated from Dead-
wood High School in 1902. She
was appointed private
secretary to Congressman
William Parker in 1907. On
Oct. 3, 1911, Blanche Colman
became the first woman admit-
ted to the South Dakota Bar.
In 1961 she was the first
woman to receive an award for
fifty years as a practicing at-
torney in South Dakota. For
much of her career she was on
the legal staff of the
Homestake Mining Company.
She retired from the firm in
1950, and has since died. Blan-
che Colman was the last
Jewish resident of Deadwood.
Deadwood's population has
now shrunk, and attrition has
eliminated the Jewish com-
munity there. The Torah,
which had been the proud
possession of the Jews of
Deadwood and Lead, has been
given to the Synagogue of the
Hills at Rapid City, South
Dakota. Though the chapter of
the history of our people who
settled in pioneer days in the
Black Hills is dimming, it re-
mains a proud memory.
Al Alschuler, a Miami Beach
resident since 1971, is likely
the sole South Florida member
of The Society of Black Hills
Pioneers. The original article
was published in the "Western
States Jewish Historical
Quarterly," This condensed
version reprinted by permis-
sion of the author, was publish-
ed in the "Jewish Digest."
The author's great-grandfather Nathan Colman to the left of the Cigar Store Indian, before his tobacco tton Ml Deadwood.


Page 12-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 18, 1987
Chanukah Hit On Vinyl and Tape
Los Angeles songwriters
Justin Wilde and Douglas
Konecky, who have written
songs for Ray Charles, Rita
Coolidge, B.J. Thomas and
others, are riding the crest of
the holiday wave these days
with two new songs for the
December season.
Their "It Must Have Been
The Mistletoe," performed on
nationwide TV by artists such
as Glen Campbell and Tanya
Tucker, and recorded by Bar-
bara Mandrell on her recent
"Christmas at Our House"
LP, may become a new staple
of the holiday season. And
their latest offering is a fresh
surprise: the first fully or-
chestrated contemporary
Chanukah song, entitled
"Happy Chanukah, My
Friend."
The story behind the laun-
ching of "Mistletoe" is a
familiar one to writers attemp-
ting to crack the highly com-
petitive and exceedingly
restricted Christmas market.
Says Konecky, "We never
realized how difficult it is to
convince the record business
that trying something new for
Christmas doesn't mean you
don't love the classics too. We
just felt it was time for a fresh
approach to things. So we
wrote a love song it's about
a couple spending their first
romantic Christmas
together."
"Don't listen to him" quips
Wilde. "He's Jewish. What
does he know about
Christmas?" They are both
laughing when Justin says
this, and then explains that
Jewish composers have writ-
ten the three best-selling
Christmas songs of all time:
"White Christmas," "Rudolph
The Red Nosed Reindeer,"
and "The Christmas Song
Chestnuts roasting ... ." It
was Konecky's idea to write a
Christmas song. And so it was
only natural that Wilde, the
Christian half of the
songwriting duo, was the first
to realize he had never even
heard a Chanukah song, let
alone one on the radio. The
Douglas Konecky, left., and Justin Wilde, right, in Los Angeles.
reason was simple: traditional
Chanukah music has never
blended in with contemporary
radio formats.
"When Justin brought me
the words to 'Happy
Chanukah, My Friend,' I was
amazed," Konecky reports. "I
didn't know he knew the dif-
ference between a menorah
and a dreidel, let alone the
meaning behind the holiday! It
was a wonderful idea!"
It took several months for
the two to perfect the music
and lyrics to what they hoped
would be a ground breaker
not only for Jewish music, but
for the holiday season as well.
After the orchestrations were
written and musical tracks
recorded, Michael Stanton,
one of L.A.'s top film and TV
session singers was brought in
to record the vocal. When the
final mix was finished, they all
realized they had created
something very special.
"Once we heard the
playbacks, we knew we had
written a song not only about
Chanukah, but about peace
and friendship between people
of all faiths, says Konecky.
"Now the challenge was to get
it played."
"Half the trouble with most
songwriting teams," says
Wilde, "is the lack of commit-
ment to seeing the project
through. Once it's recorded,
many want to walk away and
let others do all the leg work
and promotion. We didn't do
that with 'Mistletoe,' and we
weren't about to do it with a
project as important to us as
this one."
Federal Discount Center
1120 West 49 St.
Hialeah
556-5270
Happy Chanukah
Spec's Music Co.
Happy Chanukah
Merchandise Liquidators uiim
250 No. Federal Hwy.
Hallandale 454-1657
Happy Chanukah
Balogh Jewelers
WWishes His Clients & Friends
A Happy & Healthy Chanukah
x
The Forge Restaurant
432 Arthur Godfrey Road-538-8533
Holiday Greetings
LEAR SCHOOL
11211 BiscayneBlvd.,
North Miami Beach 893-5351
Happy Chanukah
The Linen Chest
18703 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Fla.
931-8530
Wish All Customers And Friends
A Happy Chanukah
Spectors & Son
575 SW 22 Ave. Miami 642-3151
"Three Generations of Builders"
Happy Chanukah
748 NE 79 St.
Miami
691-5452
FLO & BEN KRAM PRINT-RITE CO.
Happy Chanukah
15500 Quail Roost Drive 233-6615
Country Gentleman Stables
Wishes all his Clients and
Friends
Happy Chanukah
Southern Wine Spirits of America.Inc.
ix>NWKs.. 625.4171
Miami
Happy Chanukah
19 SW 6 St
Miami
Associated Photographers
Happy Chanukah
373-4774


J*
They tried to get the major
record companies behind
them, but were told the usual
things .. too narrow an au-
dience ... not a priority .. .
nobody will buy it ("the
things they tell you when they
can't figure out what to do
with you.") The two were
stonewalled for a while.
"Holiday songs don't comt
out of movies and stage plays
anymore, like 'White
Christmas' or 'Have Yourself a
Merry Little Christmas' once
did."" according to Konecky.
'In the 80's, a song's success
depends on radio airplay, and
we couldn't drive around to
radio stations all over the
country. We needed a new
approach."
The two writers decided to
ignore all the people who told
them that no market existed
for a contemporary Chanukah
song. Instead, they sent the
song to television stations in a
few large cities inviting them
to use it free of charge as an
underscore to any features
they might be planning on
Chanukah. Many didn't even
bother to respond.
Then one December day last
year after a particularly gruel-
ing recording session, Wilde
came home to his Burbank
apartment to find his answer-
ing machine jammed with
messages from people in
Chicago wanting to know
where they could buy copies of
"that beautiful Chanukah
song."
Someone at Chicago's WGN-
TV had apparently passed a
copy of the song along to Wal-
ly Phillips, Chicago's leading
radio talk show host. Phillips
loved it and played it on his
show. The switchboards lit up.
Swamped with callers, the sta-
tion began giving out the
telephone number that was on
the cassette.
Suddenly the songwriting
team was in the mail order
business. "We realized we had
tapped into a previously ig-
nored market," says Konecky.
"People ordered two, three,
sometimes five copies of the
song, to send to their kids,
neighbors, grandparents and
grandchildren, or just friends.
And they weren't all Jewish
either. Little did they know we
hadn't even thought of selling
the actual cassette itself. But
we jumped into it, and we kept
busy filling orders clear into
January."
Because of the overwhelm-
ing response to their song, this
year Wilde and Konecky have
decided to completely bypass
the traditional method of sell-
ing records. Instead they have
begun distributing the cassette
of "Happy Chanukah, My
Friend" as part of a musical
greeting card available na-
tionally through gift stores
and other retail outlets. At the
same time they are actively en-
couraging radio program
directors to add the song to
holiday playlists this year,
along with the thirty or forty
Christmas standards they will
be playing.
"Justin and I believe very
deeply in the message behind
our song, and we want to share
it with listeners everywhere.
There is so much joy in both
Chanukah and Christmas,
more than enough for
everyone. And that spirit of
sharing together is what 'Hap-
py Chanukah, My Friend' is all
about."
*******
Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-C
Michelle Leblang Seiden, president emeritus of CID Children
in Distress wished Margie Feldman a happy birthday, at a re-
cent membership luncheon at the Turnberry Isle Country Club.
CID is a voluntary support organization for the Division of Child
and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Miami School of
Medicine.
X
The Z Shop
13110 S, Dixie Hwy., Miami253-5680
Wish Everyone A Happy Chanukah
GLOBAL HERITAGE INC
Property Management & Brokerage
Steven J. Spector
575 SW 22 Ave. Miami 541-7770
Happy Chanukah
Golden West Tours
6626 W. Atlantic Ave.. Delray Beach, FL 33446
Phone 1-498-1106
Wishes Friends. Clients The Best Tours To American West.
JOSE VENTURA I
Rene de Paris Jewelry
6608 Collins Ave Miami Beach Happy Chanukah 865-7131
BiscayneMiracle Mile
Cafeteria
147 Miracle Mile
Coral Gables 444-9005
Happy Chanukah To All
Reliatex Inc.
2201 NW 72 Ave. Miami 592-3220
Happy Chanukah
Atlas Metal Industries
1135 NW 159 Dr.. Miami, Fla. 33169
Phone-625-2451
Wish All Friends & Clients
A Happy & Healthy Chanukah
Jeannetts Dresses
423 Arthur Godfrey Rd.
Miami Beach, Fl.. 531-7562
Wishes You A Happy Chanukah
Andalusia Bake Shop
248 Andalusia Ave.
Coral Gables-445-8696
Happv Chanukah
FEDCO
1605 Washington Ave., Miami Beach
531-7307
Happy Chanukah
Endurance Floors
Wish Happy Holidays To All
18460 NE 2 Ave.. Miami 652-6481
Certified Poultry & Egg Co.
763 West 18 St., Hialeah
887-7591
Happy Chanukah
CAPTAIN JOHN CALLAN
Of the HELEN C
16375 Collins Avenue
947-4081
Happy Chanukah
Joe's Stone Crab Restaurant
227 Biscayne St., Miami Beach
673-0365
Wish All His Friends And Customers
A Very Happy Chanukah


Page 14-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 18, 1987
A Miracle Remembered In A Meal
By NAOMI ARBIT
Chanukah, the eight-day
Festival of Lights, is a family
celebration of love and tradi-
tion. To commemorate an
historic struggle for freedom,
Jewish families around the
world light one new candle on
the "Chanukah" each evening
during the holiday, this year
beginning Dec. 15. On the
eighth day, the entire menorah
glows.
Here are dinner recipes for
the first day of Chanukah that
are delicious and perhaps a bit
healthier than some, but tradi-
tional enough to please
everyone.
Chanukah Baked
Beef Brisket
4-5 lb. brisket of beef, well-
trimmed of excess fat
2-3 cloves garlic, minced
2 large onions, sliced
4 ribs celery
1 cup catsup
1 cup beer
Place beef in roaster, fat side
up. Place garlic, onions and
celery on top and pour catsup
over all. Pour lA cup water in
bottom of pan. Roast in a
350-degree oven, uncovered,
basting several times, until
well browned. Add 1 cup of
beer to pan and cover; reduce
heat to 300 degrees and cook
for 2 hours more or until
tender.
Remove meat from gravy;
put aside vegetables and cool.
Strain gravy and chill until fat
rises and solidifies. Remove
layer of fat. Place gravy and
vegetables in a blender and
blend until smooth.
When brisket is cold, slice
across the grain in medium-
thin slices. Before serving,
reheat in the gravy.
NOTE: Prepare brisket at
least one day before serving.
TRADITIONAL
POTATO PANCAKES
(LATKES)
4 large potatoes (about 3 lbs.),
peeled
1 small onion
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup flour or V cup matzo
meal
2 teaspoon salt; dash of pepper
Vegetable oil for frying
Shred potatoes and onion
with a coarse hand grater or in
the food processor into a
bowl of cold water. (A tables-
poon of fruit protector in a
quart of water may be used to
prevent discoloration.)
When ready to fry, drain
mixture in a colander, and
then into a towel or
cheesecloth; for crisp pan-
cakes, wring out all moisture.
In a medium bowl, lightly
whisk eggs, salt and pepper;
add potato mixture and flour.
Stir until well mixed.
Heat 1/3 cup oil in a heavy
skillet; spoon XU cupful of mix-
ture into hot oil, flattening
each to make a pancake 4 in-
ches in diameter. Fry until
golden brown on one side,
about 4 minutes; turn and
brown other side.
Remove to paper-lined
cookie sheet to drain and keep
warm in low-temperature
oven. Stir potato mixture and
continue frying about 4 at a
time. Serve with applesauce
and sour cream. Makes 16
latkes.
LOW-CHOLESTEROL
LATKES
2/3 cup safflower oil
5 medium potatoes, peeled
4 egg whites
V2 cup onion, minced
V4 cup flour
V4 teaspoon black pepper
Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
Pour safflower oil into a 15-Ve
x lO-1^ x 1-inch jelly-roll pan;
set aside. Coarsely grate
potatoes by hand or using a
food processor into a bowl of
cold water; set aside.
In a medium bowl combine
egg whites, onion, flour and
pepper. Drain potatoes in a
colander; place in a towel and
squeeze dry. Stir potatoes into
egg mixture. Shape into eight
4-inch patties; place in
prepared pan. Brush tops with
safflower oil.
Bake, turning every 10
minutes until both sides are
golden brown about 30
minutes. Drain on paper
towels. Serve with unsweeten-
ed applesauce or plain low-fat
yogurt.
APPLESAUCE
8 medium cooking apples, peel-
ed, cored, cut up
lh cup water
1 tablespoon honey
1 tablespoon lemon juice
Combine all ingredients in a
saucepan. Bring to a boil,
reduce heat. Cover and sim-
mer 8-10 minutes or until ap-
ples are tender. Mash apples
slightly or strain, if desired.
PINEAPPLE FRITTERS
lk cup flour
xk cup whole wheat flour
2 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
Dash of salt
1 beaten egg
2/3 cup milk
Safflower oil
20-ounce can pinapple slices,
drained well
Confectioner's sugar
Stir together flours and
sugar with a dash of salt. Com-
bine egg and milk. Stir into
flour mixture until smooth; do
not overheat.
In a large skillet, heat 1 inch
1
*mi
Bellmar Flowers & Gifts
17508 Biscayne Blvd.
North Miami Beach Phone 940-5173
Ms. Lee Jubelirer Wishes All A Happy Chanukah
Ocean Electric Co.
1526 Alton Road Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
Phone -672-7233
Wish Customers & Friends
A Happy & Healthy Chanukah
Lady Mary's Hair Studio
6960 Collins Ave. 861-8164
Happy Chanukah From The Staff
Food Spot Stores
7901 SW 67 Ave.. Miami-666-0642
Happy Chanukah
COUNTRY CLUB WE CARE
DRY CLEANERS FOR YOUR
NORTH MIAMI CLOTHES
436 N.E. 125 St. 7 A.M.-6 P.M. 893-6101
Mon.-Sat. Quality Cleaning
_________Chanukah Greetings to Our Friends & Customers
A1A Employment of Miami
1325 NK 1st Ave.. Miami -- 379-8401
Happy Chanukah
Animal Lovers west
8454 SW 24th St.
Miami223-7141
Happy Chanukah
Simon & Rose Insurance
2901 Bridgeport Ave.
Miami 443-4886
Happy Chanukah
>
Charade Restaurant
2900 Ponce de Leon Blvd.Miami
448-6077
Happy Chanukah
Bay Harbor Fine Foods
1077 95th St.
Bay Harbor Island-865-0331
Happy Chanukah
The Palette
125 NE 26th St., Miami573-0980
Happy Chanukah
Miami Rug Co.
11150NW32 Ave.
Miami 685-8444
Happy Chanukah
Gulliver Academy
12595 Red Road, Coral Gables
665-3593
Happy Chanukah
K& K Trailer Supplies
23215 South U.S. 1
Miami 258-1212
Happy Chanukah
IVBVBBBSi


1
of oil to 375 degrees. Halve
pineapple slices; dry on towel-
ing. Dip pineapple, one half at
a time, into batter. (If
necessary, add more milk or
flour so that batter coats
evenly).
Fry fritters 1-Vi minutes on
each side until golden brown.
Drain on paper toweling. Sift
confectioner's sugar lightly
over top. Serve warm. Makes
about 20.
SYMBOL COOKIES
8 tablespoons margarine
I-V2 teaspoons vanilla
Trees and Mauthausen
Continued from Page 1-C
new arrivals were given bowls
of some putrid soup, an old
man went up to the soldier
dishing out the soup and asked
for some more.
"The soldier took the entire
pot of the boiling hot liquid and
threw it over the old man,
scalding him to death. The
others who happened to 'get
out of the line' were shot there
and then. Their bodies lay
slumped on the cold, wet
ground*"
He fell silent.
With the indifferent torrent
of traffic swirled around us, he
had recounted his horrific ex-
periences with the same calm
and deliberation that the Nazis
used in shooting those
Budapest Jews. He did not
embellish his own history with
a dramatic voice. These hor-
rors were terrible because
they took place in a perfectly
routine manner, just like this
cab ride.
I found myself feeling lifted
out of time and space, like a
child listening to a favorite
story. Only, I am no child and
this was no fairytale. My body
felt heavy in the back seat,
almost paralyzed by his story.
I thought of my own
Jewishness.
'' What have I gone
through?" I asked myself. The
worst experiences which came
to mind were the relatively
peaceful deaths of my parents.
Yet, both were wrenching. I
remembered how 1 had felt
after their deaths, and how I
realized that now 1 could sur-
vive anything.
I thought that no one had
gone through as much as I did
in seeing my parents die. I felt
Continued on Page 16-C
V2 cup cornstarch, sifted
1 cup flour, sifted
V2 cup corfectioner's sugar,
sifted
1 egg white, beaten
Colored sugar (optional)
Place sifted dry ingredients
into a bowl. Cut margarine in
with a pastry fork or pastry
blender until mixture is
crumbly; add vanilla and work
it into a ball. Wrap in waxed
paper and chill for 15-20
minutes.
Flour a wooden board or pas-
ty cloth and a rolling pin. Roll
out dough to Vo-inch thickness.
Cut into desired shapes with
Chanukah symbol cookie cut-
ters (available at gift shops).
Brush each cookie with
beaten egg white and sprinkle
with sugar if desired. Place on
a well-greased cookie sheet
and bake at 325 degrees for 15
minutes. Cool on a wire rack.
Makes about 2 dozen cookies.
Blue Sugar: In a shaker jar
combine xk cup sugar with 2-3
drops blue food coloring; shake
well.
Naomi Arbit of Milwaukee,
Wis., teaches cooking and is the
author of seven cookbooks.
Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-C
**s4
N
Come to the Party...
but Stay for the Bargains!
Join Us for the Grand Opening of the
one & only original
ouglas Gardens
Miami Jewish Home & Hospital
Thrift Shops
Our NEW Hallandale Store is
NOW OPEN
3194 Hallandale Beach Blvd.
4 Blocks West of I-95
FREE
Drawings Prizes
Grand Prize: A Weekend Trip
for two in Nassau, Bahamas
Early Bird Special
Free Danish & Coffee
8 AM-10 AM
all week long
Round-trip tickets Ft. Lauderdale-Nassau
courtesy of Midway Airlines. Weekend includes
round-trip airfare. 2 nights hotel accommodations.
A division of the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged at Douglas Gardens
Serving the Elderly of South Florida tor More than
40 Years
Drop this off at the Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops
to win a free weekend in Nassau. Bahamas
Name
Address
Telephone
Drawing to be held Dec. 22 at noon. Winner need
notbepresent. J^^gy
Airlines


Page 16-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 18, 1987
Coins Honor

Anglo-Jewry
The first Chanukah coins
vere minted by the State of
Israel in 1958, and they have
been issued every year since
except for the period 1964
through 1971. The 1987 com-
memoratives, featuring a
Chanukah lamp from England,
are the 18th in the series. The
reverse design common to
both coins depicts an early
Eighteenth Century Chanukah
lamp from the Felix Nabarro
Collection of the London
Jewish Museum. Made in 1709
by silversmith John tuslen for
Eliah Lindo, the >ackplate
shows the prophet Elijah being
fed by ravens, alluding to the
similarity in the names of
Eliah and Elijah. AU>. both
Elijah and the Maccabees are
associated with divine miracles
and the triumph over
paganism.
These legal tender silvei
coins are available in twc
denominations Brilliant Un-
circulated One New Shekel,
maximum authorized mintage
of 11,500 with an issue price of
$19; and Gem Proof Two New
Shekels, maximum mintage
11,000 and officially priced at
$30. Both coins are minted
from 85% pure silver, and
weigh a little under a half
ounce and one ounce
respectively.
As elsewhere, British Jewry
had its good and bad times.
The first Jewish settlement in
England dates from the Nor-
man Conquest in 1066.
Originally protected as finan-
cial agents of the Crown, these
Jews established small com-
munities in London and other
towns throughout the land, but
their position gradually
deteriorated. The earliest
recorded "blood libel" occur-
red in Norwich in 1144;
widespread riots followed dur-
ing the Crusades, notably at
York in 1190, when Jews
threatened by a bloodthristy
mob committed mass suicide.
Having been considered
economically expendable, the
5,000 Jews of medieval
England were stripped of their
possessions and expelled from
the kingdom in 1290.
Three centuries later,
Spanish and Portuguese Mar-
ranos began trading in London
and Bristol. Their intelligence
reports proved useful to the
English government, and Rab-
bi Manasseh Ben Israel's
negotiations with Oliver
Cromwell led to de facto read-
mission of the Jews in 1656.
Between 1881 and 1914,
vast numbers of Jews fleeing
the Czarist pogroms reached
England, and then sailed from
Liverpool to America and
other lands of opportunity.
Some remained, however, to
swell the Anglo-Jewish popula-
tion. Despite quota restric-
tions, a further 70,000
refugees found sanctuary in
Great Britain during the Nazi
period.
From the time of Sir Moses
Montefiore to that of Sir Isaac
Wotfeon in our own time,
Anglo-Jewry has contributed
generously to the restoration
and development of the Land
of Israel. Previously issued
British-Israel related com-
memorative coins and medals
honored Dr. Chaim Weizmann
(1962), Baron Edmond de
Rothschild and his son James
(1966), and the Balfour
Declaration (1967).
Trees and Mauthausen
Continued from Pace 15-C
as though I had experienced
some of the harshest blows of
life and could now take
strange pride in having gotten
through them. I had earned my
present happiness by virtue of
these experiences.
But now, this modest, soft-
spoken cab driver made my
sorrows seem mild by com-
parison to his. For those 10
minutes in his cab, he was
more than driver. He ws a kind
Virgil to escort me through the
"Inferno" of Mauthausen. He
helped me realize the value of
life because he had seen so
many killed because of their
ethnicity, and he had almost
lost his own.
Mr. Mathias is an excep-
tional man. He went on to say
how he now feels nothing but
joy for every moment that he
is alive. I could well unders-
tand this. I began to feel a
catharis of his pain (or was it
mine, also?).
Suddenly the cab slowed
and looking out the window, i
realized that we had reached
the end of our ride together
The indifferent maelstrom of
the "real" world awaited. For
a while, I had forgotten the
routine, that I now had to pay
the fare. I forgot about those
afternoon meetings and the
complex real estate deals
which awaited me on my desk.
As my hand struggled to
open the cab door, Mr. Mathias
looked over his shoulder at me
and said kindly, "God bless
you, and the children of Zion."
I stepped out of the cab, mv
knees weak, and watched the
cab pull back into the roar of
traffic. As I walked toward mv
building, I felt tears rolling
down my cheeks.
Norman Jacobson is a New
York real estate executive.
to your whole family
from the people at Publix.
_ May the spirit of the season bless
rfo you with peace, joy and love.
Publix


Full Text
Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 25, 1987

II
Thousands Attend
Kosher Expo
The International Kosher Foods and Jewish Life Expo
has received a warm welcome to the Miami Beach Conven-
tion Center. Irving I. Silverman, president of Nancy Neale
Enterprises and creator of the Expo concept, says more
than 28,000 South Florida residents celebrated their
Jewish heritage at the Expo, December 4-7.
"They tasted an incredible variety of kosher noshes
everything from bagel dogs to pasta to French champagne
and fancy mustards to leben and imitation shrimp, lobster
and crab meat. They listened to Klezmer bands and a
Jewish rock 'n roll group, participated in seminars about
kashruth and health, and got a headstart on Chanukah
shopping choosing from books and arts, toys, jewelry
and Judaica."
Irving Silverman chose Miami Beach because of its active
and enthusiastic Jewish community, second only in size to
New York. "Lots of other cities wanted the Expo, but we
decided on Miami Beach because of the young families and
professionals who have migrated South to take advantaged
of economic expansion and the terrific climate. New com-
panies, great people and the Florida sun, were the perfect
combination for a successful Expo."
Billed as the "biggest Kosher Party ever held," the Expo
was created to meet the needs of America's growing
kosher community. Research shows that one out of every
four products on supermarket shelves today are under rab-
binical supervision, although of the six million people who
buy kosher, only 1.5 million are Jewish.
tWeiktenm
Mrs. Charles Fistel
FOGELFISTEL
Marcia Mendelsohn of North Miami Beach
announces the marriage of her daughter,
Pamela Fogel, to Charles Fistel, son of Ralph
and Myraa Fistel of Miami.
The couple were married Sunday, Dec. 20,
at Temple Emanu-El, with Rabbis Irving
Lehrman and Samuel Rudy and Cantor
William Lipson officiating.
Lisa Feldman was matron of honor; Naomi
Teperow, Debbie Lifton, Danielle Nasoff, and
Jennifer Wechsler were bridesmaids. Jeffrey
Fistel was best man; Jordan Zwecker, Samuel
Fistel, Benjamin Fistel, and Alan Teperow
were ushers. Shira Teperow served as the
flower girl.
The bride, who is the granddaughter of Dr.
Norman Mendelsohn and Miriam
Mendelsohn, was graduated from the Univer-
sity of Florida in 1983. She is a CPA and an
audit supervisor with Rachlin and Cohen,
CPA.
The groom, who is the grandson of Bessie
Lemelman and the late Tillie and Fred
Sandier, was graduated from Florida Inter-
national University in 1981. He, too, is a
CPA, and chief financial officer of Bloc
Development Corporation.
After a honeymoon in Acapulco, the couple
will reside in North Miami.
Community Corner
Bet Shira Congregation has included in its many-
faceted "Grow by Learning" program, a class in Con-
versational Yiddish for Beginner and Intermediate
students to begin Monday, Jan. 11, 7 p.m. Students
may register in person at trie synagogue.
The Forte Forum will hear Prof. Robert Sandier on
Tuesday, Jan. 5,1 p.m. on the subject of "A Glimpse In-
to Talmudic Literature and its Relevance Today."
The Forte Forum meets at 1200 West Ave.
Three Florida Residents are among some 50
incoming students at Yeshiva College -
Yeskiva University's Undergraduate Division
of liberal arts and science for men to be
designated as Dr. Samuel Belkin
Undergraduate Scholars. Shown from left are:
Judy Paikin, director of the University Office
of Admissions; Eliahou Cohen, son of Rabbi
and Mrs. Mordechai Cohen; and Benjamin
Jay Freedman, son of Rabbi and Mrs. Simcha
Freedman, both of North Miami Beach; Barry
Ginsberg, son of Dr. and Mrs. Ira Ginsberg, of
Hollywood; and Dr. Michael Hecht, Yeshiva
College associate dean. The students attended
the Hebrew Academy of Greater Miami before
entering Yeshiva College.
jfr -38
Jeanne Marie (Mrs. Dante) Fascell accepts the Hannah G.
Solomon Award for her husband at the 17th Annual Child Care
Luncheon of the Greater Miami Section, National Council of
Jewish Women. With Mrs. Fascell are Myra Farr, left. NCJW
National Board member who co-chaired the extent, and Carol
Grunberg, President of the Grrtitrr Miami Section.
Israel Maj. Gen. Natan Vilnai, center, head of
the Manpower Division of the Israel Defense
Forces General Staff, and his wife. Anal.
recently visited Miami to meet with various
members included with the Greater Miami
Israel Bonds campaign. Meeting the Israeli
couple during a reception at the Towers of
Quayside in North Miami were, from left, An-
drew Parish, Marcy Taubenicimel, Anne
Bloom and Howard Goldstein.
Over $60,000 was raised in a spontaneous outpouring of love and
support for both a woman and a cause when the Greater Miami
Women' Auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged honored Miami Beach resident Sophia Gumenick as its
"Woman of the Year. Pictured, from left, is Auxiliary Presi
dent Phyllis Beekman and Sophia Gumenick.


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Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 26, 1987
Deaths
Allan Robert Wolfe
Allan Robert Wolfe, founder
and president of Al Wolfe
Associates, Inc., public rela-
tions firm, died December 16
at Cedars of Lebanon Hospital
after a lengthy illness.
Wolfe, 49, had a distinguish-
ed career as a public relations
professional specializing in
travel- and tourism-oriented
clients. From 1963 to 1969 he
was director of special events
for the City of Miami Beach,
responsible for managing the
city's affairs in connection
with the Miss Universe/US. A.
beauty pageants, the Jackie
Gleason show and other net-
work television programs, the
Orange Bowl Festival and the
Super Bowl. Wolfe was ac-
count supervisor for Hank
Meyer Associates, Inc., from
1969 to 1972, continuing his in-
volvement with the City of
Miami Beach among many
other clients. He resigned to
become vice president of
public affairs and communica-
tions for Norwegian Caribbean
Lines, until establishing his
own firm in 1977.
Agraduate of the University
of Florida, Wolfe was elected
to Florida Blue Key, and was
active member and the past
Supreme Master of Alpha Ep-
silon Pi fraternity the
youngest person ever to hold
that position. He was active in
a number of community and
professional organizations. As
secretary of the Atlan-
Allan Robert Wolfe
tic/Caribbean Chapter of the
Society of American Travel
Writers, he was the highest
ranking public relations pro-
fessional in that chapter. He
also was secretary-treasurer
of the Travel and Tourism Sec-
tion of the Public Relations
Society of America .
Wolfe is survived by his
daughters, Elana Kim and
Randi Suzanne, his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Wolfe
of North Miami Beach, a
sister, Rosalind, and brother,
Melvin.
Funeral arrangements are
being handled by Rubin
Zilbert, 1701 Alton Road,
Miami Beach.
Dr. Benjamin Coleman
Benjamin Coleman, MD, died in
Mt. Sinai Hospital December 16.
He was born in Russia and at the
age of four emigrated to Colum-
bus, Ga. with his parents.
He attended the University of
Alabama and the School of
Medicine at Emory University in
Atlanta, Ga. He became the head
of the Psychiatry Department at
Jackson Memorial Hospital and
subsequently opened his practice
of psychiatry until he retired in
the middle 1970's.
He is survived by sister Hannah
Coleman, his dear friend, Fanny
Wernick, and several cousins.
Services were held.
Polish Apology
Averts Israeli Standoff
TEL AVIV (JTA) Pro-
mpt apologies by Polish of-
ficials and the news media last
weekend averted a threatened
boycott by Israeli and other
Jewish groups of ceremonies
in Warsaw next April marking
the 45th anniversary of the
Warsaw Ghetto uprising.
The apologies were for an
item published in Trybuna
Ludu, the official organ of the
Polish Communist Party, that
contained anti-Israel over-
tones. The item, transmitted
abroad by PAP, the Polish
news agency, claimed that the
Polish committee organizing
the ceremonies was concerned
over "the current dangerous
revisionist and neo-Nazi
trends in the Federal Republic
of Germany as well as the
{ossible consequences of
srael's policy of expansion."
The Israeli government and
the World Federation of
Former Jewish Fighters, Par-
tisans and Concentration
Camp Inmates protested to
Warsaw. Federation President
Stefan Grayek, who was in
Warsaw, complained to Gen.
Jozef Kaminski, chairman of
the organizing committee.
Following the protests,
Trybuna Ludu amended its
earlier report and stressed
that the anniversary
ceremonies would honor the
valor and contributions of
Jews to the ultimate victory
over Nazism.
He wrote that he "deeply
regrets the incident and begs
forgiveness for the inac-
curacies" in the report publish-
ed in Trybuna Ludu and
transmitted by PAP.
Up to 4,500 expected Jewish
visitors from abroad might
have canceled plans to attend
the Warsaw commemoration
had a rift developed between
the Polish and Israeli
governments.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open E*rf OayClosed Sabbat*
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888
Radio Pioneer,
Herbert Dolgoff
Herbert S. Dolgoff, 62, of
North Dade, died Saturday,
December 19. A native of
Omaha, Nebraska, Dolgoff is
credited with pioneering the
airplay of popular Latin music
on the radio here, as station
manager and owner of various
radio stations over the years.
He is survived by his wife,
Lois; son, Howard Dolgoff;
daughter Barbara Agran;
grandchildren, Adam and
Ryan; sisters, Linny Fremer
and Dora Weinberg; and by his
brother, Edward Dolgoff.
Services were held Tuesday,
December 22 at Temple Israel
of Greater Miami, where he
served on the Board of
Trustees. Arrangements were
by Riverside Alton Road
Chapel. Memorial contribu-
tions may be made to Temple
Israel.
Rabbi
Emmet Frank
Rabbi Emmet Allen Frank,
62, died Monday, December
21. A resident of Miami Beach
since 1971, Frank founded the
All People's Reformed
Synagogue on Miami Beach's
North Shore. A supporter of
the civil rights movement,
speaking on behalf of
desegregation in Virginia as
early as 1958, he received
death threats for his efforts.
Controversial for his will-
ingness to marry interfaith
couples, Frank, a graduate of
the Hebrew Union College in
Cincinnati, said he felt that
religion was meant to draw
people together, and not to
divide them. Frank was also an
artist, and some of his pain-
tings have been displayed in
the Smithsonian Institute. The
themes in his art were, ap-
propriately, biblical.
He is survived by his wife,
Carole Frank; son Loring;
daughter, Sharon Siegel; and
grandson, Jared Siegel.
Private services were held
Wednesday at the Newman
Funeral Home.
FRANK. Rabbi Dr. Emmet Allen, of Miami
Beach, December 21. Services private.
HOFFMAN. George W, 87, of Miami.
December 21. Services were held. Inter
merit at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
KATZ. Helen. 82, of Miami Beach.
December 22. The Riverside.
KOCH. Roeyln. of Tenafly, New Jersey.
Services held in New Jersey.
KOGAN, Fanny, 91. December 21. Services
private.
GOODMAN. Jerome. 79. of Bay Harbor
Island, December 22 The Riverside.
GRANAT. Murray. Services were held.
HIRSCH. Anne (Lipp), 86. Miami Beach.
December 19. Graveside set ikes and in-
terment were held at Mt Nebo Cemetery.
SH1NKMAN. Benjamin, 90. of Bay Harbor
Islands. December 22. Ruhin-Zilbert. In-
terment at Mt Nebo Cemetery.
DORFMAN. Lewis, 54. of Miami. December
15. Services were held.
STONE. Mrs. Anna, of Miami. Rubin-
Zilbert
PETERSON. Jeanette. 69 of Miami.
December 20. Services and interment held
in New York.
BAMBERG. Harold S.. December 20. The
Riverside. Interment st Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
3RUSSEL, Ida (Kremen) of Brookline.
December 20. Services held in
COHEN. Stanley. 64. of Bay Harbor
Levitt-Weinstein. Interment st Mt Nebo
Cemetery.
KESELMAN. Morris. 76, of Miami,
December 20. Interment at Mt Nebo
Cemetery.
MORGAN. Sylvia, of Miami. Menorah
Chapels.
BRAVERMAN. Bernard. 62, of Miami
December 17. Services were held. Inter-
ment st Star of David Memorial Park
POLGAR, Alex, 79, of Miami Beach
December 18. The Riverside.
BAMBERG, Norman. December 20. The
Riverside. Interment st Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
DOLGOFF. Herbert 8. 62. of North Miami
Beach, December 19. The Riverside
GALUMBECK, Clara Harris, of Miami
Beach, December 20. The Riverside. In-
terment at Star of David Memorial Park
HOBERMAN. Tease. 76. of Miami Beach
December 19. The Riverside.
KAPLAN, Donald R. 60, of Miami
December 17. The Riverside
KRIVIT, Ida, 91, of North Bay Village. The
Riverside. Interment at Lakeside
Memorial Park.
LEIDER. Mary, 91. of Miami. December 19
The Riverside.
AKOP, Jean, of Miami Beach. December 18.
The Riverside.
EHRENKRANTZ. Joseph. 84. of Miami
Beach, December 19. Services held in
New Jersey.
LEVY. Louis L.. of Miami Beach. December
18. Eternal Light. Interment held st
Lakeside Memorial Park.
MVRAVCHICK
Harry. 84. a Miami Beach resident for 47
years, coming from New York, passed away
Tuesday, December 16. Survived by his
wife, Rebecca; loving son. Stanley (Arlene)
and daughter, Paula (Larry) Frank and four
cherished grandchildren, Leslie. Roeslyn.
Michael and Rose. Graveside services were
held at Mt. Nebo Cemetery under the direc-
tion of The Riverside.
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Friday, December 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Journeys of Conscience Planned
V
The date has been set and
brochures and applications are
available for "The March of
the Living," a trip to Poland
and Israel involving Jewish
teenagers from around the
world. Sponsored locally by
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education in cooperation with
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, the trip will
highlight two contrasting
events in Jewish history- the
45th anniversary of the War-
saw Ghetto Uprising, and the
40th anniversary of the State
of Israel.
More than 1,500 Jewish
teenagers from North
America, Israel, South Africa,
Australia, New Zealand, Latin
America and Europe are ex-
pected to participate in the
trip which will take place from
April 10-24. The first part of
the trip will include a two-day
visit to a European city whose
Jewish population was
decimated during the
Holocaust. The group will then
meet in Poland to visit the
sites of Jewish struggle and
extermination- Treblinka
Lublin and Warsaw]
culminating in a march from
Auschwitz to Birkenau to com-
memorate Holocaust Day.
The second half of the trip
will take place in Israel where
the students will com-
memorate Memorial Day in
honor of Israel's fallen
soldiers, and Israel In-
dependence Day.
In a related story, the Simon
Wiesenthal Center New
Leadership Society will spon-
sor an 11-day tour to Warsaw,
Prague and Budapest featur-
ing meetings with Jewish com-
munity leaders and Israeli of-
ficials based in Eastern
Europe.
The third "Mission of
Remembrance and Renewal"
will depart from New York Ci-
ty on Sunday, March 6 and
return on Thursday, March 16.
The trip will include historical
tours of sites of Jewish in-
terest, receptions with
American and Israeli
diplomats and evening cultural
events.
Pictured at the entrance to the Auschwitz con-
centration camp during a planning trip for
the "March of the Living" gathering, at far
left, Eliezer Klonsky, deputy director educa-
tion of Tel Aviv; Ze'ev Machnai, executive
director North American Aliyah delegation;
Tzippi Rosenman; Eugene Greenzweig, direc-
tor ofCAJE; and Dr. Alvin Schiff, executive
vice president Board of Jewish Education.
RELIGIOUS ACTION

In memory of his late wife,
Philip Langwald inaugurated
the Gladys Langwald
Memorial Scholarship Pro-
gram. This program will pro-
vide scholarship assistance for
Adath Yeshurun USY'ers to
attend one of two USY summer
educational programs, USY
Israel Pilgrimage or USY On
Wheels.
JERUSALEM Rabbi Charles Kroloff(left).
president ofARZA, the Association of Reform
Zionists of America, chats with Rabbi Alex-
ander M. Schindler, president of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations, and Sim-
cha Dinitz (right), newly-elected chairman of
the World Zionist Organization at the dedica-
tion of the Israel Religious Action Center,
sponsored by ARZA.
New Center to Counter
'Fossilized Fanaticism'
JERUSALEM A major
effort to counter the "growing
extremism of Israel's Or-
thodox establishment" and
"defend religious pluralism"
has been launched here with
the formal dedication of the
Israel Religious Action
Center, a project of the
Association of Reform Zionists
of America (ARZA).
Rabbi Charles Kroloff of
Westfield, N.J., president of
ARZA, said the new center
would take its inspiration from
the prophetic injunction,
"Justice, justice shalt thou
pursue." He told the audience
at a ceremony in Beit Shmuel,
the newly opened Reform
cultural center in Jerusalem
that will house the Religious
Action project:
"Judaism is more than
kashrut supervision and power
Politics. It is the ethical prin-
ciples of our faith that
distinguishes Judaism from all
others. We dedicate this
center in that spirit, at the re-
quest of our Israeli colleagues
Progressive Judaism and in
the pattern of the Religious
Action Center of Reform
Judaism in Washington, which
has proven so effective in the
struggle for social justice in
America."
Rabbi Alexander M.
Schindler, president of the
Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, said that in
launching the Center, Reform
Judaism "has a profound con-
tribution to make to the
Jewish state.
"Our goal," Schindler said,
"is to renew idealism in a land
Continued on Page 12-B
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Friday, December 2S, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page9-B
The Menorah" and "The Wailing Wall," limited edition
sadptures by Salvador Dali, are available in the United States
for the first time since 198*. These sculptures, created by Dali in
1981 as an homage to the Jewish people, were withdrawn from
U.S. sales in 198i because of a dispute between the artist and his
U.S. representative over distribution practices. Dali, 82 years
old. stopped creating in 1985 because of illness and the death of his
vile Gala. "The Monorah" and "The Wailing Wall" thus, are
among his last works.
Community Notes
Army Pvt. 1st Class Mark A. Milstein, son of Hilda
Milstein of North Miami Beach, has arrived for duty
with the Division Support Communications, Fort
Bragg, N.C. Milstein, a medical specialist, is a 1986
graduate of North Miami Beach Senior High School. He
has received the parachutist badge upon completion
of the three-week airborne course at the U.S. army In-
fantry School, Fort Benning, Ga.
Second Lt. Eric S. Sobol, son of Donald J. and Rose
L Sobol of Miami, has graduated from U.S. Air Force
pilot training, and has received silver wings at Reese
Air Force Base, Tex.
Albert H. Friedman, a longtime Coral Gables resident
and pioneer merchant on Miracle Mile has been chosen
as the recipient of the 1987 Robert B. Knight award.
Presented annually since 1976 by the Coral Gables
Chamber of Commerce, the award honors a person
who is noteworthy in supporting business activity and
the quality of life in Coral Gables.
Jonathan D. Beloff has been elected chairman and
president of Friends of the Gusman Cultural Center.
Inc. Beloff, a member of the law firm of Ruden, Barnett,
McClosky, Smith, Schuster and Russell, PA, was nam-
1 to the one-year term by the board of trustees of The
Friends of Gusman.
At an inter-school Torah Fair sponsored by the Cen-
tral Agency for Jewish Education and in which all area
Hebrew Day Schools participated, Hebrew Academy
students were top winners in all categories. Receiving
winner prizes in the variouis categories were: elemen-
tary school division, Aviva Gold; junior high school divi-
sion first place winner, Susie Ullman; second place Yit-
zi Ever and Danny Nagler; third place, Shirley Retter; In
the high school division, first place went to Jonathan
Konovich, second place to Yoni Epstein and Arye Ci-
ment; and third place to David Resnick, Andrew
Lebowitz and Margie Sultan.
Dr. Nathaniel I. Berlin of Turnberry Isle has been ap-
pointed deputy director of the Papanicolaou Com-
prehensive Cancer Center at the University of
Miami/Jackson Memorial Medical Center, as well as
professor of oncology and vice chairman of the
medical school's Department of Oncology.
Jean Pierre Halbwachs, a member of the
United Nations Secretary General's staff,
holds up one of the previously missing files on
Nazi war crimes at the U.N. Archives. U.N.
sources said most of the USS missing files have
been found but questions remain about how
they could have disappeared or been misplac-
ed. AP/Wide World Photo
Brandeis to
Host Halpern
Brandeis University Na-
tional Women's Committe,
Miami Beach Chapter, will
hold its Annual Brandeis
University Professor's Lun-
cheon on Sunday, Jan. 10, at
noon, at the Seaview Hotel,
Bal Harbour. Speaker will be
Dr. Martin Halpern, professor
of the Samuel and Sylvia
Schulman Theatre of the Arts.
His topic will be "The
American Jewish Experience:
Two Contrasting Dramatic
Treatments." For informa-
tion. 866-1726.
Gorbachev Denies Bias
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Soviet leader Mikhail Gor-
bachev's declared
evenhandedness on the Arab-
Israeli conflict is welcome, a
U.S. State Department official
asserted, but the United
States still awaits actual proof
of a shift from the Soviets' pro-
Arab policy.
In his new book
"Perestroika," Gorbachev
claims that "nonexistent anti-
Israel prejudices are ascribed
to the Soviet Union." He
stresses that the Soviet Union
was one of the first countries
to recognize the State of Israel
and its legitimate right to
exist.
Soviet Anti-Zionist Commit-
tee deputy chairman Samuil
Zivs also tried to project the
evenhanded image during the
summit here between Gor-
bachev and President Reagan.
Zivs said the Kremlin's
substantial military assistance
to Syria "has nothing to do"
with Soviet-Israeli relations.
Hadassah Events
The Eye Bank Luncheon ot
the Stephen S. Wise Chapter
of Hadassah will be held on
Monday, Jan. 4 at 11:30 a.m.
at the Ocean Pavilion, Miami
Beach.
Guest speaker will be Bea
Klein, Area Liaison Represen-
tative from the Miami Region.
Entertainment will be provid-
ed by the Financial Federal
Bank. For reservations,
861-5909.
The Hannah Senesch
Chapter of Hadassah will hold
its next general meeting at
noon, Tuesday, Jan. 5 at the
Shelborne Hotel, Miami
Beach. For information,
538-2111.
Two world travelers who
have visited Russia seven
times will discuss their ex-
periences with Soviet
Refuseniks, at the next
general meeting of the Naomi
Chapter of Hadassah. The
meeting wil be held on Mon-
day, Jan. 11, at 8 p.m., at the
Tamarind Apartments
Clubhouse.
Southgate Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its regular
meeting on Monday, Jan. 11,
at 12:30 p.m. in the Southgate
Terrace Room. The program
will be a tribute to Henrietta
Szold written by Muriel
Kovinow.
In a cross generational Chanukah celebration,
childrenfrom the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center visited The Hamptons con-
dominium in N. Miami Beach to charm the
residents with traditional holiday songs.


Friday, December 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
FORECLOSURE SALES-PUBLIC NOTICES
'
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-3116
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ELIZABETH CALIGER.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
yOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the adnuiustra-
ti..n of the estate of ELIZABETH
CALIGER. deceaaed, File Number
87-3116, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagier Street.
Miami, Florida 33130. The per
sonal representative of the estate
;. Max R. Silver, whose address is
B. 2nd Avenue, Suite 500,
Miami. Florida 33131. The names
anii address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
ma> have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
( claim, the name and ad-
f the creditor or his agent or
iHorMjr, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
will become due shall be
If the claim is contingent or
^.liquidated, the nature of the
unty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
-crihed. The claimant shall
sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
mail one copy to each per
-epresentative.
All persons interested in the
to whom a copy of this
4 Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
i'JJ,- Kl.Ii ATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
the; may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
-entative, or the venue or
infliction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
\NI'OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
Notice of Administration
December 18. 1987.
Max R. Silver
\- Personal Representative
of the Estate of
KLIZABETH CALIGER
Deceased
SILVER 4 SILVER
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
RKPRKSENTATIVE:
J [M 8 E. 2nd Avenue
*f Miami. Florida 33131
1 i'hone: (305) 374-4888
By Ira S. Silver
11172 December 18, 25. 1987
W THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-7268
Division 04
Fla. Bar No.: 261143
IN RE ESTATE OF
BENJAMW COLEMAN,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of BENJAMIN COLEMAN.
deceased. File Number 87-7268. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
D*de County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street. Miami,
Honda 33160. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below
* All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
"ITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
K*wt the estate and (2) any ob-
)"tion by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
^Jlenges the validity of the will.
we qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or iurisdic-
"on of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
>
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 26, 1987.
Personal Representative:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
SUN BANK/MIAMI N.A.
1111 Lincoln Road Mall
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MARTIN W. WASSERMAN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 672-3100
18191 December 26.1987;
January 1,1988
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-28384
SEC. 19
ALLIANCE MORTGAGE COM-
PANY, a Florida corporation.
Plaintiffls)
vs.
ANDREW M. MITCHELL.
VELVA T. MITCHELL, and the
unknown spouses, et si..
Defendant^)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOITH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami. Dade County. Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M.. on the 4th day
of January, 1987. the following
described propertv:
I-ot 1. Block 26. SECOND ADDI-
TION TO SIERRA MIRADA. ac-
cording to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 64. Page 81
of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
DATED the 16th day of
December. 198?
RICHARD P BRISKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal 4 Yarchin. PA
100 Southeast 2nd Street
One ('entrust Financial Center.
Suite 2300
Miami. Florida 33131-2198
Published 12/18-25
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-52815 (01)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
WOON Rl'KKAKNPAKT.
I'etitioner/Wife.
and
PIRAPOL RUKKARNPAET.
Respondent/Husband.
TO: Mr Pirapol Rukkarnpaet
1627-8 Takhh Road
Takhli. Nakhonsawan
Thailand 60140
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
STEVE POLATNICK, Esq., at
tomey for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 10691 Kendall Drive. Suite
101, Miami. FL 33176, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before January
4. 1988; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 30 day of November, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
STEVE POLATNICK. Esq.
10691 Kendall Drive, Suite 101
Miami. FL 33176
(305) 595-0424; 595-0438
Attorney for Petitioner
18153 December 4. 11. 18, 25. 1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-35858
SEC 13
STOCKTON, WHATLEY.
DAVIN 4 COMPANY, a Florida
corporation.
Plaintiffls)
vs.
EUSTAQUIO ACEVEDO. et al
Defendant^)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on the SOUTH STEPS of the
Dade County Courthouse in
Miami, Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M., on the 4th day
of January, 1987. the following
described property:
Lot 12, in Block 26, of KINGS
GARDENS SECTION THREE,
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 95, at Page
30, of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
DATED THE 16th day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal 4 Yarchin. P.A
(entrust Financial Center. Suite
2300
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami. Florida 33131-2198
Published 12/18-25
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-7258
Division 04
Fla. Bar No.: 251143
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BENJAMIN COLEMAN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of BENJAMIN COLEMAN.
deceaaed. File Number 87-7258. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street. Miami.
Florida 33160. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal represen-
tavie and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 25, 1987.
Personal Representative:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
SUN BANK/MIAMI N.A.
1111 Lincoln Road Mall
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MARTIN W. WASSERMAN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Flonda 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
18191 December 25, 1987;
January 1.1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA DX AND
FOB DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-61139 CA-25
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS.
Plaintiff
vs.
GLORIA J.M. HEARD, et at,
Defendants.
TO: GLORIA J. M. HEARD
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
GLORIA J.M. HEARD, and
all parties having or claiming
to have any right, title or
interest in the property
herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 6, Block 6. MIAMI
GARDENS MANOR SEC-
TION ONE according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 92. Page 63, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
January 22, 1988. and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 17 day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18187 December 25.1987;
January 1.8. 15, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-6046 (02)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
YAIR JACOB CHUCHANI.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of YAIR JACOB CHUCHANI.
deceased. File Number 87-6046
(02), is pending in the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street Miami,
Flonda 33130. The names and ad
dresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 25. 1987.
Personal Representative:
DAVID FELDMAN
Financial Federal Bldg. PH
407 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
JUAN J. RODRIGUEZ, ESQ.
Shea 4 Gould
801 Brickell Avenue Suite 1401
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone: (306) 372-2047
18185 December 25.1987;
January 1, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-42156 CA 13
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United
States of America.
Plaintiff
vs.
ANTONIO E. ALONSO. et ux
et al
Defendants.
TO: ANTONIO E. ALONSO and
GLADYS ALONSO, his wife
9720 Southwest Sixth Street
Miami, Florida 33174
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Foreclosure of Mortgage on the
following described property:
Lot 111. Block 2 LES
CHALETS II according to
the Plat thereof as recorded
in Plat Book 119 at Page 26
of the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it.
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida, 33146 on or before
January 22, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 17 day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18189 December 26, 1987;
January 1.8. 15, 198*
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 87-4963
DIVISION: 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
GUY EDWARD IRWIN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Guy Edward Irwin. deceased.
File No. 87-6963. is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is Dade County
Courthouse. 73 West Flagier
Street, Miami, Flonda 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this Court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
repreentative. venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the Court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 25. 1987.
Suzanne L. Irwin,
Personal Representative
655 N.E. 129th Street
North Miami, Flonda 33161
Gerald B. Cope. Jr.
Attorney for Personal
Representative
4870 Southeast Financial Center
200 S. Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Flonda 33131
(305) 579-0060
18186 December 25. 1987;
January 1, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-7207
Division 02
Fla Bar No. 027363
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LEO HERSHKOWITZ.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of LEO HERSHKOWITZ. deceas-
ed. File Number 87-7207. is pen
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida. Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 26. 1987.
Personal Representative:
GERTRUDE SIEGEL
Bridle Path Lane
Mill Neck. New York 11763
ROBERT HERSKOVICH
664 East 86th Street
Brooklyn. New York 11236
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HYMAN P. GALBUT
Galbut. Galbut 4 Menin
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 672 3100
18190 December 25, 1987;
January 1,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-2318
Division CP-03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
NIANYA COROMOTO AVILA
RINCON DE SANCHEZ a/k/a
NIANYA A. SANCHEZ.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
uon of the estate of NIANYA
COROMOTO AVILA RDMCON
DE SANCHEZ a/k/a NIANYA A.
SANCHEZ, deceased. File
Number 87-2318 CP-03, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street. Miami, Florida
33130 The personal represen
tative of the estate is ENRIQUE
BASCUAS, whose address is
10315 S.W 92nd Street. Miami.
Florida 33176 The name and ad-
dress of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
wnting and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom s copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
December 25. 1987.
ENRIQUE BASCUAS
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
NIANYA COROMOTO AVILA
RINCON DE SANCHEZ a/k/a
NIANYA A. SANCHEZ
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
AINSLEE R. FERDIE
717 Ponce de Leon Blvd..
Suite 215
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
Telephone: (305) 445-3557
18198 December 25, 1987;
January 1. 1988
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 87-41269 FC 18
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JEAN C. DUPEROUX.
Petitioner,
and
LINDA B DUPEROUX. a/k/a
LINDA B. NELOMS,
Respondent.
TO: LINDA B. DUPEROUX,
a/k/a, LINDA B. NELOMS
Residence Unknown, you shall
serve a copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon: ANTHONY CAR
BONE, P.A 612 N.W 12th
Avenue. Miami. Florida 33136,
and file original with the Clerk of
the Court on or before January 8.
1988, otherwise a default will be
entered.
December 2. 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER. Clerk
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
18158 December 11. 18. tt, 1987;
January 1,1988


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 25, 1987
Business Notes
Israeli, Palestinian Pact With EEC
By YOSSI LEMPKOWITZ
BRUSSELS (JTA) -
Israel and the European
Economic Community, after a
long delay, signed a new trade
frotocol here that will give
sraeli agricultural exports
certain tariff advantages in
the European market.
But Israel had to make im-
portant concessions to win the
agreement, changing the way
produce from the West Bank
and Gaza Strip are marketed
in Europe.
The protocol was signed by
Avi Primor, Israel's am-
bassador to Belgium and the
New Center
Continued from Page 11-B
hardened by danger and to
restore a humane voice to a
land made deaf by the shrill
sounds of religious
fanaticism."
Rabbi Uri Regev. chairman
of the center and legal coor-
dinator of the Israeli Union for
Progressive Judaism, cited a
recent poll by the Pori
research institution showing
that 57 percent of Israelis
want the powers of the rab-
binical courts to be narrowed,
while only 27 percent would
like them to retain their pre-
sent authority.
The poll also showed that on-
ly 21 percent of Israelis are
aware that judges of Israeli
rabbinical courts are not
sworn to uphold the country's
laws. While these dayanim
take an oath of allegiance to
the State of Israel, the words
"and its laws" are omitted
from the oath, he said.
Bar Against Weddings
by Reform Rabbis
to be Challenged
On the agenda of the Israel
Religion Action Center is the
right of Reform rabbis to per-
form and register marriages,
Regev said. The present
statute specifies that a rabbi
Public Notice
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Flic Nuiber 87-7068
Division 03
Flm. Bar No. 068319
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SHIRLEY COHEN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of SHIRLEY COHEN, deceased.
File Number 87-7068, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
drew of which is 73 West Flakier
Street, Miami, FL 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) ail claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 26. 1967.
Personal Representative:
MR. SAUL COHEN
18041 Biacayne Blvd., No. 1606
No. Miami Beach. FL 33160
MRS. FERNE BERGER
4467 WoodfieJd Blvd
Boca Raton. FL 334S4
PERSONAL REP.
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
NELSON A FELDMAN. PA.
1136 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands. FL 39164
Telephone 866-6716
18197 December 26. 1987,
January 1.1988
conduct Jewish marriage ser-
vices according to Jewish law.
"Our Reform rabbis are
qualified to do so, but the Or-
thodox establishment will not
permit it," he said. "We are
challenging this prohibition in
the courts, and we are also
seeking to force Interior
Ministry recognition of
Reform conversions carried
out in Israel as well as in the
United States."
It was the Reform move-
ment that won the Shoshana
Miller case, in which the In-
terior Ministry, headed by
ultra-Orthodox Rabbi Yitzhak
Peretz, was ordered to
register Shoshana Miller, an
immigrant to Israel who had
been converted by a Reform
rabbi in Colorado, as a Jew.
Rabbi Alfred Gottschalk,
president of the Hebrew Union
College, told the ceremony
that in Israel "Judaism has
been fossilized by dogma and
mindless ritual." The function
of the Religious Action Center,
he said, would be "to restore
the central prophetic spirit
that has animated Judaism
over the centuries but that has
been absent in the Jewish state
because of the domination of
the Orthodox rabbinate."
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-33370 CA-17
NOTICE OF ACTION
WEYERHAEUSER
MORTGAGE
COMPANY,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOSE A. SARDON, et. at,
Defendants.
TO: JOSE A. SARDON
4606 S.W. 139th Court
Miami. Florida 33175
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
CONDOMINIUM UNIT
NUMBER 812, OF BENT
TREE PARCEL SIX, CON-
DOMINIUM NUMBER
EIGHT, ACCORDING TO
THE DECLARATION OF
CONDOMINIUM
THEREOF, AS RECORD-
ED IN OFFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 10721 AT
PAGE 1656. OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
DADE COUNTY
FLORIDA,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy ot
your written defenses, if any. to it.
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida. 33146 on or before
January 29. 1988 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 22 day of
December. 1967.
RICHAD P. BRINKER
As Clark of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
A Deputy Clerk
18196 December 25, 1987;
January 1.8,15.1988
EEC, and by the permanent
representatives of the 12 EEC
member states. It must be
ratified by the Parliament of
Europe in Strasbourg, a for-
mality not expected to take
place before tne end of the
year.
The agreement affects main-
ly Israeli fruits, vegetables and
fresh-cut flowers, which are
popular on the continent dur-
ing the winter season. It
revises the original 1975 EEC-
Israel trade accord in con-
sideration of the entry of
Spain and Portugal into the
European Common Market in
1986. Spain, in particular,
competes with Israel in
agricultural exports, notably
citrus fruits.
Although the protocol was
initialed last year, final agree-
ment was held up because Bri-
tain and Greece unofficially
linked their approval to the
separate issue of Palestinian
agricultural exports to the
EEC.
For a time, this threatened a
breach between Israel and its
European trading partners.
Claude Cheysson, the EEC
commissioner in charge of
Mediterranean policy, in fact
warned Israel several times
that a crisis would occur if it
refused to allow direct Palesti-
nian exports to Europe.
Israel, which protested what
it saw as an unfair linkage bet-
ween the Palestinian issue and
trade, insisted that all Palesti-
nian exports from the ter-
ritories it administers be chan-
neled through the Israel state
marketing companies, Agrex-
co and the Citrus Marketing
Board.
In the end, however, Israel
backed down. The new trade
protocol provides that farmers
in the West Bank and Gaza
Strip would have the option to
export their produce to Euro-
pean customers directly. Israel
also agreed that those exports
would be labeled according to
the place of origin instead of
under the Israeli "Carmel"
brand name.
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-28079
SEC. 22
NATIONAL MORTGAGE COM-
PANY, a Teanessee corporatioa,
PlaintiffU)
vs.
EDWARD WILLIAM EASLEY.
JR.. et at,
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above. I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami. Dade County.
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M.. on
ihe Uth day of January, 1988.
ths following described
property:
Lot 21. of DOUGLAS CIRCLE,
according to the Plat thereof,
recorded in Plat Book 7 at Page
69, of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
DATED the 22nd day of
December. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clark of Circuit Court
(Circuit Coart Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney far PJaiatiff
Roooenthal ft Yarehin. PA.
3060 Biscayne Boulevard.
Suite 800
Miami, Florida 33137
Publiaaos 12/26 1/1
Paul Stein, of Kendall, has
been named associate vice
president/Investments of
Prudential-Bache Securities,
Dadeland office.
Stein, who joined the firm in
1983 as an account executive,
was previously sales manager
of Hydrocarbon Research Inc.,
a designer and licensor of oil
refinery and petrochemical
processes worldwide.
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 46
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-17869
SEC. M
STOCKTON. WHATLEY,
DAVIN COMPANY. A Florida
corporation.
Plaintiff! si
vs.
SANDRA D. PALMER, et at,
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above. I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami. Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the Uth day of January. 1988.
the following described
property:
Lot 18, in Block 4. of NORWOOD
HEIGHTS, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
65. at Page 145. of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida.
DATED the 22nd day of
December. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Cireait Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarehin
3050 Biscayne Boulevard
Suite 800
Miami, Florida 33137
Published 12/25 1/1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-50294 CA-15
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERAN'S AFFAIRS,
Plaintiff
vs.
LEONARD LOSITO II, et ux.. et
at,
Defendants.
TO: LEONARD LOSITO III and
FRANCES MARIE
LOSITO. his wife
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
LEONARD LOSITO II and
FRANCES MARIE LOSITO.
his wife, and all parties
having or claiming to have
any right, title or interest in
the property herein
described.
You are hereby notified that ar
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 9, Block 11, FIRST AD-
DITION TO ANDOVER. ac-
cording to the plat thereof,
recorded in Plat Book 72 at
Page 36 of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuat H GitiiU. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida. 33146 on or before
January 29. 1988, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 22 day ol
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clark of ths Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clark
18194 December 26, 1987;
January 1,8. 15. 1988
Two of South Florida's well-
known independent accoun-
ting firms S.H. Dohan and
Company and Simon and
Simon have combined their
firms under the name
'' Dohan/Simon/Friedman.''
Principals in the emerging
firm are Steven Dohan, Ronald
Friedman and David Simon.
with Harold Simon joining the
firm in a management
capacity.
The principals combined
their operations as of Dec. 1
and are headquartered at 7700
North Kendall Dr., penthouse.
I
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nastier 87-7259
Division 01
FLORIDA BAR No. 027343
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANNA RUBIN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ANNA RUBIN, deceased. File
Number 87-7259, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested jiersons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 25, 1987.
Personal Representative:
EDWARD RUBIN
401 Ocean Drive
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
SELMA NISSMAN
130 N.W. 163rd Street
North Miami Beach. Florida 33169
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HYMAN P GALBUT. ESQUIRE
GALBLT. GALBUT ft MENIN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
181% December 25, 1987:
January 1, 198W
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 46
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-39145
SEC 26
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR
TGAGE ASSOCIATION.
Plaintiffls)
vs.
NEIL M. GONZALEZ. JR.. an
unmarried person, et si .
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above. I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami. Dade County, Florida at
11.00 o'clock A.M.. on the 11th day
of January. 1988. the following
described property:
Unit 114 of PRINCE CON-
DOMINIUM I. a condominium ac
cording to the Declaration of Con-
dominium filed in Official Records
Book 11388 Page 23. of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida
together with an undivided in
terest in the common elements ap-
purtenant thereto as set forth in
the Declaration of Condominium.
DATED the 22nd day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
William P. MeCaughan
Suite 2803 World Trade Center
80 S.W. Eight Street
Miami. Florida, 33130
11/26 1/1
1'


ML Sinai and Diagnostics:
Doctoring The Competition-
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jtwitk Floridian Staff Writer
WHEN A $2 million
diagnostic imaging center
opened up about five minutes
down the road from Mt. Sinai
Medical Center on Aug. 31, a
competitive situation was
created because both facilities
provide some of the same
services.
The new center, which oc-
cupies the entire third floor of
the new Sheridan Center on
Arthur Godfrey Road, and the
hospital, share services such as
CAT scanning, ultrasound,
mammography, stress testing
and nuclear medical studies.
It cannot be argued that one
center has better doctors than
the other; many are the same.
"All of the radiologists at
Bennett: 'Mt. Sinai
for so very long has
been a close-knit
community and while
similar situations
have occurred
elsewhere, it just
never occurred on
Miami Beach. The
Sinai family is sort
of close.'
Some members of Mt.
Sinai's Board of Trustees said
they would have preferred not
to see Mt. Sinai s own physi-
cians enter into a situation
Mt. Sinai Medical Center
Diagnostics of Miami Beach
Mt. Sinai belong to one group
and this is the same group that
does radiology here," said Dr.
Warren Janowitz, a physician
in the Department of
Radiology at Mt. Sinai and one
)f five general partners of the
new center, Diagnostics of
Miami Beach.
Two of the other general
partners work full-time at Mt.
Sinai and the other two have
private practices but are af-
filiated with Mt. Sinai. One of
the general partners, Dr.
Manuel Viamonte, Jr., has
heen the director of the
Department of Radiology at
Mt. Sinai since 1968.
CAT Scanner and Monitoring station
that hospital officials estimate
may cost its own radiology
department revenues to
decrease by eight percent or
several hundred thousand
dollars in the 1988 budget.
"I don't feel that you can
serve two masters, but I'm not
in the position of the physician
who is losing revenue," said
trustee Rosalie Pincus.
"MORALLY and ethically,
if you're working for a hospital
full-time you shouldn't do this
kind of thing," said Edward
Shapiro, former president and
chairman of the board. "If
you're not making enough
money at the hospital then quit
the hospital and go elsewhere
don t compete with the
hospital."
Yet the doctors involved
with the new diagnostic center
are the first to say they have
had a long and loyal relation-
But if competition
must be, many
involved agree that it
might as well be
friendly.
ship with Mt. Sinai and that it
wasn't their idea to begin the
new center.
"Two years ago, a group
that had a center in Hollywood
and a group that already ex-
isted in radiology outpatient
on Miami Beach wanted to ex-
pand to the type of outpatient
center that we formed," said
Dr. Stuart Gottlieb, one of
Diagnostic's general partners.
"The affiliations of the doc-
tors who wanted to form these
centers primarily were all
from elsewhere than Miami
Beach. They could redirect a
patient from Mt. Sinai or a
beach hospital to North Dade
or South Broward. With that
in mind, we set out to basically
counteract what was going to
be anyway."
Said general partner Dr.
Noel Zusmer: "We're
radiologists and we rely on
private outpatients coming to
be tested. Imagine another
group coming to Miami Beach
and opening a diagnostic
center rather than go to Mt.
Sinai. We felt if we opened our
own diagnostic center at least
the patients would come to us
Shapiro: 'This is
nothing the board
wanted, nothing the
board approved but
the board had no
choice in the matter
and could not stop it.'
and would probably be refer-
red to Mt. Sinai."
Board member Pincus con-
cedes: "I guess it's a sign of
the times more than
anything."
THAT IS why Mt. Sinai
President and Chief Executive
Officer Fred Hirt said he can
understand the physicians'
move.
"My feeling is there are very
fine physicians who are involv-
ed, a number of whom are Mt.
Sinai physicians. Some of the
services that are done now at
Mt. Sinai may be performed
away from the hospital. That
will have an adverse effect.
But that does not preclude the
Continued on Page 5-B
Taking Risks With
Style and Substance
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff WnUr
IN HER LIFE and in the
jewelry she designs, Joan
Boyce, the former Joanie Ap-
plebaum of Miami Beach, has
always believed in taking
chances. In her personal life.
Boyce has taken chances by
traveling the world alone, and
hy marrying outside of her
religion and race.
In her business life, Boyce
has taken chances by design-
ing jewelry never intended for
the neck of a debutante; thick-
ly braided ropes of gold, heavy
ornaments set with colored
stones or old Roman coins,
earrings and rings as substan-
tial as small dinosaur eggs
these are what Boyce's crea-
tions are made of.
"I have a definite taste; bold,
big, very European, very con-
temporary, very daytime,"
says Boyce of her designs. "I
don't make fancy diamond
evening necklaces. I don't
make safe jewelry," in both
senses of the word: "It doesn't
sit in a safe, and you don't hide
Our
Community
Friday, December 25,1987 The Jewish Floridian Section B
behind a pair of diamond
studs," which Boyce refers to
contemptuously as "pimples."
"My customers rely on me
for what is new, modern, in
fashion I make jewelry so
you make a statement without
wearing ten rings you just
have one or two important
pieces," Boyce explains.
Boyce's fashion statements
do not come cheaply; you could
probably travel to China with a
friend, buy a new car, or put
your child through a year of
college for the price of her
accessories.
Boyce, however, will not
discuss the cost of her designs.
"It's like being in a doctor's
office. I respect privacy if
someone comes in with her
best friend, I wouldn't serve
them together. I wouldn't tell
one what the other bought, or
how much she spent."
Boyce admits that her policy
Continued on Page 4-B
?..

"I don't make safe jewelry it doesn't sit in a safe, and you
don't hide behind a pair of diamond studs," says jewelry designer
Joan Boyce, the former Joanie Applebaum of Miami Beach.


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 25. 1987
Operation Moses-Modern Exodus
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) On
new year's day 1985, Ruth
Gruber stood on an empty tar-
mac in Ben-Gurion Airport
near Tel Aviv and watched the
secret landing of an airplane.
The rescue of Ethiopian
.lews was under way, and
Gruber, a veteran New York
author and journalist who
covered every rescue opera-
tion since Israel was bom, was
at it again. She was the only
foreign correspondent allowed
to witness "Operation Moses."
"Rescue operations have
been my life theme," explained
Gruber, author of the just-
published "Rescue: The Ex-
odus of the Ethiopian Jews"
(Atheneum, 234 pp. $19.95), in
an interview here. "I covered
every exodus into Israel,
beginning with the illegal im-
migration Aliya Bet
through the Yemenite, Iraqi,
Rumanian and other rescue
operations."
Her involvement in the
Ethiopian exodus began in the
winter of 1984 when, because
of her experience, United
Jewish Appeal asked her to
lecture to informal, private
gathering about Operation
Moses. She soon decided to go
to Israel to witness the historic
airlift.
"I have been in Israel more
than 36 times. I have many
friends there, including
Menachem Begin, Shimon
Peres and Yitzhak Shamir,
and I asked upon my arrival to
witness the arrival of the
Ethiopians. The whole subject
was still a big secret and I was
refused," she recalled.
The decision was overturned
"only after the personal in-
tervention of the then-Prime
Minister Peres, who convinced
the Mossad that I can be
trusted," she said.
She was in her hotel room in
Jerusalem when she received a
late-night call from the
Mossad, instructing her to be
"on the steps of the Jewish
Agency building in Tel Aviv"
at 1 p.m. the next day.
Her voice full with excite-
ment, Gruber recalled that
new year's day. "I was taken
to a cordoned-off area of Ben-
Gurion Airport, surrounded by
12 silent Mossad men. Then, at
12 o'clock, a huge 707 Boeing
flew over us, and then it land-
ed," she said.
"The first one to step down
from the plane was a young
mother with a boy. The famine
was etched on her face and her
baby's thighs were no thicker
than a crayon. The baby had
(intravenous) needles in its
skull. When I asked the doctor
on the flight for the reason the
needles were in the skull, he
replied, 'It is the only place in
the baby's body a vein could be
found.' "
Gruber said that as the
Ethiopian Jews stepped down
from the plane one after
another men, women and
children she realized that
she was witnessing "the last
Biblical exodus of our time."
Asked about the uniqueness
of the Ethiopian airlift, Gruber
asserted that the rescue of the
black Jews of Ethiopia proved
that Israel "is color-blind."
She noted that the Ethiopian
Jews were culturally "out of
Ruth Gruber
the mainstream of Judaism."
Nevertheless, she pointed out,
her many visits to the absorp-
tion centers where Israel's
15,000 Ethiopians Jews lived
temporarily revealed that
most of them were doing fine.
She said she was most im-
pressed with how the children
adapted to a culture centuries
ahead in technology of what
they had known. "They are
among the brightest and most
talented in any class they at-
tend," Gruber said, noting
that almost all children speak
Hebrew and many of them
work on computers.
However, she said that older
Ethiopians, especially those
between the ages of 25-35,
have a harder time, and suffer
tremendously because of the
separation from family
members who were left behind
in Ethiopia.
According to Gruber, many
of the older Ethiopian emigres
suffer from a "survival guilt
feeling resembling that of sur-
vivors who lost their dear ones
during the Holocaust.
Gruber, the author of 12
other books, including the
bestsellers "Haven" and "Ra-
quela," visited Ethiopia twice
in preparation for her present
book. She traveled to the
remote region of Gondar,
where she visited Jews in five
villages.
She contended that the re-
maining Ethiopian Jews are
longing to be reunited with
their families in Israel.
Asked about the possible im-
pact of the predicted famine on
the Ethiopian Jews, who are
said to number about 15,000,
Gruber said: If the famine
reaches them they will be
devastated. They will be the
first to feel the hardship
because they are surrounded
by a hostile population of
peasants who believe that they
are evil creatures who suck the
blood of Christian and Moslem
children."
Gruber said that the United
States government can help
rescue the remaining Jewish
community in Ethiopia. "They
need our food now with the
famine at their door. The U.S.
can say (to the Ethiopian
government), 'we can supply
you with food, but you must let
the Jews go.' "
Doctoring Competition
Continued from Page 5-B
"Nationwide, probably 50
percent of these centers that
opened up lost money, so it's
not a guarantee of profits," he
said.
FROM A business stand-
point, Zusmer said the
diagnostic center enjoys the
benefit of being "doctor-run,
doctor-owned."
As Zusmer took a visitor on
a tour through the comfortable
and new 8,700-square-foot
facility, he pointed out the
amenities such as private pa-
tient dressing rooms, that are
part of the partners primary
concern of being a "patient-
oriented facility.
While a traditional breast
center, for example, has a
nurse show a patient how to
conduct a breast examination,
Diagnostics of Miami Beach
has a multi-media approach
that includes a video as well as
a soft-simulated breast model
from which to learn examina-
tion techniques.
As he moved from the mam-
mography room, to the stress
lab and into another room to
check a patient with gall blad-
der complaints, Zusmer noted
how, unlike the hospital, his
center offers clients "a
freestanding place where you
can get everything done."
"It's a people-oriented place
and each specialty has its own
module. Competition breeds
success, as well as better
care," Zusmer said. "If one
facility has faster, easier,
quicker services, then the
other facility says 'We'll do
better things.'
"I devoted 16 years of my
life to Mt. Sinai," added
Zusmer. "I love Mt. Sinai. I
would never do anything to
hurt Mt. Sinai."
At the other end of Arthur
Godfrey Road, at Mt. Sinai,
Hirt said the hospital is indeed
rising to the challenges in
health care today.
"The hospital is evaluating
having a single-center more
designed for outpatients," he
said. "We're trying to become
more consumer friendly.
That's the whole goal of health
care patient care."
Miami Beach dentist. Dr.
Stanley Sutnick, was elected
Miami-Dad* Community Col-
lege's 1987 Outstanding
Volunteer of the Year and
recognized at the M-DCC Foun-
dation annual December
dinner-meeting. Sutnick has
been practicing dentistry m
Miami Beach for J,0 years and
is the founder of the M-DCC
Dental Hygienics Department.
Community Corner
Kultur Lige, or the Jewish Culture League, and Club
"Anatevka" will hold a joint event on Friday, Jan. 8, at
7:30 p.m. In their new clubhouse at 100 Lincoln Road,
with Israeli writer and lecturer Abraham Karpinowith
speaking of his memories of the Polish town of Vilno.
Sendor Weisman, who comes from Vilno, will read from
Karpinowith's books. Coffee and cake will be served,
and the public Is invited.
Temple Ner Tamid Men's Club first breakfast meting
of 1988, will be held on Sunday, Jan. 3 at 9:30 a.m. at
the synagogue. The featured entertainer will be story-
teller and comedian Lou Shor.
Girt Bossak's "Sounds of Yiddish: The Jewish Con-
nectin" class resumes Jan. 12. Sessions take place
every Tuesday, 1:30 to 3 p.m. at the South Dade Jewish
Community Center. Conversational Yiddish is offered
to Beginner and Intermediate students. The class is
currently dissecting Olsvanger's "Royte Pomerantsen"
(Red Oranges) in Yiddish and English. For information,
251-1394.
The Hug Tanach, the intensive Bible study group of
Greater Miami, which began its fourth decade of study
this season will begin its winter session on Tuesday,
Jan. 5, at 9-10:30 a.m., at the Cuban Hebrew Congrega-
tion, Miami Beach. This group meets weekly and con-
ducts its session in Hebrew. For information, 576-4030.
The Young Jewish Singles of Temple Zion Israelite
Center will have an evening of dinner and Israeli danc-
ing on Sunday, Jan. 10 at 7:30 p.m. at the temple. For in-
formation 271-2311.
Jewish Family Service of Greater Miami is forming
an eight-week support group of older adults who want
to improve their personal effectiveness. "From Sad To
Glad" participants will meet at the JFS North Dade of-
fice. For information, 949-6186.
An ongoing Bereavement Support Group is being
sponsored by Jewish Family Service of Greater Miami
every Monday afternoon at the Michael-Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center in North Dade. For informa-
tion, 949-6186
Gila and Haim Wiener will sponsor and the Rabbi
Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Academy will present a
gala cantorial concert on Monday evening, Jan. 18 at
7:30 p.m. in the school's auditorium. Starring in the
evening's program will be cantors Lt. Colonel Arie
Braun, chief cantor of the Israel Defense Forces and
Jeffrey Nadel, cantor of Congregation Beth Sholom of
Washington, D.C. For information, 532-6421.
The Yivo Committee of Greater Miami weekly
Wednesday Yiddish lecture series will begin again Jan.
6 at Temple Beth Sholom at 1 p.m. and continue
through March. The opening lecture features itzlk Korn,
former Knesset member and president of the World
Council of Yiddish and Jewish Culture.
BBYO Teen Connection and the South Dade JCC will
sponsor combination sports night and dance for
seventh and eighth graders, Saturday, Jan. 23, 8 p.m.,
at the S. Dade Jewish Community Center. For informa-
tion, 253-7400.
Biscayne Chapter Women's American ORT will hold
the next meeting on Thursday, Jan. 7 at 1 p.m. In Mor-
ton Towers Auditorium. For Information, 673-3793.
The Temple Beth Moshe winter session, Adult
Education program will start on Jan. 6. Rabbi Israel
Jacobs will conduct a class In elementary Hebrew and
another first class meets Wednesday, Jan. 6 on the
biblical roots and traditions of all ritual ceremonies
from the cradle to the grave, in five successive
seminars. For Information, 891-5508.
The Sisterhod and the Men's Club of Young Israel
Sky Lake and the Jewish National Fund will sponsor a
Sunday brunch Jan. 10 at 10:30 a.m. In the Young Israel
of Sky Lake Auditorium. Claude Kadosh will entertain
and Rabbi Jehuda Melber will be the speaker. For infor-
mation, 945-8712.
Workmen's Circle, Miami Beach Branch 1059, will
meet at noon on Wednesday, Jan. 13 in the Surfside
Community Center. Members Jeanette and Gershon
Miller will entertain us with skits of Jewish humor.
The next regular meeting of the Senior Assembly of
Bet Shira Congregation will be held Tuesday, Dec. 29 at
1:30 p.m. Bill Saulson will discuss "The Unfinished Ex
odus; 'Moses' Left 100,000 Jews Behind" and narrate
video program of scenes of "Operation Moses.' "



Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 25, 1987
Jewish Home
Installs Beck
The business of electing of-
ficers combined with the
festivity of the 42nd Annual
Dinner Dance and board
meeting of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Ag-
ed at Douglas Gardens
(MJHHA) on Dec. 6 at the
Douglas Gardens campus.
After the Nominating Com-
mittee, chaired by Fred
Shochet, presented the slate of
officers, Judge Sidney
Aronowitz installed the Board
of Directors for 1988.
Harold Beck, president of
Dixie Bedding Company, was
installed as president.
Presiding over the Miami
Jewish Home since 1980 and a
Humanitarian Founder, Beck
also serves as vice president of
Founders and chairman of a
number of committees. He is
executive vice president and a
founder of the National
Parkinson Foundation and
serves on the Executive Board
of Beth David Congregation.
Joining Beck in leadership
positions are Chairman of the
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pJewish Floridian
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Board and Honorary Presi-
dent, Judge Irving Cypen;
Past Presidents, Aaron
Kravitz, Albert E. Ossip, Ar-
thur Pearlman, and Leo Rose,
Jr.; Honorary Vice Presidents,
Lilyan Beckerman, Harry
Chernin, Jack Chester, David
B. Fleeman, Leo Gelvan,
Nathan Gumenick, Lila G.
Heatter, Harry Levy, Martin
Margulies, Sam May, Polly
deHirsch Meyer, Charles G.
Reskin, Nathan Rood, Etta
Ruby, Rowland Schaefer, Ed-
ward Shapiro, Mollie Silver-
man, Fay Stein, Louis Stein,
and Harold Toppel.
Also, Vice Presidents, Dr.
John Berger, Stephen H.
Cypen, Ronald Fieldstone,
Solomon Garazi, B.B. Golds-
tein, Arthur P. Mark, and Dr.
Jon Rauch; Treasurer, A. Jef-
frey Barash; Financial
Secretary, Helen G.
Rechtschaffer; Corresponding
Secretary, Melvin H. Baer;
Recording Secretary, Ben B.
Buten; and Associate Recor-
ding Secretary, Gladys Israel.
As a special tribute, Sam and
Reba Layton, 99 and 94 year-
old tenants of the Irving
Cypen Tower, a division of
MJHHA, made a special
presentation of flowers to
chairperson of the annual din-
Installing Officer Judge Sidney Aronovitz,
left, unth MJHHA leadership from left Chair-
man of the Board Irving Cypen, President
Harold Beck and Executive Director Marc
Lichtman.
CAJE Runs Computer Contest
The Central Agency for
Jewish Education, in conjunc-
tion with Valcom Computer
Center, sponsored a contest-
essay entitled "How A Com-
Euter Can Help Me Do Better
n School," during the month
of November, with all students
attending the Judaica High
School Program in Dade and
Broward Counties eligible.
The contest was divided into
two levels with junior high
school grades 7, 8 and 9 com-
peting tor one IBM Computer-
Model 25 with software, and
ner, Helen Rechtschaffer and _.
Nancy and Dr. Jon Rauch. Feillgold tO Head MiTCy FlUld KaiSlllg
Don't Let
Lights Go Out
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation will celebrate its
50th anniversary in 1988,
marking five decades of
growth.
In honor of the federation's
Golden Anniversary and
beginning on Sunday, Jan. 24,
the Federation will hold its an-
nual fundraising volunteer-led
phonathon, Super Sunday
from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. at Tem-
ple Israel, Miami.
On Thursday, Jan. 28, the
federation will hold a Golden
Anniversary celebration at the
Fontainebleau Hilton, Miami
Beach. In addition to cocktails
and dinner, the Golden An-
niversary film that documents
the past 50 years of the federa-
tion and the community will be
shown. Also, Peter, Paul and
Mary will perform in concert,
singing "Light One Candle,"
from which the federation
derived its 1988 campaign
theme, "Don't let the Light Go
Out."
Laurence Feingold, name
partner in the Miami Beach
law firm of Fuller, Feingold
and Mallah and formerly an
executive with Israel Zim
Lines, has been elected presi-
dent for 1988 of Ambassadors
of Mercy, fund-raising arm of
Miami's Mercy Hospital.
Feingold's election was an-
nounced by Ralph Di Santo,
executive vice president of
Mercy Hospital Foundation,
Inc. Ambassadors of Mercy is
a prestigious group of
business, professional and
civic leaders whose mission is
to generate continuous major
gift support to perpetuate
Mercy Hospital's role as a
significant health care pro-
vider in Dade County.
Feingold moved up from the
position of president-elect and
first vice president. He served
as co-chairman of the Celebrity
Laurence Feingold
Roast of Circuit Court Judge
John Gale this year, which
raised funds to establish the
Judge Gale Oncology Center at
Mercy Hospital.
senior high school students
grades 10, 11 and 12 com-
peting for another computer of
the same model.
The two winners were: in the
junior high group, Steven
Cook, 9th grader from Temple
Sinai of North Dade, and in the
senior high group, Andrew
Left, 12th grader from Temple
Beth Am of Fort Lauderdale.
Top three finalists and
honorable mentions in each
grade level category included:
Adam Katz (Temple Israel),
Dayna Baldwin (Beth Torah
Congregation), Jason Feingolf
(Temple Samu-El/Or Olom),
Daniella Grossman (Temple
Beth Am), and Allison Bloom
(Temple Judea-lst Runner
Up), all in the junior high
group.
Eddie Gorfinkel (Temple
Beth Shmuel), Kenneth Block
(Temple Emanu-El), Seth
Mandelbaum (Adath
Yeshurun), and Eyran Kraus
(Temple Beth Torah-1st Run-
ner Up) were the finalists and
runner-up in the senior high
category.
PORTUGAL TOWERS
2 bedroom, 2 bath. 1-5
floors facing north &
south 531-3233.
Na'amat
USA
OCEANSIDE PLAZA
1 bedroom/2 bedroom low floor.
Malaon Qrande 1 bedroom/2
bedroom, low floor S31 3233
North Bay Village Mayor
Dr. Paul Vogel and his wife,
Marietta, will speak about
their recent trip to the State of
Israel at the Tuesday, Dec. 29,
7:30 p.m. meeting of the Sheva
of Na'amat USA. The event
will take place in the recrea-
tion room of the Treasure
House, South Building, North
Bay Village.
TOWER 41
1 bedroom convertible, 2
baths. 2 bedroom, 2 baths
call 531-3233.
MIMOSA
2 bedroom, 2 bath.
Furnished $125,000. 531-
3233.
Gulden Glades 148 NW 167th St
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For Reservations Call MS-1441 ext. 106


.
Kosher 'Chefery'
Course Feeds Need
Friday, December 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
By BEN GALLOB
A job-training program of
the Agudath Israel of
America, the Orthodox
organization, has taught about
20 unemployed people to sus-
tain Jewish simchas by cook-
ing kosher food in quantity.
Rabbi Yerachmiel Banish,
director of Aguda's Project
COPE institute, Brooklyn,
N.Y., told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that there
is a shortage of trained kosher
chefs. Yet, he noted, the in-
stitute's Kosher Chefery
Course is unique.
The 20-week class that
began this fall is the fourth.
The third course was offered
four years ago, according to
Coalition, the Aguda newslet-
ter. Frequently of course of-
ferings and number of men in
each course are determined by
federal funding.
Barash told the JTA that the
current course has 10 men, all
of whom happen to be tradi-
tional Jews, aged 18-28. Since
the course is federally funded,
it is open to any qualified
person.
The first three courses
graduated about 20 men,
Barash said, "the vast majori-
ty" of whom went from the
30-hour-a-week course to well-
paying jobs at kosher catering
firms.
He stresssed that the course
is not a simple cooking exer-
cise for would-be gourmets. It
was organized to prepare men
for careers in professional
cookery in hotels,
restaurants, institutions,
catering halls and even
airlines.
The rabbi noted that it was
difficult to prepare kosher
food that is interesting, attrac-
tive to the senses and healthful
all for hundreds of people.
He said that is why the course
includes instruction in
preparation of 165 "traditional
dishers" well-known to Jewish
diners.
The course deals with all
aspects of meat and poultry
preparation: the different
cuts, carving and dressing
them and, of course, the
kashering procedure. One
special session focuses on that
standard fare in traditional
kosher cuisine, Chinese dishes,
according to Coalition.
There also are sessions on
gefilte fish, asparagus hollan-
daise, stuffed turkey, baked
whitefish Creole, puff pastry
dough, matzoh balls and
tongue polonaise.
The class on carrots, a major
ingredient in kosher dishes, in-
cludes discussions on types,
cost comparisons, peeling,
trimming, slicing and prepara-
tion of Belgian and Vichy car-
rot dishes.
Twenty percent of class time
is spent in lectures, with the
rest in the kitchen, under close
supervision. Barash said the
students must prepare food ac-
cording to specific guidelines,
which empahsize both kashrut
and quality control.
He told the JTA that Project
COPE has received many re-
quests from women to have a
kosher 'chefery' course
organized for them. The pro-
blem, he said, is that most
women cannot attend full-
time, since they usually have
families and home duties. He
added that part-time classes
would present difficult
organizational problems.
Talking Books at Beach Library
"Jewish Life Under Soviet
Rule" will be the subject of the
lecture of the Moadon Ivri-
Hebrew Cultural Forum tak-
ing place on Tuesday, Jan. 5,
at 2 p.m., at the Miami Beach
Public Library. Guest speaker
will be Rabbi Dr. Herbert
Bomzer.
"A Coat of Many Colors:
Pages From Jewish Life," by
columnist Israel Shenker will
be the book reviewed in the
meeting of the Great Jewish
Books Discusson Group taking
place on Thursday, Jan. 7, at
1:30 p.m., at the Miami Beach
Public Library. Reviewer will
be Malvina Liebman.
The Biblical figure of
"Rebecca" will be the subject
in the lecture of the "Spiritual
Giants of the Past" series, tak-
ing place on Wednesday, Jan.
6, at 10:30 a.m., at the Miami
Beach Public Library, spon-
sored by the Central Agency
for Jewish Education.
Rebecca Korf will utilize the
midrashic literature of the
sages to focus on the unique
spiritual qualities of Rebecca.
Synopsis of The Weekly Torah Portion
. ."And they took their cattle, and their goods, which they had
gotten in the land of Canaan, and came into Egypt, Jacob, and all
his seed with him"
(Genesis U6.6).
VAYIGASH
VAYIGASH Judah approached Joseph and offered himself as
a servant in Benjamin's stead, as he was responsible for the
youngest son to their father. Unable to contain himself any
longer, Joseph revealed himself to his dumb-struck brothers. He
bade them return to Canaan, gather together their families and
possessions, and return to Egypt for the duration of the famine.
At Beersheba God removed Jacob's doubts as to the wisdom of
this course of action; He appeared to Jacob with the words: "Fear
not to go down into Egypt; for I will there make of thee a great
nation" (Genesis 1,6.3). Jacob came to Egypt "with seventy
souls." Joseph gave them the land of Goshen to settle in. There
they flourished and multiplied.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion o( the Law Is extracted end based
upon "The Graphic History ot the Jewish Heritage, edited by P Woliman
Tsamlr, $15, published by Shengold The volume Is available at 75 Maiden
Lane, New York, NY 10038 Joseph Schlang is president ot the society
distributing the volume)
Bar/Bat
Mitzvah
MATTHEW SPIEGELMAN
At Sabbath Services on
Saturday, Dec. 26 Matthew
Spiegelman, son of Linda
Nevel and Philip J.
Spiegelman will be called to
the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah at
Temple Beth Sholom. He will
also stand for his Soviet twin,
the son of refusenik Boris
Beilm, who is unable to
celebrate a Bar Mitzvah in
Moscow.
Rabbis Gary A. Click stein
and Jason Gwasdoff will
officiate.
MARA HORNSTEIN
Mara Jill Hornstein, daugher
of Dr. and Mrs. Neil L. Horns-
tein, will be called to the Torah
of Temple Beth Emet in Pem-
broke Pines as a Bat Mitzvah
on Saturday, Dec. 26. Sharing
in the ceeremony and celebra-
tion will be grandparents,
Milton and Pearl Hornstein,
and Sanford and Helen Elfen-
bein; great-grandmother,
Regina Schechter; sister,
Lauren Hornstein; cousins,
Paul and Sema Tatelbaum,
and Mildred and Bill Wittan.
Out-of-town guests will include
Mary Schaefer of Richmond,
Va. Following Sabbath ser-
vices a luncheon will be held at
the Sheraton Design Center in
Dania.
Gerald D. Hubbart
Hubbart to Run
for Judiciary
Gerald D. Hubbart, assistant
Dade State Attorney, has an-
nounced his candidacy for
Dade County court judge, sub-
ject to the 1988 elections. Hub-
bart seeks to replace Judge
Alfred Nesbitt, who will retire
at the end of his current term.
Hubbart, 45, is a bronze star-
combat veteran of the Vietnam
War. From 1972 until 1979, he
was assistant Dade public
defender. After serving in
private law practice for five
years, he joined the staff of
Dade State Attorney Janet
Reno in 1984. Hubbart is a
member of the Rules of Pro-
cedure Committee of the
Florida Bar Criminal Law
Section.
Business Notes
Newman Insurance Agency
is opening a subsidiary, to be
called Newman-Sapoznik In-
surance Agency, to better ser-
vice their clients in the area of
Life, Health, Group and
Pensions.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
5:17 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach. Fla. 531 -2120
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor. Zvl Rozen Conservative
Executive Director ,,-.,
Harry J.SIIverman ("St)
Dally minyan 7:30a.m. and 5 p.m.
Sal. Service 1:30 a.m. and 4 45 p.m.
Frt. 8pm Aieph Consecration
Sal. 8 30 a.m. Bar Mltnah Joahua Qreenberg.
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 667-6667
Leonard Schoolman, Sr. Rabbi
Mark Kram, Associate Rabbi
Lynn Goldstein. Assistant Rabbi
Frl. i:IS p.m. Rabbi Mark Kram
"A Choica For Our TlmoaT
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854-3911
Jack Riemer. Rabbi
Robert Albert, /afit\
Cantor \W))
Rev. Milton Freeman. "J*'-/
Ritual Director
Dally lamcat. Mon and Thura. 7:30a.m.
Turn.. Wad. and Frt. 7:45 a.m.
Sun. 8 a.m. Evaninga 5:30 p.m.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF SUNNY ISLES
17274ColllnsAvenue
Miami Beach Fl. 33160 947 1198
Hlllel Price. President
Rubin R. Dobln. Rabbi
Sal Serylce a 45 a m
Rabbi Dobln will spear.
Holidays Mats ills Meaningful
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St.. N. Miami. FL 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs. Rabbi
Dr. Joseph A Gorlinkel.
Rabbi Emeritus
Moshe Friedler. Cantor
Fn
m
8pm
Sal a 45 a.m.
Wsokday ssrv. Mon. Frt. S am
Mon Thuis 5 p.m. Sun. ( 30 a m
Sal 8 45 a en
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave., M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 5394112
Rabbi Aivadia Rosenberg
Cantor Moshe Buryn
Daily aarvtcas 8 a-m 4 7 p.m.
Sat 815 a.m.
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W 120th Street
238-2601 i
Rabbi David H. Auerbach \
Cantor Stephen Freedman
Frt. 8 p.m Creetlve Service
Sal 8 30 am San Aulrul Bill Shoik and Lisa
QotdsMIn Baby naming daughter
Shelley and Mars QIniburg
TEMPLE BETrUMftLOM 538-7231
Cnase Ave & 41 St St. imn
DR LEON KRONISH Senior Founding Rabbi
GARY A QIICKSTEIN. Senior Rabbi
MARRY JOLT, Auxiliary Rebfx
JASON OWASDOFF Assistant Rabbi
IAN ALPERN. Cantor
DAVID CONVISER. Cantor Emeritus
Frt 8:15 Rabbi Gwiidoff 'Stealings
Sal 1045 am Bai Mltnah Matthew Spiegelman
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd ^~~.
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz. Rabbi '5p)
Zvee Aroni. Cantor V-S
Harvey L. Brown. Exec Director
Dally aarvices Monday through Friday
1 30 a m end S.30p m
Frt 8pm
Mmcha 5pm Sun Sam and 5 30 p m
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Bath Shmual
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami Beach
534-7213 534-7214 _.
Barry J. Konovitch. Rabbi / JBKV
Sergio Grobler, President \W>
Sholem Epelbaum. President.
Religious Committee
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue /
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Assistant Rabbi Ronnie Cahan
Yehuda Shif man. Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
Kabbelet Shabbel 5pm.
Late Frl. Sara. 8 p.m. Rabbi Ronnie Cahana
will preach Cantor Shllman will chant
Sat. ierv t am
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetree Drive. Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schilf
Dairy 7:30 a.m. (Mon. 4 Thurs. 7:15) 4 7 p m
Frt. 7 p. m. Sat. S a.m.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
M/em/S Pioneer deform Congregation
137 N.E. 19th St. Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Rabbi Rax D. Perimeter
Cantor: Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob G. Bomstein
Frt. 8 p.m. Rabbi Theodore M Gordon
"A December Dilemma
Liturgy will bo conducted by
Cantor Rachelle F. Nekton.
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667 5657
Michael B. Eisenstat. Rabbi
Fn early service 4 30pm
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rosa
Shoshanah Raab, Cantor
Serrtcoo Frt. 7:30 p.m
Set. 0:30 a.m.
Oneg Shabbat will toHow
TEMPLE MENORAH
62075th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz .
Ari Frktkis, Assoc Rabbi (
Cantor Murray Ya vneh
Sat. am Sabbath eervtce
Dally Mincnah Sunday Fodey
S a.m. and 8pm
Sat Ham and515pm
TEMPLE NER TAMID 860-8345
7902 Carlyle Ave., 8609833
Miami Beach 33141 comeraetive
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Cantor Edward Klein
Dally Sera Mon..Frt. 8am- 6:30p.m '-J
Sal Mlnche 8:15 pm Sun. 8 30 a.m.
8.30 p.m. Sat.: 8 45 am sera, by Rabbi Lebovtu.
Cantor Klein
J
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung
SHAARE TEFILLAH
TORAH CENTER OF KENDALL
7890 SW 112 Street
232-6833
Rabbi Hershel Becker
s*jeaeA
Dally Sera 7 am Frl. 10 mm alter i
lighting time Shebboa 9 am Shabbos
Mlncha 10 mln bolore candle lighting time
Sun 8 30am
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave
North Dade's Ratonn Congregation
Ralph P Kingsley. Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administrator
Frl Sara Rabbi Ralph P Kingsley
topic Hark The Angels Sing "
Sat Sara 10:30 a.m.
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
2712311 .=..
Dr Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi at)
Benjamin Adler. Cantor N-3
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Minyan 7 am Mondays and Thursdays
Sunday0am Fn 8 15p.m
honoring College students
Sat. Sera 9am Rabbi Shapiro and
Cantor Adler olliciating


Hadassah and JNF Give A Dam
Friday, December 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
A massive earthen dam
designed to capture Israel's
meager and elusive annual
rainfall for new agricultural
expansion in the Negev desert
has been formally dedicated by
the project's joint sponsors,
Hadassah, the Women's
Zionist Organization of
America, and the Jewish Na-
tional Fund.
Hadassah President Ruth
W. Popkin and JNF World
Chairman Moshe Rivlin joined
Hadassah National JNF Chair-
man Beatrice I. Feldman for
the dedication ceremonies at
the dam's site south of Beer-
sheva in Israel's northern
Negev. A similar dam has been
constructed by Hadassah and
JNF near Paran, a moshav
(cooperatively-owned settle-
ment) between the Dead Sea
and Eilat in the Arava region
on Israel's border with Jordan.
"This project affirms
Hadassah's commitment to
Great Chefs Series
Comes To Beach
The Miami Beach Chapter of
the Confrerie de la Chaine Des
Rotisseurs in cooperation with
the Fontainebleau Hotel,
British Airways and
Norwegian, Caribbean Lines
will inaugurate a "World Chef
Series" on Miami Beach.
The series will feature An-
dre' Daguin of Auch, France,
Jan. 14-16, and Gerard Boyer
of Reims, France for March
10-12.
Both the Chaine Des
Rotisseurs culinary and the
general public will have two
nights to enjoy the same menu.
All dinners will take place at
the "Dining Galleries'' of the
Fontainebleau Hilton and the
general public is invited for the
Friday and Saturday evennigs.
The Thursday Evening Dinner
will be Black Tie for members
of the Chaine.
Amit Women
Simcha Chapter will meet
on Monday, Dec. 28 at noon in
the 300 building of Winston
Towers, Sunny Isles. Lunch
will be served and an enter-
taining program has been
arranged.
Florida Council Child's Tag
Dav has begun. Amit Women
will be soliciting in various
areas throughout Dade,
Broward and Palm Beach
Countries with the orange
Amit pushka. Contributions
will go towards maintaining
the 23 Amit projects in Israel
that house and educate more
than 18,000 orphaned and
needy children.
Miami Beach Mayor Alex Daoud, left, presents Israel Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin with a city medal during a reception
prior to the State of Israel Bonds' Third Annual National
Remembrance Tribute Dinner, Sunday. Looking on is Miami
Beach Comm. and Vice Mayor Abe Resnick, who served as chair-
man of the Florida Host Committee of the dinner.
Henrietta Szold's concept of
'practical' Zionism," Feldman
said at the ceremonies in a
reference to scholar, educator
and Zionist pioneer Henrietta
Szold who founded Hadassah
75 years ago. "Where the
economic growth and security
of the people of Israel is con-
cerned, Hadassah gives a
'dam' in fact, Hadassah
gives two 'dams.' "
JNF engineers moved
170,000 cubic yards of sandy
soil to create the pyramid-
shaped dam which is 400 feet
wide at its base, 55 feet high
and fills a portion of a narrow
ravine 190 feet in length. The
Hadassah-Eshet Stow Dam
as it is formally known will
capture 112,500 gallons of
water from Israel's winter
storms to replenish the area's
natural underground
acquifers.
Israel's average annual rain-
fall is about two inches, and in
the past, storm waters from
flash floods have ripped
through hills and gullies of the
sparse, barren landscape on
their way to the Mediterra-
nean Sea. The new dam will
hold back these flood waters
until they can be absorbed by
the desert sands to increase
the year-round supply of water
for irrigation of crops and
grazing lands for cattle. Three
recently-established
agricultural settlements in the
region will rely on the new
water supply which can be tap-
ped by wells of 75 feet or less.
The new dam in the Arava
spans a narrow valley with
112,000 cubic yards of sand in
a retaining wall 200 feet wide,
394 feet long and 56 feet high
to form a natural basin capable
of transporting just over two
million gallons of flood waters
annually.
The Arava and northern
Negev are critical to Israel's
economy. The 19 settlements
of the region served by the
Arava dam, for example, are
known as Israel's "winter pro-
duce basket" and harvest
melons, peppers, tomatoes,
onions, grapes, dates and
other fruits and vegetables for
domestic consumption and ex-
port to Europe.
Benjamin Meed, third from right, founder
and president of the American Gathering and
Federation of Jewish Holocaust Survivors,
was awarded the Elie Wiesel Remembrance
Award at the State of Israel Bonds' Third An-
nual National Remembrance Tribute Dinner.
Sunday. Israel Bonds International Chair-
man David Hermelin; Meed's wife Vladka;
Israel defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin; Din-
ner Chairman David Chase; Tribute Chair-
man Sam Halpern and General Chairman
Miles Lerman.
Jay Martin, at left, chairman of the American Jewish Commit-
tee 's Louis E. Seidman Human Relations Award Diner, presents
the award to Ralph Anguioli, president Sales and Distribution
Division R.J. Reynold Tobacco USA. Martin, who is chairman of
the board and chief executive officer of Capital Cigar and Tobacco
Co., Inc., was chairman of the dinner held on Dec. 3 in New York
City.
Happenings
Registration for preparatory courses for Scholastic Aptitude
Tests (SAT) will be held from 6 to 9 p.m Wednesday. Jan. 6. at
the Lehrman Day School of Temple Emanu-EI. Miami Beach.
Classes, which are for high school sophomores and Juniors of
Temple Emanu-EI families and the community at large, will begin
Sunday. Jan. 10.
Arthur and Anna Goldstein and the Hebrew Academy of South
Dade will sponsor the art auctions. The first will be held at the
home of Sandee and Alvin Burger at 7876 SW 89 Lane on
Saturday. Dec. 26. Preview will be held at 730 p.m. Auction to
begin at 8:30 p.m. The second will be held at Tradition Hall.
7435 Carfyle Ave., Miami Beach on Sunday. Dec 27. Preview is
at 1 p.m. and auction from 2-6 p.m. Admission is free to both and
each will feature a large selection of Judaica.
A new session of aerobic dance is set to begin at the South
Dade Jewish Community Centter on Jan 4 The co-ed group.
ages 18 and up. will meet on Mondays and Wednesdays from 6-7
p.m. For information. 251-1394
The Surfside Community Center and Biscayne Elementary
Community School will sponsor "Rememberings: The Way We
Were*' with Dr Ann Rubens Jan 5 through 26 from I 30-330
p.m. Admission is free.
The City of Jerusalem will be the topic of a film series to be held
in Miami Beach this January Sponsored by the Miami Beach
Recreation Division, the series will be shown at the city's three
community centers. The films may be seen every Monday in
January at Ocean Front Auditorium, every Tuesday at 21st
Street Recreation Center, and every Thursday at South Shore
Community Center. Show time is 7:30 p.m. For additional infor-
mation. 673-7730.
Broward's first KOSHER retirement center.
L m a__h__Q_J
*i Where Carina Comm INttu
Tastefully Decorated
Nursing Supervision 24 hrs
Physicians on call 24 hrs.
3 meals daily and snacks
Daily activities, arts & crafts
Licensed ACL.F.
Transportation provided
Swimming Pool & Jacuzzi
Beauty Shop
Religious services daily
Easily accessible
RETIREMENT LIVING THE WAY YOU
WOULD LIKE IT TO BE
WE WELCOME INQUIRIES PLEASE CALL 961-8111
3535 S.W. 52nd Ave. Pembroke Park, Florida 33023
Off Hallandale Beach Blvd.


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 25, 1987
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nsjaber 87-4942
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FREDA ALIBER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of FREDA
ALIBER. deceased, File Number
87-6942, is pending in the Circuit
Court for DADE County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 W. Flagter St. Miami.
Fl. 33130. The personal represen-
tative of the estate is Herbert J.
Lerner, Esq., whose address is 801
Arthur Godfrey Road, Miami
Beach. Fl. 33140. The name and
address of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated: If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
December 18. 1987.
Herbert J. Lerner
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
FREDA ALIBER
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
HERBERT J LERNER
801 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Fl. 38140
Telephone: 306 673-3000
18174 December 18. 26.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name RIAZANO IN-
TERIORS at 18800 N.E. 7 CT.,
N.M.B.. FLA. 38179 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
SHEILA POLSKY
18300 N.E. 7CT..
N.M.B. FL. 33179
18157 December 11, 18, 26.1987;
January 1,1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name FLORIDA WEST
AGENCY. INC d/b/a FLORIDA
WEST at 2100 N.W. 94 Avenue,
Miami, Florida 33172 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida
ABELARDO BETANCOURT
President of FLORIDA
WEST AGENCY. INC.
LAW OFFICES OF
MARIO QUINTERO JR., PA.
Attorneys for FLORIDA
WEST AGENCY, INC.
18162 December 11, 18.25. 1987;
January 1. 1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Attic* No. 87-62403-04
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: LORINE JONES
and
NORMAN JONES
TO: NORMAN JONES
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street North Miami Beach. Florida
33162, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before January 8, 1988;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN?
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 7 day of December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18161 December 11,18. 26,1987;
January 1,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 87-4967
DIVISION 01
(Florida Bar No. 032230)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RALPH DAVID HANKEL.
a/k/a RALPH D. HANKEL.
a/k/a RALPH HANKEL.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of RALPH
DAVID HANKEL. a/k/a RALPH
D. HANKEL. a/k/a RALPH
HANKEL, late of Dade County,
Florida. File Number 87-6957, it
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami.
Florida 33130. The name and ad-
dress of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons interested in the
estate are required to file with this
court, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and (2)
any objection by an interested per-
son on whom this notice was serv-
ed that challenges the validity of
the will, the qualifications of the
personal representatives, venue,
or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Personal Representative:
NANCY HANKEL
530 31st Street
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
First publication of this notice of
administration on the 18 day of
December, 1987
Moses J. Grundwerg
Of Law Offices of
MOSES J. GRUNDWERG, PA.
44 West Flagler St., Suite 600
Miami. Florida 33130
(305)371-4419
Attorney for Personal
Representative
18173 December 18, 25, 1987
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-44977 CA 08
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATION OF
VETERAN'S AFFAIRS.
Plaintiff
vs.
ELLANDER CHRISTINE
HALIBACK.
Defendants.
TO: ELLANDER CHRISTINE
HALIBACK
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against ELLANDER
CHRISTINE HALIBACK, and
all parties having or claiming to
have any rights, title or interest
in the property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an ac-
tion to foreclosure a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 12, Block 96. THIRD AD-
DITION TO CAROL CITY,
according to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 66.
at Page 93, of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Gitliu, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
January 4, 1988, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this court this 25 day of November,
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Aa Deputy Clerk
18147 December 4. 11. 18,25. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
eriKmri' in business under the fie
titi..us name (1) AVERBOOK
COMMUNICATIONS (2) NEW
B1SINESS SYSTEMS at 20445
NK 19th CT.. MIAMI. FL 33179
intends to register said names with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
Arthur S. Averbook
18156 December 4. 11. 18,25,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name ORLANDO AUTO
REPAIRS at 1266 OPA LOCK
BLVD. OPA-LOCKA FL 33064 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
ORLANDO RODRIGUEZ
18181 December 18,26,1987;
January 1,8.1988
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 46
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-7671
SEC 14
BUFFALO SAVINGS BANE, a
New York corporatioa.
Plaintjffls)
vs.
GIDEON PELEG, et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and beat bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami. Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M.. on the 4th day
of Jaamsry, 1*87. the following
dtribid property:
Unit No. 144A. in Building No. 4A.
ROYALE GREEN CON-
DOMINIUM 2. according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, as recorded in Official
Records Book 8511. at Pages
2104-2141, of the Public Records
of Dade County. Florida; together
with all the appurtenances thereto,
all according to said Declaration of
Condominium.
DATED the 16th day of
December. 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal A Yarchin. PA.
Centrust Financial Center, Suite
2300
100 Southeast 2nd Street
Miami, Florida 33131-2198
Published 12/18-26
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-4516* CA 04
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS,
Plaintiff
vs.
JOHN A. MCFARLAND, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: ROMAN MUDRYK
2262 Bourgoin Street
St. Laurent.
Montreal. Canada
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 11, in Block 1. and Lot
13. in Block 2 of BISCAYNE
LAKE VIEW according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 61, at Page 20.
of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1670 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
January 4. 1988 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
PlainuTs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 26 day of
November. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Aa Deputy Clerk
18146 December 4, 11,18,26. 1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 46
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-18832
SEC. 09
FEDERAL HOME LOAN MOR
TGAGE CORPORATION, a
United States corporation.
Plaintiffls)
vs.
NESTOR FERNANDEZ, et al..
Defendant/si
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above. I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami. Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M.. on the 4th day
of Jamary. 1987. the following
assert! id property:
Unit 101-B TANGLEWOOD. a
Condominium, according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof as recorded September 10,
1981 in Official Records Book
11209, at Page 1647 of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida.
The United States of America shall
have the right of redemption pro-
vided by 28 U.S.C. Sec. 2410(c) for
the period provided therein, runn-
ing from the date of the Certificate
of Title issued herein.
DATED the 16th day of
December. 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By Mana Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal A Yarchin, P.A.
Centrust Financial Center, Suite
2300
100 Southeast 2nd Street.
Miami, Florida 33131-2198
Published 12/18-26
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name LA FAMILIA
RESTAURANT at 1683-36 N.E.
8th Street. Homestead. FL 33030
intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
LAZARO MARTINEZ
REINALDO MARTINEZ
MELVIN I. ASHER
Attorney for Applicants
825 South Bayshore Drive
Suite 543
Miami, FL 33131
Tel. 541-2685
18184 December 25,1987;
January 1, 8.16,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA DM
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-478M CA-31
NOTICE OF ACTION
COWGER A MILLER
MORTGAGE COMPANY, INC..
Plaintiff,
vs.
DANIEL NOOKS, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: DANIEL NOOKS
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by.
through, under or against
DANIEL NOOKS, and all
parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or
interest in the property
herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 40. Block 10. OVER-
BROOK SHORES SUBDIVI-
SION No. 2. according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 50. Page 31. of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Gitlite, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1670 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
January 22. 1988. and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 17 day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18188 December 25.1987;
January 1,8, 15,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-41317 (CA 16)
NOTICE OF ACTION
ALLEN R. GREENWALD, and
JILL F. GREENWALD. his wife
Plsintiff.
vs.
HARVARD/OXFORD
ASSOCIATES. LTD., s Florida
limited partnership, et. al.,
Defendants.
TO: MURRAY WEINBERG.
resjdei ce unknown, if living
and. if dead, to all of the
unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees,
lienholders, creditors,
trustees or other parties
claiming by. through, under
or against the said MURRAY
WEINBERG. and all other
parties, having or claiming to
have any right, title or
interest in and to the
property under foreclosure
herein.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose s mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Lot 36 through 46. Block 68.
FULFORD BY THE SEA.
SECTION "D." according to
the Plat thereof, recorded in
Plat Book 8 at Page 58 of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida, together with the
buildings and improvements
thereon, tenements,
hereditaments and ap-
purtenances thereto
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis, Allison A
Cohen, Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address is 111 N.E. 1st
Street. Miami. Florida 38132. on
or before January 22. 1988. and
file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, s Defsult
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 18 day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: DIANA CAMPBELL
Deputy Clerk
18192 December 26. 1987;
January 1.8. 15. 1988
it
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, DM AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-30491 (CA 27)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States
Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LUIS A. TURIEL, et al.,
Defendants.
TO:AMPARO A TURIEL.
residence unknown, if living
and if dead, to all the unknowr.
heirs, devisees, grantees
a,ignees, lienholders
creditors, trustees or other
parties claiming by, through.
under or against the said AM
PARO A. TURIEL. and all
other parties, having or claim-
ing to have any right, title or
interest in and to the property
under foreclosure herein.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an ac
tion to foreclose a mortgage on the
following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Unit 236. of TIERRA DEL
SOL, a Condominium, accor-
ding to the Declaration of
Condominium thereof, as
recorded in Official Records
Book 10866, at Page 1375, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida, as amended;
together with all im-
provements, appliances, and
fixtures located thereon
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve s copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith. Mack, Lewis, Allison and
Cohen, Plaintiffs attorneys,
whose address is HI NE 1st
Street. Miami. Florida 33132, on
or before January 4, 1988 and file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 25 dsy of
November. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
18151 December 4. 11.18.25. 1987
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. Ui AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-39836 (CA 29)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, s United States
Corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
SIDNEY NAGIOFF. et al..
Defendants.
TO: SIDNEY NAGIOFF and
ROSSLYN NAGIOFF,
his wife
42 Lyttleton Court
London. England N20EB
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose s mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County. Florida
Unit No. 1002. of VEN
DOME PLACE CON
DOMINII'M, S Condominium
according to the Declaration
of Condominium thereof,
dated January 18, 1980, and
filed for record July 7. 1981
under Clerk's File No.
81R180894. in Official
Records Book 11151. at Page
186 of the Public Records of
Dade County, as amended,
together with all im
provements, appliances, and
fixtures located
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis, Allison and
Cohen. Plaintiff's attorney
whose sddress is 111 N.E 1st
Street. Miami. Florida 33132. on
or before January 4. 1988. and fil<
the original with the Clerk of tin-
Court either before service I "S
Plaintiffs attorneys or immedia'i
ly thereafter; otherwise, a Defa.iit
will be entered against you for tl i
relief demanded in the Complai"'
WITNESS my hsnd and
this Court on the 26 da> I
November, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: BARBARA RODRIGl'r
Deputy Clerk
18152 December 4. 11.18,25. Lffl
1


Friday, December 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Mt. Sinai Doctors Treat the Competition
>
Continued from Page 1-B
right of these physicians to do
what's best for their practice
and I fully understand that.
What's most important is that
we maintain a positive work-
ing relationship with a group
of quality physicians."
The trend of establishing
outpatient and ambulatory
care facilities has been set in
motion over the past three or
four years, the doctors say.
And there are several reasons:
"There's been a push by the
government to do more outpa-
tient work, and to shorten
hospital stays," said Janowitz.
"And hospitals are primarily
set up to serve inpatients.
These (outpatient) centers are
set up to serve patients who
are not as sick. It's a greater
convenience to the patient,
less waiting time to get studies
done and they don't have to be
in a hospital atmosphere."
It was some of these same
reasons that prompted Miami
Beach plastic surgeon
Lawrence Robbins. who was
named chief of plastic surgery
at Mt. Sinai in 1974, and is im-
mediate past president of
Florida Society of Plastic and
Reconstructive Surgeons, to
open his own ambulatory
facility.
"IN 1980 I became aware
that most plastic surgeons did
their surgical procedures in an
office setting," Robbins said.
In 1984, he became licensed by
the state to operate his am-
bulatory surgical facility
even closer to Mt. Sinai than is
the Diagnostic center.
"It gives patient' the
privacy they want and still af-
fords them the safety of a
hospital," Robbins said of his
desire to establish his facility
in accordance with state stan-
dards. "I think the patient de-
mand was there."
The trend seems to have
reached Mt. Sinai, however,
later than it has in other areas.
Janowitz: "We would
not have gone through
with it if the hospital
told us 'no.' "
"Originally, Mt. Sinai was
started by a group of Jewish
doctors because they were not
allowed to practice at other
hospitals on Miami Beach,"
said trustee Pincus. "And I
think we've lost sight of that."
Cecil Bennett, the hospital's
former chief financial officer,
now at John F. Kennedy
Hospital in Atlantis, Fla..
observed: "Outpatient centers
are not uncommon. What is
uncommon, is that Mt. Sinai
for so very long has been a
close-knit community and
while similar situations have
occurred elsewhere, it just
never occurred in Miami
Beach. The Sinai family is sort
of close."
Bennett, according to
diagnostic center partner
Janowitz, is the one who said
that the new diagnostic center
would not have all that
negative effect on hospital
revenues. Janowitz explained
that the medical payments to
hospitals, called Diagnosis
Dr. Gottlieb
Hirt: What's most
important is that we
maintain a positive
working relationship
with a group of
quality physicians.'
Related Groups or DRG's,
have been changed in recent
years so that the hospital gets
X-amount of dollars per
diagnosis whether the patient
is in the hospital for five days
or seven days, for example.
"The board (of trustees at
Mt. Sinai) gave us approval but
before they did, they had a
study done by their former
chief financial officer who
estimated the savings to the
hospital on inpatients, by
decreasing hospital stays,
would be greater than the cost
to the hospital from the loss of
outpatients."
BUT BENNETT told The
Jfivish Floridian, "I know
nothing about the study that's
being referred to. We did do
some studies basically looking
at whether to do the diagnostic
center on our own campus.
(That) would have been a big
investment with estimated
very little return."
Larry Hudson, Mt. Sinai's
current chief financial officer
said that in certain cases work
at an outside diagnostic center
can benefit the hospital, but
not enough to compensate for
a loss of revenue.
"There is still a negative
financial impact caused by the
movement of the patients from
the hospital to a diagnostic
center," Hudson said. "We
have reduced our total
radiology revenue estimate for
1988 by approximately eight
percent as a specific result of
the diagnostic center."
Asked to translate that into
a dollar figure. Hudson demur-
red, saying that the diagnostic
center is still new and in about
six months the hospital will
have a better fix on the finan-
cial situation created by the
new center. He did say the
eight percent figure generally
represented "hundreds of
thousands" of dollars.
"It will have a very definite
impact on the financial opera-
tion of the hospital," Hudson
said. "When a hospital such as
Mt. Sinai, which delivers the
amount of free care to the
community that it does and is
involved in teaching and
research, we have to look at all
revenues. When any portion of
revenue is lost, then we feel
it."
CEO Fred Hirt
Larry Hudson
Dr. Janowitz
Hudson, however, is con-
fronted with a much larger
picture.
BEGINNING in 1988,
because of deregulation of am-
bulatory surgical centers, free-
standing clinics can be opened
without a certificate of need,
he said, suggesting that this
may encourage the trend of
breaking-away from hospitals.
An even bigger threat, he said,
is the change in Medicare pay-
ment methodology. "The
Gramm-Rudman Balanced
Budget Law has reduced our
Medicare payments 2.3 per-
cent effective Nov. 20, 1987,"
Hudson said, "this equates to a
financial loss of approximately
$1.5 million for our next fiscal
year which begins Jan. 1."
It's a fact of life, Mt. Sinai
President Hirt said, that the
health market is in a state of
change.
''No one wants the
Cleveland Clinic coming into
Ft. Lauderdale, building
another 400 beds in the com-
munity. We don't need that
competition either but the
state of Florida allowed them
to come in."
Trends in health care repre-
sent a "complex" issue and
one which the hospital is ad-
dressing, Hirt said.
"We will not be able to be all
things to all people," Hirt ex-
plained. "Health care pro-
viders and institutions will
have to determine what areas
of excellence they're capable
of providing. For Mt. Sinai,
that appears to be neuros-
ciences, substance abuse, car-
diac diseases, cancer,
diagnosis, geriatrics, women's
programs and pulmonary
diseases."
But if competition must be,
many involved agree that it
might as well be friendly.
Janowitz said the new
diagnostic center does not in-
clude such hi-tech equipment
as a cine-scanner or magnetic
resonance imaging (MRI).
Their patients who need such
testing will be referred to Mt.
Zusmer: 'Imagine
another group coming
to Miami Beach and
opening a diagnostic
center We felt if
we opened our own
center at least the
patients would come
to us and would
probably be referred
to Mt. Sinai.'
Edward Shapiro
Sinai, Janowitz said, adding
that if an "outside" group of
doctors were to have opened
up a similar outpatient facility,
it may have duplicated such
equipment.
THERE ARE some
discrepancies about the role
Mt. Sinai's board of trustees
played in the decision. "When
we spoke to the board we
agreed to still use the facilities
at Mt. Sinai," Janowitz said.
"Before we opened this, five of
us who are general partners in
the outpatient center spoke to
the board of the hospital and
got permission from them to
go ahead and do it," he said.
"We would not have gone
through with it if the hospital
told us 'no.' "
But Hirt said, "It was never
a board issue. No, it did not
come across the board of
trustees to my knowledge."
Asked if the general part-
ners received approval from
the board, Gottlieb said, "Yes,
but that is not a public record.
Members of the board key
members of the board for-
mally accepted the concept
that we go out and counteract
the activities of other potential
diagnostic centers and form
one ourselves."
Cal Kovens, chairman of the
board, told The Jewish Flori-
dian, "I know of no board ac-
tion," and added, "to my
knowledge there was no board
approval."
Gary Gerson, vice chairman
of the board, said. "The board
certainly didn't approve it. We
knew about it," he added.
"But we were advised by our
counsel and chief financial of-
ficer that there was nothing
that could be done to block
this. And it was the feeling
that since an outside group
from Hollywood, Florida was
coming in to do the same thing
... it would be better to have
these people than an outside
group.'
THEREIN probably lie. a y
confusion over who approved
what, former president and
chairman Shapiro said.
Chairman Kovens
Dr. Zusmer
Hirt: 'We're trying to
become more
consumer friendly.
That's the whole goal
of health care
patient care.'
"The teeny bit of condescen-
ding attitude on the part of
board members who said
they'd rather have the local
doctors than the outsiders
that was misinterpreted by
some people as being permis-
sion by the board. It was not
permission from the board.
"It was just a question of if it
was going to be done and it
was a choice between A and B,
they (the board members)
wanted A. It didn't mean they
wanted it done. This is nothing
the board wanted, nothing the
board approved but the board
had no choice in the matter
and could not stop it."
Shapiro confirmed that
there were "strong reports"
that an outside group was in-
terested in opening a
diagnostic center on a major
scale and that "local doctors
more friendly to Mt. Sinai ex-
pressed an interest in beating
these people to the punch and
promised loyalty to Mt. Sinai."
Janowitz said his group
"asked the hospital if they
wanted to do this as a joint
venture." but the hospital was
not prepared to do it. So the
general partners brought in
some 75 limited partners to
support the venture, reported-
ly all of whom are doctors.
"The limited partners who
own this facility will receive a
proportionate share of
whatever profit there is but
right now we don't know what
that may be," Janowitz said.
"We're talking several thou-
sand dollars a year per share."
The average limited partner
has two shares, he said.
Contin' J on Page 6-B


Friday, December 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
FORECLOSURE SALES-PUBLIC NOTICES
i)U '
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18
IN THE CIRCUOT COURT
OK THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
l.KNERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87 52694 13
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
\ I'nited States Corporation.
Plaintiff.
IAIKO ALBERTO SALAS. et
I >efendants.
TO JAIRO ALBERTO SALAS.
residence unknown, if he is liv-
ing and. if he is dead, all
unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees.
lienholders. creditors,
trustees or otherwise, claim-
ing by. through, under or
.gainst the said JAIRO
VLBERTO SALAS, and all
>ther parties having or claim-
ing to have any right, title or
interest in and to the property
under foreclosure herein
KHJ ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a Mortgage on
the following described property in
I)ade County, Florida:
Unit No. 813, of FOX
CHASE CONDOMINIUM
NO. 2. according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, as recorded in Of-
ficial Records Book 10940, at
Page 2197. of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida, as amended;
together with all im-
provements, appliances and
fixtures located thereon
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis, Allison &
Cohen, Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address is 111 N.E. 1st
Street. Miami, Florida 88182, on
or before January 15. 1988, and
file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, s Default
will he entered against you for the
elief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
>urt on the 8 day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: JENNIS L. RUSSELL
Deputy Clerk
18170 December 11.18,25. 1987;
January 1.1988

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5937
Division (01)
IN RE; ESTATE OF
VERA GORFINE,
formerly known as
VERA ZELTZER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of VERA GORFINE. formerly
known as VERA ZELTZER,
deceased. File Number 87-6937, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, 3rd Floor.
Miami, Florida 38130. The names
wd addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (I) all claims
gainst the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic
Uon of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
1 IONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
rOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice was
xtfun on December 18, 1987.
Personal Representative:
LILLIAN HOROWITZ
8305 Meadowbrook Lane
Chevy Chase, MD 20815
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
SYLVAN HOLTZMAN
HOLTZMAN. KRINZMAN
SEQUELS
1500 San Rerno Avenue, Suite 200
^oral Gables. Florida 83146
elephone: (806) 662-7700
l817 December 18,26, 1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-30005
SEC. 30
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION, a
United States corporation.
Plaintiffts)
vs.
MATILDA HODGE. JOHN
KARRINGTON. GWENDOLYN
FARRINGTON. and the
unknown spouses, et al.,
Defendants s)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County
Courthouse in Miami. Dade Coun-
ty. Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M..
on the 4th day of January,
1987. the following described
property:
Lot 16. Block 3,
STONEYBROOK ESTATES, ac
cording to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 65, Page 30,
of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
DATED the 16th day of
December. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Coart
'irrait Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Depaty Clerk
Attoraey for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin, P.A.,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard, Suite
800
Miami. Florida 83187
Published 12/18-25
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87-53632 (04)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
FL Bar No. 003473
IN RE: The Marriage of
GODWIN ONORIOBE
and
REMELDA KYLER CHERRY
TO: REMELDA KYLER
CHERRY
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street, North Miami Beach.
Florida 33162, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before January 22,
1988; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court st Miami, Florida on
this 15 day of December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: Barbara Harper
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18182 December 18. 25.1987;
January 1.8.1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name "DESTINATION
PLANNERS INTERNA
TIONAL" at 9660 E Bay Harbor
Drive, Bay Harbor Islands, Fl
33164 intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
Managing and Marketing
Professionals, Inc.,
By Larry Cliff. President
Theodore R. Nelson,
Nelson & Feldman, P.A.
Attorney for Managing and
Marketing Professionals, Inc.
18167 December 11, 18, 25. 1987;
January 1. 1988
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-33752
SEC 13
STOCKTON. WHATLEY.
DAVIN A COMPANY, a Florida
corporation,
Plaintiffls)
vs.
EDWARD ALDER, et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on the SOUTH STEPS of the
Dade County Courthouse in
Miami, Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock AM on the 4th day
of January. 1987. the following
described property:
North 98 feet less north 54 feet of
Lots 11 and 12. Block 1, TRAN
QUILLA, according to the Plat
thereof, recorded in Plat Book 4,
Page 55, of the Public Records of
Dade County. Florida.
DATED THE 16th day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin, P.A
One C 'entrust Financial Center
100 Southeast 2nd Street, Suite
2300
Miami. Florida 83131-2198
Pabliihed 12/18-25
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-48590 CA-02
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS,
Plaintiff
vs.
PHILIP MOTT. et ux., et al..
Defendants.
TO: PHILIP MOTT and
VIRGINIA MOTT, his wife
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
PHILIP MOTT and
VIRGINIA P. MOTT, his
wife, and all parties having
or claiming to have any right,
title or interest in the
property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 18. in Block 1. of FAIR-
WAY, according to the Plat
thereof, recorded in Plat
Book 7, at Page 28, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve s copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
January IS. 1988. and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise s default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court his 10 day of
December. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18178 December 18. 26. 1987;
January 1.8.1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name STRUL PROPER
TIES at 7464 Rexford Road. Boca
Raton. Florida 33434 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, florida.
STRUL PROPERTIES
H ALLAN SHORE. ESQ.
Attorney for
STRUL PROPERTIES
18180 December 18.26. 1987;
January 1.8.1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-51154
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS.
Plaintiff,
vs.
TORRY Y. PERPALL, et al..
Defendants.
TO: All unknown heirs, creditors,
devisees or other persons
claiming by, through, under
or against Duke Ellington
Perpall, deceased
Residence Unknown
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 22. Block 30, FIRST AD-
DITION TO MYRTLE
GROVE, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 57 at Page 2 of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Gitlitz. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida, 33146 on or before
January 8. 1988. and file the
original with the Clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this court this 26 day of November,
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
18148 December 4,11,18,25, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NUMBER: 87-4845
DIVISION: 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BERNARD WEISS.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of BERNARD WEISS, deceased,
File Number 87-4845, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representatives and the per-
sonal representatives' attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (!) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representatives, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 18, 1987.
Personal Representative:
DAVID WEISS
85 Rockford Road
Wiliowdale. Ontario M2R SA8
BERN AT ROSENSCHEIN
2765 Ekers
Montreal. Quebec H3S 1E2
Attorney for Personal
Representatives:
ROBERT M HERMAN, ESQ
ROBERT M. HERMAN. P.A.
2435 Hollywood Boulevard.
Suite 201
Hollywood. Florida 33020
(306)947-4011
p308BW
18176 December 18. 25, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name PHARMATECH IN
TERNATIONAL at 633 N.E
167th ST SUITE NO. 624 N
MIAMI B., FL 33162 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun
ty. Florida.
STAR SERVICE
CORPORATION
A FLA CORPORATION d.b.a.
PHARMATECH
INTERNATIONAL
CORPORATION
18155 December 4, 11.18,25, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-6873
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MURIEL STRANZ RAFFO.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of MURIEL
STRANZ RAFFO. deceased. File
Number 87-6873, is pending in the
Circuit Court for I>ade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate is RUTH MURIEL CASCIO
a/k/a RUTH MURIEL RAFFO,
whose address is 14730 N.W. 6th
Court, Miami, Florida. The name
and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
Al! persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF TH E FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
December 18, 1987.
Ruth Raffo Cascio
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
MURIEL STRANZ RAFFO
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
SILVER & SILVER
150 S.E. 2nd Avenue,
Suite 500
Miami, Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 374-4888
By: MAX R. SILVER
1818S December 18.25.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name GALACTIC TOW
ING. at 3230 N.W 42nd St..
Miami. Fla. 33142, intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Galactic Towing Service, Inc
By Estanislao R. Hermandez.
a/k/a Ramon Hernandez
ROBERT M. JASINSKI, ESQ.
Attorney for Applicant
The Roney Plaza. Suite M-8
2301 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach. FLA. 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-4421
19150 December 11.18. 25, 1987;
January 1,1988
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-19132
SEC. 18
NATIONAL MORTGAGE COM-
PANY, a Tennessee corporation.
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
RICHARD EARL BOOK, et al..
DefendanUs)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour
thouse in Miami, Dade County.
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 4th day of January. 1987.
the following describee'
property:
Lot 7. in Block 1. of GRIFFIN
GARDENS, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
39. at Page 73. of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida.
DATED the 16th day of
December, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Depaty Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin, P.A.
Centrust Financial Center, Suite
2300.
100 Southeast 2nd Street,
Miami, Florida 33131-2198
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name TELEPHONE
REPAIR SERVICE st 964 West
31 St. Hisleah FL 33012 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun
ty. Florida
VICTOR GODOY
954 West 31 St
Hialeah. FL 33012
18163 December 11, 18, 25. 1987;
January 1,1988
Published 12/18-26
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE fS HEREBY GD7EN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name "HOTEL BANK" at
9660 E Bay Harbor Drive. Bay
Harbor Islands. Fl 33154 intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Managing and
Marketing Professionals, Inc.
By Larry Cliff, President
Theodore R. Nelson,
Nelson & Feldman. P.A.
Attorney for Managing and
Marketing Professionals Inc.
18168 December 11, 18, 25. 1987;
January 1. 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-49155 CA 28
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS,
Plaintiff
vs.
ANDREW LEE CARTER, et ux..
et al ,
Defendants.
TO: ANDREW LEE CARTER
and
ELOISE CARTER, his wife
and TIMOTHY E. CRAPPS
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
them, and all parties having
or claiming to have any right,
title or interest in the
property herein described.
You sre hereby notified that an
action to fordose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 14. Block 31. of REVIS-
ED PLAT OF A PORTION
OF CAROL CITY, according
to the plat thereof, recorded
in Plat Book 57. Page 63. of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1670 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida. 33146 on or before
January 16. 1988, and file the
original with the dark of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 10 day of
December. 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18177 December 18, 25. I<*>'
Janu*-


Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 25, 19K7
THE GARDENS AT MOUNT NEBO
Miami's most beautiful exclusively Jewish Cemetery
ifft
Ik



** 4r
V*'
Nowhere is the Jewish concept of life eternal expressed with more
dignity, love and beauty than in Mount Nebo. Lush landscaoinq
combined with more than 50 years of devoted care creates
at Mount Nebo a lasting tribute to loved ones in the'hiahest
tradition of Judaism.This tradition is continued in the Gardens
Mount Nebo's latest expansion.
VISIT OR CALL US AT: 261-7612
MOUNT NEBO
Mount Nebo Cemetery. 5505 N.W. 3rd Street, Miami. FL 33126


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 25, 1987
Risks of Style and Substance
French Premier Meets PLO
Continued from Page 1-B
stems from the possibility of
jealousy and fear of theft.
You could buy one of Boyce's
creations at Saks Fifth
Avenue, or, if it happens to be
summer, at her exclusive shop
in the West Hamptons. But
Joyce's special customers are
the ones she travels by plane
to meet for individual
appointments.
For these buyers, Boyce is
more than a mere saleswoman;
she is a fashion consultant, an
image specialist, an arbiter of
good taste.
"That's just too small for
you," Boyce informs customer
Bonnie Barnett, an elegant
blonde who is art consultant
for Sun Banks.
"Could it be for the beach? It
looks very European," com-
ments Barnett.
"EUROPEAN? Maybe last
year," Boyce retorts.
Barnett says that she enjoys
the personal attention she
receives from her individual
viewings of Boyce's yearly
selections.
"She puts me together,
gives me very good advice for
my business and social life,
which is very busy, so I don't
buy pieces I wouldn't wear,"
Barnett explains.
This year, gold with a flat or
dull finish, colored stones, old
coins, and carved intaglio
(designs engraved into stones,
usually onyx, camelian, or
malachite) are the fashionable
items, Boyce says.
But in the world of high
fashion, style is more impor-
tant than substance, and
Boyce would rather see a
woman interestingly dressed
in paste and rhinestones than
adorned by traditional stud
earrings and pearls.
"I'd rather have someone
trying to take a shot at making
a fashion statement with
whatever their pocketbook can
afford than be safe and overly
conservative,' insists the
woman whose designs are
featured in magazines such as
Harper's Bazaar.
SLENDER enough for high
fashion, expertly made-up and
exquisitely dressed in a butter-
cup yellow sweater and black
leather skirt, Boyce looks like
she travels in the same social
circles as do her customers.
Yet her husband of 23 years
works as the principal of a
Brooklyn school.
"My husband is black in the
ghetto, so we don't come from
ritz," asserts Boyce, who has a
15 year-old son and two step-
sons from her marriage.
"I did the same thing I
worked in the ghetto tor 14
years as a teacher, so it wasn't
such a difficult transition," she
contends. "It's more in-
teresting for other people look-
ing in on us and speculating;
we're definitely not yur
average Jewish couple."
Boyce, who got started in
the jewelry business by selling
pieces sent to her by her late
mother, who had a jewelry
store on the 79th Street
Causeway, credits her ability
to take charge of her as being the key to her success.
"She puts me together, "says Bonnie Barnett, who has a standing
annual appointment to view Boyce's newest creations. Trying to
decide between the various necklaces, bracelets, earrings and
rings may be difficult, but for private customers like Barnett,
Boyce provides expert advice.
"I've taken chances with
everything, and made it work.
I've always been willing to
take chances and risks," ex-
plains the former Miami Beach
Senior High graduate who
grew up along the Venetian
Causeway.
A WOMAN of contradic-
tons, Boyce admits to wearing
diamond jewelry to the
Brooklyn school where she us-
ed to teach. Yet she and her
husband "adopted a child off
the streets," and the Boyces
still keep in touch today, 20
years later.
"I could easily go back and
adopt another child today,"
says Boyce. "I'm involved with
civil rights and what's going
Al Liebert
Liebert Installed
The Kendall-Perrine Board
of Realtors installed its 1988
officers and directors at a ban-
quet at the Miami Marriott-
Dadeland.
Al Leibert was installed as
president of the board. Install-
ed with Leibert were Terri
Kolaska, president-elect; Ken-
neth Bradley, vice president;
and Gloria Pyms Baren,
secretary/treasurer. Other
directors being installed were
Cathee Cotton Deboer,
Thomas Eagle, Alan
Korschun, Carole Levine,
Rosalie Richards, Barbara
Sangetti, Joseph Stine and
Ann Weiss.
on in Africa money hasn't
jaded me to that."
Asked which historical
figure she most identifies with,
Boyce replies that she knows
which she least identifies with
Cleopatra: the legendary
queen of Egypt, whose name is
synonymous with glamor,
allurement and charm.
"I don't see myself as a
woman wanting to lure a
man," Boyce asserts. "I'm
much more in a man's world."
Yet Cleopatra and Boyce
might have struck up a profes-
sional relationship; the ancient
queen was rumored to have a
passion for opulent jewelry
especially when set with
Roman coins.
National Conference
Of Amit Women
Delegates representing the
80-thousand members of Amit
Women attended their 62nd
Anniversary National Conven-
tion held recently in Orlando,
Florida.
Daisy Berman was
unanimously elected as Na-
tional President of the
organization, along with a new
slate of officers, succeeding
Frieda C. Kufeld.
Convention highlights in-
cluded the presentation of the
Amit Humanities Award to
Claude Lanzmann, director of
the film "Shoah." Due to his
sudden illness, the award was
accepted by Abraham Cooper,
associate dean of the Los
Angeles based Simon Wiesen-
thal Center. Ambassador Alan
Keyea was guest speaker, and
the delegates were entertain-
ed by entertainers Robert
Clary and Tovah Feldshuh,
author, Gloria Goldreich.
Singles
Young, pretty, female
interested in male age 40-
50. Phone and photo to
P.O.B. 2198. New York,
NY 10185.
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Premier
Jacques Chirac broke prece-
dent by formally receiving, for
the first time, a representative
of the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
Ibrahim Suss, who heads the
PLO office in Paris, was part
of a delegation of Arab am-
bassadors who called on Chirac
to protest Israel's
"repressive" actions in the
West Bank and Gaza Strip.
They urged French diplomatic
intervention "to stop the
bloodshed."
Chirac, leader of the center-
right government, has been ac-
tively wooing the Jewish vote
for the past six years and until
now has flatly refused to meet
any PLO representatives. His
diplomatic adviser, Francois
Boujon de l'Estaing, refused
to comment on the meeting
with Suss.
But Arab sources said
Chirac "could not do otherwise
in the face of the increasing
number of Palestinian
victims."
The French government also
made a significant switch in at-
titude toward the Middle East
peace process when it called on
Israel "to start a dialogue and
negotiations' with "all in-
terested parties within the
framework of an international
peace conference."
Until now, France has
carefully avoided taking sides
on the issue of an international
conference, which has sharply
divided Israel's coalition
government.
But the statement read to
the press after France's week-
ly Cabinet meeting, presided
over by President Francois
Mitterrand, expressed the
government's worry and
emotion" over the continued
violence and loss of life in the
Israel-administered
territories.
The statement said conven-
ing an international peace con-
ference "was now more urgent
than ever before." Govern-
ment spokesman Andre
Rossinot stressed that this
view was shared by both Mit-
terrand, a Socialist, and the
conservative Chirac.
U.S.-Israel Cooperate In 'Air'
NEW YORK An agree-
ment has been reached bet-
ween the defense agencies of
the U.S. government and
Israel for joint research into
pilot performance and flight
systems.
The Memorandum of
Understanding calls for
cooperation between U.S. Ar-
my Research Laboratories and
the Flight Control Laboratory
at Technion-Israel Institute of
Technology in Haifa. The
university's laboratory is in
the Faculty of Aeronautical
Engineering.
The memorandum was ap-
proved by the U.S. Depart-
ment of Defense some months
ago and will be signed in Israel
between the department and
the Israeli Ministry of
Defense.
The joint research will in-
vestigate the effects of motion
and vibration on pilot perfor-
mance in aircraft under
manual control and the opera
tion of avionic systems by head
movements.
Problems pilots experience
while flying in grasping infor-
mation on electro-optical
displays and solutions to them
will also be investigated.
"This Man is a Master."
Pete Ciot/oo Atari i th Hondo Mogazioe
MADR6 CUCINfl
(formerly of 79th Street ftoimondo's)
Gourmet Italian
12350 N.. 6 Rve.
North Miami
Reservations 895-6071
Volet Parking Closed Mondays

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