The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03069

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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HcJewislhi FloDfidliami
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Volume 60Number 48
Miami, FloridaNovember 27,1987
Price 50 Cents
Catholic-Jewish Dialogue Suffers New Setback
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) The
state of Catholic-Jewish rela-
tions was rocked last week
with the disclosure that a ma-
jor Vatican official said that
Judaism "finds its fulfillment"
in "the reality of Jesus
Christ."
Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, a
papal adviser and head of the
Vatican Congregation for the
Doctrine of the Faith, was
quoted as saying this, and
more, in the Oct. 24 Italian
weekly magazine II Sabato.
The National Conference of
Catholic Bishops (NCCB),
meeting at its annual con-
ference in Washington, releas-
ed Ratzinger's remarks in Ger-
man, as well as copies of the
Italian magazine interview. A
major ruckus ensued, pro-
mpting rebuttals and analysis
by Jewish leaders, Catholic
leaders and the press.
At issue is Ratzinger's asser-
tion that "The Pope has of-
fered respect, but also a
theological line. This always
implies our union with the
faith of Abraham, but also the
reality of Jesus Christ, in
which the faith of Abraham
finds its fullfillment."
The Jewish Interpretation
Jewish participants in
Continued on Page 2-A
Hussein To Moscow
In Mission For Peace
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) King Hus-
sein of Jordan plans to go to
Moscow to personally seek
support from Soviet leadership
for an international conference
to resolve the Israel-Arab
conflict.
He may also visit the capitals
of the other four permanent
members of the United Na-
tions Security Council for the
same purpose or send his
senior ministers, according to
West German diplomats. No
dates were given for these
trips.
Hussein reportedly disclosed
his plans to West German
Foreign Minister Hans-
Dietrich Genscher, who
Continued on Pan 2-A
Court Rules In Favor
Of Secular Sabbath
lZ>e6ria at the interior of a synagogue in
Vowntoum Buenos Aires, after a bomb explod-
There were no injuries. The bombing
{Labor's Arad:
followed the arrest of Josef Schwammberger.
See related story, page 8-A. AP/Wide World Photo
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
secular community here won a
major victory Sunday when a
local court struck down a city
ordinance banning the com-
mercial screening of films on
the Sabbath.
But the ruling is expected to
intensify the bitter dispute bet-
ween ultra-Orthodox and non-
observant Jews over strict en-
forcement of Sabbath obser-
vance. The municipality, which
has been seeking a com-
promise between the two com-
munities, plans to appeal.
The religious bloc in the
Knesset reacted angrily to the
court's decision. Former In-
terior Minister Yitzhak Peretz.
( ..nilruied mi Page 15-A
On Who Is A Jew? And Who Is A Rabbi?
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
THE RELATIONSHIP between world Jewry
knd Israel seemed peaceful enough as long as
he ties were bonded primarily by philanthropy
nd emotions. Add the new dimension of politics
nd tension is introduced into the relationship.
Nava Arad, one of only 10 women who hold
pits in Israel's 120-member Knesset, told The
wnsh Floridian during her recent visit to
Jiami that Israel itself is just beginning to grap-
le with the issue of political involvement from
r>e Jews who live outside of Israel, in the
(diaspora.
"I do believe that Israel does not belong only
the Jewish people who are living in Israel,"
aid Arad. "We came back to Israel in order to
have a Jewish state with a majority of Jews in it
whether they live in it or not. It's an
assurance that never again will there be another
Jewish refugee, that they will always have a
home to come to.
"It is not only important for Jewish people liv-
ing in America or anywhere in the Diaspora to
be involved. I believe it is their duty to raise
their voices and be part of the debate and the
future of Israel."
The voice of world Jewry may impact the
stalemate that Israeli government officials have
had over issues such as peace negotiations with
Jordan. With Israel's two major parties. Labor
and Likud, at bitter odds over how to approach
the peace process, leaders such as Arad are try-
ing to arouse fresh support from abroad.
Nava Arad, MK
Arad, the world
leader of Na'amat,
the world's largest
women's organiza-
tion, whose member-
ship includes 70 per-
cent Labor Zionists,
is a member of the
Labor Party and sup-
ports her party's
position calling for
negotiations with
Jordan under the um-
brella of an interna-
tional peace
conference.
Continued on Page 10-A
Jewish Floridian Expanded Circulation This Issue


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 27, 1987
Israeli Role In Iran-Gate Had U.S. Imprimatur
3
do
X
I
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
While Israel had a major role
in opening and continuing the
controversial sales of U.S.
arms to Iran, the United
States government bears the
basic responsibility for the
policy, according to the con-
gressional committees that in-
vestigated the Iran/Contra
affair.
The 690-page report by the
Senate and House select com-
mittees also finds Israel was
not involved in the diversion of
the profits from the sale of
arms to Iran to the Contra
rebels fighting the Nicaraguan
government.
The report clearly confirms
that Israel sought and received
explicit approval from the
Reagan administration for
every step in the selling of
arms to Iran in the effort by
the United States to achieve
an opening with Iran and gain
the release of American
hostages in Lebanon.
The Israel Embassy had no
comment, but Yosef Gal, the
embassy spokesman, pointed
to the comments by Israel
Premier Yitzhak Shamir in
The New York Times.
Shamir said Israel had no
regrets about its participation
in the American effort. "It
was done by a common deci-
sion of our Cabinet and we are
convinced that our policy was
a correct one," Shamir told the
Times. "We did it together
with the United States, and I
do not see any reason to regret
it."
Shamir also denied that
Israel was selling arms to Iran,
but said the government has
no control over what some
Israeli businessmen may be
doing.
Reagan Called Responsible
The Senate-House commit-
tees concluded that the respon-
sibility for the Iran/Contra af-
fair lies with Reagan, because
even if he did not know that
funds for the arms sale were
Dialogue Suffers Setback
Continued from Page 1-A
Vatican relations are inter-
preting Ratzinger's
statements as saying that
Judaism can find purpose only
in Christ, thus overturning all
progress since Vatican Council
II more than 20 years ago and
especially since this summer's
meeting between Jewish
representatives and high
Vatican officials and Pope
John Paul II.
Eugene Fisher, executive
secretary for Catholic-Jewish
relations for NCCB, contended
that Ratzinger's remarks had
been misrepresented because
they were taken out of context
and translated without a feel-
ing for the "nuance" of the
language.
Ratzinger's Vatican office
released what it said was a
"clarification" of Ratzinger's
remarks in response to a re-
quest from Jewish organiza-
tions. The response contained
four points reported to repre-
sent Ratzinger's understan-
ding of Catholic-Jewish
dialogue. They are:
A Christian should
acknowledge his Old Testa-
ment heritage and know that
according to the Christian
faith the Old Testament was
fulfilled in Christ.
When Jews convert to
Christianity, they should not
forget their Jewish heritage.
Christians should
acknowledge and respect the
Jews in "their own faith and
expectations."
Christians should aspire
thorough dialogue to overcome
misunderstandings and the
"teaching of contempt" of
Jews in order to "develop true
knowledge, respect and love."
Phona: (305) 373-4805
Published weakly every Friday
since 1927 by The Jewish Florl-
dian. Office and Plant 120 N.E.
6th St., Miami. Fla. 33132. Phone
(305) 3734605.
Second-Class Postage paid in
Miami, Fla. USPS 275320.
Postmaster: Form 3578 return to
Jewish Florldian, P.O. Box
012973, Miami. Fla. 33101.
The Jewish Florldian does not
guarantee the Kashruth of the
merchandise advertised In its
columns.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: In ad-
vance (Local Area) One Year
$9 50 (Anniversary Special). Out
of town, country, upon request
By Mail $1 45 per copy
But the International Jewish
Committee on Interfaith Con-
sultations (IJCIC) decided to
postpone a meeting with
Catholic representatives,
scheduled for December.
The major factors, according
to Elan Steinberg, executive
director of the World Jewish
Congress, where Ratzinger's
statements and widespread
concern in the Jewish com-
munity that the Vatican was
approaching this meeting
without an honest assessment
of its own actions during the
Holocaust.
In September, Vatican of-
ficials had indicated the Pope
would prepare a statement ex-
pressing remorse for the
Shoah and addressing the
Vatican's role during that
time.
Steinberg explained that "now
there is widening concern by
the Jewish community that
such a statement would be
another whitewash of the role
of the church in the period im-
mediately thereafter."
Details of Ratzinger's inter-
view are unclear. It is not yet
Hussein
On Move
Continued from Page 1-A
returned from a visit to Jordan
Saturday.
Diplomats here said Hussein
was hopeful that a
breakthrough is possible in ef-
forts to advance the Middle
East peace process. They
praised his resolve to push
ahead despite major obstacles.
Diplomats here said Hussein
told Genscher that the Arab
world emerged from the re-
cent Arab summit meeting in
Amman largely united behind
the idea of an international
conference. He said the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion and other extremists were
isolated and their influence
diminished.
The Jordanian ruler express-
ed a desire to see general
European participation in the
proposed conference, apart
from the Security Council
members. The council
members are, in addition to
the Soviet Union, the United
States, France, Britain and
the People's Republic of
China.
known whether Ratzinger
gave the interview in German
or Italian, although Fisher said
it was in German.
Discrepancies In Texts
This is important because of
minor discrepancies between
the German and Italian ver-
sions of Ratzinger's remarks,
Although Fisher and Johannes
Cardinal Willebrands, presi-
dent of the Holy See's Com-
mission for Religious Relations
with the Jews, highlighted
these differences as signifi-
cant, Jewish observers do not
seem to be convinced.
For example, in the German
text, Ratzinger is quoted as
saying "for us" referring to
Catholics preceding the
quotation about "the faith of
Abraham finds its fulfillment"
in Christianity. These words
do not appear in the Italian
version. The English versions
that were quoted in the
American Catholic press did
not include the words "for us."
Alan Mittleman, program
associate in the interreligious
affairs department of the
American Jewish Committee,
believes that with these
translations "a case is attemp-
ted to be built on the fact that
the original was in German,
that Ratzinger is somewhat
reativizing it, saying that "We
Catholics believe this is true,
but we are not trying to im-
pose this on Jews."
"But Ratzinger is not a
pluralist," said Mittleman.
"For us, the words 'for us'
hardly solves our problem,"
Mittleman said that Ratz-
inger's comments "really in-
vade our faith" and "are
caught in a contradiction."
Responding to reports of the
explanation, Rabbi A. James
Rudin, national interreligious
affairs director of the AJCom-
mittee, told JTA "that really
the explanation is insufficient.
This is so important that the
Cardinal's remarks and ex-
planations deserve much more
than hanging on the two words
'for us.'"
Rudin explained why the
issue so concerned him. "If the
Cardinal's words that are read
in fact truly represent
retrogressive steps in Jewish-
Catholic relations, it's very
serious," he said.
Rudin said that Ratzinger's
statements are significant
because of his high Vatican of-
fice and his reputed strong in-
fluence on the Pope.
being diverted to the Contras,
"he should have."
"The president created or at
least tolerated an environment
where those who did know of
the diversion believed with
certainty that they were carry-
ing out the president s
policies," the report said.
Six Republican House
members and two Republican
senators issued a minority
view that Reagan and his staff
could be faulted only with
mistakes in judgment that
were not unconstitutional or
improper, as the committees
had concluded.
On Israel's involvement, the
report said Reagan and his ad-
visers placed "great weight"
on Israel's sponsorship of the
Iran initiative and the use of
Manucher Ghorbanifar, an Ira-
nian businessman, as an in-
termediary because "Israel
has taken a strong stand
against international ter-
rorism and Israeli intelligence
services are among the most
respected in the world."
(In a reaction in anticipation
of the report, Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres said in
Jerusalem that, "Perhaps the
minority (of the congressional
committee) may feel we were a
friend who was too energetic
in our offers of help, but not
one can say we had any inten-
tions other than to help the
United States to free the
hostages. That is what was at
the basis of this operation.")
The main report noted that
Robert McFarlane, then
Reagan's national security ad-'
visor, sent Michael Ledeen, a
consultant to the National
Security Council, to Israel to
seek cooperation on in-
telligence about Iran "because
of dissatisfaction with CIA
capabilities."
Ledeen testified that the
then Israeli premier, Shimon
Peres, told him that Israel's in-
telligence on Iran was also
inadequate.
Israel's Needs Said To Be
Understood
The report also noted that
the United States was under
no illusions regarding Israel's
motives. "The Israelis strong-
ly advocated the initiative
viewing it as a joint U.S.-hrae]
operation, and were willing to
give the United States
deniabihty so long as it did
not subject them to criticism
by Congress and the Secretary
of State (George Shultz) was
fully informed," the report
said.
It added that both
McFarlane and his successor
Rear Adm. John Poindexter
told the Israelis that "since
Israel and not the United
States was selling to Iran.
U.S. policy was not being
violated."
Ledeen had testified to the
committees that Peres had
told him in May 1985 that Iran
had reqested arms, but he
"would not do this unless he
had explicit American ap-
proval for it." Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin had
also demanded that Shultz be
informed.
The committees concluded in
the report that "the president
was under no illusion that the
interests of the United States
and Israel were synonymous.
As early as June 1985.
Secretary Shultz had pointed
out to McFarlane that Israel
had little to lose by promoting
the initiative; it had not policy
against the arms sales to Iran,
and, given the hostility of most
of its neighbors, Israel was
more willing to gamble on the
prospects of changes in the
Iranian governement.
"No foreign state can dictate
the conduct of U.S. foreign
policy. Superpowers make
their own decisions. And the
United States did so in this in-
stance. Nevertheless. Israel's
endorsement of the Iran in-
itiative cannot be ignored as a
factor in its origin or in its
continuation."
The minority view also
stressed that while Israel wai
promoting the Iran initiative
for its own national interests,
"we believe the U.S. govern-
ment responsibility made its
own judgments, and its own
mistakes."
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Friday, November 27, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
Conciliatory Shamir On Peace and 'Who is Jew?'
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Approximately 3,500 people
submitted themselves to a
metal detector test and allow-
ed their handbags and brief-
cases to be searched in order
to hear Israeli Prime Minister
Yitzhak Shamir speak at the
General Assembly of the Coun-
cil of Jewish Federations at
the Fountainbleau Hotel last
Thursday, Nov. 19.
Speaking on the 10th an-
niversary of Egyptian Presi-
dent Anwar Sadat's visit to
Jerusalem, Shamir said that he
called on Arab leaders "to res-
pond to our summons for
peace and come to the
negotiating table." A strong
opponent to a proposed inter-
national peace conference,
Shamir stressed his commit-
ment to the peace process
through direct negotiations.
"I pledge once we sit down
(at the negotiating table) we
will not get up untu agreement
is reached," Shamir proclaim-
ed. "To determine our future
relationship, we would like to
jlay host, as with Sadat but
we will travel anywhere to
reach agreement."
Shamir, who made it clear
that he was primarily address-
ing Jordan's King Hussein, ad-
ded that "the same goes for
other Arab leaders."
Shamir added that he would
"discuss the same with Presi-
GA Tackled
Divisive Issue
By MARK JOFFE
MIAMI BEACH (JTA) -
Legislation defining "who is a
Jew" in Israel would "wreak
deep divisiveness and
widespread disaffection" in
the world Jewish community if
it ever passed the Knesset, the
outgoing president of the
Council of Jewish Federations
(CJF) said last Wednesday
night.
"The political parties of
Israel should not deal with this
matter through the Knesset,"
Shoshana Cardin told some
3,000 delegates attending
CFJ's 56th General Assembly
here.
Speaking at the assembly's
opening plenary session, Car-
din affirmed that it is not
CJF's role to "comment on
what are and what are not ap-
propriate conversion pro-
cedures, nor do we represent
any specific ideology."
Birt likewise, she said,
Israel's major political parties
should not exploit the
longstanding controversy over
whether people converted to
Judaism by non-Orthodox rab-
bis should be recognized as
Jews in Israel.
"This issue must not be used
for political trading by the ma-
jor parties either to fashion or
to topple a government," Car-
am said.
"Our hope," she added, "is
that both major parties will re-
ject any such attempt, for we
have k0(K] reason to fear that
such legislation will wreak
divisiveness and
pread disaffection -
neither of which would bode
well for Israel or for Diaspora
Jewry."
dent Reagan when we meet."
The leader of Israel's conser-
vative Likud party, Shamir
tried to ease some of the ten-
sions which have arisen bet-
ween his faction of the govern-
ment and United States
Jewry.
One key area of dissent is
the proposed "Who Is A
Jews?" bill, which Likud has
endorsed. Many Jews in the
United States have expressed
the fear that the proposed bill
would undermine the
legitimacy of the Reform and
Conservative movements
Judaism.
in
"I have come to you as a
selected prime minister of the
State of Israel home not on-
ly to those who live there, but
home for all Jews. Israel and
America are the two main
pillars of a thousands of years
old Jewish tradition," said
Shamir.
"Let me reiterate that Israel
is the home of all the Jewish
people any Jewish person
can come here and become an
Israeli citizen under the Law
of Return," he asserted.
In reference to the "Who Is
A Jew?" bill, which would have
affected that law, Shamir said
"I personally regret that it has
become an issue between
political parties."
Stressing "unity above all,"
Shamir contended that
"despite problems, the United
States-Israeli relationship is
better than ever before."
Yet those problems, in-
cluding the dismay of many
American Jews over the
Pollard affair, prompted the
Israeli prime minister to say
that "traditionally, Jews in the
United States have respected
Israel's decisions of policy .
I trust that will continue."
Shamir addressed the cur-
rent demographic trends in
Israel, which point to an Arab
majority within 20 years, by
emphasizing the historic image
of Israel as small but mighty.
"Our strength lies in our
conviction in our cause, not in
our numbers," Shamir
asserted, nevertheless en-
couraging aliyak from the
United States and other coun-
tries in his speech.
"We need aliyah," he admit-
ted. "I can think of no finer
way to celebrate this anniver-
sary (Israel's 40th) than if all
Jews, from all over the world
especially those who have
never been would come to
Israel."
The plight of Soviet Jews
many of whom want to go to
Israel but cannot was also
touched upon in Shamir's
speech.
"We shall not rest until the
gates of the Soviet Union are
thrown open and all of them
are allowed to come home," he
said, noting that Gorbachev's
"treatment of Soviet Jews will
be the true test of glasnost."
In the year of Israel's 40th
anniversary as a modern state,
Shamir reminded the audience
of how dark the picture was
for world Jewry four decades
afro and of how different
that picture is today.
"Until 40 years ago, we were
the objects of history, the vic-
tims of autocratic rulers we
have become once again the
masters of our own destiny,"
he asserted.
Yet even mast rs of their
own destiny cai t always
shape the actior, jf others.
Shamir stressed 'he role of
Jerusalem as Israel's capital in
his speech, a fact which has not
prevented most countries, in-
cluding the United States,
from placing their embassies
in Tel-Aviv.
Shamir received his most en-
thusiastic reaction from the
audience when he touched
upon a subject which was
neither political, controversial,
nor even new.
Stressing the importance of
"Jewish education, Jewish
awareness, and Jewish identi-
ty," Shamir declared that "we
must insure that the faith of
our fathers will also be the
faith of our sons and
daughters."
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 27, 1987
March on Washington
Impact of Import
Acceptance by Vice President George
Bush of an invitation to participate in what
already can be termed the historic
Washington Mobilization assures it's receiv-
ing national and international attention.
The huge march-rally scheduled next Sun-
day, Dec. 6, was arranged on the eve of the
eagerly-awaited summit meeting of Presi-
dent Reagan and Soviet Chairman Mikhail
Gorbachev to keep the issue of USSR Jewry
on the front burner.
The just-concluded General Assembly of
the Conference of Jewish Federations
assisted the National Jewish Community
Relations Advisory Council in emphasizing
the priority of the Mobilization to American
Jewry.
To date, the reaction of Jewish com-
munities across the land has been the most
immediate to any crisis since the Yom Kip-
pur War of 1973, and probably the most in-
tense to a situation not directly relating to
Israel since the modern Jewish state was
declared in 1948.
Our own South Florida Jewish com-
munities are among those in the forefront of
the effort, chartering at least two airplanes
for a one-day visitation to the nation's
capital.
Senators Chiles and Graham and Con-
gressmen Fascell, Lehman, Pepper, Smith,
Shaw and Mica all established allies of
both Israel and Soviet Jewry have given
quick endorsements to the pre-Summit
demonstration.
In fact, the success of Dec. 6 already is
certain.
What it must not be allowed to be,
however, is the climax of the campaign to
have the Soviet Union open wide the gates
for Jewish emigration and to permit those
Jews remaining to practice their religion
freely.
The Washington Mobilization must be
merely the beginning of a new and heighten-
ed campaign for the more than two million
Soviet Jews who still live forcibly separated
from the remainder of world Jewry.
Taking advantage of a major role by virtue
of his position as vice president, Mr. Bush
a major opportunity to show off his
has
leadership abilities by making his remarks
meaningful and forceful.
The world is watching.
General Assembly Postscript
Much to its credit, the leadership of the
Council of Jewish Federations and its 56th
General Assembly took full advantage of the
timing of its GA in focusing national atten-
tion on the upcoming Washington
Mobilization.
An early morning run for Soviet Jewry on
Miami Beach's new and widened beach and a
revised session which emphasized the call
for the mobilization were among the
highlights of the General Assembly.
That they took some of the spotlight away
from the first observances of Israel's 40th
anniversary and the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's 50th was a small price to pay
for the concentration of publicity in advance
of the Dec. 6 rally in our nation's capital.
Indeed, the dramatic arrangements for
the mobilization carried through the theme
of the 56th General Assembly: Dor L'Dor,
From Generation to Generation Building
Community and Continuity Through People.
Israel Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir car-
ried off an effort to address the delegates
without sidestepping the hotly-debated topic
of an international peace conference. While
not retreating from his opposition to the
plan endorsed by Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres, Mr. Shamir announced his will-
ingness to go to any Arab land in Israel's
quest for peace.
Although each of his predecessors as
premier made similar offers during their
terms as prime minister, Mr. Shamir manag-
ed to present the offer as something new.
Except for the official visit of the premier
and the rapid and effective presentation on
plans for the mobilization, the General
Assembly was most significant in the
breadth of its participation rather than in
the content of its countless sessions and
seminars.
An excellent panel on "Who Is A Jew"
and an Oneg Shabbat that presented the
views of one another of Israel and American
Jewry were among the exchanges that war-
ranted more attention than could be given
with such a massive schedule.
Greater Miami was an able host, and our
visitors did not stray far from their ap-
pointed rounds. To all, a well done and come
again!
Holiday Season
Needs Sensitivity
It is always a no-win situation: Holiday
season at mid-winter is anything but joyous
for those who take seriously the leveling of
the wall which separates church and state.
Each year, in public schools and public
places, Jews and other non-Christians are
faced with the decision of whether to par-
ticipate in particularistic Christian
festivities. Whether it be to light a tree, sing
a carol or listen to a homily, an adult can
easily make the intellectually honest and
comfortable choice. For children, the option
becomes less simple.
Peer pressure, perceived and potential
ostracism and the like have a chilling effect
on youngsters who are encouraged to listen
to instructions and to their teachers.
The quid-pr(Hjuo mentality that suggests
that a Hanukkah decoration or game of drei-
die is a fair trade-off for a Christmas
assembly make the faulty error of en-
couraging more religion in the public schools
rather than less. And more will surely not be
more of a benefit to those who ascribe to a
minority religion.
Once again, we depend upon the Com-
munity Relations Committee "Guidelines on
Religion and the Public Schools" in order to
diffuse the sensitive situation. Suggestions
of what public school activities are both ap-
propriate and legal, guidance on how to best
handle situations which are neither, are of-
fered in clear langugage.
Should coercion, harassment or a stu-
dent's abstention be denied, the CRC ad-
vises consultation before action. Awareness
of community relations implications is the
sign of a thinking citizen. So, too, would be
the observance of religious neutrality-in and
outside of the public school system.
March For A Moment In History
By DAVID A. HARRIS
There come moments when,
as Jews, it's time for each of us
to stand up and be counted,
when we must seek to become
authors of our own history.
Such a moment will take place
in the nation's capital on Sun-
day, Dec. 6. On the eve of
General Secretary Mikhail
Gorbachev's first visit to the
U.S., thousands of Jews, join-
ed by many non-Jewish
friends, will mass in
Washington to express
with Jews in the
solidarity
USSR.
Looking back, the rally for
European Jewry at Madison
Square Garden, December
1940, was one of those
moments. So, too, were May
1948 the birth of Israel;
June 1967 the Six-Day War;
Washington on Dec. 6. we will
have an unparalleled oppor-
tunity to demonstrate for
Soviet Jewry ... for the
world's third largest Jewish
community ... for the fate of
15 percent of our collective
selves.
The world will be watching.
October 1973 the Yom Kip- Thousands of journalists from
pur War; and November 1984 around the globe will descend
Fred K Shochet
Editor and Publisher
^Jewish Floridian
Norma A. Orovitz
Managing Editor
Suzanne Shochet
Executive Editor
William T. Brewer
Doctor ot Operations
Joan C Teglas
Director of Advertising
Friday. November 27. 1987
Volume 60
6KISLEV5748
Number 48
Operation Moses. Each was
a unique moment in Jewish
history. Each demanded our
attention. Each challenged us
to make a snap decision to
become a participant or re-
main a bystander. Each, in
hindsight, perhaps caused us
to judge ourselves. Did we
recognize the significance of
the event at the time? Did we
respond immediately? Did we
do all that we could have done
to mobilize interest and sup-
port from those around us?
By our presence in
on Washington for the Sum-
mit. Much of their attention
will doubtless be directed at
our mobilization on Dec. 6. and
the stories they file will be car-
ried to dozens of nations, but
nowhere will the reports w
more closely monitored than m
the Soviet Union. If *
Kremlin had its choice, there
would be no demonstration in
Washington. It's no secret
that Soviet leaders are deepj
worried about the prospect oi
Continued on Page 13-A


Season of Peace Spurs War Of Symbols
Friday, November 27, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
By RUTI G. TEITEL
Nativity scenes, crosses and
menorahs have been erected in
the most unlikely places on
the lawns of city halls, il-
luminated on the sides of
government office buildings,
nestled in the stairways of
courthouses, emblazoned on
sheriffs' cars, towering on fire
departments and proudly
displayed in public parks.
Three years since the
Supreme Court's March 1984
decision allowing the town of
Pawtucket, RI, to finance its
Christmas Nativity scene
display, the controversy over
government sponsorship of
religious symbols still rages.
But the battleground has
shifted from the Supreme
Court chambers where, for
a time, it seemed there might
be a judicial resolution of the
question to town halls all
over the country. In the local
arena, the issue which spr-
ings up during the December
holiday season is taking its
toll in community relations at a
time of ostensible good cheer.
For Jews, these local disputes
are often no-win propositions.
The Jewish community is
split. Shall Jews endure the
temporary Christian displays,
challenge them in court, or
decide that if we can't beat
them we must join them one
for one, menorah for Nativity
scene?
Recent litigation reflects the
split. In a crowded courtroom
in Pittsburgh last December, a
Federal district judge deter-
mined that a Nativity scene
could stand in the county cour-
thouse and a menorah in front
of the City-County building.
The Lubavitch, with their at-
torneys, were jubilant their
menorah would continue to be
publicly displayed. The Anti-
Defamation League was
disheartened, having joined
the American Civil Liberties
Union action against both the
Nativity scene and the
menorah. A prior lawsuit in
Chicago brought by the
American Jewish Congress
had also challenged both. And
in California, a state superior
court upheld a menorah on the
lawn of City Hall again pit-
ting the Lubavitch against the
American Jewish Congress.
As of yet unchallenged,
menorahs sponsored by
private funds appear on public
property all over New York Ci-
ty, including Queens Borough
Hall.
Ruti G. Teitel is assistant
director of the Legal Affairs
Department of ADL's Civil
Rights Division.
Only a fad? Perhaps but
one set into motion by Lynch v.
Donnelly, the Pawtucket deci-
sion and a dangerous one for
religious minorities. Recent
Federal court of appeals deci-
sions have limited that deci-
sion to Nativity scenes in
secular displays in the context
of the Christmas season.
Crosses and free-standing
Nativity scenes displayed
without accompanying non-
religious symbols on govern-
ment property have been held
unconstitutional. A creche at
City Hall in Birmingham, MI,
and a cross on the fire head-
quarters in St. Charles, IL,
were invalidated by the Sixth
and Seventh Circuits,
respectively.
These distinctions illustrate
the problems inherent in
government establishment of
religion. Unlike a Nativity
scene a menorah does not have
a national holiday to secularize
it. Obtaining government pro-
Continued on Page 6-A
The symbolic light cast by this cross and Christmas scene is not
always welcome on the "naked"public square. AP/Wide World Photo
The Labor Perspective:
Lewinsky Candidacy Sign of Democracy
By ARTHUR HERTZBERG
In a century marked by the
bloody failures of great revolu-
tions, the Zionist enterprise
stands out as the model of a
successful social and political
experiment. Starting from
Bcratch, Zionism recreated a
sovereign state in the ancient
homeland of the Jewish peo-
ple, revived and modernized a
language and a culture,
created a multi-faceted and
original economy and a highly
efficient defense system,
rescued Jews from a condition
of powerlessness, refashioned
a strategy for Jewish survival
and gave Jews around the
world hope for the future.
Key among the many factors
that contributed to this suc-
cess was the ability of the
Jewish people to unite around
a common agenda, overcoming
different visions, com-
mitments and loyalties.
Without the Jews who lived
and struggled in Israel, no
amount of support from
Diaspora Jews would have
helped; but without that
diplomatic, financial and moral
support from abroad, Israelis
would have experienced a
much more difficult time of it.
Zionism led not only to the
establishment of the Jewish
State but to the consolidation
of a constructive relationship
among Jews all over the world.
Today the very real
achievements of a global part-
nership in Jewish life is
threatened by a shift in the
balance of power between
Israel, the central theater of
Jewish life, and the American
Jewish Diaspora. The recent
and dubious throwing around
of their weight by a handful of
fund-raisers representing the
community welfare federa-
tions in the leadership of the
Jewish Agency violates an im-
portant tradition of Jewish
political life, and betrays a cen-
tral aspect of the Zionist ethos.
Zionism meant a return to
history through the personal
and political action of the
Jewish people. In the current
situation, it is the Knesset and
the democratically-elected
Zionist Congress that best ex-
press that tradition, precisely
because they most accurately
reflect the political nature of
Israeli society. By intervening
in the process by which the
various factions in the World
Zionist Organization were ar-
riving at a consensus on direc-
tion, policies and personalities
to lead the organization, the
small grouR of fund-raisers has
done the Jewish people a ma-
Continued on Page 11-A
Trudeau's Belated 'Mea Culpa'
By BEN KAYFETZ
(Copyright 1987, Jewish
Telegraphic Agency, Inc.)
Former Canadian Premier
Pierre Trudeau's unexpected
admission this month that his
government should not have
ignored alleged Nazi war
criminals in Canada has spark-
ed a lively debate over why vir-
tually nothing was done about
the issue by his Liberal Party.
The party was in power for
more than two decades, but
some say the blame can be
spread to other government
officials.
Speaking at a closed-door in-
Lisa's 'Jewish' Life and Death
By RABBI
MARC H. TANENBAUM
(Copyright 1987, Jewish
Telegraphic Agency, Inc.)
The tragic death in New
>ork of Lisa Steinberg, the
6-year-old victim of apparent
child-beating, has wrung the
hearts of all of us. It has made
us aware of how urgent is the
need to strengthen the
opacities of social service
agencies and the police to con-
tain this growing family
violence before it destroys
more innocent lives.
But there is one aspect of
this tragedy that needs to be
s^t straight before it gets out
of hand. It was reported that
L>sa was born of Catholic
Parents and had "a Jewish up-
bringing." Lisa indeed was
born of a Catholic mother. The
notion, however, that she had
a "Jewish upbringing" is
nothing less than scandalous.
The beatings and abuse that
this poor, lovely child suffered
at the hands of her adoptive
parents, who were born
Jewish, violates every basic
teaching of Judaism about
children. Anyone who knows
anything about the Jewish
religion and real Jewish family
life knows that every child is
sacred and central in Judaism.
The child in Jewish tradition is
the highest of human
treasures. What her parents
inflicted on Lisa was savage,
not Jewish.
Equally, the battering of the
woman in Lisa's household,
Hedda Nussbaum, abuses
every Jewish teaching and
feeling about the honored
place of a wife in the strong
Jewish family tradition.
"Husbands must honor their
wives more than themselves,"
the Talmud declares.
Beyond that, this is not a
Catholic-Jewish issue. It is a
terrible human tragedy. And
all of us should be doing
everything we can together to
try to prevent Lisa Steinbergs
and Hedda Nussbaums of
whatever religions and races
from ever happening again.
Rabbi Marc H. Tanenbaum
is director of international
relations for the American
Jewish Committee.
ternational conference at
McGill University, marking
the 40th anniversary of the
Nuremberg trials, Trudeau
acknowledged that war
criminals were not a priority
for his government.
Participants in the con-
ference said Trudeau called it
a problem "of previous times.
We had too much to do with
our own problems in our
time."
Liberal M.P. Robert Kaplan,
who was Trudeau's solicitor-
general (equivalent of U.S. at-
torney general) for part of that
period and who pushed hard
for a war crimes policy, set the
priorities for the cabinet.
But, he added, bureaucrats
in the Justice ministry, who
were urging the government
to do nothing, were as much to
blame.
"We had two obstacles. One
was the low priority given to
the issue, but the second was
the legal opinions on which we
operated," Kaplan told the
Toronto Globe and Mail.
The ivil servants told the
Libera. Ca! inet that a law
which allowed trials in <' a
for crimes committe< n
Europe 40 years ago migh.. be
challenged as a violation of the
"retroactivity rule" in Cana-
dian law. Kaplan said that
Jean Chretien, who was
minister of justice then, "ap-
proached the issue with an
open mind."
But he was being advised by
Justice ministry officials,
notably Martin Lowe, a senior
bureaucrat who headed an in-
terdepartmental committee in
1981 which recommended no
action. "I think that's where
Chretien got his legal opi-
nions," Kaplan said.
Justice critic Svend Robin-
son of New Democratic Party
wouldn't let Trudeau off easi-
ly. "His behavior amounted to
shameful indifference," he
said. "It was totally unaccep-
table and deeply disturbing. It
meant that had the Liberals
been reelected quite clearly
there would have been no fur-
ther action whatsoever on this
question."
Trudeau was quoted by one
source at the conference as
saying: "I belong to a religion
where, when we confess our
sins, we cmifess not only what
we did, but what we failed to
do. In listening to my former
parliamentarian (Robinson), I
felt it was a good lesson for my
fontii d on Page 6-A


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 27, 1987
Seasonal Symbols
Spur Conflict
Continued from Page 5-A
perty for its display is dubious
religious "equality."
Many push for pro-
nouncements declaring this
country to be Judeo-Christian.
This leaves out Muslims and
those of other faiths as well as
atheists.
To join the war of the sym-
bols sets us on a road that puts
Jews in a difficult position.
The problem with using "equal
time" is illustrated by the
long-standing debate over this
country's day-of-rest laws. The
Supreme Court upheld "blue
laws" state laws prohibiting
work on Sunday as constitu-
tional because they were con-
sidered to have originated as
religious and later developed
into a merely secular day of
rest. In sharp contrast, in the
recent Caldor case in Connec-
ticut, Sabbath observer legisla-
tion providing for an accom-
modation for a Saturday day of
rest was invalidated and con-
sidered to be an establishment
of religion by the court.
Where there is government
sponsorship, minorities
generally are not treated
equally. If access is accorded
pro rota, minorities lose out.
And where government finan-
cing is accorded to a religious
institution, the results are
once again unequal with the
majority resentfully subsidiz-
ing the minority. Religious
equality requires separation.
But does separation require
anti-menorah litigation? Un-
fortunately, separation does
require a struggle. Much of
what we take for granted to-
day would not be the law
without past protest. For ex-
ample, throughout the 1800s.
the Jewish communities in
South Carolina. Ohio and Pen-
nsylvania regularly protested
to their governors when
Thanksgiving Day proclama-
tions became explicitly Chris-
tian. The results varied. In
Pennsylvania, Governor
William Johnston had issued a
proclamation calling upon all
"denominations of Christians
to acknowledge their tran-
sgressions, supplicate through
the merits of the Redeemer
the forgiveness of sins..."
After receiving protests from
the Jewish community,
Johnston apologized via a
handbill distributed on Elec-
tion Day!
This history reminds us that
democratic principles are
weak without regular exercise.
The Jewish community has
long been vigilant and must
continue to be so to secure our
precious religious equality.
This article is reprinted
from the November 1987, issue
of the ADL Bulletin, national
publication of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
Brith.
Florida Legislators Help
Reunite Russian Family
WASHINGTON Anatoly
Michelson of Naples, FL, who
has been separated from his
wife and daughter 31 years,
expects to be reunited with his
family, Senator Bob Graham
said last week.
"The world rejoices when
families that have suffered
separation can be united,"
Graham said. "The good news
that Anatoly Michelson heard
from his family in Moscow
Trudeau
Continued from Page 5-A
soul, when you realize the
number of subjects we had fail-
ed to deal with."
However, Robinson said
Trudeau's "mea culpa" didn't
change anything.
Winnipeg lawyer David
Matas recently wrote the book
"Justice Delayed," which
traces how successive Cana-
dian governments ignored the
war crimes issue for the past
four decades.
"Trudeau's indifference is
no different than that of
other former post-war
premiers, said Matas. "It's a
never-ending sequence.
"Admittedly (Trudeau)
wasn't too helpful," said
Matas, a leader of the B'nai
B'rith Canada League for
Human Rights and an active
member of the Liberal Party,
"but it's not as if he said, "The
government should do nothing
new' or 'we did nothing anc
were right to do nothing'... I1
just wasn't an issue for him."
gives us special joy as we
prepare to celebrate
Thanksgiving in this country.
Senator Lawton Chiles,
Graham and Congressman
Connie Mack of Cape Coral
were active in the effort to re-
unite the Michelson family.
I
Conductor Zubin Mehta (center) and members
of the Israeli Philharmonic Orchestra walk
beneath the main gate of the Auschwitz Nazi
concentration camp with the German inscrip-
tion "Arbeit Macht Frei" (Work Maka Y<*
Free) during a visit to the state-run museum.
AP/Wide World Photo
Israel Reacts To Arab Summit
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM Political
debate in Israel is focused on
the recent Arab summit
meeting and its possible ef-
fects on the Middle East peace
process.
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres and other Labor Party
spokesmen argue vigorously
that the summit, hosted in Am-
man by King Hussein, provid-
ed a rare opportunity to move
toward Arab-Israeli peace
negotiations through an inter-
national conference.
This assessment stems from
the apparent victory of the
moderate Arab states over the
hard-liners, resulting in the
rehabilitation of Egypt's posi-
tion in the Arab world. All but
three Arab states broke off
relations with Egypt, the
largest of Arab states, on the
heels of its 1979 peace treaty
with Israel.
The Amman summit lifted
the ban on relations, and seven
Arab countries resumed full
diplomatic ties with Egypt in
the week since the summit
ended Bahrain, Kuwait,
Iraq, Morocco, United Arab
Emirates, Yemen and the
latest and most important, oil-
rich Saudi Arabia.
Peres and his Labor col-
leagues can thus argue that by
returning Egypt to the fold,
the Arab states are signaling,
indirectly, their acceptance of
Israel.
Likud leadership takes a
diametrically opposed view.
Michael Eitan, speaking for
the party in a Knesset debate,
contended that the reconcilia-
tion with Egypt was just
another stage in the Arab
struggle to eradicate Israel.
He noted that the summit
reiterated all of the United Na-
tions resolutions favoring the
Palestinians, including the
Nov. 29, 1947 partition resolu-
tion. According to Eitan, that
in itself is sufficient to
eliminate Hussein as a serious
negotiating partner. And the
summit went on to re-endorse
the Palestinian Liberation
Organization as an equal par-
ticipant in any future negotia-
tions, Eitan pointed out.
His appraisal was con-
siderably more negative than
that of Premier Yitzhak
Shamir, leader of Likud, who
was quick to welcome the Arab
rapprochement with Egypt
and expressed hope for
favorable political conse-
quences in terms of the Arab
world's attitudes toward
Israel.
Israeli officials say Peres,
who was visiting with Euro-
C heads of state, was to
suggested a peace con-
ference under joint American-
Soviet auspices, without the
participation of the other thre
permanent members of the
U.N. Security Council
France, Britain and the
Peoples Republic of China.
This would be followed by
direct Israel-Arab
negotiations.
The view here is that Mit-
terand and Thatcher will back
his proposal. It is uncertain
whether the Reagan Ad-
ministration actively favors
that approach and if Secretary
of State George Shultz will
seek Shamir's support for it
during their meeting in
Washington.
It is also not clear whether
the Soviets would be in-
terested in co-chairing a super-
power "umbrella" for Arab-
Israeli peace talks.
Peres surely speaks of his
own interest in movement on
the peace issue. Addressing
the Knesset plenum, he asked
rhetorically. "Are we to trj
and make diplomatic progress
now, or are we to wait for the
Messiah?"
While he acknowledged that
the kind of international con-
ference envisaged by the Arao
summit differs sharply m
Israel's concept, the haw
premise was the same: that u*
Arab-Israel conflict can oe
resolved by political mean-
and that direct talks shouW
take place after an intern*
tional opening."
Responding to Likud
hecklers. Peres demandedJ
know, "Would you fror
negotiations even if there we ,
not an interational operung-
His implication was that LiKu
and its allies want no pojncj
dialogue with the Arabs lest"
involve relinquishing some
ritory for peace.


New Rate For Israel Bonds
Friday, November 27, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
An intensive month-long
campaign to achieve record
sales of the new Variable Rate
Issue (VRI) of State of Israel
Bonds will be launched by the
Greater Miami area during
November and December.
The new bond, which cur-
rently pays 7.875 percent an-
nual interest, is now available
to individuals. Minimum pur-
chase is $25,000. Previously,
the VRI Bond was available
only to employee benefit
funds, foundations and public
endowment funds. The in-
terest rate will never fall
below 7Vz percent.
"In the recent period of
volatile and fluctuating
equities markets, State of
Israel VRI Bonds, with the Vh
percent floor in their annual
interest rate, have been con-
sidered a very desirable invest-
ment," noted M. Ronald
Krongold, general chairman of
the local Israel Bonds
campaign.
"The objective of our cam-
paign is to secure a record
number of members here in
South Florida for the Prime
Minister's Club, the interna-
tional honor society of leading
supporters of Israel who help
strengthen its economy by
purchasing $25,000 or more in
Israel Bonds annually."
To launch this special Prime
Minister's Club effort, a series
of VRI sales meetings will be
conducted until the end of the
year.
Begin Prays At
Wife's Grave
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Former Premier Menachem
Begin made a rare public ap-
pearance last Friday at the
Mount of Olives cemetery to
recite Kaddish at the grave of
his wife Aliza on the fifth an-
niversary of her death.
Begin, 74, looking pale and
thin, walked to the grave on
the arms of his daughters
Hassia and Leah. He was join-
ed by his son, Binyamin Zeev
Begin. He stood unsupported
during the 25-minute
memorial service, then
departed with silent nods at
the many well-wishers pre-
sent.
"I'm not carrying 1500 stone tablets down a mountain-
couldn't you cut a few?"
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Abraham Qrunhul
Praa.JNF Or. Miami
Zav W. Kogan
Praa. JNF Southern Ration
Rabbi Irving Lahrman
Chrmn.JNFFdtn.
For Information and Reservations
Jewish National Fund 420 Lincoln Road, Suite 353, Miami Beach, Fl. 33139 Tel. 538-6464


Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 27, 1987
Germany Hopes For Quick Nazi-Extradition
By DAVID KANTOR
(Bonn)
And
SUSAN BIRNBAUM
(New York)
(JTA) West German
Justice Minister Hans
Engelhard said in Bonn that
he hoped accused Nazi war
criminal Josef Schwamm-
berger would soon be ex-
tradited from Argentina to
West Germany, despite the
lack of an extradition treaty
between the two countries.
Argentine federal police ar-
rested the 75-year-old fugitive
in the province of Cordoba.
For the preceding two weeks,
the accused mass murderer of
Polish Jews was renting a
room at a ranch in La Huerta
and apparently had plans to
flee again.
In what appears to be a
response to Schwammberger's
arrest, the doors of a
synagogue in Cordoba were
blown off, according to the
World Jewish Congress.
Schwammberger has been in
Argentina for about 38 years,
having fled, it is believed, with
the help of the Nazi network
"Odessa." The Los Angeles-
based Simon Wiesenthal
Center reports that he was ar-
rested in Austria in 1948.
West Germany had asked
Argentina for Schwamm-
berger's extradition 14 years
ago. Last month, following a
news conference in Jerusalem
convened by the Wiesenthal
Center, Argentine television
telephoned to the center's
dean. Rabbi Man-in Hier, ask-
ing for details about
Schwammberger.
Argentine authorities had in-
dicated to West Germany that
they would extradite Schwam-
mberger if they could arrest
him. Engelhard said that
Schwammberger's arrest
comes largely as the result of
close cooperation between
authorities in Buenos Aires
and Bonn.
Engelhard praised Argen-
tine police for their success in
apprehending Schwamm-
berger. He said the arrest pro-
ved that a network of interna-
tional exchange of information
was well functioning.
The World Jewish Congress
indicated that Schwamm-
berger is listed in the long-
secret United Nations War
Crimes Commission archives
as wanted for murder. The
WJC located Schwamm-
berger's name on the master
list of dossiers contained in the
archives.
Schawammberger's file in-
dicates he was an SS guard
leader at the Przemysl labor
camp and Rozwadow ghetto,
and that he was wanted for
murder by Poland in 1947.
Schwammberger was placed in
the U.N. War Crimes Commis-
sion's "A" category, its most
serious listing, which was bas-
ed on the commission's deter-
mination that the evidence
justified immediate
prosecution.
In addition, says the WJC.
the U.N. file contains eviden-
tiary material of Schwamm-
berger's having sent Jews to
Auschwitz, as well as personal
responsibility for mass
shootings. This file indicates
he was arrested in Austria in
1947.
The WJC's Buenos Aires of-
fice has notified Argentine
authorities of the existence of
the U.N. file on
Schwammberger.
The archives files were off-
limits to historians and resear-
chers for more than 40 years
until a diplomatic campaign by
Israel and Jewish organiza-
tions prompted U.S. Secretary
General Javier Perez de
Cuellar to announce Nov. 6
that the files would be made
available to historians, jour-
nalists and other researchers.
Palestinian Avoids Deportation
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel refrained from its
scheduled deportation Friday
of Palestinian activist
Mubarak Awad apparently to
avoid aggravating friction
with the Americans over his
case.
Awad, a Jerusalem-born
Palestinian, is a naturalized
American citizen. He went to
the United States in 1969 and
returned to Israel in 1985 to
found the Palestinian Center
for the Study of Non-Violent
Resistance, in East Jerusalem.
Awa, who never held Israeli
citizenship, was advised last
August that his status as a
resident alien was revoked.
The Interior Ministry refused
to extend his tourist visa,
which expired Friday, and was
about to issue the deportation
order.
Awad said he would not
leave the country voluntarily.
Jewish Property In Arab
Lands Compensation
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Knesset speaker Shlomo Hillel
contends that Israel, in any
future negotiations with Arab
countries, must insist on com-
pensation to Jews whose pro-
perty and belongings were left
behind or confiscated when
they left their Arab homes for
Israel.
"As a matter of fact, I think
that we made a mistake when
we did not include the subject
in the peace negotiations with
Egypt." Hillel said. "It
created a precedent which
does not help the cause of Jews
from Arab countries." Israel
and Egypt signed a peace trea-
ty in 1979.
In an interview with the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency,
the Iraqi-born Hillel.64, con-
ceded he cannot provide an
estimate of the value of pro-
perty and capital lost by the
Jews who fled the Arab coun-
tries. But according to various
sources, the amount is $2-$3
billion.
Hillel said that about 40,000
Jews now live in the entire
Arab world, compared to more
than one million before the
State of Israel was established
in 1948. Describing the cur-
rent situation, he noted that
about 25,000 Jews live in
Morocco, where they enjoy
"peace and freedom"; 4,500
Jews live in Syria, where they
are "oppressed and their
movement is limited"; and the
rest live in small Jewish com-
munities throughout the Arab
world.
Asked about the plight of
Syrian Jewry, Hillel asserted
that only international
pressure will ease their op-
pression and enable them to
leave Syria. He said this is the
method that was used to
release the Jews of Egypt
after the 1967 Six-day War.
'Syria holds the Jews as if
they were hostages," Hillel
charged. "Recently we have
been told that the Jews in
Syria are not oppressed as
before, but the reality is that
their freedom of movement
within the country is still
limited, and most important,
they are not allowed to leave
the country at all."
The U.S. Embassy in Tel Aviv
intervened on his behalf. In
Washington last Wednesday.
State Department spokesman
Charles Redman described
Awad as a "leading advocate
of change through non-
violence" who has "served as a
moderating influence in a
potentially volatile area."
The American position was
made even more clear when a
press conference held by Awad
here Wednesday to protest his
expulsion was attended by the
deputy U.S. consul general in
East Jerusalem, Edwin Cub-
bison. Cubbison publicly ex-
pressed hope Awad could be
allowed to remain.
The Israeli Foreign Ministry
claimed in a letter to the U.S.
Embassy that Awad did not
limit himself to non-violence,
but rather advocated
sabotage. Nevertheless, the
Friday deadline passed
without the Interior Ministry-
issuing a deportation order.
A ministry spokesperson
said later that it hoped that
Awad, "an advocate of non-
violence and observance of the
law, will abide by the law and
leave."
Instead, Awad sought sup-
port Saturday at Kol
Haneshama, a Reform
synagogue in the Baka quarter
of Jerusalem, where many of
the congregants are American
Jews who have immigrated to
Israel.
He was invited by its rabbi,
Levi Weiman-Kelman, who
heard of Awad's plans to visit
a mosque, a church and a
synagogue to plead his cause.
"Since many of our members
are Jews who moved f,o Israel,
they are especially sensitive to
the idea that someone born in
this country could be
deported," Weiman-Kelman
said.
Nazi war criminal suspect Josef Schwammberger. ?5. u< shown
before his extradition hearing at the Federal Court in La Plata.
Schwammberger, accused of war crimes against Jeu-s dunng
World War II, was arrested in Argentina. He had been living in
Argentina since escaping Austria in 19^9. West Germany is
pressing for his return to faces charges of killing up to 15,000
Jews in Poland. AP/Wide World Photo
Israeli-Iran Arms Trade
Rumors Causing Dissension
By DAVID LANDAU
(Jerusalem)
HUGH ORGEL
(Tel Aw)
And
HOWARD ROSENBERG
(Washington)
(JTA Reports of undisclos-
ed origin that Israel continues
to supply arms to Iran have
become a source of irritation
between Israel and the United
States. Officials in Jerusalem
fear they may have cast a
shadow on Premier Yitzhak
Shamir's visit to Washington.
Israeli officials have flatly
denied the reports. State
Department spokesman
Charles Redman confirmed
that the United States has con-
fronted Israel with the allega-
tions that surfaced in the
media.
He said it was American
policy to follow up any news
reports claiming that Iran has
imported weaponry. He declin-
ed to comment on their veraci-
ty, except to note that Israeli
officials "find no credibility"
in them.
The Israelis have
"investigated them and they
find no evidence that in fact
such shipments have occur-
red," Redman said. He added
that "this particular story has
been reported widely over the
past several weeks."
Israeli officials are never-
theless anxious. They said that
Shamir would deny the reports
totally if the issue were to be
raised with him in
Washington, because there is
no truth whatever in them.
Both President Reagan and
Secretary of State George
Shultz brought the matter to
the attention of President
Chaim Herzog during his state
visit to the United States two
week ago, the first ever by a
president of Israel.
According to a Doror
report, Herzog promptly con-
sulted by cable and telephone
with Shamir. Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres and Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin. His
conversations prompted an im-
mediate investigation m
Israel, the conclusions of
which enabled Herzog to in-
form Shultz that "no proof tha
been found that these reports
are correct." the paper
reported.
Davar said that Washington
also has begun a comprehen-
sive investigation of the nw
ter. The paper said the que^
tioning oFtne Israe is by the
Americans stemmed in P*
from reports in the Kuam
and British press that seug
Israeli arms dealers, inclwj*
former Israel I'
officers, are involved in
million arms deal with irw>-


Friday, November 27, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
His vision, persistence and total dedication
have forged a legacy of Remembrance
of the Holocaust for all generations
Join in honoring
BENJAMIN MEED
President, The American Gathering
and Federation of Jewish Holocaust
Survivors
on the occasion of his acceptance
of the i i

ELIE WIESEL
REMEMBRANCE
AWARD

at the
NATIONAL HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS DINNER
Address by
H. E. YITZHAK RABIN
Israel's Defense Minister
Sunday Evening, December 20, 1987
Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel, Miami Beach
Under the auspices of
STATE OF ISRAEL BONDS
IN ASSOCIATION WITH
The American Gathering and Federation
of Jewish Holocaust Survivors
MAKE YOUR RESERVATION TODAY!
CALL ISRAEL BONDS 531 -6731


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 27, 1987
Nava Arad On Israeli Controversy
Continued from Page 1-A
The Likud party is fighting against the inter-
national conference, saying Israel should con-
duct peace talks directly with Jordan.
ISRAELI Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir, in
a speech before the 56th General Assembly of
the Council of Jewish Federations last week,
sought support for his plan for direct talks with
Jordan. Arad, likewise, was busy drumming up
support for her party's position.
"I get three reactions from world Jewry,"
said Arad. "I have those who are really happy
and agree with me that we should be active in
getting support for the peace process.
"Then you have those who are saying, 'no, we
don't have the right to interfere because you are
the ones who are going to fight, you have to live
there. We are only here to help you.'
"Then you have the reaction which is saying
loud and clear we have to go on as we are now.
They support Likud."
Whether or not Jews in the Diaspora have the
right to be partners in deliberations among
Israel Knesset members is a new issue, Arad
said.
"The old leadership of the state from Ben-
Gurion (1948) to Begin (1984) made a big
mistake of saying Jews in the Diaspora should
identify themselves with Israel only in aspects of
lobbying politicians in their own countries and in
raising funds."
While Israeli leaders may be trying to win
World Jewry support on their opposing posi-
tions to the peace process, they got unsolicited
involvement from world Jewry in the controver-
sial "Who is a Jew" debate.
"The 'Who is a Jew' question was an educa-
tional process to many Israelis who realized for
the first time there is a Jewish population out-
side of Israel," Arad said.
The issue is all about the "Law of Return"
which was established in Israel in 1950 and
declared that Israel was open to any Jew. Then,
in 1970, two cases came before the Israeli
Supreme Court, Arad said. The first case involv-
ed a Jewish man who converted to Christianity.
Halacha, or Jewish law, said the man was still
considered a Jew. But the Supreme Court said,
for the purposes of the Law of Return, he was
not.
THE SECOND case involved a Jewish man
who was a high-ranking officer in the Israeli ar-
my married to a non-Jewish woman. The state of
Israel refused to write on their civil cards that
their children were Jewish because by Halacha,
the children are not Jewish if the mother is not
Jewish. Yet, Arad said, the man won in Supreme
Court, which decided that his children were
Jewish under the spirit of the law because he
had fought in Israeli wars and raised his children
in Israel.
That same year, a provision was added to the
law to include as a Jew anyone who had con-
verted. The controversy now focuses on whether
the words "by Halacha" should be added to the
law of return. Under the provision, only so-
meone who was converted according to Halacha
could be considered a Jew.
And Halacha, in Israel, is decided by Orthodox
courts. And Orthodox courts don't consider con-
version by Reform and Conservative rabbis to be
in accordance with Halacha. This has stirred up
opposition from world Jewry, the majority of
whom are not Orthodox.
The Knesset defeated the proposal to add "by
Halacha" to the conversion clause of the Law of
Return. But the issue has recently been return-
ed to the floor of the Knesset for another round.
Arad is hoping to get support from world
Jewry for her party's position that the issue of
Halacha should not be decided by the Knesset,
but should be worked out by religious leaders.
"If you want me to be cynical," Arad said,
"the question is really not 'Who is a Jew' and
what is conversion. The question is 'Who is a
Rabbi?'
IN 1921, Arad said, before the state of Israel
was born, there was a mandatory law which
gave Jewish rabbis the right to deal with Jewish
religious issues. At the time, we didn't have
Reform and Conservative rabbis to demand
their say."
Arad said the Labor Party will fight for equali-
ty of all religious streams.
"A lot of Israelis do not understand that if the
Law of Return will be changed, the majority of
the Jewish people who live outside Israel will be
discredited and I say, 'thank God for Reform,
Conservative, Orthodox and Recohstructionist.'
Becuse of the different movements Jewish peo-
ple identify as Jews.
"Most of those," Arad added, "who are
pushing for the Law of Return are not Zionists.
They are waiting for Mashiach." (The Messiah)
Proponents of conversion according to
Halacha are also making an appeal to world
Jewry, particularly in America, for support. In a
full-page ad that recently appeared in The
Jewish Floridian as well as other newspapers, it
was argued that for more than 3,000 years con-
versions had been performed only one way in
accordance with Halacha. The ad said that Jews
all over the world look to Israel for direction and
that if Israel ignores the halachic criteria for
conversion, Jews all over the world may choose
to ignore Halacha as well.
"SOME REFORM and Conservative rabbis
Politics Still Played At WZO
have been speaking from their pulpits and sen
ding mail to their membership, maliciously
claiming that by discrediting their conversions
the supporters of the Halacha amendment do
not recognize the Jewishness of Reform and
Conservative Jews," the Shofar Association of
America claims.
"Don't be misled by this false claim. Any Jew
regardless of affiliation, is a fully-fledged Jew'
The issue of 'Who is a Jew* pertains only to con-
versions to Judaism."
The 'Who is a Jew' issue only magnifies the
problems faced by Jewry worldwide. In Israel
there are growing clashes between Jews who
observe the Sabbath and non-observant Jews
who would just as soon see a movie on Friday
night. Some of these clashes have been violent.
In politics, Arad said, the smaller religious
parties "blackmail" the mainstream members of
the coalition government because they
sometimes have the swing votes on issues.
"NEVER in the history of Judaism was there
one stream," Arad said of the division. "Talmud
is full of arguments."
Arad is looking to the November 1988 elec-
tions in Israel to break the deadlock over the
peace process approach.
"It's the first time the whole question that the
character of Israel as a Jewish state will be put
forward," she said. "We are saying now we
have an historic chance to make peace with our
neighbors.
"If there will be peace the whole economy, the
whole character of the Middle East will change.
Now we go to the Common Market and to the
United States in order to export and if we can
build a better economy for the whole Middle
East it will change the whole standard of living
for all the Middle East."
Arad is asked why peace cannot first be made
within the bitterly divided Labor and Likud
parties.
"Peace you make with your enemies, not your
friends," she said.
Arad said the time is "ripe" for peace
agreements between Israel and its Arab
neighbors. "It's an historical moment and we
are going to miss it and no one will forgive
himself for this historical disaster," she said.
As the leader of Na'amat, Arad said that
women have to be more active in supporting
peace and in Israel there is a campaign to rally
Israeli women for peace. An Israeli mother, she
said, has a common bond with an Arab mother.
"I do believe women are a big factor and
women are mothers. Mothers give life," she
said, "and must protect life."
ADL Stands By Policy
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Akiva Lewinsky, the Labor
Party's candidate for chair-
man of the World Zionist
Organization-Jewish Agency
executives, said he would not
Vanunu Trial
To Continue
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Former nuclear technician
Mordechai Vanunu, on trial for
treason, lost two important ap-
peals in Jerusalem district
court Sunday.
The court rejected his claim
that he cannot be tried in
Israel because he was brought
here by illegal means. It also
upheld his confession, which
Vanunu's lawyer. Avigdor
Feldman. said was invalid
because it was obtained under
duress.
Vanunu. 38, is charged with
having given the Sunday
Times of London data on
Israel's alleged nuclear
weapons capabilities and
photographs of the nuclear
facility at Dimona in the Negev
where he was once employed.
withdraw his candidacy
despite his recent rejection by
Diaspora Jewish fund-raiser.
Speaking at a meeting of
high-level Labor Party leaders
convened by Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres, Lewinsky said
he saw his candidacy as an
undertaking on behalf of the
party, since the party
nominated him unanimously.
Peres, the Labor Party
leader, did not speak up for
Lewinsky at the meeting.
Stressing that it was impor-
tant for Labor to win the chair-
manship of the WZO at the for-
thcoming World Zionist Con-
gress here, Peres said it was
also important to avoid a con-
frontation with the fund-
raiser.
A six-member committee
headed by Peres was ap-
pointed to resolve the issue of
the candidacy and is expected
to report back this week.
Other Labor Party possibles
for the job are former Health
Minister Mordechai Gur and
former Ambassador to the
United States Simcha Dinitz.
By ANDREW
SILOW CARROLL
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith will continue to
argue against quotas and
"preferential" treatment in
the work place based on race,
gender or ethnicity, despite re-
cent amendments to its
policy
of
longstanding
opposition.
According to ADL officials
here, recent actions taken by
the agency's National Ex-
ecutive Committee represent
only "modifications" of the
organization's basic opposition
to quotas as a means of ensur-
ing equal opportunity.
gfifiu mm
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ICHANUKMatXMASTW,
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t


Friday, November 27, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Akiva Lewinsky
Democratic Candidacy
Continued from Page 5-A
jor disservice.
AN ONGOING STRUGGLE
Although the fund-raisers
have the right to "advise and
consent" on the key officials of
the Jewish Agency, the veto
that they cast over the choice
of chairman and treasurer
should be seen not in isolation,
but as part of an ongoing
struggle for control of the
funds that the agency spends
in Israel. In this process, the
fundraisers have exercised
what amounts to proxy control
of a bloc of minority stock to
force a hostile takeover and
impose their will on the untidy
and vibrant Jewish democracy.
Their operating principle is
that the ability to give
$100,000 or so to the United
Jewish Appeal gives them the
right to decide how the Zionist
movement and thus Israel
is to shape its internal life.
Akiva Lewinsky was the
choice of the Israeli
democratic process as chair-
man of the WZO, unanimously
elected by over 1,100 members
of the central committee of the
Israel Labor Party as their
candidate for the job. He and
the policies he represented
were then endorsed by other
Zionist parties, who, together
with Labor, represented a ma-
jority of the delegates elected
to the Zionist Congress. It was
at this point that the fund-
raisers vetoed him. They do
not like him, but that was
clearly no basis for so flagrant
an action. So they charged
that he had been chosen in a
political "deal."
To assert that the selection
of a candidate by delegates
representing millions of
Jewish voters is the result of a
'deal," while a veto by a small
and unelected group is
democratic and responsible,
defies all logic. Worse, it im-
poses the choice of a small
group of money men on the
system by which the Zionist
movement chooses its leaders.
The veto was unjust; it was
also unwise.
In political life, the choice is
never between the real and the
ideal but rather among alter-
natives framed by the
parameters of the possible. In
the real Jewish world, to veto
Akiva Lewinsky, the Labor
1'arty's candidate to head the
WZO and the Jewish Agency,
is to affirm either another
Labor candidate or a Likud
one. Other candidates include
able veterans of political arena
who may view the WZO and
Jewish Agency as a spr-
ingboard to higher office,
subordinating the re-
quirements of the position to
the exigencies of their political
aspirations. If the next WZO
and Agency chairman must in-
'tiate great structural
changes, as the fund-raisers
never tire of telling us, is the
best person for the job so-
meone whose ambitions lie
elsewhere, and who may, for
that reason, be unwilling to
risk alienating the vested in-
terests and powers that be?
Zionism liberated the Jewish
people from their own
powerlessness, and also from
the rule of a small group of
unrepresentative and self-
appointed leaders, responsible
to no one except themselves.
The provocative intervention
of the fundraisers in the elec-
tion process of the Zionist
movement demonstrates that
in Jewish life no less than any
place else, democracy must be
continually defended.
Rabbi Arthur Hertzberg,
author of "The Zionist Idea"
and professor of religion at
Dartmouth College, is a vice
president of the World Jewish
Congress and a delegate,
representing Friends of Labor
Israel, to the forthcoming
World Zionist Congress.
In the Cabinet Room of the White House Presi-
dent Reagan met with members of the Jewish
community who plan to lead a demonstration
Dec. 6 on behalf of Soviet Jewry. From left:
)ooogoooooooooo
Jerry Goodman, executive director, National
Conference on Soviet Jewry; Yuli Edelshtein,
recently freed refusenik; Morris Abram,
chairman, NCSJ; and President Reagan.


Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 27, 1987
mm NeWS m
Roundup
UAHC Votes To Ban Smoking
The 1.3 million member Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations has called on its 810 Reform synagogues in the
United States and Canada to "ban smoking entirely" at all
of their "meetings, functions and workplaces.
The UAHC convention delegates also voted to "establish
educational programs in religious schools and youth pro-
grams that discourage the use of smoking and non-smoking
tobacco products.
Senators Get High Marks
WASHINGTON Senators Paul Sarbanes (D., Md.),
Howard Metzenbaum (D., Ohio), Edward Kennedy (D.,
Mass.) and Lowell Weicker (R., Conn.) were among those
senators whose voting records received high marks from
the Fund For Freedom, a bipartisan political action com-
mittee that supports candidates who are committed to a
strong U.S.-Israel relationship and a pluralistic America.
Ryter Is Director
Of Memorial Council
WASHINGTON. D.C. U.S. Holocaust Memorial Coun-
cil Chairman Harvey M. Meyerhoff selected Lyle Ryter to
be Executive Director of the Council. His appointment was
approved on Nov. 18 by the Council. Dr. David Weinstein,
who had been serving as acting Executive Director since
February, resigned for health and personal reasons.
49 Years Later German City
Reopens JCC
BONN (JTA) A multi-million dollar synagogue and
Jewish community center was opened last week in
Freiburg, in the state of Baden-Wuertemberg, to replace
the synagogue destroyed by the Nazis 49 years ago.
The new center was built on land donated by the local
authorities, who, along with the state and federal govern-
ments, contributed toward its cost. No more than 300 Jews
now live in the vicinity.
West German Court
Bans Nazi Song
BONN (JTA) A court in Oldenberg has banned the
"Horst-Wessel Lied," a marching song of the Nazi SA
associated with violence against Jews.
The court overruled a lower court decision in Lingen that
allowed the tune to be performed with the original lyrics.
Begun Under
House Arrest
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Long-
time refusenik Iosif Begun was
among at least a score of
Jewish activists who were
placed under house arrest and
had their telephones discon-
nected for several hours Sun-
day. Reports from Moscow
said the house arrests would
be "for at least one day."
But Begun contacted the
Israel Defense Force radio by
phone Monday morning. He
said his telephone was recon-
nected Sunday evening but did
not say whether he was still
under house arrest.
These developments occur-
red some hours after Begun
spoke to the newspaper
Maariv by telephone Sunday
to report that his son, Boris,
with his wife and children,
have been promised exit visas
by the Soviet authorities. He
said the entire family will be
coming to Israel soon.
Begun had been among a
group of at least 20 activists
who planned to protest outside
the Soviet Foreign Ministry's
press center in Moscow
X'nst the recent increase in
cially condoned anti-
Semitism in the USSR.
The KGB learned of the
plans and its agents swooped
down on the activists' homes.
The activists had requested
permission for a demonstra-
tion several weeks ago, but
were turned down and cancel-
ed their plans at that time.
Begun himself was granted
an exit visa a few months ago,
but refused to leave without
the rest of his family. This
gave rise to reports that he in-
tended to remain in the Soviet
Union to work for the right of
Jews to practice their religion
and culture without hindrance
or harassment.
But Begun denied the
reports. His son, Boris, was
refused a visa because his in-
laws would not sign a docu-
ment consenting to their
daughter's departure from the
country. They have still not
signed it.
But, according to Begun,
Boris was summoned to OVIR,
the Soviet emigration office,
over the weekend and told that
he and his family would get
visas. Begun told Maariv he
had no idea why the
authorities decided now to
allow his son to leave.
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'Displaced' German Art
To Be Returned
Friday, November 27, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
By MANFRED NEUDER
BONN (DaD) The two
German states are engaged in
a comprehensive exchange of
works of art. Museums and
repositories in the Federal
Republic of Germany are to
return 140 paintings to the
German Democratic Republic
!<;i)R), while 290 paintings are
to be returned to the Federal
Republic by the GDR. Pain-
tings due to be exchanged are
unofficially estimated to be
worth DM200m, approximate-
ly $115,000.
Visitors to the Wiesbaden
Stadtisches Museum will soon
be able to admire Tischbein's
Portrait of a Young Lady,"
which was evacuated from
Hesse during the war, while
Lukas Cranach the Elder's
Judgment of Paris" is to be
returned to the Staatliche
Galerie in Dessau, GDR. It was
stored in the Harz as a World
War II fire raid precaution.
The way was paved for the
exchange in a minute to the
May 1986 intra-German arts
agreement: "The contracting
parties declare themselves
ready, within the means at
their disposal, to seek solu-
tions with regard to art
treasures evacuated during
the war." A Bonn government
official in charge of the ar-
rangements says: "Everything
is to be returned to its original
location."
The two sides agreed in
November 1986 to an ex-
change of archive material.
Paintings, drawings and prints
are now to be exchanged, leav-
ing sculpture and scientific col-
lections relocated for safety's
sake during the war to be
returned to their original
location.
As part of the exchange of
paintings mainly second-rate
works are to be returned to the
Schlossmuseum in Darmstadt,
the Wallraf-Richartz-Museum
in Cologne and the Stadtisches
Museum in Wiesbaden. Works
by Anselm Feuerbach and
Lovis Corinth stand out among
the westbound works of art. A
number of very valuable
works, including woodcuts by
Albrecht Durer and paintings
by Lukas Cranach the Elder,
Edvard Munch and Max
Liebermann, are to be return-
ed to museums and galleries in
the GDR.
Critics in the Federal
Republic of Germany have
claimed that works to be
returned to museums in the
GDR are almost all paintings
restored at great expense,
whereas items to be returned
to the West have in some cases
been found, on closer scrutiny
at their GDR location, to be in
very poor condition.
Exchanges of archive
material have included the
return of the document foun-
ding Rostock University to the
Schwerin state archives and
the return of Lubeck of the
1226 letter patent in which Ho-
ly Roman Emperor Friedrich
II granted the city freedom of
the Reich. In another move a
medieval altar by Brthel
Bruyn was returned to Col-
ogne by the Weimar
Schollssmuseum.
Dec. 6
March For A
Moment In History
< ontinued from Pape 4-A
a rally for Soviet Jewry, just as
they were concerned about
planned demonstrations in
France at the time of Gor-
bachev's visit there in October
1985. The Kremlin wishes our
movement would fizzle and
die. On the other hand, Soviet
Jews will be eagerly awaiting
reports of the rally, for they
rightly believe that such public
manifestations represent their
lifeline. Were it not for
Western support, their cause
would, in all likelihood, have
been suppressed long ago.
The Soviet Jewry advocacy
movement has been one of the
most successful non-violent
human rights movements in
modern history. As a result,
nearly 300,000 Soviet Jews to-
day live in freedom and dignity
in Israel and other countries.
But many others wait.
Our efforts over two decades
nave truly made a difference.
And they can continue to make
a difference if only we believe
"i our own ability to affect the
course of events.
Join in on Dec. 6. Join Ida
Nudel, Natan Sharansky,
Vladimir Slepak, Yuli Edelsh-
tein and other courageous
former Prisoners of Cons-
cience and refuseniks coming
from Israel. Join thousands of
Jews traveling by regularly
scheduled and charter planes,
buses and trains from all
across the country. Join
Catholic and Protestant
clergy, labor leaders and black
and Hispanic friends. Join
members of Congress and
state and local officials. Join
hundreds of Canadians, in-
cluding as many as 30
members of Parliament. Join
Nobel Laureate Elie Wiesel.
Join us for the largest
demonstration in behalf of a
Jewish cause in Washington's
history. And bring your
children and grandchildren.
We may not be able to promise
good weather, but we do
guarantee you a moment in
history.
David A Harris,
Washington Representative of
the American Jewish Commit-
tee, is the coordinator of the
National Summit Mobilization
Task Force.
The Federal Republic of Germany and the
German Democratic Republic (GDR) are ex-
changing works of art "evacuated" from their
original art aalleries or museums durina
World War II. Edvard Munch's "Portrait of
Dr. Linde," 1901,, is to be returned from
Munich to the GDR. Photo: DaD/dpa
Appeals Court Rules For Chabad
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Appeals Court for the Second
Circuit in Manhattan
unanimously upheld a federal
district court decision that
awarded the library that
belonged to the sixth Lubavit-
cher rebbe, Rabbi Joseph
Schneersohn, to the Lubavitch
movement.
The imbroglio pitted Barry
Gourary, grandson of the sixth
rebbe, against the organized
Lubavitch, or Chabad,
community.
Gourary, a Montclair, N.J.,
businessman who is not a
member of Chabad, had claim-
ed part of the library had been
left him by virtue of a will his
grandmother, Nechama Dina
Schneersohn the sixth
rebbe's widow left at the
time of her death in 1970.
In it, she wrote that the
50,000-book library was the
property of herself, her two
daughters, and her grandson.
Chabad, however, claimed it
was entitled to the library
because it was communal
property.
In April 1985, Gourary was
seen on a video surveillance
system taking books surrep-
titiously from the library,
located at Chabad worldwide
headquarters in the Crown
Heights section of Brooklyn,
N.Y.
He had taken more than 400
books and manuscripts and
sold more than 100 to rare
book dealers in the United
States, England, Switzerland
and Israel, at a personal profit
he claimed was $186,000.
Chabad went to court to
restrain Gourary from selling
more books, and he countered
with a suit claiming ownership
of the library. In January,
federal Judge Charles Sifton
awarded the library to
Chabad.
Chabad repurchased many
of the works at prices in excess
:>f that amount. The remaining
books and manuscripts were
placed in escrow. These will
now be returned to the library.
Soviets Sanction
Hebrew
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) More
than 70 Soviet Jews have sign-
ed up for the first officially -
sanctioned Hebrew courses in
the Soviet Union, according to
information reaching the
Soviet Jewry Information
Center in Jerusalem.
The report was hailed by
government sources here
familiar with Soviet Jewish af-
fairs as an important step for
Jewish culture in the Soviet
Union. The classes are to be
held in the town of Baku, in
the Soviet Republic of
Azerbaijan.
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420 Lincoln Road Suite :J53 Miami Beach. Florida 33138 Phone: 538-6464
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Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 27, 1987
Jewish Agencies Mum On Kennedy
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Jewish organizations are ex-
pected to maintain their tradi-
tional neutral position during
the confirmation process for
U.S. Court of Appeals Judge
Anthony Kennedy, whom
President Reagan nominated
for the Supreme Court follow-
ing the withdrawal of Judge
Douglas Ginsberg.
Washington representatives
of Jewish organizations told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agen-
cy that there does not appear
to be any reason to take a
stand on the nomination of the
51-year-old Sacramento,
Calif., native, unless
something unexpected is
revealed at Kennedy's Senate
confirmation hearings.
Many Jewish organizations
broke from the practice of not
commenting on Supreme
Court nominations when
Reagan named Judge Robert
Bork of the U.S. Court of Ap-
peals for the District of Colum-
bia to succeed Associate
Justice Lewis Powell, who
resigned from the court this
summer.
Bork's extensive written opi-
nions on privacy and social
issues caused many Jewish
organizations to oppose the
conservative judge
vehemently.
After Bork was rejected by
the Senate, Reagan nominated
Bork's appeals court colleague
Douglas Ginsburg, who, if con-
firmed, would have been the
sixth Jew in history to serve on
the high court.
But Jewish officials stressed
that Ginsburg's Jcwishness
would not gain him support in
the Jewish community if his
opinions on church-state and
social issues, which were for
the most part unknown, were
not acceptable. They also ex-
pressed the belief that the
Jewish community does not ac-
cept the concept of a Jewish
seat on the court.
Ginsburg withdrew Nov. 7
after revelations about some of
his past conduct, including
that he smoked marijuana
when he was a law professor at
Harvard. Reagan then named
Kennedy, who has been on the
U.S. Appeals Court for the
Ninth Circuit in San Francisco
since 1975.
David Brody, Washington
representative of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, said he believes that
there will not be any particular
Jewish reaction to the Ken-
nedy nomination.
Brody noted the favorable
response to the nomination
from both liberals and conser-
vatives. He said Kennedy ap-
pears to be "highly regarded
Desert Strategy
BEERSHEVA Although
Israel's Negev desert is small
compared to China's 137,000
square miles of desertland,
scientists from Ben-Gurion
University of the Negev were
invited by China's Academy of
Science to deliver papers and
share their experiences in con-
quering the desert at an inter-
national seminar on deser-
tification just concluded at
Lanzhou on the fringe of the
vast Gobi desert.
as a pragmatist" who judges
each case on the facts rather
than from an ideological
viewpoint.
He added that while many
Jews may have "legitimate
disagreements" with some of
Kennedy's opinions, he does
not appear to be "outside the
mainstream of judicial
thought" as many believed
Bork was.
David Harris, Washington
representative of the
American Jewish Committee,
said his organization does not
take a stand on judicial ap-
pointments unless there is a
question of competence.
The AJCommittee and the
ADL, did not publicly oppose
the Bork nomination.
Mark Pelavin, Washington
representative of the
American Jewish Congress,
one of the organizations that
led the Jewish opposition to
Bork, said that while many
Jews may not agree with all of
Kennedy's views, there is
nothing so far to warrant op-
position to his nomination.
Pelavin said he made this
assessment after examining
most of the approximately 400
opinions written by Kennedy
while on the appeals court
None of these opinions dealt
with the church-state issue he
noted, although he expected
Kennedy would be questioned
on this during the confirma-
tion hearing by the Senate
Judiciary Committee.
Experts consider Kennedy
to be nght-of-center, but
believe he may provide the
same swing vote as Powell did
on the court, now evenly divid-
ed between conservatives and
liberals.
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Friday, NovemberJ7^987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
The Bread of Thanksgiving
A Jewish Perspective
By RABBI
BERNARD S. RASKAS
Copyright 1987, Jewish
Telegraphic Agency, Inc.)
There are very few rituals or
commandments that the great
philosopher Maimonides
refrained from explaining. But
one about which he said, "I do
not know the reason for this"
was lechem hapanim, or "show
bread."
As described in the Books of
Exodus and Leviticus, it was a
ritual that was to be observed
in the Temple. Every day 12
loaves of bread were to be
freshly baked and placed on a
table in front of the Ark. The
loaves represented the Twelve
Tribes. At sunset the loaves
were to be removed and eaten
by the priests, who early the
next day bake 12 new loaves to
place at the altar.
The baking of bread is very
important in the history of
civilization. The French an-
thropologist Claude Levi-
Strauss claimed that baking
bread represents a peak in
cultural achievement. He
asserted that there are three
levels of cooking: boiling, fry-
ing and baking in that order.
That principle applies to our
own culture as well. When the
family is eating informally
together, it may have boiled
chicken. If someone is having
friends over for a cook-out, a
hamburger and French fries
are served. But for a real fancy
dinner, we may order Beef
Wellington or something else
"en croute" baked in a
bread shell.
This seems to confirm that
bread is an advance in civiliza-
tion. But coming back to
"show bread," I would like to
walk where Maimonides chose
not to tread. Let me offer
several reasons for the use of
bread in ritual.
The first is that bread
represents the cooperation of
God and human beings, the
creative power of their work-
ing together. Wheat is a gift of
God, but it doesn't become
bread until people bake it. This
is part of the Jewish concept of
shutaf hakadosh barukk-hu
God and people are partners in
the fashioning of the world.
There is the well-known
story of a minister who was
viewing a farmer's beautiful
fields of wheat. The minister
exclaimed, "Look what the
Lord has done!" The farmer
replied, "You should have seen
it when God farmed it alone."
Court Rules In Favor
Of Secular Sabbath
Continued from Page 1-A
leader of the ultra-Orthodox
Shas party, called it a "breach
of the status quo on religious
affairs." He indicated the
religious parties would de-
mand that the Knesset enact
legislation restricting public
entertainment on Friday
nights.
The case developed when the
municipality brought charges
against two Jersualem movie
: heaters for screening films on
Friday nights in violation of a
local ban. Judge Ayala Procac-
cia rejected the charges on
grounds that issues involving
freedom of religion and cons-
cience are the providence of
the Knesset, not the City
Council.
Mayor Teddy Kollek has
been walking a thin line bet-
ween the demands by the Or-
thodox for total enforcement
of the Sabbath and the secular
community's claim of an in-
dividual's right to decide how
to spend Israel's one non-
working day. While Kollek
agrees that Jerusalem's
"special character" should be
preserved by keeping "com-
mercial cinemas" closed on
Friday nights, he would allow
films at private clubs, such as
the local Cinematheque.
that he would con-
pursue that line.
Eitan Quits Right-Wing Party
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Reserve Gen. Rafael Eitan,
who was chief of staff during
the Lebanon war, announced
that he is quitting Tehiya, the
right-wing ultranationalist
party he joined five years ago.
He gave as his reasons per-
sonal differences with his
former political ally, Geula
Cohen, a leading Tehiya ac-
tivist. He asked the Knesset
presidium to recognize him of-
ficially as a one-man Knesset
faction.
Eitan made his announce-
ment after his Tzomet faction
list was defeated by a vote of
33-118 in elections to
Tehiya's central committee.
His departure was seen as a
victory for Cohen and Tehiya
leader Yuval Neeman.
But is was clearly a blow to
the party, which split from
Herut nine years ago after
Menachem Begin, then
premier, signed the peace trea-
ty with Egypt.
Prior to the internal crisis
that precipitated Eitan's
departure, Tehiya did well in
public opinion polls, and
political observers had
predicated the party would
'nlarge its four-member
Knesset representation in next
year's elections.
Now they believe Tehiya will
lose votes to Likud and Rabbi
Meir Kahane's extremist Kach
party.
He said
tinue to
"Both sides will have to make
concessions to coexist in this
city," he said.
At the same time, he blamed
the "fanatical behavior" of the
ultra Orthodox for provoking a
sharp reaction from the
secular community. For more
than a year, Jerusalem has
been the scene of rock-
throwing and pitch battles in
the streets as ultra-Orthodox
Jews attempted to prevent the
non-observant from entering
cinemas.
Observers here expect the
violent demonstrations to in-
tensify. According to one legal
authority, Professor Baruch
Bracha, the local court's deci-
sion was in line with the basic
approach of Israeli
jurisprudence the limita-
tions on the freedom of the in-
dividual for religious reasons
can be imposed only by the
Knesset.
Another reason for the use
of bread in ritual is that it
represents the cooperation of
people with each other. So-
meone had to plant, harvest,
thresh and then deliver the
wheat kernels to the miller.
The mills then have to grind it
into flour and deliver it to the
bakery. The bakery has to
bake it into bread, wrap it and
deliver it to the store. The,
finally, it comes to us. It could
never happen without the
cooperation of many people.
That is exactly the meaning
of a quotation by a rabbi in the
Talmud about 1,700 years ago:
"When Adam rose, he had to
plow, plant, harvest, mill,
knead and bake bread before
he could eat. And I rise each
morning to find it all prepared
for me!"
This is an ancient expression
of an idea that runs all through
civilization to this very day;
that bread is the supreme sym-
bol of interdependence and
cooperation.
It is very interesting, and
not at all accidental, that the
holiday of Pesach centers
around food. Specifically, the
symbol par excellence is mat-
zoh, which is called lechem ani,
meaning the bread of oppres-
sion or the bread of poverty. It
is, therefore, most appropriate
and meaningful that at the
very beginning of the Seder
service we recite the classic
words: "This is the bread of af-
fliction which our ancestors
ate in the land of Mitzraim. All
who are hungry, let them
enter and eat."
On Yom Kippur, the holiest
day in the Jewish calendar, the
hafiarah from Isaiah instructs
us: "Share your bread with the
hungry."
Nicholas Bedarycv, a Rus-
sian theologian who wrote in
French, put it this way:
"Bread for myself is a physical
problem, but bread for my
neighbor is a spiritual
problem."
A beautiful statement in the
Midrash tells us that the
miracle of daily bread is more
wondeful than the miracle of
the crossing of the Red Sea.
That is because the miracle of
the Red Sea happened once
and the miracle of bread hap-
pens every day.
By the way, there is a brand
of bread known as "Wonder
Bread." But isn't all bread
wonderful?
Finally, note that the essence
of bread is to be discovered in
the classic phrase, "Bread is
the staff of life." Interestingly
enough, this phrase is found in
Isaiah; the Hebrew is written
meshahn lechem The phrase
"bread is the staff of life" is
found many more times in
biblical literature.
Indeed, do we not really
have a contemporary form of
"show bread?" Namely, we
begin a meal with the hamotzi,
thanking God, "who brings
forth bread from the earth."
Doesn't this bread show that
God and human beings are co-
partners, co-creators? In-
terdependence is at the center
of society and bread, after all,
is the "staff of life."
Rabbi Bernard S. Raskas
serves Temple of Aaron Con-
gregation, St. Paul, Minn, and
is author of the trilogy "Heart
of Wisdom."
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Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 27, 1987
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I


The Re-Entry Of The Refugee Physician
SiifSJEEl rrom MoLt^lic'al uS <2ff" MSCW MedicaI S wh* his sonTwas beaten with bright young
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridxan Staff Writer
Dr. Moisey Katsman arrived
in America in 1979. Left
behind in the Soviet Union
were the degree he earned
from Moscow Medical Univer-
sity in 1966 and the years of
experience he gained as chief
of the department of internal
He was 44-years-old, didn't
speak English, but at least, he
said, he wasn't living in a coun-
try where his son was beaten
because he was a Jew.
Katsman wanted to continue
his medical career in the
United States but to do that he
had some big hurdles to clear.
He had to take two different,
major medical examinations, a
difficult task because they
were in English and because
he had been out of medical
school for over 12 years.
After three attempts,
Katsman passed the first exam
and he passed the second exam
on the first try. But in order to
be certified to practice
medicine in New York,
Katsman had to spend at least
one year in a hospital intern-
ship or residency program. His
age, he said, was a problem;
not only was he a doctor from
a foreign country competing
for a coveted residency, but he
was in his late 40s competing
with bright young students
just out of America's finest
medical schools.
Katsman came to Florida,
where this state had medical
licensing laws aimed at helping
foreign physicians such as
himself. Florida law permitted
a doctor from a foreign coun-
try to get a license to practice
medicine without having to go
through residency if the doctor
could have three colleagues
sign affidavits saying he had
practiced in his home country
for at least five years.
In January 1986, Katsman,
who lives in Miami Beach, was
able to get his license. He got a
job as the medical director of a
Broward corporation that is
opening new medical centers.
He still is not able to get af-
filiation with a hospital in
Continued on F'age 2-B
Momentum Builds
For Mobilization
r, Paul and Mary performed many of
f hits during the GA opening plenary.
Among their songs was -Light One Candle"
the theme song for Federations video. See
related story, page U-B.
JAPs No Joke To Jews
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Florxdian Staff Writer
Warning: Telling Jewish
American Princess jokes may
be dangerous to your healthy
self-image and to your rela-
tionships with Jewish
members of the opposite sex.
This was the message behind
the talk, "Jewish Women
Jewish Men: Beyond the
Stereotypes," given by Susan
Weidman Schneider, editor-in-
chief of Lilith magazine, held
last Wednesday at the General
Assembly of the Council of
Jewish Federations in the
! mtainebleau-Hilton Hotel.
imagine that you are an
l.H-year-old college freshman,"
Schneider began, "and that, as
you get up from your seat at a
sports event, the entire
s:.i chant of 'JAP, JAP, JAP.'
imagine that you go to a
Jewish fraternity for a party
and you see a caricature of a
J win woman, at which peo-
ple are encouraged to throw
iges and epithets."
Such forms of what has come
to be called "Jap-baiting," on
college campuses with large
Jewish populations, along with
the frequent appearance of
JAP jokes on late night televi-
sion talk shows, t-shirts and
greeting cards, have caused
Schneider and others to come
to the conclusion that JAP
jokes are no laughing matter.
"We realized that this form
of in-group entertainment has
lethal potential. It's anti-
Semitism masked by a scrim of
misogyny," said Schneider,
whose magazine's fall issue
revealed the dark side of JAP
jokes in a cover story.
It was not a cover story
Schneider had expected to be
reporting on in 1987; over ten
years ago, the second issue of
Lilith magazine boasted a
cover in which a Jewish
American Princess t-shirt was
being dropped into a trashcan.
Compared to today's 'Jap-a-
bilia,' that t-shirt seems rather
innocent, Schneider conceded.
"Jews are still a minority in
this country, and it's easy
when you're a member of a
beleaguered minority to pro-
ject negative stereotypes onto
the opposite sex," said
Schneider, who argued that
more interest would have been
taken in the anti-Semitic
nature of JAP jokes had it
been Jewish men, as well as
women, who were targeted.
"It's easy for members of a
minority to dump on their
women," she contended.
Yet, Jewish men are also the
object of negative stereotypes,
although Jewish American
Prince jokes are not as com-
mon as their female
counterparts.
Jewish men may be perceiv-
ed as "wimpy," or "mother's
boys," while Jewish women
are faulted for being both too
independent and assertive and
too dependent and clinging.
These stereotypes are not
new. In fact, the same
Continued on Page 3-B
The South Florida Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry was
noted overwhelming support
and response to Summit Sun-
day, a mass mobilization in
support of freedom for Soviet
Jews to be held in Washington,
D.C. on Sunday, Dec. 6. The
summit comes one day before
Soviet Premier Mikhail Gor-
bachev's scheduled visit to the
United States.
The SFCSJ, an arm of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's Community Relations
Committee, is sponsoring a
group trip for the Miami com-
munity to attend Summit Sun-
day. Thousands of Jews from
communities nationwide are
expected to join with United
States Vice President George
Bush, and former Soviet
refuseniks, Yuli Edelshtein,
Ida Nudel and Natan Sharan-
sky to express support and
concern for those Jews still
trapped behind the iron
curtain.
"The support we have been
receiving is amazing. The com-
munity is really coming out in
full force to be a part of this
historic event," said Hinda
Cantor, co-chairman of the
SFCSJ.
The rally is expected to
begin at 11 a.m. at an area of
Washington known as The
Ellipse, followed by a mile-
and-a-half march.
"It is crucial for as many of
us as possible to participate in
this summit, demonstrating
our awareness and concern for
the plight of those unable to
leave the Soviet Union against
their will. Those who cannot
attend should send someone
else who can. It is our respon-
sibility," said Jeffrey
Berkowitz, chairman of the
local Washington mobilization
committee.
The trip is scheduled to leave
Miami early morning on Sun-
day, Dec. 6, returning late
evening by charter planes. For
information on airfare,
transportation to the rally site,
and meals, 279-1435.
Sigmund Freud:
Forum Focus On Jewish Identity
busan Weidman Schneider, chief editor of Lilith Magazine, ON
J \l's.
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridxan Staff Writer
Some people may regard
Sigmund Freud as indifferent
to religious matters, hostile to
all religions and an atheist who
denied the existence of God.
But the paradox of the man
who is known as the founder of
psychoanalytic theory is that
Freud, so great an enemy of
religion, was also the founder
of the theory of modern Jewish
identity.
This paradox was discussed
during a lecture at the 56th
General Assembly of the Coun-
cil of Jewish Federations in
Miami last week, when about
100 Jewish leaders digressed
from discussion of such issues
as the Middle East peace pro-
.cess and the future of Jewish
teenagers in order to probe the
mind of one of history's great
mind-probe rs.
The host of the Freudian sea-
sion was Dr. David Ariel,
president of Cleveland College
of Jewish studies.
Ariel claims that Freud, the
product of Orthodox ancestry,
determined that Jewish identi-
ty is based on four
characteristics: intellectual
honesty; opposition to anti-
Semitism; biting self-criticism;
and strong ethical orientation.
But even before Freud set
out on his journey of
understanding the Jewish
psyche, he explored in his
books theories which Ariel said
undermine the very basis of
religion.
"Freud," said Ariel,
"developed the notion that
religion is a form of neurosis.
an internalized disillusn n
whose rituals and beliefs ought
to be discarded.
"Religion, in his \ iev.
ed on sexual etiology
Oedipal complex, he
arousing out of the son-
to supplant the father
Continued on Pagi
Our
Community
Friday. November 27. 1987 rhe Jewish Hor.dr Sechon B


* -
Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 27, 1987
Foreign Doctors Tough-Out
Restrictions and Requirements
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
It is tougher today than ever
for a refugee physician to be
certified to practice in the
United States.
The problems the refugee
physician faced 20 years ago,
primarily learning to speak
and take examinations in a
new language, have been com-
pounded today by an increas-
ing number of American
medical students competing
for a limited number of
hospital residencies or intern-
ships, required by most states
in order for a doctor to be cer-
tified to practice.
Dr. Richard Feinstein, a
Miami podiatrist and member
of the state board of medicine
from 1979 until 1986, has writ-
ten extensively on the
problem.
"Everybody wants to come
here and everybody wants to
do what they were doing in
their country," said Feinstein.
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"And doctors here are among
the best paid and have the best
equipment. On the other hand,
you have a competing problem.
Doctors in the United States
may not want other doctors
practicing here because the
perception is there are too
many doctors already. And
people in charge of licensing
are concerned with the quality
of medical care and you just
can't let someone practice
medicine here because they
tell you they were a doctor in
Kiev. What is there to prove
they are qualified?"
Feinstein estimates there
are 22,000 internships
available annually and about
30,000 candidates seeking
them, including about 18,000
American medical school
graduates.
There was a time when a
refugee physician could waive
the hospital residency require-
ment. But Feinstein said one
reason the residency require-
ment was reinstated was
because there were cases of
fraud among doctors who
falsely indicated they had prac-
ticed medicine in a foreign
country for five years.
"There was a Jewish phar-
macist in Toronto. He was in
trouble for dealing drugs. He
spoke Italian and went to Italy
and assumed the identity of an
Italian doctor," Feinstein said
of an actual case he heard
while on the board. "He took
these doctor's credentials and
got a Florida license by getting
three doctors in Miami who
didn't know him to say they
did. He passed the ECFMG
and FLEX exams after taking
a course and got a license.
Then it was found out he was a
fraud."
Feinstein said he heard at
least 10 similar cases while he
served on the state medical
board.
While the United States and
Canada have organizations
that certify medical schools in
those two countries, there is
no similar certification process
for foreign (non-North
American) medical schools,
Feinstein said, adding that if
you can't evaluate the school,
vou have to evaluate the
applicant.
There was a time when
foreign medical doctors were
welcomed in the United
States. In Florida, particular-
ly, state law was changed tc
accommodate physicians whc
were arriving in this country
from Cuba.
Today, even though the
residency requirement has
been returned to state medical
licensing laws, there is still an
exemption called the "exile
program." It permits the
residency requirement to be
waived and a restricted license
be issued to an applicant who
is "a graduate of a foreign
medical school in a country in
the Western hemisphere with
which the United States does
not maintain diplomatic
relations."
Dot Faircloth, executive
director of the Florida Board
of Medicine, said her agency
believes that Cuba is the only
country that to which the ex-
emption refers. The Cuban
physician seeking certification
here still must pass the two
medical exams and meet other
qualifications.
From 1961 until 1984, the
University of Miami Office of
International Medical Educa-
tion had been opened to assist
the refugee physician. It began
as a program designed to help
the Cuban physician but after
approximately three years the
program began to attract
physicians from 64 countries.
The program was organized
by Dr. Rafael Penalver a
Havana-born physician who
came to America in 1961
Although Penalver succeeded
in passing the required
medical examinations, he said
he helped design the course to
help other newcomers meet
the rigourous challenge of the
testing. Some 7,700 doctors
went through the program.
"The leading Cuban doctors
were working here as taxi
drivers, elevator boys ... so
there was a lot of talent, a lot
of experience in Miami."
recalls Penalver.
Back then, however, the
odds were in favor of the
physician finding work in this
country, Penalver said.
"Until 1975-76, we got so
many hospitals from all over
the country coming here try-
ing to recruit the doctors at-
tending our program that it
was unbelievable. They needed
the foreign graduates because
the United States could not
produce the number of doctors
that were needed.
"But now there are more
medical schools, so they really
do not need foreign graduates.
So it is becoming more and
Continued on Page lfi-B
Refugee Physicians Re-Enter Workforce
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Continued from Page 1-B
Florida because he has not met
the residency requirement, but
Katsman, who said he was
making $200 a month as a top
physician in Moscow, said he is
happy that he was able to
achieve what he already has in
the United States.
Doctors following
Katsman's footsteps may not
be as fortunate.
Officials with the Florida
Board of Medicine have con-
firmed that as of October 1986.
the provision of the law that
allowed for licensing based on
five years of medical practice
was deleted. Now a foreign
doctor, in addition to passing
the exams, must get a
minimum one-year residency.
And that is becoming in-
creasingly difficult to do.
"It is a supply and demand
problem," said Dr. Federico
Justiniani, director of the
Medical Education Program at
Mt. Sinai Medical Center, one
of three local hospitals that
have training programs.
"There are more American
(medical school) graduates
now than there were 20 years
ago."
Mt. Sinai has 150 residency
positions, some extending
several years. About 50 come
open each year. Yet, Justiniani
said he had 1,500 applicants
vying for those too few slots
this year.
"I feel sorry for them, that's
all," said Justiniani.
The problem has increased
to the point where a New
York-based resettlement agen-
cy under Jewish auspices
helped organize a conference
with the United States Public
Health Service, a first-of-its-
kind gathering held last week
in New York.
The two-day conference
united representatives from
different forums in an attempt
to address what organizers
said is "the severe problems
facing refugee physicians at-
tempting to recertify for prac-
tice in the United States.
The conference was also held
to discuss alternatives for
training foreign physicians in
less-appealing, but nonetheless
medically-related fields.
"Some resist the idea of go-
ing into retraining entirely and
continue to struggle and hope
to someday secure a position
as a doctor. Others accept the
idea (that they may have to
choose) an alternative and
meanwhile pursue medicine,"
said Linda Grenis, coordinator
of the Allied Health Training
Program that sprung up under
NYANA, the New York
Association for New
Americans, Inc.
"They want to be physicians
but the likelihood of that for
many of them is not good,"
said Grenis. "We encourage
them to look at other alter-
natives. They're not medicine,
but they are important posi-
tions on the health care team.
Things such as occupational
therapy, physical therapy,
laboratory technology, medical
records and administration."
There may be alternatives
for health-related jobs, but
that doesn't take away the
disappointment for those who
came to this land of opportuni-
ty to pursue their professional
dreams.
"I'm depressed because so
many years I was a physician
and now I'm not a physician,"
said Dr. Ila Levina.
Levina, 62, was an obstetri-
cian/gynecologist in the Soviet
Union. She emigrated to the
United States 10 years ago,
and arrived in Miami at the
age of 52. Now she is making
$9 an hour as a surgical assis-
tant at Baptist Hospital.
Levina said her English was
Dr. Moist-v Katsman
not good when she came to this
country. She spent three years
studying English and prepar-
ing for the medical examina-
tions. Despite four failures on
the first examination, known
as the Educational Commis-
sion for Foreign Medical
Graduate exam ECFMG,
Levina continued to study and
passed on the fifth try.
But then her husband died
and she had to work rather
than study for the second ex-
am, known as the FLEX, or
begin to look for a residency.
"It's a very difficult job,"
Levina said of the recertifica-
tion process. "People who
think it would be so easy, easy,
easy it's a big mistake."
In the Soviet Union, Levina
said she had worked as a physi-
cian from 1948 until 1977,
"and didn't miss any of my
days at work."
Levina said she cannot retire
because she will not have made
enough money to earn a social
security check large enough to
support herself. She said she is
Dr. Sulim Krimshtein
hoping to emigrate to Israel.
where her Russian medical
certificates will be accepted.
"I'm full of energy and look-
ing forward to working for
Israel," said Levina, adding
that she blames no one besides
herself for not continuing to
study to take the FLEX
examination.
But there is a happily ironic
note to Levina's story. Her
daughter, Tatyana, was a good
student and received a scholar-
ship to attend medical school.
She was just graduated from
the University of Miami
Medical School and was tappw
for a residency in pathobgy a
Jackson Memorial Medical
Center.
While refugee doctors had a
better chance of getting a
residency 10 or 20 years ago.
some said they had another sei
of obstacles to face.
Dr. Sulim Krimshtein. of
Miami, is one example on
foreign doctor who has >ut
Continued on Pag* lfiK
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6


Friday, November 27, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Forum Focus On Jewish Identity
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Continued from Page 1-B
longing for the very one
against whom he harbors such
hostile designs.
"Religion (according to
Freud) is the result of the fear
of the father's punishment and
the simultaneous desire to be
loved which is projected from
the real father onto a heavenly
r-one. Religion, is the displace-
ment and projection of the
Oedipal complex onto a fearful
God for whom one longs."
With all of that, says Ariel,
one might think Freud would
have little good to say about
Judaism. Yet, he says, that
was not the case.
Freud was born in 1856. His
parents had moved from a
shtetl in Czechoslovakia to
Vienna, which was a cultural
center and more promising in
opportunity. The move came
shortly after the wars of
liberation and constitutional
changes that brought about
hope for the first time that
..Jews could be integrated into
* the mainstream.
Freud's father was a
Talmudic scholar and a mer-
chant. Freud's mother came
out of Orthodox families of
Eastern European Talmudic
and rabbinic scholars.
When they settled in Vienna,
according to Ariel, they gave
up every vestige of Jewish
identity and observance.
"Freud grew up where there
was no observance of the Sab-
bath and holidays yet there
was a background in religiosi-
ty ." Ariel said. The only
Jewish education that Freud
received, Ariel said, was that
small amount which was pro-
vided by the state in public
schools.
"His views," Ariel con-
cludes, "were based on a com-
plete absence of exposure" to
Judaism. Yet, it was anti-
Semitism which opened young
Freud's eyes to Judaism, Ariel
said.
In his earliest writings, Ariel
said Freud recalled how his
father used to take him for
walks when he was a boy of
about 12 or 13, and tell him
what life was like before the
family came to Vienna. Freud
wrote that his father spoke of
a time when, as a young man
himself, he had walked down a
street in his village, handsome-
ly dressed, when someone
YOUR CAP IN ISRAEL
tOURCAR
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fVm
mu'M
From-
Special low prices
For reservation and
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| 212-6296090 I
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'IHWlllf.l 111....
M.T.V. ,\ III t II MILMA
ASHMION III AT
knocked his cap off and said,
Jew, get off the street."
Freud asked his father what
he did about it and, Ariel said
Freud's father replied that he
went into the street and picked
up his cap.
Decades later, Ariel said,
Freud's own son, Martin
wrote about a boat trip he took
with his father. He recalled
how a group of Christians
taunted young Sigmund and
called him a 'dirty Jew.' Mar-
tin recalled that his father
rowed the boat to shore,
jumped out and ran up to the
men who were about 10 in
number and carrying sticks.
Freud charged the crowd and
it cleared, letting him pass.
Ariel said Freud's ties to
Judaism were also evident
when a friend wrote him a let-
ter saying he believed he could
have a better future if he con-
verted and baptized his
children.
Ariel said Freud wrote back:
"If you do not let your son
grow up as a Jew, you will
deprive him of those sources of
energy which cannot be replac-
ed by anything else. He will
have to struggle as a Jew, and
you ought to help him develop
all the energy he will need for
that struggle. Do not deprive
him of that advantage."
"That," said Ariel, "is a very
surprising statement from a
man who said the best thing to
do about religion is to
eliminate it." Jewishness,
Ariel said, was one of the
single most important factors
in all of Freud's life. As a Jew,
Ariel said, Freud was able to
go against the majority. He
was free to cut his own path.
"The problem we all deal
with," Ariel said, "is if the
Jewish identity becomes
secularized, how do we
associate with Jewishness?
Freud's theory became tied in
with modern Judaism because
it's an issue of identity not
beliefs."
Freud stayed in Vienna until
1938, defiant and refusing to
leave even as Nazi terror
grew. Through worldwide ef-
forts Freud was convinced to
leave and assisted in the move.
He died in London in 1939
from cancer.
JAPs No Joke
Continued from Page 1-B
characteristics commonly
assigned to JAPs, namely
manipulative behavior, venali-
ty and aquisitiveness, are the
same characteristics assigned
to Jews in general in the Pro-
tocols of the Elders of
Zion, according to Schneider.
"The question really arises
why the resurgence of in-
terest in these stereotypes
right now?" Schneider asked
the assembled audience, which
included college students.
It is among Jewish college
students that the stereotypes
may be hitting hardest;
Schneider said that while
many Jewish men and women
in college may plan on even-
tually marrying within the
faith, they do not want to date
fellow-Jews.
"Men say that Jewish
women are too demanding,
and women say that Jewish
men will want mothers,"
Schneider recounted.
"The fallout of these
stereotypes is that our self-
esteem as men and women is
damaged, and relationships
between Jewish men and
women have become more dis-
tant," Schneider asserted.
Asked by a male member of
the audience where the
stereotypes of Jewish women
and men come from, Schneider
admitted that "they come
from certain historical
truths."
In the shtetl Jewish women
were the breadwinners; when
the Jewish family moved to
America, it became an embar-
rassment for the women in the
family to work outside the
home.
"The daughters were
pampered," Schneider related,
in describing the origin of the
"Jewish American Princess."
Schneider, who occasionally
has been told to "lighten up"
by the public and press, used to
tell examples of JAP jokes at
her talks.
Schneider no longer tells
JAP jokes, nor will she listen
to them.
"They were all anyone ever
came away from my talks
remembering," Schneider
complained. "Reporters would
put six or seven JAP jokes into
their articles, for seasoning."
Schneider advises others to
likewise refrain from telling
JAP jokes or using the ter-
minology. If Jews do not begin
to take the issue seriously, she
warns, the joke may be 'on us.'
"A Jewish fraternity in
Milwaukee that was getting
flak from other fraternities on
campus played their situtation
down, saying 'it's not impor-
tant,' Schneider recalled.
"A Jewish sorority in
Syracuse University boycotted
a public forum about anti-
Semitic JAP graffitti. We need
to arm ouselves with JAP am-
munition, we need Jewish con-
tent in our lives to combat the
stereotypes, otherwise, we are
the real victims."
CalKovens chairman of the board of Mount Sinai Medical
Center (center) greeted the Founders at their first meeting of the
season where the charter members of Mount Sinai Hospital were
honored Pictured, from left, are charter members Stanley Myers
along with Kovens, Lois Dobrin and Carl Weinkle (seated)
United Way Tops $20 Million
In the last days of United
Way's 1987 fundraising cam-
paign, volunteers and staff
worked through the weekend
in an attempt to fulfill cam-
paign chairman Melvin
Greenberg's $21 million goal.
At the dinner celebration
marking the end of the cam-
paign, held Monday, Nov. 23 at
the Omni Hotel, it was an-
nounced that the figure raised
was $20.6 million an amount
which, although short of the
goal Greenberg set two mon-
ths ago, is $2 million more
than was raised last year.
Dade County's campaign
was the best in the country
among the nation's 40 large
metropolitan areas, in terms of
percentage increase in giving,
Greenberg announced at the
Monday night dinner.
Traditionally, Dade County
has been an underdog in terms
of fundraising for United Way,
year s
a situation which Greenberg
decided to change when he
took charge of this
campaign.
Under the assumption that
many small businesses and
condominiums had been
overlooked in previous fun-
draising drives, Greenberg
amassed a large force of
volunteers to help target those
and other areas of the Miami
community.
The campaign's theme,
"Here's Where Your Money
Goes" was supported by
videotapes of Dade County
residents who had benefitted
from United Way's numerous
services, in an effort to inspire
potential contributors.
Approximately 1,000 in
volunteers, staff, and sup-
porters of this year's United
Way campaign attended the
dinner celebration.
TROPICAL GLASS
CONSTRUCTION CO. COC #010159
MIRROR
WALLS & CEILINGS
TABLE TOPS EMERGENCY REPAIRS STOREFRONTS
Dade 757-0651 Broward 462-3711
HAROLD ROSENSTEIN, Pres. Se Habia Espanoi
7933 N.W. 7th Avenue Miami
The Florida Region of the American Committee
for the Weizmann Institute of Science
The Florida Region of the Weizmann Institute of Science
is fortunate in having the distinguished folk singer and
actor, Theodore Bikel, as its featured guest artist at
the annual Dinner Dance benefiting the Institute on
Thursday, December 10,1987 at the Omni International Hotel.
Thomas P. "Tip" O'Neill, our originally scheduled guest speaker,
is recuperating from recent surgery and will be unable to appear
Rowland Schaefer,
Chairman
For information and reservations for the Dinner Dance.
please call Lee Millman at 940-7377


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 27. 1967
s^ Cedars Club Deco Ball
Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir is
seen receiving a gift of appreciation from CJF
President Shoshana S. Cardin. following the
Prime Ministers address to the 3.500
delegates gathered here last month at the 56th
General Assembly of the Council of Jewish
Federations.
'Don't Let the Light Go Out'
Puff the Magic Dragon, the main character of the folk
song sung for decades by the group Peter. Paul and Man-,
was actually a Jewish drago.
Peter Yarrow, the group's Jewish member, said he
should know. He wrote the song.
The trio, whose songs favor peace, justice and human
rights, got some 3.500 members of the 56th General
Assembly of the Council of Jewish Federations singing
along last week to their hits such as "If I had a Hammer."
"Puff' and "Blowing in the Wind."
The group also sang a song Yarrow wrote about Hanuk-
kah called "Don't Let the Light Go Out." Yarrow said
writing the song "moved me into a sense of my own
Jewishness."
"We have something to believe in," he added. "We have
something to cam- out and it's not just for Jews."
The chorus of the song passionately pleads. "Don't let
the light go out. It's lasted for so many years."
Just before the group appeared on stage, assembly
delegates saw a premier of a film produced by the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation that used "Don't Let the Light
Go Out." as its theme song.
The film, produced by GMJF Assistant Executive Direc-
tor Arthur Flink. showed the development of the federa-
tion and the community building process over the past 50
years. The Federation is celebrating its 50th anniversary
this year.
But more than showing the federation's growth, the film
took a look at the future of the Greater Miami Jewish com-
munity. This was richly illustrated in the film by having
Stanley C Meyers, the federation's founding president,
take his grandson Bobby Gilbert, on a tour of Miami and
point out the examples of the federation's involvement in
the community's growth. It was a lesson in one generation
passing on the key to Jewish continuity to the next
generation.
GA Resolutions
Eight resolutions on issues ranging from Soviet Jewry to
Catholic-Jewish relations were adopted by the Council of
Jewish Federations during last Friday's Business Session
of CJF's 56th General Assembly at the Fontainebleau
Hotel.
Voting delegates from Jewish Federations across North
America unanimously approved the resolutions, which
were presented by Paul S. Berger of Washington. Chair-
man of the CJF Resolutions Committee.
The adopted resolutions focus on the following areas:
Soviet Jewry;
Israel:
Ethiopian Jewry:
Jews in Arab Lands and Iran:
Public Policy and Human Needs.
Federation Involvement in Jewish Education:
Catholic-Jewish Relations: and
UN. Resolution 3319
A resolution cc ?rning discrimination by private clubs
was referred :-^.-K to the committee for further
consideration.
Met Invests
In Bonds
The Metropolitan Opera
Association, as part of its joint
endowment fund with State of
Israel Bonds, has invested $1
million in Israel Bonds.
Mrs. Gilbert W. Humphrey,
president of the Metropolitan
Opera Association, presented
the check to Philip I. Berman.
a member of the Israel Bonds
National Campaign Cabinet
and its President's Club who
serves as co-chairman of the
Metropolitan Opera State of
Israel Bonds program.
Eugene Lang. Chairman of
the Met's Investment Commit-
tee, noted. "For each $440,000
of Israel Bond value con-
tributed to the Met. the Met
itself, from its own endow-
ment funds, has purchased an
additional $10,000 in Bonds.
thus. Israel's economy has
received a 25 percent bonus
from the Met on the proceeds
realized from the sale of the
donated Bonds."
The evening lived up to its
art deco billing as approx-
imately 500 guests gathered at
the Fontainebleau Hilton
Hotel for the annual benefit of
Cedars Medical Center on
Nov. 14. "Club Deco" honored
South Florida's unique art
deco style.
Transformed into a tur-
quoise and peach scene of the
1930s, the Fontainebleau
Ballroom glittered with
twinkling lights and neon flam-
ingo centerpieces standing
several feet above each table.
White, arched windows fram-
ed the room's perimeter ad-
mist a sea of softly draped tur-
quoise fabric.
The cocktail reception and
gourmet buffet were followed
by dinner, dancing and a
special presentation of the
Xanadu Dancers. Then, guesk
were treated to an evening 3
casino gaming and bidding All
prizes were donated bv J
businesses, friends, and SUn
porters of Cedars Medical
high bidder for the grand
prize, two round trip tickets to
London, compliments of
Travel '^^'^ ^ Harris
Gala chairpersons. Mr and
Mrs. Alberto Vadia. and co
chairpersons Dr. and Mrs.
Cathy Sugarbaker were con-
gratulated for the evening hv
John H. O'Neil. Jr.. Chairman
of Cedars new Foundation.
All procee-: the Ball
will provide cap- ment
for Cedars M-
Hebrew University Luncheon
The Greater Miami Patron's
Guild of the Women's Division.
American Friends of the
Hebrew University, held its
annual luncheon at noon on
Monday. Nov. 23. at the Doral
Beach Hotel. Ruth Shapiro,
chairman of the luncheon,
said. "This event benefited the
Student Aid Fund set up to
cover special needs of qualified
Hebrew University students."
Benefactors who have
dedicated facilities and rooms
at the Hebrew University's
four campuses were
recognized.
Dr. Bernard Schechterman
President of Florida Political
Science Ajsociatii n Professor
at the University of Miami, in
the department of politics and-
public affairs was guest
speaker and covered Middle
East trends and
developments, including
Israeli perceptions of issues.
Assisting the chairman. Ruth
Shapiro, were Betty Shaffer.
Viola Charcowsky. Ruth Plan
and Sabina Meyers >n. The lun-
cheon was coordinated by
Florence D. Feldmar.. director
of the Women's Division.
Rose Bross (second from left). HASID (Help All Seedy I*
Distress) president, presented a $10,000 check to Cal K "ens llefi
Mount Sinai Medical Center's chairman of the board, u-ko nottd
that HASID s contributions have amounted to mort than
S100.000 to date. Joining the festivities were Edward Bross tse-
cond from right) and Charles S. Wolfe, Mount Sinai Medical
Center Foundation Executu* Director.
Sai-a A rod. member of Knesset and world
president or S'a amat. receives the key to the
City or Miami Beach from Mayor Ala Daoud
during a meeting of the Beach city commis-
sion. Arad addressed two meetings of the 56th
General Assembly of the Council of Jewish
Federations last week From lert; an Comm.
Ben Z Grenald, Harriet Green, ..lonal r
president of Saamat USA; l'i *an
Sidney WevsburxL Arad. Manor Daoud ana
Comm. Abe Resnick. .Yarn Arad honored at a reception at the Fontainem*
Hilton of the South Florida. Brou^d ana
Dade Councils of S'a amat USA
lh
u,
vu


Friday, November 27, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Cedars' Club Deco .. Simply Sensational
&ragtttt9a af^^sarasasaftr sbkSsSSS
#u(A Levkoff, Morris Rosenberg, and Florence and Rochelle Fein and Irene Siegel.
hadore Abrams.
Foundation Chairman John H. O'Neil, Jr. with
Chairman of Cedars Board Arno and Beverly Mueller.
RobertF^' ^^^ Ar0$teffUi "*** Dr' and MrS' Gisela Roberts from Monte Carlo with Eleanor Kosow Sonja S. Zuckerman with Mr. and Mrs. Melford Lord.
e man- and Linda Ray.
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Kraver and Mr. and Mrs
Victor Reiter.
Rosario Vadia with Dr. Mariano Garcia and Dorita Mrs. Richard Gerstein, Commissioner J.L. Plummer,
Feldenkreis. Richard Gerstein and Maria Christina Palacios.
Hldred (Flew) Jacobs and Audrey Finkelstein.
Judy and Dr. A. Frederick Schild, a member of Debra and Donald S. Rosenbero. former chairman of
Cedars Board. Cedars Board.


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. November 27. 1987
Miami Beach Comm. Abe Resnick. second
from right, and wife, Sarita, proudly display
the Gates of Jerusalem Medal they received
from former Israeli Finance Minister Yitzhak
Modai, center, on behalf of the Greater Miami
Israel Bonds Organization. Among those in
attendance at the dinner and presentation
were, from left: Sabeto Garazi, Sergio
Grobler, and Robert Zarco.
AJCommittee To Discuss
Evangelism and Pluralism
Rabbi A. James Rudin and
the Rev. Dr. Marvin Wilson
will meet to discuss
"Evangelicals and Jews In An
Age of Pluralism Election
'88" Tuesday, Dec. 8, at 8
p.m.. in Chatlos Hall of the
Miami Christian College. The
discussion is sponsored by the
Evangelical-Jewish Dialogue
Group of the American Jewish
Committee.
Dr. Marvin R. Wilson is the
Ockenga Professor of Biblical
Studies and chairman of the
department of Biblical Studies
at Gordon College, Wenham.
Massachusetts. He teaches Old
Testament, Jewish history and
culture, archaeology. Hebrew
and Greek.
Rabbi A. James Rudin is Na-
tional Director of Inter-
religious Affairs of the
American Jewish Committee.
Since 1968 he has served as a
coordinator of many national
interreligious conferences.
Rabbi Rudin has also served
on the Executive Council of
the American Jewish
Historical Society, and is a
member of the National Coun-
cil of Churches' Committee on
Christian-Jewish Relations on
the Interreligious Affairs
Commission of the Central
Conference of American
Rabbis.
The Evangelical-Jewish
dialogue group, now in its
third year, is co-sponsored by
AJC and Key Biscayne
Presbyterian Church (PCA).
Rev. Steven Brown. Pastor.
For information. 576-4240.
A "thank you" is tn Rachel
Mi2rachi's smile as she says
"shalom" to Avi. one of the
students who i-olunteered to
join the cleanup operation
sponsored by the boys Town
Jerusalem, founded in 19+8.
Generational Gentrification in Old City:
JERUSALEM Spreading
out in the alleyways and
backyards of Jerusalem's Old
Bukharan Quarter. 98 teenage
students of Boys Town
Jerusalem wielded brooms and
shovels to dispose of tons of
garbage which had piled up
over the years.
The once elegant Quarter
was settled in the late 1800s
by wealthy Jewish immigrants
who. at the risk of life and in
great discomfort, made the
lonjr trek from Bukhara.
Samarkand and Afghanistan
in Central Asia to the Holv
Land.
Until recently, the
neighborhood, with a popula-
tion of some 9.000 was increas-
ingly being deserted by its
young people, leaving behind a
high percentage of elderly
folk. Many of their, ire sick,
lonely and unable to take care
of their physical needs. The
result has been a widespread
deterioration of the Quarter
with its once tidv one-storv
stone buildings centered
around flag-stone paved
courtyards.
The cleanup job was under-
taken by students of Nolad.
Boys Town's Voluntary Social
Welfare Program, to primp up
the Quarter in time for its
centennial celebration. The
Bukharan Quarter Project
Renewal Organization super
vised the work as one of it-
many activities to change the
aging face of the
neighborhood.
International Jewish Expo
To Open December 4th
Next week, the Miami Beach Convention Center will welcome
the second International Kosher Foods and Jewish Life Expo
reprise of the enormously successful trade show held in New York
last March. The City of Miami Beach and Mayor Alex Daoud have
hailed its arrival by proclaiming December 4 through 7 "Kosher
Foods and Jewish Life Week."
The Expo, billed as "the biggest kosher party ever held," is
open to the public as well as to the trade. Conceived and directed
by Irving I. Silverman, president of Nancy Neale Enterprises
Inc.. the show will be comprised of about 200 exhibitors of kosher
foods and religious and cultural "Jewish Life" products and ser-
vices. Silverman explains. "We wanted to provide a vehicle for
promoting products and services geared to the specific needs of
the Jewish community and. at the same time, celebrate its vitality
and growth. The public's huge response to the New York Expo
proves that this kind of show serves an important function in the
Jewish market."
Over 50,000 visitors are expected to attend the show over the
four-day period to sample hundreds of varieties of new and tradi-
tional kosher foods, see displays of Jewish life products, meet
Jewish celebrities, listen to music, and attend lectures and
demonstrations. Exhibitors also include a cross section of major
Jewish educational and charitable organizations, hotels, travel
agencies, artists and craftspersons. Silverman said. "The Expo is
designed as a total immersion in Jewish culture; it's not just
kosher foods. There will be something to please everyone here:
toys, games, books, videos, art and, of course, delectable, tasty
morsels of nutritious kosher food." Silverman's wife and business
partner, Nancy Neale Silverman, adds, "It's an event for Jewish
people of all ages and all degrees of observance. We hope it will
give the diverse groups which comprise the Jewish community a
sense of how much they have in common. But, beyond being a
learning experience, we want everyone to have a good time."
The Expo will take place the week before Hanukkah, and many
of the exhibitors will have gift items for sale. "It's a perfect op-
portunity to do your shopping and nosh, too." said Silverman.
Show hours for the public are Saturday evening. Dec. 5. 7 p.m.
until midnight: Sunday, Dec. 6, 10 a.m. until 10 p.m.; and Mon-
day. Dec. 7.10 a.m. until 5 p.m. General admission price is $6. and
children under six are admitted free.
A Show Whose Time Has Come
Conceived and developed by Irving I. Silverman. a Roslyn. New
York entrepreneur and show manager, the Expo is the result of a
four-year research study designed to bring together under one
roof hundreds of kosher food manufacturers and suppliers of pro-
ducts used in Jewish homes. The show had its maiden presenta-
tion in March 1987 at New York's Jacob K. Javits Convention
Center to an overflow attendance of 42,000 visitors. Literally.
15,000 persons were unable to enter the exhibition became of the
tremendous crowds generated by the support and endorsement of
hundreds of Jewish organizations.
To make certain that all who wish to attend the S 'rida
show are able to do so. three times the amount of space hai t engaged at the Miami Beach Convention Center for
and special events.
The South Florida Expo will be followed by a t;
*oheduled for June 17-21. 1988 at the Javits Center in New York.
Products from Israel and Europe are Highlighted
* >ne of the most exciting displays, introduced for :ime
at the South Florida Expo, will" be the Interr...
Companies from Israel. France and Denmark
variety of products and services. Several of these participated in
the New York Expo last March with such excellent re.-u.:s that
the demand for space by other foreign exhibitors |w< : The
well-educated, sophisticated Jewish consumer, ever, more than
other Americans, has always had a great interest in inU national
travel and foreign wares, perhaps because of the wide diver
national backgrounds among Jews. The Israel O -timent
Tourist Office and El Al Israel Airlines, as official pop* rs of the
International Kosher Foods and Jewish Life Expo will r* twoof
the major exhibitors at the International Pavilion
South Florida's Vibrant. Growing Jewish Communit-
"We selected South Florida as the site of the second Expo for a
number of reasons." said Irving Silverman. "The first Expo was
such a success that many communities requested that Expos be
held in their cities, but South Florida has the fastest growing
Jewish population in the United States, second only to Nw ^ ork.
and it's not just senior citizens. Young families and single adults
have migrated to the region to take advantage of the industrial
expansion along with the terrific Sun Belt climate Ne* com
panies. great people, and the Florida sun in December, what <*'
ter place for the Expo?" It is expected that the Expo win attract
many visitors from neighboring states with s scattering of peopw
from all over the I'nited States. Canada, Israel and Europe for
what promises to be a very exciting and delightful event
Publix Supermarkets Featured
One of the largest displays in the Expo will bi '^
Pubux Supermarkets, showcasing an extensive array of ^^^
kosher products from manufacturers throughout the I ni
States and abroad. Publix. one of Florida's major uPerm"^
operators, "wants to strongly identify itself with the
munity." It also wants to be responsive to the availabi.'> "T.
kosher food products to better serve their Jewish clier.tek uw
has found that many non-Jews also prefer k JJJ
because of the perception that kosher is synonymous "'''
quality


Friday, November 27, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
A "Topping Off Party" for the Louis and Bess
Stein Commons Building at the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged was held on
Nov. S at the construction site on the Douglas
Gardens campus. The event marked the com-
pletion of the building's concrete shell, "top-
ped" by construction of the roof Attending the
event were, from left: Harold Beck; Bess and
Louis Stein; Irving Cypen; and Marc
Lichtman, executive director.
itH'STAwul LAiwirMf
The Florida Trade Union Council for
Histadrut celebrates with, from left: Eliezer
Rafaeli, Executive Vice President of the Na-
tional Committee for Labor Israel; Hon. Alex
Daoud, accepting the prestigious Menorah
Award for Congressman Claude Pepper;
Daniel J. Miller, President of the Florida
AFL-CIO. The First Annual Florida Trade
Union Council for Histadrut Dinner was held
on Oct. 25, with proceeds to sponsor scholar-
ships for the Histadrut in Israel.
Ambassador Rahamin Timor, Israeli Consul
General to Florida, presents a special Presi-
dent's Award to Consolidated Bank, Hialeah,
* behalf of the Greater Miami Israel Bonds
Urganization. Accepting the award are chair-
man of the board Angel Fernandez Varela, se-
i condfrom left, and senior vice president and
head controller Rene Carrasco, second from
right. The bank was recognized for support of
Israel through the Israel Bonds program.
Witnessing the presentation is Salomon
Garazi, right, who is a member of the board of
governors of the Greater Miami Israel Bonds
campaign.
Principals in the opening of Diagnostics of Miami Beach in the
Sheridan Center include (left to right), Jefferson National Bank
President Norman M. Giller; Beach City Comm. Abe Resnick;
Dr. Noel Zusmer. one of Jive general partners of Diagnostics of
Miami Beach; and Comm. William E. Shockett and his wife. Jill.
Diagnostics of Miami Beach is the city's first major diagnostic
imaging center outside of a hospital.
Community Notes
Airman William D. Myers, son of William F. Myers of
Homestead, Fla., and Martha L Felton of Vandergrift,
Pa., has graduated from the U.S. Air Force freight traf-
fic specialist course at Sheppard Air Force Base. Tex.
Ambassador Walter Annenberg of Philadelphia,
former U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain, and Jack D.
Weiler of New York, will serve as co-chairmen of the
Israel Bonds Organization's Israel 40th Anniversary
Committee, it has been announced by M. Ronald
Krongold, General Chairman of the Greater Miami
Israel Bonds campaign.
The HMO Luncheon Meeting of the Stephen S. Wise
Chapter of Hadassah will be held on Monday, Dec. 7 at
11:30 a.m. at the Ocean Pavilion, Miami Beach. Harriet
Cohen, Area Representative of the Miami Beach
Region will be the principal speaker, followed by a
Hanukkah Program conducted by Marion Glazer. For
information, 866-0966 or 961-5909.
Sydney S. Traum, a tax partner in Shea and Gould's
Miami law office, was installed as president-elect of
the American Association of Attorney-Certified Public
Accountants, Inc. (AAA-CPA) during a ceremony in San
Antonio, Tex. The AAA-CPA is comprised of men and
women who are qualified to practice both as lawyers
and CPAs, a group comprising less than three percent
of the country's 600,000 attorneys and 300,000 Certified
Public Accountants.
"This Man is a Master."
Peter Clayton Miami/South florido Magazine
CksiRcimofufa
MfiDR6 CUCINn
(formerly of 79th Street Roimondo's)
Gourmet Italian
l2350N..6fi\/e.
North Miami
Reservations 893-6071
Volet Parking Closed Mondays


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 27, 1987
Parkinson Foundation Schedules 30th Year Fete
The Woman of the Year Lun-
cheon of the Greater Miami
Women's Auxiliary of the
Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged will
honor Sophia Gumenick Tues-
day, Dec. 9, at noon at the
Doral Beach Hotel. For infor-
mation, 751-8626.
On Wednesday, Dec. 9, at the
Fontainebleau-Hilton Hotel,
WIZO, the Women's Interna-
tional Zionist Organization
will hold its Sixth Annual
Fashion Show Luncheon. The
honoree is Fana Holtz. For in-
formation, 982-9445 or
937-1308.

x A
)
i i
\
Dade County cultural and civic
leader Marlene Berg has been
selected as the 1988 Woman of
the Year by the American
Heart Association of Greater
Miami. She will be honored at
the 8th Annual Women with
Heart Luncheon, to be held
Dec. 1, at the Sheraton Bal
Harbour.
The event, sponsored by
Neiman-Marcus, will begin at
11:30 a.m.
"HIRING! Federal .
ment jobs in your area and
overseas. Many immediate
openings without waiting
list or test $1548,000.
Phone call refundable.
(602) 838-8885. Exl 5775."
VTROOUCING
EXECUTIVE HOME CARE INC.
* WVWSIF10 MOMC CAA AOENCr
CALL US FOR
bmm HoMmotn. Mo***n. -nm
<***
A luncheon, marking the
30th anniversary of the Na-
tional Parkinson Foundation
will be held Thursday, Dec. 3
at the Fontainebleau-Hilton.
Lady Evelyn Ruth Barnette,
will be honored as the recipient
of the Jeanne Levy
Humanitarian Award.
Cheri Rosenthal, chairper-
son of the 1987 luncheon will
present Brenda Nestor,
chairperson of the 1986
Fashion Show Luncheon, with
an appreciation awar.l for her
work with the National
Parkinson Foundation.
For information, 133-7022.
Community Corner
Psalms of thanksgiving will be sung at Temple Sinai
of North Dade on Friday evening, Nov. 27 by Cantor Irv-
ing Shulkes and Choir member, Kris Deren. The focus
of the regular Sabbath Eve Service at North Dade's
reform congregation will be on the national holiday
which is celebrated at this time each year by people of
all faiths.
Young Jewish Singles of Temple Zion Israelite
Center will have a "Day At The Spa" at the Fon-
tainebleau Hotel on Sunday, Dec. 13 from 10:30 a.m. to
... The group will meet at the temple to car-pool at 9:45
a.m. For reservations and information, 271-2311.
Biscayne Chapter, Women's American ORT will hold
its next meeting on Thursday, Dec. 3 at 1 p.m. in Morton
Towers Auditorium. For information, 673-3793.
The Temple Beth Am Concert Series presents "An
Afternoon of Music" with The Ridge String Quartet on
Sunday, Dec. 6 at 4 p.m. at the temple. For information,
667-6667.
The new Beth Am Singles will sponsor movie night
on Sunday, Dec. 6 at 7 p.m. geared to professionals bet-
ween the ages of 21-39. For information, 667-6667.
The Graduate Program of Jewish Studies presents
the Unity of the Bible, a Matthew B. Rosenhaus lecture
by David Noel Freedman, professor of Bible at the
University of Michigan and the University of California,
San Diego on Monday evening, Nov. 30, 7:30 p.m. in the
Library, Room 103, of Barry University.
Aventura Jewish Center Sisterhood will meet at noon
on Wednesday, Oct. 28. Beverly Berlin will review a
book by Ethel Merman. The Sisterhood will have their
second annual Luncheon and Fashion Show on Thurs-
day, Dec. 3 at noon, in the Garden Room of Turnberry
Country Club. For information, 935-0666.
The National Council of Jewish Women (NCJW),
Greater Miami Section will hold its 17th Annual Child
Care Luncheon at the Doral Beach Hotel, Miami Beach,
on Wednesday, Dec. 2 at 11:30 a.m. Hon. Dante B.
Fascell will be awarded the Hannah G. Solomon
Award. For information, 576-4747.
The biblical character of Jonah, will be the subject of
the next session in the series, "Spiritual Giants of the
Past" taking place on Wednesday, Dec. 2, at 10:30 a.m.
at the Miami Beach Public Library. Guest speaker will
be Dr. Sandy Andron. High School Director of the Cen-
tral Agency for Jewish Education.
A classic novel of early American Jewish immigra-
tion, "The Rise of David Levinsky" by Abraham Cahan.
will be reviewed at the Great Jewish Books Discussion
Group meeting on Thursday, Dec. 3, at 1:30 p.m., at the
Miami Beach Public Library. Discussion leader will be
Kalman Mintz.
B'nai B'rith Women will be holding its next meeting
on Wednesday, Dec. 2 at University of Miami, Hillel
House, 7:30 p.m. All Jewish women in their 20's in-
terested in joining may call for information and reserva-
tions, 596-4132.
"Kultur Lige" (Jewish Cultur League) and Club
"Anatevka" announces the opening of the winter
season of Culture Affairs in Yiddish on Friday, Dec. 4 at
7:30 p.m. in the Auditorium at 100 Lincoln Road.
Joseph Goldhar will discuss Humor and Tragedy by
Sholom Aleichem.
Emil Cohen, a Jewish-American comedian, will I a
the guest entertainer at a special celebration in honor
of Israel's 40th Anniversary on Sunday, Dec. 13, at the
Maison Grande condominium, Miami Beach. Spon-
sored by the Greater Miami Israel Bonds Organization
in association with the Maison Grande Israel Bonds
Committee, the event, will begin at 7:30 p.m.
Brandeis University National Women's Committee.
Miami Beach Chapter, will hold its Odyssey trip to The
Bayside Marketplace aboard "The Spirit" docked at the
Fontainebleau Hotel, on Wednesday, Dec 16 at 11 a.m.
with lunch aboard the boat. For information, 868-3197
The Single Jewish Professionals, serving Singles of
all ages, is sponsoring a Singles Hanukkah Partv
featuring all types of dance music, at Club Casablanca
top of the Coconut Grove Hotel, Sunday, Dec. 6 at 8
p.m. For information, 538-2884 or 932-4031.
Zoning for the Dave and Mary Alper Jewish Com-
munity Center, to be located at SW 112th Street and
112th Avenue, received unanimous approval at a hear-
ing before the Dade County Zoning Appeals Board on
Nov. 4. The Board approved a special exception and
variances to build a school, health club, youth center
recreational areas and other ancillary uses at the new
center. There were no filed objections, the way is clear
for construction of the $9.5 million project, expected to
take one year to complete.
Bet Shira Congregation Sisterhood is having its
Chanukah Bazaar on Wednesday, Dec. 9 from 5-9 p.m.
in the social hall. There will be food, clothing, jewelry,
toys, crafts and gifts for sale.
On Sunday, Nov. 29, at 3 p.m., the performing artist
series at the Bass Museum of Art will feature bassist
Donald Nelson and cellist Victoria Strauss in concert
The Jazz at the Bass series will present Dana Paul
and his Nantucket Sound in their upcoming concert on
Sunday, Dec. 6 at 7 p.m., a Jazz/Pop program at the
Bass Museum.
On Monday, Dec. 7, 11 a.m. several veteran's groups
will gather on 10th Street beach on Miami Beach to
remember the events of Pearl Harbor Day and to honor
those who perished that day. The ceremonies, though
simple, are done every year in tribute and remembrance
to the war dead. The speaker that day will be Pearl Har-
bor survivor George Dehay. The benediction will be
done by Maurice Weinman, Past Commander of the
Jewish War Veterans Miami Beach Department 330,
and TAPS will be played by the organizer of this event,
Aaron Morah.
Sunday, Dec. 13, 2:30 p.m. matinee first Opera of the
Series of Five "Bianca and Falliero." Call 653-2873.
Wednesday to Sunday, Dec. 30 to Jan. 3 New Year
Weekend at "Sans Souci Hotel, $215 p.p. double, in-
cluding transportation. Call 652-1574 or 652-0400.
Temple Ner Tamid Sisterhood will present rabbi
Eugene Labovitz, who will review: "The Unorthodox
Murder of Rabbi Wohl," by Rabbi Joseph Teluskin and
"The Ritual Bath Case," by Faye Kellerman, on Tues-
day, Dec. 1, 10:30 a.m. at the temple. For information.
866-8345.
Jazz and Pop Al Fresco at Temple Shir Ami will begin
Sunday, Dec. 6 at 6 p.m. with the New York City Swing
Band. For information, 279-7311.
Women's American ORT, Lakeside Chapter, is spon-
soring a cruise to San Juan, St. Croix, St. Thomas sid
Nassau on Jan. 2 to Jan. 9. For information, 272-6049.
Women's American ORT, Lakeside Chapter, is rav-
ing a Luncheon and Fashion Show at the Gleneagies
Country Club on Wednesday. Dec. 9, at noon. For infor
mation. 278-9934 or 265-0165.
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center
in cooperation with the South Dade and Miami Beach
Jewish Community Centers present Marvin Hamlich, in
concert, on Sunday, Dec. 13, at the Gusman Cultural
Center, Miami. The proceeds of the concert, which
begins at 7:30 p.m. will go to support the JCC's social
sen/ice programming. For information, 932-4200.
251-1394 or 534-3206.
Temple Beth Moshe Sisterhood is sponsoring an
"Orchard Street Bazaar" on Sunday, Dec. 6 from 9.30
a.m. to 5 p.m. at Temple Beth Moshe.
Norman Sholk, Chairman of the Southeast Region of
The Jewish Theological Seminary of America, has an-
nounced plans for the second program in the series 01
educational evenings on Tuesday. Dec. 8 at Tempi?
Samu-EI/Or Olom at 7:30 p.m. Rabbi Yaakov o
Rosenberg, former Vice-Chancellor of the Serr
will be guest speaker


Na'amat
USA
Rabbi Jory Lang of Temple
Both El, North Bay Village,
will address members of Sheva
Chapter of Na'amat USA
Tuesday, Dec. 1, at 7:30 p.m.
in the recreation room of the
Treasurer House Point
Building, North Bay Village.
Berthan Liebmann, presi-
dent of Masada Chapter of
Na'amat USA, will discuss
Na'amat's role in the just-
concluded 56th General
Assembly of the Council of
Jewish Federations at a
chapter meeting Wednesday,
Dec. 2, at 12:30 p.m. in Suite
600 of the 605 Lincoln Road
Building, Miami Beach.
Refreshments will be served,
and there will be a games
tournament.
Friday, November 27, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Barry University's graduate
program of Jewish Studies is
presenting a guest lecture by
David Noel Freedman on "The
Unity of the Bible," Monday,
Nov. SO, in the Barry Library
at 7:30 p.m. Prof. Freedman is
editor of the prestigious An-
chor Bible series of biblical
commentaries and is the
author of many books, in-
cluding Pottery, Poetry, and
Prophecy, and a commentary
on Honea. For information.
758*89*.
Rackman to Highlight Smith Forum
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation will present the
third annual Marilyn K. Smith
Leadership Enrichment
Forum Dec. 9-11. The Forum
centers on issues of concern to
the leadership of the Jewish
community.
This year's speaker-scholar
will be Dr. Emanuel Rackman.
The theme Rabbi Rackman
will explore through several
discussion groups, is "The
Jewish Message for the Con-
temporary Jewish Communi-
ty: The Role of Leadership as
we Approach the 21st
Century.
The Marilyn K. Smith
Leadership Enrichment
Forum was established in 1985
in memory of Marilyn K.
Smith, an outstanding com-
munity leader who died
tragically of cancer at the age
of 48. m
On Wednesday, Dec. 9, Rab-
bi Rackman will speak to
Federation and community
leadership at 7:30 p.m. at the
Omni International Hotel on
"Voluntarism in the Jewish
Tradition."
On Thursday, Dec. 10, he
will address Young Leadership
at 7:30 p.m. at Temple Israel
of Greater Miami on "Polariza-
tion, Tolerance and Accom-
modation in American-Israel
Relations: The Role of the
Next Generation."
On Friday, Dec. 11, Jewish
communal professionals will
hear Rabbi Rackman speak at
8:30 a.m. at the Federation on
"Jewish Law and Jewish
Values in the Survival of Jews
and Judaism: The Role and
Responsibility of the
Professional."
Rabbi Emanuel Rackman
For information, 576-4000
ext. 279.
L
Eilat Chapter of Na'amat
*1 i SA will meet Monday, Dec.
7, at 1 p.m. in the community
room of Financial Federal Sav-
and Loan Association, 755
Washington Ave., to observe
llanukkah.
\ musical program will
feature Jennie Greenberg and
Chapter president Faye
Brucker will present stories
from Sholem Aleichem.
Shalom Chapter of Na'amat
ISA will hold a luncheon and
card party Thursday, Dec. 10
at 11:30 a.m. at David Park,
Hollywood Blvd. at 32nd
Court, Hollywood.
President Bertha Lazaar
said the Hanukkah celebration
is open to the public, but reser-
vations are required,
454-8848.
,
Hadassah Events
The Hannah Senesch
Chapter of Hadassah will hold
il next general meeting at
noon, Tuesday, Dec. 1 at the
Shelborne Hotel. For informa-
tion. 538-2111.
Hatikvah Hadassah will be
having their chapter meeting
!' 10 at 7:30 p.m. at Temple
I Social Hall, 9900 North
Kendall Drive. The speaker for
the evening will be Rabbi Ed-
win Farber from Temple
Samu-el/Or Olom. The topic
will be, "The Origin of
Customs and Superstitions."
The Hadassah Medical
Organization Luncheon will be
held Monday, Dec. 14, at 11:30
a.m. For reservations, Sylvia
Polak 538-9650, Doris Meland
861-4683, or Jeanne Fuerst
865-8026.
The I.R. Goodman Chapter
ot Hadassah announces that
the regular meeting will be
neld on Tuesday, Dec. 8,1 p.m.
the American Savings Bank
Building, Lincoln and Alton
Kads, Miami Beach.
The Oneg Shabbat will be
"eld on Saturday, Dec. 5 at 1
R-m- at the Forte Towers
"uilding, Miami Beach.
"stett will be Ann Kaplan in
1 hnor of her birthday.


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 27, 1987

Amit Technion To Honor Founders
Israeli Consul David Cohen holds the Israel Freedom Award he
presented to the Miami Beach Region Hadassah on behalf of the
Greater Miami Israel Bonds Organization. The Miami Beach
Region Hadassah was recently recognized during a luncheon at
the Eden Roc Hotel for their support. Accepting the award were
Ricki Igra, President, and Jean Jacobson, Luncheon
Chairperson.
The 1987 Americanism Award
to Robert F. Ehrling, president
General Development Cor-
poration on the occasion of the
75th Anniversary of the Anti-
Defamation League will be
presented at a Dinner-Dance
tendered in his honor by the
ADL. Thursday, Dec. S. at the
Omni International Hotel,
Miami.
The National Parkinson Foun-
dation will be holding an Inter-
national Gala on Nov. 28, the
first official event of the newly
established International Divi-
sion. This Division is compris-
ed of local, national and inter-
national business leaders who
support the work of the Na-
tional Parkinson Foundation.
Fana and Abel Holtz will
chair the Gala.
co-
Abel Holtz
Women
Coral Gables Chapter will
hold a luncheon meeting to
celebrate Hanukkah on Tues-
day, Dec. 1, at noon, at the
Zamora Temple.
Moorings Chapter will meet
on Tuesday, Dec. 1, at noon, in
the Auditorium of Moorings
Towers, North Miami Beach.
Vered Chapter will hold a
Hanukkah boutique at the
home of Yvonne Lifshutz,
from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sun-
day, Nov. 29. A great variety
of gifts at reasonable prices
will be sold, plus wrapped gifts
for children to purchase for
holiday giving. For informa-
tion, 651-8622.
Hope and Larry Fuller
Lidia and Jimmy Resnick
Hope and Larry Fuller have been elected co-presidents of the
Family League of Temple Emanu-El, succeeding Lidia and Jim-
my Resnick. They will be installed by Dr Irving Lehrman, rabbi
of the Miami Beach congregation, at a reception at their home, at
7:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. SO. The Resnicks will receive a special
award for their leadership on behalf of the Family League and of
the synagogue. Resnick recently was elected chairman of the
Florida State Athletic Commission. Fuller is a name partner in
the Miami Beach law firm cf Fuller, Feingold and Mallah. Hope
Fuller is a member of the board of directors of the Miami Beach
Jewish Community Center.
Col. Maurice Weinman, com-
mander of Miami Beach Post
No. 330 of the Jewish War
Veterans of the United States,
has been appointed National
Membership Chairman. This
national appointment comes as
recognition of the 25 years of
service that Col. Weinman has
given to the local post as it's
commander.
'Sheik of
Avenue B'
Opens
"The Sheik of Avenue B,"
the new Jewish ragtime and
jazz era musical revue, will
open in Florida at the Hallan-
dale Theatre November 26.
The show, which is scheduled
for New York in the spring of
1988, is based upon the music,
songs, dance and comedy of
the leading composers and per-
formers who displayed their
talents in the worlds of Broad-
way, Vaudeville and Tin Pan
Alley.
Isaiah Sheffer has written
the revue material and is stag-
ing the show which was con-
ceived by Henry Sapoznik.
Lanny Meyers has done the ar-
rangements and orchestration
of these classic gems from the
Broadway, Vaudeville and Tin
Pan Alley archives and is also
the musical director.
The cast of Broadway and
Off Broadway performers will
include Avi Hoffman, Ida Rae
Hersh, Wendy Baila, Celeste
Mancinelli, Glenn Rosenblum,
Jay Schneider and Laurie
Taradash.
Lawrence Toppall is the pro-
ducer of the show which will
tlay a full Tuesday through
unday schedule at the Hallan-
dale Theatre. For information
call (305) 372-9922.
Sam B. Topf
Mr. Sam B. Topf, Southern
Regional Chairman, American
Technion Society Israel In-
stitute of Technology, an-
nounced that Al Isaacson will
be the dinner chairman at this
year's Annual Dinner-Dance
honoring Technion Founders
on Dec. 12, at the
Fontainebleau-Hilton Hotel.
The Society of Founders will
honor new members with a
presentation by the evening's
guest speaker, Ambassador
Moshe Arens. Technion
Founders are Mr. and Mrs
Jack Bellock and family, Mr
and Mrs. Ben Botwinick
Drescher Family, Mrs. Vivian
Hyman, Mr. and Mrs. Ben
Marks, Mrs. Anne Padawer
and Mr. Harry Reis.
The Hon. George Firestone
is president of the Greater
Miami Chapter.
The Dinner-Dance will
feature, as guest speaker, the
Honorable Moshe Arens.
presently a member of the
Knesset and a past Minister
Without Portfolio of the Israel
Cabinet.
For information. 868-5666.
Happenings
The Miami City Ballet announces an all-Balanchine program
will highlight the company's first international engagement Dec
10 through 21 in a three-city tour of Israel Marking its debut Dec
12 through 1-4 at Tel Aviv's Mann Auditorium ihe Jerusalem
rheatrc will follow Dec 10 and 17 with the final performance
scheduled Dec I!) at Haifa Auditorium
Temple Israel of Greater Miami will present 'Jewish -lazz
Under The Stars at the temple. Saturday. Dec S at 7 30 p.m .
featuring the Ira Sullivan Quartet. For information. 573-5900
Registered nurses at the National Jewish (enter for Im-
munology and Respiratory Medicine LUNG LINE Information
Service in Denver. Colo provide answers to questions about lung
and immunologic diseases The information service is available
toll-free to callers from throughout the United States at (800)
222-LUNG LUNG LINE nurses are available Monday through
Friday
A double bill "At Home' by Conrad Bromberg and
"Chinamen" by Michael Frayn will run at least through the an
nounced date of Dec. 5. on Fridays and Saturdays at Miami
Repertory Theater For information. 279-4400
The monthly informational meeting of the Dade hroward
Lupus Foundation will be at 7:30 p.m.. Wednesday. Dec. 9. in the
auditorium of the Institute of Medical Specialties. 2845 Aventura
Blvd in North Miami Beach Anne Czaiowski. MSW. will discuss
"Coping with Lupus For information. 931-1407
Irving Tabachmkoff. Principal of the Workmen's Circle South
Florida Jewish School for Children, will speak at a meeting of the
Workmen's Circle on Wednesday. Dec. 9. noon, at Surfside
Community Center.
"Soviet Foreign Policy Decisionmaking in the (iorbachev Era
is the topic for a talk at the University of Miami Graduate Vhool
of International Studies, at 2pm Thursday. Dec S I'he speaker
is Vernon V Aspatunan. the Evan Pugh Professor ol Political
Science and Director of Slavic and Soviet Language Ana enter
at Pennsylvania State University The talk is sponsored b> the
UM's Institute for Soviet and Flast European Studies
The L'niversit.v of Miami School of Continuing Studies
presents "Intersession 88. a new concept in concentrated want-
ing, starting Jan 6 Fifteen special topics will be taught b) top I s
faculty in an intensive week-long program offering Students the
chance to earn up to three hours of academic credit Registration
deadline is Dec 18 Subjects range from a professional writing
workshop with authors James Michener and Isaac Bashevis
Singer as quest speakers to a leadership and motivation seminar
To register, or for a free brochure. 284-4000
A meeting of the Big Three Dade. Broward and Palm Beach
Boards of Education To Consider The Role Of Dade's Career
Education Labs In Dropout Prevention
Miami Beach Community Concert Association is current >
entering its 31st season. This pioneer, non-profit concert series is
run exclusively by volunteers at the Theater of Performing Arts
The series begins on Tuesday. Dec 1 at 8 p.m. with Norman
Luboff Choir _____
On Tuesday. Dec 1 at 1 p.m. Susan Lichtman *jj[|
Americas Commitment to Israel Its 40th Anniversary
Forte Forum at 1200 West Ave Miami Beach


B'nai Mitzvah
CRAIG LEFKOWITZ
Craig Alan Lefkowitz, son of
Lila and Stuart Lefkowitz of
Coral Springs will be called to
the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday at Agudath Israel
Hebrew Institute in Miami
Beach.
Maternal grandparents are
Hela Hirsch and the late Hillel
Hirsch, of Miami Beach. Pater-
nal grandparents are Pearl
and Murray Lefkowitz of
Sunrise.
In addition to Chanting his
haftorah, Craig will serve as
Bal Korah.
Craig is a student at
Ramblewood Middle School
and has a sister, Beth.
GREGORY METZGER
Gregory Joel Metzger, son of
Eileen and Sheldon Metzger
will be called to the Torah as
Bar Mitzvah on Saturday at
8:30 a.m. at Adath Yeshurun
Synagogue, North Miami
Beach.
The celebrant is a student in
the Confirmation class at
Adath Yeshurun, and is active
in United Synagogue Youth-
Kadoma. Gregory attends
John F. Kennedy Junior High
School where he is in the
eighth grade.
Gregory is a member of the
hand at JFK Junior High
School where he plays
trombone.
AMANDA BROWN
Amanda Heather Brown,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Michael Fingar will be called
to the Torah as Bat Mitzvah on
Saturday at 10:30 a.m. at Tem-
Craig Lefkowitz
pie Sinai.
The celebrant is active in
Junior Snifty and she attends
Highland Oaks Junior High
where she is in the eighth
grade.
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Fingar
will host the Kiddush following
the services in honor of the
occasion.
ANDREA NASS
Andrea Wendy Nass,
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Hal
Nass, will be called to the
Torah as a Bat Mitzvah at
Temple Beth Sholom on Satur-
day at 10:45 a.m.
Andrea will be sharing her
Bat Mitzvah with Gulbaor
Rabaev, a Soviet Refusenik
who has been denied the
freedom to live her life in the
Jewish tradition.
Hubert E. Zobel, left, recently spoke on "Tax-Samng Techniques:
U'hat's Left for 1987" at the second annual Estate Planning
Seminar sponsored by the Florida Region of the Weizmann In-
stitute of Science. Shawn, at right, is Harry B. Smith, chairman
oj the Estate Planning Committee.
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
"And he dreamed, and behold a ladder set up on the earth, and
the top of it reached to heaven; and behold the angels of God ascen-
ding and descending im it"
(Genesis 28.12)
VAYETZE
VAYETZE On his way to Haran, Jacob lay down to rest at a
place where God appeared to him in a dream, promising to be with
him and to give the land to him and his seed after him. Rising the
next morning, Jacob lifted the stone on which he had slept, and
set it up as a pillar. He called the place Beth-el, meaning "house of
God," and vowed to serve God there when he returned to his
father's house. The Lord would be his God. In Haran Jacob work-
ed twenty years as a shepherd for Laban seven years for his
first wife, Leah, seven years for his second wife, Rachel, and six
years for the sheep. His wives gave him their maid servants
Bilhah and Zilpah as wives. Jacob's four wives bore him 11 sons:
Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Dan, Naphtali, Gad, Asher,
Issachar, Zebulun, and Joseph; he also had one daughter named
Dinah. At God's direction, Jacob returned home to his father's
house. On the way he met the angels of God.
(The recounting ol the Weekly Portion of the Law l extracted end based upon "The
Graphic History ol the Jewish Mentan- edited by P Wollman Tsamlr. $15. published by
Shengold The volume is available II 75 Maiden La?e. New York. NY 10038 Joseph
Schleng Is president of the society distributing the volun-e)
Friday, November 27, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Bill Goldring
Dean' Goldring
To Deauville
Bill Goldring, regarded as
the Dean of South Florida
caterers, has returned to the
executive branch of the
Deauville Hotel and has been
named Catering Consultant.
He will work closely with Al
Sicherer, director of Catering,
in helping arrange special din-
ners and affairs. During the
celebrated era of Miami Beach,
he was in charge of Food and
Beverage at the Deauville, in-
cluding presentation of stars
like Sammy Davis Jr., Frank
Sinatra, Lena Home, Steve
Lawrence and Edye Gorme,
Judy Garland and many
others.
Sponsors of major dinners
like the Deeds Club, St. Jude,
Parkinson, Israel Bonds, the
Opera Ball, and many others
have repeatedly paid tribute to
Goldring for his expertise and
organizational ability.
Temple Beth Sholom of Greater
Miami will continue its tradi-
I ion of providing discussions of
important aspects of Jewish
life with this years' announce-
ment of the Sunday morning
Omnibus Lecture Series, now
in its Uth season. On Dec. 6,
Yehuda Amichai, Israel's
leading poet to be published in
the United States will lead a
poetry reading and talk.
South Shore
Celebrates
South Shore Hospital and
Medical Center Auxiliary will
observe its 16th anniversary
Friday, Dec. 4, with a "Sweet
16 Birthday Party Bazaar" in
the penthouse dining room of
the Brodie Pavilion.
The auxiliary, which sup-
ports the medical treatment,
research and education pro-
grams of South Shore, af-
filiated with the University of
Miami School of Medicine, will
sell crafts, arts, antiques,
plants, clothes, jewelry and
books. The bazaar is slated
from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m., with
free admission and free park-
ing for both members and
guests.
For reservations and infor-
mation 864-3539.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
5:09 p.m.
BETH YOSEPHCHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach. Fla. 5312120
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947 1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor: Zvi Rozen Conservative
Executive Director: ^>,
Harry J. Silverman ( Jfc'j
Dally mlnyen 7:30 a m and S p.m.
Sat Service 1:30 a.m. and 4 45pm
Frl t p.m Welcome home service lor students
who studied In Israel
Sat 8:30 am Bar Mltnah Oregon Metzger.
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 667-6667
Leonard Schoolman, Sr. Rabbi
Mark Kram, Associate Rabbi
Lynn Goldstein, Assistant Rabbi
Frt. US p.m. Rabbi Lynn Qoldateln
rill apeak on Giving Thanks"
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854-3911
Jack Riemer. Rabbi
Robert Albert,
Cantor
Rev. Milton Freeman,
Ritual Director
CD
Datly services. Mon. and Thurs. 7:30 a.m.
Tues.. Wed. and Fit 7 46 a.m.
Sun 6 am. Evenings 5:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St.. N. Miami. FL 33161
891 5508 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs. Rabbi
Dr. Joseph A. Gortinkel. '\S\
Rabbi Emeritus '.??'
Moshe Friedler, Cantor
Fn 8p ii,
Sat. 8:45 a.m.
Weekday serv Mon Fn 8am
Mon.-Thurs 5 p.m Sun 8.30 a.m
Sat 8 45 s m
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave., M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Aivadia Rosenberg
Cantor Moshe Buryn
Daily service* 8 s m S 7 p.m.
Sat. 8:15 a.m.
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W 120th Street
238-2601 /So.
Rabbi David H. Auerbach \W)
Cantor Stephen Freedman
Fn. Services 8 p.m
Creative service Set Sere 8:30 am
Bar Mltnah Chai Havurati
M^C BETH SM6L6M 538 7231
Chase Ave & 41 st St Liberal
DA LEON KHONISM, Senior Founding Rabbi
GARY A OLICKSTEIN, Senior Rabbi
HARRY JOLT. Auxiliary Rebb.
JASON OWASOOFF. Assistant Rabbi
IAN ALPERN, Cantor
DAVID CONVISER. Cantor Emeritus
Frl. 8 15 p.m Rabbi Qwesdotf will speak on
"Between Two Dreams." Bat Mttiveh
Andree Wendy Ness Set Services 10 45 s m.
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd -:-.
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz. Rabbi 'V)
Zvee Aroni. Cantor "-S-
Harvey L. Brown. Exec. Director
Daily services Monday through Hiday
I 30 a m and s 10 p m
Late services Fn 7 30 p m
Bat Mitzvah Monica Haim
Sat 8 25am Bai Mitivan Craig Otu.
and Mincha 5pm Sun Sam and 6 JOp m
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami Beach
534-7213 534-7214
Barry J. Konovitch. Rabbi f
Sergio Grobler, President \
Sholem Epelbaum. President,'
Religious Committee
]
TEMPLE EMANUEL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
V-?S.
/
Dr. Irving Lehman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Assistant Rabbi Ronnie Cahan
Yehuda Shifman. Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
Kabbalat Shabbat 5 p.m Sat. t a.m
Dr. Irving Lehrmen will preach.
Cantor Yehuda Shifman will chant
Thanksgiving Day.
Bar Mltnah Joseph Molcho
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive. Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Dally 7:30 a.m. (Mon. 1 Thurs 7.15) A 7 p.m
Frl. 7 p m Sal. t a.m. Reserv lor High Holiday
Daya.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Miami's Pioneer Reform Congregation
137N.E. 19th St. Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor: Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob G. Bornstein
Frl. 8 p.m. Downtown
Rabbi Res D. Perimeter will speak on
Speaking Truth to Superpower "
Liturgy will be conducted by
Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667-5657
Michael B. Eisenstat, Rabbi
Sal. Shabbat Service 11:15 em
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Shoshanah Raab. Cantor
Services Frl. 7:30 p.m.
Set. 8:30 a.m.
Oneg Shebbat will tollow
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz ,__
An Fridkis. Assoc Rabbi Sfr'i
Cantor Murray Yavneh XX
Sal 9 a m sabbath service.
Daily Mlncheh Sunday-Friday
Bern and8p.m.
Sat. 9 a.m. and 5 15 p m.
TEMPLE NERTAMID 866-8345
7902 Carlyle Ave.. 866 9833
Miami Beach 33141 Conservative
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Cantor Edward Klein $P)
OellyServ Mon Fn Bam 630pm k-S
Sal Mincha 8:15 p.m Sun s 30 a m
8.30pm Set 845 em sere by Rabbi LaboviU.
Cantor Klein
SHAARAYTEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung
SHAARE TEFILLAH
TORAH CENTER OF KENDALL
7880 SW112 Street ,.
2326833 V*
Rabbi Hershel Becker
Dally Sere. 7 a.m. Frl. 10 mm after candle
lighting lime ShebbosBs m Shabbos
Mlnche 10 mln. before candle lighting time.
Sun 8 30am ________
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dade's Reform Congregation
Ralph P Kingsley, Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S Ramsay. Administrator
Fn Serv Rabbi Ralpnp Kingsir-y
To Everything A Time A Time To Mobilize
Sat serv 10 30 a m
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
271-2311 s
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi &^
Benjamin Adler, Cantor X-S
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Minyan 7 am Mondays
and 8 a m Thursdays
Sunday9am F- fl'Spm
Sat Sere 9 e m Rsb. ohepiro and
Cantor Adlei otlicieling.
Ber Mltnah Adam Wlllnsky


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 27, 1987

Deaths
Helene 'Lany' Narot
Nearly 500 people filled the
main sanctuary of Temple
Israel of Greater Miami on
Tuesday for memorial services
for Helene "Lany" Narot. The
former wife of the late Dr.
Joseph R. Narot died Sunday
from complications following
open-heart surgery. She was
58.
In prose, poetry and music,
Narot was eulogized by Cantor
Jacob Bornstein, cantor-
emeritus of Temple Israel, and
long-time friends Cong.
William Lehman and em-
pressaria Ruth Greenfield.
A social-psychotherapist,
Narot was eulogized by
Lehman as having lived life
"with guts and gusto" and,
after having overcome per-
sonal tragedies, "beine on the
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name OCEAN RENT-A-
CAR at 865 N.W. 43rd Ave.
Miami. Fl 33126 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Figueredo Auto Center
A. Fla. Gen. Partnership
LeJeune Seven. Inc.,
Gen. Partner
865 N.W. 43rd Ave.
Miami. Fl 33126
Attorney Paul M. Marmish, PA.
SHEA A GOULD
18112 November 20.27;
December 4. 11. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Civil Action No.: 87-49440 FC 18
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
YONI YAAKOV
and
ETTY B. YAAKOV
TO: ETTY B. YAAKOV
Residence Unknown
A Petition for Dissolution of
your Marriage has been filed in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses on Alec Ross, attorney
for Petitioner. 160 SUNNY ISLES
BLVD. N. MIAMI BEACH. FLA
and file the original with the clerk
of the above court on or before
January 4, 1988: otherwise a
default will be entered against you.
Dated in Miami on November 24.
1987.
RICHARD BRINKER. Clerk
Dade County. Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18144 November L7;
December 4, 11. 18. 1987
threshold of a new and
fascinating time in her life."
Calling Narot "giving and nur-
turing," Lehman parapn.-ased
Narot's own published
writings: "I rejoice in the good
years," she had written, "and
am grateful for wonderful
memories."
Bornstein's eulogy was of a
more personal nature which
cited Narot's "nobility of
humaness and strength of
character." He, like Lehman,
approached the pulpit with "a
celebration of her life."
Ruth Greenfield and Borns-
tein offered an oratorio for
voice and piano written ex-
pressly for the memorial
service.
Narot is survived by
Leonard Rapaport. her mother
Sylvia Rubin and three
children; Peter Berg,
Elizabeth Berg and Susan
Gladstone.
MEYERSON. Mrs Dorothy of Miami
Beach. Rubin-Zilbert.
BAREN. Rebecca B. 81. of Coral Gables.
November 19. Private services were held
BOGDONOFF. Miguel. Rubin Zilbert.
GORDON. Sally Ludmer. 82, of Orlando.
November 21. The Riverside. Interment
at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
NAROT. Helene J 58. of Miami. November
22. The Riverside.
SIRKIN. Alexander (Ed). The Riverside.
YOUNG. Jack, 74, of Miami, November 21
Interment at Star of David Memorial
Park.
GREENBERG. Gerald of Miami Beach
Eternal Light. Interment at Lakeside
Memorial Park.
GREENSTEIN. Morris. 69, of North Miami
Beach. November 21. Levitt-Weinstein
Interment at Star of David.
GOLDBERG. Harold, 81. of North Miami
Beach. November 21. Services and inter
ment in New York. The Riverside.
RADl'NS. Solomon. 87, of Miami.
November 20. Interment at Mt NVI
Cemetery
WAYNER. Rose, 91. of Winter Haven and
formerly of Miami. November 19. The
Riverside. Interment at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
YOKEL, Hilda R.. November 20. The
Riverside.
MINTZ. Eve, 68, of North Miami Beach.
November 20. Levitt-Wemstein.
AL1BER. Freda, of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert.
BATALIN. Sandra, of North Miami Beach
Menorah Chapels
MARLIN, Edward, of North Miami Beach
Services held in New York.
SIEGALL, Herman. 71, of Miami
November 16. Services and interment at
Star of David Memorial Park.
l.EPZELTER. William, of North Miami
Bosch. Rubin-Zilbert. Interment at
Lakeside Mausoleum.
KRICHTMAN, Florence (Fruitman). of
Miami Beach. November 17 Services held
in Toronto. Canada.
MILLER. Herman, of Miami Beach. Ser
vices held in New York. Rubin Zilbert
ITLEY. Betty R., of Miami Beach Rubin
Zilbert.
ORLINSKY. Abraham, 75. of North Miami
Beach. November 17. Levitt-Weinsteir
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service
Dade County
M2 2IWH
Browtird County
ItaprvMnttri b> Kiwrmdv Mvmurul (Impel, Inr,
New York: (7|HHW8-7WWJBwnii Blvd fl 7tii k.i Forest
Ik N Y
Jazz and Jewish Music
On Saturday, Dec. 5. at 7:30
p.m., Cantor Rachelle F.
Nelson of Temple Israel of
Greater Miami will present
'Jewish Jazz Under The Stars'
at the Miami temple. This pro-
gram will feature the Ira
Sullivan Quartet in a unique
concert. Sullivan, considered
one of the greatest living jazz
artists today, and his quartet
will perform an evening of
Jewish theatre and folk music
in popular jazz form. Selection
Cantor Rachelle Nelson
Mozart On
Miami Beach
Coming to Florida for the
first time is the 50-member
Mozarteum Orchestra of
Salzburg. Principal resident
orchestra of the Salzburg
Festival since its inception in
1920, the orchestra began in
1841 and became associated
with the Mozarteum Conser-
vatory when it was founded in
1880. The South Florida Gala
Premiere concert by the
Mozarteum Orchestra of
Salzburg is set for Thursday
evening, Dec. 3, at 8 p.m. in
the Jackie Gleason Theatre of
the Performing Arts. Miami
Beach.
Berman Elected
Daisy Berman was unanimous
ly elected National President
of AMIT Women, this coun-
try's largest women's religious
Zionist organization and the
State of Israel's only Reshet
(Network) for religious secon-
dary technological education.
Her election took place at
AMIT Women's 62nd Anniver-
sary National Convention held
recently in Orlando. Berman
succeeds Frieda C. Kufeld.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Eeiy Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888
from Broadway scores written
by Jewish composers will also
be included. Joining Sullivan
and his quartet is Cantor
Rachelle F. Nelson who has ar-
ranged all of the music for the
evening's performance and
will sing many of the pieces.
Prior to the concert, a Hav-
dalah Service will be con-
ducted by Rabbi Rex D
Perimeter. For information
573-5900.
.'MvtO Greenfield Kd
Oak Park. MiehiMB 48233
i:ii:ii M3-1622
Hebrew Memorial Chapel
of Greater Detroit
Kfficienl. Reliable. Traditional
with
Dignity and I'nderslandinn
l niitpli'tr Shipping Ser* i< Kron> I Inml.i \r'd
Your First Call to Us will
Handle All Funeral Arrangements
SPECIAL LIMITED PRE-NEEn OFFER
FUNERAL AND BURIAL
IN THE BEST OF JEWISH TRADITION
$1,595
I akeidi Memorial Park and I uriul Light Funeral Director* art- pri>ud In
sponsor this unique program which comhinev ownership or a plot ,11 mir
I., inn I ill Memorial Park and a plan for pre paid funeral services..
This exceptional \alue .iun- that \our one call v* ill put \ou in touch with
the people vvho helicve there is nothing dignified a ht ut paving mori far I
traditional |cwi.h funeral that VtHI have to.
Hl-Rr is WHAT WE INCLUDEi
eceRNAL
LiQlTC
Prompt Transfer from Place of
IVath
Care and Preparation of I Vcease.l
Casket and Hearse
Arrangement Direction of
Craveside Services
Permits and Henefit Assistance
14 hour emergence service
Shiva I .mdlcs. I 'arils and Benches
\j\yj) ^r*
t .rax, -Hi
Paved Private Visitation Path
Steel Reinforced Concrete Vault
Opening and Closing ot liftte
Perpetual Craiesite*. Car*
N* maintenance or srnm Iff *
*i jevvish Tradition sin. l*H*i
*
TOTAL: $1,595
No Interest Payment Plans Available
Far complete information on our pk>l and funeral service parkafi plan
call vour lakeside Eternal I ight repri-w-nianvi todav
In time ol need, one call will handle all the detail*
DADE:
S 92-0690
BROWARD:
525-9 H9
The Spirit
Of Our Tradition
Lives On.
Dignity, simplicity and economy are tin- mandates
of Scripture lakeside Memorial Rark upholds the tra
iliiions of Jewish burial in a beautffid, intelligently
designed setting
lakeside the only memorial park in the atutb (bat
Was created to icct tin- needs ofercn Jctiish family
Please call for a tour of
our Garden of Heroes, an
innovation in alnne ground
burial modeled after the
mausoleums of ancient Israel
10301/V.W 25th Street
Miami. Florida 33172
Dade (305) 592-0690
Broward (305) 525-9339
W
lakeside. .
Mpmgriel


FORECLOSURE SALES-PUBLIC NOTICES
Friday, November 27, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
*
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under tin- fie
litmus name Flamingo Spirits.
inc., a Florida corporation at Store
No, 2, East 10th Avenue ami 9th
Sireet. Hialeah, Florida intend to
i,t said name with the Cierk
if the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
. Florida.
FLAMINGO SPIRITS, INC,
Martin W. Wassman
Attorney for Howard (ialbut
I 81MMi NovemlKT 1:!. 20, 27;
December i. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-50142 15
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
No. 00347.1
IN RE:
I \I>VS HILLa/k/a
W1HROZINE
GLADYS FRANCES HILL
and
KnHKRTIVAN HILL
TO: ROBERT IVAN HILL
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ
ten defenses, if any. to it on JOY
KARKAN. attorney for Petitioner,
whose addreas is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street North Miami Beach, Florida
33162, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
>n or before December 28. 1987;
'therwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 19 day of November, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
\- Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By E. SEIDL
As Deputy Clerk
'Circuit Court Seal)
18126
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-3472 (29) FC
ACTION FOR ADOPTION
IN RE: In the matter of the Adop-
tion By
GLADYS EICHELBERGER
TO: GROVER SMITH
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action, for
Adoption of a minor has been filed
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on Joshua S. Galitzer.
Esq.. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 17101 N.E. 6th
Avenue, North Miami Beach. Flu
33162, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before Deceml>er 28, 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 19 day of November. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
Sy: B.J. FOY
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seai)
Joshua S. Galitzer. Esq.
17101 N.E. 6th Avenue
North Miami Beach, Fla. 33162
653-3535
Attorney for Petitioner
18120 November 27;
December 4. 11, 18. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-43846(14)
NOTICE OF ACTION
RESIDENTIAL FINANCIAL
CORP.,
Plaintiff
vs.
RICARDO A. GARCIA, et ux.
etal.,
Defendants.
November 27; TO: RICARDO A. GARCIA and
December 4. 11.18, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE No. 87-40178 CA 09
NOTICE OF ACTION
FKDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United
States of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
EDUARDO M. ANTUNA, et ux.,
<'t al., Defendants
TO
PETER ORDWAY
Sligo Road
R.F.D. No. 1
Dover.
New Hampshire 03820
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage thereafter; otherwise a default wi
>n the following described be entered against you for the
CARMEN J. GARCIA,
his wife
6915 SW 94th Court
Miami. Florida
i*OU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 11, Block 1, MIROSA
SUBDIVISION, according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 105. Page 31 of
the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madniga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida. 33146 on or before
December 18. 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
property:
Lot 22, Block 2. of
OAKRIDGE ESTATES
SECTION THREE, accor-
ding to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 57,
"age 10, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida.
"as been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy ol
your written defenses, if any, to it.
'"i Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
*M, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
tables, Florida. 33146 on or before
December 28, 1987 and file the
"riginal with the Clerk of this court
cither before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
reef demanded In the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
this Court this 18 day of
November, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18'23 November 27;
December 4.11.18,1987
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 10 day of
November, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18099 November 20,27;
December 4. 11, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name FIGUEREDO/GAR
CIA JOINT VENTURE at 865
N.W. 43rd Ave. Miami. Fl 33126
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Maser, Inc. a Fla. Corp.
Figueredo LeJeune, Inc.
a Fla. Corp.
865 N.W. 43rd Ave.
Miami 33126
Attorney Paul M. Marmish. PA.
SHEA & GOULD
18U0 November 20,27;
December 4, 11,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. -FC-87-47537 22
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
in n- the marriage of
CACHETA F WALTERS
Petitioner
and
skcree WALTERS
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:3EGREE WALTERS
1! Chester Av..
Kingston 11. Jamaica
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action f,,r dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required t" serve ; copy of
>our written defenses upon; I. .1.
GRAFF BSQ attorney lor ivn
tioner, whose address is 688 N.E.
N U B Honda 83182, on
or before December 11. 1987 ami
file the original with the clerk of
this court Otherwise a default will
* entered against you
RICHARD P. BRINKER
I Herd >! tin- Court
By: E Seidl
As Deputy Clerk
Novembers, i:(. 20, -'7. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-4426
Division (4)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FEIGA ZAIDMAN DEKIJNER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of FEIGA ZAID-
MAN DEKIJNER. deceased, File
Number 86-4426, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami, Florida. The per-
sonal representative of the estate
is SHAMA SAMUEL KIJNER,
whose address is 9801 Collins
Avenue. 11-M. Bal Harbour,
Florida. The name and address of
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands aginst the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
November 27. 1987.
SHAMA SAMUEL KIJNER
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
FEIGA ZAIDMAN DEKIJNER.
Deceased
SILVER & SILVER
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
150 S.E. 2nd Avenue
Suite 1326
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 374-4888
By: MAX R. SILVER
18140 November 27;
December 4. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Little David Produc
tions at 770 Northwest 195th
Street. Unit 210. N. Miami Beach,
FL intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
Little David Music. Inc.
Douglas D. Stratton. Esq.
Attorney for
Little David Music. Inc
18129 November U7
December 4.11, 18, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-6118
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MICHAEL ALBEK.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of MICHAEL ALBEK. deceased.
File Number 87-6118, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County
r'lorida. Probate Division, the ad
dress of which is 71! West Flagler
Street, Hade County Courthouse.
Miami, Florida 33130. The nanu>
and addresses of the personal
representatives and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED. '
Publication of this Notice has
begun on November 27, 1987.
Personal Representatives:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flage'r Street, Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
LONIA L. ALBECK
3750 N. E. 170 Street
North Miami Beach. Fla. 33160
Attorney for Personal
Representatives:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler St., Suite 1201
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 374-3116
Florida Bar No. 059023
18145 November 27;
December 4, 1987
IN THE CIRCUTI COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 87-4146
Division: 04
IN RE: GUARDIANSHIP OF
WILLIAM B. SNOWDEN,
Incompetent.
NOTICE OF TERMINATION
OF GUARDIANSHIP
(Florida Bar No. 184878)
The final accounting and petition
for termination of the Guardian-
ship of William B. Snowden, In-
competent, have been filed in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the Guar-
dian of the Person and Property of
William B. Snowden, Incompetent,
appointed by this court on July 17,
1987, and the Guardian's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
within thirty (30) days of the first
publication of this notice, any ob-
jections to the final accounting and
application to terminate the
Florida guardianship.
ALL OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this notice has
begun on the 27 day of November,
1987.
CHERYL A. SOVERN, Guardian
of the Person and Property of
William B. Snowden, Incompetent
4596 California Road
Okeana, Ohio 45053
DENNIS R. TURNER. ESQ.
STEARNS WEAVER MILLER
WEISSLER ALHADEFF 4
SITTERSON. PA.
Attorneys for Petitioner
220 Museum Tower
150 West Flagler Street
Miami, florida 33130
(305) 789-3555
18136 November 27;
December 4. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name .lack of Diamonds at
3765 N.E. 163 Street NMB Fl
88160 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida
Jack Stemlier
Attorney Joshua A Galitzer
18105 November 20.27;
December 4,11.1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-39826 FC 01
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
CORRINA A. DEESON
Petitioner,
and
I.ARRY DEAN DEESON
Respondent
TO LARRY DFAN DEESON
2h2dl SW 152 Avenue
(Last known address 1
Lot No 278
Leisure City. Fla 33033
YOU ARK HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filial against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
STANLEY E. G(K)DMAN. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 909 East 8th Avenue.
Hialeah. Florida 33(110. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
January 4. 1988; otherwise a
default will he entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 24 day of November. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
STANLEY E. GOODMAN
909 East 8th Avenue
Hialeah, Florida 33010
Attorney for Petitioner
18143 November 27;
December 4, 11.18.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name FIGUEREDO AUTO
LEASING at 865 N.W. 43rd Ave.
Miami, Fl 33126 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Figueredo Auto Center
Fla. Gen. Partnership
LeJeune Seven. Inc..
Gen. Partner
Attorney Paul M. Marmish, P.A.
SHEA& GOULD
1X111 November 211. 27.
December 4. 11.1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-60051 (12)
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
BRUNA VASCOS PENAYO
Petitioner/Wife
and
ALBERTO PENAYO
Respondent/Husband
TO: ALBERTO PENAYO
Respondent
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of your Marriage hs
been filed and commenced in this
court and you are required to serve
a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Robert I. Spiegel man.
Attorney at Law. Suite 518. 19
West Flagler Street, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is
Miami, Florida 33130 and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
December 28, 1987; otherwise
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 18 day of November. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By JENNIS L. FARRELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Robert I, Spiegelman, Esq.
Spiegelman & Spiegelman
19 West Flagler St. No. 518
Miami. FL 33130
(Phone) 371-2508
Attorney for Petitioner
18121 November 27;
December 4, 11.18,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name FIGUEREDO AUTO
CENTER at 865 N.W. 43rd Ave.
Miami, Fl 33126 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida
Sema, Inc.. A Fla. Corp.
LeJeune Seven, Inc
a Fla. Corp.
865 N.W, lord Ave.
Miami. Fl 33126
Attorney Paul M Marmish, PA.
SHKA A- GOULD
18109 November ^( 1. 27
December 4, 11. 11187
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5830
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BENJAMIN BECK.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of BENJAMIN
BECK, deceased. File Number
87-5830, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida.
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida. The personal
representative of the estate is
ERNEST NEMETH, whose ad
dress is 38 Jay Circle, Fairfeld.
Connecticut 06430. The name and
address of the personal represen
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
November 27, 1987.
ERNEST NEMETH,
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
BENJAMIN BECK.
SILVER & SILVER
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
150 SW 2nd Avenue
Suite No. 500
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 374-4888
By: MAX R SILVER
18141 November 27;
December 4. 1987


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 27, 1987
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie-
titious name "SIMPLY
BEAUTIFUL BASKETS" at
6601 B.W. 116th Court Suite No.
107, Miami. Fla. 33173 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
ELLEN KARSH
6601 S.W. 116th Court
Suite No 107
Miami, Fla. 33173
18106 November 20.27;
December 4.11.1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Civil Action No. 87-49524 (28)
IN RE:
MELHADO JAMES
and
\ BERTRAM ARCHIBOLD
MARTIN
TO: BERTRAM
ARCHIBOLD MARTIN
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on JOY BARKAN. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 2020
N.E. 163rd Street, North Miami
Beach, Florida 33162 and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
December 18, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 16 day of November. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By. T. Casamayor
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18113 November 20.27;
____________December 4.11.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Civil Action No. 87-47591-11
FL. BAR NO. 604437
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JOHN C. OKEKE
Husband,
vs.
BERNADETTE O. OKEKE,
Wife.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: BERNADETTE 0. OKEKE
(Address unknown)
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, with
the Clerk of this Court, with a copy
to your husband's attorney. Jack
Werner. Esq.. 1850 N.E. 198th.
Terrace. North Miami Beach. FL
33179. on or before December
11th, 1987; or a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in this petition.
DATED: October 22, 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of Said Court
By John Brands
As Deputy Clerk
18083 November 6. 13. 20. 27.1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 87-471C2
IN RE: The Marriage of:
MARIE Y BUTLER.
Petitioner,
and
VIVICIOUS L. BITLER.
Respondent.
TO: VIVICIOUS L. BUTLER,
Residence Unknown, you shall
serve a copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar
riage upon: ANTHONY CAR
BONE. PA., 612 N.W 12th
Avenue. Miami. Florida 33136.
and ni<- original with the Clerk of
the Cowl N or Iwfore December
I!, 1987. otherwise a default will
be entered.
mbar 5. 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER, CM
B) BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
-'194 November 13. 20. 27;
De.eml.er 4. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-47890-31
NOTICE OF ACTION
COWGER & MILLER
MORTGAGE COMPANY. INC .
Plaintiff,
vs.
DANIEL NOOKS, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: All unknown heirs, creditors,
devisees or other persons
claiming by. through under
or against Guerda Isma f/k/a
Guerda Celestin, deceased
Residence Unknown
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 40, Block 10. OVER
BROOK SHORES SUBDIVI-
SION No. 2, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 50. Page 31, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Gitlitt, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
December 11, 1987, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 4 day of
November, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
18086 November 13. 20, 27;
December 4. 1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY.FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-54780
SEC. 08
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION, a
United States corporation,
Plaintiffis)
vs.
ROBERT PEREIRA. et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above. I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami. Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 7TH day of DECEMBER.
1987. the following described
property:
Lot 10, in Block 6. of Biscayne
Highlands, according to the Plat
thereof, aa recorded in Plat Book
46. at Page 26. of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida.
DATED the 18TH day of
NOVEMBER, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Depaty Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin
3050 Biscayne Boulevard. Suite
800
Miami. Florida 33137
Published 11-20-27
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nuaber 87 6113 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HENRIETTA FONTANAZZA.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration of
the estate of HENRIETTA FON-
TANAZZA. deceased. File
Number 87 6113 02, is pending in
the Circuit Court in and for Dade
County, 73 W. Flagler St.. Miami.
FL 33130. The name and address
of the personal representative of
this estate is set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, all claims against
the estate.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Personal Representative
ROSA LEE STANLEY
16585 NE 3 Av.
Miami, FL 33162
First publication of this notice of
administration on the 20 of
November, 1987.
I. JEROME GRAFF. ESQ.
633 N.E. 167th St.,
Suite 1015
Miami, Fla. 33162
Telephone: 651 3343
Attorney For Personal
Representative
1810! November 20.27. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Joel Brazeman
Distributors at 740 Arthur God-
frey Rd, Miami Beach, FL 33140
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Joel Brazeman
740 Arthur Godfrev Rd
Miami Beach, FL 33140
18139 November 27;
December 4. 11. 18, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
87-47361
FLORIDA BAR NO: 018468
NOTICE OF SUIT OF
PETITION OF DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
ARNOLD CALABRIA,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DOROTHY ANN CALABRIA,
Defendant.
TO: DOROTHY ANN
CALABRIA
12 HEMSTEAD AVENUE
ROCKVILLE CENTER,
LONG ISLAND.
NEW YORK. 11570
YOU, DOROTHY ANN
CALABRIA, are hereby notified
that a Notice of Suit has been filed
against you, and you are required
to serve a copy of your Answer on
Plaintiffs ARNOLD CALABRIA,
c/o Ronald L. Davis, P.A., At-
torney for Plaintiff. Suite 406,
Sky lake State Bank Building, 1560
N.E. Miami Gardens Drive, North
Miami Beach, Florida 33179,
Telephone (305) 940-2352, and file
the original Answer or Pleading in
the Office of the Clerk of the Cir
cuit Court on or before the 28 day
of December, 1987. If you fail to do
so. judgement by default will be
taken against you for the relief
demanded in the Notice Of Suit.
THIS NOTICE shall be publish
ed on week for (4) consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDLAN.
Dated November 18. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER. Clerk
Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
BY: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18128 November 27;
December 4.11,18, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious names MORRIS FITTER-
NICK. MIRIAM FUTERNICK,
THE ESTATE OF JACK
FUTERNICK, AND MOLLIE
FUTERNICK. d/b/a M F PRO-
PERTIES at 12300 N.W Mad
Avenue. Miami. Florida 33167 in
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
SHEA & GOULD
By: Edward E. Levinson, PA.
Attorneys for Morris Futernick.
Mirian Futernick, The Estate of
Jack Futernick, and Mollic
Futernick
18081 NovemlKT <;. IS, 20,27, IM7
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COirNTY
Civil Action No. 87-47738-01
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ATHENA JACILDO WEIDER.
wife
and
JAMES FREDERICK
WEIDER. husband.
TO: JAMES FREDERICK
WEIDER
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on ARTHUR
H. LIPSON, attorney for Peti
tioner, whose address is 801 Nor-
theast 167 St., Miami. Florida
33162, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before December 11, 1987:
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand
ed in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 4th day of November. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: C. P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18084 November 6, 13, 20. 27. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-50443 22
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GERTRUDE TOUSSAINT.
et ux., et al..
Defendants.
TO: AMERICAN SAVINGS
AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION
131 Oyster Creek Drive
Lake Jackson. Texas
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
The North 100 feet of the
South 200 feet of Tract "C."
Block 91, REVISED PLAT
OF PORTION OF GOLF
PARK. SECTION TWO, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 34,
at Page 36, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Stuart H. Gitlitz. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida. 33146 on or before
December 28. 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 20 day of
November, 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By E. LE SUEUR
As Deputy Clerk
18133 November 27;
December 4, 11,18.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name A No. 1 Auto Electric
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Roberto Arias
9606 NW 27 Ave.
Miami. Fl 33146
18102 November 20, 27;
____________December 4,11,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Joel Brazeman Leas-
ing at 740 Arthur Godfrey Rd.
Miami Beach, FL intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit (krart of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
JOEL BRAZEMAN
740 Arthur Iiodfrey Rd
Miami Beach, FL 33140
18138 November 27;
Decemur 4. 11.18, 1981
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 87-5704
DIVISION (01)
IN RE:ESTATE OF
ANNE NASCHEK,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO: ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the Estate of ANNE
NASCHEK. Deceased, late of
Dade County, Florida, File No.
87-5704 is pending in the Circuit
Court in and for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is Dade County
Courthouse. 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33130. The
name and address of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons interested in the
estate are required to file with this
Court. WITHIN THREE MON
THS OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and (2)
any objection by an interested per-
son on whom this notice was serv-
ed that challenges the validity of
the will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Personal Representative:
Robert Nash
10 Capri Drive
Spring Valley. New York 10977
First publication of this notice of
administration on the 27 day of
November. 1987.
Moses J Grundwerg
44 West Flagler Street. Suite 600
Miami. Florida 33130
(306)371-4419
Attorney for Personal
Representative
18134 November 27;
December 4. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name J. SANCHEZ, CORP
DBA. FAMILY MOTORS at
9550 NW 79th AVENUE
HIALEAH GARDENS.
FLORIDA 33016 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
ELIO SANCHEZ-PRESIDENT
1820 W 53rd STREET
(APT. 508)
HIALEAH. FLORIDA 33012
18136 November 27;
December 4.11.18.1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 87-39602 FC 03
IN RE: The Marriage of:
MULTER SAINT FLEUR,
Petitioner,
and
MICHELLE DENISE
SAINT-FLEUR,
Respondent.
TO: MICHELLE DENISE
SAINT FLEUR
Residence Unknown, you shall
serve a copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar
riage Upon: ANTHONY CAR
BONE. PA.. 612 N.W. 12th
venue, Miami, Florida 33136, and
file original with the Clerk of the
Court on or before December 4,
1987, otherwise a default will be
entered.
October 29, 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER. Clerk
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
18079 November 6. 13.20,27. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOU8 NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name M & G IN-
VESTMENTS at 13170 N.W. 43rd
Avenue Opa-Locka. Florida 33054
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
GERALD A MERLO
SUSANA MERLO
MIGUEL GRILLO
MARIA A GRILLO
HARVEY D. ROGERS, ESO.
1401 N.W. 17th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33125
18119 November 27;
December 4, 11. 18.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COl'RT FOB
DADE COUNTY, FLORHh
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-4929
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ESTHER BERTHA BI'RdHER
NOTICE OF ""^
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS iiwiv,
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE AB0VI
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED I\
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of ESTHFR
BERTHA BURGHER, deceased
File Number 87-4929. is pending in
the Circuit Court for I lade I 'ounty
Florida. Probate Division the ad-
dress of which is 73 w Flagler St
Room 307, Miami, Fl. 38130. The
personal representative of the
estate is Kathryn Strata-, whose
address is 3126 Chariyne Dr.
Hendersonville, No. Carolina
28739. The name and address of
the personal representative's tt-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re
quired. WITHIN THREE M.i\
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficienc copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one .,*j per-
sonal representative
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file ar.\ objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
November 27, 1987.
KATRYN E. STREETER
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ESTHER BERTHA Bl'RGHER
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
Daniel Sepler, PA.
999 BrickeU Ave.. No. 400
Miami, Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 577-0900
18132 November 2i:
December 4,1987
AMENDED
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name AMPAC PROPER
TIES at 4906 SW 8th Street. Coral
Gables, Fl 33134 intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
PASTOR DE LA TEJERA
RENE MONTEAGIDO. JR
ERNESTO C.l'ERRA
FRANK D. CABEZA
MELVIN J. ASHER
Attorney for Applicants
825 South Bayshore Drive
Suite 543
Miami, FL 33131
Phone: 541 -2585
18101 November '..->
December 4 11. I*7
NOTICE IINDER
FICTITIOUS NAMI LAW
NOTICE IS HERI
that the underside.i **#*
engage in business"[$.
titious name < r->'';.;'' ..K.
PUANCB PARTS
\ HE at 4150 NW 7 N
Miami. FX
register said DM
of the Circuit Curt.: I :.. l.*
' Florida. .,,..!
CENTRAL APPLIANCE
PARTS AND SERV
18087


FORECLOSURE SALES-PUBLIC NOTICES
Friday, November 27, 1987/The Jewish Floridian
NOTICE UNDER
Page 15-B
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-50859 05
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
AI.EMELIDA A. LIVAS, wife
and
BRNEL LIVAS. husband
TO: Mr. Ernel Livas
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on AR-
THUR H. LIPSON. attorney for
Ivtitioner, whose address is 801
N.E. 167 Street Miami, FL 33162,
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before January 4, 1987; otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
if said court at Miami, Florida on
this 24 day of November, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: E. SEIDL
As Deputy Clerk
(CircuitCourt Seal)
18142 November;
December 4. 11, 18. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 87-36405
DIVISION: 06
NOTICE OF ACTION
- PROPERTY
MARIANO MAHIMER,
Plaintiff
EVELYN OYER MAHIMER. et
al
I k-fendant
T( i: All of the heirs of Evelyn
Oyer Mahimer, if alive, and if
dead their unknown spouse,
heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors and all other parties
claiming by, through, under
nr against them; and all
unknown natural persons if
alive, and if dead or not
known to dead or alive, their
-cveral and respective
unknown spouse, heir-.
deviesaed, granted and
rcditors. or other parties,
claiming by, through or
under those unknown natural
persona; and. the several and
respective unknown assign.-.
successors in interest.
teas or any corporation
>r other legal entity named
i defendant; and all
claimants, persons or parties,
'.atural or corporate; or
whose anct legal status is
unknown, claiming to have
any right, title or Interest in
and tn the lands hereafter
described.
ADDRESSES UNKNOWN
ygU ARE HEREBY
Nl 'TIFIED that an action to Quiet
m the following property in
'''I-County, Florida:
Lot 8 less the East 50 feet
thereof and all of Lot 7. Block
H. of GULFAIR ESTATES,
according to the Plat thereof,
recorded in Plat Book 40, at
I'age 11, of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on MARTIN W. WASSERMAN,
ESQUIRE, Galbut, Galbut, &
Menin, Plaintiffs attorney, whose
address is 999 Washington
unu.-, Miami Beach, Florida
33139, on or before December 18,
1987, and file the original with the
u'rk Of this Court either before
ervics on Plaintiffs attorney or
1 "' '(lately thereafter; otherwise,
1 default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
omplaint or Petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on November 12, 1987.
RICARDO P. BRINKER
Clerk Of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
MARTIN W, WASSERMAN.
ESQUIRE
J'Hibut, Galbut & Menin
y '' Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
'lephone: (305) 672-3100
fl'Tida Bar No. 251143
18118 November 20, 27;
December 4. 11.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In hnriness under the Be-
Utious name Robert Bloom at 740
NE 167 St. Suite 2, North Miami.
Fla 88160, intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the ('ircuit
Court of Dade County, Florida
Steven Pollack
18095 Novemlier 18, 20, 27;
December 4, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-35296 CA 05
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASS. i( 1ATION. ar
association organized and
existing under the laws of the
United States of America
Plaintiff
vs.
KAMIRO.I. MUNERA. ctal.,
Defendants.
TO: MERCEDES FKil'EROA
a/k/a MERCEDES MUNERA
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
partial claiming interest by,
through, under or against
MERCEDES FIGUEROA
a/k/a MERCEDES
MUNERA, and all parties
having or claiming to have
any right, title or interest in
the property herein
described,
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DA HE
County, Florida:
Unit 219. of FOCSA CON-
DOMINIUMS, A con-
dominium according to the
Declaration thereof, as
recorded in the Official
Records Book 9019. at Page
482, of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suits
^14. 1670 Madniga Avenue. Coral
("allies, Florida. 88146on or before
December 11, 1987, and file the
original with the Clerk of tins court
either before service or Plaintiff!
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
lie entered against VOU for the
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS m) hand and the seal
of this court this li day of
November,
RICHARD I' BRINKER
As Clerk of the ( 'ourt
B] BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18098 November 18,20, 27;
December I
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
(IRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-33377
SEC. 15
STOCKTON. WHATLEY,
DAVIN & COMPANY, a Florida
corporation,
Plaintiff! s)
vs.
ABELAR DO LONG AS
CEDENO. et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, 1
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M.. on
the 7TH day of DECEMBER.
1987, the following described
property:
Lot 2. Block 57, LESLIE
ESTATES SECTION FIVE, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 96, at Page
79, of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
DATED the 18TH day of
NOVEMBER. 198;.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin
3050 Biscayne Boulevard. Suite
800
Miami. Florida 33137
Published 11-20-27
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Southeast Accounting
Services at 7204 Jacaranda Lane
Miami Lakes, Florida 33014 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Janusz Enterprises, Inc.
by: Joseph Janusz,
President
Nelson Keshen
Attorney for Janusz Enterprises
Inc.
181,8 November 20, 27;
____________December 4,11,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-6510
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RAFAELA CUELLAR.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration of
the estate of Rafaela Cuellar,
deceased. File Number 87-6510, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33130. The personal
representative of the estate is Ar-
mando Garrido, whose address is
2810 N.W. 9th St. Miami Fla. The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, all claims against
the estate.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
November 20, 1987.
Armando Garrido
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Rafaela Cuellar
Deceased
ATTORNEY TOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Manuel Zaiac
150 SE 2nd Ave Suite rtio
Miami Fla 33131
Telephone: 358-4:.N>
18117 November 2(1. 27. 11187
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name George Cohen at 740
N.E. 167th St. Suite 2 N. Miami.
Fla. intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
Shelby Pollack
18108 November 20.27;
December 4. 11, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-45169 CA 04
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATOR OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS.
Plaintiff
vs.
JOHN A. MCFARLAND. et al..
Defendants.
TO: JOHN A. MCFARLAND
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 11, in Block 1. and Lot
13, Block 2 of BISCAYNE
LAKE VIEW according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 61, at Page 20,
of the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madniga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida. 33146 on or before
December 18. 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 10 day of
November, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18098 November 20,27;
December 4, 11. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie-
titious name ORICHAS
BOTANICA INC. DBA,
ORICHAS BOTANICA at 2742
SW 8th STREET (UNIT-10)
MIAMI. FLORIDA 33135 intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
ALBERTO RODRIGUEZ
1500 SW 16th AVENUE
MIAMI, FL 33145
1H131 November 27;
December 4. 11. 18, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-6095
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE I IF
PEARL KOBLENTZ.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Pearl Koblentz, deceased, File
Number 87-6095, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County
Program County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
W. Flagler Street, 3rd
Floor.Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TS i.NS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on November 20, 1987
Personal Representative
JOHN J. CONTNEY
601 Grand Concourse
Miami Shores. Florida 33138
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
JUDITH A. FRA.NKE1.
!tiii Arthur Godfrey Road -
Suite 116
Miami Beach, Fla. 88180
Telephone: (305) 674-1818
18100 November20. 27. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE PROPERTY
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Civil Action No. 87-49652-23
IN RE:
MARIO MEDIOUS
and
ABBIE LORRAINE MEDIOUS
TO: ABBIE LORRAINE
MEDIOUS
c/o Julia l.assiter
1694 Madison Avenue
New York City,
N.Y. 10029
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street, North Miami Beach.
Florida 33162 and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before December 28,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 17 day of November, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: John Rranda
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
1*114 November 20,27;
December 4. 11. 1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY,FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-20944
SEC 25
STOCKTON. WHATLEY.
DAVIN & COMPANY, a Florid.
corporation.
Plaintifflsl
vs.
MARCOS BAYONA. and the
unknown spouse, etc.. et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami, Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M.. on the 30TH
day of NOVEMBER. 1987, the
following described property:
Lot 7. in Block 23. of KINGS
GARDENS SECTION THREE,
according to the Plat thereof,
recorded in Plat Book 95. at
Page 30. of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida.
DATED the 10TH da] of
NOVEMBER. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
( lerk of Circuit Court
'Circuit Court Seall
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin. P.A.
3050 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-30974 CA 30
NOTICE OF ACTION
NEW METROPOLITAN
FEDERAL SAVINGS AND
LOAN ASSOCIATION.
Plaintiff.
vs.
LEON GROSSMAN and
REGINA GROSSMAN, his wife,
et al..
Defendants.
TO: MARTIN GREENFIELD,
residence unknown, if alive,
and if dead, to all of the
unknown heirs. dev i*
grantees, assignees,
lieiiholders creditors.
trustees or otherwise,
claiming In. through, under
or against the sai I MARTIN
GREENFIELD, and all other
parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or
interest m and to the
propert) under foreclosure
herein
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, thai an
action to foreclose s mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Lot 24, Blocks, FLAMINGO
TERRACE SUBDIVISION,
according to the plat thereof.
as recorded in Puri Hook 10,
at Page 8, of the Public
Records of Dade Count),
Florida
has lieen filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Keith. Mack, Lewis. Allison &
Cohen, Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address is III N.E 1st
Street. Miami, Florida 88182, on
or before December 4, 19X7, and
file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 2 day of
November, 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
18080November 6, IS, 20. 27. 19X7
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in buisness under the fic-
titious name CORKY'S JR. OF
MARGATE at 420 South Dixie
Highway, Coral Gables. Florida
33146 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
New Deli Restaurant Corp.
11 ALLAN SHORE
Attorney for
NEW DELI RESTAURANT
CORP
1X137 November 27;
December 4 11, 18. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business at 1801 Collins
Ave. Miami Beach, Florida, under
'In fictitious name of ELITE
KOSHER TOURS intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit ('ourt of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Elite Kosher Tours. Inc.
by Michael Lefkowitz
President
Attorney At Law
Michael Lefkowitz. Esq.
Flamingo Dr. M.B.
8107 November 20, 27;
December 4 11 1<7
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name A & A BROTHERS.
INC. D.B.A. "LOS PINARENOS"
at 1864 SW 8th STREET MIAMI.
FLORIDA 33135 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
ARSENIO RODRIGUEZ
PRESIDENT
11139 NW 6 TERRACE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33172
Attorney for
A & A BROTHERS INC.
ARSENIO RODRIGI EZ-PRES.
18130 November 27;
December 4, 11.18, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5484
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANITA MAE BENSON
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of ANITA MAE
BENSON, deceased, File Number
87-5484, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida.
Probate Division the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street.
3rd Floor, Courthouse. Miami,
Florida 88180 The personal
representative of the estate is
ANITA JOAN young, whose ad-
dress is 1201 Placetai Avenw
(oral Cables Florida 88146. The
name and address of the persona:
repressntalivi sttornej an
forth below
All persons having claim
demands against the state are re
quired. WITHIN THREE MON
TIIS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file Witil the clerk Ol
the above court a written State
menl of ait) claim or demand the\
ma] have. Each claim must he in
writing and must indicate the basil
for the claim, the name and ad
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured the security shall
lie described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Dale of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration
November 20, 1987
ANITA JOAN YOUNG
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ANITA MAE BENSON
I ) i'i i <* ** t
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
HERBERTZ M\RVIN
9998 Sunset Drue. Suite 108
Miami Florida 88178 .
Telephone: (806) 279-0730
Fl Bar 06104'
IXHM November 20,27, 1987


Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 27, 1987
Re-Entering Medical Field
Continued from Page 2-B
ceeded because of hard work
and a willingness to change his
specialty to a less-crowded
field.
Krimshtein finished medical
school and a residency in
psychiatry in the Soviet Union
in 1969, and practiced
fsychiatry until he came to the
fnited States in October 1985,
at the age of 32. Like Levina
and Katsman. Krimshtein said
he knew hardly any English.
He took the ECFMG twice
and failed. No one had told him
there were places where he
could have gone to study for it.
He sat with a dictionary and
translated medical books from
English into Russian. The test
was multiple choice and he said
Soviets were not used to such
a testing system let alone
taken under the pressure of
time.
He finally found a study
course and the third time he
took the exam, he passed.
Then he had to study for the
FLEX, a three-day, 10-hour-a-
day exam with some 1,750
questions.
Meanwhile, he was living in
Philadelphia where Jewish
organizations had given him
enough money to support his
family for six months. After
that, while he was studying
English and the medical ex-
ams, he took a job as a nursing
aide in a psychiatric hospital
doing tasks such as making
beds and bathing patients. He
also worked as an aide at a
Jewish nursing home and as a
nighttime security guard.
Exams out of the way, he
sought a residency and had
two offers. He chose to accept
an internship at Temple
University Hospital in physical
medicine.
Now Krimshtein is a
physiatrist, a doctor who
rehabilitates the disabled.
There are only about 2,000
physiatrists in the United
States. Dade County has only
10, he said.
When he came to Miami in
1983, Krimshtein worked for
two years at the University of
Miami Pain Center. In August
1985, Krimshtein opened his
own 5,000-square-foot office at
the Dupont Plaza Hotel.
He had some assistance from
his wife Sheila Jaffe, whom he
married in February 1985. "To
be a doctor in private practice
in the United States you have
to have not only medical skills
but business skills. And grow-
ing up in a socialist system he
had a lot to learn about con-
tracts," said Jaffe.
Jaffe, a lawyer, who has
worked with the Ministry of
Justice in Jerusalem and in
private practice in New York,
recently was accepted to the
bar in Florida but tor now, she
is helping her husband
establish his practice.
Krimshtein treats patients
suffering from chronic pain
caused by arthritis and sports,
back or work-related injuries.
He designs a total program at
his clinic which includes
psychological counseling,
physical restoration and condi-
tioning, vocational testing and
counseling, stress manage-
ment training and patient
education in self-management
of pain.
He prefers to take patients
off medication when possible
and train them to work their
muscles and overcome their
pain. The center is not design-
ed to take more than 12 pa-
tients at a time, and Krimsh-
tein says he enjoys helping
people recover in a matter of
weeks from ailments that had
been plaguing them for years.
"This is a last resort. No one
else has been able to'help," he
said.
It has taken time, but Krim-
shtein has also been granted
hospital privileges at facilities
throughout Dade County.
While Krimshtein chose a
less-traveled path, doctors
from foreign countries today
are increasingly competing
against American medical
school graduates who are also
seeking lesser-populated fields
of medicine.
Making it to the PoSitinn .
an American phyfi?0^
well beisummarLj i, IZlS
ofthemtest.Wha,s;;Ua
the American-bred rrX'
student is going to ^2,
tougher for the refugee n!1
can. The issues today afE
as simple as ability' to X
medicine: Age, language sS1
academic backgro^/X
mg matched by opportune
motivation and determine on'
Restrictions and Requirements
Continued from Page 2-B
difficult for a foreign
to get medical
more
graduate
training."
Foreign physicians, par-
ticularly those from Cuba,
were assisted by a special
legislative act. Former State
Sen. Paul Steinberg said pro-
grams to assist the Spanish-
speaking physician were need-
ed not only to aid the physi-
cian. "It was to create a body
of physicians who could create
a Cuban clientele in Miami,
who were Spanish speaking,"
Steinberg said. "One hand
washed the other. It helped
them establish here and filled
the gap in the community."
Penalver said the enrollment
in the course declined until it
finally was discontinued.
While getting a residency is
becoming increasingly difficult
for the foreign physician, the
examinations that must be
taken before they can even get
a residencMe becoming more
string e'-TT" too. And,
authorities in the health field
point out that there also is a
growing number of American
students who studied in
foreign medical schools who
return to this country and
must take those exams, as
well. But they have the advan-
tage of speaking the English
language and being more ac-
customed to the American
system of testing.
Bill Kelly, a staff member of
the Educational Commission
for Foreign Medical Graduates
in Philadelphia, said the ECF-
MG has doubled in length sicne
1984.
"The one thing that may
make it more difficult," Kelly
said, "is there's more of an em-
phasis on basic medical
sciences which is what they
learn their first years of
medical school." That makes
the test difficult for the physi-
cian who has been out of
medical school for several
years.
In addition to the basic
science and clinical science
components, there is an
English section that must also
be passed.
In all cases, the pass rate is
less than 50 percent.
In 1987, Kelly said, 10,887
foreign medical students took
the basic science component of
the examination and 2,599 or
24 percent passed. There were
8.124 students who took the
second part of the exam and
3.125 or 39 percent passed.
While there is no formula
that spells success for thel
refugee physician, youth, skill
and determination "to succeed
seem to enhance his or her
chances. But as it becomes in-
creasingly difficult to make a
smooth transition in America
the physician-hopeful mav
have to choose an alternative
career.
Last week's New York con-
ference of professionals in the
medical field sought to address
some of these problems.
Organizers of the convention I
said while the refugee physi-
cian may have to seek alter-
natives, it is hopeful they can
at least remain in the health]
profession.
'Yiddish
Culture Winkle'
Yiddish Culture Winkle will
hold its second meeting of the
season, on Thursday, Dec. 10
at 10:30 a.m. at Temple Ner
Tamid. Rabbi Yehudahj
Melber, Lecturer and I
Talmudist, will speak on the I
life of "Yehudah Halevy, His]
Poetry and Writings."
PUBUX
VKOSHER
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