The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03067

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Volume 80 Number 46
Miami, FloridaFriday, November 13,1987
Price 50 Cent*
Miami Convenes 56th General Assembly
More than 3,500 Jewish
leaders from around the
United States, Canada and
South America, will arrive in
Miami on Nov. 18 to par-
ticipate in the Council of
Jewish Federations (C JF) 56th
annual General Assembly
(GA), hosted by the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation. It is
the largest such gathering of
its kind, and the one time each
year that North American
Jewish leaders have the oppor-
tunity to meet, discuss, and
make decisions on current
issues of importance to their
respective communities and to
the entire Jewish world.
To mark the import of the
GA, Israeli Prime Minister
Yitzhak Shamir will be the
keynote speaker. This year,
delegates representing South
American Jewish communities
will take part in the Assembly
extending its impact and
influence.
The Assembly is sponsored
by the CJF, the national or-
ganization that provides con-
sultation and support services
Continued on Page 7-A
Herzog On First
Presidential Visit
Frenck Prime Minister Jacquee Chirac
gesture* as he speaks to his Israeli counter-
part Yitzhak Shamir (left) during an outdoor
welcoming ceremony in Jerusalem, Sunday.
1 /'' 'Vic said he hoped his visit would help im-
prove relations between Israel and France.
Improving relations among Diaspora and
Israeli Jews across the generations will be
Shamir's topic next Thursday as he addresses
Miami's General Assembly. See related stories
Page 6-A AP/Wide World Photo
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Israel's blue-and-white flag
flew along Pennsylvania
Avenue outside the White
House Monday as President
Chaim Herzog arrived for the
Brsl statf visit to Washington
by a president of Israel.
Herzog and his wife, Ora, ar-
rived at Andrews Air Force
Base early Monday morning
aboard a U.S. presidential air-
craft and were met by
Secretary of State George
Shultz. The two had a half-
hour meeting later at Herzog's
hotel.
The official visit began Tues-
day, when Herzog met with
President Reagan at the White
House in the morning and ad-
dressed a joint session of Con-
gress in the afternoon.
Shultz will host a luncheon
for Herzog at the State
Department and Reagan
hosted dinner Tuesday night
at the White House.
Herzog was also scheduled
to lay a wreath at the Tomb of
Continued on Page 2-A
'Hijacking' Compounded By Confusion
JTA Staff Report
TEL AVIV (JTA) At
deadline, mystery compounded
by confusion surrounds the
40-foot yacht SUco and its
passengers, hijacked at sea
Sunday off the Gaza coast, ap-
parently by terrorists of the
dissident Abu Nidal faction of
the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
The 17-ton vessel and its
eight passengers six adults
and two children were
brought to Moslem West
Beirut. At a news conference
there, a spokesman for the
Abu Nidal gang, Walid Khal-
UN Finally Opens
War Crimes Files
ed, claimed that some of the
passengers carried Israeli
passports and described the
children as Hebrew-speaking.
The names of the adults
were released. A thorough
check of the Israel Interior
Ministry's computer index of
identity cards failed to match
any of the names with Israeli
citizens. Israelis must have ID
cards to obtain passports.
A preliminary check of
visitors and tourists failed to
come up with the names. The
Ports Authority and the
various marinas in Israel con-
firmed that the Silco had not
called at an Israeli port,
though it might have been en
route to Israel when seized.
Khaled said at his news con-
ference that the episode was
"a slap for the Zionized king of
Amman," a reference to King
Hussein of Jordan, and for the
"Zionized leaders" par-
ticipating in the Arab summit
conference now taking place in
Amman.
Israeli Defense Minister Yit-
zhak Rabin said Monday that
the seizure of the yacht was
clearly timed to coincide with
the Arab summit and planned
to draw attention to the Abu
Nidal faction. He said that if it
was hijacked, as claimed, it
was not in Israeli territorial
waters, which the terrorists
dare not approach for fear of
Israel's navy.
Nevertheless, the time has
Continued on Page 14-A
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
I (JTA) United Nations
Secretary General Javier
I Perez de Cuellar announced
Friday the opening of files on
more than 40,000 suspected
Nazi war criminals to govern-
[ ments and scholars.
His announcement was im-
mediately hailed by Israel,
long a proponent of the open-
ing, as "an historic and
|courageous decision."
Perez de Cuellar said in a
[statement read by his
[spokesman that the decision
(followed consultations with
Until Friday, the files of the
long defunct WCC had been
accessible only to the govern-
ments of United Nations
member states. The files are
currently located in the U.S.
archives in Manhattan.
The secretary general an-
nounced Friday that "under
the new rules and procedures
now approved, the charge files
and the related papers will be
available to governments for
official research into, and in-
vestigation and prosecution of,
war crimes.
"Access for governments
has been broadened. Not only
he 17 former members of the may governments continue to
[U.S. War Crimes Commission request information on specific
^CC)- Continued on Page 13-A
Hussein Double-Talks Peace
By HUGfl ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) King Hussein of Jordan has reportedly signaled Israel
not to take seriously hard-line remarks he has made at the Arab summit in Am-
man this week, the Israeli news media reported Monday.
Hussein, in his speech at the opening of the summit Sunday, is reported to hae
exhorted the Arab states for unity against Iran and Israel, both of which he
claimed had designs on Arab territory.
But according to Hadashot, Hussein sent a messsage to Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres through a middleman recently, pledging to honor the ar-
rangements they agreed to at a meeting in London last April. He stressed that
he intends to continue to work to advance negotiations between Jordan and
Israel under the auspices of an international conference, Hadashot reported.
The newspaper said circles close to Peres believe Hussein's signals are in
earnest and that the results of the Arab summit will not affect the agreements
they reached. The assessment of the Foreign Ministry here is that even if the
king makes statements critical of Israeli policy on the peace process and in the
administered territories, he does not intend to disavow agreements reached so
far on the peace process.
Continued on Page 3-A


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 13, 1987
The New Argentine Jew
Synthesized-Not-Dichotomized
By AVIVA CANTOR
BUENOS AIRES (JTA)
The central struggle Argen-
tine Jews are involved in, says
Conservative Rabbi Baruj
Plavnick, is that "until now
our community has been
either/or: either you're Or-
thodox or non-religious; either
Zionist or (Jewishly) uninvolv-
ed; either Argentinean or
Jewish. We want to find ways
to be both Jewish and
Argentinean."
Many young Argentine
Jews, Plavnick among them,
feel that for them to be "both
Jewish and Argentinean,"
they need a communal struc-
ture which addresses the pro-
blems of Argentine society as
Jews. They warn, in the words
of Hebraica Community
Center executive director
Alberto Senderey, that "if we
don't express opinions about
the whole society, the youth
will have no option but to go to
other parties" outside the
community.
Attorney Paul Warshawsky,
who is involved in human
rights causes, feels that Jewish
youth want "to enter into
engagement with current pro-
blems." But the official com-
munal structure, he told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency,
"has not succeeded in putting
before the youth a coherent
and moral behavior pattern."
Discussions about the cur-
rent policies of the DAIA, the
officially recognized political
umbrella organization for
Argentine Jewry, tend to
segue very quickly and easily
into bitter criticism of what it
did and did not do during the
junta's reign of terror to help
save the estimated 30,000
desaparecidos (disappeared),
among the 1,500 Jews and
into the horror stories that
everybody has to tell about
their own relatives and friends
who disappeared at the time.
(These are documented in
"Nunca Mas: The report of the
Argentine National Commis-
sion on the Disappeared,"
New York, Farrar. Straus and
Giroux, 1986.)
Many continue to accuse the
DAIA of not being supportive
of the parents of disappeared
children. Matilda Mellibowsky.
* whose daughter Graciela was a
- 29-vear-old translator at the
i
'CMIMM
Phone: (305) 373-4605
Published weekly every Friday
since 1927 by The Jewish Flori
dian Office and Plant 120 N.E.
6th St.. Miami. Fla 33132. Phone
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SUBSCRIPTION RATES: In ad-
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$8.50 (Anniversary Special)- Out
of town, country, upon request.
By Mail $1.45 per copy.
Ministry of Economic Affairs
at the time she was kidnapped
in the middle of the street on
the Sabbath. September 21,
1976, said, "they should have
turned the world upside
down'' to save the
desaparecidos.
Graciela's father, Santiago
Mellibowsky, said many
parents were told by the
DAIA, "you didn't give your
children a Jewish education
and that's why they were kid-
Editor's Note: Aviva Cantor,
a writer based in New York,
was one of the Jewish jour-
nalists and communal leaders
to have participated in an in-
vestigative trip throughout
Argentina. This article U the
last in a series about Argenti-
nean Jewry.
be done responsibly and such a
"cold analysis" was not possi-
ble now, he said.
in fighting for Soviet Jewry
when they are killing people
two meters from your own
homes."
Jewish youth, being more
sensitive to social injustice,
tend to look outside the com-
munity for what they cannot
find inside it. "Every day,
we're closer and closer to
assimilation," said Fiterman,
an engineer who now heads
the Public Works Department
of the Buenos Aires
Not Strangers In The Land
napped." Jacob Fiterman, a
former president of the Zionist
Federation, said the DAIA's
attitude toward the
desaparecidos was that they
"must've done something."
He and many other Jews
pointed out, however, that
many of the young Jews who
disappeared were apolitical
psychologists, teachers, doc-
tors and scientists. The latter
include the five Jewish
members of the 11-member
Atomic Energy Commission,
among them 26-year-old
Daniel Bendersky. His
parents, Fany and Jose
Bendersky, are involved with
an effort to create a Museum
of the Desaparecidos.
There were also people kid-
napped for ransom, an
estimated 30 percent of whom
were Jews. One of them,
banker Osvaldo Sivak, still has
not returned even though his
family paid the ransom.
Said Rabbi Efraim Rosenz-
weig of Cordoba, "Many peo-
ple closed their eyes. They
didn't want to see what was
happening, like in Nazi Ger-
many." Hans Levin, head of
the German Jewish congrega-
tion in Cordoba, said this
behavior wa especially painful
for Jews like himself, who lost
95 percent of his family in the
Holocaust.
A former official of the
DAIA told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency of his un-
successful attempts to get
them to take action. "If the
junta had demanded from
them lists of Jews, they would
have turned them over," he
said.
DAIA president Dr. David
Goldberg, queried about the
charges, told a visiting North
American delegation of Jewish
journalists and communal
leaders that "the Jewish com-
munity did a lot but not
enough. Even with one disap-
peared, one death, we could
say we did not do enough. But
was more possible?"
Asked by this reporter
whether the DAIA had under-
taken since 1983 an evaluation
of its actions, he said it had
been tried once, unsuccessfully
"immediately there was the
passion, the accusations, the
differences." An analysis must
Filmmaker Aida Bortnik
believes that "in Latin
America, to look at the past
and to try to understand it is
very dangerous." She at-
tributed the poor reception
Jews gave to her latest film.
"Pobre Mariposa" (Poor But-
terfly), which deals with anti-
Semitism in Argentina in the
1940's and 1950's. to their not
wanting to be reminded of
their bad experiences in that
period.
Contrasting the behavior of
the DAIA with regard to the
desaparecidos, which they
refrain from evaluating, and
its present involvement with
strictly "Jewish" issues. War-
shawsky said:
"The Jewish community can-
not use a double standard
regarding Jewish and non-
Jewish issues and expect to
have the youth (remain) in the
community. There's no sense
municipality. "No one sends a
message as to why to be a Jew.
All we have is our roots."
The DAIA has for the past
half-century seen as its man-
date defending Jews against
anti-Semitism and upholding
Jewish dignity. It has con-
sidered its fulfillment of this
mandate a success precisely
because of its refusal to
"interfere" in the domestic
politics of Argentina.
"This has elements of a
Greek tragedy," Warshawsky
told the JTA. "You cannot ex-
pect the Jewish community to
be engaged in general pro-
blems the way they should be,
but you cannot expect the
Jewish youth to have a double
standard."
There are young communal
leaders, however, who do not
share Warshawsky's
pessimism and who feel the
community should be expected
President Herzog In U.S.
Continued from Pajje 1-A
the Unknown Soldier in Arl-
ington Cemetery on Thursday
and address a luncheon of the
Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish
Organizations on Wednesday,
after visiting a Jewish daj
school in the Maryland suburb's
of Washington.
He also had meetings
scheduled on Wednesday and
Thursday with Vice President
George Bush. Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger
and AFI-CIO President Lane
Kirland.
Herzog was to leave for New-
York, where he and his wife
were to attend a Metropolitan
Opera Guild benefit perfor-
mance at Lincoln Center that
evening.
On Friday, he is to meet with
l nited Nations Secretary
General Javier Perez de
Cuellar and New York City
Mayor Edward Koch. He will
meet with Cardinal John
(M Onnor, archbishop of New
^ ork, at his hotel on Saturday.
That night, he will receive
the 1987 Covenant of Peace
Award of the Synagogue
< oundl of America at a
private dinner reception in his
honor.
Before leaving for Israel
Sunday night. Herzog will fly
u? il u Brandeis University in
Waltham. Mass.. in the after-
noon where he will receive a
honorary doctorate degree
to be involved with Ifci
blems of the coui^fi
seek to break out of them 3
ghetto the commumtTfi
been enclosed in, J J
democracy has made pJS
the open expression ofZ
and ideas and active pan,ciM:
tion in the society's struggles
What young leaders life
Plavnick, the rabbi of (V
unidad Bet El. Conserv^
Rabbinical Seminary fe-J
Daniel Fainstein, the office
at the Hebraica community
center, arid Jewish Human
Kignts Movement (JHRMi
president Herman Schiller
seek is to create a wav for
Jews to he Argentine Jets
committed to both their
Jewishness and their nationali-
ty, not simply Jews who h
pen to be living m Argentina.
"We are looking for Jewish
identity, commitment to tit
Jewish tradition, openness to
the world, and interaction bet-
ween universalism and par-
tieularism.-' said Fainstein.A
similar sentiment was express-
ed by Hebra:ra executive
director Alberto Senderey:
"We're a pluralistic institution
interested in Argentine af-
fairs, giving its opinion in
defense of Jewish ethics and
the interests of the Jewish
people."
They seek, in short, to create
a "new Argentine Jew" who is
"not dichotomized" between
these two parts of his or her
identity, but rather, has made
a synthesis l>etween them; and
a new Jewish community.
which is also h"th Jewish ana
Argentinean and does notfeei
that one has to be committed
only to one r the other
identification.
Schiller's statement of the
impetus for the JHRM defines
the goals of ail these "new
Jews" of Argentina: "We are
trying to give a new character
to Jewish identity." he said.
"We are struggling so that
people will know that we have
an involvement in the -
in its daily life, that we are
part of the iety, and can
hold up Jewish pride tha: *
fight for der, -.v. We want
everyone to know that we are
not strangers I ere."
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'Exodus' Orphans
To Reunite
40 Years Later
Kmcm
Friday, November 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
TM
Samuel Rothberg has set out
|t<> locate members of a group
|ol' children he met 40 years
earlier on their arrival in the
Ifuture State of Israel.
On August 21, 1947, a
[British prison ship bringing
1500 Jewish orphans of the
[Holocaust from a detention
jcamp in Cyprus arrived at
IHaifa port. Rothberg, visiting
|British Mandatory Palestine
on behalf of the United Jewish
lAppeal, was at the dock to
Igreet the orphans. Sam
IRothberg was tnen chairman
of "Big Gifts UJA."
Four decades later,
IRothberg came across
photographs of the dockside
encounter among his papers
and decided to find out what
had become of the children.
A happy reunion in Tel Aviv
with a half dozen of the or-
phans, now grandparents
themselves, resulted after
Israeli newspapers reprinted
40-year-old photos of Rothberg
and the children.
Now, Rothberg and his new-
ly reunited friends have set
their sights on a larger reunion
and are trying to find the hun-
dreds of other orphans who ar-
rived August 21, 1947. Infor-
mation can be sent to
Rothberg at Post Office Box
6056, Jerusalem 91060, Israel.
After Jacob defeated the angel, he went on
to wrestle Hulk Hogan for the championship
Hussein Double-Talks Peace Plan
ISoni Koren and Samuel Rothberg, with photo made 40 years
er when Rothberg greeted Sara among 500 Jewish orphans
m the future State of Israel.
Continued from Page 1-A
Haaretz reported that Hus-
sein told British Foreign
Secretary Sir Geoffrey Howe
at a meeting on Amman last
week that the Arab summit
would not change his stand on
the issue of an international
conference and would not
cause him to renege on his
agreements with Peres.
Sources in Jerusalem quoted
by Haaretz believe that during
the summit, Hussein will be
forced to "tow the line" of the
Arab consensus and to express
support for the Soviet-Syrian
idea that the Arab-Israeli
dispute should be settled not
through direct talks but rather
at an international conference
with the participation of the
five permanent members of
the United Nations Security
Council.
Haaretz said it is believed
Hussein will pay this price in
exchange for passage of a
meaningful resolution on the
war in the Persian Gulf.
Meanwhile, a senior official
at the British Foreign Office
reportedly told the Israeli am-
bassador in London, Yehuda
Avner, that Hussein has
criticized the Reagan ad-
Continued on Page 15-A
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. November 13. 1987
The Welcome To The GA
The Challenge Of The GA
Greater Miami Jewry, on the eve of its
own 50th anniversary as a formal communi-
ty, will play host to the 56th General
Assembly of the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions beginning next week.
For the following five days, the dateline of
Miami Beach will have importance exten-
ding far beyond the borders of the United
States and Canada.
The more than 3,000 delegates who will
convene at the Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel
have a substantive agenda, and there is
every reason to believe that the delibera-
tions will go beyond such matters as how to
best celebrate Israel's upcoming 40th an-
niversary and how to involve the next
generation in Federation campaigns and
leadership.
Advance materials on the GA far and
away the most significant annual gathering
of American Jews do not spell out any
discussion on just how deeply we can be in-
volved in the State of Israel's quest for
peace.
The "Who is a Jew?" Question will be ad-
dressed through what is described as "a uni-
que trialogue with Orthodox, Conservative
and Reform rabbis to discuss areas of
commonality."
But there certainly are rapidly-developing
areas of immediate concern in such matters
as the debate over the candidates proposed
for the positions of chairman and treasurer
of the World Zionist Organization.
Also unmentioned in preliminary
materials is an intensive debate on the ex-
tent to which Jewish emigrants from the
Soviet Union should be urged to go to Israel
rather than to the United States or other
western countries.
The importance of Jewish communities in
distress notably Ethiopia, Syria and Iran
is singled out, but the urgency of insuring
that Soviet Jewry does not suffer because of
the releases of some of the best known
"refuseniks" cannot be overemphasized.
Attesting to the importance Israel places
upon the General Assembly will be the visit
here of Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir. His
announced subject, "Israel and North
America Partners Across the Genera-
tions," gives the fiery premier the proper
latitude in his Thursday evening, Nov. 19,
address.
Much of the credit for both attracting the
GA to Miami Beach and for the precision-
like preparations properly goes to the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation, which ap-
proaches its half-century mark as the senior
partner of five federations in South Florida.
The Jewish Floridian, now in its 60th
year, joins our entire community in welcom-
ing the Council of Jewish Federations.
And the more than half-million Jews who
live in Dade Broward and Palm Beach coun-
ties will watch attentively to measure the
level of true deliberations.
Only in a truly open convention can the
General Assembly equal its role as the voice
of the central planning and fund-raising
organizations which have come so far in
representing the nearly 800 localities in the
U.S. and Canada with a Jewish population of
more than 5.7 million.
JTX
Stanley C. Myers
Leader For a Half-Century
It is indeed appropriate that the 56th
General Assembly will single out for special
recognition Stanley C. Myers, the first presi-
dent of the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion.who is rounding out a half century of in-
spired and inspiring service to his fellow
Jews.
It was at the home of Martha and Stanley
Myers that the organization of Federation
began in a Miami Jewish community which
was among the first to recognize the
challenges of Hitler's rise to power in Nazi
Germany.
And when Stanley Myers became the na-
tional president of what was then the Coun-
cil of Jewish Federations and Welfare
Funds, the rapid increase in the size and im-
portance of the Greater Miami community
first received proper recognition.
The family of Stanley Myers, which has
three generations in leadership positions
here, signifies the importance of the GA
theme this year "Dor L'Dor: From
Generation to Generation Building Com-
munity and Continuity Through People."
The Jewish Floridian joins a grateful local
and national community in paying tribute to
the man who deserves the title for life of
"Mister Federation," Stanley C. Myers.
The Premier
Visit Of Yitzhak Shamir
It is to the credit of Israel's remarkable
democracy that Yitzhak Shamir visits us as
Prime Minister to address the General
Assembly of the Council of Jewish
Federations.
Assuming the leadership of a Likud party
shaken by the sudden withdrawal of
Menachem Begin from politics, Mr. Shamir
has twice assumed the premiership at far
from routine times.
"eJewish Floridian
Fred K. Shochet
Editor and Publisher
Norma A. Orovitz
Managing Editor
Suzanne Shochet
Executive Editor
William T. Brewer
Director of Operations
Joan C. Teglas
Director ot Advertising
Friday, November 13,1987
Volume 60
21 Heshvan 5748
Number 46
When we welcome the Prime Minister for
his address to the G.A. next week, we will
accord him the same warm reception given
to each of his predecessors, all of whom
made a mission to Miami on at least one
occasion.
Just Say 'No' To Reagan!
There is no news older than a week-old
press release issued by The White House on
the moral imperative of confirming Judge
Douglas Ginsburg to fill the Supreme Court
seat left vacant by last summers retirement
of Associate Justice Lewis Powell.
Admittedly, President Reagan offered
Ginsburg's name as a post-Bork threat made
good, as a token Jew to appease the liberal
masses (that confirmed by his own
spokesman, Marlin Fitzwater) and a
younger-yuppie and more saleable
conservative.
That Ginsburg would have been the first
Jew to sit on the high court since 1969, that
Ginsburg would have been the sixth of the
faith to serve in such a revered capacity does
not automatically suggest that he would
have followed in the august position of
Brandeis, Cardozo, Frankfurter and
Goldberg.
Ginsburg's withdrawal following reports
of his cable-oriented conflict of interest, his
consulting-cum-law practice while a pro-
fessor at Harvard Law School and, most
significantly, his personal smoking habits is
more a condemnation of the President's
faulty nomination procedures than it is of
Ginsburg himself.
Jewish advocacy agencies showed more
restraint in weighing and measuring their
possible and potential endorsements than
did all the President's men. If reports are ac-
curate in that President Reagan selected
Ginsburg over Judge Anthony Kennedy a
mere half-hour before the nominee's (any
nominee's?) announcement, then perhaps it
is the Jewish establishment that should be
even more aggressive in advising and con-
senting. We agree with the spokemen of all
those advocacy agencies who inveighed
against a "Jewish" seat on the Supreme
Court lest that philosophy exchange the
search for the brightest and the best and the
most intellectually honest for a quota system
of ethnic type-casting.
. ^- '-^i. '-.'


'Skinheads In Germany'
Neo-Nazism and Hooliganism
Friday, November 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
H"
By IRMGARD
PIORKOWSKI-WUHR
Skinheads first appeared in
West Germany at the end of
the 1970s. Since then, they
have come to be associated
with extreme right-wing
movements.
There has been a noticeable
increase in the number of in-
cidents of various type in-
cluding crime by neo-Nazis
since 1974. Since 1979, there
has been an increase in overt
anti-Semitism.
After an initial rush, the
membership of the various
skinhead movements
stagnated at about 1,500 hard
core activists.
"We're coming slowly but
we're coming hard," was the
catchcry with the double
meaning taken from a song
which appeared at the funeral
of Rudolf Hess in the Bavarian
town of Wunsiedel earlier this
year extremists waved Nazi
flags and yelled out for
"Revenge for Hess."
The death of Hess did not
rekindle neo-Nazi feelings, but
it brought the movement into
the spotlight and the glare of
the international press. Many
brought Nazi banners to the
funeral, knowing they would
Behind The Scenes:
be photographed.
If you believe the statistics,
youth is not so susceptible to
neo-Nazi ideas and extreme
right-wing methods. That is
true as far as it goes. Tradi-
tional neo-Nazi groups have lit-
tle appeal among the young.
Only about one percent of 15-
to 24 years olds are members
of such groups or feel they
belong; three percent say the
groups are "quite good."
These were the results of a
study sponsored by Shell in
1981. This has not changed
much. Wilhelm Heitmeyer, a
Continued on Page 10-A
I Vo.nn our path at your peril. Skinhead violence at neo-Nazi party
rally.
UN Report Further Indicts Waldheim
By DAVID HOROWITZ
UNITED NATIONS -
(WUP) Brian Urquhart, a
Britisher and one who had
served as a political adviser of
every Secretary-General since
the founding of the World
Organization, has termed his
former boss, Kurt Waldheim, a
"duplicitous megomaniac"
who has done immense
damage to the United Nations
and to those who have devoted
their lives to it."
This revelation comes from
one of the most distinguished
rnder-Secretary-Generals the
UN has ever had. It is probably
the most damaging against the
former Austrian Nazi that has
come out. It highlights an in-
terview appearing in the cur-
rent issue of the DipUnnatic
World Bulletin, edited by
Richard A. Holman and Jack
Barnes, which serves the UN
and international community.
Declares the publication:
"Brian Urquhart, who is
perhaps better qualified than
most to evaluate the five men
who have led the organization,
having worked for all of them
since he joined the UN straight
out of British military uniform
mi 1945. bluntly calls
Waldheim a living lie for hav-
ing prevaricated about his
World War II service as an of-
ficer in Hitler's army."
Currently a Resident
Scholar of the Ford Founda-
tion, "Urquhart," the UN
bulletin notes, "lets his hair
down about the now President
of Austria and many other per-
sonalities in a fascinating
book, 'A Life in Peace and
This cartoon was made by the Hungarian-
American cartoonist ana author, Emery
Kelen, during Kurt Waldheim's first term as
UN Secretary-General.
War.' In his remarks about the
fourth Secretary-General, Ur-
quhart acknowledges that, like
virtually everyone in the
Secretariat, he was persuaded
by Waldheim's story that he
was wounded on the Soviet
Front in late 1941, invalided
out and spent the rest of the
war poring over his law books.
"When from time to time
there were unsubstantiated
stories or allegations about his
past," Urquhart states
"Waldheim invariably and
strongly reaffirmed this story;
but, his former aide em-
phasizes that "it is now clear
that Waldheim lied for almost
40 years about his war record,
presumably believing that the
truth would stand in the way
of his relentless pursuit of
public position and office." Ur-
quhart dismisses him as "an
energetic, ambitious
mediocrity."
The former British Under-
Secretary-General has some
harsh criticism for the Perma-
nent members of the Security
Council for having failed to
check the War Crimes Com-
mission files now to be open-
ed for broader access to
researchers, scholars and
press or their own records
"to discover if there was
anything unsuitable or ques-
tionable in this German Army
officer's past."
As this column has previous-
ly noted, there are some
historians who hold that the
Soviets who had strongly
supported the Austrian
against his strongest oppo-
nent, Ambassador Max Jakob-
son of Finland, a Jew and
Diamond City Deputy Mayor:
Cautious Patience For Peace Process
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
YITSCHAK BEN-GAD,
born in Tripoli, Libya and now
the deputy mayor of Netanya,
Israel's coastal "Diamond Ci-
ty," has a Hebrew word for
anyone who may be growing
impatient about the fluidity of
the Middle East peace process.
"Savlanut!"
"Patience!"
he urges.
Ben-Gad says patience may
be needed because the Israeli
coalition government that is
almost divided 50-50 about
how to approach the peace pro-
cess, may not change even
with new elections in Israel in
November 1988.
Ben-Gad, speaking to The
Jewish Floridian during a re-
cent stop in Miami, has spent
the last month in the United
States giving some 50 lectures
coast-to-coast on the Middle
East.
He also spent part of his
American visit boosting
tourism in his city, rich in the
diamond industry, that sits on
the Mediterranean Sea. And
he came as a representative of
WOJAC (World Organization
of Jews from Arab Countries).
Ben-Gad's father was the
chief rabbi of the Jewish com-
munity of Tripoli. When Ben-
Gad was 11, his family made
aliyah to Israel.
As a delegate of WOJAC,
Ben-Gad says, "We came to
Washington to let the
American people know our
rights were not respected, our
property was confiscated and
we suffered misery and
humiliation and beating and
execution. We are calling <>n
the world to compensate Arab
Continued on Page 14-A
certainly some Yugoslavs and
even a few Americans, were
not ignorant of his Nazi war-
time record.
Author Brian Urquhart, who
had distinguished himself as
an officer during the allied in-
vasion of Germany and who
had vainly warned the British
against an aborted parachute
landing in Holland that turned
into a tragedy for the allies,
says that Waldheim had wor-
ried a lot about his public im-
age. "He was too anxious to be
given credit and tended to be
too accessible to the media .
His manner sometimes seemed
ingratiating, and he tried too
hard with too little to say. He
occasionally lost his temper
with journalists, with
disastrous results ."
With the UN War Crimes
Files opened, the world will
learn for the first time the
complete facts relating to Kurt
Waldheim's World War II ac-
tivities in file 724.
Moreover, as Dr. Harris
Schoenberg, Director of the
UN Affairs. International
Council of B'nai B'rith, points
out, "the open files could pro-
ve an embarrassment to
governments that have relied
for support upon or employed
accused war criminals in sen-
sitive positions. The thorough
examination of these files," he
insists, "is vital for understan-
ding the past, punishing the
guilty, and deterring anyone
who would currently consider
genocide..."
It is up to the present
Secretary-General to an-
Continued on Page 11-A
Yitschak Ben-Gad


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 13, 1987
Rabbinical Council:
Restore Criterion Of Need,
Not Polictics, To Philanthropy
NEW YORK The Rab-
binical Council of America will
call on the General Assembly
of the Council of Jewish
Federations which will meet
next week, to restore the
criterion of need when
allocating funds to Jewish poor
in Israel or throughout the
world.
"Charity has always been
the unifying force of American
Jews whether religious or
secular and attempts to in-
troduce criteria of politics or
divisive religious issues rather
than need of recipients
threaten to destroy the Jewish
community structure in the
U.S.," said Rabbi Milton H.
Polin, RCA President.
The RCA said its call was to
the Jewish philanthropic
leadership and the entire
Jewish community.
In introducing the resolution
which will be presented to the
General Assembly, Rabbi
Emanuel Feldman of Atlanta,
Chairman of the RCA's Com-
mittee on Federations, em-
phasized that philanthropy has
traditionally been an area
which has untied all Jews. He
expressed regret that philan-
thropic organizations were
drifting away from their scope
and purpose and basing philan-
thropy on politics and
ideological considerations.
The RCA called on the
Jewish community to "restore
Zedek (just'ce) to Zedekah
(charity) by reestablishing the
primacy of the principle that
charity be allocated according
to the needs of the recipient
without regard to other
considerations.
Rabbis from 13 major Jewish
centers throughout the coun-
try participated in a special
conference of the RCA held
here last week to discuss
developments in the Federa-
tion movement.
Rabbi Emanuel Feldman,
Chairman of the Rabbinical
Council of America's Commit-
tee on Federations and Rabbi
Louis Bernstein, Chairman of
the Israel Commission, were
Co-Chairmen of the
Conference.
In his remarks to the con-
ference, Rabbi Feldman ob-
jected to Federation leaders'
attempts to influence legisla-
tion and political issues in
Israel by the use of charity
dollars.
As an example of religious
divisiveness, Rabbi Feldman
cited the "Who is A Jew ques-
tion," in which the Orthodox
position "has been grossly
misrepresented as excluding
Reform and Conservative
Jews from the people of Israel.
This is simply not a fact."
He was joined by Rabbi
Oscar Fasman of Chicago, in
criticizing those who are pro-
jecting this false image of Or-
thodoxy for political purposes.
Rabbi Louis Bernstein reveiw-
ed the proliferation of the
philanthropic organizations
and the tensions between
them. They are also becoming
involved for the first time in
issues which are of concern to
Orthodox Jews. Rabbis
reported varying tensions bet-
ween the Orthodox community
and federations in different
parts of the country.
The conference voiced deter-
mination to strengthen the ties
with the federations and
United Jewish Appeal. It
undertook to identify Or-
thodox contributors to federa-
tions and those active in their
leadership. Plans were discuss-
ed for a national Orthodox
leadership conference on
philanthropy and federations.
Aaron Podhurst
Nancy Lipoff
Plenary Session Schedule
The following are highlights of the plenary session
schedule for the five-day Council of Jewish Federations
56th Annual General Assembly:
Forums and Workshops Expand GA
Twenty forums, at the
General Assembly, consisting
of formal presentations by ex-
perts and panelists followed by
question-and-answer sessions,
will deal with a wide range of
domestic and overseas con-
cerns. Several forums will
focus on Israel-Diaspora rela-
tions, to commemorate Israel's
40th anniversary.
Domestic issues center on
four basic themes:
Transmission. Involving
the next generation in cam-
paign and leadership and
reaching out to inadequately
involved Jews, such as singles,
the elderly and the disabled.
Unity and diversity in the
Jewish community. The ques-
tion of "who is a Jew" and a
unique trialogue with Or-
thodox, Conservative and
Reform rabbis to discuss areas
of commonality.
Jewish education.
Strengthening our educational
institutions, supporting adult
Jewish education and
enriching veteran leadership.
Jewish mobility. Retool-
ing federations in order to
cope with the change from a
local to a continental society.
A number of forums will
feature overseas concerns,
including:
Soviet Jewry. A discus-
sion with promient refuseniks
about the current situation,
the role of federations and
future trends.
Jewish communities in
distress. Ethiopia, Syria and
Iran.
The Third World. The
JDC role in helping developing
countries.
World Jewry. Building
Jewish community and con-
tinuity globally, discussions
with leaders from Latin
America, Great Britain, Den-
mark and Australia and the
situation in South Africa.
In the context of Isrel's 40th
anniversary, several forums
will consider some of the na-
tion's significant relationships.
The United States. Israel
as a strategic ally in the Middle
East.
Federations. Expanding
the relationship between
Federations and Israel.
The Jewish Agency.
Deepening the partnership.
In the media. Journalists
discuss how Israel and the
Diaspora perceive each other.
In addition to the forums,
hundreds of other sessions
have been scheduled for this
year's General Assembly.
Dozens of workshops,
designed to foster discussion
and interchange of ideas, are
also scheduled. Workshop
topics will include timely
issues such as welfare reform,
AIDS in the Jewish communi-
ty, children of divorce and
catastrophic health care, as
well as the constant Federa-
tion concerns of human
resources and leadership
development, endowments,
campaign, missions, Jewish-
Catholic relations and
synagogue-Federation
relations.
Wednesday,
November 18
7:15-8:45 p.m.
9-10:30 p.m.
Thursday,
November 19
10:15 a.m.-Noon
1:45-3:30 p.m.
4-5:45 p.m.
8:45-10 p.m.
Friday, November 20
8-10:15 a.m.
2:30-4:15 p.m.
Saturday,
November 21
8:45-10:30 p.m.
Sunday, November 22
7:45-9 a.m.
Keynote address by CJF President
Shoshana S. Cardin, "Dor L'Dor:
Building Community Through
People."
Will Jewish Teenagers Become
Jewish Adults?
Who is a Jew Perspectives on a
critical issue.
Federation Leadership: Enhancing
the partnership
Challenges in Jewish Education:
How Federations Can Strengthen
Local Jewish Educational
Institutions
Keynote address by Israeli Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir, "Israel
and North America Partners
Across the Generations."
Transmitting Jewish Values to
College Students A Challenge to
the Jewish Community.
Jewish Communities in Distress:
Ethiopia, Syria, Iran.
Keynote Speaker, Dr. Jeanne J.
Kirkpatrick, former U.S.
ambassador to the United Nations.
Closing Plenary: "Where Do We
Go From Here? A Look Ahead.''
Kirkpatrick To Address GA
Dr. Jeane J. Kirkpatrick,
former United States Am-
bassador to the United Na-
tions, will join two prominent
former Soviet refuseniks, Ida
Nudel and Vladimir Slepak, as
featured speakers at the 56th
General Assembly of the Coun-
cil of Jewish Federations.
Kirkpatrick will address the
assembly in Miami while Nudel
and Slepak will be broadcast
via satellite live from Israel, on
Saturday evening, Nov. 21, at
the Fountainebleau Hotel in
Miami Beach, FL
Appointed United States
Permanent Representative to
the United Nations by Presi-
dent Ronald Reagan in
January 1981, Kirkpatrick was
the first woman to serve as the
United States* chief UN
representative. She also serv-
Jeanne J. Kirkpatrick
ed as a member of President
Reagan's Cabinet.
After serving one of the
longest terms of any UN am-
bassador, Kirkpatrick resign-
ed her position in January
1985 and returned to private
life to teach, write and lecture.
A recipient of The Presiden-
tial Medal of Freedom, the na-
tion's highest civilian award,
Kirkpatrick is widely regarded
as having one of the strongest
voices and keenest minds the
United States has ever en-
joyed in a UN ambassador. She
"fT,8'11 sPaJ< out on
behalf of foreign policy objec-
tives, has lectured on political
and international issues at
many conferences and forums
and is currently writing a book
and a weekly syndicated
newspaper column on interna-
tional affaire.
Htlene Berger. active W &
Greater Miami Jewish F>
tion since 1971 hat heen ap-
pointed National Chairw
of the Council of '
Federation a f< 'JF) "
Divitim. She will fc
nt the CJF General
on Nov. 1 9,


Miami Site of General Assembly
Host Community for 3,500
Friday, November 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
State Museum in Poland at the
Main Library in the Metro-
Cultural Center.
be artisans
people
Continued from Page 1-A
for North American Federa-
tions, of which there are ap-
proximately 200.
Some of the issues the
delegates will discuss during
the five days they are together
include Jewish/Catholic rela-
tions and the significnce of the
recent meeting between
Jewish leaders and Pope John
Paul II; the pressing concerns
of Ethiopian and Soviet Jews,
with special attention focused
on the upcoming summit bet-
ween U.S. President Ronald
Reagan and Soviet Prime
Minister Mikhail Gorbachev;
and the partnership between
Israel and North American
Jewry. In addition to Shamir,
a number of other guest
speakers will attend the
Assembly, including Dr.
Jeanne J. Kirkpatrick, former
United States Ambassador to
the United Nations.
Workshop topics will include
timely issues such as welfare
reform, AIDS in the Jewish
community, children of divorce
and catastrophic health care as
well as the constant federation
concerns of human resources
and leadership development,
endowments, campaign and
missions.
"This is an important event
for our community during our
Golden Anniversary as a
Federation in Miami,
highlighting 50 years of com-
munity building. It is also a
tremendous opportunity for
our residents to meet and mix
with Jewish leaders from other
cities and discuss Jewish
issues," said GMJF President
Aaron Podhurst.
Domestic issues will include
how to involve the next
generation in campaign and
leadership and reaching out to
inadequately involved Jews,
such as singles, the elderly and
the disabled.
In addition, a number of
resolutions will be discussed
and voted upon, pertaining to
such current Jewish concerns
as the controversial "Who is a
Jew?" issue that was recently
voted down in the Israeli
Knesset; federation involve-
ment in Jewish education;
peace in the Middle East; and
discrimination by private
clubs.
Orthodox, Conservative and
Reform rabbis will engage in a
"trialogue" to discuss areas of
commonality.
Most of the sessions and
events will take place at the
headquarters hotel for the GA,
the Fontainebleau Hilton on
Miami Beach. In addition to
the workshops and meetings,
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, as the host com-
munity, has several special ac-
tivities planned for the
delegates, including a gala
reception to be held pool side
at the Fontainebleau; a
run/walk on the beach for
Soviet Jewry; and a visit to the
powerful exhibit, "Auschwitz:
A Crime Against Mankind,"
on loan from the Auschwitz
There will also
and crafts
demonstrating their talents,
and a special Judaica Shop will
be set up at the Fontainebleau.
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation began planning
events for the 3,500 delegates
over a year ago.
Over 1,000 local residents
have volunteered to assist the
Federation in various
capacities during the five-day
meeting, including as monitors
at the message center, infor-
mation desks, delegates
lounge and throughout the
hotel as "meeters and
greeters."
Each year, the GA is rotated
to a major Jewish community
in the United States or
Canada. The GA has been held
in South Florida twice before.
The first local GA took place in
1963 at the Diplomat in
Hollywood. In 1975, the GA
was headquartered at the
Dean Ville Hotel on Miami
Beach.
"Having the GA here is a
unique opportunity for us and
we hope it will lead to more in-
1 COUNCIL
Of
II HIM
III II VIII S\


n 'l- A i M 1 n
MMHHHaVH
56TH GENERAL ASSEMBLY
NOVEMBER 18 22 1987
novative programming and
creating ideas which will
enable the Federation and its
agencies to better serve the
Miami community," said Nan-
cy Lipoff, chair of the Federa-
tion Host Committee.
Assisting Lipoff are Host
Committee Vice Chairman and
Federation Board members
Helene Berger and Herb
Canarick, assistant Vice Chair
Judi Billig and their steering
committee.
The General Assembly is
open to local residents, with an
admittance fee to all
workshops and special events.
For more information,
576-4000, ext. 215.
fEWBH
fWICXML
KEREN KAYEMETH
LEISRAEL) INC.


SPuvubvp, SWeWe* 20, 4987
5445 Wcdiinb i*&in>/nue
&uy*a*n cJ)i*in*i 42:30 &. i\
f
*
Zov W. Kogan
Pros. JNF Southern Roglon
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
Chrmn.JNFFdtn.
Emoat Samuals
V.P. JNF Or. Miami
Rabbi Mayor Aft'- ,
Chrmn .....*w,,s
For Information and Reservations
Jewish National Fund 420 Lincoln Road, Suite 353, Miami Beach, Fl. 33139oaT


Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 13, 1987
Arabians Make Good
Import And Export

mand
horsemen
world.
BEERSHEVA, Israel -
The King Solomon Stables of
Ben-Gurion University of the
Negev has a winner.
A six-year-old thoroughbred,
Aristo Magnum, who "im-
migrated" to Israel from
Arizona a year ago, was
chosen champion Arabian
stallion at the eighth Annual
Show of the Israel Arabian
Horse Society held in Rishon
le-Zion.
The winner's cup was award-
ed by General Hayin Bar-Lev,
Israel's Minister of Police, and
head of the Israel Arabian
Horse Society.
Prized for their grace and
superb performance, the Ara-
bian horse was bred and trad-
ed in Israel since King
Solomon's time. But by the
end of World War I, their
number had diminished due to
cross-breeding and exporta-
tion, and by 1950 had virtually
disappeared from the modern
state of Israel.
The late Herbert Cashvan, a
distinguished horseman from
Virginia Beach, VA, dreamed
of reintroducing Arabian
horses into Israel. Six years
ago, the Cashvan Center for
Animal Health and Improve-
ment was established at Ben-
Reagan Again
Denounces
Racism-Zionism
Stand
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) Presi
dent Reagan has vowed to
"continue to denounce" the
UN General Assembly resolu-
tion of 1975 equating Zionism
with racism "until it is
repealed."
The president made the
pledge in an Oct. 28 letter to
Morris Abram, chairman of
the Conference of Presidents
of Major American Jewish
Organizations. It was in reply
to a letter Abram sent to the
president on Sept. 22 thanking
him for denouncing the anti-
Zionism resolution in the
course of his speech to the UN
General Assembly on Sept. 21.
"You are right that this ad-
ministration has repeatedly
condemned the 'Zionism is
racism' resolution," the presi-
dent wrote in his letter.
"Moreover, we will continue to
denounce that resolution until
it is repealed. It may not be
soon enough for you or me.
Reagan's letter concluded:
"In the meantime, I know that
I can count on your support, as
you can count on mine, to fight
against any and all attempts to
delegitimize the State of
Israel."
The "Zionism is racism"
resolution was adopted by the
General Assembly on Nov. 10,
1975. Major Jewish groups and
organizations have announced,
on the eve of the 12th anniver-
sary of the resolution, that
they are undertaking major
campaigns to denounce it and
mobilize world public opinion
to -prepare the grounds for its
repeal. .
Gurion University. In a
research program headed by
Dr. Allan Degen, purebred,
registered Arabian horses are
imported from the United
States and the offspring are
selected in accordance with
descriptions found in biblical
records.
The King Solomon Stables is
a unit of the Center with fully
equipped stud farm and pad-
dock facilities.
There are now an estimated
400 purebred Arabian horses
in the country as a whole, due
to the efforts of Herbert
Cashvan, Degan and a small
group of horse enthusiasts.
They have become a valuable "**
export and are much in de- Aristo Magnum, a 6-year-old thoroughbred of
by knowledgeable the King Solomon Stables of Ben-Gurion
throughout the University of the Neqev. has been chosen cham-
pion Arabian stallion at the 8th annual thow
of the Israel Arabian Horse Society held fa
Rishon L 'Zion.
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Jewish National Fund Tribute Banquet
Honoring Cong. Dante B. Fascell
A Huge Success
Friday, November 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
OQOQOOOBQQOOOOBQOOOQOoBeQOOQQOOOOOOOQQOQOOQy/
Jose I. Astigarraga, Esq
Banquet Co-Chairman
Dr. Irving Lehrman
Chairman JNF
Foundation
Cong. Dante Fascell
Guest of Honor
Sherwood M. Weiser
Banquet Co-Chairman
pr Irving I
Di,'U/l.
,rma, Cong. = Fascell. ZeT^ ?& g^g ^5^^^
Astigarraga. Rabbi Darnel Syme. Sherwood M.^^, ^L %* ftfc iS^SSS
M*>,Mt Ftolft Cot*.Dante Fascell, Rabin Kupferman. Also present hut no, shown. Mr. and
ayer Abramowitz. Zev I '. Kogan Mrs Ralph NoHon, and Mr. Osborn.
Cong Dante Fascell and Zev W. Kogan with the
[dynamic Anne Ackerman, dedicated and
i 'standing leader of JNF.

Seated: Uzi (iaffney. Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz, Seated left to right: Zev
Habbi Daniel Syme, Jose I. Astigarraga, Cong, and Eugene Rosenberg. Paul
Mrs. Dante Fascell, Sherwood M. Weiser. Standing Administrator JNF. Mrs.
[eft to right: Mrs. Israel Keren, Mr. Keren and Mrs. **ft to right: Ml* and
Weiser. Maestro and Mrs. bhmuel
The JNF Tribute Banquet held recently in the Omni Hotel was one of
celebration and high spirits, honoring Cong. Dante Fascell. Chairman
United States Foreign Relations Committee. Congressman Fascell was
presented with the highest JNF award. THE TREE OF LIFE. Cong.
Fascell was singled out to receive this award tor his outstanding service
to the State of Florida, the United States, humanity, mankind, and his
special understanding of the needs of Israel, and the friendship he has
extended to Israel for so many years.
High tribute was paid to Cong. Fascell by Jose I. Astigarraga and
Sherwood M. Weiser, and Jose I. Astigarraga
display the JNF Citation of Honor presented to*.
Seated left to right: Mrs. Eshkenazi and Moises them 'as Ranbi Daniel Syme look on.
Eshkenazi. Judge and Mrs. Joseph ('ohen of Israel,
FrancoiseSitzer, Standing left to right: Mr. and Mrs.
Willy Gort, Nily Falic. Director JNF Latin Division,
Fima Falic, and Guest.
W. Kogan, Mr and Mrs. SeQted lpf( fu ^f; Comm flnrf Mrs ^
Ungerand Roslyn Unger, Weisburd Mr Potamkin_ Mrs, Rohert Silverstein.
Jack Kwartner. Standing Mrs Wflw|rf Rosen Standin left to n ht (omm
Prof Andre Bialolenki. and ^ A()e Raniek> Roherl Silverstein. Urrv
tershko. Jack Kwartner. Taylor flf|rf HgmU Rospn
Sherwood M. Weiser. Banquet Co-Chairmen, as well as by every speaker.
Cong. Fascell was magnanimous and magnificent in his response.
The Invocation was given by Dr. Irving Lehrman. Pres. JNF
Foundation.Greetings were brought by Zev W. Kogan. President .INK
Southern Region, the Guest Speaker of the evening was Rabbi Daniel B.
Syme of New York, Rabbi Mayer AbramowiU. Chairman JNF Executive
Board brought greetings and gave the Benediction. Cantor Yehuda
Shifman. sang the Star Spangled Banner and the Hatikvah. Dancing was
to Ted Martin's Orchestra.
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND, 420 Lincoln Rd., Suite 353, Miami Beach, FL 33139
IOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQQOOC.1


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 13, 1987
Germany Notes Youthful
Skinhead Neo-Nazis
Continued from Page 5-A
lecturer at Bielefeld Universi-
ty reports in a current study
that the figures are much the
same.
But he does report a strong
trend among young people
towards the ideas normally
associated with the extreme
right. Of the 1,257
respondents, 57.2 percent
favor the death penalty for ter-
rorism, drug trafficking and
sex murder; 66.5 percent want
tougher punishments handed
out by the courts; 43.5 percent
agree with the slogan "Ger-
many for the Germans"; and
37.4 percent of 16- and
17-year-olds agree with the
slogan, "Out with the wogs."
All these are typical stances
favored by the extreme right,
including skinheads.
"Germany, wake" and
"Jews out" cry skinheads.
They spray swastikas on their
bedroom walls. Right ex-
tremists hate anything
strange, hate foreigners and
things that are different. Puri-
ty is their aim. The basis of
their belief is that people are
born unequal.
They believe in violence.
They refer to the daily "fight
for existence" and, in general,
reject democratic solutions to
social and political conflict.
Authoritarian and militant
modes of behavior are part of
their style.
In 1985, the Bonn Justice
Ministry warned that more
than a third of extreme right
wingers were violent. The very
word Gewalt recalls the war
and the Nazis.
It also brings to mind the
more recent past such as in
1980 when a bomb went off in
Munich during the Oktoberfest
and a brawl with crude
weapons fought in Hanover in
1984. Heitmeyer refers to
xenophobia and to the less ob-
vious attitude of favoring
violence as a means of solving
conflict. He says these at-
titudes are not taken seriously
enough and points out that a
few years ago, it was never for
a moment believed that the
skinhead "youth sub-culture"
would ever become closely in-
volved with the extreme right
of politics. It was considered
that skinheads were not
capable of becoming politically
involved. Yet now skinheads
acted as marshals at neo-Nazi
rallies.
Heitmeyer charged youth
work programes with not do-
ing enough to help. An "in-
sidious widening" of the pro-
blem had been ignored. Youth
centers were proud that they
remained spared from
hooligans like skinheads and
took this to be a sign of their
own special qualities.
He said the reality was that
social work was done with less
objectionable youths. The
delinquents were ignored.
Also ignored were the "less
socially conspicuous" like
youths who spent much of
their time in pin-ball parlours
or billiard salloons, went to
soccer matches on Saturdays
and sometimes displayed but-
tons proclaiming: "I'm proud
to be German."
After a recent Bundesliga
football match, three fans
started chanting "Heil Hitler"
and breaking into the Horst
Wessel song. They are now
spending a year behind bars.
The judge said in sentencing
Sabbath-Secular
Compromise Brings
No Conciliation
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTAS) -
A dispute that has produced
violence in the streets here
may have been resolved Sun-
day night by the City Council,
but not without threats of
violence in council chambers.
A compromise was adopted
in the fierce dispute between
ultra-Orthodox residents of
the city, who demand strictest
observance of the Sabbath by
all of its citizens and the
secjlar population, which
would like to pursue entertain-
ment and other activities on
Friday nights and Saturdays.
The council, under the chair-
manship of Mayor Teddy
Kollek, adopted the recom-
mendations of the Harman
Eublic committee to restrict
ut not ban cultural activities
for the non-religious in limited
areas of the city. That commit-
tee's chairman is Avraham
Harman, chancellor of the
Hebrew University of
Jerusalem and a former
ambassador.
But the proceedings of the
council meeting produced
near-violent confrontations,
and the representatives of two
ultra-Orthodox factions, Shas
and Agudat Israel, walked out
in a fury before it ended.
Tempers flared when Kollek
pounded his gavel to try to cut
short a lengthy speech by
Agudat Israel Councilman
Avraham Leisersohn. Another
Aguda, councilman, Meir
Porush, produced a gavel of
his own, pounded the table and
shouted, "Mr. Mayor, you are
not the only person to have a
hammer, and you had better
let people talk."
Labor Councilman Em-
manuel Suesman approched
Porush, apparently to wrest
the gavel from him, but was
confronted by other Orthodox
members. At that point,
Kollek warned Porush, "I can
break your head with my
hammer."
them that "we must head off
this infection. We can't afford
to let this sort of thing happen
again in this country. '
In the emotionally charged
atmosphere of football
stadiums, neo-Nazis often mix
with crowd in a deliberate ef-
fort to contact politically
susceptible fans, say police.
Neo-Nazi leader Michael
Kuhnen once said his best
recruiting grounds were
where skinheads and football
fans gathered.
But even in groups where
young people seek like-minded
people, recognition, security
and direction and where there
is no clear extreme-right
mood, there are certain na-
tionalistic and authoritarian
traits.
Togetherness and com-
radeship are again important
since tne new conservatism
and new romanticism surfac-
ed. Boy scout-like activities
and a suggestion of campfire
atmosphere attract many who
are looking for new values
because the old values have
not, in their opinion, lived up
to expectations.
Some groups use this trend
to recruit and extreme-right-
wing oriented youth
magazines use the theme of en-
vironmental protection in an
effort again to make the term
Heimat modern along the lines
of "pure environment, pure
people."
One young woman from a
village in Lower Saxony said
in explanation of her earlier
fascination with neo-Nazis that
her desire for security and
recognition could have just as
easily led her to Bhagwan or
another of the sects.
She said she had no idea
about politics or the extreme
right, but Michael Kuhnen had
made a strong impression on
her. He was single-minded and
knew what he wanted. He of-
fered direction.
Youth needs a sense of direc-
tion but, because of the friabili-
ty of social continuity, it is
becoming more and more dif-
ficult to plot out direction.
Heitmeyer says his study
shows that the attraction of
the right had its roots not in
the ideology itself but in social
ideas.
Criminality, illegl strikes,
unrest among youth, van-
dalism, even conscientious ob-
jection, citizens initiatives,
alcoholism, drug abuse and
also the rebellious attitude of
some people towards the state
are increasingly taken to be at-
tacks on democracy and ap-
peals for a "strong state."
The fear of being over-
whelmed by foreigners is not a
just talk in the bar. It is a sub-
ject talked about by mayors
and other politicians openly.
Heitmeyer is worried about
the dangers in education. He
says old-fashioned virtues such
as industriousness, sense of
duty, faith, discipline and
punctuality were again becom
ing popular among German
parent*. But the* we?fi
very^s which had become
discredited ,n the fascist eS
They could lead to an acS
tance of violence. ^
Heitmeyer maintains that
1the.r^ts.of. right extremism
he right w,th,n society and no?
as had long been thought on
its periphery. He ha/fouS
these tendencies not onlv
among the socially disadvan
taged such as the unemployed
but also among self-assured
youths who had a more
assured view of the future
who already had embarked on
careers, for example.
The case against skinheads
following the death of a
Turkish youth in Hamburg in
1986 showed that skinheads
can come from "respectable"
families. One of the charged
was the son of a senior
policeman.
Now the courts want to use
another father of a skinhead to
bring home the point to the
public. The son was battered to
death by his "comrades" in
Hanover in February. He was
15 when he made friends with-, if*
skinheads and got closer and''
closer to them, said the father
in evidence.
He had spoken with his son
often in an effort to get him to
change his mind at first
unsuccessfully.
Eventually he was suc-
cessful. The boy, then aged 17
told the police about his former
comrades and died because
of it.
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Friday, November 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Defense Postscript:
Weinberger Unlikely To Be Missed
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The resignation of Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger
has removed from President
Reagan's Cabinet the leading
opponent of the expanding
alliance between the United
States and Israel over the last
seven years.
While maintaining that he is
not anti-Israel, Weinberger
has continually argued that the
United States must not be
seen as neglecting its Arab
friends in the Middle East,
particularly Saudi Arabia and
Jordan, in favor of Israel.
The 70-year-old defense
secretary has been the leading
advocate in the Reagan ad-
ministration for arms sales to
Saudi Arabia and Jordan, and
is believed responsible for
some of the harsh actions the
administration has taken
against Israel during the last
seven years.
After Jonathan Pollard, a
civilian intelligence analyst for
the U.S. Navy, was arrested
for spying for Israel,
Weinberger refused to go
along with a State Department
effort to ensure that the affair
would not harm long-term
U.S.-Israel relations.
Weinberger also opposed the
administration's efforts for
strategic cooperation with
Israel and sought to prevent
Israel from building the Lavi
jet fighter from its inception.
Some of his most controver-
sial acts came when the U.S.
Marines were sent to Beirut in
1983. Weinberger first refused
any direct liaison between the
Marines and Israeli troops ad-
jacent to them, which resulted
in at least one confrontation
between the two sides.
When the Marine barracks
were blown up on Oct. 23,
1983, the Pentagon rejected
an offer by Israel to have the
wounded flown to an Israeli
Egyptian Ambassador Talks Peace
Ten years after President
Sadat's historic flight to
Jerusalem, "the collective will
of the Arab world is clearly in
favor of peace with Israel," ac-
cording to Egypt's am-
bassador to Washington,
Abdel Raouf El Reedy.
In an address to ARZA, the
Association of Reform Zionists
of America, at the national
convention of the Union of
American Hebrew Congrega-
tions this week, Ambassador
El Reedy said that the mood in
the Arab world now was
"enough is enough" and that
"it is time to leave the past
behind us and strike a historic
compromise that would end
the stains quo of hostility and
establish a new relationship
between the Arabs and the
Israelis."
Fear of Khomeini a Factor?
The Egyptian envoy, who
was part of President Sadat's
team at the Camp David peace
talks with Israel, hinted that
fear of the spread of Islamic
fundamentalism was a key fac-
tor in current Arab thinking
toward Israel making peace
with Israel presumably more
desirable than surrender to
Khomeini fanaticism.
"Two sets of forces are
working at cross-purposes in
the Middle East,'1 El Reedy
said. "One force is working to
resolve existing conflicts in ac-
cordance with the accepted in-
ternational consensus. The
other force rejects peace and is
wnt upon the violent over-
throw of the present system.
"It is this latter force that
seeks to win the support of
meml)ers of the young genera-
tion by exploiting their
'iis.-atisfaction and frustra-
tion," he told the ARZA
leaders.
The Egyptian envoy, who
expressed warm appreciation
ARZA's president, Rabbi
paries Kroloff, for the invita-
tion extended to him and
*ho was received cordially by
UN Report
Continued from Page 5-A
"ounce without delay that the
files on Waldheim and others
his ilk are finally accessible
. the Public, with only a
Minimum of restrictions, if
jny. so as to distance himself
">m his predecessor of ill
U iVind not ^ome suspect
11 as an accessory after
"ic tact.

the Reform Jewish leaders mutual recognition, with the
said the "new relationship" he respect, mutual security and
envisioned would be based on fruits of peace shared by both
"mutual coexistence and sides."
hospital. Weinberger main-
tained that this was a decision
by the commander at the
scene, based on established
practices. Later, the United
States and Israel entered into
an agreement to provide such
medical treatment.
Weinberger directly con-
fronted the perception that he
is anti-Israel in a speech to the
American Jewish Committee
in New York on May 13. 1983
in which he stressed that "this
is simply not true."
"I am a strong supporter of
Israel, and an admiring
witness to the democracy they
have built and preserved under
the most trying conditions,"
he said.
But, he added, even if he was
not an "admirer" of Israel, "as
secretary of defense, I would
still be a strong supporter of
Israel," because, in addition to
the emotional ties between the
two countries, "it is clear that
we in the United States have
an important stake in Israel's
security."
Weinberger will be succeed-
ed as secretary of defense by
Frank Carlucci, formally
Reagan's national security ad-
viser. Carlucci is considered
close to Weinberger, having
served under him in the Nixon
administration and then as
deputy secretary of defense
from 1981 to 1983. Carlucci is
believed to have proposed the
sale of AWACS planes to
Saudi Arabia in 1981 and had
pushed for arm sales to the
Saudis when he was deputy
director of the Central In-
telligence Agency in the
Carter administration.
However, it is Carlucci who
is credited with the com-
promise worked out with
Senate leaders to remove
Maverick anti-tank missiles
from a $1 billion arms sale to
Saudi Arabia.
Carlucci is expected to be
replaced by his deputy, Army
Lt. Colin Powell. He would be
the first black to be national
security adviser.
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 13, 1987
. News _-
Koiiii
Call It Na'amat Canada
TORONTO At a reportedly merry and slick eighth
triennial convention here, Pioneer Women of Canada voted
to change its name to Na'amat Canada. The sister
organization in the United States recently changed its
name to Na'amat U.S.A.
Teens' Vandalism Trial Postponed
WATERBURY, Conn. The trial of 12 teenagers charg-
ed with vandalizing two Jewish cemeteries here has been
postponed at the request of their attorney. The Connecticut
Jeurish Ledger reports.
The 12 including three 15-year-old girls were ar-
rested last month. As Chief Inspector of Detectives John
Griffin described the alleged crime, the teens, after a drink-
ing party, entered the Brass City and Waterbury Hebrew
Sick Benefit cemeteries by rolling back the surrounding
chain-link fence.
They allegedly sprayed paint on and overturned nearly
90 gravestones, causing damage that, Griffin said could run
into many thousands of dollars. Griffin said that it was not
anti-Semitism that motivated the teens, but rather the in-
fluence of alcohol.
UAHC Elects Californian As Chairman
CHICAGO Allan B. Goldman, 50, of Los Angeles, a
lawyer, took office this week as chairman of the board of
trustees of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations,
central body of Reform Judaism in the United States and
Canada. He succeeds Charles J. Rothschild Jr. of Teaneck,
N.J.
Goldman, the youngest chairman in the 115-year history
of the UAHC, was elected to a two-year term at the closing
session of the organization's national biennial convention
here.
Help For Frail Elderly?
WASHINGTON Qualified frail elderly and disabled
persons would be eligible for up to 100 days a year of adult
day health care under a bill introduced in the senate last
week by Chairman John Melcher.
Under the Montana Democrat's bill, eligible individuals
would pay only a $5 daily copayment in return for the ser-
vices, which include health assessment and monitoring,
personal care, assistance with meals and physical or oc-
cupational therapy.
Jewish Agencies Assist Illegals
HIAS AJCommittee, AJCongress UAHC. B'nai B'rith
and NJCRAC were among the sixteen national organiza-
tions which urged members of the United States Senate to
support legislation that would temporarily stay the depor-
tation and detention of Salvadorans and Nicaraguans
residing illegally in the U.S. who face an uncertain future
in their native lands.
The focus of the appeal to the senators, according to the
organizations was that the U.S. "traditionally has been a
leader m assisting refugees fleeing persecution in their
homelands.
Jewish Group To Aid
Libyan Jews, Fight Poverty
NEW YORK Two Jewish organizations, one to aid Li-
byan Jewish refugees and the other to fight world poverty
were recently formed.
The Internationa] Commission on Claims of Jews from
Libya hopes to help the tens of thousands of Jews forced
out of Libya to make claims for compensation for na-
tionalized property, according to Abraham Foxman, na-
tional director of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith. The commission was incorporated at ADL head-
quarters here and will receive ADL legal assistance.
The Libyan Jewish community, which according to ADL
had existed hospitably for more than 2,000 years, was forc-
ed completely out by pogroms and threats of violence by Li-
byan Arabs from 1945-67.
Robert Duke
Named Holocaust Campaign Leader
WASHINGTON, D.C. Robert E. Duke, has been nam-
ed director of the United States Holocaust Memorial
Museum's fundraising campaign A Campaign to
Remember. The Campaign's goal is to raise more than
$100 million to build, equip and endow this major national
Mall in Washington D.C.
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Friday, November 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
At Auschwitz:
Israel Philharmonic
Plays Poland In Conflict
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
reported remark by the con-
ductor of the Israel Philhar-
monic Orchestra (IPO), now
touring Poland, appears to
have struck a sour note in the
delicate task of restoring
diplomatic relations between
the two countries, which
Poland broke 20 years ago.
Ambassador Mordechai
Paltzur, who heads the in-
terest section Israel opened in
Warsaw only last summer,
was forced to apologize for the
remark, which had incensed
Polish leaders and Americans
of Polish origin, Davar
reported Monday.
According to an American
news report, the IPO conduc-
tor and musical director, Zubin
Mehta, and one of the musi-
cians, told a reporter that the
IPO was visiting Poland with
"mixed feelings" because of
the treatment of Jews by Poles
during World War II and the
collaboration by many Poles
with the Nazis at that time.
When the story appeared,
Paltzur was summoned to the
Foreign Ministry in Warsaw
and told that the Polish Con-
sulate in Chicago had received
dozens of telephone calls from
irate Polish Americans who
urged that the IPO tour be
canceled.
The Israeli envoy reportedly
offered his apologies and ask-
ed the Israeli Foreign Ministry
to stress to the IPO the sen-
sitivity of their hosts. The or-
chestra arrived in Warsaw
Sunday for a one-week tour
which is to include a visit to
Auschwitz.
Canada To Seek Soviet
Help In War-Crimes Search
By MICHAEL SOLOMON
MONTREAL (JTA) -
Canada has begun negotia-
tions with the Soviet Union
and the government of Poland,
Romania, Hungary,
Czechoslovakia, West Ger-
many and Israel to allow Cana-
dian legal teams to search for
evidence in the cases of 20
definite war crimes suspects
and 200 probable suspects
residing in Canada.
Justice Minister Ray
Hnatyshyn announced the
development last week in an
address to an international
human rights conference that
opened at McGill University
Law School here.
Participating in the con-
ference, whose theme is
"Nuremberg 40 Years Later:
The Struggle Against Injustice
in Our Time," are prominent
jurists, government ministers.
Chicago Sun-Times correspondent Chuck
Ashman is shown in New York last Sunday
nth a small portion of the top secret United
Motions Nazi archive files which will soon be
made public. The files identify 25,000 accused
war criminals from World War II and have
been sealed for forty years. Ashman obtained
the first copy and the Chicago paper has begun
publishing portions of the files. AP/Wide World
Photo
TOP CASH PAID
War Crimes Files Opened
Israel has repeatedly demand-
ed since 1986 that the files be
idividuals, but they now may opened to public scrutiny,
access for general
Continued from Page 1-A
sk for
Zealand, Norway, Poland, and
the United States.
OLD PtTROTTtTRE
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Bronzes
Pianos
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esearch."
At first, Australia was the
only one of the 17 members of
the defunct WCC to support
The secretary general fur-
kher decided that the files "will i^Yg Request. But gradual-
If ** ^"^ I?r-}*T fi*e >v *nd due in Dart to Israel's
** 'esearch by individuals into
the history and work of the
United Nations War Crimes
ly, and due in part
persistent efforts, all 17 states
accepted the Israel position.
Commission
crimes."
and into war
Israel diplomats here said
Friday that the decision to
pen the files was "a major
iplomatic victory for Israel."
The former members of the
WCC are Australia, Belgium,
Britain, Canada, China,
Czechoslovakia, Denmark,
France, Greece, India, Luxem-
bourg, Netherlands. New
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Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 13, 1987
Diamond City Deputy Mayor
Offers Israeli Perspective
Continued from Page 5-A
Jews for all that."
VISIBLY SHAKEN. Ben
Gad pounds a nearby table as
he says, "Everyone talks
about Palestinian rights. They
do not talk about the rights of
Jews. You cannot speak about
Palestinian rights without
speaking about Jewish
rights."
All of his family's property,
and their business, was con-
fiscated by Libyan authorities
before they left the country for
Israel, he says.
During his brief stop in
Miami, Ben-Gad announced
that he met with leaders of the
Cuban community to discuss
erecting a monument to Cuban
freedom fighter Jose Marti in
Netanya. "We're discussing
ways to fulfill the idea," he
says.
NETANYA, a city of about
130,000 residents 20 miles
north of Tel Aviv, is similar to
South Florida not only in
climate but in the fact that
thousands of families make
their living in tourist-related
fields. Netanya has 30 hotels
and 4,000 hotel rooms and the
resort city is planning to add
another 4,000 rooms.
"We have night life on the
shore, beautiful night clubs,
shopping centers, a clean city,
warm people, reasonable
prices," he says.
"In Independence Square,
starting at eight at night and
going until two in the morning,
thousands of people pass
through the square. They sit in
the night air and sip drinks and
eat falafel."
Ben-Gad studied in Bar-Ilan
University in Tel Aviv, major-
ing in Middle East studies. He
continued at Dropsie Universi-
ty in Philadelphia, where he
received his doctorate.
Although his lecture subjects
are broad-based, Ben-Gad says
he must have been asked
"about 200" questions regar-
ding the Middle East peace
issue during his visit to Miami.
Ben-Gad is an active
member and chairman of the
religious section of the Likud
Party led by Israel Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir.
Ben-Gad explains Israel's
coalition or unity government:
Because neither major party,
Likud nor Labor, could get a
public mandate in the last elec-
tion, the new brand of joint
government came about. The
Labor Party is led by Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres. Peres
and Shamir swapped titles
half-way through the election
term.
Shamir and Peres have been
bitterly divided this past year
over the method of negotiating
peace with Jordan. Peres has
said the only way to get Jordan
to the negotiating table is to
meet at an international con-
ference that would include the
five permanent members of
the United Nations Security
Council. That would allow the
Soviet Union as well as
England, France and China to
have a say in the negotiations.
SHAMIR refuses to budge
in his opposition to the interna-
tional umbrella and says the
only way to have peace
negotiations is for Israel to sit
down directly with Jordan.
While American officials are
The Palestinian issue is not at the heart of the
problem The problem is the Arab refusal to
accept Israel and I think Jews should stop
apologizing for being there!
negotiating autonomy of areas
such as the West Bank. That
area would be neither part of
Jordan nor annexed by Israel,
he says.
JORDAN'S King Hussein
has so far refused to sit down
with Israel to discuss peace
prospects without the interna-
tional umbrella. Hussein,
political observers say, is con-
cerned about repercussions
such a move on his part would
have from Syria and the PLO
as well as on his own life
Says Ben-Gad: "We achiev-
ed peace with Egypt with,,,,,
Russia and China If |7
really wants to neiS"
peace he should negoffS
us personally." *lth
th?teuGad- dismis*l views
that Hussein may be rejeSJ
direct negotiations wj gS
for fear of his own life. el
"Hussein is a man of several
souls. He's burie,i all S
enemies and he's still alive."
making attempts to resolve
the deadlock, Israel's coalition
government at one point ap-
peared headed for a split and
calls for early elections seemed
the only way to resolve the
issue.
"Shamir is not one to change
his mind like some others,"
Ben-Gad observes.
Because the split in Israeli
public opinion is almost equally
divided on the peace con-
ference issue, it is unlikely that
either party, Labor or Likud,
would win a mandate in the
next elections on this issue
alone, Ben-Gad predicts.
Ben-Gad, sharing what he
thinks may be surprising news
to Americans states: "There
are many people who believe
that the next government (in
Israel) should be a government
of national unity once again."
A strong supporter of Likud
himself, Ben-Gad says he
would favor his Likud Party
once again sharing power in
the Knesset with the Labor
Party. The unity government
has had many philosophical
disagreements but the fact is
that it has worked in many
areas including reducing
Israeli inflation from some 27
percent a month to one per-
cent a month.
"Peres and Shamir are dif-
ferent but are in the same
room and it is locked," Ben-
Gad reasons. "It is a wedding,
not of love, but of necessity."
Yet, if Israel continues the
unity government, as Ben-Gad
predicts, Likud still "will
never" agree to an interna-
tional conference, he says.
"So," Ben-Gad says, show-
ing his party's hard line, "if
Peres wants a unity govern-
ment he must forget about the
international conference."
BEN-GAD suggests that
neither party, Likud or Labor,
could establish a stable
government in Israel with a
slight majority.
"When I left Israel, the polls
asking about the upcoming
election show that 41 members
would get elected to Likud and
45 to Labor."
Asked what might end the
deadlock over the Peres-
Shamir peace conference
views if not an election, Ben-
Gad offers the Hebrew word
for patience, "savlanut."
"I believe there are good
chances for comprehensive
peace in the Middle East. The
Arab world slowly but surely is
coming to the realization there
is no military solution to the
conflict and Israel will be there
as long as there is a Middle
East," says Ben-Gad.
Ben-Gad's assessment of
Israel's military position
comes at a time when
members of the U.S. House
Appropriations Committee
managed to maintain Israel's
level of $3 billion in military
and economic aid. Several
Congressman have told The
Jewish Floridian in recent
months that there is an annual
struggle to maintain Israel's
slice of the foreign aid pie
which is the largest received
by any foreign country.
"I think," Ben-Gad adds,
"that the number of Arabs
who agree in political solutions
are above the number of Arabs
who believe in a military
confrontation."
BEN-GAD says Shamir is
opposed to the inclusion of out-
side nations in the peace pro-
cess because they want Israel
to go back to its pre-1967
borders. On the other hand,
Ben-Gad says, the Arab-Israeli
problem in the Middle East is
not an issue of land.
"All problems in the Middle
East are because of Arab
refusal to see Israel exist,"
says Ben-Gad. "In 1948, Israel
did not have Arab territory
and that didn't stop the Arabs
from attacking Israel. In 1967,
we didn't have the Golan
Heights, West Bank, Gaza
Strip.
"The Palestinian issue is not
at the heart or the foot of the
problem. The problem is the
Arab refusal to accept Israel
and I think Jews should stop
apologizing for being there.
"For the sake of peace (with
Egypt) we gave up the whole
Sinai. There are no people in
the world who love peace more
than the Jews. We want peace
with the Arabs. We've proved
we can fight and win."
Ben-Gad says he sees "no
other way to go" than to work
the Camp David peace accords
with Jordan, which is
'Hijacking' Disinformation
Compounds Confusion
Continued from Page 1-A
come for the world tc realize
there are terrorist organiza-
tions trying to sabotage even
the slightest positive move-
ment in the Middle East,
Rabin said.
He said Israel is in contact
with the governments of
France and Belgium, whose
nationals were said to be
among the hijacked
passengers.
The names released by the
Abu Nidal spokesman Sunday
night are Fernand Houtekins,
40; Emmanuel Houtekins, 42;
Valerie Emmanuel Houtekins,
16; Laurent Emmanuel
Houtekins, 17; Godlieve Kets;
and Jacqueline Valente, 30,
described as a French
national.
In Paris, French authorities
said they had no information
about any of the passengers.
But the Belgian Interior
Ministry confirmed Monday
that Emmanuel Houtekins; his
wife, Godlieve, 48 born Kets
possibly Katz and their
children, Valerie and Laurent,
are Belgian citizens, but are
believed to live in Lyon,
France.
French officials said the four
Belgians are not registered in
Lyon or anywhere else in
France. They have not been
able to trace a French woman
named Valente.
French naval authorities
said the Silco is not registered
in France, but is on record as
having put into Cannes in the
summer of 1985. Port officials
in Cannes said a vessel named
Silco was registered there
three years ago, but not under
the registration number and
ownership quoted by the Abu
Nidal group.
In Geneva Monday, Michelle
Merrier, a spokeswoman for
the International Committee
of the Red Cross, told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
that neither Israel nor any
other government has asked
the ICRC to intervene on
behalf of the hijacked
passengers. The ICRC acts on-
ly on the requests of the par-
ties involved, she explained.
The JTA approached the
ICRC because Abu Nidal's
spokesman said Sunday that
ICRC delegates would be
given permission to visit the
passengers, apparently being
held hostage.
So far the hijackers have
made no demands for their
release and return of the
yacht.
The Abu Nidal gang has a
heinous record of perpetrating
assassinations, kidnappings
and terrorist attacks, mainly
outside the Middle East. It
was responsible for the at-
tempted murder of the Israeli
ambassador to Britain. Shlomo
Argov,
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Tel.: (312) 782-3933


Friday, November 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
Hornblass On Israeli Prisons:
Arab Prisoners Treated Well
By PATRICIA GOLAN
The president of the Interna-
tional Association of Jewish
Lawyers and Jurists says he is
tremendously impressed" by
the way convicted Arab ter-
rorists are treated in Israeli
prisons.
Recently returned from a
trip to Israel, association presi-
dent Jerome Hornblass, a New
York State Supreme Court
judge, stated that although
there has been some tighten-
ing of conditions since his last
fact-finding mission in 1985,
Arab prisoners were treated
with the "utmost humanity"
ami accorded extensive
privileges.
Hornblass, an Orthodox Jew
who was elected president of
the association last spring, ex-
plained that he visits prisons
on each of his trips to Israel to
see how prisoners are being
treated. "You can judge a
society by how it treats its
prisoners those on the
lowest rungs of society," he
remarked. "It is important for
me as a Jew to know how
prisoners in Israel are
treated."
Hornblass reported that con-
ditions have changed
somewhat since his 1985 visit.
"Prisoners no longer have ac-
cess to one another as in the
past," he said. "The Israeli
authorities learned this access
was being used to learn ter-
rorist methods."
Describing the Israeli prison
in Nablus on the West Bank,
Hornblass explained that
prisoners in cells within a cell
Hussein Double-Talks
block no longer have access to
one another through open
gates. The prisoners had used
the access to establish a prison
hierarchy, he added and
during his previous visits, he
had to go through this hierar-
chy in order to speak to
prisoners.
The warden, Hornblass said,
allowed him to speak to
whomever he wished. No
prisoner, he said, complained
about any sort of brutality. In
the past, prisoners had criticiz-
ed the quality of food, but this
time their complaints were
mainly about the lack of access
to one another, Hornblass
said.
Prisoners are allowed to
write and receive letters, hold
daily religious services,
receive newspapers and listen
to the radio stations of their
choice. Hornblass noted that
every cell has a television set,
and that the prisoners are
served the same food given to
the Israeli army.
There are twice weekly
visitations. The prisoners,
Hornblass said, speak to
visitors through a mesh parti-
tion, rather than a glass wall,
as is the case in most prisons.
"It is actually incredible,"
declared Hornblass, "that
these people, who have been
convicted of the most serious
crimes against the state, are
treated so well."
The judge said that he had
planned to visit members of
the Jewish underground serv-
ing time in Israeli prisons, but
had been unable to because of
his busy schedule which includ-
ed meetings with heads of
Jewish lawyers* organizations
from all over the world.
Interviewed in Hebrew on
Israeli television, Hornblass
was asked only about MK Meir
Kahane, which he said surpris-
ed him. "This is one of the
main interests in Israel," he
said. "Should Kahane be stop-
ped from talking, should he be
allowed to keep his seat in the
Knesset, or be thrown out?"
"My answer," Hornblass
continued, "was very clear as
an American, but not so clear,
perhaps, if I were living in
Israel. Freedom of speech is a
cherished, sanctified concept
except if a person endangers
the well-being of the people.
The standard test for this in
America is yelling 'fire!' in a
crowded theater when there is
no fire. The Israelis have to
decide if what Kahane is say-
ing is jeopardizing the people."
"From the Jewish point of
view," Hornblass commented,
"if someone is doing
something to hurt the Jewish
people, he is not entitled to any
rights. "I don't know whether
what Kahane is doing is
deliberately destructive to the
Jewish people, or whether he
is merely expressing a minori-
ty opinion."
Continued from Page 3-A
ministration for failing to
work agressively enough to
prevent a stalemate in the
peace process.
Peres stated here Friday
that "there is definitely a
chance for an international
(conference) opening, perhaps
more than there was before."
He said that "from Jordan's
point of view, there is no
chance of direct negotiations
without an opening."
A violent demonstration in
the West Bank Sunday that
greeted the summit opening in
Amman, points to sharp divi-
sions between pro-Jordanian
Palestinians and die-hard sup-
porters of the Palestine
I.iheration Organization.
Both camps have circulated
petitions to be conveyed to the
Arab leaders at the summit.
According to some sources,
the pro-Jordanian petition has
already reached Amman. It is
Baid to emphasize the common
destiny of both banks of the
Jordan River, Jordan's
decisive role in a solution of
the Palestinian problem and
the need for a political
itive solution between
Jordan and a Palestinian
entity.
It declares, however, that
the 1'LO is the legitimate
representative of the Palesti-
nian people.
The other petition, signed by
1 "ivs of PLO supporters and
figures identified with the Left
in the administered territories,
was published Sunday in East
Jerusalem Arabic newspapers
identified with the PLO.
It calls for the establishment
of an independent Palestinian
state under PLO leadership
and condemns any attempt to
deny the PLO's status as the
sole representative of the
Palestinian people.
The published document fur-
thermore censures the "divi-
sion of authority" between
'srael and Jordan for ad-
ministration of the territories.
'l denounces the Jordanian
ve-year plan to improve liv-
H conditions in the ter-
ritories as a plot to create an
alternative leadership to the
fu !,lt also sharply condemns
tf* United States.
Many Soulh RoridTans share a bond with Israel.
We support It, financially and emotionally. On the eve
of Its fortieth anniversary, Susan Uchtman examines the
state of Israel today, and Its hopes for the future.
A NEWS 4 SPECIAL REPORT
All This Week 6 & 11pm
UITVJ


Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 13,1987
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i



Jewish Day Care-The National Perspective ..
More than half of
Jewish women with
children under Jive
work outside the
home. For many,
finding quality child
rare that is also
affordable has become
a continuous
struggle. Can the
Jewish community
help? Recent research
shows that by offering
quality day care the
Jewish community is,
in fact, investing in
its own future.
By
ELANA EIZAK KUPERSTEIN
"Not knowing who was go-
ing to take care of Joshua was
the single most frightening
part of going back to work,"
says new mother Lori Gard-
ner, from Silver Spring,
Maryland. Ellen Kagen
Waghelstein, also from
Maryland, has survived three
separate child care ar-
AijMWrexplains the havdalah sermee to to keep quality staff and at the same time
children at a Jewish Community Center day maintain fees that young couples can^ffyT
care program. Not so easily explained is how wpw* can ajjora.
rangements in the last year.
The difficulties she has en-
countered in locating child
care for 16-month-old Andrea
have convinced her that our
country only pays lip service to
the idea that "children are our
most valuable resource."
While only seven percent of
American families fit the tradi-
tional model of two children,
working father and
homemaker mother, the
United States still has no com-
prehensive child care policy for
the 24 million children who
need it.
In 1981, the Reagan ad-
ministration made significant
cuts in existing child care sub-
sidies for low income families.
The only other allowance of-
fered by the government is in
the form of a limited tax credit
for child care expenses.
Quality child care that is also
Continued on Page 4-B
Beach-Bred Professor 'Rewrites' Bible
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jiwilk Floridian Staff Writer
IF THE BEST detectives
are the ones who can figure
out 'whodunit' from clues
which have been present all
along, then Biblical scholar
Richard Elliot Friedman, who
recently written the book,
W ho Wrote The Bible?" may
be one of the best detectives of
all time.
Friedman, a professor of
Hebrew and Comparative
Literature at the University of
California at San Diego, has
re-examined the Bible, which,
according to Jewish tradition
was written by Moses, and, ac-
cording to popular scholarly
theory, was written and edited
by some four different sources.
Scholars have long pointed
to clues in the Bible which sug-
gest an author other than
Moses descriptions of
events which Moses could not
have described, such as his
death, the presence of
"doublets," or two different
versions of the same story, as
in the beginning of Genesis.
and the use of different names
for God in the different
versions.
Other scholars have
restricted themselves to
postulating a writer in ancient
Israel, (the 'E' author, who
calls God 'Elohim'), a writer in
Judah, (the author of the 'J'
document, which refers to God
as 'Jehovah') a 'P' or Priestly
author and a fourth author for
the book of Deuteronomy.
Friedman has gone further.
In a telephone interview from
his California office, Friedman
The Last Train At The Station:
Miami Plans March On Washington
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Planes are being chartered
by the South Florida Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry, a
committee of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, in
order to bring Miamians to the
Washington summit mobiliza-
tion march and rally on Sun-
day, Dec. 6
The march, which is ex-
pected to draw hundreds of
thousands of Jews from across
the country, will include ap-
pearances by Natan Sharan-
sky, Ida Nudel, Vladimir
Slepak, Yuli Edelshtein, Misha
Kholmiansky, all former long-
time refuseniks and prisoners
of conscience.
Intended to focus attention
on the plight of Soviet Jews
who wish to emigrate, the
march will begin at 1 p.m. near
the White House at the Ellipse
and will proceed to either the
Lincoln Memorial or the
Capitol, followed by the rally
at 2 p.m.
The march and rally have
been planned to take place one
day before Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev begins
summit meetings with Presi-
Continued on Page 6-B
says he used "a mixture of ar-
chitectural, archaeological,
biblical and Talmudic
sources," along with the
writings of the Jewish
historian Josephus, who wrote
at the time of the second Tem-
ple. Friedman has suggested
two names, one for the author
of Deuteronomy and what is
known as the Deuteronomic
history (the books of Joshua,
Judges, Samuel 1 and 2 and
Kings 1 and 2) and one for the
redactor or editor who put the
Bible together into the form
we know it today.
"The prophet Jeremiah or
his scribe, Baruch Ben
Neriyah, one or the other is
editor and part author of seven
books of the Bible," says
Friedman, basing his theory in
part on the similarity of
language in the book of
Jeremiah and in Deuteronomy.
"DEUTERONOMY was
produced in two editions, the
first in Jerusalem at the time
of king Josiah and the second
in Egypt shortly after the time
of the exile. My research leads
me to believe that it was the
same person, and here
Jeremiah was in Jerusalem at
the time of Josiah and in
UM Included In Top 'Jewish Schools'
WASHINGTON Accor-
ding to the latest edition of
Jewish Life on Campus," an
annual directory published by
he B nai B'rith Hillel Founda-
>ons the two schools in the
United States which have the
J'ghest number of Jewish
r fnu,denjs are Brooklyn College
and New York University
^h 15.000 each. Brooklyn
gege also has the second-
nighest percentage of Jewish
students; 60 percent. New
Seent iVCrSity haS 37
As in the past, most of the
American schools with high
percentages of Jewish
students are in the East. Ex-
cluding the Jewish
Yeshiva/Stern College, the top
schools percentagewise are
Brandeis University, with 64
percent; Brooklyn College, 60
percent; and Queens College,
SUNY-Binghamton, and Clark
University, 50 percent.
Following them are Colum-
bia University, 39 percent;
New York University, 37 per-
cent; Tufts University, Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania, and
SUNY-Oneonta, 35 percent;
George Washington Universi-
ty, 33 percent; and Yale
University, Tulane/Newcomb
University, Washington
University-St. Louis, SUNY-
Albany, and SUNY-Stony
Brook, 30 percent.
In the far West, California
State-Northridge has both the
highest percentage (28) and
the most Jewish students
(8,000). It is followed by the
University of California-Los
Angeles (18 percent and 6,000
students), and University of
California Berkeley (16 per-
cent and 5,000 students).
Heading the South are
Tulane/Newcomb (30 percent
and 3,000 students), Emory
University (22 percent and
1,800 students), Duke Univer-
sity (17 percent and 1,500
Continued on Page 2-B
... And The
Local Overview
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jeunsh Floridian Staff Writer
Infants as young as eight-
weeks-old are being left in the
hands of day care center
workers as the number of
working-parent families in-
creases and the Jewish com-
munity in Dade County at-
tempts to meet the challenge.
Day care centers that are be-
ing opened in Jewish com-
munity centers and
synagogues are offering an
alternative to the working
parent who needs day care ser-
vices yet wants to maintain his
or her child in a Jewish
environment.
The number of day care
centers affiliated with the
Jewish community is still small
compared to the need. Some
have waiting lists. But most
have just opened in recent
years, showing that slowly, the
community is attempting to
respond to the need.
The newest kid on the block
is the Aleph Day Care Center
at the Miami Beach Jewish
Community Center. It opened
Continued on Page 6-B
t
Richard E. Friedman
Egypt during the time of ex-
ile, Friedman explains.
Jeremiah's "family
pedigree" as a descendant of
the priesthood "indicates he
had access to the sacred texts"
of Israel's history, which he
assembled together and
edited, according to Friedman.
While other biblical scholars
have conjectured that a
Deuteronomic historian or
school of historians assembled
the texts, no one has ventured
to name an individual as the
actual author and editor
before.
"If it wasn't Jeremiah, it had
to be someone living at the
same time, in the same place,
writing in the same style and
agreeing with him on
everything," Friedman
Continued on Page 3-B
Our
Community
Friday, November 13,1987-The Jewish Floridian Section B


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 13, 1987
Hammer to Receive
Weizmann Award
evening, Dec. 10, at the Omni
International Hotel.
Hammer, a resident of
Miami Beach, has devoted
more than 40 years of his life
and career in the service of the
Jewish Community both at
home and abroad.
The award will be presented
to Mr. Hammer by Norman D.
Cohen, Chairman of the
American Committee. Among
the previous recipients of this
prestigious award were British
Prime Minister Margaret
Thatcher, U.S. Senator Henry
Jackson pioneer radio-TV ex-
ecutive David Sarnoff, actor-
comedian Danny Kaye and
Lord Sieff of Brimpton. A
native of Brooklyn, Mr. Ham-
mer served for 35 years
(1939-1974) as Executive Vice
Chairman of The Jewish Agen-
cy and United Israel Appeal,
with responsibilities for all
financing efforts other than
the United Jewish Appeal and
Israel Bonds.
Gottlieb Hammer, one of the
original founders of Israel's
Weizmann Institute of
Science, will receive the
"Weizmann Award in Sciences
and Humanities" at the In-
stitute's annual American
Committee/Florida Region
Dinner Dance on Thursday
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Jewish
Schools
Beautification Committee To Install Pallot
tions, 371-2723.
Other officers to be
Florida Supreme Court
Chief Justice Parker Lee
McDonald will speak at the an-
nual dinner and installation
meeting of the City of Miami
Committee on Beautification
and Environment Thursday,
Nov. 19. A 6 p.m. cocktail
reception will precede the 7
p.m. dinner at the Biscayne
Bay Marriott Hotel.
E. Albert Pallot, partner in
the Miami law firm of Pallot
and Poppell, will be sworn in
for a 27th consecutive one-
year term as chairman of the
committee. Dade Circuit Court
Judge Philip Bloom will be the
installing officer. For reserva-
with Pallot are: R^J^
reto, first vie cBK ftf
Baros. Jr., Mrs. RA Bui
Jr., Charles Carroll' pS
Cromer, Helen Eidson ffi
Fieber.Jhelma Gibson. Ruth
Nevin
P. Nagy, MrsrB.CPhit
Ra nh ReniM, d..._ .i."Ps.
Graff, Beverly Harris, New
Isenberg, the Reverend
E. Albert Pallot
Ralph Renick. Betty 3
and Charles WhitcJ* "&
chairmen; David R. c0U(J
vice chjirman and corresrm
ding secretary and Mrs. Edna
S.Downey, vice chairman and
recording secretary.
The Hospice Decision
Continued from Page 1-B
students), and the University
of Miami (16 percent and 2,300
students).
Of the Ivy League schools,
following Columbia, Penn, and
Yale are Harvard University
(25 percent and 3,000
students), Brown University
(25 percent and 1,600
students), Cornell University
(18 percent and 3,200
students), Princeton Universi-
ty (17 percent and 1,000
students), and Dartmouth
University (10 percent and 450
students).
For every school included,
the directory lists Jewish
enrollment, Jewish course?
kosher dining, Hillel units, and
other related information in
402 colleges in the United
States, plus 23 in Canada and
16 abroad, all of which have a
Jewish student population.
Besides listing Jewish-
related information, the direc-
tory, edited by Dr. Ruth Fred-
man Cernea, director of
Hillel's Publications and Ex-
tension Service, has an open
letter to Jewish students and
their parents. Cernea says that
the letter, together with the
director, can answer the most
frequently asked questions.
Cernea explains that while
the figures listed for total
enrollment are accurate, the
figures of Jewish enrollment
are estimtes because on many
campuses religious preference
cards are no longer distributed
and, if they are, many Jewish
students refrain from listing
their religion.
Rabbi Maurice Lamm
"The Hospice Decision"
will be the topic of the Sixth
Annual Interface Between
Religion and Medicine which
will be held at Mount Sinai
Medical Center on Tuesday,
Deo. 1.
The course is designed to
provide clergy and health care
professionals with the methods
and approaches available in
dealing with the philosophy
and meaning of hospice, its
medical implementation and
psycho-social issues. The
seminar will include lectures
and workshops as well as en-
courage audience participation
in open discussion with the
faculty.
The guest speaker for the
seminar will be Rabbi Maurice
Lamm, president of the Na-
tional Institute for Jewish
Hospice.
Registration for this pro-
gram is open to clergy, physi-
cians, nurses, social workers
and health professionals.
For information, 674-2311.
The Greater Miami Israel
Bonds Organization will pre-
sent a special award to Her-
mione and Sidney Spahn at a
Breakfast commemorating the
20th anniversary of the Libera-
tion of Jerusalem on Sunday
Nov. IS, at the Jade Winds con-
dominium at 9:30 a.m. For in-
formation, 531-6731.
SECRETARY WANTED
"Active Organization needs experienced sec-
retary. Good typing and communication skills
Knowledge of Spanish, Hebrew and Short-
hand a plus-not mandatory. Contact us at
(305) 358-8111 for interview.
Walter Dart land, neidy-
named special counsel to At-
torney General Bob Butter-
worth for Consumer and
Citizen Affairs, will be guest
speaker at Temple Israel of
Greater Mi ami'* next
Downtown Business Breakfast
Forum, on Thursday. Nor. IS.
7:J,5 a.m. at the temple.
Dartland. the former Dade
County Consumer Adiwate,
will talk on 'The Attorney
Generals Office Representing
the Public's Interest" For
reservations, 57S-59O0.
Not ainco David and Goliath ha*
something ao tiny mad* It ao big.
It's Tetley s tiny little tea leaves They've been making it WJ*
Jewish homes for years Tetley knows that |ust as tiny
chops and tiny peas are the most flavorful, the same is truei>
tea leaves That's why for nch. refreshing lea Tetley c*p
are packed with tiny little tea leaves Because tiny is tasw
TETLEY
ForBiqlr*
SaUsfxtton
t*y '.*'**.-
K CartHlad Kosher
TETLEY. TEA -fa* u w#*


Local Scholar Grades 'Bible' Book^
Friday, November 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
By JEREMIAH UNTERMAN
Richard Elliott Friedman,
Professor of Comparative
Literature at the University of
California, San Diego, has
written a bold, challenging,
unusual book, for which he
must receive due acclaim. He
has succeeded in translating
into the language 01 tne lay
person the obscure complex-
ities of biblical source
criticism.
Source, or "higher,"
criticism is that branch of
biblical scholarship which
seeks to discover the original
literary sources which com-
prise the Bible. The process of
discovery is done by paying
close attention to the cuT
ferences in nuances of
language (particularly
vocabulary ana phraseology),
viewpoint, ideology, structure,
and other literary elements
which are present in the Bible.
These differences to source
critics (of which Friedman is
one) point to different com-
positions from the hands of dif-
ferent writers. Friedman ex-
plains simply and well the
historical development of
source criticism, which he
describes as the attempt to
isolate the different authors of
the Bible and which he traces
from ancient times through
the end of the 19th Century.
Friedman then takes the
reader on a journey among the
texts of the Hebrew Bible, con-
centrating on the Torah
(Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus,
Numbers, Deuteronomy), the
historigraphical books of
Joshua, Samuel, and Kings,
and the prophetic books of
Jeremiah and Ezekiel. He suc-
ceeds in pointing out
numerous contradictions, in-
consistencies, and doublets
which gave rise to honest ques-
tions about the dating and
authorship of biblical stories,
(Doublets are stories or events
which are told twice in dif-
ferent ways, such as the two
accounts of the creation of
Humankind in the first and se-
cond chapters of Genesis.)
Friedman is a master at
describing the components of
each of the four main sources
discovered by higher criticism
J, E, P, and D which com-
prise the Torah (according to
that th ?ory).
A significant portion of Who
Wrote the Bible? is devoted to
that very question. Here,
Friedman is at his most dar-
ing. Dismissing any references
to those branches of biblical
scholarship which have suc-
ceeded and even surpassed
source criticism and ignoring
other obstacles in his way,
Friedman throws caution to
the winds and claims that none
other than the prophet
Jeremiah (or possibly his per-
sonal scribe, Baruch ben
Neriah) wrote most of the
history of the Bible from the
book of Deuteronomy on
through the end of Kings.
There is no question that
Who Wrote the Bible engender
schollarly controversy over
many of Friedman's conclu-
sions and conjectures, as well
as his methodology and his
own sources (does he rely too
heavily on the teachings he
received at Harvard, in con-
trast to, for example, Israeli
scholarship?). But these issues
will be fought out in their pro-
per forum scholarly journals
on biblical studies.
In sum, there is no question
that Richard Friedman has
done an admirable service to
both the lay public and the
scholarly community. He has
conclusively shown scholars
that it is possible to translate
scholarship into populer,
readable terms. Hopefully, this
will encourage other scholars
to leave the ivory tower of
academe and write for the
general public. And even if
many of his conclusions are
eventually rejected by
scholars, this controversial
work will force the critics to
delineate their objections
clearly, and thus the purpose
of scholarship the increase of
knowledge and understanding
- will be advanced.
'

vV L^ R_S
WHCL
WROTE
Dr. Jeremiah Unterman is
director and associate pro-
fessor of Jewish Studies at
Barry University. He is the
author of many scholarly ar-
ticles in the Harper's Bible
Dictionary, and a new book on
Jeremiah, From Repentance
to Redemption, which will be
released in the next few
months.
Iieilll ElllITT FIIEIIII
Richard Elliot Friedman, author of Who Wrote The Bible?
will speak at the Miami Book Fair International, to be held at
Miami Dade Community College's downtown Wolfson Campus,
Building No. 2, Room 2106, on Saturday, Nov. U at 1 p.m.
The 1987 book street fair, which features over 100 authors,
children's programs, rare book displays and food demonstra-
tions runs from Nov. 13-15 and precedes Jewish Book Month,
which begins Nov. 16.
Beach Author Cites Biblical 'Signatures'
(Ontinued from Page 1-B
contends.
Such a person might be
Baruch Ben Neriyah,
Jeremiah's scribe, who left
behind him one of the Bible's
most tangible clues as to
authorship a clay stamp
reading "belonging to Baruch
Ben Neriyah the Scribe" in an-
cient Hebrew lettering.
"We may be looking at the
signature of one of the authors
of the Bible, Friedman asserts.
It s an extraordinary thing
like finding 'Moses Loves Zip-
porah' carved in a tree."
Even more extraordinary,
perhaps, is Friedman's asser-
tion that he may have pin-
pointed the person who took
the
'We may be looking
at the signature of
one of the authors .
It's
extraordinary ..'
various writings of the 'J'
and 'E' authors,and wove
them together with the 'P'
document to produce the Bible
as we know it today.
"Ezra is the editor of the
rorah, the person who put it
|ll together," contends
'nedman.
"In the books of Ezra and
Nehemiah it is written that
kzra shows up in Babylon with
a book, holds a big assembly at
the water gate, and reads the
Torah to the people, who hear
things they have never heard
before," recounts Friedman,
who dates this event at around
450 BCE.
"It is clear from the text
that what he read were the
five books of Moses, basically
what you and I have now. This
is the first time that it is made
clear that they have the whole
Torah, the same book you
know."
CALLING EZRA "the
fashioner of the Torah," Fried-
man says that his was "one of
the great literary
achievements of all time."
What makes Ezra's achieve-
ment also one of the most
ironic of all time, according to
Friedman, is that he combined
"two books meant to be alter-
natives to each other, and sew-
ed them together so brilliantly
that everyone accepted it for
2,000 years. We're only now
figuring out what he did."
The 'P' or priestly docu-
ment, he explains, was written
as an alternative to other
writings which often depicted
Moseir brother Aaron, from
whom the priesthood claimed
descent, in an unflattering
light.
Another assertion which
Friedman makes in his book is
that the priestly writings, long
thought to have been written
during the time of the second
temple, actually may have
been authored "hundreds of
years earlier than that. The
priestly material must have
been written during the time
of the first temple."
Friedman bases his argu-
ment on the theory that the
tabernacle mentioned in the
Bible existed and was housed
in the first temple, as seems to
be implied by the priestly
writings. The tabernacle was
destroyed when the temple
was burnt down.
"You wouldn't write 'Wor-
ship only at the tabernacle' if it
had already been destroyed,"
Friedman contends, pointing
to the fact that the priestly
writings often refer to the
tabernacle.
Other evidence which sug-
gests the impossibility of
Moses having personally writ-
ten the five books ascribed to
him. Friedman says the fact
that Moses, who lived around
the 13th century BCE almost
certainly spoke and wrote a
different Hebrew from the 7th
century BCE Hebrew in which
the books are written supports
his thesis.
LINGUISTIC analysis over
the past 15 years has made
such deductions possible,
although Friedman admits
that "we know nothing about
Moses' Hebrew. But even if I
never saw a page of
Shakespeare, I would know he
never said 'Far out, man,
totally,' which is 20th Century
California English,' says the
Miami Beach-bred Friedman.
Friedman, who has been
likened to a detective unravel-
ing a mystery by many book
reviewers, once studied to
become a rabbi.
"I studied in the Conser-
vatie Rabbinical Seminary for
three years," he reveals. "I
considered becoming a rabbi."
"I was drawn to scholarship
though, and that was 1971
precisely the period that
Judaic Studies was growing up
(as a discipline) in colleges all
over this country."
Of his decision to choose a
more secular form of biblical
scholarship, Friedman says
simply that he "had an option.
Before, if you had intellectual
Judaic interests, you became a
rabbi."
The man who once con-
sidered the rabbinate has more
than a detective's appreciation
of the mystery of who wrote
the Bible.
"For a time, most biblical
scholars have been just taking
the Bible apart, and that's why
there is a lot of criticism of
Biblical scholarship," he
concedes.
"But what's important now
is that we're at the point
where we can put it all
together, where we're not
reading 'J' or 'P,' but we're
reading the Bible."
YET READING the Bible
will never be the same, says
Friedman, for now "we have
this added awareness of how
we come to it, a real apprecia-
tion of the complexity of the
events which came to produce
this book. It's like reading the
Bible in a poorly lit room and
then someone turns the lights
on."
Friedman speaks with en-
thusiasm of the "richness" of
the text "written by over 100
authors," but some may argue
that proof that Moses did not
write the Bible is proof that
destroys not only the book's
mystery, but also some of its
power to inspire.
Asked if finding out that
Moses did not write the Bible
and discovering who may have
been the text's actual authors
and editors is like finding out
how a magician does his trick,
Friedman replies that "it
hasn't had that effect on me."
"People who have read the
book and written me have ac-
tually expressed how it enrich-
ed the experience. The Bible
has always existed in an unreal
world that's why biblical
films always are so bad."
FRIEDMAN'S book, which
supplies political and
sociological background for
the possible authors of the Bi-
ble, dispells some of that sense
of unreality.
But it does not necessarily
have to dispell faith in the
nature of the Bible as a sacred
text, he insists.
"I'm not denying that the Bi-
ble is from God. Many people
seem to think that to say the
five books of Moses were not
by Moses is to say that they
were not revealed or inspired
by God," Friedman reveals.
"But a Biblical scholar sheds
no light on that at all. That's a
matter of faith. You can con-
tinue to believe that the five
books of Moses are from God
what you cannot believe is
that they were from Moses."


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 13, 1987
National Perspective On Jewish Day Care
Continued from Page 1-B
affordable is so hard to find
that, for many parents, balanc-
ing the demands of working
and raising children has
become a continuous struggle.
In the Jewish community,
more than half of the women
with children under five work
outside the home; for most it is
an economic necessity.
Whether we approve or disap-
prove is not the issue. Jewish
families face a real and im-
mediate need but is the
Jewish community
responding?
Communities across the coun-
try are slowly awakening to
the fact that quality child care
is a most urgent priority for
young Jewish parents. Some
are setting up a child care task
force; others have gone as far
as to build extensions to their
day care facilities in the Jewish
Community Center.
"It has been very difficult to
turn away Jewish families who
stand to gain so much from a
Jewish day care program,"
says Toni Goodman, Early
Childhood Director for the
Jewish Community Center of
Greater Washington, who has
85 names on her waiting list.
The center's day care program
expanded from 15 children six
years ago to 95 today. A new
facility will be ready to serve
infants in 1988. The projected
$600 monthly fee for infants
does not deter parents: "The
stake hasn't gone in the
ground yet," says Goodman,
"and we already have ten in-
fants on our list; some of them
haven't been born yet."
The impetus for the $1
million expansion project came
in part from the findings of a
1984 demographic study of the
Washington area Jewish com-
munity which projected a
sharp increase in need for day
care.
While only few cities cur-
rently offer infant day care
under Jewish auspices, most
are moving rapidly from the
basic nine-nour-a-week
nursery school program to ex-
panded schedules. In a na-
tional Jewish day care survey
conducted in 1984 by the
Council of Jewish Federations,
40 percent of the existing pro-
grams had waiting lists.
Almost 50 percent of the 76
reporting federations in-
dicated that they were beginn-
ing or expanding their day
care services.
Jewish day care profes-
sionals are enthusiastic about
this recent trend. The waiting
lists they've been keeping for
the last few years convinced
them long ago of the need for
expansion. They also realize
that by offering quality Jewish
day care they may encourage
some parents to "be fruitful
and multiply." The quality and
cost of child care in their com-
munity is one of the factors
young couples consider when
deciding whether or not to
have one more child. For a
Jewish community concerned
about replenishing its
numbers, this is an important
consideration.
Jewish day care advocates
see day care as a family's
earliest entry into broader
Jewish affiliation. "This is
definitely one of th remises
we work under," agrees Judy
Fine-Helfman, assistant direc-
tor of Budget and Planning for
the Washington United Jewish
Appeal Federation. "If you
can connect someone to the
Jewish community through an
early and positive association
with day care, you can retain
the family and keep them in-
volved," she explains.
Recent research offers proof
of the correlation between
Jewish day care and a family's
Jewish identification. Ruth
Pinkenson Feldman, an
educator credited with star-
ting Philadelphia's first in-
dependent Jewish day care
program in 1979, conducted a
survey of 300 families. The
results showed that invo.ve-
ment in a Jewish day care pro-
gram has a positive impact on
parents' Jewish identity by in-
creasing their level of ritual
and holiday observance and by
strengthening their ties to the
Jewish community.
Feldman stresses that these
outcomes assume that "the
program provides high quality
child care with a strong Jewish
component built into the cur-
riculum and with opportunities
for the parents to become in-
volved." The survey was sup-
ported by the American
Jewish Committee, the
Philadelphia Federation of
Jewish Agencies and Gratz
College.
"It's wonderful to see a body
of research supporting what
we have been seeing for
years," says Sharon Strauss,
the Washington, D.C. Jewish
Community Center day care
director. Parents of
preschoolers who attend her
synagogue-based program
speak enthusiastically about
what their family has gained
from their child's experience.
Charlotte Jacobs feels that
the program gave her
daughters Aviva and liana "a
good taste of Judaism in a very
natural way. It incorporated
Jewish phrases, rituals and
holidays into their earliest
memories." She feels that
Jewish day care is, therefore,
one of the best ways for work-
ing parents to "propagate
Judaism in their children."
The Jacobs, who didn't know
many Jewish families when
they first came to Washington,
now have good friends whom
they have met through their
daughter's activities. They are
delighted that their daughter
also has developed lasting
friendships with other Jewish
children at the day care
program.
Nancy Graber, whose
children Brian and Elana both
attend the center, was over-
joyed when her four-year-old
daughter joined her in singing
the four questions at their last
Seder. "We felt that the pro-
gram would be a good Jewish
foundation a complement to
what we would give them at
home," she explains.
Ellen Kagen Waghelstein
prefers one-to-one care for her
16-month-old daughter but is
100 percent certain that when
Andrea is ready for day care,
she will choose a program
under Jewish auspices. She
believes that Jewish day care
is like an extended family and
minimizes the impact of taking
the child out of the home.
Waghelstein, who is the coor-
dinator of the National Child
and Adolescent Mental Health
Resource Center, contends
that "for a child, entering a
Jewish day care program is
not such a radical change since
he goes from one Jewish en-
vironment to another, which
has the same flavor as home."
Ruth Feldman focused on
these and other positive im-
plications of Jewish day care
when she presented the results
of her study at the first na-
tional conference on Jewish
day care. Sponsored by the
William Petschek Family
Center of the American Jewish
Committee, the May con-
ference brought together
Jewish day care providers,
researchers, and policy makers
from across the country to
discuss the implications of
research on planning for the
Jewish community.
But from policy to im-
plementation the road is long,
because quality day care is a
very costly, labor intensive
undertaking.
In 1986, following their na-
tional day care survey, the
Council of Jewish Federations
recommended that local
federations set up task forces
on Jewish day care and pro-
vide start-up funds and sub-
sidies when needed.
Judy Fine-Helfman, The
Washington federation's assis-
tant director of budget and
planning headed a special task
force on needs for early
childhood services. She ex-
plains that the Washington
area Jewish federation now
provides start-up funds of bet-
ween $18,000 to $20,000 to
local agencies "after
validating the need and loca-
tion for the proposed day care
program." The programs are
expected to become self-
sufficient after receiving the
original support.
Some programs keep costs
in line by using space availble
in synagogues and other
Jewish agencies. There are, of
course, many other benefits to
a synagogue location. The
Jewish curriculum can be
enhanced by easier access to
the rabbi and other available
educators. "It's a way for the
synagogue to support the com-
munity and become more in-
volved with its needs," says
Sharon Strauss who operates a
day care program at a
Washington area synagogue.
"The parents also represent
potential members," she adds.
For many families, the need
for day care comes at a point
which precedes synagogue or
other Jewish affiliation.
Placing day care in a Jewish
community center building
also offers invaluable oppor-
tunities to enrich the program
according to Beth Sloan, presi-
dent of the JCC of Greater
Washington. "Our senior
adults have a wonderful rap-
port with the youngsters," she
explains. "They are often
paired up for joint art projects
and other intergenerational
programs. The day care kids
also enjoy the pool, the music
room and other facilities in the
building."
While most day care profes-
sionals are optimistic about the
current developments in the
Jewish community's response
to dy care, some feel that in
order to catch up with the
need, we should move even
faster. "I see a difference bet-
ween rhetoric and accomplish-
ment." sys Norman Finkel,
director of Federation Day
Care Services (FDCS) of
Philadelphia. His agency is
unique because it is devoted
solely to day care. FDCS
began in 1911 and now serves
875 children in 11 sites
throughout Philadelphia.
Despite the fact that it has
doubled in size since 1980,
FDCS has not received any in-
crease in allocation in the last
three years.
"We are moving more rapid-
ly than in previous years,"
Finkel concedes, "but the
Jewish community is still
responding in a piecemeal
fashion." He feels a need for a
much more comprehensive na-
tional effort to address the
needs of families from a wide
variety of socio-economic
backgrounds. "Federation
planners have not shown a
dollar commitment to meeting
the day care needs of the
Jewish community," he says,
"because they are locked into
existing, established ser-
vices." He sees it as a missed
opportunity, because "the
need is there, and Jewish
parents will have to go
elsewhere. Although it is cost-
ly to do it right, day care pays
back to the Jewish community
many times over in terms of
Jewish identification."
Other than the funding
issues, the most crucial day
care problem identified by
several studies and task forces
is the difficulty in attracting
and retaining quality staff, an
issue which aggravates the
problem of high costs.
While the quality of care is
directly related to the training
of providers and to the adult-
chid ratio, the majority of
chi d care workers in the
United States earn minimum
wage or less. In 1980, the tur-
nover rate of child care pro-
viders in centers was 41.7 per-
cent. For other occupations,
the average rate is 20 percent.
"Can we expect anybody to
care for ten children, eight
hours a day, year round, for
minimum wage?" ask child
care advocates.
Although day care center,
under Jewish auspices S
more competitive salaried
their professional staff 11
stil difficult to corSi
salaries offered by p
school systems. "Our teacher,
start at $16,000 a vea/E
12-month year,- explains
Strauss, "and the public
schools here offer them
$20,000 to $22,000 a year for a
10-month year and shorter
days Since providers n
Jewish day care centers also
have to be able to teach a
Jewish curriculum, the already
diminished pool of early
childhood educators becomes
even smaller. "It sometime
takes a month to place a
teacher in a position," savs
Strauss.
"Because education begins
at birth, we must provide ex
cellent, consistent care. It is
critical for centers to have a
budget that will support train-
ed, educated Jewish staff,"
says Ruth Pinkenson
Feldman. "This is also a
women's issue." she claims.
"It is totally unfair for one
group of women to return to
work at the expense of
another." In 1985, 97 percent
of all child care providers were
women. Child care workers
feel that the low salaries
reflect low esteem for their
profession. "How little we pay
them shows how little we care
about children," says
Feldman.
While quality staff is only
possible with higher wages,
the resulting increase in costs
would place day care far above
the reach of most families. As
a nation, we must deal with the
fact that quality day care is by
definition expensive. And for
the Jewish community, the
unavoidable link between
wages, quality care and affor-
dability leads to only one con-
clusion if we are truly con-
cerned about a Jewish future,
we must continue to search for
creative ways to support quali-
ty Jewish day care for our
children.
Reprinted from Women1'
World, the national newspapn
ofB'nai B'rith Women.
Community Notes
Dade Circuit Court Judge Richard Yale Feder has
been honored by the Academy of Florida Trial Lawyers
with its annual award "to the member of the judiciary
who has made the greatest contribution to public
understanding of our civil justice system in the
American society." Judge Feder received the award
Wednesday, Nov. 4 at the annual convention of the
Academy, held at the Stouffer Hotel in Orlando.
Stephen M. Masterson, executive director of the
Academy of Florida Trial Lawyers said that the deci-
sion to select Judge Feder for this year's award was
unanimous.
d ASiPeh M- Kurtz- Partner, Sharff, Wittmer and Kurtz
A., has been elected president of the University of
Miami Citizens Board for 1987-88. Vice president and
campaign chairmen are Richard B. Bermont, first vice
president and resident manager, Drexel Burnham
Lambert Inc. and Howard A. Mesh, partner, Peat Mar-
wick Main and Co.
The South Florida and South Dade Councils of B'nai
B'rith Lodges and Units has announced their search'0'
nominees for the B'nai B'rith Outstanding Cinw'
Award. The award has been designed to honor the
dividual or organization that has contributed to the Djj
terment and enhancement of life in the community- rw
details and resume information, 1-981-7711.


Shabbos Challenge: Reaching Out
With Restrictions and Love
FridayJ^ovembeM3^ 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
It is considered a mitzvah to
bring home guests on the Sab-
bath, and few people take this
mitzvah more seriously than
Aaron Schwarzbaum, who,
along with his wife, Janice,
welcomes roughly 20 people a
week, mainly junior high, high
school, and college age kids
from assimilated backgrounds,
into his North Miami Beach
home from sundown Friday
night to sundown Saturday.
He calls his offer of hospitali-
ty "Shabbos challenge."
"We offer a challenge, to
spend one complete shabbat
properly, and then leave with
the same stereotypes about
Orthodox Jews that you had
before," explains Schwarz-
baum, who has made the
custom of extending Sabbath
hospitality into a full time job.
"Our goal is to show the
l>eauty in Judaism which, un-
fortunately, most people don't
realize not to make people
religious or Orthodox," he
contends.
"While some kids come back
regularly, and some have
become religious, kids also
return to their Reform and
Conservative homes with in-
creased dedication to the
Jewish religion," Schwarz-
baum asserts.
Indeed, the "Shabbos
Challenge" program, founded
two-and-a-half years ago by
Schwarzbaum and Mitch
Coopersmith, has been endors-
ed by Conservative Rabbi Sim-
cha Freedman of Temple
Adath Yeshurun and Reform
Rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff of
Congregation Bet Breira,
whose son attended a Sabbath
at the Schwarzbaum home.
The program, (through
which pamphlets, business
cards, and a newsletter are
dizbaustributed), is supported
by donations, although in the
beginning Schwarzbaum paid
for much of the expense of
feeding guests out of his own
pocket. Now incorporated as a
non-profit organization,
Shabbos Challenge" will soon
hold its second annual fun-
draising dinner, on Nov. 28 at
the Casablanca Hotel.
But the main assistance the
program gets may be from
Schwarzbaum's helpful
neighbors.
"Within a one block radius,
we could house 50 if we had
to," Schwarzbaum says. "Our
neighbors and friends are Or-
thodox, and always on
emergency alert. They've
never let us down."
This support system has
been used several times, when
overflow has necessitated
moving the boys to another
house to sleep (boys and girls
sleep in separate rooms in the
Schwarzbaum's home) and one
memorable night when "the
septic tank broke down, and
we had to go to the neighbor's
to go to the bathroom,"
Schwarzbaum recalls.
Guests arrive at the
Schwarzbaum household just
before candlelighting time on
Friday nights.
After candlelighting, "the
guys go to shul (synagogue)
and the girls spend time with
my wife," says Schwarzbaum,
adding that "girls can go to
shul, although the vast majori-
ty do not."
When the men return from
services, "Shalom Aleichem"
is sung, the ritual washing of
hands is performed, and the
blessings over the wine and
meal are said.
"Dinner takes between
three to four hours, because
we sing between each course,
and this is usually when ques-
tions and discussions begin. By
the time dessert and benching
(the performance of the after-
As lunch rivals dinner in
length, people who worry
about their weight are told
"that you never gain weight
on Shabbos," according to
Schwarzbaum.
When the meal is concluded
at around 4:30 p.m., "the guys
go back to shul for mincha ser-
vices and the "third meal,"
and the girls have their meal at
home or have it at the home of
one of my wife's female
friends."
Frequent "Shabbos
Challenge" guests may branch
out, trying one or another
neighborhood shut (also Or-
thodox) or spend a Sabbath at
another home on the invitation
of the Schwarzbaum's
neighbors and friends.
Boys and girls attending
"Shabbos Challenge" may
have found that one of the
chief challenges of spending
time in an Orthodox home is
behaving with a certain
amount of decorum towards
the opposite sex.
"We have had instances of
boyfriends and girlfriends be-
ing more openly affectionate
than Orthodox Jewish tradi-
tion permits," says Schwarz-
baum, "but if my telling them
something at that point in time
will embarrass them, I'll
wait."
S
LIFESTYLE
I
;:*:*:;:*:*:*:->:-x*:*:w
Aaron Schwarzbaum
dinner prayer) are done, the
hours have just flown by,"
Schwarzbaum asserts.
Schwarzbaum, who helps
prepare and clean up after the
dinners, speaks glowingly of
the fame of his wife's
specialties, "Mazetti," a chop-
ped meat and noodle dish, and
a spicy noodle kugel.
"We have a policy no one
helps clean up the first time,"
says Schwarzbaum, conceding
that this is one way to prevent
well-meaning guests from in-
advertently mixing milk and
meat dishes together.
"We are usually done by
midnight. Some people just
conk out others stay up until
2 or 3 in the morning talking to
us. If they're interested in
talk, we'll stay up and talk,"
he says.
Guests sleep either in beds in
spare rooms or on the living
room floor in sleeping bags.
Sleeping quarters are kept
dark, while other rooms re-
main lit throughout the Sab-
bath, when one is not supposed
to flick a light switch on or off.
Preventive guards prevent
guests unused to such restric-
tions from breaking the Sab-
bath by accident, although
Schwarzbaum admits that he
"can still do it today. You're
human, you make mistakes."
The television is secreted
away in the closet, to make
sure that temptation is out of
sight and, one assumes, out of
mind as well.
"In the morning, the boys
and girls take a ten minute
walk to shul for services, at
around 8:30 a.m. Between
10:30-11, we return home for
kiddush, and then we have
lunch," says Schwarzbaum.
Yet love has blossomed
through the program; one
young woman met her future
husband at her first Sabbath,
and Schwarzbaum, calling the
product of that union "the first
Shabbos Challenge baby"
named the child at his bris.
Schwarzbaum, who himself
once ate hot dogs from street
vendors during a time in his
life when he questioned his
reasons for becoming an obser-
vant Jew, says that his "whole
outreach is not to preach. If I
preach, if I tell you that you
have to keep Shabbos, I'm
finished. I have the kind of per-
sonality where if someone tells
me to do something, I won't do
it," he admits.
"If I see someone rushing in-
to Judaism, I tell them to slow
down. If they get into it in a
week, then get out of it, they
think that they have 'tried
Judaism' and they close their
minds," says Schwarzbaum,
who found his own reason for
being observant only after
years of searching and
questioning.
"I realized I was looking for
a reason, but the reason was
already there: I was a Jew," he
explains.
Schwarzbaum, both through
his "Shabbos Challenge" and
through classes held at his
home, deals with Jewish in-
dividuals who have been
caught up in fundamentalist
and evangelical Christian
groups.
But although Schwarzbaum
works "on a curative level,
with people involved with cults
such as 'Jews for Jesus,' he
emphasizes the importance of
his "Shabbos Challenge" pro-
Jenice Manning came back to the "Shabbos Challenge.
'preventive
gram as a
measure."
"When you experience the
full Shabbos and the songs, it
rekindles emotions of pride
long lying latent," he
contends.
Jenice Manning, a full time
student of occupational
therapy in her thirties, would
agree. Eight months ago,
when she first attended a
"Shabbos Challenge," she was
not aware that Sabbath con-
sisted of anything more than a
Friday night dinner.
"You can tell that my Jewish
education was lacking," she
admits. "Once in a while, on
the high holy days, I went to
Reform services. I looked into
Havurah services for a while,
but I really couldn't connect. I
took some classes at a Reform
synagogue, but the feeling
wasn't there."
Recalling the times during
her childhood when her grand-
father took her to Orthodox
services, Manning decided to
attend Schwarzbaum's home
for a taste of observant
Judaism.
"It helped clear up much of
the ambivalence I hau about
being Jewish," asserts Mann-
ing, who is, by her own admis-
sion, becoming more religious.
"I just moved and the
"Shabbos Challenge" moving
crew moved me. Janice
Schwarzbaum is making me a
"kosher party" being a stu-
dent, I can't afford to make my
kitchen kosher by myself so
people come and everyone
makes a small contribution,
and then Janice will buy the
things I need and a rabbi will
come to help her kosher the
kitchen."
Once involved with the Na-
tional Organization of Women,
(NOW), Manning says that she
has "found more sisterhood
with the women in the Or-
thodox community than in all
the years I was involved with
NOW.
"I'm at a point in my life
where for the first time I
would like to be married," she
asserts.
Although Manning still con-
siders herself a feminist, she
has already dated "through a
shidduch, where they set i'
for you."
Orthodox Jewish marriages,
she contends, are not as une-
qual as some may believe.
"The outward impression of
the man being in charge and
just sitting there and the
woman being a barefoot, preg-
nant slave is a stereotype I
haven't found to be true," she
says.
"I'm not saying it's perfect,
but I found more husbands
spending time being fathers
among the Orthodox. In
feminism we always said that
fathers should be more involv-
ed with the children."
All in all, Manning believes
that, while it may look as if be-
ing observant imposes limita-
tions on a person's lifestyle,
the opposite is really true.
"People told me that if I
would get involved with the
Orthodox, my life would close
up in fact, in so many ways,
my life has opened up, because
everything is so community-
minded, from dating to the
marriage process and after the
marriage," says Manning.
"First, I saw Shabbos as a
lot of restrictions," she says,
"but it's really a holiday."
Singles
CONNECT YOURSELF to:
"The Jewish Connection's
Singles Directory-1988."
Personal listings and
information guide for
singles of all ages, locally,
nationally and interna-
tionally. For application
send self-addressed
stamped envelope to: The
Jewish Connection
23 Saturn Ct. Syosset,
N.Y.11791.
SLIM, PRETTY TEACHER
5'4", non-smoker looking
for good guy 30-40 years
interested in lasting
relationship. Comes from
a great family I should
know I'm her father.
Write Box SP c/o Jewish
Floridian, P.O. Box 012973
Miami. FL33101.


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 13, 1987
Jewish Community
Aids Day Care
Continued from Page IB
Sept. 8 and has 30 children
ranging from eight-weeks to
five-years-old enrolled. Pro-
gram coordinators expect that
the 65-child capacity will be
filled by the end of the year.
It apparently is the only JCC
day care program which has
kosher lunches catered for the
children in order to maintain
uniformity in dietary laws.
The center is open Monday
through Friday from 7:30 a.m.
until 6 p.m., except on Friday
when it closes at 5 p.m. It is
opened year-round and only
closes for about a dozen
holidays such as Rosh
Hashanah, Yom Kippur and
Thanksgiving.
The cost includes a $55
registration fee, a JCC
membership ($195 family or
$120 single-parent) and a pro-
gram fee of $80 per week.
Unlike some other Jewish day
care programs which have
scholarship funds to assist
families who cannot afford the
fees, the Miami Beach JCC
does not have a budget line-
item earmarked for scholar-
ships, according to executive
director Jerry Libbin.
"However, we're working
with people the best we can to
make it available for them,"
Libbin said, adding that addi-
tional dollars for scholarships
and program operation have
been contributed through fun-
draisers and charitable
organizations.
The JCC received $18,295 in
subsidies from the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and
the United Way in order to
open the day care center, Lib-
ben said.
About three years ago, the
GMJF appointed a special task
force to examine child care
issues. The conclusion was
that day care centers are need-
ed and should receive support.
The problem was that the day
care centers were added to
lists of other programs that re-
quired funding previously.
According to Aleph Daycare
Center director Sybil Hart, 33.
"Curriculum-wise there is
nothing different here than
pre-school; we teach arts and
crafts, music, reading and
math readiness and an
understanding of our Jewish
heritage. What we offer at the
daycare compliments the pre-
school: Breakfast, a substan-
tial hot kosher lunch, an after-
noon nap, less-structured ac-
tivities in the afternoon and
then at 5 to 6 o'clock, it's
Sesame Street time."
Although Aleph is Jewish-
oriented, the center is opened
to non-Jewish children as well
and one non-Jewish woman
told The Jewish Floridian she
brought her son to the center
when he was seven-months-old
"because it was the best one I
could find. Jewish schools,"
she said, "have got the best
reputation for looking after
the children."
There are seven staff
members on board now at
Aleph but with an increased
enrollment that number is ex-
pected to rise in order to meet
state Health and
Rehabilitative Services cer-
tification requirements of
child-staff ratio. For infants
one and under, the ratio is
four-to-one.
Hart said the JCC staff is
Miami Plans March
On Washington
Continued from Page 1-B
dent Ronald Reagan in
Washington, on Monday, Dec.
7.
"The Refuseniks keep telling
us that 'the last train is at the
station.' It is our responsibility
to see that they are all on that
train," says Hinda Cantor, co-
chairman of the South Florida
Conference on Soviet Jewry.
Jeffrey Berkowitz, chairman
of the local Washington
Mobilization Committee, ex-
plains that "it is imperative
that this community not stand
in silence and that we mobilize
to let the world know that we
shall never forget those of our
brothers and sisters who are
imprisoned behind the iron
curtain.
"With Gorbachev's visit to
Washington, we have a unique
opportunity to focus world at-
tention and the attention of
the Reagan administration on
the issue of human rights or
the lack of them in the
Soviet Union," Berkowitz
asserts.
"Gorbachev is actively seek-
ing favorable world opinion
and is looking to win arms con-
cessions from the United
States, all of which is based on
his suggestion that the Soviet
Union can be trusted,"
Berkowitz notes.
"But there are over 400,000
Jews who have requested per-
mission to leave the Soviet
Union and have been denied
the right to do so. The message
we must send is that a country
which does not respect the
rights of its people cannot be
trusted to abide by its arms
control commitments."
Asked if he thought that the
march and rally would effect
the outcome of the Summit
negotiations, Berkowitz
replied "I think Reagan would
have to be a fool to ignore it."
Stressing the importance of
the summit march as "an op-
portunity to offer our young
people an experience that will
teach them we cannot afford
to be indifferent," Berkowitz
expresses the hope that
"everyone in the community
go and be counted," or, failing
that, make it possible for
others to go in their stead.
"We have hundreds of high
school and college students
who are prepared to go, but
who need some financial
assistance in order to do so,"
he explains.
For information: South
Florida Conference on Soviet
Jewry, 279-1435.
Brad Miller (left) and Michael Scandorian are
among the lunch-bunch at the Michael-Ann
Russell Jewish Community Center Daycart
Program.
hoping to add a new wing
especially for the day care
center sometime in 1988, but
for now they are using existing
but renovated and altered
rooms in the JCC center in
mid-Miami Beach.
Hart said it is not surprising
to see centers opening up that
are catering to children as
young as two months old.
"Times have changed.
Women work and families are
scattered around the coun-
try," she said.
There is research going on
now that is just beginning to
explore the long-term effects
of placing very young children
in day care, Hart said. But the
phenomena is so new that the
results have not been
evaluated.
"Obviously, poor quality day
care will produce some kind of
long-term results that are in
some way negative. On the
other hand, poor mothering
has the same effect," she said.
"The question is what are the
long-term effects of day care
and what can be done political-
ly within the next few years so
that our society will find the
generosity to help make good
day care available to
everyone."
Hart notes that most
children seem to be thriving in
a setting where there are
other children and appropriate
activities.
The first Jewish day care
center to open its doors to in-
fants as young as two months
old was the Michael-Ann
Kussell JCC in North Dade.
The three-year-old program
serves children up to age five.
The capacity for about 20
children has been met and
there are approximately 15 to
20 children on a waiting list,
according to Judy Shapiro,
director of Youth and Family
Services for the JCC.
Like its Miami Beach
counterpart, the Michael-Ann
Russell Day Care Center is
open Monday through Friday.
Hours are 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. ex-
cept on Sabbath eve when it
closes at 5 p.m. In the summer,
a day camp replaces the pre-
school program but the infant
day care remains the same.
The cost includes a one-time
$50 registration fee and
membership at the JCC is re-
quired ($400 annually fami-
ly/$250 single-parent). The in-
fant day care program (tw
months to two-and-a-hali
years) costs $325 a month. The
program for children age two-
and-a-half through five years is
$260 a month for those atten-
ding the full day.
The children eat breakfast at
home and while the school
monitors the lunches, the food
is brought from home. Cookies
and juice are served as snacks
to the older children.
The North Miami Beach JCC
day care center also is certified
by HRS.
"We probably have the most
ultra-modern day care
centers," boasts Shapiro.
"Built-in playpen, VCR, TV, a
special carpet designed for
daycare centers so no bacteria
can grow. We have 13 brand
new deluxe cribs."
There are six staff for 20
children.
"I have people who come to
me pregnant and reserve a
spot and they're not even
ready to give birth for three
months," Shapiro said. "They
pay those extra three months
because they want the
Michael-Ann Russell Day Care
Center."
Shapiro said the center this
year has given at least $18,000
in assistance to families who
could not afford the day care
fees. The scholarship alloca-
tion is provided by the GMJF.
In the day care center, the
children are taught Jewish
values, Shapiro said. At a Sab-
bath program every Friday,
the children say prayers as
they share challah and juice.
The bulletin boards are
decorated on holidays such as
Rosh Hashanah and Purim. A
parent group meets with the
center staff so they feel a part
of the school, Shapiro said.
"Our infant day care center
becomes their home away
from home because they're
leaving their most prized
possession with us."
The Jewish Community
Center at South Dade has a
nursery school day care pro-
gram. Children who have turn-
ed two (by June) up to five
years of age can be left at 7:35,
although classes do not start
until 8:30 a.m. For children
with working parents there is
an optional extended care pro-
gram in the afternoon that in-
cludes a nap and activities un-
til 6 p.m.
The center is open Monday
through Friday and a summer
program follows a similar
schedule. There are almost 200
children in all the school's pro-
grams and about 50 to 60 in
the full day care portion. A few-
spaces are available in the day
care program, according to
Addie Unterlack. director of
the South Dade JCC's Early
Childhood Development
Program.
The cost for care includes a
$100 registration fee and, in
order to participate in the full
day care program, one must be
a member of the JCC ($210 an-
nually family/$136 single-
parent). The monthly fee for a
full day's care is $300. About
28 families are currently
receiving scholarship support
which is partially funded by
the National Council of Jewish
Women, Unterlack said.
"We really don't want to
turn anyone away.'' she
"We try to stretch our scholar-
ship dollars as far as they could
go."
The need for more day care,
particularly infant day care in
the South Dade area "is
definitely there,'' L'nterlacK
said. More space may tie
available for this need when
the JCC begins to build its ne
South Dade facility, for whjcj
groundbreaking is scheduled
in December.
The nursery school portion
of the day care center offers
basic academic and socializa-
tion skills, Unterlack said, .H*
children bring their lunch from
home but are served snacks in
the morning and afternoon.
While most synagogues and
temples have day school pro-
Continued on Page 10"B

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Friday, November 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Leonard L. and Bertha Abess,
\Leonard L. Abess, Jr., above,
land Jayne Harris-Abess will
be honored at Temple Emanu-
El 's semi-annual Congregation
Winner-Dance to be held Sun-
\day, Nov. 15 at 6 p.m. Leonard
\L. Abess is Chairman
I Emeritus of City National
Waiik of Florida; Leonard L.
\ Abess, Jr. is Chairman of the
tBoard,
Peace
Process
To Be
Debated
The Middle East peace pro-
Cess will be the subject of the
)avid Brown Forum spon-
ored by the Southeast Region
pf the American Jewish Con-
iress. The forum will be held
pn Sunday, Nov. 22 at Temple
Israel of Greater Miami, at
0:80 a.m.
This past September, the
imerican Jewish Congress
idopted a policy which called
^pn the government of Israel
consider participating in an
International Peace Con-
ference which would be con-
vened by the five permanent
nembers of the United Na-
lons Security Council. Con-
ess policy has been the sub-
'' of much controversy
rithin the American Jewish
immunity.
Phi] Baum, AJCongress na-
lonal associate executive
P or and director of its
pommission on International
Hairs; and Bernard Mandler,
vice president of the
utheast Region of
"Duress, will be the
IJC
ed speakers. Baum and
[andler participated in a Mid-
East Peace Process task
Wee which visited Israel in
ftly.
The forum is open to all
u 'tigress members and the
sneral public. For informa-
"n. >73-9100.
introouong
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Jewish Home To Install Rudolph At Gala
fiami Jewish Hnmo *nA t__ <**. ...... *
Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged at
Douglas Gardens (MJHHA)
President, Sidney J. Rudolph
and the new slate of Founders
officers will be installed on
Nov. 14 at the Fifth Annual
Founders Gala at the Doral-on-
the-Ocean.
In five years, Founders has
grown to 398 members who
have pledged more than $26
million toward the Miami
Jewish Home's seven-year,
$35 million capital expansion
program. Their goal for the
year, ending on Nov. 14, is
425.
"Founders is providing the
money and iust as important
the leadership to build a new
kind of geriatric care com-
plex," noted MJHHA Chair-
man of the Board Irving
Cypen. "I have every con-
fidence that Mr. Rudolph will
take up the mantle of leader-
ship from his predecesor,
Louis Stein, and bring to the
task his own inimitable
dynamism"
Rudolph is currently chair-
man of the board and
secretary treasurer of Rudy's
Restaurant Group, Inc. and
Rudolph Foods, Inc. He was
the founder and first chairman
and secretary treasurer of
Rudy's Sirloin Steak Burgers,
Inc., Wendicorp Miami, Inc.
and Wendicorp Los Angeles,
Inc. Rudolph developed the
world's first "all purpose
credit card" which later merg-
ed with Diner's Club.
Rudolph is a Grand Founder
of the University of Miami
Medical School and a Founder
and Trustee of Mount Sinai
Medical Center. In additin, he
is a member of the Executive
Committee of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith and served as President
of Palm Bay Tower Con-
dominium Association. A
Director of the Miami Jewish
Home, he is also Chairman of
the Unrelated Business Com-
mittee and currently serves as
Treasurer of Founders.
Joining Mr. Rudolph on the
1987-88 slate of Founders' of-
ficers are Past Presidents, Lila
G. Heatter, Sidney L. Olson
and Louis Stein; Honorary
Vice Presidents, Harry Cher-
nin, Nathan Gumenick, Polly
deHirsch Meyer and Rowland
Schaefer; Vice Presidents,
Melvin H. Baer, Harold Beck,
Jack Chester, B.B. Goldstein,
Carol Greenberg, Barbara F.
Hornsby, Donald Jacobson,
Arthur Pearlman, Helen G.
Rechtschaffer and Edward
Shapiro; Secretary, Myron M.
Behrman; Assistant
Secretary, Nathan B. Rood;
Treasurer, Sam May; and
Assistant Treasurer, Aaron
Kravitz.
Sidney J. Rudolph


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 13, 1987

Two generations of the Kuttler family will be honored at the 18th
Annual Samuel Scheck Hillel Community Day School Scholar-
ship Dinner Dance Nov. 1J, at Deakter Hall of Beth Tor ah Con-
gregation. Joyce and Irving Kuttler, seated, and Roberta and
Miles Kuttler, standing, have taken an active role in the school
since its inception and, as original founders, have served on the
Board of Governors and Executive board and have supported all
HiUel functions. For information 9S1-2881.
FOUNDERS of Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged
(MJHHA) at Douglas Gardens held their first meeting of the
season on Oct.20. Pictured from left: Lucile and Melvin Boer;
Natalie Edwards and her husband, new FOUNDER Jack Ed-
wards; and FOUNDERS Sylvia and Sol Bloom.
Happenings
Jewish comedy with the special flavor of the Yiddish theatre is
coming o South Florida Thanksgiving Day. The musical comedy
revue. "The Sheik of Avenue B' opens Thursday. Nov. 26 at the
Hallandale Theatre. This Jewish ragtime and jazz era comedy
revue, presented in English and Yid-lish. brings alive the song,
dance and comedy of the downtown Jews from the golden age of
Irving Berlin. Eddie Cantor. Fannie Brice. Billy Rose. Smith and
Dale. Sophie Tucker and Al Jolson the stars who portrayed
that amazing new American phenomenon Yiddishkeitl
Rhoda Ehrlich and Bess Plasky will chair the City of Hope's
third-annual "Hope Ball" in Miami, to be held Nov. 21 at the Bis-
cay ne Bay Marriott Hotel. The "Hope Ball" reception will begin
at 7 p.m. while dinner will start at 8 p.m. For information.
944-6262
The Dade County Chapter of the Florida Association for
Women Lawyers will hold its next meeting on Monday. Nov. 16.
'at Way Off Broadway. May-fair in the Grove starting at 6 p.m.
The program for the evenig is a panel discussion entitled "Super
Lawyer. Super Spouse and Super Parent: Having It All!". For in-
formation. 947-7581.
The Robyn Tubin Chapter of the City of Hope will hold its next
regular meeting on Thursday. Nov. 19 at noon on the 3rd Floor.
Food Court community room of the 163rd St. Mall A mini lunch
will be served. There will be a musical book review on the life of
Ethel Merman.

National and international celebrities will play round-robin ten-
nis at the 4th Annual Barry Gibb Love and Hope Tennis Festival
Nov 21 and 22 at the Turnberry Isle Yacht and Country Club in
North Miami Beach All proceeds will benefit the Diabetes
Research Institute at the University of Miami School of Medicine
For information. 477-3437.
Cedars Club
Deco Ball
Cedars Medical Center's an-
nual benefit, chaired by Alber-
to and Rosario Vadia, with Dr.
Everett and Cathy Sugar-
baker, will reflect an Art Deco
theme this year. The "Club
Deco" ball will be held at the
Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel on
Saturday, Nov. 14 at 7 p.m.
Past ball chairpersons and
dedicated Cedars supporters
comprise the organizing com-
mittee, which includes: Dr. and
Mrs. Martin Arostegui, Mr.
and Mrs. Jack Carmel, Dr. and
Mrs. Robert Feltman, Dr. and
Mrs. Mariano Garcia, Mr. and
Mrs. Jerry Haar, Mrs. Eleanor
Kosow, Mrs. Maria Luisa
Lopez, Mr. and Mrs. Gustavo
Lopez-Munoz, Mr. and Mrs.
Ted Lotterman, Mr. and Mrs.
Enrique Montolieu, Mr. John
0 Neil, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Jose
Romano, Mr. and Mrs. Donald
Rosenberg, Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Rosenblatt, Mr. and
Mrs. Michael Weintraub and
Mrs. Sonja Zuckerman.
Recognized for their support
and generosity in under-
writing portions of the "Club
Deco" Ball were: Drs.
Feltman, Worton, Keusch,
Lay-ton and Spira; Emergency
Medical Group; Dr. Daniel
Seckinger, and Wood, Lucks-
inger and Epstein, Attorneys
at Law.
For information, 325-5405.
Amit
Women
Vered Chapter will hold a
general membership meeting
on Tuesday, Nov. 17 at 8:15
p.m. at the home of Dale
Pianko. Guest speaker will be
Gene Greenzweig, executive
director of CAJE, who will
speak on his recent trip to
Poland. For information,
653-7389.
Chai Chapter will meet on
Wednesday, Nov. 18 at 7:30
p.m. at the home of Ruth
Stern. A book review entitled
"Remember Me To G-d" by
Morris Kaufman will be
presented by Susie Feldman.
Prospective members are
invited.
Hatikvah-Miami Beach
Chapter invites everyone to a
Thanksgiving Luncheon
meeting on Thursday, Nov. 12
at noon at the Morns and An-
na Eisenberg Social Hall,
when a presidium member of
Florida Council of Amit
Women will speak about the
National Convention which
took place recently in Orlando:
Dvorah Chapter will meet
on Wednesday, Nov. 18 at 1
p.m. at the Roney Plaza.
Refreshments will be served.
The Florida Council of
Amit Women will hold its ex-
ecutive board meeting on Mon-
day, Nov. 16 at 10:30 a.m. in
the Council Office in North
Miami Beach. Bus transporta-
tion is available.
Community Corner
Two collections of Jewish folk tales, "Miriam's Tm
bourine" and "Elijah's Violin" will be reviewed bv Rah"
bi Rami Shapiro of Temple Beth Or at the next mLt'
of the Great Jewish Books Discussion Group on W
day, Nov. 19 at 1:30 p.m. in the Miami Beach pZI
Library.
Beach Public
Bet Shira Congregation Sisterhood will hold a book
review and brunch on Wednesday, Nov. 18, at lOarnin
the Social Hall when Robert Sandier, professor of
Jewish Literature at the University of Miami will hi
reviewing the book "Night" by Elie Wiesel. '
Temple Menorah Sisterhood will hold its Paid Un
Membership Luncheon on Wednesday, Nov 18 at noon
at 7435 Carlyle Ave. For information, 865-1133.
Dr. Irving Lehrman, past national president of the
Synagogue Council of America, has been selected to
teach at the general Assembly of the Council of Jewish
Federations Jewish Education Expo. The event, known
as Expo 1987 "Lunch and Learn" will be held Friday
Nov. 20 at the Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel in Miami
Beach, from 12:15 to 1:30 p.m.
Registration for the 1987-88 Adult Institute of Jewish
Studies will be held Tuesday, Nov. 17, beginning at
10:30 a.m. in the Pearlman Room of Temple Emanu-EI
of Greater Miami, Miami Beach. A single registration
fee enables students of all ages to enroll for one or
more classes if registrants are members of Temple
Emanu-EI or any of its auxiliaries. Faculty for the fall-
winter semester includes Or. Irving Lehrman and Rab-
bis Maxwell Berger and Ronnie Cahana. Classes,
which begin Nov. 24, will be held Tuesday mornings
from 9:30 a.m. until 12 noon and from 7:30 until 9:30
p.m.
The annual Open House and Meeting of the Parent
Teacher Association of the Lehrman Day School will be
held Tuesday, Nov. 17 at 7:30 p.m. at the school. Accor-
ding to P.T.A. president Jeanne (Mrs. Boris) Rosen, the
public is also invited to inspect the dramatic physical
and educational advances made by the school through
its recently-completed $2 million expansion program.
The Lehrman Day School of Temple Emanu-EI provides
comprehensive Hebrew and general studies from
kindergarten through the eighth grade. It is fully ac-
credited and affiliated with the Solomon SchechterDay
Schools operated by the Conservative Movement
throughout the United States.
The new Isaiah Unit of B'nai B'rith, No. 5357, will be
presented its official charter Thursday, Nov. 12, at 7:30
p.m. at Forte Towers, Miami Beach. Gerald Schwartz,
past president of the Miami Beach Lodge of B'nai B'rith
and former national chairman of the B'nai B'rith State
of Israel Bonds Committee, will present the charter to
Louis Kotick, president of Isaiah Unit.
The Annual Book Fair of the Lehrman Day School of
Temple Emanu-EI will be held Monday, Nov. 16,
through Sunday, Nov. 22, 9 am.-3:30 p.m., at the
school's campus.
55 plus Singles South Oade Jewish Community
Center HAVURAH offers opportunities to meet ne*
people through dinners and small group activities. For
information, 251-1394.
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the -,
will have its Founders' Fifth Annual Gala Nov. 14, at 7
p.m., at Doral-on-the-Ocean. The Junior Auxiliary
General Meeting will be Nov. 17 at noon at the
Singapore Hotel. The Greater Miami Women's Auxiliary
General meeting will be Nov. 19 at noon at Cliffords
Restaurant. The North Miami Beach Auxiliary Regular
Meeting will be Nov. 19 at noon at Young r"
Skylake. For Information on all events, 751-8626.
Israel
Russian emigre conductor Se-
myon Bychkov will conducts
London Philharmonic leading
off the SOth anniversary season
of the Great Artists Series, on
Nov. 16 at the Muxmi Beac
Theater of the Performing
Arts, beginning at 8:16 P-n-


Friday, November 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
The Miami-Coral Gables-Dade Chapter, Women's
Division American Society for Technion, will meet for
lluncheon at the University of Miami Faculty Club on
Monday, Nov. 16 at 11:30 a.m. Guest speaker will be Mr
Leffrey A. Kern, L.L.M. who will discuss "Estate Plann-
ing and Your Tax Benefits."
The Chana Miriam Schwarzbaum Memorial Shabbos
IChallenge Inc. will hold its Second Annual Fundraising
jDinner honoring Mitchell Coopersmith and remember-
ling the late Irwin Block at 8 p.m. Saturday, Nov 28 at
the Casablanca Hotel on Miami Beach. For informa-
tion, 654-2808 or 652-5184.
A "Penny Cup Drawing." On Wednesday, Nov. 18
Temple Beth Moshe's Early Childhood Department will
Ipresent a "Fun For All" night in the Clara and Seymour
jSmoller Ballroom from 7-9 p.m. For information
891-5508.
The Dade County Women's Political Caucus will
| hold their next meeting on Saturday, Nov. 14 at 10 a.m.
at the home of Do'rie Lurie for reports on the National
WPC Convention by Dorie Lurie; reports on the NWPC
Committee by Ruth Bartoli; nominating committee;
and distribution of tickets for the Fund Raiser by
Frances Devore, Fund Raising Committee chair.
On Tuesday, Nov. 17 Mendell Selig will speak at the
IForte Forum in the Auditorium at 1 p.m. on the subject
lot "Israel: Update." Selig, a recipient of the National
Service Award, Jewish Theological Seminary of
America, is a founder of the Zionist House in Boston.
The North Dade-Broward New Leadership Division
[State of Israel Bonds is hosting a Picnic on Sunday,
Nov. 22 at 11 a.m. at TY Park. For information, 531-6731.
Adath Yeshurun Congregation will hold a Member-
ship Shabbat Dinner on Friday, Nov. 20, at 6 p.m. in
honor of new members who have joined the synagogue
[since July 1. Potential Members will also be invited to
[the program as guests of the congregation. For infor-
[mation, 947-1435.
Deborah, the Biblical heroine of battle and song, will
Ibe the subject of the forthcoming lecture in the
['Spiritual Giants of the Past" series on Wednesday,
TJov. 18 at 10:30 a.m., at the Miami Beach Public Library
when Rabbi Ronald Cahana, assistant rabbi at Temple
Emanu-EI, will discuss Deborah as a model for contem-
porary Jewish women. Admission is open and free to
She public. For information, CAJE at 576-4030.
Residents of the Del Prado condominium in Miami
Jeach will participate in a Breakfast on Sunday, Nov.
" at 10 a.m. in the Oel Prado Auditorium. The event,
which will be held under the auspices of the Greater
fliami Israel Bonds Organization, will be a celebration
M Israel's 40th Anniversary. For more information,
W1-6731.
The Greater Miami Patron's Guild of the Women's
KSon' African Friends of the Hebrew University,
'"'I hold Its annual luncheon at noon on Monday, Nov.
at the Doral Beach Hotel. Ruth Shapiro, chairman of
fie luncheon, said {he event will benefit the Student
Fund set up to cover special needs of qualified
Hebrew University students. Benefactors who have
ledicated facilities and rooms at the Hebrew Univer-
fy s four campuses will be recognized. For reserva-
Pons. 868-0287.
Na'amat USA
[Kinneret Chapter of
''amat USA will meet Mon-
y. Nov. 16, at noon at Tem-
Ner Tamid when Cantor
n Yudoff will offer a
ecial selection of traditional
modern music.
[Chapter vice president
wva Berland, who attended
recent national Na'amat
invention in Los Angeles,
111 report on the gathering.
Leah Benson, vice president
of the South Florida Council of
Na'amat USA, will speak on
the recent upswing in the
emigration of Soviet Jews to
Israel at the meeting of the
Golda Meir Chapter of
Na'amat USA on Thursday,
Nov. 19, at noon in the com-
munity room of the 100 Lin-
coln Road Building. Admission
is open to the public, and
refreshments will be served.
Sephardi Federation Meets In Miami
Abraham Sofaer, legal ad-
viser to the Department of
State, and Moshe Katzav
Israel's Minister of Labor and
Welfare, will be the principal
speakers at the national con-
vention of the American
Sephardi Federation Nov.
15-18 at the Castle Premier
Hotel in Miami Beach.
Solomon Garazi, chairman of
the South Florida branch of
the Federation, is serving as
convention chairman. Some
350 leaders of Sephardi Jewish
communities across the United
States many of them from
Muslim lands or Spanish-
speaking cultures are ex-
pected at the three-day con-
ference, whose theme is
"Israel's 40th Anniversary -
The Sephardi Continuity."
The Federation, founded in
1973, seeks to strengthen
Jewish identity and awareness
within the Sephardi communi-
ty, to sensitize Jewish leaders
to Sephardi problems in Israel
and the Diaspora, and to pro-
mote education about Sephar-
dim, their history and culture.
It also functins as a spokesman
on Sephardic concerns at the
Garazi
Katzav
Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish
Organizations, of which it is a
member.
Minister Katzav, a native of
Iran who has been in his post
since 1984, will address the
opening session of the conven-
tion Sunday evening (Nov. 15)
at 7 p.m. in the hotel.
Judge Sofaer, who was born
in India and served for six
years on the bench of the
Federal District Court in New
York, will deliver the major
address at the convention's
closing banquet at 8 p.m. Tues-
Sofaer
day evening Nov. 17.
Other highlights of the con-
vention include a photographic
exhibtion titled, "The Forgot-
ten Million Arab Jewry:
Heritage and Aspiration,"
from the Museum of the
Diaspora in Tel Aviv; a forum
on "Sephardim in Israel and in
Arab Lands Today:"
A symposium titled, "Se
Habla Espanol: Sephardi Iden-
tity Among Spanish Speaking
Jews; and a workshop on
''Sephardim in the
Holocaust."
Hebrew Academy Plans 40th Anniversary
The 40th Anniversary of the
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy will be
marked at the school's Annual
Scholarship Dinner on Sunday,
Dec. 6, at the Marriott Hotel.
"M'dor l'dor, from genera-
tion to generation," will be the
evening's theme in recognition
of those who have been involv-
ed with the Academy
throughout the past 40 years.
Chairing the 40th Gala event
are Tania Lapciuc and Ellen
Gelman, Academy parents and
social and civic leaders.
Special honor will be paid to
four generations of the Adler
family, in recognition of their
involvement in Jewish educa-
tion and with the Miami
Jewish Community.
The four generations to be
honored are: Esther Adler,
Ellen Gelman
Sam and Ruth Shinensky,
Samuel and Bernyce Adler,
Karen Adler, Michael and
Judy Adler, Sara and Lance
Raiffe, Matthew, David and
Rachel Adler, Jonathan and
Daniel Raiffe.
Tania Lapciuc
Special tribute will also be
paid to three teachers: Joseph
Ackner, Charaa Groner and
Zahava Sukenik, whose com-
bined service as educators of
two generations of Academy
students spans 85 years.
More than $65,000 was raised when the
Alzheimer's Care Committee Notables met
Oct. 29 at the Miami Beach home of Walter
and Rhoda Lebowitz. The Notables raised over
$100,000 last year, its first year of existence,
which goes toward the Gumenick Day Center
and Alzheimer's care and treatment pro-
grams at Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged at Douglas Gardens. Planning
the year's activities for the Notables are from
left. President Bella Goldstein, Claudia
Potamkin and Rhoda Lebowitz.


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 13, 1987
Miami Day Care
Continued from Page 6-B
grams, The Jewish Floridian
could cite only a handful that
were accepting younger in-
fants and extending hours to
accommodate the needs of
working parents.
The Day Care Center at
Temple Adath Yeshurun,
which has been opened for
about three years, has parents
leaving deposits even before
the mother has her baby in
order to secure a space, said
Jill Griffin, supervisor of the
infant/toddler program at the
temple in North Miami Beach.
But, there is a waiting list of
about 20 children, she said.
The infant programs accom-
modates babies from three-
months-old to 22 months. It is
open Monday through Friday
from 7:30 a.m. until 6 p.m.
Kosher breakfasts and lunches
are provided. There are eight
staff members including
teachers and aides for about 30
children.
The facility is open year-
round except in August when
it closes tw- i weeks for repairs.
The full-time program costs
$80 percent per week for tem-
ple members and $85 for non-
members. The fee includes
food.
The program was created
specifically to accommodate
the needs of working parents,
Griffin said.
"Parents have anxiety about
leaving their kids at this age,"
Griffin said. "Parents come in
and as they fill out the applica-
tion, they're weeping. I tell
them they're normal parents
and if they didn't have an anx-
iety attack, I'd worry more."
They do feel more secure
leaving their children in a
synagogue program, she said,
and once the children unders-
tand that their parents are
coming back, they seem to
have more fun than they would
Hadassah
Events
The Mt. Scopus Hadassah,
Admiral's Port will meet on
Tuesday, Nov. 24, at noon in
the East Card Room. Dr.
Lawrence Krasne will speak.
The Yiddish class, conducted
by Jean Salinger will be on
Monday, Nov. 16 in the East
Card Room.
Hatikvah Hadassah will be
having its board meeting Nov.
19 at 7:30 p.m. at the home of
Susan Nevel. For information,
255-7120.
The Bay Harbor Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its regular
monthly meeting on Tuesday,
Nov. 17 at Bay Harbor Town
Hall at 12:30 p.m. Dr. Henry
Green, of the University of
Miami Program on Judaic
Studies, will speak on Jewish
Life in South Florida "The
Past is Our Future."
The Hadassah Israel Educa-
tional Services project will
have a luncheon and fashion
show on Thursday, Nov. 19 at
Jama Eastern Shores
Sunny Isles at noon. For infor-
mation, 861-3971.
by themselves in a home
setting.
"It's fun to watch them
grow too," said Griffin, ex-
plaining that staff members do
tasks that the mother tradi-
tionally did such as potty-
training the child. "They're lit-
tle people who develop a per-
sonality and with nurturing
they change and mature and
learn to cope with sharing and
getting along with
everybody."
Temple Beth Am offers an
after school program to accom-
modate children aged three to
11 until 6 p.m., although the
school does not start until 8:30
a.m. The late day classes in-
clude pottery, sculpture,
karate and computer and the
cost for the 13-week
afterschool program is $400,
which includes three enrich-
ment programs.
The local federation task
force that helped fund some of
these JCC day care programs
has been disbanded for over
two years and there are no
plans to reestablish another
task force in the near future,
said Jacob Solomon, director
of Planning and Budgeting for
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation. The recommenda-
tions from the previous task
forces, however, are in effect,
he said.
As working parents continue
to seek day care alternatives
for their children, some may
do so outside of state and city
regulations. Even leaving
chOdren with a friend in'tjf
community who cares
several children at her home
may be in conflict with child
care licensing or zoning
requirements. 8
But as one parent told The
Jewish Floridian: "To them
it's a business. But they (the
babysitters) are people whom
we trust. We feel knowing the
person who is taking care of
our babies she's a friend as
well as a person in the com-
munity is worth everythintr
in the world." g
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Bat Mitzvah
/
LILLIAN SHAPIRO
Lillian Cyd Shapiro,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John
Shapiro, will be called to the
Torah as a Bat Mitzvah on
Saturday, at 10:30 a.m. at
Temple Emanu-El.
The celebrant was a student
at Lehrman Day School,
kindergarten through seventh
grade. She now attends Ran-
som Everglades, where she is
in the eighth grade, and is on
the Junior varsity volleyball
team.
Lilly is a dancer, and has
danced in Jacksonville, Tam-
pa, and at the Dade County
Youth Fair. She has also danc-
ed in the Berkshires. At pre-
sent, she is a jazz dance in-
structor at the Emanu-El Con-
servatory of Music and Fine
Arts.
Synagogue High Schools Merge

Beth Torah and Adath
Yeshurun Synagogues have
merged their Judaica High
School Programs. The classes,
now under the guidance of
Rhea Schwartzberg, educa-
tional director of Adath
Yeshurun, alternate between
the three synagogues.
The Judaica High School is a
joint effort on behalf of Cen-
tral Agency for Jewish Educa-
tion (CAJE) and the individual
synagogues to establish mean-
ingful classes in Jewish sub-
jects for the post-bar and bat
mitzvah student. Students in
10th grade or higher are eligi-
ble to take college credit
courses through the program.
Dr. Sandy Andron, director
of Judaica High School Pro-
gram, CAJE, says of the
merger, "It seemed like a good
idea for the programs to be
socially as well as educational-
ly rewarding. The merger has
added a great deal of
camaraderie and also provided
enlarged educational and
course options for students."
lillel Elects Local Students
B'nai B'rith Hillel Student
ecretariat, representing
nore than a quarter-million
Jewish students in colleges
nd universities across North
America, elected eight new
lelegates and four alternates
or the 1987-88 school year.
Two each were named for
he Northeast, the Southeast,
he Midwest and the West.
In the Southeast, Anat
Grunberg of North Miami
Beach and University of
Miami, and Aaron Weil of
Miami Beach and University of
Georgia, were elected as
delegates, and Joyce Kam-
merman of Valley Cottage,
N.Y., and American Universi-
ty as an alternate.
Herzl Institute Lecture Series
An 18 week Distinguished
Lecture Series, sponsored by
Ithe Florida Region Theodore
terzl Institute, in conjunction
with the Synagogue Council of
Pelray and the four Delray
temples, was announced by
Florida Region Coordinator, Is
fcronin. The lectures will be
Wd Tuesdays, at 10:30 a.m.,
It various temples free to the
The first of the lecture
series, on Dec. 1 will be offered
by Rabbi Pinchas Aloof, at
Temple Anshei Shalom. In his
lecture, Rabbi Aloof will
develop the theme in "An
Analysis of the notion, origin
and development of Bar-Bat
Mitzvah."
For information, 499-2735,
or 498-1564.
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
"And after this, Abraham buried Sarah his wife in the cave of
the field ofMachpelah before Mamre"
(Genesis 23.19).
HA YE SARAH
HAYE SARAH Sarah died at the age of 127 in Hebron, and
was buried in the Cave of Machpelah, which Abraham purchased
as a family grave yard. Anxious for Isaac to marry one of his kin-
folk rather than an idolatrous Canaanite woman, Abraham sent
his trusted servant Eliezer to his former home in Mesopotamia
where his brother Nahor lived. Approaching the city, Eliezer
Prayed for the success of his mission. He determined on a pro-
cedure: He would ask each girl he met, "Give me your pitcher and
let me drink": the girl who would reply, "Drink, and I will give
% camels drink also" should be Isaac's destined bride (Genesis
rJ-HJ. Rebekah, daughter of Bethuel, the son of Abraham's
brother Nahor, came to the well to draw water, and responded
with the correct formula to Eliezer's request. Thanking God for
lit kindness, 'he old family retainer presented himself to
Kehekah's family, explained his mission, and received permission
r Rebekah to accompany him back to Canaan as Isaac's prospec-
tive wife. Isaac loved Rebekah, and was consoled in her after his
mothers death. Abraham took another wife, Keturah, and she
AKC u Sns whom he d'spatched to the east. At the age of 175
Abraham died and was buried next to Sarah in the Cave of
Machpelah.
unon8T!ICOlJn,lno of ,he Weekly Portion of the Law Is extracted and based
Tsam ,e,G,,Pn|c History ot the Jewish Heritage." edited by P Wollman-
lanM Published by Shengold The volume Is available at 75 Maiden
fi.;.K .ew YorK' NY 10M Joseph Schlang Is president ot the society
attributing the volume.)
Friday, November 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Eliezer Silberstein
Local Student
To Compete
In Jerusalem
Eliezer Silberstein, the
14-year-old son of Rabbi
Harvey Silberstein, principal
of the Rabbi Alexander S.
Gross Hebrew Academy
Elementary School, will repre-
sent the Hebrew Academy at
the International Bible Con-
test, to be held in Jerusalem
April 21, 1988.
As a ninth grade student at
the Hebrew Academy last
year, Eliezer took third place
in the National Bible Contest
held in New York last May. In
preparation for this contest,
Eliezer memorized 70 Bible
chapters.
Eliezer, who has won awards
in mathematics, science and
Judaic Studies, will be com-
peting with Israeli students
among others in the upcoming
international contest in
Jerusalem.
Mildred Riesenberg, president
of Miami Region ofHadassah,
has recently returned from a
trip to Puerto Rico where she
worked with the local
Hadassah chapter, one of the SO
chapters in the Miami Region.
Riesenberg addressed a
meeting of Young Leaders and
a Membership luncheon,
delivering her speeches in
Spanish. The Puerto Rico
Chapter consists of women of
all ages, many of whom are
Cuban refugees.
Beth Torah Singles
Beth Torah Singles presents
Jerry Levine, Channel 10's
Consumer Troubleshooter and
weekend Anchorman who will
be guest speaker on Wednes-
day, Nov. 18 at the temple in
the Nacron Chapel. There is an
admission fee. For informa-
tion, 947-7528.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
5:13 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach, Fla. 531-2120
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor: Zvl Rozen Conservative
Executive Director.
Harry J. Silverman f^)
Dally mlnyan 7:30 a.m. and S p.m.
Fri. tarvtca Bp m
,2,uj;' SKSff R,bbl ""Ph Kmoaley.
WtPfS* Saturday 8 30 a.m. Shabb.i
Kldduah following In honor ol Sam Topi
75th Birthday
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 667-6867
Leonard Schoolman, Sr. Rabbi
Mark Kram, Associate Rabbi
Lynn Goldstein, Aaalatant Rabbi
Fri. 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Matt Kram will .p... on
Orandparanla and Orandchlldran -
Oanaratlon To Ganaration "
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W 3rd Avenue 854-3911
Jack Rlemer, Rabbi
Robert Albert, vfi&V.
Cantor 1
Rev. Milton Freeman, ^***y
Ritual Director
Dally aantcaa. Mon and Thura. 7:30 a.m.
Tuaa.. Wad. and Fn 7 45 a.m.
Sun. I a.m. Evanlnga 5:30 p.m
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami Beach
534-7213 534-7214 ^^
Barry J. Konovitch. Rabbi /jBkV
Sergio Grobler, President LW#
Sholem Epelbaum, President,
Religious Committee
)
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue /
Miami Beach '.
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Assistant Rabbi Ronnie Cahan
Yehuda Shifman, Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
Kabbalat Shabbat 6 p.m. Sat. 9 a.m.
Or. Irving lahrman will ptaach
Cantor Yahuda Shltman will chant.
Bat Mltnah Lillian Cyd Shapiro
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive, Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Dally 730 am (Mon Thora 7:15)* 7 p.m
Fri. 7 p.m Sat. 9 a.m. Raaan tor High Holiday
Daya.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
M/aml'a Pkmt Raform Conoraoatlon
137 N.E. 18th St. Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Rabbi Rax D. Perimeter
Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob Q. Bornsteln
Fri S p.m. Downtown:
Rabbi Rai D. Parlmatar will apaak on
"Papa Waa a Patriarch Llturay will ba
conductad by Cantor Rachalla F Nalaon
and Cantorial Solon! Harvay Kaufman
Mambara ol Ralph Chwaat'a Qlmal Claaa
will conduct portlona ol tha liturgy.
????
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St.. N. Miami. FL 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs, Rabbi
Dr. Joseph A. Gorfinkel. fIK\,
Rabbi Emeritus
Moshe Frledler, Cantor
m
Fri. S p.m.
Sat 8:45am
Waakday aan. Mon.-Fri. S a.m.
Mon.Thura. 5 p.m. Sun. 8 30 am
Sal 45 am
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave., M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Alvadla Rosenberg
Cantor Moshe Buryn
Dally aanricaa S am 4 7 p.m.
Sat StSa.m
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
238-2601 (
Rabbi David H. Auerbach \
Cantor Stephen Freedman
Fri. Soreteoa ( p.m. Family Sarvica 4th Orada
will participate Sat 9:30 a.m.
Bar MltnahMarti Jaiiray Holland.
DR. LEON KRONISH. Santo. Founding Rabbi
GARY A. QLICKSTEIN. Santor Rabbi
HARRY JOLT, Aulllary Rabbi
JASON QWASDOFF Aaalatant Rabbi
IAN ALPERN. Canto.-------
DAVID CONVISER. Cantor Emaritua
Fri 8 15pm Rabbi Gary Click slain will apaak
on 'Slate ol tha Union: Ratorm
Judalam 5748 Saturday aarvicaa 10:45 a.m.
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd. ^--.
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz. Rabbi fw)
Zvee Aroni, Cantor V-S>
Harvey L. Brown. Exec. Director
Daily aanicas Monday through Friday
7:30a m and 5 30pm
Lata aanlcaa Fri 7:30 p m
Sat 8:25 am and Mincha
515pm Sun 8a m andS30pm
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667 5657
Michael B. Eisenstat, Rabbi
Sat Shabbat Samca 11:15 a.m.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Shoshanah Raab, Cantor
Sarvlcaa Fri. 7:30 p.m
Sat. 9:30 a.m.
Onag Shabbat win follow
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz ajajt.
Ari Fridkis, Assoc Rabbi f.
Cantor Murray Yavneh S-S/
Sat. 9 a.m. Sabbath aanfca
Dally Mlnchah Sunday Friday
1 p.m.
Kile.
I a.m. anal 8 c
Sat. 9 a.m. and SMS p.m.
TEMPLE NER TAMID 866-8345
7902 Carlyle Ave., 866-9833
Miami Beach 33141 Conaanathw
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz .>.,
Cantor Edward Klein [ B i
Dally San. Mon Fri ( a.m. 8 30 p.m X-X.'
Sat Mincha 8:15 p.m. Sun 8:30 am -
8:30 p.m Sat.: 8:45 a.m. aarr. by Rabbi LabovtO.
Ca.WorKlaln
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung
SHAARE TEFILLAH
TORAH CENTER OF KENDALL
7880 SW 112 Street *..-.._*,.
232-6833 X^T
Rabbi Hershel Becker *J '-
Dally San. 7 a.m. Fri. 10 mm alia, candta-
llgntlng lima Shabboa 9 a.m. Shabboa
Mincha 10 mln. batoro candla lighting lima
Sun 8:30 a m
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dade s Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kingsley, Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administrator
Rabbi Julian I Cook will apaak on
What a Naw in tha World olRalorm
Sat aan Bar Mitnah Stavan Duchm
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
271-2311 jaflfa.
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi IW)
Benjamin Adler, Cantor x^**
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Minyan 7 am Monoaya and Thuradays
Sunday 9 a.m. Fn. 6:30 p.m aan conductad
by Qlmal and Dalad Habraw Schoni
ial San 0am Rabbi Shapiro ana
Cantor Adlar officiating


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 13, 1987
Deaths
Commander
Sidney Pasternak
Major Sidney James Paster-
nak, commander of Miami
Beach Post 85 of the American
Legion, passed away unex-
pectedly at a Legion meeting
on Tuesday, Nov. 3. The
Veterans Day banquet honor-
ing him as Post Commander
for the past 10 years was held
as a tribute to his memory and
his 69 years of service to the
American Legion on Saturday,
Nov. 7, at the Deauville Hotel.
Pasternak, a native New
Yorker, was a veteran of both
World Wars. In 1920, he join-
ed the American Legion in
Bronx County, N.Y. In 1940,
he became a member of the
Forty and Eight, the honor
society of the American
Legion, where he was elected
Grand Chef de Gare of New
York State in 1959. In 1967, he
was elected Department Vice
Commander.
Pasternak retired in 1972,
moved to Miami Beach and im-
mediately became active in
Miami Beach Post 85 of the
American Legion where he
was elected Commander in
1974. Four years later, he was
persuaded to assume the office
again.
Pasternak is survived by his
wife Adeline, a retired New
York City teacher of speech
and dramatics.
KOGAN
Yetu. 77. of Boca Raton, Fla. passed away
November 7. Beloved wife of Morris, former
partner of Mayflower Surgical Supply Com-
a, Brooklyn. N.Y and Investment
er. Miami Beach; devoted mother of
Gerald, justice on the Supreme Court of
Florida; mother-in-law of Irene Kogan.
Stephen Kogan, prominent defense at-
torney, Miami; mother-in-law of Anne; lov-
ing grandmother of Robert, Debra, Karen
and Ashley Kogan; sister of Ruth Clelak
Mrs. Kogan attended Columbia University,
New York City. She was president of
American Jewish Congress, Louis Brandeis
Chapter, president Miami Beach Branch
Hadassah, holder of Builder of Israel
Award. Israel Histadrut Foundation.
Founders Award American Histadrut
Development Foundation, life member
B'nai B'rith Women, leading fund raiser
Hadassah Services were held at Levitt-
Weinstein, North Miami Beach Chapel. In-
terment at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
STAR. Murry, November 5. Services wen-
held.
ROBINSON. Mrs. Frances. 75, of Bay Har
bor Island. Services held in New Jersey.
Rubin-Zilbert in charge of arrangements.
BRESSMAN. Lawrence B., 70, of North
Miami Beach, November ft. Levitt-
Weinstein.
COHEN. Shirley. 67. of North Miami
Beach, November 5. Levitt-Weinstein. In-
terment at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
OURHAAN. Esther, of Miami Eternal
Light.
CRASS, Tillie, 90, of Miami Beach.
November 5. Services private.
SAFFAN. Charlotte, of Miami Beach.
Rubin Zilbert. Interment at Lakeside.
FREEDMAN. Sidney, of North Miami
Beach. The Riverside.
FRL'MKES. Mrs. Lillian, of Miami Beach.
Interment in New York. Rubin-Zilbert in
charge of arrangements.
KEEGAN. Albert of Miami. Levitt-
Weinstein.
RUBIN, George (Spike). Services were held
SCHWARTZ, Samuel. 79, of North Miami
Beach, November 9. Services held in New
Jersey. Levitt-Weinstein in charge of
arrangements.
HARRIS, Morris. 76. of West Miami.
November 7. Interment at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
PATERSON. Nat. 78. of North Bay Village.
November 8. The Riverside. Interment at
Lakeside Memorial Park.
26640 (JreenfieldHd
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DADE:
592-0690
BROWARD:
525-9339
RICE, Lynn.' Allison, 32, of Davie. Menorah
Chapels.
ROSENFELD, Marion, 79, of Miami Beach,
November 8. The Riverside. Interment at
Star of David Cemetery
SMITH. Dr Manuel, of Miami. Menorah
Chapel.
SONN, Faye. of Miami Beach. Eternal
Light. Interment at Lakeside Memorial
Park.
ARONSON, Evalyn S., of Miami Beach.
November 4. Services held in
Philadelphia.
POLL, Leo. 87, of Miami, November 3. Ser
vices and interment held at Star of David
Memorial Park.
SILVER, Gertrude Kline, November 4. The
Riverside. Interment at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
RESNICK. Abe. 90, November 4 Private
Services.
BLANK, Herbert of North Miami Beach,
November 3. Services were held.
NASH, Raymond. 59, of Miami. Novemlier
4. The Riverside. Interment at Lakeside
Memorial Park.
Dl'NN, Aaron (Arden), of Miami Beach.
Rubin-Zilbert
GANG. Ethel. November 2. Services held in
New York.
PASTERNAK. Maj. Sidney James Rubin
Zilbert.
MANTEL. Sol, of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert. Interment at Mt. Nebo.
CERSTEIN. Ethel. 88, of Miami Beach.
November 5. The Riverside. Interment at
Lakeside Memorial Park
FOX. Gordon. 79. formerly of Dania and
Boca Raton. October 13. Services in New
York.
GREENBERG, Leone. 94. of North Miami
Beach. October 21. Riverside.
ORSHAN. Nathan, of Bay Harbor Island
Eternal Light.
RIBIN, Bernard, 64, of Miami Beach, Oc-
tober 23. Blasberg. Interment at Lakeside
Memorial Park.
SALTIEL, Ralph. 64, of North
MiamiBeach, October 23. Levitt
Weinstein. Interment at Star of David.
LERNER, Eleanor, of North Miami Beach.
Eternal Light. Interment al Lakeside
Memorial Park.
STRONGIN, Arthur, 80. of Miami Beach.
October 22. Riverside
SCHIFFER. Nathan. 80. of North Miami
Beach. October 28. Levitt-Weinatein.
ADER, Birdie S 90, of Miami, October 31.
Riverside.
LACKRITZ, Howard, 26, of North Miami
Beach. Menorah.
LEVIN, Mrs. Sarah, of Miami Beach. Inter
ment at Mt. Nebo Cemetary.
SAKS, Edward, of Miami Beach Eternal
Light. Interment at Lakeside Memorial
Park.
FEIGELES, Blanch, 82. of North Miami
Beach, November 1. Levitt-Weinstein. In-
terment at Lakeside Memorial Park.
KOLKER. Max, of Miami Beach Rubin
Zilbert. Services in St. Louis, Mo.
NATHENSON. Harry L.. 84. of Miami. Oc-
tober 31 Riverside.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open E>ery Da Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888
Kingsley To 'Exchange' Pulpit
Rabbi Ralph P. Kingsley,
spiritual leader of North
Dade's Temple Sinai, will ad-
dress the members of Con-
gregation Adath Yeshurun on
Friday evening, Nov. 13.
Rabbi Kingsley's visit to
Adath Yeshurun marks the
completion of an exchange of
pulpits, that was marked last
month by Rabbi Simcha Freed-
man's visit to Temple Sinai.
The pulpit exchange "may
seem like a small thing, but
given the climate in the Jewish
world, it is good to know that
there are voices on both ends
of the religious spectrum who
see the inherent danger of
intra-Jewish conflicts, and who
are committed to building
Roberta Peters, of the
Metropolitan Opera, will per-
form at Temple Emanu-El of
Greater Miami Wednesday,
Dec. 9, 8 p.m. in the opening
event of the 1987-88 Cultural
series sponsored by the Miami
Beach congregation. Other
events scheduled for the series
include Ted Koppel and former
Israeli Foreign Minister and
Deputy Prime Minister Abba
Eban. For information,
538-2508.
Rabbi Kingsley
alliances that stress the fact
that we are truly ()ne people"
says Rabbi Kingslev.
m
to
St
in
l'l
,1;,
DO
tn
th
w
Cl
&
an
I..
ed
l.(
Ta
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service
i
Ddde County
Brow.ird County
.YL'-'OW
Represented In Riverside Memorial ChH|x li
New York: iVIm _'..( TKiKi^urfiis HKd A 76th KM Kim ill
h
MM
a
M
m
M,
tu
nu
s
ih
The Spirit
Of Our Tradition
Lives On.
Dignity, simplicity and economy are the mandates
of Scripture lakeside Memorial Park upholds the tm
ditions of Jewish burial in a beautiful. intelligently
designed setting.
lakeside the only memorial park in t/x- south that
was created to meet the needs of eivry Jeuish Jamih
Please call for a tour of
our Garden of Heroes, an
innoiation in above-ground
burial modeled after the
mausoleums of ancient Israel.
10A01NW 25th Street
Miami, Florida JM7J
Dade (305) 592-0690
Broward (305) 5259339



Business Notes
The Chase Manhattan Bank
will be honored for its service
to Israel as Fiscal Agent for
State of Israel Bonds since
1951 at a luncheon in the Hotel
Pierre in New York on Thurs-
day. Nov. 19, it has been an-
nounced by Sy Syms, a Na-
tional Associate Chairman of
the Bond Organization who
will serve as Luncheon
Chairman.
Berkowitz, Dick and Kaplan,
Certified Public Accountants,
announces that Michael S.
Leone, LL.M., C.P.A. has join-
ed the firm as Tax Manager.
Leone was previously Senior
Tax Manager at Peat, Mar-
wick. Main and Co.
Stuart Graver will be
honored bv the Men's Fashin
Guild of South Florida as its
"Man of the Year" Saturday
night, Nov. 21, at the organiza-
tion s annual black-tie dinner
and dance at the Fon-
tainebleau Hilton Hotel.
A 7 p.m. cocktail reception
will precede the 8 p.m. dinner
with reservations available,
261-4921.
Jerome Shevin, a principal
with the law firm of Sparber,
Sheinn, Shapo and HeUbron-
ner, PA, makes his acceptance
speech as chairman of the
Metro-Dade Community Rela-
tions Board at the board's an-
nual luncheon on Oct. 3.
Sheinn chaired the board's first
Unity Week celebration in
Dade County from Oct. 16-2S.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-39761 CA-19
NOTICE OF ACTION
THE KISSELL COMPANY.
Plaintiff
vs.
ROBERT J. STEWART, et al..
Defendants.
TO: ROBERT J. STEWART
1226 Drexel Avenue No. 308
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 16, in Block 4, of
LAZARUS ON RICHMOND,
according to the plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 110
at Page 99. of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida. 33146 on or before
November 20, 1987. and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 19 day of October,
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Diana Campbell
As Deputy Clerk
18057 October 23,30;
November 6. 13.1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Civil Action No. 87-43659-07
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ELIZABETH ALVA CHUMAN.
Petitioner,
and
R1CARDO CHUMAN.
Respondent.
TO: RICARDO CHUMAN
121-07 84th Avenue
Kew Gardens. NY 11415
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on MELVIN
J. ASHER, ESQ.. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 825
South Bayshore Drive, Suite 543.
Miami. FL 33131. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
November 13th. 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 7th day of October, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: John Branda
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18037 October 16,23.30;
November 16.1987
i114.1M laaact Caa4itiaa .f Groveqate Bank
e Miami. Florida
September 30.
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*)>-.

18089
November 13, 1987
Friday, November 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
Fascell to Get NCJW Honor
The National Council of
Jewish women (NCJW),
Greater Miami Section, will
hold its 17th Annual Child
Care Luncheon at the Doral
Beach Hotel on Wednesday,
Dec. 2 at 11:30 a.m. when the
Hon. Dante B. Fascell will be
awarded NCJW's highest
honor, the Hannah G. Solomon
Award, for distinguished ser-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-45774
NOTICE OF ACTION
NEWORLD BANK FOR
SAVINGS, f/k/a BASS
RIVER SAVINGS BANK.
Plaintiff,
vs.
JORGE SAVANY, et ux.. et al..
Defendants
TO: ROY WYETT and JANET
M. WYETT, his wife
105 Governor's Court
Governor's Square
Greer, South Carolina 29651
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 14, Block 2. MACSON
HEIGHTS, according to the
Plat thereof, recorded in Plat
Book 66. at Page 2, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it.
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida, 33146 on or beofre
November 30, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 22 day of Oc-
tober, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
18069 October 30;
November 6, 13.20,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-47890-31
NOTICE OF ACTION
COWGER & MILLER
MORTGAGE COMPANY. 'C
Plaintiff.
vs.
DANIEL NOOKS, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: All unknown heirs, creditors,
devisees or other persons
claiming by, through under
or against Guerda Isma f/k/a
Guerda Celestin. deceased
Residence Unknown
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida.
Lot 40. Block 10. OVER-
BROOK SHORES SUBDIVI-
SION No. 2. according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 50. Page 31. of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. GitliU, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida. 33146 on or before
December 11. 1987. and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
nlirf demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 4 day of
Noverber, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By T CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
18086 November 13. 20,27;
DMemtMr4,lM7
vice in bringing about social
change.
After luncheon and the con-
gressman's remarks, enter-
tainment will be provided by
members of the Young Artists
Program of the Greater Miami
Opera.
The theme of the event is
"Today's Children Tomor-
row's World."
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-43846(14)
NOTICE OF ACTION
RESIDENTIAL FINANCIAI
CORP.,
Plaintiff
vs.
RICARDO A. GARCIA, et ux.
etal..
Defendants.
TO: MANUEL GARCIA
56-38 Van Cleef
Corona, New York 11368
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 11, Block 1. MIROSA
SUBDIVISION, according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 105. Page 31 of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
November 13th, 1987, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 8th day of Oc
tober. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Jennis L. Russell
As Deputy Clerk
18044 October 16. 23,30;
November 6, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 87-3613
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
BARBARA A. PEREZ,
Petitioner
and
ROLANDO D. PEREZ.
Respondent.
TO: ROLANDO D. PEREZ
878 West 79 Place
Hialeah. Florida 33014
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a Petition for Dissolu
tion of Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on SYLVAN HOLTZMAN.
Holtzman. Krinzman & Equels,
1500 San Remo Avenue. Suite 200,
Coral Gables. Florida 33146, at
torney for Petitioner, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above-styled court on or before
November 20, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the
Petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Dadc Coun-
ty, Florida on this 19 day of Oc-
tober. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Diana Campbell
As Deputv Clark
A TRUE COPY
CkrauH Court Seal
Attorney for Petitioner
SYLVAN HOLTZMAN
ll'iltzman, Krinzman & Equels
1500 San Remo Avc., Suite 800
Miami. Florida .i:i 146
Telephone: (305) 662 7700
18056 (letabar T.\. SO;
November 6. IS, 1987
. :r


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 13, 1987
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-S489
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BERENICE P. WEISS
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of BERENICE
P. WEISS, deceased. File
Number, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Dade County, FL 33130.
The Personal representative of the
estate is Barbara S. Breland,
whose address is 5080 South Da vie
Road, No. 206 Davie, Dade Coun-
ty, FL 33314. The name and ad-
dress of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the dole of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
vlidity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
November 13, 1987.
BARBARA S. BRELAND
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
BERENICE P. WEISS
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Harold A. TurtleUub
9995 Sunset Drive, Suite 108
Miami. FL 33173
Telphone: (305) 271-4000
18097 November 13,20, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Civil Actioa No. 87-475*1-11
FL. BAR NO. 604437
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JOHN C. OKEKE
Husband,
vs.
BERNADETTE 0 OKEKE.
Wife.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: BERNADETTE O. OKEKE
(Address unknown)
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, with
the Clerk of this Court, with a copy
to your husband's attorney. Jack
Werner. Esq.. 1860 N.E. 198th.
Terrace, North Miami Beach. FL
33179, on or before December
11th. 1987; or s default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in this petition.
DATED: October 22, 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of Said Court
By John Brands
As Deputy Clerk
18083 November 6, 13, 20, 27. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name CENTRAL AP-
PLIANCE PARTS AND SER-
VICE at 4150 NW 7 St. No. 207,
Miami. FL 33126 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
CENTRAL APPLIANCE
PARTS AND SERVICE, INC.
18087 November 13,20, 27;
December 4, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the fic-
titious name Flamingo Spirits,
Inc.. a Florida corporation at Store
No. 2, East 10th Avenue and 9th
Street, Hialeah. Florida intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
FLAMINGO SPIRITS. INC.
Martin W. Wasaman
Attorney for Howard Galbut
18090 November 13.20,27;
December 4,1987
Ui THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nuaaer 87-6366
DivisioaOl
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JACK LANTANG
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
ion of the estate of JACK LAN-
TANG. deceased. File Number
87-6366. is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida.
Probate Division, the address of
which is Dade County Courthouse,
73 West Flagler Street Miami,
florida. The personal represen-
tative of the estate is KAREN
LANTANG, whose address is 7941
N.W. 19th Avenue, Miami.
Florida. The name and address of
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ddress
of the creditor or his agent or at-
torney, and the amount claimed. If
the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMNADS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration
November 13. 1987.
k,REN LANTANG
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
JACK LANTANG
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
BARRY L. GARBER. ESQ.
444 Brickeli Avenue, No. 650
Miami, Florida 33131
Telphone: (305) 373-3606
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87-44239 FC 23
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
KEIKO YATES,
Petitioner/Wife,
and
CHARLES ROBERT YATES.
Respondent/Husband.
TO: CHARLES ROBERT
YATES
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court snd you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on MARC POSTELNEK. PA., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad
dress is 407 Lincoln Road, Suite
10 B. Miami Beach. FL 33139. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
November 20th. 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 14th day of October, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LAW OFFICES OF MARC
POSTELNEK, P.A.
BY: MARC POSTELNEK
407 Lincoln Road. Suite 10-B
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-7210
Attorney for Petitioner
18048 October 23. 30;
November 6, 13, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-35296 CA 05
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, at
association organized and
existing under the laws of the
United States of America.
Plaintiff
vs.
RAMIRO.I Ml'NERA. et al
Defendants.
TO: MERCEDES FIGUEROA
a/k/a MERCEDES MUNERA
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
MERCEDES FIGUEROA
a/k/a MERCEDES
MUNERA, and all parties
having or claiming to have
any right, title or interest in
the property herein
described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County. Florida:
Unit 219. of FOCSA CON-
DOMINIUMS, A con-
dominium according to the
Declaration thereof, as
recorded in the Official
Records Book 9019. at Page
422, of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve s copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida. 33146 on or before
December 11, 1987, and file the
original with the Clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 6 day of
November, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18093 November 13,20,27;
December 4,1987
noticf; UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Tropical Storm Sport-
swear at 4150 N.W. 7 St. No. 207
Miami, FL 33126 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Tropical Storm, Inc.
18064 October 30;
November 6, 13,20,1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-46368 FC 21
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Fla. Bar No. 0476203
IN RE: The Marriage of
ARMANDO ACANDA, JR.
Petitioner,
and
DESIREE ACANDA,
Respondent.
TO: Desire* Acanda
2440 S. Hamlin
Chicago. 111. 60623
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
snd you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on USHER BRYN. ESQ.
The Roney Plaza, Suite M-8, 2301
Collins Ave., Miami Beach, Fla.
33189, attorney for Petitioner, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
November 30, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 21 day of October. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN. ESQ.
The Roney Plaza. Suite M-8
2301 Collins Ave
Miami Beach. Fla 33139
(Phone) (305) 532-1155
18063 October 30;
November 6, 13,20. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-38539 (17)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL HOME LOAN
MORTGAGE CORPORATION,
Plaintiff
vs.
PAUL M MARMISH, et al
Defendants.
TO: PA1 I. M MARMISH
1670 Micanopy Avenue
Coconut Grove,
Florida 33133
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Unit No. 16-D of THE AR-
BOUR TOWNHOUSE SEC-
TION III, Condominium, ac-
cording to the Declaration
thereof, as recorded in Of-
ficial Records Book 7648 at
Page 275 and in Con-
dominium Plan Book 22 at
Page 5, both of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve s copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1670 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
November 30, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise s default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 21 day of Oc-
tober, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18062 October 30;
November 6, 13, 20, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, deaWjJ tn
engage in business under the fie
titious names MORRIS FCTFw
NICK. MIRIAM Fl TFRNCK
THE ESTATE of jar*
FUTERNICK. AND MOLLIF
FUTERNICK, d/h/a M F PRO
PERTIES at 12300 NW 3^d
Avenue, Miami, Florida 33167 ,.
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
SHEA & GOULD
By: Edward E. Levmson. P.A
Attorneys for Morns Futemick
Mirian Futernick, The Estate of
Jack Futernick, and Mollie
Futernick
18081 November 6,13,20,27,1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-45013 01
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
RENE E. ROBAINA
and
ELIZABETH ROBAINA,
TO: Elizabeth Robaina
302 West Westfield
Avenue
Roeelle Park.
New Jersey
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed and
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Harvey D Friedman,
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is FRIEDMAN & KAPLAN.
P.A., 3636 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida 33135, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
November 20. 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week lor four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my han.l and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 16th day of October, 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Cil
Dade Count). 1
By E -
As Deputy I
(Circuit Court >
HARVEY I) FRIEDMAN
3636 West Flagler So
Miami, Florida 33135
Attorney for Petitioner
18061 "-
.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number H7-6106
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE 'F
MAX EPSTEIN
Dei
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRA! I'IN
The administration oftht Wtatl
of MAX EPSTEIN, deceased, File
Number 87-6106 (0^1.
the Circuit Court for Dan County,
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 7:t W Flagler
Street, Miami. Florida. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below
All interested persons are re
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (I) all ci*>
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested personi to
whom this notice ws mailed that
challenges the validity of the will
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or junsdif
tion of the court .
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL Bfc
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Now* has
begun on November 13. 1987.
Personal Representtbve:
ADELE E. BERGER
10096 S.W. 70th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33156
Attorney for Personal
Representative.
JAMES R. SLOTO
MISHAN, SLOTO
A HOFFMAN. P.A m
200 S. Biscayne Blvd.. niiw
Miami. FL 33131
Telephone: (306) 379-1792
18088 November 13. *>"


Friday, November 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-46650-15
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ADELE ROSE BARON,
wife,
and
GARY BARON,
husband.
TO: Mr. Gary Baron
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on AR-
THUR H. LIPSON, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 801
N.E. 167 Street Miami, FL, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
December 4. 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
lus '28 day of October, 1!87.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
[Circuit Court Seal)
3076 October 30:
November 6, 13.20.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-46715-18
Florida Bar No. 161802
ELLIOT L. MILLER,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ALBERT CONDE, his unknown
heirs at law, legatees,
tlevisees or grantees.
Defendant.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
TO: Albert Conde and all
those holding thereunder.
Residency unknown.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for to
quiet title has been filed against
you for the real property described
to wit:
Lot 6 in Block 7 of Marilynda,
according to the Plat Book
thereof, recorded in Plat
Book 50 at page 32 of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
You must serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it on
Judith A. Frankel, Attorney for
the Plaintiff, 960 Arthur Godfrey
Koad. Suite 116. Miami Beach.
Florida 33140 and file the original
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
on or before December 4, 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered
igainst you for the relief demand
ed in the petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in the Jewish
Floridian.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
the said Court at Miami, Dade
County, Florida on October 28.
1987.
Richard P. Brinker,
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: T. CASAMAYOR
Deputy Clerk
Judith A. Frankel. Esq.
Attorney for Plaintiff
960 Arthur Godfrey Road
Suite 116
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Phone: (506) 674-1313
"8078 October 30;
Novembers, 13. 20, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-44255 (27)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ROSE MARIE WARE,
Petitioner,
and
BILLY J. WARE.
Respondent
TO: BILLY J. WARE
Residence Unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage upon: ANTHONY
CARBONE. PA.. 612 N.W. 12th
Avenue, Miami. Florida 33136
and file original with the Clerk of
the Court on or before November
-" 1987, otherwise a default will
he entered.
October 13. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By: Jennia L. Russell
180&0 October 23.30;
November 6. 13, 1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-20944
SEC. 25
STOCKTON, WHATLEY,
DAVIN & COMPANY, a Florida
corporation,
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
MARCOS BAYONA. and the
unknown spouse, etc., et , Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami, Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M., on the 30TH
day of NOVEMBER. 1987. the
following described property:
Lot 7. in Block 23. of KINGS
GARDENS SECTION THREE,
according to the Plat thereof,
recorded in Plat Book 95, at
Page 30. of the Public Records of
Dade County. Florida.
DATED the 10TH day of
NOVEMBER. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
K "in-viit Court Seal)
by MARIA SAMA
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin. P.A.
3050 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-30974 CA 30
NOTICE OF ACTION
NEW METROPOLITAN
FEDERAL SAVINGS AND
LOAN ASSOCIATION.
Plaintiff,
vs.
LEON GROSSMAN and
REGINA GROSSMAN, his wife.
et al
Defendants.
TO: MARTIN GREENFIELD,
residence unknown, if alive,
and if dead, to all of the
unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees,
lienholders, creditors,
trustees or otherwise,
claiming by, through, under
or against the said MARTIN
GREENFIELD, and all other
parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or
interest in and to the
property under foreclosure
herein.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Lot 24. Block 3. FLAMINGO
TERRACE SUBDIVISION.
according to the plat thereof.
as recorded in Plat Book 10.
at Page 3. of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Keith, Mack. Lewis, Allison &
Cohen. Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address is 111 N.E. 1st
Street, Miami. Florida 33132, on
or before December 4, 1987, and
file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 2 day of
November. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
18080November6.13.20.27.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name William Camacho
Tool Distributing at 6360 NW 200
St. Miami FL 32015 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
William Camacho
6360 NW 200 St.
Miami FL 33015
18055 October 23.30;
November 6,13.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-46436 (24)
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATION OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS,
Plaintiff
vs.
VERNON FORBES, et ux..
etal..
Defendants.
TO: VERNON FORBES and
PATRICIA FORBES,
his wife
4068 Edison Avenue
Bronx, NY 10466
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 8, Block 28. of FIRST
ADDITION TO MYRTLE
GROVE SUBDIVISION, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof,
received in Plat Book 57,
Page 2, of the Public Records
of Dade County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you
arc required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it.
on Stuart H. (iitliu, Attorney lor
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 88146 on or before
December 4, 1987 and Ok the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 27 day of Oc-
tober, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
18077 October 30;
November 6,13.20,1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
t'iril Action No. 87 46337 2*
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
VILMA THOMPSON
and
ROY THOMPSON
TO: ROY THOMPOSON
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your wri-
teen defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street North Miami Bech, Florida
33162, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before November 30, 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 26 day of October1, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By JENNIS L. RUSSELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18074 October 30;
November 6. 13.20.1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 87-39602 FC OS
IN RE: The Marriage of:
MULTER SAINT FLEUR,
Petitioner,
and
MICHELLE DENISE
SAINT-FLEUR,
Respondent.
TO: MICHELLE DENISE
SAINT-FLEUR
Residence Unknown, you shall
serve a copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage Upon: ANTHONY CAR-
BONE. PA., 612 N.W. 12th
venue, Miami. Florida 33136, and
file original with the Clerk of the
Court on or before December 4,
1987, otherwise a default will be
entered.
October 29, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER. Clerk
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
18079 November 6, 13.20.27. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-2686
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MOHINI CHATANI
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of MOHINI
CHATANI. deceased. File
Number 87-2686, is pending in the
Circuit Court for DADE County,
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Hauler-
Street, Miami, FL 33130. The per
sonal representative of the estate
is CM ETAN CHATANI. whose ad-
dress is 1800 Collins Avenue,
Miami Beach. FL 33139. The
Name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are srl
forth baton
All pfraoni having claims or
demands against the estate are re
quired, WITHIN THREE HON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state
merit of any claim or demand they
may have, Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
devliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to ech per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have the challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
November 13. 1987.CHETAN
CHATANI
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
MOHINI CHATANI
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
EUGENE J. WIESS
407 Lincoln Road, Penthouse NE
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Telephone. (305) 534-4721
18092 November 13. 20,1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 87-47162
INRE: The Marriage of:
MARIE Y. BUTLER,
Petitioner,
and
VIVICIOUS L. BUTLER.
Respondent.
TO: VIVICIOUS L. BUTLER.
Residence Unknown, you shall
serve a copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon: ANTHONY CAR
BONE. P.A., 612 N.W. 12th
Avenue, Miami. Florida 33136,
and file original with the Clerk of
the Court on or before December
11. 1987. otherwise a default will
be entered.
November 5. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER, Clerk
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
18094 November 13.20.27;
December 4.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Robert Bloom at 740
NE 167 St. Suite 2. North Miami.
Fla. 33160. intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Steven Pollack
18095 November 13. 20.27;
December 4,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5466
Division 01
IN RE:ESTATE OF
SOPHIE LEVINTON.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate of
SOPHIE LEVINTON, deceased,
File Number 87-5466, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street Miami, Fl. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on November 6. 1987.
Personal Representative:
MARTIN RUBASHKIN
c/o BOURNE, NOLL & KENYON
AK2 Springfield Avenue
Summit, New Jersey 07901
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
LEFF. PESETSKY & ZACK.
P.A.
SAMUEL I. LEFF. ESQ.
1367 N.E. 162nd Street
No. Miami Beach, Fl. 33162
Telephone: (305) 945-7501
18082 November 6. 13, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. -FC-87-47537 22
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
in re the marriage of
CACHETA F. WALTERS
Petitioner
and
SEGREE WALTERS
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: SEGREE WALTERS,
19 Chester Av.,
Kingston 11, Jamaica
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon; I. J.
GRAFF. ESQ., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St. N.M.B. Florida 33162, on
or before December 11. 1987 and
file the original with the clerk of
this court otherwise a default will
be entered against you.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: E. Seidl
As Deputy Clerk
18085 November 6. 13. 20.27, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-47738-01
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ATHENA JACILDO WEIDER.
wife
and
JAMES FREDERICK
WEIDER. husband.
TO: JAMES FREDERICK
WEIDER
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on ARTHUR
H. LIPSON. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 801 Nor-
theast 167 St., Miami, Florida
33162, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before December 11. 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 4th day of November. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: C. P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18084 November 6, 13. 20.27, 1987


Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 13, 1987
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FILES


Miami Site of General Assembly
Host Community for 3,500
Friday, November 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Continued from Page 1-A
for North American Federa-
tions, of which there are ap-
proximately 200.
Some of the issues the
delegates will discuss during
the five days they are together
include Jewish/Catholic rela-
tions and the significnce of the
recent meeting between
Jewish leaders and Pope John
Paul II; the pressing concerns
of Ethiopian and Soviet Jews,
with special attention focused
on the upcoming summit bet-
ween U.S. President Ronald
Reagan and Soviet Prime
Minister Mikhail Gorbachev;
and the partnership between
Israel and North American
Jewry. In addition to Shamir,
a number of other guest
speakers will attend the
Assembly, including Dr.
Jeanne J. Kirkpatrick, former
United States Ambassador to
the United Nations.
Workshop topics will include
timely issues such as welfare
reform, AIDS in the Jewish
community, children of divorce
and catastrophic health care as
well as the constant federation
concerns of human resources
and leadership development,
endowments, campaign and
missions.
"This is an important event
for our community during our
Golden Anniversary as a
Federation in Miami,
highlighting 50 years of com-
munity building. It is also a
tremendous opportunity for
our residents to meet and mix
with Jewish leaders from other
cities and discuss Jewish
issues," said GMJF President
Aaron Podhurst.
Domestic issues will include
how to involve the next
generation in campaign and
leadership and reaching out to
inadequately involved Jews,
such as singles, the elderly and
the disabled.
In addition, a number of
resolutions will be discussed
and voted upon, pertaining to
such current Jewish concerns
as the controversial "Who is a
Jew?" issue that was recently
voted down in the Israeli
Knesset; federation involve-
ment in Jewish education;
peace in the Middle East; and
discrimination by private
clubs.
Orthodox, Conservative and
Reform rabbis will engage in a
"trialogue" to discuss areas of
commonality.
Most of the sessions and
events will take place at the
headquarters hotel for the GA,
the Fontainebleau Hilton on
Miami Beach. In addition to
the workshops and meetings,
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, as the host com-
munity, has several special ac-
tivities planned for the
delegates, including a gala
reception to be held pool side
at the Fontainebleau; a
run/walk on the beach for
Soviet Jewry; and a visit to the
powerful exhibit, "Auschwitz:
A Crime Against Mankind,"
on loan from the Auschwitz
State Museum in Poland at the
Main Library in the Metro-
Cultural Center.
There will also be artisans
and crafts people
demonstrating their talents,
and a special Judaica Shop will
be set up at the Fontainebleau.
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation began planning
events for the 3,500 delegates
over a year ago.
Over 1,000 local residents
have volunteered to assist the
Federation in various
capacities during the five-day
meeting, including as monitors
at the message center, infor-
mation desks, delegates
lounge and throughout the
hotel as "meeters and
greeters."
Each year, the GA is rotated
to a major Jewish community
in the United States or
Canada. The GA has been held
in South Florida twice before.
The first local GA took place in
1963 at the Diplomat in
Hollywood. In 1975, the GA
was headquartered at the
Dean Ville Hotel on Miami
Beach.
"Having the GA here is a
unique opportunity for us and
we hope it will lead to more in-
COUNCIL
Cf
JEWIM-
III II VIM NN
M I
H I
56TH GENERAL ASSEMBlv
NOVEMBER 18 2? 1987
novative programming and
creating ideas which will
enable the Federation and its
agencies to better serve the
Miami community," said Nan-
cy Lipoff, chair of the Federa-
tion Host Committee.
Assisting Lipoff are Host
Committee Vice Chairman and
Federation Board members
Helene Berger and Herb
Canarick, assistant Vice Chair
Judi Billig and their steering
committee.
The General Assembly is
open to local residents, with an
admittance fee to all
workshops and special events.
For more information,
576-4000, ext. 215.
M
IRMSH
rwioiw
RID
(KEREN KAYEMETH
LEISRAEL) INC.
cjfritintn &t/


Mivndap, QteeemAe* 20, 4987
5445 ($o/Un4 JvmBHttB
&Uc4!f\li &boa Abraham Qronhut
Praa.JNFGr. Miami
ZavW. Kogan
Praa. JNF Southern Raglon
Rabbi Irving Lahrman
Chrmn. JNF Fdtn.
Ernast Samuals
VP JNF Gr. Miami
Rabbi Mayar Abramowltz
Chrmn. JNF Exac. Board
For Information and Reservations
Jewish National Fund 420 Lincoln Road, Suite 353, Miami Beach, Fl. 33139 Tel. 538-6464
J


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 13, 1987
Miami Day Care
Continued from Page 6-B
grams, The Jewish Floridian
could cite only a handful that
were accepting younger in-
fants and extending hours to
accommodate the needs of
working parents.
The Day Care Center at
Temple Adath Yeshurun,
which has been opened for
about three years, has parents
leaving deposits even before
the mother has her baby in
order to secure a space, said
Jill Griffin, supervisor of the
infant/toddler program at the
temple in North Miami Beach.
But. there is a waiting list of
about 20 children, she said.
The infant programs accom-
modates babies from three-
months-old to 22 months. It is
open Monday through Friday
from 7:30 a.m. until 6 p.m.
Kosher breakfasts and lunches
are provided. There are eight
staff members including
teachers and aides for about 30
children.
The facility is open year-
round except in August when
it closes twi i weeks for repairs.
The full-time program costs
$80 percent per week for tem-
ple members and $85 for non-
members. The fee includes
food.
The program was created
specifically to accommodate
the needs of working parents.
Griffin said.
"Parents have anxiety about
leaving their kids at this age,"
Griffin said. "Parents come in
and as they fill out the applica-
tion, they're weeping. I tell
them they're normal parents
and if they didn't have an anx-
iety attack. I'd worry more."
They do feel more secure
leaving their children in a
synagogue program, she said,
and once the children unders-
tand that their parents are
coming back, they seem to
have more fun than they would
Hadassah
by themselves in a home
setting.
"It's fun to watch them
grow too," said Griffin, ex-
plaining that staff members do
tasks that the mother tradi-
tionally did such as potty-
training the child. "They re lit-
tle people who develop a per-
sonality and with nurturing
they change and mature and
Events
learn to cope with sharing and
getting along with
everybody."
Temple Beth Am offers an
after school program to accom-
modate children aged three to
11 until 6 p.m., although the
school does not start until 8:30
a.m. The late day classes in-
clude pottery, sculpture,
karate and computer and the
cost for the 13-week
afterschool program is $400,
which includes three enrich-
ment programs.
The local federation task
force that helped fund some of
these JCC day care programs
has been disbanded for over
two years and there are no
plans to reestablish another
task force in the near future,
said Jacob Solomon, director
of Planning and Budgeting for
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation. The recommenda-
tions from the previous task
forces, however, are in effect,
he said.
As working parents continue
to seek day care alternatives
for their children, some may
do so outside of state and city
regulations. Even leavino
children with a friend in
community who cares Z
several children at her hom,
may be in conflict with chfo
care licensing or ioZ
requirements. 8
But, as one parent told U,
Jewish Floridian: "To then
it's a business. But they
babysitters) are people whoni
we trust. We feel knowing the
person who is taking care of
our babies-she's a friend
well as a person in the com-
munity is worth everythint
in the world."
The lit Scopus Hadassah.
Admirals Port will meet on
Tuesday. Nov. 24. at noon in
the East Card Room. Dr.
Lawrence Krasne will speak.
The Yiddish class, conducted
by Jean Salinger will be on
Monday. Nov. 16 in the East
Card Room.
Hatikvah Hadassah will be
having its board meeting Nov.
19 at 7:30 p.m. at the home of
Susan Nevel. For information.
255-7120.
The Bay Harbor Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its regular
monthly meeting on Tuesday.
Nov. 17 at Bay Harbor Town
Hall at 12:30 p.m. Dr. Henry
Green, of the University of
Miami Program on Judaic
Studies, will speak on Jewish
Life in South Florida "The
Past is Our Future."
The Hadassah Israel Educa-
tional Services project will
have a luncheon and fashion
show on Thursday, Nov. 19 at
Jama Eastern Shores
Sunny Isles at noon. For infor-
mation. 861-3971.
the ORIGINAL
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Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 13, 1987
Rabbinical Council:
Restore Criterion Of Need,
Not Polictics, To Philanthropy
NEW YORK The Rab-
binical Council of America will
call on the General Assembly
of the Council of Jewish
Federations which will meet
next week, to restore the
criterion of need when
allocating funds to Jewish poor
in Israel or throughout the
world.
"Charity has always been
the unifying force of American
Jews whether religious or
secular and attempts to in-
troduce criteria of politics or
divisive religious issues rather
than need of recipients
threaten to destroy the Jewish
community structure in the
U.S.," said Rabbi Milton H.
Polin, RCA President.
The RCA said its call was to
the Jewish philanthropic
leadership and the entire
Jewish community.
In introducing the resolution
which will be presented to the
General Assembly, Rabbi
Emanuel Feldman of Atlanta,
Chairman of the RCA's Com-
mittee on Federations, em-
phasized that philanthropy has
traditionally been an area
which has untied all Jews. He
expressed regret that philan-
thropic organizations were
drifting away from their scope
and purpose and basing philan-
thropy on politics and
ideological considerations.
The RCA called on the
Jewish community to "restore
Zedek (justice) to Zedekah
(charity) by reestablishing the
primacy of the principle that
charity be allocated according
to the needs of the recipient
without regard to other
considerations.
Rabbis from 13 major Jewish
centers throughout the coun-
try participated in a special
conference of the RCA held
here last week to discuss
developments in the Federa-
tion movement.
Rabbi Emanuel Feldman,
Chairman of the Rabbinical
Council of America's Commit-
tee on Federations and Rabbi
Louis Bernstein, Chairman of
the Israel Commission, were
Co-Chairmen of the
Conference.
In his remarks to the con-
ference, Rabbi Feldman ob-
jected to Federation leaders'
attempts to influence legisla-
tion and political issues in
Israel by the use of charity
dollars.
As an example of religious
divisiveness, Rabbi Feldman
cited the "Who is A Jew ques-
tion," in which the Orthodox
position "has been grossly
misrepresented as excluding
Reform and Conservative
Jews from the people of Israel.
This is simply not a fact."
He was joined by Rabbi
Oscar Fasman of Chicago, in
criticizing those who are pro-
jecting this false image of Or-
thodoxy for political purposes.
Rabbi Louis Bernstein reveiw-
ed the proliferation of the
philanthropic organizations
and the tensions between
them. They are also becoming
involved for the first time in
issues which are of concern to
Orthodox Jews. Rabbis
reported varying tensions bet-
ween the Orthodox community
and federations in different
parts of the country.
The conference voiced deter-
mination to strengthen the ties
with the federations and
United Jewish Appeal. It
undertook to identify Or-
thodox contributors to federa-
tions and those active in their
leadership. Plans were discuss-
ed for a national Orthodox
leadership conference on
philanthropy and federations.
Aaron Podhurgt
Nancy Lipoff
Forums and Workshops Expand GA
Twenty forums, at the
General Assembly, consisting
of formal presentations by ex-
perts and panelists followed by
question-and-answer sessions,
will deal with a wide range of
domestic and overseas con-
cerns. Several forums will
focus on Israel-Diaspora rela-
tions, to commemorate Israel's
40th anniversary.
Domestic issues center on
four basic themes:
Transmission. Involving
the next generation in cam-
paign and leadership and
reaching out to inadequately
involved Jews, such as singles,
the elderly and the disabled.
Unity and diversity in the
Jewish community. The ques-
tion of "who is a Jew" and a
unique trialogue with Or-
thodox, Conservative and
Reform rabbis to discuss areas
of commonality.
Jewish education.
Strengthening our educational
institutions, supporting adult
Jewish education and
enriching veteran leadership.
Jewish mobility. Retool-
ing federations in order to
cope with the change from a
local to a continental society.
A number of forums will
feature overseas concerns,
including:
Soviet Jewry. A discus-
sion with promient refuseniks
about the current situation,
the role of federations and
future trends.
Jewish communities in
distress. Ethiopia, Syria and
Iran.
The Third World. The
JDC role in helping developing
countries.
World Jewry. Building
Jewish community and con-
tinuity globally, discussions
with leaders from Latin
America, Great Britain, Den-
mark and Australia and the
situation in South Africa.
In the context of Isrel's 40th
anniversary, several forums
will consider some of the na-
tion's significant relationships.
The United States. Israel
as a strategic ally in the Middle
East.
Federations. Expanding
the relationship between
Federations and Israel.
The Jewish Agency.
Deepening the partnership.
In the media. Journalists
discuss how Israel and the
Diaspora perceive each other.
In addition to the forums,
hundreds of other sessions
have been scheduled for this
year's General Assembly.
Dozens of workshops,
designed to foster discussion
and interchange of ideas, are
also scheduled. Workshop
topics will include timely
issues such as welfare reform,
AIDS in the Jewish communi-
ty, children of divorce and
catastrophic health care, as
well as the constant Federa-
tion concerns of human
resources and leadership
development, endowments,
campaign, missions, Jewish-
Catholic relations and
synagogue-Federation
relations.
Plenary Session Schedule
The following are highlights of the plenary session
schedule for the five-day Council of Jewish Federation-
56th Annual General Assembly:
Wednesday,
November 18
7:15-8:45 p.m.
9-10:30 p.m.
Thursday,
November 19
10:15 a.m.-Noon
1:45-3:30 p.m.
4-5:45 p.m.
Keynote address by CJF President
Shoshana S. Cardin, "Dor L'Dor:
Building Community Through
People "
Will Jewish Teenagers Become
Jewish Adults?
Who is a Jew Perspectives on a
critical issue.
Federation Leadership: Enhancing
the partnership
Challenges in Jewish Education:
How Federations Can Strengthen
Local Jewish Educational
Institutions
Keynote address by Israeli Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir, "Israel
and North America Partners
Across the Generations."
Transmitting Jewish Values to
College Students A Challenge to
the Jewish Community.
Jewish Communities in Distress:
Ethiopia, Syria, Iran.
Keynote Speaker, Dr. Jeanne J.
Kirkpatrick, former U.S.
ambassador to the United Nations.
Sunday, November 22 Closing Plenary: "Where Do We
7:45-9 a.m. Go From Here? A Look Ahead."
8:45-10 p.m.
Friday, November 20
8-10:15 a.m.
2:30-4:15 p.m.
Saturday,
November 21
8:45-10:30 p.m.
Kirkpatrick To Address GA
Dr. Jeane J. Kirkpatrick,
former United States Am-
bassador to the United Na-
tions, will join two prominent
former Soviet refuseniks, Ida
Nudel and Vladimir Slepak, as
featured speakers at the 56th
General Assembly of the Coun-
cil of Jewish Federations.
Kirkpatrick will address the
assembly in Miami while Nudel
and Slepak will be broadcast
via satellite live from Israel, on
Saturday evening, Nov. 21, at
the Fountainebleau Hotel in
Miami Beach, FL
Appointed United States
Permanent Representative to
the United Nations by Presi-
dent Ronald Reagan in
January 1981, Kirkpatrick was
the first woman to serve as the
I'nited States' chief UN
representative. She also sen,
Jeanne J. Kirkpatrick
ed as a member of President
Reagan's Cabinet.
After serving one of the
longest terms of any UN am-
bassador, Kirkpatrick resign-
ed her position in January
1985 and returned to private
life to teach, write and lecture.
A recipient of The Presiden-
tial Medal of Freedom, the na-
tion's highest civilian award,
Kirkpatrick is widely regarded
as having one of the strongest
voices and keenest minds the
United States has ever en-
joyed in a UN ambassador. She
continues to speak out on
behalf of foreign policy objec-
tives, has lectured on political
and international issues at
many conferences and forums
and is currently writing a book
and a weekly syndicated
newspaper column on interna-
tional affairs.
Htlene Berger, active in the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion since 1971 has been "/
pointed National Chain/
of the Council of J>
Federation* (CJF) Won
at the CJF Ccvcrnl \
on Nov. 18.


Bat Mitzvah
/
LILLIAN SHAPIRO
iLillian Cyd Shapiro,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John
Shapiro, will be called to the
Torah as a Bat Mitzvah on
Saturday, at 10:30 a.m. at
Temple Emanu-El.
The celebrant was a student
at Lehrman Day School,
kindergarten through seventh
grade. She now attends Ran-
som Everglades, where she is
in the eighth grade, and is on
the Junior varsity volleyball
team.
Lilly is a dancer, and has
danced in Jacksonville, Tam-
pa, and at the Dade County
Youth Fair. She has also danc-
ed in the Berkshires. At pre-
sent, she is a jazz dance in-
structor at the Emanu-El Con-
servatory of Music and Fine
Arts.
Synagogue High Schools Merge
I Beth Torah and Adath
(eshurun Synagogues have
erged their Judaica High
^hool Programs. The classes,
pw under the guidance of
hea Schwartzberg, educa-
lonal director of Adath
leshurun, alternate between
\e three synagogues.
The Judaica High School is a
Int effort on behalf of Cen-
Agency for Jewish Educa-
Mi (CAJE) and the individual
nagogues to establish mean-
classes in Jewish sub-
jects for the post-bar and bat
mitzvah student. Students in
10th grade or higher are eligi-
ble to take college credit
courses through the program.
Dr. Sandy Andron, director
of Judaica High School Pro-
gram, CAJE, says of the
merger, "It seemed like a good
idea for the programs to be
socially as well as educational-
ly rewarding. The merger has
added a great deal of
camaraderie and also provided
enlarged educational and
course options for students."
illel Elects Local Students
J'nai B'rith Hillel Student
Icretariat, representing
|re than a quarter-million
vish students in colleges
universities across North
(lerica. elected eight new
egates and four alternates
ithe 1987-88 school year.
fwo each were named for
Northeast, the Southeast,
Midwest and the West.
In the Southeast, Anat
Grunberg of North Miami
Beach and University of
Miami, and Aaron Weil of
Miami Beach and University of
Georgia, were elected as
delegates, and Joyce Kam-
merman of Valley Cottage,
N.Y., and American Universi-
ty as an alternate.
Herzl Institute Lecture Series
^n 18 week Distinguished
cture Series, sponsored by
I Florida Region Theodore
N Institute, in conjunction
f n the Synagogue Council of
pay and the four Delray
piples, was announced by
prida Region Coordinator, Is
onin. The lectures will be
Tuesdays, at 10:30 a.m.,
various temples free to the
mc.
The first of the lecture
series, on Dec. 1 will be offered
by Rabbi Pinchas Aloof, at
Temple Anshei Shalom. In his
lecture, Rabbi Aloof will
develop the theme in "An
Analysis of the notion, origin
and development of Bar-Bat
Mitzvah."
For information, 499-2735,
or 498-1564.
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
'A nd after this, Abraham buried Sarah his wife in the cave of
'held ofMachpelah before Mamre"
(Genesis 23.19).
HAYE SARAH
'AYE SARAH Sarah died at the age of 127 in Hebron, and
pas tmried in the Cave of Machpelah, which Abraham purchased
M a family grave yard. Anxious for Isaac to marry one of his kin-
IIk rather than an idolatrous Canaanite woman, Abraham sent
pis trusted servant Eliezer to his former home in Mesopotamia
rhere his brother Nahor lived. Approaching the city, Eliezer
Played for the success of his mission. He determined on a pro-
cure: He would ask each girl he met, "Give me your pitcher and
me drink": the girl who would reply, "Drink, and I will give
jy camels drink also" should be Isaac's destined bride (Genesis
w-ty. Rebekah, daughter of Bethuel, the son of Abraham's
P'ther Nahor, came to the well to draw water, and responded
|. lhl' correct formula to Eliezer's request. Thanking God for
[I! ^'n(|ne88-. the old family retainer presented himself to
r Hkah's family, explained his mission, and received permission
r K,',)ekah to accompany him back to Canaan as Isaac's prospec-
f '* We. Isaac loved Rebekah, and was consoled in her after his
other s death. Abraham took another wife, Keturah, and she
,re |'im sons whom he dispatched to the east. At the age of 175
Faham died &n chpelah.
loneThCOun,'ng the wek|y Portion of the Law is extracted and based
ami/t?cGraphlc Hl8,0'y of the Jewish Heritage,' edited by P Wollman-
. l.*'5' Published by Shengold. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
"* York. N.Y. 10038. Joseph Schlang is president of the society
r"'ibutmg the volume
Friday, November 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Eliezer Silberstein
Local Student
To Compete
In Jerusalem
Eliezer Silberstein, the
14-year-old son of Rabbi
Harvey Silberstein, principal
of the Rabbi Alexander S.
Gross Hebrew Academy
Elementary School, will repre-
sent the Hebrew Academy at
the International Bible Con-
test, to be held in Jerusalem
April 21, 1988.
As a ninth grade student at
the Hebrew Academy last
year, Eliezer took third place
in the National Bible Contest
held in New York last May. In
preparation for this contest,
Eliezer memorized 70 Bible
chapters.
Eliezer, who has won awards
in mathematics, science and
Judaic Studies, will be com-
peting with Israeli students
among others in the upcoming
international contest in
Jerusalem.
Mildred Riesenberg, president
of Miami Region ofHadassah,
has recently returned from a
trip to Puerto Rico where she
worked with the local
Hadassah chapter, one of the SO
chapters in the Miami Region.
Riesenberg addressed a
meeting of Young Leaders and
a Membership luncheon,
delivering her speeches in
Spanish. The Puerto Rico
Chapter consists of women of
all ages, many of whom are
Cuban refugees.
Beth Torah Singles
Beth Torah Singles presents
Jerry Levine, Channel 10 s
Consumer Troubleshooter and
weekend Anchorman who will
be guest speaker on Wednes-
day, Nov. 18 at the temple in
the Nacron Chapel. There is an
admission fee. For informa-
tion. 947-7528.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
5:13 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach, Fla. 5312120
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig
ADATHYESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Zvl Rozen Conservative
Executive Director. ,jj>
Harry J. Silverman fab)
Dally mlnyan 7:30 a.m. and S p.m.
Frl unicilpm
Att LEfftB,bo' '* "wto
uTJ "k.^ ^"""n* Mam. Sh.bb.i
Kidduih loiiowing in honor ol Sam Tool
75lh*lrtnday
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 667-6867
Leonard Schoolman, Sr. Rabbi
Mark Kram, Associate Rabbi
Lynn Goldstein, Assistant Rabbi
Frl. 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Mark Kram will ip... on
Grandparents and Qrandchlldran
Generation To Generation "
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854-3911
Jack Riemer, Rabbi
Robert Albert, ,.
Cantor (if.)
Rev. Milton Freeman,
Ritual Director
v
Dally Mnrlcaa. Mon and Thur*. 7:30 a.m.
Tim*.. Wad. and Frl. 7:4S a.m.
Sun. S a.m. Evenings 5 30pm
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave., Miami Beach
534-7213 534-7214
Barry J. Konovitch. Rabbi /'.
Sergio Grobler, President \V/
Sholem Epelbaum, President,*"
Religious Committee
m
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Assistant Rabbi Ronnie Cahan
Yehuda Shifman, Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
Kabbalal Shabbat 6 p.m. Sal. 9 a.m.
Dr. Irving Lahrman will preach
Cantor Yehuda Shilman will chant.
Bat MlUvah Lillian Cyd Shapiro.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive, Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schlff
Dally 7:30 a.m. (Mon. Thura. 7:1S) 7 p.m
Fit. 7 p.m. Sat. vim Raaarv tor High Holiday
Daya.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Mlaml'i Pioneer Reform Congregation
137 NE. 19th St. Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob G. Bomatein
Fn 8p.m. Downtown:
Rabbi Rai D. Partmatar will apaak on
"Papa Waa a Patriarch." Liturgy will ba
conducted by Cantor Rechatle F Nalaon
and Cantorlal Sololat Harvay Kautman.
Mambara ol Ralph Chwaiti Qlmal Claaa
will conduct portion! ol tha liturgy.
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667-5657
Michael B. Eisenstat. Rabbi
Sat Snabbat Service 11 15 am
? ?????
)
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St.. N. Miami. FL 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs, Rabbi
Dr. Joseph A. Gorf inkel, /""*
Rabbi Emeritus
Moshe Friedler, Cantor
Fn.8p.rn
Sat. 8:45 a jn.
Weekday aarv. Mon Fn 8 a m
Mon. Thura. 5 p.m. Sun. 8:30 am
Sal. MS a.m.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave., M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 53*4112
Rabbi Aivadla Rosenberg
Cantor Moshe Buryn
Dally aervtcae 8 am 8 / pjn.
Sat. 8:15 am
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
238-2601 i
Rabbi David H. Auerbach \
Cantor Stephen Freedman
Frl. Service! 8 p.m. Family Sarvlca 4th Orada
will participate Sat 9:30 am
Bar Mltnah Mark Jattrey Holland
TfMPLE BETH sHQLoM 538-7231
Chase Ave. 4 41 St M Liberal
DR. LEON KRONISH. Senior Founding Rabbi
OARY A QLICKSTEIN Sank* Rabbi
HARRY JOLT. Au JASON OWASDOFF Aaaletenl Rabbi
IAN ALPERN. Cantor *""
OAVIO CONVISER. Cantor Emerttua
Frl. 8:15 p m. Rabbi Gary Glickataln will apaak
on "Stale ol tha Union Reform
Judaiam 5748 Saturday aarvicaa 10:45 am
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7526
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd. ._---,
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz. Rabbi '3*)
Zvee Aroni. Cantor X-J>
Harvey L. Brown. Exec. Director
Daily aarvicaa Monday through Friday
7.30 a m and 5 30 pm
Lata aarvicaa Frl 7:30 p.m.
Sat 8 25am and Mincha
5:15pm Sun 8am and 5.30p.m.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Shoshanah Raab, Cantor
Sarvicei Frl. 7:10 p.m.
Sat. 9:30 am
Onag Snabbat will lollow
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz ^>
Ari Fridkis. Assoc Rabbi ,'SBj
Cantor Murray Yavneh VX^
Sat.9am sabbatheantca.
Dally Mlnchah Sunday Friday
Bamandftp.m
Sat.9a.m. and 8:15p.m.
TEMPLE NER TAMID 866-8345
7902 Carlyle Ave., 866-9833
Miami Beach 33141 Conaarvatlva
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz >s>.
Cantor Edward Klein f Wt j
Dally Sarv. Mon Frl 8 a.m. 8:30 p.m. % -X.
Sat. Mincha 8:15 p.m. Sun 8:30 a.m.
ft X p m Sat.: 845 am aarv by Rabbi Lebovttz.
up.r
Ca.
ilor Klein
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
ol North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St
North Miami Beach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung
SHAARE TEFILLAH
TORAH CENTER OF KENDALL
7880 SW 112 Street toJLai.
2326833 v3??
Rabbi Hershel Becker *J V
Dally San. 7 a.m. Frl. 10 mln. attar candla
lighting lima Shabbol9 a m Shabboa
Mincha 10 mln. balora candla lighting lima
Sun. 8:30 a.m. ________
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dade s Retorin Congregation
Ralph P. Kingsley, Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I. Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
Rabbi Julian I Cook will apaak on
Whale Now In tha World olRalorm
Sat. aarv Bar Mitzvah Slavan Ouchm
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
271-2311 **.
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi (W )
Benjamin Adler, Cantor V-S' '
David Rosenthal, Auxiliary Cantor
Minyan 7 a.m. Monday! and Thursdays
Sunday 9 a.m. Fn 8.30p.m aarv conducted
by Oimal and Dalad Hebrew School
:>*i Serv 9am Rabbi bnapi'o una
Cantor Adiar olhciating