The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03066

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
' ]fewi]hi Fl]ri >sh m.
/A*A
lolume 60 Number 45
Miami, Florida Friday, November 6,1987
Price 50 Cents
Reagan Nominates Jewish Jurist To Court
4^1 11
^B" %
r

By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
President Reagan nominated
U.S. Court of Appeals Judge
Douglas Ginsburg as an
associate justice of the
Supreme Court Thursday. If
confirmed by the Senate, he
would be the sixth Jew to
serve on the high court, the
first since 1969.
Reagan made the announce-
ment before a cheering au-
dience in the East Room of the
White House. He urged the
Senate to act quickly to pre-
vent the type of opposition
that led to the rejection by the
Senate of his first nominee to
replace Justice Lewis Powell,
Judge Robert Bork.
Reagan said the 41-year-old
Ginsburg is "unpretentious'
and "highly respected by his
peers." He noted that
Ginsburg was confirmed
unanimously last year when he
was named to the Court of Ap-
peals for the District of
Continued on Page 15-A
/
esident Reagan introduces Court of Ap-
%L? Judge Douglas Ginsburg to the press as
announced that Ginsburg will be his
rinee to the Supreme Court in the White
For Berg Murder:
Security Tight
As Hate Trial Begins
.HJ kAi Hi mil: it
\
o
s
House Briefing Room last Thursday.
Ginsburg, who could be the high court's only
Jewish justice, was widely reported to be the
choice of Attorney General Edwin Meese III,
By CHRIS LEPPEK
Intel-mountain Jewish News
DENVER (JTA) -
Security was unusually tight at
the U.S. District Courthouse
here last week as jury selection
began in the civil rights trial of
\e Shin Bet Secret Report:
Coercion Used To Extract Confessions
By HUGH ORGEL
PEL AVIV (JTA) The
|in Bet, Israel's internal
curity agency has, since
[71. used psychological and
physical pressures" to obtain
lfessions from suspected
riorists and resorted to per-
py to ensure convictions, ac-
fding to the report of an in-
stigating committee, made
alic, in part, on Friday.
The report is expected to
jger a flood of appeals to
heel's Supreme Court for
trials for terrorists and
hers convicted on the basis
[confessions.
The report, nevertheless,
recommends no criminal ac-
tion against Shin Bet
operatives who employed
extra-legal methods and, in
fact, sanctions such methods in
some cases. The extent to
which they may be permitted
is specified in a section of the
report submitted to Premier
Yitzhak Shamir that remains
secret.
The report was prepared by
a government-appointed
judicial commission headed by
former Supreme Court Presi-
dent Moshe Landau, assisted
by a former head of Mossad,
the external secret service,
whose identity is classified,
State Comptroller Yaacov
Maltz and Gen. Yitzhak Hofi,
former commander of the nor-
Continued on Page 13-A
Gorbachev Damns Soviet Past
MOSCOW Soviet officials
have long been accused of
rewriting their history to suit
current political currents. In
the present climate olglasnost,
Mikhail Gorbachev re-
examined Soviet history in a
much-anticipated speech in the
Kremlin Palace or Congress,
on Monday, Nov. 2.
In the nationally televised
speech, which marked the
kickoff of celebrations for the
Bolshevik Revolution's 70th
anniversary, Gorbachev spoke
on issues which had been taboo
in the Soviet Union for the
past 25 years.
Admitting that Stalin was
guilty of "enormous and un-
forgivable" crimes, Gorbachev
Continued on Page 14-A
four avowed white
supremacists accused of
murdering Denver radio talk
show host Alan Berg, a Jew, in
1984.
At least a dozen federal mar-
shals guarded the defendants
as the lengthy jury selection
process began last Monday. It
was expected to last through
the week, and the trial itself
several weeks.
The defendants, accused of
planning and carrying out the
murder of the outspoken and
popular radio personality, are
members of the white
supremacist gang known
variously as the Silent
Brotherhood or The Order.
David Lane, 48, a former Ku
Klux Klan member in Col-
orado, is accused of driving the
getaway car after the June 18,
1984 machine-gun slaying at
Berg's apartment here. Lane
had argued with Berg on his
radio program several weeks
before the murder.
Bruce Pierce, 33, is accused
of being the trigger man.
Continued on Page 10-A -
ongressman Lehman:
On The Paradox Of
The Presidential Focus
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
\Jewisk FUmdian Staff Writer
CONGRESSMAN William
Ihman is asked to place his
* Who will it be in the White
fuse in 1988: Democrats or
publicans?
[Depends on the economy,"
* the 74-year-old North
.de Democrat, a senior
fiber of Congress, Chair-
F> of the Transportation Ap-
*>Pnation Sub-Committee
1 a member of the powerful
>use Appropriations
Imnuttee.
['If the economy improves,
then I think Republicans will
have a good chance to keep the
White House. If the economy
deteriorates, I think
Democrats will walk in."
Lehman, meeting with The
Jewish Floridtan, said
America's infrastructure
needs modernization if the na-
tion is to maintain its strength
yet he did not fault his own
branch of government or
Democrats versus
Republicans.
"I think it has to do with the
paradox of this administration
just as much as. anything else,"
he said. "And the paradox of
this administration is defense,
defense, defense."
Lehman touched on his
distaste for defense spending
several times during the
course of the interview, mak-
ing comments such as, "We
should be trying to spend our
money on solid waste instead
of nuclear weapons."
As Chairman of the House
Transportation Appropria-
tions Sub-Committee, Lehman
is battling for a $10 billion
Continued on Page 6-A
Cong. William Lehman


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 6, 1987
Not Strangers in the Land
By AVIVA CANTOR
(Part Six In A Series)
BUENOS AIRES JTA) -
The debate over pluralism in
the Argentine Jewish com-
munity centers in large part on
the question of what action
Jews should take on behalf of
democracy and human rights
to best ensure the survival of
both democracy and of the
community and who should
decide.
The debate takes place in the
aftermath of eight brutal years
of military rule following a
half-century in which every
elected government was over-
thrown by coup. The junta's
1976-83 reign of terror has left
a legacy of raw memories and
of fear that the past may be
prologue.
Young Jews told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that dur-
ing the junta, people were
afraid to read, to think or to be
involved. Said a young com-
munal leader in Cordoba, the
city with the second largest
Jewish population: "During
the junta there was no safe
place. If you had a group you
were suspect. The biggest fear
we have to overcome is the
fear of joining."
Although most Jews do not
believe a military coup immi-
nent, nervousness about
whether the government was
strong enough to weather the
pressures from the military
forces became especially acute
in the past half-year. It was
during this time that the
military pressed for and
won the passage of legisla-
tion that would basically halt
the trials of most officers ac-
cused of perpetrating human
rights atrocities, such as
murder, torture and kidnapp-
ing, during the reign of terror.
In late December, Parlia-
ment passed the "Punto
Final" (last stop) law Presi-
dent Raul Alfonsin had called
for, which set a deadline of
February 22 for new indict-
ments. The prospect of trials
of mid-level officers on active
duty set off a series of bar-
racks rebellions during Easter
Week in April. Despite the fact
that over a half-million people
from all sectors of society took
part in a rally to support the
government, Alfonsin called
for a second law.
This "Obediencia" (due obe-


dience) law, passed with
modification in June, granted
virtual immunity of prosecu-
tion to all officers below the
rank of Brigadier-General,
under the presumption that
they were "under subordina-
tion to superior authority and
carried out orders, lacking the
possibility of ... opposition."
Reuven Sadan, the Kibbutz
Artzi/Mapam shaliach
(emissary) to Latin America,
said the government "wanted
to get out from under the
pressure of the generals and
close the book" on human
rights cases. Most Argenti-
neans, he continued, "want to
finish with the trials." Herman
Schiller, president of the
Jewish Human Rights Move-
to conduct a war against them,
he said. "But I cannot accept
that tortures won't be tried."
Many Jews felt torn between
their personal feelings as Jews
that tortures and murderers
should, like Nazi war
criminals, be tried and punish-
ed, and their political evalua-
tion that if this was done,
democracy might not survive.
Dr. David Goldberg, presi-
dent of the DAIA, the officially
recognized political umbrella
organization for Argentine
Jewry, told a visiting North
American delegation of Jewish
journalists and communal
leaders at the time of the Obe-
diencia debate that "the main
present risk to Argentine
democracy is that the military
anti-Semitic element should
take power, they will know
what the position of the com-
munity is. Because of its posi-
tion, the community has a
special risk."
There are many in the com-
munity, however, who are
critical of the DAIA for issuing
what they regarded as a
"weak declaration" during
Easter Week, and for not tak-
ing a position on the Obedien-
cia law because, in Goldberg's
words, "this is not a question
of black and white."
The Jewish Human Rights
Movement, said Schiller, is
trying to give a Jewish tone to
the human rights struggle."
But, he told JTA, "it's not
easy to go against the stream
.***<*&L****&*?**l*l***:+.+*-~+*
The Jews Of Argentina
Fear The Past Is Prologue
ment (JHRM), described the
population as "a little tired,
pessimistic that nothing can be
done."
The response among Jews to
the introduction of the Obe-
dience law was mixed.
Schiller, who opposed the
law, commented that what the
generals really wanted was
"vindication that they were
the messiahs who saved
Argentina from Satan." Renee
Epelbaum, a leader in the
Founding Line group of the
Madresof the Plaza de Mayo
who have been marching since
1976 to demand to know what
happened to their missing
children, felt the law
represented giving in to
blackmail: "Next time they
will demand monuments to
their heroism," she said.
Jorge Jaimovich, the
attorney-general of Cordoba
province whose cousin Alejan-
dra was tortured, raped and
murdered after being kidnap-
ped in 1976, told JTA he was
conflicted. The terrorists
"were criminals, too" and it
was legitimate for the military
people are not happy, because
they felt they are being called
up as a mass group to justice,"
he continued.
"The military feel they are
being accused. The democratic
society doesn't want to accuse
the (entire) armed forces, only
the people who participated in
these horrible crimes. How can
we place the whole armed
forces on trial? Even though
this was not the intention, this
is how it appeared. This
delicate situation cannot be ac-
cepted or last for a long time."
Goldberg told the delegation
that the Argentine Jewish
community had "openly put its
total bet on the democratiza-
tion process. The Jewish com-
munity is seen as naturally
democratic, therefore outside
any possiblity of a totalitarian
regime. With a totalitarian
regime, the greatest benefit
the Jewish community can
hope for is not to be bothered,
but it can have no participation
and is therefore half-dead. We
need an alive Jewish
community."
But, added Goldberg, "if an
in the Jewish community."
"It's a harsh battle," con-
tinued Schiller, whose
newspaper Nueva Presencia
was the target of two bombs
and daily phone threats during
the junta because of its strong
stand on human rights. "But
it's a Jewish tradition to fight
injustice."
Members of Rabbi Baruj
Plavnick's Convervative Com-
unidad Bet El are also active
on behalf of human rights.
Congregants wearing kipot
participated in the rally during
Easter Week, giving out mat-
zot to other demonstrators.
The Seminario Rabinico, which
trains Convervative rabbis, is
preparing a doc
vd.ng a political 2L*
the Easter Week XL'
from a B.bHcal *
Teenagers from the iu
Community Cent*? fc
very active in i *j
democracy, marched S
their flags in th* 3
Obedience^rallyVyVS
Hebraica holds regiljJj
meetings on human rights^
.ssettmgupachairtoS
forms of discrimination
RSle "?e.m** of b*
B nth which sees educafo
toward democracy as oneoj
functions marched in that ri
\y, they did so as individuals
They did not carry their |I
^TT5' a youne leaderl3rj
JIA, because "wecannot.
mit the accusation of ben
Communists." a charge ofta
hurled at human rights *.
tivists and Jews.
B'nai B'rith, he said, speak
up without prior authonzatia
by the DAIA when necessarr
but only in its own nme.
does the Hebraica. This at-
titude is not always favor**
received by the DAIA
deed, one DAIA leader called
B'nai B'rith "undisciplined"-
because, he said, "the DAIA
believes there should be odj
one voice in the communitv
the DAIA's.
The Hebraica, its president
Mario Trumper, told the Nodi
American delegation, was or*
of the institutions that founded
the DAIA in 1936, which, he
said, was useful for mam
years. "But now things haw
changed. Many (ethnic)groups
have many different (internafi
movements which express |
themselves and their on]
needs. We think the Jewisi
community must have #
ferent voices to express itseit j
for different readings i\
reality."
Germany, Canada
Redouble Nazi Search
*Jen iti th*kJ**n
'OMIMM
Ptxm: (305) 37*4805
Published weekly every Friday
Ince 1927 by The Jewish Flori
dlan. Office and Plant 120 N.E.
6th St. Miami, Fla. 33132. Phone
(306) 373-4606.
Sacond-Ctasa Postage paid in
Miami. Fla. USPS 275320
Postmaster Form 3578 return lo
Jewish Florldian, P.O. Box
012073. Miami, Fla. 33101.
The Jewish Florldian does not
guarantee the Kashruth of the
merchandise advertised In its
columns.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: In ad-
vance (Local Area) One Year
W 50 (Anniversary Special) Out
of town, country, upon request.
By Mall S1.45 per copy.
NEW YORK (JTA)) -
The Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith and B'nai B'rith
Canada have commended the
West German government for
doubling its reward for infor-
mation leading to the arrest of
wanted Nazi war criminal
Josef Schwammberger.
The reward, announced by
the Ministry of Justice in
Bonn, now stands at the
equivalent of $250,000.
Schwammberger is accused of
organizing the deportation of
Jews in Poland to the
Auschwitz death camp and of
personally murdering at least
50 Jews in Przemysl
southeast of Warsaw, on
September 3, 1943.
Reported to have sought
refuge in Argentina after
World War II, Schwamm-
berger, 76, is now believed to
be living in Canada, under an
alias, with members of his im-
mediate family. His name was
on a list of the 10 most wanted
Nazi fugitives issued in
Jerusalem Oct. 14.
Frank Dimant, executive
vice president of B'nai B'rith
Canada, noted in Toronto that
the increased reward is
payable for information
leading to Schwammberger's
whereabouts or arrest. It no
longer carries the condition
that he be extradited to stand
trial in West Germany.
This is significant inasmuch
as Canada recently
adopted legislation allowing
war criminals found on Cana-
dian soil to be prosecuted for
crimes committed elsewhere.
Continued on Page 11-A
Now the community has something good to celebrate
The Fontainebleau Hilton has invested $2 million in
an all-new Kosher Banquet Facility. We now offer
aa f~*^___..I .a a ___
Completely separate facilities dedicated
strictly to Kosher food.
Capability to serve up to 10,000 Kosher
meals at a sitting.
All food preparation under strict rabbinical
supervision.
For great weddings or bar mitzvahs. the Fontainebleau is
just the beginning. Contact our catering departmental
538-2000, extension 3521.
RDNTAINEHIJU HILTON
KlMKI \MW<\
14411 oll.ns Avenue. Miami. Florida J3140
.^a-i J^A**..,..;' I I '-'^"'-


wm News m
Konndnp
Friday, November 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
Austrian Socialist Denounces Waldheim
New Violence
In Territories
JERUSALEM (JTA) Violence erupted anew in the
administered territories following a clash between Israeli
forces and rioting students at Bethlehem University in
which two students were seriously wounded and several
others overcome by tear gas. Military authorities ordered
the Bethlehem campus closed for three months because of
the rioting.
Department Stores Bought
By U.S.-Israeli Group
NEW YORK (JTA) A partnership of American and
Israeli investors has purchased the outstanding stock of
Shalom Stores Ltd., owner of Kol Bo Shalom, the first and
largest privately held department store chain in Israel.
The investor group was organized and is headed by
Goldklang Silvers Investment co., the merchant banking
division of M.S. Goldkland & Co. Inc., an investment bank-
ing firm that specializes in developing relationships bet-
ween companies based in Israel, the United States and the
Far East.
New Who's Who
In World Jewry
BALTIMORE The new edition of WHO'S WHO IN
WORLD JEWRY, the first in six years, has been complete-
ly revised and features a special reference section on Soviet
Jewish Refuseniks.
The 1987 Seventh Edition includes more than 6,000
newly-researched biographies of Jewish men and women of
achievement from more than 70 countries, according to
publisher Charles A. Buerger. Mr. Buerger is also
publisher of The Baltimore Jewish Times and the Detroit
Jewish News. The co-publishers of WHO'S WHO IN
WORLD JEWRY are Michael and Robert Hort, President
and Chairman of the Board of Enterprise Press, Inc., in
Xew York, For information, (212) 741-2111.
Dutch Must Compensate Women
Survivors
AMSTERDAM The minister of social welfare is under
court order to revise his decision denying government
payments to women victims of the Nazis who are not their
family breadwinners.
The case arose from the appeal of a Jewish women whose
payments were stopped when she married. She charged
sex discrimination, noting that men married to wealthy
women continue to receive their payments.
Soviet Jewish Emigration Slightly Up
nE WUY0RK A total of 912 Jews left the Soviet Union
m October, of whom 246 proceeded to Israel, the National
Conference on Soviet Jewry reported Monday.
^,aft month's emigration figures compare to 724 Jews
who left the Soviet Union in September and 104 who left in
October 1986. The total emigration for the year to date
numbers 6,340.
Neo-Nazi Sentenced to Prison
FRANKFURT Former Neo-Nazi Otfried Hepp was
sentenced Oct. 27 in Frankfurt to ten and a half years in
prison for attempted murder, membership in a terrorist
group and participation in a crime involving explosives as
well as four bank robberies. Hepp was a leading member of
a neo-Nazi grup in Frankfurt with anti-American views
which planned and carried out the bombing of cars belong-
ing to American soldiers in 1982. A U.S. Army sergeant
was seriously injured in Butzbach in December 1982 by a
car bomb planted by Hepp. The 29-year-old Hepp gave a
complete confession during the trial and asserted that he
had renounced his neo-Nazi beliefs.
Argentine Catholic Lay Leaders
Apologize
WASHINGTON Argentina's National Commission on
Justice and Peace, an organization composed of lay leaders
of the nation's Conference of Bishops, has apologized to
B nai B'rith for anti-Semitic comments made by an Argen-
tine priest earlier this month.
In a letter to Seymour D. Reich, international president
of B'nai B'rith, Estiban de Navares, president of the com-
mission, and Emilio Albistur, secretary, said "On behalf of
the Catholic community, we ask you to forgive us for the of-
fense you have been given." The anti-Semitic sentiment
was expressed in a church mass for a military group by the
Rev. Manual Beltran.
VIENNA (JTA) A
ranking member of Austria's
governing Socialist Party last
week denounced President
Kurt Waldheim as "a per-
fidious liar" and demanded
that he resign for the good of
the country.
Thunderous applause
greeted the remarks by Josef
Hindeis, president of the
Federation of Socialist
Freedom Fighers, at the open-
ing of the party's three-day na-
tional congress here. "When
an official does serious damage
to the country, it is not
undemocratic to say: 'Resign
in the interests of Austria, Mr.
Waldheim,' Hindeis said.
He assailed Waldheim for
having concealed for 40 years
including two terms as
secretary general of the
United Nations the fact that
he served during World War II
as an intelligence office with a
German army unit in the
Balkans that was involved in
the deportation of Greek Jews
and atrocities against civilians
and resistance fighters.
The 575 delegates attending
the Socialist Party congress
are to debate two resolutions
on Waldheim, the World
Jewish Congress reported.
One calls for his resignation;
the other would place a
greater distance between the
party and the Austrian head of
state.
Waldheim's Nazi past was
exposed by the World Jewish
Congress during his campaign
for the Austrian presidency in
the summer of 1986. He has
since been placed on the U.S.
Justice Department's "Watch
List" of aliens barred from
entering the United States.
Carter Plans Mideast Meet
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Two prominent Likud
members of the Knesset, Ehud
Olmert and Dan Meridor, are
"considering" invitations from
former president Jimmy
Carter to speak for Is.-ael at a
high-powered peace seminar in
Atlanta, Ga., where a Jorda-
nian minister, Palestinian
political figures and Iraqi
diplomats will also attend.
The two MKs'names appear
in print in a preliminary pro-
gram issued by the Carter
Center of Emory University
for the conclave, scheduled for
mid-November. Other par-
ticipants include Adnan Abu
Oudeh, the minister of the
Royal Court in Jordan's
government; Iraqi Am-
bassador to the U.S. Ab-
dullamir Al-Anbari; Iraqi Am-
bassador to the UN Ismat Kit-
tani: East Jerusalem editor
Hanna Siniora; Egyptian
presidential aide Osama El-
Baz; and ranking Soviet and
Chinese officials.
The official designation of
the two-day event is a "con-
sultation." Their names,
however, do not appear in the
program.
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 6, 1987
And Now, Justice
Douglas Ginsburg?
Following the tortuous road to non-
confirmation of Judge Robert Bork, we face
the specter of another conservative in the
mold of Attorney General Edwin Meese III.
And, we face another standoff on Capitol
Hill.
Does it malign the process to suggest that
the Reagan administration is throwing a
token Jew to the Senate lions in an attempt
to defang the hearings? Does the nomination
of a largely unknown and patently young
and inexperienced jurist of conservative
bent who is Jewish suggest that the ad-
ministration is attempting to emasculate the
process and the liberal organizations that
fought successfully against the Bork
nomination?
Surely, the American Jewish community
is not so naive or ethnically immature that it
would buy (or encourage senators to vote
for) a jurist whose potential tenure on the
court is half a healthy lifetime based upon
the suffix of his last name. Surely we
demand from Sen. Joe Biden's committee
the same thorough investigative review of
Judge Douglas Ginsburg that we sought
with Judge Bork.
In the early reviews of Judge Ginsburg's
resume, questions have been raised about a
perceived conflict of interest, the absence of
significant writings, and only a year's worth
of federal judicial experience.
Among the most damning of worries is the
presidential threat to throw another Bork at
Reagan's thwarted Supreme Court desires.
If, as one syndicated columnist suggested,
Bork dragged a 30-year paper trail behind
him, then Ginsburg has left not even a
footprint.
With that as prologue, do we dare ask,
'And now, Justice Ginsburg?'
Reaching For The Summit
To his credit, President Reagan has put
his full resources behind both achieving the
summit conference of Dec. 7 and the propos-
ed treaty banning intermediate range
nuclear weapons.
It is not wholly unexpected that he finds
the principal opposition coming from his
most vigorous adherents, whose fears were
expressed when Reagan voiced his "evil em-
pire" description of the USSR.
Just as then President Nixon faced a
firestorm almost 20 years ago from the right
when he opened U.S. relations with Com-
munist China, the current White House in-
cumbent must overcome like cries of
disbelief.
In both instances, the conservative legions
have sought to enlist the aid of American
Jewry which is so united in its support of the
State of Israel.
Once again, Jewish organizations and
leaders will have to remind the hawkish seg-
ment of the Senate that the Soviets' anti-
Zionism and anti-Semitism do not alone
negate this nation's foreign policy.
Only a Nixon, it is said, could have gone to
what was then Peking. And perhaps only a
Reagan can achieve the end of a significant
part of the nuclear madness which threatens
mankind.
If verification details can be worked out,
the INF treaty deserves ratification.
The summit in no way represents
American surrender to Moscow, but only a
capitulation to the realization that the hor-
rors of a global war are all too real.
?OTA
Unlearning The Hate
The very names are frightening:
Skinheads, White Aryan Resistance, the
Southern National Front and, of course, the
KKK.
Like its forebears and ideological col-
leagues, the "Skinheads" are neo-Nazi.
The racist "Skinheads," however, are
a youth-oriented group which surfaced in
the U.S. in the early '80s and which has been
involved in violent activities as close to home
as Orlando.
And now, utilizing the new found media of
"shock radio" and public access cable televi-
sion, the fringe organizations have punc-
tuated the airwaves with their hatred.
In the small Idaho town of Coeur D'Alene,
some 120 organizations from across the land
gathered to make common cause against the
new wave of neo-Nazism.
The anticipated Jewish and Black civil
rights agencies were on hand, but so, too,
were Montana farmers, Hispanic war
veterans, gay students, Asian Americans,
American Indians and Moslems espousing
Palestinian rights.
The very idea that the Pacific Northwest
be made into an all-white bastion free of
Jews (the "Aryan Nation") seems beyond
belief. But the threat is real enough to cause
numerous other meetings in addition to the
Idaho session.
The Northwest Coaliton Against Malicious
Harassment is the mouthful which brought
the 120 groups together.
But it overcame its long name with agree-
ment on the one issue which unites the
disparate membership: The need to institute
practical methods of fighting prejudice in
the United States.
Other gatherings to combat the seemingly
renewed prospects of organized bigotry are
being held around the country
They may not have the glamour of the
marches of the 1960's, but their purpose and
their need are equally great.
'Meals On Wheels'
"Meals on Wheels" is the popular and
generic title for a program which will
receive deserved national recognition begin-
ning Sunday.
In Dade County, we look especially to the
Jewish Vocational Service Nutritional Pro-
ject which services 1,600 elderly patrons in
both the congregate communal setting and
through a home-delivery program.
Funded through Title III of the Older
Americans Act, the JVS meals project is
Dade's only kosher meal service program.
While it is non-discriminatory and serves a
minority population as well as Jews in Miami
Beach and North Miami Beach, the local
JVS project is noteworthy because, since
1972, it is one of the originally-funded pro-
grams to provide vital sustenance in a way-
sensitive to the physical and psychological
needs of its clients.
We applaud the JVS for its ongoing ser-
vices in seven congregate sites and
acknowledge the desperate need fulfilled by
the wheels portion of the meals project. The
all-senior volunteer staff and the almost ex-
clusively senior part-time staff deserve
special note.
It is their commitment to their fellow
citizens that makes the program continue to
work.
Redgrave Plays The Court
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
VANESSA REDGRAVE.
the British actress who cham-
pions the PLO, has gained a
civil rights victory in her court
battle with the Boston Sym-
phony Orchestra.
Redgrave filed a $5 million
lawsuit in Boston in 1984 after
the orchestra canceled her con-
Fred K. Shochet
Editor and Publisher
eJewish Floridian
Norma A. Orovitz
Managing Editor
Suzanne Shochet
Enecutive Editor
William T. Brewer
Director of Operations
Joan C. Teglas
Director ot Advertising
Friday, November 6. 1987
Volume 60
14Heshvan 5748
Number 45
tract as narrator for a produc-
tion of "Oedipus Rex."
This has been a protracted
fight in which a colorful
melange of nationalities is
noticeable. We are indebted to
Sophocles of Greece for the
original text and to France's
Jean Cocteau for the text of
Russian composer Igor
Stravinsky's fabulous music.
The symphony's music direc-
tor is Seiji Ozawa of Japan.
Redgrave hails from England,
where she generates pro-
paganda for the Palestinian
terrorists; and the orchestra
has long been the pride of
Boston Brahmans.
Now a U.S. circuit court has
reversed the ruling of a federal
district court, which had *
allowed consequent*
damages for the cancejntg
of the Redgrave contract wro
the symphony. BeyondJig
the circuit court reversed *
district court on the appi|
tion of the Massachusetts U"
Rights Act.
Orchestra management no*
faces a thorny financial PJ
blem, and many familiar w
Redgrave's deep ^**5
the PLO and hostMy tjjj
Israel are disturbed by the new
court developments.
It's true, but hard to un^
tand, that when ReJP
signed the contract, an
Continued on Par 13-A
~~


The Proactive Approach:
Friday, November 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
The Cutting Edge Of Hate Group Management
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
COEUR D'ALENE, Idaho
The Northwest Coalition
Against Malicious Harassment
utilized its first-ever conven-
tion, a three-day conclave here
that ended Sunday, to examine
the one issue on which its
disparate membership agrees:
the need to develop and pro-
mulgate practical means to
battle prejudice in the United
States.
To this serene resort town
near lakes and gentle moun-
tains came 225 people, among
them Montana farmers,
Hispanic war veterans, urban
radical blacks, Asian
Americans, gay students,
Moslems interested in Palesti-
nian rights and members of
several American Indian
tribes.
They represented 120
organizations including the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith and the American
Jewish Committee, both
charter members of the
coalition.
Tony Stewart, head of the
political science department at
the local North Idaho College
and organizer of the con-
ference, described the coali-
tions as a "fragile crystal."
Oscar Eason Jr., conference
vice president, gave a similar
appraisal at the conference's
Closing plenary. "Each of us
has one thing in common: We
want to fight racial and
religious harassment. We
on that," he stated,
n acknowledged that any
number of groups present had
"only that one single issue in
common."
What you need to know,"
said Larry Broadbent, a local
deputy sheriff who is
acknowledged nationally as an
intelligence specialist on hate
groups, "is that the concerns
you have in New York are the
same concerns we have in
Idaho. There are good people
all over the United States and
there are hate groups, too, all
over, that we all oppose."
The conference was marked
by plaintive descriptions of
specific hurts against the
various ethnic groups,
perpetrated by racist ex-
tremists or, in the case of the
American Indians, by a long
history of government
indifference.
Conference participants
were silently respectful of all
speakers, and vibrant dialogue
followed almost every presen-
tation on responses to harass-
ment and prejudice.
This Idaho town, about 50
miles east of Spokane, Wash.,
was a natural site for the con-
ference. In recent years it has
been the site of attacks by the
ultraright-wing Aryan Nations
movement, whose compound is
located just north of here in
the vicinity of Hayden Lake.
The Aryan Nations and
allied groups have declared
their goal of making the
Pacific Northwest an all-white
bastion.
Although the Aryan Nations
recently has been quiet in the
immediate area, conference
speakers noted the ongoing
underground and sporadic ac-
tivity in the Northwest and
throughout the entire country
by loosely aligned, right-wing
neo-Nazi groups.
Many of the speakers called
for state legislatures to in-
crease the powers of law en-
forcement officials to combat
violence and latent prejudice.
Attorney General Jim Jones
Soviet Jew Vladimir Slepak ended a 17-year
hut tie to leave the Soviet Union Sunday, arriv-
ing in Vienna to a welcome from his son Alex-
ander at Vienna Airport. (AP/Widc World Photo)
Continued on Page 12-A
Sol Linowitz
Backing Into Camp David Again
Ambassador Sol Linowitz
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
THE UNITED STATES
has a "real responsibility" tc
help Israeli officials work
through their sometimes crip-
pling differences that block a
peace agreement with Jordan,
said Ambassador Sol M.
Linowitz, a man who has the
ear of Secretary of State
George Shultz and the friend-
ship of Israel's top political
leaders.
Linowitz, who played a role
in the Panama Treaties
negotiations and the Camp
David accords, spoke to The
Jewish Floridian during his
recent visit to Miami.
Shultz returned to the
United States last month after
visiting the Middle East and,
according to Linowitz,
reported that "not very much
happened," in his attempt to
move the Israeli leaders closer
to an agreement on how to ap-
proach a Middle East peace
agreement.
Linowitz met with Israeli
leaders in August and said he
understands the issues that
are blocking progress. "I did
get a few ideas where there
could be movement and that I
communicated to the State
Department," he said. "I
recommended that Shultz go
there."
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres, leader of the Labor Par-
ty, "believes that this is a
critical moment to try to move
forward with the peace con-
ference if the peace process is
not to die," Linowitz said. The
Peres plan calls for the par-
ticipation of the five perma-
nent members of the United
Nations Security Council br-
inging the parties together for
bilateral negotiations.
Prime Minister Yitzhak
Shamir, leader of the Likud
Party, which shares control of
the government with the
Labor party, "believes to move
forward under the Peres plan
will not be in the best interest
of Israel and will indeed invite
problems because of the in-
volvement of the Soviet
Union," Linowitz said.
THE DEADLOCK of the
Israeli leaders and the
"danger of an explosion" in
the Middle East are reasons
why "the United States has a
real responsibility now," said
the 73-year-old ambassador.
"I think we have to work
with both Shamir and Peres on
an ongoing dedicated basis to
try to help them overcome
their differences."
For starters, Linowitz, a
senior partner in the interna-
tional law firm of Coudert
Brothers, said the United
States should get involved
with the Middle East peace
process on a continuing basis.
"I'd like to see them appoint
a special emissary with the
authority I had to work on a
continuing basis with (Jor-
dan's King) Hussein and Peres
and Shamir. They used to have
it. Phil Habib did it. I did it.
But now the State Department
is doing it."
Linowitz cited an example of
how the United States could
help the process.
"Shamir," he said, "is con-
cerned about the participation
of the Soviet Union. As a con-
venor, he's going to involve
them substantially as well as
procedurally. He would be
reassured if there was some
way of making absolutely clear
that this would not happen.
We can help them deal with
that issue, for example, by our
Continued on Page 15-A


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 6, 1987
Lehman: Tough On ...
Id
Continued from Page 1-A
transportation bill and says he
would vote for more gas tax
money especially if it were to
be earmarked for the nation's
highway system and public
transportation.
He said the problem with the
nation's controversial air-
traffic control system is that
no one has built a new airport
in 15 years, but Lehman strays
back to his favorite whipping
post the defense budget.
"WE HAVE a problem
vitalizing our air-traffic con-
trol system basically because
the software in our com-
puterized air-traffic control
system is two years behind
schedule," he said.
"And one of the reasons it's
behind schedule is that most of
our best software technicians
are working in the Depart-
ment of Defense. We're spen-
ding way too much money do-
ing hi-tech things that should
be going into our consumer
society."
Lehman aimed his attack at
"big ticket weapops that
nobody can use anywhow"
such as the MX-missile, the
B-l bomber and the Strategic
Defense Initiative System,
known as Star Wars.
"All our best technology and
brains are going into the
Defense Department and not
into health services. That's the
way its been almost eight
years under the Reagan
Administration."
However, a Congressman
can "run into all kinds of
troubles" trying to get these
programs killed, Lehman ad-
mitted. "If you try to eliminate
the MX-missile, maybe 100
people working in Birm-
ingham, Alabama may lose
their jobs. California has
almost a half-million people
working in the defense in-
dustry. In Massachusetts, all
those schools MIT, Harvard,
University of Massachusetts
are turning out these highly
educated people who are in
turn dealing with industries
that make hi-tech weapons."
'If the economy
deteriorates, die
Democrats will walk
in.'
While defense spending can
be cut as far as Lehman is con-
cerned, the $3 billion in foreign
aid to Israel should not be cut,
he said. Lehman and a few col-
leagues on the Appropriations
Committee were able to block
the move against exempting
Israel and Egypt from the
across-the-board reductions in
military aid. While the 1988
appropriations bill has left his
subcommittee, it still has not
been signed into law. Israeli
officials are now debating
whether to voluntarily forgo
some $80 million in military
aid.
"TRADITIONALLY, Israel
has been at the $3 billion level
and once you start harking
away at that, once you permit
the level to drop below $3
billion, there will be attempts
to reduce this level of funding
not by $36 million (as was tried
this year) but by $236 million,"
said Lehman.
There were some committee
members who felt that it
would be in Israel's best in-
terest to take the cuts so that
they would not be held out as a
special case, Lehman said.
Israel is the largest recipient
of U.S. foreign aid but every
year "the pressures are get-
ting more difficult to withs-
tand," Lehman said. "It's very
difficult to make any program
exempt from the cut. To many
people there's not logic of cut-
ting AIDS research or reduc-
ing the hot-meals program and
still not reduce aid to Israel.
That's our battle."
When he argued for the
Israeli aid to be maintained,
Lehman said he pointed out
"that Israel cannot endure and
survive under a reduction in its
aid from the U.S., become a
victim of the military build-up
by the Soviets in Syria, and
then have another outbreak in
the Middle East.
"The other argument we use
is that Israel is strategically
important to the U.S. in that
part of the world. Israel is our
only truly dependable ally
there and it is almost an exten-
sion of our own U.S. national
security."
Lehman and the other South
Florida congressman, have
joined the majority of
legislators keeping Israeli aid
alive. Still, said Lehman, there
is no opportunity for Israeli
supporters.
"I THINK you have to be
very much concerned,"
Lehman said. "I do not have a
crystal ball but it would be
unreasonable to think the level
of funding for Israel could re-
main permanently at a fixed
level when every other federal
program, including our own
defense spending, will have to
be reduced under the pressure
to reduce the federal deficit.
We have to play this year by
year. Hopefully, there will be
some kind of an accord worked
out in the Middle East in the
foreseeable future where
Israel would no longer need,
perhaps, the level of defense
expenditures."
The best hope for Israel,
Lehman predicted, is Jordan's
King Hussein. "There is, I
think a great deal of behind-
the-scenes maneuvering bet-
ween Israel and Jordan and
trying to stabilize the West
Bank situation.
"We have now a Jordanian
Bank operating on the West
Bank," Lehman nmoted,
"making consumer loans and
other tilings. The Jordanian
presence in the daily lives of
people in the West Bank is go-
ing to maybe split the loyalty
of the West Bank settlers bet-
ween the PLO-types and
Jordan."
'The pressures on
Israeli aid are getting
more difficult to
withstand.'
On the subject of military
and economic aid, Lehman ex-
pressed regrets that his com-
mittee had no option but to cut
aid to Pakistan.
"We have a law that says
any country that we provide
military or economic aid to
that's in the process of
creating nuclear weapons, that
aid has to be cut off. Now we
find that Pakistan is building a
plutonium bomb.
"So we've stopped aid to
Pakistan even though
Pakistan is very important
strategically to our position in
Afghanistan. And also,
Pakistan is now providing the
main highway for the Iranian
Jews to escape from Iran into
Pakistan and then Israel."
LEHMAN said the commit-
tee is waiting for Reagan to
certify that Pakistan is no
longer proceeding with this
building of the bomb and then
"aid can be forthcoming."
Lehman, unlike his South
Florida legislative colleagues,
does not support military aid
for the Nicaraguan contras in
their flight against the
Marxist-backed Sandinista
government.
"We should let those two
factions, the contras and the
Sandinistas and, I have no
sympathy for the Sandinistas
resolve their own conflict,"
Lehman said. "Pouring
weapons into Central America
only means more bloodshed.
"We have supported tyran-
ny from time to time, whether
it's tyranny that exists in
Chile, or tyranny that exists in
Philippines. We supported
South Korea when it had a
very oppressive government.
"The problem with us is that
we seem to support most
anything that stands in opposi-
tion to the spirit of Marxism or
socialism. I happen to think
the Sandinistas are not really
relevant to the security of this
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TEL A VIV UNIVERSITY Secretary of State Gorge P. c^
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administration. Mr. Shultz himself contributed $10,00
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(right).
country or even to its
neighbors. They're such a God-
forsaken, earthquake-
demolished country, how can
they be a threat to its
neighbors or the United
States?"
President Reagan, Lehman
contends, "is obsessed" with
Nicaragua. Reagan, he said,
believes that Nicaragua will be
the home of Soviet submarines
and missile sites. Lehman
thinks differently.
"What Central America is
about is basically 400 years of
oppression under the big land
owners, the oligarchic families
and the established military,
and then everybody else on the
other side. Now everybody
else is trying to have a voice,
have land reform, and have
some kind of hope for oppor-
tunity. They've been disen-
franchised, poverty-stricken,
disease-ridden, uneducated, il-
literate, everything else for
300-400 years. That's the pro-
blem. Not the Soviets."
LEHMAN also differs from
some colleagues who admit
that the United States should
not have gotten so involved in
the Persian Gulf but now
there, should not back out.
"We shouldn't have gotten
there. We shouldn't be there.
And we should get out," he
stated. "I don't think we owe
the Kuwaitis and the Arab
countries any American lives
or resources. They'll stick it to
us any time they have the
chance.
"I don't think," he added,
"we need to subsidize with our
money the protection of oil to
Japan and Western Europe,
They never encouraged us to
go in there and reflag those
ships," he said of the Kuwaiti
tankers which are flying the
American flag as the U.S.
military escorts them through
the Gulf.
'What Central
America is about is
basically U00 years of
oppression.'
As for being involved and
not wanting to retreat,
Lehman observed. "We were
in Lebanon and we got out. We
were in Vietnam and we got
out. I hope it doesn't take a
disaster to show the irra-
tionality of us being there."
While Lehman discussed
some of his political views, he
also revealed what he thought
was his political strength.
"If I had a thrust in what I
Continued on Page 9-A
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Friday, November 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
War Crimes Commission
To Open UN Files
By MARK JOFFE
NEW YORK (JTA) The
former member states of
tie Allied War Crimes Com-
nission have finally agreed to
i plan to open its files on more
han 40,000 Nazi war criminals
public inspection. Eyal
irad, a spokesman for the
[sraei Mission to the United
ilations, said in a telephone in-
^rview Sunday that the mis-
[ion had not been informed of
he news, but had been able to
onfirm reports about the com-
nission's decision that ap-
eared Saturday in the New
fi.rk Times.
Arad said UN Secretary
feneral Javier Perez de
Euellar will announce the deci-
lon when he returns from
Europe this week and is vir-
uallv certain to authorize
pening the files, which of-
ficially are under his
irisdiction.
The secretary general is
|ii>i Wound by any recommen-
btions" of the commission,
Lrad said. But he added that
rerez de Cuellar "told us that
[v wants to open the files.
there's no point in dragging
ii- feet any further," he said,
m that the commission has
lecided.
Until now, the files of the
)ng-defunct War Crimes
pommission have been accessi-
jle only to the governments of
nember states of the United
Rations. Israel has been press-
Dg for some time that they be
pen to scholars, researchers,
riters and journalists.
Initially, most of the 17
|>rmer member states of the
Bmmission were opposed.
ne by one they fell in line,
Dwever, and after several
Meetings over the last two
pmths unanimous agreement
reached on a formula for
iiblic access.
[Under the reported plan,
ksponsibility for granting ac-
kss will be transferred from
ke secretary general to the
fnited Nations member
internments, which will be
ee to authorize their citizens
inspect the files, stored at
ke United Nations archives on
lark Avenue South,
lanhattan.
[Commenting on the commis-
lon's decision, Binyamin
Ntanyahu, ambassador of
Vael to the United Nations,
kid, "This is an important vic-
fy over those who would
stort and deny the terrible
uths mankind should never
rTget if it is to retain its
imanity."
Arad said the decision is like-
' to enhance Israel's standing
I the international communi-
j- "We showed the world we
live the power to pursue goals
p believed in" and that "we
fn get what we want." He ad-
"we were helped im-
mensely in our campaign by
any Jewish organizations."
I Responsibility for the files
p transferred to the United
felons in 1948, after the War
Times Commission completed
investigations. Israel's
impaign gained momentum
Ihen Kurt Waldheim, a
fnier secretary general of
the United Nations, was
elected president of Austria in
the summer of 1986, after a
campaign during which Jewish
groups, mainly the World
Jewish Congress, exposed the
Nazi past which he had con-
cealed for 40 years.
Waldheim is one of the
25,000 names on the list of so-
called "Class A" suspects in
the war crimes file against
whom the commission felt it
had sufficient evidence to pro-
secute. The list provides one-
line summaries of the
background of the suspects
and the accusations against
them.
Arad said the opening of the
files will facilitate the prosecu-
tion of wanted Nazi war
criminal Alois Brunner who
now lives in Syria. The Syrian
government has refused to
comply with an extradition
warrant issued by the West
German government years
ago.
"We want to revive the
whole issue and hopefully br-
ing international pressure on
Syria to release Brunner,"
Arad said. He observed that it
was "not surprising" that
Brunner lives in Syria. Noting
that Amnesty International
recently released a report on
the use of torture in Syria, he
said, "Where else could he feel
at home?"
Brunner, whose file is in the
archives, reportedly told the
Chicago Sun-Times in an inter-
view that he doesn't regret
anything. He still lashes out
against Jews.
Retired Ohio auto worker accused of Nazi war (*M during a short break in Demjanjuk 's trial
fnmes at thi Treblinka death camp, John which resumed Monday after two-month
Demjanjuk llejl) consults with his lawyer John delay. (AP/Wide World Photo")
Demjanjuk Gets Defense
By GIL SEDAN-
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Count Nicolae Tolstoi, a dis-
tant relative of the famous
Russian novelist and
philosopher Leo Tolstoi,
testified for the defense Mon-
day in the trial of suspected
war criminal John Demjanjuk.
Tolstoi, a historian, backed
the main defense argument of
the Ukrainian-born Demjanjuk
that he had been a German
prisoner of war during World
War II and therefore could not
have been the notorious
Treblinka death camp guard
known as "Ivan the Terrible."
The prosecution has cited a
1948 application for help Dem-
janjuk submitted to the United
Nations in which he nowhere
mentioned that he was a POW.
Demjanjuk says he feared he
would be forcibly returned to
the Soviet Union.
Tolstoi said he researched
the issue of the forced return
of Soviet refugees ater the war
and found Demjanjuk's ex-
planation reasonable. He said
that even as late as 1948,
Soviet nationals were being
returned to the Soviet Union
against their will and the
Western allies cooperated in
that policy until 1950.
Demjanjuk testified that he
belonged to a Red Army unit
stationed in Heuberg in the
spring of 1944. The prosecu-
tion produced expert
testimony that the specific unit
did not exist in that region at
that time. Tolstoi testified
however that it could have
been there, as Demjanjuk
claimed.
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Me &cAefo$20. $45. $40.
&c* iftcAeit ^adi 532-4368


Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. November 6. 1987
On Eve Of Meet:
Demonstration To Sway Summit
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Ida Nudel and Vladimir and
Maria Slepak. three long-time
refuseniks who recently im-
migrated to Israel, will join
thousands of American Jews
and non-Jews in a demonstra-
tion for Soviet Jewry on the
Mall here Dec. 6. the eve of the
summit meeting between
President Reagan and Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev.
Plans for the "Washington
Mobilization" were announced
at a news conference here
Monday by the Summit III
Task Force, representing 50
national Jewish organizations
and 300 local federations and
councils, which has been plann-
ing the demonstration for
nearly two years.
The mobilization is expected
to be the largest Jewish
demonstration ever held in
Washington Mobilization and
former chairperson of the Na-
tional Jewish Community
Relations Advisory Council.
But she emphasized that the
demonstration will also include
thousands of non-Jews who
support the struggle for Soviet
Jewry.
"The mobilization will serve
as a watch to guarantee and
stimulate" both the I'nited
Staes and the Soviet Union to
keep the issue of human rights
high on the agenda during the
talks between Reagan and
Gorbachev, said Morris
Abram, chairman of the Na
tional Conference on Soviet
Jewrv. which organized the
Task Force.
"The principle that we will
be emphasizing time and again
is that while no one is asking
for any direct linkage of arms
reduction and human rights or
emigration, the credibility of
the Soviet Union and the good
faith and the return to the nor-
mal relationships, which we all
hope for. will be measured and
tested by whether the Soviet
Union complies with its obliga-
tions under international law.
international treaties and the
Helsinki Accords," he added.
Abram said the joint
IS-Soviet statement issued
by the White House after
Reagan announed Govbachev
accepted his invitation to a
summit Dec. 7 was "historic."
He explained that this was
because the statement stress-
ed that the summit would be
"a substantive meeting which
covers the full range of issues
between the two countries"
and would seek to make
"significant headway over the
full range these of issues."
Abram credited the "per-
sistence" of Reagan and
Secretary of State Shultz in
making human rights an agen-
da item in meetings with the
Soviets in changing Moscows
attitude that human rights is
strictly an internal matter.
The demonstration, which
will start at the Ellipse and
conclude at the Lincoln
Memorial, will be "dignified
and orderly." Abram said.
"This is not a demonstration
against." Levine said. "This is
a demonstration for for a
process of emigration which
will be sustained, which will be
substantive in terms of the
numbers of people who will be
able to leave and which will be
systematic so that Soviet Jews
know what to expect when
they apply for visas."
Noting that the demonstra-
tion will allow participants to
"make our feelings known by
making our presence known."
Levine said that just as during
the civil rights movement, the
mass gathering will be one of
the "very few times in life"
when a single person by his or
her presence can feel that he
or she "made a difference."
Senate Rushes
To Rescind
Resolution
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON-(JTA).A
sense-of-the-Senate resolution
was adopted urging the United
States to support efforts to
have the United Nations
General Assembly rescind its
1975 resolution equating
Zionism with racism.
The resolution, introduced
by Sen. Daniel Moyninan (D.
N.Y.), declares that the IN
resolution "has been unhelpful
in the context of the search for
a settlement in the Middle
East; is inconsistent with the
Charter of the United Nations;
remains unacceptable as
misrepresentation of Zionism;
has served to escalate religious
animosity and incite anti-
Semitism."
A similar resolution has been
introduced in the House by
Reps. Hamilton Fish and Ben-
jamin Gilman (both R.. N.Y.)
Ullman's Pledge To Israeli Students
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Norwegian film star Liv
Ullmann was awarded an
honorary PhD by Haifa
University this week, her
seventh honorary doctorate.
Ullmann pledged that "for
as long as I shall earn money."
she would finance the educa-
tion of an Arab student at
Haifa University, and her hus-
band Donald Saunders. who is
Jewish, would finance, that of a
Jewish student.
Ullman dedicated the PhD to
the memory of Pavel Fried-
man, an 11-year-old Jewish
boy murdered by the Nazis at
Auschwitz. Two years
previously, in the There-
sienstadt ghetto, he wrote a
poem about a yellow butterfly
which survived him.
Jewish Press Awards Planned
WALTHAM, Mass. (JTA) The Cohen Center for
Modern Jewish Studies at Brandeis University will join the
American Jewish Press Association in sponsorship of a ma-
jor award program for the Jewish press.
The Brandeis center will administer the Simon Rockower
Memorial Awards for Excellence in North American
Jewish Journalism beginning this fall. Brandeis public rela-
tions officer Steven Cohen will continue to administer the
award.
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WOJAC Demands
Arab Compensation
Friday, November 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
mien
TM
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
[Arab countries were urged
Wednesday to pay compensa-
I tion to the estimated 850,000
Jews who were forced to leave
I their homes and other assets in
I Arab countries after the
I establishment of the State of
Israel.
A resolution making this de-
imand was adopted by some
800 delegates from North and
I South America, Europe and
Israel as they ended the three-
|day, third international con-
ference of the World Organiza-
I tion of Jews from Arab Coun-
tries (WOJAC) here.
WO JAC also called on the
Arab governments, especial-
ly Iraq. Syria, and Yemen," to
"cease the exploitation of the
|Arab refugee problem for,
[political purposes." The Arab
[countries should "absorb and
[resettle their neglected
|brothers, just as Israel in-
Itegrated the majority of
llewish refugees from Arab
countries," the WOJAC
resolution said.
Israeli Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres told the Knesset
Monday that Israel will seek
compensation for Jewish pro-
perty abandoned in the Arab
countries at the proper time.
He spoke during a Knesset
debate timed to coincide with
the WOJAC conference.
Speakers at the conference
had emphasized that the issue
of Jewish refugees from Arab
countries had not received
world attention, because the
refugees were welcomed into
Israel and are now an integral
part of that society.
It was also stressed that
there were more Jews who
were forced to leave Arab
countries than Palestinian
Arabs who left Israel and their
property which was frozen,
abandoned or expropriated far
exceeds the value of the pro-
perty left by Palestinian
Arabs.
Lehman'Alabama Bill'
t ontinued from Page 6-A
was trying to accomplish, it's
maybe not sweeping economic
programs or budgetary reform
or a master plan for peace or
nuclear disarmament. My role
has t>een most effective when I
fan make a difference for cer-
lin people."
A case in point: The other
day, one of Lehman's consti-
tuents came to his office and
he helped arrange for her a
1,200 eye operation she
Critically needed but could not
afford. Lehman knew the
voman's mother from when
^he was a waitress at Wolfie's
iestaurant on Miami Beach.
DURING Lehman's travels
In recent years to East Berlin
pn Congressional business, he
Bidet racked to discuss Jewish
peeds of the community. His
Merest resulted in that Com-
munist city's first full-time
abbi in 19 years.
In 1984, he personally smug-
fted a heart valve into the
joviet Union, enabling a
pman to receive a life-saving
eration.
In 1981, Lehman negotiated
ith Argentinean officials to
ave released into his personal
istody', a young Jewish
Argentinian woman who had
ent 52 nightmarish months
ehind bars as a political
Jrisoner.
As a ranking Democrat on
h5,,Se,ect Committee on
[children, Youth and Families,
enman this summer held
anngs in Miami to support
Us position that there is a
eat need for daycare centers
' assist working mothers.
Lehman was born in Selma,
^, the son of a peppermint
>ck manufacturing company.
"tier. After graduating from
N University of Alabama
*ith a degree in economics,
enman moved to Miami,
["ere he met Joan Feibleman,
whom he has been married
r 48 years. Lehman went in-
a used car dealership
Fulness, for which he became
Rtely known as "Alabama
While used car salesmen
sometimes have questionable
products, Lehman said he was
different. "I never really tried
to hard-sell a car. I never real-
ly tried to get the top dollar for
it. And I had more mechanics
than I did salesmen. People us-
ed to say, 'Best used car I ever
bought."
LEHMAN left his business
operation to managers and
returned to school, spending
months studying at institu-
tions such as Harvard and Ox-
ford, he said. Then he started
to teach, at Norland Senior
High School and then Miami-
Dade Communtiy College.
"People said, 'You're a
businessman and a teacher.
We need someone like you on
the school board.' "Lehman
ran for the school board in
1966 and unseated an
incumbent.
"In 1972, they redistricted
and there was an extra con-
gressional seat in North Dade.
I'd done what I could do at the
school board," he said. "We'd
gone through the desegrega-
tion process and things had
settled down and I said, 'I'll go
to Washington. I can do more
for education up there than
down here so I ran for Con-
gress in 1972 and was
elected."
On the Arab Nations:
'They'll stick it to us
any time they have
the chance.'
In 1988, Lehman said, he
plans to seek another term.
"As long as I'm productive
and do things that a new
member couldn't do because of
the position I'm in up there, I
think I have a responsibility to
the community and besides
that, I enjoy what I'm doing.
When the staff is going to have
to lead me around by the hand
because I'm decrepit."
"I'll get out before that
happens."
"Souvenirs. Get your Exodus souvenirs here-robes, hats,
pendants...."
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 6, 1987
Berg Trial Began Amid Security
Continued from Page 1-A
Richard Scutari, 40, allegedly
acted as lookout during the
crime, and Jean Craig, 54, is
accused of shadowing Berg in
the weeks before his killing. A
suspected fifth member of the
alleged hit squad, Robert
Mathews, was killed in a
shootout with police in
Washington in December
1984.
The defendants already are
serving prison terms from con-
victions on racketeering
charges stemming from the
Brotherhood's earlier ac-
tivities, mostly in the Pacific
Northwest. Under the federal
charges they are now facing,
all could draw maximum life
terms in prison.
U.S. attorneys charge that
Berg's murder was part of a
radical rightwing plot to over-
throw the U.S. government,
often called by Brotherhood
members the "Zionist Occupa-
tional Government," or ZOG.
The defendants are charged
More Conflict On Israeli Cuts
I
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Finance Minister Moshe
Nissim said last Wednesday
that Israel would not volun-
tarily give up any part of
American military aid, but
would have to accept a possible
decision by the U.S. govern-
ment to cut it.
According to Nissim, Israel
is fully entitled to both
economic and military
assistance from the United
States, because *of the
strategic role it fulfills. Israelis
a strategic asset, possibly the
only one the free world has in
the Middle East, and it costs
the United States much less
than its expenditures in
NATO, Nissim said.
He spoke at the annual
seminar of the Treasury's
budgets department and was
referring to speculation by the
news media that Israel might
willingly forgo about $80
million of the $1.8 billion of
promised American military
aid this year as a gesture
toward Washington's efforts
to cut the federal deficit.
The Defense Ministry denied
any such intention Tuesday.
The Cabinet reportedly agreed
last Sunday that Israel will in-
sist on receiving its American
aid package in entirety.
Moshe Arad, Israel's am-
Death Penalty
Gets Backing
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Sentiment has been mounting
for capital punishment in
Israel and Justice Minister
Avraham Sharir added his
voice in support of the death
penalty for "very serious
crimes."
He told reporters it should
apply not only to Arab ter-
rorists but to Jews convicted
of crimes such as rape and
murder or the kidnap-killing of
a child.
"I am under the impression
that the effect of the present
punishment has eroded,"
Sharir said, referring to the
current maximum penalty for
crimes in Isrftel, life imprison-
ment. He stressed that the na-
tionality and religon of the
criminal was irrelevant.
Demands for capital punish-
ment rise every time a ter-
rorist commits murder. The
last person executed in Israel
was Nazi war criminal Adolf
Eichmann. who was hanged in
1961.
bassador to the United States,
was quoted by the Jerusalem
Post last Thursday as denying
press reports that he favored a
voluntary cut in American aid.
A statement issued by an
Israel Embassy spokesman
noted that economic and
military aid was part of a for-
mal American commitment to
Israel.
with violating Berg's civil
rights by murdering him
because of his Jewish religion.
To prove its case under the
1968 federal civil rights law,
the prosecution must convince
the jury that the defendants
acted with force, injured Berg,
acted because of Berg's
religion, acted willfully and
took action resulting in Berg's
death.
Violation of Berg's civil
rights apparently is easier to
prove than homicide, accor-
ding to Saul Rosenthal,
regional director here of the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith. He explained that
unlike under the latter charge,
circumstantial evidence is per-
missible in a civil rights case
and evidence can be "lumped
together to paint a picture" to
convict the four as a group.
Prosecutors plan to in-
troduce evidence indicating
that The Order had also
discussed murdering such
well-known Jewish figures as
Baron Elie de Rothschild and
television producer Norman
Lear.
The prosecution is expected
to call more than 100
witnesses including a man in-
volved in the group's
counterfeiting operations,
another who already has
testified that Brotherhood
members told him of their role
in Berg's killing and a rabbi to
define what is a Jew.
Attorneys for the defense
quizzed jury candidates as to
whether they believed so-
meone could be highly anti-
Semitic, yet be unwilling to ad-
vocate the murder of a Jew, of-
fering a possible hint as to
their trial strategy. All those
questioned acknowledged such
a possibility. Most potential
jurors indicated they were of-
fended by anti-Semitic
remarks.
Berg often used his radio
shows to lambaste white
supremacists and other
racists frequently J"
with them on the air over k
telephone. After such a dX
sion with former Colorado K
Klux Wan leader Freu^U
in 1979, Wilkins came Z
Berg's studio and confronted
fe.Belaud at the time that
Wilkms was armed during the
incident, but later declined tn
press charges.
The federal action on the
case follows a decision last
year by Denver District At-
torney Norm Early not to file
homicide charges against the
four, based on his feeling that
there was insufficient evidence
to convict them.
Rosenthal, who protested
the district attorney's decision
not to file charges, tied the
trial to a number of cross-
burning incidents in the
Denver area in recent days.
"The next step in this pro-
cess would be the adoption of
an ethnic harassment and in-
timidation statute in Colorado
to punish cross-burners,
swastika-sprayers and other
intimidators of minorities," he
said. "Alan's death deserves
no less that this."

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Friday, November 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Rabin Raps U.S. Persian Gulf Policy
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
(Washington)
And HUGH ORGEL
(TelAvir) .
(JTA) The State Depart-
ment voiced surprise Thursday
it Israel Defense Minister Yit-
hak Rabin's criticism of the
,'S. policy in the Persian Gulf.
Rabin, at a press conference
st week in Jerusalem, charg-
Cd that the United States has
een manipulated into suppor-
ting Iraq in its eight-year war
nth Iran, with the result that
he Soviet Union has "become
he only superpower that can
talk to both parties" in the
Iran-Iraq war.
"We certainly would
disagree wiht his assessment
and we're surprised at this
criticism of our policy," State
Department spokesman
Charles Redman said. "All
states in the Middle East, in-
cluding Israel, which has been
singled out frequently as an
enemy of the government of
Iran, should be concerned
about Iran's hostile behavior
and expansionist goals."
Although Israeli leaders
have made it no secret that
they favor Iran in the Gulf
war, Rabin's remarks were
believed to be the first public
criticism of the U.S. policy by
an Israeli government official.
The defense minister hinted
that the West, including the
United States, may have fallen
into a trap to take action
against Iran for the benefit of
Iraq.
As Rabin saw it, the U.S.
and European navies entered
the Gulf conflict due to Iranian
attacks on civilian oil tankers
actions that were only in
retaliation for Iraqi attacks on
Coca-Cola Will Not Boycott Israel
NEW YORK An
American Jewish defense
organization has received writ-
ten assurances that the Coca-
Cola Company has "no inten-
tion of terminating or restric-
ting" its long-standing rela-
tionship with its franchised
ottler in Israel. That
surance was given after the
merican Jewish Congress
et with Washington and New
fork city counsel for the giant
oft drink company and
rought to their attention cor-
pondence betwen Coca-
ola and Syrian boycott of-
cials, which the AJCongress
btained through a source in
,ondon.
; entire episode was
onstructed by the organiza-
on; Coca-Cola has been on
e Arab blacklist since 1967
hen it franchised a bottler in
rael. While all of the 21
embers of the Arab League
e engaged in a primary
ycott of Israel and Israeli
oducts, only 13 of those
untries maintain blacklists
of companies that trade with
Israel. Consequently, the soft
drink was sold in Egypt,
Algeria and six other Arab
lands. Last July, Coca-Cola
opened a bottling plant in the
Persian Gulf region which was
approved by the governments
of the United Arab Emirates
and Oman, countries that
adhere to the secondary
boycott, indicating a softening
of their position.
Coca-Cola was interested in
further expansion in the Arab
world and in November 1986,
its English-based branch
sought permisison to register a
branch office in Syria. As part
of the process, it submitted
corporate information and
documentation in Syrian of-
ficials. Two months later,
Coca-Cola filed a report (No.
78638341) with the U.S. Com-
merce Department, although
at that stage no question about
the Arab boycott had arisen.
As part of the Syrian
registration process, Coca-
Cola was told that it must file a
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Suite 210 i3
No entries will be returned
Winners will be announced at the Expo and their
PflAers will be displayed there
All coiilebtantA wtwse fosters will he displayed mil
receive a free admissi' I
request that its boycott status
be reviewed and it also a
received a letter from the
Damascus boycott office to
that effect. Coca-Cola
thereupon filed a second
report with the Commerce
Dept. (No. 3808032) in which it
stated that it would not submit
any information prohibited by
regulations of the Export Ad-
ministration Act.
On May 31, 1987, Coca-Cola
filed a third report with the
Commerce Department which
included a translation in
English of the letter from the
Syrian Boycott Office. Again,
Coca-Cola told Commerce that
it declined to forward any in-
formation not permitted by the
anti-boycott regulations.
Satisfied with the good faith
of the Coca-Cola Company, the
AJCongress has accepted the
August 4, 1987 assurance of
the company that it plans to
continue its relationship with
the Israeli bottler.
Coca-Cola has shown that it
can do business both in Israel
and the Arab world. The drop
in the price of oil and the con-
sequent recession in Arab
revenues have undoubtedly
contributed to a softening of
certain Arab countries'
boycott postures.
- Boycott Rep0* ~
Nazi Search
Continued from Page 2-A
Dimant said B'nai B'rith
Canada has worked with the
Royal Canadian Mounted
Police's war crimes division on
individual cases of alleged war
criminals, in conjunction with
the ADL's war criminals task
force.
In addition, Dimant urged
Canadian Justice Minister Ray
Hnatyshyn to immediately
launch the prosecution of 20
alleged war criminals living in
Canada who were cited by the
Deschenes Commission.
The commission, headed by
Judge Jules Deschenes of the
Quebec Superior Court, con-
ducted a year-long investiga-
tion of war criminals living in
Canada and submitted its
report and recommendations
to the government earlier this
year. The law allowing the pro-
secution of war criminals in
Canadian courts was one of
the recommendations.
Welles said that individuals
who have information on
Schwammberger should con-
tact Prosecutor Hoeschner in
Stuttgart, West Germany, or
the ADL at 823 I'nited" Na-
tions Plaza. New York. NY
1(1017; (212)490-2525.
Yitzhak Rabin
Iranian oil storage installa-
tions and ships.
Iraq had certain objectives
when it started the war and
later "globalized" it, Rabin
said. Iraq hoped to knock Iran
out by attacking its oil installa-
tion on the eastern shores of
the gulf. Failing that, it sought
to draw Iran into attacking
pro-Iraqi installations and
tankers on the western shores.
This forced the United
States to take actions against
Iran, to Iraq's benefit, Rain
said.
He contended that the
Western fleets do not "protect
the Iranian right of free
navigation, which is under at-
tack by the Iraqis. They pro-
tect only the right to naviga-
tion of Kuwait, Saudi Arabia
and the oil princes of the
western side of the Gulf that
might be attacked by the Ira-
nians in response to the Iraqi
attacks."
He said that if Israel had to
choose a winner in the war bet-
ween its two sworn enemies.
it would prefer Iran. As he had
stressed during his visit to
Washington last summer,
Rabin explained that Iran will
be a "bitter enemy" of Israel
as long as the Khomeini
regime is in power.
But he added that Iran was a
friend of Israel for the 28 years
before the Khomeini regime
and could be again "once this
crazy idea of Shiite fundamen-
talism is gone."
Rabin also contended that
the Iran-Iraq war has produc-
ed some political benefits for
Israel and may even help ad-
vance the peace process with
Jordan.
Amog the advantages was
the fact that the Arab world,
particularly Syria, cannot now
count on Iraq to join an Israel-
Arab war, "whatever some
crazy Syrian might think,"
Rabin said. In addition, he
said, the Gulf war has created
"total disarray" in the pro-
Soviet camp, allowing Egypt
to rebuild its relations with the
Arab world, damaged by the
Israeli-Egyptian peace treaty
of 1979, without harm to
Israel.
Furthermore, Rabin said,
Baghdad's dependence on Jor-
dan for logistical support has
provided King Hussein with
considerable leverage in peace
moves toward Israel.
However, this situation might
not last and Israel must take
the initiative now in the peace
process with Jordan.
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 6, 1987
Hate Group Management
Continued from Page 5-A
of Idaho cited the importance
of stronger law enforcement,
coupled with strict legislation.
Idaho recently enacted laws
severely penalizing acts
leading to violence or even
training for violence.
Idaho and Washington both
enacted laws against malicious
harassment. Montana,
through its Human Rights
Commission, has established
strict rules that provide for
civil rights of all groups.
Deputy Sheriff Broadbent
said an important goal is to in-
clude hate crimes reporting in
national legislation enacted by
Congress. Just such a bill was
passed by the House Judiciary
Committee last week.
Jones said law enforcement
officers must advocate the
dignity and equality of all
citizens. "Too often we assume
that when the Bill of Rights
was written, when the Con-
stitution was approved, that
the job had been done. Well,
certainly it hasn't," he said.
Referring to the Aryan Na-
tions' "separate estate" in
Idaho, he said "law enforce-
ment officers at all levels have
the responsibility to step for-
ward and say, 'that is
something that is completely
counter to our way of life, and
certainly it ought not to be
permitted."
The activities of organiza-
tions such as the Aryan Na-
tions are more than just ethnic
attacks, according to Leonard
Zeskind, research associate for
the Atlanta-based Center for
Democratic Renewal and a
leading expert on right-wing
extremism in America. He said
"attacks by hate groups are
part of cutting edge of attacks
on democracy."
In a workshop on the status
of hate groups, Zeskind em-
phasized his "job is not to find
out what the groups have
done, but what they're going
to do next, because if we
organize around what the
Aryan Nations did in 1985, we
are not going to be prepared
for 1990."
Marjorie Biller Green,
ADL's western states educa-
tion director, presented a
workshop featuring written
and audio-visual material she
develops and disseminates to
educators, businesses and
community groups.
In her view, "an aging and
predominantly white" popula-
tion in the United States con-
fronts a "baby boomlet of in-
creasing minority population"
that is "beginning to impact
the schools," coupled with a
"service-based rather than
manufacturing-based economy
and the increasing movement
of women into the work place,
all of which create a change
(that) is often frightening."
Bob Hughes, mediator for
the Community Relations Ser-
vice of the U.S. Dept. of
Justice in Seattle, received the
coalition's first Bayard Rustin
Civil Rights award at the con-
ference's closing dinner.
During the conference, he
told of his meetings with
children of Holocaust sur-
vivors in Port Angeles, Wash.,
following anti-Semitic van-
dalism. When he asked them
how they felt, he recalled, he
was met by "a great deal of
silence. They didn't know how
to react yet."
He told JTA he has learned
that "one precipitating inci-
dent usually brings out other
unresolved problems or
grievances from other areas of
community life. And hopefully
once addressing one, a group
will go on to address others
and establish not just a reac-
tive mode to these problems,
but become proactive in
developing preventive
measures on through to educa-
tion programs, and develop
new, creative, innovative ap-
proaches to anticipate pro-
blems and resolve them before
they become critical."
Budapest Stocks Soviet
Kosher Take-Out
When Malev flight 100 from
Budapest landed in Moscow,
Oct. 28, it carried one of the
most unusual cargoes ever to
arrive in the Soviet Union
the first shipment of food and
supplies to stock the kosher
take-out restaurant that will
be opened on the grounds of
the city's famed Chorale
Synagogue.
Announcement of the
historic shipment was made by
Rabbi Arthur Schneier, presi-
dent of the Appeal of Cons-
cience Foundation, which is
providing funds for the pro-
ject. Among the foodstuffs
that arrived in the first ship-
ment from Hungary were:
salami and other smoked
meats, fresh chicken, kosher
cooking oil, margarine, white
wine and brandy.
Also included in this first
consignment were two
refrigerator display cases.
All of the foodstuffs and kit-
chen and other supplies have
been purchased with funds
provided by the Appeal of Con-
science Foundation and were
admitted into the Soviet Union
duty-free, Rabbi Schneier said.
He added that the certificate
of kashrut bearing the ap-
proval of the Orthodox rab-
binate of Hungary is printed
on each of the products in
Hebrew, Hungarian and
Russian.
Approval for the kosher food
service was granted earlier
this year by Konstantin Khar-
chev, chairman of the Council
of Religious Affairs of the
USSR Council of Ministers,
under an agreement worked
out earlier this year in Moscow
with Rabbi Schneier.
Imre Miklos, chairman of the
Hungarian Church Office, a
post equivalent to that of
Minister of Religion, granted
approval for the purchases in
and shipment from Hungary.
It was agreed that the take-
out restaurant on the grounds
of the Chorale Synagogue
would be an interim step pen-
ding the opening of a full-
fledged kosher restaurant at
an appropriate site in the
Soviet capital, Rabbi Schneier
said.
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Friday, November 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Coercion Used To Extract Confessions
Continued from Page 1-A
them sector. The commission
was set up as a result of two in-
cidents that created turmoil in
Israel and headlines around
the world. One was the April
1984 killing of two Arab bus hi-
jackers in the Gaza Strip after
they were handed over to Shin
the Israel
which cap-
Bet agents by
Defense Force,
tured them alive.
The second was the case of
former IDF Lt. Izat Nafsu,
whom the Supreme Court
earlier this year ordered
released from prison after ser-
ving seven years of a life
sentence for alleged spying
and contact with terrorists.
The high court found that Naf-
su, a Circassian Moslem, was
convicted on the basis of
evidence fabricated by the
Shin Bet.
WZO Court Rules On Election
By
ANDREW SILOW CARROLL
NEW YORK (JTA) The
[Supreme Court of the World
Zionist Organization on Friday
ruled in favor of two Zionist
[groups and against three
[others who contested the pro-
Icess by which American
[delegates were elected this
|spring to the 31st World
Zionist Congress.
In ruling here Friday, the
pourt accepted appeals of the
election procedures brought by
the Zionist Organization of
Vmerica and Bnai Zion, but re-
cted appeals brought by the
Religious Zionists of America,
Americans for Progressive
srael and Students for Israel.
All five groups brought ap-
eals against the Area Elec-
lon Committee (AEC) of the
American Zionist Federation,
rhich conducted elections in
lay to determine representa-
lon at the Zionist congress,
fhich convenes in Jerusalem
Dec. 6.
Some 210,957 American
ws participated in the May
ections and on the basis of
returns, 152 mandates
fere apportioned across the
litical spectrum.
The appellants were critical
a verification procedure
lopted by the AEC which
ught a more accurate count
of eligible voters from the
various ideological slates of
the American Zionist Federa-
tion. In the process of
tabulating votes, the AEC
penalized organizations for
voter eligibility discrepancies.
In their appeals, the RZA,
API and Students for Israel
maintained that they were
each entitled to a larger share
of the mandates than had been
determined by the AEC pro-
cedure. (RZA received 14 man-
dates, API got one and the
Students for Israel did not win
any.) In addition, the RZA con-
tended that the independent
company hired to examine
voter records, Equifax, col-
laborated with AEC officials in
falsifying its findings.
In ruling against the ap-
pellants and for the AEC, the
court said that it is the duty of
a constituent body to attack
election methods before the
election, and not after.
WF Opens Borders
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Israel Defense Force appears
to have the situation along
Israel's northern border well
in hand and the number of
border crossings has been in-
creased to facilitate the move-
ment of hundreds of Lebanese
villagers who commute to jobs
in Israel every day.
According to a senior IDF
officer, quoted by Davar, there
has been a significant decrease
in recent months of the
number of incidents, clashes
and attacks carried out or foil-
ed along the northern border.
They have decined by 50 per-
cent compared to the previous
year, he said.
In addition, it was found that
about 65 percent of the clashes
between the IDF and terrorist
bands now occur on the nor-
thern fringe of the Israeli-
controlled security zone in
southern Lebanon, rather than
within the zone, A I
Hamishmar reported.
Within the framework of
Israel's "good fence" policy,
an additional opening has been
provided near Kibbutz Malchia
for Lebanese villagers enter-
ing and leaving Israel. A se-
cond border crossing was
established near Nabatiyeh in
southern Lebanon to allow
residents of the security zone
access to the rest of Lebanon
for family visits to Sidon and
Beirut.
While Israeli officials have
welcomed the report as a
means to correct past failings,
they have expressed concern
that its publication could
damage Israel's image abroad.
Israeli officials had vigorously
denied complaints of malprac-
tice in the interrogation of
suspects lodged by such highly
respected groups as Amnesty
International. The report now
proves the complaints to have
been well-founded, at least in
part.
The commission absolved
the country's political leader-
ship, the judiciary and military
authorities on grounds that
they did not know of the Shin
Bet's practices and could not
be held responsible for them,
even though Shin Bet reports
directly to the prime minister,
who oversees its operations.
It found that perjury was a
matter of Shin Bet policy
related to the inadmissibility
of confessions since 1971, and
was committed by Shin Bet of-
ficials to conceal their inter-
rogation methods and ensure
conviction. The report notes
that in terrorist cases, confes-
sion is the main instrument to
obtain conviction, but branded
the perjury "ideological
criminality."
The most serious instances
of perjury involved the three
men who headed Shin Bet
since 1971, particularly the
last two, Avraham Ahituv and
Avraham Shalom. Shalom was
forced to resign after the bus
hijack affair, along with
several other ranking Shin Bet
officials. AH received presiden-
With respect to "physical
pressure," believed to be a
euphemism for torture, the
commission noted in the
published part of its report
that normal police methods of
interrogation and presentation
to the courts of corroborative
evidence could not always be
applied to terrorism cases.
Such evidence was frequent-
ly impossible to find or present
because it was obtained by
undercover agents or by
pressure exerted on witnesses.
Therefore, psychological or
physical pressure should be
allowed within certain bounds,
the report states. It proposes
guidelines for the Shin Bet to
follow in such cases. It also
recommends that external
supervision and control of Shin
Bet by the Knesset, the prime
minister, the Cabinet and the
state comptroller be
strengthened.
The commission rejected
criminal action against Shin
Bet operatives on grounds that
they could plead justificatin in
the fight against rampant ter-
rorism and because prosecu-
tion would wreak havoc in the
ranks of the Shin Bet.
It found that harsh inter-
rogation methods and perjury
were not employed to convict
innocent persons. The report
in fact repeatedly praises the
Shin Bet's efforts and success
in fighting terrorism.
At the same time, it recom-
mends that the attorney
general and the military
judicial authorities take steps
to permit re-trials in response
to all justified requests.
It also recommends that ap-
propriate guidelines be issued
to allow prisoners sentenced
by military courts in the ad-
ministered territories the right
tial pardons, although no for- of appeal. At present there is
mal charges were brought no right of appeal against
against them. military court rulings.
Redgrave On A New Stage
Continued from Page 4-A
lestra spokesman said the
fiagement was unaware of
pro-PLO crusade and the
it generated in the
arts of Jews and many
hers who are disgusted with
PLO's terrorist activities.
^CONSISTENCIES in the
dgrave story help explain
wrath she creates.
Cxample: Deep concern was
pd over her selection for
role of the Auschwitz sur-
ror, Fania Fenelon, in Ar-
Miller's TV feature
ying for Time." Although
dgrave had produced three
tt-PLO documentaries by
pO, when the Fenelon drama
eared, Miller defended the
3. "She doesn't know the
ling of anti-Semitism,"
[ler said. "She backs the
W and opposes Israel
wse of her hatred of
realism."
aITa' ^'nce when is Israel
Wed to capitalism, and does
to advance im-
aggression and
established
perialism,
death.
Example: She campaigned
for the blacklisting of British
actors who performed in
Israel, yet sees no reason for
those who loathe her political
activities to feel uncomfortable
when she performs.
WHEN ORCHESTRA
management canceled her ap-
pearance, Redgrave's lawyers
claimed a well-orchestrated
output of "vehemental
threats." The Boston police
commissioner said he could not
guarantee her safety. It was
then revealed that while pro-
tests were raised, no physical
threats were made. And the
commissioner denied ever say-
ing he couldn't guarantee the
lady's safety.
In district federal court, the
jury held the civil rights of the
actress had not been proven
violated. It should be noted
that the symphony manage-
Erave feel guilty when she ment <"d pay the $27,500 per-
her huge earnings into formance fee as well as the
$100,000 consequential
damage cost.
Who Needs It?
We Do!
ouglas Gardens
ft Shops
10
"talism's shrine, the bank?
xample: In November
when the Beirut
me Monday Morning in-
ewed her, she said there
I ^m for a State of Isrel
added that Israel, pattern-
after Hitler's Reich, was
Robert E. Segal is a former
newspaper editor as well as
director of the Jewish com-
munity councils of Cincinnati
and Boston.
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Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 6, 1987
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
President Reagan said Friday
that human rights will be on
the agenda when he meets
with Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev here Dec. 7.
Gorbachev
Flanked by Secretary of
State George Shultz and
Soviet Foreign Minister
Eduard Shevardnadze,
Reagan announced the
scheduling of the long-awaited
summit after Shevardnadze
had presented him with a let-
ter from Gorbachev.
The White House meeting
was held between day-long
talks at the State Department
by Shultz and Shevardnadze.
At the summit, the two
superpower leaders are to sign
a treaty to eliminate in-
termediate and short-range
missiles, still being negotiated
in Geneva, Reagan said. The
president said he will discuss
with Gorbachev a treaty to
reduce strategic arms by 50
The summit was schedule
percent, which he hopes could
be signed when he visits
Moscow next year.
Reagan added that he and
Shevardnadze agreed that his
meeting with Gorbachev will
also cover the "full range of
issues" between the United
States and the Soviet Union,
"including bilateral, regional
and human rights issues."
parently bringing with him tt
summit date. ne
The National Conference on
Soviet Jewry (NCSJ) Z
mediately welcomed the sum
m.t and expressed the hope
that human rights, including
6 ,iSwUVLf Soviet Jewry*
would be high on the agenda
Continued from Page 1-A
announced that an investiga-
tion of Stalin begun by Nikita
Krushchev in the 1950's, and
terminated in the early 60's,
would be resumed.
Gorbachev also spoke
favorably of Krushchev, the
Soviet leader who fell from
grace after his 1953-64 tenure,
and, even more suprisingly,
had words of praise for Nikolai
Bukharin, the revolutionary
associate of Lenin's who had
been an official non-person in
the Soviet Union since his ex-
ecution by Stalin in 1938.
Tempering his outspoken
review of recent Soviet history
with criticism of some
Krushchev's and Bukharin's
actions, Gorbachev also did not
expressly state that tRe fate of
Stalin's perceived enemies was
execution.
Leon Trotsky and other
associates of Lenin's, whose
contributions to the revolution
became non-history when they
fell into political disfavor in the
Soviet Union, were not
rehabilitated in Gorbachev's
speech.
Other unusual elements of
Gorbachev's speech were
references to the Soviet
Union's 1919 non-aggression
pact with Nazi Germany, a
decision which Gorbachev
termed "not the best," and
allusions to a new era of
cooperation between com-
munist and capitalist countries
in an "interrelated, in-
terdependent" world.
UAHC
A/firms Peace
Proposal
CHICAGO (JTA) "The
right and responsibility" of
American Jews "to participate
in Israel's peace debate" was
strongly affirmed by Rabbi
Alexander Schindler, presi-
dent of the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations, in his
presidential address Saturday
to 4,250 delegates attending
the Reform congregational
organization's national bien-
nial convention at the Hyatt
Regency Hotel here.
Schindler also urged Israel
to "reject the status quo" in
the West Bank and Gaza and
"to relentlessly pursue all
avenues to peace that will
maintain the Jewish and
democratic character of the
state." He suggested in that
connection that an interna-
tional conference for Middle
East peace would be "a lesser
risk than stagnation" of the
peace process.
Schindler also proposed that
"a liberal version of Judaism"
if introduced into the Soviet
Union "could improve the pro-
spects of Jewish survival" for
those Jews who elect to remain
in the USSR.
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Linowitz Sees Peace Plan
In Light of Camp David
Friday, November 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
Continued from Page 5-A
saying that if the Soviet Union
undertakes that kind of role
the United States is ready to
walk out (of the conference).
And that's the kind of thing we
can do."
Shamir, Linowitz added, had
voted against Camp David, but
now is saying that Israel
should proceed in concert with
the accords; that is, setting up
an autonomous program and
then a plan which will deal
with the process on a long-
term basis.
"What is important to
recognize is that everybody
Shamir, Peres, the United
States would prefer direct
bilateral negotiations between
Israel and Jordan, (between)
Israel and the Palestinians,
and Israel and other Arab
countries. But Jordan is simply
not going to undertake this
without an umbrella of an in-
ternational conference,"
Linowitz said.
Asked the reasons for this,
Linowitz said, "(Jordan) wants
to be sure they don't get at-
tacked by Syria, that they
don't unleash the PLO against
them and that Hussein, who
was with his own grandfather
when he was assassinated,
does not become a victim
himself.
"SO HUSSEIN says, and
we believe him, that he needs
the cover of an international
conference under which he can
then undertake negotiations
directly with Israel. And
Shamir says that should not be
necessary. That's where you
get the conflict."
Peres, said Linowitz, "and, I
think the United States now,
believe that there is no alter-
native to an international con-
ference if you want Hussein to
come to the table."
A Camp David-type setting
would be an obvious solution to
the dispute, but Hussein said if
he didn't do it before he won't
do it now. "Remember," said
Linowitz, "60 percent of the
people of Jordan are Palesti-
nian and therefore he is very
concerned about his own posi-
tion if the Palestinians should
erupt against him."
On the Israeli side, Linowitz
said Peres and Shamir are in-
terested in different goals.
"Peres, I believe, accepts
Ginsburg Picked For Court
( ontinued from Page 1-A
Columbia.
Ginsburg, who was born in
Chicago, is not active in
Jewish affairs, according to
Jewish sources here. He
graduated from Cornell
University and the University
of Chicago Law School. He
was a law clerk for Justice
Thurgood Marshall.
An assistant professor and
| then professor at the Harvard
Law School from 1975 to 1983,
Ginsburg served the Reagan
administration first as an of-
ficial in the Justice Depart-
ment's Antitrust Division and
then in the Office of Manage-
ment and Budget. He returned
to the Justice Department in
1985 as an assistant attorney
general in charge of the An-
titrust Division.
Ginsburg has specialized in
antitrust and economic regula-
tions and has not written
about civil rights and social
issues, the areas which
brought about the opposition
to Bork. Reagan noted that
while a conservative, Ginsburg
nevertheless has won the
French Court and Extradition
Thwarted by Israeli Move
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
I Jerusalem rabbinical court
backed away last week from
I its halachic ruling that the ex-
| tradition of William Nakash be
delayed for six months or
longer out of consideration for
I his wife.
After a lengthy session, the
court announced its ban would
end on Dec. 1. The Supreme
Court has aleady ordered
Nakash's extradition to
France, where he was con-
victed in absentia for murder
land sentenced to life imprison-
Iment. The French authorities,
however, have agreed to a se-
cond trial.
The rabbinical court in-
tervened to protect Nakash's
pregnant wife from the status
of agunah an abandoned
woman should her husband
have to serve a lengthy
sentence, abroad. Religious
law prohibits an agunah from
remarrying.
The rabbinical court said it
would continue its efforts to
persuade Nakash to grant his
wife a provisional divorce
which she could invoke at any
time.
Balfour Day Marked By Unrest
JERUSALEM An upsurge of violence in the ad-
ministered territories marked the 70th anniversary of the
Balfour Declaration Monday.
Two Israelis were slightly injured and later hospitalized
when the Egged bus they were riding was stoned near
Hebron. Curfews were imposed on the Balata and Askar
refugee camps near Nablus after violent demonstrations.
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BY REQUEST
respect of liberals.
Before Thursday's an-
nouncement there had been
speculation that Reagan would
name either a Jew or a woman
to the court to blunt criticism
from two of the major groups
that had been opposed to the
Bork nomination.
The First Jew named to the
Supreme Court was Louis
Brandeis, who served from
1916 to 1939. He was followed
by Benjamin Cardozo,
1932-38; Felix Frankfurter,
1939-62; Arthur Goldberg,
1962-65; and Abe Fortas,
1965-69.
Goldberg resigned from the
court when President Johnson
named him ambassador in the
United Nations. Fortas resign-
ed after charges of improper
conduct. In 1968, Johnson
sought to name Fortas as chief
justice, but Senate conser-
vatives blocked the confirma-
tion until Johnson left office.
the notion that you're going to
have to trade off some part of
the West Bank and Gaza in
order to get a deal, in order to
make an arrangement.
"FOR HIS PART, Shamir
has given no signs that he's
ready to give up any territory.
He believes tnat the West
Bank and the Gaza, or, Judea
and Samaria as he calls it,
belong to Israel; they are
historically and traditionally
part of Israel and therefore
there'd be no reason to sur-
render any part of it. So there
is that basic difference.
"The one place where you
can bring them together is if
Shamir now says, 'We ought to
proceed in accordance with
Camp David.' Camp David en-
visages an arrangement which
will resolve the issue on a
lasting basis among Israel,
Egypt, Jordan and the Palesti-
nians and there's no agree-
ment that will ever come out of
that that doesn't involve some
give on Israel's part.
"Peres is saying, 'You'll
never get it.' "
Recalling the events that led
to the Camp David talks,
Linowitz said that in 1977, it
was agreed to have an interna-
tional conference with the in-
volvement of the Soviet Union
and the United States to deal
with the Middle East.
"(Egypt's 'ate president An-
war) Sadat didn't like that. So
Sadat went to Jerusalem and
that's what started the whole
business of Camp David.
"It was not originally intend-
ed that there be a separate
Egypt-Israeli arrangement. It
was always intended that Jor-
dan be part of it, that the
Palestinians be part of it. But
the others wouldn't join.
That's how Camp David came
into being. People backed into
Camp David."
What's new, said Linowitz,
"is Jordan is ready to go to the
negotiating table."
The question, said Linowitz,
is how to make Shamir
comfortable.
Linowitz was asked to
discuss which, Peres or
Shamir, he feels is holding
back the peace negotiations
process.
"I BELIEVE," 'he
answered, "that Peres is right
substantively in saying let's go
forward with an international
conference as a way to get the
peace process process moving.
I think Shamir is right in ask-
ing the hard questions he asks.
And maybe that's the common
ground you start with; that if
you're going to achieve what
Peres wants, have good
answers for the questions
Shamir raises."
Linowitz said he agrees with
Shamir that "time is running
out and the danger of an explo-
sion is real, very real. There's
too much tension, hostility,"
he said. "Just look at the way
the shootings are going on, the
killings are going on, and it's
going to get worse. You've got
a fire burning there, the
Palestinian issue, and it's go-
ing to be a great danger for the
country."
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Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 6, 1987
.\
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Incumbents Fare
Well In Races
Incumbents swept the beach
ballot clean Tuesday as Mayor
Alex Daoud, Commissioners
William Shockett and Abe
Resniek won by overwhelming
pluralities.
Incumbents did not fare as
well in Miami and Hialeah elec-
tions. Mayor Xavier Suarez
will face former Miami Mayor
Maurice Ferre in a runoff
next Tuesday. Commissioner
Joe Corollo and contender Vic-
tor De Yurre will also face a
runoff.
Only Miami incumbent com-
missioner J.L. Plummer in
Croup 3 was clearly re-elected.
In Hialeah, incumbent
Mayor Raul Martinez was re-
elected while in the City Coun-
cil, two incumbents are among
the eight candidates who will
face runoff elections for four
seats.
Daoud overshadowed three
challengers and with 11,368
votes, kept all at bay. Second
place finisher Raphael Herman
mustered only 1,147 votes.
In the Beach Commission
races, incumbents beat the
challengers with equally great
margins. In the Group 3 race,
Shockett received 9,921 votes
compared to closest challenger
Stephen Remsen with 1,358
votes. Incumbent Commis-
sioner Resniek, 10,403 votes,
had an easy victory over
challenger Marty Sherman,
2,827 votes.
Beach Commissioners
Stanley Arkin, Ben Grenald,
Bruce Singer and Sidney
Continued on Page 11-B
--, Among the artifacts on exhibit beginning Nov.
Crime Against Mankind 12 at the Metr-Dade cuuwai center wax be
personal effects, including suitcases, con-
fiscated from those who were herded onto
trains to Auschwitz. See story page 7-B.
A Daughter Remembers ... Her Mother Does Not
By GINGER ROOD JACOBS
"What are you staring at?"
What am I staring at? It is
all so familiar yet so strange
and unknown. Who is this
woman yelling at me, who
refuses to know who I am? Can
this really be my mother?
My sister asks a penetrating
question: "If you believe in a
soul, where is our mother's
soul now?" Is it locked up in
what is still her body? Has it
gone with her personality, her
spirit, her memories?
What goes on in her mind? I
wish I could understand her
pain, her frustration. There
are still times when she knows
that she doesn't know. She
relies on my Dad for the pro-
per social cues so she can react
to another person. Yet there
are fragments, there is still
Editor s Note: Ginger Rood Jacobs shares with her readers
avery intimate mew of family life with an Alzheimer's pa-
twnt Jacobs a former Miamian, now resides in Encino
Lalif. where her husband, Steven Jacobs, is spiritual leader
oj the New Reform Congregation.
something going on inside of
her.
Anger
She remembers anger. That
seems to be the only thing she
can remember. She may even
remember why she is angry.
Yet she does not remember
throwing the knife the minute
before.
She remembers Ginger. But
which Ginger does she
remember? Two months ago,
she knew who Ginger was
her cute, adorable, bubbly,
vivacious daughter, about 10
years old. She was willing to
go along with me and play the
game that I was Ginger. She
was able to recognize Ginger-
like speech or movements in
things I would do.
But on the next visit, she
became violent when anyone
tried to tell her that I was
Ginger.
"She is not Ginger! Why are
you saying that? What do you
know about this. Go away. She
is not Ginger. I have no
daughters."
Yet, Ginger is definitely im-
portant in her mind. It Ginger
is not a daughter, who is she?
But isn't that a question I
always asked? What is so dif-
ferent now? Only Alzheimer's!
Only Alzheimer's. How easi-
ly I can say that! How com-
plicated the meaning. How
painful the reality. How
devastating to watch my
mother disappear yet remain
alive. How frustrating to
witness the agony that my
father suffers, able to do
Continued on Page 2-B
Roods Dedicate Alzheimer Unit
The Nathan and Roddy C.
Rood Alzheimer's Unit of the
Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged was
dedicated last week, a facility
made possible through an en-
dowment by the foundation
Nathan Rood started in 1986
on behalf of his wife, Roddy,
who suffers from Alzheimer's
Disease.
The Roddy C. Rood Founda-
tion will provide evaluation,
care and treatment for
Alzheimer's victims and educa-
tion and care for their
caregivers.
The 29-bed Rood Unit pro-
vides long-term care for pa-
tients with advanced cases of
Alzheimer's and temporary
quarters for those being
evaluated or admitted.
The patient-to-staff ratio is
four-to-one.
"More staff means the
caregivers can devote more
time to their patients, not only
in terms of physical care, but
also in personal attention,"
Continued on Page 2-B
Nursing the Stock Brokerage Through Crash
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
ON THE 31ST floor of the
Amerifirst building,
stockbrokers at the offices of
Drexel Burnham Lambert are
busy fielding questions from
clients panicked by the drastic
drop in the market of two
weeks ago.
Yet in the midst of this sea of
financial activity is an island of
calm, as Maryanne Witkin,
vice president of Investments,
takes a moment to nurse five-
week-old Katherine behind the
glass walls of her office.
Witkin, an elegant blonde, is
what the media love to call a
"supermom."
With a high powered job, a
husband, and another child at
home, Witkin waited less than
a month after giving birth
before returning to work, with
new baby Katherine right by
her side in a white wicker
bassinet.
"She comes here because
I'm breast-feeding," says
Witkin, who worked out of her
home for a while following
older daughter Stephanie's
birth.
"But that was a different
firm, and I have greater sup-
port here," she adds.
Also supportive is Witkin's
Continued on Page 4-B
Our
Maryanne Witkin and Katherine on an
average business day at Drexel Burnham
Lambert.
Community
Friday, November 6, 1987-The Jewish Flondian Section B


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 6, 1987
UrH
Dedicating the Roddy C. and Nathan B. Rood
Alzheimer's Unit on Oct. 29 were (left, to
right): Abe Rood; MJHHA Chairman of the
Board Irving Cypen; Nathan and Roddy
Rood; Ginger and Rabbi Steven Jacobs; and
Sydney Traum.
Continued from Page 1-B
nothing except love him from a
distance.
What is it about this disease
that removes all that is
positive from the victims, yet
Only Alzheimer5
8-
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pJewish Floridian
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retains the negative far
longer?
My angry, possessive, in-
secure mother remains. The
tender, fun-loving, spirited,
caring mother is gone. The
mother that used to be en-
thralled by nature now refuses
to look. The mother that
taught me to love life now
screams in my face that I am
not Ginger.
So many of her actions today
are the same as they were
when I was a child, only they
are more intense. How many
of my memories of my mother
are really of the person, and
how many are of Alzheimer's
taking control so long ago?
What was real and what was
the disease?
Only Alzheimer's. The pain
of watching this stranger in
my mother's body and her
reactions defies words. I try to
remember how I felt watching
her scream, throwing things,
trying to rip off my father's
clothes all because she had
discovered that I planned to
spend the night. I wanted to
cry that I was not a stranger
trying to take her husband
away, that I was her daughter.
I wanted to scream for her to
recognize me, I wanted to cry
for the futility of life.
Sometimes I grow afraid
that I could be the same as she
someday. Victims' children are
more likely to get the disease
themselves. The irony of it: I
was always told in a positive
way that I was just like my
mother. I always resisted.
Now it terrifies me that I
might, after all, be just like
her.
Only Alzheimer's. I want to
mourn. I am mourning. Yet,
when someone dies, there is
usually a receptive communi-
ty. With Alzheimer's, family
members mourn alone, prior to
death. We need an understan-
ding community.
Supportive, caring friends
mean so much and help me
through all my rougher times.
I would be lost without them.
The pain would be unbearable
if I were alone.
I sit and watch my children.
I do not want my children to go
through the pain of having a
mother who does not recognize
them. Might the day really ar-
rive when I will not know
them? It is so difficult to im-
agine that. I'm sure it would
have been equally hard for my
mother to imagine it. Yet, that
day is here. Not only does she
not know her daughters; she
doesn't know that she ever had
daughters.
/ know she had daughters. I
am one of them. I have had to
say goodbye to my mother
while she is alive. I have had to
realize that this insidious
disease, this Alzheimer's, has
taken away all that was my
mother. I must cling to all of
my wonderful memories of
her. The person that created
those memories and gave me
the strength to remember is
gone.
May she soon be in peace.
Ginger Rood Jacobs is a
member of the Alzheimer's
Disease and Related Disorders
Association of Los Angeles and
serves on the board of Miami's
Roddy C. Rood Foundation.
She wrote this article original-
ly for the Los Angeles Times. It
preprinted here by permission
of the author.
Alzheimer's Unit
Continued from Page 1-B
said Rood. "Alzheimer's pa-
tients, more than most people,
need the warmth of personal
contact; the smiles, the hugs,
the warm reassurances that
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they are loved and not
forgotten."
The dedication ceremony in
the Ruby Auditorium of the
MJHHA Douglas Gardens
Campus, was highlighted by a
presentation entitled: "Caring
for the Caregivers: Taking
Care of a Victim of
Alzheimer's Disease." Speak-
ing at the program were
Margaret Lynn Duggar, Direc-
tor of Aging and Adult Ser-
vices for HRS in Tallahassee
and Dr. Eric Pfeiffer, Director
of the Suncoast Gerontological
Center in Tampa.
Florida Religious School Students
Participating In Poster Contest
Sponsored by
International Kosher Foods and Jewish Life Expo
Students from Florida's religious schools are being riven
the opportunity to enter a special poster contest sponsored
by the International Kosher Foods and Jewish Life Expo
According to Irving I. Silverman, Expo Director and
president of Nancy Neale Enterprises, the contest, named
"Foods and Themes from the Bible" is an excellent wav for
youngsters to express their Jewish heritage.
The Expo, being held at the Miami Beach Convention
Center December 4-7, is a total immersion in Jewish life
and culture, and Silverman wants the children, as well as
their parents and teachers, to join together at the Miami
Beach Convention Center to bask in the Yiddishkeit.
They'll be tasting delicious and different kosher foods
listening to all kinds of Jewish music, seeing Jewish books
and toys and games. The Expo is the total Jewish learning
experience. It's a wonderful way for youngsters to
demonstrate what they've learnt in class" Silverman says.
An entire section of the show is being set aside to display
kosher foods and Jewish life products from around the
world. Companies from Israel, France, Germany and Den-
mark are scheduled to participate.
Feldheim Publishing and Nefesh Ami have donated
prizes to be awarded to religious schools atended by winn-
ing contestants. The contest is open to students in two
separate categories: 7 to 10 and 11 to 18.
Rabbi Sol Schiff, Executive Vice President of the Rab-
binical Association of Greater Miami says "... At a time
when our young people are looking for excitement in
philosophies alien to Judaism, the Expo will give them an
opportunity to see for themselves the rich selection of
Jewish culture."
For further information regarding the contest, please
contact the International Kosher Foods and Jewish Life
Expo, 4400 North Federal Highway, Suite 210-13, Boca
Raton, Florida 33431. You can telephone the Expo toll-free
at 1-800-356-4404, or at 305-394-3795.
We are pleased to announce
the new ownership and re-opening
of
Enjoy original Frencn cuisine
for lunch or dinner in an
old world atmosphere of
art and antiques.
Reservations
442-1990
2534 Ponce de Leon
Coral Gables, Fla.


Pop-Singer Hasid:
Friday, November 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Baal Shem Tov Sings Through 'Baal Tshuvah'
By SUSAN BASS
(WZPS) In 1970, David
("Dadi") Ben-Ami, a young
Israeli pop singer, was
catapulted into the public eye
with a hit song "Desdimona."
Newspaper headlines declared
A New Star is Born." But
just as popular success stood
within his reach, it lost its ap-
peal. Ben-Ami stopped perfor-
ming and dropped out of sight.
Return to Singing
In 1985, after an absence of
12 years, Ben-Ami returned to
the stage and the recording
studio. He clearly had traveled
a great distance in those years,
both spiritually and musically,
for today he is a Bratslav
Hasid living quietly in
Jerusalem's ultra-orthodox
Mea Shearim neighborhood.
His return to the entertain-
ment world resulted from a
chance encounter on the
streets of Jerusalem. The pro-
ducer of Galpaz Records ap-
proached Ben-Ami and en-
couraged him to begin singing
again. Ben-Ami, after careful
consideration, eventually
agreed to record the songs of
the Bratslav Hasidim, but in-
sisted that only professional
musicians with classical music
backgrounds accompany him;
and that the musicians not use
electronic instruments. He
wanted to present Hasidic
songs as they were composed
and intended to be sung.
Ben-Ami's "Songs of Rabbi
Nachman of Bratslav" was
produced by Galpaz Records,
Jerusalem, in 1985. Since
then, he has made concert ap-
pearances throughout Israel
and has appeared on Israeli
television.
Influence of Nachman of
Bratslav
Ben-Ami explains that many
of the Hasidic melodies he
sings were composed by
Nachman of Bratslav, who
died in 1811 at the age of 39. A
Continued on Page 10-B
David ("Dadi") Ben-Ami as pop singer and
actor (left) and David Raphael Ben-Ami to-
day, a Bratslav Hasid.
don. $/u*Au Men &&***
9tmim i&nAatAado* to $ff/**
I
Sac. Y*c* U. gjV&of*>U*uc<*


Sfhndap, Qbecetnfa* 20, 4987
labile &^nUet 3oe4' (tWoton&Uu iAe CfCon&ve*)
5445 pWSfotd *J&e*ue
&*>pu*m Qfiitine* 42:30 P.tM. Qivncinp io ike &e ZnW. Kogan
PrM. JNF Southern Region
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
Chrmn. JNF Fdln.
Ernaat Samuels
V.P. JNF Or. Miami
For Information and Reservations
Jewish National Fund 420 Lincoln Road, Suite 353, Miami Beach, Fl. 33139 Tel. 538-6464


Page 4-B The Jewish Fkrknan. Friday.
6. 1967
Nursing The Wall Street Crash
C~u>aed treat P* 1-B
husband, a rea. esl
deretaper. whom Wrdrin eaik.
~ib active, devoted father.
Aithough, of course, be
doesr t r-reast-teed.
"I was {Jawing to My
home for a few weeks ngh:
after the baby was bora."
WWsai aoanota. "I was going to
jost handle a few thmgs from
home.
"But as I watch CNN and
FNN (the sews and financa!
networks! ineessandy wkate
rm at home. I began to cone
in a little bit as I saw the
market was eroding."
THE DAT : :
stockmarket crash. Wrdrin
a
"No one eoaki bare dooe
:hing on that day.
anyway, asserts Witkm, wbc
returnee to work on an ;
fulk^ne bass the day
N: x asked 3* U cone
Deck. I specahxe in liec :r_-
come, so the marxe: id ->:
a negarve effect ~ :
says WV^sr_ =
the nature .:" tr_-
that I have M ?e toocr -----
: er.ts a. '" : -
Caboet.
A full-one nanny at
* | mi
iT't i
la eat
and
! MM
ra- -
rocs-_ t-i
::r iirj-.-er
W-jcr ;
"I w_ cradoa&y ml uiii
fcmftr^ KadssriM ^;ft
y-*ifrm_ although, she admits.
she sal brags Mm tghnr
Sssphssse. now a toddier
the office oc oceastoc
"I LIKE ^i
with my career, but
tie of the reasons
ic this career ts recaus*
" :*r~ asserts
M>st ::'--. riMattfftatij
kxk oat of that they enjoy
the fact chat I'm a making
meeker, they doc t resect t
says Witkm- 'Many of them
are parents themsehpea.
Someosses chests caT. me
.x and ask aooct my kids
before they asc a:
mvesanenca
Whkm. whe can breast-feed
iaueecy under her aiooae
without ra.s.r-g either
or her garment, and
a diaper serrrtt: her
a two year term
ac i-*^-f-Ar of the Profes-
a the Greater Maim;
Federation, and s a
of UJAs Saaocal
Toamr Women's Leaoerscx
hours When Bry kids iss'
ta tsetse, when they
wir-t :.: :xar ar.
: I ar arrange tc i: that."
Witkm asserts
'. >on't have to stay home
i. the ume zc hav* tree: be
I JMinkJ
The tsggm probiem wtth
baby Kjiherme _--
accardmg to W-tkm. m
that i: throws her whole
schedoie off. and she doesn't
sJeec at long durtcg the
t^rrt.
The biggest probiea. wrth
: -^xst-:'eedr-.g r_r-_-^ i t^ne of
r-Annai ensss s that assets
In
of stress. I don't
so I supplement
s diet wtth for-
Gasses,
Auditions Open
revae. "The
Good OM Days." for szngers.
saeers and -nr-wf-a-< of a!
ages at the N Mare Beach
cBsaaU Srnm Qmmm
ry Mnsnisf from 1 3C-3JC
^#ej Saarth. ]
-..:
Htt
* aSBBSSnBBBL CIU! __
aay afternooa from 2-4 Blsv
Classes are free and oaajosag
Assfrey Ssasti s a certified
teacher std works for
aassi* CessKy beBBol Board m
or the eaasses. she may he
at 532-58?"
mala. WKkJn acirr.
WHkm
"I isst walk into meet
rine in tow. as if I
had a notepad in hand, and
participate." she contends.
FeDow workers do no; view
baby Katherine as a piece of
office equipment, however.
""I get a constant stream of
rs coming in to ask. 'How
ts Kane* My observatK-
that it has been a very pleasing
distraction for those who want
a distraction for a few
moments during the day."
says Wrtirin. adding. "I'm not
looking at this as a babysitting
service "
Being a mother and being a
stockbroker require some of
the same talents, according to
Witkm.
You need organization, and
I a very orgamzed pe-
bota it h Mkfi an: a: w K V -
BIT ^"HEN a5*:e: r she
seeps ner :a.rr :r botr
. -. Whc
I Tm a
Plm \ I eter
Business trinsaetwn between Wxtkin and F:*ti P"*^
tr Bmnont. Kathmne observes.
Bermont is calm about the new
addition to the firm.
"She doesn't impact the of-
fice." he contends. "We have
sales meetings, and the baby
just sleeps like some of the
"other people The baby is ter-
rific. She's not an issue."
Bermont confirms that there
is no set policy on babies in the
office, but agrees that one
would be instituted if Witlrin s
cxarr.pie sparked a baby boom.
A baby boom at the firm
might be a possibility. Ronald
Kaufler, first vice president of
Investments, and an expectant
father says that "If I were the
I would definitely
ea."
9ak Mindy Forer
c
i really want a baby, so
rnayte [*m attached to ha
her around." she concedes
"But she's a really goad baby.
M she's
u know, hav-
ing a baby here at a time
when the market was very
-r-.se added the only
" added the only sense of
humanity to the debacle." fills
Kaufler.
"Let's say that the baby was
here at the perfect time in this
office." Forer affirms.
Witlrin is ibc consider
having more efaS I
"I would Bkc | she j.
its. "but I'rr. *Ak:r^ it one
nuts
a time
Robin Mitdu .-':;. dm-
::" 4 5(mtl
Florida, wm i to tki
CKaxr of the Satv mai Hannk
Committee at :** meeting of tht
NBC Boa-: Trust*. Rabin
Ckentz k-u. -yen an extentm
of the NBC iffict in Miami to
conduct txt nfu ^rrinng and
resource fmnetxont of tkt
orgamzation.
Ramaid Lentt. a Coral Gabies-
based public relations consul-
tan:, kat been elected the tSrd
president of the Proores* Club
Vmsm, ent of South
F.:--ida's oldest private
business organisations. Levitt
u prmxden: cf Ronald Levitt
Associates. Inc. Elected to
serve as 19SS officers are Rm
Lieberman. South Bade At-
:o*neu k-ca the lour firm or
Iisfcipi man. Kobrn. Burke and
Pmthman. nee president: and
Dtmgkt Pearee. president of
Cssj Cit*. Inc.. South Bade '
BANKERS SAVINGS BANK
305 56666^'
HIGH RATE CERTIFICATES
YTKLD RATE*
3 MONTHS MONTHS 9 MONTHS 1 YEAR 7.52* 7.75 8.M 8.17 7.25% 7.45 7.70 7.85
minimum deposit $10,000 all accounts insured to $100,000.
CD RATE INSURED TIERED
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MINIMUM AMOUNT SLSM
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S4<% adjustable rate mortgages
Only 1 point. Quick ck
xr
rsuc
fl
Liberal Reform Congregation seeks
Cantorial Soloist for growing
Kendall Temple of
300 family members. Send resume
before December 1st to:
Temple Shir Ami,
P.O. Box161971, Miami, Fl. 33116


From Miami:
Friday, November 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Local 'Minyan' Goes To Aspen Mountains
By SANDY DIX
From Miami to the moun-
tains, Jewish Floridians have
found a second home. The best
of the west has of late been
settled by locals who seek
refuge from the long, hot sum-
mer. Aspen has won collective
favor.
Nestled in the Colorado
Rockies some 200 miles south
of Denver, Aspen has been
declared the answer to flat ter-
rain and relentless humidity.
The lure of the Roaring Fork
Valley now makes it easy to
forget for a time both beach
and bay. From June through
September and sometimes
later, faces from the Gold
Coast invade en masse. They
take up summer residence in
45 lodges, 41 condominium
complexes, or an array of Vic-
torian homes in the west end
section of town. Most rent;
many buy after the infections
spirit of Aspen takes hold.
It does not take very long to
notice perceptible change even
among the most die-hard of
natives. By night, Jewish
Floridians remain the same,
semi-sophisticated except for
the casual dress. Many par-
ticipate in a summerlong
cultural festival including daily
doses of classical music, ballet,
opera, theater, lectures, and
art displays in over 30
palleries. Evening meals can
be enjoyed in more than 80
restaurants, expensive even by
Miami standards. But, Col-
orado nightlife is with rare ex-
ception limited for the Jewish
Floridian. He must be
prepared for daybreak when
dramatic change takes place.
As dawn approaches. Jewish
mountaineering turns from
: joke to serious enter-
The impact of a weekly
- or golf game back home
comparison to the rug-
>ckies. The effect of cool
breezes, crystal-clear streams.
ami of course, shimmering
trees is evident. Promi-
locale are often spotted
on the Rio Grande path.
Hunter Creek. Maroon Bells,
or dreaded Ute Trail. They
have been known to throw
snowballs 11,000 feet up at
Linkin's Lake or plunge 40
feet into the icy Devil's Pun-
chbowl. Hiking boots replace
designer shoes worn at home
when the quest to climb most
| every mountain becomes real.
Back to nature is most often
achieved by foot. But, many
also choose to see the coun-
tryside by horseback over
steep cliffs, white-water raft
I trips, hayrides, biking, jeep
jtours, the gondola ride up
[Aspen Mountain, or hot air-
[ballooning. Occasionally the
[visitor take time out to shop
[the open-air malls, watch the
| impromptu street entertainers
and student musicians, take a
carriage or stagecoach ride
around town, or see what real
cowboys do for a living at the
anowmass Rodeo. Relaxation
I has its place in Aspen but rare-
I'y at the expense of first-hand
| experience.
Those who do migrate to
Aspen from Miami come for a
variety of reasons. Miami
Beachite Hope Puller feels
that Aspen offers "a wonder-
ful change for everyone from
the tropics with pleasant days
and cool nights/' She enjoys
outdoor sports unavailable in
South Florida such as rafting,
hiking, and rock jumping but
explains that "it does not have
to be all rugged with a blen-
ding of what is natural and
sophisticated. One can go to
the fanciest restaurant in
jeans."
There are those Jewish
Floridians who take the rugg-
ed side seriously. On a typical
day Hollywood's Dr. Milton
home." His usual tennis game
or morning joy is enhanced by
"one view more magnificant
than the next." This year he
eyed the scenery from a new
angle on his first hot air-
balloon ride.
Relaxation is a key factor to
those like Gwen Berlin who
feels Aspen "allows everyone
to unwind. Here we don't have
to lock our doors at night. It's
a whole different, easy way of
Caster together with his preg
nant daughter-in-law hiked 17
V. miles through a difficult
mountain trail toward the
town of Crested Butte some 17
miles away, then flew back by
helicopter. On another outing,
auto dealer Alan Potamkin
and real estate developer Seth
Werner would safely lead a
dozen climbers up a vertical in-
cline. For such expeditions
people "need to be in shape to
begin with," according to col-
lege coed Allison Langer
"because of the high altitude.
Struggling to stay fit on hikes
brings people closer
together."
Others like Paula Levy see
serenity as the ultimate goal.
"Absorbed by the surroun-
dings," Levy prefers
"aesthetics to heavy physical
activity with a whole gang."
To meditate on a slow walk is
more her style. Her husband,
Joel, also enjoys the chance to
slow down a bit, since he
"operates at a fast pace at
life where people can do and
wear what they want. There is
camaraderie through the
music with those from
backhome we don't have
enough time to see."
Leisure clearly comes in a
variety of forms. For accoun-
tant Michael Silver and his art
connoisseur wife, Peggy, cons-
tant physical activity away
from the office is "a refreshing
change." In one 24-hour period
the couple tried river, rafting,
tennis, hiking, and attended a
concert.
Be the goal fitness or fun,
there is little doubt that Flori-
dians have fallen willing victim
to a town and its seductive
charm. It is the west, accor-
ding to attorney-banker Allen
Fuller, that can "put things in
perspective. Psychologically,
mountains are humbling. In
South Florida, unless we go
under water, man feels he has
conquered the environment."
Continued on Page 6-B
Larry Fuller takes a break frvm river-rafting.
irS LIKE SHE NEVER LEFT!
COUNTRY-STYLE ITALIAN REGIONAL COOKING
W grow our own Hwbs (basil, tarragon, saga,
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Home-mada garlic rolls A dassarts
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Pice 6-B The Jewish FWxban/Friday. November 6. 1967
Local 4Minyan' Goes
To Aspen Mountains
fraPareS-B
Rave
notices are by do
unanimous. Biggest
ats are the exorbitant
prices and the absence of air
coodraonmg in restaurants.
shops, and steeping facilities.
Critics also mention religion
of lack thereof in a resort
town. Observant Jews will find
that Aspen does not cater to
their very definite needs.
kosher foods are hard to come
by. At present there is no per-
manent synagogue, either
Reform, Conservative, or Or-
thodox, in Aspen. But, recent-
ly a small congregation was
formed in a local church for
weekly Friday night services.
Location notwithstanding, the
mountain mmyan is never-
theless complete.
Perhaps, it is the unioue
blend of what is simple and
sophisticated that attracts so
many Jewish noridians to
Aspen. Once the hunting
grounds of the Ute Indians, in-
vaded by miners back in 1879.
a booming or town during the
heyday of silver as well as the
home of the largest nugget
ever found. Aspen boasts an
interesting though short-lived
historv. More than IOC' vears
since *B. Clark Wheeler'first
came to town. Aspen thrives.
What is natural lives on long
after the drive for precious
metals ended. Each summer it
takes visitors far from the
madding crowd into tne Great
Outdoors. And that's precisely
where Jewish Floridians long
to be.
Sandy Dix
freelance writer.
it a local
Community Notes
Jonathan Hams has been appointed to chair the
Israel-American Jewish Relations Task Force of AJC's
Miami Chapter. The Task Force's objective is to help
develop AJC's perception of Israel and define how
American Jews should relate to her.
Girt Bossak s class Sounds of Yiddish: The Jewish
Connection'" take place every Tuesday. 1:30 to 3 p.m. at
the South Dade Jew sh Community Center. Conversa-
tional Yiddish is offered to Beginner and Intermediate
students in Yiddish and English. The class is currently
dissecting The Bmtel Brief. For information.
251-1394
Eugene Greenspan, executive director of the Jewish
vocational service, recently received the Florida
Association of Rehabilitation Facilities (FARFi
Outstanding Service Award' at its annual awards lun-
cheon, m recognition of h.s many years of persona,
commitment to the field of rehabilitation, and h.s work
m behalf of persons with disabilities
Trade County Commissioner Jim Redford presented
Etta Balsam with a 'Happy Birthday Certificate'- for
her 100th birthday. Comm Redford was pined by
Etta's son. Mickey Balsam, president-elect. B'nai
B"rith. South Florida Council and the Social Club at the
Jewish Home for the Aged, where Balsam resides Not
to be outdone by the commissioners remarks, the
100-year-old Mrs. Balsam took the microphone and
spoke about the importance of civic-minded citizens
Brandeis University National Women's Committee.
Miami Beach Chapter, on Tuesday. Nov. 10. will hold its
luncheon at noon, at the Ocean Pavilion Hotel. For
more information. 893-7116.
B'nai B'rith Women Young Miami Chapter formed
for women in the 20s. Former BBG and Hiliel members
are welcome to call 279-0659 for details
The Israel Histadrut Campaign of South Florida will
host the annual "Chai Luncheon'' in support of the Irv-
ing Gordon Laboratory for Optics Sunday. Nov. 8. noon,
at the Eden Roc Hotel. Couvert $20
Gershon S. Milter, president of the Men's Club of
Tempie Emanu-EI. has been elected vice president of
programs for the Florida Region of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Men's Dubs. Miller, president of the Miami
Beach Lodge of B'nai B'rith. has been an attorney in
practice here for more than 35 years, and for more than
20 years served as president of the weekly luncheon
club of B'nai B'rith.
United Synagogue of America is sponsoring three
summer programs for teenagers: USY on Wheels. USY
Israel Pilgrimage and Natrv-USY Year Program in Israel.
Information and brochures are available from the
United Synagogue of America. DepL of Youth Ac-
tivities. 155 5th Ave.. New York. NY. 10010 (212)
533-7800). _________
After a successful climb to Linkxn's Lake,
from left: Alan Potamkin. Michael and Peggy
Silver. Alien and Susan Fuller. Seth Werner,
Marion and Leonard Lansburgh
Stanley G. Tale. 59. chief ex-
ecutive officer of Stanley Tax*
Enterprises, a Sort}, M\am;
Beach conglomerate specialis-
ing in constructifn. develop-
ment, investing and con-
sulting, hat been appointed to
The Florida Council of 100.
Based m Tampa. The Council
it comprised of a selec
100 Florida business leaders
r*o set standards and carry
out goals for the tndiridua.'
committees they serve.
The Miami Museum of Science
has selected a new Executive
Director. Sonxa EMiller. Born
in Havana, Cuba, Miller u a
graduate of the University of
Miami with a M.B.A m Inter-
national Business and a MS
Ed. in Administration and
Supervision Miller was the
founder and Presider,
Miller Universal Languag-
Training Institute. In'c
fMULTt
Sorth Miami Beach resident
Mercedes S. Benhamu.
daughter of Rabbi Leon and
Eielyn Benhamu, it a new stu-
dent this year at Yeshiva
University's Stern College for
Women tSCWi m Sew York Ci-
ty. This year's entering doss
includes students from 16
states and six countries.
ADL Honors Ehrling
Former Governor Reubin D.
Askew. David F. Brown. Hank
Meyer and Sherwood Weiser
will serve as dinner chairmen
of the ". M7 America*
Award Dinner-Dance spon-
: by the Ann-Defamation
Leag.r :' B'na: B'rith. The
award will be the League's
gaia event to be held or. Thurs-
day. Dec. 3. at the Omni Inter -
natjonai Hot*
Ehrling. president of
Generai Development Cor-
poration since 1980. is being
honored for his deep-rooted
concern and sense of respon-
sibility for the rights and
Robert F. Ehrling
privileges of his fellow man.
For information and reser-
vations. 373-6306.
The Bob Russell Community
Retreat Center has announced
plat* for a reunion of the
Jewish Community Leader-
ship Retreat to be held at the
Omni International Hotel,
Monday ci Jewish Community Leader-
ship Retreat, the first aj
kind in South Florida. **
held this past June 5-' i *
Pnlm Beach. In attendaru*
were over 110 reprrsentativa
from major Jewish tions and institution* ti i*
County. For more *&**?
about the reunion. P^Jr
tact Miles Bunder. r^OSO.


Friday, November 6^1987/Thg Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
The shoes were collected after the "showers."
Auschwitz Exhibit
Opens Nov. 12
"Auschwitz: A Crime
Against Mankind," an exhibi-
tion of Holocaust artifacts and
documents, will open on Nov.
12 at the Main Library, Metro
Dade Cultural Center.
The exhibition sponsored
locally by the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation on loan
from the United Jewish Ap-
peal is a result of successful
negotiations between UJA and
the Polish government. The
agreement provides for a two-
year national tour.
The exhibition, which was
"rganized in Poland by the
Auschwitz State Museum and
the International Auschwitz
Committee, tells the tragic
story of the Auschwitz Death
Camp in Poland from 1940 un-
til its liberation by Allied
troops in 1945. The exhibition
is composed of 135
photographic panels and items
including personal belongings
of the murdered victims, such
as suitcases, eyeglasses, shoes,
prayer books and tallit (prayer
shawls), human hair and ar-
tifacts from the concentration
camp itself such as oven parts
and barbed wire.
The exhibition was originally
on display at the United Na-
tions during the winter of 1985
in commemoration of Human
Rights Day, and was seen by
more than 70,000 individuals.
The United Nations Center for
Human Rights is continuing its
sponsorship of the exhibition.
wtw for the observance in 1988 of the 50th anniversary of the
mnding of Temple Emanu-El of Greater Miami and the 45th an-
nversary of Dr. Irving Lehman's service as rabbi of the Miami
e aw Semi-Annual Dinner Dance Meeting of the synagogue. Zelda
thuZ1*8 Canning, above, were designated as chairpersons of
jjf Family Night" event which will be held in the Friedland
oattrooro of Temple Emanu-El. Reservations for the session may
<* made by telephoning 5384503.
Brushes, mirrors and shaving materials
taken from Holocaust victims.
Crematorium peephole and Zyklon B gas
cannisters.
South Shore Hosts Luncheon
The Annual Thanksgiving
Paid-Up Membership Lun-
cheon of the South Shore
Hospital Auxiliary, featuring a
talk by the well-known Dr.
Thomas Terry Thompson and
amusicale, will be held Thurs-
day, Nov. 12 at 12:30 p.m. in
the penthouse of the ten-story
glass tower building of the
hospital, in Miami Beach.
A welcoming address will be
given by Dr. Willliam Zubkoff,
executive director of South
Shore Hospital and Medical
Center, affiliated with the
University of Miami School of
Medicine. He will include an
update on the latest happen-
ings at the hospital and its
plans to enlarge and renovate
the emergency center.
Monte Carlo
Celia Siegel said there will
be a brief ceremony at 11:30
a.m., prior to the luncheon, in
the main building honoring
those that have established
names on the memorial plaque.
Helen Owen and Ruth
Roney, both of Miami Beach,
serve as co-presidents of the
auxiliary.
SECRETARY WANTED
"Active Organization needs experienced sec-
retary. Good typing and communication skills
Knowledge of Spanish, Hebrew and Short-
hand a plus-not mandatory. Contact us at
(305) 358-8111 for interview.
Night
Women's Cancer League of
Miami Beach will present
"Monte Carlo Night," Thurs-
day, Nov. 12, 7 p.m. at the
Fontainebleau Huton Hotel.
For information, 674-2464.
DIRECTOR
TEEN PROGRAMS, NO. DADE COMMUNITY
CENTER SEEKS DYNAMIC INDIVIDUAL TO
DEVELOP AND PROMOTE TEEN PROGRAMS
EXCELLENT CAREER POTENTIAL. 932-4200.
ext. 223.


4
Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 6, 1987
Write
Dear \omi
. For Advice
Dear Nomi. an advice column, will appear regularly in the
pages of The Jewish Floridian.
Dear Readers:
Here is some more advice, sent in by a reader, for the
"Night Owl" who wrote that he and his morning lark wife
could not agree on a weekend sleeping schedule (he wants to
sleep late in the morning, she wakes up early and disturbs his
rest).
Dear Nomi:
Why do people make it hard on themselves? Do they really
enjoy suffering or making mountains out of molehills?
Solution 1: Close the bedroom door! When dear little wife
rises, she can remove herself to another room softly, closing
the door behind her. Unless, of course, this is her way of
showing her resentment that her husband is sleeping.
No door? It's an efficiency apartment?
Solution 2: If the husband is like most people, he probably
rises once during the night or when the wife wakes him at 6
a.m.
At either time, he can put on a sleep mask to keep out the
light. They are not uncomfortable. Noises including her voice
on the phone can be eliminated by earplugs also not
uncomfortable. I know people who use them and cannot hear
the phone ring.
Also, the telephone company sells, for a very reasonable
price, 25-foot cords one attached to the phone, the other to
the receiver, thereby*making the phone go a distance of 50
feet from the bed.
If the wife loves her husband, she does not have to make
calls before 10:30 or 11 a.m. when her husband rises. Or else
she can close the top on the commode, pull the phone into the
bathroom and sit there or lie in the tub, where she can talk to
her heart's content with the door closed. Surely the bathroom
has a door.
These two people have to stop acting like morons and
learn to compromise a little bit before this stupid little
problem becomes a major catastrophe or is it covering
bigger hostilities and problems?
If that is the case, they had better seek counseling now.
Sincerely,
Evelyne
Miami
Founders of Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged
(MJHHA) at Douglas Gardens held their first meeting of the
season on Tuesday October to. Pictured from left to right are:
LucUe and Melvin Boer; Natalie and Jack Edwards; and Sylvia
and Sol Bloom. The next Founders event will be a Fifth Anniver-
sary Gala at the Doral-on-the-Ocean on Saturday. Nov. U.
Happenings
The Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation wdl hold The Arnold Ganz Investment
Seminar featuring Charles B Ganz. who will present "An
Historical and Current Perspective on the Stock and Bond
Markets A Panel Discussion will follow on "Tax-Advantaged
Philanthropic Investments The event will be Wednesday. Nov.
I I from 3 to 5 p.m at the Omni International Hotel
The Neil Schrff Family. President and Mrs tdward T Foote II
and the Board of Trustees of the University of Miami will sponsor
a tennis exhibition, reception and dedication Ceremony of The
Neil Schiff Tennis Center on the University Campus on Sunday.
Nov 8. from 4-7 p.m For information. 284-3449
The Adlai Stevenson Democratic Women s Club will hold a
general membersiup meeting Thursday. Nov. 12 at the Surfside
Community Center Janet Reno. Dade s State Attorney, will
speak _____
Jewish War Veterans Post and Auxiliary No 723 and Town
of Surfside will hold Veterans Day Services on Wednesday. Nov
11 at 10 30 am at Veterans Park. 88th St. and Harding Ave
Surfside In case of rain it wil he held at Surfside Center For
information. 864-6679
Hadassah
Events
Kinneret Hadassah will have
book review at their next
regular meeting on Tuesday,
Nov. 17, 12:30 p.m. at the El
Conquistador Clubhouse. The
White Elephant Sale at the
Clubhouse will be held on Dec.
1.
The I.R. Goodman Chapter
of Hadassah will hold its
regular meeting on Tuesday,
Nov. 10, 1 p.m. at the
American Savings Bank
building, Lincoln and Alton
Roads. Miami Beach.
"Hospital Supplies" will be
featured.
The first Oneg Shabbat of
the new year will be held on
Saturday. Nov. 7,1 p.m. at the
Forte Towers Building. Guest
speaker will be Miami Beach
Mayor Alex Daoud, who will
show film slides of his trip to
Israel on behalf of the National
Jewish Fund.
The Renanah Chapter of
Hadassah will hold a luncheon
to welcome new members and
to greet the incoming officers
for 1987-88 at the Carriage
Club on Miami Beach 11:30
a.m. Monday, Nov. 9. For
reservations, 865-0238 or
865-3667.
The Southgate Chapter of
Hadassah will hold a Hadassah
Medical Organization Lun-
cheon on Thursday. Nov. 19 at
noon at Temple Emanu-E1.
For information. 672-5127.
The Henrietta Szold Chapter
of Hadassah. Miami Beach,
will hold its first meeting on
Tuesday. Nov. 10, 11 a.m. at
300 71st St., Miami Beach.
A welcome for President
Florence Greenberg has been
planned.
Martin Cohn, MD, chairman
of the Sleep Disorder Center
of Mt. Sinai Medical Center,
will be guest speaker when
Ko'ach Chapter of Miami
Beach Hadassah meets Tues-
day, Nov. 10 at 8 p.m. in the
Cadillac Hotel. The public is in-
vited. For information,
864-8363.
Na'amat USA
A humorist Anne Hanker,
a songstress Esther Weins-
tein and a guest speaker
Leah Benson are on tap for the
Wednesday, Nov. 11, 11:30
a.m. meeting of the Beba
Idelson Chapter of Na'amat
scheduled in the Club Room of
the 100 Lincoln Road Building,
Miami Beach.
Benson, membership vice
president of the South Florida
Council of Na'amat USA, will
speak on the importance of
enrolling new and life
members for the organization.
Amit
Women
Shalom Chapter will meet
on Tuesday, Nov. 10 at 11:30
a.m. at 100 Lincoln Road,
Social Hall, Miami Beach.
Lunch will be served.
Community Corner
Bud and Toby Levin will host a cocktain reception in
support of the Weizmann Institute of Science Guest
speaker will be Dr. Fritz Bach who will discuss
"Modern Day Approaches to Medical Problems" on
Thursday, Nov. 12, 5:30 p.m. at the Island Club on
Williams Island.
Yiddish Branch No. 679 of Workmen's Circle will pre-
sent cultural afternoon Sunday, Nov. 8, 1 p.m.. at the
Seville Beach Hotel, Miami Beach. Featured will be
Sender and Mindelle Wajsman in a special program:
"Our Treasure in Word and Song." Accompanist is
Shmuel Fershko, composer and pianist. A full-course
dinner will be served. For reservations. 947-7889
Temple Zion Israelite Center's Young Jewish Singles
presents a "Trivia Night." The event will be held at the
Synagogue, on Sunday evening, Nov. 8 at 7:30 p.m For
reservations, 271-2311.
The David Pinski Culture Club will open, for the com-
ing season, on Saturday, Nov. 7, at 1:30 p.m., at the Ida
Fisher School Cafeteria, Miami Beach, and for each
succeeding Saturday. There will be a poetry and
musical program.
American Jewish Congress, Justine-Louise Wise
chapter will meet Thursday, Nov. 12 at 12:30 p.m. at the
American Savings and Loan Association Bank building
at Alton and Lincoln Roads.
Temple Zamora Sisterhood will hold its annual
"Welcome Home Dinner" on Sunday, Nov. 8 at the tem-
ple in Coral Gables. For reservations and information
444-0661 or 279-9389.
Student leaders of 20 schools in the United States
and Canada including the Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy, converged on Washington. DC last
month to participate in the Torah High School Network
Student Organization Delegate Conference Eric
Schimmel and Hal Klein represented the Hebrew
Academy at the conference. The students committed
themselves to projects including human rignts for
Soviet Jews, working to replant the fire-damaqed
Jewish National Fund forest in memory of children *ho
died in the Holocaust, solidarity parades and programs
held by all network schools on Yom Ha'atzmaut,
Israel's 40th birthday and larger intercontinental stu-
dent gathering will be held in March.
Ainslee R. Ferdie, Past National Commander o< the
Jewish War Veterans of U.S.A., will speak at Temple
Beth Tov in South Dade on "Jewish Heroes: Now and
Then" on Friday, Nov. 6 in conjunction with West
Miami Post 223 celebratin of Veterans Day. Mr. Ferdie
will also participate in the Surfside Community
Veterans Program on Wednesday, Nov. 22, with the
Harry H. Cohen Post 723 of Surfside/Bal Harbour and
also the West Miami Annual Veterans Day program.
B'nai B'rith Women will hold a membership cocktail
party for women in their 20's on Sunday, Nov. 8 For in-
formation, 279-0659 or 596-4132.
The Aventura Jewish Center Singles of all ages will
host a Shabbat Service on Friday, Nov. 6. at 10 p.m. The
service will be at the Aventura Jewish Center located at
North Miami Beach. An Oneg Shabbat will follow the
service. For an advance reservation, 932-7969
Temple Beth Sholom, Miami Beach, will be featuring
exhibition of painting, sculpture, photography and a
special exhibit on the Holocaust from the Beth Hatefut-
soth Museum in the Lowe-Levinson Art Gallery, located
in the temple, throughout the year. The upcoming ex-
hibition, through Nov. 9, will be Raisa Fastman's
photographs depicting "A Portrait of American
Mothers and Daughters."
On Friday evening, Nov. 13, the Daled classes of
Beth Torah Congregation's Harold Wolk Religious
school will be hosting the first Friday Night Family Ser-
vice of the 1987-1988 school year at 7:30 p.m.
The Jewish War Veterans of the U.S.A., Post No. 778,
will meet Thursday, Nov. 12, 7:30 p.m. at Killian Drive.
For information, 385-0456.
Rabbi Rex Perimeter will review Philip Roth's "The
Counterlife" on Tuesday, Nov. 10,10:30 a.m. at Temple
Israel of Greater Miami.
Cadet Marc A. Klein, son of Mr. and Mrs. Sydney
Klein of Miami Springs, Fla., has been officially ac-
cepted into the U.S. Air Force Academy's Cadet Wing
as a member of the class of 1991 during the annual ac-
ceptance parade.
-*. j


More than 300 women who help maintain the
Scholarship Fund at the Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy wil be honored on Wednesday, Nov.
11 at the Royal Hungarian Restaurant at noon.
Florida friends, Annenberg Research Institute for
Judaic and Near East Studies will hold a luncheon
meeting on Thursday, Nov. 12 at noon at the Harbor
House. There will be a book review by Lana Goldberg of
Heil Kahane" by Yair Kotler, a Maariv Reporter. For
reservations, 866-5842.
The Miami Beach Chapter, Women's Division,
American Technion Society, will hold a membership
drive and luncheon meeting at the Shelborne Hotel on
Thursday, Nov. 12, at noon. For information, 531-0005.
Workmen's Circle will present Minerva Kaplan,
Broward activist, world traveler, expert on Russia and
member of the Florida Silver Haired Legislature who
will discuss "Refuseniks" on Wednesday, Nov. 11 at
noon at the Surfside Community Center.
Temple Beth Sholom Adult Study Classes will begin
on Monday, Nov. 9 at 10 a.m. and run through March 28.
The first Coffee, Culture and Conversation for the
season will be held at 10:30 a.m. on Sunday, Nov. 8. The
guest speaker for the morning will be Rabbi Gary
Glickstein. For information and registration, 538-7231.
Jewish War Veterans Post and Auxiliary Harvey H.
Cohen No. 723 will hold its monthly meeting on Sun-
day, Nov. 8 at 10 a.m. at Surfside Community Center.
For information, 865-2396.
Workmen's Circle, Miami Beach Branch 1059, will
[meet at noon on Wednesday, Nov. 11, in the Surfside
Community Center. Guest speaker Minerva Kaplan,
recently returned from her trip to the Soviet Union, will
| speak on the subject of refuseniks.
The American Jewish Committee will host a lun-
Icheon of "community and cooperation" in honor of Ar-
chbishop Edward A. McCarthy and the Papal visit
organization team. Tuesday, Nov. 12, noon at the Omni
Hotel. Miami Herald Publisher Richard Capen will
[speak.
Miami Beach Mayor Alex Daoud will discuss "Miami
IBeach: A New Renaissance," at the Forte Forum, Tues-
day, Nov. 10, 1 p.m., at the_1200 West Ave. Auditorium.
Aguadath Israel Hebrew Institute, Miami Beach, will
be hosting a gala evening, in honor of Jewish National
Fund, on Wednesday, Nov. 4, 7:30 p.m.
The Federation Towers, a HUD housing for low in-
come elderly, is sponsoring a Flea Market on Tuesday,
Nov. 10, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The proceeds from the
Flea Market help to fund the cultural and social pro-
grams for the elderly tenants in the building.
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center
is sponsoring the annual Chanukah Happening on Sun-
day, Dec. 6, from 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Area vendors,
craftsmen, artists, and community service organiza-
tions who wish to participate in the event, which last
year attracted 2,000 guests, should contact 932-4200,
for details.
The next regular meeting of Sholem Lodge 1024 in
the Auditorium of the University of Miami Hillel House
will be held Sunday.Nov. 8 at 10 a.m. Irving J. Whitman
|will discuss "Criminal Justice in the Soviet Union."
Women's American ORT, Southwest Chapter, will
[bold its Seventh Annual Holiday Bazaar on Sunday,
|Nov. 8, from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Greenery Mall.
National Council of Jewish Women, Greater Miami
[Section will host a family picnic Nov. 8, from 3 to 6 p.m.
[at Larry and Penny Thompson Park, Shelter No. 2. For
Information, 255-9147.
The Nachman Arluck Yiddish Culture Club will host a
[lecture by Moishe Becker on Sholom Ashe on Monday,
Ifov. 9, 1:30 p.m. at the American Savings and Loan at
[Lincoln and Alton Road.
LBeth Toran Congregation is holding registration for
te Eve|yn ar>d Monroe Mitchel and Family Jewish
Education and enrichment program for Adult Studies
'or 1987-1988. The program begins this week. Courses
re held Monday and Wednesday evenings and Tues-
Qay morning. For information, 947-7528.
Dnln6 South Dade Jwish Singles Network has an
EKJM Bowling League, the League meets on Tues-
Ki ?&hts at 9 P-m- at Don Carter's Kendall Lanes. Call
P'-1394, for information.
Friday, November 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Wedding
JAFFEBINKOV
Jerome and Pat Kipnis announce the mar-
riage of their daughter, Joanne Lee Jaffe, to
Michael Terry Binkov, son of Seymour and
Katherine Binkov, on Saturday, Oct. 10.
The couple were married at the Great
House of Quayside with Cantor Rachelle
Nelson of Temple Israel officiating. Atten-
ding the bride were Yvonne Sabia and
Elizabeth Jaffe, bridesmaids, and Suzanne
Jaffe Durieux, matron of honor. Attending
the groom were John Sabia and Patrick
Durieux, ushers, and Mark Kram, who was
best man.
Joanne, a registered nurse specializing in
spinal cord injuries, and Michael, owner of
Creative Carpet Concepts, will reside in
Coconut Grove following a honeymoon along
the coastline of California.
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Binkov
Dr. Robert H. McCabe, Miami-
Dade Community College
President, has been invited to
serve on the first Public Policy
Advisory Committee of the
Association of Governing
Boards of Universities and
Colleges (AGB). The Public
Policy Advisory Committee
will advise AGB staff and
Board of Directors on various
national and state public
policy issues in terms of policy-
making, participation and
strategy.
Leo Plotkin, a former Dade
County resident now an at-
torney in Clearwater, received
the Ray Watson Memorial
Award at the recent annual
meeting of the Association for
Retarded Citizens. The award
honors a volunteer for outstan-
ding service in advocating for
mentally retarded citizens in
Florida. Plotkin is past presi-
dent of the Dade and Florida
Associations for Retarded
Citizens. He is currently presi-
dent of the Florida Bar
Disability Law Committee.
Fascell and Lehtinen
At Beth Am Breakfast
U.S. Rep. Dante Fascell and
state Sen. Dexter Lehtinen
will discuss campaign issues of
the 1988 presidential election
at the Temple Beth Am
Brotherhood Breakfast Forum
9:30 a.m. on Nov. 15 at the
temple.
Chesterfield Smith, former
president of the American Bar
Association will moderate the
discussion.
The talk is open to the
public. Reservations aren't
necessary but seating is
limited to 200. For informa-
tion, 667-6667 or 266-4250.
The highly successful Southeast Area Conference ofNa'amat USA
brought smiles from principals of the annual event. They are,
from the left, Col. David Ben-David, guest speaker; Lillian Hoff-
man, treasurer of the area; Gert Aaron, coordinator; and Har-
riet Green, national vice president of the organization. The col-
onel is a former commander of Israel's famed paratrooper train-
ing school.
Students of the Lehrman Day School of Temple Emanu-El raised
funds recently for Yad Vshem, the memorial to the six million
Jewish victims of the Holocaust located in Israel. Ryan Feig, left,
a graduate of the Lehrman Day School, is shown presenting a
donation to Rabbi Menahem Fogel, director of commemoration
and public relations of Yad Vashem. Studies of the Holocaust are
an integral part of the school's curriculum, so the selection of Yad
Vashem as the recipient of contributions was a natural, accor-
ding to Feig.


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 6, 1987
Andrew Kreps David Kreps Dawn Wechsler
--------B'nai Mitzvah-------
ANDREW KREPS
And
DAVID KREPS
Andrew John Kreps and
David Michael Kreps, sons of
Dr. and Mrs. Richard Jacobs,
and Dr. and Mrs. Joel Kreps,
will be called to the Torah on
the occasion of their Bar Mitz-
vah, on Saturday, at 5:30 p.m.,
in the chapel at Temple
Emanu-El. Miami Beach.
Andrew attends Vanguard
School, where he is in the
eighth grade, and David at-
tends Ransom Everglades,
where he s in the seventh
grade. Both boys attend Tem-
ple Emani; El Sunday school.
Andrew and David are both ac-
tive in dramatics, and have
done numerous TV commer-
cials and movies.
DAWN WECHSLER
Dawn Bianca Wechsler,
daughter of Mr. Howard
Wechsler and Maria Wechsler,
will be called to the Torah as a
Bat Mitzvah on Saturday at
10:30 a.m. at Temple Emanu-
El.
Dawn is a student at Miami
Country Day School, where
she is in the eighth grade. She
is vice president of the student
council, a cheerleader, and an
accomplished dancer tap. jazz
and modern.
Israel Museum Plans
$11 Million Addition
NEW YORK Jerusalem
Mayor Teddy Kollek this week
came here to unveil plans for a
new $11 million wing for 20th-
century art in the Israel
Museum, located in Israel's
capital.
Officials of the famed
museum the Jewish state's
foremost repository of art and
archaelogy joined with our
patrons throughout the United
States at a news conference.
Scheduled for completion in
1990, the new wing was
designed by Jorgen Bo, the
noted Danish architect.
Located a few blocks from the
Knesset, Israel's parliament,
the wing will be located on the
Hill of Tranquility. It will look
out over western Jerusalem,
the part of the city held by
Israel for all of its modern
history.
Kollek said the Israel
Museum, which draws more
visitors than any Israeli site
other than the Western Wall,
"could not be considered com-
plete without the art of the
20th century."
Nathan Cummings, a long-
time winter resident of Palm
Beach, was a principal patron
of the new project, and the
wing will be named in his
honor. Most of the funds for
construction were raised by
Americans, according to
museum director Martin Weyl,
who joined Kollek at the
conference.
Funded in 1965, the Israel
Museum is adjacent to the Bil-
ly Rose Art Garden and the
Hebrew University of
Jerusalem.
Orthodox Canadians
Rap Congress Move
TORONTO (JTA) The
local Va'ad HaRabbonim (Or-
thodox Rabbinical Council) has
strongly urged the Canadian
Jewish Congress to reverse its
decision to join an alliance of
On Friday, Nov. 6, at 8:30 p.m.
Rabbi Barry Konovitch,
spiritual leader of Temple Beth
Shmuel, the Cuban Hebrew
Congregation, Miami Beach,
will celebrate his 20th year as a
Rabbi.
U.S. Jewish agencies opposing
any amendments to Israel's
Law of Return.
The law provides for im-
mediate Israeli citizenship for
all Jews who seek it. Ultra-
Orthodox political movements
have sought to define conver-
sion within the law as decided
by Orthodox criteria or Israeli
rabbinic courts.
A telegram from the rabbis
to CJC President Dorothy
Reitman asserted that CJC's
integrity "rests in providing a
forum for representation of
various and varying ideologies
in the Jewish community to
come together."
To adopt the Law of Return
resolution, the telegram con-
tinued, "is a breach of the Con-
gress' mandate."
Baal Shem Tov Sings
Through 'Baal Tshuvah'
Continued from Page 3-B
few of the melodies are even
older, having first been sung
by the Baal Shem Tov, founder
of Hasidim and Nachman's
great grandfather. The most
recent melody on the tape, "It
is Forbidden to Despair," was
written half a century ago, and
became a symbol of hope to the
Jews of Europe during the
Holocaust.
Nachman of Bratslav taught
that man faces many
obstacles, but he must cling to
faith, encouragement, joy,
song, dance and a longing for
direct contact with God. The
movement Nachman founded
continued after his death, and
today is centered in Jerusalem
and in B'nai Brak.
Ben-Ami sees little con-
tradiction between the life of
the Bratslav Hasidim and his
own secular Zionist
background. Born on Moshav
Nahalal, he is a third-
generation Israeli whose
grandparents were among the
founders of the early moshav
movement. Ben-Ami points
out that Nachman of Bratslav
was a Zionist, who wrote that
every step he took brought him
closer to Eretz Yisrael. Only in
Israel, Nachman thought, is it
possible to fulfill all of the
mitzvot (commandments).
Return to Torah.
While acknowledging the
secular sources in the modern
Zionist movement, Ben-Ami
beliees that Zionism without
religion ultimately is in-
complete. "Today, Jews
without Torah see no reason to
live in Eretz Yisrael."
Ben-Ami's own return to
Torah had some rather unex-
pected sources. He points out
that he was not baal tshuvah.
newly religious, and that
yeshivot for baalei tshuvah did
not even exist in the early
1970's. His own return to
Judaism came in stages during
the course of many years.
In his early twenties, and at
the threshold of real popular
success, Ben-Ami suddenly
Beginning Monday evening,
Nov. 16, on both the 6 p.m. and
11 p.m. newscasts, an-
chor/reporter Susan
Lichtman, who accompanied
members of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation on their Oc-
tober "Mission of a Lifetime,"
will present a ten-part series
that will cover the Israel that
ordinarily doesn't make the
evening news. Lichtman and
the News 4 cameras viewed
Israel "through the eyes of the
Federation's Mission par-
ticipants, visiting Or Akiva,
Miami's sister city, the
Western Wall, and High School
in Israel students from Miami.
"began to feel the emptiness
of the whole thing. Like
many of his contemporaries,
he sought "the truth," and
eventually arrived at the
teachings of the Maharishi and
transcendental meditation. He
adopted the practice of going
to a monastery twice a year,
for a week of meditation. Dur-
ing one of these stays, he met a
young man who was beginning
to explore the Bratslav com-
munity. This contact resulted
in an invitation to spend Shab-
bat with a family in Mea
Shearim, a Shabbat which
Ben-Ami recalls as a turning
point in his life. "I feel like I
was in heaven, in the Garden
of Eden. The couple with
whom I stayed were modest,
warm, charming and quietly
happy. I sensed in their house
a wholeness and peace. In the
middle of the night, our host
took us into the field for
meditation ... I never forgot
that Shabbat."
Ben-Ami began to go to
synagogue, but continued to
give concerts on Friday nights.
Slowly but steadily, however,
he became more observant,
maintaining contact with the
Bratslav Hasidim, even during
a two year period when he
studied with the Chabad. After
a few years, he moved to
Jerusaelm "to enter the dep-
ths of the teachings of Rabbi
Nachman."
Ben-Ami's parents and
former neighbors at Nahalal
were at first stunned by his
return to Judaism. But even-
tually perhaps reassured by
the same warm, quick smile
they came to accept his curled
payot (earlocks) and beard,
knee-length black coat, wide-
brimmed black felt hat and
Hasidic lifestyle. They recent-
ly attended one of Ben-Ami's
concerts, and in their honor he
sang several old Zionist songs.
With his return to the stage,
Ben-Ami merges his two
worlds. He uses the medium he
mastered in the first part of
his life to convey the messages
important to him in the se-
cond. No longer in search of
stardom, he brings to the stage
a new modesty in presenting
the music of the Bratslav
Hasidism to the Israeli public.
Afeir Rosenne, Israel's former
Ambassador to the United
States will be guest of honor at
a dinner celebrating the tenth
year of the Camp David Peace
Treaty betwen Israel and
Egypt. Dr. Sidney L. Olson of
Miami Beach, and Vice Chair-
man of the International
Board of Governors of Shaare
Zedek Hospital in Jerusalem
will chair the Sunday evening,
Nov. 22 dinner which will be
held at Temple Emanu-El in
Miami Beach.
The Greater Miami hrael
Bonds Organization will honor
Miami Beach City Commis-
sioner Abe Resnick and his
wife, Sarita, at the Cuban
Hebrew Israel Bonds Gala Din-
ner Dance on Saturday, Nov.
7, at the Marriott on the Bay,
Miami. The Dinner Dance mil
begin with a reception at 8 p. m.
The Resnicks, who will receive
the Gates of Jerusalem
Medallion, are being recogniz-
ed for stalwart supporters of
Israel since the inception of the
state in 1948 and for their ac-
tive involvement in various
community, charitable and
philanthropic organizations.
Nicholas Simmonds has been
appointed to the position of
Southeast Regional Director
for Brandeis University. Sim-
monds comes to Brandeis with
more than IS years of Jewish
communal experience on two
continents. Most recently he
served as Director of Com-
munications with the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and
prior to that held positions
with Jewish organizations in
Great Britain and Canada,
The Southeastern Florida
Holocaust Memorial Center
will be honoring Bernyce
"Bunny" Adler and Harry A-
"Hap" Levy as 1987 Ad Jour-
nal for their efforts in com-
memoration and education of
the Holocaust.
Singles
CONNECT YOURSELF to
"The Jewish Connection's
Singles Directory-1988."
Personal listings and
information guide lor
singles of all ages, locally.
nationally and interna-
tionally. For application
send self-addressed
stamped envelope to: The
Jewish Connection
23 Saturn Ct. Syosset,
NY. 11791.


Art in Heart Of Miami Beach
Art In The Heart of Miami Beach will enter its third year
when the art festival closes down Arthur Godfrey Road
from Pine Tree Drive to Prairie Avenue, from Saturday,
Dec. 6, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Art booths, international food, and dancers, singers and
mimes will be featured attractions. Performers will display
their talents both days from 1-4 p.m.
The art festival will award prizes adding up to a total of
$3,400 for artwork in various categories, including best in
show. First place winners will have their art showcased at
the Bass Museum.
The artwork of children from North Beach Elementary
will also be displayed along the school's fence.
The festival is supported by grants from the Dade Coun-
cil of Arts and Sciences, and the Miami Beach Visitors and
Convention Authority, and is sponsored by Sol Beer of
Mexico, Cellular One, Hagen-Dazs, and Jefferson National
Hank. Media sponsors are FM Joy 107 and Channel 4.
Andrew Hirschl is show chairman.
WOmen's American ORT Golden Shores Chapter will
sponsor a lecture series to begin on Thursday, Nov. 17 at
7:30 p.m. The first speaker will be Marilyn Volker, Sex
Therapist and Director of Community Education, Health
Crisis Network. The subject for this evening's talk will be
"Women's Sexuality An Extraordinary Dance of Life."
Friday, November 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Otzma Draws Locals
Elise Lipoff and Steven
Gentilcore are the Greater
Miami participants in the one
year Israeli "Otzma" pro-
gram, sponsored by Israel
Forum and the Coucil of
Jewish Federations. Lipoff
and Gentilcore were selected
from among a group of local
applicants because they best
met the criteria of the
program.
"This is not a vacation," said
Ralph Chernin, chairman of
the Otzma selection committee
of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation. "One of the pro-
gram's main objectives is to
bond young American Jews to
Israel and the Jewish com-
munity in a way that will
stimulate them to become
Jewish professionals or active
volunteer leaders when they
return to the United States."
The first three months of the
program are being spent on a
kibbutz ulpan. There Lipoff
and Gentilcore, along with the
other participants from
around North America, will
work, learn Hebrew and
become a part of kibbutz socie-
ty. During the middle periods
of Otzma they will do
agricultural work and assist
with immigrant children at
Youth Aliyah villages. The
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's participants will spend
the final period of the program
working with Israelis in Or
Akiva on a variety of social
and educational projects.
Elise Lipoff
Steven Gentilcore
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
"As he sat in the tent door in the heat of the day; and he lifted
up his eyes and looked, and, lo, three men stood ever against him"
(Genesis 18.M).
VAYERA
VAYERA God appeared to Abraham as he sat at the door of
his tent in the heat of the day. Lifting up his eyes, Abraham
beheld three men (actually, angels in the form of men). Abraham
ran toward them, took them into his tent, and treated them
hospitably. One of the angels foretold that in a year Sarah would
war a son. The other angels went on to Sodom to destroy the city
because of its wickedness; only Lot, Abraham's righteous
nephew, was to be saved. God revealed this plan to Abraham, who
Pleaded that Sodom be saved for the sake of the righteous persons
''ving in it. But it turned out that Sodom could not be saved -
there were not 10 righteous persons in the whole city. Lot was
saved, and lived in a cave. There his two daughters bore him two
sons: Benammi, or Ammon, and Moab. In fulfillment of the
angel's prophecy, Sarah bore a son, who was named Isaac. When
the lad grew up, God tested Abraham's devotion by bidding him
offer Isaac as a sacrifice. Abraham prepared to carry out God's
bidding; at the last moment, an angel intervened, and Isaac was
saved. Abraham had passed the hardest trial of all.
*Jhe '"counting of the Weekly Portion of the Lew Is extrscted end based
Tm G'Phlc History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman-
sarnir $15 published by Shengold The volume is available at 75 Maiden
i,,7' New York, NY. 10038 Joseph Schlang Is president of the society
attributing the volume.)
Daoud
Shockett
Resnick
Incumbents
Continued from Page 1-B
Weisburd were re-elected Oct.
2 when no one filed to
challenge them. Weisburd was
elected vice-mayor by his col-
leagues Wednesday morning.
In Miami, incumbent Mayor
Suarez received 19,930 votes.
Ferrer, whom he will face in a
runoff, received 14,692 votes.
Although the Hialeah race
was hard fought, incumbent
Mayor Martinez received
10,929 votes. The closest
challenger, Nilo Juri, received
4,866 votes.
McCarthy To Be
Honored By AJC
The Miami chapter of the
American Jewish Committee
will host a luncheon to honor
Archbishop Edward A. McCar-
thy and others for their work
in organizing the recent Papal
visit on Tuesday, Nov. 12, at
noon at the Omni Hotel.
Richard Capen, publisher of
the Miami Herald, will be the
keynote speaker.
For information, 576-4240.
Help Wanted
Experienced partime ear-
ly Childhood Consultant for
Jewish Schools Call
576-4030.
Synagogue
Listing
CandleHghting Time
5:21 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach, Fla 531-2120
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor: Zvi Rozen Conservative
Executive Director
Harry J. Silverman
Dally mlnyan 7:30 a.m. and S p.m.
Fri services p m
Bat Mltrvsh Mellaea Frankal
Sal. service 8:30 a.m. and 4 45 p.m.
Sun. 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Or.
S. Miami 667-6667
Leonard Schoolman, Sr. Rabbi
Mark Kram, Associate Rabbi
Lynn Goldstein, Asslstsnt Rabbi
Fri. 7:30 p.m.
Rabbi Leonard A. Schoolman speaks on
"A Banquet In Heaven.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854-3911
Jack Rlemer, Rabbi
Robert Albert, /SjN
Cantor Vg)
Rev. Milton Freeman, *
Ritual Director
Daily aervlcei. Hon. and Thura. 7:30 am
Tuea.. Wed. and Fri. 7:4S a.m.
Sun. 6 a.m. Evenings 5:30 p.m.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami Beach
534-7213-534-7214
Barry J. Konovitch, Rabbi
Sergio Grobier, President
Sholem Epeibaum, President
Religious Committee
\
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue /_.
Miami Beach \yg)
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Assistant Rabbi Ronnie Cahan
YehTida Shifman, Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
Kabbalal Shabbat 6 pm. Sat. 9 a.m.
Dr. Irving Lehrman will preach.
Cantor Yehuda SMIman will chant.
Bat Mltzvah Dawn Blanca.
Bar Mltiveh Andrew John Krepa and
David Michael Krept.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive. Miami Beach
532 6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schilt
Dally 7:30 am. (Mon I Thura. 7.1S) 4 7 pjn.
Fri. 7 B-m. Set Bern Hum, tor High Holiday
Days.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Mlam/'s Woeeer Reform Congregation
137 N.E. 19th St. Miami, 573-5000
0900 N. Kendall Dr., 505-5055
Rabbi Rex 0. Perimeter
Cantor: Rachalle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob Q. Bomstein
Frit p.m.
Downtown: Rabbi Has D. Perimeter
will apeak on "Movement Within
The Movement."
Liturgy will be conducted by
Cantor Rachalle F. Neleon.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St.. N. Miami. FL 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs, Rabbi
Dr. Joseph A. Gorflnkel, ffiKV
Rabbi Emeritus \WX
Moshe Friedler, Cantor
Fri. 8 p.m.
Sat 8:48am
Weekday eerv. Mon.-Fri. ( a.m.
Mon Thura. 8 p.m. Sun. 8:30 a.m.
Ssl 8 4b m
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave., M.B., FL 33130
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Alvadla Rosenberg
Cantor Moshe Buryn
Deity services8am 17p.m
Sat 8 16am
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
238-2601 (--.,
Rabbi David H. Auerbach \Q)
Cantor Stephen Freedman
Fri. Services 8 p.m. Guest Speaker
Marlon Shulevlti. Seminary Rabbinical
Student Sat. Services 9:30 e.m.
Quest Speeker: Marlon Shuls.it;
Bet Mltzvah Eydie Ingber
DR. LEON K RONISH. Senior Founding Rabbi
QARY A OUCKSTBN. Senior Rabbi
HARRY JOLT. Au.Hlery Rabbi
JASON QWASOOFF Asslstsnt Rabbi
IANiALPERN, Cantor ""r"
DAVID CONVISER. Cantor Emeritus
DENNIS J. RICE. FT.A.. Executive Director
Fri. 8 15 p.m Rabbi Gary Qllckaleln
will speek on "Zionism Is Not Racism
lav services 10:48 am ^^
BETH TOPAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd. .gj.
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz. Rabbi (W)
Zvee Aroni. Cantor x-?*
Harvey L. Brown. Exec. Director
Dally eervleea Monday through Friday
7:30 a m and 5 30 p m
Saturday 8:25 am with Bar Mltzvah ol
Ira Cohen and mlncha 8 15 p_m
Sunday eervleea 8 am and 5:30 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667 5657
Michael B. Eisenstat. Rabbi
Sal. Shebbal Service 11:18 s m
Bat Mltzvah Qibn.li. Melman.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Shoshanah Raab. Cantor
Services Fri. 7:30 p.m
Set. 9 30 a.m.
Oneg Shebbet will follow
TEMPLE MENORAH
62075th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz sSMa.
An Frtdkis. Assoc Rabbi fSbi
Cantor Murray Yavneh V3E>
Sat. t a.m. Sabbath eonrtoe.
Dally Mlnchah Sunday Friday
8 a.m and 8 p.m
Sal. 9 a.m and 8:15 p.m
TEMPLE NER TAMID 8664345
7902 Cartyle Ave.. 866-9833
Miami Beach 33141 Conservative
Rabbi Eugene Labovttz ,<->,,
Cantor Edward Klein {B|
aWr^B-Z*
""*""*"
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miemi Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung
SHAARE TEFILLAH-
TORAH CENTER OF KENDALL
7880 SW112 Street *.--Wr*
2324833 ^
Rabbi Hershei Becker f f
Dally Sen. 7 am Fri. 10 mln attar candle
lighting time Shebboe 9 e.m. Shsbbos
Mlncha 10 mln. before candle lighting lime
Sun 8:30 a.m. ________
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dade s Reform Congregation
Ralph P Kingtley. Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
Fri. Family Worship Service 7:30 p.m
Sal. Service 10:30 e.m.
Ber Mltiveh Sales Brodaky.
)
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Or. Conservative
271-2311
Or. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi l
Benjamin Adler. Cantor
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Mlnyan 7 a.m. Mondays and Thuredaya,
Sunday 9 a.m.. Friday 8:15 p.m..
Kadlmanlks (7th and 8th graderal conducting
eervleea Sal 9am .conducted
by Kedlmenlka.


Page 12-B The Jewish FTorkhWFriday, November 6, 1987
Deaths
Lionel Cassel, Pioneer Miamian
Lionel Cassel, 98, of Miami
Beach, passed away Sunday,
November 1, at his residence.
He was a pioneer Miamian,
coming in 1914. He is survived
by sons, Alvin (Ethel) Cassel,
Dr. Chester (Carol) Cassel;
daughter Ann Freeman, 10
grandchildren and two great-
grandchildren.
Services were held at The
Riverside Guardian Plan
Chapel.
Jacqueline du Pre
PARIS (JTA) Jac-
ueline du Pre, whose
istinguished career as a
cellist was cut short when she
was stricken by multiple
sclerosis 14 years ago, died of
the disease in London, Oct. 19
at the age of 42. She had been
married since 1967 to Israeli
conductor and pianist Daniel
Barenboim, who presently
heads the Paris Orchestra and
the Bastille Opera.
Dr. Harry Barron
NEW YORK (JTA) Dr.
Harry Barron, executive direc-
tor emeritus of the National
Foundation for Jewish Culture
and a Jewish communal
worker for five decades, died
here Oct. 12. He was 77.
Executive director of the
foundation from 1965-80, he
previously served as director
of the Jewish Community
Council of Cleveland as well as
the New Orleans Jewish
Federation. He also served in
President Franklin
Roosevelt's administration on
the Fair Employment Prac-
tices Commission.
The foundation has schedul-
ed a memorial service for Nov.
10.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service
Dade County
532-209!)
Brow.ird County
Represented n> Riverside Memorial Chapel, In.
NW York: (718) 263-7600 Queen* Blvd a .<>ih Rd P.nvsi Hill*. \ V
SPECIAL LIMITED PRE-NEED OFFER
FUNERAL AND BURIAL
IN THE BEST OF JEWISH TRADITION
$1,595
I-akoiJr Memorial Park and Eternal Light Funrral Director* arr proud to
1wn,w ,n' unique program which combine* ownership of a plot at our
beautiful Memorial Park and a plan for pre-paid funeral arrvires.
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HERE IS WHAT WE INCLUDE:
Prompt Tranafer from Place of
Death
Care and Preparation of Deceased
Casket and Hrarac
Arrangement Direction of
Gravesiilr Service*
Permits and Benefit Assistance
24 hour emergency service
Shiva Candle*. Card* and Hrn.hr.
C>rave*ite
Paved Private Visitation Path
Steel Reinforced Concrete Vault
Opening and Closing of Grave
Perpetual Gravesites Care
No maintenance or service fee*
A Jewivh Tradition .incr IVAS
Foe
TOTAL: $1,595
No Interest Payment Plans Available
complete information .mi our plot and funeral service package plar
call vour Lakeside Eternal Light representative today.
In time of need, one call will handle all the detail..
DADE:
592-0690
BROWARD:
525-9339
ALTER, Arthur. 36, of Miami. October 27.
Interment at Star of David Memorial
Park.
COMART, Paul, of Miami Beach, October
27. Bbaberg.
GORFINKEL. Sara, of Miami Beach
Rubin-Zilbert
HIFFER. Nathan. 80, of North Miami
Beach, October 28. Levitt-Weinstein
.vEISNER. Edythe, 83 of Miami. October
28. Services in Massachusetts.
GREENBERG, Sidney, 71, of North Miami
Beach, November 1.
HOWARD, John B.. 73. of Miami Beach,
November 2. Riverside.
W0LFS0N, James M.. of Miami Beach.
November 2. Blasberg.
LERNER. Eleanor, of North Miami Beach.
Eternal Light. Interment al Lakeside
Memorial Park.
STRONGIN. Arthur, 80, of Miami Beach,
October 22. Riverside.
SCHIFFER. Nathan, 80, of North Miami
Beach, October 28. Levitt-Weinstein.
ADER, Birdie S., 90, of Miami. October 31.
Riverside.
LACKRITZ. Howard. 26, of North Miami
Beach. Menorah.
LEVIN. Mrs. Sarah, of Miami Beach. Inter-
ment at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
SAKS, Edward, of Miami Beach. Eternal
Light. Interment at Lakeside Memorial
Park
FEIGELES, Blanch, 82, of North Miami
Beach, November 1. Levitt-Weinstein. In-
terment at Lakeside Memorial Park.
KOLKER. Max. of Miami Beach. Rubin-
Zilbert. Services in St Louis, Mo.
NATHENSON, Harry L., 84, of Miami, Oc-
tober 31. Riverside.
BORENSTEIN, Benjamin (Benny). 92,
November 2. Eternal Light. Lakeside
Memorial Park.
GREEN, Etta, November 3. Services in
New York.
0STR0FF, Wilfred, 72, of North Miami
Beach. Riverside
WOLFSON, James M of Miami Beach,
November 2. Blasberg.
FOX, Gordon. 79, formerly of Dania and
Boca Raton. October 13. Services in New
York.
GREENBERG. Leone. 94, of North Miami
Beach. October 21. Riverside.
ORSHAN. Nathan, of Bay Harbor Island
Eternal Light.
Rl'BIN, Bernard, 64, of Miami Beach, Oc-
tober 23. Blasberg. Interment at Lakeside
Memorial Park.
SALTIEL. Ralph. 64. of North
MiamiBeach, October 23. Levitt-
Weinstein. Interment at Star of David.
Through years of dedicated service,
we have become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH "THE ASSURED PLAN-
LARRIES BLASBERG IRA M. BLASBERG MICHAEL C BLASBFRr
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FUNERAL DIRECTOR
Past President Jewish Funeral
Dnecio'soi America
720 SEVENTY-FIRST STREET
865-2353
Fune'aiDi'ecu
MIAMI BEACH FLORIDA
33'4.
How do you find out
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Lakeside, the only memorial park in the south tlxtt
was created to meet the needs of every feuishfamily
Please call for a tour of
our Garden of Heroes, an
innovation m above-ground
burial modeled after the
mausoleums of ancient Israel
10301 N.W 25th Street
Miami, Florida 33172
Dade (305) 592-0690
Broward (305) 525-9339
lakeside. ,
Mgnnonal


Soft drink industry innovator
Julius Darsky of Miami Beach,
and Akron, Ohio, was inducted
into the Beverage World Hall of
Fame at the Interbev annual
trade conference in Chicago on
Monday, Nov. 2. The honor,
given by the publishers of
Beverage World magazine,
recognized Darsky's contribu-
tions to the soft drink industry
over h is 56-year career.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Civil Action No. 87-47591-11
FL. BAR NO. 604437
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JOHN C OKEKE
Husband,
BERNADETTE 0. OKEKE,
Wife.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: BERNADETTE O. OKEKE
(Address unknown)
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
Ktiot) for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, with
the Clerk of this Court, with a copy
to your husband's attorney. Jack
Werner, Esq.. 1860 N.E. 198th.
Terrace, North Miami Beach, FL
33179, on or before December
Uth, 1987; or a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in this petition.
DATED: October 22. 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of Said Court
By John Brands
As Deputy Clerk
18083November6,13.20,27, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-45355 FC 21
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Fla. Bar No. 0476203
IN RE: The Marriage of
ARMANDO ACANDA, JR.
Petitioner,
and
DESIREE ACANDA,
Respondent
TO: Desiree Acanda
2440 S. Hamlin
Chicago. III. 60623
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
Md you are required to serve a
wpy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on USHER BRYN. ESQ.
The Roney Plaza, Suite M-8, 2301
Collins Ave., Miami Beach. Fla.
33139, attorney for Petitioner, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
November 30, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FL0RID1AN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
""8 21 day of October. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
"-ircuit Court Seal)
iVct?.7!ey for Petitioner:
iHER BRYN, ESQ.
The Roney Plaza. Suite M-8
1 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
18063 October 30;
November 6,13, 20,1987
NEW YORK Strengthen-
ing the Lay-Professional Part-
nership for Jewish Educa-
tional Excellence" is the theme
of a mini-conference for lay
and professional leadership
sponsored by the Jewish
Education Service of North
America (JESNA). The mini-
conference will take place in
Miami, immediately following
the closing session of the Coun-
cil of Jewish Federations
General Assembly (GA) at the
Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel,
Sunday, Nov. 22, 11:30 a.m. to
8:80 p.m. Registration is open
to non-GA participants. Al
Golden is chairman of the
event.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. -FC-87-47537 22
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
in re the marriage of
CACHETA F. WALTERS
Petitioner
and
SEGREE WALTERS
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: SEGREE WALTERS,
19 Chester Av.,
Kingston 11, Jamaica
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon; I. J.
GRAFF, ESQ., attorney for Peti
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St.. N.M.B. Florida 33162, on
or before December 11, 1987 and
file the original with the clerk of
this court otherwise a default will
be entered against you.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: E. Seidl
As Deputy Clerk
18085 November 6.13. 20,27,1987
W THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-6466
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SOPHIE LEVINTON.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate of
SOPHIE LEVINTON. deceased,
File Number 87-5466, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagier
Street Miami, PL The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on November 6, 1987.
Personal Representative:
MARTIN RUBASHKIN
c/o BOURNE, NOLL & KENYON
382 Springfield Avenue
Summit, New Jersey 07901
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
LEFF. PESETSKY 4 ZACK,
PA.
SAMUEL I. LEFF. ESQ.
1367 N.E. 162nd Street
No. Miami Beach, Fl. 33162
Telephone: (305) 945-7501
18082 November 6. 13, 1987
Friday, November 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
Stern Elected
To FAHA
Harvey M. Shapiro has been
appointed Chief Operating Of-
ficer at North Miami Medical
Center. Formerly the executive
director of AMI Doctor's
Hospital of Tulsa, Oklahoma,
Shapiro will be responsible for
managing operations for North
Miami Medical Center.
Shapiro is not entirely new to
the North Miami area. Bet-
ween 1979 and 1981 he was the
executive director of
Southeastern Medical Center
and in 1976, he was the Assis-
tant Administrator at AMI
Parkway Regional Medical
Center.
Song And Dance
The Adath Yeshurun Men's
Club presents its first annual
Broadway Show and Dinner,
on Sunday, Nov. 29 at 2 p.m.
Melissa Manchester in Andrew
Lloyd Webber's "Song and
Dance" at the Jackie Gleason.
Theatre of the Performing
Arts (TOPA), followed by din-
ner at Peking Embassy, 1417
Washington Ave., Miami
Beach. Tickets are limited.
Total cost: $75.10 per couple.
Call 947-1435 for reservations.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUrT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-30*74 CA 30
NOTICE OF ACTION
NEW METROPOLITAN
FEDERAL SAVINGS AND
LOAN ASSOCIATION.
Plaintiff,
vs.
LEON GROSSMAN and
REGINA GROSSMAN, his wife,
et al.,
Defendants.
TO: MARTIN GREENFIELD,
residence unknown, if alive,
and if dead, to all of the
unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees,
lienholders, creditors,
trustees or otherwise,
claiming by, through, under
or against the said MARTIN
GREENFIELD, and all other
parties having or claiming to
have any right, tiUe or
interest in and to the
property under foreclosure
herein.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Lot 24, Block 3. FLAMINGO
TERRACE SUBDIVISION,
according to the plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 10.
at Page 3, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack. Lewis, Allison &
Cohen, Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address is 111 N.E. 1st
Street. Miami. Florida 33132. on
or before December 4, 1987. and
file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 2 day of
November, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
18080Noveraber6,13, 20,27,1987
Elliot Stern, Associate Ex-
ecutive Director of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged at Douglas Gardens,
has been elected Treasurer of
the Florida Association of
Homes for the Aging (FAHA)
for 1987-88.
FAHA, a statewide associa-
tion, is committed to pro-
moting the cause of non-profit
institutions that deliver quality
healthcare to the elderly.
Curently FAHA represents
more than 180 health
care/retirement communities
serving more than 55,000
elderly Floridians.
Mr. Stern has been
associated with FAHA for five
years. Last year, as a member
of the Board of Trustees, he
was the first person selected to
receive the Association's An-
nual President's Award" for
outstanding service and
leadership in the field of elder-
ly care.
TN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-46436 (24)
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATION OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS,
Plaintiff
vs.
VERNON FORBES, et ux..
etal.,
Defendants.
TO: VERNON FORBES and
PATRICIA FORBES,
his wife
4068 Edison Avenue
Bronx. NY 10466
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 8, Block 28, of FIRST
ADDITION TO MYRTLE
GROVE SUBDIVISION, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof,
received in Plat Book 57,
Page 2, of the Public Records
of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
December 4, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 27 day of Oc-
tober, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
18077 October 30;
November 6, 13,20, 1987
On Sunday, Nov. 8, at 7:30
a.m., the program "Still Small
Voice" will feature a discus-
sion of the highlights of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's Golden Anniversary
"Mission of a Lifetime." The
program, hosted by Rabbi
Solomon Schiff, director of
Federation's Community
Chaplaincy Service and ex-
ecutive vice president of the
Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami, will revisit the
Mission through the eyes of
three Federation leaders.
Guests will include Aaron
Podhurst, Harry A. "Hap"
Levy and Marine Schwartz.
"Still Small Voice" will be
rebroadcast on Jewish Federa-
tion Television on Monday,
Nov. 9, at 6:30 p.m. and Thurs-
day, Nov. 12 at 7 p.m.
Business Notes
Richard E. Friend has
become a partner in Ruden,
Barnett, McClosky, Smith,
Schuster and Russell, P.A. at
the law firm's Miami office, an-
nounced Elliott Barnett,
senior member of the firm.
Jorge Fernandez, 26, has
been elected vice president of
Jefferson National Bank at
Sunny Isles. Fernandez, who
has been with Jefferson for
more than three years, will be
in charge of operations,
customer service and security
at the two North Dade offices
of Jefferson National Banks.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87 46337 29
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
VILMA THOMPSON
and
ROY THOMPSON
TO: ROY THOMPOSON
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your wri
teen defenses, if any. to it on JOY
HARK AN. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street North Miami Bech, Florida
33162, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before November 30, 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 26 day of October, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By JENNIS L. RUSSELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18074 October 30.
November 6.13,20.1987


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 6, 1987
FORECLOSURE SALES-PUBLIC NOTICES
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-43846 (14)
NOTICE OF ACTION
RESIDENTIAL FINANCIAI
CORP..
Plaintiff
vs.
RICARDO A. GARCIA, et ux.
et al.,
Defendants.
TO: MANTEL GARCIA
56-38 Van CM
Corona. New York 11368
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 11. Block I, MIROSA
SUBDIVISION, according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 105. Page 31 of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida. 33146 on or before
November 13th. 1987, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 8th day of Oc-
tober, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Jennis L. Russell
As Deputy Clerk
18044 October 16.23, 30;
November 6,1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Civil Actioa No. 87-43659-07
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ELIZABETH ALVA CHUMAN.
Petitioner,
and
RICARDO CHUMAN.
Respondent.
TO: RICARDO CHUMAN
121-07 84th Avenue
Kew Gardens. NY 11416
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT1
FIED that an action for Dissolu
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on MELVIN
J. ASHER. ESQ.. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 825
South Bayshore Drive. Suite 543.
Miami. FL 33131. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
November 13th. 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 7th day of October. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: John Brands
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18037 October 16. 28.30;
November 16.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that tfte undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name PACFEL ENTER
PRISES, a Florida general part-
nership at number 1385 East 10th
Avenue, in the City of Hialeah.
Florida 33010 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 9th
day of October. 1987.
MICHAEL FELLNER
IRVIN PACHTER
Law Offices of Marc Postelnek.
PA.
By: Marc Postelnek. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
407 Lincoln Road. Suite 10-B
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-7210
LMM October 16. 23, 30:
November 6. 1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 46
W THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. OJ AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-6962
SEC 14
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK, a
national banking association
f/k/a ROYAL TRUST BANK.
N.A.,
Plaintiffls)
vs.
CLAUDIA CALDERA a/k/a
CLAUDIA MONTIEL
CALDERA. FLAVIO E.
CALDERA a/k/a FLAVIO
ENRIQUE CALDERA. and the
unknown spouses, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors,
or other parties claiming by.
through, under or against them,
etal..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 16th day of November,
Dad7. the following described
property:
Condominium Parcel Number 203,
in Building Number 11, of IN
DIAN LAKE VILLAGE II CON-
DOMINIUM, a Condominium, ac-
cording to the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof and Exhibits at-
tached thereto, as recorded in Of-
ficial Records Book 10483. at
Page 2666, and in condominium
Plan Book 79, at Page 24.
Amendment No. 1, as recorded in
Official Records Book 10493. at
Page 2058; Amendment No. 2, as
recorded n Official Records Book
10613, at Page 2291; Amendment
No. 3, as recorded in Official
Records Book 10687. at Page 66;
Amendment No. 4, as recorded in
Official Records book 10687. at
Page 77; and Amendment No. 5,
as recorded in Official Records
Book 10775, at Page 1992. of the
Public Records of Dade County,
Florida.
DATED the 28th day of Oc-
tober. 1M7.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin. P.A.,
Suite 800
3060 Biscayne BoulevardMiami,
Florida 33137
Published 10/30 11/C
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-621*
Division 02
Fla Bar No. 068319
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANNA R. SCHAYE
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ANNA R. SCHAYE. deceased.
File Number 87-5219 (02), is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for bade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagter Street. Miami. FL 33130.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested person are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHm THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all daims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will.
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
oegun on October 30. 1987.
Personal Representative
SHIRLEY LANS
7760 Travelers Tree Drive
Boca Raton. FL 33433
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
NELSON & FELDMAN. P.A.
1135 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands. FL 33154
Telephone: 865-5716
KM October 30;
nber 6. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-3047
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
GERTRUDE WASSERMAN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of GERTRUDE WASSERMAN.
deceased, File Number 87-3047. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
DADE County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33130. The names and ad
dresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October SO, 1987.
Personal Representative:
DIANE D. PORTER
c/o Martin W. Wasserman,
Esquire
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MARTIN W. WASSERMAN.
ESQUIRE
999 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 672-3100
18070 October 30;
November 6,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBTE DIVISION
File Number 87-4068
Division 02
Florida Bar No. 117544
IN RE: ESTATE OF
Hyman Lasar, a/k/a
Hymen Lasar
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Hyman Laxar, a/k/a Hymen
Lazar. deceased, File Number
87-6058 (02), is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, 3rd Ft. Miami, Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 30. 1967.
Personal Representative:
EDWARD E. LEVmSON. ESQ
1428 BrickeU Ave.. Suite 700
Miami, Florida 33131
DUBBIN, BERKMAN, GARBER
BLOOM A MORIBER
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
By: Kenneth M Bloom
444 BrickeU Avenue. Suite 660
Miami. Florida 33181
Telephone: (305) 373-3606
18076 October 30,
November 6. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name William Camacho
Tool Distributing at 6360 NW 200
St Miami FL 33015 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
William Camacho
6360 NW BM
Miami FL 33015
18055 October 23, 30;
November 6, 13. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-6769
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MOLLIE S. MEYER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of MOLLIE S. MEYER, deceased,
File Number 86-6769, is pending in
the Circuit Court for DADE Coun-
ty, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth before.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 30, 1987.
Personal Representative:
SARAH S. WEISS
100 Lincoln Rd. Apt 1433
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT
999 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 672-3100
18067 October 30;
November 6,1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-19965
SEC. 14
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION. A
United States corporation.
Plaintiffls)
JANET GEBARA a/k/a JANET
CHOUTE, et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above. I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS ol
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami, Dade County. Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M., on the 16th day
of November. 1987, the following
described property:
Lot 5, Block 4. RANDALL PARK,
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 53. Page 20,
of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
The United States of America shall
have the right of redemption pro-
vided by 28 U.SC Sec 2410(e) for
the period provided therein, runn-
ing from the date of the Certificate
of Title issued herein.
DATED the 28th day of Oc
tober. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V.Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin. P.A.,
Suite 800
3060 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
Published 10/34 11/6
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious names MORRIS FUTER
NICK. MIRIAM FUTERNICK,
THE ESTATE OF JACK
FUTERNICK, AND MOLLIE
FUTERNICK, d/b/a M F PRO
PERTIES at 12300 N.W. 32nd
Avenue. Miami. Florida 33167 in
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
SHEA & GOULD
By: Edward E. Levinson, P.A.
Attorneys for Morris Futernick,
Minan Futernick. The Estate of
Jack Futernick. and Mollie
Futernick
18081 November 6. 13. 20. 27. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOB
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-6000
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BESS K. GOLDBLATT
NOTICE OF ^^
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of BESS K. GOLDBLATT. deceas-
ed. File Number 87-6000, is pen
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division
the address of which is 7:
Flagler Street Miami. Florida. The
names and addresses of tlie per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OP
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personai
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 30, 1987
Personal Representative:
NCNB NATIONAL BANK
OF FLORIDA and
MAURICE GOLDBLATT
9499 N.E. SECOND AVENUE
MIAMI SHORES, FL. 33138
ATT: MR. EUGENE F. MAGEE,
TRUST OFFICER
AND VICE PRESIDENT
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
LEFF, PESETSKY &
ZACK, PA..
Samuel I. Leff, Esq.
1367 N.E. 162nd Street
No. Miami Beach. Fl. 33162
Telephone: (306) 945-7501
18071 October 30:
November 6.1987
DN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-47738-01
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ATHENA JACILDO WEIDER,
wife
and
JAMES FREDERICK
WEIDER, husband
TO: JAMES FREDERICK
WEIDER
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on ARTHUR
H. LIPSON, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 801 Nor-
theast 167 St.. Miami. Florida
33162. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before December 11, 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the set)
of said court at Miami. Florida On
this 4th day of November, 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As CWk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: C. P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18084 November 6,13.20. 27.1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 87-396M FC 03
D>J RE: The Marriage of:
MULTER SAINT-FLEl'R.
Petitioner,
and
MICHELLE DENISE
SAINT-FLEUR.
Respondent.
TO: MICHELLE DENISE
SAINT-FLEUR
Residence Unknown, you shall
serve a copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage Upon: ANTHONY CAR-
BONE. P.A.. 612 N.W. 12*
venue. Miami. Florida 33Kv and
file original with the Clerk of the
Court on or before December *
1987, otherwise s default will t*
entered.
October 29. 1987
RICHARD P BRISKER C"k
Bv: BARBARA RODRR.l *
18079 November 6, 13. 20. -'..IN


FORECLOSURE SALES-PUBLIC NOTICES
Friday, November 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-46650-15
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ADELE ROSE BARON.
wife,
and
GARY BARON.
husband.
TO: Mr. Gary Baron
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on AR-
THUR H. LIPSON. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 801
N.E. 167 Street Miami, FL, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
December 4, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
A -aid court at Miami, Florida on
this 28 day of October, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
October 30;
November 6, 13,20. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-46715-18
Florida Bar No. 161802
ELLIOT L. MILLER,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ALBERT CONDE. his unknown
heirs at law. legatees,
deviate* or grantees.
Defendant.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
TO: Albert Conde and all
those holding thereunder.
Residency unknown.
Y00 ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for to
quiet title has been filed against
you for the real property described
t" wit:
Lot in Block 7 of Marilynda.
according to the Plat Book
thereof, recorded in Plat
Hook 50 at page 32 of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
jfou must serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
Judith A. Frankel, Attorney for
the Plaintiff, 960 Arthur Godfrey
Road, Suite 116, Miami Beach,
Honda 33140 and file the original
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
on or before December 4, 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered
gainst you for the relief demand
"I m the petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
eeutiye weeks in the Jewish
Hnndian.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
the said Court at Miami, Dade
"U,ntv' Florida on October 28,
Richard P. Brinker,
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: T. CASAMAYOR
. M Deputy Clerk
Judith A. Frankel, Esq.
Attorney for Plaintiff
W Arthur Godfrey Road
Suite 116
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
"ione: (305) 674-1818
18078 October 80;
November 6,13.20. 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-44255 (27)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ROSE MARIE WARE.
Petitioner,
and
BILLY J. WARE,
Respondent.
TO: BILLY J. WARE
Residence Unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu-
Jjonof Marriage upon: ANTHONY
CARBONE. P.A., 612 N.W. 12th
Avenue, Miami, Florida 33186
d file original with the Clerk of
* Court on or before November
<" 1987. otherwise a default will
* entered.
October 13, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
... By: Jennis L. Russell
18050 October 23.30;
November 6,13, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5497
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ADOLPH WEISSLER,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ADOLPH WEISSLER, deceas-
ed, File Number 87-5497, is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for bade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagter Street, Dade County Cour-
thouse, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 30, 1987.
Personal Representative:
HERBERT KARLINER
175 N.E. 132nd Terrace
North Miami, Florida 33161
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler Street, Suite 1201
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 374-3116
18073 October 30;
November 6, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-38539 (17)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL HOME LOAN
MORTGAGE CORPORATION,
Plaintiff
vs.
PAUL M. MARMISH. et al.,
Defendants.
TO: PAUL M. MARMISH
1670 Micanopy Avenue
Coconut Grove,
Florida 33133
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Unit No. 16-D of THE AR
BOUR TOWNHOUSE SEC-
TION III, Condominium, ac-
cording to the Declaration
thereof, as recorded in Of-
ficial Records Book 7648 at
Page 275 and in Con-
dominium Plan Book 22 at
Page 5. both of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida. 33146 on or before
November 30, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 21 day of Oc-
tober. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18062 October 30;
November 6.13.20,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name LES PETITES 41ST
STREET at 738 Arthur Godfrey
Road, 41st Street, Miami Beach.
FL 33140 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
ANA ROTHBAUM
SARA ROTHBAUM
MARIA PEREZ
EUGENE J. WEISS
Attorney for LES PETITES 41ST
STREET
18046 October 16.23.30;
November 6, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-45013 01
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
RENE E. ROBAINA,
and
ELIZABETH ROBAINA
TO: Elizabeth Robaina
302 West Westfield
Avenue
Roselle Park,
New Jersey
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed and
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Harvey D. Friedman,
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is FRIEDMAN & KAPLAN
PA.. 3636 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33135, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
November 20. 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 16th day of October, 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: E. Seidl
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HARVEY D. FRIEDMAN
3636 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33135
Attorney for Petitioner
18051 October 23.30;
November 6,13,1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87-44239 FC 23
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
KEIKO YATES,
Petitioner/Wife,
and
CHARLES ROBERT YATES.
Respondent/Husband.
TO: CHARLES ROBERT
YATES
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on MARC POSTELNEK. PA., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 407 Lincoln Road, Suite
10-B, Miami Beach, FL 33139. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
November 20th, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 14th day of October, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LAW OFFICES OF MARC
POSTELNEK. PA.
BY: MARC POSTELNEK
407 Lincoln Road. Suite 10-B
Miami Beach, FL 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-7210
Attorney for Petitioner
18048 October 23, SO;
November 6.13,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Tropical Storm Sport-
swear at 4150 N.W. 7 St. No. 207
Miami, FL 33126 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Tropical Storm, Inc.
18064 October 30;
November 6.13,20,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-45774
NOTICE OF ACTION
NEWORLD BANK FOR
SAVINGS, f/k/a BASS
RIVER SAVINGS BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JORGE SAVANY. et ux., et al..
Defendants
TO: ROY WYETT and JANET
M. WYETT, his wife
105 Governor's Court
Governor's Square
Greer, South Carolina 29651
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 14, Block 2, MACSON
HEIGHTS, according to the
Plat thereof, recorded in Plat
Book 66, at Page 2, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or beofre
November 30, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 22 day of Oc-
tober. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
18069 October 30;
November 6,13,20,1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.'87-3613
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
BARBARA A. PEREZ.
Petitioner
and
ROLANDO D. PEREZ.
Respondent.
TO: ROLANDO D. PEREZ
878 West 79 Place
Hialeah, Florida 33014
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for Dissolu
tion of Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on SYLVAN HOLTZMAN,
Holtzman, Krinzman & Equels.
1500 San Remo Avenue, Suite 200,
Coral Gables, Florida 33146, at-
torney for Petitioner, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above-styled court on or before
November 20, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the
Petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Dade Coun-
ty, Florida on this 19 day of Oc-
tober, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Diana Campbell
As Deputy Clerk
A TRUE COPY
Circuit Court Seal
Attorney for Petitioner
SYLVAN HOLTZMAN
Holtzman, Krinzman & Equels
1500 San Remo Ave., Suite 200
Miami, Florida 33146
Telephone: (305) 662-7700
18056 October 23, SO;
November 6.13.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-41508 CA 1C
NOTICE OF ACTION
THE BINGHAMTON SAVINGS
BANK.
Plaintiff
vs.
MARYD. HELMS, et al..
Defendants.
TO: MARY D. HELMS
6800 Peachtree
Industrial Blvd.
Unit AA7
Doraville, GA 30360
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
n the following described
property:
Lot 5 of Block 41. FIRST
ADDITION TO CAROL CI-
TY GARDENS, according to
a plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 68 at Page 31 of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Esq.. At-
torney for Plaintiff, whose address
is Suite 214. 1570 Madruga
Avenue, Coral Gables, Florida.
33146 on or before November
13th. 1987, and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter,
otherwise a default will I* entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 8th day of Oc-
tober. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
18042 October 16. 23.30;
November 6.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OK
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-39761 CA-19
NOTICE OF ACTION
THE KISSELL COMPANY.
Plaintiff
vs.
ROBERT J STEWART,
et al..
Defendants.
TO: ROBERT J. STEWART '
1226 Drexel Avenue
No. 308
Miami Beach,
Florida 33139
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
propafty:
Lot 16, in Block 4. of
LAZARUS ON RICHMOND.
according to the plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Booh 110,
at Page 99. of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue. Ceral
Cables, Florida, 33146 on or before
November 20, 1987. and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 19 day of October.
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Diana Campbell
As Deputy Clerk
18057 October 23. SO;
November 6, 13. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name ROLL PRODUC
TIONS at 7440 S.W. 74th Court.
Miami, Florida 33143 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
ISMAEL LEDESMA
LORI LEDESMA
Douglas D. Strut ton. Esq.
Attorney for LEDESMA
505 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
18038 October 16. 23. 30;
November 6,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SOUTHEAST AC
COUNTING SERVICES. INC. at
7204 Jacaranda Avenue, Miami
Lakes, Florida 33014 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun
ty, Florida.
JANUSZ
ENTERPRISES. INC.
By: JOSEPH JANUSZ,
President
18040 October 16, 23,30;
November 6,1987


Pf*l-B The
Cl 1987
Hunter Honored At
Israel Florida Venture
Bv CHERYL KANE
Tie State of Israei i
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Florida Secretary oi Ccm-
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ajrsed m Israel by Abraham
Shanr. Mhnscer :f Tcursni.
ace Anei Sharon. Minister :f
Trade and Industry.
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state rf Portia and the State
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