The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03065

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
T clfewislb Flor idiam.
Volume 80Numbar 44
Miami, FloridaFriday, October 30,1987
Price 50 Cants
Secret Report Thwarts Move of Arab Separatism
Rabbi Yitzchok Dubovick, left., speaks on a bullhorn as Capt.
Lloyd Allen of the Providence, R.I., police department instructs
him to keep his protest on the public sidewalk and off the property
of Temple Emanu-El, which is on the east side of town, Sunday in
Providence. A group of Jews gathered at the temple at noon to ral-
ly against a recent rash of incidents involving swastikas painted
on area temples and Jewish-owned businesses. The executive
director of the temple called for the police to remove the
demonstrators. AP/Wide World Photo
Israeli Cabinet Last To Know of Peace Moves
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
American efforts to advance
the Middle East peace process
appear to have suffered
because of diplomatic setbacks
sustained by the Reagan ad-
ministration and the uncertain
I economic situation in the
United States, according to
reports in the Israeli news
media Monday.
Akiva Eldar, diplomatic cor-
respondent of Haaretz,
reported that Secretary of
State George Shultz told
Israeli leaders during his visit
here a week ago that the ad-
ministration has set far-
reaching goals in the areas of
foreign relations and the
economy for its last 15 months
in office.
Shultz said President
Reagan ordered his advisers to
come up with programs to
refute the claim that his lame-
A Window to Another World:
I'Our Sharansky' Damns Glasnost
duck administration will be im-
potent during its final year.
These include a Middle East
settlement, as well as attempts
to resolve the situations in
Afghanistan, the Persian Gulf
and Central America.
But, according to Haaretz,
officials in Jerusalem believe
the recent stock market crash
reflects an acute crisis of con-
fidence in the American
economy. This, coupled with
Shultz's failure to arrange a
Reagan-Gorbachev summit
Continued on Page 12-A
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
secret report containing
recommendations aimed at
thwarting Arab separatist
tendencies within Isrel will be
presented to Premier Yitzhak
Shamir soon, Haaretz
reported Sunday.
The report, whose authors
detect a growing trend among
Israeli Arabs to establish their
own autonomous institutions
and split away from the state,
contains recommendations
calling for special budgets of
235 million shekels ($147
million) over the next five
years to be allocated directly
to the minorities sector.
Some 85 million shekels ($53
million) would be directed to
the development of Arab
municipalities, according to
the report, which is titled
"Principles of Government
Policy Toward the Minorities
Sector in Israel."
According to Haaretz, which
obtained a copy of the docu-
ment, the report was prepared
by former Likud-Herut
Cabinet Minister Moshe Arens
and his Arab affairs adviser,
reserve Brig. Gen. Amos
Gilboa.
Arens, interviewed on the
"Erev Hadash" (New Even-
ing) program, which winds up
daily broadcasts of educational
television, said he "knew
nothing" of the secret report,
which was also published by
Maariv.
But he later admitted under
pressure that work had started
on such a report when he was
defense minister. Arens
became defense minister in
1983, succeeding Ariel Sharon.
The report, as published in
Haaretz, alleges that
"laundered funds from
abroad," whose source is
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion bodies, are conveyed to a
portion of the minorities
Continued on Page 13-A
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewuk Floridian Staff Writer
Natan Sharansky posed
punely for photographers at
the Monday, Oct. 26 press con-
ference which took place at 7
iP-m- at Temple Adath
Yeshurun in North Miami
Beach, despite the fact that he
had just gotten off an airplane
and was still on Israeli time,
roughly 2 a.m.
Smiling and lifting up
various proclamations and
Hate Crimes Bill
Passes House Panel
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)-
A bill requiring the Justice
Department to collect data
aoout crimes motivated by
"anal, ethnic, religious and
an-gay prejudice was approv-
* by the House Judiciary
'-onjmittee by a 21-13 vote last
week.
I The Hate Crime Statistics
Dl would require the FBI to
publish an annual report
similar to the Uniform Crime
Statistics it now provides.
A similar bill was approved
by a House Judiciary subcom-
mittee two years ago, in-
troduced by Rep. Barbara
Kennelly (D-Conn.), but never
was voted upon by the full
House. Kennelly and Rep. Dan
Glickman (D-Kan.) reintroduc-
Continued on Page 9-A
resolutions, Sharansky, who
had spent nine years of his.life
prior to February, 1986 in
Soviet prison camps, often in
solitary confinement, seemed
unfazed by the constant flash
of lightbulbs and the
whispered gasps of
recognition.
Sharansky was present at
the press conference, and at
the public rally which followed,
to publicize the continuing
plight of Soviet Jewry.
"Despite glasnost, there is
no evidence that the condition
of Soviet Jewry has changed,"
said Sharansky in a statement
made at the beginning of the
press conference.
Noting that there is "some
kind of disappointment of Mr.
Gorbachev" Sharansky stated
that the same people who are
now evincing disappointment
Continued on Page 8-A
Natan Sharansky


Page 2-A The Jewish FToridian/Friday, October 30, 1987
I
s
x
Not Strangers in the Land
By AV1VA CANTOR
(Part Fire In A Scries)
BUENOS AIRES (JTA)
- "Half the board of the
Hebraica Community Center
thinks Argentina is very anti-
Semitic. The other half says,
'You've never been to
Poland.' "
This comment by Alberto
Senderey. Hebraica's ex-
ecutive director, illustrates but
one of the differences of opi-
nion currently being expressed
among the Jews of Argentina,
a country with a long and fear-
ful record of anti-Semitism.
The debate in the community
on "how far to go" in suppor
ting the democratic govern
ment of President Raul Alfon-
sin is directly related to these
differences in evaluating the
extent of anti-Semitism in
Argentina as well as determin-
ing how Jews are perceived by
non-Jews. It is related, as well,
to differences in evaluating the
strength of the democratic
government given fhe fact
that this is the first time in 30
years that there have been
3,000 uninterrupted days of
democracy.
Argentine government
leaders. Jewish and non-
Jewish, officially claim there is
no problem with anti-Semitism
at present. Vice President Vic-
tor Martinez told a delegation
of visiting North American
journalists and communal
leaders at a meeting in the
Parliament building that "you
are facing a brand-new Argen-
tina. There is no racial or other
discrimination anybody can
work freely and make
investments."
Marcello Stubrin, a young
Jewish Deputy whose great-
great-grandfather settled in
an agricultural colony in the
Santa Fe province, said at the
meeting that "the government
is fighting for human rights
and against problems like anti-
Semitism. which exist
underground in societies like
ours, (led) by enemies of the
government."
It is generally acknowledg-
ed, however, that there are
deep anti-Semitic sentiments
held in the military forces, the
Church, and the Peronista
movement, whose Justicialista
Party has made a comeback in
this month's elections. The
question is. how much in-
fluence do these institutions
have today in shaping public
opinion in relation to the Jews?
.
Phono: (306) 171-4605
PuoWahed wMkty mmy Friday
atnoa 1897 by Tha Jewish Ron
dtan. Offloa and Plant 120 N.E.
6th St., Miami. Fla. 33132. Phone
(305) CTM60S
Sacond-Claaa Postage paM to
Miami. Fla. USPS 275320
Postmaster Form 3S7t rat urn to
Jewish Floridian. P.O. Box
012973. Miami. Fla. 33101.
Tha Jawtsh Ftortdtan does not
guarantaa tha Kaahnidt of tha
merchandise advertised in its
columns.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES, m ad-
vance (Local Araa) Ona Yaar
SS 30 (Anniversary Spatial) Out
of town, country, upon request
By Mail SI 45 par copy
The Story of Argentinean Jewry
Every month, there's a
rightwing ceremony taking
place calling for the freeing of
the generals convicted of
human rights atrocities during
the junta's reign of terror.
There are shouts of "end the
radical synagogue" a
reference to the Jews Alfonsin
appointed to his Cabinet
Bernardo Grinspun. Minister
of Planning; Roberto Schte-
ingart. Undersecretary of
State for Information and
Development: Manuel Sadov-
sky. Secretary of State for
Science and Technology; and
Marcos Aguinis. Secretary of
Culture.
But many Argentine Jews
feel the vast majority of the
population does not harbor
anti-Semitic feelings and
views.
Screenwriter Aida Bortnik.
an active member of the
Argentina, he said, has "a
50-year fascist history and
deep Catholic sentiments, part
of which is anti-Semitism.
These are not easy to
eradicate."
Herman Schiller, whose
newspaper Sueva Presencia
fought for human rights dur-
ing the reign of terror, told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
that the junta tried to
popularize anti-Semitism at
that time, but did not succeed.
Now. he said. anti-Semitism
has become "unfashionable"
because "the people have a
great hatred for the military.
They know what the military
did to the Jews" a reference
to the estimated 1.500 Jewish
desaparecidos (disappeared
persons; presumed murdered).
"They know the Jews are not
the enemy. Now there is no
hatred of the Jews."
Warswasky, an attorney
tive in human rights causes,
that Argentina "is a secular
country with baptized but not
practicing Catholics. There's a
strong current of secular
thinking in Argentina." Still,
the Constitution mandates
that the president must be a
Catholic.
Even in the Peronista move-
ment, which some describe as
"feelings in search of an
ideology." and which has been
influenced by the military,
there are some winds of
change blowing. A young
Jewish provincial leader said
there is a new faction of youth
who wish to separate the
movement from its fascist
basis and initiate a middle-
class program.
Schiller, who is president of
the Jewish Human Rights
ac- Jacobo Fiterman
by Alfonsin to held 8*3
works department
Buenos Aires municipal
feels non-Jews-don't undej
tand why Jewish parents 2
so terrible if a child mania,
non-Jew, and whv Jews
they don't feel at home her*
don t go to Israel." PttanJ
former
.of thel
Movement, said that a symbol
| Anti-Semitism in the Military j
j Pluralism in the Mainstream I
1 I
Radical Party who spent
several years in exile because
of death threats during the
junta's reign, believes that
"there's no popular anti-
Semitism here. But the
military and the church use it;
they regard Jews as dangerous
people. And the influence of
Nazism was very strong in the
past."
The military, a young leader
in B'nai B'rith Argentina told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agen-
cy, learn at their academy that
"Jews are ugly, they all have
money, and they rob the
poor." Another young Jew
told JTA that "there are many
streams in the military but all
are anti-democratic," adding,
"there is an anti-Semitic ele-
ment in the militarv" as well.
A Jewish professional in his
40's believes the military has
been "discredited and does not
have public backing." There's
a general consensus, he said,
that "the brutality and the
lunacy" of the junta were "un-
forgivable." However, he does
not believe that this feeling
constitutes an "immunization"
against future military
regimes.
Some Jews believe that the
Church was also discredited
because, with a few excep-
tions, it supported the junta
during the reign of terror. The
official tendency during the
junta was to stress Catholic
values.
Despite the political power
of the church even today,
manv Jews hold with Paul
Rabbis Demand Animal Rights
of the changes is that the
Peronist CGT (General Con-
federation of Labor) recently
started a human rights group,
which invited him to speak.
Bortnik believes that there is
"no prejudice" against Jews
because "everybody is so mix-
ed." And, indeed, there is a
high rate of intermarriage
among Jews, estimated (there
are no statistics) at between 25
and 50 percent.
The screenwriter, herself
married to a non-Jew. believes
that most Argentines do not
think of the Jews as a religion
but "as a people or race."
Senderey holds an opposite
view: Jews, he said, "are the
only organized minority. Most
non-Jews see Jews as being of
the Jewish religion. To people
with a Catholic background,
this is strange."
Israel." FitenW I
a tormer president of th.
Zionist Federation who*
father was active in the (left
Zionist) Poale Zion. continued,
"We're very far from explW
ing to people what it means to
be a Jew.' He believes there is
no real understanding of
pluralism on the part of tbe
Argentine public.
A meeting of the North I
American delegation with'
elected provincial officials
Cordoba, where the constitu-
tion was amended last April to
allow a non-Catholic to be
elected governor, confirmed
the existence of a melting pot
(integration) rather than toss-
ed salad (pluralism) approach |
to ethnic groups.
Cordoba Vice Governor Ar
mando Grosso told the dele
tion that Argentina is "
cradle of races. There is coex-
istence between the different
nationalities.'' Cordoba Educa-1
tion Minister Robert Peyranol
added that "because of racial I
integration, we never say of al
prominent person that he is a I
Jew or a Catholic but an|
Argentinean."
This, he continued, was thel
reason that neither the con-j
tribution of Jews of any other]
ethnic group is cited in tbe I
school textbooks, although he
recognized that "the JewishI
community has given Argen-I
tina great values in culture and]
politics." Jorge Serejsky.
represents B'nai B'rith on thel
Pedagogical Congress which-'
working on educational
reform, was asked by this
reporter whether he planned
to suggest introducing
material about Jews into the |
curriculum.
His answer:
yet ripe.
SAN FRANCISCO -
(JTAS) The Northern
California Board of Rabbis has
demanded humane treatment
of animals in biochemical
research and has condemned
the use of violence by animal
rights groups, the Northern
California Jewish Bulletin
reports.
In what may be an un-
precedented move in the
United States, the rabbis
voted 15-1 with one abstention
last month to approve a six-
point resolution that:
Calls on federal regulatory
agencies to enforce existing
standards for humane treat-
ment of laboratory animals.
Urges research institu-
tions to comply with establish-
ed professional guidelines.
Calls on colleges and
universities to minimize the
use of animals in teaching and
to ensure students are in-
structed in ethical treatment
of animals.
Encourage scientists to
use non-animals models for ex-
perimentation and to seek
funds to develop the concept.
Urges rabbis to teach rab-
binic injunctions against caus-
ing unnecessary pain and suf-
fering to animals.
The resolution also
"condemns as contrary to
Jewish tradition, democracy
and interests of public health
the use of violence, vandalism
and destruction as methods of
observation or protest."
Animal rights groups have
bombed laboratories and
research clinics here.
Rabbi Burt Jacobson of
Berkeley originally supported
the resolution, but changed his
mind because he said he feared
it wasn't broad enough and
would be used to maintain the
status quo.
But Rabbi Avi Levine of
Berkely said "the task force
decided not to address every
possible use of animals for ex-
perimentation because in each
case the ethical justifications
or lack of them are varied
and must be dealt with
separately."
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Friday, October 30, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
U.S. Aircraft Manufacturer To Sue
Israel
TEL AVIV (JTA) Pratt and Whitney, a major
American manufacturer of aircraft engines, is about to file
suit in New York against the Israeli government for $350
million in compensation for violation of contracts related to
the joint development of the Lavi, Israel's second genera-
tion jet fighter plane, the Israeli news media reported
Sunday.
The Lavi project was abandoned by decision of Israel's
Cabinet last Aug. 30 because of excessive costs. The
Reagan administration had been urging such action for
more than a year. The Lavi was financed by U.S. military
grants.
Joffe Begins Work As JTA Editor
YORK (JTA) Mark Jonathan Joffe has assumed
responsibility as editor of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency,
William Frost, president of the International Jewish News
service, announced this week.
Joffe, 27, directs the agency's daily and weekly reportage
of news affecting Jews around the world. He previously
served as news editor of the Jewish Exponent of
Philadelphia, an award-winning Jewish weekly newspaper
and one of the nation's largest.
New Annex For Hungarian Hospital
The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee
(.IDC) will build a 35-bed annex to the existing Jewish
hospital in Budapest, Hungary. The new annex will ease
the problem of overcrowding at the hospital. The plans to
build the hospital were discussed last week with the
Hungarian State Minister of Religious Affairs, Imre
Miklos, during his visit with JDC leadership in the USA.
Cabinet Shuts Down Israel Radio, TV
TEL AVIV (JTA) The Cabinet agreed Sunday to
close down Israel radio and television for 90 days, pending
legislation that would allow the government-owned Israel
Broadcasting Authority (IBA) to reorganize under new
regulations with a reduced staff.
The proposal was introduced by education Minister Yit-
zhak N'avon in view of the strike by IBA journalists, now in
its third week with no signs of a settlement. During the
closure, legislation would be introduced in the Knesset to
amend the broadcast law. About 600 of the 1,800 jour-
nalists and technicians now employed by the IBA would be
dismissed and the several unions representing them would
be redued to a single work committee. The strikers have
received no pay for the last two weeks.
Syrian Jews Released
TEL AVIV (JTA I President Hafez Assad of Syria
ordered the release of five Syrian Jews imprisoned for
allegedly spying for Israel and they have since immigrated
to Israel, according to the Cairo magazine October, quoted
here by Davar Monday.
The Egyptian news weekly indicated their release was
engineered by former President Jimmy Carter when he
met with Assad in Damascus six months ago.
Saudi Prince Leaves Washington With
No Promises To Spur Peace
WASHINGTON (JTA) Crown Prince Abdallah of
jaudi Arabia ended four-day visit to Washington Wednes-
day without giving any public indication that the Saudis are
now willing to be helpful in the Middle East peace process.
A State Department official, who was briefing reporters
n the visit Tuesday, said the Reagan administration
stressed its commitment to the peace process in the
meetings with Abdallah, but refused to give any indication
of the crown prince's response.
Two U.S. Mayors Boycott Conferences
Excluding Jerusalem
NEW YORK (JTA) The mayors of New York and
Boston boycotted two separate international conferences
devoted to great cities of the world because Jerusalem has
nt been invited.
Mayor Ed Koch of New York canceled his appearance at
the Capitals of the World Conference, which was held in
Ottawa. And Mayor Raymond Flynn of Boston announced
w will not be going to the World Conference of Historical
pities in Kyoto, Japan, next month even though Boston,
Kyoto sister city, was the only American city invited to
'be conclave.
Israel Considers Cuts
Due to U.S. Dollar Crunch
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
There is a growing inclination
in Israel to voluntarily forgo
some $80 million in U.S.
military aid next year in view
of accelerated efforts by the
Reagan administration and the
Congress to pare the huge
federal deficit.
But the matter is being hotly
debated, it was reported here
Monday. Some senior politiasl
figures believe it is better for
Israel to accept a small reduc-
tion as a gesture of good will
toward Washington than to
wage a struggle. Others
however, insist Israel must not
agree to cuts.
'Israel will have to decide
within a short time whether to
agree or fight it," sources in
Jerusalem noted Sunday.
Maariv reported Monday that
the Americans are feeling out
Israel on the matter and in fact
contacts between the two
countries on this issue have
already begun.
The $80 million constitutes
4.5 percent of the $1.8 billion
in U.S. aid to Israel in the com-
ing year. But the Gramm-
Rudman bill may force an
overall cut in foreign aid.
Israelis fear that in Tight of
President Reagan's statement
about budget cuts at his na-
tionally televised news con-
ference last week, there would
be an unpleasant reaction in
Washington should Israel balk.
But Defense Minister Yit-
zhak Rabin seems to be in the
camp of those Israelis who
would fight any cuts. "I am
depending on the administra-
tion to fulfill its com-
mitments," he told military
correspondents Sunday. He
maintained that "the problem
is in Congress."
Rabin said he was deeply
worried about Israel's ability
to pay for its future military
needs. He noted there has
been a real drop in the value of
the U.S. dollar over the past
two years, and this con-
tributed to increased person-
nel costs in Israel's weapons
development programs, which
are financed largely by
American military grants. He
said that while the U.S. Con-
gress has traditionally been
friendly to Israel, maintaining
current levels of aid would be
difficult if there is a downturn
in the American economy. He
noted that the amount of
American aid to Israel will be
decided by Nov. 20 and until
then there is no certainty how
much Israel would receive.
"In any event," Rabin said,
"the top priority is the signing
of the deal for the third con-
signment of F-16Cs, which we
will be receiving in the early
1990s." The second consign-
ment is presently being
delivered to Israel.
The F-16Cs will replace the
Lavi, Israel's second genera-
tion jet fighter plane which the
government canceled last
August. Accordingly to Rabin,
"If we had not dropped the
Lavi, the (Reagan) administra-
tion would not have backed
us."
Abandonment of the project
was not without high price to
Israel. Israel Aircraft In-
dustries employed 6,000
engineers and aircraft workers
to build the Lavi. Rabin said
about 3,000 could be absorbed
by other divisions of IAI, but
the remaining 3,000 would lose
their jobs. He said of that
number, 800 temporary
workers can be dismissed
without any loss to IAI. About
400 over age 55 who have at
least 15 years of seniority will
be induced to take early retire-
ment and 1,800 will be offered
higher severance pay to leave,
Rabin said.
HUD Rescinds Demand
For Non-Kosher Foods
By ELAINE DeROSA
Greater Phoenix Jewish News
PHOENIX (JTA) The
U.S. Department of Housing
and Urban Development
(HUD) has rescinded a
memorandum which would
have demanded that federally
subsidized Jewish apartment
complexes offer non-kosher
food in addition to their man-
datory meal programs.
The rule, announced in
August, would have affected
more than a dozen HUD-
subsidized Jewish apartment
projects through the nation.
These centers provide the
mandatory meals to ensure
that residents have nutri-
tionally balanced meals and op-
portunity to socialize and be
seen by staff, according to
Meyer Cohen, executive direc-
tor of the Kivel Geriatric
Center here.
He added that the cost of the
kosher program required par-
ticipation of all the residents.
The rescinding of the memo
was the result of a meeting
last month between Thomas
Demery, assistant secretary of
HUD, and representatives of
Kivel, the North American
Association of Jewish Homes
and Housing for the Aged,
Agudath Israel of America,
the Va'ad Hakashrut of
Phoenix and United Communi-
ty Inc. of Los Angeles.
At the meeting, Demery
agreed to issue a memo
describing the August order,
released by a lower level HUD
staffer, as a "miscom-
munication."
The issue arose last April
when a resident in the Chai
House Jewish apartment pro-
ject in San Jose, Calif., was
told she couldn't sprinkle
parmesan cheese on her
kosher meat, according to
Ellen Feingold of Boston,
chairman of the association's
Public Policy Committee.
The resident complained to
her representative in Con-
gress. Rep. Henry Gonzalez
(D., Texas), chairman of the
House Subcommittee on Hous-
ing and Community Develop-
ment, heard of the case and
wrote to HUD Secretary
Samuel Pierce Jr.
The letter contended that to
impose kashrut in a federally
funded project was "an un-
constitutional violation of the
principle of separation of
church and state," HUD'S
August memo followed.
Kivel executive director
Meyer Cohen got early word of
the memo and began his cam-
paign to have it rescinded.
Announcing...an exciting
s*'-:
POSTER
CONTEST
Open to all students in
Religious Schools in Florida
"FOODS THEMES FROM THE BIBLE"
An opportunity for creative expression in cory unction with
Florida's Biggest Kosher Party and Celebration of Jewish Life
iponaored ty U ..

mz
1 A*t CaUforlu:
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 30, 1987
'Glasnost' Casts
Ambiguous Shadow
In the welcome reflection of the local visit
this week by Natan Sharansky, we note an
impressive role call:
Ida Nudel
Vladimir and Maria Slepak
Col. Lev Ovsishcher
Leonid and Ekaterina Yusefovitch
Mark and Slava Shifrin
Andrei Lifschitz
Boris and Ludmilla Fridman
Evgeny and Rimma Yakir
Like Sharansky and Nudel before them,
the Slepaks and Ovsishcher have been
released after their long-time tenure as
Prisoners of Conscience. Other refuseniks,
and their families, are expected to follow.
The West will soon welcome among the
ranks of freed Soviet Jews, the Shifrins and
Fridmans and .. .
But what of Anna Kholmiansky, wife of
former Prisoner of Conscience Aleksandr
Kholmiansky?
She started a hunger strike last week pro-
testing the ongoing refusal of the USSR to
grant her family permission to leave.
In the case of the Kholmianskys, refusal is
based on a rule requiring anyone seeking to
emigrate to obtain a statement from his or
her parents that-the applicant has no finan-
cial obligations toward them.
"These parents who wish to prevent
emigration of their children may do so by
refusing to issue such a document," Anna
Kholminsky wrote in a letter announcing
her hunger strike.
"No other proofs are accepted and the
authorities wash their hands, claiming the
problem to be purely a family one. Thus, this
ingeniously designed clause allows the
authorities to hold people here for genera-
tions without affecting the image of a new
Soviet liberalism," Kholmiansky asserted.
And, what of the other "Kholmiansky"
families?
While the Soviets have scored the greatest
in a public relations coup with the new policy
of 'glasnost* or openness, we must ask
wherein the Jewish community fits?
Although we note with pleasure and
gratitude that in the first half of 1987, more
than 3,000 refuseniks were allowed to
emigrate, we recall the Soviet commitment
of 11,000 by year's end.
If the Soviets truly respect their own sta-
tion, that as signator to the 1975 Helsinki
Accords, if the Soviets are indeed more sen-
sitive to human rights and the attendant
regard in the West, if expectations of
repatriation of Jews to the homeland have
been encouraged, why still do we note that
only "first-degree" relations will cause an
application to be accepted? How long will
the "secrecy" clause work against those
who have not been privy to "secrets" for
years beyond counting?
Cultural exchanges, conferences on
humanitarianism, sister-city programs not-
withstanding, we view the high profile
releases with ambivalence.
Surely, we are grateful for the releases of
all the Nudels and Sharanskys and Shifrins.
But we dare not forget all the Kholmian-
sky families.
We are grateful.
But, we are not forgetful.
Wall Street No Excuse
"So, if you had a bad week, whv should I
suffer?" *
That was one of the messages of Tevye in
"Fiddler on the Roof." and Jewish philan-
thropies should not be made the unwilling
victims of the Wall Street crash of 1987.
The tradition of tzdek Judaism which represents more than
charity.
It is the needs of the cause and individuals
to whom we give, rather than the tax
benefits we gain which must be the measure
of our contributions in this year of financial
unrest.
The tens of thousands of Jews at home, in
Israel and around the world whose very ex-
istence may depend on donations cannot be
made to take the full brunt of the precipitous
decline of Dow Jones.
Now more than ever, we are called upon
not to give until it hurts, hut to give until it
helps.
The Lesson of Judge Bork
With the Senate's dramatic, 58 to 42 rejec-
tion of the nomination of Judge Robert Bork
to the Supreme Court, President Reagan
has been put on notice about his next
selection.
Not only must the President's new
nominee to succeed Justice Powell be
scholarly and experienced in the judiciary,
but also must have a demonstrable respect
for First Amendment rights.
Judge Bork failed in the end not because
he was viewed as too conservative, but
because his past record reflected a disdain
lor the right of privacy and other individual
rights.
The overwhelming margin of his rejection
discredits the far right's claim that "it was
only politics" which caused the Bork
downfall.
In the end, Judge Bork was the principal
witness against himself. He lost with honor,
however, and the Senate must have an open
mind about Reagan's replacement nominee.
Movement Towards Peace
Even as American Jewry debates whether
or not it can have a voice in Israel's decision
on how to advance the peace process in the
Middle East, the United States appears to
be re-entering the efforts to find a solution.
Secretary of State George Shultz. who has
repeatedly demonstrated that he has no pre-
judice against Israel, has again brought
forth the suggestion of a Soviet American
bilateral participation in place of a total in-
ternational presence.
Shimon Peres totally endorses direct,
face-to-face talks between Israel and her
Arab neighbors as the best means of achiev-
ing peace. But he looks with favor on other
means of reaching the start of such talks.
These were what worked in the Camp
David accords, and the Egyptian peace trea-
ty with Israel has held rather firmly for
eight years now.
But the ongoing violence in Gaza and
Judea and Samaria (the West Bank) cannot
be allowed to continue without every possi-
ble effort to break through.
American efforts to help should not lightly
be thrust aside.
Senate Races
Require American-Jewish Review
By MORRIS J. AMITAY
With the 1988 elections just
a year away, the major focus
has been on all the candidates
for the Presidency. However
there are a number of impor-
tant Senate contests which
friends of Israel are already
watching closely.
Mounting budget deficits
and increasing demands to cut
cumbency is such a strong fac-
tor in the House of Represen-
tatives, and because the
Senate traditionally plays*
more significant role in foreign
eJewish Floridian
Fred K Shochet
Editor and Publisher
Norma A. Orovitz
Managing Editor
Suzanne Shochet
Executive Editor
William T. Brewer
n"ector o( Operations
Joan C Teglas
Director ot Advertising
Friday, October 30.1987
Volume 60
7 Heshvan 5748
Number 44
foreign aid programs, make it affairs Alreadv we are being
SuXPXi5 HER the.ade: of vete a*friends -
quate aid levels for Israel and
maintain its opposition to
unrestrained sales of
sophisticated U.S. weapons to
Israel's foes. This means that
the American Jewish com-
munity must maintain a high
level of involvement in next
year's congressional elections,
most particularly the U.S.
Senate. This is because in-
well as promising challengers
who need our help.
In New York. Senator Pat
Moynihan, a long-time _rnenu
going back to his days as am
bassador to the United Na
tions. is seeking reflection
his third six-year term. H "
Continued on Page 1**


Friday, October 30, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 6-A

The 'New' Jackson
Not Unlike the Old
KVETCH!
TM
By ERIC ROZENMAN
If foreign policy substance
counted more than style in
political campaigns. Rev. Jesse
Jackson's interview in the
November-December issue of
Tikkuu magazine could do to
his presidential campaign
what the Neil Kinnock
videotape did to Sen. Joseph
Biden's, For example:
Syria. Saudi Arabia, Iraq,
Libya and Iran "already ac-
,.,.,,'t the state of Israel as a
fait There is no evidence of
them using, for example, their
collective might in a contrary
a;i\, because they know that
their relationship to America
is in some measure conditional
upon their acceptance of
Israel's right to exist."
This breathtaking revision of
Middle East realities
resembles President Ford's
1976 claim that the Soviet
Union did not control Poland.
Jackson said that the U.S.
"interest and will to protect
Israel is substantial and seems
unequivocal (emphasis added).
America has a special interest
with Saudi Arabia, that
likewise must be
protected ..."
Of course the United States
has important interests in
Saudi Arabia. But equating
American commitments to a
friendly, Western-style
democracy like Israel and an
oil price-manipulating feudal
monarchy like Saudi Arabia in-
dicates, at best, a geopolitical
blind spot.
Jackson also claimed that
"there is an understanding
between this country and the
Saudis. They will not abuse our
relationship to atttck the
State of Israel, and they have
not." Where, in that view,
Hoes Saudi financing of Syria
and the PLO, its long obstruc-
tion of Egypt's return to inter-
Arab politics, and financial
threats should Jordan make
peace with Israel, fit?
The candidate said
America's most significant act
"to protect Israel's right to ex-
ist in the Middle East was not
a military act. It was a
diplomatic act. It was Camp
David ..."
But successful diplomacy
j^sts on military strengths.
Had Israel not reversed the
"Pening success of the Egyp-
tian and Syrian attacks in 1973
- partly with belated U.S.
mihtary resupply Anwar
^adat might not have been
convinced, at last, of the
necessity of a negotiated
settlement.
Jackson dodged a question
the legitimacy of Zionism:
the Jews had a need for a
homeland, and the political set-
lement was reached. I accept
in* political settlement as
reality without getting into the
e'lgion of the matter." He
nen said the crisis still lingers
^ause of the failure then "on
^'ng a homeland for the
,a'estiniansas well."
'". fact, the Palestinian
;;'I*did not get their state in
?J7:1949 because they and
S Arab countries refused the
,,N Partition plan. Instead,
'ev went to war against
Israel. The crisis lingers since,
except for Egypt, the Arab
world still refuses to make
peace with Zionist Israel.
Jackson accepted the
Pope's meeting with Kurt
Waldheim. but changed the
topic when the interviewer
asked about a hypothetical ses-
sion between the pontiff and
the head of South Africa.
Then, on the PLO "cove-
nant's" demand for the
elimination of Israel, the can-
didate said that while any call
for genocide is wrong, "there's
a difference between what's
remotely possible and what's
actual and real. The Palesti-
nians cannot drive the Jews in-
to the sea. The South Africans
are driving blacks into the sea
. and, unfortunately, the
Israeli government has been in
complicity with the South
African regime."
That seems to imply that it is
all right for the PLO to call for
the destruction of Israel so
long as the PLO cannot do it.
It distorts the level of Israel's
ties to South Africa and ig-
nores much of black Africa's
Arab-coerced discrimination
against the Jewish state.
Describing South Africa as the
"Fourth Reich," Jackson at-
tempts to confiscate the
Holocaust reality and sym-
bol from Jewish experience,
"Swell-the only shade for 200 miles and it
catches fire!"
even to identify Israel with
those he says are acting like
Nazis.
But, accepting Jackson's
own distinction between the
remotely possible and the ac-
tual, South Africa is no equal
to the Third Reich; there is no
"final solution" for blacks. In-
stead, it is a country headed,
however violently, toward rule
by blacks.
Offered a chance to
repudiate "black fascists" like
Louis Farrakhan, Jackson can-
not do it.
The "new Nixon" of 1968
turned out to be the original
repackaged; so too with the
"new" Jackson.
Near East Report
Division and Deadlock
No Cause for House Divided
By JULIUS BERMAN
Since the end of World War
II, American Jews have been
particularly outspoken about
the safety and security of Jews
abroad in part out of an ef-
fort to make sure that never
again will the world be silent in
the face of Jewish suffering.
The U.S. Jewish community
has marched for Soviet Jewry,
protested the inhuman treat-
ment of Jews in Syria, de-
nounced anti-Semitism in
Argentina and condemned ter-
rorist attacks against Jews en-
joying a holiday on a cruise
ship in the Mediterranean or
worshipping at Sabbath ser-
vices in Istanbul.
There has been one excep-
tion to the practice of express-
ing our opinions on life-or-
death issues affecting our
fellow-Jews abroad. That ex-
ception has been the foreign
policy of the State of Israel -
more particularly, the deci-
sions of the Israeli government
having to do with the safety of
the people and the security of
the nation. The strongly-held
consensus has been that posi-
tions on such matters ought to
be adopted by the Israelis
themselves, for they are on the
firing line and they and their
children might well have to
pay for these decisions with
their blood.
To be sure, American Jews
have not withheld their advice.
The Conference of Presidents
of Major American Jewish
Organizations was formed in
part to articulate the consen-
sus of American Jews on such
issues. Representing as it does
the opinion of some 45 national
Jewish organizations, the
Presidents' Conference has
not hesitated to advise, inform
and even argue with the
government of Israel on mat-
ters of every kind. Our opi-
nions, when expressed
through the normal channels
that have been established bet-
ween the leaders of Israel and
the spokesmen for the
American Jewish community,
have been listened to with
respect and interest;
sometimes our advice is taken,
sometimes not.
But the dialogue has been an
internal one. If we had opi-
nions and there is no shor-
tage of them among American
Jews we did not broadcast
them, nor take advertisements
in the maior American media
to bring them to public atten-
tion. We did not seek to in-
fluence the government of
Israel through the pages of
The New York Times, for the
result if not the intent of such
actions is to influence
Washington, not Jerusalem.
Two recent events, however,
indicate that the traditional
deference we have paid to the
Israelis whose lives are on the
line may be ending. In late
September the American
Jewish Congress, in a well-
publicized statement, announc-
ed that it endorsed the interna-
tional peace conference pro-
posed by King Hussein and en-
dorsed by Foreism Minister
Peres (and rejected by Frime
Minister Shamir). A week
later, Foreign Minister Peres
himself, in a speech to the Con-
ference of Presidents, urged
the organized Jewish com-
munity to give voice to its
views with respect to his
dispute with the Prime
Minister on the peace
.vX-X-X-X-X-X*X'X-X-XwXvX-X-X-X-X-XvX-
| Commentary
conference.
I believe these two
developments mark an alarm-
ing retreat from sound policy.
Although the continued
wooden reverenced bow to an
old policy merely because it is
in place is not necessarily wise,
Continued on Page 12-A
::-x%::x-x-:-x-x<-:-x-:-x;xwx-xw%;xWx;.:
Another View of Glasnost
g By MORRIS B. ABRAM
Chairman
Conference of Presidents
of Major American
Jj Jewish Organizations
:: The recent vote in the
:: UN General Assemblly by
:j| the Soviet Union to bar
:' Israel's admission casts a
; long shadow on the
I Kremlin's credibility. The
:j: Gorbachev regime, which
speaks of "openness," has
:: demonstrated by this
hypocritical gesture that
I its foreign policy remains
:|: motivated by the same
:: cynical power politics that
^characterized the
>: pre-"glasnost" era.
This disturbing action
8 compounds a long and
S sorry record of Soviet anti-
:: Jewish and anti-Zionis: ac-
x tivity a the United Na
x tions. [I reminds us that it
I was the Soviet Union tha
lobbied for the notorious
^x-x-XvXvX^X-xvX-xWxX-x-X-xWXWx-x-XX:-:
General Assembly resolu-
tion attacking Zionism,
one of the most infamous
declarations ever adopted
by the international
community.
Soviet spokesmen keep
insisting that their country
is easing the restrictions of
life at home in the Scviet
Union. The world has yet
to see such systematic
change regarding the
rights of Soviet Jews. This
latest Soviet vote in the
UN underscores the ex-
tent to which the new
"openness'' in interna-
tional affairs also appears
to lie a snare and a
delusion.
By illuminating the
darker side of Soviet reali-
ty, MOSCOW'S anti-Israel
vote at the UN under-
mines the trust that alone
can guarantee a successful
-uniniit meeting.
xWx-XvX-: : x-x-XXx-XXx-x-x-x
x


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 30, 1987
National JDL Leader Shifts
To Stance of Moderation
By LIONEL SOLFE
Is the national chairman of
the Jewish Defense League
getting mellow in his middle
age?
Irv Rubin asserts that JDL,
now based in Los Angeles, will
cease disrupting speeches in
synagogues by leftists and
even outright Arab PLO
supporters.
"We had no right to disrupt
these events, and we have
caused ourselves more grief as
an organization by doing that
than anything else." he said in
a recent interview.
"If rabbis want to invite
PLO speakers and New Jewish
Agenda speakers, that should
not be our I even if
they won't let us speak,
tinued.
Rubin explained that he
n't want JDL dismissed as
a bunch of hooligans, even if
toughness is not necessarily
bad. "We have been called the
Jewish Black Panthers." *' he
noted. "Well, there's a basic
thing in the animal world
one panther will not mess with
another panther." Still. JDL
under his leadership is
undergoing some changes.
"I'm picking my issues more
carefully. I want to stay with
American issues, and get away
from the Middle East. We
want to be the Guardian
Angels of the Jewish people."
he said. "Listen. I would be a
hypocrite telling Israel what to
do with its Arabs. Sure I ad-
vocate a certain policy, but it's
not worth a bucket of warm
spit if I'm not in the State of
Israel."
Rubin may have mellowed,
but he still looks like a golem.
He's well over six feet tall.
with a rugged, strong face that
looks a bit like an unfinished
sculpture. Rubin gives the
sense of living on the edge of a
perennial rage, and combined
with his size, there's
something intimidating about
him.
But he's now four decades
old and there is a certain
mellowness to him that you
didn't see just a few years ago.
He does not deny that perhaps
some of his passion has ebbed.
And he has become more sen-
sitive to the fact that he still
doesn't get much respect from
the Jewish hierarchy.
None of this is meant to imp-
ly that he no longer cares
about the fate of Jews. For ex-
ample, by most accounts, the
recent news conference at
which Los Angeles Mayor Tom
Bradley came out strongly
against black Muslim leader
Louis Farrakhan can be ex-
plained in part by Rubin, who
insisted on getting an answer
from the mayor about
Farrakhan.
Of course, he's not very
diplomatic. Estabishment
Jewish organizations might
think that most of what be
does is counterproductive at
best, but be has a following.
He insists that he does not
believe in breaking the law,
although he is willing to go to
jail for civil disobedience. It's
just that be says he is not a
proponent of violence, even if
there's always the suggestion
of it around him.
For example, last year the
FBI at first blamed Rubin and
the JDL in the bombing
murder of Arab-American and
Palestinian activist Alex Odeh
in Santa Ana. Calif. Rubin said
to charge him with the crime,
or face a lawsuit. Although he
had made certain rather ugly
and tasteless comments about
the murder, the FBI never ar-
rested him.
The City of Los Angeles
recently demanded the right
not to have to defend itself
from Rubin's suit against it on
the grounds of national securi-
ty. Cities, obviously, don't
usually invoke national securi-
ty in lawsuits. Rubin sued the
city because he said its police
department sent an agent into
the JDL to encourage the
group to perform outragi
>f violence.
The city claimed it can't
open its files on JDL beca ;
would harm national security.
The American Civil Liberties
Union took on Rubin's case.
The city's position was
recently denied by a higher
court, and Rubin, who has not
always been a big fan of the
ACLL" for its defense of the
free speech rights of the Klan.
neo-Nazis and other anti-
Semitic groups, admits that he
now sees the need for the
organization.
Rubin's wife Shelley says
she's always amazed at her
husband's drive. She knows he
gets discouraged and
frustrated, but unlike so many
political activists he is still go-
ing strong. "When it comes to
the dirty work, people are
always willing to call on Irv
Rubin and the JDL." she said.
"He has real guts."
The other day he and a cou-
ple of members stood in front
of Farrakhan's mosque in Los
Angeles seeking signatures to
a petition to rescind Far-
rakhan's invitation to Los
Angeles. He only got one
signature, but he wanted to
make a point.
Rubin is still angered by
perceived slights to the JDL.
He almost plaintively wails
about not getting credit he
says is due. For instance, he
was the only Jew who organiz-
ed a protest when the
notorious Rumanian Nazi Ar-
chbishop Valerian Trifa show-
ed up.
He believes J DL is
misunderstood. "Listen," he
said, "the JDL was never
meant to be a permanent
organization. That's what's
wrong with Jewish organiza-
tions. They never die. What is
the American Jewish Commit-
tee, what is the American
Jewish Congress? Most people
have absolutely no concept
what these groups stand for.
Back in the '30s they helped
out Jews who were victims of
Jew-hatred. Most have a pro-
Israel policy, yet in the same
house they have a New-Jewish
Agenda, which has pro-
Palestinian aspirations. But
they won't let us in."
Much of Rubin's shtick has
the feeling of '60s street
theater for example bran-
dishing semi-automatic
weapons or knives in front of
news cameras. The City At-
torney tried to put Rubin in jail
for soliciting murder when
Rubin offered $500 to anyone
who killed or maimed a Nazi,
and $1.0000 if "he brings me
his ears." A jury decided that
Rubin's remarks were con-
stitutionally protected political
hyperbole.
On the other hand, Rubin
has been arrested more than
30 times, although he never
was convicted of a felony. In
New York, several JDL
members face prison terms for
setting off smoke bombs in a
theater and attempts at fire-
bombing and pipe-bombing
cars.
Rubin, however, says the of-
ficial JDL has little presence in
For Terrorist' Bombings
But Former JDL Chairman
Sentenced to 10 Years
Y< RK VTel
rial oha:r-
- in Ft--:
. ul in "ter-
bombmgs staged to
: mistreatmv
NEW
cier
gue
ed
pria
r iriat"
protest
Jews
Judge I. Leo Gosser of
Federal District Court in
Brooklyn revoked Vancier's SI
million bail as he imposed the
stern sentence on the man who
served as JDL chairman from
April 1985 until November
1986.
Vancier was convicted of
participatig in a series of bom-
bings, including the Oct. 20.
1986 firebombing of A very
Fisher Hall at Lincoln Center
in Manhattan. The Moscow-
State Symphony was schedul-
ed to appear that day. and the
stage door entrance was
damaged. Thert- were no
Fed tries
.anded \
bail I :. .ludge Gi
lefendant
go bombing innocent people to
make a point."
Earlier the jurist sentenced
Murray Young. 60. of East
Meadow. Long Island, to five
years in prison. Vancier and
Young each had pleaded guilty
to racketeering charges in-
cluding acts of bombing, extor-
tion, fraud and arson. Each
faced 20 years' imprisonment.
Young also was a militant
member of the JDL.
A third defendant. Sharon
Katz. 44. of Manhattan, was
given five years' probation, in-
cluding a suspended five-year
sentence and six months of
house arrest.
New York, so split is it j-.
various factions, some <
whom make no bones aW
their desire for violence
Police estimates mm
there are abut 30 harg
JDL members in Los Aneek
and more than 1,000 who^
checks when needed. R^
refuses to discuss this.
He learned about being
Jewish in his hometown 3
Montreal, where, he said the
anti-Semitism was so strong
he had no choice but to defend
himself.
His philosophy also came
from the trauma both of learn-
ing about the Holocaust his
parents lost much of their
family but also of understan-
ding the kind of vicious anti-
Semitism that he says can lead
to other holocaust!
His ideology, as did that of
his original mentor, Rabbi
Meir Kahar zw
Jabotinsky. th< h0
'lang
and later Pr
Menad -also

pundit ''.
cept i
where B

Rubin cam*- I Los Angeles
from Montr.
1960. He graduated high
school here, a: t on to
Los Angele.- I ege in
1966 to study graphic arts.
During the years that many
Jewish youth were caught up
in protests against the war in
Vietnam, he joined the Air
Force and served in an in-
telligence unit.
While in the Air Force he
ran into some particularly
virulent anti-Semites, and
when he got out he received a
big jolt when in 1970 he saw
"this Nazi headquarters in El
Continued on Pan l$-A
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5713 N.W. 27th Avtnut,
Hallandale Beach
Miami
.Hallandale
A division of the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged at Douglas Gardens


Friday, October 30, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Soviets Balk At New Peace Proposal
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Secretary of State George
Shultz indicated last Friday
that he was unable to get the
Soviet Union to go along with
a new proposal for negotia-
tions between Israel and Jor-
dan under the auspices of the
United States and the Soviet
Union.
"We haven't made any par-
ticular progress in the varying
concepts we have about that,"
Shultz said at a press con-
ference in Moscow following
two days of talks with Soviet
Foreign Minister Eduard
Shevardnadze and Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev. The
press conference was seen
here as it was held over the
Cable News Network (CNN).
Shultz was apparently refer-
ring to the latest proposal to
have Moscow and Washington
jointly host negotiations bet-
ween Jordan and Israel, as
well as the earlier proposal for
an international conference
which would include the five
permanent members of the
United Nations Security
Council.
The Soviets have backed Jor-
dan and other Arab countries
in pressing for the interna-
tional conference. The issue
has divided the government of
national unity in Israel, with
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres and his Labor colleagues
supporting the concept as the
only way to bring Jordan into
the negotiations while Premier
Yitzhak Shamir and Likud are
vehemently opposed because
of a belief the Soviets would
use it to press anti-Israel
actions.
During Shultz's visit to the
Middle East en route to
Moscow, Shamir and Peres ap-
parently agreed to allow
Shultz to raise the new concept
with the Soviets.
However, Shultz has never
publicly acknowledged that
there is such a proposal.
Shamir told Israel Army Radio
that it was agreed not to
disclose the plan while the U.S.
official was in the Soviet
Union.
The proposal is aimed at
avoiding the term "interna-
tional conference" since it
calls for direct talks between
Israel and a Jordanian-
Palestinian delegation under
U.S.-Soviet auspices.
But the existence of the pro-
posal became public in Israel
and has already drawn fire
from some members of Likud
and the rightwing Tehiya Par-
ty, which has submitted a non-
confidence motion in the
Knesset.
Shultz's response on the
Mideast process came in an
answer to a question from a
Soviet reporter. The secretary
stressed that the United
States has been a "helpful
partner" in seeking peace in
the Mideast.
He added that in addition to
seeking peace, "We have made
many efforts to improve the
quality of life" for Palestinians
on the West Bank and Gaza.
He said during his recent visit
he discussed what is being
done on this with both Israel
and Jordan.
Meanwhile, the major
obstacle to either an interna-
tional conference or to the new
proposal is the insistence by
both Israel and the United
States that before the Soviet
Union can participate in the
Middle East peace process it
must restore diplomatic rela-
tions with Israel and allow
Soviet Jews to emigrate in
greater numbers.
Shultz indicated that he was
pleased that efforts on human
rights were being developed
"carefully and systematical-
ly." He noted it was a major
issue in his talks with Shevard-
nadze and had been discussed
by a working group of U.S.
and Soviet officials.
The secretary met briefly
last Thursday with about 60
refuseniks, which included per-
sons seeking to immigrate to
Israel or to rejoin spouses in
the United States. Many were
the same people who attended
a Passover seder hosted by
Shultz at the U.S. Embassy
when he was in Moscow last
spring.
Richard Shifter, assistant
secretary of state for human
rights and humanitarian af-
fairs, said the Soviets had set
up a commission, promised last
spring, to review the cases of
refuseniks and will announce
decisions within six months.
According to reports from
Moscow, Shifter stressed that
while progress is being made
on Soviet emigration policies,
"we still have a very, very
hard road ahead."
Emigration from the Soviet
Union increased this year to
5,403 by the end of September
and has included some well-
known long-time refuseniks
like Iosif Begun, Ida Nudel and
Vladimir Slepak. But Soviet
Jewry activists in the United
States note there are nearly
400,000 Jews who want to
emigrate and new applicants
Continued on Paee 13-A

(KEREN KAVEMETH
LEISRAEL) INC.
^
\
Member of the Knesset
Former Ambassador to Egypt
5445 ^tUUnb *%fafe*Ue
Wancinp to ike i'/*>*/. tiat/tn ('wketfut
Exec. Vice Pres. JNF of America
9un &Uce/Uu>*i 44:30 d&M
&bop*a*n <2)in*te* 42:30 &.*Jl.





.'/
Abraham Qrunhut
Prea. JNF Or. Miami
Rabbi Irving Lahrman
Chrmn. JNF Fdtn.
Ernaal Samuals
V P JNF Gr Miami
ZavW. Kogan
Praa. JNF Southern Region
For Information and Reservations
Jewish National Fund 420 Lincoln Road. Suite 353, Miami Beach, PI, 33139 Tel. 538-6464
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Chrmn. JNF Exec. Board


Pfc 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. October 30, 1987
Sharansky Damns Glasnost and Decries Numbers

Continued from Page 1-A
"were the same people who
were criticizing me and others
they saw as opponents of
Gorbachev."
Sharansky asserted that he
"was never really opposed to
Gorbachev but opposed to
naivete" on the part of the
American public, which
perceives the charismatic
Soviet leader incorrectly, ac-
cording to Sharansky.
"He is not a human rights
champion. He is not concerned
with the situation of Soviet
Jewry," he contended.
"He is concerned abut the
situation of Soviet economy.
Gorbachev is a new kind of
Soviet leader a realist. He
"Anti-Semitism
was the only thing
making its Jews."
understands he must open the
gates to the West. He
understands the importance of
human rights issues" to the
West, said Sharansky.
"If he would be able to save
the economy without making
concessions to human rights,"
Gorbachev would not concern
himself with human rights
issues at all, Sharansky
asserted, adding that the
Soviet leader would try to get
by on "limited concessions" to
the West in respect to Soviet
Jewry.
"He has succeeded in replac-
ing the struggle to release our
people with the struggle to
release a few important names
for the majority of the
American Jewish people. His
successful public relations
campaign has given the im-
pression that our struggle is
coming to a happy end, said
Sharansky, himself one of the
"important names" whose
release garnered world-wide
attention for the Soviet's self
proclaimed policy of glasnost
or openness.
"Just now is the moment
when we have an historic op-
portunity to get serious results
yet we demonstrate com-
placency. It's clear what we
must do in the coming days
and weeks, to make sure that
human rights and Soviet
Jewry issues will be part of
detente.
"That's why I'm here," said
Sharansky bluntly, looking
about the small room at the
assembled print, radio and
television reporters, "and not
at home where I would like to
be. We must send a clear
message to Gorbachev, that
we are not pacified."
Asked by a reporter what
the Soviet Union had to lose by
releasing Soviet Jews, Sharan-
sky replied that it was not an
issue of "brain drain," mean-
ing a fear of losing the coun-
try's intelligentzia through
emigration.
Rather, it was the Soviet
philosophy of collective good
superceding individual desire
which resulted in the strict
Soviet policy toward Jewish
emigration, according to
Sharansky.
"An individual is not suppos-
ed to decide for himself what
to read or say, sometimes even
what to think. An individual is
certainly not supposed to
Miami Beach Commissioner Abe
Sharansky to Miami's public rally.
Resnick welcomes Natan
everything about my life
more than I knew myself,"
said Sharansky.
"Then he looked at A vital,
and said, 'Oh, I know you, too.
You're Ida Nudel.' "
Although Sharansky con-
tinued by expressing his con-
cern that too much media and
public attention has been given
to a few famous refuseniks
such as Nudel and himself, he
was also no doubt pointing to
the fact that not enough credit
has gone to his wife, Avital,
who worked for years to
secure her husband's release
from Chistopol prison.
Sharansky, who said that he
did not know the meaning of
the word "Hanukkah" before
the age of 20, explained that
he "grew up in the completely
assimilated generation of
Soviet Jews."
He went on to say that many
Soviet Jews of his age knew
their Judaism only as a word
on their identification cards,
and as a set of restrictions
against entering certain in-
stitutes or obtaining certain
coveted job positions.
"Anti-Semitism was the onlv
Just now is the
moment when we
have an historic
opportunity to get
serious results...
That's why I'm here
and not at home
where I would like to
be. .
thing making us Jews many
wanted to change the word on
their children"s identification
to read 'Soviet,'" he
admitted.
"Then the Six Day War in
1967 changed all that." recall-
ed Sharansky. "Suddenly Jews
in the Soviet Union felt
themselves to be part of a
large Jewish family. They saw
a way to fight for dignity.
Even the anti-Semites showed
us more respect."
With the awakening of
Jewish consciousness in the
late '60s and early '70s in the
Soviet Union, the young Natan
decide in what country to
live," he explained of the
Soviet way of thinking.
In response to another ques-
tion, Sharansky stated that he
had never agreed with the opi-
nion that the decision on the
part of some Soviet Jews
granted exit visas to move to
the United States instead of
Israel discouraged the Soviets
from opening their doors still
wider to Soviet Jewish
emigration.
"Shamir, Peres, almost all
held that view, but I never
agreed," said Sharansky.
"Now, no one holds Avith that
view because the Soviets
themselves have said, 'go
ahead, it's not an issue.' "
Immediately following the
press conference, Sharansky
was ushered into a large
auditorium in the temple,
where he was greeted with
thunderous applause from the
assembled crowd, numbered
by Adath Yeshurun at 1,800.
Exuberant shouts of support
came from members of a
Zionist youth group, who rais-
ed a banner bearing the colors
if Israel's flag, blue and white.
Nan Rich, chairman of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Miami's Community Relations
Committee, Hinda Cantor and
Shirley Pollak, co-chairmen of
the South Florida Conference
on Soviet Jewry, (an arm of
the CRC) and Rabbi Simcha
Freedman, rabbi of Temple
Adath Yeshurun, were among
those who spoke to an au-
dience so primed for Sharan-
sky that enthusiastic applause
followed almost every
comment.
Sharansky, whose face had
begun to show some of the
strain of facing an audience in
what was for him the middle of
the night, nevertheless manag-
ed to inject humor into his
words, although the humor
never disguised the
seriousness of his underlying
message.
"Little more than one month
ago, I and Avital took a taxi in
New York. The driver looked
at me in the mirror, and said,
'I know you.' Then he told me
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haransky, then called Anato-
Shcharansky, entered a
swing movement whose
ls were to make emigration
i Israel a possibility.
I Sharansky, who quickly
ecame the movement s
okesman after joining in late
972, was arrested by the
iGB in 1977 on charges of es-
Lnage. His wife, Avital, who
id been allowed to emigrate
Israel and had done so one
ay after their wedding, began
er long struggle to publicize
er husband's plight.
| "It was clear our whole
kovement was on trial,"
(haransky asserted. "There
las talk during my trial of a
[ionist plot against the USSR,
with many names of
fnited States politicians and
Xurnalists.
For them, our struggle for
leedom was really a struggle
(rainst the basic tenets of the
Soviet) system.
Only the knowledge that he
las not forgotten by the out-
fcde world sustained him,
hrough the years of imprison-
ent and isolation, he
called.
In the 18 months that 1 was
olated !>etween my arrest
nd my trial, the KGB tried to
lonvince me that if I didn't
hange my position right away
hey would sentence me to
eath." he recalls.
But encouragement surfaced
the unlikely guise of
vidence for the prosecution,
thich. under Soviet law,
iharansky had a right to
fispect.
"It was a video film of a
(emonstration in the West, in
py behalf, with my wife Avital
utside of the Soviet embassy.
^hat excited me was to see,
terall those months, my wife
eaking in such beautiful
Jebrew and English on my
ehalf... it was like a window
i another world." .
[ Sharansky, claiming that his
ommand of Hebrew and
fnglish was faulty, and that
needed to understand the
|rosecution's evidence in
der to prepare his defense,
quested to be shown the
tdeo clip again and again.
Although many in the au-
dience probably wanted to
hear the man they called "our
Sharansky" speak more about
his personal odyssey to
freedom, Sharansky himself
was far more concerned with
the continuing odyssey of
Soviet Jewry and with what he
considers a popular misconcep-
tion of current Soviet policies.
"Brezhnev released 51,000
Jews, and we said, 'not
enough.' Gorbachev will pro-
bably release seven times less,
but everyone says 'what pro-
gress he is making!'
"Gorbachev passed a new
rule only those who have
first degree relatives can apply
for exit visas. When (years
ago) a heavy Soviet tax was
passed on immigration, what a
thunderous response from the
West, but what reaction now?"
asked Sharansky.
"Gorbachev must see that all
Jews are first degree relatives.
Glasnost has brought freedom
to known refuseniks but the
chances for (the majority of
Soviet Jews) are getting
worse, not better."
Sharansky added that "the
struggle cannot survive
without outside attention."
Summoning the energy to
offer one more story to the ex-
pectant crowd, Sharansky
looked out at the small sea of
faces, and said: "During my
trial, the other side said to me,
'Why do you think you are so
important? They (the
demonstrators trying to
secure Sharansky's release)
are only students and
housewives. We are KGB.'
"Many times, they try to
convince me my fate is in their
hands," Sharansky continued.
"But in the end, the
housewives and students won
out against the army of KGB."
And it was clear as Sharan-
sky stood before the crowd,
which included many
housewives and students, that
he thought that they could do
it again, and again and again,
until not only those refuseniks
with media-recognized and
well-known names had secured
their release.
Friday, October 30, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Hate Crimes Bill
Continued from Page 1-A
1 the bill this year.
iHowever, the bill adopted by
pe committee was introduced
p Rep. John Conyers Jr. (D-
Mi.), adding the concern for
nti-gay prejudice.
There is some fear that in-
iuding crimes against gays in
Relate bill might endanger
F Passage in Congress. But
Rid Brody, Washington
presentative of the Anti-
MIAMI
NACH S
KOSHfR
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, stressed that it was im-
portant to gather statistics on
hate-motivated crimes in order
to make the public aware of
the extent of such crimes.
The House recently adopted
a bill, introduced by Glickman,
that would impose federal
criminal penalties for damage
to religious property and in-
jury to persons in the free ex-
ercise of their religious beliefs.
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Nobel laureate Joseph Brodsky smiles while
enjoying a cigarette in London last week
following the announcement of his Nobel
literature prize win. Brodsky, a former in-
mate of a Soviet labor camp, lives in exile in
the United States. *P/Wide World Photo
CMOQBOOOOBQOCH
"Create Land From Sand'
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DO YOU HAVE a share in the redemption of
THE LAND OF ISRAEL?
HAVE YOU MADE your contribution to the
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND (KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL)?
IF NOT NOW... WHEN?
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Name
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 30, 1987

From Johannesburg
South African To Lead Jewish Agency
By J.J. GOLDBERG
New York Jewish Week
NEW YORK (JTA) A
wealthy South African Jewish
businessman was expected to
be chosen Thursday night for
the highest position in interna-
tional Jewish philanthropy
the chairmanship of the board
of governors of the Jewish
Agency.
The controversial selection
was decided by an eight-
member nominating commit-
tee in a closed meeting here on
the eve of Sukkot, and is ex-
pected to confirmed by the full
board meeting in Jerusalem.
The move came after a
months-long tug-of-war bet-
ween Israel's political
establishment and the leader-
ship of Jewish philanthropies
worldwide over the choice of
new leaders for the trouble-
laden Jewish Agency.
Diaspora leaders have become
increasingly strident in their
criticism of how the Jewish
Agency administers its social
service programs in Israel.
The candidacy of the South
African, Mendel Kaplan of
Johannesburg, haa been
greeted with discomfort by
both Israelis and Americans in
the Jewish Agency's
leadership.
"It just wouldn't look very
good these days to have the
Jewish Agency run out of
Johannesburg," said one high-
ranking leader in the U.S.
Jewish federation community,
who asked not to be itentified.
The Israelis, however, were
reluctant to exercise their
right of veto, fearing a
Diaspora backlash against the
unpopular Israeli candidate for
a parallel post chairmanship
of the Jewish Agency
Executive.
According to Jewish Agency
power-sharing rules, the chair-
man of the executive is filled
by the World Zionist Organiza-
tion, and the chairman of the
board of .governors is filled by
the oJmlanthropies with the
"advice and consent" of the
other.
Both incumbents, executive
committee chairman Leon
(Arye) Dulzin of Jerusalem and
governing board chairman
Jerold Hoffberger of
Baltimore, are about to step
down.
Kaplan has been promoting
himself as Hoffberger's suc-
cessor since last winter. His
candidacy, which was not
taken seriously by federation
leaders in this country until
weeks ago, had the solid back-
ing of philanthropists outside
the United States who
demanded a turn at chairing
the board.
The board chairmanship had
been in U.S. hands since the
board's founding in the 1971
Jewish Agency reconstitution.
Acording to informed
sources, Kaplan claimed he
had the backing of Israeli
Premier Yitzhak Shamir and
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres. Aides to Peres,
however, said he was concern-
ed at the diplomatic implica-
tions for Israel of having a
South African in the highly
visible post. An energetic,
globe-trotting fund raiser who
has served as chairman of the
worldwide Keren Kayesod and
treasurer of the World Jewish
Congress, Kaplan's own
political views were not at
issue although some liberal
South African Jews claimed he
"travels with the kind of peo-
ple" identified with the ruling
National Party, which in-
stituted the apartheid system
in 1949.
Kaplan's primary opponent
was Chicago businessman Ray-
mond Epstein, chairman of the
Jewish Agency's budget and
finance committee and a
former chairman of the Coun-
cil of Jewish Federations in
North America.
It appeared, however, that
the five Americans on the
nominating committee in-
cluding the top lay leaders of
the national United Jewish Ap-
peal, the United Israel Appeal
and the Council of Jewish
Federations deferred to the
strong feelings of delegates
from Australia, Canada and
France.
The 74-member board of
governors is evenly divided
between representatives of
Zionist and philanthropic con-
cerns 22 of whom are
Americans named by Jewish
federations.
Meanwhile, the WZO leaders
in the Jewish Agency were
Israeli Leaders to U.S.
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
President Chaim Herzog and
Premier Yizhak Shamir of
Israel are both scheduled to ar-
rive in the United States next
month and meet with Presi-
dent Reagan at the White
House.
Herzog's arrival Nov. 10 will
mark the first time an Israeli
head of state has paid a state
visit to Washington.
Herzog, who will be accom-
panied by his wife, Ora, will
meet with Reagan on Nov. 11
and will travel to New York
the following day for meetings
with Jewish leaders. He is
scheduled to conclude his visit
and returns to Israel Nov. 14.
Shamir will meet Reagan at
the White House on Nov. 20,
according to Israeli officials
here. The meeting between the
two leaders will be brief "no
more than 20 minutes'* and
will not deal with any major
issues, the officials said.
Reagan is expected to meet
with Shamir again in January
for a "working session." ac-
'No' On
Ethiopian Jewry
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Ethiopia has reacted negative-
ly to a request by Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres to
allow the emigration of 15,000
Jews still living there.
Peres told the Conference on
the Demography of the Jewish
People here that he made the
request in a meeting last
month in New York with his
Ethiopian counterpart,
Berhanu Bayih. "But the
minister reacted negatively,"
said Peres.
cording to the officials.
Shamir will begin his U.S.
visit in New York on Nov. 15,
only a day after the Israeli
president will have completed
his state visit. The Israeli
premier will meet in New York
with Jewish leaders and then
fly to Miami to address the
Council of Jewish Federations
General Assembly on Nov. 19.
A number of Israeli Cabinet
ministers, meanwhile, are ex-
pected to arrive in the United
States in the coming weeks,
the Jewish Telegraphic Agen-
cy has learned.
Ariel Sharon, Israel's
minister of commerce and in-
dustry, arrived in Washington
on Monday for talks relating to
trade between the United
States and Israel.
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres will come to New York
for a short visit on Dec. 13.
And three other ministers
are expected to arrive in New
York next month. They are
Health Minister Shoshana
Arbeli-Almoslino, Economic
Coordination Minister Gad
Yaacobi and Welfare Minister
Moshe Katzav.
In addition, Knesset
Speaker Shlomo Hillel will ar-
rive here at the end of
November.
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HAIFA ASHKELON EILAT
speaking out firmly against
Kaplan's candidacy in the days
preceding the board meeting.
"American Jewry is the
largest community in the
diaspora, and it's important
that the chairman's job go to
an American," said Dulzin in a
recent interview.
That view has echoed by the
agency's number-two Israeli,
treasurer Akiva Lewinsky,
who added that the agency
would be in a delicate position
if Israeli-South African rela-
tions deteriorated.
Lewinsky conceded in an in-
terview that he would not
recommend the Israelis exer-
cise a veto against Kaplan,
largely because it might
backfire against Lewinsky
himself. A kibbutz member
and former managing director
of Bank Hapoalim, Lewinsky
is the leading candidate to suc-
ceed Dulzin as chairman of the
executive. He was nominated
last spring by the Israel Labor
Party.
His nomination has touched
off protests from a number of
U.S. philanthropists who fear
he is too much a part of the
system they are seeking to
change. Likud, however, has
been unable to provide an op-
ponent. Thus, it is possible
that Lewinsky could be elected
at the Jewish Agency congress
by acclaim only to face a
possible veto from Diaspora
philanthropists.
The choice of Kaplan as
chairman appeared intended
to forestall that eventuality, in
part because he spends half of
each year in Jerusalem and
could serve as the philan-
thropists' "eyes and ears" in
agency management, U.S.
philanthropic sources said.
Morton A KvrnreUh o/jj
Ycn-k City has been elected "A
tional Chairman of the Unildl
Jewish Appeals 1989 CoJ
paign. The announcement wot]
"Jf by Alexander Gm\
Chairman of the UJA Board A
Trustees and of the 1989 sl\
tional Chairman Selection]
Committee.
German DA On
Nazi Search
The District Attorney's Of-
fice in Frankfurt, Germany is
actively pursuing the case'of
Alois Brunner, who heads the
list of major Nazi war
criminals still at large. In this
connection, witnesses are
needed to Brunner's wartime I
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A Short Memory in the Gulf
Friday, October 30. 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Waldheim
'American Umbrella' For Iraqi Interests? Denies
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) A
liddle East scholar visiting
he United States has
wondered at the naivete of
nericans vis-a-vis the Per-
ji Gulf, and the perception
at Israel wants the Gulf War
j continue.
Or. Yossi Olmert, a research
icholar at the Dayan Center
,'or Middle Eastern Studies at
Tel Aviv University and a lec-
urer at the school's Depart-
-nent of Middle Eastern and
African Studies, was in the
United States recently for a
lecture series sponsored by the
Anti-Defamation League of
IB'nai B'rith.
In an interview at the JTA
offices, the 38-year-old
scholar, who is the youngest
brother of Likud M.K. Ehud
Olmert, sat and marveled at
the long-time insistence of
Americans to view the Arab-
Israeli conflict as the dominant
policy issue facing the Middle
East while ignoring other
areas of potentially dangerous
contention in the region.
Now, he noted, Americans
are being unavoidably con-
fronted by other Mideast
dynamics through daily news
dispatches from the Persian
Gulf.
Olmert also expressed skep-
ticism that America has a
clear-cut, intelligent approach
Orthodox Kidnapping
A Case of Satmar Deja Vu
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
\ut a five-year-old boy
ken by his mother from the
\ township of B'nei
Jrak several months ago,
illegedly because his father
rvas not sufficiently strict in
jiis religious observances, is
eing treated by police as a
^idnapping.
The serious crimes squad has
en assigned to the case after
le father reported
knonymous telephone calls
Varning that he would never
l his son unless he returns to
trict Orthodoxy.
The telephone caller, a male,
aid the boy's mother charged
hat the father stopped study-
|)g Torah. engaged in secular
ursuits and had purchased a
television set. Residents of
I'nei Rrak are vigorously
discouraged from watching
television or reading "secular
newspapers."
The incident recalled the
case of Yossele Schumacher,
who was abducted from Israel
by his grandparents 30 years
ago because they thought he
was not being raised in a
strictly Orthodox manner. He
was spirited abroad, reported-
ly with the help of the ultra-
Orthodox Neturei Karta and
the Satmar rebbe, who
secreted him in a series of
yeshivot in Europe and the
United States.
The Israeli secret service
finally tracked him down in the
Williamsburg section of
Brooklyn and returned him to
his family in Israel.
Schumacher, today a secular
Jew, prefers not to discuss the
episode.
U.S. Joins Israel
In Negative UN Vote
r,-i
Bj YITZHAK KABI
JNITED NATIONS -
A) Israel and the United
tes were the only countries
vote against a resolution
ling for greater cooperation
tween the United Nations
the countries of the Arab
le.
The resolution was adopted
me Genera] Assembly by an
'erwhelming majority" of' 158
untries. There were no
stentions.
The resolution, sponsored by
a on behalf of the Arab
'tes, said increased coopera-
n between the UN and Arab
ague states would help
jhieve the implementation of
N resolutions on the ques-
ts of Palestine and the Mid-
le East.
CloWs Maksoud, chairman of
* Arab League at the UN,
the General Assembly
t cooperation between the
N and his organization has
rad implications for develop-
ment projects and for the clos-
<,. the aP between the
"eloped and developing
was. He asserted that UN
'">pams in the Arab world -
hu those of the UN
"Wren's Fund, the UN
jvelopment Children's Pro-
ram and the World Health
ft
Organization had a far-
reaching impact.
The representative of Israel,
Jeremy Nissim-Issacharoff,
charged that activities of the
A rah League violated the UN
charter because its "raisnn
d'etre" has been to deny the
existence of the State of
Israel.
Ambassador Herlwrt Okun
of the United States, explain-
ing his vote against the resolu-
tion, said it called for im-
plementation of UN resolu-
tions on the Mideast which the
U.S. voted against. General
Assembly resolutions on the
Mideast have called for the
establishment of a Palestinian
state and the withdrawal of all
Israeli forces from territories
occupied in the 1967 Six Day
War, including East
Jerusalem.
UAHC Convenes
The Egyptian and Israeli
ambassadors to Washington
will join nearly 3,000 delegates
from more than 800 Reform
Judaism in North America,
which was to open Thursday
evening, Oct. 29 in Chicago
and continue through Monday,
Nov. 2.
to its elevated involvement in
the Persian Gulf.
"I hope that they have a
strategy, not just tactics. I
hope they have a reasonable
measure of cooperation with
their allies," he said. "There is
no reason for America to be
deeply involved in the Gulf,
enabling countries like Iraq to
cause trouble. That would
deteriorate the situation."
Olmert wanted to ensure
that Americans remembered
who, indeed, struck the first
blow that began the now
seven-year-long Gulf War.
"The Iraqis attacked Iranian
shipping. If America really
wants to protect free naviga-
tion in the Gulf, they have to
be event-handed in that sense,
to make sure the Iraqis don't
go crazy."
He took aim at America's
short memory in the Gulf, say-
ing "America seems to forget
that Iraq killed 36 Americans.
"His suggested response?
"Tell the Iraqis and the Ira-
nians that they can expect the
same treatment from
America. Instead, what is hap-
pening in reality is that the
Iraqis have an American
umbrella."
Commenting on Israel's
position on the war, Olmert
said, "The general perception
that Israel wants the Gulf War
to continue is incorrect. We
are not very much interested
in a war that is taking place
between two of our worst
enemies." However, he admit-
ted that "We have no reason
to wish Iraq to win the war."
Touching on the clandestine
scheme to sell arms to Iran,
Olmert said Israel had "very
good reason" to take part in
the largely American caper.
"First of all, Israel does not
sell very many arms to Iran.
But Iranians are very short of
aircraft and spare parts, and
Iran and Israel use the same
American planes and the same
American arms." But even
more important, explained
Olmert, "is the existence of
Iranian Jewry. What is Israel
if not a Jewish state?" The
presence of a Jewish communi-
ty anywhere is reason enough
for Israel to get involved
somehow in that country, he
said.
Glabal political reasoning
also plays an obvious part,
Olmert observed, echoing
responses now familiar to
American ears. "Look, there
are many Israelis who believe
that the Khomeini regime is
not likely to last forevermore.
There may be another
upheaval in Iran," he said, and
while there could be a Western
element, there also could be a
Soviet takeover.
"We don't want to see a pro-
Soviet regime in Iran, nor does
America," he pointed out.
"Just imagine the Soviets in
Iran. There is no question that
Iran is lost now, but is it lost
forever? There must be some
thinking for the future."
OSS-CIA
Link
By REINHARD ENGEL
VIENNA (JTA) Presi-
dent Kurt Waldheim has
denied overseas media reports
that he was recruited by the
Office of Strategic Services
(OSS), precursor to the CIA,
after World War II. A
spokesman for Waldheim call-
ed the reports "untrue and
fabricated.
According to the reports, the
OSS began recruiting German
officers who had held key in-
telligence posts during the
war. Waldheim served as an
intelligence officer in a Ger-
man army unit that carried out
atrocities in the Balkans, in-
cluding the deportation of
Greek Jews. He deals with in-
formation about the Yugosla-
vian resistance, British com-
mando activities in the
Mediterranean and later
Soviet armies in the Balkans.
The OSS was said to have
sought German intelligence
personnel familiar with Soviet,
Communist and other leftist
activities.
Meanwhile, the Austrian
Foreign Ministry announced
that it would ask the U.S.
State Department, on behalf of
Waldheim, for the president's
CIA file, which the Central In-
telligence Agency has refused
to make public so far.
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 30, 1987
Peace Moves in Flux
Continued from Page 1-A
meeting and the difficulties en-
countered by Shultz in gaining
agreement over Middle East
peace talks, makes it unlikely
that Reagan's 15-month plan
will achieve success, Haaretz
reported.
At the same time, Foreign
Ministry sources have express-
ed concern that a superpowers
agreement would delay or
sidetrack American peace ef-
forts in the Middle East.
Laborite Minister-Without-
Portfolio Exer Weizman said
Sunday that there is a new
American-Israeli proposal for
Middle East peace
negotiations.
Speaking on the army radio,
he implied it hinged on
U.S.-Soviet co-sponsorship of
Israeli-Arab peace talks as an
alternative to an international
peace conference under the
auspices of the five permanent
members of the United Na-
tions Security Council. Since
both formats would involve the
Soviet Union there is hardly
any difference, Weizman
maintained. Soviet officials ap-
pear to be giving some thought
to Moscow's involvement in
the peace process. Yossi
Beilin, political director-
general of the Foreign
Ministry heard from British
Foreign Office sources that
Soviet Deputy Foreign
Minister Yuli Vorontsov spoke
in London last week about
various options for Palestinian
representation at peace talks.
Vorontsov also stated that the
renewal of Soviet diplomatic
relations with Israel is a stage
in the comprehensive
framework of the Middle East
peace process, Haaretz
reported.
Meanwhile Cabinet
ministers are complaining that
Premier Yitzhak Shamir and
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres have failed to brief them
on their talks with Shultz.
Davar diplomatic correspon-
dent Yossi Mel man reported
Monday.
"Cabinet ministers are
frustrated," Energy Minister
Moshe Shahal was quoted as
saying. "It is simply absurd
that journalists receive a
report on the content of the
talks, government officials
know, but only the Cabinet is
not told. As ministers, legally
we have joint responsibility for
things we are not told about,"
Shahal said. Several ministers
are expected to raise the issue
at the next Cabinet meeting.
Dialogue On
'House Divided'
Continued from Pare 5-A
there are a number of reasons
why the traditional practice of
not getting involved in Israeli
security matters is a sound one
and should not be abandoned.
One reason is that long ex-
perience has taught us that
support for Israel in Congress
and the White House results in
no small measure from the
perception of a united,
organized Jewish community
standing as one behind the
policies of the Israeli govern-
ment. I have no doubt that
America's support of Israel
economic, military, diplomatic
and every other way
ultimately depends on calcula-
tions of American national in-
terest. Yet at the same time
the desire to accommodate the
position of a united American
Jewish community has played
and will play a powerful role in
shaping American thinking
about Israel.
The wisdom of this policy is
clear. Conflicting signals from
American Jews might give
legitimacy to policies that pose
a threat to the security of the
Jewish State.
I recall one case in point
from my own experience as
Chairman of the Conference of
Presidents. Immediately
following the announcement
by President Reagan on
September 1, 1982 of a new
Middle East peace initiative,
which would have foisted on
Israel a PLO-Jordanian
federation in Judea and
Samaria, Secretary of State
George Shultz invited the
leadership of the American
Jewish community to his office
to seek our views on the
matter.
Before entering the State
Department, our group met
privately. At that meeting we
agreed doves and hawks
alike to present to the
Secretary a united position.
We all understood the
negative consequences that
would inevitably flow from a
divided opinion expressed by
the Jewish community at a
meeting with the Secretary of
State. Whatever influence
American Jews might have in
the formulation of our govern-
ment's policy in the region
would, we felt, be eliminated
totally if our meeting with Mr.
Shultz represented a house
divided. And the fact is that,
for whatever reason, our
meeting with Secretary Shultz
was followed by the effective
neutralization of the Reagan
initiative.
Viewed in this light, the ac-
tions of the American Jewish
Congress and the efforts by
Foreign Minister Peres were
unfortunate. Both have stated
that the division and deadlock
within Israel on this issue
justified and, indeed, required
the taking of public positions.
In my judgment, such taking
of positions weakens Israel's
case, divides its friends and en-
courages its enemies. It is the
assumption of authority
without responsibility, in an
area that affects human lives
and could determine the very
future of the Jewish State.
Another unfortunate by-
product of this open debate is
the erroneous implication that
the reason for lack of progress
in the Middle East peace effort
is Israel's failure to agree to an
international conference. The
overwhelming public emphasis
on this issue threatens to over-
shadow the true reason for the
failure to achieve peace the
refusal of the Arab states to
follow Egypt's lead, recognize
Israel and enter into bilateral
negotiations leading to a long-
overdue peace treaty.
Julius Berman is a former
chairman of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations.
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Senate Races
Require Review
Friday, October 30, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Continued from Page 4-A
en written about Moynihan
'when it comes to in-
jjectual sophistication, erudi-
tion and lifelong scholarly out-
Cut, there has been no one like
Movnihan in the Senate in
dern times." Time and time
in Moynihan has spoken
it eloquently on behalf of
srael and has been the moving
orce behind such initiatives as
tailing for moving the
(American Embassy in Israel
Com Te! Aviv to Jerusalem.
tonally, it was thought that
I would not face a serious re-
jection challenge. However,
hterest in running has recent-
been displayed by Rudolph
liuliani, U.S. Attorney for the
Southern District of New
ork, who has received a great
eal of publicity over the past
ear for his prosecution of
llafia and Wall Street figures.
his race bears closer wat-
hing as American Jews both
New York and around the
puntry can be expected to ral-
f to Moynihan's support.
In Ohio, Howard Metzen-
aum faces a potentially dif-
: race should the moderate
tepublican mayor of
Cleveland, George Voinovich,
nth the Republican nomina-
for Metzenbaum's seat,
(etzenbaum, who served in
he Senate for a year in 1974
nd was then elected in his
wn right in 1976, has been in-
(imately involved in all issues
Meeting Israel. Most recently
i was instrumental in getting
he Administration to agree to
Ignificantly reduce the latest
J.S. arms sale to Saudi
^rabia. Long before he came
the Senate, Metzenbaum
tas a pre-eminent leader in
ne Cleveland Jewish com-
hunity. With a Voinovich can-
pdacy expected to cut into
petzenbaum's traditional
olitical base in Cleveland, this
bntest could become a cause
tr concern and a maximum ef-
}n will be called for on
letzenbaum's behalf by
fiends of Israel.
(Another Jewish senator with
ppeccable credentials in our
[eater community, Frank
utenberg, is seeking a se-
id term in New Jersey.
utenberg, former national
urman of the United Jewish
PPeal, is facing almost a uni-
pe challenger Pete
Mans. Hawkins' resume is
The Chosen
To Play N.Y.
[George Hearn will play Reb
flinders, the Orthodox rabbi
hth a harmonious relationshp
| his God but conflicts with
M son. in Chaim Potok's new
fisical, "The Chosen," to
P Sunday, Nov. 15, with
*ning night scheduled for
hursday, Dec. 17, at the Se-
N Avenue Theater in New
I'lrk.
I The Chosen," a story of the
Nurinjr friendship of two
f.u,,K boys in Brooklyn, is
Peauleci lo play on Broadway
[[""ticket-, and information
811 the Box Office of the Se-
? Avenue Theater at (212)
"4-1460.
almost too good to be true
since he can claim to have been
a soldier (general), scholar
(PhD., Rhodes Scholar) and
athlete (Heisman football
trophy winner). Despite hav-
ing never held any elected of-
fice and being a very recent
resident of New Jersey,
Dawkins is mounting a serious
effort to unseat Lautenberg.
Lautenberg, like Metzenbaum
and Moynihan, has been a
down-the-line supporter of all
issues affecting Israel and his
re-election is a high priority.
Not all Jewish Senators
however have been as consis-
tent in their support. Chich
Hecht, conservative
Republican of Nevada, who
will be seeking re-election for
the first time next year, has
been somewhat of a disap-
pointment to the pro-Israel
community, most notably for
having cast the deciding vote
in June of 1986 permitting a
significant missile sale to
Saudi Arabia. His opposition
on the Senate floor to ratifica-
tion of the Genocide Treaty
(which he later did vote for)
and his two votes against per-
mitting Orthodox Jews in the
military to wear skullcaps, was
also criticized in some
quarters. Hecht's re-election
prospects are rated as the
poorest of all incumbent
senators running next year.
He is currently more than 40
percentage points behind
popular Governor Richard
Bryan in a state-wide poll.
Bryan, who will be visiting
Israel shortly and is close to
the Las Vegas Jewish com-
munity, can be expected to be
a firm friend, and an odds-on
favorite to replace Hecht in
the Senate.
One of the closest Senate
races that is shaping up will be
in Minnesota, pitting incum-
bent Republican David
Durenberger, a reliable and
valuable friend, against
"Skip" Humphrey, the son of
the late Hubert Humphrey.
While Humphrey, the state's
attorney general, is expected
to be supportive on issues of
concern, Durenberger, who
was elected in 1978, has
already demonstrated his firm
commitment to maintaining
Israel's security as being in the
best interests of the United
States.
Finally, an opportunity ex-
ists in Rhode Island to elect
the current Lieutenant Gover-
nor, Richard Licht, who will be
opposing incumbent John
Cnafee, a less-than-ardent sup-
porter. Licht, whose late uncle
was Governor of Rhode Island,
has been a phenomenon in that
state's politics. He has always
maintained close ties to both
the Rhode Island and national
Jewish committees. Licht's
chances of unseating the
veteran Chafee are excellent,
and his could be one of the
more interesting Senate races
in 1988.
A number of our other good
Senate friends are in good
political shape at this point.
But if previous experience is a
guide, we could be in for a
number of unpleasant sur-
prises. This means that we
must continue to remain better
informed and hopefully more
involved in the days ahead on
behalf of Israel's supporters in
the Congress.
Prior to their Moscow meeting last week.
Secretary of State George Shultz chats urith
Soviet Foreign Minister Ednard A. Shevard-
nadze, right, in Moscow before beginning
discussions on arms control and other issues
between their two nations. AP/Wide World Photo
Soviets Balk At Proposal
Continued from Page 7-A
are being discouraged by a
strict new law.
Meanwhile, Shultz ended
four-and-a-half hours of talks
with Gorbachev last Friday
without the Soviet leader ac-
cepting President Reagan's in-
vitation to a summit in
Washington this year. The an-
nouncement of a date for the
summit had been widely ex-
pected before Shultz went to
Moscow.
Shultz said Gorbachev told
him he would write a letter to
Reagan, and the disappointed
secretary added, "we'll be
checking the mail."
If Gorbachev does come to
Washington, thousands of
American Jews and non-Jews
are expected to greet him with
a massive demonstration on
behalf of Soviet Jewry.
Secret Arab Report Disclosed
Continued from Page 1-A
population mainly elements
that do not identify with the
state.
The report recommends that
"the defense establishment ex-
amine ways to encourage
minorities to volunteer for the
Israel Defense Force, and
draw up programs according-
ly, placing the emphasis on
Bedouins and Christians
(Arabs) in the first stage, and
preparing the organizational
and other tools for their in-
tegration into the various IDF
units."
Since the state was founded,
Israeli Arabs have been ex-
empt from military service on
humanitarian grounds that
they should not be forced to
fight against Arabs in Israel's
wars and because Arabs in
the armed forces are con-
sidered a security risk. As a
consequence, Arabs are ex-
cluded from the various
benefits to which IDF veterans
are entitled. However, Druze
and Circassian Moslems are
permitted to serve.
The report recommends that
"the establishment of an in-
dependent Arab party with an
affinity to the PLO or to bodies
working for the realization of
autonomy for the Arabs of
Israel be prevented."
It refers specifically to such
bodies as the National Com-
mittee of Arab Local Councils,
the Student Committees, High
School Student Committees
and the Committee for
Safeguarding Arab Lands,
among others.
"The existing national Arab
bodies (should) be integrated
into the framework of existing
state and public institutions
and, should this prove impossi-
ble, they should not be granted
official recognition," Haaretz
quoted the report as stating.
"Illegal subversive activity,
and activities whose goal is to
realize aspirations of splitting
off from the State of Israel,
(must) be prevented and
thwarted," the report says.
It recommends "working
toward creating a state of
equality and integration bet-
ween the minorities population
and the majority Jewish
population, through the alloca-
tion of the required resources
and the creation of an at-
mosphere that accords the
minority population a feeling
of belonging to the state, and
of their being an inseparable
part of it."
According to demographic
forecasts, minorities in Israel,
chiefly Arabs, will total
1,183,000 by the year 2000, or
29 percent of the population,
compared with 17 percent to-
day. The Jewish population is
projected at 4,126,000 by
2000.
The percentage of Druze and
Christians is expected to drop
while the percentage of
Moslems rises, especially the
Bedouins, whose annual
natural rate of increase is bet-
ween 4.5 and 5 percent.
Effect of Wall Street Crash
On Tel Aviv Exchange
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Tel Aviv Stock Exchange
bounced back again last week
in brisk trading, recovering
five to seven percent of the
18-20 percent it lost in share
prices following the Wall
Street crash. But observers
said it was still too early to
forecast how the exchange
would behave in the coming
days.
The Bank of Israel reported
that conversion to cash orders
for some 66 percent of the
commercial bank shares which
had been frozen totaled 1.4
billion shekels ($875 million)
out of 2 billion shekels ($1.25
billion) held by the public. The
funds will be deposited in the
investors' accounts on Oct. 30.
Capital markets commis-
sioner Yehuda Drori said he
expected no dramatic effects
on the economy from the large
amounts of cash that will be in-
jected by the end of the month
with the share payments.
He estimated that half of the
sums cashed-in will be
deposited almost immediately
in savings plans or be invested.
The balance would not
necessarily be used to finance
consumption, he added.
Dan Halperin, formerly
Israel's economic affairs
minister in Washington, wrote
in Maariv Vv'ednesday that
since the U.S. government's
fiscal year is just beginning,
the Wall Street decline will
have no effect on U.S. aid to
Israel.
It is reasonable to assume,
however, that the ability of
Jewish philanthropists to
fulfill their donation pledges
will be affected, since most of
them have a great deal of their
money invested in the stock
market, he wrote.
Yediot Aharonot quoted
Deputy Finance Minister Adiel
Amorai as saying that the en-
tire $1.2 billion in U.S. non-
military aid for this year will
be transferred to Israel in
another 10 days, and will not
be affected by the American
financial crisis.
The aid money will put
Israel's foreign currenty
reserves at some $5.7 billion,
the largest sum in years, and
Israel is likely to consider
repayment of debts to the
United States, especially those
with high interest and less
desirable terms.
->


Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 30, 1987
Egyptian Mummy
Identified As Joseph
Dr. Shulamit Bar-Shany (center of first row),
Director of MDA Blood Services, explains
blood processing procedures at the new MDA
National Blood Service Center in Ramat Gan,
Israel to Botho Prinz Zu Sayn-Wittgenstein
(center of second row) President of the Ger-
man Red Cross.
German Red Cross And Red Magen David
TEL AVIV A recent visit
was made to the new Magan
David Adom (MDA) National
Blood Service Center in Ramat
Gan by Botho Prinz Zu Sayn-
Wittgenstein, President of the
German Red Cross Society, for
the purpse of develooping
bilateral cooperation between
the two Societies.
He was taken on a tour of
the new MDA Blood Center by
MDA President, Prof. Arieh
Harell, where Dr. Shulamit
Bar-Shany, MDA Director of
Blood Services, gave him a
detailed explanation of their
blood processing procedures.
Defense Questions
Demjanjuk's
ID Card
JERUSALEM Vital ques-
tions as to the validity of a
Nazi identity card said to be
that of John (Ivan the Terrible)
Demjanjuk were raised by the
defense this week as the war
crimes trial resumed after a
two-month recess.
Abraham Shifrin. an Israeli
who operates a Jerusalem-
based center on activities of
the Soviet Union's intelligence
and security services, testified
as Judge Zvi Tal returned to
the three-judge panel.
Shifrin, appearing as a
defense expert, said that the
KGB (Soviet secret police) ask-
ed for his assistance in
fabricating dossiers on in-
dividuals who had fled the
USSR.
Stripped of his citizenship in
1986, and extradited from the
United States to Israel, Dem-
janjuk claims that he is a vic-
tim of mistaken identity.
The 67-year-old defendant is
standing trial on charges that
he is the Ukrainian guard
known as "Ivan the Terrible,"
the man who operated the gas
chambers at Treblinka. An
estimated 850,000 Jews were
slaughtered at the death camp
in Nazi-occupied Poland.
The former Cleveland auto
worker claims he was a
prisoner of war during 1942
and 1943, the dates of the
sadistic Ivan's crimes.
He was also shown the various
types of MDA Ambulances in-
cluding the Mobile Intensive
Care Units, Bloodmobiles and
Mobile Field Units as well as
the sophisticated lifesaving
equiment and emergency
medical apparatus now in use
in these vehicles.
Sayn-Wittgenstein was so
impressed by the MDA
Emergency Medical and Blood
demonstrations and so ad-
mired MDA's high standards
of professionalism and the ef-
fectiveness of its Emergency
Medical facilities and lifesav-
ing operations that he advised
Prof. Harell that the German
Red Cross Society will donate
110,000 blood transfusion
units and 60,000 ABO on-the-
spot blood typing units to
MDA.
LONDON Is a mummy in
Cairo's world-famed museum
really Joseph, one of the
patriarchs of the Torah?
The experts of biblical and
archaeological studies were as-
tounded this week by news of a
claimed proof that such is the
case.
Ashmed Osman, author of
the new book, "Stranger in the
Valley of the Kings," has made
the widely-reported assertion
to an astonished scholarly
world.
Osman says the mummy,
Yuya, in the Cairo Museum
(which is a must-see destina-
tion for every Egyptian
tourist) is Joseph.
The 53-year-old author,
teacher and translator worked
for more than two decades to
find the missing link between
Egyptian history and the nar-
rative of the Five Books of
Moses.
"I feel that Yuya, the chief
administrator and thus the vir-
tual ruler of Egypt under the
pharoahs Tuthomis IV and his
son, Amenhotep II, was the
Joseph of the Book of
Genesis," Osman said.
Accepted Egyptian
historical studies place the
dates of their rule between
1413 and 1367 BCE.
The biblical account of
Joseph, whose father Jacob
made him a coat of many col-
ors, describes Jacob's love for
his favorite son. Joseph's half-
brothers, in a fit of jealousy,
stole the coat and sold him into
slavery in Egypt.
Yuya or Joseph?
Yuya's tomb, excavated 82
years ago by an American ex-
cavation between the tombs of
the two pharaohs in the Valley
of Kings is well documented by
Egyptologists.
But Osman said no one notic-
ed that Joseph had called
himself "a father unto
pharaoh," until he launched a
detailed examination of the
tomb which has been a minor
tourist attraction on the west
side of the Nile opposite
Luxor.
Yuya had 41 titles, but no
other person in Egypt ever
was called "a father of
pharaoh."
On that unique distinction,
Osman has set off a whirlwind
of biblical debate which may
finally establish the historicity
of the exile of the ancient
Israelites in Egypt.


-
Sharon Offers New Role for Arabs
Friday, October 30, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Ariel Sharon, Israel's minister
of commerce and industry,
said that unless Israeli Arabs
are willing to serve in the army
and pay their share of the
taxes, as do other Israelis,
they should not be permitted
to vote for the Knesset.
The Likud leader emphasiz-
ed that he was making this
proposal because Israeli
\r;il>s. who will number one
million by the year 2000, now
are dictating what govern-
ment will be" in Israel since
they provide the deciding
margin between the almost
evenly split two major political
blocs, Labor and Likud.
Sharon made this argument
as he gave his vision of what
Israel should be by the end of
the century in a talk sponsored
h\ tin- (enter for Strategic
and International Studies, a
Washington-baaed think tank.
He had been in Washington to
serve is co-host of a two-day
conference marking the se-
cond anniversary fo the Free
Trade Area agreement bet-
ween Israel and the United
I States.
The controversial former
I defense minister took pains to
stress that he was not talking
about expelling Israel's Arabs
as has been proposed by Kach
leader Rabbi Meir Kahane. He
I said that as a native-born
Israeli "I have been living with
I Arabs all my life" and expects
[tii continue doing so.
Sharon stressed that Israeli
[Arabs should have equal
{rights, but they must also
fulfill the duties and obliga-
tions of other Israeli citizens.
|He noted that there are 80,000
Jews who live in Israel, but
Juh" are not citizens and thus
Icannot vote for the Knesset.
lAralts who do not serve in the
larniy should also be in-
habitants with "everything
bpen" to them except the right
|ovote for the Kness. t.
H>' added that Israelis had
I the "mistake" of telling
Israeli Arabs that "we unders-
tand that you are part of the
[Arab nation" and thus do not
JDL Shift
lontinued from Page 6-A
Monte." Only a few months
Priier he had joined JDL after
fearing Rabbi Meir Kahane
ppeak.
Today Rubin is less
Enamored of Kahane, even
though when Kahane bowed
ft as chief of the JDL, which
F created, he turned over his
prmanship to Rubin.
Rubin has maintained that it
"nportant to show that
ish people are capable of
andmg up for themselves. I
F>nt to stop perpetrating the
P'sh thing. I don't like the
^ody Allen approach."
JJe Mid that he wants "a
2g Jewish image, so that
nen an anti-Semite walks up
,a,Je*.. .and calls a person
J*e or dirty Jew, the
*sponse will not be a weak
esponse."
ty*lRolfe is editor of the
, Bri* Messenger, Los
[y.s, and author of three
2osl recently the novel
Train North"
want to serve in the army.
But, Sharon said he tells
Israeli Arabs that "you are
part of the State of Israel
your president is Chaim Her-
zog, your leader is not
(Palestine Liberation
Organization chief Yasir)
Arafat, your leader is the
prime minister of Israel."
Sharon made his proposal,
though in the context of what
Mimeimmimmmttm
He sees as a solution of the
Palestinian problem in which
Israel would control all the ter-
ritory west of the Jordan River
and a Palestinian state would
be in what is now Jordan. He
noted that Palestinians now
make up most of the popula-
tion of Jordan, as well as a ma-
jority of its parliament and
many of its governmental
leaders.
Israel and Jordan would
negotiate the conditions of the
Arabs in Judaea, Samaria and
Gaza, Sharon said. But he
stressed that Israel alone
would be responsible for the
internal and external security
of the West Bank and Gaza.
However, there should be as
little interference as possible
with the everyday life of the
residents of the territories,
Sharon said.
The only "practical" way to
achieve such a settlement is
through the autonomy plan
outlined in the Camp David
agreements, Sharon said.
"That is the only way that I
believe that you can move for-
ward," he said.
A Close Shave
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Orthodox minority in the town
of Netivot, east of the Gaza
Strip, would deny their secular
neighbors a close shave. They
are boycotting shops that sell
razor blades on grounds that
Jewish tradition forbids the
use of blades to remove or trim
beards.
i
I
' i
mm **> **Ma**0*i0mm0mm00*&0&0m*0'&*&*^***0<*m&**&m*0**m*m**9*m>
'
' i
1
' i
'
1
'
1
1
1
i
1
1
1
1
'
1
1
1
1
the ORIGINAL
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Owned and operated by WOLFIE'S RESTAURANT, INC., Joseph Nevel, Chairman; Oavid H. Nevel, President


Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 30, 1987

New! USAir nonstop
toPittsbui^,Philadelphia
and Cleveland.
Convenient service to 99 other cities.
Starting November 1, USAir will begin nonstop service to Pittsburgh,
Philadelphia and Cleveland every day from Miami. So fly the Northeast's # 1 airline to these
and 99 other cities throughout the U.S.:
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Papal Postscript:
More Tough Talk
On Gut Issues
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewitih Floridian Staff Writer
THE COLOR and con-
troversy surrounding the
Pope's September meeting
with Jewish leader in Miami
has died down, but the
Catholic-Jewish dialogue con-
tinues, as evidenced by this
Monday's meeting of local rab-
bis and representatives of the
Archdiocese of Miami, all key
players in the papal visit, at
Harry University.
Arthur Teitelbaum,
Southern Regional Director
the Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith. who presided
explained that the meeting
"was designed as a clergy
Continued on Pace 4-B
Interfaith Religious
Coalition Renewed in
Downtown's Rebirth
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Even as Miami's downtown
districts are undergoing a kind
of rebirth, the Downtown
Religious Coalition, which has
existed intermittently since
the 1960's, has also been
reborn.
The coalition, which consists
of the religious and lay leader-
ship of houses of worship
located in the downtown
Miami area, was reestablished
by Rabbi Rex Perimeter of
Temple Israel of Greater
Miami, Reverend Steven Kim-
mel of the Central Baptist
Church, and Reverend William
Barnes of the First United
Methodist Church.
Although several of the
downtown churches, including
those of Reverends Kimmel
and Barnes, had continued to
hold inter-denominational
meetings, a coalition of both
Jewish and Christian religious
components has not existed
Continued on Page 2-B
Satan Sharansky peruses psalm book which
IMU retu rned to him by Soviet prison officials.
Sharansky in Profile:
First We Become Zionists Then We Become Jews
B\ ELLEN ANN STEIN
Indian Staff Writ*
NATAN SHARANSKY,
the former Soviet refusenik
trht for freedom
. caUM championed by
and other supporters
worldwide, says he has not
to a therapist or
iatrist since his sudden
release to Israel in Februarv
"I m er had those problems.
I think the KGB helped me to
be absolutely healthy from the
psychological point of view,"
Sharansky mused as he shared
some of his struggles, current
lifestyle and hopes in an ex-
clusive interview with The
Jeunsh Floridian on Tuesday.
While it is common for
Americans to seek counseling
to help with their struggles, it
is unlikely that half as many
have endured the mental and
physical torture Sharansky
faced while imprisoned for
almost a decade in Soviet
prison and labor camps. There
were years that went by when
he could not see his family,
times he was placed in an isola-
tion cell with no outside
connection.
Then, and now, Sharansky
had his methods of coping.
"Sometimes I had to repeat
to myself hundreds of times a
day to keep myself rational,
what is my aim, what are my
systems of values, who are the
KGB, what are their aims and
to repeat this and to repeat
and to repeat."
AS A YOUTH he had been a
chess champion and there
were many times in prison
when he would create chess
games in his mind.
"Especially when you're in
the punishment cell, suffering
from cold and hunger and from
no contact with the world," he
recounts. "Nothing to read or
write and simply to keep think-
ing about something and to
keep being logical you have to
have some exercise, and that
was my exercise.'
\Bakery in N. Miami Beach:
Non-Jew Observes
Kashrut and Sabbath
The discipline that Sharan-
sky exhibited then is evident
now as he sits in an office in
the Jewish Federation of
Greater Miami office,
where posters calling for his
freedom as well as the freedom
of other Soviet Jews, still hang
on the walls. He is calm and
serious and his blue eyes
reflect that he is living in the
moment.
Sharansky was not immune
to the emotions of his ordeal
and he savs that is "exactly
Continued on Page 8-B
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
' Floridian Staff Writer
Men with yarmulkes and
en on their way to work
I stopped hy Abraham's Bakery
'''> 167th Street in North
Miami Beach, where the
Pastries looked good and
| anelled even better.
The cash register was ring-
*lf. a sign of prosperity for the
ty's I'uhan-born owner.
*no once had it so bad in
navana that she cried out in
pain when the food rations
were not enough to feed her
hungry children.
It is Friday and soon
Moraima Martinez will close
her bakery for the Sabbath.
The sign on the window says
that the bakery is strictly
kosher and supervised by one
of the country's most
respected kashrut supervisory
agencies. Signs also indicate
that the bakery is closed in
ontinued on Page 10-B
Community
Friday, October 30,1987-The Jewish Floridian-Section B

Moraima Martinez outside her N. Miami
Beach Abraham's Bakery.


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 30, 1987

Interfaith Religious Coalition
Renewed In Downtown's Rebirth
Continued from Page 1-B
for a number of years.
"There is obviously a great
attempt being made to bring
back the downtown area."
says Rabbi Perimeter. "The
religious institutions which
have had a long commitment
to the downtown area have a
responsibility to participate in
that revival, and to address the
issues which must be faced in
this attempt social and prac-
tical. moral and
demographic."
The group held its first
meeting on Tuesday. Oct. 20 at
Temple Israel, where plans for
an upcoming ecumenical
Thanksgiving ser\-ice. to be
held the week before
Thanksgiving, were discussed.
In attendance at the meeting
were Rabbi Perimeter and
Reverends Kimmel and
Barnes, along with Reverend
Winston Rudolph of Mt. Zion
Baptist Church, layperson
JoAnne Karscher from the
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Rev. William Barnes
Trinity Episcopal Cathedral
and members of the downtown
homeless coalition, there to
discuss issues concerning care
for the homeless and hungry.
Although other, similar
issues are on the coalition's
agenda, along with plans for
joint participation in Temple
Israel's annual interfaith. in-
terracial Passover seder, the
group is "only just beginning
to determine the direction in
which we'll go," according to
Perimeter.
Perimeter adds that
"problems facing downtown
congregations, problems of
membership, finance, and
security as well as social
issues, will be addressed."
Reverend Barnes suggests
Rabbi Rex Perimeter
that the decline of the previous
religious coalitions may have
been due to crises in recent
years which affected
downtown Miami, and the
religious institutions located
there.
"My hunch is that over the
last 20 years the city of Miami
has experienced great change,
with members (of downtown
religious institutions) moving
farther away, so that con-
gregations were not being
drawn from the
neighborhood." he says.
"We had to become more
metropolitan we had to
focus inward for our own sur-
vival and concentrate on
membership. Ecumenical con-
cerns took a backseat."
Barnes admits. "Now we have
stablilized."
Rev. Steven Kimmel
Reverend Kimmel notes that
he. Reverend Barnes and Rab-
bi Perimeter "are all about the
same age and are all trying to
build effective ministries in
downtown Miami, which is a
pretty big job. We have a lot in
common."
The three leaders are also all
relatively new to their respec-
tive congregations, and Kim-
mel adds that "for the dif-
ferent churches and the
synagogue downtown to talk
to each other is very impor-
tant. It's especially important
for Christians and Jews to talk
to one another, to know that
were not in this thing alone; to
know we're not in competition,
but that we can be partners
together.
"We're looking forward to
greater involvement with each
other, to having a meaningful
impact on the city as we work
together." he asserts.
Says Barnes of the bond bet-
ween the three downtown
religious leaders, "it feels real-
ly good. Here we have three
guys, Rex, Steve and myelf,
and we sit down and talk about
what's going on in our con-
gregations, and when one says
something, the other two nod
in agreement.
"It makes you want to get
together," he admits. "You
know, back in pioneer times in
Miami there was a great deal
sen-ices
Methodists held
Presbyterian tents^in^
downtown core is not at Z
heavily residential, a JJ
pioneer spirit is going on her?
"We are recapturing some
of what made Miami sucK
great place to live 90
ago," Barnes affirms.
years
The Downtown Religious
ofcooperationbetweenthedif- B^^Im^SSL a?
ferent denominations. Temple Israel. ngs at
Marshall Berkson, left, president and board chairman <>(South
Shore Medical Center, presents the Miami Beach hospital* m:
Claude Pepper Community Service Award to Peter Mo$er, chair-
man of the executive committee ofCenTrust Bank and mapr sup-
porter of the University of Miami Comprehensive Pain and
Rehabilitation Center of South Shore.
Dr. William Zubkoff. left, presents the other Claud* Pepper
Award of South Shore Hospital and Medical Center to Dr. Hubert
Rosomoff and Renee Steele Rosomoff. director and pr,-grans
director of the UM Pain Center of South Shore, which is a)-
fUiated with the University of Miami School of Medicine. The
presentations took place at the hospital's annual dinner at the
Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel
Kids find us fun,
but our postal no joke.
Chef Boyardee" Pac-Man: Smurf.'" ABC's
& 1. 2. 3 s, and Tic Tac Toes pasta is
serious food kids love to eat While we
make our pasta in shapes kids find fun to
eat. we also make sure they're filled with
good ingredients like rich, ripe tomatoes
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that s also 95% fat free, and contains com-
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thank goodness for Chef Boyardee
Thank Goodness for Chef Boyardee

-'


Friday, October 30, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Miami Herald, News
Recommend Mayor
Alex Daoud for Beach
MAYOR ALEX DAOUD
Mayor Alex Daoud of Miami
iBeach this week picked up the
leditorial recommendations of
Iboth The Miami Herald and
iThe Miami News, giving the
I incumbent a sweep of all major
I endorsements issued in Tues-
day's upcoming city election.
Earlier Daoud, the first
[mayor of the city born in
Miami Beach, was given solid
endorsements from the United
672-3100
For R.des To Poll*
Teachers of Dade County
(T.I.G.E.R.-COPE), the Dade
County Council of Senior
Citizens, the Miami Beach
lodge of the Fraternal Order of
Police, the Miami Beach
Firefighters Political Action
Committee and by the P.A.C.
of the Municipal Employees
Union of the City of Miami
Beach. The Beach Board of
Realtors P.A.C. also endores-
ed Daoud.
Daoud, who first won elec-
tion to the Beach city commis-
sion in 1979 and is the dean of
the commission, gained yet
another distinction this week
when incumbent City Commis-
sioners Stanley Arkin, Ben Z.
Grenald, Sidney Weisburd and
Bruce Singer each endorsed
Daoud.
Arkin, Grenald, Weisburd
and Singer won re-election
automatically when the four
veteran commissioners were
unopposed. By Florida law,
their names will not be on the
ballot, but each commissioner
signed an endorsement card
urging their supporters to vote
for Daoud.
Heading an impressive list
of individual endorsers of
Daoud, who was elected to a
two-year term as mayor in
1985 and drew only three
token opponents this time, are
Congressman William Lehman
and former Governor Reubin
O'D Askew. This is the second
time in two Daoud outings for
mayor that the popular former
Governor has endorsed Daoud.
Joining the Daoud team
were Dade Mayor Stephen
Miami Herald, News
Recommend Commissioner
Abe Resnick
Powerful recommendations
Tom The Miami Herald and
The Miami News this week
propelled Miami Beach City
Commissioner Abe Resnick in-
> a strong lead in his cam-
ugn for re-election to second
rm in the city's non-partisan
plection Tuesday.
esnick, who was selected
ether with his wife Sarita
i the honoree for this year's
Mate of Israel-Cuban Hebrew
Congregation Bonds dinner,
*on election by a 79 percent
margin in his first try for
public office two years ago.
hairman for the
outheastern United States of
he Conference of American
ewish Survivors of the
holocaust, Resnick is founder
f, llfe president of Ohr
Miairn Congregation in Miami
fku He ^ 's a member of
Peboard of Temple Emanu-El
P' Greater Miami.
Resnick also gained strong
orsements this week from
Miami Beach TJOard of
ealtors Political Action Com-
F* and from the Dade
kjunty Council of Senior
P"'*ens. He a!so was endorsed
by the Miami Beach Fraternal
Order of Police, the Miami
Beach Firefighters through
their P.A.C. and by the P.A.C.
of the Municipal Employees
Union.
A veteran developer who has
built some 70 condominiums in
Miami Beach and neighboring
communities, Resnick is past
president of the Miami Beach
Developers Council. He also
won the endorsement of
Pauline and Harry Mildner,
leaders of the Miami Beach
Retirees.
Resnick, a Founder of Mount
Sinai Medical Center and a
director of its Foundation, is a
member of the board of Shaare
Zedek Hospital in Jerusalem.
Twice during the past year, he
accompanied Miami Beach
Mayor Alex Daoud on missions
to Israel.
Still more endorsements for
Resnick came from Harriet
Green, chairman of the board
of the American Zionist
Federatoon of South Florida;
Felice Schwartz, vice presi-
dent of the South Florida
Council of Na'amat USA; and
Billie Kern, past national
president of the JWV
Auxiliary.
Resnick won endorsements
from Kenneth Treister, who
created the Pacesetter
Awards of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and design-
ed the chapel of Temple Israel
of Greater Miami, and from
Stephen Cypen, past president
of trie Kiwanis Club of Miami
Beach.
Others joining the Resnick
team include Russell Galbut,
past president of the Miami
Beach Taxpayers Association;
David Nevel, also a former
Taxpayers Association former
president; attorneys and civic
leaders Allen Fuller and Larry
Feingold; community pillar
Nathan Gumenick and Dr.
Solomon Lichter, former prin-
cipal of Miami Beach High.
More Resnick endorsers in-
clude George Feldenkreis,
Oscar Baisman, Norman
Broad, Martin Gelb, attorney
Joseph Rackman, Art Deco
leader Linda Polansky and
Gerald Schwartz, past presi-
dent of the Miami Beach
Clark and County Commis-
sioners Harvey Ruvin, Barry
Schreiber and Sherman Winn.
Florida Senator Owen
Margolis and State Represen-
tatives Mike Abrams, Ron
Silver, James Burke, Elaine
Bloom and Luis Morse also
sent Daoud endorsement
cards.
Long-time attorney for the
Tenants Association of
Florida, Daoud gained the sup-
port of Harry and Pauline
Mildner, leaders of the Miami
Beach Retirees. Civic leaders
Harriet Green, national vice
president of Na'amat USA;
Billie Kern, former national
president of the Jewish War
Veterans Ladies Auxiliary and
past president of the South
Florida Council of B'nai B'rith
Women; and Gerald Schwartz,
national vice president of the
American Zionist Federation,
strongly endorsed Daoud.
Others who joined the Daoud
team, which is furnishing free
rides to the polls to anyone
telephoning 538-0385 or
672-3100, include Joseph
Nevel, past president of tne
Miami Beach Chamber of Com-
merce; David Nevel, past
president of the Miami Beach
Taxpayers Association; former
Florida Speaker of the House
Pro Tern Barry Kutun and
Juan Matalon.
Judy Drucker, Gerry San-
chez, Olga Guillot and Mayor
Shlomo Lahat of Tel Aviv
were others who signed Daoud
endorsement cards.
Daoud is the recipient of the
Miami Beach Jaycees' Good
Government League, past
president and board chairman
of the American Federation of
Senior Citizens Miami Beach
chapter and an active member
of the American Zionist
Federation.
He is a graduate of Beach
high schools, the University of
Tampa and Northern Illinois
University School of Law, and
an associate in the Miami
Beach Zoning Board of Adjust-
ment, also endorsed Daoud.
Daoud's campaign managers
urged all eligible Beach voters
to punch No. 6 Tuesday bet-
ween 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. and to
call 538-0385 for free rides to
the polls.
F
UNCH No. 6
pd. pol.idv
COMMISSIONER
ABE RESNICK
538-0385
For Rides To Polls
Lodge of B'nai B'rith.
Resnick, who fought in com-
bat against the Nazis in World
War II, moved to Miami Beach
from Cuba 27 years ago. A
member of the B'nai B'rith
Century Club, he is a Founder
of the Miami Beach Chapter of
the Association for the
Welfare of Soldiers in Israel.
Resnick is former Vice
Mayor of Miami Beach.
pd pl adv
PUNCH No. 21


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 30, 1987
Barry U. Meet:
Gut Issues Reviewed After Papal Visit
Continued from Page 1-B
dialogue flowing out of a
pledge that the Anti-
Defamation League and the
Archdiocese made at the time
of the controversy of the
Waldheim visit with the
Pope."
Sister Jeanne O'Laughlin,
president of Barrv University.
Rabbi Sol Schiff. executive
vice president of the Rab-
binical Association of Greater
Miami, and Monsignor Bryan
Walsh, chairman of the Ar-
chdiocese Interfaith Commit-
tee, all spoke at the meeting
about the need to go beyond
mere talk and verbal expres-
sions of friendship.
The assembled clergy includ-
ed Rabbi's Irving Lehrman of
Temple Emanu-el, Ralph
Kingsley of Temple Sinai. Sim-
cha Freedman of Temple
Adath Yeshurun. Israel Jacobs
of Beth Moshe Congregation,
Leonard Schoolman of Temple
Beth Am; Mark Kram,
associate rabbi at Temple Beth
am. and Herbert Baumgard,
rabbi emeritus of temple Beth
Am.
Also present were Frank
McGraff, executive director of
regional National Conference
of Christians and Jews.
Bishop Robert Dorsey, and
Rev. John O'Grady. chairman
of religious studies at Barry
University.
THE LUNCHEON meeting
began with a Hebrew blessing
over the meal, and concluded
with a benediction given by
Bishop Dorsey.
In between, there was talk
about the time for talk being
over.
"I don't want to talk
anymore." said Sister
O'Laughlin. "I don't want
anymore nice lunches. I like
you guys already, you don"!
have to convince me. You're
talking to a little old nun who's
had a Master's degree in
Jewish Studies for six years.
"We have to learn to act,"
she asserted, proposing a joint
Jewish and Catholic strategy
to create an educational pro-
gram "to de-mythicize who we
are."
Rabbi Schiff spoke about the
papal visit, bluntly admitting
that "not everything said in
the Pope's speech was perfect-
ly acceptable. Some things
were not said, some could have
been said differently."
Schiff noted that the Pope's
reference to the Vatican's
"help" to Jews during the
Holocaust (a sensitive issue for
many Jews) and his mention of
the rights of Palestinians
(which Schiff termed inap-
propriate in this setting")
were among those things
which "could have been said
differently."
Schiff said that during the
long summer of controversy
over the Pope's visit, "the
Jewish community questioned
the value of dialogue. Some
felt we should discard it, while
others felt the problem was
with the level of dialogue.
They felt we concentrated too
much on being good brothers
and sisters, and not enough on
the gut issues."
MONSIGNOR WALSH con
tended that "those difficult
days of July and August
Sr. Jeanne O'Laughlin
Arthur Teitelbaum and
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Monsignor Bryan Walsh
resulted in 25 years of moving
up the calendar" in terms of
Catholic-Jewish relations.
"Otherwise, without the con-
troversy, the visit would have
been ceremonial and nice, but
would not have moved the
dialogue forward," said
Walsh.
"Jewish-Catholic relations in
Miami have implications far
beyond ourselves," he
asserted, "because although
Jews and Catholics are
minorities in most places, in
Miami, we are the community
up to 70 percent of the
population in Dade and
Monroe Counties."
Calling the presence of a
large community of Jews and
Catholics here "a tremendous
responsibility and challenge,"
Walsh spoke of a need to push
beyond "nice luncheons" and
"friendship."
He concluded by saying that
"we must get to specific plans
to extend and build on what
has already been done then
the Miami experience can be a
beacon to the rest of the
world."
There were other calls for
specific plans of action. Rabbi
Baumgard suggested an
outreach program whereby the
Hispanic population, largely
Catholic, and the Jewish
population of Miami could
learn more about each
other."
Calling meetings a chance to
"take minutes and lose
hours." Rabbi Freedman said
that the Jewish community
was "afraid to mention the
word anger."
"Until we have relations
which are not merely formal,
and talk as real people about
real concerns, we'll be as
separate as we've always
been," he added.
Speaking out on real con-
cerns, John O'Grady. who
teaches New Testament at
Barn-, admitted that "there is
a perception that Jews talk too
much about the Holocaust, and
the same with Waldheim."
Asked if he knew of a way to
make Catholics more sensitive,
however, O'Grady said that he
"did not know."
PERHAPS the only positive
comment about ceremonialism
that was made at the meeting
was that "symbolism has its
own power, even if the
substance emerging from the
papal meeting was not what
some might have wished."
Yet Teitelbaum pointed to
the importance of the con-
ference, even if those who at-
tended felt that bagels and
verbal expressions of friend-
ship were no longer enough.
"It's important not to leave
a vacuum in Jewish-Catholic
relations," he said, because
that kind of break in the
dialogue between the two com-
munities "gets filled with the
most retrogressive reactions."
Retreat Reunion
The Bob Russell Community
Retreat Center has announced
plans for a reunion of the
Jewish Community Leader-
ship Retreat to be held at the
Omni International Hotel,
Monday evening. Nov. 9. The
Jewish Community Leader-
ship Retreat, the first of its
kind in South Florida, was held
this past June 5-7 in West
Palm Beach.
For more information about
the reunion, please contact
Miles Bunder, 576-4030.
Marc Lxchtman (left). Executive Director of the Miami Jev-ui
Home and Hospital tor the Aged at Douglas Garden* received?.
honorary plaque/or his seven years ofserxnce an .,*
Chairman of the Board of Nursing Home A ,r
goi minwtrators in the State of Florida. Presenting ,,/ m
Edward Gillman. a new member of the Board.
TMt
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Friday, October 30, 1987/Tbe Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Have Hands Will Travel
In the time it takes for har-
ried office workers to take a
coffee or cigarette break, they
can now take a ten-minute
massage break without ever
leaving their desks.
But while caffeine and
nicotine do not actually relieve
tension, a mini-neck and
shoulder massage "is a real
stress buster," according to
Robin Turetsky, the healing
hands behind Have Hands Will
Travel, her office-delivery
massage business.
Turetsky, who prefers to
handle groups of people,
makes "house calls" to the of-
f ice s of attorneys,
I stockbrokers, computer pro-
grammers, and other white
I collar workers.
"Men just need to take off
I their jackets and loosen their
ties." she says. "Women
might take off a particularly
chunky necklace, but that's
lall." '
Turetsky directs her
lacupressure massages to the
Ineck and shoulders because
("stress very often builds up
Ithere, and for an office worker
[there's no physical outlet."
for a ten minute massage, but
not for an hour-long one."
Trained in classical Swedish
massage at a school here in
Miami, Turetsky attributes
part of her skill to training of a
very different kind.
"I started playing piano at a
very young age, she recounts.
"Maybe that s why my hands
are strong for massage."
Turetsky did more than
merely play the piano. A
former performer of Hebrew
and Jewish music, she was a
cantorial-soloist and taught
students, preparing them for
Bar or Bat Mitzvah.
Her decision to switch
careers, she says, was not due
to lack of success as a
performer.
"It was going well, but I
didn't believe in what I was
teaching anymore," says
Turetsky. "I know Hebrew,
and understood the words I
was saying," she explains, ad-
mitting that she no longer ac-
cepted the messages behind
the Hebrew songs and
prayers, "and so I could not
teach them."
for all people," she asserts.
"With nuclear disarmament
an issue, and world hunger,
and environmental issues ... I
think the whole world needs a
lot of help right now. We're in
a time of crisis," Turetsky
contends.
Still a teacher at heart,
however, Turetsky instructs
her massage clients in stress
reduction techniques.
"It's teaching, too
teaching people relaxation and
breathing," she says.
Turetsky did not always con-
sider massage a vehicle for
helping others: At one time,
she viewed it as one of the
perks of a pampered lifestyle.
"I thought of it as a luxury
for rich people," she recalls.
"Then I was in a bad car acci-
dent. I found massage very
helpful when I was in pain and
the doctors didn't see anything
wrong with me."
Nowadays, Turetsky sees
massage as "preventative
health.7,
"Instead of waiting to get
sick or to go to see a doctor,
Lifestyle by Alisa Kwitney
Turetsky is not sure why
I tension seems to migrate to
I those areas.
"It might be driving in rush-
Ihour traffic, or perhaps we
were meant to be crawling on
all fours, but 90 percent of the
people I see carry tension in
I their neck and shoulders.
Maybe it's just part of living in
the 20th century," she
I suggests.
Not that she is arguing
(against the benefits of a full-
Ibody massage; Turetsky simp-
|ly points out that "in our rush-
l society, people make time
"There was definitely
something I was looking for in
the Jewish religion that I did
not find," she admits, adding
that she "didn't find it in
Eastern religions or
Catholicism, either. What I
was looking for was inside of
me."
Turetsky has not abandoned
Judaism entirely, although it is
no longer her focus.
"Culturally, I'm Jewish, and
I do think it's true that Jews
care about other people I
just want to do what I can to
make this world a better place
!
you take care of yourself.
Massage is like exercise and
proper nutrition part of a
program of wellness," she
explains.
Sometimes people have trou-
ble beginning such a program,
because they do not want to
admit that there is a problem,
according to Turetsky.
"I think women more readily
admit that they have stress
men are more macho, and
don't want to admit to having
stress. Or else, they have some
idea about a woman touching
them," she reports.
Asked if people are embar-
rassed when they receive their
initial in-the-office massage.
Turetsky admits that
"sometimes people are
flustered at first, but when
they feel it, they love it. They
might not even think that they
need it, but when I go in there
and hit certain pressure
points, they're amazed at how
much tension they had."
Music also has the ability to
soothe, even creatures more
savage than downtown Miami
executives, but Turetsky says
she does not miss that life.
"I still receive opportunities
to sing at peace rallies, or
performing Jewish songs at
weddings. It seems that
whenever I want it, the oppor-
tunity is there," she says.
"I feel much happier bring-
ing healing to people than I did
performing."
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Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 30, 1987
Na'amat USA Conference Kinder Concert
Officers and leaders of
Na'amat USA councils,
chapters and clubs from
throughout Dade, Broward
and Palm Beach counties were
to meet Thursday, Oct. 29, at
an all-day Southeast Area Con-
ference at the Inverrary
Hilton Hotel, Fort Lauderdale.
Col David Ben-David,
former commander of the
State of Israel's paratrooper
training school and one of his
nation's foremost military
heroes, was to speak on
"Celebration of Jerusalem
the Undivided City."
This year is the 20th an-
niversary of the reunification
of Israel's capital during the
Six-Day war of 1967.
Shulamith Saltzman of
Margate was to speak on "Is
Zionism Viable Today?" and
was to lead a discussion on the
upcoming (December) 31st
World Zionist Congress in
Israel.
Gert Aaron of Hallandale,
Southeast Area coordinator of
Na'amat USA, the Women's
Labor Zionist Organization of
America, was to preside and
Sylvia Snyder of Delray
Berach was to serve as lun-
cheon chairman. Harriet
Green of Coral Gables and
Miami Beach, national vice
president of Na'amt USA, was
to lead a workshop session on
the impact of Na'amat in
Israeli society.
Na'amat Events
Eilat Chapter Na'amat USA
will meet on Monday, Nov. 2,1
p.m. at the Financial Federal
Bank 8th and Washington
Ave.
A musical program is plann-
ed with Frieda Levitan and Ida
Kovalsky featuring Paul
Yanofsky on the mandolin.
The book, "Random Winds"
by Belva Plain, will be review-
ed by Bertha Liebman at the
Wednesday, Nov. 4,12:30 p.m.
meeting of the Masada
Chapter of Na'amat USA. The
meeting will be held in the
South Florida offices of the
organization, 605 Lincoln
Road Building, Miami Beach.
Amit Women
Coral Gables Chapter will
meet on Tuesday, Nov. 3 at
noon at Zamora Temple.
Lunch will be served.
Galil Chapter invites family
and friends to attend its Fresh
Air Fund luncheon on Monday,
Nov. 2 at noon at the Young
Israel Synagogue, North
Miami Beach. Saundra
Rothenbere. Dresiding
member of the Florida Coun-
cil, will be the guest speaker,
and a musical book review en-
titled "The Life of Ethel Mer-
man" will be presented by
Beverly Berlin.
Moorings Chapter will meet
on Tuesday.Nov. 3 at noon in
the Auditorium of Moorings.
Towers, North Miami Beach.
Lunch will be served.
At Beth Am
Temple Beth Am will spon-
sor an hour-long children
children's concert, entitled
"Music, A Small World After
AH" on Sunday.Nov. 1 in the
temple sanctuary, from 4-5
p.m.
Guy St-Amant, principal
percussionist and timpanist of
the Philharmonic Orchestra of
Florida, will demonstrate
various aspects of percussion
and computer music, followed
by cantorial soloist Harvey
Kaufman, who will present
American, Country and Euro-
pean Folk music, encouraging
audience involvement.
Instruments will be
distributed to children in the
audience so they can accom-
pany the artists, and light
refreshments and balloons will
be available at the Artist's
Reception following the
concert.
The Children's Series is be-
ing presented under the um-
brella of Temple Beth Am's
Concert Series. For ticket in-
formation call 667-6667, or
665-6228.
Andron Elected
Sandy Andron, high school
director of the Central Agency
For Jewish Education (CAJE),
has recently been elected to
the national board of the Cult
Awareness Network, the
largest such organization in
the world. The Network's
function is to increase the
public's awareness of problems
and issues pertaining to cults
in the world community.
Yiddish Film Festival ncjw Luncheon
Four Yiddish films will be
shown during this season's In-
ternational Jewish Film
Festival at University of
Miami's Beaumont Cinema,
sponsored by the UM Judaic
Studies Program and the Cen-
tral Agency for Jewish
Education.
Three of the movies are
dramas and one is a musical.
All the movies selected have
English subtitles.
The festival will open Nov. 3
with "Mirele Efros." "The
Singing Blacksmith" will be
featured Nov. 17. On Dec. 1,
the festival presents "Where
is My Child? Vu Iz Mein
Kind?" on Dec. 15 will be
"Tevye the Dairyman, Tevye
Der Milchiker."
All films begin at 7:30 p.m.
For inforr- '*ion, 284-4375.
For Ship-A-Box
Greater Miami Section, Na-
tional Council of Jewish
Women, announces a luncheon
at the University of Miami
Faculty Club, on Nov. 5, noon,
to benefit Ship-A-Box. This
program of NCJW collects
funds which purchase educa-
tional toys and materials for
shipment to Israel for use in
kindergartens and day care
centers. For information,
576-4747.
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7933 N.W. 7th Avenue
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Miami
The Greater Miami Israel
Bonds Organization will honor
the Miami Beach Region
Hadassah at a special luncheon
celebrating Israel's UOth an-
niversary on Thursday, Nov.
5, at the Eden Roc Hotel The
luncheon will begin at 11:30
a.m. Special guest performer
will be Judy Steel, vocalist with
a large repertoire of contem-
porary and traditional folk
songs in English, Hebrew, Yid-
dish, Ladino, Spanish and
French.
Property Tax Appeals
For hotels, apartments, shopping centers,
office buildings, restaurants, warehouses,
hospitals, specialty properties. Contingent or
hourly basis.
THOMAS R. POST, PA
ATTORNEYS
(305)379-1500
Delegates from the South Dade Area representing tht SoutkttM
District of Women '$ American ORT are attending tht :")
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year-long celebration of their 60th Anniversary. A mong tht ijoo
delegates were, firm wti Loisbeth Emanuel, Gloria i
Laurel Shapiro and Mary EUen Peyton.
Happenings
Miami Dade Community College's Lunchtime Livelj arts Serin
will present Side l>> Side." an open rehearsal with two I estival
Miami" orchestras m the Gasman (enter tor the Performing Arts
on Monday, Not 2 from 10 ><> a m to 1 p.m Die featured or
chestras uill be the University of Miami Symphonj (Orchestraaad
the r'ort Worth Chamber Orchestra
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Friday, October 30^987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Hadassah Events
The Torah Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its annual
Hadassah Medical Organiza-
tion Luncheon at the Sofitel
Hotel, Monday, Nov. 9, 11:30
a.m. The program will include
singer Toni Ross. For informa-
tion, 382-2038.
On Monday, Nov. 9 in the
1200 West Ave. Auditorium at
1 p.m. There will be a Book
Review by Elsie Rubin for the
Forte Towers Chapter of
Hadassah.
Hatikvah Hadassah will be
having its annual paid-up
member dinner Nov. 12 at 7:30
p.m. at Baptist Hospital
Auditorium. For information,
595-0931.
The Renanah Chapter of
Hadassah has rescheduled the
meeting canceled due to hur-
ricane Floyd to Monday, Nov.
9 at 11:30 a.m. at the Carriage
Club. Miami Beach. The
meeting will feature a lun-
cheon buffet and comedy by
Charlotte Cooper. New
members and the incoming of-
ficers of 1987-88 will be
welcomed. For reservations,
865-0238 or 865-3667.
On Sunday, Nov. 8, the
Naomi Chapter of Hadassah
will hold its Fabulous Fall
Fashion Bruncheon. Fashions
will lie from United States Ap-
parel of the Town and Country
Mall. The program begins at
11:30 a.m. and will be held at
the Kings Creek Clubhouse.
For information and reserva-
tions. 385-4452 or 382-1142.
Much Ado About Something"
is the Heart to Heart presenta-
tion to be given at the next
general meeting of the Naomi
GMJF to Win
PR Awards
NEW YORK, NY A total
Awards for Excellence in
lie Relations will be
Mted to 50 Jewish
rations throughout North
i during the 66th
J Assembly of theCoun-
Jewish Federations, Nov.
"- in Miami.
teei) Federations won
'/"la Awards, led by the
ration of Boston, which
ter Miami Jewish Federa-
list) won a Gold Award.
h addition, Miami won
ilver awards and an
honorable mention. Arthur
rlink, assistant executive
tor of GMJF, served on
the CJF Public Relations
Awards Committee.
Chapter of Hadassah. The
meeting will be held on Mon-
day, Nov. 9, at 8 p.m., at the
Tamarind Apartments
Clubhouse. Visitors are
welcome.
There will be Paid-Up-
Membership Dinner and Mini-
Bazaar for Aliyah Chapter, on
Monday, Nov. 9 from 6:30-10
p.m. at the Kendalltown Club
House.
Golda Meir Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its monthly
meeting on Monday, Nov. 9, at
noon, at the Ocean Pavilion
Restaurant, Miami Beach. The
meeting will be followed by a
card-party.
Stephen S. Wise Chapter of
Hadassah is sponsoring a
weekend at the Lido Spa from
Thursday, Nov. 5 to Sunday,
Nov. 8. Three meals a day, dai-
ly massages, games by day and
dancing and entertainment by
night are part of the package.
For information or reserva-
tions, 944-4617.
The Albert Einstein Chapter
of Hadassah will hold its
General Meeting on Nov. 9 at
noon, at Temple Adath
Yeshurun. Also planned is a
stay at the Lido Spa, Sunday,
Nov. 22-25. For reservations,
945-7391. In addition, Nov.
26-29 Thanksgiving Weekend
at the San Souci Hotel.
The Greater Miami Israel
Bonds Organization will
recognize the Miami Beach
Region of Hadassah at the an-
nual Israel Bonds-Hadassah
Luncheon scheduled for Thurs-
day, Nov. 5, at the Eden Roc
Hotel, Miami Beach. Guest
entertainer will be singer Judy
Steel. For information,
531-6731.
Morton Towers Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its next
meeting on Monday, Nov. 9 at
1 p.m. in Morton Towers
Auditorium. For information,
.754.
The Southffate Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its Regular
Meeting Monday. Nov. 9 at
12:30 p.m. in the Terrace
Room of the Southgate Apart-
ments. The meeting will
feature a playlet written bj
Muriel Kovinow on the recent
innovative breakthrough of
the Hadassah Medical
Organization. The cast will in-
clude: Muriel Kovinow, Esthr
Melzer, Anne Weinstei,
Florence Tubelle, Selma Paris
and Ruth Katz.
FREE SKIN CANCER
EXAMINATION
By Certified Dermatologist
1680 Michigan Avenue
Suite 900
Miami Beach
By Appointment Only 532-4478
Wedding
SNYDERWINTNER
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Snyder, of
Philadelphia, Pa., announce the marriage of
their daughter, Barbara Jean Snyder, to
George Barry Wintner, son of Betty Jacobson
and the late Eugene Wintner, of Boca Raton.
The couple were married in Pittsburgh on
Sunday, Oct. 25. Susan Weiss of Philadelphia
was matron of honor; Roberta Phillips of
Boston was bridesmaid; and Elizabeth Mar-
cus of Pittsburgh was flower girl.
Robert Marcus of Pittsburgh was best man;
David Pober, Matthew Marcus, Howard Elbl-
ing and Joel Smooke were ushers.
The bride and groom, who honeymooned in
Israel, will reside in Pittsburgh, Pa.
Mrs. George Barry Wintner
Letter to the Editor
EDITOR:
We write, as members of the
Brandeis University Board of
Trustees, to clarify any
misunderstanding that may
exist with respect to recent ac-
tions of the Board that were
reported in the September 14
issue of the New York Times
and further discussed in the
Jewish Floridian.
Brandeis University, found-
ed by members of the
American Jewish community
and heavily supported by that
community, was created as a
nonsectarian university, open
to all. The founders sought to
establish an institution that
would offer resistance to any
kind of discrimination or
exclusion.
As a university and a com-
munity, Brandeis has long
taken pride in its "host at last"
tradition. Indeed, the concept
was integral to a study com-
mittee and report endorsed by
the trustees which included
the recommendation recently
reported in the press to offer
additional dining options for
non-Jewish Brandeis students.
It is our opinion that Brandeis
should aspire to more than just
being a good host. The concept
of "host" carries with it the
implication that there are
"guests" individuals warm-
ly welcomed and encouraged
to visit, but who. at the same
time, are only visitors. All
faculty members, students,
and staff members at Brandeis
should feel that they are more
than '"guests." Brandeis
should he "home'' lo all.
With the endorsement of the
Board of Trustees, the univer-
sity's current policy is to ex-
pand the options available for
dining on campus. Beginning
this fall, Brandeis' 3,700
undergraduates and graduate
students may choose from an
international cuisine offered in
one dining hall or from either
kosher or non-kosher menus
that have always been
available in another dining
hall. At the same time, the
Sherman Dining Hall, which
houses the kosher dining ser-
vice, is undergoing expansion
and renovation so that both
the kosher kitchen, currently
serving about 300 students,
and the non-kosher kitchen
may better serve
undergraduates.
Although the student
population continues to be
more than 60 percent Jewish,
Brandeis is an institution
founded on the basis of a con-
scious and deliberate desire to
be open to all qualified men
and women, and to provide a
community in which in-
dividuals of all faiths, races,
and backgrounds may feel
comfortable and at home. It
has been, and is, our intent to
be true to that tradition.
Signed:
Leonard Farber,
Chairman of the Board
Henry Foster,
former Chairman of the
Board
Evelyn E. Handler,
President
Jack Hiatt,
former Chairman of the
Board
Sister Cities' Mayors Meet
Mayor Uri Amit of Ramat
Gan, Miami Beach's sister city
in Israel, will address students
of the Lehrman Day School of
Temple Emanu-El at a 9:45
a.m. assembly Friday, Oct. 30.
He will share speaking
honors with Beach Mayor Alex
Daoud, who invited Mayor
Amit to visit South Florida
during a visit to Israel earlier
this year by Mayor Daoud and
Beach City Commissioner Abe
Resnkk.
Mayors Amit and Daoud will
No at Temple Emanu-KI Satur-
day morning. Oct. 31. for the
Sabbath service to lie con-
ducted by \)r. Irving Lehrman
at the Mia m i Be a C h
congregation.
More than 200 students of
the United Synagoue Youth
(USY) Movement of Conser-
vative Judaism will be guests
of Temple Emanu-El at the
Saturday morning service.
They also will participate in a
special, 7 p.m. youth service
Friday evening.
Mayor Daoud noted that
Ramat (Janis a city "a little
larger than Miami Beach,
which is a distinct part of
GreaerTel Aviv. It is the home
of Bar-Kan University, and
one of the Fastest growing
municipalities in the Jewish
.-late. Mayor Amit is a
dynamic representative of a
dynamic citj
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Pompano Beach Florida 946 1800
/CBC\


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 30, 1987
Write
Dear \omi
. For Advice
[ear Nomi. an advice column, will appear regularly in tht
pages of The Jewish Fluridian.
Dear Nomi:
My wife and I hired a nursing aide to care for my ailing
mother, who still lives alone. The aide is supposed to keep a
watch on my mother, help clean and dress her, give her medical
checks, make sure she takes her pills and cook for her.
Herein lies the problem: The nurse's aide served my mother,
who has kept strictly kosher all her life, a chicken meal on a
"milk" dish. Now, I have tried to explain to the aide that "milk"
and "meat" dishes must be kept separate, and that she should
not serve milk items with meat items together at one meal, but
the woman insists she cannot keep straight what is a milk pro-
duct and what is not, and she has too much on her mind to worry
about which dish is which.
It is difficult to find and hire another nursing aide, and my
wife and J do not have a lot of time. Should we go to the bother of
obtaining another, more amenable nursing aide? Should we in-
form my mother about the mix-up with the dishes? She is really
too old to know the difference unless we inform her.
Sharansky: Press The Soviets
Sincerely,
Confused Kin
Dear Confused Kin:
Families often go to a lot of trouble and expense to honor the
memory of loved ones. Even though your mother's faculties are
some want impaired, \ would think it far more appropriate to pay
tribute to the memory of who she was and what she held dear
now, while she is still alive, than later.
So, in my opinion, it would be fitting to find a nursing aide
who would be willing and able to comply with the basic laws of
kashrut. This could be done quite easily by marking cabinets
"Milk" and "Meat" for cooking utensils and buying disposable
plates and silverware. If breakfast, lunch and dinner occur at
scheduled intervals and are planned in advance (as they usually
are for the elderly) there should not be a great deal of effort in-
volved for anyone.
I would not, however, suggest that you tell your mother
about the mix-up which has already occurred. It was not her
fault, and nothing can be done to alter the past, so why upset
her?
Yours,
Nomi
Dear Nomi:
My husband criticizes me all the time, and when he isn't
criticizing, he's nagging me. It's always, "why didn't you turn
the light off last night, and "You shouldn't have bought more
bread, it'll just rot in the refrigerator." Little things, but when
they are said all the time, they can drive a person crazy! Then my
husband goes on and on about how I need to remember to get the
car fixed, buy a new lamp, call the dentist about an appointment
for the two of us whenever one thing is accomplished, he's on
to the next.
When I tell my husband to stop criticizing me, he says, 'If
you could manage to stop doing these things, I wouldn't have to
criticize you.' When I ask him to stop nagging, he says that I
never remember anything.
Nomi, I feel like running away to the South Seas and living
where there are no dentists, cars to be fixed or washed,
groceries to be bought or husbands to nag! What can I do to get
some peace of mind?
Yours Truly,
Harried in Miami
Dear Harried:
You need to sit down with your husband and work out a dif-
ferent method for insuring that tasks get done. You could divide
up chores (fixing the car, making dentist's appointments) and
the person Vesponsible should take complete charge.
Or else you could have a list of "Things To Be Done" pinned
to the refrigerator or bulletin board. You or your husband would
add items to the list as they came up, and check them off as tasks
are accomplished.
As for the constant nagging, you might suggest instituting a
weekly house meeting, where the two of you could have a time
limited "gripe session" which might also serve as a forum for
discussing how the "Tasks To Be Done" are progressing.
Remind your husbnd that, as much as he may feel that you
need constant reminding, and as much as he may feel an im-
mediate need to "get things off his chest," you cannot function
properly under those kinds of conditions. And if you cannot func-
tion properly, less, and not more, will be accomplished.
NmOOUCMG
executive Home Care Inc.
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Continued from Page 1-B
why" he is writing a book that
tells about the struggle of
Soviet Jews and his years as
the unofficial spokesman for
human rights in the Soviet
Union. Although books have
been written about Sharansky,
this is the first book he has
authored about his
experiences.
RANDOM HOUSE
publishers gave him a large
enough advance on the book to
support his family during its
writing and enable him to
spend the remainder of his
time working for the release of
Soviet Jews.
"It gives me the opportunity
to relieve me of my past," he
says of the book, which is
scheduled for release in May.
"I think it's an important
message, to share this ex-
perience. It's a big relief that
now I've almost finished with
my past and I can work instead
on Russian Jews."
He started working on the
book a little over a year ago
and worked on it every day for
about six hours. He wrote his
way through more than 1,000
pages only to learn that Ran-
dom House would prefer to
keep it to 600 pages. People
don't read long books, Sharan-
sky was told. 'Yet, they didn't
know where to cut," he adds.
"They said, 'this is good, this is
good,' but that the masses of
people don't read."
While Sharansky may be
stable, his life is oftentimes
not.
"I say many times, but peo-
ple think that I'm joking, that
sometimes I'm missing those
days when I was in prison
because then I had all the time
to concentrate on some impor-
tant things in our lives, some
most important challenges.
And here everyday you have
thousands of things, it's such a
mess, a stream of information.
I don't have time to stop to
think, to analyze and to make
the most important choices.
And that's really something to
which I have to get accustom-
ed and somehow take control
over things."
SHARANSKY says he has
postponed a lucrative offer to
make a big lecture tour in
America, it would mean many
months to leave Israel and to
turn Soviet Jewry into
business. I think it's not impor-
tant for the struggle." he says.
Sharansky is living in
Jerusalem with his wife Avital
and their one-year-old
daughter, Rachel, who was
conceived almost immediately
after Sharansky arrived in
Israel.
His 79-year-old mother Ida
Milgrom, who waged her own
fight against the Soviet
authorities when she learned
her son was not getting proper
medical attention in prison,
was allowed to emigrate to
Israel about six months after
Sharansky arrived and now
lives with her son and
daughter-in-law. At first,
Sharansky reveals, the
Kremlin officials would not
release his mother. "The first
months the Soviets tried to
blackmail me, sending infor-
mation that if I would be
outspoken, if I go to America,
it would have a negative in-
fluence on permission for my
family to leave.
Sharansky strikes a jaunty pose,
before his only public appearance
Temple Adath Yeshurun.
BUT FROM ALL my ex
perience, I know the most im-
portant thing is not to
demonstrate that you are
weak or vulnerable to their
blackmail and so I continued to
do what I was doing."
Sharansky's wife had been in
Israel since 1974. They had
known each other for eight
months and decided to get
married. The day after their
marriage, Avital left for
Israel. For the next 12 years
she was separated from her
husband.
Sharansky explains why he
encouraged the separation.
"When we met I was already a
refusenik," he says. "I didn't
want her to get refused. And it
was such an optimistic mo-
ment, I insisted she apply
separately. At this time we
tried to register our marriage
officially in Soviet offices and I
was already known as a
troublemaker. They gave her a
visa and didn't let us register
our marriage. Then, at the last
accommodating photographers
in Miami on Monday night at
moment, we succeeded to have
a marriage with a rabbi in a
chupah. So on July 4. 1974, we
had chupah and the fifth (of Ju-
ly) she left."
When Sharansky arrived in
Israel he found that his wife
had become religiously obser-
vant. While Avital was
fighting for her husband's
release from the Soviet Union
a fight that Sharansky now
points out was stronger than
Soviet officials would have
predicted she was joined in
her struggle by religious
Zionist movements and was in-
fluenced, he explains, by some
of the greatest Zionist
spiritual leaders.
The change his wife made
from knowing little about her
religion as did most Soviet
Jews to becoming tradi-
tional in her observance, is a
change Sharansky Bays is
working in their marriage
"because we respect one
another. And of course, if she
wants to keep a kosher house 1
help her. But as you see, 1
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n't have a kippah (skull cap)
so on. We have the same
I and the same belief but
fh of us has his own way."
ETTING REUNITED
er the years of separation
i not as difficult, Sharansky
lerves. because even in
^ration a spiritual relation-
had been maintained.
e were in the midst of a
Ugle and knew all the time
ft we were struggling
ether. It helped me to sur-
. definitely even though for
there was no informa-
aTihat's why we've never
a feeling that (they were)
; years..
|of course, we found out
i of us has quite a different
erience and knowledge and
rotations. But if you have
and respect, it's not dif-
ilt to overcome."
he one thing they had in
jimon. was they were
png the wave of Soviet
ts to become Zionists, and
Inism. Sharansky says,
\e before Judaism.
[ike many Jews, Sharansky
i he never felt comfortable
khe Soviet system "where
[state decides for you what
[must think, what you must
, what you must write.
felt anti-Semitism from
childhood. But then, as
by other Soviet Jews, I saw
[solution of my problem on-
i assimilation.
\nd then, when 1967 came,
link it was a turning point
I Soviet Jewry," Sharansky
f, referring to the Six-Day-
in Israel. "Suddenly we
lized that there is a state
ch is struggling not only
| its own independence but
dignity.
THE VICTORY OF Israel
bhow changed the at-
|phere of the Soviet Union
anti-Semites started
Jews with more
ct, maybe some hatred,
|more respect. And so we
realizing that we have
her fate, we have a choice
his country, we are not
ned to live like slaves in
|Soviet Union. So we first
ne Zionists and then we
ne Jewish. You will see
first people who were
ggling to leave the Soviet
i were all ardent Zionists.
though none of them
anything about Hebrew
[the Jewish culture, they
K all going to Israel.
Pd it is a Jewish instinct
[made the Jew less willing
ept the Soviet lifestyle,
intends. "Because Jews,
pe time, even if they're not
I'cal dissidents, try to
My initiative all the time,
fher it g economical or
M initiative, but all in-
lve is punishable in the
ft Union.
Mre was a distinct key to
'.Political, if not sheer
cal survival during his
went days. First, people
f willing to publicly say,
Lwey didn't want to live in
povet Union. But that was
enough, he says.
pm the very first mo-
Mhey found strong sup-
rm ^e world Jewry and
2'ng the unofficial
\mu-' knew how imPr-
r this everyday contact
the world Jewry was. If
lldf ,mLoment tne KGB
L. 7 that I was not at the
ot attention, that today
iSSsappear for a month
r*dy m the West would
' ll' I would never have
been able to work one day as
the spokesman. We know
many cases when some
unknown dissidents from the
Ukraine, Lithuania starts
his activity and he is at a stage
where he is still unknown and
the KGB stops it right away."
And once Sharansky became
involved he was in over his
head.
"When you ride on a tiger,
the more dangerous it is to
stop. If you are already in such
a risky situation the best that
you can do is to continue."
AS A CHILD, Sharansky
got excellent grades in school
and was a chess champion. He
recalls at the time that he did
not have a desire to be a leader
but that he "simply felt myself
uncomfortable with this non-
initiative system and I was
looking for ways to display my
individuality."
He thought he would grow
up to become a chess champion
or a mathematician or so-
meone in the science field.
"Reading books was my one
passion and exact science,
chess, logic, was the other. If
somebody said that my career
would be through the KGB
prison, I would really be
shocked."
In prison, Sharansky main-
tained his rights, staging
hunger strikes, including one
that lasted 110 days. He ad-
mits he didn't want to really
die. Then again, he said he
came awfully close to death
"but I simply understood there
was no choice; that I don't
want to come back just to
come back to that life which I
lived before. And to continue
living a free person I'd have to
insist on the right demands.
"I wanted to live but as a
free person," states Sharan-
sky, who was tried on charges
of treason and anti-Soviet
agitation and propaganda. "I
mean, even in prison you can
live as a free person and even
out of prison you can live a
non-free person. I tried to ex-
plain that in my book."
SHARANSKY'S recollec-
tions for that book will not be
based on any notes he had
taken while imprisoned; "all
that you write or are found
writing from time to time is
confiscated," he explains.
He left prison only with his
psalm book, which, on his visit
to Miami this week, he pulled
out of his coat pocket to
display. His wife had sent it to
Friday, October 80, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
him from Israel shortly before
his arrest. And even for that,
he had to fight.
"Only after a big struggle
did they let me take it. I laid on
the snow and said I wouldn't
go to the airport unless they
gave it to me."
The airport is where Sharan-
sky was taken by surprise in
February of 1986. Without
telling him where he was go-
ing, Soviet prison officials,
nine years into his 13-year
sentence, walked into his cell
and said, 'Sharansky, you're
going to interrogation.'
Instead, he was taken to a
waiting airplane. He knew
something was amiss when he
noticed the plane had about
100 unfilled seats. Yet, it took
off with only him and four
KGB men aboard.
Two hours had passed and
Sharansky says he knew they
had crossed the Soviet border.
Then, he was told: "I have to
inform you that there is a
special decision by the
Supreme Soviet of the Soviet
Union that for bad behavior
you are deprived of Soviet
citizenship."
Sharansky hardly felt at a
loss.
"Of course I was excited,
and afraid to believe it. And so
I said to him. "After 13 years
after I asked you to deprive me
of Soviet citizenship, you final-
ly did it,' and secondly, I used
this opportunity once again to
say that I was not a spy, that
all my activity was in the in-
terest of those Soviet Jews
who wanted to leave."
NOW, Sharansky concludes,
the struggle for "release of
our people is at an important
crossroad.
"On one hand we have a
Soviet leader who knows he
needs to reach as soon as possi-
ble cooperation with the West
on economic, scientific and
arms questions. He
understands the power of the
human rights issue. He
understands he must present a
new image.
"On the other hand, this
leader understands very well
how to speak to the West and
he's succeeded to convince
everybody that he is making
very serious changes in human
rights and the Soviet Jewry
question."
But the reality, says Sharan-
Continued on Page 10-B
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Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 30,1987
Community Corner
The opening session of the Forte Forum will be held
Nov. 3 with Elsie Rubin discussing: "The Amazing
Adventures of the Jewish People," by Max I. Dimont.
The opening session is dedicated to the memory of
Sophie Primak, who, for 20 consecutive years, opened
the Forter Forum.
On Saturday eve, Oct. 31 the "Singles for ARMDI"
will hold Halloween Party at the Harbour House North
Building Auditorium. The dance will be from 8 p.m. until
midnight. For information, 864-2251.
Six courses will be offered this semester for parents
of Hebrew Academy students covering such varies
topics as Jewish Medical Ethics, Yiddish, Hebrew
Language (Ulpan), Israeli Folk Dance, Talmud and Art
Appreciation. The semester begins Tuesday, Nov. 3.
For information, 531-0422.
Jacob and Ruth Cohen will celebrate their 50th
Golden Wedding anniversary at late Friday Night Ser-
vices, Oct. 30 at 8:15 p.m. at The Aventura Jewish
Center. Mr. and Mrs. Cohen are this years Israel Bond
Honorees for Aventura. Mr. Cohen is The President of
The Aventura Jewish Center. Ruth Cohen is an active
leader of the Sisterhood and Congregation.
The towering Biblical figure of the prophet Elijah will
be the first personality dicussed in the series "Spiritual
Giants of the Past," a cultural series beginning its fifth
year, on Wednesday, Nov. 4, at 10:30 a.m., at the Miami
Beach Public Library, 2100 Collins Ave., Miami Beach.
The The Parent Network of Beth Torah Congregation
Schools will sponsor a Chanukah Boutique on Wednes-
day, Nov. 4 from 6:30-9 p.m. A Puppet Show featuring
"Moon Dance Productions" will be held at 7 p.m. for
children two years and up. For information, 949-2481.
The University of Miami Judaic Studies program will
present a Jewish Film Festival, starting Nov. 3 with the
film "Mirele Efros," in Yiddish, with English subtitles,
at 7:30 p.m. in Beaumont Cinema, Coral Gables
Campus.
Dr. Ephrain Stern of Hebrew University of Jerusalem
will speak on "The Persian Period in Palestine" at 8
p.m. Nov. 3 at the University of Miami Lowe Art
Museum.
University of Miami law professor Bruce Winick will
speak on "The Right to Refuse Treatment. First
Amendment Limits on Mental Health Treatment," on
Nov. 4 at 7 p.m. in Room 112 of the School of Law. and
on "Substantive Due Process Treatment" at 7 p.m.
Nov 11 at the same time and location. The talks are
part of the faculty lecture series on the bicentennial
reflections on the Constitution of the United States
and are open to the public free of charge.
Baker Observant Of Kashrut and Sabbat]
Pepper Honored
In Absentia
ByCHKRYLKANE
The Florida Trade Union
Council for Histadrut honored
Congressman Claude Pepper
in its first dinner in association
with the Florida AFL-CIO and
the Israel Histadrut Campaign
of South Florida.
Due to a minor illness, Pep-
per was unable to attend the
dinner at the Sheraton Bal
Harbour on Sunday, Oct. 25.
In his stead, Miami Beach
Mayor Alex Daoud accepted
the Council's Menorah Award
on behalf of the congressman.
The plaque was etched with
the inscription, "Don't desert
me in my old age," a reference
to Pepper's history as a cham-
pion of the elderly.
"Pepper is not only a great
friend of labor and working
people, but also a great friend
of Israel." said Daniel Bloch,
minister for Labor Affairs for
the Embassy of Israel in
Washington, D.C. in his
remarks. "Israel has always
cherished special friendships
vr\ by the American labor
movement. It is a model and a
guiding light to developing
trade movements around the
world."
Daoud presented Daniel J.
Miller, president of the Florida
AFL-CIO, with a proclamation
declaring the previous Friday,
Oct. 23, "Florida Trade Union
Council for Histadrut Day" in
Miami Beach.
Also in attendance were
Lenore Miller, president of the
Retail, Wholesale and Depart-
ment Store Union; Ehezer
Rafaeli, executive vice presi-
dent of the National Commit-
tee for Labor Israel-Histadrut;
and Elliott Engelmbaum, ex-
ecutive director of the Israel
Histadrut Campaign of South
Florida.
Proceeds from the event will
be allocated to schools in the
Amal School Network, the
vocational and technical high
schools in Israel
Continued from Page 1-B
observance of Sabbath laws.
"In my business and my
house nobody does any work
on shabbas," she says. "I con-
sider myself a shomer shabbas
in the very meaning of the
word since I am a Sabbath
observer the way the bible
specifies in Isaiah, Chapter 58,
Verse 13."
Martinez herself is not
Jewish. But she says she is
every bit as observant as her
Jewish clientele who observe
the Sabbath. Martinez and her
husband Julio, who runs their
other bakery on Miami Beach,
are Seventh-day Adventists.
"Sabbath for the Seventh-
day Adventist is exactly like
for Jewish from sunset Friday
to sunset Saturday. We cook
all our food before sunset Fri-
day and, on Saturday, we don't
turn on the radio or TV. We
don't read newspapers. We on-
ly read religious writing on the
sabbath."
Martinez was raised by a
Jewish family, brought into
business by that family, and
keeps her business strictly
kosher not only because her
own religion observes dietary
laws similar to kashrut but
because her clients want high
standards of kashrut.
Martinez was willing to meet
the standards of one of the
strictest kashrut supervisory
agencies, Star K. And she has
done that well.
"Abraham's is strictly
kosher and we're very
satisfied with the way they
follow our guidelines," said
Rabbi Zvi Rosenbaum, who in-
spects about 30 businesses for
Star K.
About five of the businesses
on his local route are owned by
non-Jews, Rosenbaum says.
"There is no problem what-
soever with a non-Jew owning
a kosher food business so long
as proper supervision of the
production of the food is in-
sured." said Rabbi Yaakov
Sprung, director of the Florida
region for Star K.
The pastries at
Abraham's,' Sprung say.-.
mst as kosher as pastries
in a bakery run by an Orthod
Jew
Let's lace it." said Rabbi
David Lehrfield, of Young
Israel of Greater Miami. "m<
businesses that have (kosher
supervision) are run bj non-
Jews." Heinz products are one
example, says Lehrfield. And
then, he notes, there are non-
Jewish airlines employing non-
Jewish stewardesses who
serve kosher food; restaurants
that serve kosher food that are
not owned by Jews; and many
food manufacturing businesses
that employ kosher labels but
are not owned by Jews.
Rabbi Max Lipschitz, presi-
dent of the North Dade Kosher
Supervisory Board, said about
the only business that usually
requires a Jew always present
is a butcher because he is cut-
ting meat. But many products,
including detergents and
wines that are sanctioned by
kashrut boards are owned by
non-Jews. Lipschitz agrees.
At one point, Lipschitz's
agency supervised a bakery
that non-Jewish owners had
Iwiught from Jewish owners.
"We went there every day and
checked the ingredients. They
didn't bring in anything that
was non-kosher."
Sprung calls Martinez an
"impeccable person," and her
bakery "as kosher as any other
bakery in the world.
"She conforms to a kashrus
organization as accepted and
accepted more so than virtual-
ly any other kashrus organiza-
tion in the world."
Martinez started buying
kosher ingredients for a
bakery she managed.
"Seventh-day Adventists
don't have kashrut but they
don't eat pork. They only eat
food that is specified in the bi-
ble as clean,' she explains.
Then, when she got her own
business, a kosher food inspec-
tor noticed her religious signs
in the window and recognized
the couple from the kosher
bakery they had formerly
managed on Miami Beach.
"He asked to see our licence
and told us we were missing
the kosher licence. He told us
to sign an application for a
kosher license and look for a
rabbi to supervise us. They
came one night and worked
with the bakery to make
everything kosher."
Martinez says she made the
decision to become strictly
kosher, because even though
she was using kosher ingre-
dients, some of her customers
wanted her to have the conti-
nuing strict supervision that
results in certification by a
reputable kashrut agency.
Martinez says she and her
husband became more
religious after living under
Cuba's communist system. In
many ways, the Martinez's ex-
periences in Cuba parallel the
punishment that is faced by
Soviet Jews who try to
emigrate from Russia.
Martinez was born on a farm
but when she was a young girl
her parents sent her to live
with, and work for, a Jewish
couple because they wanted
her to have a better life and
education living in the city.
Martinez eventually married
Julio, who owned a small
grocery store. In 1968, Cuban
dictator Fidel Castro, having
come into power, national!/.
their business. And her hus-
band, who had made about
$1,000 a month in his store.
was allowed to stay on as a
worker earning approximately
$72 a month.
When they applied for im-
migration visas to leave the
country, Julio lost his job. At
one point, he was sent to labor
in the sugar cane fields making
$15 for three months' work.
As the matriarch of the fami-
ly, Martinez used her ingenui-
ty to make ends meet. She
took the small allocation of
meat the family was rationed
and instead of eating it, made
it into croquettes to sell. As a
dressmaker, she also did some
sewing.
At one point, Martinez says
she was almost arrested for
wondering aloud how her baby
would have food to eat. She
cries when she reflects on
those days. After that. I was
very religious,'' she says. She
and Julio do not smoke or
drink coffee or any alcoholic
beverages. They do not dJ I
wat= ^ 4ft
A sister in Miami borrows
money to finally help pa?
way out of Cuba.
When the Martinez's J
their two children came to
South Florida, they S3
tact with the Jewish 2
who had raised her. Thevinl
vited the Martinez's to manani
one of their businesses in ?Z
to Rico. But the Martinez,
were told they would have to
552e*hB SatUrday' *
"I felt very bad because B
was very thankful to them but
I decided my religion and my|
God should come first," Marl
tinez maintains.
They went to Chicago where!
they were told they would!
have a better chance of finding!
work. Julio worked and his|
wife spent every day in acli
learning to speak English.
Three years later, the
Jewish man who had
her came to Chicago and l.
them to return to Miami tonal
a bakery he opened on Miami!
Beach Friedman'?. The!
Martinez's were told the!
bakery would be closed oil
Saturday. Eventually the!
bakery was sold and the:
owners continued to emploj|
the Martinez family. But
day came when the Martineu|
pursued their dream and op
ed their own business. It i
July of 1974 when they open
Abraham's bakery in the'
block of Collins Avenue.
She remembers that
were proud, but "filled
faith that God would help us."|
Their store did prosper i
they recently bought
former Paramount Bakery i
North Miami Beac
Abraham's II was openedi
Martinez does cveryti
there from bobb-j
the actual baking.
Although M
enjoy vc Iamd
ing," she anot'
dream.
"I've alwi
heart to
idential h
lv and that'
to make moi
Meanwhile -
to the 9
are coming
cakes and
Martinez is Wf
she is not
own Sabbat': |
"Everything is n
explains! "Thursday nigM-'
cooking and cleaning
done."
Sharansky
Continued from PBe
sky, is that while more"
"Soviet refuseniks are
being allowed ,0I,e'"*B
from the Soviet InjM
unknown Jews to appD
more difficult than ever.
"What's worse WjJ
Sharansky worn**. Js/L
solidarity is weakeneajg
too many people "
(Soviet loader MikhaiD
bachev. T- $
believe '" "" f
him."
. -. .- .:: :


Friday, October 30, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
From left: Jennie Solo and Myrna Fistel.
Adult B'not Mitzvah Marks 30-Year Friendship
Jennie Solo and Myrna
fistel, friends for 30 years,
be called to the Torah as
J'not Mitzvah at Temple
Bamu-el/Or Olom in West Ken-
Pall, on Saturday, Oct. 31.
Sharing the celebration are
's children, all of whom
in- Bar and Bat Mitzvah
t Temple Or Olom, and Jennie
Solo's son and daughter, who
were both graduated from
Temple Or Olom's Religious
Sschool.
Fistel, a teacher of the learn-
ing disabled at Chapman
Elementary School in Naranja,
and Solo, a member of Temple
Samu-el/Or Olom's board of
directors and officer of the
Sisterhood, are the first adult
B'not Mitzvah at the temple,
which was formed from
Temples Samu-el and Or Olom
in June of 1986.
After the women become
B'not Mitzvah, they will be
eligible to be called to the
Torah, as it is the temple's
policy to count women in a
minyan.
B'nai Mitzvah
Michelle Billig
MICHELLE BILLIG
[Michelle Billig, daughter of
r. and Mrs. Robert Billig,
elebrated her Bat Mitzvah on
tt. 23 at Beth Torah con-
jugation in North Miami
leach. She shared the
eremony with her Soviet
kin, Dina Lukatsky.
[Michelle is an eighth grader
t Highland Oaks Junior High
jchool, and a student at Beth
h's Judaica High School
_Tam. She has been a
ember of Beth Torah's choir
r the past six years, and par-
Ryan David Brill
ticipated in the Choir's Tour to
Irael. Michelle is active in Beth
Torah's Youth program,
where she serves as president
of Kadima.
Michelle is the grand-
daughter of Rabbi and Mrs.
Rubin Dobin and Mrs. Lucy
Billig. Her parents are actively
involved in Miami's Jewish
community. Mr. Billig is cur-
rently serving as the president
of Beth Torah Congregation.
RYAN DAVID BRILL
Ryan David Brill, son of Mr.
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
"Lift up now thne eyes, and look for all the land which
tlm mm*, to thee will I give it, and to thy setdfor ever"
(Genesis 1S.U-15).
LEKH LEKHA
UKH LEKHA At the command of God, Abram left Haran
wd journeyed to Canaan. There God appeared to him and said:
Into thy seed will I give this land" (Genesis 12.7). There was a
lamine ln the land of Canaan, and Abram took his household to
"HT/pt. On his return, he and his nephew Lot separated peaceably,
wt choosing to settle in the plain of Sodom. In the battles bet-
ween the northern kings and those of the plain of Sodom, Lot was
aptured. Learning of his nephew's plight, Abram armed his
*JJ> and pursued Lot's captors. He defeated them and
*j*ued his nephew and the other captives from Sodom. God
jJJMe a covenant with Abram to give him and his seed after him
i land of Canaan ("The Covenant between the Parts"). When
hand"1 S W^e ***"" Mw t*lat she was barren sne 8ve HaKar- ner
wi n'den' to Abram ** wu?e- Hagar bore Abram a son, who
to Ah w Ishmael- At God's command, Abram changed his name
L .k and nis wife's name to Sarah. He was circumcized,
"W>er with all the males of his household.
upon* fco"n,ln0 of ,h* Weekly Portion of the Law Is extracted end based
Tum,. ,' Pn|c H|story o( the Jewish Heritage," edited by P Wollman
Ln nl,5'Punished by Shengold The volume Is available at 75 Maiden
1itri'hui!W N Y 10038. Joseph Schlang Is president of the society
u,ln0 the volume.)
and Mrs. Luis Brill, will be call-
ed to the Torah as Bar Mitzvah
on Saturday, at 10:30 a.m. at
Temple Emanu-El, Miami
Beach.
The celebrant is a student in
the Lehrman Day School. He is
in the eighth grade.
Ryan enjoys tennis, baseball,
football and basketball.
Mr. and Mrs. Brill will host a
Kiddush following the services
in honor of the occasion at
Temple Emanu-El and a recep-
tion at the Sheraton Bal Har-
bour. Out-of-town relatives
will include Irving and Hilda
Shechter, and Debbie and
Barry Shechter, from Jew
Jersey; and Ivan and Gerald
Saks, from Texas, and Mr. and
Mrs. Arnold Gewirtz from
N.Y.
JONATHAN LEVINE
Jonathan Adam Levine, son
of Jeffrey and Sue Levine will
be called to the Torah as Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday, at Adath
Yeshurun Synagogue, North
Miami Beach.
The celebrant is a student in
the Adath Yeshurun Religious
School. Jonathan attends
Highland Oaks Junior High
School where he is in the
eighth grade. Jonathan is a
star pitcher and all-star all-
around baseball player. His op-
timist team won the champion-
ship this year.
Mr and Mrs. Jeffrey Levine
will host the Kiddush following
the services in honor of the
occasion.
Special guests will include:
Sisters Michelle and Sharyse,
brother, Darren, grandparents
Marvin Levine, Lee and Mor-
ris Narzamsky, Uncle Paul
Levine, aunt and uncle Phyllis
and Leslie Seifter, Aunt Ruth
Schneider, Cousins Steven
Seifter, Sharon Seifter, War-
ren and Jackie Seifter, Aunt
May, and great-great Aunt
Ted who will be celebrating
her 90th birthday.
Rabbi Simcha Freedman and
Cantor Zvi Rozen will
officiate.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
5:21 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach, Fla. 531-2120
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor: Zvl Rozen Conservative
Executive Director
Harry J. Silverman (8h
Dally minyan 7:30 a.m. and S p.m.
Sal. 5:30 p.m
Bar Mltnah Jonathan Lamna
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 667-6667
Leonard Schoolman, Sr. Rabbi
Mark Kram, Associate Rabbi
Lynn Goldstein, Assistant Rabbi
Frl a 15 p.m. Rabbi Mark Kram spaak
on "Galling To Know Mo Part II."
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854-3911
Jack Riemer, Rabbi
Robert Albert, ,
Cantor (VI
Raw. Milton Freeman, w*
Ritual Director
Dally aorv. Sun. t a.m. 4 S:30 p.m.
Mon. a Tum. 7:30 a.m. a 5 JO p.m
Wad 7:16 a.m. M p.m.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave Miami Beach
534-7213 534-7214
Barry J. Konovitch. Rabbi / JBV,
Serqlo Groblaf, President \%f
Sholem Epelbaum. President,
Religious Committee
(f)
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Assistant Rabbi Ronnie Cahan
Yehuda Shilman, Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
Kabbalat Shabbat 6 p.m Sat. S a.m.
Dr. Irving Lahrman will praach
Cantor Yahuda Shilman will chani
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive, Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schitt
Dally 7:30 a.m. (Mon. i Thunj. 7:15) I 7 p.m.
Frl. 7 p.m Sat. 9 a.m. Raaarv lor High Holiday
Daya.
)
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami, FL 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs, Rabbi ^^
Dr. Joseph A. Gorfinkel. /
Rabbi Emeritus \,
Moshe Friedler. Cantor
Frl. S p.m
Sat. (:45 am
Waokday aarv Mon Frl. a.m.
Mon -Thura 5 p.m. Sun. 1:30 am
Sit 8 *> m
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jatfarson Ave.. M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Aivadia Rosenberg
Cantor Moshe Buryn
Dally aarvtoaa 6 am S 7 p.m.
Sal. 6:15 am
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
238-2601 '
Rabbi David H. Auerbach \
Cantor Stephen Freedman
Friday vn aonrtcaa 0 p.m.
Saturday aarvlcoa 9 30 a.m
Bar Mltnah D.m.t P.t Finn.
TEMPLE BETH 5H6L6M 538-7231
Chase Ave.* 41 at St. ubam
OH LEON KRONISH, Sartor Founding Rabbi
OARY A. QLICKSTEIN. Senior Rabbi
HARRY JOLT, HyiiBUni Rabbi
JASON OWASOOFF, taalatanl Rabbi
IAN ALPERN, Cantor
OAVID CONVISER, Canter Emarttui
DFNNi* J RICE. FT A Eacutla Director
Frl. i-i5 p.m Rabbi JaaonQwatdoll
will tpoaa on "In OuI Qt An Ideal."
BETH T JRAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd. ^-.
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz. Rabbi fV)
Zvee Aroni, Cantor x3.
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Dally aonrlcaa Monday through Friday
7:30 a.m and 5.30p.m.
Saturday 8 2S a.m with Bar Mltnah ol
Ira Cohan and mlncha 6 15 p.m
Sunday aarvlcat 8 a.m and 5:30 p.m.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
MJani/'a Ptonaar ftatorm Congregation
137 N.E. 19th St. Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob G. Bornsteln
Frl. S p.m
Downtown: Rabbi Ran 0. Parlmatar
will apaak on "No Quna Allowad."
Liturgy win ba oonductad by Cantor
Rachalla F. Nalaon
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667-5657
Michael B. Eisenstat, Rabbi
Succoth aarv. Frl a 15 p.m. Slmchat Torah
Oct. 14 S p.m Oct. 16 10 a.m
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Roae
Shoshanah Raab, Cantor
Saretoaa Frl. 7:J0 p.m
Sat. 9:30 a.m.
Onag Shabbat will loMow
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz ^>
Ari Fridkis, Assoc Rabbi (Vb)
Cantor Murray Yavneh *X
Sat. S a.m. sabbath aarvtoe.
Dally Mlnchah Sunday Friday
8a. m and 8pm
Sat. lam and 5:15 p.m
TEMPLE NER TAMID
7902 Carlyle Ave.,
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Cantor Edward Klein
866-8345
866-9833
Conaarvaliva
)
Dally Sary Mon. Frl. S a.m 8 JO p m
Sat. Mlncha 815 p.m. Sun. 8 30 am
6:30 p.m. Sat: 6:46 a.m. aarv by Rabbi Labovitz.
Cantor Kiam
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung
SHAARE TEFILLAH
TORAH CENTER OF KENDALL
7880 SW112 Street
232-6833
Rabbi Hershel Becker
Dally San. 7 a.m. Frl. 10 mln. altar candta
lightinglima Shabboa(am Shabboa
Mlncha 10 man. before candla lighting lima
Sun 6:30 a.m. ______
w
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dade's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kingsley, Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
Frl. 6 p.m and Sat. 10:30 am
Pulpit Ouaat: Rabbi Samual Rothbarg.
SanricM chanlad by Jodl Dom
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
2712311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi (
Benjamin Adler, Cantor '
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Minyan 7 am. Mondays and Thuradayt.
Sun. 9 a.m. Friday 8.15p.m.t
Dr Norman Shapiro conducting
Cantor Benjamin Adlar chanting liturgy
Sal 9am



Pag 12-B TW fcgfci FtoridMnffriday, OctobTSO, 1967
J7arnf Kotkin, Miami Jeweler
Deaths

.-.
Jordan Taxon, N. Miami Beach Rabbi SS^S^18-**
Funeral
Harry Kotkin, a well-known
jeweler in the Miami area, pas-
ed away October 27. He was
87. Kotkin was a pioneer Mia-
Alvin Richter
Alvin Richter. well-known
jeweler and pioneer family
scion, died of cancer at his
Miami Beach home last Fri-
day. He was 73.
Mr. Richter. his late father
Joseph, and brother Daniel
were among the establishment
downtown business communi-
ty from the time they opened a
pawn shop in the original
Halycon Arcade now the
Dupont Building. With the
establishment of that first
jewelry store in Miami along
Flagler Street, the Richter
family became part of the
fledgling town's business core.
Since 1970. Alvin Richter
was the family business' sole
owner, having bought out his
brother's share. In addition to
his career as a jewelry broker,
Mr. Richter was a hotel and
real estate broker.
A Michigan native, Mr.
Richter was graduated from
Miami High School *and the
University of Florida at
Gainesville.
Mr. Richter leaves his wife,
Norma, his brother Daniel and
four sons: Robert Scott, Keith,
Reed and Jon. Services were
held at Temple Israel of
Greater Miami with Riverside
having handled the
arrangements.
mian. having come here in
1917 from New York City.
Kotkin, a resident of Miami
Beach, was a member of B'nai
B'rith and Temple
Zion/Israelite Center. He is
survived by his wife, Gertrude,
and his children, Jack Kotkin
of Miami, Rosalie (Merle) Sidle
of Palm Beach Gardens, and
Florice Weiner of Miami. He
also leaves his brothers Mike
of Miami and Max of Ft.
Lauderdale. and sister Bernice
Saphin of Miami, along with
grandchildren Marcia. Mark.
Rhonda, Stacy. Ross and Jill,
and great-grandchilden
Michele. Marissa. Mitchell and
Haldon.
Interment was held at Mt.
Nebo cemetery.
NOVICK, Jot* "f Miami Beach. October
25. Rubin Zilbert.
K1ERMAN. Pauline. 77. of Miami. October
26.
KATZMAN. Esther. 70, of North Miami
Beach, October 25. Levitt-Weinstein.
SALINGER. Harriet S., 87, of Miami
Beach. October 25. No services will be
held.
BALSAM. EtU. 100, of Miami. October 26.
The Riverside North Miami Beach.
BURROWS, Roslyn (Roz). mother of Ruth
Shack and David Burrows, Oct. 21. No
memorial service.
GOLDMAN. Charles. 86, of Bay Harbor
Islands. Oct. 21. Burial in New York.
LOTOW. Norman P., 57, of Miami. Oct. 22.
FRIEDLANDER. Lillian. 84. of Miami. Oct.
20. Riverside. Interment at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
GRODSKY. Hattie, of Miami Beach. Oct.
21. Eternal Light. Interment at Lakeside
Memorial Park.
JACOBS, Gertrude (Paloger), Oct. 16. Ser-
vices in New York.
SILVERBERG. Frieda, 86, of Miami, Oct.
20. Interment at Star of David Memorial
Park
I.H.N 54.M622
WMIGmwfbMM.
Oak Park. MichiKan 4KB7
Hebrew Memorial Chapel
of Greater Detroit
Efficient. Reliable. Traditional
with
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SPECIAI LIMITED PRE-NEED OFFER
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$1,595
I akr*iJ< Memorial Park and Eternal Light Funeral Director* are proud (o
.ponv.r this unique program which combine* ownership of a plot at our
hrautiful Memorial Park and a plan for pre-paid funeral srrvicr*.
Thi exceptional value assures that your one call will put vou in touch with
the people who helietr there i* nothing dignified ahout paving more for a
traditional Jewish funeral that vou har eo.
HERE IS WHAT WE INCLUDE:
Hi prPHKiAl 1 Late?
#uSc..... Prompt Tranafer from Place of Death Care and Preparation of Defeated Casket and Hearse Arrangement Direction of Oeaveaidr Service* Permits and Benefit Assistance 24 hour emergency ser*kc S'iva Candle*. Card* and Benches ('ravrsite Paved Private Visitation Path Steel Reinforced Concrete Vault Opening and Closing of Crave Prrprtual Oratesites Care No maintenance or *er* ice fee* A Jcwith Tradition ince lSS
TOTAL: $1,595 No Interest Payment Plans Available For complete information on our plot and funeral sjrHn package plan call vour Lakeside Eternal Light representative today. In time of nerd, one call > ill handle all the driaiU DADE: BROWARD: 592-0690 525-9339
Rabbi Jordan I. Taxon of
North Miami Beach passed
away October 26. He was 70.
Taxon was a member of the
Rabbinical Assembly of
America, Jewish War
Veterans. Harmony Lodge,
No. 2463 B'nai B'rith, Chicago
Board of Rabbis, New York
Board of Rabbis, Greater
Carolina Association of Rabbis
and the Association of Retired
Rabbis of South Florida. He
was a member of Beth Torah
Congregation and Young
Israel of Greater Miami.
Taxon is survived bv his
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every DayClosed Sabbalh
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888
services were held
wife, Gloria, son Morse, and at Levitt-Weinstein, and inter
daughters Janet Grable and ment at Lakeside Memorial
Naomi Litchman, as well as his Park.
KdX Gordon, 19, formerly of Dania and
Bom Rai.m. October 18. BtrvioM in New
York.
GREENBERG, Loom, M, of North Miami
Beach. October 21. Riverside.
ORSHAN, Nathan, of Bay Harbor Island.
Kternal Light.
RUBIN, Bernard. tW. .if Miami Beach. ()c-
tobar 81 BlMParg, Interment at Lakeside
Memorial Park.
SALTIBL, Ralph, 64. of North
MiamiBeach. October 28. Levitt-
Weinstein. Interment at Star of David.
BERCER. Max. of Miami Beach Rubin
Zilbert.
ROBERTS. Louis, of Bav Harbor Islands.
Rubin Zilbert
ROSENBLUlf. Goldye. of Miami Beach
Rubin-Zilbert
ROTHENBERC. Flora, of North Miami
Beach. October 24. Services private.
LERNER. Anna. 89, of Miami Beach. Oc-
tober 23. Rubin-Zilbert. Burial was in New
York.
ROMANER. Betty, 65. of North Miami
Beach, October 25. Riverside.
WOFL. Sol, 69, of Miami. October 26 Inter-
ment at Lakeside Memorial Park.
Business Notes
Elliot S. Schantz, was hired
as the first comptroller for the
Southeastern College of
Osteopathic Medicine.
Schantz, 44. will direct all
financial affairs for the North
Miami Beach medical school
and its affiliate institution, the
Southeastern College of Phar-
maceutical Sciences.
Billie Kern, a sales associate
with The Keyes Company
Realtors for the past 17 years,
has been named Civic Leaguer
of the Year by the Miami
Beach Civic League.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service
Dado County
Brow.ird ( ounlv
M2 urn
KeprVflenterl \.\ Kiwrsi.ic Memorial Oia| lm
New YtM&:<718) 263-7600 (jueemiBlvd &7KthKd rW.tHill.N.\
How do you find out
about advance
funeral planning?
Turn to us, turn to
RIVERSIDE
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FOR GENERATIONS A SYMBOL OF JEWISH TRADITION
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AT insurance funded pteanur :vogO", I
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of Scripture lakeside Memorial Park Upholds the tra
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lakeside... the only memorial park in the south tlxit
was created to meet the needs ofex try Jeuisb famih
Please call for a tour of
our Garden of Heroes, an
innovation in ahoiv-ground
burial modeled after the
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103O1NW 25th Street
Miami, Florida 33172
Dade(305)592-0690
Broward (Mm 525-9339
W
Lakeside. ,
IJJ1UJ*
IHHB
MMMBM


FORECLOSURE SALES-
PUBLIC NOTICES
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Cm* No. 87-41190-FC-12
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
FLORA A. GRAHAM
Petitioner
and
SILAS GRAHAM
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Silas Graham.
residence unknown
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-44255 (27)
IN RE: The Marriage of-
ROSE MARIE WARE.
Petitioner,
and
BILLY J. WARE.
Respondent.
TO: BILLY J. WARE
Residence Unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage upon: ANTHONY
CARBONE, PA.. 612 N.W. 12th
Avenue, Miami. Florida 88186
yOU ARE NOTIFIED that an and file original with the Clerk of
Ktjon for dissolution of marriage the Court on or before November
and to take your real property has 20. 1987. otherwise a default will
been filed against you and you are be entered.
required to serve a copy of your October 13. 198".
written defenses upon: I.J.
GRAFF ESQ. attorney for Peti-
whose address is 633 N.E.
1(7 St N.M.B. Florida 33162 on
or before November 6th. 1987 and
file the original with the clerk of
this court otherwise a default will
be entered against you. The real
property located in Dade County,
Fl. is described as Lot 12. 1st add'n
10 Monnah Park. PB 33 P 9
records of Dade County (covers
both a Homestead and adjoining
vacant lot).
fifed September 30. 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
-k of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
October 9, 16.23.30,1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By: Jennis L. Russell
18050 October 23.30;
November 6, 13. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
I that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
name PACFEL ENTER-
I PRISES, i Florida general part-
p ,ii number 1385 East 10th
Avenue, in the City of Hialeah,
Florida 88010 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
lOrcuit Court of Dade County,
Florida
. Miami. Florida, this 9th
ber, 1967.
MICHAEL FE1XNER
IRV1N I'ACHTER
|Uw Offices of Marc Postelnek.
I *
|Hv Marc Postelnek, Baq.
Attorney for Applicant
i-i''" Lincoln Road, Suite 10-B
pliant! Beach, Fl. 88139
TeU-jih..n. 105) 588 .'Jin
October 16,28,80;
November 6, 1987
IN TIIF CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
IR< I IT OF FLORIDA IN
AM) FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-38539(17)
NOTICE OF ACTION
l'EI>ERALHOME LOAN
[M"KTi Ia.;e CORPORATION.
1 Plaintiff
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87 46337 29
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
VILMA THOMPSON
and
ROY THOMPSON
TO: ROY THOMPOSON
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your wri-
teen defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street North Miami Bech, Florida
33162. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before November 30, 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FI.ORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
tins 86 day of October, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. F'lorida
By JENNIS L. RUSSELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18074 October 3li.
November 6, 13,20, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5219
Diviaion 02
Fla. Bar No. 058319
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANNA R SCHAYE
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ANNA R. SCHAYE. deceased.
File Number 87-5219 (02), is pen-
on for Foreclosure of Mortgage ^"8 in *** Circuit Court for Dade
the following described County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
F'lagler Street, Miami, FL 33130.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested person are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
"**n filed against you and you r*ctin by an interested person on
rquired to serve a copy of "horn this notice was served that
* written defenses, if any, to it, challenges the validity of the will,
wppard Faber, Attorney for tne qualifications of the personal
'"tiff, whose address is Suite representative, venue, or jurisdic-
'570 Madruga Avenue, Coral tion of tile COUTt-
Florida, 33146 on or before ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
"* 30, 1987 and file the TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
*"*> the Clerk of this FOREVER BARRED.
"efore service on Publication of this Notice has
attorney or immediately begun on October 30, 1987.
1 otherwise a default will Personal Representative:
. d "gainst you for the SHIRLEY LANS
Sliced in the complaint. 7760 Travelers Tree Drive
1NESS my hand and the seal Boca Raton. FL 83433
"J10 this 21 day of Oc- Attorney for Personal
Representative:
NELSON ft FELDMAN, P.A.
1186 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands. FL 83)54
Telephone: 666-5716
18068 October 30;
November 6,1987
PAULM MARMISH.etal..
I Defendants
|T(I PAUL M MAKMISH
WHO Mieanopy Avenue
1 oconul Grove,
rlorida 38188 '
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
"perty.
0* No 16-D of THE AR-
K TOWNHOUSE SEC-
ION III. Condominium, ac-
cording to the Declaration
Uiereof, as recorded in Of-
ficial Records Book 7648 at
Jge 275 and in Con-
dominium Plan Book 22 at
?W 5. both of the Public
>rds of Dade
Florida
County.
either
( mitred
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-6000
Division 01
IN RE:ESTATE OF
BESS K.GOLDBLATT
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of BESS K. GOLDBLATT. deceas
ed, File Number 87-6000, is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street Miami, Florida The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 30. 1987
Personal Representative:
NCNB NATIONAL BANK
OF FLORIDA and
MAURICE GOLDBLATT
9499 N.E. SECOND AVENUE
MIAMI SHORES, FL. 33138
ATT: MR. EUGENE F. MAGEE.
TRUST OFFICER
AND VICE PRESIDENT
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
LEFF. PESETSKY &
ZACK, P.A..
Samuel I. Leff, Esq.
1367 N.E. 162nd Street
No. Miami Beach. Fl. 33162
Telephone: (305) 945-7501
18071 October 30;
November 6. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-45355 FC 21
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Fla. Bar No. 0475203
IN RE: The Marriage of
ARMANDO ACANDA. JR.
Petitioner,
and
DESIREE ACANDA.
Respondent
TO: Desiree Acanda
2440 S. Hamlin
Chicago. III. 60623
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on USHER BRYN. ESQ.
The Honey Plaza. Suite M-8, 2301
Collins Ave.. Miami Beach, Fla.
33139. attorney for Petitioner, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
November 30, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 21 day of October. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN, ESQ.
The Roney Plata. Suite M-8
2301 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139
(Phone) (306) 532-1155
18063 October 30;
November 6, 13,20, 1987
\ 1987.
BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
* Deputy Clerk
,. OetoberSO-.
November 6.13. SO. 1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 46
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-69C2
SFC 14
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK, a
national banking: aeeaciatien
f/k/a ROYAL TRUST BANK.
NJU
Plaintiffs)
va.
CLAUDIA CALDBBA a/k/a
CLAUDIA MONTIEL
caldbba. rurio E.
CALDERA a/k/a FLAVIO
ENRIQUE CALDERA. and the
unknown spouses, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors.
or other parties claiming by,
through, under or against them,
etal..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami. Dade County.
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M.. on
the 16th day of November.
Dad7, the following described
property:
Condominium Parcel Number 203,
in Building Number 11, of IN-
DIAN LAKE VILLAGE II CON-
DOMINIUM, a Condominium, ac-
cording to the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof and Exhibits at-
tached thereto, as recorded in Of-
ficial Records Book 10483. at
Page 2655, and in condominium
Plan Book 79. at Page 24,
Amendment No. 1, as recorded in
Official Records Book 10493. at
Page 2058; Amendment No. 2. as
recorded n Official Records Book
10513. at Page 2291; Amendment
No. 3. as recorded in Official
Records Book 10587, at Page 65;
Amendment No. 4, as recorded in
Official Records book 10587, at
Page 77; and Amendment No. 5,
ai recorded in Official Records
Book 10775, at Page 1992, of the
Public Records of Dade County
Florida.
DATED the 28th day of Oc-
tober, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin, P.A..
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne RoulevardMiami,
Florida 33137
Published 10/30 11/6
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-3047
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
GERTRUDE WASSERMAN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of GERTRUDE WASSERMAN,
deeaasad, F'de Number 87-3047, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
DADE County, Florida. Probate
I bvision. the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street. Miami,
Florida 83180. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal reprcscn
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 30. 1987.
Personal Representative:
DIANE D. PORTER
c/o Martin W. Wasserman,
Esquire
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MARTIN W. WASSERMAN.
ESQUIRE
999 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 672-3100
18070 October 30;'
November 6. 1987
Friday, October 30, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 1S-B
personal representative's attorney when it will become due shall be
are set forth before. stated. If the claim is contingent or
All interested persons are re- unliquidated, the nature of the
quired to file with this court, uncertainty shall be stated. If the
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF claim is secured the security shall
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF be described. The claimant shall
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims deliver sufficient copies of the
against the estate and (2) any ob- claim to the clerk to enable the
jection by an interested person on 'clerk to mail one copy to each per-
whom this notice was served that sonal representative,
challenges the validity of the will. All persons interested in the
the qualifications of the personal estate to whom a copy of this
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 30, 1987.
Personal Representative:
SARAH S. WEISS
100 Lincoln Rd. Apt. 1433
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT
999 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
relephone: (806)672-8100
18067 October 30;
November*; 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 864769
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MOLLIE S. MEYER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of MOLLIE S. MEYER, deceased.
File Number 864769, is pending in
the Circuit Court for DADE Coun-
ty. Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida.
The names and addrneai of the
pawaaal representative and the
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBTE DIVISION
File Number 87-6058
Division 02
Florida Bar No. 117546
IN RE: ESTATE OF
Hyman Lazar. a/k/a
Hymen I.azar
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Hyman Lazar, a/k/a Hymen
Lazar. deceased. File Number
87-6058 (02). is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, 3rd Fl. Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
bagun on October 30. 1987.
Personal Representative:
EDWARD E. LEVINSON. ESQ.
1428 Brickell Ave., Suite 700
Miami. Florida 88181
DUBBIN, BERKMAN. GARBER.
BLOOM & MORIBER
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
By: Kenneth M. Bloom
444 Brickell Avenue. Suite 650
Miami, Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 373-3606
18075 October 30;
November 6, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5277
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOHN ROBERT PETTIGREW
a/k/a JOHN R. PETTIGREW
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of JOHN R. PET-
TIGREW, deceased, File Number
87-5277. is pending in the Circuit
Court for DADE County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street.
3rd Floor, Miami, FL 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate is CAROL KAHN PET
TIGREW. whose address is 1057
Northeast 204th Terrace, Miami.
FL 33179. The name and address
of the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the ail B not yet due, the date
a copy
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
thil Notice of Administration: Oc-
tober 28, 1987.
CARON KAHN PETTIGREW
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
JOHN ROBERT PETTIGREW
a/k/a JOHN R. PETTIGREW
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
DOUGLAS D. STRATTON. Esq.
505 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, PL 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-7772
18054 October 23.30.1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-19965
SEC. 14
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR
TGAGE ASSOCIATION, A
United States corporation,
Plaintiffls)
vs.
JANET GEBARA a/k/a JANET
CHOUTE. et al.,
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style ot
which is indicated above. 1 will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami. Dade County, F'lorida at
11:00o'clock A.M.. on the 16th day
of November. 1987, the following
described property:
Lot 6, Block 4. RANDALL PARK,
according to the Plat thereof, a*
recorded in Plat Book 53. Page 20,
of the Public Records of Dade
i ounty. Florida.
The I 'nited States of America shall
have the right of redemption pro
vided by 28 U.S.C. Sec. 2410(c) for
the period provided therein, runn
ing from the date of the Certificat.
of Title issued herein
DATED the 28th day of l v
tobar, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circait Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin. P.A..
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Published 10/30 11/6
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name LES PETITES 41ST
STREET at 738 Arthur Godfrey
Road. 41st Street. Miami Beach.
FL 33140 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida
ANA ROTHBAUM
SARA ROTHBAUM
MARIA PEREZ
EUGENE J. WEISS
Attorney for LES PETITES 41ST
STREET
18046 October 16. 23.30;
November 6. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, deeiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Tropical Storm Sport
swear at 4160 N.W. ? St No. 207
Miami, FL 38126 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida..
Tropical Storm. Inc.
18064 OetoberSO;
November 6.13.20.1987


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 30, 1987
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-46650-15
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ADELE ROSE BARON,
wife,
and
GARY BARON,
husband.
TO: Mr. Gary Baron
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if anv. to it on AR-
THUR H. LIPSON. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 801
N.E. 167 Street Miami. FL. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
December 4, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 28 day of October, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18076 October 30;
November 6,13,20,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nwber: 87-M47
Division 04 .
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BLANKA GOLDHABER,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of BLANKA
GOLDHABER, deceased, File
Number 87-5647, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagier
Street. Miami, FL 33190. The per-
sonal representative of the estate
is EMERICK KATZ, whose ad-
dress is 2401 Collins Avenue.
Miami Beach, Florida 33140. The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FDL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: Oc-
tober 23, 1987.
EMERICK KATZ
As Personal Representative
of the Eaate of
BLANKA GOLDHABER
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
EUGENE J. WEISS
407 Lincoln Road. Penthouse
N.E.,
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Telephone: (306) 534-4721
18061 October 23,30.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-46715-18
Florida Bar No. 161802
ELLIOT L. MILLER.
Plaintiff,
vs.
ALBERT CONDE. his unknown
heirs at law. legatees,
devisees or grantees.
Defendant.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
TO: Albert Conde and all
those holding thereunder.
Residency unknown.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for to
quiet title has been filed against
you for the real property described
to wit:
Lot 6 in Block 7 of Marilynda.
according to the Plat Book
thereof, recorded in Plat
Book 50 at page 32 of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
You must serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
Judith A. Frankel, Attorney for
the Plaintiff, 960 Arthur Godfrey
Road, Suite 116, Miami Beach,
Florida 33140 and file the original
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
on or before December 4, 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in the Jewish
Floridian.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
the said Court at Miami, Dade
County, Florida on October 28,
1987.
Richard P. Brinker,
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: T. CASAMAYOR
Deputy Clerk
Judith A. Frankel. Esq.
Attorney for Plaintiff
960 Arthur Godfrey Road
Suite 116
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Phone: (305) 674-1313
18078 October 30;
November 6.13,20.1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Civil Action No. 87-43669-07
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ELIZABETH ALVA CHUMAN,
Petitioner,
and
RICARDO CHUMAN.
Respondent.
TO: RICARDO CHUMAN
12107 84th Avenue
Kew Gardens, NY 11415
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on MELVIN
J. ASHER. ESQ., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 825
South Bayshore Drive, Suite 543,
Miami, FL 33131. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
November 13th. 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 7th day of October, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: John Branda
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18037 October 16, 23,30;
November 16.1987
PUBLIC NOTICE
The annual return of the Obdulia
S. De Von Bernard Charitable
Foundation Trust is available at
the address noted below for inspec
tiontJuring regular business hours.
by any citisen who so requests
within 180 days after publication
of this notice of its availability.
The Obdulia S. De Von Bernard
Charitable Foundation Trust
1110 Brick ell Avenue
Suite 700
Miami. Florida, 33131
The Foundation Manager is
I. Stanley Levine, Trustee
Publication of this Notice on the
30 day of October. 1987.
1*066 October 30,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5497
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ADOLPH WEISSLER.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ADOLPH WEISSLER. deceas-
ed. File Number 87-5497, is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida. Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street. Dade County Cour-
thouse. Miami. Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
gainst the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 30, 1987.
Personal Representative:
HERBERT KARLINER
175 N.E. 132nd Terrace
North Miami. Florida 33161
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagier Street, Suite 1201
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (306) 374-3116
18073 October 30;
November 6.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-46436 (24)
NOTICE OF ACTION
ADMINISTRATION OF
VETERANS AFFAIRS,
Plaintiff
vs.
VERNON FORBES, et ux..
at at,
Defendants.
TO: VERNON FORBES and
PATRICIA FORBES.
his wife
4068 Edison Avenue
Bronx, NY 10466
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 8, Block 28. of FIRST
ADDITION TO MYRTLE
GROVE SUBDIVISION, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof,
received in Plat Book 57,
Page 2, of the Public Records
of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it,
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
December 4. 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 27 day of Oc-
tober, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
18077 October 30;
November 6,13,20,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name INTERNACIONAL
NORTHVSIA (USA) CORP
DBA. INTERNACIONAL NOR
THVSIA at 10550 NW 77th
COURT (UNIT-301) HIALEAH
GARDENS. FLORIDA 33016 in
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
RUDOLF M
APPENZELLER
PRESIDENT
1H033 October 9,16.23.30, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-45013 01
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
RENE E. ROBAINA.
and
ELIZABETH ROBAINA.
TO: ElizaiH'th Robaina
302 West Wcstfield
Avenue
Roselle Park.
New Jersey
YOU ARE HEREBY N'oTI
FIED that a petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed and
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on Harvey D. Friedman,
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is FRIEDMAN & KAPLAN.
PA.. 3636 West Flagier Street,
Miami. Florida 33135. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
November 20. 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 16th day of October. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: E. Seidl
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HARVEY D. FRIEDMAN
3636 West Flagier Street
Miami. Florida 33135
Attorney for Petitioner
18051 October 23. 30;
November 6, 13, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nuaber 87-6780
Diviaioa04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MAURICE A. SCHWARTZ
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
(FLORIDA BAR NO. 184878)
The administration of the estate
of of Maurice A. Schwartz, deceas
ed, File Number 87-6780, is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street. Miami, Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 23, 1987.
Pearl Goeti
Personal Representative:
28 Cardinal Road
Manhaaset, New York 11030
DENNIS R. TURNER
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
STEARNS WEAVER MILLER
WEISSLER ALHADEFF
& SITTERSON. PA.
Museum Tower, Suite 2200
160 West Flagier Street
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (306) 789-3200
18062 October 28,30, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Lazaro and Elsa Ex-
otic Flowers at 3300 SW 94 Ct.
Miami FL 33165 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Lazaro Martinez and
Elsa Martinez
18029 October 9. 16.23. 30, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE BKRVICI
(NO PROPERTYl
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OP
THE ELEVENTH JLDICIAI
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87-44239 FC 23
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
INRE:THEMARRIa.IKik
KEIKO YATES.
Petitioner/Wife.
and
CHARLES ROBERT YATES
Respondent/Hi^'
TO: CHARLES K.iHKRT
YATES
RESIDENCE I NKXOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NuTl
FIED that a petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage hai beta filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to
your written defenses, if anv to it
onMARCPOSTE!.M-.K.PA..at.
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 407 Lincoln Road, Suite
10-B, Miami Beach. FL 33139. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
November 20th. 1967; otherwise
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall he published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 14th day of October, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Barbara Rodnguei
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LAW OFFICES OF MARC
POSTELNEK, PA.
BY: MARC POSTELNEK
407 Lincoln Road, Suite 10-B
Miami Beach. 1X88188
Telephone: (3051688-7210
Attorney for Petitioner
18048 October28,80;
November 6.13,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under die fie-
titious name CHILO'S
CAFETERIA at 13766 SW. 84th
Street, Miami. Florida 33183 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
MARGARITO J BELL0
13720 S.W 32nd Street
Miami. Florida 33175
18034 October 9.1*. a. 30.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-45774
NOTICE OF ACTION
NEWORLD BANK FOR
SAVINGS, f/k/a BA8S
RIVER SAVINGS BANK
Plaintiff,
JORGE SAVANY. etux..etsl..
Defendants
TO: ROY WYETT and 'ANET
M. WYETT. his wife
106 Governor's C urt
Governor's Square
Greer, South Carolina 29661
YOU ARE NOTIFIED thstm
action for Foreclosure of MorWJ
on the following desenbeo
TTi Block 2, MACS0N
HEIGHTS, according to Uie
Plat thereof, recorded in PUt
Book 66, at Page 2. of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida,
has been filed against you and y*
are required to serve s copy'
your written defenses, if any,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney*
Plaintiff, whose address is >
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, tow
Gables. Florida. 33146 on or bent
November 30, 1987 and**
original with the Clerk of *
Court either before service *
Plaintiffs attorney or 'mmW"J
thereafter: otherw.se a dofsuJt
be entered against you for
relief demanded in the cornpU^
WITNESS my haiM ..mi the*"
of this Court this 22 day of Of
tober. 1987 ...
RICHARD P. BKINKtK
AaCtarkoftbeOjurt
ByCLARINDABK'W>
18069
As Deputy Clerk
October*
Noveml-T-.U-0'191'


FORECLOSURE SALES-PUBLIC NOTICES
Friday, October 30, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-41508 CA 16
NOTICE OF ACTION
THE BINGHAMTON SAVINGS
BANK.
Plaintiff
MARY D HELMS, et al..
Defendants.
TO: MARY D. HELMS
6800 I'eachtree
Industrial Blvd.
Unit AA7
Doraville, GA 30360
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
or Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
rty:
Block 41. FIRST
ADDITION TO CAROL CI-
TY GARDENS, according to
reof U recorded in
88 .' Page 31 of
Ri cordi of Dade
. Florida.
i against you ami you
- to lerve copy of
(.louses, if any, to i!
M Gitliti, Esq., At-
; unt itY. whoso artdrOM
i 1570 Madruga
Avenue Coral Gablaa, Florida.
before November
13th, 1981 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
I baton lenrlee on Plaintiffs at-
>r immediately thereafter,
ntherwi-i i default will he entered
against you for the relief demand-
I ed in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 8th day of Oc-
| tober, ins?
RICHARD P. BRINKER
rk of the Court
B> Barbara Rodriguez
Al Deputy Clerk
118012 October 16, 23,30;
November 6. 1987
I IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY.FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5794
Division 02
|1N RE: ESTATE OF
ROSA H. APPLESTEIN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
M ROSA II APPLESTEIN.
feceased. File Number 87-5794. is
(ending in the Circuit Court for
mtj Florida, Probate
treat of which la 78
' reet. Room 307,
pami, Floridi 33180. The names
of the personal
r itivi and the personal
[ attorney are set
I peraOM are re
I With this curt.
!TH1N niKKK MONTHS OF
BLICATION OF
ID all claims
and 121 am ob-
raatad person on
was served that
ilidity of the will,
of the personal
Pprewnutne. venue, or jurisdic
aw. of the court.
U. CLAIMS AND OBJEC
C,oV,^"TS()KILEUW,LLBE
[W^ U BARRED.
Nation of this Notice has
"on October 23. 1987.
Personal Representative
Allan H. Applestein
I l,m,i asuarina Concourse
^ral Gables, Florida 33143
9 for Personal
nutive:
&CYPEN
' Box 402099
m'Beach, Florida 33140
Wone: (305) 532-3200
October 23,30, 1987
.JW11CT UNDER~
SgmjHJS NAME LAW
7Z P HEREBY GIVEN
"^''"'Kned. desiring to
ln ""siness under the fie-
m ROLL PRODUC-
ES W.74th Court.
"nda 33143 intends to
ttr,^ .??me with th*- Clerk
nori",C,,Ur,ofr^^Coun-
'^EL'-EDESMA
"OR! LKDESMA
?*D- Stratton. Esq.
'^LEDESMA
jo!" Road
Bewh Florida 33139
October 16. 23, 30;
November 0, IW7
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-43846 (14)
NOTICE OF ACTION
RESIDENTIAL FINANCIAI
CORP.,
Plaintiff
vs.
RICARDO A. GARCIA, et ux
etal.,
Defendants.
TO: MANUEL GARCIA
56-38 Van Cleef
Corona. New York 11368
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property;
Lot 11. Block 1. MIROSA
SUBDIVISION, according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 105, Page 31 of
the Public Recordi of Dade
County, Florida.
has been Died against > are required to serve copy of
your written defen.es. if any. I" it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whoae address ii Suite
214, 1670 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida, 88146 on or before
November 18th, 1987, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediate!}
thereafter, otherwise a default wiil
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 8th day of Oc-
tober, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By .lennis L. Russell
As Deputy Clerk
18044 October 16, 23,30;
November 6, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name William Camacho
Tool Distributing at 6360 NW 200
St. Miami FL 33015 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
William Camacho
6360 NW 200 St.
Miami FL 33015
18055 October 23, 30;
November 6, 13.1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 87-3613
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RK THE MARRIAGE OF
BARBARA A PEREZ,
Petitioner
and
ROLANDO n PEREZ,
Respondent.
TO ROLANDO D. PEREZ
878 West 79 Place
Hialeah, Florida 33014
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on SYLVAN HOLTZMAN,
HolUman, Krinzman & Equels,
1500 San Remo Avenue. Suite 200,
Coral Gables, Florida 33146, at-
torney for Petitioner, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above-styled court on or before
November 20, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the
Petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and tbe seal
of said court at Miami, Dade Coun-
ty. Florida on this 19 day of Oc-
tober, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Diana Campbell
As Deputy Clerk
A TRUE COPY
Circuit Court Seal
Attorney for Petitioner
SYLVAN HOLTZMAN
Holtzman, Krinzman 4 Equels
1500 San Remo Ave.. Suite 200
Miami, Florida 33146
Telephone: (305) 662-7700
18056 October 23,30;
November 6. 13, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-4683
Division (04)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALVIN M. GETZ
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OF DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of ALVIN M.
GETZ, deceased, File Number
87-4683 (04), is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for DADE County.
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate is FRANCES GETZ. whose
address is 2000 N.E. 187th Drive.
North Miami Beach, Fla. 33179^
The name and address of the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
URSULA METZGER. Wellisch.
Metzger & Stanton. P.A. 161
Almeria Ave.. No. 200E. Coral
Gables, Fla 33134.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: Oc-
tober 23, 1987.
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ALVIN M. GETZ
J Ii '( '#''t s**i 1
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
URSULA METZGER, ESQ.
WELLISCH, METZGER &
STANTON, P.A.
161 Almeria Ave., No. 200E,
Coral Gables, Fla. 33134
Telephone: (305) 445-7954
18060 October 23,30. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Caae No. 87-42621-FC-14
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
david r. Mcknight
Petitioner
and
wendy Mcknight
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Wendy McKnight,
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.J.
GRAFF. ESQ. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St., N.M.B. Florida 33162 on
or before November 6th, 1987 and
file the original with the clerk ol
this court otherwise a default will
be entered against you.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: C. P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
18028 October 9. 16.23, 30, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nuber 87-5703
Diriiio04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
E. CARRmGTON BRECK,
a/k/a EDYTHE C. GANTZ
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of E. CARRINGTON BRECK.
a/k/a EDYTHE C. GANT, deceas
ed. File Number 87 5703, is pen
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street. 3rd Floor, Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and ad
dresses of the personal represen
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) al) claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will.
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 23. 1987.
Personal Representative:
LILY A. KLINE
6001 Twin Lake Drive
South Miami, Florida 33143
Attorney for Personal
Representative.
H. ALLAN SHORE, ESQUIRE
Fromberg, Fromberg, Gross,
Shore & Lewis, P.A.
420 S. Dixie Highway. 3rd Floor
Coral Gables, FL 33146
Telephone: (305) 666-6622
18053 October 23, 30, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OK
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-39761 CA-19
NOTICE OF ACTION
THE KISSELL COMPANY.
Plaintiff
vs.
Ki (BERT J. STEWART,
el al.
Defendants.
TO ROBERT J. STEWART
\22i\ Droxel Avenue
No, 808
Miami Beach.
Florida 88139
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foredoeure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 16, in Block 4. of
LAZARUS ON RICHMOND,
according to the piai thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 110,
at Pan 99, of the Public
Recordi of Dade County,
Florida
has been filed againat you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida. Xi 146 on or before
November 20. 1987, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for Oie
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 19 day of October,
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Diana Campbell
As Deputy Clerk
18057 October 23.30;
November 6. 13. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in ousiness under the fic-
titious name SOUTHEAST AC-
< HINTING SERVICES, INC. at
7204 Jacaranda Avenue. Miami
Lakes. Florida 33014 intends to
register said name with the Clark
of the Circuit Court of Dade Conn
tv. Florida.
JANTSZ
ENTERPRISES, INC.
By: JOSEPH JANUSZ,
President
l hi i in October 16,0,90;
November 6. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5827
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ADELAIDE M. THORMAN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of ADELAIDE
M. THORMAN. deceased. File
Number 87-5827. is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler,
Third Floor, Courthouse Miami
Florida 33130. The personal
representative of the estate is
KEITH E. THORMAN. whoso ad-
dress is 12686 Moss Rancl Road,
Miami, Florida 33156. Tin name
and address of the
representatives att
forth bekra
All persons having claims or
demands againat the e re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the alwve court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT Si I FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: 11,
tober 23. 19S?
KEITH E THORMAN
As Personal Representative
Of the Estate of
ADELAIDE M THORMAN
I lea
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
HERBERT /. MARVIN
9996 Sunset Drive, Sun.- 108
Miami. Florida :i:(17:i
Florida Bar No. 051041
Telephone: (305) 279-07.(0
18058 October 23,30, 1987
NOTICE
WAREHOUSEMAN'S SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
THAT BY VIRUTE OF
CHAPTER 678, FLORIDA
STATUTES ANNOTATED (1941)
WAREHOUSEMAN AND
WAREHOUSES RECEIPTS
WHEREIN, A.B VAN LINES. A
FLORIDA CORPORATION BY
VIRTUE OF ITS WAREHOUSE
LIENS HAS IN ITS POSSES
SION THE FOLLOWING
DESCRIBED PROPERTY; LOT
1050.
HOUSEHOLD GOODS AS THE
PROPERTY OF:
MR GILBERT MACHIN. LAST
KNOWN ADDRESS: APT 506.
9210 FONTAINBLEAU BLVD.,
MIAMI, FL 33172 AND THAT
ON THE 6TH DAY OF
NOVEMBER. 1987 DURING
THE LEGAL HOURS OF SALE
MAINLY BETWEEN 10:00
FORENOON AND 2:00 IN THE
AFTERNOON AT 2136 NW 24
AVE., MIAMI. FLA. THE
UNDERSIGNED SHALL OF
FER FOR SALE TO THE
HIGHEST BIDDER FOR (ASH
IN HAND THE ABOVE
DESCRIBED PROPERTY.
DATED THIS 23 DAY OF OC-
TOBER. 1987.
18059 October 23, 30, 1987


Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 30, 1987


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