The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03064

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
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T JewI]b IFloir idHaiu.
.*iS!Lft,
ran
Vol. 60-No. 43
Miami Friday, October 23,1987
Price 50 Cents
-...'.
Hundreds "/Palestinian students carry an empty coffin wrapped
in a Palestinian Liberation Organization Flag which is outlawed
AP/Wide World Photo
in Israel. One student holds a second PLOflag at BirZeit Univer-
sity's campus, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank.
Shultz'
Ambivalent
Mideast Visit
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Secretary of State George
Shultz wound up his visit to
Israel in a mood more con-
templative than confident of a
breakthrough toward Middle
East peace in the near future.
While he conceded at a news
conference here Sunday that
he could point to no "big sign
of progress" following a series
of talks with Israeli leaders on
ways to advance the peace pro-
cess, he expressed hope that
"we gradually (will) get
somewhere" and observed
that "there has been con-
siderable progress" in the
past.
The main issue confronting
Shultz is Premier Yitzhak
Shamir's apparently unben-
ding opposition to an interna-
tional conference for Middle
East peace. Shultz' carefully
formulated news conference
remarks seemed to underscore
his oft-repeated insistence that
he would not press the premier
on this matter.
But some observers detected
a note of annoyance with the
Israeli leader's adamancv.
Together with Israel, he told
reporters, he would try "to
find some avenues" with
Continued on Page 11-A
Revised Saudi Sale Will Now Pass Congress
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The Reagan Administration's
proposed $1 billion arms sale
to Saudi Arabia, which only a
few days ago seemed almost
certain to be rejected by Con-
gress, now is expected to go
through without much difficul-
ty. The turnaround came late
last week when the White
House reached an agreement
with several key Senators
*hich eliminated Maverick
anti-tank missiles from the
package.
The package does contain 12
F-15C and F-15D iet fighters,
which would be delivered to
the Saudis when their present
F-15s wear out or crash, main-
taining the Saudi F-15 fleet at
60. It also will include elec-
tronic upgrading equipment
for the F-15 and M-60 tanks
the Saudis already have, and
93 artillery-ammunition
carriers.
The compromise was an-
nounced after 68 Senators and
half of the House had announc-
ed their opposition to the sale.
It had been worked
President Reagan's
Security Adviser,!
Carlucci, in meetin
Senate opponents of
Both Senate Majority
Leader Robert Byrd (D. W.
Va.), who had opposed the
sale, and Senate Minority
Leader Robert Dole (R. Kan.)
expressed support for the pro-
posal. "I think it's probably go-
ing to be approved," Dole said
after the White House meeting
in which the compromise was
approved.
More important, the com-
promise was approved by Sen.
Bob Packwood (R. Ore.), who
along with Sen. Alan Cranston
., Calif.) had initiated two
tters to Reagan in
ptember urging against any
arms sales to Saudi Arabia.
The last letter had 68
signatures.
In addition, the compromise
was also supported by two
Jewish Senators i Howard
Metzenbaum (D. Ohio) and
Rudy Boschwitz (R. Minn.).
"We have decided not to
contest the sale," Packwood
said.
The decision by Packwood,
who has led the opposition to
all previous arms sales to the
Saudis, would almost
guarantee the sale will go
through even if a resolution is
introduced in the Senate to re-
ject the arms package.
The American Israel Public
Affairs Committee (AIPAC) is
Continued on Page 3-A
Can't Close NY-PLO Mission
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
*ne state Department has in-
Jated that it cannot legally
Jse the Palestine Liberation
wganization's observer office
the United Nations in New
70rk. even if ordered to do so
y Congress.
"Closing that mission would
be consistent with our in-
Iun2^al ]e^ obligations
J*r the UN headquarters
Ef"16"1'" Department
desman Charles Redman
said last Friday. Redman was
commenting on the action of
the Senate, which in approving
the $3.6 billion State Depart-
ment authorization bill late
last week adopted by voice
vote an amendment by Sen.
Charles Grassleyn (R. Iowa) to
close the PLO's UN mission,
as well as its information office
in Washington. The State
Department on Sept. 15 had
given the PLO information of-
fice 30 days to close.
Refuseniks Learn of Permission
To Emigrate On TV Link-Up
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) A Soviet Jewish emigre living in the United States
learned on television last Wednesday night that his grandparents had received
permission to leave the Soviet Union.
Leonid Fridman of Boston heard the good news during "Capital to Capital,"
an unusual program allowing American and Soviet journalists and government
'A Hell for Human Rights'
officials to exchange views via satellite.
The live discussion, broadcast by ABC News in the time slot usually reserved
for "Nightline," began with prerecorded news clips, including one of Fridman
describing the plight of his grandparents, Natan and Etya Tkach, who for 10
years had been refused permission to emigrate for reasons of "secrecy."
Leonid Zolotarovsky, speaking from the Kremlin itself, informed ABC host
Peter Jennings, on the floor of the U.S. Senate, that the clip was "outdated"
because "they have left."
Continued on Page 11-A
/


Page 2-A The Jewish FToridian/Friday, October 28, 1987
The Jews of Argentina
I
I
I
2
I
B
3
9
8
9
By AVIVA CANTOR
(Part Four In A Series)
BUENOS AIRES (JTA)
It would be hard to tell from
a casual walk on the main
streets of this cosmopolitan
capital city that never seems
to sleep, but Argentina, with
its lively cultural and social
life, is in the grip of a severe
economic crisis. The country
has a $53 billion foreign debt
and crippling inflation, has
undergone over 600 strikes
and work stoppages in the past
year, and has an unemploy-
ment rate of five percent and
rising.
the average income was up
more than four percent after a
drop of six percent in 1985
there is general agreement
that the economic crisis had
adversely affected Jews, who
lack a strong economic base.
Argentine Jews, said
Reuven Sadan. the shaliach
(emissary) of Kibbutz Artzi
(Mapam) to Latin America,
have tended to work at luft-
mentsch (unsolid. rootless) ac-
tivities, such as wheeling-and-
dealing. Many were involved
with the textile industry,
which was wiped out. and with
construction, which is in crisis.
problem is beginning. There is
a vast private school network
in Argentina, and the govern-
ment is reauired by law to sup-
port parochial schools. It pro-
vides most of the Jewish
schools' budget for general
studies, including teachers'
salaries, which rose by 50 per-
cent in the Jewish schools
after last year's negotiations
with the" 2.500-member
Histadrut Hamorim (teachers'
union).
There are no official figures
as to precisely how many
Jewish students attend the dav
Editor's Note: Writer
.4 lira Cantor traveled
throughout Argentina with a
delegation of North American
Jewish journalists and com-
munal leaders. Her series on
Argentinean Jews continues in
this edition.
schools, it has different levels
of Hebrew classes and in-
troductory courses on Jewish
life.
The 18-year-old Rambam
High school in the old Jewish
plafcned for its new struct
m the upwardlv-mohT
Belgrano-eighborhid 'le
In addition to jewi,fc
studies, the long school dl
or 8 a.m. to 5 or 7 p.m, *"
prises classes in technical and
scientific subjects, such
computers (communication^
are on the future arenSi
liberal arts and JHJ
FTidel believes the ORtS
which others called the most
important technical school in
Argentina, gives its students
more chances on the labor
market.
An estimated 711 percent of
Jewish high school graduates
:-:-:-:>:v>xx::::->:->w^^

Jewish Schools, Assimilation And
University of the Taxi in a Poor Economy
"It's difficult for people to
understand that we are no
longer a rich country." film-
maker Aida Bortnik.told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency.
"Middle-class Argentines
grew up thinking about
ourselves as a country of
riches without end."
Argentina is still rich in
natural resources it exports
beef and wheat and in
natural wonders such as the
magnificent Iguazu Falls
toured by a delegation of
North American Jewish jour-
nalists and communal leaders
on a recent visit to the
country.
But the economy is in a
shambles. "The junta
destroyed our economy and in-
dustry." said Bortnik. The
economy has been described as
speculative rather than pro-
ductive, and there are
reportedly less than one-half
million blue-collar workers out
of a population of 28 million.
Over the past ten years,
many middle and upper-class
people have been catapulted
into poverty. People speak
wryly of "the university of the
taxi" of individuals with ad-
vanced degrees working as cab
irtvers. if they are In
Many Argentine scientists
have emigrated because of
what they regard as the coun-
try's low technological level.
Although some people
believe that things have been
improving in 1986. invest-
ment rose by 18.5 percent
after six vears of decline, and
Many Jews are merchants
and in the "free professions."
such as doctors, lawyers,
engineers and psychiatrists.
This last group finds their ser-
vices as popular and as much
in demand as in the United
States. The Secretary of
Culture, noted writer Marcos
Aguinas (his sister. Shoshana
Aguinas. directs the San Mar-
tin Jewish High School in Cor-
doba) practices psychoanalysis
from 8 a.m. to noon and then
goes to his government office
to work from 12 to 8 p.m.
There are also many Jews
among the unemployed, and
the AMU the Kehilla of
Buenos Aires Ashkenazic
Jewry finds itself giving out
more welfare than ever before.
Many families cannot afford to
send their children to Jewish
schools. While some scholar-
ship money is available, many
parents are too proud to ask
for it.
Enrollment in the 5 7 Jew
day schools :r. Buenos Aires
and the half-dozen in the pro-
vinces is increasing. The trend
began under the junta, when
parents wanted their children
to be in a "protected environ-
ment" all day. It has continued
because it :s regarded as one of
the few means to fight against
assimilation, according to
Rkardo Kleinman. secretary
of the DAIA. the represen-
tative body of Jewry, in
Cordoba.
In addition, private schools
are considered educationally
superior to public schools,
where parents also fear a drug
schools. According to Joshua
Flidel. director of ORT in
Latin America, there are
12-14.000 children in the
Jewish primary schools
(grades one through seven)
and 3.000 in the secondary in-
stitutions (grades eight to 12)
in Buenos Aires.
Nor are there any official
statistics on the percentage of
Jewish youth who attend these
schools. Various estimates
given to the North American
delegation ranged from 25 to
30 percent. Some 800 percent
of the primarv school
graduates reportedly do not
continue on to Jewish secon-
dary schools.
Most of the day schools in
Buenos Aires and in the pro-
vinces one each in Cordoba.
Rosario. Santa Fe. Bahia Blan-
co. Mendoza and Tucuman
are secular in orientation, with
Jewish holidays taught and
celebnteo as pan of Jr
culture. There is a high level of
Hebrew and in some
language of instruction in
Yiddish, if
taught at all. is given several
hours a vos
The Hebraica Commtn
Center's five-year-o!
High school, part of the trend
of these centers to establish
secondary schools, focuses or.
the arts "like a Je
'Fame.' sa:d Hebraica ex-
ecutive director Albert
Senderey
Amos accepts 70 out of 150
applicants after a preparatory
course. Since 30 percent never
attended Jewish primary
Tufts U. Won't Reschedule

BOSTON (JTA) Com-
plaints and apologies not-
withstanding. Tufts Universi-
ty here will not reschedule its
commencement from the first
day Shavuot. May 22. 1988. ac-
cording to reports in the
Jewiah press.
Complaints from Jewish
students and their parents
began upon disclosure of the
1987-88 universitv calendar
last May
University provost Sol Grt-
tleman apologized in a
September 25 letter to the
Jewish rommumiji "In the
midst of the hohest week of the
Jewish year, we find ourselves
having to ask for forgiveness,
he wrote. He urged Jews to
"make the best out of a bad
situation" because changing
the date "would cause hard-
ship for someone else."
Gittleman said the scheduled
mistake was made four or five
years ago. Universitv
spokespersons have contended
that changing the date would
disrupt summer school
scheduled to begin the next
day. as well as clinical intern-
ships, hotel reservations of
parents attending commence-
ment, travel arrangemer
foreign students and athletic
events.
neighborhood of Once (now be-
ing settled by Korean im-
migrants) requires of its 420
students a high level of
Hebrew, the language of in-
struction for 52 hours a week
of Jewish studies. This in-
cludes two hours on religion,
two on Israel and four on Yid-
dish, according to its director.
Braja Kunin de Levy
This year. Rambam
established the Janusz Korc-
zak post-secondary Institute
for Teacher Training. Forty-
students enrolled, including
three from the provinces and
many on AMIA Kehilla
scholarships. Not only is there
no shortage of "Jewish
teachers, but Argentina "ex-
ports" them to other South
American communities.
With over half the 1.530
ORT secondary school
students coming "from non-
Jewish primary schools. ORT
puts a great deal of effort into
' program,
which expanded this vear to
eight hours a week including
Hebrew. Bible and Jewish
rtory There :> small
agogue in the old building
in the Jatai district and one
of both the Jewish and the
public schools go or. t miver-
sity. the rest int. the labor
market. The boys are required
to do a yeai of post-high school
military service.
In all the Jewish high schools
except ORT which is 70 per-
cent male in enrollment -
female students predominate.
Senderey indicated that the
main reason is that parents
seek to have their knm begin
to prepare in high sch xtl for a
future professor, and
"Judaism doesn't lead to a
career."
Another impact oi the
economic scene on Jewish
education is that mam f the
schools, including ORT and
Rambam. have intr iuced
classes in English Man)' of the
students told r- they
hoped to go to the U S
Senderey baneves a .
part of the Algi
population will
because "there -
future for then
America." He
recently acca
of head of JDC
Jewish Joint
rr.mitteek Israel.
?o\atl^B.te JLower
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"Waterfront Rental Apartments'
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Beauty Parlor on Prsmises




Friday, October 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
Puerto Rican-Israeli Link
Puerto Rico is about to set up a joint venture with Israel
Aircraft Industries (1AI). Local firms will assemble IAI's
Arava aeroplane which has already become a
"bestseller" on the continent so as to expand its com-
mercial success. An attempt to enter into a similar ar-
rangement with Mexico floundered in the 1970s.
The proposed agreement has more than commercial
significance. Israel currently services the Arava aeroplanes
itself, but is now suggesting that it hands over its know
how to the Puerto Ricans so they can service not only the
Arava but other aircraft as well. The United Stastes would
be involved since its aricraft could also be serviced in Puer-
to Rico, an important strategic consideration.
German Neo-Nazi War 'Games'
German neo-Nazis are producing anti-Semitic computer
games aimed at the country's young computer enthusiasts.
West German authorities have already banned 40 of these
games including ones which praise Hitler and require the
players to conquer Europe and throw opponents and Jews
into concentration camps. However, the games continue to
flood the market via private distribution networks.
Navy Teaches Holocaust
The U.S. Navy has launched a program to help Navy
chaplains learn and teach others about the Holocaust. The
project is in response to a recent request by Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger, who has asked all military
heads to initiate programs dealing with the Holocaust. The
Navy has published a workbook and resource packet which
is livided into five section including an introduction
describing the Holocaust, an education section, liturgical
passages and theological material. The packet will be
distributed to over 1,000 Navy chaplains all over the world.
Immigrant Doctors Tested
A new Israeli law requiring immigrant doctors to pass
professional tests before entering the country could have
" us consequences for aliya. Already a group of
el Jewish physicians are reconsidering their plans to
emigrate to Israel because of the law. However, the Health
Ministry has reaffirmed the necessity of the tests since too
many immigrant doctors have failed to reach an adequate
professional level.
Conscientious Objectors
TEL AVIV (JTA) The Defense Ministry indicated
Monday that young Israelis entering the Israel Defense
Force will have to serve wherever they are assigned
regardless of their personal views.
The ministry was responding to a letter from 34 high
school seniors, all at the top of their class, who said they do
not want to serve in the administered territories for
ns of conscience.
Dutch Compensate Holocaust Victims
AMSTERDAM (JTA) The Dutch cabinet has decided
that compensatory payments to victims of Nazi or
Japanese persecution during World War II will continue to
be made, but the government will not consider applications
from the so-called second generation of victims.
An advisory committee has proposed that applications
may be made until the year 2010, when children born dur-
ing the Nazi occupation of Dutch colonial territories will
have reached age 65, entitling them to old-age pensions.
Swastikas in Providence
PROVIDENCE (JTA) The Jewish community here
has been the target of extensive anti-Semitic graffiti over
the past week.
Fluorescent orange swastikas were discovered over the
Columbus Day weekend. The swastikas had been spray-
painted onto the walls of two synagogue and two Jewish-
owned businesses. Last Friday, another swastika was
chalked onto the entrance to Providence's Jewish Com-
munity Center. All of these incidents took place in the
heavily Jewish East Side neighborhood, in the environs of
Brown University.
Coalition Questions Jackson Candidacy
New York Assemblyman Dov Hikind (D., Brooklyn), an-
nounced the formation of the Coalition for a Positive
America at a recent press conference. The Coalition is a na-
tional grass-roots organization formed to educate the
Public about the character and history of the Reverand
Jesse Jackson, the Democratic Party's front runner for
nomination as presidential candidate. Supporting the Coali-
L"'t!aIre religious, civic, political and professional leaders,
th Jewish and non-Jewish.
A Palestinian is stopped by Israeli troops for
a body search at Anatot refugee camp in the
outskirts of Jerusalem. Twenty-five Palesti-
nians were detained at Anatot on the eighth
day of unrest in the occupied West Bank and
Gaza strip.
Saudi Sale 'Sure Thing'
Continued from Page 1-A
not expected now to lobby
against the sale. The support
of the compromise by at least
two Jewish Senators, both
leading advocates of Israel,
makes it easier for other
Senators to support the sale
without being considered anti-
Israel.
The Maverick was con-
sidered the weapon in the
arms package with the most
potential danger to Israel. The
Administration withdrew last
June a proposal to sell the
Saudis 1,600 of the anti-tank
missiles because of strong con-
gressional opposition.
The White House had
delayed submitting the arms
proposal because it had hoped
to convince Senate opponents
to accept a lesser number of
Mavericks. But this effort fail-
ed. A statement that Reagan
"personally assured the Saudi
government that in event of an
emergency the United States
would provide Mavericks from
American stocks with ap-
propriate notifications to the
Congress."
While congressional op-
ponents had voiced concern
that the weapons sold to the
Saudis could be used against
Israel in a future Arab-Israel
war, their opposition had
stressed the lack of Saudi sup-
port for U.S. national interest
objectives in the Mideast, in-
cluding the peace process, and
Saudi support for organiza-
tions, such as the Palestine
Liberation Organization,
which engage in terrorism.
The Administration was ap-
parently successful in convinc-
ing opponents that the Saudis
have been cooperating in the
latest U.S. efforts in the Per-
sian Gulf. Capitol Hill sources
noted that both sides can now
claim they won. They credit
the Administration's will-
ingness to consult with Con-
gress, particularly the Senate,
before announcing the arms
proposal, rather than the
previous practice of sending
the proposal to Congress and
then seeking support.
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We endorse The GUARDIAN PLAN" insurance funded prearranged funeral program


Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 28, 1987
South Florida Honors
Three Leaders
In a span of five days. South Florida will
pay tribute to three of its most prominent
governmental and business leaders.
Each of the men Congressmen Dante B.
Fascell and Claude Pepper and Florida
Power and Light Company executive Leland
C. (Bud) Hunter will be honored for ongo-
ing and exemplary leadership for the land
and people of Israel.
These significant events under the
auspices of the Jewish National fund, Israel
Histadrut Campaign and State of Israel
Bonds, deserve communitywide support
because of both the causes they represent
and the public figures whom they salute.
Rep. Dante B. Fascell
Saturday night, the Jewish National Fund
units from throughout Florida will gather in
the Grand Ballroom of the Omni Hotel to
give recognition to the distinguished chair-
man of the House Foreign Affairs
Committee.
Representative Dante B. Fascell. who has
served the people of South Florida in both
the state legislature and the Congress for
nearly 40 years, has long been identified as a
champion of Israel.
He will receive JNF's prestigious Tree of
Life Award at a black-tie dinner at which
Fascell is certain to voice his opinions on the
rapidly-changing developments in the Per-
sian Gulf and Middle East areas.
This dynamic Democrat has maintained a
steady posture of support for a strong na-
tional defense coupled with a relentless pur-
suit of arms reduction and peace. He has not
been afraid to challenge both Democratic
and Republican Administrations when they
advocated unwarranted sales of
sophisticated weaponry to Israel's declared
enemies.
We join the Jewish National Fund in prais-
ing Dante B. Fascell.
Rep. Claude Pepper
Sunday evening, the Florida Trade Union
Council for Histadrut will join with the
Florida State AFL-CIO in honoring the
respected dean of the United States Con-
gress, former Senator Claude Pepper.
Indeed, it was during his tenure as
Florida's United States Senator that Pepper
moved to the forefront in efforts of
American and world Jewry to first establish.
and then recognize the State of Israel.
As chairman of the powerful House Rules
Committee. Pepper has continued his
historic service to the people of the entire
nation as well as his own Congressional
district in South Florida.
Pepper's support of organized labor in the
United States alone is more than enough
reason for the testimonial at the Sheraton
Bal Harbour Hotel.
And the long-term cooperation between
the AFL-CIO and the Histadrut. Israel's
powerful labor federation, has paid hand-
some dividends for both America and the
Jewish state.
To Congressman Pepper, best wishes for
the proverbial 120 years.
/'// teJre ihe high road
and you'll +al\e Hie low road,.
Mr. Leland C. (Bud) Hunter
Wednesday evening, the scene shifts back
to the Omni where the State of Israel Bonds
Organization will bestow the Israel 40th An-
niversary Medal upon Leland C. (Bud)
Hunter, senior vice president of FP&L.
As chairman of the board of directors of
Miami's Victoria Hospital and as Nice-
chairman of the Dade County School Ad-
visory Committee. Mr. Hunter has provided
dedicated and distinguished leadership.
His citation acknowledges his
"humanitarian leadership and steadfast
championing of Israel as a bastion of
freedom and democracy."
When he declined an offer to be named
United States Undersecretary of Labor. Mr.
Hunter chose South Florida over
Washington, D.C. as the communitv in
which he would work effectively to bring
management and labor together."
hi^iStT ^i*'0" who gather to honor
him will have the opportunitv to share in hi<
mvestment m Israel's fight for econorruc t
Bonds t^* P^*1** of Israel
Jewish Floridian
Fred K Shochet
EOrtor and ***
Nomn A Orwtz
Suzanne Sftochet
iCutn Edflor
Wilham T Brewe'
D Mai oc-*- :->
Joan C Tagias
Friday. Ot. oMr23.1987
Volume 60
30TISHRI5748
Number
Thus, on three separate occasions, our
community, state and national leaders of the
Jewish, general, business and labor
munities will demonstrate their solidarity in
support of the only true democracy u
Middle East.
This is an auspicious manner in whi
launch the year-long observance of I?-
4'ith anniversary.
Morality, Not Expediency
Any reluctance the United States may
have had in energetically pushing to open
the United Nations files on Nazi war
criminals should have been ended by the
weekend's startling disclosure by the
Chicago Sun-Times.
That newspaper said one locked file con-
tains "irrefutable evidence" placing
Austrian President Kurt Waldheim as a key
intelligence officer in the Wehrmacht High
Command, which deported 40.000 Greek
Jews to death camps.
Even more shocking is mounting evidence
that this country recruited Waldheim and
other former Nazi officers to play leading
roles in the cold war against the Soviet
Union in the immediate post-war year-
Such expediency, using totalitarian sup-
porters of one stripe to fight another, is
never in the best interests of this or any
other democracy.
Equally important, the Sun-7" mo report
should end any argument as to the
of the World Jewish Congress' oh.
against Waldheim. which were made prior
to his election.
Let the files be opened!


Two Views From France
Friday, October 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
France Notes New Resources In The Difference
Between Crime
And Tragedy
Bv ABRAHAM H. FOXMAN
And ROBERT B. GOLDMAN
Holocaust revisionism the
attempt to deny the gas
chambers and mass extermina-
tions of Jews in World War II
- suffered setbacks this year
in France. The pseudo-
historians who had propagated
the revisionist thesis had done
including some of the darker
aspects of French policy and
behavior in the Nazi years.
France seems to be saying:
Let's have the truth, and let
our young people remember it.
To begin with, there are
political consequences. The Le
Pen remark, unmitigated by
an unsuccessful attempt to
Commentary
much of their work in France,
and there those ideas suffered
their severest reverses.
The most recent blow for the
revisionists was provoked by
Jean-Marie Le Pen, presiden-
tial candidate of the extreme
right National Front in the
elections next spring.
On a radio program in mid-
September. Le Pen who had
gone to much trouble to per-
suade Jews that he was not
anti-Semitic and has been
asiduously professing his sup-
port for the State of Israel
said something that has been
the stuff of the front pages
ever since. He said that the gas
chambers were a mere
"detail" of World War II, that
he had never seen any, and
that historians were still
debating whether they existed.
The reaction of France's
politicians from left to right, of
the media regardless of
ideology, of young people, in-
tellectuals and old people who
remember the war has been a
veritable storm.
Coupled with the response to
the testimony, the defense
arguments and the verdict of
the trial of Klaus Barbie, the
Nazi 'butcher of Lyon," in Ju-
ly, it is the story of a nation
that is facing up to the 1940'a
"explain" it five days after he
made it, is forcing the majority
conservatives to draw a sharp
line between their own coali-
tion (headed by Prime Minister
Jacques Chirac) and the Na-
tional Front, and thus to cast
the latter into a kind of "off-
limits" category.
The public reaction is
creating unanimity among all
mainstream parties that revi-
sionism is unacceptable, and
that candidates aspiring to na-
tional office will from now on
have to declare it out of bounds
in legitimate political
discourse. Interior Minister
Charles Pasqua of the RPR
(Gaullist)) party headed by
Chirac has suggested adoption
of a law that would make the
espousal of revisionism a
crime, and the National
Front's own Pascal Arrighi, a
National Assembly member
from Corsica, has spoken out
along the same lines.
But the issue far transcends
politics. Television, the
newspapers and weekly
magazines have been full of
discussions and articles ex-
plaining that revisionism has
its roots in Nazism and
represents an attempt to
distort or falsify the meaning
Continued on Page 12-A
After Dreyfus:
Irony That is Le Pen
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
It is ironic that while the
Jewish Museum of New York
is displaying a striking exhibit
waling with the French anti-
Semitism that led to the false
imprisonment of Jewish army
officer Alfred Dreyfus at the
turn of the century, a similar
incident occurs.
Jean-Marie Le Pen, who
symbolizes much that disturbs
the Jews of France, recently
said that Hitler's gas
chambers may not have ex-
ited, and even if they did, con-
stituted a minor point in the
history of World War II.
If incipient fascism exits in
Jkn !t is **'" incubated in
t^ French National Front,
organized by the French fiery
"gntwmg politico Le Pen 15
ears ago. Taking advantage
1th6 weakness of the French
economy and hoisting the ban-
?Ll\, "^ance for the
drench, Le Pen has reveled
seeing support for his
xenophobic enterprise rise
from two percent three years
ago to 11 percent today. The
only cloud in his political sky is
that his adventure in
Holocaust revisionism has
brought some opposition
within his own ranks and
solidified the influential forces
standing against him.
The much admired and
respected Jean-Marie Cardinal
Lustiger, whose Jewish
mother died at Auschwitz, was
startled by Le Pen's comment
about the gas chambers and
said he was frightened by the
debasement of thought in Le
Pen and his followers "because
they pay a role of perversion of
all generations." Foes of Le
Pen are pleased that the Inter-
national League Against
Racism and Anti-Semitism has
brought legal action aganist
Le Pen, with the result that
the court ordered him to pay
damages to all the civil rights
Continued on Page 12-A
.4 berenred mother mourns her son, who/ell in
ih, 197S Yom Kippur War, at Jerusalem's
m ilitary cemetery on Mt. Herzl, following this
Another Perspective:
year's holiday. (JTA/World Zionist News Photo
Service)
On The Peace Plan
By RABBI
MARC H. TANENBAUM
The latest installment of
Israel-Diaspora relations is
neither a pleasing nor con-
structive experience for
Israel or for American Jewry.
As everyone knows, Israel is
engaged in a major internal
political conflict over the pro-
posal for an international con-
ference on Middle East peace.
Premier Shamir and his allies
oppose it; Foreign Minister
Peres and his allies support it.
They are battling to line up
constituencies.
Crucial to this peace process
is not only the future ot Israel-
Arab relations, but the issue of
Israel's security.
In recent weeks, forces
within both the Shamir and
Peres factions have begun
mobilizing, or trying to
mobilize, major U.S. Jewish
organizations to identify with
with their respective political
views. The American Jewish
Congress made front-page
headlines by supporting
outright the Peres proposal.
Efforts were then made by
Shamir factions to have other
U.S. Jewish agencies identify
politically with the Likud
position.
Suddenly, it began to app- &r
as if American Jews w re
Israeli citizens lining up to sup-
port their political party in
Israel. Fortunately, both for
Israel and for U.S. Jewry, such
dangerous play was halted
midstream.
It is time to reassert clarity
aBout our respective roles: The
principal actors in Israeli
political life are Israeli citizens
whose very security depends
on their political decisions.
American Jews and
diaspora Jewry in general
are the supporting cast and
ought not to exceed their
competencies.
Rabbi Marc H. Tanenbaum
is director of international
relations for the American
Jewish Committee.
Jeu-\s> legraphie Agency


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 23, 1987
Israel-China Relations:
Proceeding With
Caution, The Two
Sides Move Closer
By VICTOR PERRY
A strange and largely illicit
romance has been taking place
between Israel and the Peo-
ple's Republic of China: while
China may want her Great
Wall breached, she doesn't
want anyone to know about it.
In the past year, informal
contacts have taken place bet-
ween officials of both countries
regarding the opening of
diplomatic relations. This in-
cludes a two-hour meeting in
early 1987 at the United Na-
tions between Avraham
Tamir, director-general of
Israel's Foreign Ministry, and
the Chinese ambassador to the
UN. The Chinese diplomat
repeated his country's well-
known policy that China would
not recognize Israel as long as
Israel did not accept the PLO
and a Palestinian state. The
main difference, however, lay
in the fact that the Chinese ad-
mitted officially that the
meeting had taken place.
China also announced that, as
a permanent member of the
UN Security Council, it would
gladly participate in an inter-
national peace conference.
In the meantime, contacts
between the two countries con-
tinue at a very practical level.
Specifically, China is in-
terested in obtaining
agricultural know-how and
high technology from Israel.
Serious negotiations have been
taking place between Chinese
authorities and Israeli
agricultural officials for over
two years. But China insists
that the meetings be kept
secret lest their African and
Third World allies be offended;
periodic press reports of
Kmcfti
cooperation with Israel are in-
variably denied by China.
Earlier this year, however, a
high Chinese official approach-
ed the Israeli government in
connection with obtaining ex-
pertise on a regular basis. The
Chinese Deputy Minister of
Agriculture suggested to
Avraham Katz-Oz, his Israeli
counterpart, that China send a
delegation to Israel in order to
study its agricultural techni-
ques. The Chinese stressed
that they would like the invita-
tion to come from a private
group and not from any official
body connected with the
government. Katz-Oz replied
that while the invitation could
be extended from a private
body, such as the Israel Cotton
Council, the visit would have
to be an open one without any
subterfuge or third party in-
tercession. This written ex-
change was subsequently
publicized in the Israeli press
and since then an official
silence has fallen regarding
further contacts with China.
Nevertheless, an official
Israeli economic delegation
has visited China and in-
dividual Israeli experts
mostly in agriculture have
worked in Cliina. In addition, a
large number of Israelis in
various fields have visited
there in the past two years,
both individually and as part of
scientific delegations atten-
ding international congresses.
This is about the only way that
communist China allows
Israelis to enter on their own
passports. Even then, the visa
is stamped on a separate piece
of paper which is later
removed.
TM
Bar-Ilan University conferred Honorary
Fellowships on two outstanding leaders of the
Jewish world Simon Weber, editor-
emeritus of the "Forward, "and Harold Platt,
prominent Yiddishist and communal leader
at the annual dinner of the Israeli univer-
sity's Yiddish studies program in New York.
Left to right: Prof. Gershot, Winer, head at
Bar-Ilan's Yddish studtt* Aeartment; Mri
Lillian Silver, daughter of Si wo, Weber, n^
accepted the award for fir father; Mr. Platt'
and Dr. Emanuel Rackmun. chancellor ^
Bar-Ilan. Photo By Alexander 1
The export of Israeli arms
shipments and military ex-
perts, periodically reported in
the foreign media, has been
repeatedly denied by both
sides. The possibility should
not be discounted, however,
considering that Israeli arms
particularly Soviet equip-
ment captured in wartime
have reached such countries as
Rumania and Morocco. In-
deed, earlier this year, the
London Times reported that
Israeli experts were working
in China refurbishing and
upgrading Soviet T-54 and
T-55 tanks.
The most visible interchange
has been in the field of
agriculture, which is not sur-
prising considering the fact
that three-fourths of China's
labor force works in
agriculture and produces half
of the national income. The
first major break came in May,
1985 when a nine-man deleea-


1967DavK3S Bowrr- ,rk Saunoer, An nghtt reserved
tion of Israeli experts headed
by Prof. Shmuel Pohoriles,
Director of the Planning and
Development Authority in the
Ministry of Agriculture,
visited China officially.
Pohoriles' delegation
presented working papers to
their Chinese hosts with sug-
gestions for the transmission
of Israeli technology in such
fields as irrigation, energy,
medical technology, livestock,
artificial fish ponds, animal
feeds, industrial processing of
agricultural products and
regional planning projects.
The Chinese surprised their
Israeli guests with the extent
of their knowledge about
Israeli achievements in
agriculture and high
technology. They had ap-
parently heard about them
from their African friends who
have benefitted appreciably
from Israeli know-now. The
total investment in the various
joint projects discussed
reportedly reached one billion
dollars.
scientists and businessmen -
report a most cordial recep-
tion, great curiosity about
Israel, a surprising knowledge
of Israeli accomplishments in
the scientific and military
fields (including intelligence"),
and invitations for futun
cooperation and reciprocal
visits. The hosts admit,
however, that their expres-
sions are personal and that of-
ficial ties must await political
decisions at the government
level.
Nevertheless, the liberaliza-
tion of communist China in re-
cent years, its opening to t
West and the deientralizatka
of much of its economy, has
opened numerous possibilities
for Israeli entrepreneurs to j
enter China through the bs
door. In fact, for the purpose I
of foreign investments and the |
hiring of foreign experts.
much independent authority
has been granted to district
and municipal officials *b |
have made direct deals win'
foreign investors. According
All visiting Israelis both Continued on Page 15-A
"I thought you. were checking for gender'?1"
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Unrest in Territories
Linked To Shultz Visit
Friday, October 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin maintained that the
escalation of violence in the ad-
ministered territories is linked
to the forthcoming visit of U.S.
Secretary of State George
Shultz and will soon abate.
Rabin told reporters it was
possible that "outside
elements" were trying to stir
up trouble and create an at-
mosphere of disorder on the
eve of Shultz's visit. Security
sources quoted by the news
media seemed to agree. They
accused supporters of the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion of inciting the local
population to demonstrate
their strength for the benefit
of Shultz, who was due to ar-
rive in Israel later in the week.
Five Palestinians and three
Israelis have been killed and
18 injured in clashes over
the last three weeks in the
West Bank, East Jerusalem
and the Gaza Strip. The latest
flare-up occurred in Ramaliah
Monday when border police
opened fire on rioting Arab
youths, fatally wounding a
35-year-old Arab woman
passerby, Inayat Samir Hindi.
mother of five children.
Five others wounded in the
incident included a 15-year-old
high-school girl, Ghadeer
Omar, and a 68-year-old man.
All were hospitalized and
reported to be in fair
condition.
According to security
sources, border police fired in-
to the air to disperse Arab
youths waving Palestinian
flags and portraits of PLO
chief Yasir Arafat. When that
had no effect, the police aimed
at the demonstrators' legs.
Ghadeer Omar was wounded
in the knee. The death of the
woman who apparently had no
part in the demonstration is
under investigation. She was
struck in the chest by a stray
I bullet.
Ten Arab youths were ar-
rested in East Jerusalem after
they stoned two Israeli police
vans. Riots broke out at Bir
Zeit I'niversity and Bethlehem
University where students
stoned Israeli troops. An
Israeli woman motorist and a
policeman were hit by stones
in other incidents in the West
Bank.
In Gaza, Arab teen-agers
erected road blocks and stoned
vehicles with Israeli license
Plates. Thev were dispersed by
troops firing into the air. The
Board of Trustees of the
Islamic University in Gaza
declared a recesss until
tempers calm. Its 5,000
students were sent home for
the rest of the week.
Security sources said the re-
cent eruptions of violence
were the result of their having
foiled several attempted acts
of terrorism in the territories.
Chief of Staff Gen. Dan
Shomron told reporters that
six terrorists who escaped
from a maximum security
prison in Gaza 18 months ago
were responsible for a number
of murders in the territory.
Five were killed in clashes
with security forces and
another was captured.
The upsurge of violence
began before Shultz's trip to
the Middle East was announc-
ed. An Israeli reserve soldier
was stabbed in death by a
West Bank Palestinian on
Sept. 24. On Oct. 6, four
Palestinian terrorists and an
agent of Shin Bet, Israel's in-
ternal secret service, were kill-
ed in a Gaza Strip shootout
following a car chase.
A 25-year-old Israeli was
fatally shot by a Palestinian
gunman in Jerusalem's Old Ci-
ty and some 2,000 Moslems
hurled rocks and bottles in a
two-hour riot on the Temple
Mount, protesting a visit there
by members of the Temple
Mount Faithful, a small grouip
of Orthodox Jews who demand
that the site be cleared of its
Moslem shrines and the Tem-
ple rebuilt.
Police fired tear gas.
Twenty-five demonstrators
were wounded and 12 were
arrested.
The ongoing strife has trig-
gered a debate in Israel over
security policy in the ad-
ministered territories.
Reserve Maj. Gen. Shlomo
Gazit, former chief of military
intelligence and former coor-
dinator of activities in the ter-
ritories, warned that a "strong
arm" policy that is not consis-
tent with political and moral
considerations is counter-
productive, it was reported.
Gazit said he has discerned
two important changes recent-
ly: the increased boldness of
Joseph Foshko's artistic polemic against the
Ku Klux Klan is one of a series ofFoshko car-
toons from the Yiddish newspaper, Der Tog,
on display in the exhibition, A People in
Print: Jewish Journalism In America, at the
National Museum of American Jewish
History, Independence Mall East in
Philadelphia, through December SI, 1987.
Arab demonstrators and their
choice of more "legitimate"
targets soldiers and men in
general rather than women
and children. Gazit said that
imposing the death penalty for
terrorist offenses, as sug-
gested by Premier Yitzhak
Shamir and many other
Israelis in and out of public
life, would only encourage ex-
tortion in the form of threats
on the lives of Israeli soldiers
held by terrorist groups in
Lebanon.
Jewish National Fund
^nKo*(Keren Kayemeth Leisrael)
Redeems, Reclaims, Rebuilds the Land of Israel
SUPPORTTHEJNF
NJCRAC Plan Protects Judiciary
PLANT TREES IN ISRAEL
FOR ALL OCCASIONS
Plant as Many Trees as You Wish
($5 Per Tree)
Secretary Shultz
NEW YORK Threats to
the Bill of Rights posed by the
changing composition of the
federal judiciary is identified
as one of the overriding con-
cerns of the American Jewish
community by the National
Jewish Community Relations
Advisory Council in its just
published Joint Program Plan
for 1987-88.
The annual Plan represents
the consensus reached among
NJCRAC's 11 national and
113 community member agen-
cies on the critical priority
issues for the Jewish communi-
ty relations field in the coming
year. As the instrument of na-
tional planning, the plan seeks
to anticipate issues before they
break so the field can be ade-
quately prepared to respond.
The Plan's warning of
threats to the Bill of Rights
posed by the changing com-
position of the federal
judiciary, particularly in the
Supreme Court, was reflected
in the Senate Judiciary Com-
mittee's hearings on the
nomination of Judge Robert
Bork. The Plan's judgment
was that "the relevance of a
nominee's view on fundamen-
tal national issues, such as civil
rights and the separation of
church and state, has become
an important central part of
the debate over what factors
to consider in screening
judicial nominees." The Plan
calls upon "the Senate to exer-
cise its constitutional obliga-
tion by scrutinizing more
vigorously the backgrounds
and qualifications of nominees
to federal judi< iarj posts."
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? Holiday Greetings
[ i Birthdays
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Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friaay, October 23, 1987
Israeli TV Strike
Boosts Second Channel
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
strike by Israel Broadcast
Authority journalists, which
has blacked out radio and
television for eight days has
given an unexpected boost to
the proposed commercial TV
network, known officially as
the second channel.
Although the Knesset is still
debating the legislation
necessary to establish it, per-
mission was granted to a
private television production
company in Jerusalem for live
coverage of the arrival of Ida
Nudel at Ben Gurion Airport
last week.
Special permission was also
granted for a series of "ex-
perimental broadcasts' on the
private channel. They will in-
clude nightly one-hour films,
under arrangements made
with the Cinema Owners
Association.
Until now, the Communica-
tions Ministry's engineering
department has been moving
slowly in the direction of a se-
cond channel. During the past
year it has screened still
photograhs for short periods
each evening.
The purpose is to stake for-
mal claim to Channel 22 on the
Ultra High Frequency (UHF)
band to prevent its pre-
emption by Egypt or other
neighboring Arab states. It
has also been broadcasting
reruns of shows from Israel
Television and Educational
Television.
Meanwhile, no progress
seems to have been made in
settling the broadcasters'
strike. Radio and television
journalists are demanding the
same pay scale as print jour-
nalists. Although they are
members of the Journalists
Association, they receive
lower salaries than their
newspaper colleagues because
they are employed by the IBA,
a government agency, and are
classified as civil servants. The
Finance Ministry refuses to
consider wage increases for
any single branch of public sec-
tor workers, and the IBA
management says its hands
are tied.
Shultz Stood Up By Palestinians
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Secretary of State George
Shultz ended his three-day
visit to Israel Monday sug-
gesting that the Palestinians
may be their own worst
enemies.
It was "contradictory" for
the Palestinians to demand
that their views be heard and
yet refuse to meet with him,
Shultz said at a final news con-
ference before departing for
Egypt. He was referring to the
select group of Palestinian
politicians and business people
from the administered ter-
ritories invited for a talk at his
Jerusalem Hilton Hotel suite
Sunday afternoon.
The secretary waited in vain.
None snowed up. Some may
have been deterred by threats,
Shultz said, adding, "that only
Synagogue
Arsonist Sentenced
BOSTON (JTA) A
22-year-old man has been
sentenced to five to 10 years in
prison for burning down Tem-
ple Beth David of Westwood,
Mass., on March 14 as well as
the torching of two autos and
theft.
Christopher Badessa, a
laborer with a minor criminal
record, had pleaded guilty
despite his maintenance of in-
nocence in the face of "over-
whelming" evidence, the
Jewish Advocate reports. He
had been the subject of a na-
tionwide alert before he turn-
ed himself in to police a week
after the incident.
reminds us that peace has its
enemies." The list of invitees,
carefully put together by U.S.
consular officials in East
Jerusalem, included former
Gaza Mayor Rashad A-Shawa,
Dr. Khatem Abu Ghazzala of
Gaza and Mayor Hannah el
Atrash of Beit Sahur in the
West Bank.
A-Shawa, who is pro-
Jordanian, said in an interview
later that he did not wish to
deepen divisions in the Palesti-
nian camp by meeting with
Shultz at this time. He and the
others also may have wanted
to avoid the small group of
Palestinian students picketing
Shultz's hotel during the time
set for the meeting.
They carried placards com-
paring restrictions in the ad-
ministered territories with
those in force against Jews in
the Soviet Union. Shultz, who
observed the pickets, told
reporters, "I don't know of
any limitations on emigration"
from the territories.
The East Jerusalem Arabic
press, which has considerable
influence with West Bankers,
had advised the Palestinian
leaders not to attend the
meeting. They said the recent
escalation of violence in the
territories was good reason to
boycott Shultz.
Other reports indicated the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion had pressured represen-
tatives from the territories not
to meet with Shultz, because of
the secretary's involvement in
recent moves to close the
PLO's Information Office in
Washington.
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Ida Nudel shows her just-received certificate
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teservadox Resolutions:
Orthodox, Conservative, Reform
Rabbis Work Out Compromise On 'Get'
Friday, October 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
By RABBI
HASKELL LOOKSTEIN
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
here is good news for 5748.
year 5747 saw a first in
New York Jewish com-
nity: Rabbis of all different
rpoints worked together
a religious problem and
[night it closer to a solution.
rhe problem we faced is vex-
[: How to enable all Jews to
rry freely with each other.
> of the reasons the problem
5ts is that about 25 percent
Jewish marriages today end
divorce. Most of the divorc-
I couples obtain only a civil
orce. They do not arrange
la "get" (religious divorce).
lost divorcees marry a se-
I time. That marriage is in-
|d according to Orthodox
I Conservative Jews unless
et has been obtained to end
first marriage. In such a
the children of that se-
marriage are considered
nzeirim (illegitimate) ac-
ding to Torah law and are
|igible to marry other Jews
ept for other mamzeirim.
he problem is exacerbated
|a number of factors. First,
pt Jews do not even know
at a get is. Second, most
form and Reconstructionist
bis do not require a get as a
requisite for remarriage. In
lition. when a candidate for
parriage suddenly needs a
or his former
Use may be uncooperative.
lount Chocula
Loses Star
ffiW YORK General
|ls has withdrawn four
lion packages of its Count
aila cereal and is redesign-
the box to eliminate a
fish Star of David from
id the neck of its Dracula
Btration.
William M. Shaffer, the
nneapolis-based company's
blic relations manager, ex-
ped that a new electronic
essing technique had been
I to lift the likeness of Bela
fosi from the 1930 film
acula" and place it on the
real package. Lugosi's
^tume in the film included a
[pointed medallion with a
ge stone center used to hyp-
tize people but the process-
; technique flattened out the
N thereby turning the
Million into a Star of David.
Shaffer said that four million
ckages of Count Chocula
real had already been
Btnbuted when the situation
fcs brought to the company's
ftention by the Anti-
etamation League of B'nai
fnth.
I immediately changed
p. Package design for the re-
JjurunK four million packages,
ur TV commercials.
[ lured ourselves that
OB would not he on
r communication from
( Mills affer
vindictive or demand money to
gain compliance (would any
sum not be outrageous?) The
aggrieved party then has two
unacceptable choices: to marry
contrary to Jewish law, at
least as far as Orthodox and
Conservative Jews understand
it, or to remain single, as an
agunah.
A committee of the New
York Board of Rabbis was
authorized to propose a resolu-
tion to solve this problem. The
participants included Rabbis
Gunter Hirschberg and Marc
Gelman (Reform), Gilbert
Rosenthal and Allan Blaine
(Conservative), Robert
Aronowitz (Reconstructionist)
and Marc Angel and myself
(Orthodox). We were all united
on the desire to solve the pro-
blem. The biggest hurdle was
the inegalitarian structure of a
get (the man gives it; the
woman accepts it).
Some suggested that if we
could egalitarianize the docu-
ment there would be no pro-
blem. Others countered that if
we did that there would be no
get at all. We decided together
and some of my colleagues
compromised greatly on this
that as important as
egalitarianism may be as a
religious principle for some of
us, the ability of all our
children to marry freely
among each other was of
greater import to all of us.
The resolution, which was
passed both unanimously and
enthusiastically by the Board
contained the following three
parts:
We called upon every rabbi
to counsel his (or her) con-
gregants that in the event of a
civil divorce the congregant
should make certain to ar-
range for a Jewish divorce
get from a religiously
recognized tribunal authorized
to issue such a document.
We called upon
synagogues and the wider
community to take sanctions
against any divorced person
who refused to cooperate with
a former spouse who wishes to
obtain a get. Such sanctions
would include the withholding
from such a person of any
honors or privileges within a
congregation, or any office
holding or honors in the wider
community.
We suggested that rabbis
encourage couples who are
about to be married to sign a
prenuptial agreement pro-
viding that in the event that
the marriage ends in a civil
divorce, the husband and wife
will cooperate in the giving
and receiving of a get.
This resolution was made
possible by a spirit of mutual
love and respect which
members of the New York
Board of Rabbis have for each
other. We do not obscure our
differences. But we accept
each other as idealistic pro-
ponents of differing points of
view arrived at by deep
religious convictions. In most
areas we simply agree to
disagree. But on the issue of
get we saw a problem which
threatens to divide our people
into two groups, the members
of which will not be able to
marry each other. Because our
commitment to the Jewish
people as a whole transcends
whatever adjective may be
prefixed to our interpretation
of Judaism, we acted as one
and we hope that other boards
of rabbis will do the same.
Find out how good
we really are
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TODAYS TWA. FIND OUT HOW GOOD WE REALLY ARE.


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 23, 1987
Israeli Constitution No Wall of Separation
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
(Part One
Of A Two-Part Seriet)
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Israel has begun a year-long
celebration of its 40th anniver-
sary with a special emphasis
on the Declaration of In-
dependence proclaimed when
the Jewish State was
established.
But one major promise of the
Declaration has not yet been
realized a constitution.
"The promise of the Declara-
tion of Independence should be
fulfilled with a constitution for
Israel in order to safeguard
the humanistic and democratic
values upon which Zionism
was founded and to provide
Israel with an efficient govern-
ment which will enable us to
face the very difficult pro-
blems ahead," said Uriel
Reichman, dean of the Tel
Aviv University Law Faculty,
in an interview with the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
here.
Reichman and three of his
colleagues at the law school
have drafted a proposed con-
stitution which includes a Bill
of Rights and wide changes in
the government of Israel. He
said the draft was written
after consultation with con-
stitutional scholars and
political scientists in Israel,
the United States and Western
Europe.
Since the proposed constitu-
tion was released at Tel Aviv
University last August, there
has been "an explosion of
Israeli opinion" in favor of a
constitution, Reichman said.
Israelis have volunteered to
support the campaign for a
constitution and a committee
has been formed to press the
government to act. "People
have shown up in my office to
support the campaign" and
donate funds, Reichman said.
He said Israeli newspapers
have offered free advertising
space, a major ad agency is
undertaking the campaign free
Arab Ouster Vote Quashed
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) The General
Assembly voted 80-39 to reject
an Arab-sponsored move to
deny Israel its credentials.
There were 10 abstentions and
29 countries were absent. The
margin of defeat was the
largest ever for the Arabs in
their early attempt to expel
Israel from tne world
organization.
This year it took the form of
an eight-word amendment to a
resolution before the General
Assembly to accept collective-
ly the credentials of 115 UN
member states. The Arabs pro-
posed the phrase, "except with
regard to the credentials of
Israel," but the move was
overwhelmingly rejected.
Israeli diplomats, while very
much satisfied with the out-
come, expressed disappoint-
ment that the Soviet Union
continued to support the Arab
attempt to oust Israel. Israel
had specifically requested the
USSR change its position at a
meeting here between the
Israeli Ambassador to the UN,
Binyamin Netanyahu, and the
Soviet UN envoy, Alexander
Belongov.
Two Communist-bloc coun-
tries, Poland and Hungary,
which recently established
low-level diplomatic relations
with Israel, were among the
absentees. The People's
Republic of China abstained,
as it has in past years.
The behavior of Jordan was
something of a mystery. Jor-
dan and Egypt were the only-
Arab League members that
did not add their signatures to
those of 19 Arab countries and
the Palestine Liberation
Organization on a letter to UN
Secretary General Javier
Perez de Cuellar protesting
Israel's membership in the
UN. Nevertheless, Jordan ap-
peared on the list of sponsors
of the expulsion amendment,
apparently having come under
severe pressure from the Arab
League.
At the time of the vote,
however, the Jordanian
delegation was absent from
the roll call, leading Israeli
diplomats to express cautious
hope that Jordan may yet cast
a vote against Israel's ouster
from the UN.
Holiday Symbol Goes to Court
NEW YORK The Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith asked a federal appeals
court to bar public displays of a
Christmas Nativity scene and
a Hanukkah menorah on
government property in Pitt-
sburgh during the coming holi-
day season.
The League is representing
Malik Tunador. a Moslem, who
is one of the plaintiffs in the
case. Tunador testified in
federal district court that as an
Allegheny County taxpayer he
felt excluded by the two
religious symbols. The other
court rejected his argument.
In a brief filed with the Third
Circuit Court of Appeals in
Philadelphia, the ADL said the
annual placement of a creche
in the Allegheny County cour-
thouse and a Hanukkahon the
steps of the Pittsburgh City-
County building constitutes
government promotion of
religion that violates the First
Amendment's separation of
church and state.
of charge and buses carry free
ads urging a constitution.
Support has also come from
business and financial leaders,
and the mayors of 30 cities
throughout Israel have issued
a proclamation urging the
Knesset to act, Reichman said.
President Chaim Herzog in
his Rosh Hashanah message
also lent his support. "This is
the time to hold a thorough,
non-political national discus-
sion, to be based on a new na-
tional consent, on the issue of
formulation of a constitution
for Israel," Herzog said.
He defined such a constitu-
tion as one "which will anchor
the fundamentals of living in
the State and will strengthen
Israel's democracy, a constitu-
tion which will mirror our
qualities of unity and uni-
queness as a nation, which will
be based on the Declaration of
Independence, as well as on
the realities of life in Israel
after 40 years of sovereignty."
Reichman said he has received
support from Knesset
members of all parties.
Premier Yitzhak Shamir has
praised the effort of the law
professors and said Israel was
"mature" enough now to have
a constitution.
While Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres has not made
any public statements yet,
Reichman, who is scheduled to
meet with him, said he believes
Peres will also support the
effort.
Reichman said he knows
there are many difficulties
ahead, but he believes that this
is the "opportune moment,
providing that the public
pressure will be kept on very
strongly" and the issue can be
kept non-partisan.
"We are trying hard to
finalize the matter before the
end of May 1988," when the
next election campaign for the
Knesset is scheduled to begin,
Reichman said.
He said he would like to see
representatives of all the par-
ties meet in a closed conven-
tion to approve the constitu-
tion and submit it to the
Knesset. Although it is not re-
quired, Reichman believes that
if the Knesset approves a con-
stitution it should be submitted
to a referendum so that all
Israelis can take part in
creating a new "social
covenant."
Richman said that he and his
colleagues engaged in their ef-
fort because of a fear that the
current situation endangers
Israel's democratic structure
and the humanistic values on
which Zionism was
established.
That is why a "Bill of
Rights" was considered man-
datory. "The most sacred
human rights can be amended
by a simple majority of the
Knesset," he said.
He noted particularly the
religious laws which are sub-
ject to pressure from the small
religious parties needed to
form a government by Labor
and Likud. He said the rightw-
ing political element might
find they need the support of
Rabbi Meir Kahane to form a
government and adopt a law to
impose a curfew on Israeli
Arabs, or the left wing might
need the Communists and
agree to nationalize major
industries.
"In order to preserve in-
dividual freedom, the State
should be run for the benefit of
its citizens rather than the
politicians," Reichman said.
The proposed Bill of Rights
would preserve religous
freedom, but it would also pro-
tect secular Israelis, allowing
civil marriage, divorce and
burial. Reichman said. But, he
stressed, there would be no
"wall of separation" as in the
U.S. Constitution, and the
State would still support
religious services.
Reichman rejected the long-
held common view that David
Ben Gurion, Israel's first
Prime Miister, did not push for
a constitution because of the
religious issue. He noted that
the National Religious Party
was ready to support a con-
stitution in 1949-50 and that
one of its leaders would have
chaired the committee draf-
ting the document.
"Beb Gurion simply did not
want a stituation in which his
hands would be tied by a bin-
ding document," Reichman
said.
In addition to the guarantee
contained in other democratic
constitutions, Reichman said
the proposed Bill of Rights
would also contain the right of
citizens to a humane standard
of living. He explained that in
the Jewish tradition of each
Jew being responsible for the
other, citizens who were starv
ing or homeless would have a
sKE n ^A government
Reichman said he did not fej
that Israel could end up with,
constitution in which Israeli
would lose some of the rid,!!
they now have. This is the con
cern of many in the U S in
eluding the Jewish communitv
about the proposals for a
stitutional convention to force
an amendment requiring a
balanced budget.
While there is always the
danger of this happening
Reichman conceded he
believes the Bill of Rights is
too ingrained in the American
tradition for this to happen in
the U.S., and polls have shown
that two-thirds of Israelis
want their country to be a
Western-style democracy.
Marden D. Paru has been ap-
pointed National Campaign
Director at the American OKI
Federation. Prior to joining
the American ORT Federa-
tion, Paru served as tki
Metropolitan New York
Regional Director of American
Technion Society. At National
Campaign Director, Paru will
be responsible for directing all
fund raising and chapter
development activities- ot the
American ORT Federation
throughout the United State*.
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Friday, October 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Soviet Emigrees
Announced On TV
Continued from Page 1-A
"Are you sure they can
leave?" asked Jennings.
Because if you are, I assure
vou this is the first he has
heard of it or anyone has heard
0f it," Jennings replied, the
he" referring to Fridman.
The telecast was the second
such program between
members of Congress and the
(Kremlin, although un-
precedented in frankness. The
Soviets, who saw the over-one-
hour broadcast Thursday mor-
ning beginning at 6:30 a.m.,
got the entire telecast, in-
cluding the American
I commercials.
Press reports from Moscow
I indicate the Soviets were
rather startled to awaken to
an unexpected, uncensored
American condemnation of
their human rights record,
emanating from the floor of
the U.S. Senate, and being
responded to in precise detail
by members of their own
I government.
Sen. Daniel Patrick
Moynihan (D-N.Y.), seated ad-
I jacent to Jennings, slammed
] into the Soviet human rights
I record with marked direct-
Iness. "We all know perfectly
I well that for most of this cen-
I tury the Soviet Union has been
la hell for human rights," he
I said.
Lynn Singer, executive
[director of the Long Island
[Committee for Soviet Jewry,
I said refuseniks Lev Elbert in
Kiev Vladimir Slepak in
[Moscow and Aba Taratuta in
[Leningrad were "very im-
pressed" by the program,
[especially by Rep. Steny
Hoyer (D-Md.), chairman of
the Helsinki Commission, who
enumerated individual cases of
refuseniks who were not yet
permitted to leave.
Hoyer asked why the Soviets
wouldn't let refuseniks "like
Leon Charny" leave, mistak-
ing the younger brother living
in Needham, Mass., for Ben-
jamin Charny of Moscow, who
sufferes from cancer and heart
disease, among several
ailments.
Several relatives of
refuseniks were presented in
Congress for the television
program, including Galina
Welishina, a Soviet emigre
whose husband, Pietris
Belphin, has been denied per-
mission to emigrate 17 times
on the basis of "state secrets."
A deputy minister from
Lithuania said he was familiar
with this case and said "it is a
case of state secrets."
Rep. Clay Shaw (R-Fla.)
referred to the five-year limit
on "secrecy," which Gor-
bachev himself attested to in
1985. The Lithuanian's
response was that "Gorbachev
said five, 10 years, sometimes
even more. I was there when
he said it. I remember it well."
Rep. Benjamin Gilman
(R-N.Y.) enumerated cases of
Jews who have over the years
applied to leave the USSR.
"Since 1968, we have 670,000
affidavits from Israel and
200,000 from the United
States. I have a list of 383,000
who have requested emigra-
tion visas." Gilman also refer-
red to the "tightening up of
restriction to only blood
relatives."
Shultz Concludes
Mideast Visit
Continued from Page 1-A
hich Shamir could be "more
imfortable than he obviously
with the international
inference."
His words were more
tinted when he spoke at the
eizmann Institute of Science
m Rehovot and at Tel Aviv
niversity after receiving
lonorary doctorates from both
nstitutions earlier Sunday.
'Those who are reluctant to
explore new ideas, or even
revisit old ones, have an
obligation to offer something
different as an alternative to
*e status quo," Shultz said.
The Secretary arrived in
Israel last Friday afternoon
fw was greeted at Ben-
wuion Airport by Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres. Later
h(1 met for his first working
- with Shamir and later
with p..
urday, he flew to
ftau Arabia, returning to
Jerusalem by t-vening for fur-
>er talks with Shamir and
/ had a final round
"""Si amir Sunda> night. He
P* ; rypi Mondaj morn-
"? Aci -rdirig to Amen
.1!
the Persian Gulf
situation during his brief stay
in Saudi Arabia.
Shultz is visiting the region
before going to Moscow for
nuclear arms limitation talks
and some observers attached
significance to his time-table.
But Shultz himself asked
Israelis to view his visit in the
context of the "continuing
discussions going on all the
time." He referred to Shamir's
forthcoming visit to the United
States and to the state visit by
President Chaim Herzog next
month.
Shultz said his talks here
were "thorough, intense .
constructive and beneficial."
He noted that "We all believe
that the way to get to peace is
through direct negotiations.
Now, how do you bring that
about?" he asked. "We con-
tinue to scratch our heads
about that..."
Editor's Note: Almost lost
in the news was Shut!; I ""-
nouncrme. $10.00*'
tonal donation, tl
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ty i, is in
political *>
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Misha Taratuta, son of prominent Leningrad
refuseniks Aba and Ida Taratuta, met with
Sen Lawton Chiles (D., Fla.) to discuss the
hardships he faced during his 11,-year struggle
to emigrate from the Soviet Union. This is the
first time Misha has personally met Sen.
Chiles, who adopted the Taratuta family six
months ago. In addition to the litany of dif-
ficulties that refuseniks face, the Taratutas
were the subjects of heightened discrimination
and ostracism after TV and newspaper pieces
showed photos of Aba Taratuta, revealed his
name and labeled him a "traitor" and
"Zionist conspirator."
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. October 23. 1987
French Crime and Tragedy
Continued from Page 5-A
of World War II.
In fact, says historian Jean
Marie-Rioux. it is not revi-
sionism at all, but denial.
Rioux wrote in the newspaper
Le Monde that to speak of
revisionism and revisionists is
to suggest that revisionism is
an alternative historical school
rather than a pro-Nazi pro-
paganda mill. Rioux says these
people must be called what
they are: "negators." or
Africans or Palestinians who
were trying to rid themselves
of foreign rule.
It was a more subtle and in-
sidious kind of revisionism, it
was an attempt to equate
Hitler's genocide with a war of
independence.
The verdict in the Barbie
case showed that neither judge
nor jury accepted the Verges
defense. They said, in effect,
that genocide is genocide and
Editor's Note: Robert Goldman discusses anti-Semitism
of the 'left* and 'right' in a local interview beginning on
page 1-B.
deniers people who. just as
the Nazis tried to keep their
genocide secret, are denying
the truth in our time.
Chances are that as the
political campaign in France
heats up with Le Pen playing a
prominent role, the unmasking
of revisionism wll continue to
be part of the public dialogue.
All these events came on top
of the Barbie trial, where revi-
sionism also reared its head.
Jacques Verges, Barbie's
defense attorney, and his two
assistants attempted to
downgrade the Holocaust with
the argument that to throw
people into the gas chambers
was not different from killing
people in a war. They argued it
was no more of a crime to kill
millions of defenseless Jews
only because they were Jews,
than it was to fight against
Algerians, Vietnamese.
war is war, and the two are as
different as crime from
tragedy.
It appears that in 1987
France turned a page, and by
its response to the falsifiers of
history added a chapter of
decency to a past that had
been tainted by World War II.
In the process. France has
shown other nations which
have tended to forget or
forgive that, even more than
40 years later, a people can
find within itself new
resources of character and
moral strength.
Abraham H. Foxman is na-
tional director of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith. Robert B. Goldman is
director of ADL's European
Office in Paris.
Jeuisk Telegraphic Agency
France After Dreyfus
Continued from Page 5-A
groups taking part in the case.
Le Pen, a World War II
paratrooper, is a spellbinding a
public speaker with seemingly
unlimited financial resources.
His comrades in racism admire
him for "saying out loud what
the French think deep down."
That is: Well, that foreigners
admitted to France are an
insect-like plague. That all who
oppose the National Front are
Marxists. That "for the
Socialists, it's me or suicide."
And aspiring to bring all Fren-
chmen together in a fasces (an
ancient Roman symbol of
power), thus echoing the
philosophy of Mussolini.
Le Pen knows how to draw
out the worst in his mob. For
example, when the name of the
distinguished Jewish
stateswoman Simone Veil, a
former President of the Euro-
pean Parliament, was men-
tioned at a National Front ral-
ly, the neo-fascists shouted:
Soviet Delegation
To Extend Stay
DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Soviet Consular delega-
tion in Tel Aviv has been
granted a formal three-month
extension of its original three-
month visa to Israel.
Observers say this means, in
effect, that the eight Kremlin
officials have become a semi-
permanent presence in Israel,
and thereby constitute a step
toward eventual restoration of
normal diplomatic ties.
"Back to Auschwitz."
Although they failed to men-
tion Bergen-Belsen. they
might have, for she suffered
during the Hitler era in both
death camps.
Le Pen's television tirades
have attracted an estimated 14
million. What. then, of his
future?
Sardonically, in 1985,
France's well-edited daily Le
it recommended "letting
the were wolf howl and foam
himself into exhaustion." This
is a dubious proposal. Recall
that a werewolf named Hitler
howled and foamed so effec-
tively that he nearly conquered
Europe.
If there is hope for halting
Le Pen's thrust to the degree
of power and influence to
which he aspires, it lies in part
in the fear of terrorism in
France. This trepidation has
prompted thousands of
citizens to raise cries of
outrage as they march down
Paris streets protesting such
tragedies as the 1980 bombing
of the Rue Copernic
Synagogue and the 1985 Rivoli
Beaubourg cinema bombing
during the Jewish Film
Festival.
The shame of the Dreyfus af-
fair cannot be easily forgotten
in France. Nor will that
historic, civilized nation
capitulate to the National
Front or any other group of
Hitler-admirers.
Robert E. Segal is a former
newspaper editor and director
of the Jewish community coun-
cils of Cincinnati and Boston.
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Friday, October 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Israel And The Diaspora: A Rift In The Partnership
By SIMON GRIVER
The rift between the
[piaspora fundraisers and
Israeli members, each of whom
(comprise one half of the
Jewish Agency's Board of
Governors, became the domi-
nant issue at this summer's
Jewish Agency Assembly. On
[the one hand, the Israelis felt
aggrieved at the manner in
which the Diaspora represen-
tatives had forced World
Zionist Organization and
Jewish Agency chairman Arye
Dulzin not to seek reelection,
nhile for their part, the
Diaspora delegates were in-
tuited by the backlash of
Resentment vented at them.
Behind the argument over
ulzin is a longstanding divi-
sion between Israeli leaders
Lnd the Diaspora fundraisers.
I'nder the historic shiddach
match) arranged at the birth
If the Jewish state, the
Diaspora donated large sums
)f money for Israel's welfare
jihich the Jewish Agency
ipent in coordination with the
government.
But the marriage was a
fraught with problems. As the
fears went by, overseas fun-
Jraisers felt that they should
lave a greater say in how the
Jioney they were donating was
[sed! Israelis, however,
irgued that decision could not
le made from offices in New
fork or Los Angeles but only
i Israel.
Nevertheless, world Jewry
^ras given a role following the
econstitution of the Jewish
Lgency in 1971. Half of the
pembers on the newly-formed
ird of Governors were to be
boninated by the overseas
undraisers with the other half
eing Israeli representatives
bosen by the WZO. Yet many
rhe overseas
fundraisers found
wit they could wield
p'lisiilerable power if
Ihey stood together.
overseas Jews remained
frustrated because executive
power remained firmly in
Jerusalem with most Jewish
Agency department heads re-
maining party politicians serv-
ing in the same capacity with
the WZO.
As time passed, the overseas
fundraisers found that they
could wield considerable
power if they stood together.
At last spring's Board of
Governor's meeting, a motion
was passed asking Dulzin to
state that he would not seek
another term as Jewish Agen-
cy chairman. The motion pass-
ed because some Israelis abs-
tained from voting but even if
the vote had split 50-50.
Dulzin's moral authority would
have been significantly under-
mined; he would have been
unable to continue in office
with the unanimous disap-
proval of the Diaspora
fundraisers.
At the heart of the
matter is a mutual
antipathy between the
Israelis who are
politicians and the
fundraisers who are
businessmen and
corporate executives.
The ostensible reason for
such widespread dissatisfac-
tion was Dulzin handling of
Bank Leumi. The Jewish
Agency has controlling in-
terest in the bank and as such
the chairman serves as the
bank's governor. Following
the revelations about former
chairman Ernst Japhet's $5
million severance pay. Dulzin
came under fire for his
perceived lack of interest in
the bank he governed.
But Irving Bernstein, who
sits on the Jewish Agency's
Board of Governors and who
served for many years as ex-
ecutive vice-president of the
United Jewish Appeal (the
American fundraising
STRUCTURE OF THE WORLD ZIONIST ORGANIZATION
AND THE JEWISH AGENCY
[g
ORGANIZATION
TWE IEWISH AGE NO
TERRITORIAL ZIONIST f f DERATIONS
IDE OtOClCAl GROUPINGS
INTERNATIONAL KWIVI BOOKS
WORLD ZIONIST ORGANIZATION
UNITED ISRAEL APPEAL
WORLD KEREN HAYESOO
ZIONIST CONGRESS
AS? DELEGATES
USA-2% ISRAEL-J%
OTHER COUNTRIES-31%
ZIONIST SUPREME COURT
ATTORNEY Of THE WZO
THE IEWISH NATIONAI
EUND
IEGAI
ADVISOR
THI
COMPTROLLER!
THE ASSEMBLY
DELEGATES
uia -"%vvoDw^N7^Ytibo^ in
HISAiWZO- SOX
ZIONIST GENERAL
COUNCIl
161 MEMBERS
BOARO OE GOVERNORS
74 MEMBERS
PRESIDIUM
KRM BUDGET & FINANCE COmmI
ZIONIST EXECUTIVE
16 MEMBERS AND
ASSOL IATE MEMBERS
CHAIRMAN Of THI
EXECUTIVE
TREASURER
IEWISH AGENCY
EXECUTIVE
I9MEMBERS
SHLICFMM AUTHORITY
EDUCATION PROGRAM AND FUNOS
u
LEGAL
ADVISOR
IMMIGRATION & ABSORPTION DIVISION
SETTLEMENT DIVISION
TREASURY DEPT
VOUTH I HECMAIUTZ Of PT
EDUCATION a, CULTURE DEPT
TORAH EDUCATION DEPT
ORGANIZATION Of PT
INFORMATION DEPT
DEVELOPMENT SERVICES OEPT
SEPHARDI COMMUNITIES OEPT
YOUNG LEADERSHIP DEPT
EXTERNAL RELATION OEPT.
STUDENT DIVISION
SPIRITUAL SERVICES DIVISION
IMMIGRATION It ABSORPTION DEPARTMENT
SETTLEMENT DEPARTMENT
TREASURY DEPARTMENT
YOUTH ALIYA DEPT
PROUCT RE NEVVAL
HOUSING PROGRAMS
SOCIAL PROGRAMS
ISRAEL EDUCATION FUND
PNp*JbYltWZOOr Dtp
organization that collects most
of the Jewish Agency's funds),
does not regret the decision to
oust Dulzin.
"It was not the Bank Leumi
affair," he explains, "that pro-
voked the decision to ask
Dulzin not to seek reelection so
much as the need to renew the
Agency's leadership. We in the
Diaspora, and especially in
America, are more accustom-
ed to limited tenure. Dulzin is a
fine man who has worked hard
and well for the Jewish Agen-
cy. But leadership must every
so often make way for younger
blood."
The consensus in Israel
cutting across party lines is
that Dulzin was treated badly.
r*""7 former President, Yitzhak Navon,
fJH '"'it plans for Israel's UOth anniversary
' emphasize the Jewish state's ties with the
rj\an "the values of freedom, democracy
contained in Israel's Declaration
ardk'ulence- Ai a Pre88 conference sPon-
inirw ,he Conference of Presidents of Major
w*rfw Jewish Organizations, which is
coordinating the U.S. observance of the an-
niversary, Mr. Navon. right, joined Howard
M. Squadron, chairman of the National Com-
mit tee for Israel's UOth Annirersiiri/. in nouneinga broad range of events in Israel unit
the l mted States marking four decades of in-
dependent Jewish statehood.
Uzi Narkiss, Head of the
WZO's Department of Infor-
mation and a representative of
the Labor Alignment, feels
that Dulzin was handled in an
undignified manner. "Dulzin
made a mistake," he insists.
"He should have been more in-
volved in the affair of Bank
Leumi. But Dulzin could have
been persuaded not to seek
reelection in a more dignified
way. Dulzin has dedicated his
best years to the Zionist move-
ment and has achieved a great
deal. There was no need to
knock him over the head with a
hammer in public."
The Likud's Matitiahu
Droblas, Joint Head of the
Jewish Agency's and WZO's
Rural Settlement Department,
is equally adamant in his con-
demnation of the action of the
overseas philanthropists on
the Board of Governors.
"It was anti-democratic
behavior," he asserts. "Who
are they to depose Dulzin?
They were nominated, not
elected. The Zionist Congress
democratically decided that
Dulzin should head the WZO
and the Jewish Agency, and
the upcoming Zionist Congress
will decide the next head."
At the heart of the matter is
a mutual antipathy between
the Israelis who are politicians
and the fundraisers who are
businessmen and corporate
executives.
"The fundraisers complain
about efficiency," says
Droblas, "and no doubt we can
improve our efficiency. But we
are not a profit-making cor-
poration. Our business is social
welfare, informational ac-
tivities, education and settle-
ment. You cannot approach
these issues with callous
calculations of profit and loss."
Bernstein, however, would
like to see more of Israel's
talented businessmen involved
with the Jewish Agency. "It
would mean that the Diaspora
fundraisers would be speaking
to people of their own kind,"
he explains. "It is only logical
that matters are facilitated
when people who are working
together have things in
common."
But there is no inclination
among the Israeli members of
the Jewish Agency establish-
ment to depoliticize their
membership. "Who is a politi-
cian anyway?" asks Droblas.
"Most of them are also
lawyers, journalists, university
professors and businessmen.'
The Israelis consider that
the Diaspora fundraisers are
being unrealistically modest in
Inevitably, a major
bone of contention
continues to be aliya,
or rather a lack of it.
their definition of political ac-
tivity. They maintain that by
assuming community leader-
ship roles within the Diaspora,
the philanthropists are involv-
ed in politics. Moreover, of-
ficials insist that depoliticizing
the Jewish Agency would
ideologically castrate the
movement which forms a vital
bridge between Israel and the
Diaspora.
In this, the two sides may
not be so far apart. Bernstein
is insulted by the derogatory
way in which the term "fun-
draiser" is hurled at people.
"Fundraising is among the
most noble of Zionist
endeavors," he claims. "I am a
life-long fundraiser and a
lifelong Zionist. Fundraising
forms an integral part of the
Continued on Page l.">-A


Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Frida>. October 23. 1987
Satellite Network To Network Groups
The new television system
linking local Jewish Federa-
tions in a closed circuit com-
munications network will also
be available for use by outside
organizations and institutions,
according to the Council of
Jewish Federations, sponsor
of the system, and the Jewish
Satellite Network, which
operates the network.
The network, which uses
statt'-of-thVart technology to
transmit live programming by
domestic and international
satellites, will become opera-
tional later this month. It will
link Jewish Federations in 25
major cities across the coun-
try, with another dozen ex-
pected to sign up before the
end of the vear.
Meed Designated Weisel Honoree
Benjamin Meed of New
York, president of the
American Gathering and
Federation of Jewish
Holocaust Survivors, has been
designated as the 1987 reci-
pient of the third annual Elie
Wiesel Holocaust Remem-
brance Award.
The prestigious award, nam-
ed for its first recipient, Nobel
Peace Prize Laureate Elie
Wiesel, will be presented to
Meed at a National Holocaust
Survivors Dinner in his honor
to be held Dec. 20 at the Fon-
tainebleau Hotel, Miami
Beach.
The dinner, which is being
held in association with State
of Israel Bonds, is expected to
draw an attendance of several
thousand survivors from all
sections of the United States
and Canada.
Carmi Schwartz, executive
vice president of CJF, said the
facilities would be open to local
and national Jewish organiza-
tions as well as non-Jewish
groups affiliated with the
United Way.
CJF plans to use the net-
work for seminars, briefings,
conferences training and key
committee meetings. It also
views the satellite facility as
serving the needs of other non-
profit organizations that do
not have sufficient resources
to establish their own systems.
Groups interested in explor-
ing an arrangement with CJF
or installing their own in-house
systems should write or call
Lee Hanna. Jewish Satellite
Network, 790 Madison
Avenue, New York. NY 10021.
(212) 517-3300.
Fron left: Hesi Carmel. Lee Hanna, and Meir A
tmnal Satellite Networks, which developed Uu .'
\< vork.
You are invited to attend the
FIRST SOUTHEAST APPEARANCE
OF
NATAN (ANATOLY) SHARANSKY
1
FOR OVER 10 YEARS
YOU DEMONSTRATED FOR SHARANSKY
NOW JOIN HIM
IN SOLIDARITY WITH THE 400,000 JEWS STILL WAITING.
DATE: Monday, October 26, 1987
TIME: 7:30 p.m.
PLACE: Temple Adath Yeshurun
1025 Miami Gardens Dr., N. Miami Beach (Sharansky Dr.)
Sponsored By
GREATER MIAMI JEWISH FEDERATION'S
SOLTH FLORIDA CONFERENCE ON SOVIET JEWRY
a committee of the
COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMITTEE
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
Special Thanks to Temple Adath Ye*hurun
SEATING IS LIMITED.
tZ(l) Greater Miami Jewish Federation


Israel-China Relations
Friday, October 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
I Continued from Page 6-A
L Xinhua, the official Chinese
Inews agency, over 120 foreign
companies are now operating
in China as compared with
I' ne in 1979. Their in-
vestments exceed $500 million
Iwith half of the enterprises be-
ing "production-oriented.
I'During 1985 the number of
partly owned foreign ventures
reportedly jumped by 130 per-
|ent, from 1,000 to 2,300.
Foreign investors, however,
ire not without discontent:
tomplaints of bureaucracy,
long delays, uncertain and
'hanging regulations and high
It All
IComes Down
To Dollars
Continued from Page 13-A
tionist structure.
"Too many people are trying
prove that they are better
han others," Bernstein adds.
[Nor is it a question of we in
he Diaspora and they in Israel.
n'ithin the family of the
ewish people, there are many
sues that unite Israelis with
heir Diaspora brethren,
egardless of political orienta-
jon, religious philosophy or
thnic background."
These sentiments are
idespread both in Israel and
Kaspora and have called into
uestion the existing relation-
tiip between the WZO and the
ewish Agency. In theory, the
tiaspora could dictate to the
ewish Agency through the
ITZO, 62 percent of the Zionist
Jongress votes which selects
pe Jewish Agency Executive
re controlled from abroad.
in practice, most Diaspora
elegates tend to take direc-
from the Israeli political
krties whom they represent.
nothing else, the con-
oversial undercurrents and
hjuments l>etween Israeli and
aspora leaders livened up an
Iherwise pedestrian Jewish
|ency Assembly. The most
?ntrove rsial item was the
defining of what entails a
lonist institution in an att-
empt to see that Jewish Agen-
^ funds do not reach ultra-
thodox yeshivot that are
M-Zionist.
[Inevitably, a major bone of
Intention continues to be
\W. or other the lack of it.
W on this issue, Israel and
Mspora leaders may be draw-
K closer together. "I'm not
TO to make aliya myself,"
Ws Bernstein. "Never-
e|ess, there should be major
"!" from America.
"agogues, youth
ovements and community
fitters across the states
Odd place greater emphasis
jjjW. But ultimately the
"has to come from Israel
w and at the moment there
I no lead."
P"j* agrees that "im-
mion and absorption are a
, pnority with the govern-
nt- Unstructice policies on
'^bject barely exist."
L "W> is no doubt that the
diaspora dialogue, and
^eements regarding the
r*.Aency. will continue.
rtk 2r the two >* still
"k with each other there is at
* "ope for progress.
ISRAELI SCENE
[There
overheads, have become more
frequent of late. One Canadian
Jewish businessman, who
maintained sales offices in
Peking now Beijing and
Hong Kong, recently closed
down his operations and settl-
ed in Israel. While he has voic-
ed his disillusionment to
friends, he remains careful to
avoid any publicity on the
subject.
Nevertheless, Israelis at
both the official and private
levels continue their attempts
to breach the Great Wall. One
of the more visible signs of this
effort has been the recent
upgrading of the Israel con-
sulate in Hong Kong and the
addition of a commercial at-
tache. Hong Kong is con-
sidered to be the best window
to China. Its importance will
grow as the date of 1997 looms
for its takeover by the com-
munist Chinese, after 99 years
as a British crown colony. One
Israeli advertising: firm has
even put out a Chinese
language brochure on Israeli
economic enterprises to be
distributed on the mainland
with the help of the Israel-Asia
Chamber of Commerce.
Perhaps as a portent of
things to come, it is reported
that Israel has recently begun
exporting semen from its prize
bulls for insemination in
Chinese cows. In Israel it is
hoped that this will lead to the
birth of more than just calves.
ISRAEL SCENE
Taba Boundary
Talks Continue
GENEVA (JTA) The in-
iternational panel of arbiters
{deciding whether Egypt or
I Israel owns the Sinai territory
of Taba will hold a new round
of talks in February and hear
oral testimony at the end of
that month. Later, the panel
will view and visit Taba, which
sits at the Sinai border bet-
ween Israel and Egypt.
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Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 23, 1987

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At One Herald Plaza:
Chusmir Reports to the
Executive (Editor's) Suite
Janet Chusmir
From Paris to Miami
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Getting Janet Chusmir to sit
down and discuss herself and
her role as the executive editor
of one of the nation's most
powerful newspapers meant
putting up with the pressure of
clock-watching even though
she graciously had all calls put
on hold.
In the reception area outside
her office, Chusmir's assistant
on a recent day was fielding
call after call and saying the
same thing; that Chusmir
stands by the statement
Herald publisher Dick Capen
made in response to a full page
ad taken out by members of
the Hispanic community
decrying the Herald's treat-
ment of Radio Marti and other
issues involving coverage of
Latin American issues.
Outside in the newsroom,
reporters and editors walk
about, sit behind computer
screens and confer with one
another. There is discussion
about Wall Street's biggest
crash. But Chusmir shuts her
door, closing out the pulsating
newsroom, and sits with a
Jewish Floridian reporter on a
comfortable sofa in a bay-front
office.
Chusmir, 57, was born in
Boston, the daughter of the
late Henry and Anna Zoll. Her
father owned a leather and
shoe findings business. Her
mother was a bookkeeper but
gave that up when she got
married and became a
housewife, a path that
Continued on Page 8-B
Dollars Block Attempt
For Disabled Homes
Goldmann On European Anti-Semitism
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jeu-ish Floridian Staff Writer
EUROPEAN JEWISH
(communities "know more
about us than we do about
Ithem," says Robert Goldmann,
[director of the Anti-
iDefamation League's Paris
loffice.
"Current European Jewry is
Ihazy in the American-Jewish
[consciousness, yet there are
about a million and a half Jews
living there." Goldmann
M us to go a little
way to inform
ourselves when we go over to
Europe on vacation.
Born a European himself,
Goldmann left Germany in
1939. Today, he watches the
movements of fringe radical
groups which still fly the
swastika in France, Germany
and Spain.
But these extremist factions
do not disturb him as much as
other groups which have
entered the mainstream of
European politics by conceal-
ing their anti-Semitic
ideologies.
"There continues to be anti-
Semitism in Europe, as there
is everywhere. There are dif-
ferent versions of it in France,
Germany and Spain, on both
the right and left sides of the
(political) fence," says
Goldmann.
Anti-Semitism "exists
elsewhere, too, but there (in
France, Germany and Spain)
there are organized groups,"
he adds.
To the right of the political
spectrum, there are figures
such as France's Jean-Marie
Le Pen, a presidential can-
Continued on Page 4-B
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Two Greater Miami Jewish
agencies are attempting to
establish Dade County's first
group homes for the Jewish
disabled. Money, however, is
the obstacle.
"There's a crying need in the
community for kosher group
homes for the disabled," said
Rachel Tannenbaum, newly
appointed director of Jewish
Vocational Service (JVS).
The Jewish Federation of
Greater Miami has put group
homes for the disabled on its
funding lists but dollars have
not been available, agency of-
ficials said.
But the impetus to push for-
ward in helping the disabled is
not only a local concern. Last
month in New York, 140
representatives from 41 com-
munities in North America and
Israel gathered for the Na-
tional Conference on Service
to Jewish Individuals with
Disabilities.
Tannenbaum and one other
Miami representative, Sandra
Chalnick, executive assistant
of Jewish Family Service, at-
tended the two-day con-
ference, the first of its kind
ever held in the country.
Group homes for the disabl-
ed is the topic in which
Chalnick and Tannenbaum are
particularly interested.
Although there has not been
funding locally for the homes,
there are efforts being made to
get state funds for such
Continued on Page 2-B
Boy Scouts Offer Options for Educating Jewish Kids
Bj El LEN ANN STEIN
I
JEWISH KIDS are ratting
. religious education in the
borne, in the synagogue and in
the tin.st unlikely of places, the
cout troops.
with the announcement of a
new emblem that-can be earn-
in Jewish studies by the
kroungest, first grade Tiger
Scouts this fall, the National
pewish Committee on Scouting
P expanding the program
Mready available to scouts
from second grade to post-
high school, or 20-year-olds.
Scouting and religion do
MX, according to Marvin Jay
Bnapir... chairman of the local
Jewish Committee on
pcouting.
He cites the 12th law in the
scout oath which declares that
"A scout is reverent."
Yet, there were only about
13 Jewish emblems earned by
Boy Scouts this year, accor-
ding to Shapiro.
"Would we like to see more
awards? Yes. That is why the
Jewish committee pays for the
awards. We supply them with
the papers, record books they
will need. And, we make the
presentation of awards," he
says.
"Scouting itself is a problem
when they start competing at
the bar mitzvah level. I think a
lot of parents don't make an
effort for the boy to receive
the award. If we had a hun-
dred applicants a year we
MACCABEE
Tree of Life Honor to Fascell
Dante Fascell
Congressman Dante Fascell
will receive the Jewish Na-
tional Fund's highest tribute,
the Tree Of Life Award, at a
black tie dinner to be held
Saturday, Oct. 24 in the Grand
Ballroom of the Omni Interna-
tional Hotel.
The 8:15 dinner, to be
preceeded by a 7:30 p.m.
reception, will honor Fascell
for his years of public "service.
A Miami resident since 1925,
Fascell served in Africa, Sicily
and Italy during World War II
before embarking on his
political career.
First elected to Congress in
1954, Fascell was an official
congressional observer to the
Continued on Page 3-B
could raise money to pay for
the medals. That's not the
problem."
It is not that the Jewish
scout leaders are not making a
presence. The local chapter of
the Jewish scouting committee
has been serving Dade,
Broward and Monroe Counties
for about 17 years and has ap-
proximately 50 to 60 dues-
paying members, according to
Shapiro.
THE 12TH LAW of the boy
scouts obligates the scout to be
reverent toward God, to be
faithful in his religious duties
and respect the conviction of
others in matters of custom
and religion.
While the boy scouts have
been trying to get more scout
participation in the Jewish
award program, the girl scouts
are only now trying to
organize a local chaptt r of the
National Jewish Girl Scout
Committee. But the need is
there and that is why Dade
County resident Doris Gold
has been appointed to organize
the local chapter. Gold was not
available to discuss her plant.
There are awards for Jewish
studies in the girl scouts as
there are for other religions,
says Pauline Russell, program
services director for the Girl
Scout Council. But because
there is no local Jewish girl
scout organization, there is no
way of telling how many girls
in South Florida earn the
Jewish badges, known as the
Lehavah, Menorak and Ora
awards.
"Girl' scouting is an
*
Our
ecumenical organization,
says Russell. "Each girl's faith
is a family or individual deci-
sion so religious awards are
not earned in a troop setting as
other awards but with family
and religious institution."
If there is a question of
whether teaching Judaism
should be left to religious in-
stitutions and not scouting, it
does not trouble Gene Greenz-
weig, executive director of the
Central Agency for Jewish
Education in Greater Miami.
The emblem for Jewish
studies in scouts is a "great
idea," Greenzweig believes.
"It's part of a scout being
Continued on Page 5-B
Congressman Claude Pepper
will be honored by the Florida
Trade Council for Histadrut at
its first annual dinner at the
Sheraton Bal Harbour on Sun-
day, Oct. 25 at 7 p.m. There
will be a reception at 6 p.m.
The dinner, which is also being
sponsored by the Florida State
AFL-CIO, will be attended by
prominent members < political and union
communities.
Community
Friday, October 23,1987 Tht Jawish Floridian Section B


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 23, 1987
Muriel and Sidney J. Rudolph
The FOUNDERS of the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged are holding their
fifth Annual Gala at the Doral-on-the-Ocean
on Miami Beach. At what is expected to be the
largest Gala yet, FOUNDERS and their
guests will step into a Paris street scene.
Flower-sellers, newspaper kiosks, can-can
dancers and the strains of such gallic greats as
Louis and Bess Stein
Charles Aznavour and Jacques Brel will
create the cocktail hour ambience. "We've
done our very best to re-create the glamour
and the dazzle that was 'Cafe Society,' noted
Muriel Rudolph who, along with her husband
Sidney and Louis and Bess Stein, will co-
chair the Gala.
Homes For Disabled Blocked By Funds
Continued from Page 1-B
homes, they said. At the con-
ference, they were also able to
exchange ideas with represen-
tatives of cities such as Seat-
tle, Cleveland and Denver
where there are already group
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homes for the Jewish disabled.
David Saltman, executive
director of the JFS, said when
it comes to funding for the
homes locally, "the light is not
bright. From a point of view of
funds we have difficulty fun-
ding what we already have,"
he said.
A group home provides a
support system for someone
who is disabled and cannot live
by himself, and cannot or
should not be living with fami-
ly anymore.
"Our most recent study,
which was several years ago,
was that there were 40 to 50
developmental^/ disabled who
could use a group home,"
Saltman said. "That would
take five group homes because
a group home is designed for
about six to 10 adults." And,
Saltman said, he thinks his
study "underestimated" the
need."
"There is a tendency, par-
ticularly with the handicapped
to be discomforted by them
and not pay enough attention
to their problems," Saltman
said. "The problems with han-
dicapped people," he added,
"are several, not only because
their handicaps are so
debilitating but because people
have problems with dealing
with the handicapped."
The conference, however,
pointed out that "other cities
are doing wonderful things,"
Melvyn B. Frumkes, of
Frumkes and Greene, PA,
Miami, will address members
of the B'nai B'rith Bench and
Bar chapter on Oct. 28 about
the implications of divorce to
Jewish families. Mr. Frumkes
is also an adjunct professor at
the University of Miami School
of Law and a member of the
faculty of the National Judicial
College.
says Tannenbaum, "and we're
behind the times." Miami, she
notes paradoxically, is among
the top four largest Jewish
communities in the country.
The keynote address at the
convention was titled, "It's
Time to Open Our Doors:
Jewish Responsibility
Jewish Values."
The keynote speech was
delivered by Shoshana S. Car-
din, president of the Council of
Jewish Federations, one of the
conference sponsors. The
Council is the national associa-
tion of 200 Jewish Federations
in some 800 communities serv-
ing an estimated 5.7 million
Jews in the United States and
Canada.
"People with disabilities are
first and foremost people,"
Cardin said. "As parents, pro-
fessionals and leaders in the
Jewish community, it is our
responsibility to reach out and
make a home for them in our
synagogues, Jewish Centers,
schools and homes."
There was also a presenta-
tion about "Kids on the Block"
by an almost life-size puppet
troupe that works to improve
communication between the
disabled and non-disabled
populations.
At a program fair, 22 agen-
cies, Federations and other
organizations exhibited
materials and answered ques-
tions on their services to
disabled individuals.
"The New York meeting is
the first time the Council of
Jewish Federations has
recognized as an organized
group that there is a problem
with the Jewish disabled," said
Tannenbaum, of the JVS.
"So for us it was truly
wonderful because we have
been serving disabled people
for 30 years."
Tannenbaum's agency is the
only such Jewish agency to
work with the disabled in the
state of Florida, she said. The
JVS has a large sheltered
workshop for the disabled, and
offers work evaluation con-
tracts for the community and
skills training, serving approx-
imately 350 disabled people a
year. Still, there is room for
expansion there, too.
"We could double the size of
our facility tomorrow if we had
the funds," said Tannenbaum.
"There are a tremendous
number of disabled people here
in Dade County."
UN War Crimes File
Subject to Discussion
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) Representatives of
the 17 former members of the
United Nations War Crimes
Commission met with UN
Secretary General Javier
Perez de Cuellar last week to
inform him of their respective
governments' final position on
opening the files of Nazi war
criminals at the UN Archives
in Manhattan.
A meeting on the issue held
here Sept. 22-23 reached no
agreement, and the second
meeting was set to allow the
representatives time to con-
sult with their governments
and receive new directives.
But informed sources told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agen-
cy that no decision was ex-
pected. They stressed that the
final decision rests with the
Secretary General, who has
the authority to order the files
open. It is not expected before
the end of the month.
The issue is whether to allow
access to scholars, historians
and researchers to the dossiers
on more than 40,000 accu*)
Nazi war criminals T
dossiers are presently acce"
eorJytothegoveiS
UN member states.
The sources also told .k.
JTA that 16 former *&
of the long defunct E
Crimes Commission haw
already expressed supponfo
greater access to the files The
only country that has not y
disclosed its position is France
After last month's meetine a
source said the French had
suggested that scholars and
historians be allowed to view
the files at the archives but not
to publish or announce their
findings. The French position
was attributed to the fact that
the files contain more accusa-
tions of war crimes committed
in France than in any other
ocuntry.
It is contrary to the inten-
tions of Israel, which originallj j
demanded that the files he
open to all. The reported I
French proposal would, for all |
practical purposes, leave then
sealed.
Cypen and Kaplan to be Honored
Cypen Kaplan
Hazel Cypen and Mary Rose
Kaplan will be presented the
annual Temple Emanu El
Sisterhood Award Wednes-
day, Nov. 4, during the
organization's annual member-
ship luncheon. The event is
scheduled at 11:30 a.m. in the I
Friedland Ballroom of the |
Miami Beach synagogue. I
featured at the program
be "Fashions for Florida" by|
Jeanne Ross.
Dr. Irving Lehrman, rabbiof|
the congregation for the |
44 years, will present the TESI
Awards to both Mrs Cypal
and Mrs. Kaplan, each rfl
whom has served as president!
of Sisterhood and as a |
chairman of the annual!
Lehrman Dav School ScholaJ
ship Ball.
For reservations. 538, eit|
33.
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THOMAS R. POST, PA
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Friday, October 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
On Wednesday
the Lawyers
Study Torah
RaMBaM Downtown, a
Wednesday noon study group
which for the last year has
been studying the Mishnneh
Tank of Maimonides, will
complete the first of the 14
volumes on Wednesday, Oct.
28 at noon, in the conference
room of the law firm of
Rumberger, Wechsler and
Kirk, 3401 One Biscayne
Power. The group will
Icelebrate with a traditional
L/i/M/i/. a ceremony to mark the
[conclusion of the study of a
|major Jewish work.
The 20-year study of
hf&imonides code of law is an
[undertaking of Havurah of
|South Florida, an independent
Jewish fellowship. The study is
done in English, and no prior
learning is necessary to join
jthe group.
The first volume of the
Mishneh Torah is titled "The
took of Knowledge" and con-
terns the fundamentals of
Jewish faith. The next volume,
khich will begin at once, is
I'The Book of Love" and con-
ferns the Jewish prayer
Service.
Fur information, call
pt.>i 7:i49.
Spousal
Bereavement
Group
Bonds Honor Hunter
Sen. Graham and Dr. Vileshina
Graham Talks Tough on Soviets
WASHINGTON Human rights must be on any agenda
for U.S. talks with the Soviet Union, Senator Bob Graham
told a Florida woman separated from her husband because
Soviet officials refuse to let him emigrate.
"In our country, we sometimes take human rights for
granted," Graham told Dr. Galina Vileshina of Boca Raton.
"That's why it's shocking to learn that Soviet authorities
won't allow your husband to be re-united with his family."
Dr. Vileshina, a neurologist practicing medicine in Fort
Lauderdale, visited Graham in Washington on her way to
see her husband Pyatras Pakenas in Lithuania.
Soviet authorities allowed Dr. Vileshina to emigrate in
1980, but have denied an exit visa 17 times to her husband,
who needs heart surgery, she said.
Leland C. "Bud" Hunter
will be honored for his
charitable and community in-
volvement at the State of
Israel Bonds Organization
Israel 40th Anniversary
Dinner.
The event will be held Oct.
28 beginning with cocktails at
6:30 pm. at the Omni Interna-
tional Hotel in Miami.
The guest speaker will be
Charles Allen, Jr., an expert
on international terrorism and
on Nazi war-criminals living in
the United States. Allen has
written widely on the subject
of Nazi war-criminals and has
testified as an expert witness
before the U.S. Congress.
Hunter, Senior Vice Presi-
dent of Florida Power and
Light Company, has been ap-
pointed throughout the years
to serve on various committees
nationally and locally. He has
been active in United Way
since its inception and
developed and implemented
FP&L s Minority Vendor Pro-
gram, which was recognized
For the role it played in aiding
minorities to get better
positions.
He serves as board chairman
of Victoria Hospital and is a
member of the Florida
Lawyers Prepaid Legal
Services.
Leland "Bud" Hunter
Rabbi Simcha Freedman will
celebrate his 50th birthday and
25 years in the rabbinate on
Oct. 2U, in the Social Had of the
Adath Yeshurun Synagoque at
8:S0 p.m.
The Institute of Medical
Specialties Social Work
)epartmerit will be starting a
Spousal Bereavement Group.
The group will focus on
leveloping or restoring social
Ikills and providing support
lor nun and women who have
i pro found recent or
prior li
The group will meet on
ridays beginning Oct. 23 in
he auditorium at the Institute
|f Medical Specialties, 2845
Ventura Blvd., North Miami
Beach. For information,
186-5942.
Tree of Life
lonor to Fascell
Continued from Page 1-B
\ms Control Talks in Geneva
_nd has chaired numerous con-
cessional committees, In-
jjuding the Foreign Affairs
pommittee since 1984.
Chairing the Gala Banquet
I Jose Astigarraga, Norman
'raman, and Sherwood
*eiser. Members of the Din-
|er Committee include:
Leonard Abess; Jerome
Win; Donald Bierman; Rep.
[lame Bloom; Daniel Dubbin;
larton Goldberg; Samuel
farte; Burton Kahn; Donald
*eon; Norman Lipoff;
lUnley Margulies; Alan
[oUmkin; Herschel Rosen-
Eli .Commissioners Barry
fhreiber; Sol Schreiber; Fred
L.chet; Commissioner
[Jam Shockett; Neal Son-
F; Alan Steinberg; Kenneth
785 me(i Weisbrod; and
y Weiss.
Wa JosePh Sternstein is
8'dent of JNF of America;
Lemuel Cohen is executive
*rary of JNF of America.
KEEPS CEREAL
FRESHER LONGER
KEEPS CEREAL
CRISP LONGER
PROVIDES AIR TIGHT
STORAGE
ioom cmroumoii
flr*M-mlrtiorpf
Where keeping Kosher Is a delicious tradition.


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. October 23, 1987
From Paris:
Goldmann Reports on 'Left' and 'Right'
Continued from Page IB
didate of the extremely na-
tionalistic Front National*
Party.
Le Pen recently made
headlines in France and
abroad by calling the gas
chambers a mere "detail" of
World War II, and questioning
whether or not they existed at
all.
"The Front National*1 is
within France's legitimate
political framework, although
it is on the extreme right,"
says Goldmann who calls Le
Pen "a Huey Long, populist
type with a folksy, chauvinistic
appeal."
Le Pen will not win France's
presidential election, accoring
to Goldmann, "but he does
have sufficient strength to win
concessions from the
mainstream conservative par-
ty," headed by Prime Minister
Jacques Chirac.
"Le Pen says that he is not
anti-Semitic, and that he is a
strong supporter of Israel,"
Goldmann relates, noting that
Le Pen is surrounded by "rigid
ideologies who are wry anti-
Semitic he reflects the revi-
sionist views around him."
The Front Nationale's
stance is, according to
Goldman, xenophobic in
general; anti-Semitism is "a
component, a streak not open-
ly expressed."
Even further to the right.
"Neo-Nazi groups fly the
swastika in France, Germany,
and Spain," Goldmann
reports, noting that the
Spanish Neo-Nazi movement,
CEDADE, spawned a similar
group in Chile.
In Spain, which received a
large number of former Nazi
immigrants after World War
II "the day after (prominent
Nazi Rudolf) Hess died, there
were swastikas all over
Madrid, and signs which read
'He's Finally Free,'"
Goldmann recounts.
Germany has a "marginal
Neo-Nazi party," but "could
not have afforded to let
(Austrian president) Kurt
Waldheim run, much less let
him be elected," Goldman
contends.
"Germany, no matter how
much we may criticize it, has
had to come to terms with
World War II," he explains,
adding that the level of sen-
sitivity to issues of anti-
Semitism is much higher than
in Austria.
But left wing groups which
espouse anti-Zionist doctrines
"under the umbrella of Third
World Support, equating
Israel with South Africa and
the Palestinian Arabs with the
blacks" concern Goldmann far
more than do the far-right
anti-Semitic movements.
"I think that this is the more
dangerous kind of anti-
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Semitism," says Goldmann.
"The left is anti-Semitic, in
my view, because they are
anti-Zionist. Considering the
role that Israel plays in the
Jewish psyche after the
Holocaust," those who oppose
Israel and not a particular
Israeli policy are anti-Semitic,
in my estimation.
"And this excessive
negativity against Israel is still
rooted in thousands of years of
bad feelings about Jews," he
asserts.
The reason why left-wing
anti-Semitism "is more impor-
tant and more dangerous," ac-
cording to Goldmann, is
because "it comes from a less
recognizable, less rejectible
source. They hold ideas we
agree with as liberals, such as
human and minority rights,
anti-apartheid, and so on.
"When they say things in
the United Nations about Jews
holding an inordinate amount
of power in business and
universities, about Israel, they
set up Jews as a hostile minori-
ty, and they come from a direc-
tion which it is harder for us to
reject because they represent
many things near to our
hearts," says Goldmann.
Goldmann also does not hold
with groups in the United Na-
tions and elsewhere which
criticize Israel and Jews in
general for not living up to a
certain moral standard.
"Personally, I do not think
that non-Jews have the right
to have higher expectations of
Jewish policies and actions,
after 2,000 years of prosecu-
tion in the Christian world."
he says.
"If Jews perform on a moral-
ly higher level, associate more
with human rights causes, and
contribute more to charities
(than other groups) that does
not give non-Jews the right to
judge us and say. i expect that
of you,' Goldmann asserts.
Goldmann met with the
European Jewish Congress in
Greece last month, and reports
that there are indications that
full diplomatic status between
Israel and Greece may be
granted within a six-month
period.
"There is a small Jewish
community there again," he
says, composed mainly of
Holocaust survivors who have
returned.
The small Spanish Jewish
population will soon enjoy a
moment in the limelight, that
country's government is plan-
ning to honor the upcoming
500-year anniversary of Col-
umbus' discovery of America,
in 1492 and the concomitant
expulsion of the Jews from
Spain.
Now that the non-Jews are
beginning to recognize the im-
portance of Jewish contribu-
tions around tje world, it may
be time for American Jews to
recognize the important con-
tributions of their European
counterparts.
"I wish, considering the size
and increasing organization of
European Jewish com-
munities, that American Jews
would develop more interest in
getting to know them, their
structure and how they
operate," says Goldmann.
American Jews would also
be doing Israel a favor by get-
ting to know about Jewish life
overseas, according to
Goldmann.
"American support for
Israel is taken for granted," he
explains. "European support
is not. So when European
Jews do something (which
might effect their countries'
policies) it cannot be taken for
granted."
Jews here in the United
States must learn more about
Jews around the world "sow*
can work together, especially
for the welfare of Israel" '
Letter to
The Editor
EDITOR:
As an attorney heavily in.
volved in guardianship prac-
tice, I want to compliment
your staff reporter Ellen Stein
for her excellent article on the
Guardianship Program and on
the general issues.
Reports in the general press
were highly misleading in
terms of the situation in Dade
County although they did go
into the Guardianship Pro-
gram, and the horrors of the
guardianship system but with
reference to states other than
Florida and areas other than
Dade County.
The casual reader might well
have believed that all of the
criticisms of extreme ex-
amples referred in fact to our
county.
Ellen Stein has done an ex-
emplary job of research and a
very sensitive analysis and 1
am preserving copies of the ar-
ticle and sending them to out-
of-town clients or to clients
who do not subscribe to The
Jewish Floridian, whose
parents or other relatives are
subject to guardianship
problems.
Sincerely,
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Boy Scout Jewish
Study Program
THE MOST RECENT JEWISH STUDY PROGRAM
for Tiger Cubs will go into effect this fall. To qualify the
smuts must becomes familiar with Jewish holidays
vocabulary, heroes, symbols and objects. The program was
prepared for the National Jewish Committee on Scouting
by Rabbi Hyman Chanover of Baltimore and the Education
Service of North America.
The Macabbe award wil take about nine months to earn
says Barclay Bollan, national news editor for the Boy
ScuUtS.
Bollan gave this preview of the categories the bovs will
work with:
Names: In his notebook the scout has to provide Jewish
names for himself, his mother, his father, his grandparents
He has to name a synagogue in his area.
Holidays: He has to list the Hebrew names of four out
of 10 Jewish holidays, tell three facts about each of the
four, and carry out one activity connected with each. The
holidays are Passover, New Year, Day of Atonement, New
Year of the Trees Sabbath, Feast of Booths, Feast of
Weeks, Feast of Lots, Festival of Lights, and Israel In-
dependence Day.
Terms: He has to tell what each of the following five
terms means: Mazel Tov, Shalom, Yom Tov, and Mitzvah.
Symbols, objects and articles: He has to identify five of
the following nine objects, indicate how they are used,
draw three of the five or construct them out of wood
oaktag, cardboard, Styrofoam, metal or other materials:
Siddur. shofar, mezuzah, matzah, lulav, menorah, dreidle,
talit, haggaddah (or substitute other symbols: Star of David
Holy Ark, Afikomen, gragger.)
Community Helpers: the scout has to tell what two of
four persons do, give the name of one such person in his
own community, and interview him: rabbi, cantor, Jewish
educator or Jewish community center worker (he may)
substitute a sofer or Jewish Federation worker.)
Heroes: Tell briefly about five of the following 10 im-
portant Jews: Abraham, Moses, King David, Mordechai,
Judah Maccabee, Hillel, Rabbi Akba, Haym Salomon,
Theodor Herzl, and Anatoly Sharansky; (or) Deborah,
Queen Esther, Mainonides, Chaim Weizmann, David Ben
Gurion, Golda Meir.
Ellen Ann Stein
Friday, October 23, H^OThe Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
From left: Marvin Jay Shapiro. Chairman of
the South Florida Council, and the Jewish
Committee on Scouting; Ben Love, chief scout
executive. National Council; Max Silber, Na-
tional Jewish Committee on Scouting, and
Irne Baron, vice chairman South Florida
Council and Jewish Committee on Scouting.
American Sephardi Federation
To Inaugurate So. Florida Group
In a historic meeting,
members of Miami's Sephardi
community recently reached a
unanimous decision to
establish a branch of the
American Sephardi Federa-
tion in South Florida.
In trying for the first time to
create a concerted strategy for
uniting South Florida's large
Sephardi population, the deci-
sion was met by an en-
thusiastic response. In keeping
in line with the overall goals of
the American Sephardi
South Florida Council
Scouts Augment Religious School
Federation, this branch will
develop programs to promote
Sephardi heritage, education
and culture with a special em-
phasis on its youth
involvement.
Solomon Garazi, American
Sephardi Federation regional
vice president/honorary presi-
dent of Temple Moses and vice
president of FESELA
(Sephardi Federation of Latin
America)) was elected to chair
South Florida's branch of the
ASF. Garazi, who was also
elected to serve as chairman of
the ASF's national convention
in Miami, which will be held
between Nov. 15-18, at the
Castle Premier Hotel, said
Continued from Page 1-B
fully rounded, especially with
institutions like scouts where
they re trying to develop full
citizens," he says.
It is a parent, teacher, rabbi
or neighbor who works with
the boy in preparing the work
tor the award, Shapiro says.
But there is some conflict caus-
ed by the "inflexibility" of the
| sponsoring institutions.
'WE HAVE A TEMPLE in
'"southwest whose
members' children belong to
scouting in a church. The ra^bi
jys alI boys should be in tem-
f onSAoAfcw. How can a boy
f 'nvolved in scouting if it's
[mandatory he be in services?
'here has to be a certain
[amount of give and take,"
pnapiro asserts.
Shapiro himself was never a
y scout. Although he was
Sk 5 America, he resettled
IW k1* in Cuba where
m were in business for many
ms young years
V
In I960 Shapiro
FheU-S.Event..n,
returned to
Eventually, his oldest
Raymond wanted to
2V ^ 8cout and the
tt j- J01ned was in a
Itoft Church in ^h
2J"- His other son, Ira, also
involved in scouting.
finally brought Shapiro
interest in scouting.
rtierV01 a religious man
nereI goto shul every morn-
Marvin Jay Shapiro
ing. But I believe we live in a
world that is predominantly
non-Jewish. But all those non-
Jews know that we are Jews.
So why not flaunt the fact and
show them that we are Jews
and are proud to be Jews and
what Jews can accomplish,"
says Shapiro.
Historically, the Jewish com-
munity was active and in-
terested in the establishment
of the Boy Scouts of America,
says Shapiro, among them Sig-
mund Eisnor, who made the
first uniform.
There is in scouting what is
generally known as "open"
and "closed" troops, open
troops usually being receptive
to members of all religions.
Shapiro says there are some
troops that are more or less
closed and have a tendency to
be of their own religion. "The
Jewish community has been
more liberal to the acceptance
of what we call an open
troop," says Shapiro.
THE MAIN FUNCTION of
the Jewish committee is to en-
courage boys to enter the
scouting program, Shapiro
says. He points to the develop-
ing Jewish communities in
West Broward and Boca
Raton as target areas for such
Jewish scouting involvement.
Once the boys enter the
scouts, the Jewish committee
"tries to make it interesting
for them," says Shapiro. His
organization sponsors an an-
nual awards ceremony and a
camping retreat for scouts and
their families.
For the 17 years the South
Florida Jewish Boy Scouts
Council has been active,
Shapiro says an ethnic void has
been filled. "We felt it was
necessary. You have to stand
up and be counted. We show
the Gentile world we're scouts
yes, but first we're Jews," he
says. "I'm not telling kids to
be kosher and go to shul, but
'You're Jewish and be proud of '
it.*
Solomon Garazi
that one of the first items on
the agenda of this newly form-
ed branch is to finalize plans
for the upcoming convention.
The official inauguration of
the branch will take place on
Oct. 26 at Temple Moses.
The American Sephardi
Federation, founded in 1973 is
an umbrella organization for
Sephardim, their congrega-
tions and organizations and is
the American branch of the
World Sephardi Federation.
Slepaks
Released
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Refuseniks Vladimir and
Maria Slepak, who have been
seeking to leave the Soviet
Union for the past 17 years,
were informed by Soviet
emigration officials last week
that they had been granted
permission to emigrate.
News of the development
first reached the west via an
Associated Press report from
Moscow and was later confirm-
ed by the National Conference
on Soviet Jewry, which con-
tacted the Slepaks directly by
telephone.
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Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 28, 1987
wttmmsnimiiifmmtuttifiifit
On Oct. 29. at the Omni Hotel
in Miami, the American
Jewish Committee will award
to Harry B. Smith and Elliott
B. Barnett the prestigious
Learned Hand Award. The
Learned Hand Award was
established in memory of a
legendary figure, Judge Learn-
ed Hand, Senior Judge of the
United States Circuit of Ap-
peals for the Second Judicial
District from 1924 to 1951.
Widely admired at a Dean
among American jurists.
Judge Hand was famous for the
extensive range of decisions
which he tendered in more than
two thousand cases, especially
in cases centering on questions
of constitutional rights and
anti-trust legislation.
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Tri-County Meet of Conservative Rabbis
A meeting of The Rabbinical
Assembly, Southern Council of
the Southeast Region has been
convened by Rabbi David B.
Saltzman, A venture Jewish
Center and chairman of the
Southern Council.
The meeting of the Conser-
vative rabbis of the tri-county
area will be held Tuesday,
Countybank Begins
Plans For
25th Anniversary
November will mark County
National Bank's 25th year of
service to the loc munities. President, George
Apelian, noted that plans are
being drawn for an exciting
celebration throughout
November.
Coral Gables attorney Ainslee
R. Ferdie has been elected
president of the Florida
Lawyers Legal Insurance Cor-
poration, a nonprofit company
that provides the public u-ith
legal services and promotes
prepaid legal insurance. Fer-
die. who has served on the
board of directors since the cor-
poration s inception, has held a
numbe~ of positions in the
Jewish and legal community,
including presidency of the
Coral Gables Bar Association,
the Greater Miami BBYO
Board and. currently, the
Florida Herut Zionists. Ferdie
is managing partner of Ferdie
and Gou2. a civil liiigation.
property and general practice
law firm.
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Nov. 3, noon, at the Sunrise
Jewish Center, Sunrise,
Florida.
Rabbi Jack Riemer of the
Beth David Congregation in
Miami, will lead a study ses-
sion entitled, "Ethical Pro-
blems Confronting the Con
temporary Rabbi." Rabbj
Jacob Luski, B'nai Israel of St
Petersburg and regional presj!
dent, will share a "Renonal
and National Update."
Miller and Spillis
Co-Chair United Way
Under the direction of Communities co-chairs Sue Miller
and Electra Spillis, United Way's 1987 Communities Cam-
paign effort is underway.
1987 marks the fourth year that a portion of the cam-
paign has been in the hands of neighborhood volunteers
who solicit donations from small businesses, professionals
and residents located in 10 Dade County communities.
According to Miller, "There are thousands of people who
work in small, family-owned businesses, and professionals
who don't work for the major employers within Dade Coun-
ty. The Communities Campaign offers them the opportuni-
ty to participate in a community-wide effort at a grassroots
level with which they are familiar."
Volunteers are planning community kick-offs, special
programs and events to increase community awareness of
the 1987 United Way Communities Campaign.
Last year's Communities Campaign raised more than $8
million, but according to Miller and Spillis. there is a great
potential for growth.
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Friday, October 23, 1987Tie Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Wedding
NAGIN-GEWIRTZ
James and Florence Nagin of Boca Raton
announce the marriage of their daughter, Gail
M. Nagin, to Joel Matthew Gewirtz, son of
Max and Annette Gewirtz of North Miami
Beach, on August 30.
Serving the bride as Maids of Honor were
Lynne Wolfson and Sheila Wacks. Baylene
Wacks was the flower girl.
Serving the groom as Best Man was Dave
Willingham. Howard Wacks and Eli Wolfson
were the ushers.
The reception was held at the Deauville
Hotel.
The bride currently is a registered dietician
working as a food service specialist for
Clintec Nutrition, and the groom is a
respiratory therapist working as a phar-
maceutical sales representative for Schering-
Plough Corp.
The honeymoon to Mexico City has been
postponed. However, following the wedding
the couple plans to reside in North Miami,
Florida.
Mrs. Joel Matthew Gewirtz
Engagement
JACOBSCAMINSKY
Carol Jacobs of Bal Harbour announces the
marriage of her daughter Sheryl Joy to Larry
Ciminsky, son of Norman and Sylvia Cimin-
sky of Downsview, Canada, on August 16, at
Temple Beth Shalom in Toronto. Attending
the bride were her close friends from Miami:
Marsha (Spivak) Brieter, Shelly (Pinsky)
Green and Davida (Schwartz) Schacter. Anne
Gail Ciminsky of Toronto was Maid of Honor
and Rochelle (Ciminsky) Little was Matron of
Honor. Mistress of Ceremony was Terry Pep-
per of New York (formerly of Miami).
Best Man was Phillip Ciminsky. Ushers
were Evan Jacobs of Bal Harbour, Brian Lit-
tle and Phyl Chidnofsky of Toronto. The bride
was given away by her brother, Dr. Richard
Jacobs, and her mother.
The former Miss Jacobs graduated from
North Miami Beach Senior High School, the
University of South Florida and Miami Dade
Dental Hygienists School. The bridegroom
graduated from the University of Toronto
with a degree in Certified Public Accounting.
Out-of-town guests included the bride's
maternal grandmother, Mina Schneider, and
Al Eisner, both of Miami. From New York,
Lola and Maury Sprachman, Diane and
Stanley Kranczer, Jeffrey and Lori
Sprachman, Steven and Joyce Sprachman,
Melissa and Lori Kranczer. Other Floridians
attending were Allison Schwartz, Mike
Green, Bernie Brieter and Stanley Shapiro.
Longtime friend Cathy Geary, from Dracut,
Mass., also attended. Mr. and Mrs. Ciminsky
are residing in Toronto. The couple toured
Italy for their honeymoon.
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Historical Society
To Meet
The Southern Jewish
Historical Society, which was
organized in the 1950s under
the auspicies of the American
Jewish Historical Society, was
reactivated at a meeting in
Richmond, Virginia, in 1978.
Its meeting this year is
scheduled for Durham. North
Carolina. Nov. 6-8.
Board member. Dr. Henry
Green, chairman of the
University of Miami's Judaic-
Studies Program, will par-
ticipate. For information, (919)
929-8875.
Hadassah Events
Sunday, Nov. 1, will be
"Hello Hadassah Sunday" in
Dade County, as well as across
the United States. More than
1,700 communities will be par-
ticipating in the sixth year of
Hadassah's national reenroll-
ment and new membership
drive which has helped to
make the organization the
largest women's Zionist
organization in the country.
Here in Dade County,
Hadassah volunteers will be
making calls to Jewish
households to collect dues
from new and reenrolling
members.
Menorah Chapter of
Hadasah will meet at Temple
Israel, Kendall on Oct. 26 at
12:30. Brenda Myerson, of the
Riverside Speakers Bureau,
will speak on coalition for
peace.
Dr. Eilat Shinar of Hadassah
Medicare 1987 will be the
keynote speaker at Temple
Adath Yeshurun on Thursday,
Oct. 29 at 10 a.m.
Dr. Shinar will also speak at
the Adult Forum following ser-
vices Oct. 30 at Temple Zion at
8:15 p.m. -
The Regular Luncheon
Meeting of the Stephen S.
Wise Chapter of Hadassah will
be held on Monday, Nov. 2 at
11:30 a.m. at the Ocean
Pavilion, Miami Beach.
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Ross,
Certified Financial Planners
and investment counselors will
be guest speakers.
For information, 866-0966 or
861-5909.
Zohara Hadassah will hold a
paid-up membership luncheon
on Oct. 30 at Eldorado Condo
Recreation Hall.
Ricki Igra, president of the
Miami Beach Region of
Hadassah, has announced that
Eva Silberman, an Argenti-
nean active in Jewish educa-
tion, and an elected member of
the National Board of
Hadassah. will be guest
speaker a the Region Office.
300 71st Street, Suite 430, on
Oct. 25 at 10:30 a.m. Her topic
will be "Unlimited Horizons."
The Hannah Senesch
Chapter of Hadassah will hold
its next General Meeting at
noon, Monday, Nov. 2, at" the
Shelborne Hotel. For informa-
tion 538-2111.
The Masada Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its annual
Paid Up Membership Lun-
cheon on Monday, Oct. 26 at
noon, at Adath Yeshurun. Dr.
Eleanor Packter will be the
guest. For information,
651-0160.
The Interamerican Chapter
of Hadassah presents a
Presidential Gala Dinner
Dance at the Fountainebleau
Hilton Hotel, on Saturday,
Oct. 24, at 8 p.m. All donations
go toward the "Adopt A Pa-
tient Program." For informa-
tion, 864-2939.
Temple Beth Am begins its
concert series with "An After-
noon of Music," featuring
Menahem Pressler playing
piano pieces by Schuman,
Beethoven, Chopin, Debussy
and Liszt. The concert begins
at 4 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 25.
Sylvia Herman and Linda
Minkes, Co-chairpersons of the
Florida Hadassah Ziom
Youth Commission, annoui.
the appointments of David
London as regional director of
Young Judaea, Walter
Synalovski as area coor-
dinator, Keith Bet-man as
senior advisor, and Michelle
Fink as Ofarim/Tsofim
Coordinator.
Amit Women
Events
Geula Chapter will meet on
Oct 28 at 7:30 p.m. at Tower
41 Social Hall, Miami Beach.
Chai Chapter meets at the
home of a member on Wednes-
day, Oct. 28 at 8 p.m.
Hatikvah-Miami Beach
Chapter will meet on Thurs-
day, Oct. 22 at noon in the
Morris and Anna Eisenberg
Social Hall, Miami Beach.
Lunch will be served and Mr.
Jossi Tietelbaum from the of-
fice of the Israeli Consulate
will give a presentation.
Tamara Chapter will hold its
luncheon meeting on Thurs-
day, Oct. 22 at noon in the
Social Hall of Galahad Three,
Hollywood. A book review en-
titled "My Father and I" by
Camelia Sadat will be narrated
by Beverly Berlin.
----- s-
(SI :
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129"

s49"m.pc
B*g 169C* PC

I* k .. ilius'


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 23, 1987
Chusmir'Good Enough For The Herald'
Continued from Page 1-B
Chusmir was determined not
to take for herself.
She has an older brother,
David Zoll. a CPA and at-
torney. Her younger sister, a
buyer, has passed away.
"It was a very business-
oriented family as you can tell
1 was kind of an oddball
because I wanted to be a
writer in this family where
everybody was quite business-
orieiited," she recalls.
Chusmir went to Boston
I'niversity bo study journalism
at the age of 16, entering
earlier than most students
because she had skipped some
grades. Her first week at BU.
she met the man she would
marry: The sports editor of the
college newspaper had inter-
viewed her for a job.
"We fell in love and I pro-
mised my parents that I would
graduate from college before I
got married, so I accelerated
and did it in three years, 1
graduated on one Sunday and
got married the next Sunday,"
she says.
After marriage Chusmir
says she "promptly retired."
She never had to work and
didn't. "You didn't do that in
those days," she says. "I mov-
ed to Providence, Rhode
Island and was active in the
Sisterhood and various things
and then had children.
Chusmir's husband, Lenard
H. Chusmir, is an associate
professor at Florida Interna-
tional University. He teaches
organizational behavior in the
School of Business. They have
two children. Marsha, 35, mar-
ried to Dr. Philip Shapiro, is a
music teacher and has had 12
musical compositions publish-
ed. The couple lives in Ormond
Beach, near Daytona, with a
son Matthew whom Chusmir
calls "extraordinary."
"He's very bright," she
says. "He's not two and he can
recite the whole alphabet, he
can count to 20, and he sings
dozens of songs in perfect
musical pitch. He's fun and he
has a great personality."
Her son Steven, 34, is mar
ried and sells commodities.
On her style: "Good
enough for the Herald
to want me."
The Herald is "a great part
of my life, but it's not my en-
tire life." she says. She does
read the street edition of the
Herald before she goes to bed
and on a recent night she call-
ed the paper because she saw
something that had to be cor-
rected. Last week, she drop-
ped in at the Herald at 11 p.m.
after attending a ballet
because she was "interested"
in how certain stories had
worked out. She will have a
computer terminal installed in
her home so she can tap into
newsroom stories.
Chusmir was 33 when she
and her family moved to
Florida. It was 1956 and she
says it was "awfully boring be-
ing at home, especially if
you're as young as I was. I was
finished having children when
I was 22. What was I going to
do for the rest of my life? I did
not find volunteer work that
challenging or rewarding."
She had options. One was
the degree in journalism and
that wasn't easily won: "I had
family members who thought I
was crazy and that I shouldn't
do it. My mother didn't want
me to major in journalism. She
wanted me to major in home
economics so that when 1 mar-
ried a doctor I could entertain
and have good referrals. She
just didn't see that as a role for
a nice Jewish girl chasing
fire engines, doing things that
journalists do."
Obviously Chusmir was
either strong-willed or the
pressure from home wasn't
that intense because she did
attend Boston University's
Communication School. Years
later, when her stories from
Florida appeared in the Boston
Globe. Chusmir remembers her
mother "had a glow of ap-
preciation because her friends
would call her up."
The second factor in
Chusmir's decision to opt for
the workplace over the
homefront was support from
her family.
"My husband wanted me to
go to work because he realized
that I was very bored at home
and that was not good for me.
But he and the children
wanted their meals to be just
as good and everything else
done. I think I had the usual
conflicts that most women
have who have stayed at home
for years catering to their
families. Then they leave and
the meals suffer and other
things suffer."
Once she was working, her
schedule was, "long hours and
tough hours. It was hard on
the kids." Sometimes a
housekeeper was there;
sometimes her husband was
there: sometimes the kids
were alone.
"As the months passed and
they saw that I was very happy
they realized that it was best
for me and the family and they
have been very supportive,"
she says now.
Her first job was freelancing
on what was then the North
Dade Journal. In just a few
weeks, she was asked to join
the staff of the former Miami
Beach Daily Sun, which was
then owned by executives of
Knight newspapers. She work-
ed there for five years and
when they sold the paper,
Chusmir was brought to the
Miami Herald, a Knight-
Ridder paper.
At the Daily Sun, Chusmir
worked with many journalists
who went on to achieve well in
their careers such as Herald
Pulitzer-prize winning police
reporter Edna Buchanan.
Chusmir says she interview-
ed practically "all the
celebrities that came into town
from Charleton Heston* to
Margaret Mead."
She says it's "immodest" to
reflect on the stories that she
broke and her other claims to
fame. "We had a very good
team, at that point, that did a
good job of covering the com-
munity. I had my share of
scoops and things like that but
it's hard for me to judge how
the public viewed me," she
says.
But when asked about her
early style, she pleasantly
snaps: "Good enough for the
Herald to want me."
Chusmir says she had a way
of getting people to open up to
her about things they might
not share with another
reporter.
"I think because I generally
care about people and they can
sense that and I'm interested
in them bj l>eing able to pick
up on messages that they send.
Sometimes reporters are so
busy with their own questions
that they're not taking cues
from the subject as to what is
going on.
"I think reporting is ver\
hard work, to get information,
to do the background, to do the
research, to cover all the
bases, to do it well is not easy.
To just come in and talk to so-
meone is the easv wav to do it.
"Good writing is
grounded in very
aggressive reporting
and that is not easy."
"If you really want to find
out about a person and a sub-
ject, it entails a great deal of
labor and effort to research
that subject or that person.
But from the time I was a child
of 11, who wrote a composition
on the World's Fair and got an
'A' on it, there was something
to me enormously magical and
satisfying about writing. But
you say 'Does it come to you
naturally?' Good writing is
grounded in very aggressive
reporting and that is not
easy."
She learned her craft on the
job.
"The first day I was asked,
could I write a story on the
typewriter on deadline and 1
said, 'I don't know.' And the
first day I arrived on my job
was the Monday after Ken-
nedy was assassinated and
they sent me out to St.
Patrick's Church to cover the
mourners and the service. I
said, 'What time do you need
the story' and it was like
maybe 40 minutes after I
would get back from the thing
and I just put the paper in the
typewriter and did it."
As a journalist, Chusmir ad-
mits she was aggressive, very
aggressive, and that when she
came to the Herald she was
sometimes assigned stories
that nobody else could get
after other people begged to
get them.
Chusmir doesn't negatively
judge her tenacity: "No," she
says with a quick laugh, "it has
to do with fear of failure."
When she came to the
Herald in 1968, there were
some women reporters
although not nearly as many as
there are today. She worked as
a reporter covering general
assignments and started the
local interest column that has
since been passed on to Fred
Tasker.
Although she now manages
a paper that has collected
many Pulitzer prizes, Chusmir
herself has never won that
prestigious journalism prize
but says, "Yes, every jour-
nalist wants to."
But she did work hard to
break many stories, and many
of her pieces won national
recognition. She says she was
the first to write that babies
were being born drug-
addicted. She had been work-
ing on another story at
Jackson Memorial Medical
(enter and talked with some
people who mentioned that a
baby was born and there was
something untoward about the
infant. Chusmir stuck with the
story and the resulting deter-
mination of what was wrong
with the babies of addicted
parents. She also was the first
to write about the newly in-
dependent, prisoner-of-war
wives of Vietnam veterans
having some concerns about
their husbands coming home
to women who were no longer
sheltered.
Television journalist Bill
Moyers did a documentary
following her story. She also
did a series on why children
were not learning to read in
the Dade County Public
Schools that won her first
prize nationally from the Na-
tional Reading Association.
Chusmir worked hard, did
well, and Herald management
asked her to become an editor.
Chusmir said "No thanks;"
she wanted to stay a reporter.
She refused that first invita-
tion, but years later went back
and said, "I'm ready."
"You don't want to
come to the Miami
Herald and turn it
upside down."
That point came in 1975 and
she became features editor.
And the boredom of being a
housewife at 33 struck again.
"I was following President
Ford around on the golf course
and I was very bored and I
thought if you're bored follow-
ing President Ford then you
better get out of it.
"I had been on wonderful
stones been on the ,,am S
covered some of
shots, was part of,,,. Kni^;
Ridder team on several
political convention \ .
had wonderful, ivondeS
assignments. I used to go to
lallahassee eat' -rj
couldn't have bet i inder or
more ecouragin.
ed to do practical, anythnw
that I wanted to -.mate and
at the same tin wven
very good assi^ i But 1
realized I wa |nger
challenged. It wa
something
She became i |(Kjav
editor, and in 19'
named assistant managing
editor, responsible <-i^ht of
the Herald's sectioi Sne left
the Herald to become presi-
dent and publisher oi the Daily
Camera in Boulder. Colo, for
five years apparently proving
her skills on that smaller
Knight-Ridder paper. In June
of 1987 she was named ex-
ecutive editor of The Miami
Herald.
"I'm responsible for the
overall direction of the news
coverage and that takes many
decisions during the day from
personnel decisions to play of
stories, to tone of the paper, to
anchoring news in Central and
South America to all kinds of
things," she says.
"What the Herald has is a
brilliant, dedicated hard-
working newsroom that's com-
mitted and aggressive. And I
think every executive editor
brings his or her sump to it
and you don't want to come to
the Miami Herald anil turn it
upside down."
Chusmir was not at the
paper when it was decided to
run the story aiiout Gary
Hart's alleged affair with Don-
na Rice which eventually led to
Hart's bow-out decision. But
she supports the Herald's
posture.
"It is a question of a
Continued on Pige lfi-B
Happenings
A High Tea honoring Florence Hecht will be sponsored by The
Friends of the Bass Museum of Art. Sunday. Nov. 1. 4-6 p.m. ai
ihe Castle Premier Hotel. Miami Beach. For information.
673-7530
Homage to Dance Photography by Bobi Dimond. will begin
Nov. 1 with an artist's Reception from 1-6 p.m followed by a
dance performance at 4 p.m. at The Carefully Chosen Gallery
Miami Beach. The exhibition continues through Nov 2 The Women's Cancer League Monte Carlo Night, with black
jack, craps, roulette and baccarat, will be held Thursday. No* 12
at the Fontainbleau Hihon For information, call 674-2464
The late Danny Kaye. worldwide crusader for children s
causes, and Buffalo Bob Smith, who was host of the IflSO'l era
children's program The Howdy Doody Show.'" are the layper-
sons who will be inducted into the 1987 Miami Children's Hospital
International Pediatrics Hall of Fame.
You are invited to Lindy with Dr Bernard J Fogel. ^
President for Medical Affairs and Dean of the University ot Miami
School of Medicine at the 35th Anniversary of the Medical
School. Nov 20. 730 in the evening at the Castle Premier
Resort. Miami Beach For information. M7-6256
New arts ground will be broken on South Beach when Ground
Zero Gallery hosts its gala champagne opening on Friday 0d
30. from 8 p ml 1 p.m. Located at 661 Washington Avem i"sl
next door to The Strand. Ground Zero will be a tree gallery.
mounting changing exhibits each month Artist-onciu.J *
gallery boasts an impressive roster of Florida artistv and ocular-
ly scheduled arts symposiums, film screenings J."-< lllJ I**-10
recitals For information. 673-4022



On the Lighter Si He
Friday, October 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Chicken Soup Cures Colds, Flu and Fat
By ALISA KWITNEY
I Fh.ridian Staff Writer
AS A i HUBBY CtilLD ,
[june Webb was told, "ach,
Ivou're Jewish, so you're fat."
Bui Jewish women need not
|je "tofaQ," or full figured,
lassert:-' Webb, who stands as
[living; proof that the most
[traditional Jewish food of all,
bucket] -Hip, can help get rid
lofexce.-.- poundage as well as
jit help. ?el rid of sniffles and
Icolds
Sayi Weber, who lost 129
Loun'ds >n a chicken soup diet
bf her "wn devising, "I've
en fighting the battle of the
bulge since I was 12, and I've
fried every diet you can
ne."
But banana, grapefruit,
irater. and liquid protein diets
I not work for the 5-foot-lVi
nch-Webb, who weighed in at
i high of 263 pounds.
"Every morning I would
(rake up and say, 'I'm going
a diet.' And then I would
heat, and go to bed and say
wll tomorrow I'll diet,' ad-
bits Webb.
[ But commitments made the
ht before did not stop Webb
Irom turning to the
bfrigerator at day's dawn.
"FOOD IS a thousand addic-
June Webb
ns," Webb explains. "Every
"j* I got nervous, every time
had problems with my
Mren, I would run to the
frigerator. Talking on the
'ephone. I had to have
mething to munch on. Back
"n I was single, if a date
d me up, I would eat
pelf into oblivion."
[Webb, a self-admitted
poodaholic," recounts that
fen her mother's admonitions
,you re getting fat, don't
would cause her to
P became a closet eater,"
;reveals.''iwouldgetu in
middle of the night, or
-n no one was at home, and
into the car to drive for
J iou think, 'no one is
ung, here's my chance.' "
|iet Webb, who calls herself
Eft* and "an ex
F*j. contends that she
CameLher appearance
KS uher P^sonality,
;ou?n she admits that she
always embarassed. I liv-
utside my body."
Lf!?:SLhe ""&** never have
Eh? the,chicken soup diet
P transformed her from a
"u '"to a size 6, had it not
been for her youngest
daughter and husband.
"SHANA LOOKED at me
and started to cry. Then she
went home and told my hus-
band, who said, 'you ought to
be pregnant. You look it.' That
was when I made up my mind
to lose the weight." says
Webb, who asserts that her
husband's harsh comment was
necessary.
"Had he been more gentle
and he was. for a long time -
%
empty plastic gallon milk con-
tainers. Soup with the puree
was consumed four times dai-
ly. Webb supplemented her
jet wiht a daily multiple-
vitamin.
Today, over a year later,
Webb is still not sick of chicken
soup, although her kids are.
"They say, 'oh no, she's
eating soup again.' But how
can anyone not love chicken
soup?" Webb wonders.
"Sometimes when my husband
LIFESTYLE
it wouldn't have any effect on
me, because he loves me fat or
thin. But he met me thin, and
he wanted me thin," she
explains.
Another impetus for Webb
to shed poundage was her
brother's marriage to a circus
trapeze artist.
"She was thin, and I was
jealous," Webb concedes.
Yet Webb did not sit down
then and there to invent her
chicken soup diet. Rather, she
created it by accident.
Your clothes don'i get
looser at first. They
just get less tight.
"I was busy with my own
business (representing in-
vestor properties) and with be-
ing a mother," says Webb,
who did not have time to spare
for elaborate diet recipes,
measuring food on special
scales, or other such com-
plicated dietary procedures.
"But every Friday night, we
have chicken soup. "It's tradi-
tional in my family. And I was
used to putting whatever soup
was left over in the
refrigerator."
Webb found herself grabb-
ing bowls of soup and heating
them in the microwave oven
when hungry, but only realized
that she was losing weight
when friends pointed it out to
her.
"When you're as big as I
was, it's hard to notice," says
Webb. "Your clothes don't get
looser at first. They just get
less tight."
But Webb took heart and
began to cook up great quan-
tities of chicken soup "enough
for two or three weeks," in her
grandmother's big black pot,
Eutting in "everything but the
itchen sink and the fat."
ONIONS. GARLIC, car-
rots, celery, parsnip, herbs,
curry, spinach, even rhubarb
and grapes and other fruits
went into the pot, seasoned
with a great deal of ginger, but
not even a speck of salt.
"Then I strained the soup
through cheesecloth after it
had cooled, to drain off any ex-
cess fat," recalls Webb, who
pureed the vegetables and
chicken (skin and fat removed)
and froze the clear broth in
wants to take me out on a
Saturday afternoon, I insist he
takes me somewhere where I
can have matzoh ball soup."
A brief fling with hot fudge
sundaes put a few pounds back
on Webb's petite frame,
although she swears that she is
again being faithful to chicken
soup.
"I eat regular foods now,
and chicken soup for
maintenance," says Webb. "I
eat fruit for sweets, and
nothing after 6 p.m. I'm not
going to let what happened to
me before happen again."
Webb admits that she is "ad-
dicted to 'Jewish pennicilin,' "
but contends that the side ef-
fects are hardly something to
worry about.
"I wasn't sick, I wasn't
hungry, it improved my love
life and made me look
younger." Webb asserts.
"When 1 was a kid, everyone
used to say I resembled
Elizabeth Taylor, and now I
Because I was fat, I would never let anyone
take a picture of my full body I would hide
behind a table, or put the kids in front of me,"
Webb recalls.
feel like her,'' she adds.
BUT ELIZABETH
TAYLOR lost weight at ex-
pensive health spas, Webb
points out, while chicken soup
is affordable to almost
everyone.
In view of this, Webb might
be considering whether or not
the food which made her
healthy and wise might not
make her wealthy, as well.
Webb says that she would in-
deed consider marketing her
own special blend of chicken
soup for dieters if she could
get the financial backing.
Yet even if her chicken soup
does not pan out in a business,
the future is golden for June
Webb.
"My whole life has changed
because of it," she says of the
savory broth. "My children are
happier, my husband is hap-
pier and I'm happier."
Deportees Get Berlin Memorial
BONN A monument in
memory of the thousands of
Jewish fellow citizens
deported to Nazi concentra-
tion camps was unveiled in
Berlin. The memorial is
located on the Putlitz Bridge,
directly above railroad tracks
on which transports carried
Jews to the camos. The chair-
man of the city's Jewish com-
munity, Heinz Galinski, main-
tained in a speech that too
many traces of Nazi crimes
had already disappeared.
Many hold the dubious belief
that these crimes would be bet-
ter forgotten, but the spiritual
and physical wounds of the
concentration camps have not
yet healed, Galinski said. He
added, however, that there
was also "another Germany,"
represented by people wbo
showed humanity "in the time
of inhumanity." These "un-
sung heroes" gave persecuted
people refuge at the risk of
their own lives, he declared.
ESTATE AUCTION
SATURDAY & SUNDAY NOV. 7th & 8th at 1:00 P.M.
FEATURING SEVERAL MAJOR ESTATES & COLLECTIONS
INCLUDING: FURNITURE CLOCKS ORIENT ALIA IVORIES HARDSTONES EUROPEAN
PORCELAINS ORIENTAL RUGS BRONZES SILVER LIENS CRYSTAL ART GLASS
CHINA NETSUKE AS WELL AS MANY FINE. UNUSUAL DECORATIVE ITEMS
SPECIAL ATTRACTION *
REMOVED FROM THE BANK ESPIRITO SANTO. MIAMI. A GOOD COLLECTION OF ORIGINAL
OIL PAINTINGS. WATERCOLORS, PRINTS LITHOS INCLUDING SEVERAL LISTED ARTISTS!
ESTATE & MODERN JEWELRY COLLECTION
TERMS: CASH. CHECK AM EXPRESS. VISA MASTERCARD DISCOVER ALL SALES SUBJECT TO A 10' SUV ERS PR EMI *
EXHIBITION STARTS MONDAY. NOV 2nd HOURS: 10 A.M. S P.M
AND THURSDAY. NOV 5th HOURS: 7-9 P.M. CATALOGUES AVAILABLE $2 00
C.B. CHARLES <&^
'J J GOINT.
Iaictio*
Estate Specialists / Auctioneers Appraisers
750 E Sample Rd at Dixie Hwy (Exit 36 East oft 1-95) Open Daily 10 A.M. to 6 P.M
Pompano Beach. Florida 946-1800
/CBC\


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 23, 1987
Write
Dear .Yomi
. For Advice
Dear Nomi. an advice column, will appear regularly in the
pages of The Jewish Floridian.
Dear Nomi:
On Saturdays and Sundays, I like to sleep late. It's
something I look forward to all week, being able to stay in my
nice warm bed until 10:30 or 11 a.m.
But my wife is an early riser who wakes up at 6 a.m. no
matter what time she goes to bed, and once she's up, she's up;
she turns on the lights, begins bustling about in the kitchen
making coffee, slams the front door, talks on the phone and
makes it impossible for me to stay asleep.
I say to her that she should try to be quieter, but she replies
that she is quiet, telling me that I'm a light sleeper. She says
she tiptoes about and tries to speak softly but I hear every
word, and when she turns on the light, it shines in my eyes.
What on earth can we do? We have been married and
arguing about this matter for two years.
Yours Truly,
Night Owl
Dear Night Owl:
You and your wife should try to work out an agreement.
While it is unfair to expect her to stay in bed quietly until you
wake up, it is not unfair to ask her to limit some of her
activities for a few hours in the morning.
Perhaps she could wait to turn on the light until she is
outside of the bedroom, and try to be more conscious of how
loud she is being while making phone calls, the coffee, etc.
Experiment with different sound levels (she in the kitchen;
you in the bedroom) before the weekend mornings arrive, so
that you can both arrive at a compromise you can live with.
Yours,
Nomi
Dear Nomi:
I am 35 years old and it looks to me like I am not going to
get married at least not in time to have a child. I have
always assumed that someday I would meet a man whom I
would marry, and that we would have children. But the years
seem to have flown by, and I realize that if I don't get married
in the next few years, I will not only miss out on the joys of
marriage, I will miss out on joys of motherhood as well.
Unless, of course, I have a child on my own. I could I am
self supporting, have savings, love babysitting for my friends'
children and have a dear old male friend who wouldn't mind
being the father of my baby.
But some people say it is cruel to bring a child into the
world without a father. What should I do go ahead and risk
it all to have the baby I so dearly want, or heed the advice of
others and give up on my dream of being a parent?
Sincerely,
Moping for Maternity
Dear Moping for Maternity:
The question of whether or not to choose to be a single
parent raises many issues, some of them significantly religious
and halachically serious. As I am not as well equipped to
answer those kinds of issues as would be a rabbi, I shall
restrict my answer to solely secular issues.
Although it is probably not the ideal situation for a child, I
do not think that it is cruel for a single parent to have and
raise a baby, so long as that parent realizes that he or she will
have to take on the burden of being both mother and father to
the infant.
As a single parent, you will have to grapple with the
immense responsibility of fulfilling all of your baby's needs,
and as your child grows, so will your responsibilities grow.
What if the infant is sick or born with a defect? Can you
cope with a child through illness and various developmental
stages, including adolescent rebellion? Are your savings
enough to send a son or daughter through college?
Also, think about how having a baby will affect your career,
your social life and your chances for meeting and marrying
someone.
And what about your dear friend, the child's potential father
what kind of responsibility, if any, will he take on? Is there
a chance that he wul want to be very involved with the baby
or not involved at all?
You must think about how the answers to these questions
affect your decision, and how they might potentially affect the
well-being of a child.
Yours,
Nomi
Stephen Muss, right, receives an unusual
crystal award from Dr. Irving Lehrman.
center, rabbi of Temple Emanu-El, during the
communityunde tribute luncheon at the Fon-
tainebleau Hilton Hotel honoring Muss and
fellow hotelier Howard Kaskel. On left is Nor-
man Frank, president of the Miami Beach
Chamber of Commerce, which sponsored the
event. Muss and Kaskel were honored fur their
investment in new convention facilities at
their respective Beach hotels, the Fan-
tainebleau and Doral. Dr. Lehrman was
chairman of the luncheon.
THE GARDENS AT MOUNT NEBO
Miami* most beautiful exclusively Jewish Cemetery
*-'
fw


Nowhere is the Jewish concept of life eternal expressed with more
dignity, love and beauty than in Mount Nebc Lush landscaping,
combined with more than 50 years of devoted care, creates
at Mount Nebo a lasting tribute to loved ones in the highest
tradition of Judaism.This tradition is continued in the Gardens.
Mount Nebos latest expansion
ZJfll VISIT OR CALL US AT: 261-7612
|V<
lUlMOUNT NEBO
Mount Nebo Cemetery 5505 N.w. 3rd Street. Miami. FL 33126
; ,,


Bar Mitzvah
Friday, October 23, 1987ffhe Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Zachtry Miller
ZACHARY MILLER
Zachary David Miller, son of
|Dr. and Mrs Douglas J. Miller,
(will be called to the Torah as
Bar Mitzvah on Saturday, at
[Temple Israel of Greater
Miami.
The celebrant is a student at
Ransom-Everglades Middle
chool, where he is in the
leighth grade.
Zachary is a member of the
chool's football, baseball and
basketball teams.
Special guests will include
grandparents, Mr. and
Mrs. Milton J. Miller and Mr.
find Mrs. Harold Bobroff from
Michigan, and uncles Mark
Bobroff from New York and
>r. Fred Miller from
California.
JOSHUA SILVERMAN
Joshua Seth Silverman, son
pf Jack and Beverly Silverman
?ill be called to the Torah as
Bar Mitzvah on Saturday, at
|:30 a.m. at Adath Yeshurun
Synagogue, North Miami
peach.
I The celebrant will be twinn-
N and share his Bar Mitzvah
pith a Soviet Refusenik youth,
nid Lisenkir.
J Joshua is a student in the
Naica High program at
Math Yeshurun and is active
? Kadima, where he serves as
Executive Vice President of
Programming. He attends
P'pland Oaks Junior High
Wiool, where he is in the eigth
Among Joshua's honors and
Pterests are the following:
[warded the Ed Graff
femoral Award from Hai
klass; member of the National
ponor Society; chosen the
ftstanding math and outstan-
l">8 science student in
Fenth grade; awarded the
paham Award five con-
^utive years for Junior Con-
nof1'0"- Jn the summer of
Is*. Joshua was chosen to at-
Pd the World of Water
lTP' s,Pecia'>zing in science
mI math. Over 2,000 children
J plover Florida applied,
id only 60 were accepted.
Llf? ?"u Bever|y Silverman
[J host the Kiddush following
r services in honor of the
pasion.
fcial puests wil1 '"elude:
fhi&T Rose s'lverman of
Pade|ph,a. Uncle Phillip,
Eh ? and Cousin Ben of
tn t Phm; Aunt Claire "d
' ww of Philadelphia;
Adam Epstein
cousin Benjy and Daniel
Pugatch of Massachusetts; and
Cousin Wendy Honigman of
Jacksonville, Florida.
ADAM EPSTEIN
Adam Keith Epstein, son of
Dr. and Mrs. Marc Epstein will
be called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday, at 10:30
a.m. at Temple Emanu-El,
Miami Beach.
Adam will share his Bar
Mitzvah with Isai Khayamov,
of Dagestan SSR, USSR.
The celebrant has been a stu-
dent in the afternoon religious
school of Temple Emanu-El.
He attends Miami Country
Day School, where he is in the
eighth grade.
Na'amat USA
Chai Chapter of Na'amat
USA will stage a fashion show
with its own members as
models Sunday, Oct. 25, at
noon at the Raleigh Hotel,
Miami Beach.
An entertainment program
featuring Rose Gershen, Helen
Skolnik and violinist George
Rosen also will be presented.
In addition, each sponsor
and each new member will be
awarded a personally crafted
piece of original jewelry,
designed by "Miss Ada."
Reservations and informa-
tion, 673-2772.
liana Chapter of Na'amat
USA will hold a luncheon and
card party Wednesday, Oct.
28, at 11:30 a.m. at Winston
Tower 500, Sunny Isles.
Lillian Hofmman, president,
will give an update on the role
of Na'amat in Israel and the
United States in securing the
release of Soviet refusenik Ida
Nudel, who was given permis-
sion to emigrate from the
USSR to Israel.
Reservations, 935-0361.
liana Chapter of Na'amat
USA will hold a book review
and meeting Tuesday, Nov. 3,
at Winston Tower 100, Sunny
Isles.
Sophie Weissman will pre-
sent a book review. The lun-
cheon session is free for all
paid up members.
Peace Chapel Heals Wounds
BONN A "peace chapel"
was officially opened Friday at
the former American-run
"Golden Mile" prisoner-of-war
camp near Remagen
(Rhineland-Palatinate). The
ceremony was attended by ap-
proximately 900 former camp
inmates from the Federal
Republic and Austria. The
chapel will house the recently
rediscovered "Black Madonna
of Remagen," sculpted out of
the camp's mud by the late art
professor Adolf Wamper of
Essen while he was a prisoner
there. Of the 1.5 million Ger-
man soldiers who passed
through the camp at the end of
the World War II, 1,200 died
from malnutrition and
dysentery. State Secretary in
the Defense Ministry Agnes
Hurland-Buning, whose hus-
band and brother-in-law were
prisoners in the camp, paid
tribute to the chapel as a
"memorial for peace in
freedom" and as part of
German-American history.
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
. "Go forth from the ark, thou, and thy wife"
NOAH
(Genesis 8.16)
NOAH Noah was commanded to build an Ark for shelter from
the Flood that would overwhelm the earth. In the Ark he placed
his wife and three sons, Shem, Ham, and Japheth, together with
their wives; also two of each species of creature on earth, one
male and one female to perpetuate the species (seven were allow-
ed for the species that were ritually clean). The Flood that
covered the earth drowned all living things except those in the
Ark with Noah. After a year, the waters receded and the earth
dried. Noah let all the creatures out of the Ark, that they might be
fruitful and multiply on earth. He sacrificed in thanksgiving to
God. God, for His part, promised Noah that He would never again
send a flood that would destroy the earth. The sign for this agree-
ment, or covenant, is the rainbow. Men increased and spread over
the world: in the land of Shinar they sought to build a tower
whose peak should reach to heaven. Here, they thought to concen-
trate all the earth's population. But God, irked at man's presump-
tion, confused their speech. Previously all men had spoken one
language. Now they spoke various languages; not being able to
understand each other, they could not work together, and the
building of the Tower of Babel ceased. Terah. the father of
Abram, came to Haran.
(The recounting ol the Weekly Portion ol the Law is extracted and based
upon -The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage." edited by P. Wollman-
Tsamir. $15. published by Shengold The volume is available at 75 Maiden
Lane. New York. NY. 10038. Joseph Schlang is president ot the society
distributing the volume.)
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
6:26 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CH AIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach, Fla. 531 -2120
Rabbi Dow Rozancwaig
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Baach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Zvl Rozen Conservative
Executive Director. ^>,
Harry J. Silverman ("IT)
Frl B p.m. New Member Conner atlon
Sit. am.BarMltnah Jo.hu. silverman
Soviet Twin Loonkl LlHoklr
Mon. 7:J0 p.m. N.Ian Anatoly Sharaneky
. will apeak In poreon
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 667-6667
Leonard Schoolman, Sr. Rabbi
Mark Kram, Associate Rabbi
Lynn Goldstein, Assistant Rabbi
Frl. Bill p.ir..Aaet. Rabbi Lyeno OoMateln
will apeak on "dotting To Knew Ma Part I
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.VV. 3rd Avenue 654-3911
Jack Riemer, Rabbi
Robert Albert.
Cantor
Rev. Milton Freeman.
Ritual Director
Dally ion. Sun. S a.m. S 5:30 p.m
ton. S Tuoa 7 JO em a S M p.m
Wed.7:1Se.m.SSp.m.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave., Miami Baach
534-7213-534-7214
Barry J. Konovitch, Rabbi
Sergio Grobler, President
Shotem Epelbaum, President,
Religious Committee
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue ,,
Miami Beach {]
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shifman, Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
Kabbalat Shabbit 0 p.m. Sat. 8 l.m.
Dr. Irving Lehrman will preach
Cantor Yehuda Shifmin will chant
Bar Mltnah Adam Epatain.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetree Drive, Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schitf
Dally 7:30 a.m. (Mon. 1 Thure. 7:1B) 7 p.m
Frt. 7 p.m Sat. 9 a.m. Reeen. tor High Hobday
Deyi
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
JJ o*eer Reform Coogrogiitan
137 N.E. 19th St. Miami, 673-5900
B990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob Q. Bornsteln
Frl. p.m.
Downtown: Rabbi Rex D.. _
Cintof Rachelle F. Notion will conduct
the liturgy
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 6675657
Michael B. Eisenstat, Rabbi
Basses* am. Frl. BUS p.m. Stmehel Torah
Ocl.1l I p.m Oct 15 10 am
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami, FL 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs, Rabbi
Dr. Joseph A. Gorf Inkel, /""*
Rabbi Emeritus I
Moshe Friedler, Cantor
Frl. p.m.
aatMkeJs,
Weekday ion Mon.Fri. S m
Mon. Thur*. 5 p.m. Sun. 8:30 a.m.
Sit S: 15 l.m
Bit Mrtzvih Johinni Teealer
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1546 Jefferson Ave., M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 53*4112
Rabbi Alvadla Rosenberg
Cantor Moshe Buryn
OaSy aenrton S a.m S 7 p.m.
Sat. 1:15 am
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
238-2601 /
Rabbi David H. Auerbach \ W)j
Cantor Stephen Froedman
Friday eve tentcei S p.m.
Saturday lanricai 9 30 l.m.
Bir Muiv.h E.n Paul Somenet
TEMPLE BETH 5H6L6M 538-72311
Chase Ave. & 41st St Uberal
Dfl LEON KRONISM, Senior Founding Rabbi
QAR. A OLICKSTEIN. Senior Rabbi
HARRV JOLT, Auxiliary Rabbi
JASON QWASDOFF. Aaatetent Rabbi
IAN ALPERN. Cantor
DAVID CONVISER. Cantor Emerltui
OFNNIS J. RICE. FT.A.. Executive Director
Frl 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Gary A Glick.lein
"Noah Mori. Noih List
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Shoshanah Raab, Cantor
Service! Frt.7:J0em
Sit. :30 l.m.
Oneg Bhebbet WBH
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Ari Fridkls, Assoc Rabbi (
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Bat. t i.m seebeen i
V

only Mlnchoh Sajwday Frkaoy
(l.m. ind p.m
Sal 9 a m and 116 p.m
TEMPLE NER TAMID 0664345
7902 Carlyle Ave., 866-9833
Miami Beach 33141 Coneervettve
Rabbi Eugene LabovHz ,^.
Cantor Edward Klein TBV
Dilly Sen. Mon.Fri. S a.111. S:J0 p-m. V-X
Sat. Mlncha 8:15 p.m Sun. 8:30 i.m. -
ftSO pjn.Set.: S48 un. aan. by Rabbi labovnx.
Cantor Klein
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung
SHAARE TEFILLAH
TORAH CENTER OF KENDALL
7860 SW 112 Street *.,-
232-6633
Rabbi Hershel Becker
Dally Sen. 7 i.m. Frl. 10 mln. liter candle-
lighting time. Shabboe ( a.m. Shiboo.
Mlncha 10 mln. betore candle lighting lime.
_____________ Sun. 8:30 l.m

BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd ^s
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz. Rsbbi f)
Zvee Aroni, Cantor v-&
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Fn. Simchat Torah 6:25 p.m.
Mlncha 8:30 p.m. Sat 8 25a m
Mlncha 7 15pm Sun. 8 am a 5:30 p.m.
Bat Mltnah Michelle Bilhg
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Deda's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kingsley. Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administrator
'3ai&2V! R*lpn p K,vioy.
Who Wrote The Hebrew BeSCr'
Set.BeiMltn.hKlmberly-
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
2712311 ^
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi W)
Benjamin Adler, Cantor x-5*
Oavid Rosenthal, Auxiliary Cantor
Mlnyin 7 i.m Mondiyi ind Thundiya.
Frldiy 8:15 p.m.. Dr. Norman Shapiro
Ribbl .peak, on "Who I. Righteous
Bet. t em.


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 23, 1987
Deaths
Earle Cantor, Retired N.Y. Executive
Earle Cantor, 78, of Buffalo.
New York, a Florida resident
1

or*

i**
fi^
for the past 12 years, died Oc-
tober 17.
The retired president of the
New York Fur Auction Co.
and King's County Cold
Storage Co. was a former resi-
dent of Brooklyn, New York.
He is survived by his wife
Theresa; son Faye (Robert)
Gosselin of Miami and
daughter Geraldine Berch of
Tempe, Arizona; grand-
children Robert, Lisa, Lorrie.
Ian, Mark, Ruth, Eric, Renee;
and great-grandchildren
Michael and Curtis.
Servies were held Tuesday
in Boca Raton.
SCHNEIDERMAN. Hairy (Srrutty). of
Miami Bech. October IS. The Riverside
BYRON. Lillimn. of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert.
DORIN. Saul, of Miami Beach. Rubin-
Zilbert.
l.EVINE Bella, of Miami Beach. October
16. Services in New York City.
SOLOMON. Albert, of Miami Beach. Oc-
tober 17. Services in Philadelphia.
D0TWIN, Esther. 70. of Miami Beach. Oc-
tober 13. Interment at Star of David
Memorial Park.
BROOKS. David. 41. of Miami Beach. Oc
tober 18. Services in Miami.
CAPLAND. Jean A. of Miami Beach, Oc-
tober 16. Blaaburg
LEONARD. Jack F 96, of Miami Beach
Services at Lakeside Memorial Park.
ROSENZWE1G, Sara, 80, of Miami. Oc-
tober 14. Sankaa in Miami.
SHVPNICK. Abe. of Miami Beach Services
in New York.
BLOOM. Georm, 84. of Miami Beach, Oc-
tober 16. Interment at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery
Through years of dedicated service,
we have become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
^Uy J*aW^*W
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH "THE ASSURED PLAN
LARRIES BLASBERG IRA M. BLASBERQ MICHAEL C BLASBERG
FurtfaiWrecto, ,.,., o,ec,o-
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
Past President Jewish Funersi
Dtrsctors o' America
'JOSEVENTV-FlRSTS'REET
865-2353
MIAMI BEACH FlOOiDAJJ'4
-I'll I \l
MIIMMIIK
FUNERAL AM) BURIAL
IN THE BEST OF JEWISH TRADITION
$1,595
Lakr*iJr Memorial Park and Eternal Light Funrral Director* are proud to
sponsor thi* unique program which comhinr* ownrnhip or a plot al our
hraufiful Mrtnorial Park and a plan for prr-paid funeral tcrvicev
Thiraceptional value aaaum that vour one call will put vou in touch with
the people who hrlievr there i nothing dignified ahout paving morr for a
traditional Jrwi*h funeral that vou Kae to.
HERE IS WHAT WE INCLUDE:
exreuNAl
UgItc
w
Lakeside.
Proenpt Transfer from Place of
Death
Care and Preparation of Deceased
Casket and Hearse
Arrangement Direction of
Gravessde Service*
Permit* and Benefit Assistance
24 hour emergency service
Shivs Candle*. Card* and Benche*
Gratrsite
Paved Private Visitation Path
Steel Reinforced Concrete Vault
Opening and Closing at Grave
Perpetual Gravesites Care
No maintenance or *ervice fee*
A )r*i*h Tradition ince !9*iS
TOTAL: $1,595
No Interest Payment Plans Available
For complete information on our pint and funeral service package plan
call vour Lakeside Eternal Light representative today.
In time of need, one call will handle all the detail*.
DADE:
592-0690
BROWARD:
525-9339
BLUM, Martin, of North Miami Beach, 0c
tober 14. Menorah.
HARRIS, Paul. 61. of Miami. October 13
Bunal at Lakeside Memorial Park.
KI MBLE. Madelyn S., 47. of Miami Beach,
October 14. Blasberg.
LEVINE, Samuel, 82. of Miami Beach. Oc-
tober 14 Levitt-Weinstein
SMITH, Simon. 94, of Miami. October 14.
Services in New York.
GACH. SALLY SPERLING. 69. formerly
of Miami. October 18 Interment at Mt
Nebo Cemetery.
GALEWrrZ. Hannah, of Miami Beach. Oc-
tober 18 Blaaberg.
COHEN. Sarra. of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert.
i i IPLDi. Jean (Bermanl. 87, .if Miami. Oct
20 Interment .it Mt ''"-
GELBARD, Ruth. B2, r*l Nortt Miami
Beach. Oet 19 Levitt-Weintein.
LEVINE, Sam. tW. of Miami. (Vt 19 Inter
ment at Mt. Nebo Cemetery
NODELL, Sally, of North Miami Beach.
Oct 20 Kiwrside.
SCHAPIRO. Rose 89, of Bay Harbor Od
19. Riverside
STARK. Sarah, of Miami Eternal Light. In
terment at Lakeside Memorial Park
Business Note
Alan Sakowitz. announce?
the re-location of his law office
from Dadeland Towers North
to the Whittaker Building in
North Miami. The son of
Theodore J. Sakowitz. Federal
Public Defender, for the
Southern District of Florida,
he graduated from the Univer-
sity of Miami School of Law. In
1982, he received his Master of
Laws in Taxation (LLM).
Sakowitz's practice involves
primarily acquisitions and
sales of business and real
estate, corporate planning and
taxation, estate planning,
bankruptcy, landlord tenant
matters and recording and
foreclosure of condominium
liens.
RUBIN
ZILBERT
CHAPEL
MONUMINT CO
CIMITIRY COUNSIUNQ
10 CHAPELS SERVING
DADE
BROWARD
PALM BEACH
The Florida Region of .
American Committee (L T
Weizmann Institute ofScie^t
unU sponsor ifc second annZ
Estate Planning SemS*Z
Tuesday Oct.j:. J
in the Bolton Room of the cC,
International Hotel. Robert e
Zobel, a Tax Partner ln t
Miami Office of Touche R and Co. and Associate V
tumal Director for Pm
Financial Manage*
that firm, will speak
MinvteTofSarings Teckni
For infbrmatioi
Hone, 940-7
When a loss occurs
away from home.
.in iti mini iii.l
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service
Dade County
5.I2-2IKK)
Broward County
Represt-nted hy Riverside Memorial Chapel. In.
New York: (718)263-7600 Que*ns Blvd.* 7thRrl.. Farm Hills N Y
nuncffi
DADE
538-6371
rlLi
BER
BROWARD
920*6660
The Spirit
Of Our Tradition
Lives On.
Dignity simplicity and'economy are tl.\> mandates
of Scripture lakeside Memurud i\ok Upholds It* tin
Jit ions of Jewish burial in a beautiful, intelligent l\
designed setting
lakeside the only memorial park in //* south that
was created to meet the needs ofeieryJewish family
Please call for a tour of
our Garden of Heroes, an
innovation in abote-ground
burial modeled after the
mausoleums of ancient Israel
10301 N.W 25th Street
Miami, Florida 33172
Dade (305) 592-0690
Broward(305) 525-9339
w
Lakeside. .
.



Community Corner
Victor H. Beinfield, a well-known figure in the South
Florida Jewish community, is receiving an honorary
doctor of humane letters degree from Brandeis Univer-
sity on Oct. 24. A former self-employed businessman
and local philanthropist, Beinfield was inducted as a
Brandeis Fellow in 1985. His major gifts to the universi-
ty include endowment of academic chairs and con-
tributions to fellowship and other programs.
The Dade County B'nai B'rith Bench and Bar Chapter
will be hosting its Monthly Dinner Meeting on Wednes-
day, Oct. 28, at the Biscayne Bay Marriott Hotel, Miami
Cocktails at 6:30 p.m. and Dinner at 7 p.m. Melvyn
Frumkes will be the featured speaker discussing
Divorce Under Jewish Law; Getting a Get." For infor-
mation or reservations, 223-2391.
The Temple Judea Sisterhood presents the Paid-Up
Membership Annual Luncheon, Wednesday, Oct. 28, at
10:30 a.m. Ronni L. Korschun, RD, MS, Registered Dieti-
cian and well-known nutrition authority, will be the
Guest Speaker. Korschun's topic will be: "Food is Love
- Breaking the Old Jewish Myth!"
West Miami Auxiliary No. 223, Jewish War Veterans,
will hold its annual Paid Up Membership Party, Thurs-
day. Oct. 29, at Temple Beth Tov, West Miami. The
group recently received a plaque from the Victim/Ad-
vocates program of the Metro Dade Department of
Human Resources at a special program. The Auxiliary
also had its annual Scholarship Award presentations:
Brian Berg, Martin Burman, Jerilyn Botwinik, and
Beverly Rodriguez.
Biscayne Chapter Women's American ORT will hold
its next meeting on Thursday, Nov. 5 at 1 p.m. in Morton
Towers Auditorium. For information, 673-3793.
Temple Beth David is holding a Ballroom Dance
class on Sunday, Oct. 25 at 7:30 p.m.
The Aventura Jewish Center Sisterhood will meet at
noon on Wednesday, Oct. 28 at the Temple. A book
review by Beverly Berlin will be featured.
The Adath Yeshurun Men's Club will present its first
annual sports breakfast featuring Tony Segretto, WTVJ
sports analyst on Oct. 25 at 9:30 a.m.
Mike Abrams, who represents North Dade in the
Tallahassee Legislature and is a member of North
Dade's Reform congregation, Temple Sinai, will speak
at his synagogue on Sunday morning, Oct. 25. The
event marks the first meeting of the year for the
Synagogues Brotherhood and will take place in the
Wiener Social Hall at 9:30 a.m. following the Sunday
morning Minyan.
Lowe Levinson Art Gallery announces Opening
Night, Friday, Oct. 23 at 9:30 p.m. (after Services) at an
Oneg Shabbat reception "A Portrait of American
Mothers and Daughters," by Raisa Fastman,
Photographer at Temple Beth Sholom, Miami Beach.
me exhibit will run from Oct. 23 through Nov. 9. Judy
pucker .s the Cultural Consultant for Temple Beth
Shalom.
South Florida Women's Committee will meet
Wednesday, Oct. 28, at 11:45 a.m. at Raleigh Hotel,
ES each- The Program will be provided by
53113J n personal safety tlDS- For Information,
Beth Torah Congregation, Miami Beach, is premier-
"9 two separate Singles Groups. The Young Singles
nr.oo1"35) wi" havin0 Its 'Irst dance Thursday,
29 at the Benny Rok Campus, in Deakter Hall
F,i=?m. "sPOt"Qht On Singles" is the theme. Jon
|Fr,ed Wl" be the guest disc jockey.
. A special presentation entitled "Caring for the
dregivers: Taking care of a Victim of Alzheimer's
L',hase will highlight a program dedicating the
-man and Roddy C. Rood Alzheimer's Unit of the
(MJHMAJewish Home and Hospital for the Aged
loct 9Q Tne dec,lcation ceremony will take place on
I Qarfi at 7:3<* D-m- 'n RUDV Auditorium on the Douglas
MjHHlSDCampu8 of MJHHA- A Private reception of
Ronrtc Board members and personal friends of the
i "^s will precede the dedication at 6:30 p.m.
|siSKflles for ARMDI Chapter invites all interested
featur- etween ^SS to Its Oct. 31 Halloween Party
225 tne contemporary sounds of nightclub
Ljll Ir'SOn9stylist Rachell Paton and Orchestra. There
other! ,ncin9, refreshments, and a chance to meet
Bob at947rf in a fun stmosphere. For information call
Friday, October 23, 1987fThe Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
German-Jew Wins Prize
Stuart Blumberg, vice presi-
dent oJ'Hotelerama, Inc., which
owns the Fontainebleau Hilton
Hotel, has been elected
president-elect of the Miami
Beach Chamber of Commerce.
II' "ill be installed at a Nov. 28
dinner at the Fontainebleau
Hilton. A. Anthony Noboa, ex-
ecutive vice president ofJeffer-
son Bancorp, Inc.. which oums
a nd operates Jefferson Na-
tional Banks in Dade and
Palm Beach counties and Jef-
ferson Bank in Broward Coun-
ty, has been elected treasurer of
the Beach Chamber.
Howard Shaw, President and
Chief Telecommunications
Analyst, Shaw Communica-
tions Consultants, Miami has
been re-elected for a third time
to a three-year term as a direc-
tor of the North Dade Chamber
of Commerce.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Civil Action No. 87-43669-07
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ELIZABETH ALVA CHUMAN.
Petitioner,
and
RICARD0 CHUMAN.
Respondent.
TO: RICARDO CHUMAN
12107 84th Avenue
Kew Gardens. NY 11415
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu
imn of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on MELVIN
J. ASHER, ESQ., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 826
South Bayshore Drive, Suite 643,
Miami, FL 33131, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
November 13th, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 7th day of October, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: John Brands
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18037 October 16.23, 30;
November 16, 1987
FRANKFURT (JTA) -
German-born Jewish
philosopher Hans Jonas was
awarded the annual Peace
Prize of the West German
Book Trade Association last
week at the Frankfurt Book
Fair.
Business Note
Joel J. Karp, a leading inter-
national tax attorney, has join-
ed the Miami law firm of Paul,
Landy, Beilery & Harper,'
P.A., where he will direct the
firmVtax activities.
Before joining the firm, Mr.
Karp, a graduate of Columbia
Law School, had been Director
of International Taxation at
Greenberg, Traurig, Askew,
Hoffman, Lipoff, Rosen &
Quentel, P.A., Miami.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-4683
Division (04)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALVIN M. GETZ
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OF DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of ALVIN M.
GETZ. deceased, FUe Number
87-4683 (04). is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for DADE County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagter
Street, Miami. Florida 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate is FRANCES GETZ, whose
address is 2000 N.E. 187th Drive,
North Miami Beach, Fla. 33179
The name and address of the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
URSULA METZGER, Wellisch,
Metzger 4 Stanton, P.A. 161
Almeria Ave.. No. 200E. Coral
Gables. Fla 33134.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: Oc-
tober 23. 1987.
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ALVIN M. GETZ
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
URSULA METZGER. ESQ.
WELLISCH. METZGER &
STANTON. P.A.
161 Almeria Ave.. No. 200E,
Coral Gables. Fla. 33134
Telephone: (305) 445-7954
I8Q60 October 23, 30. 1987
Jonas fled Germany in 1933,
going to Britain for which he
fought in the War of In-
dependence. He has taught at
the Hebrew Unversity. His
mother died in Auschwitz.
Since 1955, Jonas taught at
prominent universities in the
United States and Canada. He
was chairman of the
philosophy department at the
New School for Social
Research from 1957-73. He
has written numerous books
and philosophical works of a
secular as well as religious
nature.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Lazaro and Elsa Ex-
otic Flowers at 3300 SW 94 Ct.
Miami FL 33165 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Lazaro Martinez and
Elsa Martinez
18029 October 9, 16,23,30,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 87-6647
Divisioa 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BLANKA GOLDHABER,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of BLANKA
GOLDHABER, deceased, File
Number 87-5647, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, FL 33130. The per
sonal representative of the estate
is EMERICK KATZ. whose ad
dress is 2401 Collins Avenue.
Miami Beach. Florida 33140. The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persona interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: Oc-
tober 23. 1987.
EMERICK KATZ
As Personal Representative
of the Esate of
BLANKA GOLDHABER
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
EUGENE J. WEISS
407 Lincoln Road, Penthouse
N.E.,
Miami Beach, FL 33139
Telephone: (305) 534-4721
18061 October 23,30. 1987


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 23, 1987
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-41508 16
NOTICE OF ACTION
THE BINGHAMTON SAVINGS
BANK.
Plaintiff
vs.
MARY D. HELMS, etal..
Defendants.
TO: PERPETUAL
SAVINGS & LOAN
ASSOCIATION
229 East Park Avenue
Waterloo, Iowa 50704
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 6 of Block 41. FIRST
ADDITION TO CAROL CI-
TY GARDENS, according to
a plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 68 at Page 31 of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Esq., At-
torney for Plaintiff, whose address
is Suite 214. 1570 Madruga
Avenue. Coral Gables, Florida.
33146 on or before October 30th,
1987, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorney or
immediately thereafter, otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 23rd day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By John Kranda
, As Deputy Clerk
Ml October 2.9,16.23. 1987
IN THE CIBCUIT COURT FOB
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-57*4
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROSA H. APPLESTEIN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ROSA H. APPLESTEIN.
deceased. File Number 87-5794. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
DADE County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street, Room 307,
Miami, Florida 33130. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, >r jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 23, 1987.
Personal Representative:
Allan H. Applestein
130 Casuarina Concourse
Coral Gables. Florida 33143
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Wayne A. Cypen
CYPEN A CYPEN
P.O. Box 402099
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Telephone: (305) 532-3200
18049 October 28,30,1967
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name AIR AMBULANCE
AMERICA at number 9100 South
Dadeland Boulevard. Suite 1104.
Miami, Florida intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
AIR AMBULANCE CENTRAL.
INC.,
a Florida corporation
by: LARRY BERCU, President
Michael L. Mann. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
9100 South Dadeland Boulevard
Suite 1103
Miami. Florida 33156
18624 October 2.9. 16.23. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-41508 CA 16
NOTICE OF ACTION
THE BINGHAMTON SAVINGS
BANK.
Plaintiff
vs.
MARY D. HELMS, et al..
Defendants.
TO: MARY D. HELMS
6800 Peachtree
Industrial Blvd.
Unit AA7
Doraville. GA 30360
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 5 of Block 41, FIRST
ADDITION TO CAROL CI-
TY GARDENS, according to
a plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 68 at Page 31 of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Esq.. At-
torney for Plaintiff, whose address
is Suite 214, 1570 Madruga
Avenue. Coral Gables, Florida,
33146 on or before November
13th, 1987, and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter,
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 8th day of Oc-
tober. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
18042 October 16, 23.30;
______________November 6 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name ROLL PRODUC-
TIONS at 7440 S.W. 74th Court.
Miami. Florida 33143 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
ISMAEL LEDESMA
LORI LEDESMA
Douglas D. Stratton, Esq.
Attorney for LEDESMA
505 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
18038 October 16,28,80;
Novembers, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-43846 (14)
NOTICE OF ACTION
RESIDENTIAL FINANCIAI
CORP.,
Plaintiff
vs.
RICARDO A. GARCIA, et ux.
et al.,
Defendants.
TO: MANUEL GARCIA
56-38 Van Cleef
Corona. New York 11368
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 11, Block 1, MIROSA
SUBDIVISION, according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 105, Page 31 of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida, 33146 on or before
November 13th. 1987. and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 8th day of Oc-
tober. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Jennis L. Russell
As Deputy Clerk
18044 October 16.23, 30;
November 6, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5173 (01)
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BERTHA CUBELL,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of BERTHA CUBELL, deceased.
File Number 87-5173 (01). is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida. Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street, Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person op
whom this notice was served tha t
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the persons J
representative, venue, or jurisdii .
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 16, 1987.
Personal Representatives:
PAUL LEVIN and
HERBERT S. SHAPIRO
c/o SHAPIRO AND WEIL
1666-79th St. Cswy..
St*. 608
Miami Beach, Florida 33141
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HERBERT S. SHAPIRO
SHAPIRO AND WEIL
1666-79th St. Cswy., Ste. 608
Miami Beach. Florida 33141
Telephone: (305) 864-2369
18041 October 16, 23. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name William Camacho
Tool Distributing at 6360 NW 200
St Miami FL 33015 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
William Camacho
6360 NW 200 St.
Miami FL 33015
18055 October 2.i.:d i:
November 6, 13. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
( \SE NO. 87-3613
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE (>F
BARBARA A. PEREZ,
Petitioner
and
ROLANDO D. PEREZ,
Respondent.
TO: ROLANDO D. PEREZ
878 West 79 Place
Hialeah, Florida 33014
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for Dissolu
tion of Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on SYLVAN HOLTZMAN,
Holtzman. Krinzman & Equels.
1500 San Remo Avenue, Suite 200.
Coral Gables, Florida 33146, at
torney for Petitioner, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above-styled court on or before
November 20, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the
Petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Dade Coun-
ty, Florida on this 19 day of Oc-
tober, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Diana Campbell
As Deputy Clerk
A TRUE COPY
Circuit Court Seal
Attorney for Petitioner
SYLVAN HOLTZMAN
Holtzman, Krinzman & Equels
1500 San Remo Ave., Suite 200
Miami. Florida 33146
Telephone: (305) 662-7700
18056 October 23.30;
November 6,13,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
angaga in business under the fic-
titious name Jack of Diamond at
8766 N.E. 163 Street, NMB, Fl
83160 intends to register said
naiM with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court <>f Dade County. Florida.
Jack Stember
Joshua Galitzcr.
Attorney for Jack Stemlier
18021 October 2. 9. 16. 23. 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-44255 (27)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ROSE MARIE WARE,
Petitioner,
and
BILLY J. WARE,
Respondent.
TO: BILLY J. WARE
Residence Unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage upon: ANTHONY
CARBONE, P.A.. 612 N.W. 12th
Avenue, Miami. Florida 33136
and file original with the Clerk of
the Court on or before November
20. 1987. otherwise a default will
be entered.
October 13. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By: Jennis L. Russell
18050 October 23,30;
November 6, 13. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5827
Division 04
IN RE:ESTATE OF
ADELAIDE M. THORMAN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of ADELAIDE
M. THORMAN, deceased. File
Number 87-5827, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagier.
Third Floor, Courthouse, Miami,
Florida 33130. The personal
representative of the estate is
KEITH E THORMAN. whose ad-
dress is 12535 Moss Ranch Road.
Miami. Florida 33156. The name
and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claim-- or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE WON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OP THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall he stated. If the
claim is secured the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: Oc-
tober 23. 1987.
KEITH E. THORMAN
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ADELAIDE M. THORMAN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
HERBERT Z. MARVIN
9995 Sunset Drive, Suite 108
Miami, Florida 33173
Florida Bar No. 051041
Telephone: (305) 279-0730
18058 October 23. 30. 1987
NOTICE
WAREHOUSEMAN'S SALF
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
THAT BY VIRUTE OF
CHAPTER 678. FLORIDA
STATUTES ANNOTATED (1941.
WAREHOUSEMAN AND
WAREHOUSES RECEIPTS
WHEREIN. A.B. VAN LINES A
FLORIDA CORPORATION BY
VIRTUE OF ITS WAREHOUSE
LIENS HAS IN ITS POSSES
SION THE FOLLOWING
DESCRIBED PROPERTY- LOT
1050. '
HOUSEHOLD GOODS AS THE
PROPERTY OF:
MR. GILBERT MACH1N LAST
KNOWN ADDRESS: APT 506
9210 FONTAINBI.EAI BLVD'
MIAMI. FL 33172 AND THAT
ON THE 6TH DAY OF
NOVEMBER, 1987 DURING
THE LEGAL HOURS DKSALE
MAINLY BETWEEN iooo
FORENOON AND 2:00 IN THE
AFTERNOON AT 2136 NW 24
AVE.. MIAMI. FLA. THE
UNDERSIGNED SHALL OF-
FER FOR SALE TO THE
HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH
IN HAND THE ABOVE
DESCRIBED PROPERTY.
DATED THIS 23 DAY OF OC
TOBER. 1987.
18059 October 23,30,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5650
Division 02
Bar No. 128923
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HEIMAN L. ZELDMAN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the admini.-trr
the estate of HEIMAN I. ZEID-
MAN. deceased. File Number
87-5650, is pendinK ill the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the sddn
which is 7:< W Fieri Si Miami.
Florida 88130 Th.
represents iv.
Rhoda Price, whose sddn
2301 Collr Heart.
Florida 88189 Tnc him .rnd ad-
dress of the pi
tative's ittorm
baton
All persoi
demands again-'
quired, WITHIN THREi
THS FROM THI FTHE
FIRST PUBl [CATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to fill
tlie above court
ment of any claim or
may have, Bach d u
writing and must
for the claim, the I .
dress of the cred"
attorney, and the an
If the claim is in
when it will bw
stated. If the da
unliquidated, thl f <**
uncertainty shall be Itated If the
claim It secured -.shall
be described. The Ian IM shall
deliver suffincn! I ph "f 'he
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one COO) to each per-
sonal representativi
All persons interested m the
estate to whom a cop) "( dffl
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required w']
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent will, the
qualifications of the per*"*
representative, or the venue *
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMAND*
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO'FTL
ED WILL BE FOREVtK
BARRED. ,
Date of the first publication oi
this Notice of Administration: W-
tober 16, 1987.
Rhoda Price
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
HEIMAN L. ZEIDMAN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
KWITNEY, KRO0P *
SCHEINBERG, PA.
BY: RICHARD I. KROOP
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 51-
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-75-5
18045 October 16.23.!'


FORECLOSURE SALES-PUBLIC NOTICES
Friday, October 23, 1987fThe Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOB
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nubtr 87-6703
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
E CARRINGTON BRECK,
a/k/a EDYTHE C. GANTZ
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
0f E. CARRINGTON BRECK,
i/k/t EDYTHE C. GANT, deceas-
ed, File Number 87-5708, is pen
diiig in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flayer Street, 3rd Floor, Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 23. 1987.
Personal Representative:
LILY A. KLINE
6001 Twin Lake Drive
South Miami, Florida 33143
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
H. ALLAN SHORE, ESQUIRE
Fromberg. Fromberg, Groat,
Shore & Lewis, PA.
420 S. Dixie Highway, 3rd Floor
Coral Gables, FL 3S146
Telephone: (306) 666-6622
18053 October 23,30. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-39761 CA-19
NOTICE OF ACTION
THE KISSELL COMPANY,
Plaintiff
ROBERT J STEWART.
etal.,
Defendants
TO .ROBERT I STEWART
1226 Drexel Avenue
No. SOB
Miami Beach,
Florida 33139
Y0C ARE NOTIFIED that an
Mion for Foreclosure of Mortgage
"" the following described
property:
Lo< 16. in Block 4, of
LAZARI s ON RICHMOND.
according to the plat thereof.
"recorded in Plat Book 110
Page W, f the Public
fewrdl of Dade County.
Honda.
M filed against you and you
'' required to serve a copy of
ritten defenses, if any to it
5 Sh7;i'ar'1 Fhw. Attorney for
"*n ,ff. wns<, ad(iresg js Sujte
''.' Madruga Avenue. Coral
*. Honda, 33146 on or before
| "jwbtr 20, 1987. and file the
Jd wh the aerk of thjg
lPlT-.fr '" Mm servire
r"'f rney or immediately
"Wter. otherwise a default will
* entered against you for the
W Tv^n'l''<1 in the """plaint.
I of tk my nand and ** eal
IJ^court this 19day of October,
"CHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By I>iana Campbell

As Deputy Clerk
October 23, 30;
November 6,13. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
i T,y,T,ous name ^w
lACElSHEREB* GIVEN
" the undersigned, desiring to
STln bU8ine8s und*r *** fc-
1 COrvVrT^-** ^UTHEAST AC-
SWING SERVICES. INC. at
llZ n^* Avenue' mmA
iLT. nda 380M intend to
oftTr ^ name with the Clerk
AnrtCourtofDK,ecoun-
ENTERPRISES. INC.
*r JOSEPH JANUSZ.
^ President
October 16, 23, 30;
November 6,1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-46013 01
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
RENE E. ROBAINA,
and
ELIZABETH ROBAINA.
TO: Elizabeth Robaina
302 West Westfield
Avenue
Roselle Park,
New Jersey
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed and
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Harvey D. Friedman,
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is FRIEDMAN & KAPLAN
PA., 3636 West Flagier Street!
Miami, Florida 33135, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
November 20, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 16Ui day of October, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: E. Sn.il
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HARVEY D. FRIEDMAN
3636 West Flagier Street
Miami. Florida 33135
Attorney for Petitioner
18051 October 23, 30;
November 6,13.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT LN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Naaiber 87-6780
Diviaioa 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MAURICE A. SCHWARTZ
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
(FLORIDA BAR NO. 184878)
The administration of the estate
of of Maurice A. Schwartz, deceas-
ed. File Number 87-5780, is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street, Miami, Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 23, 1987.
Pearl Goetz
Personal Representative:
28 Cardinal Road
Manhaaaet, New York 11030
DENNIS R. TURNER
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
STEARNS WEAVER MILLER
WEISSLER ALHADEFF
& SITTERSON. PA.
Museum Tower. Suite 2200
150 West Flagier Street
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 789-3200
18062 October 23,30.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name YOCUM PRINTING
at number 4155 East 8th Avenue,
Hialeah. Florida, intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
tv. Florida.
Y PRINTING CORP.,
a Florida corporation
by: PETER ALVAREZ, President
Michael L. Mann, Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
9100 South Dadeland Boulevard
Suite 1103
Miami, Florida 33156
18026 October 2.9, 16, 23.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 87-41190-FC-12
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
FLORA A. GRAHAM
Petitioner
and
SILAS GRAHAM
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Silas Graham.
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
and to take your real property has
been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses upon: I.J.
GRAFF, ESQ. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E
167 St.. N.M.B. Florida 33162 on
or before November 6th, 1987 and
file the original with the clerk of
this court otherwise a default will
be entered against you. The real
property located in Dade County.
Fl. i- described as Lot 12, 1st add'n
to Monnah Park, PB 33 P 9
records of Dade County (covers
both a Homestead and adjoining
vacant lot).
Filed September 30. 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
18027 October 9.16, 23.30,1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87-4423 FC 23
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
KEIKO YATES,
Petitioner/Wife,
and
CHARLES ROBERT YATES,
Respondent/H usband.
TO: CHARLES ROBERT
YATES
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been fded and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on MARC POSTELNEK, PA., at-
torney for Petitioner, whoee ad-
dress is 407 Lincoln Road, Suite
10-B, Miami Beach. FL 33139. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
November 20th. 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 14th day of October. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LAW OFFICES OF MARC
POSTELNEK, P.A.
BY: MARC POSTELNEK
407 Lincoln Road. Suite 10-B
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-7210
Attorney for Petitioner
18048 October 23.30;
November 6, 13.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name PACFEL ENTER-
PRISES, a Florida general part
nership at number 1385 East 10th
Avenue, in the City of Hialeah,
Florida 33010 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this 9th
day of October, 1987.
MICHAEL FELLNER
IRVIN PACHTER
Law Offices of Marc Post el nek.
P.A.
By: Marc Postelnek. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
407 Lincoln Road, Suite 10-B
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-7210
18047 October 16. 23,30;
November 6. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5277
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOHN ROBERT PETTIGREW
a/k/a JOHN R. PETTIGREW
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of JOHN R. PET-
TIGREW, deceased. File Number
87-5277, is pending in the Circuit
Court for DADE County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagier Street,
3rd Floor, Miami, FL 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate is CAROL KAHN PET-
TIGREW, whose address is 1057
Northeast 204th Terrace, Miami.
FL 33179. The name and address
of the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: Oc-
tober 23, 1987.
CARON KAHN PETTIGREW
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
JOHN ROBERT PETTIGREW
a/k/a JOHN R. PETTIGREW
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
DOUGLAS D. STRATTON. Esq.
505 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, FL 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-7772
18054 October 23,30. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name INTERNACIONAL
NORTHVSIA (USA) CORP.
DBA. INTERNACIONAL NOR-
THVSIA at 10660 NW 77th
COURT (UNIT-301) HIALEAH
GARDENS, FLORIDA 33016 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
RUDOLF M.
APPENZELLER
PRESIDENT
18033 October 9.16. 23.30. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SOUTH POINTE
POPS in Dade County, Florida, in
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
GREATER MIAMI
COMMUNITY
CONCERT BAND. INC..
a Florida non-profit corporation
by: ALLAN TAVSS, President
Mirhael L. Mann. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
9100 South Dadeland Boulevard
Suite 1103
Miami. Florida BUM
18025 October 2. 9. 16. 23. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-35769 CA 24
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
as Trustee for th.- Housing
Finance Authority of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida under a trust indenture
dated as of September 1. 1988,
Plaintiff
vs.
.11'ANITA GARCIA.
Defendants.
TO: JUANITA GARCIA.
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
chiming interest by, through.
under or against JUANITA GAR-
CIA, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title or
interest in the property herein
described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
lot 2, Block 19. PRINCBTO-
NIAN SUBDIVISION SEC-
TION FIVE, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 122. at Page 86 at
the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
November 6th, 1987. and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 29th dav of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
18022 October 2,9.16,23, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 87-4M21-FC-14
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
davtd r. Mcknight
PettttHM
ano
wendy Mcknight
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Wendy McKnight.
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.J.
GRAFF, ESQ. attorney for Peti
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St.. N.M.B. Florida 33162 on
or before November 6th, 1987 and
file the original with the clerk ol
this court otherwise a default will
be entered against you.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: C. P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
18028 October 9,16, 23,30, 1987
NOTICE UNDER '
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name LES PETITES 41ST
STREET at 738 Arthur Godfrey
Road, 41st Street. Miami Beach,
FL 33140 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
ANA ROTHBAUM
SARA ROTHBAUM
MARIA PEREZ
EUGENE J. WEISS
Attorney for LES PETITES 41aV
STREET
18046 October 16.23.30;
November 6. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name CHILO'S
CAFETERIA at 13766 S.W. 84th
Street, Miami. Florida 33183 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
MARGARITO J. BELLO
13720 S.W. 32nd Street
Miami, Florida 33175
18034 October 9,16,23,30, 1987


Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 23, 1987
At One Herald Plaza:
Chusmir Reports to the Executive (Editor's) Suite
Continued from Page 8-B
presidential candidate's in-
tegrity and judgment and I
think the Herald was correct
in following the lead that he
was having a rendezvous in
Washington," Chusmir says.
As for the growing influence
of South Florida's Latin
American community,
Chusmir says, "The Herald
will continue to cover the news
accurately and fairly and in a
balanced way. When your com-
munity changes you need to
respond to the changes in
terms of coverage. We would
be derelict in a community
such as Dade County which is
44 percent Hispanic if we
didn t have coverage of the
Hispanic community in our
paper. So obviously,' she con-
cedes, "we need to expand and
improve our coverage of the
Hispanic community.
"I find many of the people in
the Latin community have
been very responsive and
helpful and there are some
who disagree with what we do
but we try to communicate and
understand their point of view.
But the Herald will continue to
be an aggressive, objective
paper."
Chusmir says the Herald
needs to broaden its coverage
in "all communities. I think we
need to broaden our coverage
in the Black community just as
well, in the Haitian communi-
ty. We have a lot of groups
here."
It is not a question of
whether these areas have been
neglected, she says. "You
want to keep doing better and
better. And the Herald, like
any newspaper, is trying to do
a better job all the time."
Asked about the Jewish con-
cerns involving the Herald's
coverage of community af-
fairs. Chusmir says, "I really
don't know what the Jewish
community's relationship with
the Herald is. The Herald has
tried to cover the Jewish com-
munity and it's not something
we've changed because I'm
here. I think our coverage of
the Waldheim situation was
excellent with the pope and
with the Jewish leaders
meeting with the pope. That's
not because I'm here. That's
because it's an excellent staff
that would do it in a fair and
objective way.
SINGLES
WHAT IS WRONG WITH
Miami bachelor woman,
widowed for the last 10-15
years, having lost all
desire and courage to get
back on the marriage
tract? Will social work, and
theatre bachelorhood on
their towers of Camelot?
Men are willing, ladies must
try. World traveler. 72 feels
active, spry, more like 40.
wishes to meet a lady,
with or without a car.
Would welcome a romance
developing into a heavenly
marriage better than a
chadchun affair of our
parents. Write box SR &
Jewish Florkjian, P.O. Box
012973. Miami. Fl 33101.
' I don't have to go out in this
newsroom and say, 'Be fair to
the Jewish community, be fair
to the Hispanic community.
This is a newsroom that wants
to cover the community better,
to monitor it better, to get
reporters to plug into it
better."
"I don't have to go
out in this newsroom
and say 'Be fair to
the Jewish
community
Now the Herald is working on
an expansion of its Spanish
edition, El Herald, Chusmir
says. Asked about other
changes she has been effec-
ting, Chusmir says, "The
paper emphasized crime too
much and with that emphasis
of crime, we lost some of the
space that could give us better
balance. And I think the paper
has been in better balance. We
certainly are tapped into the
Latin community a lot more
than we were when I first
came. We're even monitoring
it better in terms of monitor-
ing the radio in Cuba and
Spanish radio and television.
I've brought in a course on the
Cuban culture and history that
some of our people are
attending."
When Chusmir started at
the Herald there weren't
women in positions of top
management and there
weren't women covering a lot
of beats such as police and
courts. Women, she says, were
more in the women's depart-
ments. Asked her particular
interest: politics, crime, the
family, Chusmir answers, "I
think I had an interest in
everything." No, she says, she
did not see herself as wanting
to entertain readers. Asked if
she had little toleration of cor-
ruption, Chusmir asserts, "I
think that presumes motives
behind what a reporter is. A
reporter is someone who
reports the news. I wasn't
there on crusades. I was there
to report the news."
But she wasn't always
satisfied. In fact. .
"I'm never pleased with
anything that I've written or
done," she says. "My stan-
dards for what I want to ac-
complish have always been
higher than what I can do."
Her parents, mother in par-
ticular, set very high stan-
dards for her, Chusmir recalls.
But when she is asked to share
some of the secret wisdom her
mother taught her, Chusmir
almost doubles up in laughter
an unusual posture for this
soft-spoken, well-suited ex-
ecutive and blurts out,
"Start with flour and end with
flour when you're making ,
cake- Chusmir, who is known
for her baking skills, collet
herself from the laughter ana
adds, "She (my ^TJr
always used to say that educa-
tion is the one thing they can't
take away from you. I don't
know if she said anything but
I just really believe that good
isn't good enough. I \m.
always want to make it better
to be done right."
On Judaism, Chusmir says
"I'm very proud to be Jewish
but not observant at this time
of my life." But Judaism does
fit into her life, she says. "It's
what helped shape me. I was
raised in a Jewish family, I was
privately tutored in Hebrew
and the scriptures, so I was
given a very good Jewish
background and we obsered
the holidays and certainly
observed the ethics and tenets
of Judaism and I don't think
you can separate me from
them."
So that leads one to wonder
whether her Judaism wil] ef-
fect her role as one of the key
voices behind Miami's voice.
"It's what I am and if I fit in
then it fits in," she says.


Full Text
Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 23. 1987
Israeli TV Strike
Boosts Second Channel
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
strike by Israel Broadcast
Authority journalists, which
has blacked out radio and
television for eight days has
given an unexpected boost to
the proposed commercial TV
network, known officially as
the second channel.
Although the Knesset is still
debating the legislation
necessary to establish it, per-
mission was granted to a
private television production
company in Jerusalem for live
coverage of the arrival of Ida
Nudel at Ben Gurion Airport
last week.
Special permission was also
granted for a series of "ex-
perimental broadcasts" on the
private channel. They will in-
clude nightly one-hour films,
under arrangements made
with the Cinema Owners
Association.
Until now, the Communica-
tions Ministry's engineering
department has been moving
slowly in the direction of a se-
cond channel. During the past
year it has screened still
photograhs for short periods
each evening.
The purpose is to stake for-
mal claim to Channel 22 on the
Ultra High Frequency (UHF)
band to prevent its pre-
emption by Egypt or other
neighboring Arab states. It
has also been broadcasting
reruns of shows from Israel
Television and Educational
Television.
Meanwhile, no progress
seems to have been made in
settling the broadcasters"
strike. Radio and television
journalists are demanding the
same pay scale as print jour-
nalists. "Although they are
members of the Journalists
Association, they receive
lower salaries than their
newspaper colleagues because
they are employed by the IBA.
a government agency, and are
classified as civil servants. The
Finance Ministry refuses to
consider wage increases for
any single branch of public sec-
tor workers, and the IBA
management says its hands
are tied.
Shultz Stood Up By Palestinians
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Secretary of State George
Shultz ended his three-day
visit to Israel Monday sug-
gesting that the Palestinians
may be their own worst
enemies.
It was "contradictory" for
the Palestinians to demand
that their views be heard and
yet refuse to meet with him,
Shultz said at a final news con-
ference before departing for
Egypt. He was referring to the
elect group of Palestinian
politicians and business people
from the administered ter-
ritories invited for a talk at his
Jerusalem Hilton Hotel suite
Sunday afternoon.
The secretary waited in vain.
None showed up. Some may
have been deterred by threats,
Shultz said, adding, "that only
Synagogue
Arsonist Sentenced
BOSTON (JTA) A
22-year-old man has been
sentenced to five to 10 years in
prison for burning down Tem-
ple Beth David of Westwood,
Mass., on March 14 as well as
the torching of two autos and
theft.
Christopher Badessa, a
laborer with a minor criminal
record, had pleaded guilty
despite his maintenance of in-
nocence in the face of "over-
whelming" evidence, the
Jewish Advocate reports. He
had been the subject of a na-
tionwide alert before he turn-
ed himself in to police a week
after the incident.
reminds us that peace has its
enemies." The list of invitees,
carefully put together by U.S.
consular officials in East
Jerusalem, included former
Gaza Mayor Rashad A-Shawa,
Dr. Khatem Abu Ghazzala of
Gaza and Mayor Hannah el-
Atrash of Beit Sahur in the
West Bank.
A-Shawa, who is pro-
Jordanian, said in an interview-
later that he did not wish to
deepen divisions in the Palesti-
nian camp by meeting with
Shultz at this time. He and the
others also may have wanted
to avoid the small group of
Palestinian students picketing
Shultz's hotel during the time
set for the meeting.
They carried placards com-
paring restrictions in the ad-
ministered territories with
those in force against Jews in
the Soviet Union. Shultz, who
observed the pickets, told
reporters, "I don't know of
any limitations on emigration"
from the territories.
The East Jerusalem Arabic
press, which has considerable
influence with West Bankers,
had advised the Palestinian
leaders not to attend the
meeting. They said the recent
escalation of violence in the
territories was good reason to
boycott Shultz.
Other reports indicated the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion had pressured represen-
tatives from the territories not
to meet with Shultz, because of
the secretary's involvement in
recent moves to dose the
PLO's Information Office in
Washington.
TOP CASH PAID
OLD FURMTURE
ORIENTAL RUGS
OLD OIL PAINTINGS
Objects of Art
Brtc-a-Brac
Tapestries
Bronzes
Pianos
Silver
Single Items or Complete Estates
DADE ESTATE 4.AI I IHII S BROWARU
751-4770 6914 Biacavnc Blvd. 462-0730
Ida Nudel shows her just-received certificate
of Israeli citizenship at Ben Gurion Airport
Reception Hall shortly after her arrival to
Israel from Moscow, ending a 16-year battle to
AP/Wide World Photo
emigrate. Seated beside Ms. Nudel are Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir (left) and Foreim
Minister Shimon Peres.
Yacht Financing at The Private Bank.
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The Private Bank concentrates on meeting the financial needs of highly successful
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For example, yacht financing at The Private Bank is available in amounts of $50,000
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teservadox Resolutions:
Orthodox, Conservative, Reform
Rabbis Work Out Compromise On 'Get'
Friday, October 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
By RABBI
HASKELL LOOKSTEIN
gh Telegraphic Agency
There is good news for 5748.
he year 5747 saw a first in
ie New York Jewish com-
jjnity: Rabbis of all different
Uvpoints worked together
i a religious problem and
ought it closer to a solution.
[The problem we faced is vex-
g: How to enable all Jews to
arry freely with each other.
Le of the reasons the problem
hsts is that about 25 percent
[Jewish marriages today end
[divorce. Most of the divorc-
couples obtain only a civil
jirorce. They do not arrange
a "get" (religious divorce).
^lost divorcees marry a se-
nd time. That marriage is in-
d according to Orthodox
J Conservative Jews unless
ret has been obtained to end
first marriage. In such a
e, the children of that se-
_ marriage are considered
imzeirim (illegitimate) ac-
ding to Torah law and are
ligible to marry other Jews
cept for other mamzeirim.
The problem is exacerbated
[a number of factors. First,
bst Jews do not even know
at a get is. Second, most
form and Reconstructionist
bbis do not require a get as a
erequisitc for remarriage. In
dition, when a candidate for
narriage suddenly needs a
i. her his former
wise may i*> uncooperative.
'ount Chocula
Loses Star
WEW YORK General
Ills has withdrawn four
llion packages of its Count
locula cereal and is redesign-
the box to eliminate a
ish Star of David from
und the neck of its Dracula
itration.
/illiam M. Shaffer, the
^nneapolis-based company's
relations manager, ex-
vindictive or demand money to
gain compliance (would any
sum not be outrageous?) The
aggrieved party then has two
unacceptable choices: to marry
contrary to Jewish law, at
least as far as Orthodox and
Conservative Jews understand
it, or to remain single, as an
agunah.
A committee of the New
York Board of Rabbis was
authorized to propose a resolu-
tion to solve this problem. The
participants included Rabbis
Gunter Hirschberg and Marc
Gelman (Reform), Gilbert
Rosenthal and Allan Blaine
(Conservative), Robert
Aronowitz (Reconstructionist)
and Marc Angel and myself
(Orthodox). We were all united
on the desire to solve the pro-
blic
uned that a new electronic
essing technique had been
I to lift the likeness of Bela
Mi from the 1930 film
la" and place it on the
freal package. Lugosi's
^stume in the film included a
it-pointed medallion with a
?e stone center used to hyp-
people but the process
! technique flattened out the
thereby turning the
UOion into a Star of David.
[Shaffer said that four million
ckages of Count Chocula
had already been
Mtnbuted when the situation
las brought to the company's
ftention by the Anti-
ftamation League of B'nai
I nth. ^
1'We immediately changed
P*. package design for the re-
Paiimig four million packages,
JJwl our TV commercials.
ired ourselves that
on would not be on
mmunication from
Mills," Shaffer
blem. The biggest hurdle was
the inegalitarian structure of a
get (the man gives it; the
woman accepts it).
Some suggested that if we
could egalitarianize the docu-
ment there would be no pro-
blem. Others countered that if
we did that there would be no
get at all. We decided together
and some of my colleagues
compromised greatly on this
that as important as
egalitarianism may be as a
religious principle for some of
us, the ability of all our
children to marry freely
among each other was of
greater import to all of us.
The resolution, which was
passed both unanimously and
enthusiastically by the Board
contained the following three
parts:
We called upon every rabbi
to counsel his (or her) con-
gregants that in the event of a
civil divorce the congregant
should make certain to ar-
range for a Jewish divorce
get from a religiously
recognized tribunal authorized
to issue such a document.
We called upon
synagogues and the wider
community to take sanctions
against any divorced person
who refused to cooperate with
a former spouse who wishes to
obtain a get. Such sanctions
would include the withholding
from such a person of any
honors or privileges within a
congregation, or any office
holding or honors in the wider
community.
We suggested that rabbis
encourage couples who are
about to be married to sign a
prenuptial agreement pro-
viding that in the event that
the marriage ends in a civil
divorce, the husband and wife
will cooperate in the giving
and receiving of a get.
This resolution was made
possible by a spirit of mutual
love and respect which
members of the New York
Board of Rabbis have for each
other. We do not obscure our
differences. But we accept
each other as idealistic pro-
ponents of differing points of
view arrived at by deep
religious convictions. In most
areas we simply agree to
disagree. But on the issue of
get we saw a problem which
threatens to divide our people
into two groups, the members
of which will not be able to
marry each other. Because our
commitment to the Jewish
people as a whole transcends
whatever adjective may be
prefixed to our interpretation
of Judaism, we acted as one
and we hope that other boards
of rabbis will do the same.
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