The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03063

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
' Jewi]fo Floridllaini
eUJ2^&
*/av
Vol. 60 No. 42
Miami Friday, October 16,1987
Price 50 Cent*
Moment Of
Silence
'Heard' Before
Supreme Court
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The Supreme Court heard
Arguments last week on
Iwhether a 1987 New Jersey
law requiring a minute of
silence in public schools "for
private contemplation and in-
trospection' violated the First
Amendment prohibition on the
lestablishment or religion.
The case. Karcher v. May, is
Ian appeal of a decision by the
[Third U.S. Circuit Court of
(Appeals upholding a 1985 deci-
sion bj the Federal District
Court in New Jersey that the
law was unconstitutional.
Norman Cantor, a Trenton,
M Jersey lawyer, represen-
ting Jeffrey May, a New
Ijersey teacher, who along with
several parents and students
challenged the law, argued
Ithat i.-cussion in the New
Ijersey Legislature during the
Id e l.i .i ; e on the bill
[demonstrated that supporters
Continued on Page 6-A
JERUSALEM Palestinian Arabs leave the
Temple mount in haste, carrying one who was
overcome by teargas fired by Israeli border
police who broke up a confrontation between
Jews and Moslems. Arab worshippers tried to
"t
\ AP/Wide World Photo
stop efforts by Orthodox Jews, members of the
right-wing Temple Mount Faithful, to pray at
the site which is sacred to both Judaism and
Islam. Israeli police rapidly dispersed both
sides afier firing warning shots.
House
Approves
A 'Hate
Crimes' Bill
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
A "hate crimes" bill that
would impose federal criminal
penalties for damage to
religious property and injury
to persons in the free exercise
of their religious beliefs was
approved by the house on a
voice vote Monday.
The bill, introduced by Rep.
Dan Glickman (D., Kan.), pro-
vides for fines up to $250,000
and/or imprisonment for
anyone who causes $10,000 or
more damage to a church,
synagogue, religious cemetery
or other religious real property
or causes serious bodily injury
to a person trying to exercise
his religious beliefs.
The House passed a similar
bill introduced by Glickman
last year. But David Brody,
Washington representative of
the Anti-Defamation League
Continued on Page 3-A
Right-Wing Extremists Convicted Of IRS Threats
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
[NEW YORK (JTA) -
five members of a rightwing
xprotest group with links to
violently anti-Semitic
ftjanization were convicted in
Vegas of threatening the
t Odds:
Peace Plan
[Controversy
By WILLIAM SAPHIRE
U22 YORK -(JTA)- The
itmn of the organized
ienean Jewish leadership
the sharply controversial
jsue of whether they have the
Ignt and obligation to take
PI'c position* on matters af-
P'.ng Israel's security and
[reign policy, was made clear
M letter by Morris Abram,
EL cT!;man "f the Con-
irence of Presidents of Major
Kican Jewish Organiza-
haL Pre"iier Yitzhak
CnKUoreignMini8ter
fcleaS'l^^" Abram
hat "RSunda-v- "* stated
^te1? in, *vin*
LVn of cl lsrael on mat-
fa*" but tt ?kltS very bein-
L'ne'nbershin 8ame tir,
r^cedi?'" th* con:
aoes not restrict con-
r0nt"-ued on Page
lives of agents of the Internal
Revenue Service and a Nevada
state judge.
The five are members of the
Committee of the States, a
group affiliated with the Chris-
tian Identity movement, which
espouses the belief that the
Jews are the children of Satan
and which calls the United
States government "ZOG" -
"Zionist-Occupied Govern-
ment." The Committee was
formed in 1984 in Mariposa,
California.
Convictions in Federal
District Court in Las Vegas
were meted out to Rev.
William Potter Gale, who
heads the Ministry of Christ
Church in Mariposa and is
founder of the Identity move-
ment; Fortunato Parrino, an
assistant at the church;
Richard Van Hazel of Arizona;
and Patrick McCray and his
brother George McCray, of
Nevada. A sixth defendant,
Gary Dolfin of Nevada, plead-
ed guilty to lesser charges
after the trial began.
In addition, two others nam-
ed in the indictment. Angelo
Stefanelli and Susan Kieffer of
Nevada, pleaded guilty to
reduced charges and agreed to
cooperate with the
government.
Those convicted face possi-
ble maximum sentences of 34
years' imprisonment and fines
of $250,000, according to assis-
tant U.S. prosecuting attorney
Richard Pocker.
The trial was monitored by
the Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith in Los Angeles,
which has furnished informa-
tion on the case to law enforce-
ment agencies throughout the
country. Betsy Rosenthal,
ADL Western states civil
rights director, called the ver-
dict a "warning to extremists
that the American people will
not tolerate their threats of
physical harm to our officials
and government institutions."
The ADL had obtained
documents from the Commit-
tee's first meeting, among
which was a statement warn-
ing that any attempt to in-
terfere with the group by any
person or government agency
would "result in the death
penalty being imposed upon
conviction by said
Committee."
For many years, the ADL
Continued on Page 15-A
Congressman Dante Fascell
Questions Strength By Sword
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jevxsh Flondian SlulJ II
U.S. Rep. Dante Fascell isn't always
optimistic about world affairs such as
the foreign policy change in the Persian
Gulf or the American posture of
strength by the sword when it could use
a little more intellect.
But Fascell, a political veteran first
elected in 1954, now chairman of the
powerful Foreign Affairs Committee,
was candid, blunt, and frequently
frustrated as he discussed several key
issues in an exclusive interview with the
Jewish Floridian.
He tossed about topics including
Soviet Jewry, the doomed Israeli Lavi
jetfighter and the military buildup in the
Persian Gulf, on the eve of his being
honored with the Tree of Life Award by
the Jewish National Fund.
Fascell was peppery when he discuss-
ed the scrapped Lavi jetfighter "The
problem in Israel was, with all the
budget problems they've got the
highest per capita deficit in the world,
the highest tax rate in the world, the
economic problems they've got, a split
political system that boils down to one
vote on any one issue why would they
want to pursue this super expensive
airplane? So, they decided, well, discre-
tion is the better part of wisdom.
Sometimes you can't buy a Cadillac,
you've got to buy a Ford."
Fascell supports, and staunchly so, $5
billion in economic and military aid the
United States gives Israel, a chunk that
makes Israel the largest recipient of the
total $11-$12 billion foreign aid budget.
Continued on Page 10-A
Dante Fascell


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 16, 1987
The Jews Of Argentina:
Not Strangers In The Land
By AVIVA CANTOR
BUENOS AIRES (JTA)
The secular/Zionist orienta-
tion of Argentine Jewry
which dates back to the period
of Jewish immigration in the
1880's is being challenged in
recent years by the rise of a
Conservative movement which
is attracting many young
people.
The movement was
spearheaded by the establish-
ment of the Seminario
Rabinico Latinamericano by
Rabbi Marshall Meyer in 1962.
At the time the Seminario was
founded, Argentine Jewry was
a "secular community with
poor Orthodox leadership and
rabbis who didn't know how to
reach the youth," its 30-year-
old rector, Daniel Fainstein,
told a visiting delegation of
North American journalists
and communal leaders.
The Seminario, which mark-
ed its 25th anniversary this
August, has ordained 30 Con-
servative rabbis to date, most
of them working in Argentina.
They were invited to take over
pulpits of old synagogues
founded by immigrants many
of which were "vaguely,
though not ideologically or
theologically, traditional,"
said Fainstein. "They sought
to have young people and a
rabbi who can confront the
issues that concern them."
Rabbi Efraim Rosenzweig of
Cordoba's Temple Bet El, is a
Conservative rabbi, as is the
official rabbi of Mendoza. In
Buenos Aires, in addition to
the Conservative Comunidad
Bet El, there are 20 minyans
(prayer groups) which meet in
Jewish schools, started by
parents of the students.
The Seminario is now
located in a modern building in
the Belgrano district of
Buenos Aires where 20,000
Jews, many upwardly-mobile,
live. It trains rabbis, communi-
ty directors to work with
them, and madrichim
(counselors) for youth gro
titute for adult
education, an afternoon
school with 198 pupi.
choir open to all; and main-
tain? a library of over 27.000
volumes, and a burgeoning
publications program.
Comunidad Bet El, also in
the Belgrano district with Rab-
bi Baruj Plavnick at the pulpit,
+Jewi*i>nor*Ma*
'OMIMM
Phone: (306) 37*4606
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SUBSCRIPTION RATES: In ad-
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99.50 (Anniversary Special) Out
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By Mall 01.45 per copy.
Editor's Note: Writer
Aviva Cantor traveled
throughout Argentina with a
delegation of North American
Jewish journalists and com-
munal leaders. Her series on
A rgentinean Jews continues in
this edition.
attracts about 1,500 con-
gregants on the average Fri-
day evening. There is an air of
conviviality at the services:
people dress informally and sit
on folding chairs. The spirit is
lively and people sing along
with congregants (including
women) who lead some of the
prayers, accompanied by an
organ.
Conservative rabbis in
Argentina, said Fainstein,
tend to be "left-wing Conser-
vative" and believe in the
equality of women. One of the
students at the Seminario, a
grandmother named Margit
Baumatz who serves as rabbi
for the German congregation
Lamrot Hakol ("in spite of
everything"), is planning to be
the first woman ordained
there.
The situation in the various
synagogues where Conser-
vative rabbis serve, however,
is still in the process of transi-
tion. In Cordoba, although
Rosenzweig thinks women
should be allowed to have an
aliya, he told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency, "this is
not the congregation's minhag
(custom) and one cannot
always go against the con-
gregation." Five or six years
ago, he added, "it was a big
revolution to get mixed
seating."
What is the reason for the
growth of the Conservative
movement in a community
which has always been
secular? Some Argentine
leaders attribute it to a
"spiritual awakening." Others
advance a socio-economic in-
terpretation: Conservative
upper middle
eeka different ideology
Zionisni. which WHS pn>
an and lower class petit
bourgeois in tone. Fainstein
tunta the latter reason.
stating that there are Conser-
vative communities "in all
places, far from being
wealthy."
"Conservative rabbis
. tend to the left-
wing and believe in
the equality of
women."
Another theory is that the
religious interest on the part
of Argentine Jews started dur-
ing the eight-year reign of the
junta, when few other vehicles
of expression were regarded
as safe. A similar explanation
is preferred in relation to the
increasing popularity of the
community centers, which
became "a family haven" at
that time.
Perhaps the explanation
closest to the mark is that
Argentine Jews are increas-
ingly seeking ways to make a
synthesis between being Jews
and being Argentineans. The
Conservative movement and
the community centers are
each trying to work out such a
synthesis and both feel
strongly that the communal
structures should reflect the
actual religious and political
pluralism that exists among
Jews.
One of the objects of their
critique in this regard is the
AM1A (Atodacion Mutual
Israelita Argentina), also call-
ed the Kehiln The AMIA funds the Jewish
schools in the capital city and
the provinces, holds cultural
activities such as lectures, ex-
hibits and concerts, and ad-
ministers welfare and the
cemeteries.
Outgoing AMIA president
Luis Perlmutter told the North
American delegation that out
of the annual budget of $10
million, 50 percent goes to
education and 25 percent to
social welfare. The AMIA, he
said, has overcome its budget
crisis of several years ago; it is
generally acknowledged that
good financial management
played a key role here.
Hebraica officials and others
criticize the AMIA for not in-
cluding the Sephardim. who
constitute about 30 percent of
Buenos Aires Jewry. The
Sephardim are mainly descen-
dants of immigrants from
Syria. Morocco. Algeria and
Turkey. They run their own
synagogues (30) and schools
(three). The exclusion of the
Sephardim from the AMIA.
however, derives mainly from
their having had different
models of communal organiza-
tion at the time of their
immigration.
Another criticism of the
AMIA is that its official rabbi
is Orthodox, and it is he who
officiates at all ceremonial
functions. More importantly,
there are no AMIA activities
on the Sabbath, and no non-
Orthodox conversions are ac-
cepted by its rabbinate.
Chinese Scientists
May Reciprocate Visits
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVTV (JTA) -
Scientists in China are intense-
ly interested in Israeli science
and may be coming to Israel in
the not too distant future to in-
vestigate it at first hand, Haifa
University mathematics Prof.
Jonathan Golan said here
recently on his return from a
visit to the People's Republic
of China.
The work of Israeli scientists
is well known to the Chinese
and their books and research
papers are to be found in every
university there, Golan said.
He said he was invited by the
Popular University in Beijing
one of 17 in China's capita'
and traveled as an in
dividual, not a group member
to attend a conference there.
Israelis in variou.- fields whi
have gone to China traveled at
a group until now
Golan said he used his Israeli
passport even though China
has never officially recognized
Israel, and received a warm
welcome.
"They are very interested in
Israeli science. They know
there is more scientific output
from Israel than there is from
all of China. I was accepted
very warmly. They are very in-
terested in plugging into the
This Heifer
Wasn't Cowed
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
heifer at Kibbutz Magan gave
birth to a two-headed calf on
Yom Kippur. The bovine in-
fant was suckling with both
mouths, leading one wag to
liken it to the tax collector.
The heads are joined at the
middle. The calf therefore has
two ears but four eyes and two
noses. The zoological oddity is
rare but not unknown.
net-
that
international scientific
work," Golan said.
He said he thought
Chinese scientists would begin
coming to Israel in a year or
two. "They are all interested
but are also somewhat hesitant
about being the first to ask for
a Chinese exit visa to come to
Israel," he said.
Golan said he and his
Chinese colleagues talked very
little of politics. "They are not
that interested in politics. The
Middle East problem is very
far from their thoughts or in-
terests. Their attitudes toward
us and our regional problems is
like ours toward Campuchea.
which does interest them." he
said,
AMIA admit that many in t
body favor religious pluralisnT
but are fearful that the Or'
thodox rabbis would never h-
cept it and the Kehila WoJj
then be divided. This th*
AMIA is determined to avert
Community-wide elections
to the AMIA are held every
three years; six parties put 1
candidates and officials are
selected by a system of propor-
tional representation. At the
time of the visit of the North
American delegation, posters
from the different parties run-
ning in the spring elections
were still on the walls of
buildings in the old Jewish
Once (pronounced On-say)
neighborhood, where the
AMIA building is local
Hebraica ] Man(i
Trumper criticized the fact
that the AMIA is run along the
lines of old Jewish political
parties, "some of which have
disappeared in Israel hut are
still alive and well in Argen-
tina." and dominated by the
Avoda (similar to the Israeli
Labor) Party.
In the recent elections.
Avoda garnered 40 percent of
the vote. A party named
Breira, representing all the
community centers and clubs
and calling for "religious
pluralism and a richer Jewish
life," ran for the second time.
It garnered 20 percent of the
votes.
However, only about 9,000
Jews voted in the recent elec-
tions (down from 12.600 in
1966), out of an estimated
Jewish population in Buenos
Aires of 230,000. Trumper told
the delegation that "the ma-
jority of Jews in Buenos Aires
don't know and don't care
about these kind of discus-
sions. The youth don't par-
ticipate in the elections ..."
Others added that the Kehila's
workers are not allowed by
Argentine law to vote in such
elections.
Trumper called for opening
up the list of people who can
vote, giving "other kinds of
services that can integrate the
poor and the rich, and
"integrate rather than divide"
Ashkenazim and Sephardim
He concluded: "A unit;
which does not accept religious
pluralism works
history."
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Friday, October 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A"
mm News m
Roundup
Toronto Adopts Cuban Congregation
TORONTO (JTA) Rabbi Erwin Schild of Adath
Israel Synagogue here announced at a meeting of the Cana-
dian Jewish Congress Ontario Regional Executive Commit-
tee that the Board of Governors of his congregation has
voted to "adopt" the similarly named Adath Israel
Synagogue of Havana, Cuba. What the adoption will con-
sist of in practical terms has not yet been worked out, but it
may include fraternal visits to Cuba as tourists, provisions
of prayerbooks, prayer shawls and other synagogue needs
and various other kinds of tangible assistance. The Cuban
house of worship consists of an aging membership and has
limited and diminishing financial resources.
Strategic Meet Postponed
TEL AVIV (JTA) The biannual meeting on strategic
cooperation between Israel and the U.S. which was to have
begun last week in Washington has been postponed
because of a family tragedy. David Ivri, Director General of
the Israel Defense Ministry, was in Washington Monday
when he learned of the death of his son, Air Force Capt. Gil
Ivri. 27. in the crash of his F-16 fighter bomber during a
training exercise. The strategic talks will be held at a later
Holocaust Info Sought
LOS ANGELES (JTA) Yad Vashem, the Martyrs'
and Heroes' Remembrance Authority in Jerusalem, has
issued an international appeal for information about sur-
vivora and victims* of the Holocaust. Some three million
"pages of testimony" have already been filed. The Martyrs
Memorial of the Holocaust here provides a form for that in-
formation, which can be completed in English or Yiddish.
Fur more information, write to 6505 Wilshire Blvd., Los
Angeles, CA 90048.
Israel's Economy On Verge Of New Growth
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israel's economy, stagnant for
years, appears to be on the verge of a new period of
growth. But it faces severe difficulties, indicated by figures
released this week by the Central Bureau of Statistics.
During the first nine months of 1987, Israel paid some
billion for imported goods $1.5 billion more than in
the same period of 1986. The level of imports this year has
higher than in any year from 1980-85. The highest rise
n the import of consumer products, up 36 percent over
fear.
The Hank of Israel announced that the foreign debt now
stands at $25.7 billion, an increase of $693 million.
Tl.....retically, every Israeli owes more than $5,000 in
foreign debt.
Economists attributed the increase of the foreign debt to
the rise in private loans taken overseas and the weakening
of the U.S. dollar against European and Japanese curren-
cies. The Israeli Shekel is geared to the dollar.
Arab's Annual Ouster Effort Of Israel
l,N'TED NATIONS (JTA) Nineteen Arab countries
and the Palestine Liberation Organization have sent a let-
ter to UN Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar pro-
testing Israel's membership in the world organization. The
letter, written by Libya and signed by all the other Arab
natl0"s except Egypt and Jordan, was circulated at the
world body on the eve of the scheduled Tuesday vote on the
Arab-sponsored resolution to deny Israel's credentials to
the I nited Nations 42nd General Assembly.
Israeli diplomats said they expect the annual assault on
Sfu S credentia,s to be defeated. The vote last year was
M1, and that majority has grown steadily in recent years.
Israeli Student Killed In Old City
JERUSALEM (JTA) Funeral services were held
nere Sunday for an Israeli student and newlywed who was
totally shot Saturday evening in the Old City. Yigal Shahaf,
4, an electronics student who worked as a guard at night,
was shot at close range near the Via Dolorosa while stroll-
ing with his wife of four months and a couple of friends
from Netanya.
Jerusalem police are holding seven suspects in the
murder, but there is no indication that any of them was
airectlv linked to the shooting.
Prayerbook Misprint Alert
JJt5\ Y/?RK ~ WA) A nationwide alert to four
MpiJ!1 u lines in its latet prayerbook has been issued by
wihUdk fublications of Brooklyn. Mesorah, which
Judaic i Art Scro11 series of Enlish translations of
mach^ classics. says that four lines in its new Succoth
too la* \went unnoticed until two days before the holiday,
,ate to he recalled.
Hate Crimes Bill
Continued from Page 1-A
of B'nai B'rith who worked
closely with the Congrega-
tional committees that drafted
the legislation, told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that
several changes were made.
He said the earlier bill made
any damage to a religious pro-
perty a federal offense. But it
was decided that the federal
government should only be
brought in for a major offense
causing at least $10,000 in
damages, rather than desecra-
tions like daubing a swastika
on synagogues which can be
handled by local authorities.
The current bill also makes it a
federal crime to use a vehicle
that could be used in interstate
commerce, for commission of
hate acts whether or not it
crosses a state line, Brody
said. He said he plans to work
with Sen. Howard Metzen-
baum (D., Ohio), who is
scheduled to introduce a "hate
crimes" bill in the Senate, in
an effort to ensure his pro-
posal would coincide with the
bill adopted by the House.
Up to now, religiously-
motivated violence was not
subject to federal prosecution
except in the cases of arson or
where explosives were used.
The defacing of property,
which is one of the most com-
mon acts against synagogues
and black churches, was not a
federal crime.
In addition, a major reason
for the bill was that reports
have indicated that incidents
based on religious and racial
bias are increasing and becom-
ing more violent.
Meanwhile, Glickman and
Rep. Barbara Kennelly (D.,
Conn.) plan to introduce a com-
panion bill that would require
the Justice Department to
gather hate crime statistics for
an annual report as it does
with other crimes.
Alpha Omega
Dedicates New
Israeli
Dental School
TEL AVIV Alpha Omega,
the International Jewish Den-
tal Fraternity, recently
celebrated the official opening
of the Goldschleger School of
Dental Medicine at the Tel
Aviv University. This dental
school is one of only two in
Israel. The other one, The
Hadassah School of Dental
Medicine, was founded by
Alpha Omega in 1953 at The
Hebrew University in
Jerusalem.
The new Tel Aviv dental
school is intended to help
alleviate the great lack of den-
tal treatment in Israel's under-
privileged areas. The school's
students will serve after
graduation for three years in
dental clinics of the Kupat
Holim, the Israeli Health
Organization.
Although founded over 80
years ago to combat
discrimination in U.S. dental
schools, Alpha Omega's cur-
rent activities are much
broader in scope.
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 16, 1987

Open Up the Nazi Archives
The United States should take an active
role in supporting Israel's bid to open the
United Nations' Archives on Nazi War
Crimes.
Already, a clear majority of those nations
which participated in a decision after World
War II to keep the contents secret has
declared it no longer opposes their
disclosure.
Israel's ambassador to the UN, Benjamin
Netanyahu, points out disturbing events
around the globe denying the extent of the
Holocaust, contending even in a London
play that Shoah was a joint conspiracy of the
Nazis and Zionists.
Nothing can be lost by opening the files. In
the past 40 years, the files have been used to
try only three accused Nazi criminals for
criminal war acts.
Equally as important as potential prosecu-
tion of some Nazis who may still be alive and
unpunished is the documentation to the
world of the systematic destruction of Euro-
pean Jewry.
We can learn the final disposition of entire
Jewish communities seized by the Nazis, ob-
tain new details on the death camps in-
cluding lists of staff members of the Ger-
mans who tortured and imprisoned the six
million.
The Secretary General of the UN has con-
vened a meeting to discuss the opening of
the Archives. He should not give serious
consideration to a suggestion that they be
made available to nations such as Israel, but
that the contents cannot be published.
While the possibility of finding more
specific information on Kurt Waldheim is
slim, there is much to be uncovered in these
records which were maintained even as the
Holocaust continued until the end of the
war.
America should take the lead in champion-
ing this fight.
An Old Alliance Works Again
With the rejection of Judge Robert Bork
assured, this is an appropriate time to ex-
amine the revival of the alliance which pro-
vided the margin in the bitter fight on Presi-
dent Reagan's nominee for the Supreme
Court.
The overwhelming number of Jewish,
Black, labor and women's organizations
which actively opposed the Bork nomination
formed the most unified effort since the
height of the civil rights movement a
quarter of a century ago.
It is significant that Judge Bork's pro-
testations that the right of privacy is not
guaranteed by the Constitution tipped the
balance against him.
Because of that issue alone, the coalition
which aligned against his confirmation was
justified. Also important to bring to the
debate were Bork's judicial decisions and
writings which in almost every case tilted
strongly against the rights of individuals.
Typically, right-wing proponents of Bork
are assailing what they see as an unholy war
on the part of their traditional targets the
American Civil Liberties Union, the AFL-
CIO, the NAACP and the National
Organization for Women (NOW).
They do not single out Jewish groups for
the same condemnation, because they no
longer are considered an automatic ally of
what they term the liberal pressure lobby.
Once again, Florida's U.S. Senators
Lawton Chiles and Bob Graham lined up on
the proper side. They opposed the Bork
nomination on the basis of his view that only
limited protection for individual liberties
and freedom can be found in the
Constitution.
They reject Judge Bork's contention
that judicial restraint was mandated by the
"original intent" of our Founding Fathers.
Let's unite and mardj )
on Jerusalem/Jy
On one point, we agree with Judge Bork.
He deserves a final yea-or-nay vote from the
Senate. And so do the American people.
Repeal the Service Tax
The Florida legislature acted with proper
speed in plugging the loophole in recent law
which permitted citizens to carry firearms,
openly displayed.
Hopefully, legislators acted quickly
enough to negate a Dodge City image being
added to the picture of drug war shootouts
which the name "Miami" symbolizes to so
many nationwide.
But why the delay in discarding the ill-
advised tax on such services as advertising
which daily adds to the toll of cancelled con-
ventions and irrevocably lost millions to our
state?
Surely, the legislature and Governor Bob
Martinez can sense the outrage of the public
at large about the services tax.
It is unfortunate that it is taking so long to
implement the public weal and wishes.
America In The Gulf:
Where Does Israel Fit In?
By JOSEPH ALPHER
By agreeing to reflag
Kuwaiti tankers and escort
them through Persian Gulf
waters with U.S. Navy ship.-.
the United States embarked
upon a complex adventure,
and with doubtful partners:
the ail-too willing Russians,
the reticent Gulf Arabs, and
the essentially indifferent in-
dustrial states of Westcrii
Europe and Japan. Where, if
at all, does Israel fit in?
It was during the Carter ad-
ministration that America,
alarmed by events in
Afghanistan, Iran, and the
Horn of Africa, established a
regional command to oversee
American interests in the Gulf
region. This was done primari-
ly for the strategic purpose of
deterring or countering Soviet
military offensive moves into
the region. The prospect of
Soviet strategic gains at
America's expense has been
the main American worry
regarding the Gulf since Kho-
meini's rise to power in
January 1979; certainly since
the outbreak of the Iran-Iraq
war in September 1980. In-
deed, it was this very concern
that prompted National
irity Advisor Robert
McFarlane and his team to at-
tempt to cultivate elements in
the Iranian leadership that
ostensibly shared U.S. fears of
Soviet encroachment: the
Commentary
fiasco known todaj as
Irangate.
Now the American regional
command, known as CENT-
COM. finds itself facing off
against, not the USSR, but
Iran. Instead of risking
American lives to protect the
Gulf with its vital oil
reserves from Soviet en-
croachment, it is risking them
against Iran. And while the
defense of freedom of naviga-
tion is an honorable task, this
is being done at a time when oil
from sources outside the Gulf
is so plentiful that America's
allies are plainly uninterested
in supporting the American ef-
fort. Finally, the entire opera-
tion appears to have been
cleverly orchestrated by a
neutral Gulf Arab state
Kuwait, in order mceita
essentially under
even admirable, goa
ing an end to the Gull
BO doing Kuwait ha
couraged by both Soviel
Iraq and pro-Amer
Arabia
To add ironv up i
America's aim S rce in
the Gulf now also I
collaborating in ai anti-
Iranian role with none "ther
than the Soviet L'nion; the
Kuwaitis have arranged for
both superpowers to escort
their tankers. Of course, there
is some historical precedent
for this situation: during
World Wars I and II. the
Soviet Union and the western
powers collaborated to deal
with the challenge of Iran
whose strategic location, then
as now, made it an asset not to
be ignored.
It is against this backdrop
that the Reagan administra-
tion would like Israel to relax
its opposition to the supply of
sophisticated American arms
to Saudi Arabia. That opposi-
Continued "" P"*- |;,*A
Fred K. Shochet
Editor and Publisher
Jewish Floridian
Norma A. Orovitz
Managing Editor
Suzanne Shochet
Executive Editc
William T. Brewer
Director ot Operations
Joan C Teglas
Director ot Advertising
Friday, October 16,1987
Volume 60
23TISHRI5748
Number 42



The Opposite Perspective:
Friday, October 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Americans and Germans From The Other Side
By WOLFGANG BORGMANN
Stuttgarter Zeitung
Three people that have made
recent German history and il-
lustrate the changes it has
gone through are Adolf Hitler,
Konrad Adenauer and Willy
Brandt.
They all have one thing in
common: they have been nam-
ed Time magazine's Man of the
Year: Hitler in 1938, Adenauer
in 1953 and Brandt in 1970.
This changing face is one
aspect of a book by
Philadelphia Professor Frank
Trommler.
Many might have an initial
attitude of skepticism when
they realize that this huge
me 1198 pages) is a long str-
ing of lectures delivered at the
university to commemorate
the landing of the first 13
families who left Krefeld for
the new land in 1683.
collection, called
//"/ die Deutschen.
a stock-taking of this
fear old relationship.
I lespite whatever reservations
i pie may have, the book is
worth reading.
The actual result of the lec-
which at first seem to be
randomly thrown together, is
staggering. This carefully
edited and illustrated book
reveals itself as probably uni-
que, an extraordinarily multi-
faceted compilation of con-
tributions to American-
Germany history. Practically
every contribution illuminates
rial aspect or opens new
flits.
Whoever is prepared to
make the effort to read the
short articles will get a colorful
n of America and its
lan immigrants. The
much more than a
Jtory book. It
lines of develop-
cl reach up to the
- three centuries have
i irrival of millions of
n America. Thev left
Editor's Note: While the
following perspective was writ-
ten for a German reading au-
dience, its content has value for
Americans and, especially,
American Jews. We offer it
here as an unusual op-ed view.
>:;i::ir because of economic hardship,
religious intolerance or
political persecution.
In the second half of the 19th
century a quarter of the
population of Chicago was
German. Between 1820 and
1980 seven million went to
America. Every fourth
American can claim German
ancestry, even when only five
percent of the grandchildren
of German grandparents can
speak German.
There is no doubt that Ger-
mans have made important
contributions to the develop-
ment of this multi-ethnic conti-
nent. German beer for in-
stance, which is pulled cold in a
watered down version of the
original serves as a well known
example.
However despite their
numbers, the Germans have
never played an important role
in politics. Even the German
language, which has been kept
alive, often by considerable ef-
fort, has over the centuries
lost its power. This was the
price paid for being
assimilated, which many Ger-
mans as well as other na-
tionalities, willingly paid or
were forced to pay. Mean-
while, beginning at turn of this
century, America developed a
tear of foreign influence. This
has given rise to the view that
America has reached its
capacity for taking m and
assimilating new currents of
immigrants. Though despite
everythini till remains a
relatively tolerant c tuntr
emigr i
intoleration,
such as anti-German feeling
' -
AP/Wide World Photo
BEERSHEVA Sobbing women in a funeral
procession for Israeli Shin Bet security agent
Victor Arajwan mourn his death. Arajwan
and four Palestinian guerillas were killed in a
clash between Shin Bet agents and terrorists.
He was buried in the Negev capital.
during the first world war,
which made it dangerous to
speak German, and the intern-
ment of Japanese immigrants
during the second, belong to
the darker side of the
American immigration
experience.
But such examples which
took place against a
background of world war. have
remained the exception rather
than the rule. The attitude of
many Germans remains to this
day somewhat ambivalent.
Hitler, for example, regarded
Americans as simpletons
aps such a statement
could be expected from a man
like him.
But negative views were
prevalent also among more
respectable people. The great
German poet Heinrich Heine
said, "Their religion is the ex-
ploitation of the world and
money is their god."
Even Sigmund Freud, who
was honored by Americans,
gruffly said "America is a
mistake, undoubtedly a gigan-
tic one. but nevertheless a
mistake.'"
This goes to show that even
highly educated men were also
prepared to accept prevailing
fies.
Man) Americans nave dif-
ficulty coming to terms with
the "Krauts." But this is more
understandable when one con-
siders the size of the country
and the fact that it has enough
problems on its plate without
having to think about
Germany.
Today America and Ger-
many are connected by a
rather distant relationship.
The evidence shows that there
have always been ups and
downs.
But current works from
Wolfram Hanrieder and Fritz
Stern it has been elaborately
worked out. that the interests
of the superpower America
Continued on Page 13-A
Israeli Electoral Reform:
After 40 Years Of Wandering In The Political Desert
By DR. ALON BEN-MEIR
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
The continuing disagree-
ment over the proposed inter-
national Mideast peace con-
ference is but one manifesta-
tion of Israel's current and un-
fortunate political paralysis. It
results from the attempt by
two men and two parties
to govern together despite be-
ing ideologically and politically
incompatible. When they do
agree, when compromise is
achieved, it is usually at the ex-
pense of Israel's national
interest.
Admittedly, in its present
'orm the Israeli government
i achieved a remarkable
''fgree of economic stability;
in,r.ler- the cost of preserv-
W this 39-month-old "mar-
nuclol rnvenience" between
... i11.'1 :"' SJj major political
U.hili...- and recurrent,
,,"'"l* internal conflict
within the government. The
arrangement has clearly run
its course.
Many observers of the
Israeli political scene argue
that new elections could solve
the country's present political
crisis. Unfortunately, Israel's
political malaise transcends
the identity of the current
government leaders. It is
embedded in the political
system itself.
As long as elections in Israel
are essentially tests of party
strength and not judgments
on individual candidates a
new election can result only in
the situation in which no one
party is able to command a ma-
jority (or even a near-majority)
in the Knesset (where consent
of at least 61 members out of
120 is required to form a
government). This is the elec-
toral arena where hold
reforms must be undertaken.
Political parties in Israel,
such as Likud and Labor,
serve more than just an elec-
toral function; they are a way
of life. Often, the job security
and welfare of a party member
depends directly on the party
and its national network of oi-
fices and welfare services.
While the popularity of smaller
parties may change from one
election to another, Likud,
Labor and the religious parties
continue to enjoy the general
support of their respective
constituencies.
Yet, it is the smaller, and
often newer, parties that con-
tinue to hold the balance of
power in the Knesset. During
each election cycle, new par-
ties claiming to have the
answer to Israel's ills grab an
important piece of the elec-
toral pie. Why? Because only
one 120th of the total popular
v.te (less than on. ;., rcent) is
needed to qualify for a seat in
the Knes
This system has the merit of
being very democratic, but it
does create a Knesset in
perpetual uproar, and more
often than not gives the very
small parties degres of power
highly disproportionate their
electoral or parliamentary
numbers.
When the Likud party came
to power in 1977, it was com-
pelled like Labor before it
to form a coalition government
with the religious parties (who
join any government as long as
their religious concerns are
met). The 1984 elections
created even more political in-
stability: Both Likud and
Labor emerged from the elec-
tion in a virtual dead heat and
neither was able to deal effec-
tively with Israel's rapidly
deterio- 'ing economy.
Coalition a ivernmenl -
tion well only when they
ad with a genuine unin of
purpose. But this is a rarity in
the world today, and Israel's
coalition governments over
the last 40 years have certainly
been no exception. This state
of affairs puts Israel's entire
national well-being in jeopar-
dy. The time has indeed come
for a bold political initiative to
rectify this alarming situation.
The leaders of both Likud
and Labor must together call
for political reform legislation
that can provide the nation
with a strong, democratic
government that will enjoy a
real mandate from the elec-
toral. Israel must have a
government that can act swift -
ly, intelligently and
courageously in the face of the
political dynamics of the Mid-
dle East
There are a number of more
effective electoral systems
that Israel an look "
Continued >>n Page li'-\


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 16, 1987
Moment Of Silence
4
'Heard' Before
Supreme Court
Continued from Page 1-A
wanted the legislation as a way
to foster prayer in the
classrooms.
Cantor said teachers could
use the minute of silence to in-
fluence students to pray, par-
ticularly in the lower grades
where pupils would not
understand the meaning of
''contemplation and
introspection."
But Rex Lee, representing
Alan Karcher, former Speaker
of the New Jersey Assembly,
said the minute of silence was
a "legitimate secular" act
designed to quiet down
students as the school day
began.
He said the law to set aside
the minute was mandatory on-
ly for principals and teachers,
not students, who could use it,
or not use it, in any way they
wanted.
The law reads:
"Principals and teachers in
each public elementary and
secondary school of each
school district in this state
shall permit students to
observe a one-minute period of
silence to be used solely at the
discretion of the individual stu-
dent, before the opening of ex-
ercises of each school day for
quiet and private contempla-
tion and introspection."
While the Supreme Court in
1985 ruled unconstitutional an
Alabama law providing for a
minute of silence for "medita-
tion and voluntary prayer,"
the Court may decide the
latest case on the technical
grounds that Karcher did not
have the "standing" to file the
appeal.
The Reagan Administration
has filed a brief declaring that
while it believes the law is con-
stitutional, the appeal should
be dismissed becasue Karcher
has no jurisdiction.
The law was adopted in
December 1982, when the
Democratic-controlled
Assembly overrode a veto by
Gov. Thomas Kean, a
Republican. May immediately
filed a suit challenging the law
in January 1983.
When neither Kean nor his
attorney general would defend
the suit, Karcher decided to
defend it in his capacity as
speaker. But about the time
the Court of Appeals gave its
decision in 1985, the
Republican took over the ,
Assmebly, and the new
speaker, Charles Hardwick,
asked that his name, which had
been substituted for Karcher's
on the appeal to the Supreme
Court, be withdrawn.
Karcher filed an appeal and
Lee maintained Tuesday that
he could do so since he was still
a member of the Legislature.
Should the court reject the
appeal on the ground that Kar-
cher has no legal right to ap-
peal, the lower court decision
would stand and the New
Jersey law would be stricken
from the books.
If the court decides Karcher
has the right to appeal and
deals with the constitutional
establishment of religion issue,
some observers believe it
would result in a 4-4 spit, since
the court is short one justice.
This too would uphold the
Court of Appeals decision.
Among those filing briefs in
support of May were: the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, American Jewish Con-
gress, American Congrega-
tions, National Jewish Com-
munity Relations Advisory
Council, New Jersey Associa-
tion of Reformed Rabbis, New
Jersey-West Hudson Valley
Council of the Union of
American Hebrew
Congregations.
WASHINGTON Judge Irving Kaufman,
who retired in June as a Federal Court of Ap-
peals jurist, is presented the Presidential
Medal of Freedom at White House ceremonies.
Judge Kaufman's wife, Helen, looks on. left, as
Ai'Wii. World Photo
President Ronald Reagan congratulates tht
judge. His service in the New York-based ap-
peals court won national acclaim fran Jewish
and non-sectarian organizations alikt.
Find out how good
we really are
in the U.S.
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The Rare Mixed Marriage
Conversion In A Non-Jewish Home
Friday. October 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
By BEN GALLOB
A disenchanted Catholic
woman married an indifferent
Christian and later converted
to Judaism. She believes her
marriage deserves a sym-
pathetic understanding,
something born-Jews often
withhold from more typical
mixed marriages.
Sharon Haber, a data
gvstems analyst in Huntington
Beach, Calif., described her
journey to acceptance of
Judaism, beginning at age 16,
and the impact of that journey
,m herself and her family in an
article in a recent issue of
Sh'"
She pointed out that her
marriage had been nominally
Christian until she converted,
totally unlike the pattern
which concerns Jewish com-
munal leaders in which a
Jew. usually a male, marries a
non-.Iew who does not convert.
The Haber-style mixed mar-
riage is rare but it does hap-
pen. Rabbi Joseph Glaser, ex-
ecutive vice president of the
Central Conference of
American Rabbis (CCAR), told
the JTA that some Reform
rabbis have told the CCAR
about requests to officiate at
weddings of prospective con-
verts "and we discourage"
the idea.
Haber agreed that it was ap-
propriate for a rabbi, or even a
rabbinical court, to question
how real the opportunity was
for home celebration of
Judaism in the prospective
convert's household. But, she
argued, that should not mean
that a non-Jew seeking conver-
sion whose sincerity had been
Golda's Denver
House May
Be Salvaged
By CHRIS LEPPEK
HEWER (JTA) After
mere than a year of legal bat-
tles to save Golda Meir's
dilapidated former home from
demolition here, a philan-
thropic foundation has in-
dicated its willingness to
move, repair and utilize the
structure.
By a unanimous vote, the
foundation of the Auraria
Higher Education Center
declared support for placing
the duplex permanently on the
grounds of the center and com-
mitted itself to raising the
[Unas necessary for the
building's renovation or
restoration.
The building has been unoc-
cupied since 1981, when it was
narrowly saved from
wuidozers at its original loca-
lon m West Denver. Since
uien the small brick structure
"as been moved to two city
Parks, was partially burned by
arsonists, defaced with anti-
jemitic symbols and has been
tne subject of numerous and
IM LdisPutes over how *
HI ^ lIti,ized and where jt
| sriuld be located.
Jn'1'/'1' suPPrt from the city
nrm K restoration funds
Eed ,ilffic"lt to obtain; the
Ked Jewish community
Ihit,' madea financial com-
* to the project
proven and who had
demonstrated satisfactorily
that he or she could fulfill the
obligations of a Jew, should be
denied acceptance solely on
the basis that a mixed mar-
riage would be created.
She began her account by
declaring that "the one ques-
tion I (along with every other
convert to Judaism) am asked
repeatedly is a simple one and
has no simple answer. It is
'Why?' That question is usually
followed closely by 'Is your
husband Jewish?' People are
surprised and confused when I
say he is not."
Haber's brief history of her
growing inability to accept
basic tenets of Christianity
and her expanding acquain-
tance with intellectually- and
morally-attractive Jews led
her to decide gradually that
what she wanted was a
spiritual home, "a place where
I could feel comfortable wor-
shipping the one God in which
I believed, a faith in which I
could raise my children with
conviction and a community of
which I could be a part."
Judaism, as she understood
it, seemed to fit that goal. But
during conversations with a
rabbi, she discussed the
unusual problems of how her
husband, Mike, would react to
her decision by which she
would change a nominally
Christian union into a mixed
marriage and to plan for con-
sistent Jewish practices in a
nominally non-Jewish home.
She recalled that she and
Mike "literally spent hours
about how our children would
be raised as Jewish (by this
time our son was on the way),
what I wanted our (Jewish)
observances to be as regards
to kashrut, Shabbat and the
holidays and festivals and how
this would affect Mike."
Mike began attending Sab-

bath services with her from
time to time. "We attended
the temple's second night
Seder and he came to the High
Holy Day services with me. He
became acquainted with the
rabbi and grew to highly
respect him. We discussed
having a bris for our son and
things such as temple
membership."
Could all this have happened
if Mike had equally strong
religious views? She
acknowledged that "one of the
reasons it has been so suc-
cessful for us is Mike's flex-
ibility in this area." which
stemmed from the fact that he
had not been raised "with any
religious training."
As in more typical mixed
marriages, religious holidays
presented difficulties,
specifically Christmas, in
which "the problems are not
between us but usually stem
from other friends and
family."
"We do not celebrate the
holiday," she reported, "but
Mike does have a daughter by
a former marriage and we con-
tinue to send her gifts for her
holiday as we do the rest of our
Christian family members."
She added that "they, in
turn, give us gifts on
Chanukah." She said, "We
have agreed to not make
Chanukah a Jewish Christmas,
but rather to keep it in
perspective as the minor
Jewish holiday that it is."
Out of her experience, she
reported two firm conclusions.
One was that the rabbi should
be concerned about conversion
creating barriers between hus-
band and wife when one
spouse remains a non-Jew,
which apparently was not one
of her own difficulties.
The other was that rabbis, in
approaching such issues,
should encourage the
conversion-seeker to work out
any differences within the cou-
ple before conversion takes
place.
"Create Land From Sand"
DO YOU HAVE a share in the redemption of
THE LAND OF ISRAEL?
HAVE YOU MADE your contribution to the
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND (KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL)?
IF NOT NOW... WHEN?
DO IT NOW!!!
Enclosed is my gift of: $____________
Name
Address.
All contributions to JNF are tax deductible.
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND, INC.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 353 Miami Beach. Florida 33139 Phone: 538-6464
DOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
M
HVM5H
IW0W
(KEREN KAYEMETH
LEISRAEL) INC.
HOLD THIS VERY IMPORTANT DATE JANUARY 20,1988
By Popular Demand
"The Jewish National Fund Israelis Are Coming"
Returning To Miami
In Concert
In Tribute To
MAESTRO SHMUEL FERSHKO
Wednesday Evening, January 20,1988
A t The Theater Of The Performing Arts

For Further Information Please Contact:
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND, 420 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach, Florida 538-6464
tooooooooooooooooooooooooooeooooeeoooooooo<


Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 16, 1987
Israeli Security And American Restraint
Questions In The Peace-Plan Controversy
Continued from Page 1-A
stituent organizations from
taking their own individual
positions subject to their sense
of the common good."Last
month, the American Jewish
Congress, a constituent of the
Presidents Conference, releas-
ed a policy statement suppor-
ting an international con-
ference for Middle East peace
and a compromise solution for
the Israel-administered ter-
ritories, positions favored by
Peres and his Labor Party but
fiercely opposed by Shamir
t and Likud.
Some media reports here in-
ferred a rebuke to the
AJCongress in Abram's letter.
But AJCongress president
Theordore Mann, reached by
telephone at his Philadelphia
office Monday morning, told
the Jewish Telegraphic agency
that his organization "approv-
ed" Abram's letter and "we
think it is correct, absolutely
correct."
He stood by the AJCongress'
policy statement and predicted
that "other major Ameican
Jewish organizations will soon
essentially be covering the
same ground" and will take
positions "similar to ours."
In releasing his letter to
Shamir and Peres Abram ex-
plained that the latest phase of
the debate, which in fact began
with the founding of the
Jewish State nearly 40 years
ago, was touched off by the
widely publicized AJCongress
statement. It erupted again
when Peres, answering ques-
tions following an address to
the Presidents Conference
Sept. 30, appeared to endorse
the AJCongress' initiative.
The Israeli Foreign Minister
stated that while it is up to
Israel's parliament to "decide
on matters of life and death"
for the nation, he
very surprised" if
'would be
American
Jews remained "neutral on the
issue of peace."
Abram released a letter to
him from Shamir, dated Oct. 1,
in which the Premier stressed
that "... all of us, here and
abroad, have adhered to the
principle that matters of ex-
istence and security must be
left to those who are called to
shed their blood for the coun-
try. Thus and only thus has the
American Jewish leadership
been able to present to the
world a united front on the
fundamental issues of Israel's
existence and help it im-
measurably in its
struggles ..."
Shamir added, "The regret-
table recent attempt to breach
this understanding sets a
dangerous precedent. There is
a shock of disbelief in Israel
..." The Premier seemed to
be referring to both Peres'
remarks to the Presidents
Conference and the
AJCongress policy statement.
Abram also released Peres'
rejoinder to shamir, dated Oct.
4, in which he said he was
"very surprised to read your
reaction to my address" to the
Presidents Conference. He
took the Premier to task for
"criticizing the activities of the
Foreign Minister in his
absence from the country .."
Abram, in his letter to the
two Israeli leaders, dated Oct.
7, stated: "American Jewry
has been a partner in the effort
to create a sovereign State of
Israel.. None of us would be
deed or word, impair the
sovereignty or security of this
state. The essence of
sovereignty is the right and
power of a state to decide for
itself the great issues of life

A
}
>*
Dr. Nili Ramu (left) gives Orit Tsemach, 17, a farewell hug as the
teenager sets off for Camp Sunshine at Lake Sebago, Maine, last
month. Dr. Ramu will head the new Adolescent Cancer Center in
Hadassah 's Sharett Institute of Oncology which is being establish-
ed with a gift from Camp Sunshine's founders, Drs. Larry and
Anna Gould of Boca Raton.
and destiny. Fortunately,
sovereignty in Israel is vested
in its people acting through a
democratically constituted
government.
"Since its establishment as a
Jewish state, Israel and its
governments have always
been receptive to the expres-
sions of the diverse views of
Jews abroad Internal ex-
amination and debate of issues
faced by governments of Israel
is in the best tradition of
American Jewish life, and the
channels to Israel have always
been open to communicate
divergent views on every
political and communal con-
cern. As an individual or
representative, I have publicly
expressed view points on mat-
ters of Jewish communal in-
terest at times different
from existing Israeli govern-
ment policy but not on mat-
ters which affected the State's
ultimate existence and
sovereignty.
"Such restraint in giving
public advice to Israel on mat-
ters of security has been a
tradition of the Conference of
Presidents from its very begin-
ning. At the same time,
membership in the Conference
does not restrict constituent
organizations from taking
their own individual positions
subject to the sense of the com-
mon good.
"The Conference itself has
used its channels to com-
unicate to Israeli officials
views and opinions represen-
ting consensus, near consen-
sus and dissent on the range of
Israeli policies. Restraint by
the Conference on the public
airing of contrary views on
matters of the safety of the
State rests not solely on
abstract theory but on a prac-
tical reality ..."
Mann told the JTA that the
primary emphasis of the
AJCongress policy statement
was not support for an interna-
tional peace conference but a
"correction of the status quo"
which itself is the subject of
vigorous debate in the Israeli
media.
He observed that many in
Israel critical of the
AJCongress' stand did not
read its policy statement. In
order to make its position
clear, the AJCongress is
publishing in Hebrew the text
of its policy statement in
advertisements in five major
Israeli daily newspapers, ap-
pearing this week.
Meanwhile, the debate con-
tinued to boil over the
AJCongress policy statement
and Peres' strong advocacy of
an international conference
during his visit to the U.S. last
month.
Bernice Tannenbaum,
chairperson of the World
Zionist Organization-
American Section, declared
that "It is unfortunate that an
important American-Jewish
organization has taken a public
stand concerning an issue
which is clearly to be decided
in the Israeli political process
. American Jews and their
responsible organizations,
have the right and even the
obligation to contribute their
views on issues and events
concerning Israeli society ..
However, our comments and
interventions transgress the
obligation of responsibility
when they trespass into issues
of Israel's security and
political future," Tannenbaum
said.
An opposite view was taken
by Isak Arbus, president, and
John Ranz, executive
secretary, of the Holocaust
Survivors Association U.S.A.
who stated in a letter to the
AJCongress: "We strongly
believe that it is in the best in-
terests of the State of Israel to
adhere to the democratic
ideals of its founders. We com-
mend you therefore for the
courageous stand you have
taken on two vital issues to the
Jewish state and the Jewish
people: The central one of the
West Bank and the need for an
international conference on
Middle East peace."
Gloria Elbling, national
president of NA'AMAT USA
(formerly Pioneer Women-
NA'AMAT) stated that "Our
50,000-member organization
strongly backs the position for-
thrightly expressed by Israeli
Foreign Minister Peres in his
speech to the United Nations
General Assembly and to the
Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish
Organizations of which
NA'AMAT USA is a
member," Rabbi Alexander
Schindler, president of the
Union of American Hebrew
Congregations (UAHC),
stated, "The current debate on
the peace conference is a focal
issue, as is the issue of
religious pluralism (in Israel)
on which it is our obligation to
make ourselves heard. I see
nothing inappropriate about
Foreign Minister Peres' call to
involve ourselves in the cur-
rent debate on the
process.
peace
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Friday, October 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
American Jewry And The Middle East Peace Process
By THEODORE R. MANN
Many were surprised when
Jie AJCongress adopted and
ssued a policy statement on
he Middle East peace process
_hat was at odds with the
Israeli Prime Minister's opi-
nion. Candidly, even I as the
Congress president, was sur-
prised. But from my angle of
Lion, from the inside of the
Congress movement, what
has really remarkable was the
Enanimity en the subject. An
h.person task force that I an-
ointed in .lune unanimously
na(j, the recommendation,
nd our Governing Council
uly representative of the
ass roots membership
Joted to accept that recom-
mendation by an overwhelm-
ing majority. Such a policy
ould not have been adopted in
he past; the rank and file
Membership would not have
[ermitted it. What has
hanged?
|Two things have changed:
V first is the stark realiza-
Dn that if the status quo con-
hues, in 12 years Arabs will
Institute 45 percent of the
ppulation of Israel and the oc-
ipied territories, and a few
thereafter the majority
ppulation in the "Jewish'
ate will not be Jewish. Our
sk force undertook first to
ktermine whether these
bmal demographic forecasts
ere in dispute. Unfortunate-
|, they are not. They are the
duct of Arnon Soffer, the
an of Haifa University's
ilty of Social Sciences and
athematics, and are based on
^mographic data of Israel's
i of Statistics. We found
[o sociologists or
nographers who differ with
lit data or who draw
Rcantly different conclu-
bns from it. There exists no
ernative data. We found in-
Blectuals and political figures
no stated, correctly, that if
try large numbers of
nerican Jews or Soviet Jews
ove to Israel, or if large
umbers of Palestinians were
Big Bird Is
Raised In Israel
JEERS H EVA, Israel -
*M the ostrich replace the
ne^as the symbol of the
.*" The big bird is being
J5^ commercially by Ben-
non I'niversity scientists
confirm that it is a
ative source of income for
ev settlers.
Health-conscious gourmets
p the meat tastes better than
r*en and is richer in protein
T* lower in calories and
PJJol. The export of
Ren meat to European
Ptaurants has proven
fjuar. Moreover, a one-egg
lelette feeds 20 peopfe
rs useJ for designer shoes,
r and western cowboy
Pts, bring $500 per akin.
bjrch dau is being
le J* and ranchers in 30
48 Jho, faced with declin-
b& 0f catt,e and
Plural products, have
*> raise the big birds
lnn7lnK as much as
r w a pair of healthy
to emigrate to the oil-
producing states as they did in
the 1970s (they have since
returned to the West Bank),
the forecasts would prove to
be wrong. We concluded that
any one of these events is
possible, but improbable.
The second thing that has
changed is that Israel has a
"unity" government that is at
a total stand-off. Half actively
seek a compromise with Jor-
dan and the Palestinians in
order to avoid the obvious con-
sequences of a continuation of
the status quo. The other half,
however, led by the Prime
Minister, while wanting peace,
are either content with the
status quo or would carve it in
stone by formally annexing the
occupied territories. They op-
pose very vehemently the In-
ternational Peace Conference
supported by Shimon Peres
and King Hussein. We pressed
the Prime Minister and his
supporters to determine
whether they have any alter-
native proposals that might
Theodore R. Mann
avert the realization of the
forecasts. They had none.
The International Peace
Conference is far from the
ideal format for peace negotia-
tions. It is, however, a method,
agreed to by Shimon Peres and
King Hussein, that will pro-
duce direct, face-to-face
negotiations, without precon-
ditions, among Israel, Jordan
and Palestinian represen-
tatives, thus satisfying the
core Israeli demand of the past
39 years. Peres and Hussein
have agreed that the PLO will
not represent the Palestinians.
And they have agreed that no
dispute may be submitted to
the International convenors
(the five Security Council)
members) for resolution if
either Israel or Jordan objects.
The United States, for its part,
has committed itself to join
Israel in walking out of the
Conference if the Interna-
tional convenors should at-
tempt to impose a solution on
Israel. All of us agreed, and
Shimon Peres agrees, that it is
not the ideal format. But there
are no other viable options, ex-
cept doing nothing and permit-
ting the future to unfold.
Permitting the future to un-
fold with no change in the
status quo means that in a
decade and a half there will be
no democratic Jewish state.
Other Jewish organizations
can speak out now, as we have
done, or can refrain from do-
ing so. But silence, no less than
speaking out, has its conse-
quences, and in this case the
consequences of silence are far
more severe. Let there be no
mistake about it Israelis
care about what American
Jews think. For those of us
who love Israel, whose very
identities are intertwined with
the people of Israel and their
destiny, it is time to speak out
now to Israel's leaders and its
people, and to say that in our
judgment the continuation of
the status quo constitutes ir-
responsible folly that will lead
to a tragedy of historic dimen-
sions, for Jews will soon
become a minority in their own
land.
f. S/ii -fboinq ^ i femoiH/
The Board of Directors and the entire Douglas Gardens Family, are proud to pay tribute to those men and
women whose foresight and generosity are helping the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aaed to
uphold its covenant of renewed life and renewed hope with the < slderly of our community.
Theirs is a legacy that is eternal... a Living Legacy
Jack A Abbott Regina & Morns Englartder Ida Hoffman Meyer Myers Joseph B Miller Joseph E. Sett Louis 4 Ethel Sett
Herman Abraham Hams & Rose Ertoer Isaac Hoffman
Moth Adams Marion Eskow Joseph Honig Minnie 4 Jacob Miller William Sett
Joseph 0. Albert David A Clara Everett Harry Hortenstetn Moms Miller Margaret Segall Chitia Lucy Shapira Ida A Shaw
Joseph & Ethel Alter Bernard Farber Henry Israel Alex Minowitz
Max & Ida Altschuller Leah Fa/ber Betty Jacks Ida H. Morris
Charles Amate Jacob & Mary Feder Rose S. Jackson Sophie Morvil William Nachman William S. Shapiro
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Ethel S. Feldman Jack A Sophia Jacobs Elizabeth Nasatir Miriam 4 Jacob Shustek
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Isaac Baum Samuel & Rose Frankel Samuel Kipnis Herman Powell
Israel & Hinda Berezein Frank F Fredel Moms & Esther Klein Bessie Pritzker George Allen Small, MD Eva Smith
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Carl E Brandes Fanny Geller Max & Bertha Langendorf Benjamin Rose Lillian Stem
Fred Brenner Rose Gershon Leah a Louis Lavitt Louis Rosenbaum Benjamin Steinman
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Elias 4 Fannie Zornberg
VI Please direct inquiries concerning our Living
LmJ Legacy Program (o the Development Office of
LJMJ me Miami Jewish Home and Hospital tor the Aged
I----- at Douglas Gardens 751 8626
^


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 16, 1987
Fascell On U.S.,
Europe And Israel
Continued from Page 1-A
There are few issues that
Fascell will describe as being
either a "black or white," and
clearcut. He is firm on his posi-
tion that the contras fighting
the Marxist-leaning Sandinista
government in Nicaragua
should receive U.S. support.
"Either you believe in
democracy or you don't," says
Fascell.
But, he is quick to add, the
decision to supply the contras
with arms and money from
weapons sales to Iran, without
congressional knowledge, is an
end not justified by its means.
Lt. Col. Oliver North, the
single most targetable figure
in the arms-contra scandal, is
"certainly not a hero to me,"
Fascell says.
"The man said he lied, said
he destroyed evidence, that he
did all these things for the
good of the country and
because of the president and
all that kind of stuff.
"I certainly cannot accept
the fact that a person would lie
under oath, be involved in the
destruction of sensitive and
important government
documents in the middle of an
investigation that's going on
and then say that person's a
hero."
Fascell says when he ex-
Fascell questions 'the
American posture of
the sword.'
plains things he likes to start
from "square one." When he is
speaking about the Persian
Gulf, he notes that there has
been a naval presence in the
Gulf for 40 years and that he
always has supported that
U.S. presence.
"One of our policies has been
to support freedom of naviga-
tion in the Persian Gulf and
other places in the world, con-
trary to their territorial claims
which are not generally ac-
cepted in the international
community," he says.
The United States' other
policy is to be sure that oil
flows freely to the industrializ-
ed nations of Europe and
Japan.
"There's no way we
could sit idly by and
watch Europe go
belly-up
economically."
Even though the U.S. only
gets six percent of the oil, he
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NEW YORK Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres of Israel told the Conference of
Presidents of Major American Jewish
Organizations last week that the time was ripe
for an international peace conference as a way
of bringing about direct negotiations between
Israel and Jordan. Speaking to more than 100
leaders of national Jewish organizations,
Peres reported on his meetings with the
foreign ministers of the Soviet Union and
China and with Secretary of State Shultz
Seated, left, Morris B. Abram, chairman of
the Conference; Moshe Arad. Israel's am-
bassador to the U.S.; and Moshe Yegar,
Israel's consul-general in New York. Photo
Isaac Berez
adds, "if oil were denied
Europe it would have a
tremendous adverse economic
impact on the United States as
well because our economies
are so inextricably linked that
there's no way we could sit idly
by and watch Europe go belly-
up economically."
The military presence in the
Gulf region also is important
"in order to be sure that fun-
damentalism or any other 'ism*
did not suddenly overrun all of
the Middle East. Also, to make
sure the Soviets did not have
any designs on their long-held
desire for a warm water port."
For all of the above reasons
Fascell says he supports the
U.S. military Gulf posture.
The decision to reflag
tankers is what changes the
Gulf policy and where Fascell
had his objections.
"(When) you put the flag on
there, you have a direct con-
nection with the United States
with regard to the protection
of its flag. Now, what did that
do? It meant we had to put
more military force in the Per-
sian Gulf because now you've
got a new problem: You've got
to escort these babies back and
forth. We must protect the
American flag on that tanker.
There's no choice .
On oil tankers:
"You've got to escort
these babies back and
forth."
"It was an increased risk
with no appreciable benefit to
the United States. Our people
were already there. What was
the emergency or the added
necessity of having an
automatic response which
guaranteed that the United
States must respond?"
Yet, now that it has been
done Fascell says he opposes
getting out. "We cannot
unilaterally get out because
that would be a sad, tragic
mistake. And. furthermore,
we're going to have to rer
pond. If we get attacked we
have no choice now. We're
committed. And we would look
foolish in the eyes of the world
if we didn't protect our equip-
ment, our manpower and our
principle."
Fascell says he doesn't have
to sense that when it comes to
the Gulf, the U.S. is in trouble.
"You can see it. Every day,"
he says. "First it was the
mines. Then we had to call on
the Brits and the Brits didn't
want to come. Now the Brits
are coming. The French didn't
want to come. Now the French
are coming. Most people were
not aware that the Persian
Gulf existed before that, even
though the Iran-Iraq war was
going on for seven years and
tankers were going through
there every day."
"We're forced to
protect our
equipment, our
manpower and our
principle."
Yet the biggest "sword Damocles," an important issue
that overrides everything else,
has to be "nuclear wipe-out,"
Fascell asserts.
"You have the Soviet Union
and the United States, two
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great powers, with more than
enough weaponry to incinerate
everything in the world at the
drop of a hat. One has to con-
sider where we're going as a
human race, if," he pauses,
thoughtfully "we're going
anywhere at all.
"And you have to be con-
cerned whether or not there's
sufficient intelligence to
resolve this issue. You've got
competing ideas, you've got
differences of opinions strong-
ly held by people, and up until
now, mankind has not been
able to resolve these without
killing, whether it's in the Mid-
dle East, or Arab and Jew, or
Gentile .
"All of us, all of mankind,
have spent more money, cer-
tainly, than anybody could
possibly imagine. And all of
that to do what? In order to
say that we're safe? We have
to have security from our
enemies. And so we spend and
we spend and we spend and we
build new airplanes we can't
afford and we do all kinds of
things. For what? To protect
ourselves."
That brings Fascell to share
his views on the general
philosophy of this nation
which, he says, has a tendency
- with respect to both rhetoric
and action on foreign policy for
the last sue years "that
Everything can be resolved if
/ou're just big enough and
ugh enough."
?ascell questions if
jthing can be
resolved if you're just
1 enough and tough
"While it is essential for us
maintain a strong military
itablishment in the world, un-
^rtunately, we need to exer-
se our intelligence to a
eater degree as a nation on
w to resolve these disputes.
rnich is to say, there has to be
W other way to exert
adership other than through
er stark, military power.
ot all disputes lend
emselves to resolution at the
of a gun."
Fascell, who was born March
1917. in Bridgehampton,
g Island, has lived in
Miami since 1925. He and the
former Jeanne-Marie Pelot
whom he married, are the
parents of Sandra Jeanne
(Mrs. Frank) Diamond and
Tom Francesca (Mrs. Stan)
Strother. A son, Dante Jon,
died in an automobile accident
m 1984.
Fascell has been a member
of the Foreign Affairs Com-
mittee since 1957 and is chair-
man of the subcommittee on
Arms Control, International
Security and Science, vice-
chairman of the Select Com-
mittee to Investigate Covert
Arms Transactions to Iran,
and serves on the Select Com-
mittee on Narcotics Abuse and
Control.
He is not among the
Democratic presidential con-
tenders, but Fascell, who says
he always supports the
Democratic nominee, favors
Rep. Dick Gephardt, his col-
league from Missouri. "I think
he's very able. He's a very
hard worker. He's a straight
thinker," Fascell says.
It is Fascell's involvement
on the Commission on Security
and Cooperation in Europe,
known as the Helsinki Com-
mission, that has enabled him
to press the Soviet Union on
human rights issues such as
the release of Soviet Jews who
have been denied permission
to emigrate.
Press as the U.S. may,
however, there are limits to
what can be done and the un-
told number of Soviet Jews
who are still waiting for per-
mission to emigrate are a
testimonial to that.
"All the organizations and
individuals have worked so
hard and just have to keep do-
ing what they've been doing
because that's the only hope
that Jews in the Soviet Union
have," Fascell asserts. "We
mustn't lose hope that is the
point."
The Soviet leadership is new
and how far Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev will go in
this regard is still difficult to
determine, Fascell says. But,
he makes a point of the issue
whenever the opportunity
arises. In addition to direct
questioning of Soviet officials
on specific families, Fascell
says his verbatim tactic is to
say:
"Maybe you could say this is
a constitutional process, that
Friday. October 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
"Glasnost doesn't
mean anything if
you're Jewish."
this is your business, this is
your country, you can do what
you want to. This may be very
true. But if you think the rest
of the world doesn't notice the
kind of mistreatment and
harassment that goes on with
Jews and other minorities
you're sadly mistaken."
Fascell says Soviet leaders
respond by asking what 'dif-
ference does it make?';
"Glasnost doesn't mean
anything if you're Jewish,"
referring to the new Soviet
posture of openness.
The U.S. can apply leverage
Continued on Page 14-A
French Jew Interred In Pantheon
Cassin 1968 Nobel Laureate
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) The body
of Rene Cassin, a French Jew,
resistance fighter and 1968
Nobel Peace Laureate, was in-
terred in the Pantheon with
full military honors last week,
more than 10 years after his
death.
His casket joins those of 364
great names in French history,
including Louis Pasteur and
Jean Jaures, at ceremonies to
be attended by President
Francois Mitterrand, Prime
Minister Jacques Chirac, and
the presidents of the Senate
and National Assembly.
Cassin served as Gen.
Charles de Gaulle's wartime
Minister of Justice and later
drew up the International
Declaration of the Rights of
Man. He also headed the
Alliance Israelite Universelle.
He died in February 1976, at
the age of 89.
Former President Valery
Giscard d'Estaing signed the
decree for his reinterment at
the Pantheon. But it took a
decade before it was im-
plemented. The ceremony,
broadcast live on French
television, was attended by
3,000 guests from all over the
world.
Cassin's body was received
with full military honors at the
Les Invalides Chapel where
Napoleon is buried and lay in
state until the afternoon
before the burial. The official
mourners were headed by
Defense Minister Andre
Giroud.
Israeli Jets Hit Bekaa
BEIRUT A one-story
building used by the Marxist
Popular Front for the Libera-
tion of Palestine was
destroyed by a weekend Israeli
air strike against PLO bases in
the Bekaa region of eastern
Lebanon.
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridiaii/Friday. October 16. 1987
Electoral Reform
May Salvage Split
Continued from Page 5-A
fashioning political reform, for
example, those in Scandinavia,
Britain and the United States.
In particular, the European
systems encourage the forma-
tion of strong, viable govern-
ing coalitions without
discouraging smaller parties
from participating in the
system. Israel should consider
the following proposal.
There shall be two elec-
tions a party primary in
which the country would vote
as a single constituency (as at
present), and a general elec-
tion in which the country
would be divided into 120
single-member districts.
In the party election, each
voter would cast a ballot for a
party and for its leadership.
The ballot would list the can-
didates for leadership; such
candidates may be chosen by
the parties, or may file
independently.
Only parties obtaining at
least 5 percent of the total
votes cast in the primary-
would be permitted to present
a candidate in the districts in
the general election. There
would be no residency require-
ment for candidates in the
general election.
It is assumed that party
leaders chosen in the primary
election would become can-
didates for the office of Prime
Minister; however, they would
remain eligible only if they also
were elected in the district in
which they chose to stand in
the general election. A party
that lost its leader in the
general election would choose
a replacement from the list it
presented in the primary.
As in the present system,
the party commanding a ma-
jority would form the
Lrovernment.
* In the Knesset, members
would be released from party
discipline if the first vote on
any issue was inconclusive:
thereafter they
their conscience.
mav vote
These or similar reforms
would permit the smaller par-
ties to test their national ap-
peal in the primary, then en-
courage them to seek alliances
for the general election if they
fall below the 5 percent
threshold. Above all. the
single-member district rule
would move the country closer
to viable governing majorities
without also (as in the case of
Britain) discouraging either
the major opposition party or
smaller regional or local
parties.
It may well be that a can-
didate such as Meir Kahane of
Kach would be elected under
the new rules, but that could
hardly be counted a loss to
Israeli democracy. And the
gain would be the encouraging
of present or future parties to
seek broader, more represen-
tative constituencies based on
the issues of national concern.
Premier Shamir and Foreign
Minister Peres now have an
historic opportunity to join
hands and push for these or
similar political reforms.
Likud and Labor command
sufficient votes in the Knesset
to pass such legislation.
After 40 years of wandering
in the political desert, a new
post-statehood generation in
Israel must now challenge old
self-serving dogma. They must
demand from their leadership
a new political order that will
strengthen Israel internally
and enhance its image and
credibility throughout the
world.
Israel's political and
economic security a.- well as
the prospect for an overall
Middle East settlement may-
depend on how this issue is
addressed.
'
I
oecializing
M -' and Jewish affairs.
1,483 Iranian
Jews Emigrate
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) In
the first eight months of 1987,
1.483 Jews from Iran im-
migrated to the West through
Austria, according to Austrian
Foreign Minister Alois Mock.
In a press conference here,
Mock disclosed that a total of
5,188 Iranian Jews im-
migrated via Austria between
July 1, 1983 until August of
this year.
Mock stressed that his
government is proceeding
"without asking too many
questions of the Iranian
refugees and without publiciz-
ing individual cases" in order
not to endanger the flow of
Jewish immigrants from Iran
in the future and the remain-
ing relatives of those Jews who
were able to leave Iran. "It is
Austria's consistent policy to
help people in danger,
wherever they are and who
ever they are." Mock stated.
There are presently about
30,000 Jews in Iran and it is
believed that most of them
would emigrate to Israel and
other countries in the West if
they were allowed to do so by
the Iranian authorities.
The Austrian official, who
also serves as his country's
vice chancellor, said Jewish
emigration from the Soviet
Union has increased con-
siderably, with 5,003 Soviet
Jews being granted exit visas
in the first eight months of
1987, compared to a total of
901 persons in 1986. He
pointed out that a total of
272,622 Soviet Jews passed
through Austria between 1958
and August 1987 on their way
to Israel or other countries.
"Austria continues to be
committed to giving free
choice as to where they want
to eventually settle down."
Mock declared, adding.
'Austria will continue to act as
a country of first asylum for
refugees from all parts of the
world."
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Friday, October 16, 1987/The Jewish Fioridian Page 13-A
Americans and Germans From the Other Side
Continued from Page 5-A
and the medium-sized power of
West Germany have diverged
widely even if strong bonds
still bind the two together.
The attitude of many
Germans remains to
this day somewhat
ambivalent Hitler,
for example, regarded
>ts. Perhaps
uement
expected
a man like him.
According to Hanrieder, the
recent dispute over the
Imedium-rarige missiles showed
that the consensus about the
Tcharacter and intensity of the
threat is no longer
khere.
Hanrieder described aptly
nature of the German
adox. The West Germans,
le said, "seem simultaneously
[o be afraid that the
Americans might use atomic
weapons and also that they
night not."
Fritz Stern points out that
Ihe German destiny is directly
linked to the German-Russian
elationship in a manner which
hiany Americans don't
Bnderstand.
At the same time it's true to
kay. as Frank Trommler, sym-
pathetically put it: The new na-
tional or European conception
if itself is developing out of a
listancing of itself from
Imerica hut not to Russia.
Lmerica's closeness deter-
mines its distance.
I Whoever would like to know
iat Americans
mans, and isn't
\ ng up a heavy
| will find highly
| g findings in a com-
| ailed Aintrikaner
\ ichland and die
I bj the Tubingen
J > Kurt Stapf,
loltpuij; Stroebe and Klaus
was.
[They investigated the views
"American students on Ger-
Mn.v and found that Germans
P not all too popular. Both
Mst and East Germans are
JN m the bottom third on an
Iternational popularity scale.
[Those interviewed admitted
the Germans worked
. were efficient and family
'tated. But on the other
they tended to lack pas-
[> be not open in attitudes
' to lack a zest for life.
ICertainly the authors found
[not very flattering to have
Je Germans placed next to
J Kussians, the Poles and the
EkLerrnans M the people
|^theleast;oiedinwc.
lether American students
representative of
Sfn public option in
fcn r remains an open ques-
ILt such opinions are a
fcTJL worr^'- even tf they
r "t happen to agree with
J* own experience.
political observers
, >come afraid that
E?coulu turn away from
fcif.can Basin. In view of the
still close relationship between
Germany and the U.S.A., that
might appear to be a
somewhat rash judgement.
The fact is that the make-up of
the immigrants has changed.
And that could play a decisive
role in determining where
American interests are.
This is pointed out in Donata
Elschenbroich's new, in parts
very subjective book, Eine Na-
tion von Einwandem.
To date 84 percent of recent
immigrants have come from
South America and Asia. In
the sixties 62 percent came
from Europe. This trend can
only weaken the European
component in the U.S.
The authoress, who is
employed at the German In-
stitute for Youth in Munich,
gives America a good report
card for the way it treats its
immigrants.
At the same time she takes
into account discrimination,
especially against ethnic
minorities. But she goes on to
point out the successful efforts
which have been made for
their legal and political
assimilation.
Even in Reagan's America,
the quota system has been by
no means abolished as an
emergency measure to
alleviate the disadvantages of
minorities.
Donata Elschenbroich com-
pares the self confidence of the
U.S. with the "against our
will" mentality of West Ger-
mans towards immigration.
What it means to be an im-
migrant in Germany is not so
clear. In her book she says that
American mainstream society
is more flexible. German
mainstream society is more
flexible. German mainstream
society in comparison, is as
rigid as concrete.
One may be in disagreement
with her opinion about West
German attitudes to im-
migrants. But one would have
to agree with her that
American behavior towards
the newly arrived has many-
positive characteristics
Many Germans have
themselves profited from the
U.S. attitude to immigration.
That's not to say that
Americaii attitudes have
always been the best.
Professor David Wyman,
lecturer in history at the
university of Massachusetts,
deals in his book. Das uner-
urunschte Volk. with a dark
episode in American immigra-
tion history.
The author, who is a staunch
friend of Israel, has written
with bitterness about America
and the destruction of Euro-
pean Jews.
He has devastatingly con-
demned the Roosevelt govern-
ment for not helping the Jews
against the pilfering of the
Nazis. America he said, "was
the traditional land of the
persecuted and repressed. But
we let the Nazi murderers
have their way." Wyman
maintains that several hun-
dred thousand could have sur-
vived if the government hadn't
shown negligence and
carelessness in their handling
of the matter. The author has
pointed out the negligence of
American Jews too.
In his book he says that the
Holocaust was certainly a
Jewish tragedy. But, also a
Christian tragedy for Western
civilization. People were
murdered while others just
looked on. Wyman closes his
stirring book, which makes use
of new sources, on a sarcastic
note. The European Jews he
writes, "were neither
Americans or Englishmen. It
was tough luck for them that
they were not only foreigners
but Jews of all people."
Even this episode is part of
American immigration
history. A part of history,
about which the Germans have
the least right to point an ac-
cusing finger.
America In The Gulf
To Sidestep Peace Conference
When He Meets With Shultz
jManv
iv e
By HIGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Premier Yitzhak Shamir in-
tends to sidestep the subject of
an international conference on
Middle East peace when
Secretary of State George
Shultz comes to Israel.
He will concentrate instead
on interim arrangements with
Jordan. In fact, Shamir will be
seeking Jordanian support to
scuttle an international con-
ference according to media
reports here Monday.
Shultz was scheduled to ar-
rive on Oct. 15, a day earlier
than originally announced, in
order to meet with moderate
Palestinian leaders from the
administered territories, it
was reported. A senior State
Department official indicated
that Shultz's visit is intended
chiefly to conciliate the
moderate Arab states and that
he does not intend to raise
broader expectations with
respect to his visit, Haaretz
reported quoting a report from
the Israel Emabsssy in
Washington.
Shultz's planned visit to Jor-
dan, meanwhile, has been call-
ed into question because King
Hussein will be out of the coun-
try at the time. Haaretz said it
was possible the Secretary of
State would go to Jordan brief-
ly during his stay in Israel to
meet with Prime Minister Zaid
al-Rifai, and then return to
Israel.
Al Hamishmar reported
Continued on Page 15-A
Continued from Page
tion is ablv represented by
AIPAC the pro-Israel lobby
and by a large number of
senators and congres-
who support Israel. Lately it
has also been fueled by a
in Washington that the Saudis
and their Gulf allies are
than cooperative when it
comes to helping the U.S. help
them. Even pro-Saudi ad-
vocates had to note the Saudi
Air Force's reluctance to give
chase to the Iraqi attack jet
that crippled the USS Stark,
and the Saudi regime's refusal
to grant the U.S. basing
rights. The Reagan ad-
ministration argues that
enhanced arms supplies to the
Saudis would better enable
this American ally to protect
the Gulf, and might thereby
obviate the need for pro-
western Arab states to turn to
the Soviet Union. Israel, as a
strategic ally of the U.S., is
asked to show greater
understanding for this
American need.
Yet, given the recent series
of events in the Gulf, and in
view of the fact that even Con-
gress is demanding a greater
show of goodwill on the part of
t(u Gulf Arabs, isn't I
also justified in asking tha
Kuwaitis, and Saudis mak<
some small i en-
courage Arab m on in
the Arab-Israel co lould
not the Saudis, for i cample,
show more support for the Jor-
danian peace init ative? Or
stop paying the PLO protec-
tion money? Or cease pro-
viding financial support for
Syria until it mends its pro-
Soviet, pro-Iranian and pro-
terrorist ways? Washington
would do well to exploit the
current plight of its friends in
the Gulf to encourage them to
send positive signals to Israel
rather than to complain that
Israel is foiling the Amerian
design to supply them more
weapons.
If Irangate demonstrated
the bankruptcy of American
(and Israeli) strategic thinking
regarding Iran, the current
situation in the Gulf appears to
show that the fuzzy underpinn-
ings of Irangate continue to
distort American strategic
thinking regarding the entire
Gulf question. Israel and its
supporters are justified in
pointing out the Israel's real
value as a strategic ally of the
U.S. has been well manifested
by the dubious and confused
actions of Ame Arab
friends in the Gu
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Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 16, 1987
Fascell On 'Glasnost'
mum
TM
I
Continued from Page 11-A
by refusing to make financial
credits available or extending
'- the most favored-nation treat-
ment and generally not
cooperating economically with
the Soviets. The hope is that
they would understand that if
they moved forward with
respect to human rights, they
could expect an improvement.
"They went just the other
way," Fascell points out.
"They took the position, 'this
is an effort to blackmail us (the
Soviets) and punish us and
therefore we're going to
stop.' The fact, he adds, is
that the Soviets went from a
cap of releasing 50,000 Jews
annually to a bare trickle
today.
"I think in all fairness one
would have to say unless the
Soviet attitude changes that
we can't count on legislative
punishment to produce an im-
provement in the human rights
area or get more Soviet Jews
out. We, as a nation, and a lot
of individuals in high places,
both in Congress and in the ad-
ministration, have continually
pressed the Soviets to unders-
tand this issue; that it's not
smart to do what they're
doing."
After 30 years in Congress,
Fascell, when asked to gauge
Israeli-American relations,
responds that the relationship
"is strong and it is deep." But,
he cautions, "the main thing
we're concerned about is a
matter over which we have ab-
solutely no control. That's the
political and economic situa-
tion in Israel. Sooner or later,
Israel's going to have to solve
those problems."
When Fascell returns to
Washington, the biggest issue
that will face his committee is
a vote on whether or not to ap-
prove the foreign aid package.
The Reagan administration, he
says, is only lukewarm on its
support of the bill because it
wants an additional $2 billion
tacked onto the package of $12
billion in general foreign aid.
While a "real fight will be on
our hands," Fascell predicts
that Israel, will continue to get
the largest cut of the foreign
aid pie.
In addition to its historical
support of the State of Israel,
Fascell says that Israel serves
the American interests in the
Middle East.
Maintaining a democratic
posture means not allowing
the Soviets to have any expan-
sion and fortunately, Fascell
notes, "on that score we're
aided by the Arabs because of
their religion."
That is why it is important to
bring about a state of peace
between the Arabs and Israel,
he explains. That involves oil.
It also involves the divisive
turmoil in today's Israeli
Knesset about the method of
negotiating peace with the
Arabs, either through an inter-
national peace conference or
direct negotiations. Fascell
declines to take a position in
support or opposition to a
peace conference, and states
that the decision must be
Israel's.
"(Israel) may be divided but
they have an official position.
Whatever that is, I can sup-
port it. Specifically, with
regard to the international
conference, if they can live
with an international con-
ference that would act as an
umbrella for a Middle East
peace conference, that would
be fine.
"If they can live with that,
then certainly I can support
that. If they turn around
tomorrow and say they
couldn't live with that, then I
wouldn't support it. Because
there's no way to impose a
solution on the Middle East.
You cannot impose it.
"You can't say to Israel -
and I don't care how you say it
you must deal with the PLO.
We think it's wrong ourselves.
Regardless of our position,
could anybody ever tell the
Israelis what to do and the
answer is 'no.' Not only is it
not right, they wouldn't do it
anyway. That's the whole
issue."
But, he warns: "The Middle-
East is the biggest tinderbox
in the world."
i
(=cn
DOOO
'IN CONCERT
VgrzzznzHS.
1987 David S Boxerman and Mark Saunders All rights reserved
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Friday, October 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
Extremists Convicted Of IRS Agent Death Threats
.. ...id f*-fktn '*** 1 A I _. I .___I i* _.
Continued from Page 1-A
has been monitoring Gale, who
has a solidly racist, anti-
Semitic resume. According to
Rosenthal, it was Gale who
first introduced Rev. Richard
Butler, leader of the Aryan
Nations-Church of Jesus
Christ Christian in Hayden
Lake, Idaho, to the Identity
movement.
In addition, Gale was long
viewed as a leader of the Posse
Comitatus. an organization of
loosely affiliated bands of arm-
ed vigilantes. The Posse gain-
ed national recognition in 1983
when one of its members, Gor-
don Kahl, was indicted for kill-
ing two U.S. marshalls and
r.illed himself in a shoot-
out with police in Arkansas.
a Posse evangelist,
Supplied tapes Cor broadcast to
radio station KTTL-FM in
Dodge City. Kansas, in 1983.
He. along with James
Wickstrom, another Posse
evangelist, also spoke at at
least one meeting of local
farmers stricken by the in-
tense farm crisis and prone to
scape-goating Jews and others
in a conspiracy against them.
In his broadcasts, Gale
espoused violence while invok-
ing God's name, and urged the
collection of dossiers on
"every damn Jew rabbi in this
land, and every Anti-
Defamation League leader or
JDL leader in this land." He is
alleged to hold paramilitary
training operations, Rosenthal
said, adding that Gale had
written training manuals for
the Posse. She said he is
reportedly in poor health.
An assistant to prosecuting
attorney Pocker said that Gale
ps currently free on bail,
although Rosenthal said the
prosecution had argued that
he, and the others, were
dangerous and should be
|imprisoned.
Trials are still pending for
ither affiliates of the Identity
[movement, including 11 na-
tionwide leaders of the Aryan
ns, who were indicted on
-edition by a federal
jury in Fort Smith,
bout a half year
are scheduled to
in federal court
Shamir
1 ontinued from Paga i:j..\
Shamir met Sun
|*y with a group of pro-
, Palestinians in the
*esl Bank to solicit their sup-
: to counter a posisble
Teement between the U.S.,
p the Soviet Union to re-
Fm the joint Jordanian-
P'estinian delegation in
reparation for an interna-
lnal conference.
[Shamir, said Al Hamishmar,
p signalling Hussein to join
fn to block such a move and
increase Israeli-Jordanian
operation in the territories
"nst the Palestine Libera-
Organization. Stronger
operation between the two
Pjjtr.es would, in Shamir's
'ew, serve to deter an inter-
s'11 .inference with
J"pa*lciPaton.Hiscallto
&n.for face-to-face
peeting ,s intended to institu-
nalize Israeli-Jordanian
Ration and to correct the
pP'ession that Likud has
Indicted for sedition was
Robert Miles, a leader of the
Aryan Nations and also involv-
ed in other neo-Nazi activities.
Miles, who calls himself a
minister, was originally con-
victed of burning school buses
during integration of schools
in Michigan in the 1960s, for
which he served jail time.
Miles' trial is scheduled for
next year.
Other members of the Aryan
Nations were convicted in re-
cent months in Tucson,
Arizona, on charges of
counterfeiting and attempting
to pass counterfeit notes at a
state fair in Spokane,
Washington. Trials were
scheduled last week for Ed
Hawley and David Dorr, im-
plicated in the bombings of
several locations in Coeur
:<** mmttrnm
D'Alene, Idaho, in September
1986, including several federal
buildings and the home of a
Roman Catholic priest and
human rights leader.
In addition, a trial is schedul-
ed Oct. 26 in Denver for those
accused of the murder of
Jewish talk-show host Alan
Berg in 1984. The
perpetrators were members of
The Order, an offshoot group
of the Aryan Nations.
In July, the Aryan Nations
held its annual conclave in
Hayden Lake, which was,
Wassmuth told JTA, "much
more low-key and less attend-
ed" than in past years and
primarily focused on fund-
raising for the trials. "There
was much less rhetoric than
usual about taking over,"
Wassmuth said.
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Page 16-A The Jewish Florkttan/Friday, October 16,1987

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The site of the future JCC has been marred slogans, seen here painted over after the most
and marked by anti-Semitic signs and recent incident.
Anti-Semitic Graffiti Scars
Signs At Planned JCC Site
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Flondian Staff Writer
Recent anti-Semitic van-
dalism on the site of the future
ave and Mary Alper Jewish
Community Center, at SW 112
ptreet and 112 Avenue, was
he third such incident to take
)lace this year.
In this latest incident,
vastikas and "Adolph No. 1"
fere spray-painted across
i posted on the lot where a
ll-service Jewish Community
tenter is slated to be built in
the near future.
One of the signs, posted fac-
ing the turnpike, was 30 feet
high, leading to speculation
that the perpetrator of the
anti-Semitic graffiti was
young.
"It had to be someone fairly
young and agile," contends
Naomi Olster, campaign coor-
dinator for the JCC project.
"People don't go around with
30-foot ladders in their cars."
Olster believes that the signs
were probably defaced on the
eve of Rosh Hashana, as area
schools were closed for the
Jewish holiday.
The first occurrence of anti-
Semitic vandalism on the lot
took place last Passover, when
Ed Rosen, executive director
of the South Dade JCC (which
will be replaced by the new
facility) approached the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith for advice.
Rosen was informed by the
Continued on Page 5-B
Jewish Fraternal Society
Of Jewish Law And Order
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jtu-yJi Flondian Staff Writer
I Crime and corruption, drugs
lid vice: Television shows and
ledia reports have often
lown the dark side of Miami's
Wice force.
|But there is another side to
enforcement in South
Wa, a side which has less
; do with bullets and hand-
up than it has to do with yid-
fweit and tzedakah.
fringing this healthy dose of
,ami Nice' to the community
the members of the
nrim Society, a fraternal
charitable organization of
Jewish law enforcement
personnel.
According to David
Waksman, second vice presi-
dent of South Florida's
Shomrim Society, the
organization has its roots in
previously established
Shomrim societies, which exist
in many northern cities.
The South Florida chapter of
the organization was founced
in 1984 by several Jewish
Metro-Dade police officers,
with the assistance of Rabbi
Michael B. Eisenstat of Tem-
ple Judea.
"In larger cities like New
York, Shomrim is mostly for
police, and there are different
societies for state police, cor-
rectional prison guards, and so
on," says Waksman, Dade
County assistant state at-
torney assigned to the Major
Crimes Division.
"Here, we have expanded to
include people in all areas of
law enforcement judges,
prosecutors, parole and proba-
tion officers, Drug Enforce-
ment and FBI agents, even
two members of the Dade
County State Medical Ex-
aminer's Office," Waksman
Continued on Page 4-B
Irandeis Prexy:
School No Less Jewish
or Serving Pork And Shellfish
|By JUDITH ANTONELLI
" Jewish Advocate
(ALTHAM, Mass. (JTA)
ne recent introduction of
r and shellfish in a
,ena of Brandeis Universi-
inere does not as some
Ba critics claim -
"nisn the Jewish character
school, according to its
president, Evelyn Handler.
"How many Jews do you
know who keep kosher?" she
asked in a recent interview.
"Brandeis consists of Jews of
every stripe, from the most
Orthodox to those who are
non-practicing but feel very
culturally and passionately
Jewish There is nothing
stronger about Brandeis than
its ties to the Jewish
community."
The university has one
kosher dining hall, and the
other dining halls have always
served non-kosher food. To
Handler, the availability of
Continued m Page 10-B
Saturday Schools
No Offense
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
A second Dade County
public school has initiated a
Saturday education program,
but school officials and Jewish
community leaders said the
program will not offend those
who observe the Sabbath
because the program is volun-
tary and affiliated with inner-
city schools with little, or no,
Jewish population.
"This is part of school-based
management," said Dade
County School Superintendent
Dr. Joe Fernandez. "The
schools, along with their com-
munity, and the administra-
tion make a determination of
what type of program would
meet the best needs of the
kids."
It is a voluntary program
and it's "not in conflict with
any group and that com-
munity's religious beliefs,"
said Fernandez.
Charles R. Drew and Liberty
City Elementary Schools are
offering the Saturday morning
program where reading,
writing and arithmetic are
taught.
Drew and Liberty City are
among 11 inner-city schools
participating in an experimen-
tal program called "Partners
in Education" that allows
teachers and principals to seek
out creative solutions to educa-
tional problems.
"At the present schools that
we have the program in, there
is no impact on the Jewish
community," Fernandez said.
"And obviously I would not
put a program in a community
that would have a negative
impact."
School board member Dr.
Michael Krop said, "Personal-
ly, I don't see where it crosses
Continued on Page 2-B
Cong. Lehman:
East Berliner Report
On Newly Assigned Rabbi
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
The Communist system
behind the Berlin Wall is not
so bad and Jews have a place in
that society, infers Dr. Irene
Runge, an American born
daughter of Jewish-German
immigrants. "It's a system I
believe in," says the scholar,
who moved to Germany with
her parents in 1949 and has liv-
ed in East Berlin ever since.
Runge, a soziologin Ger-
man for sociologist has
come to the United States with
a delegation of scientists, ar-
tists, and scholars who will
represent the German
Democratic Republic (GDR) in
a cultural exchange program
in Minneapolis this week.
Runge, an associate pro-
fessor in the history depart-
ment of East Berlin's Hum-
boldt University, included in
her U.S. stops a Miami visit
this week in which she discuss-
ed the pulse of Judaism in East
Germany and the American
rabbi who last month became
the first full-time rabbi in 19
years to serve East Berlin's
Continued on Page 2-B
Dr. Irene Runge and Cong. William Lehman
Our
Community
Friday, October 16, 1967 Tho Jewish Floridian Section B


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 16. 1987
'Good Faith' Report On East Berlin Rabbi
Continued from Pafre 1-B
only congregation.
East Germany's Jewish
Community
That rabbi is Isaac Neuman
of Champlain, 111. Neuman is a
Reform rabbi but as Runge ex-
plained, the one congregation
in East Berlin has members
ranging from the Orthodox to
liberal with about 200
members. Although there are
no certain figures, she
estimates that there are ap-
proximately 2.000 Jews in
East Berlin, a city that prior to
the Holocaust counted 170.000
Jews
(There are an estimated 500
members in the eight con-
gregations that are in East
Germany today. Runge says.)
Runge visited The Jewish
Floridian last week with U.S.
Rep. William Lehman (D..
North Dade). who said his in-
volvement in securing the ser-
vices of the new rabbi began
during a 1986 visit to East
Germany when he met with
U.S. Ambassador to the GDR.
Francis Meehan.
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"1 asked him what the main
problem was in the Jewish
community. He said, 'we need
a full-time rabbi.' Lehman
recalled adding the problem
was in part a lack of com-
munication between the
Jewish community and the
East German government on
the type of clergy needed.
'The GDR is unique in the
Soviet east bloc vis-a-vis its
toleration of organized
religion." Lehman reported on
his return from East
Germany.
Lehman noted that East
German State Secretary for
Religious Affairs. Klaus Gysi.
suggested more than once that
"the government has a closer
relationship with the Jews
than with other religious com-
munities in the GDR. because
many in the current Marxist
government fought with Jews
on the streets against Hitler's
Brownshirts and, against
fascism."
Rabbi Isaac Neuman
Arrangements were made
for the rabbi at high levels of
government in the United
States and East Germany, ac-
cording to Lehman.
Says Runge: "The rabbi is
able to get in and out of the
country whenever he wants.
He has a driver who can go in
and out of West Berlin. He has
a househelper. He's getting a
secretary, he has an office, he
has a three-room apartment.
and he has a salary* that mat-
ches the salary of a university
professor."
Lehman noted that the rela-
tionship between the GDR and
United States on this issue
takes on increased diplomatic
importance because not too
much is negotiated bilaterally
between the U.S. and GDR.
"Achieving a small agree-
ment in the non-political area
Saturday Schools
Continued from Page 1-B
over" the lines of church and
state separation. "We need
someting like this (program)
desperately."
Mark Freedman. regional
executive director of the
American Jewish Congress
said. "As long as programs
like these are voluntary, and
students are not being penaliz-
ed and no objections are being
raised, it's the same instance
as other extra-curricular
activities.
"From the standpoint of the
establishment of religion and
free exercise, there doesn't
seem to be a problem."
Nor do the Saturday classes
raise concern with American
Jewish Committee regional
director Bill Gralnick
"I don't think there's
anything wrong with it at all."
says Gralnick. "The reality in
the inner city is the school
serves a bunch of functions
that the borne can't. If these
schools are keeping kids off
the street and educating them
better, I can't do anything
more to applaud it. If. in fact,
it becomes mandatory for kids
to attend school on Shabbat.
jm. we'd be raising holy hefl."
can improve the political
climate for cooperation on
other issues. I learned from
our State Department
diplomats that success on this
project would be helpful to our
bilateral negotiations concern-
ing U.S. and Jewish property
claims and other issues.
From the East German point
of view, Lehman said, "obtain-
ing trade concessions with the
U.S. is one of the major goals
of the current government.
But one of the problems is as
long as they have the Berlin
Wall up it is very unlikely the
U.S. will drop trade restric-
tions on the GDR."
While she was in Miami.
Runge also met with members
of the American Jewish Com-
mittee, the organization in-
strumental in bringing Rabbi
Neuman to East Berlin.
'Making do' rabbinicallv
The last time her congrega-
tion had a full-time rabbi was
19 years ago, Runge said.
Since then, the congregation
has brought in rabbis on
holidays and employed a chaz-
zan full time. They "imported"
a rabbi because there were no
rabbis left in Germany follow-
ing the Holocaust, she said.
"We could have trained
somebody. We could have sent
them to Hungary where they
have rabbinical schools," she
said. "But we didn't find
anybody young enough or old
enough who was willing to go
to study for seven years to
become a rabbi."
The new rabbi immediately
began to involve the communi-
ty by offering Hebrew lessons.
"Newspapers, radio and
television became very in-
terested. People who hadn't
been to synagogue came
because they heard there was
a new rabbi. Even members
who did not show up for a long
time showed up," Runge said.
The rabbi is expecting to
have difficulties with members
of the congregation who are
more traditional, however,
because he is Reform. He will
have to compromise, Runge
said.
The Jewish community is so
small that there does not ap-
pear to be any move for it to
flourish into the American-
style system of separate con-
gregations for Orthodox, Con-
servative. Reform and
Reconstructionist movements
of Judaism.
Anti-fascist tradition
Asked if anti-Semitism
resurfaced with the revived
focus on Judaism in Germany,
the birthplace of Nazism and
the Holocaust, Runge
answered, "We don't have
neo-Nazis and there's not a
basis for anti-Semites to do
anything. We can talk about
people who are privately anti-
Semites, but there's a very
strong anti-fascist tradition in
GDR.
"People are very interested,
and the new rabbi has piles of
letters from Jews and non-
Jews along with invitations to
speak at universities. There's a
lot of willingness to learn in
this country," she said.
"He wants people to feel
good in the community,"
Runge said. "He's very ag-
gressive. We think it's great
that he's asking questions that
ajot of us don t ask anymore
For example, if something
to be renovated he saw *!
looks terrible, let's fix it.' "
Lehman confirmed that the
East German government is
preserving the huge Jewish
cemetery there and that the
government initiated a project
to finance reconstruction of
what was the main synagogue
in Berlin, which was destroyed
during Kristallnacht. and the
site from which many in the
Jewish community were
deported to the death camps.
In East Germany today, the
problem would not be opening
a yeshiva. it would be a pro-
blem finding Jews i g0 there,
Runge said.
Assimilation
"It's not apathy We're talk-
ing about very small numbers.
A lot of them are older. We're
all established persons. We're
all professionals. Everybody
has a good job. good income, so!
people are not that much after |
getting into a yesh
Says Lehman: it sounds |
like the Jewish community in
my hometown of Selma, Ak.
They don't know whether
they're Jews or whether I
they're Southerners!"
Asked why her parents I
returned to Germany after the
Holocaust, Runge answers,
"They wanted to go back tot
new Germanv in which they|
believed in. They wanted to i
back to an anti-fascist Ger-
many. That's why I think it's
important for Jewish people to I
live in Germany. You can't just I
abandon Germany and say, 'no]
Jews anymore.' '
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'Loving Kindness' Recounts
Daughter's 'Return'
By HAVIVA KRASNER
The recent success of books
jat investigate spiritualism,
3elf-improvement and how to
find life's meaning indicates
that many people are seeking
to add a religious dimension to
their lives.
Material and professional
success, and the accompanying
prestige, are just not fulfilling
enough for many people. Some
are joining growing
movements that stress the
spiritual, such as the Jewish
\baal teshuvah movement.
A baal teshuvah is a formerly
Inon-observant Jew who
becomes observant. Most
\baaki teshuvah are young peo-
ple who were raised in non-
religious homes, somehow
I came in contact with religious
Ijews and accepted their way
lof life. Sometimes these youth
[become attracted to Judaism
[after ht'ing approached by a
[member of a yeshiva in an
llsraeli street and offered a
|p!ace to stay for a few days.
This phenomenon can cause
najor rifts within the family.
Parents with antagonistic feel-
ings toward Judaism, who
We raised their children
likewise, suddenly hear that
their i'hild has become a
religious Jew. How do they
peal with it'.' This is the focus
M Anne Kuiphe's latest novel,
litled "Loving Kindness"
I it Hooks, New York,
$17.95).
The nfronts not only
he difl encountered by
baren' Uei ti'shuvah in
I with their children's
ms to become more
'ligious, but in general the
I parents face in
pying to accept their
lOdren's lifestyles when dif-
erent from their own.
| The I.....k, Roiphe's seventh,
lives into relationships -
ecifically that between an
feminist mother who has
lfs a
Vintage Affair
Sunday. October 18. 1987.
A very good time of yea r.
Perfect, in fact, for an
[International
Wine Event!
Beth Am Singles would
like to invite the
community's single
professionals, 21-39.
tojoin in the
festivities
at 7:30 p.m.
in the
temples
Social
Hall.
hors
d'oeuvres
and a
dis
cussion
will
follow
at 8:00.
$7.
$10 at
door.
Please
R.S.V.P. byA
'October 14thN
, 667-6667
l^0^ to hearing from you
//
rejected most of her Judaism
and her formerly undirected
and suicidal daughter who has
entered an ultra-Orthodox
Hasidic yeshiva in Jerusalem.
When Annie Johnson
receives a letter from her
daughter Andrea saying that
she has changed her name to
Sarai and plans to marry a boy
the yeshiva has chosen for her,
Annie goes to Israel to in-
vestigate and hopefully
retrieve her daughter.
Andrea's decision to join the
yeshiva is ironic. Her mother
had always stressed to her the
importance of being a free
spirit, encouraging her
capricious lifestyle both emo-
tionally and financially.
However, Andrea longed for
discipline and rules. She rebell-
ed by giving up her in-
dependence for the highly
restrictive lifestyle at the
yeshiva.
Although Annie's plan does
not succeed, her ultimate deci-
sion is a monumental step for
her, and an admirable develop-
ment of character that could
be an inspiration for all
parents having difficulty let-
ting go.
Annie is the narrator of the
novel, so the reader sees and
understands the mother's
dilemma through her own
eves. "Loving Kindness" is
also recommended reading for
adolescents because it can help
them sympathize with a paren-
tal point-of-view. But even
more, it provides parents with
some valuable lessons in child-
rearing.
Religiously, Roiphe provides
no solutions. The mother is so
far to the left, and the
daughter so far to the right,
that there is no apparent
middle-ground. Both are being
dishonest with themselves:
Annie, by denying her own
heritage; and Andrea, by deny-
ing the modern world and her
own individuality.
Annie's series of dreams,
Continued on Page l.'t-K
Friday, October 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Business Breakfast Forum Series
Political Editor Tom Fiedler,
of The Miami Herald, will be
the kick-off speaker for the
Temple Israel of Greater
Miami Downtown Business
Breakfast Forum, Thursday,
Oct. 22 from 7:45 to 9 a.m. at
137 NE 19th St. Fiedler will
speak on "Outlook for the
Presidential Campaign, 1988:
Candidates, Their Strengths
and Weaknesses. Fiedler
writes a weekly political col-
umn and will direct The
Herald's 1988 coverage of the
presidential campaign. Infor-
mation and reservations,
573-5900.
Tom Fiedler
Israel Bonds -
Bonos da Israel
f WANTED
ISRAEL BONDS
BEFORE MATURITY
For our bast prices Call Harold A. Lit win
(305)531-2223
1-800-330-1818
LITWIN SECURITIES INC.
761 Arthur Godfrey Rd. Miami Beach, Florida 33140
STOCKS, BONOS & OPTIONS / COMMISSION DISCOUNTS
J.F.


Page 4-B The Jewish FIoridian/Friday, October 16, 1987
Shomrim:
Society Of Jewish Cops Aids County
Continued froin Page 1-B
explains, adding that the socie-
ty represents police depart-
ments from Broward and the
Palm Beaches, as well as
Dade. At present, the society
has approximately 145
members.
There is a practical rationale
for the decision to expand the
society's membership. South
Florida does not boast the
same percentage of Jewish
policemen and women which
larger cities do, and it can be
difficult to pinpoint which of-
ficers are Jewish.
"In New York they check off
ethnic background in case of
death, but they don't do that
here," says Waksman, a
former New York policeman
whose beat for six years was
the notorious "Fort Apache"
in the South Bronx.
So Waksman, who admits
that he doesn't know "how
many Jewish officers there are
out there" nevertheless strives
to inform people about
Shomrim through the
policeman's magazine.
"We have an annual dinner
dance, we distribute matzohs,
Passover foodstuffs and
kosher wine to needy families
in South Beach. And in Oc-
tober, we hold our charity pic-
nic to benefit the spinal cord
injury unit at Jackson
Memorial Medican Center,"
Waksman recounts, listing
some of the group's activities.
The picnic is in honor of
Cheryl Seiden, a detective in
the sexual battery unit of
Metro-Dade, who was shot in
the neck and paralyzed during
a 1982 robbery attempt.
"She spent the last two
weeks of her life in the spinal
cord unit," explains Waksman.
Rabbi Michael B. Eisenstat
There is also a scholarship
named for Seiden, and for the
late Donald Kramer of the
Miami Beach Police Depart-
ment. Kramer was shot and
killed in the line of duty.
Waksman has many plans
for the future, including in-
creased interaction with
members of other police
organizations.
"What they do in New York,
and what we want to start, is
to give out an of -of-the-
year award to a .i-Jewish
policeman," he say-
"Hopefully, some of the
other organizations will
reciprocate. We'll buy a table
at their annual dinner dance,
they'll buy one at ours, and it
will be beneficial," Waksman
adds.
But before other organiza-
tions become involved.
Shomrim may concentrate on
a problem a bit closer to home.
"We're trying to get the
young Jewish policemen, the
rookies, involved with
Shomrim and we're just not
making contact." Waksman
admits.
"Maybe they think we're an
old man's organization
because we have some retired
officers," he suggests.
Shomrim President Robert
Singer, a Metro-Dade
homicide detective,
understands the situation of
the young officers.
"It's hard to come to
meetings when you're assign-
ed to all kinds of different
schedules," he concedes.
"When you're working around
the clock, it's hard to make
time."
But Singer sees the impor-
tance of Shomrim as a force
for protecting the Jewish
community.
"Historically, if there had
been more Jewish people in the
military and in law enforce-
ment in Poland, Germany and
France, maybe we wouldn't
have had the problems we
did," during World War II,
says Singer.
"They would have worked
harder to protect the rights of
minorities if you're a victim
at one time or another, you're
more sensitive to persecution
happening to someone else.
You are more sensitive to the
situation minorities are in," he
contends.
Yet Singer is satisfied with
the sensitivity of the ad-
ministration to Jewish issues
on the force.
"We wanted to put together
a group so that nolice
officers could meet and
>!ize. and if they had pro-
blems unique to their being
Jewish, we could help them."
Singer explains.
"But the administration has
been very helpful. A couple of
years ago. for example, a
sergeant's test was scheduled
for Yom Kippur by oversight.
It was then rescheduled for
observant officers."
Says Singer of anti-
Semitism in the community,
"Although I haven't found any
problems, in this profession,
you're in a better position to
find those problems if they ex-
ist. We're on the front lines
here, so we'd probably see it
first."
But Shomrim was not born
out of a reaction to discrimina-
tion, according to Singer.
"We just thought that
there's a large Jewish com-
munity, and we wanted to
make an impact, to help. We
had something to offer but we
needed a vehicle to offer our
services."
Shomrim does offer services
to the community, such as sen-
ding members to con-
dominiums to instruct elderly
residents on safety.
"The police department does
that, too, but they have only so
many resources and we would
like to help over and above
what is required," says Singer,
who hopes the society will
become more involved with the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion and other local Jewish
organizations.
Irving Heller, a 80 year
police veteran and chief of
North Operations Division for
Metro-Dade's Police Depart-
ment, serves on Shomrim's
board of directors. Says
Heller, "I'm red haired and
freckle faced. People take me
for Irish."
But Heller says that he likes
informing people that he is
Jewish.
"I want people to know.
There has always been this
myth that Jews "do not enter
the law enforcement
profession."
Young Jews need a role
model, according to Heller, so
that they will be more inclined
to consider law enforcement as
a possible profession.
"We're trying to gain
recognition throughout the
community, so people will
begin to realize that we do
have a Jewish law enforce-
ment organization, will take
pride in being Jewish, and will
want to join," Heller asserts.
Jews on the police force
should represent the communi-
ty proportionately, because
'they can be more
knowledgeable about cases
such as vandalism to a
Iri'ing Heller, chiif <>f M>tn>-Dade Police Department's NM
Operations Division, stands next to son Randy /right) a sergtatl
with SWAT. th* inim ichirh handles hostage negotiations.
synagogue.
Heller.
according to
At least one young Jewish
man has heeded Heller's ad-
vice and joined both the police
force and Shomrim.
Randy Heller, 27. is a
sergeant with SWAT, the
team that covers hostage
negotiation assignments.
"It was a complete surprise
to me when my son joined the
department." Heller admits.
"But I would like to see monl
Jews join police departmenal
throughout the United
States."
Irving Heller joined tbel
force in 1958. when, he 3aji[
"there could not have beenl
more than 200 police officers.!
and ten Jews if that many.''
Now Heller estimates thatd\
the 2,400 sworn personnel ij
the Metro-Dade Police Depan-f
ment, 250 or so are Jewish.
Who Needs It?
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ouglas Gardens
Thrift Shops
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A division of the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged at Douglas Gardens


Site Scarred
By Nazi Slurs
Continued from Page 1-B
IaDL that "people do it for the
Lttention, and attention adds
Ifuel to the incidents. It's giv-
ing (the vandals) what they
Iwere craving."
Rosen and others decided
not to publicize the two prior
incidents of anti-Semitic graf-
ti, based on that advice.
"We ignored it the first time
ecause we thought it probably
vouldn't happen again," says
)lster.
"We were wrong. They real-
r defaced the sign much worse
time than last time," she
eveals.
After the third incident,
dowever, it was decided that
he press should be informed.
'I think now is the first time
ve feel that we should go
kublic on it, because it really
Dints to the need for a center
hat brings the community
ogether," Rosen asserts.
But going public may be dif-
icult, due to another
nonymous person with paint-
brush in hand.
According to Olster, "the
ding that struck us was that
ch time (the vandalism oc-
red) an anonymous person
come by and painted it
irer. This time we decided to
ke an issue, and we wanted
take a picture, but it was
fready painted over."
Rosen contends that "it was
very well-meaning person
at did it. I wish we could
ink him or her."
[Yet white-washing anti-
emitic incidents is not exactly
the ADL would advise.
Recording to Arthur
eitelbaum, southern area
rector of the ADL, "if there
[property damage, one ought
alert the police department
at coven that jurisdiction,
te pictures of the damage if
bit', and make a proper
^lice report."
lowever, media reports
ay not be advisable.
["We are always asked in
^ffiti incidents whether or
the press should be involv-
Our advice is that generally
is not a good thing to do. Our
fperience over the years is
Tit press reports frequently
fnerate copy-cat incidents.
"If the vandalism or damage
is serious enough, press repor-
ting will be virtually
automatic," Teitelbaum adds.
The decision to go public
with the report of this third in-
cident of anti-Semitic graffiti,
however, was not "ill-
advised," according to
Teitelbaum.
Teitelbaum: "In
terms of the
generational rebirth
of anti-Semitism, this
is very profound. ."
"But there is a certain risk
in going to the press, especial-
ly to the general press," he
contends.
Spray-painted graffiti of an
anti-Semitic nature "is a
regular occurrence in
Florida," Teitelbaum
recounts.
"We receive these reports
with some frequency, and we
treat these incidents serious-
ly," by monitoring patterns of
anti-Semitic vandalism, from
graffiti to serious damage,
over the course of each year.
The last full year that the
ADL has statistics on, 1986,
points to a 67 percent increase
in such incidents across the
state, with a rise from 47 oc-
currences in 1985 to 79 in
1986.
Eighty percent of persons
arrested for such anti-Semitic
vandalism and harassments
are under the age of 20, accor-
ding to Teitelbaum.
"This underlines the fact
that anti-Semitism is a learned
behavior. Attitudes are form-
ed in the younger years and
certainly tend to remain," says
Teitelbaum, who points out
that the effort and risk involv-
ed even in "simple" anti-
Semitic spray paint vandalism
mean that the activity "is not
as casual as one might think."
That the Jewish community
has been chosen as a target for
the graffiti changes the nature
of the vandalism:
"In terms of the genera-
tional rebirth of anti-
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Friday, October 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Building the Dream r-
',_ FutUre H"M> Of-
DAVE & MARY ALPER
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
The whitewash job was incomplete: Remnants
of the slurs remain visible.
Semitism, this is very pro-
found stuff," Teitelbaum
admits.
The empty lot where the
Dave and Mary Alper Jewish
Community Center will soon
be built will not be guarded.
"We have no money, and the
person would be guarding an
empty piece of property," Ed
Rosen explains.
When the center begins con-
struction before the end of the
year, Rosen says that he hopes
that there will be no continua-
tion of anti-Semitic vandalism,
although he fears it.
If the vandalism does con-
tinue, Rosen says that "we will
discuss what will happen
then."
But basically, Rosen remains
optimistic.
"In four years in the old
Jewish community center a
half a mile away, we have had
no such incidents. I have not
experienced anti-Semitism in
the community," he asserts.
Yet now that anti-Semitism
has reared its head, Rosen
feels that "it really makes the
center that much more impor-
tant. It really points to the
need to build bridges to other
segments of the community."
Hadassah Events
Hatikvah Hadassah will be
having its board meeting
Thursday, Oct. 22, 7:30 p.m. at
the home of Alecia Sachs. For
information, 255-7120.
Kinneret Hadassah will host
a fashion show and paid up
membership lunch on Tuesday,
Oct. 20 at 11:30 a.m. at El
Conquistador Clubhouse.
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For Your Shopping Convenience SUN S A Has A Mini-Bus
Complimentary Transportation To Leading Shopping Plazas


Page6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 16, 1987
*
Three Generations ofLevys Traveled to Israel
for Mission of a Lifetime. The Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Golden Anniversary
"Mission of a Lifetime" left for Israel last
Sunday. Pictured from left are: Harry A.
"Hap" Levy and Davida Levy, general
chairmen of Federation '$ Golden A nniversary
year; their granddaughter Melissa, age 2, the
youngest mission participant; daughter-in-
law Linda Levy; and son Robert Levy.
TOP CASH PAID
OLD ffURMTURE
ORIENTAL RIGS
OLD OIL PAEVTIAGS
Objects of Art
Bric-a-Brac
Tapestries
Bronzes
Pianos
Silver
Single Items or Complete Estates
iDADE I ESTATE GALLERIES IBROWARD
751-4770 6914 Blscayne Blvd. 462-0730
Property Tax Appeals
For hotels, apartments, shopping centers,
office buildings, restaurants, warehouses,
hospitals, specialty properties. Contingent or
hourly basis.
THOMAS R. POST, PA
ATTORNEYS
(305)379-1500
Sexton-Ritual Director
Major South Florida Conservative Congrega-
tion seeking SEXTON-RITUAL Director, prefer-
ably retired cantor, for daily services, Torah
readings and related duties.
Send resume and references to:
Box Holder
P.O. Box 191709
Miami Beach, FL. 33119-1709
Personal & Confidential
Joint Venture:
Jewish Home
And Mount Sinai
Anybody in Dade County
needing home health services
can now get the "HomeAdvan-
tage." This Home Health
Agency, a joint venture of the
Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged at
Douglas Gardens and Mount
Sinai Medical Center, has
received a new name and a
new logo.
"A myriad of home health
services will now be offered
under the umbrella-name
HomeAdvantage," said
HomeAdvantage Chairman of
the Board Barton S. Goldberg.
"HomeAdvantage was licens-
ed in November and already
our professionals have seen
more than 1,000 patients.
Clearly, there is a critical need
in the community for the kinds
of services that we are
offering."
Available services include
nursing care; home health
aides; home maker services;
physical, speech and occupa-
tional therapies; social work;
dietary consultations; the
delivery of medical supplies,
and now, "high tech" services
such as IV set-ups.
For information on all
HomeAdvantage services
674-2111.
PLEASE COMPLETE AND SEND TO:
LANDOW/YESHIVA/LUBAVITCH EDUCATIONAL CENTER
1140 Alton Rd.. Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
Jewish Nam*
Mother's Nam*
Family't Name (voluntary)
Address (voluntary)
City
State
Country Telephone #
I am committed to gather Jaws, man, woman and children to :<- 'k to them words of Torah and to Inspire them
to loam Torah and have tear of Heaven. I would like to be contacted regarding Hake) activities monthly
_____lees frequently. '
Date
.Signature
Community Corner
Army Pvt. 1st Class Robert L. Resnick. son of Donald I
Resnick. Scottsdale. Ariz., and Barbara M. Resnick N0 k
Miami. Fla.. has arrived for duty at Schofield Barracks Haw
Resnick is a military police specialist
The Robyn Tubin Chapter of the City of Hope will hold its ne
regular meeting on Thursday. Oct. 2 at noon at the HWrd Strew
Mall Food Court
The State of Florida will present a check for $2;>2.()0010 the
F3ass Museum for Phase II of the museums expansion program u
the annual meeting of the Friends of the Bass Mi
Wednesday. Oct. 21 at 7:30 p.m. at the museum
useum on
Baptist Hospital of Miami Foundation's Board of Directors has
elected three new members Rafael (Ralph) Acevedo. Dillard
(Rod) Borden and Stuart Eiseman Each has served on the Foun-
dation's Development Council and has been an active fund raiser
on behalf of the not-for-profit hospital and will ser\e four-year
terms on the Foundation Board
IN THE SEPTEMBER 11TH AD FOR
Country Kitchen Egg Noodles
THE EGGS WERE OMITTED
FROM THE LIST OF INGREDIENTS.
THE CORRECTED RECIPE APEARS BELOW.
Pineapple Lukshen Kugel '
V* cup half and half, light
cream or heavy cream
Y* cup sugar
Vs cup golden raisins
2 teaspoons cinnamon
v* teaspoon vanilla
1 package (12 oz )RONZ0NI<
COUNTRY KITCHEN Style
Wide Egg Noodles
Vi cup butter or margarine
2 cans (8 or each) crushed
pineapple in ,uice
4 eggs. weM beaten
Prepare noodles as directed on package Drain well and
place in large bowl Stir in butter In another bowl combine
pineapple, eggs, half and half, sugar, raisins, cinnamon and
vanilla Stir pineapple mixture into noodles Spoon into
greased 13 x 9-inch baking dish Bake at 350" tor 40 to 45
minutes or until top is ensp and golden brown Makes 10 to
12 servings
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R93-M92


Happenings
The Men's Club of Temple Anshei Shalom will
sponsor a breakfast-meeting Oct. 18, 9:30 a.m. The
guest speaker will be Fred Scott, whose topic will be
Money Matters." For information, 495-0466.
The Temple Menorah Sisterhood will sponsor a trip
to Epcot Center on Oct. 25, 26, 27. Advance notice is
needed. For reservations, 866-0221, 868-6568.
Jewish War Veterans Post and Auxiliary of Harry H
Cohen No. 723 will hold its monthly meeting on Oct. 18
at 10 a.m. at Surfside Community Center. For more in-
formation, 865-2396.
The Miami Beach Chapter, Women's Division,
American Technion Society, will hold its opening lun-
cheon meeting at the Shelborne Hotel, Miami Beach
on Thursday, Oct. 22 at noon. Contact is Jean Zaben'
531 0005 or Diane Scherer, 538-4756.
Greater Miami Women's Division, American Friends
of the Hebrew University, will hold their initial meeting
on Friday, Oct. 23, at 11:45 a.m. at the Ocean Pavilion.
Guest speaker for the afternoon will be Dr. Jeremiah
Unterman, director and associate professor of Jewish
Studies at Barry University. For information, 868-0287.
The Homestead Jewish Center will sponsor the pro-
gram "Do You Remember The Way It Was" on Sunday,
Oct. 25, at 7 p.m. For information, 248-4839. The even-
ing will include anecdotes, "Bintel Brief" memorabilia
- everything to recall the world of the past that used to
be.
The Michael-Ann Russell JCC will begin a series of
cultural arts classes to include painting, calligraphy
and dance. For information on times and fees
932-4200.
The City of Miami Beach presented Flagler Federal's
President Herschel Rosenthal with a proclamation
honoring the Savings and Loan for its commitment to
Miami Beach in a reception Thursday, Oct. 15 at the
newly renovated Collins branch.
The Amit Women Convention will be held at the
Hyatt Orlando from Oct. 25 to Oct. 28. For reservations,
members should contact their chapter president or call
the Florida Council office at 651-1444.
National Council of Jewish Women, Greater Miami
Section, will hold a sale at the Thrift Shop, 12900 W.
Dixie Hwy., N. Miami, on Thursday, Friday, Saturday,
Oct. 22, 23, 24 from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. to support com-
munity service projects. Bric-a-brac, books, furniture,
las well as family clothing greatly reduced.
The next general meeting of the Sisterhood of Tem-
ple Zamora will be held on Wednesday, Oct. 21 at 1 p.m.
|at the Temple, in Coral Gables.
The Greater Miami Women's Auxiliary of the Miami
[Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged at Douglas
[Gardens will hold its Annual New Year's Luncheon on
lOct 22 in the Ruby Auditorium. Traditionally, this is the
[Auxiliary's first fundraising event of the year and all
[proceeds go to the Building Project. For informa-
|tion/reservations, 751-8626.
Teen Focus, a therapy group for high school teens
win begin Wednesday, Oct. 21 at the Jewish Family
service office in Kendall. Groups for junior high teens,
children and adults are also available through the JFS
[Group Therapy Program at four JFS offices in Dade
[bounty. For information, 445-0555.
Bnei Akiva of Greater Miami will host a Simchat
liorah 2 on "Hakafot Shniyot" Oct. 17, 9 p.m., at the
iworth Dade Hillel Community Day School. All ages
[welcome! For information, 651-0639.
. Bet Shjra Congregation Sisterhood is having its paid
ria,me/rbersnip meting and fashion show on Wednes-
: 0ct 21 at 7:30 p.m. In the social hall. The
k,1mood women will model fashions by Joyce's
Backroom Routine
)om Boutique.
Miami Civic Theater Opens In Kendall
il40rma La Douce" is the opening production for the
"-"eat, non-profit Miami Civic Theatre in Kendall Town
it-ountry. To have begun Thursday, Oct. 15 at 8 p.m., a
Uw> ,member. semi-professional cast will perform under
F* direction of founder Dr. Ari Kedem.
nnntlal suport for the theatre has come from an
tic>M n"rUs (,<)natin and a grant from Dade County. For
^ Ket ""wmation. 270-0910.
Friday, October 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
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Native Miamian Jerome
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law firm of Sparber, Shevin,
Shapo and Heilbronner, P.A.,
has been elected chairman of
the 30-member Metro-Dade
Community Relations Board.
He will be installed as chair-
man on Friday, Oct. 23, at the
board's annual luncheon to be
held at the Marriott Hotel in
Biscayne Bay.
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JEWISH & KOSHER MARKET WILL BE THE FOCUS...
DECEMBER 4-7.1987 MIAMI BEACH CONVENTION CENTER MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
Join the impressive list ot Kosher Food Manufacturers, Distributors. Retailers, Caterers,
Jewish Life product suppliers, providers of services to the Jewish Community and major
organizations who have already booked space for the giant show.
CONFIRMED EXHIBITORS partial listing.
TOUCH or 100AH INC ESPLANADE HOTEL MORRIS KATZ ART STUDIO RAMAOA RENAISSANCE THE CAREFULLY CHOSEN MC
AGRIVIN 'AMlOLiA iNC KMERET KOSHER FOOOS HOTEL CONTMENTAL HOTEL
AILEGJS TRADING FEL0HEIM PUBLISHING KIPPAH-ART INC RONZOW (GENERAL FOOOSl EGBl
CORPORATION FMREWEIGH KITCHEN ART SANKA (GENERAL FOOOSl EMBASSY RESTAURANT
AMERICAN FRIENDS FOUNTAINBLEAU KOSHER KORNER SANS SOUCI HOTEL EMUNAN WOMEN OF AMERICA
OF ATf[t COHANM HILTON RESORT 0F.STAURANT SCHAPMO S WME CO LT0 FRIENDS Of IDF
AMERICAN FRIENDS FRIOAY S MPORTED K0ZV SHACK SETTON INTERNATIONAL GERSCHWALD PRODUCTS
OF TAD EZRAH BREAD CRUMBS KRUM S CHOCOlATIERS FOOOS Of COPENHAGEN
AMERICAN STANDARD FRIENDS OF LUSAVITCH LEGUME INC SHELBOURNE HOTEL IRON Of MIAMI
TECHNOLOGY CORP Of FLOROA LUBlCOM COMMUNICATIONS SHOPAR KOSHER FOOOS JERUSALEM PIZZA
AMERICAN ZIONIST GAYLE WEISS CO MAOAN KOSHER FOOOS SHUPRA CHOCOLATES JEWISH FLORIDIAN
YOUTH FOUNDATION AMER JEWISH HOME MARC-MARTIN SIMCHA CANOLE CO JOPCOMC
AMIT WOMEN GENERAL FOOOS PUBLISHING CO SPICE TME FOOOS INC MASAOA IMPORTS
ARI EDITIONS HEBREW NATIONAL HAZEL SKULL UNITED SYNAGOGUE NATIONAL COUNCIL OF
B N Ai B RJTH WOMEN KOSHER FOOOS INC CAP CORPORATION Of AMERICA YOUNG ISRAEL
AKRKIM FOOOS HJ HJMZ ME HADRIN DAIRY VACATION STATION TOURS PARAMOUNT BAKEMASTER
ANTON S HEISLER FOOOS MENDEL S HAYMISH BRAND VISUAL MPACT SOC
BERNAN FOOOS HOO L A VAN TUMKIV MESOMM ETA TECH SHAARE TZEDEK
BfalAMERKA PRO0 OP ISRAEL LTD PUBLICATIONS LTD WILTON FOOOS MC SHELAT KOSHER FOODS
CALLIGRAPHER S INK HOUSE OP SEAGRAM THE MIAMI JEWISH TRIBUNE WORLD TABLEWARE INT L SHALOM TELEVISION SHOW
CASTLE PREMIER HOTEL IM* INDUSTRIES INC MOGEN DAVID YANNAIADT Sinai KOSHER FOODS CORP
ClARiDGE HOUSE INT I KOSHER KOSHER MEATS YAYM CORP SuEGO BAlGlEY T Shirts
NURSING HOME DISTRIBUTORS MRS WEIN8ERGS
Suki 1 DING
COORO PLANNING ISRAEL GOVERNMENT FOOO PRODUCTS WE WELCOME OUHNIWIIMHITOBS: TREE OF LIFE TV
FOR PROFESSIONALS CRYSTAL LIGHT BEVERAGES TOURIST OFFICE ISRAEL HtSTADRUT MUSEUM OF THE MKVEH NAT I HEBREW ISRAELI TUPPERWARE il KARAT VERSAILLES HOTEL WINN-DIXIE SUPERMARKET
(GENERAL FOOOtl FOUNDATION G*T CENTER acbti supreme of flomoa
0 S FAMOUS INC JASON OAJBY PRODUCTS NATURAL WAY MILLS MC AMERICAN FRMNOS OF
LUGM TAHOFHM DYNASTY GEMS ^EWISH BRAILLE INSTITUTE NATURE FRESH. INC NEE MAN S ORIGINAL ART MIGDAL OHR AMERICAN GATHERING OF WOPA.0 ZIONIST ORGANIZATION
EAT MOR FOOOS JEWISH PRESS JEWISH WOPAD NOAM GOURMET MC OLANACOF* HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS AMERICAN JEWISH RADIO
OF MIAMI. INC THANK 1FOPIINCREASING
(L AL A*l*ES JOHN S RAVIOLI GROUP PALETAFROZFRUIT NETWORK OUfl EKH4BITOR ROSTER
EMPIRE KOSHER JUOAICA ENTERPRISES INT I CORP AMRAM iOB> ART STUDIO Hay w list rovr
POULTRY. MC KAREN t KAPLAN PENTA HOTEL BAMAALE
[HTENMANN S INC KOSHER CATERERS POST CEREALS BEST HEALTH NATURAL ntm* mourn* >td?
ERGO MEDIA INC KASHRUS MAGAZINE (GENERAL FOOOSl BEVERAGES
THE EXPO WILL BE MORE THAN THREE TIMES BIGGER...AND BETTER TOO!
Trip** the size of tht first Expo in New York City Mora Kosher food tasting...
More exhibitors... Mora entertainment...
a More displays-____________________________________ Celebrities... prizes..._______________
General Admission $6.00 Group Admission $4.00 (minimum 30 tickets)
Limited Exhibitor space available... call our office for information and reservations.
Israel
South Florida Office
THE INTERNATIONAL KOSHER FOOOS & JEWISH LIFE EXPO
4400 North Federal Highway Suite 210-13
Boca Raton. Florida 33431
(800) 356-4404 (toll tree in Florida) (305) 394-3795 {Boca Raton)
OFFICIAL HEADQUARTERS:
Hotel Sans Souci and Hotel Versailles
(800) 327-8470
DISCOUNT AIR FARES:
Eastern Airhnes/Bartlett Travel
(800)332-1133
I


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 16, 1987
Bonds To Honor FPL's Bud Hunter
Leland C. "Bud" Hunter,
senior vice president of
Florida Power and Light Co.,
will be honored by the State of
Israel Bonds Organization
when it holds its Israel 40th
Anniversary Dinner on
Wednesday, Oct. 28, at the
Omni International Hotel. The
dinner will begin with a
More than 200 professionals attended the 15th Annual Tax
Seminar held by the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Foun-
dation of Jewish Philanthropies. Pictured from left 1987 Tax
Seminar Chairman, Sydney S. Traum presents a certificate of
appreciation to guest speaker Sheldon S. Cohen, former commis-
sioner of the Internal Revenue Service.
Business Note
cocktail reception at 6:30 p.m.,
and is being held to coincide
with a year-long celebration of
the birth of Israel as a state.
Hunter will receive a special
40th Anniversary Award at
the dinner.
"Mr. Hunter is being
recognized for contributing so
much to the local community,
as well as to charitable
organizations," said M. Ronald
Krongold, general chairman of
the Greater Miami Israel
Bonds campaign. "A propo-
nent of the free enternr,,
system Mr. Hunter h^R
of the industrial ,mm!g
which is in common with hnw
businesses in the Sut* rf
Israel thrive." te of
rP&L, Hunter ah > serves as
chairman of the Board of
Directors of Victoria Hospital
in Miami and a member of the
Board of Governors of the
Florida Lawyers Prepaid
Legal Services.
Leland "Bud" Hunter
U.S. No Water To West Bank
WASHINGTON (JTA) The Reagan Administration
expressed its objections to supplying Israel or Jewish set-
tlements in the West Bank with any water found through a
proposed drilling project east of Bethlehem.
An American company, Moriah Energy and Technology
Corp. of Englewood, Colorado, plans to drill for the water
using untried and expensive methods in an effort to tap an
underground sea.
"We have expressed our deep concern to the government
of Israel about the project and have asked for more infor-
mation," State Department deputy spokesperson Phyllis
Oakley said.
Broward Bank has changed
its name to Jefferson Bank, ef-
fective immediately, following
acquisition of its parent
holding company by Jefferson
Bancorp, Inc. a publicly-held
bank holding company head-
quartered in Miami Beach.
Jefferson Bank elected Ar-
thur H. Courshon president
and chairman of the board of
Jefferson Bancorp, Inc., as its
chairman of the board. John D.
Ransdell continues as presi-
dent of the bank.
Leonard Grand, who had
served as chairman of the
board of Broward Bank, was
elected vice chairman as was
Barton S. Goldberg, president
of Jefferson National Bank in
Miami Beach.
Others elected to the board
of Jefferson Bank include Nor-
man M. Giller, president of
Jefferson National Bank at
Sunny Isles, Leonard H.
Schwartz and Emily Vernon.
Courshon said Jefferson
Bank will institute programs
which will duplicate the
policies of Jefferson National
Banks in Palm Beach and
Dade counties, where Jeffer-
son Bancorp, Inc., operates
three national banks and seven
offices.
Those banks provide highly
personalized banking, featur-
ing Gold Account service.
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Write
Dear Noin i
. For Advice
Hear Nomi. an advice column, will appear regularly in the
gutt of The Jewish Floridian.
tar Nomi:
|l am marrying an educated, beautiful. Jewish girl whose
nilv originally comes from Cuba. Like my family (American
the past two generations), my bride-to-be's ancestors come
Inn Russia, and like my family, her relatives are strongly
rish, put a great deal of emphasis on family togetherness,
lainly professionals teachers, lawyers and doctors.
The problem is. that whenever our two families meet
[ether it's as if we were from two totally different tribes:
speak Spanish and are painfully polite; and my folks
Ke uiu-.imfortable comments about "different cultures" and
we were all immigrants, once."
i m afraid that our wedding is going to resemble an armed
||iv bet ween two enemy camps. What can I do to help make
families come together more?
Ifacerelj.
Miami West Side Story
ir Miami West Side Story:
fou can't really do much except to give your two families
! opportunities to be together, and encourage them to
Change stories from Russia and compare notes on how one
nily wound up in Cuba, and the other, in America.
; seems to me that both sets of parents need to see the
er as being familiar, recognizably Jewish, with customs and
kefs that are common to both. You can try to point up
ularities and instigate good conversation topics, but the rest
pp to them.
ly only other suggestions are that you try to incorporate
dding customs from both families, and play songs familiar
nests from the bride's side as well as from the groom's,
s the person performing the marriage ceremony could
include a brief sermon about the joining together of two
ures as well as two people.
any case, many marriages begin with open warfare
ween the bride's and groom's respective families an
1 truce may not be much fun, but it is not the worst
ation imaginable. In years to come (perhaps with a first
ndchild), relations between your families will doubtless
Friday, October 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
rove.
ours,
Nomi:
Nomi
ly girlfriend wants me to help her host a party. Normally, I
)ld say yes' without thinking twice, but my girlfriend has
tone involved with selling a certain product, and she wants
nrow numerous parties to help sell that product.
be says that all I have to do is open up my house and invite
nds she will take charge of the refreshments and the
bg. Then, after the party, she will ask if anyone is
Jested not only in buying some of the product, but if
bne wants to throw parties to help promote it, as well.
feel that it might be insulting to some people to be invited
(friend's party and then be expected to buy or sell some
Bet. But my girlfriend is very forceful, and makes it sound
"it would be no skin off my back." Should I tell her that I
do it0 How should I tell her?
|>urs Truly,
Party Pooper
Party Pooper:
pu have the choice of telling your friend a white lie, such
[wish I could help you, but I don't have the time right now
hjanize a party in my home," or you can be honest, and
per that you don't feel comfortable throwing parties where
lie are expected to do anything more than have a good
I and socialize.
lyou tell her a white lie, she might continue to stress the
Ithat she would do all the work, and so on. If you tell her
^th, she might be slightly insulted. No matter what you
jjer, however, make it clear that you do not feel like
""sing the issue anymore.
ree with your feeling that some people might be insulted
B>ng invited to a "product party." It is not worth it to risk
feting friends by hosting a party you would rather not be
Pved with, anyway.
furs,
Nomi
l Tanach' Begins Series
e Hug Tanach, the inten-
se study group of
Beach, will begin its
year on Tuesday, Oct. 20,
the prophetical book of
as the subject matter
^l semester.
This group, which conducts
its sessions in Hebrew, will
begin meeting weekly at its
new location, the Cuban
Hebrew Congregation, Miami
Beach, from 9-10:30 a.m.
The Mosaic At The T':
New York Gets New Theater
By MARLENE GOLDMAN
NEW YORK The Mosaic
Theater has developed an in-
augural schedule of original
theater addressing timeless
social aspects of Judaism in-
cluding history, identity and
poetry and music it hopes is
worthy of its namesake.
This "theater with adven-
ture," as its artistic director,
Michael Posnick, describes it,
"deals with Jewish ideas and
aspects that haven't appeared
on stage in a long time .
Jewish myths, heroes .
streams of Jewish life that are
daring and cannot be
politicized."
Operating from a crowded
fourth floor office with three
paper-laden desks, The Mosaic
Theater replaces the American
Jewish Theater, which has
relocated downtown after
seven years at the 92nd Street
Y cultural and educational
center. The Mosaic Theater
will perform six productions in
a 110-seat Y theater.
Posnick, who will direct two
of them, has directed theater
for two decades at the Yale
Repertory Theater, the
Manhattan Theater Club, the
National Theater of the Deaf,
Playwrights Horizons, the
Long Wharf Theater and the
O'Neill Theater Center, and
has taught at the Yale Drama
School and Hunter College.
He helped to organize the
First International Conference
and Festival of Jewish Theater
in 1982 in Tel Aviv, staged the
New York Chamber Sym-
phony production of the
Brecht-Weill "Mahogany
Songspiel" in the 1985-86
season at the Y and has been a
theater consultant for the Na-
tional Foundation for Jewish
Culture.
Posnick said he was pleased
when Omus Hirshbein, direc-
tor of the Y's Performing Arts
Department, asked him to join
the Mosaic project. "I was
grateful for the opportunity to
bring together the two very
powerful aspects of my life,"
Posnick explained. "I have the
impulse to explore what it
means to bear the identity of
being a Jew, so the plays apply
to me."
The productions, which run
at intervals from Oct. 17-July
10, "can serve as a bridge bet-
ween exploring one's own
identity as a Jew and as a be-
ing who lives in America,"
Posnick said. "But they may
just engender more
questions."
Kicking off the season, the
San Francisco-based A Travel-
ing Jewish Theater will ex-
plore issues of contemporary
Jewish identity with music,
humor, puppetry and dramatic
images in "Berlin, Jerusalem
and the Moon." The theater
group called on Posnick to
direct this New York premiere
of the production, which
recently drew praise at Israeli
and European festivals.
A more controversial pro-
duction, "Acts of Faith," will
follow. Set in a hijacked jet
bound for the United States
from Israel, the play, a world
premiere by Marilyn Felt,
centers on the relationship bet-
ween a 35-year-old American
Jewish divorcee and a young
Shiite hijacker. The woman is
faced with the opportunity to
save the life of the hijacker as
he begins choking. Posnick
hopes the dilemma will
generate discussion and pro-
voke thought.
Continuing with the em-
phasis on enriching Jewish
culture is the third piece, "An
Evening of Jewish. Story
Theater." Paul Sills will pre-
sent a musical journey through
Jewish folktales from around
the world. The stories, based
on those from Howard
Schwartz's books "Elijah's
Violin" and "Miriam's Tam-
bourine," hold a mirror to a
Jewish home "to explore this
unique Jewish world in order
to discover its universality,"
Posnick said.
Addressing a more historical
theme, the fourth play,
"Rosenfeld's War" by Gus
Weill and directed by Posnick,
is a documentary drama based
on transcripts from the 1939
Congressional hearings on a
bill that would have extended
the existing immigration
quotas to allow 20,000 children
from Germany to enter the
United States. President
Roosevelt rejected the bill.
Posnick explained that "the
purpose of the play is not to
point a finger at a dead person
or remourn the Holocaust. The
goal is to generate a new kind
of listening. When people hear
the words of almost 50 years
ago, they should recognize
that those same words are be-
ing spoken in different parts of
the world and to different peo-
ple today."
On May 15, the last day of
the performance of
"Rosenfeld's War," a public
symposium entitled "From
Shoah to Sanctuary" will ex-
amine American response to
the Holocaust and current im-
migration issues.
Following the four plays,
The Mosaic Theater will per-
form the Tony Award-winning
National Theater of the Deaf s
version of "The Dybbuk" by S.
Anski. Posnick worked 12
years with the National
Theater, teaching and
directing.
The final project for the
season will spotlight puppet
artist Eric Bass in "Sand,"
following its world tour. Bass
blends 30 handcrafted puppets
with actors, music and move-
ment to create a love poem in
which a German woman and a
Jewish man are applied to the
theme: Tomorrow they marry,
tonight they dream. This pro-
duction will feature perfor-
mance by Bass' Sandglass
Theater.
The Mosaic Theater was
scheduled to have been official-
ly dedicated in early October
with impresario Joseph Papp
speaking and placing a
mezuzah on the door.
Posnick's expectations for
the theater reach beyond the
first year's works. He said he
hoped the troupe could feed a
network of American Jewish
theaters with original
material.
He also plans to make
synopses and begin translation
of some 2,000 Yiddish plays
registered with the Library of
Congress, drawing Israeli
directors and playwrights into
the project.
The Women's Division of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation recently held its annual
retreat at the Softtel Hotel. Pictured from left,
(standing) are Leslie Klein, Micki Hochberg,
Women's Division vice president; Marvis
Schaecter, co-chairman of Federation's "Mis-
sion of a Lifetime" Janet Chusmir, executive
editor of The Miami Herald, a guest speaker
during the retreat, and Joan Smith. Pictured
from left (seated) are Shoshana Cardin, presi-
dent of the Council of Jewish Federations and
scholar-in-residence; Helene Berger, president
elect, Council of Jewish Federations, Women'
Division; Ellen Mandler, Federation's
Women's Division president; and Renata
Bloom, retreat co-chairwoman.


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 16, 1987
Brandeis Serving
Non-Kosher Food
Continued from Page 1-B
rDrk and shellfish is no dif-
erent than offering
cheeseburgers, and she is sure
that those who keep strict
kashrut would agree.
She said Brandeis must be
viewed not as a Jewish univer-
sity but as "a non-sectarian
university with strong Jewish
support. We want every stu-
dent to be comfortable here.
We pride ourselves on our
diversity."
Handler said the board of
trustees' decision to allow the
new foods was made so that
"every kid at Brandeis should
be as comfortable as at any
other university." She added
that Brandeis has "always
assisted the Orthodox Jew to
function on this campus," and
that will not change.
The comfort argument has
been challenged by some facul-
ty members. "Can anyone
believe that there is a student
anywhere whose decision to
enter Brandeis will depend on
whether he can get a bacon,
lettuce and tomato sandwich
for lunch?" asked Prof. Marvin
Fox, director of the Lown
School of Near Eastern and
Judaic Studies, and now on
sabbatical.
Emphasizing that he was
speaking as an individual, he
said: "It would be one thing if,
from the beginning of
Brandeis, there had been no
restrictions. But to suddenly
and deliberately, in the
school's 39th year, change the
policy established by Dr.
(Abram) Sachar ... is self-
defeating and inflicts needless
injury."
He agreed with Bernard
Reisman, professor of
American Jewish communal
studies and director of the
Hornstein program in Jewish
communal service, that pork
and shellfish were more offen-
sive than mixing dairy pro-
ducts with beef. The former
"psychologically connote the
separateness of the Jews,"
Reisman said. "Even Jews
that don't observe kashrut
have a psychological reaction
to pork and shellfish."
He continued that the policy
would fail to attract more
students and in fact would
"antagonize the people who
have built and maintained the
university."
Fox saw the food decision as
part of an overall board at-
tempt to make Brandeis less
Jewish and more universal. He
said the calendar, for the first
time in at least 15 years,
doesn't list the names of
Jewish holidays.
Furthermore, he said a
report issued by the board last
spring referred to the
"mistaken impression" that
Brandeis is intended mainly
for the Jewish community as
"the most serious handicap in
attracting qualified students."
Amit Women
Events
Dvorah Chapter will meet
on Wednesday, Oct. 21 at 1
p.m. in the Roney Plaza.
Refreshments will be served.
Hatikvah-Miami Beach
Chapter will hold a luncheon
meeting on Thursday, Oct. 22
at noon in the Morris and An-
na Eisenberg Social Hall,
when Jossi Teitelbaum from
the office of the Israeli Con-
sulate will be guest speaker.
Shalom Chapter will meet
Tuesday, Oct. 20 in the Club
Room of 100 Lincoln Road at
11:30 a.m., when Mayor of
Miami Beach Alex Daoud will
present a slide presentation of
his trip to Israel.
Vered Chapter will hold a
new and prospective member-
ship tea at the home of Sarah
Raab in North Miami Beach,
on Tuesday, Oct. 20 at 8 p.m.
There will be a video shown
during the program.
Florida Council of Amit
Women, Executive Board will
meet Monday, Oct. 19 at 10:30
a.m. at the Council Office in
North Miami Beach.
The Chai Chapter will hold
its 18th (Chai) Annual Paid Up
Membership Party at the home
of Ruth Sakowitzx, 8650 SW
84 Court on Wednesday, Oct.
21 at 7:30 p.m. For informa-
tion and reservations,
595-2200 or 226-9244.
Beth Sholom
Consecration
At the Simchat Torah Ser-
vice on Thursday, Oct. 15, 17
new students in the School for
Living Judaism at Temple
Beth Sholom, kindergarten
through the second grade,
were to be consecrated by Rab-
bis Gary Glickstein and Jason
Gwasdoff.
The following studetns were
so consecrated:
Elliot Brown, Elizabeth
Cofino, Esther Farin, Lisa
Gersten, Alex Jonas, Jennifer
Kaiser, Aaron Miller, Jennfier
Miller, Heather Minoff,
Samuel Perwin, Elizabeth
Reichler, Erica Rosen,
Madeline Rosenthal, Richard
Severson, Elizabeth Sherman,
Joshua Shore, and Jessica
Warren.
Miamian Carter Krone celebrated his Bar Mitzvah at the
Western Wall while on an American Zionist Youth Foundation
summer program. Also participating from the Miami area were
Elyse Baretz and Debra Semel.
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Albert Vorspan Moshe Arad
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The Union of American Hebrew Congregations will hold its 59th
biennial general assembly in Chicago October 29-November 3 The
UAHC's Eisendrath Award will be presented to Albert Vorspan
senior vice president, for his leadership of UAHC social action
programs. Speakers will include Israel's ambassador to the U S
Moshe Arad; Tom Dine, executive director ofAIPAC and Arthur
Hartman, recently-retired U.S. envoy to the Soviet Union,
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University of Florida religion Professor Samuel Hill (left)
discusses course curriculum for the new master's program with
qraduate student James Roughton. The master's program in
religion is being offered for the first time this fall after an in-
itpendent review committee sent by the Florida Board of Regents
determined that such a program was needed at UF.
U. of Florida Adds
Religion Master's
GAINESVILLE The
University of Florida started
its first master's degree pro-
gram in religion this fall, and
four students have already
signed up for the new program
approved by the Florida Board
of Regents.
Now in its first semester, the
irogram was creaed after an
".dependent review committee
sit by the Regents decided
hat a department as good as
he one at the University of
lorida should offer a master's
egree, Samuel Hill, the pro-
ram's coordinator, said
ently.
"It doesn't often happen
at the pressure (to create a
rogram) comes from outside.
is time it came from outside
e department," he said.
This meant that they had
sped for us and thought we
ere qualified to do graduate
ork and indeed couldn't
stify not doing it."
The program is divided into
'o areas of study: Western
eligious thought, which
Hows the history of Western
'ligion from Ancient Hebrew,
ewish and various Christian
evelopments to modern
ligious thought; and religion
American culture, which
ks at how religion fits into
r culture.
Plans are to start an area in
fa" Kullen has been ap-
^nted Research Director for
< Greater Miami Jewish
Iteration. Prior to coming to
^deration, Kullen worked at
V* Miami Jewish Home and
Vmtal for the Aged as the
[ycLDirector f t1" Nurse
\^ Training Program. In
"<: position she will be
Ponsible for research and
Wopment for Federal
1 its campaign.
Eastern religions in either
1988 or 1989, Hill said. The
area will examine Hinduism,
plus other religions, including
those of Africa. A search com-
mittee is looking for someone
else to join the faculty next
fall. HU1 said three of the 11
current faculty members have
a primary interest in Eastern
religions.
"We have a good running
start toward doing work in
that field," he said.
For more students, the
master's program will be a
starting point in their career,
Hill said.
"We assume that most of the
people who come here to earn
a master's in religion will go
on and do PhD work elsewhere
in the field of religion," he
said. "Some will come for per-
sonal enrichment."
Hill said that a PhD program
may be started here eventual-
ly, but for now he is concerned
with doing a good job with the
master's program. He said
that although the real work of
starting the program has only
taken place in the last few
years, faculty members have
been "flirting with the idea"
since the early 1970s.
"We were ready for it and in
a certain sense, hungry for it,"
he said.
B'nai Mitzvah
CRAIG MANDELBAUM
Craig Adam Mandelbaum,
son of Anne and Harold
Mandelbaum will be called to
the Torah as Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday, at 8:30 a.m. at Tem-
ple Adath Yeshurun.
The celebrant is a student in
the Judaica High School and is
in the 8th grade and is active
in USY Kadima and D'or
L'Dor program. He attends
Highland Oaks Junior High
School and is in the 8th grade.
Craig is a member of the
Junior Honor Society,
Resource Program for gifted
students, and is on the staff of
the school newspaper. He is
also interested in Art and has
had a piece exhibited at North
Miami Art Museum.
Mr. and Mrs. Harold
Mandelbaum will host the Kid-
dush following the services in
honor of the occasion.
Special guests will include:
Aunt and Uncle Minna and
Harold Finkelstein of New
York City, New York. Mr. and
Mrs. Larry Turtel and son
Alex from Long Island, New
York, and Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Labelson from New
Jersey.
Rabbi Simcha Freedman and
Cantor Zvi Rozen will officiate
at the services.
JOHANNA TESSLER
Johanna Tessler, daughter
of Rene and Dr. Stephen
Tessler will be called to the
Torah as Bat Mitzvah on
Saturday Oct. 17 at Temple
Beth Moshe. Rabbi Israel
Jacobs will officiate and Haz-
zan Moshe Friedler will chant
the liturgy.
Johanna, known also as
Joey, is an 8th grade student
at Miami Country Day and is
President of Student Council.
She is a student in drama and
has performed last year in Neil
Simon's play "Brighton Beach
Memoirs at Ruth Foreman's
Theater.
Dr. and Mrs. Stephen
Tessler will host the kiddush
following the services in honor
of the occasion.
Na'amat Events
A luncheon, fashion show
and card party, sponsored by
the Masada Chapter of
Na'amat USA will take place
Thursday, Oct. 22 at noon at
the 1968 Jefferson Con-
dominium on Miami Beach.
For information, 532-0020.
Friday, October 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
. and God dhnded the
(Genesis 1.3-4).
. "And God said: Let there be light'
light from the darkness"
BERESHIT
BERESHIT God created the world in six days. On the first day
He created the light and called it "day;" the darkness He called
"night." On th second day He created the expanse of the
heavens On the third day the waters were assembled into oceans
and dry land was seen. This was called "earth." Next, vegetation
flourished. On the fourth day the luminaries were fixed in the sky.
On the fifth day. fish, reptiles, and fowl were created. On the
sixth day, the beasts, animals, and man were created. On the
seventh day, God rested from all His labors. Therefore he blessed
the seventh day and sanctified it. Man was created alone: after-
ward. God took a rib from Adam's side and fashioned a wife for
him; Adam called her Eve, meaning "the mother of all living
things." At first Adam and Eve lived happily in the Garden of
Eden; but they ate the fruit of the forbidden tree of knowledge
and were driven out of Paradise. The sons of man multiplied and
progressed. However, their ways were evil and God decided to
erase all men from the face of the earth. Only Noah found favor in
the eyes of God.
(The recounting ol the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage." edited by P Wollman-
Tsamlr, $15, published by Shengold. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
Lane, New York. NY 10036 Joseph Schlang is president of the society
distributing the volume.)
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
6:26 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach, Fla. 531-2120
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaiq
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
'Cantor: Zvl Rozen Conservative
Executive Director ^>
Harry J.Silverman fytyl
t
Mlnyan 7:301.111.4 8:30 p.m.
Sal. aSun.Sa.rn.4ep.nl.
Shabbat aan Sat. 8 00 a.m.
Bar Mltnah Craig Mandelbaum
TEMPLE BETH AM
S9S0 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 667-6667
Leonard Schoolman, Sr. Rabbi
Mark Kram, Associate Rabbi
Lynn Goldstein, Assistant Rabbi
Frl. 1:15 p.m Rabbi Laonard Schoolman will
apeak on "Miami: Their Dream, Our Raallty."
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854-3911
Jack Riemer, Rabbi
Robert Albert,
Cantor
Rev. Milton Freeman,
Ritual Director
Dally aan. Sun. ( a.m S 5:30 p.m
Mod. TliM. 7:30 a.m 4 5:30 p.m
Wad 7 15t m 4 Ip m
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave Miami Beach
534-7213-534-7214
Barry J. Konovitch, Rabbi t**\
Sergio Grobler, President %Xf
Sholem Epelbaum, President,
Religious Committee
TEMPLE EMANU EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shifman. Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
Slmchal Torah Frl. I a.m. Or. Irving Lahrman
will olllclata Cantor Yahuda Shllman will
chant. Sal. 9 a.m. Mlncha Bar Mltnah
Saan Poanor.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive. Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schif f
Dally 7:X am (Man. Thurv MS) 4 7 p.m.
Fit 7 p.m Sal. a.m Haaarv. lor High Holiday
Daya.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
M/im/'i Plonaar Meto/m Congregation
137 N.E. 19th St. Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5066
Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob G. Bomateln
1 Frl p.m
Downtown: Rabbi Rex D. Partmata. 4
Cantor Raohoha F. MMaon will load
cong In Slmchal Torah.
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667 5657
Michael B. Elsenstat, Rabbi
Succoth aan Frl. :15 p.m Simohat Torah
Oct. 141 p.m Oct. IS 10 ajk.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami, FL 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs, Rabbi
Dr. Joseph A. GorfInkel. /'?.
Rabbi Emeritus Ifi
Moshe Friedler, Cantor *"*
Frl. 7 p.m.
Sat. 8:45 am
Waekdaytan Mon Fn Sam
Mon Thurv 5 p.m Sun. 6:30 a.m
Sat 8 45 a.m.
Sal Mltnah Johanna Taaalar
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave., M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Alvadla Rosenberg
Cantor Moshe Buryn
Dally aorvtcaa ( a.m 4 7 p.m.
Sat. 415 a.m.
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
2382601 f
Rabbi David H Auerbach \
Cantor Stephen Freedman
Simchal Torah 4 Milalot Frl 9 30 a.m
Shabbat Frl. 8 p.m.
Sat. (30 a m Bat Mltnah
Pimali Michilla Howard
TEMPLE BETWSHALOM 538-7231
Chase Ave. 4 41 at St. Liberal
DR. LEON KRONISH Senior Founding Rabbi
GARY A OUCKSTEIN. Santo. Ribbi
HARRY JOU Au.lllary Rabtx
JASON QWASDOFF Aailltant Rabbi
IAN AlPERN, Cantor
DAVID CONVISER. Cantor Emorttua
DENNIS J RICE, F T.A., E.acutivi Director
Frl. (: 15 p.m Rabbi Giremain "In Tha Big
toning Sal 10:45 aan
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd. ^-,
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz, Rabbi (W|
Zvee Aroni, Cantor V'3 '
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Frl Slmchal Torah 6 25 p.m.
Mlncha 6:30 p.m Sal 6 25 i m
Mincha 7:15 p.m. Sun 8 a.m 4 5 30 p.m
Bat Mitzvah Mlchalla Bllllg.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Shoshanah Raab. Cantor
SantoaaFrl 7:30 pj*.
Sat. r30 a.m.
Onag Shabbat wlH I
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowltz
Arl Frtdkis, Assoc Rabbi (
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sit 9 m sibbath
Dally Mlnchih Sunday
6 a.m andSpm
Sat 9i.m and 1161
V
TEMPLE NERTAMID 866-8345
7902 Carlyle Ave., 866 9833
Miami Beach 33141 Conaervatlvo
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz ~.
Cantor Edward Klein f)
Dally San. Mon Frl 8 a.m. 8:30 p.m -S
Sat Mlncha 6:15 pm Sun 6 30 am
8:30 p.m. Sal.: 8:45 a.m. aon. by Rabbi Labolu
Cinlor Main
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung
SHAARE TEFILLAH
TORAH CENTER OF KENDALL
7880 SW112 Street
232-6833
Rabbi Hershel Becker
je??
Dally San 7 a.m. Fri 10 mln after candla
lighting tlma Stiabboi a.m. Shabboa
Mlncha 10 mln balore candla lighting tlma
Sun 830a.m.
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dade's Reform Congregation
Ralph P Kingsley. Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administrator
Fri. 8 p.m. Pulpit guilt Rabbi Simcha
Freedman Sal Bat Mltnah Llabetti Klau.
Aulrul Chartaa Bartln 4 Oalla Shocron Baby
naming Branda Riqual Shapiro
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
271-2311 ;),
Or. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi flfcl
Benjamin Adler, Car,ir x^>
David Rosenthal, Auxiliary Cantor
Mlnyan 7 a.m. Monday! 4 Thuraday
Sunday 8 a.m. Frl 8 15 pm
Conducted by Dr. Norman N. Shapiro
Sal.aan 8a m


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 16, 1987
CHEESE FOR ALL REASONS
Cheese from Norway Jarlsberg, Nokkelost and Gjetost
has been dubbed cheese for all reasons because of its ver-
satility and universal appeal.
The good news is that elegant, tasty fare can also be
relatively light. While certainly not "diet" dishes per se,
the following recipes should please the palate and leave
guests feeling comfortable afterwards.
Norwegian cheese also fits into Americans newly
discovered love of "grazing." Lots of nutritionists think it's
a terrific idea so long as you chose healthy fare. The
salads, enriched in taste and texture by a pair of adaptable
Norwegian cheeses, certainly qualify on that count. For the
most part, they require little effort to prepare and elevate
grazing to an art.
JARLSBERG PARTY SWIRL
1 loaf frozen bread dough
1 cup shredded Jarlsberg cheese
V cup chopped pitted black olives
xk cup minced green pepper
V* Tsp. chili powder
V* Tsp. garlic salt
Melted butter or margarine
Place bread dough in greased shallow bowl. Cover,
defrost and let rise until doubled, according to package
directions.
In bowl combine cheese, olives, pepper, chili powder and
garlic salt. Blend well.
Divide dough into thirds. On lightly floured board, roll
each into 15x3-inch rectangles. Brush with melted butter.
Reserving V! cup cheese mixture for topping, sprinkle re-
maining cheese mature over dough. Roll each up jelly-roll
fashion, to make 3 rolls 15 inches long. Braid together.
Pinch ends to seal and tuck under. Place on ungreased bak-
ing sheet.
Bake at 375 F for 25 minutes. Sprinkle reserved cheese
down center of bread. Bake 5 minutes longer. Serve warm.
Makes one large loaf.
JARLSBERG BROCCOLI SLAW
2 cups shredded broccoli stems
1 cup broccoli florets
1 cup cubed Jarlsberg cheese
1 cup shredded carrot
1 small purple onion, cut in strips
Vt cup chopped walnuts
V cup raisins
2/3 cup bottled creamy Italian dressing
Crisp salad greens (optional)
In bowl, combine first 7 ingredients. Add dressing and
toss to blend. If desired, serve on crisp greens. (Mixture
may be served immediately or refrigerated several hours to
overnight, to further blend flavors.) Makes 6 to 8 servings.
Of course, what's a more natural combination than bread
and cheese.
SCALLPED POTATOES NOKKELOST
1 cup chopped leek
'/ cup (Vj stick) butter or margarine
V cup unsifted all-purpose flour
lMi Tsps. salt
1/8 Tsp. pepper
2 cups milk (whole, low-fat or skimmed)
8 cups sliced red-skinned potatoes unpeeled
2 cups shredded Nokkelost cheese
%* cup bread crumbs
4 Tbsps. melted butter or margarine
In saucepan, cook leeks in V cup butter until tender. Add
flour, salt and pepper. Gradually add milk. Cook, stirring
until thickened.
In 2-quart buttered baking dish, arrange half of the
potatoes, half sauce and half the cheese mixture. Repeat
layering.
Bake, covered, at 375 F for 45 minutes. Uncover. Blend
bread crumbs and remaining butter. Sprinkle around edge
of casserole. Bake 15 minutes longer. Makes 8 servings.
WINTER GARDEN SALAD
2 cups broccoli florets
2 cups cauJoflowerets
1 pkg. (10 ox.) kidney beans, drained
1 medium red pepper, cut in strips
1 small purple onion, sliced and separated into rings
1 cup bottled Caesar salad dressing
14 cup chopped parsley
y Tsp. crushed (or 2 Tsps. fresh) basil
1% cups cubed Jarlsberg cheese
4 endive, cut into circles
1/3 cup toasted pignoli (pine) nuts (or equivalent blanched.
slivered amonds)
Crisp salad greens
In bowl, combine first 6 ingredients. Add dressing,
parsley and basil. Toss to blend. Cover and refrigerate untii
ready to use.
Just before serving, add cheese, endive and nuts. Spoon
onto crisp greens. Makes 8 servings.
Burke
Rick Burke
To Manage
FantasyWorld
Don Rose, Managing Direc-
tor of FantasyWorld Club
Villas, has announced the ap-
pointment of Richard Burke as
General Manager of the resort.
His responsibilities extend to
the operation of all guest
related services.
Burke has been associated
with the hotel industry for the
past 17 years. His career
began at the Washington, D.C.
Hilton Hotel where he worked
his way up from room clerk to
sales manager. In recent
years, Burke has held key
management positions with
quality properties such as
Hyatt, Marriott, and Grenelefe
resorts.
James Allen (Lenny)
Gray.Jr. has also been engag-
ed as tennis professional for
the resort. Formerly on the
pro tournament circuit, Gray
has devoted the last 19 years
to serving as a teaching pro-
fessional. Gray will provide
lessons to guests as well as ar-
range tournaments on Fan-
tasyWorld's seven lighted ten-
nis courts.
FantasyWorld Club Villas is
a family swim and tennis
resort, only five minutes from
Walt Disney World. It offers
282 two-bedroom, two-bath
townhouses for nightly rental.
The resort is one of the first in
Florida to have added a video
cassette player in each unit. A
large selection of family shows
and current hits are available
"around the clock" from the
automated credit card
operated dispensing machine
in the hotel's lobbv.
Amtrak Offers Fall-Winter
Travel Bargains
WASHINGTON Amtrak is offering bargain fares for
medium- and long-distance train trips now through May 26
l"oo.
The rail passenger corporation has reduced the price of
its popular All Aboard America fare and brought back the
"One-way Plus $7" fare which was discontinued during the
summer months.
The All Aboard America fare allows round-trip travel
within one, two or three regions of the country. The new
fares are: $138 for travel within one region of the country
$188 for travel within two regions, and $238 for travei
within all three regions. Children, ages 2-11, pay one-half
the adult fare.
Under the All Aboard America plan the Eastern region
extends from the East Coast to Milwaukee or New Orleans
the Western region extends from the West Coast eastward
to El Paso, Texas or Denver, Colo., and the central Region
is everything in between.
The All Aboard America fare is a great bargain com-
pared to regular fares for long-distance trips. For example,
using the $138 one region fare, a traveler could save $310
on a trip from New York to New Orleans and return via
Chicago. Or, with a two region All Aboard America fare of
$188, a traveler could go from Chicago to Los Angeles via
Albuquerque, and return via Las Vegas and Denver, saving
$308 off the regular fare. For a three-region cross-country
trip, say from Seattle to New York City on the Empire
Builder route through Montana, and return via Denver and
Salt Lake City, the All Aboard America fare of $238 would
save a traveler $364.
According to Tim Gardner, vice president of passenger
marketing, "The greatest benefit of our All Aboard
America fare is its flexibility. Tickets may be purchased
anytime before boarding the train, although we do suggest
making reservations as early as possible since seats are
limited. You en start the trip any day of the week and take
up to 45 days to complete it. You can stop over for no extra
charge at two cities in addition to your destination. And,
best of all, you can return by an alternate route allowing
maximum sightseeing along the way. Another reason our
All Aboard America fare is so popular is that it applies to
travel starting and ending in any of the approximately 500
cities and towns we serve; it is not limited to the major
markets."
For travelers going shorter distances, the "One-Way
Plus $7" fare is the best bargain. This fare allows round-
trip travel for just $7 more than the regular one-way fare,
where the one-way fare is $60 or more. For example, a
round-trip from Los Angeles to San Francisco would cost
$64, plus $7, for a total of $71. saving $57 off the regular
round-trip fare. Children, ages 2-11, ride for half the adult
fare.
The One-Way Plus $7 fare will not be available during
certain holiday periods: Nov. 24-29 and Dec. 16 through
Jan. 3.
Both special fares are valid for trips up to 45 days. The
fares are good for coach travel, but may be upgraded to
first-class and sleeping accommodations by paying the ap-
propriate accommodations charge. These special fares may
not be used on Auto Train or on Metroliner Service trains.
Uruguayan Jews Pressure For Soviet Emigration
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Soviet Foreign Minister
Eduard Shevardnadze mingled
with and spoke to more than
1.000 Uruguayan Jews
demonstrating outside the
Soviet Embassy in Montevideo
last week demanding full
rights for Jews in the USSR it
was reported here from the
Uruguayan capital.
Shevardnadze assured them
that his country has adopted a
more liberal policy toward
Soviet Jews, including freer
emigration. He also held a
street dialogue for 15 minutes
with the president of the Cen-
tral Committee of Uruguayan
Jews, Pedro Sclossky, accor-
ding to Seymour Reich, inter-
national president of B'nai
B'rith.
Reich commended the
Jewish community in
Montevideo for its strong
demonstration of concern for
Soviet Jewry. It apparently
prompted the unusual
response by Shevardnadze.
Ranking Soviet officials rarely
if ever have direct personal
contact with human rights
demonstrators.
According to Reich's report,
Shevardnadze assured the
crowd of his "firm resolve to
solve the problem of Soviet
Jewish emigration" and in-
vited Uruguayan Jewish
leaders to visit the Soviet
Union to see for themselves.
He reportedly told Sclossky
that exit visas would be
granted to Jews except in
cases where national security
was involved. Sclossky replied
that the security argument
was invalid and pressed for the
right of Jews to freely practice
their religion and culture in
the USSR.
A special appearance by the Leningrad State Symphony has to*
announced by Judy Drucker. president of the Concert Assocw *
of Greater Miami, a not-for-profit presenting organization- i
Soviet orchestra will perform for one night only on Oct. It <" '*
Miami Beach Theater of the Performing Arts. The orch**tra W
be led by ch lef conductor Alexander Dm itriev (riqht). with /<<""'.
Lcuar Berman (left). For information, the Concert AfoeialW**
Greater Miami. 532-3+91.
m


Friday, October 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
\,\mh. Rahamim Timor, Israel Consul General of Florida,
{presents the Presidents Award to Ocean Bank President Jorge
\fem, center, on behalf of the Greater Miami Israel Bonds
lOrganK'itinn. Ocean Bank was recognized for it support of Israel
I through the Israel Bonds program. Helping make the presenta-
tion u Sabeio Garazi, right, a member of the Cuban Hebrew
\ltrael Bonds Committee.
Loving Kindness Recounts Return
Continued from Page 3-B
featuring an ancient rabbi who
reprimands her, reveals her
feelings of guilt, suggesting
that maybe she has gone too
far in her religious open-
mindedness. However, An-
drea's decision to join the
yeshira is also extremely
radical, and Roiphe does not
create any other character for
the rader to try to emulate
religiously, leaving the reader
wondering what Roiphe's own
religious philosophy is.
Whether intentional or not,
"Loving Kindness" is not a
tendentious novel, and it is up
! to the reader to draw his or
her own conclusions about
what a proper moderate
stance would be.
Perhaps Roiphe put a bit of
Iher own past into the
I character of Annie, since she
was a proud secular Jew.
But she became more religious
and conscious of her heritage,
inspiring her to write,
'"iif rat ion Without
Memory" her non-fiction
book about her own return to a
more religious Judaism.
"Loving Kindness" is absor-
bing, moving and thought-
provoking for Jews and non-
Jews alike. Although on the
surface the topic seems to be
Jewish, in reality, it is univer-
sal. Roiphe speaks to all
parents and children. And
although not everyone is a
parent, each one of us is so-
meone's child.
Stanton Levin
Joins Law Firm
Sianton G. Levin has joined
the downtown Miami Law of-
fice of Blackwell Walker
Fascell and Hoehl as a tax
partner, expanding the firm's
tax and pension practice.
Levin is certified in taxation
by the Florida Bar and is a
member of its tax section.
Levin was assistant treasurer
of the Florida Bar Foundation
from 1984 to 1985
SPECIAL LIMITED PRE-NEED OFFER
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all your I ake-.ul. Elemal I ighl representative today.
In time .. need, one call will handle all the detail*
DADE:
592-0690
BROWARD:
525-9339
Deaths
SHENKIN, Lenore Ehrens, 74, of Miami,
October 11. The Riverside.
C.REENBERG, Mildred, 73, of Miami
Beach, October 11. Riverside.
WEINSTEIN, Charles E., 90, of Miami
Beach, October 7. Services and interment
held at Star of David Memorial Park.
COHEN, Maim, of Miami Beach. Eternal
Light. Interment at Lakeside Memorial
Park.
COLEMAN, Dr. Denzil R., 90, of Biscayne
Park. October 8. Interment at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
rTSHMAN, Hilda, of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert.
POLLOCK, Harry H., 72. of Miami, October
7. Services were held.
l.AZAR. Hyman, of Miami Beach. Rubin-
Zilbert.
EPSTEIN. Max. 76. of Miami. October 9.
Services and interment held at Mt Nabo
Cemetery
SCHWARTZ, Claire (Grandma Kitty). Oc
toiler 4 Services were held.
SEIDEN, Frances, of North Bav Village.
Rulnn Zilbert.
ZATI.IN. Bemice. 81. of North Miami, Oc
tober 10. The Riverside.
BECK. Jane, 87. Services held In Highland
Park. New Jersey.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every Day* Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888

Hi
Bronze
COHEN, Fanny, 93, of North Miami Beach.
October 10. Eternal Light
MELTSNER, Robert. 81. of Miami Beach
Blaaberg Chapel.
ORNSBY. Julia, of Miami Beach. Eternal
Light. Interment at Lake Memorial Park.
SHEVER. Goldye Velick, 84. Services were
held.
SOBEL, Abraham, 88, of Miami, October
10. Services held in Pinelawn, New York.
CHODROFF. Dr. Harry G., 88. of Bay Har
bor, October 7. The Riverside. Interment
at Lakeside Memorial Park.
KURTZBERG. Diana. 74, of North Miami
Beach, Octobers. Levitt-Weinatein. Inter
ment at Lakeside Memorial Park.
DVOSKIN, Tess, 71, of Orlando, formerly
of Hialeah Gardens, October 12. Services
at Mt. Nebo.
GREEN, Lillian, 75. of North Miami Beach,
October 13. Levitt Weinstein.
ARBETTER. Kenneth L.. 83. of North
Miami Beach. October 11. The Riverside.
MANDEL. Tillie. 72. of Miami Beach. Oc-
tober 12. The Riverside Interment at Star
of David Cemetery.
The Board of Directors and the entire organization
of Herut Zionist of Florida mourns the loss
of its Honorary Chairman
HAROLD KONOVER
a man who was a devoted supporter of Israel,
a philanthropist and a true Jew through and through,
and we pray that his soul be given eternal rest.
JOSEPH MORLEY
Secretary-General
AINSLEER. FERDIE
President
-'tlMIM.reenlpeld Rd
Oak Park. Michigan 18237
l.tl.ll 54.11622
Hebrew Memorial Chapel
of (.renter Detroit
Efficient, Reliable. Traditional
with
Dignity and Understanding
('mplt-ti' Shipping Service rruin I lnrid.i \re.i
Your First Call to Us will
______Handle All Funeral Arrangements
When a loss occurs
away from home.
SIMM numivM
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service
DadV County
:>:i2-20!i
Brow.ird ( ountv
) '.: "IRMJ
rtepn enUil
New York:
The Spirit
Of Our Tradition
Lives On.
Dignity, simplicity and << onomy are the mainlines
of Scripture Lakeside Memorial Park upholds //* tm
eUttons of Jewish burial in a beautiful, intelligently
designed setting
Lakeside the only memorial park in toe south that
n as created to meet tlx' needs of every Jewish family.
I'lease call for a tour of
our Garden of Heroes, an
innovation m above-ground
burial modeled after tin1
mausoleums of ancient Israel
W301NW25tb Street
Miami. Florida 33172
I hide (305) 592-0690
Browardt3051525-9339


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 16, 1987
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL ,
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Cue No. 87-40575-26
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
KATHERINE B. ROGERS
Petitioner
and
VERNEL ROGERS
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Vernel Rogers,
Residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I..I
GRAFF. ESQ.. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St. N.M.B. Florida 33162, on
or before October 23. 1987 and file
the original with the clerk of this
court otherwise a default will be
entered against you.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By C.P. COPE LAND
As Deputy Clerk
18007 September 25;
October 2,9,16,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Cue No. 87-41 ltO (12)
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
FLORA A. GRAHAM
Petitioner
and
SILAS GRAHAM
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Silas Graham.
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I. J.
GRAFF. ESQ., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address \s 633 N.E.
167 St. N.M.B. Florida 33162 on or
before October 30, 1987, and file
the original with the clerk of this
court otherwise a default will be
entered against you.
DATED: September 22, 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: F Seidl
As Deputy Clerk
18016 September 25;
October 2, 9, 16,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Cue
No. 87-41189 (12)-FC-
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
ARNETTA M. YOUMANS
Petitioner
and
CONNIELEE E. YOUMANS
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: CONNIELEE E.
YOUMANS,
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I. J.
GRAFF, ESQ., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St. N.M.B. Florida 33162 on or
before October 30, 1987, and file
the original with the clerk of this
court otherwise a default will be
entered against you.
DATED: September 22. 1987
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: F Seidl
As Deputy Clerk
18017 September 26;
* October 2.9.16.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW i
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to.
engage in business under the fie-,
titious name MISS TEE FOR ME
at 18170 N.W. 43rd Avenue, Opa-
Locka. Florida intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,;
Florida.
Jerry Sue Fashions, Inc.
HARVEY D. ROGERS
Attorney for
Jerry Sue Fashions, Inc.
13170 N.W. 43rd Avenue
Opa-Locks, Florida 33054
18003 September 26;
October 2, 9.16.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87 40457
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
RUBEN CAMACHO, husband,
and
CARIDAD CAMACHO, wife.
TO: CARIDAD CAMACHO
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on AR-
THUR H. LIPSON. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 801
Northeast 167 Street, Miami,
Florida 33162. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before October 23,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 17 day of September, 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
18009 September 25;
October 2.9,16, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-40972(27)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
ALBERTO HERNANDEZ-
MENDOZA,
and
GAIL HERNANDEZ
TO: Gail Hernandez
214 SAW 168nd Street
Number 64
Seattle, Washington 98148
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are r.
quired to serve a copy of your writ
ten defense-, if any, to it on Steven
Miller. Esquire, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is FRIED
MAN & KAPLAN, P.A.. 363t;
West Flagier Street, Miami,
Florida 33135. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before October 23,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for he relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 21 day of September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Steven Miller, Esquire
FRIEDMAN & KAPLAN, P.A.
3636 West Flagier Street
Miami, Florida 33136
Attorney for Petitioner
18012 September 25;
t _________October 2.9,16.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SANDY'S PRO-
DUCE at 730 First Street, Miami
Beach, FL intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
SOUTH POINTE PRODUCE, Inc.
730 First Street
Miami Beach, FL 33139
18011 September 26;
___________October 2,9,16,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Lasaro and Elaa Ex-
otic Flowers at 3300 SW 94 Ct.
Miami FL 33165 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Lazaro Martinez and
Elsa Martinez
18029 October 9, 16,23,30, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-41508 16
NOTICE OF ACTION
THE BINGHAMTON SAVINGS
BANK.
Plaintiff
vs.
MARY D. HELMS, et al..
Defendants.
TO: PERPETUAL
SAVINGS & LOAN
ASSOCIATION
229 East Park Avenue
Waterloo, Iowa 50704
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 6 of Block 41. FIRST
ADDITION TO i'AROL CI-
TY GARDENS, according to
a plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 68 at Page 31 of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Esq.. At-
torney for Plaintiff, whose address
is Suite 214. 1570 Madruga
Avenue. Coral Gables, Florida.
33146 on or before October 30th.
1987, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorney or
immediately thereafter otherwise
a default will l>e entered against
you for the relief demanded ir the
complaint.
WITNESS im hand and the seal
of this Court this 2Srd daj of
September, 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
B) JoKh Brands
As Deputy Clerk
18019 October 2.9, 16,28, 1987
Statement of Ownership, Manage-
ment and Circulation (required by
39 USC No, 8886): 1 Title of
publication Jewish Florirlian
(Miami). Publication N
- Date of filing; Sept. 80, :
Freqoenc] of issue Weeklj A
I let published annually:
Annual subscription price:
$9.50. 4 Location of known of
fice of publication: 120 N E 6
Street. Miami. Fla 88182. 6 -
Location of headquarter
publishers: 120 N K 6 Street.
Miami, Fla. 33132. 6 Publisher,
editor, managing editor Fred K
Shochet. 120 N.E. 6 Street, Miami
Fla. 33132. 7 Owner. Fred K.
Shochet, 120 N.E. 6 Street. Miami.
Fla. 33132. 8 Known bon-
dholders, mortgagees or other
security holders holding or owning
1 percent or more of total amount
of bonds, mortgages and other
securities, if any: None. 9 for
completion by non-profit organiza-
tion: None. 10 Extent and
nature of circulation, given in this
order: Average no. copies each
issue during preceding 12 months
followed by actual no. copies single
issue published nearest to filing
date: A) total no. copies printed
(net press run): 26,238, 56.800; B)
paid circulation: 1 sales through
dealers and carriers, street ven-
dors and counter sales, 52. 0; 2
mail subscriptions: 19,412. 55.971;
C) total paid circulation; 19,464^
55,971; D) free distribution by
mail, carrier, or other means,
samples, complimentary and other
free copies, 5,7%, 0; E) total,
distribution 25,269, 65,971; F)
copies not distributed: 1) office
use. left over, unaccounted for,
spoiled after printing, 979, 829; 2)
returns from news agents: 0, 0; G)
Total: 26,238. 66,800.1 certify that
statements made by me above are
correct and complete.
s. Fred K. Shochet, publisher.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name INTERNACIONAL
NORTHVSIA (USA) CORP
DBA INTERNACIONAL NOR
THVSIA at 10650 NW 77th
COURT (UNTT-301) HIALEAH
GARDENS, FLORIDA 33016 in
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
RUDOLF M.
APPENZELLER
PRESIDENT
18033 October 9, 16.23,30. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5650
Division 02
Bar No. 128923
IN RE:ESTATE OF
HEIMAN L. ZEIDMAN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration of
the estate of HEIMAN L. ZEID-
MAN. deceased, File Number
87-5650, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 W. Flagier St., Miami,
Florida 33130. The personal
representative of the estate is
Rhoda Price, whose address is
2301 Collins Ave., Miami Beach,
Florida 33139. The name and ad
dress of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured the security shall
be described. The claimant -hall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persona interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OP THIS
NOTICE, to file any objectioni
they may have that challenge the
validity of the dece.leiit's .ull. the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: (>c-
tober 18, '''
Rhoda Price
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
HEIMAN I. ZEIDMAN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
KWITNEY. KROOP &
SCHEINBERG. P.A.
BY: RICHARD I. KROOP
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 512
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-7575
18045 October 16,23, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SOUTHEAST AC-
COUNTING SERVICES, INC. at
7204 Jacaranda Avenue, Miami
Lakes, Florida 33014 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
JANUSZ
ENTERPRISES. INC.
By: JOSEPH JANUSZ,
President
18040 October 16,23,30;
November 6.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOU8 NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name ROLL PRODUC-
TIONS at 7440 S.W. 74th Court.
Miami, Florida 33143 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
ISMAEL LEDESMA
LORI LEDESMA
Douglas D. Stratton. Esq.
Attorney for LEDESMA
505 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
18038 October 16.23.30;
November 6. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION I
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-41608 CA 16
NOTICE OF ACTION
THE BINGHAMTON SAVINGS
BANK.
Plaintiff
vs.
MARY D. HELMS, et al..
Defendants.
TO: MARY D. HELMS
6800 Peach tree
Industrial Blvd.
Unit AA7
Doraville, GA 30360
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 5 of Block 41. FIRST
ADDITION TO CAROL CI-
TY GARDENS, according to
a plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 68 at Page 31 of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Gitlitz. Esq., At-
torney for Plaintiff, whose address
is Suite 214, 1570 Madruga
Avenue, Coral Gables. Florida,
33146 on or before November
13th, 1987, and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter,
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 8th day of Oc-
tober, 1987
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputv Clerk
18042 October 16,28,80;
November!'. 1987
INTHECIRCl'IT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
C 181 NO. K7-138IS (14)
NOTRE OF ACTION
RESIDENTIAL FINANCIAL
CORP
Plaintiff
v.-
RICARDO A GARCIA, et ux.
et al.,
Defendants.
TO MANUEL GARCIA
Van elect'
Corona, New York 11368
YOU ARK NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 11, Block 1, MIROSA
SUBDIVISION, according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 105. Page 31 of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
November 13th, 1987. and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 8th day of Oc-
tober, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Jennis L. Russell
As Deputy Clerk
18044 October 16,23.30;
November 6,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name LES PETfTES 41ST
STREET at 738 Arthur Godfrey
Road. 41st Street, Miami Beach.
FL 33140 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
ANA ROTHBAUM
SARA ROTHBAUM
MARIA PEREZ
EUGENE J. WEISS
Attorney for LES PETITES 41ST
STREET
18046 October 16,23.30;
November 6,1987
WI THE CIRCUIT COURT nJ
DADE COUNTY, FLOBtn?1'
PROBATE Dlflg*
File Number 87.5173,0,,
Division 01 '
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BERTHA CUBELL,
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
of^ERTH'A'r^Ktr
File Number ST.fSfe
iiig in the Circuit Com LrS
County, Florida. Probw^S^*
tiie address of whicHfe
SnorThStrm' *-*
33130. The names and add*.!
of the personal represent^
the personal representative', T'
torney are set forth below ]
AU interested persons ,
quired to file with this J
WITHIN THREE MONTHS^
THE FIRST PUBLICATION!
THIS NOTICE: (,) j *J
against the estate and (2) uv *
jection by an interested person o.
whom this notice was served thai
challenges the v;Uidity of the wi I
the qualifications of the persoaJ
representative .,.nUe. or jurisdx-1
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEf
TIONS NOT Si. FILED WILLK
FOREVER BARRED,
Publication of this Notice ail
begun on Oel tier 1*.. 1987.
Personal Representatives
PAUL LEVIN and
HERBERT S SHAPIRO
a/oSHAPIRi -ad weil
1666-7Wi Si i nq
Bu
Miami Beach, Florida 33U1
Attorney fol
RepriM! '.i'
HERBERTS SHAPIRO AND WEIL
1666-79th Si -te. 608
Miami Beai 8141
Teleph
18041 '.31*1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOI S NAME LAI
NOTICE IS HEREBY CWI
'hat I :esina|I
engagi n ler t
titiou VCFEL ENT
PRISES I
I
:'::. .-I
Florid;, I
Circuit i
Flori
Date
-
Mil I
HTER
Law off I
P.A
B] Mar P
Attornej for K\ plicant
4(17 Line
Miami Bead Fl
Telephone I
18041 .rl6.i3.il
November 6.1*1
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCHTCOlRTOf
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Civil Action No 87-UW:
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR niSSOLlTP
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ELIZABETH ALVA CHlMAN
Petitioner,
and
RICARDO CHI MAN,
Respondent.
TO RICARDO CHUMAN
121-07 84th Avenue
Kew Gardens. NY 1U15 .
YOU ARE HEREBY WJ
FIED thst sn action for D*
tion of Marriage hs beenwj
against you snd you are raja*
to serve s copy of y"!!^
defenses, if any. to it on M&w
J. ASHER, ESQ.. ^*I
Petitioner, whose a***?* ".
South Bsyshore Drive Sui"M
Hiami, FL 33131. ati.J
original with the clerk of HJJJ
styled court on or w
November 13th. 1*7; other-
default will be entered:!*
for the relief demanded in *"
plaint or petition .^Ji
WITNESS myta^Sil
of said court at Miami, fW-
this7thdsyof(>'iober l*g
RICHARD P. BRINKE*
As Clerk, Circuit Couf
Dade County. Flon
By: John Brand*
As Dep"" Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal) ,*j|
18037 Vt^M
October]
November I


FORECLOSURE SALES-PUBLIC NOTICES
Friday, October 16, 1987/The Jewish Fioridian I'agc 15-B
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
M THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
the ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
| CASE NO. 87-6752
SEC 05
ALLIANCE MORTGAGE COM-
PANY Florid* corporation
fikta CHARTER MORTGAGE
COMPANY.
I Plaintiffis)
AMOS MURRAY, and the
unknown spouse, etc.. et al.,
ilefendanUs)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
I pursuant I" an Order or Final
judgment entered in this case
I now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
I STEPS "f the Dade County Cour-
Ithouse in Miami. Dade County,
I Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M.. on
I the 26th day of October, 1987,
I the following described
I property:
I Lot 19 in Block 9. of REVISED
PLAT OF BLOCKS 2. 3. 4 AND 5
loPARCOLA GARDENS, accor-
I flog to the Plat thereof, as record-
I ,-i in Plat Book 50, at Page 17. of
I the Public Records of Dade Coun-
I iv. Florida
DATED the 7th day of October,
11987.
RICHARD P. RRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
| (Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
I Attorney for Plaintiff
iRosenthal & Yarchin, P.A.
3050 Biscay ric Boulevard
Suite 800
I.Miami. Florida 33137
[ Published 10/9-16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY.FLORIDA
Cue No. 87-42621-FC-14
FAMILY 1)1 VISION
FL BAR 368016
[In re the marriage of
david r. Mcknight
Petitioner
ind
wendy Mcknight
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
[TO: Wendy McKnight,
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
I action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
lire required to serve a copy of
lyour written defenses upon: IJ.
IGRAFF. ESQ. attorney for Pet-
itioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
1167 St., N.M.B. Florida 33162 on
lor before November 6th, 1987 and
jfile the original with the clerk of
[this court otherwise a default will
[be entered against you.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: C. P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
1 October 9, 16.23, 30, 1987
| IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Cue No. 87-41190-FC-12
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
Pin re the marriage of
FLORA A. GRAHAM
Petitioner
and
SILAS GRAHAM
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
Silas Graham,
residence unknown
0U ARE NOTIFIED that an
*^n for dissolution of marriage
1 to take your real property has
iSSr aR*ln8t y" nd you are
. ^ 8erve copy f you*
FAFF, ESQ. attorney for Peti-
*w. whose address is 633 N.E.
"St., N.M.B. Florida 33162 on
L tk November 6th, 1987 and
* wginal with the clerk of
court otherwise a default will
J*"*1 again* you. The real
Py located in Dade County,
"escribed as Lot 12, lit add'n
"onnah Park, PB 33 P 9
* of Dade county (coverg
"Homestead and adjoining
FJed September 30. 1987
MCRARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By-Barbara Rodriguez
18027 a DePuty Clerk
0ctober9. 16,23,30, 1987
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CA8E NO. 87-12255 CA 29
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK,
as Trustee for the Housing
Finance Authority of Dade
County, Florida, under a Trust
Indenture dated as of September
1, 1983,
Plaintiff
vs.
BARBARA ADLER, et al..
Defendants.
TO: MELVIN LEWIS ADLER
and ANITA PERLMAN
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
them, and all parties having
or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the
property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
UNIT No. 101. of CALUSA
CLUB VILLAGE CON-
DOMINIUM BUILDING A.
according to the Declaration
of Condominium thereof, as
recorded in Official Book
11749. at Page 1868, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida. 33146 on or before
October 23, 1987, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 17 day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18006 September 25;
October 2,9,16.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Giotto International
at 4086 NW 66 Avenue, Virginia
Gardens, Fl 33166 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Harold Schuller. Jr.
4086 N.W. 65 Ave.
and
The Pluton Company of Caracas.
Venezuela whose owner is Mr.
Maximo De Paulis. Address of De
Paul is and Pluton is Edificio Ex-
agon, Prolongacion Avenida
Romulo Gallegos, El Marques.
Caracas, Venezuela.
18002 September 25;
October 2,9.16. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name CHILO'S
CAFETERIA at 13766 S.W. 84th
Street. Miami, Florida 33183 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
MARGARITO J. BELLO
13720 S.W. 32nd Street
Miami, Florida 33175
18034 October 9. 16.23,30. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name SOUTH POINTE
POPS in Dade County. Florida, in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
GREATER MIAMI
COMMUNITY
CONCERT BAND. INC..
a Florida non-profit corporation
by: ALLAN TAVSS, President
Michael L. Mann. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
9100 South Dadeland Boulevard
Suite 1103
Miami, Florida 33156
18025 October 2.9. 16.23. 1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISON
CASE NO. 87-16187
SEC. 07
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION. A
United States corporation.,
Plaintiffis)
vg.
LEAVY JOHNS, et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami, Dade County, Florida at
11:00 o'clock A.M.. on the 26th day
of October, 1987. the following
described property:
Lot 24, Block 43, of FIRST ADDI
TION TO MYRTLE GROVE, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 57, Page 2.
of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
The United States of America shall
have the right of redemption pro-
vided by 28 U.S.C. Sec. 2410(c) for
the period provided therein, runn-
ing from the date of the Certificate
of Title issued herein.
DATED the 7th day of October.
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin. P.A.
Suite 800
3050 Biacayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
Published 10/9-16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-39335 CA-25
NOTICE OF ACTION
LINCOLN SERVICE
CORPORATION.
Plaintiff,
va.
RUSSELL P. ROGG,
et ux., et al.,
Defendants
TO: KATHY BLIVEN ROGG
Broadwell Road
Morrisonville,
New York 12962
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 1, Block 5. FIRST ADDI
TION TO HOMESTEAD
LAKE PARK HOMES, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 66.
at Page 22. of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida. 33146 on or before
October 23, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 17 day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18005 Septembr25;
October 2.9, 16,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name YOCUM PRINTING
at number 4155 East 8th Avenue.
Hialeah. Florida, intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, F'lorida.
Y PRINTING CORP.,
a Florida corporation
by: PETER ALVAREZ. President
Michael L. Mann. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
9100 South Dadeland Boulevard
Suite 1103
Miami. Florida 33156
18026 October 2, 9, 16. 23.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-2687
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
REGINA KINAS,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of REGINA
KINAS, deceased, File Number
87-2687(01), is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagier
Street. Miami, Florida 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate is KLARA HERZBERG
CHAVEZ and PAUL KINAS.
whose address is 8985 Bay Drive,
Surfside, Florida 33154. The name
and address ofthe personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
EUGENE J. WEISS, ESQ., 407
Lincoln Road, P.H. NE, Miami, FL
33139.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the derk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: Oc-
tober 9, 1987.
KLARA HERZBERG CHAVEZ
and PAUL KINAS
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
REGINA KINAS
V stfw^rfm tssBSra
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
EUGENE J. WEISS
407 Lincoln Road, PH-N.E.
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Telephone: (305) 534-4721
18035 October 9,16,1987
-----.*-
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name AIR AMBULANCE
AMERICA at number 9100 South
Dadeland Boulevard, Suite 1104,
Miami, Florida intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
AIR AMBULANCE CENTRAL.
INC..
a Florida corporation
by: LARRY BERCU, President
Michael L. Mann. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
9100 South Dadeland Boulevard
Suite 1103
Miami, Florida 33156
18024 October2.9, 16,23. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE FS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name CORAL ANIMAL
CLINIC at 2500 S.W. 107 Avenue,
Store 32, Miami, Florida, 33165 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Guguio E. Rodriguez
18010 September 25;
October 2.9, 16.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nuaiber 87-5666
Divi.ion 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FRANCES J. JOHNSON
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of FRANCES J.
JOHNSON, deceased. File
Number 87-5666. is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is Dade County
Courthouse 73 W. Flagier St.,
Miami, Florida 33130. The per-
sonal representative of the estate
is RONALD JOHNSON, whose ad-
dress is 4987 SW 25 Avenue, Ft.
Lauderdale, Florida. The name
and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the derk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THI8
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: Oc-
tober 9. 1987.
Donald Johnson
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
FRANCES J. JOHNSON
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
ARTHUR H. LIPSON
801 Northeast 167 Street
Miami. Florida 33162
Telephone: 305-653-3030
18032 October 9.16, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87 40466-31
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ROBERT VINES, husband,
and
HONDA M. VINES, wife.
TO: RONDA M. VINES
Star Route 4, Box 505
Pryor, Oklahoma 74361
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on AR-
THUR H. LIPSON, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 801
Northwest 167 Street Mismi, Fla.
33162, and file the original with
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-35769 CA 24
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
as Trustee for the Housing
Finance Authority of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida under a trust indenture
dated as of September 1, 1983,
Plaintiff
vs.
JUANITA GARCIA,
Defendants.
TO: JUANITA GARCIA.
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against JUANITA GAR-
CIA, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title or
interest in the property herein
describsd.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida
lot 2. Block 19, PRINCETO-
MAN SUBDIVISION SEC-
TION FIVE, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 122, at Page 86 of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
November 6th. 1987, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 29th dav of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
18022 October 2,9,16,23, 1987
t-
NOTICE OF ACTION
CON8THUCTTVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Actioa No. 87-4002J FC01
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
No. 003473
IN RE:
BENNETT JOSEPHSON
and
NATHLIE BARRECK
JOSEPHSON
TO: NATHLIE BARRECK
JOSEPHSON
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for the Peti-
tioner, whose address is 2020 N.E.
163rd Street North Miami Beach.
Florida 33161. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before October 23.
1987; otherwise a default will be
.-ntered against you for the relief
lemanded in the complaint or
wtition.
This notice shall be published
>nce each week for four con-
lecutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 16 day of September 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOY BARKAN
2020 N.E. 163rd St.
North Miami Beach. Fl. 33162
(305) 944-9100
18004 September 25,
October 2,9, 16.1987
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 23, 1987; | -
otherwise a default will be entered NOTICE UNDER
against you for the relief demand FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
ed in the complaint or petition. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
WITNESS my hand and the seal that the undersigned, desiring to
of said court at Miami, Florida on engage in business under the fit-
this 17 day of September, 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18008
titious name Jack of Diamond at
S766 N.E. 163 Street, NMH. Fl
38160 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida
Jack St ember
Joshua (i.-tht/er
September 25; Attorney for Jack Steml-er
October2,9,16,1987 18021 Octobers,, it;, a, 1981


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Full Text
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
Friday, October 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
m THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
E ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-6752
err 05
ALLIANCE MORTGAGE COM-
PtNY Florida corporation
f/fc/s CHARTER MORTGAGE
COMPANY.
Plaintiffs)
vs.
AMOS MURRAY, and the
inown spouse, etc., et al.,
[VfendanUs)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
| pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
ril sell t" the highest and best
(udder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami. Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 26th .lay of October. 1987.
Ike following described
property:
Lot 19, in Block 9, of REVISED
PLAT OF BLOCKS 2, 3, 4 AND 5
0FARCOI.A GARDENS, accor-
I ding to the Plat thereof, as record-
ed in Plat Book 50, at Page 17. of
the Public Records of Dade Coun-
| tv. Florida.
DATED the 7th day of October,
I 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
| (Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
I Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin, P.A.
13050 Biscayne Boulevard
I Suite 800
I Miami. Florida 33137
[Pibluhed 10/9-16
LN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT UN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 87-42C21-FC-14
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
I In re the marriage of
david r. Mcknight
Petitioner
and
wendy Mcknight
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
|T0:WendyMcKnight,
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
I action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.J.
GRAFF. ESQ. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St.. N.M.B. Florida 33162 on
I or before November 6th. 1987 and
file the original with the clerk ol
I this court otherwise a default will
I be entered against you.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: C. P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
118028 October 9, 16.23.30.1987
LN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CaaeNo. 87-41190-FC-12
FAMILY DIVISION
, FL BAR 368016
I In re the marriage of
[LORA A. GRAHAM
Petitioner
SILAS GRAHAM
Respondent
Im oN0Tra OF ACTION
|TO: Silas Graham,
residence unknown
'Oil ARE NOTIFIED that an
|*Oon for dissolution of marriage
It^ >"*" rel property has
*n filed against you and you are
^quired to serve a copy of your
Mar,? ndefeMM uPO": I-'-
42*FFLESQ attorney for Peti-
Iie7 c' whoM ddwas is 633 N.E.
r7 St.. N.M.B. Florida 33162 on
iU ,kre Novembr th. 1987 and
m original with the clerk of
, court otherwise a default will
Jeered against you. The real
*ny located in Dade County,
E^edMLotlMstadd'n
"onnah Park. PB 33 P 9
"** of Dade County (covers
Homestead and adjoining
F-uT t)
R^ut*mber30'1987
"'CHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
"y. Barbara Rodriguez
P8027 (wlPUty Clerk
f wooer 9, 16,23.30, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-12255 CA 29
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK,
as Trustee for the Housing
Finance Authority of Dade
County, Florida, under a Trust
Indenture dated as of September
1. 1983,
Plaintiff
vs.
BARBARA ADLER. et al.,
Defendants.
TO: MELVIN LEWIS ADLER
and ANITA PERLMAN
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
them, and all parties having
or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the
property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
UNIT No. 101. of CALUSA
CLUB VILLAGE CON
DOMINIUM BUILDING A.
according to the Declaration
of Condominium thereof, as
recorded in Official Book
11749. at Page 1868. of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida, 33146 on or before
October 23, 1987, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 17 day of
September. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18006 September 25;
October 2.9,16. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Giotto Internationa]
at 4086 NW 65 Avenue. Virginia
Gardens. Fl 33166 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Harold Schuller, Jr.
4086 NW, 65 Ave.
and
The Pluton Company of Caracas.
Venezuela whose owner is Mr.
Maximo De Paulis. Address of De
Paulis and Pluton is Edificio Ex-
agon, Prolongacion Avenida
Romulo Gallegos, El Marques.
Caracas, Venezuela.
18002 September 25;
October 2,9, 16. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie-
titious name CHILO'S
CAFETERIA at 13766 S.W. 84th
Street. Miami. Florida 33183 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
MARGARITO J. BELLO
13720 S.W. 32nd Street
Miami, Florida 33175
18034 October 9. 16, 23.30, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name SOUTH POINTE
POPS in Dade County, Florida, in
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
GREATER MIAMI
COMMUNITY
CONCERT BAND, INC..
a Florida non-profit corporation
by: ALLAN TAVSS, President
Michael L. Mann, Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
9100 South Dadeland Boulevard
Suite 1103
Miami. Florida 33156
18025 October 2. 9. 16.23, 1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISON
CASE NO. 87-16187
SEC. 07
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION. A
United States corporation.,
Plaintifffs)
vs.
LEAVY JOHNS, et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami. Dade County, Florida at
11.00 o'clock A.M., on the 26th day
of October. 1987. the following
described property:
Lot 24, Block 43, of FIRST ADDI
TION TO MYRTLE GROVE, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 57, Page 2.
of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
The United States of America shall
have the right of redemption pro-
vided by 28 U.S.C. Sec. 2410(c) for
the period provided therein, runn-
ing from the date of the Certificate
of Title issued herein.
DATED the 7th day of October,
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin. P.A.
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Published 10/9-16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-39335 CA-25
NOTICE OF ACTION
LINCOLN SERVICE
CORPORATION.
Plaintiff,
vs.
RUSSELL P. ROGG.
et ux., et al.,
Defendants
TO: KATHY BLIVEN ROGG
Broadwell Road
Morrison ville,
New York 12962
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 1, Block 5, FIRST ADDI-
TION TO HOMESTEAD
LAKE PARK HOMES, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 66,
at Page 22. of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
October 23, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 17 day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18006 Septembr25;
October 2,9, 16,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name YOCUM PRINTING
at number 4155 East 8th Avenue,
Hialeah, Florida, intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Y PRINTING CORP..
a Florida corporation
by: PETER ALVAREZ. President
Michael L. Mann, Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
9100 South Dadeland Boulevard
Suite 1103
Miami, Florida 33156
18026 October 2, 9. 16.23.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-2687
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
REGINA KINAS,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of REGINA
KINAS, deceased, File Number
87-2687(01), is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami. Florida 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate is KLARA HERZBERG
CHAVEZ and PAUL KINAS,
whose address is 8985 Bay Drive,
Surfside, Florida 33154. The name
and address ofthe personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
EUGENE J. WEISS, ESQ.. 407
Lincoln Road, PH. NE, Miami, FL
33139.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: Oc-
tober 9. 1987.
KLARA HERZBERG CHAVEZ
and PAUL KINAS
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
REGINA KINAS
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
EUGENE J. WEISS
407 Lincoln Road, PH-N.E.
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Telephone: (305) 534-4721
18035 October 9,16,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name AIR AMBULANCE
AMERICA at number 9100 South
Dadeland Boulevard, Suite 1104.
Miami, Florida intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
AIR AMBULANCE CENTRAL.
INC..
a Florida corporation
by: LARRY BERCU, President
Michael L. Mann, Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
9100 South Dadeland Boulevard
Suite 1103
Miami. Florida 33156
18024 October 2.9. 16,23.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE FS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name CORAL ANIMAL
CLINIC at 2500 S.W. 107 Avenue,
Store 32, Miami, Florida, 33165 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Guguio E. Rodriguez
18010 September 25;
October 2.9, 16.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5666
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FRANCES J. JOHNSON
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of FRANCES J.
JOHNSON, deceased. File
Number 87-5666. is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is Dade County
Courthouse 73 W. Flagler St.,
Miami, Florida 33130. The per-
sonal representative of the estate
is RONALD JOHNSON, whose ad-
dress is 4987 SW 25 Avenue, Ft.
Lauderdale, Florida. The name
and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom s copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE,
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FTL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: Oc-
tober 9, 1987.
Donald Johnson
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
FRANCES J. JOHNSON
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATrVE:
ARTHUR H. LIPSON
801 Northeast 167 Street
Miami, Florida 33162
Telephone: 305-653-3030
18032 October 9.16,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87 40466-31
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ROBERT VINES, husband,
and
RONDA M. VINES, wife.
TO: RONDA M VINES
Star Route 4, Box 505
Pryor. Oklahoma 74361
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on AR-
THUR H. LIPSON, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 801
Northwest 167 Street Miami, Fla.
33162. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 23, 1987; |
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal.
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 17 day of September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18008 September 25;
October 2,9. 16,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-35769 CA 24
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
as Trustee for the Housing
Finance Authority of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida under a trust indenture
dated as of September 1, 1983.
Plaintiff
vs.
JUANITA GARCIA.
Defendants.
TO: JUANITA GARCIA.
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against JUANITA GAR-
CIA, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title or
interest in the property herein
described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
lot 2, Block 19. PRINCETO-
NIAN SUBDIVISION SEC-
TION FIVE, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 122, at Page 86 f
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida. 33146 on or before
November 6th, 1987, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 29th dav of
September. 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
18022 October 2,9.16,23.1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTT
Civil Actioa No. 87-40021 FC01
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
No. 003473
IN RE:
BENNETT JOSEPHSON
and
NATHLIE BARRECK
JOSEPHSON
TO: NATHLIE BARRECK
JOSEPHSON
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN. attorney for the Peti-
tioner, whose address is 2020 N.E.
163rd Street North Miami Beach.
Florida 33161, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before October 23,
1987; otherwise a default will be
.ntered against you for the relief
iemanded in the complaint or
letition.
This notice shall be published
>nce each week for four con-
cutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 16 day of September 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOY BARKAN
2020 N.E. 163rd St.
North Miami Beach, Fl. 33162
(305) 944-9100
18004 September 25;
October 2.9,16. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN
I hat the urwiersigii.il. desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Jack of Diamond at
:!7t>", N.E. 163 Street. NMB. Fl
33160 intends to register said
name with the Clerk ,.|" the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
.lack Stemhcr
Joshua Guilt,
Attorney for .lark Stember
18(121 October 2. '->. Hi. '_>:!, 1987


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Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 16, 1987
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL ,
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CMC No. 87-40575-26
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR .168016
In re the marriage of
CATHERINE B ROGERS
Petitioner
and
VERNEL ROGERS
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Vernel Rogers.
Residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.J.
GRAFF. ESQ.. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St. N.M.B. Florida 33162. on
or before October 23. 1987 and file
the original with the clerk of this
court otherwise a default will be
entered against you.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
18007 September 26;
October 2,9,1.6.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Caae No .87-41190(12)
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
FLORA A GRAHAM
Petitioner
and
SILAS GRAHAM
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Silas Graham.
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
art required to serve a copy of
vritten defenses upon: I. J.
GRAFF. ESQ.. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St. N.M.B. Florida 33162 on or
baton October 30. 1987, and file
the original with the clerk of this
court otherwise a default will be
-.d against vou.
PED: September 22, 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: F Seidl
As Deputy Clerk
IWM September 25:
October 2. 9. 16. 1987

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Caae
No. 87-41189 (12) -FC-
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
ARNETTA M. YOUMANS
Petitioner
and
CONNIELEE E. YOUMANS
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: CONNIELEE E
YOUMANS.
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I. J.
GRAFF. ESQ.. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St N.M.B Florida 33162 on or
before October SO. 1987. and file
the original with the clerk of this
court otherwise s default will be
entered against you.
DATED: September 22. 1987
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: F. Seidl
As Deputy Clerk
18017 September 28
' October 2.9.16.1987
NOTICE UNDER
riCTTTIOUS NAME LAW <
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage m business under the fic-
titious name MISS TEE FOR ME
at 13170 N.W. 43rd Avenue. Ope
Locks, Florida intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Jerry Sue Fashions. Inc.
HARVEY D. ROGERS
Attorney for
Jerry Sue Fashions. Inc.
13170 N.W. 43rd Avenue
Opa Locks. Florida 33054
|JM September 25.
October 2.9.16.1987
US THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Actioa No. 87 40457
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
RUBEN CAMACH0. husband,
and
CARIDAD CAMACHO. wife.
TO: CARIDAD CAMACHO
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on AR-
THUR H. LIPSON. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 801
Northeast 167 Street, Miami,
Florida 33162. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before October 23,
1987, otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 17 day of September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
MM September 25:
" October 2. 9.16. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-40972(27)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
ALBERTO HERNANDEZ
MENDOZA.
and
GAIL HERNANDEZ
TO: Gail Hernandez
2USW 152nd Street
Number *4
Seattle. Washington 98148
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has beer,
file-i agajasl you and you are r.
quired to serve a copy of your writ
ten defense- :f any. to it or. 9
Miller. Esquire, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is FRIED
MAN & KAPLAN. P.A.. 363^
West Flagler Street. Miami
Florida 3313.S and file the original
with the dark of the above styled
court on or before October 23.
a default will be
entered against you for he rein:
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 21 day of September. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By T CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Steven Miller. Esquire
FRIEDMAN A KAPLAN. P.A.
3636 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33135
Attorney for Petitioner
18012 September 25:
_____________October 2.9.16.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GrVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name SANDY'S PRO
DUCE at 730 First Street, Miami
Beach. FL intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
SOUTH POENTE PRODUCE, Inc.
730 First Street
Miami Beach. FL 33139
18011 September25:
___________October 2.9. 16. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the underagned. desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Lasaro and Elsa Ex-
otic Flowers at 3300 SW 94 Ct.
Miami FL 33165 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida
Lasaro Martinez and
Elsa Martinet
180 October 9,16.23.30. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
LN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY'
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-41508 16
NOTICE OF ACTION
THE BINGHAMTON SAVINGS
BANK.
Plaintiff
MARY D. HELMS, etal..
Defendants.
TO: PERPETUAL
SAVINGS & LOAN
ASSOCIATION
229 East Park Avenue
Waterloo. Iowa 50704
VOl ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 5 of Block 41. FIRST
ADDITION TO CAROL CI-
TY GARDENS, according to
a plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 88 M Page 31 of
the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
0B Stuart H. Gitlitz. Esq.. At-
torney for Plaintiff, whose address
is Suite 214, 1670 Madruga
Avenue, ("oral Gables, Florida.
331411 on or before October 30th.
1987, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
ervios on Plaintiffs attorney or
immediately thereafter otherwise
a default will l>e entered against
you for the relief demanded ir the
complaint.
WITNESS m> hand and the seal
of this Court this 23rd dtj of
ber, 1887
Kit HARD 1- BRINKER
Ai Clerk of the Court
B> JoKn Br
.> Clerk
18019 October 2,9 I
Statement of Ownership. Manage-
ment and Circulation (required by
39 USC No. 1 Title of
publication: Jewish Flnridian
' Pnbbtal PS820 2
Date of filing: Sept 38,
Fn
V nuaDy:
Annual -
' :.-.>
'. E. 6
I 5 -
:on of headquart.
pubnsl
I Publisher,
editor, managing edit.
Shochet 120 N E 6 Street, Miami,
Fla 88182 7 owner. Fred K
Shochet. 120 N E I Stra Miami.
Fla. 33132. 8 Known bon
dholders. mortgagees or other
security holders holding or owning
1 percent or more of total amount
of bonds, mortgages and other
securities, if any: None. 9 for
completion by non-profit organiza-
tion: None. 10 Extent and
nature of circulation, given in this
order: Average no. copies each
issue during preceding 12 months
followed by actual no. copies single
issue published nearest to filing
date: A) total no. copies printed
(net press run): 26.238, 56.800; B)
paid circulation: 1 sales through
dealers and carriers, street ven-
dors and counter sales, 52, 0; 2
mail subscriptions: 19,412. 55.971;
C) total paid circulation; 19,464,
56,971; D) free distribution by
mail, carrier, or other means,
samples, complimentary and other
free copies. 5,796. 0; E) total i
distribution 25,259. 55,971; F)
copies not distributed: 1) office
use. left over, unaccounted for.
spoiled after printing, 979. 829; 2)
returns from news agents: 0, 0; G)
Total: 26.238. 56.800.1 certify that
statements made by me above are
correct and complete.
s. Fred K. Shochet, publisher
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titions name INTERNACIONAL
NORTHVSIA (USA) CORP
DBA INTERNACIONAL NOR
THVSIA at 10650 NW 77th
COURT (UNTT-301) HIALEAH
GARDENS. FLORIDA 33016 in
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
RUDOLF M
APPENZELLER-
PRESIDENT
18033 October 9. 16, 23. 30. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5650
Division 02
Bar No. 128923
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HEIMAN L. ZEIDMAN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration of
the estate of HEIMAN L. ZEID-
MAN. deceased. File Number
87-5650, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 W. Flagler St., Miami,
Florida 33130. The personal
representative of the estate is
Rhoda Price, whose address is
2301 Collins Ave.. Miami Beach.
Florida 33139. The name and ad-
dress of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to ma kh per-
sonal repreaental
All persons interted in the
setatl whom a copy of this
Notice ol Administration ha
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
! OF THE FIRS T
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they maj have that I'
validity of : .). the
qualifications of thi
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOTSOFIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
IVate of the first publication of
::r.mistration: Oc-
tober 16, I I
Rhoda Pi
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
HEIMAN L ZEiDMAN
I W-a*sk^tUM1
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
KWITNEY. KROOP &
S( HEINBERC. P.A.
BY: RICHARD I KROOP
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 512
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-7575
18045 October 16. 23. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SOUTHEAST AC
COUNTING SERVICES, rNC. at
7204 Jacaranda Avenue, Miami
Lakes. Florids 33014 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
JANUSZ
ENTERPRISES, INC.
By: JOSEPH JANUSZ.
President
18040 October 16, 23.30;
November 6,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name ROLL PRODUC-
TIONS at 7440 SW. 74th Court.
Miami. Florida 33143 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
ISMAEL LEDESMA
LORI LEDESMA
Douglas D. Stratum. Esq.
Attorney for LEDESMA
505 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
18038 October 16. 23.30
November 6.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION I
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-41508 CA 16
NOTICE OF ACTION
THE BINGHAMTON SAVINGS
BANK.
Plaintiff
vs.
MARY D. HELMS, et al..
Defendants.
TO: MARY D. HELMS
6800 Peachtree
Industrial Blvd.
Unit AA7
Doraville, GA 30360
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 5 of Block 41. FIRST
ADDITION TO CAROL CI
TY GARDENS, according to
a plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 68 at Page 31 of
the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H Gitlitz. Esq.. At-
torney for Plaintiff, whose address
is Suite 214. 1570 Madruga
Avenue. Coral Gables. Florida.
33146 on or before November
13th, 1987, and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter,
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 8th day of Oc-
tober, 1967
RICHARD P BRINKER
A- Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy ("lerk
18042 October 18.28.80;
November 6. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN \NI) FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-43846(14)
NOTICE OF ACTION
RESIDENTIAL FINANCIAL
CORP
Plaintiff
RICARDO A GARCIA, et ux
et al..
Defendants.
TO: MANUEL GARCIA
- Van Claef
Corona. New York 11368
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property;
Lot 11. Block 1. MIROSA
SUBDIVISION, according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 105. Page 31 of
the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida. 33146 on or before
November 13th. 1987, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 8th day of Oc-
tober, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
-By JennisL. Russell
As Deputy Clerk
18044 October 16.28.80;
November 6. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name LES PETITES 41ST
STREET at 738 Arthur Godfrey
Road, 41st Street, Miami Beach,
FL 33140 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
ANA ROTHBAUM
SARA ROTHBAUM
MARIA PEREZ
EUGENE J. WEISS
Attorney for LES PETITES 41ST
STREET
18046 October 16.23. 30;
November 6. 1987
UI THE CIRCUIT COURT aJ
DADE COUNTY. FU)Jm?8
PROBATE m\SK
RI.Nn.ber87.5nS,
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BERTHA CL'BELL,
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
File Number S^ofc
dingintheCircmtCounLlK
County. Florida. Probate^
tte address of whicHfe
Flagler Street, ^ W
WIJ0. The names and addn~
of the personal represenuZaJ
the personal representative'.
torney are set forth below i
All interested persons ve -.
quired to file with H^Z2\
WITHIN THREE MONTffiTS
THE FIRST PUBLICATION J
THIS NOTICE: (1) all 1*
against the estate and (2) any *
jection by an interested person
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the rf
the qualifications of the p*,,^
representative torn, or junsdjt-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS and QBJEf 1
TIONS NOT SAILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication .if this Notice hail
begun or. i
Personal Kep-.senutives
PAUL LEVIN'and
HERBERT S SHAPIRO
c/o SHAPIRo AND WEIL
168.,
Miami Bi M8SI4I
Attorn.;. '
Repreaental
HERBERT S -HAI'IRO
SHAPIRO AND WEIL
1666-79th S- v,..608
Miami Beach, Fl ndi S3 Hi
Telephoni
1*041 '.3.1917'
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIiii S NAMEU1
NOTICE IS HEREBY ;ives|
that the ill :esirugal
I
I
PRISI -
'

Circuit
Flor
"i

MICHAEL FELLNEI
IRVIN I'M'HTER
Law Hff:. |
I' A

4n7 I. te 10*
Miami Beach Fl
Telephon.
18047 .tI6.23.RI
"!*r6.19B|
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCT!\E SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHF. CIRCUTCOl'BTOf
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOE
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Civil Action No 87-43659*
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ELIZABETH ALVA CHI MAN
Petitioner,
and
RICARDO CHUMAN.
Respondent.
TO: RICARDO CHUMAN
121-07 84th Avenue
Kew Gardens. NY 11415
YOU ARE HEREBY WN
FIED that an acton for Da*
tion of Marriage hat **JtA
against you snd you are reqw
to serve a copy of your *nfl-
defenses, if any. to it on MB-
J. ASHER. ESQ.. -"n*JZ
Petitioner, whose dd,?s,"y1
South Bayshore Drive. Sa*
Miami. FL 33131. and *
original with the clerk of the "J"
styled court on or
befor*
November 13th, 1987: others
default will be entered aj-
for the relief demanded *
plaint or petition .J,
WITNESS my hand
of said court at Miami. rw".
this7thdayof(Vtoberl*'
RICHARD P BRINKS*
As Clerk, CrcuijC^
Date County, flora*
By: John Bran*
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seall *%\
18037 ^U,*:,6 1*
^immmmm^^.