The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03062

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
eJewislb Floridiam.
*2H?/n
.60-No. 41
/A**'
Miami Friday, October 9,1987
Price SO Cents
Nudel:
s/HV 'I Am No Longer Refusenik'
[{
I'l


^remarkable photograph, taken from the
ed Jewish Appeal Archives, shows white-
Med British soldiers on board the ship
M Of it was refused admission to the port
hifa September 28, 19U7. A re-enactment
' event was held vX Israel on the UOth an-
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) "I
am not a refusenik anymore,"
a joyous Ida Nudel told
reporters in a telephone inter-
view from Moscow Monday.
But she does not believe her
exit visa signals a new policy
of the Kremlin toward Soviet
Jews.
Nudel, 56, was told by the
Soviet authorities only last
Friday that she will be allowed
to leave the USSR to join her
sister, Elena Fridman, in
Israel, whom she has not seen
for 16 years. Her name
reportedly headed the list of
former Prisoners of Cons-
cience which Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres gave Soviet
Foreign Minister Eduard
Shevardnadze when they met
in New York Sept. 23.
But she feels the Soviets are
using her and other prominent
refuseniks recently granted
exit visas to achieve certain
diplomatic goals and improve
their image. "In ancient times,
the Pharaohs used to please
the chiefs of neighboring coun-
tries with very exotic things,"
Nudel said. "I feel that I am a
white crocodile. I was used to
please Mr. Reagan and Mr.
Shultz before a meeting of the
superpowers."
Observers here tended to
agree. They suggested Nudel
was granted her visa on the
eve of Yom Kippur because of
the added public relations im-
pact. Nudel, an engineer-
economist, was in Moscow for
a hearing for permission to
resume residence there after
being forced for five years to
live in the Moldavian city of
Bendery. Before that she lived
in exile in Siberia from
1978-82.
But instead of getting her
Moscow residency permit, she
Continued on Page 16-A
IDF Divided
On 'Purity Of Weapons'
niversary of the denial of landing rights in
then-Palestine to 4,515 Holocaust survivors.
Three Jews were killed and 28 injured before
the British succeeded in returning the refugees
from Europe's DP (Displaced Person) camps
to occupied Germany. See Story, Page 5-A.
TEL AVIV A fierce
debate has broken out in the
top echelons of the Israeli Ar-
my over the controversial
policy known as "purity of
weapons."
The policy, which has been
unofficially observed by the
Army for many years,
stipulates that Israeli soldiers
should risk their lives rather
than accidentally endanger
enemy civilians. It also man-
dates that Israel refrain from
bombing terrorist targets
located close to civilian areas.
lardianship Program:
ade County Praised Amidst National Scrutiny
The policy first sparked
public criticism during the
Lebanon War, when Israeli
troops were ordered to go
from house to house hunting
terrorists, which resulted in a
high casualty toll.
Israel's bombing raids on
PLO targets in Sidon have
sparked a new debate on the
subject. Some civilians were
accidentally killed in the raid,
prompting Major-General
Moshe Bar Kochba to complain
Continued on Page 14-A
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
i JnmaK Fhridian St^ff Writer
In an aging America, as
lardianship programs na-
sally come under closer
natiny and outright attack,
de County has a program
at has been hailed as a model
I care for the elderly person
Po has been ruled legally
Competent.
What makes this program
unique, is that it permits an
agency to handle everything
from a person's medical needs
to legal affairs. This required a
change of state law in 1973.
Previously only a bank or an
individual not an agency
could serve as a court-
appointed guardian.
IN DADE COUNTY, the
Jewish Family Services (JFS)
recognized a critical need in
care for the incompetent elder-
ly and established a program
in 1974 ago that spun-off to
become the non-sectarian
Guardianship Program of
Dade County which serves
residents aged 60 or over.
Although the agency does
everything from sending a
card to an elderly ward on his
birthday to providing
transportation to a doctor's
appointment, the Guardian-
ship Program should only be
viewed as a "last resort," ac-
cording to program's ex-
ecutive director, Frank G.
Repensek.
"It is, in fact, a very severe
Continued on Page IB
Austria: U.S. Envoy Assails Anti-Semitism
VIENNA U.S. Am-
dor Ronald Lauder said
' an interview published here
"at Austrians silently en-
gaged anti-Semitism by
weeping it under the carpet.
I Lauder, expected to leave
Ff Pst this autumn, is himseli
fwish and told Profil
[agazine that he and his fami-
7 were told by a Viennese
Pop owner that Jews were not
welcome on the premises.
He said the incident occur-
red in June 1986, shortly after
he took up the job of American
envoy to the Austrian capital.
"What has most troubled
me, is not the fact that there
are Austrian anti-Semites, but
that too many people in this
country ignore anti-Semitism
and are therefore inclined to
sweep things under the carpet
and, through this attitude,
silently encourage anti-
Semitism," the weekly quoted
him as saying.
Leaders of Vienna's Jewish
community have reported a
rise in anti-Semitism since the
U.S. Justice Department
decided in April to ban Presi-
dent Kurt Waldheim from en-
try because of hsi war record.
The Ambassador said
Waldheim could contest the
U.S. decision in court but was
apparently unwilling to do so.
Waldheim, a former UN
Secretary General, told Profil
last week that there was no
possibility of appealing the
decision.
Lauder, who will be replaced
by former Time magazine
Continued on Page 2-A


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 9, 1987
The Jews Of Argentina:
By AVIVA CANTOR
(Part Two In A Series)
BUENOS AIRES "The
Mexicans came from the
Aztecs, the Peruvians came
from the Incas and the
Argentineans came from the
boats." This popular saying
among Argentinians sum-
marizes the reality of the im-
migrant ancestry of the vast
number of the current popula-
tion of 28 million, of which one
percent are Jews.
Of the estimated 250,000
Jews in Argentina "we have
no statistics," is a phrase often
heard in the country about
230,000 are concentrated in
the capital city of Buenos
Aires, home to about one-third
of Argentina's citizens.
The second largest Jewish
communities, Cordoba and
Rosario, each has 10,000 Jews,
followed by Tucuman, with
4,000; Mendoza with 2,000;
and Mar del Plata and Salta,
with 1,000 each. The rest are
scattered, many of them in the
towns near where the Jewish
agricultural colonies establish-
ed by Baron de Hirsch in the
1880's flourished until the
mid-1920's.
"The history of the com-
munity is secular and leftist,"
said Joshua Flidel, director of
ORT in Latin America, at a
meeting with a delegation of
North American journalists
and communal leaders who
recently visited the country.
Jewish immigrants were ac-
tive in the Socialist, Anarchist
and liberal movements of the
early part of the 20th century.
The grandparents of WIZO
president Amalia Polack who
settled in Rosario were among
the founders of both the
Socialist and the Radical Par-
ty. Moses Levinson was an im-
portant philosopher and leader
in the old Radical Civic Union
party in the 1940's and 1950's.
Many immigrants were fer-
vent Zionists who saw the
country "as only a stepping
stone" to Palestine, Polack
told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency. "Jews who came here
chose Zionism in place of
religion," added Alberto
Senderey, executive director
of the Hebraica Community
Center. "Part of that
mythology is to make aliya."
K Relationship With Israel
~ Argentine Jewry's relation-
ship with Israel is primarily
-CMMM
Ptona: (306) 171-4806
Published weekly every Friday
few* 1927 by TIM Jewish Rori
dun. Offloe and Plant 120 N.E.
th St, Miami, FU 33132. Phone
(308| 3734005.
Second CUm Postage paW In
Miami, Fla. U8PS 278320.
Poetmester: Form 3870 return to
Jewish Florldlan. P.O. Box
013073. Miami, Fla 33101.
Tho Jawith Ftoridian does not
ouarantaa Mm Keehruth of tha
merchandise advertised In its
cofufnns.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: In ad
vanca (Local Araa) On* Yaar
$8 50 (Anniversary Special) Out
of town, country, upon raquaat.
By Mall $1.48 par copy.
Not Strangers In The Land
cultural, philanthropic and
sentimental. In Cordoba, for
example, the Jewish communi-
ty took great pride in the fact
that the city dedicated an
"Israel Plaza" with a large
menorah in the middle of it in
May. Aliya runs about 1,000 a
year, according to Israeli Am-
bassador Efraim Tari.
Activities in support of
Israel are the main agenda of
B'nai B'rith, with 800
members, 80 percent of them
in Buenos Aires, and WIZO.
Founded in Argentina in 1926,
WIZO has about 20,000
members, many of them in the
smaller cities "we have
some chapters with three peo-
ple," Polack told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency. Though
primarily involved with its 12
projects in Israel, WIZO also
participates in philanthropic
endeavors to help poor
Argentinians.
Possibly the most
quintessential^ Argentine
Jewish institutions is the
Hebraica Community Center.
Located in a 14-story building
in the middle of town a short
walk from the charming
Claridge Hotel where
members of the North
American delegation stayed,
the Hebraica is open and jump-
ing with activities for 3,000
people from 7 to 1 a.m. The
Hebraica, said Senderey, was
founded by free-thinkers.
Begun 60 years ago, its by-
laws forbad the introduction of
politics (by which they meant
Zionism) and religion. The
politics clause was repealed;
the religion clause was not.
"The thrust is secular and
pluralistic," said Hebraica
president Mario Trumper.
Every Jewish holiday is
celebrated, and the center is
open for activities on the Sab-
bath. Senderey sees the
Hebraica as a kind of cultural
"supermarket" where people
who "want to connect with
Judaism come for a day-to-day
experience which covers the
whole span of life."
The center gears itself to
serve three prime constituen-
cies: the 2-12-year-old group,
teenagers, and adults. Its feast
of cultural activities for its
20,000 dues-paying members
(and anyone else who wishes to
attend them at nominal cost)
ranges from films, to theater,
a choir, lectures and forums,
an open university for adults
Envoy Assails
Anti-Semitism
Continued from Page 1-A
editor-in-chief Henry Grun-
wald, also criticized Austrians
for allowing the Deputy Mayor
of Linz, Carl Hoedl, to remain
in office after comparing the
WJC's accusations against
Waldheim to the Jews' treat-
ment of Christ 2,000 years
ago.
"A person like Linz Deputy
Mayor Hoedl would not have
been capable of remaining
Deputy Mayor of Philadelphia
or any other city in the United
States. I believe he could not
have stayed in office in any
other city in the West."
The slogan "Death to the Jews" smeared on The Hebrew inscription reads, nnijiMM
the walls of a Buenos Aires synagogue in 1961. "And thou shall love they neighbor at (Ape?
taught by professors at Argen-
tine universities, and a
40,000-volume library. The
cultural exhibits in the lobby
travel to municipalities,
schools and other non-Jewish
institutions.
Hebraica places most of its
efforts on Jews in their teens
"when most of Jewish identity
is formed," said Senderey. In
addition to its Amos High
School, it runs groups for
teenagers led by college-age
madrichim (counselors) train-
ed by Hebraica, one for every
20 youths, and a supplemen-
tary two-afternoon-a-week
school for children in non-
Jewish primary schools. At 17,
the young people spend two
months in Israel's Carmiel,
where each pupil is "adopted"
by a local family.
A Major Success Story
The Hebraica which
belongs to the Maccabi net-
work of 60 community centers
in Argentina also has a
country club of 350 acres about
a half-hour drive from town.
Some 500 families own chalets
and condos there, with a dor-
mitory for the 300 non-
residents who stay over for en-
tire weekends. Between
3-4,000 people, including
groups of teenagers, travel
there on Saturdays and Sun-
days to take part in a variety
of cultural and sports
activities.
"When the community club
trend started in Argentina 12
years ago, we had to react or
Jews would join the non-
Jewish clubs," said Senderey.
The country club attracts
couples with children who
want their offspring to par-
ticipate in Jewish activities
and to meet other young Jews.
There is no synagogue or
other religious activity at the
club because the Hebraica
respects the secular character
of its members and does not
want to confront the problem
of what religious movement to
give space to, said Trumper. It
welcomes mixed couples who
"understand that when they
choose to come here they are
making a decision on the
education of their children "
Taking Public Stands
Hebraica leaders believe
that addressing all the pro-
blems of Argentina and of the
world in the free atmosphere
of their forums and taking
strong stands in support of
human rights and against anti-
Semitism has a strong educa-
tional impact upon the youth.
They pointed to the fact that
when Msgr. Antonio Plaza, the
former Archbishop of La
Plata, charged in March 1987
that "the government is full of
Jews" (who) "made us
squander three years discuss-
ing (human rights). ..
the Hebraica took out a
newspaper ad calling Plaza
"one of the originators of
Argentine fascism." The next
day. said Trumper, President
Alfonsin used the same
arguments in a speech.
A second example was the
action of the Hebraica in
March 1986, when the
Peronist CGT (General Con-
federation of Labor) union
leader Saul Ubaldini respond-
ed at a televised rally ti|
shout of "Jews soni
whores" by saying that "t
are black sheep in
group." The Hebraica -i
well as B'nai B'rith -tooki
a strong ad in the news;
Hebraica also took out i
newspaper ad when there i
a bomb in the center's!
seven years ago during
reign of the junta.
"If you want to
children to be proud Jews, i
have to (take such actioij
without fear," Senderey
the North America!
delegation.
Editor's Note: Writer kt\
Cantor traveled tkr
Argentina with a delegati\
North American Jeuwj
nalists and communal I
Her series on the 3n\
Argentina continues i
edition. For a related tf
on South Florida'* ifl
nean/Jewuth cmmunih/.
page 1-B.
i
TMt FIKST...
'AND STILL TWf FINtST
S5ou.tlxLte "Xbwers
Hotels & Apartments
"Waterfront Rental Apartments"
900 West Ave. On The Bay
Miami Beach, Fla.
672-2412
1 2 Vr. Lhhi Available Pool & Shutnetward
Mario* and FlshlnfPler Restaurant *
Planned social activities Lounoa
to nil your hours happily
FURN. UNFURN. EFRCIENCY
FURN. & UN FURN. 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH
Beauty Parlor on Premises
\f
i


wm News -
Koundup
U.S.-Israeli Trade Conference
WASHINGTON, D.C. A special U.S.-Israel trade con-
ference will convene in Washington D.C, Oct. 18-20, where
American and Israeli business and political leaders will ex-
amine the advantages afforded by the unique U.S -Israel
Free Trade Area (FTA) Agreement.
I The conference, entitled "The Free Trade Agreement: A
[Model for Cooperation A Partnership for Growth," is co-
[hosted by U.S. Trade Representative Clayton Yeutter and
[Israel's Minister for Industry and Trade Ariel Sharon. The
[conference is the first of its kind in the United States.
ADL Lambaste U.S. Dept of Ed.
NEW YORK, NY The Anti-Defamation League of
fe'nai B'rith has criticized a U.S. Department of Education
>eview panel for saying that a nationwide Holocaust
teaching curriculum is unbalanced because it does not pre-
sent the Nazi point of view and is inspired by "anti-
Christian" ties. In a letter to Secretary of Education
William J. Bennett, ADL national director Abraham H.
^oxman asserted that it is proper to ask how Nazism took
^ver Germany and how the assault on the Jews became cen-
tral to its policies. "But to suggest that the Nazis' program
Is a legitimate view is another matter altogether, he said.
Responding to another criticism of the panel that the
program has too much emotional impact on students Mr.
oxman declared:
"Students should not, of course, be asked to sound the
iepths of human emotion. But a study of Nazi methods of
nass annihilation can yield many important historical in-
sights. It can show how a nation s laws, its scientific elite
and its religious ideals the hallmarks of Western civiliza-
tion can be deployed to kill purposefully and without
remorse."
Anti-Semite Law Possible
NEW YORK Dr. Alois Mock, Vice-Chancellor and
foreign Minister of Austria, condemned the Nazi
lolocaust "as the most hideous and abominable crime,"
fcnd pledged that Austria's Second Republic "will do
everything necessary to prevent that demoniacal cancer
T-om happening again."
Mock, who is also chairman of the Austrian Peoples Par-
ly (OVP), declared that he supports a proposed law in the
Austrian Parliament outlawing anti-Semitism as a criminal
kffense. The legislation has just been approved by a
Parliamentary committee, and will shortly come before the
Hill parliament for adoption.
Lauder To Get Javits Award
WASHINGTON B'nai B'rith announced the establish-
ient of the Jacob K. Javits Leadership Award. The award
honors those who exemplify, in spirit and deed, the high
ieals and moral vision that are the legacy of Jacob Javits,
he late senator from New York. The first recipient of the
iward will be Ronald S. Lauder U.S. Ambassador to
Austria. The presentation to Ambassador Lauder will be
nade Oct. 29 at the Grand Hyatt Hotel in New York City.
Israel Out Of Meet
TORONTO (JTA) Israel has been excluded from a
PCapitals of the World" conference to be held in Ottawa
lext month at which terrorism against capital cities will be
pi the agenda. Libya was among the nations invited.
A spokesman for Ottawa Mayor James Durell who is
Organizing the conference said an invitation had been sent
1 Mayor Shlomo Lahat of Tel Aviv but was returned with
note stating that Israel's capital is Jerusalem. Canada
Poes not recognize the status of Jerusalem as Israel's
apital.
Graham and Chiles Oppose Sale
WASHINGTON Senators Bob Graham and Lawton
whiles were among those who urged the Reagan Ad-
ministration to drop an expected $1.4 billion arms sale to
saudi Arabia. Graham, Chiles and 60 other senators signed
l letter to the president saying the sale cannot be justified.
The senators' letter to the White House said the Saudis
had not made substantial efforts to help the peace process,
while continuing to fund the Palestine Liberation Organiza-
Jon (PLO).
Israeli Ties To Chinese And Soviets?
UNITED NATIONS In his appeal to the USSR and
;hina, both strong supporters of the Arab cause, Israeli
foreign Minister Shimon Peres said that to establish
wplomatic relations with Israel was a way to advance the
wise of an international peace conference.
To both Moscow and Beijing, we say candidly:
Jiplomatic relations are not the price for peace but a chan-
' for communications," Peres declared.
Friday, October 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A "
Orovitz Named Managing Editor
Norma A. Orovitz has been
named managing editor of The
Jewish Floridian, according to
its editor and publisher, Fred
K. Shochet.
Orovitz returns to The Flori-
dian after a hiatus of 10 years.
Since her original tenure as a
feature writer, Orovitz has
been a contributing editor at
Miami Magazine (now
Miami/South Florida
Magazine), a feature editor at
On Design magazine, and a
consumer columnist for The
Miami News.
In addition, she co-produced
and field-hosted consumer
segments for WTVJ's AM
South Florida, produced the
consumer and shopping pro-
grams for Viewtron-Viewdata
Corporation of America. The
author of three books, in-
cluding "Smart Shopping on
Florida's Gold Coast, she has
written for The Miami Herald,
The Los Angeles Times and The
Ft. Lauderdale News and Sun
Sentinel.
An honors graduate of the
University of Miami, Orovitz is
Norma A. Orovitz
active in civic and communal
circles. She serves as president
of the Southeast Region of the
American Jewish Congress,
vice-president of Temple Israel
of Greater Miami, immediate
past chairman of the Presi-
dent's Advisory Council on
Jewish Studies at Barry
University, and is a member of
The Founders of Mt. Sinai
Medical Center. The founder
of Citizens' Crime Watch for
her Beach community, Orovitz
was nominated as Outstan-
ding Young Woman in Dade
County."
Norma A. Orovitz, 44, and a
South Florida resident since
1961, is married and the
mother of three daughters.
Le Pen Rating Declines In Poll
PARIS (JTA) The popularity of Jean Marie Le Pen,
leader of the extreme rightwing National Front, plum-
meted by 60 percent according to a poll published in Le
Figaro, apparently in reaction to his public expression of
doubt that the Nazi gas chambers ever existed and his
denigration of the Holocaust as a "mere detail" in the
history of World War II.
The Private Bank has big plans
for the small business.
At Northern Trust Bank, we are not so much interested in the size of your company as in the scope
of your ambitions. So we welcome the opportunity to help your business grow.
The Private Banker gives you the personal attention you need. A program is tailored to enhance the
financial profile of both you and your company. Our business-oriented services are at your command.
Such as, personal and commercial lines of credit, real estate financing, investment opportunities,
employee benefit plans, and many others. And, of course, we also serve all your everyday hanking needs.
So bring your vision to The Private Bank.
Well help your company gnmintoit. NortheiTl TVllSV Bailk-
Northern Trust Bank of Florida "00 Brickell
Avenue, Miami, Telephone 372 1000.
Ask for David Highmark. .
The Primtr Bank
\iirlhmi lhi.slliinkqfflorUa WunuiamiSurthcni This!njFinn/lalnqmivlumair
siihxnlian<'.\ nfSurllimi Tt-usl (

Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 9, 1987
Ida Nudel Free But Others
Remain In Soviet Captivity
Welcome indeed was the news that Ida
Nudel has been granted permission to leave
the Soviet Union after 16 years waiting to
emigrate.
Encouraging also is the release of other
refuseniks over the past several weeks.
But the news is far from all good.
Moscow claims that there are at most
15,000 cases waiting for determination
that is the number of Jews who have asked
for exit visas, presumably to Israel.
Jewish and non-Jewish sources alike place
the actual number at many times that
figure.
In addition, such prominent Jews as
Vladimir Slepak, Aleksander Yoffe, Naum
S. Meiman and Valery N. Soifer are among
those still waiting for approval to leave the
USSR.
Ida Nudel, who spent four years in
Siberian exile for hanging protest posters
outside her window, received the gratifying
news just hours before the beginning of Yom
Kippur.
Her sister, Yelena Friedman, an official of
Na'amat in Israel, has led an unrelenting,
global campaign to free Ida Nudel.
Those efforts paid off, but the job of world
Jewry is to place the matter of emigration of
our brothers and sisters in the Soviet high
on the agenda of every national and interna-
tional forum.
A Salute To Our Senators
Senators Bob Graham and Lawton Chiles,
who are bringing favorable attention to
Florida in their increasingly visible roles in
the Congress, deserve special praise for two
recent actions.
Graham and Chiles voted to allow
members of the military to wear neat and
conservative religious apparel such as yar-
mulkes. Closeness of the count, 55 to 42,
made the support of Southern Democrats
decisive.
"This is a victory for religious freedom,"
Graham correctly commented after he and
his colleague helped steer the amendment
introduced by Sen. Frank Lautenberg to
passage.
Both Florida members of the Senate also
were among the 62 who signed a letter to
the President urging the Reagan Ad-
ministration to drop a proposed $1.4 billion
arms sale to Saudi Arabia.
"We do not believe it wise to reward Saudi
behavior, which has so frequently harmed
U.S. interests, with another sale of
sophicated arms," Chiles and Graham said
in their letter.
On both counts, each merits recognition.
Celebrate Newspaper Week
As National Newspaper Week draws to a
close, Florida still faces a challenge to the in-
dependence of its press in the form of the
state sales tax on advertising.
Already Florida's newspapers and
other media have suffered financial losses
because ours is the only one of 50 states to
impose such a tax.
Whether by repeal or revision the
legislature should heed promptly the
justified shouts of protest coming from
every segment of the population.
It is inappropriate for members of the
Florida House and Senate to join in wishing
this and the hundreds of other daily and
weekly newspapers in the state well, and at
the same time fail to act on a patently unfair
measure.
The newspape redates our Declaration
of Independence and Constitution in the
United States of America's march towards
>JT\<>
nationhood.
Many of our Founding Fathers came from
among the ranks of Colonial editors and
publishers.
Newspapers have not only survived the
advent of radio, television and of other elec-
tronic means of communication, but have
prospered along with their competitors.
Laser photographs, satellite transmissions
and international telephone lines make it
possible for The Jewish Floridian to provide
its readers with news which happened only
hours before press time.
But our ability to further enhance our
primary mission of offering our readers cur-
rent information in both our news and
advertising columns is made more difficult
by this ill-considered tax.
It's high time to bid the tax on advertising
farewell.
Miami Latin Jewry Flourishes
South Florida Jewry continues its rapid
development as an international community.
Right-Wing Zealot:
Many Latin American nations a
represented in an ongoing influx of M
who have left Central or South America!!
a variety of political, economic, religiousij
sociological reasons.
Argentinean and Nicaraguan Jews anil
the forefront of those who have greatly il
creased the Hispanic Jewish communityh
Greater Miami.
These arrivals promise to match tkl
dedication and determination of Cuhl
Jewry, which has emerged into an effectml
community during the past quarter of {
century.
It is only natural that Greater Miami -I
the gateway to Latin America for tradeaKl
commerce should be a magnet for Jeiil
who bring with them a rich heritage and &}
tense pride in our faith.
The conclusion of Sukkot. and hence tkl
High Holy Days, offers us a chance to refwl
on the opportunities and challenges wiid|
our neighbors bring with them.
Holocaust Material Is Anti-Christian
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
A right-wing ideologue
employed by the U.S. Depart-
ment of Education attempted
to build a case against "Facing
History and Ourselves," the
highly regarded Holocaust
education organization and
program. She not only failed,
but actually enhanced the
stature of the program.
In her zeal, Christine Price,
assigned to help evaluate the
Holocaust teaching organiza-
tion and its materials, con-
demned the program as anti-
Christian and accused it of fail-
ing to present the Nazi and Ku
Klux Klan point of view.
Before deciding to give the
project a score of 40 out of 100,
she condemned it for being
anti-war and anti-hunting. To
top off her insipid judgments,
she branded as "leftist" the
New York Times foreign cor-
respondent, Flora Lewis, who*
was quoted by "Facing
History and Ourselves."
Price and a second Educa-
tion Department staff person,
Shirley Curry, who gave Price
the assignment, both are said
to be enthusiastic true
believers in the extreme right
views set forth by Phyllis
Schlafly, leader of the Eagle
Forum. In her book, "Child
Abuse in the Classroom,"
Schlafly names "Facing
History" as one of the abuse*
"It is," she wrote,
organization deceitful I
design."
Apparently unmindful ofbff
own efforts to mold opuuj
she goes on to upbraid "rm
History" for trying to "cW
young people's attitudes/
political and social issues.
For one to grasp the depjj
Schlafly's alarming pn**"?
tions for the proper indoctrw
tion of impressionableiH
it is essential to note JJ J
urges children to '1***
nuclear bomb as a.impJg
gift from a wise and wonderw
Continued on Pe ,J-A
Fred K Shochet
Editor and Publisher
eJewish Floridian
Norma A. Orovitz
Managing Editor
Suzanne Shochet
Executive Editc
William T Brewer
Director ot Operations
Joan C Teglas
Director ol Advertising
Friday, October 9,1987
Volume 60
16TISHBI5748
Number"


WlkfU/rt GhsttO.' Friday, October 9,1387/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Plan To Rebuild Will Bury Past And Conscience
By
[LFRIED F. SCHOELLER
Suddeuttcke Zeitung
decision by Frankfurt
iril to build a municipal
[ter over the ruins of part of
old Jewish ghetto has
gashed a bitter dispute.
he city's mayor, Wolfram
kck, heads the Christian
nocratic-dominated council
made the decision to
|d. A year ago, Brack wrote
a book that "historic
numents are nothing other
In primary sources of
lory. They are not stored in
lives or museum pieces per
[their immovable place for
time is where they original-
tood."
Jot surprisingly, Brack has
i doing all he can to disown
I statement.
lis decision to go ahead on
riK-platz and build has
eashed a storm of protest
less tempestuous than the
j>ute three years ago over
[production of a Fassbinder
criticized as anti-Semitic.
he opposition, far from be-
I party based, is growing by
I day.
he conservation lobby says
ruins are the most impor-
testimony of past Jewish
in Germany and, as such,
| indispensable.
ae enough, little is left of
Jewish past. After the
rember 1938 pogroms, 280
?ogues were burnt to the
tund, including the
leplatz synagogue, and a
her 76 destroyed in other
5.
he ruins excavation has
light to light are unques-
ably important, differing
i Christian ruins, of which
^e are plenty.
he council has ruled out a
se for thought and is deter-
1 to keep to the constrac-
schedule. The main walls
Ian administrative block are
lady under construction
1 earthmoving equipment is
|work on the adjacent ex-
ation site.
ter several hasty and ill-
Iceived proposals Mayor
kk has outlined to Hilmar
The Judengasse in Frankfurt, depicting Jews
being massacred in 16 U ... The German
Tribune
Hoffmann, head of the
municipal arts department, a
fresh compromise he says is
final. There is to be no further
discussion on the subject.
It is the fifth compromise,
and in principle no different
from the others in envisaging
the preservation of a few
fragments to be arranged in a
museum display.
The only new ideas are a few
extra foundations to be includ-
ed and a few worlds of descrip-
tion for the museum site to be
incorporated in the service
center.
The latest plan provides for
the preservation of five of the
16 foundations. They are all
that is left of houses that once
were known as the Ram, the
Lamb, the Stone House, the
Sparrowhawk and the Her-
mitage, or Hot Baths.
Jewish ritual baths are to be
preserved, as are the founda-
tions of what is thought to
have been a former hospital.
Three of the ruins show
what cramped quarters the
Jews lived in. One is to in-
dicate the living standards of a
richer ghetto dweller, the last,
as a former Talmud school, to
testify to religious life in the
Frankfurt ghetto.
This is the city's plan for
preserving and presenting the
past of the second-largest
Jewish community in Ger-
many, formerly a center of
Jewry in Western Europe.
The site covers an area of
500 square meters, with
museum facilities taking up
the same amount of space
again.
This plan has been criticized
as a cynical, Philistine gesture.
The archaeological testimony
is to be largely destroyed and
in its place visitors will be
shown a model of the former
ghetto about 10 ft. long incor-
porating the latest technical
ploys and also available on a
video cassette.
There is every justification
in criticizing this concept as a
waste disposal center for
unpleasant reminders of
history.
Hesse Prime Minister
Walter Wallmann came to the
assistance of his fellow-
Christian Democrat and suc-
cessor as mayor of Frankfurt
at a CDU gattiering. But wrtet
he had to say failed to improve
matters.
He said there had been no
direct link between the
Frankfurt ghetto and
Auschwitz which no-one had
suggested in the first place.
His aim was to demystify the
finds and to make them
available to the general public.
He would do better to read
more widely. Das Labyrinth, a
1789 description of the ghetto
by Danish traveller Jens Bag-
gesen, published by C.H. Beck,
Munich, 1986, tells a lurid tale:
"Visualize a group of several
thousand men dressed in rags,
several thousand half-naked
women and several thousand
stark naked children crushed
and cramped together in a
single narrow alleyway.
"What an appalling picture
of misery! What a wailing and
gnashing of teeth! What a
pestilential smell of warm liv-
ing, lifeless and dead riff-raff!"
Is one not reminded of condi-
tions in concentration camp
barracks? For obscure
reasons, Wallmann came up
with a view on the origins of
Nazi racial policy.
Christian anti-Semitism, he
said, was not to blame for
Auschwitz. It was, "and I say
so hesitantly and diffidently,
the wrong road this country
has taken since the
Enlightenment."
He might just as well have
branded Moses Mendelssohn
and Leasing, Borne and Heine
Christian and Jewish cham-
pions of tolerance.
Wallmann would like to put
out the light shed by the site.
He feels the Borneplatz finds
must be seen as separate and
distinct from the German peo-
ple's guilt in connection with
the crimes committed between
1933 and 1945.
The remains of the ghetto,
he says, are no cause for
shame. Such attempts to ease
the burden of history are hard
to reconcile with the history of
the Frankfurt ghetto since
1462.
A single street 300 meters
long, for centuries it was one
of the places where Jews were
abused and humiliated before
the Nazis "perfected" the
technique.
The prehistory of Jewish
persecution in the Third Reich
is very much in evidence in the
Frankfurt ghetto, even though
it may have been opened in the
era of bourgeois emancipation.
Unless the signs are totally
misleading, Mayor Brack is
not going to be dissuaded on
any historical or moral
grounds whatever from soon
giving the go-ahead to clear
the site for construction.
Grotesque and disgraceful
scenes have already occurred,
such as when young Jews, who
together with other
demonstrators, staged a six-
day sit-in on the site to prevent
Continued on Page 12-A
bamatic Photo Recalls
"hip Exodus Became Symbol Of Jews' Desire For Israel
he ship Exodus was named
fer the ancient journey from
fery to freedom, but on
Kember 28, 1947, it became
nighty and modern symbol
Jewish yearning to live in
frtz Israel.
he ship had set sail from
many with 4,515 Holocaust
mvors, but the British, in
trol of then-Palestine and
ler heavy Arab pressure,
red it at the mouth of Haifa
Jbor. The survivors refused
leave. The British boarded
] ship.
he Jews fought back with
ks and tin cans, but even-
ly three were killed, 28 in-
fd and the rest forced onto
N British transports for
prn to Europe.
P>e British asked the
Jjch to take the survivors
'he French refused, but no
ter; the Jews said they
Ua only go to Eretz Israel.
They were taken to Hamburg,
but by the time Independence
was declared, May 14. 1948,
every one of them, as in-
dividuals or in small groups,
had reached Israel.
The photo on the front page
of this issue of the Jewish
Floridian was released by
United Jewish Appeal Na-
tional Chairman Martin F.
Stein from the UJA Archives.
In releasing the photo, Stein
said, "The spirit of the Exodus
lives on. In every era we
understand more fully the
meaning of the Exodus and the
importance of the Jewish State
to Jews everywhere.
"Two years ago we recogniz-
ed the importance of Israel for
the Ethiopian Jews, and more
than 10.000 who would other-
wise have perished in a sub-
Saharan famine are now alive
and being aided through UJA
contributors and others, to live
free lives in Israel. Today, we
focus especially on the Soviet
Jews.
"Every Jew must try to
understand the wider picture;
that there is a world Jewish
family and each of us has a
commitment to Jews wherever
they live.
"We at UJA continue to be
as dedicated today as we have
been since before Israel's
establishment," Stein said.
"We are, indeed, One People,
One Destiny."
Security forces demolishing the home of a
Palestinian who confessed to murdering IDF
reservist Alexander Arad, September 29,
1987. Arad, a J,3 year old father of two, was
*9k
scabbed tc death while trying to hitch a ride
from tht .' iiddo junction to hi* home on Kib-
butz Menaxhe. Photo by Scoop 80


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 9, 1987
Former Floridian Cited:
Costa Rica Harbors Nazi Collaborator
H
c
d
A

1'
A
F
al
d
u
ti
ri
P
I
C

A
R
|
y

F
F
h
s
I
o
tl
c
d
t

r
F
f
th
ei
til
ml
L.
M
c
F
H
A
J.
i:
o
u
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) A
Ukrainian post-war emigre to
the United States whose
background as a Nazi col-
laborator was confirmed by
U.S. federal court has received
a temporary residency visa in
Costa Rica, according to a
report in the Sept. 20 edition
of The Ukrainian Weekly,
datelined San Jose, Costa
Rica.
Bohdan Koziy fled to Costa
Rica from the U.S. about three
years ago to avoid impending
deportation to the Soviet
Union, where he is himself ac-
cused of the deportations and
killings of Soviet (Ukrainian)
citizens in World War II.
The Costa Rican Minister of
the Interior, Ronaldo Ramirez,
in announcing that Koziy and
his wife, Yaroslava, had been
granted the visas, expressed
doubt about the sufficiency of
the evidence against Koziy
presented by the Soviets. "His
supposed authorship of crimes
against Jews has not been
demonstrated," Ramirez said,
adding that Koziy had not
broken any Costa Rican laws
and, therefore, the Costa
Rican government had no
reason to deport him.
On Aug. 14, 1985, NBC
Nightly News revealed that
Koziy was in Costa Rica,
where he was reported living
in a luxurious hacienda. On
Sept. 14, 1985, The New York
Times, in an article titled
"Costa Rica's Image as Haven
Fading," reported that Koziy
had been in that country since
October 1984.
Koziy had owned the Flying
Cloud Motel in Fort Lauder-
dale, Florida, which he
reportedly sold.
Former Floridian
avoids deportation in
Costa Rican hide-out
In the report in The Ukrai-
nian Weekly, Ramirez failed to
mention any American fin-
dings against Koziy his age
has been reported as both 64
and 67 who was stripped oi
his U.S. citizenship in March
1982 for having lied about his
wartime activities when he
entered the U.S. in 1949. He
became a naturalized U.S.
citizen in 1956.
Even more startling about
the Costa Rican move to grant
Koziy temporary residence are
grevious moves by the Costa
ican government itself to
deport him. In August 1986,
Costa Rican Deputy Interior
Minister Alvara Ramos an-
nounced that the government
was seeking a court order to
expel Koziy.
Then, in March of this year,
Koziy was ordered extradited
to the Soviet Union by the
Costa Rican Superior Penal
Tribunal of Alajuela. At that
time, the public prosecutor of
San Jose said that the court's
extradition ruling could not be
appealed.
In 1979, the U.S. Justice
Department's Office of Special
Investigations (OSI) had filed a
complaint seeking Koziy's
denaturalization, which was
followed by the 1982 trial in
Federal District Court in West
Palm Beach, Florida.
Former OSI director Allan
Ryan Jr., in his book "Quiet
Neighbors," described Koziy
as a member of the Ukrainian
police auxiliary in Stanislau
that operated under German
direction during the war. His
identity and occupation were
corroborated by German in-
surance documents found.
At his trial, the OSI
presented, on videotape,
several Soviet and Polish
witnesses who testified that
they had known Koziy. They
described his role in the killing
of Stanislau's Jews, particular-
ly his singling out of Jewish
children as victims. Their
descriptions were graphic and
horrifying.
Eli Rosenbaum, who was a
prosecutor for the OSI during
Koziy's trial in Florida, said,
"What is doubly offensive is
not only that the Costa Rican
government is not extraditing
him to stand trial in the Soviet
Union, as its own courts have
authorized, but they are not
even moving to expel him from
Costa Rica. Now the Interior
Minister intercedes after all
these proceedings and
substitutes his own judgment
that there is insufficient
evidence. That's utterly fan-
tastic. What more would he
like to see?"
Ruben Robles, Ministerial
Consul of the Costa Rican Em-
bassy in Washington, told JTA
that Ramirez granted the tem-
porary visa because the ex-
tradition order is still in pro-
cess of execution. "Extradi-
tion proceedings were started
in the courts. Until final court
notification regarding his ex-
tradition is taken, he (Koziy)
may remain."
In 1982, West Germany
refused to acquiesce to a
Justice Department request to
extradite Koziy from the U.S.
and prosecute him despite con-
clusive evidence that Koziy
had killed a four-year-old
Jewish girl.
In August 1986, Kalman
Sultanik, vice president of the
World Jewish Congress and
chairman of the U.S.
Holocaust Memorial Council's
Committee on anti-Semitism,
released Justice Department
documents indicating that the
West German government
declined the American request
despite agreeing with
American authorities that the
child had been murdered by
Koziy.
At Koziy's 1982 trial,
eyewitnesses described
Koziy's snatching of Monica
Singer, the four-year-old
daughter of a local Jewish doc-
tor, and his taking her to the
police station. The witnesses
described her crying, "Mother,
he's going to shoot me," and
"I want to live." Koziy took
out his pistol; her mother turn-
ed her head.
In July 1982, the OSI wrote
to the West German Ministry
of Justice suggesting that
Koziy be extradited for "per-
sonally and single-handedly"
murdering the girl "by
shooting her at point-blank
range." In the same letter, the
OSI refers to Koziy actively
participating in the murders of
members of another Jewish
family.
The West German Foreign
Office declined the American
request in a diplomatic note to
the American Embassv in
Bonn on March 28. 1983! The
note, refusing "to initiate ex-
tradition proceedings in this
case," nevertheless conceded
"There is no doubt as to
Koziy's participation in the
two aforementioned shooting
incidents."
The West German govern-
ment described the crimes as
"manslaughter" rather than
"murder" because the killings
could not demonstrate "cruel-
ty, iniquity, lust for murder,
and base motives." Therefore,
the German document said,
the crimes were no longer pro-
secutable because the statute
of limitations on them had run
out in the spring of 1960.
"Cruelty would exist only if
the perpetrator, beyond the
purpose of executing the tt
ings, had imposed specif
ortortiireonthevictimsoj
a mentality entirely devK
feeling or mercy fl!V
that one of the victims J
four-year-old child in Jj
does not suffice to estabhai
determination of a crud
underhanded killing il
available documents do *
show any indications that,
cording to the meaning of 4
law, Koziy acted out of ib
for murder."
Actrest Liv I Ilium* hold* up am Ida NwL I 7 ""
cated Liv UUmann Terrace al the Jet i(kH
m UUmann'a latest film "Moscow Farewell." bated mSm
refiumik .Xudel '$ I if WOM screened. "I ha ..in.v.lifwjjl
veryfaw have been so important to me." eaid UUman*.ftj^
ntfht of the picture is liana Friedman. Ida Nudel't n*er.*n\
an official ofNa'amat in Israel.
"Helping you in money way a"
Cha,. FUral U not aociaUd with Chat, Manhattan Bank. N.A.. or it* affiLat..
Wishing You A Happy Holiday


|Y. Law Change To Protect
itically 111 Observant Jews
Friday, October 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
BEN GALLOB
ish Telegraphic Agency
inges in New York State
and hospital pro-
res, which could involve
ad-death decisions for
/ant Jews, are in the pro-
jf becoming law or having
ice of law.
changes involve
folding cardiopulmonary
scitation (CPR) from
cen patients and the
issue of criteria for
lination of death. The
es are in part the pro-
of an intense months-
struggle in Albany, the
capital, by the Agudath
of America, a national
lox organization.
revisions, designed to
ct the rights of observant
L were made part of two
[One set guidelnes for doc-
in issuing "Do Not
scitate" (DNR) orders;
r was meant to meet
iox objections to the pre-
Idefinition of death based
rirreversible cessation of
jnctions of the entire
i, including brain stem,"
^ding to David Zweibel,
jath Israel's director of
of Governmental Af-
i and its General Counsel.
|DNR order is an instruc-
placed in the medical
of a patient to withhold
two bills were approved
lie Assembly and State
Gov. Mario Cuomo
only the DNR measure
ig the first week in
st, to become effective
ril. However, he took
ction on the Definition of
bill, apparently because
Task Force on Law and
after listening to
lony on the bUls, ap-
itly favored the DNR
^ure but was negative to
jroposed changes in the
ition of death. Zweibel
ted on both.
Jeibel explained, in his
nony that Agudath Israel
^sted the concept in that
"unlimited individual
Homy" because that con-
|gave the stricken patient
bsolute right to decline
in the event of car-
Imonary arrest, even
expectation of recovery
|e patient was "positive.
testified that, "as
Inced by laws against
fle, society has a substan-
piterest in the preserva-
f human life an in-
so substantial that it
iighs an individual's
l that for him (or her) life
I longer worth living."
told the Jewish
paphic Agency that there
I be added "a limitation on
hdividual's right to decline
life-sustaining (CPR)
treatment."
He told the JTA that "we
think a society which permits
suicide is a society which
devalues the sanctity of human
life" and that the autonomy
concept retained in the DNR
law "comes close to it."
A second Aguda objection,
which Zweibel said was needed
by the legislators, was that the
measure did not protect the
religious rights of an in-
capacitated person who re-
quires a surrogate to
communicate.
A surrogate is defined in the
new law as a relative; or an in-
dividual specifically chosen by
the patient; or, when no such
person is present, a "close
friend" familiar with the pa-
tient's religious beliefs. A sur-
rogate's decision can be
challenged by the patient's
family.
In the absence of a sur-
rogate, doctors would be
authorized to withhold CPR if
they considered it "medically
futile," or when a court ap-
proved a DNR on the basis of
the patient's "known wishes"
or on "a finding of the pa-
tient's best wishes."
In place of the apparently
defunct Definition of Death
measure, the State Depart-
ment of Health prepared new
regulations to accommodate
beliefs of patients who have
religious objections to the con-
cept of "irreversible cessation
of all functions of the entire
brain." On that basis, doctors
could withhold CPR from a pa-
tient defined as brain-dead,
Zweibel said.
The new regulations require
hospitals, prior to a final deter-
mination of "brain death," to
make reasonable efforts to
notify the patient's next of kin,
or a close friend, that such a
finding was imminent. If the
relative or friend indicated
that medical reliance on the
"brain death" criterion would
offend the patient's religious
beliefs, the hospital would be
"required reasonably to ac-
commodate" those beliefs,
Zweibel said.
Many, though not all,
Halachic authorities, hold that
death occurs when there is ir-
reversible cessation of
breathing, cardiac activity and
brain activity. Some
authorities consider cessation
of breathing the most reliable
indicator of death.
Zweibel said the issue before
the legislation was not the dif-
ferences among Jewish
authorities over criteria of
death, but rather as he
testified at various hearings
"we simply ask that society
OP CASH PAID
-D FURHmURE
1EHTIAL RUGS
I > OIL PAI iVn NG s
Single I terns or Complete Estates
PAkSm ESTATE GALLERIES BROWARD
"4770 6914 Biscavne Blvd. 462-0730
i Objects of Art
Bric-a-Brac
Tapestries
Bronzes
Pianos
Silver
Sen. Lawton Chiles, D-Fla., (right) met with
Moishe Nissim, Israeli Minister of Finance
(left). Chiles told Nissim he will ask the Senate
Appropriations Subcommittee on Foreign
Operations to authorize the refinancing of the
high interest part of Israel's American debt.
About one billion dollars of Israel's $10 billion
official debt to the United States would be af-
fected, Chiles said. The refinancing would be
at rates about two percent lower than at pre-
sent. The subcommittee will meet on the mat-
ter in mid-October.
not impose its secular views"
on definition of death "upon
particular religious
communities."
He told the Assembly Health
Committee that the death
definition revision had the sup-
port of a broad spectrum of the
Jewish community, including
the National Jewish Commis-
sion on Law and Public Affairs
(COLPA), which helped draft
the measures, and other
Jewish groups.
The new death definition
resolutions were published in
the New York State Register,
providing a 30-day period for
public comment. Since there
has been no negative comment
about the brain death amend-
ment for observant Jews, the
regulations become as binding
as statutory law, upon health
committee actions.
SOME PEOPLE LIVE THEIR
ENTIRE LIVES WITHOUT
TASTING WATER.
Some people have never tasted water that's tresh
and pure as a spring Water without sodium,
pollutants, or carbonation Water with nothing added,
nothing taken away. Some people have never tasted
clean, clear Mountain Valley Water trom a natural
spnng in Hot Springs, Arkansas
If you're one of those people, try Mountain valley
Water You II be tasting water for the very first time.
MOOMTAIM VAII1Y WATER
SPRING WATER FROM HOT SPRINGS. ARK
Purely for drinking.
DADE BROWARD
696-1333 563-6114
Israeli Population
Nears 4.4 Million
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
population of Israel is
estimated at 4,375,000 of
whom 3,590,000 are Jews, ac-
cording to figures released by
the Central Bureau of
Statistics.
The total population was up
by 1.4 percent since
September 1986 and the
Jewish population increased
by 1.1 percent. There were
nearly 100,000 births
registered during the last
Hebrew calendar year, three
quarters of them Jewish.
About 12,000 new immigrants
arrived during the year, com-
pared to 9,200 the previous
year.
According to the Bureau,
nearly two million Israelis
45 percent live in 11 cities of
100,000 population or more.
Jerusalem is the largest with a
population of about 477,000
persons, followed by Tel Aviv
with 318,000 and Haifa with
223,000. The populations of
both of the latter two cities
have been declining.
'Jewish Jewish National Fund
Pare1 (Keren Kayemeth Leisrael)
Redeems, Reclaims, Rebuilds the Land of Israel
SUPPORT THE JNF

PLANT TREES IN ISRAEL
FOR ALL OCCASIONS
Plant as Many Trees as You Wish
($5 Per Treel
18Trees-Chai
25 TreesCluster
36 Trees-Double Chai
50 Trees-Jubilee
75 Trees-Arbor
100 Trees-Garden
300 Trees-Orchard
1000 Trees-Grove*
Dedication Ceremony in Israel and a
Special Plaque in the Koresl is Included
D Holiday Greetings
O Birthdays
D Anniversary
D Bar/Bat Mltzvah
. Wedding
D Graduation
? In Honor
D In Memory
LI Get Well
D Good Wishes
D New Baby
D New Year
D Special Occasion
D In Gratitude
D____________
Ksiablishan Annuity with the JNF
Remember the J N K in your Will
Link your Name Kternally with
the Land of Israel
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND
420 Lincoln Rd.. Suite 363, Miami Bear h. FL 33139
Phone 538-6464


Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 9, 1987
Arab Armies:
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV While Arab
armies are maintaining their
quantitative advantage over
the Israel Defense Force
(IDF), they are also beginning
to reduce the long-standing
qualitative advantage that
Israel has traditionally en-
joyed. So warned Maj. Gen.
(Res.) Aharon Yariv, former
head of military intelligence
and now head of the Tel Aviv
University's Jaffee Center for
Strategic Studies.
Yariv said that Arab armies'
"concentrated effort" to buy
the best weapons systems
available ranging from
Soviet-made MIG-29 jets and
T-72 tanks to the American-
made F-15 fighters may in
effect erode Israel's
qualitative advantage on
which it has depended as a
deterrent and in war.
He added that Israel's
strategic position was never
better, due to a combination of
such factors as American sup-
gort, the Iran-Iraq war,
gypt's adherence to the
Camp David agreements and
the socio-economic ramifica-
tions of the shortfall in oil
revenues.
Yariv likewise noted that
while there were no unusual
developments in the Arab-
Israeli military balance over
the past year, attention must
be paid to "the importance of
the Arab armies build-up,
dating back to the 1970's."
Examples of such expansion
since the 1973 Yom Kippur
war cited by Yariv included an
increase in the number of
mechanized divisions fielded
by Syria, Jordan and Egypt
from 10 to 22; an increase in
Iraqi divisions from 12 to 40;
and an increase in the number
of tanks employed by Arab ar-
mies from 4,500 to 7,300,
while helicopters have gone
from 200 to 500.
Yariv stressed that Israel
has meanwhile enlarged its
own armed forces. While the
IDF consisted of six divisions
in 1973, it now has 12. The
Israel Air Forces, with 300
combat planes at its disposal in
1973, has since doubled.
He added, however, that
"the IDF is now scraping the
bottom of the manpower bar-
rel, or is nearing such a
stage."
Brig. Gen. (Res.) Aharon
Levran, who along with Zeev
Eytan authored an annual
report, pointed out that this
was the first year the Jaffee
Center publication analyzed
unconventional strengths and
capabilities in the region.
Report found that both
Pakistan and Israel have
achieved an advanced nuclear
potential, yet the Arabs "do
not appear to be perturbed."
The three-part explanation
for this, Levran said, is that
Arab armies possess chemical
weapons and view them as a
possible deterrent, their belief
that Israel would resort to
nuclear weapons only if its
very existence were en-
dangered, and the apparent
Syrian belief that the Soviets
will supply a "nuclear um-
brella" should the need arise.
Levran added that Israeli
Quantitative Advantage Over IDF
researchers have concluded
that the likelihood of Pakistan
transferring an "Islamic
(nuclear) bomb" to one or
more Arab countries is "very
unlikely."
Citing unverified reports
which name Libya as the possi-
ble recipient, Levran said that
if such a plan exists it would
still take Pakistan several
years to ready such an arsenal.
In response to a question con-
cerning the efficacy of Israel
publicly declaring a nuclear
policy, Yariv said that "assum-
ing Israel does have nuclear
weapons, I don't see any ad-
vantage to declaring a nuclear
policy at this time.
"It would drive the Arabs in-
to a frenzy of buying nuclear
weapons. We should stick to
our guns by saying we won't
be the first to introduce
nuclear weapons into the
region."
The time may come, he add- be more difficult m a future
ed, when Israel should war for the IAF to provide air
negotiate making the Middle support for the ground forces.
East nuclear-free, but the time
is not yet at hand.
On the subject of Syrian
strategy and rearmament,
Yariv said he doesn't foresee
any "imminent danger" of at-
tack, but stressed that Israel
has no choice but to remain ex-
tremely vigilant.
Enormity of Syria's stan-
ding army some 500,000
strong its acquisition of the
most advanced Soviet
weaponry, ranging from three
submarines to Skad missiles
capable of reaching 160 miles
and its commitment to obtain-
ing "strategic parity" with
Israel must be matched by the
IDF's own readiness. In addi-
tion, Syria and other Arab
states have acquired a first-
rate mobile air defense
system, meaning that it may
In general, Yariv said, Arab
armies are "both big and
strong. They are highly
mobile, have a high concentra-
tion of firepower, are sup-
ported by strong fortifications,
and they can rely on both a fix-
ed and mobile air defense."
One tangible danger
represented by the Arabs'
growing strength, he added, is
that Arab leaders will begin to
believe the Middle East con-
flict can in fact be resolved
through a "military solution."
As for the halted Lavi jet
fighter project, Yariv said that
the Cabinet decision was very
important since "it has freed
resources for the development
of weapons systems for the
future battlefield." Such
weapons systems, he em-
phasized, will be decisive in
determining the outcome rf
any future war.
Other key findings about
1986 from the 460-page reT*
are:
, Vi^.1 ^^ aPProximate-
ly 100 high-quality tanks and
25 helicopters, had a standW
army of 170,000 and a reserve
force of 370,000, and spent
$4.3 billion on defense, as op-
posed to $4 billion in 1985.
Syria last year added 20
helicopters, two submarines
four MFPBS and seven other
naval craft. It had approx-
imately 1,000 T-72 tanks, in.
eluding the new and improved
model, 1,500 BMP armored
personnel carriers (considered
to be the best in the world) and
650 combat aircraft (including
255 helicopters). It spent $3.47
billion on defense, as com-
Continued on Page 11 A
"This book
to comer
"Simon Wiesenthal:
(Renowned Nazi hunter,
Director of Jewish Documentation Center)
"I read the book in a single day; I found it
so compelling i\ was hard to put down. A
picture is drawn of a man who managed to
stay human amidst inhumanity.... We should
be glad such a detailed account of a true
survivor.. .will remain for ages to come."
Claude Lanzmann:
(Creator of Sfiooh)
"An adventure.. .almost novelesque in the
extraordinary succession of miracles which
enable the young man to remain among the
living so as to eventually tell his story forty
years later with Voltairesque ferocity and
often sheer and invigorating joy.
"From one ordeal to another, outwitting
death time after time, Henry Orenstein, an
intelligent, soberly pessimistic Candide, is
possessed by a will to live so prodigious that
he seems able to maintain his spirit while
overcoming the most improbable odds."
Menachem Begin:
(Former Prime Minister of Israel)
"... An important contribution to bring out the
facts about the cruelty of Nazi Germany, of the
heroic efforts for the survival of our brethren."
Nathan Perlmutter:
(Former National Director,
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rrrh)
"Riveting. Because the book is innocent of
the affectations and devices of fiction, it is
so overwhelming an experience that half a
century later you are there, experiencing the
fears and, remarkably, experiencing the will
to live. Orenstein prevails as did Jewry and,
reading him, we do too."
will remain for ages
!Ql
We
If/,
Lucy S. Dawidowicz:
(Author of The War Against the Jews)
"This is a stirring account of a struggle for
life against all odds. Once you begin this
book, you won't be able to put it down."
Allan A. Ryan, Jr.:
(Former director of the Office of Special Investigations
of the Justice Deportment)
" I Shall Live is a poignant and deeply moving
testament to the human spirit, and to fero-
cious courage in the face of hopelessness...
No reader can be left untouched by it."
RKAUP0RT BOOKS
U B L
H E R
Jew Yo.k, NY 10016 [),sll,utec) by Kampmann & Co


Red Cross Sends Israel Rare Blood
Friday, October 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
German-Revisionist Slights Holocaust
BONN (JTA) The Zen-
tralrat, the governing body of
West Germany's Jewish com-
munity, has issued a strong
warning against continuing ef-
forts by certain German
scholars to downgrade the
magnitude of Nazi crimes
against the Jews and who
argue that the Holocaust was
no more "unique" than other
mass killings in modern
history.
That view is being
disseminated by the revisionist
school of German thinkers and
academics whose theses seem
to be that Nazi war crimes
were no worse than others and
Germans therefore should not
feel exceptional guilt for their
past.
A leading proponent of revi-
sionism is Prof. Ernst Nolte of
the Free University of Berlin
who has given academic
respectability to revisionist
theories. Nolte's assertions
are taken seriously in some
scholarly quarters because of
his intellectual credentials. He
is author of papers which have
become classic textbooks for
historians of fascism and
totalitarianism.
In two recent books and in
an interview in the mass cir-
culation Die Welt, Nolte main-
tained it is the task of
historians to examine the ra-
tionality of Hitler's ideology
and Nazi behavior, including
their campaign to exterminate
the Jews.
According to Nolte, the
Soviet Gulag preceded the
Holocaust and was partly
responsible for it because the
Nazis viewed the Communist
threat largely as a Jewish one.
TEL AVIV Magen David
Idom (MDA), recently made
urgent appeal to the Blood
Services of the American Red
Uross for four units of a very
are type of blood called
J*Bombay" to save the life of a
kne year old baby hospitalized
kt the Rarnbam Hospital in
laifa. The American Red
Jross advised MDA that
Ithough they had very few
Jonors of this blood type, they
vould dispatch the blood from
heir frozen reserve at once via
Air to the MDA National
Blood Service Center in Ramat
Gan, Israel.
With the use of the special
blood supplied by the
American Red Cross, the Ram-
bam Hospital successfully per-
formed neurosurgery and the
baby is recovering.
Over the years the American
Red Cross has cooperated with
the American Red Magen
David for Israel and Magen
David Adorn in fulfilling
special humanitarian requests.
Parviz Karim-Panahi defends black Muslim
leader Louis Farrakhan to several uniden-
tified members of the Jewish Defense League
in front of the downtown Los Angeles Conven-
tion Center. Farrakhan's open anti-Semitic
remarks, coupled with his active role in the
1984 Presidential bid of the Rev. Jesse
Jackson, have inspired close scrutiny by
numerous Jewish agencies. In spite of protests
by California business, civic and religious
leaders, the black Muslim spokesman drew a
capacity audience. | AP/Wide World Photo
GoingTo
The Northeast?
Save 900 Miles
Of Driving
On AutoTrain.
Take Amtrak's Auto Train and you won't have to worry about
traffic jams, bad weather, breakdowns, lodging or where to find a
decent place to eat.
Instead, you can sightsee in our Dome Car. Watch a free feature-
length movie. Socialize in the lounge car. Or simply relax in a wide,
reclining seat. For additional comfort and personalized service,
optional sleeping accommodations are also available.
The Auto Train leaves each afternoon from Sanford, near Orlando.
Two adults and a car travel to Lorton, Virginia, which is Just outside
Washington, D.C., for as little as $237. A savings of 52% over
Auto Train's regular one-way fares. Included in the fare is a deli-
cious full-course buffet dinner and a tasty continental breakfast.
Kosher meals are available if you let us know in advance.
Make your reservations now to take advantage of the best rates.
Call your travel agent or call Amtrak at 1-800-USA-RAIL.
Amtrak's Auto Train. The ride that saves you 900 miles of driving.
BaSwlti rtiingttthtit"*Wm **>aaalQiMpMai^ayt
Offor good for travoi 10/1/S7 2/14/M.
-i-.....-J^SSr" Kiiin iliTTIfili'lii i i;iiiii7m.....Aim.
iYniteii
ALL
ABOARD
AMTRAK
-----. .LJMMeVT^X


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 9, 1987
Peres Recaps 8-Point Program
YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) Israeli Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres spoke out strongly last week at the General
Assembly Tuesday for an international conference for Mid-
dle East peace. He devoted much of his speech to detailing,
publicly for the first time, the eight points he said were
agreed to by Israel and Jordan five months ago on the ob-
jectives of such a conference and how it would be
organized.
Peres, in his address to the 42nd session of the Assembly,
also appealed to the Soviet Union and the People's
Republic of China, both permanent members of the UN
Security Council which would sponsor the international
conference, to establish diplomatic relations with Israel.
The Eight-Point Agreement
He listed the eight points of the agreement reached bet-
ween Jordan and Israel with the good offices of the United
States.
The goal is peace through direct negotiations.
An international conference is the way to direct
negotiations.
The conference will not impose any settlement.
All parties to the conference must accept UN Security
Council Resolutions 242 and 338 and renounce terrorism.
Negotiations are to solve the Palestinian problem in all
its aspects through negotiations between the Jordanian-
Palestinian delegation, and the Israeli delegation.
Negotiations will be conducted independently in three
bilateral/geographic committees: a Jordanian-Palestinian
delegation and an Isralei delegation; Syrian and Israeli
delegations; Lebanese and Israeli delegations. All delega-
tions, as well as an Egyptian delegation will participate in a
fourth multi-lateral committee.
The bilateral commitees will be engaged in solving the
conflicts of the past while the multi-lateral committee
would deal with future settlements.
The international peace conference will be sponsored
by the five permanent members of the Security Council
who will be entrusted with bringing the parties together
and legitimizing the process.
mien
TM
,^v

^J
&
W1-0--". .'v*
c?
3
,VT

,
o
h.
^
* M -
a
ft v 5
I
1987 David S Boxerman and Mark Saunders All rights reserved
"It may not be a better bagel but it's a bigger one."
India: 'No' To Israeli Prof.
Rightwing Le Pen Cancels Brit Trip
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) Jean-
Marie Le Pen, leader of
France's far rightwing Na-
tional Front Party, has cancel-
ed his planned visit to Britain
as anger still boiled over his
remarks on a recent radio in-
terview that the Holocaust
was a mere footnote to the
history of World War II.
Last week, an embarrassed
Conservative Party made clear
that Le Pen would not be
welcome. He was invited by
Sir Alfred Sherman, a promi-
nent Conservative and former
S'litical advisor to Prime
inister Margaret Thatcher to
address a fringe meeting at
the party's annual conference
in Blackpool next month. Nor-
man Tabbit, national chairman
of the Conservative Party, said
Le Pen would be given no
facilities at the conference and
urged party members to
boycott any fringe meetings
where he might speak.
Sherman, a one-time Com-
munist turned rightwing
ideologue and himself Jewish,
said he invited Le Pen before
the latter's public denigration
of the Holocaust. Although Le
Pen did not retract his
remarks, Sherman accepted
his subsequent explanation
that he simply wanted to view
the Holocaust in the perspec-
tive of all the mass deaths that
occurred in the war years.
Le Pen, a member of the
French Chamber of Deputies,
is being sued in civil court by
the International League
Against Anti-Semitism
(LICRA) for inciting racial
hatred.
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Indian government has refus-
ed to grant a visa to Hebrew
University Prof. Shlomo
Avineri who has been invited
by one of India's most
prestigious "think tanks" to
participate in a conference on
Soviet bloc developments in
December.
Avineri, an expert on Marx
and Communist theory and
one of Israel's leading
Sovietologists, said he receiv-
ed his invitation a year ago
from the Indian School of
Political Economy. He said he
has since received many in-
auiries from the school about
le paper he was to present at
the conference.
He said he would inform
other prospective participants
of the Indian government's
refusal and expected that
some would decide to boycott
the meeting. Avineri served
for a time as Director General
of the Foreign Ministry under
Shimon Peres.
DISCOVER THE MAGIC OF AMIT WOMEN.
THE Allltc NATIONAL CONVENTION
IN ORLANDO, FLORIDA.
(Seminars, Decisions, and Disney World, too)
October 25th-28,1987
At the fabulous Hyatt Orlando Hotel.
rVOB^
cuw
0B ^uhTdAc""
CLAUDE LANZMANN
Honored Guest Speaker,
Director ofSHOAH,
the most important film
ever made about
the Holocaust.

Addmonal guest speakers include:
Ambassador Aba HMaMl Secretary of State for Bureau of International Organizational Affairs
Neil and Pam WtMon, house ''parents' Beit Hoveled
*ooda Barad, Director Eastern Region of the Simon Wiesenthal Center
Attend briefings from key government officials
Discuss the impact of technology on AMIT's educational goals
Develop fundraising, recruitment, PR and programming skills
Adopt an international budget and elect new officers
PLUS, exciting featured speakers, films and videos
Disney World, EPCOT, and time to relax
ttSm&S ^J^oman: Norma Ho,zer Co-Chairwomen: Francine Lashinsky, Sondra Sokal
/wJJ!? ,NFORMAT,ON CONTACT AMIT WOMEN, 817 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10003
(212)477-4720 Outside New York State (800)221-3117
4\mfc
women


Ankara Shifts Policy
Israel No Longer 'Taboo'
Friday, October 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Turkey is prepared to
strengthen its economic,
cultural and diplomatic ties
with Israel. But, diplomatic
sources told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency, Turkey
in return wants Israel to use
its alleged influence on the
"Jewish lobby" in America to
advance Turkish interests in
Washington.
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres met here with Turkish
Foreign Minister Vahit
Halefoglu. It was the first
meeting in the last 20 years
between the Foreign Ministers
of the two countries.
Turkey, a Moslem country,
does not have full diplomatic
ties with Israel. The two coun-
tries only have consular level
representations between
them. Because of its solidarity
with the Moslem Arab world,
Turkey has been careful for
ears not to intensify its ties
Bwith the Jewish State, at least
ot openly.
The willingness of the
rkish Foreign Minister to
eet with Peres represents a
ajor shift in Ankara's policy
oward Israel and the Arab-
sraeli conflict.
In a special interview with
e Jewish Telegraphic Agen-
cy following the meeting bet-
een the two Foreign
inisters, the spokesman for
he Turkish Foreign Ministry,
mbassador I rial Batu, said:
"The meeting between
eres and Halefoglu con-
futes by itself an improve-
ent in relations between the
ro countries. In addition, we
lemonst rated to the whole
oslem world that Israel is no
nger taboo." The Turkish of-
ml noted that Turkey is the
' Moslem country in the
rorld. apart from Egypt,
mfch has diplomatic relations
iith Jerusalem.
Israeli and Turkish sources
ofirmed that the Turkish
oreign Minister accepted an
vitation by Peres to visit
rael. If such a visit indeed
es place, it would mark a
ajor progress in relations
between the two countries.
Turkey seeks the influence
of what it conceives to be the
"powerful Jewish lobby" in
Washington. The Turks
believe that the Greek and
Armenian lobbies in
Washington are harming
Turkish interests and they are
convinced that the Jewish lob-
by is capable of turning things
around to satisfy the Turkish
request for American military
and economic aid. Presently
the Turkish government
receives about $600 million an-
nually in American foreign
assistance.
Peres, in his meeting with
Halefoglu Wednesday,
discussed the prospects for an
international peace conference
on the Mideast. "We told
Peres that we support an in-
ternational peace conference
but we stressed that such a
conference must be attended
by the PLO, which is the
legitimate representative of
the Palestinian people," the
spokesman of the Turkish
Foreign Ministry told the JTA.
The JTA has learned from
reliable sources that the two
Foreign Ministers also discuss-
ed cooperation in the fight
against international ter-
rorism. Turkey and Israel have
been cooperating secretly on
this problem for some years
now. Turkey is a target of
Armenian and Kurdish ter-
rorists who launch hit-and-run
attacks on Turkish citizens
along the Turkish-Syrian
border.
Dutch Premier
First To Israel
AMSTERDAM (JTA) -
Premier Rudolph Lubbers of
The Netherlands will visit
Israel next spring at the invita-
tion of Premier Yitzhak
Shamir. The trip will be the
first by a Dutch Prime
Minister to Israel. Lubbers
heads the coalition cabinet of
Christian Democrats and
Liberals.
WELCOME TO A
MEW EXPERIENCE
in sophisticated Retirement Living
J M A N 0 B 'tL
iWhere Caring Comes naturally'
MM S.W. 52nd Avenue rembroke Paik, Florida 33023
A COMPLETE LIFESTYLE
in AI KOSHER ENVIRONMfT
Tastefully Decorated
NursingSupervision24 hrs.
Physicians on call 24 hrs.
3 meals daily and snacks
Daily activities, arts*crafts
Social activities
Transportation provided
Swimming Pool f Jacuzzi
Beauty Shop
Religious services dally
Easily accessible
WEWELCOPlEEnqUiniES rLEASECALL961 8111
1
f N

Dr Victor BraiUrvsky, who had been a Soviet seen here being blessed at Jerusalem $ Western
^iiLfZJle^r\ "T"^ 2 1STQel WM' **? afier hi8 arrivai- Phot by S>0P 80
September 2Uth With his family. Brailovsky is r A/World Zionist News Photo Service
Arab Armies Over IDF
Continued from Page 8-A
pared to $3.3 billion in 1985.
Jordan sent military ad-
visers and instructors to, inter
alia, Iraq, Lebanon and
Bahrain, while it deployed a
volunteer unit in Iraq. It had a
standing army of 80,300 and
107 combat aircraft. Jordan
cooperated with Britain in
upgrading its 275 Chieftain
tanks and spent $735 million
on defense as opposed to $526
million in 1985.
Egypt replaced outmoded
tanks, APCS and combat air-
craft with new acquisitions
particularly F-16 and Mirage
2000 aircraft. It also acquired
Soviet SA missile batteries
and patrol boats. Egypt's stan-
ding army numbered 453,000
its reserve forces 400,000 and
it fielded 2,300 tanks and 587
combat aircraft. Egyptian
forces were deployed abroad in
Jordan (radar station, uncon-
firmed), and Sudan. It
transferred weapons to, inter
alia, Afghan rebels Iraq,
Lebanon, Morocco, Uganda
and the U.S. (a few MIG-23's).
It spent $5.2 billion on
defense, as opposed to $4.1
billion in 1985.
Libya enlarged its ground
forces from two to four divi-
sions, and added 50 quality
combat aircraft. It deployed
one battalion in Lebanon,
alongside the Syrian forces.
The standing army numbered
101,000, Libya spent $3.15
billion on defense (unconfirm-
ed), as opposed to $4.2 billion
in 1983.
FLORIDA'S
DADE (305) 944 9666
BROWARD
(305)921 5800
In Toronto 283-2539
Montreal 848-9192
800-327-4122
FAMOUS
ON THE OCEAN
3101 S OCEAN DRIVE
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 3X19
2 WEEK $56.
Super Specials^
PAY FOR 1st WEEK
2nd WEEK FREE
AVERAGE PRICE PER NIG H T
FOR 14 DAYS STAY P.P.
DBL. OCC.
Rates As Low $112 p.p.
Daily. Dbl. Occ.
Reopens for
the Season.
Rates Include 3 Meals And 2 Snacks Daily Massages Sauna
All Baths Facial Gymnasium Exercise Yoga Water Exercise
Nutritionist Physician Reducing Equipment Shutfleboard
Swirlpool Movie Bingo FREE QOLF Live Band Nightly Dancing
And Entertainment.
For Your Shopping Convenience SUN SPA Has A Mini-Bus
Complimentary Transportation To Leading Shopping Plazas


Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 9, 1987
Plan To Build Over Borneplatz
And Bury Past And Conscience
Continued from Page 5-A
its destruction, were expelled
from the former ghetto for
disturbing the peace.
Some of them had
demonstrated to prevent the
performance of Fassbinder's
play. Then their protest was
applauded. Now they are
branded as criminals. Which
only goes to show how readily
the Frankfurt city council
measures non-violent
resistance by dual standards.
The affair, which is by no
means yet over, has already
shown that a debate of such
extraordinary historical and
moral volatility cannot be
governed solely by the majori-
ty in the city council.
Officials in charge of historic
monuments cannot claim to
have behaved brilliantly
either. The head of excava-
tions concealed a conflict of in-
terest that in any other con-
text would automatically have
disqualified him.
As the man in charge of the
dig he must be in a position to
arrive at independent deci-
sions and be subject solely to
the dictates of his conscience.
Yet as curator of the
Frankfurt museum of pre-
history and early history he is
subject to instructions by
Mayor Brack.
The delegation of respon-
sibility to an expert from fur-
ther afield would dispel the
massive mistrust he now faces,
especially as he has turned a
deaf ear to the justified public
desire for detailed
information.
You can forfeit your authori-
ty by working solely behind
the scenes as an archaeologist
and merely advising the
administration.
A fresh monument has now
been erected around the
disputed site: a corrugated
iron wall round three sides of
the site to conceal the earth-
moving equipment, construc-
tion workers and ar-
chaeologists from the in-
quisitve glances of passers-by.
This wall is designed mainly
to prevent the public from see-
ing what is done (or left un-
done) on Borneplatz. It is also,
figuratively speaking, a three-
sided set of blinkers the city
authorities have decided to
wear.
Bulldozing the finds apart
from a few vestiges for
museum use is no way to win
the discussion. It has long
ceased to be a matter of mere
presentation of archaeological
finds. The sense of history and
morality of recollection are
now involved.
The ruined landscape as
unearthed has a sensual quali-
ty and an aura that are bound
to be extinguished when reduc-
ed to diminutive, museum
dimensions.
The meager, broken stones
of foundations and walls must
not be reduced to remains of
cultural history and hidden
away in an administrative
building. The historical status
of the site and its importance
for our collective memory
must not be decided at the
party-political level.
In Borne's childhood, in the
days of the French Revolution,
about 500 people vegetated in
the 50 meters of ghetto now
uncovered beneath the
asphalt.
This is a site on which we can
visualize better than anywhere
else a part of history that
eludes us. As Baggesen wrote
in 1789:
"Here in this dark, narrow,
dirty, stinking and virtually
closed alley where they live
one can study the statistics of
an entire nation.
"Those who have walked
along it and failed, heedless of
the nudges, trickery and
unpleasantness, to feel sorry
for their seven thousand
cramped and oppressed fellow-
humans, those who are not
moved by this cameo to feel
sorry for the condition of all
others suffering in more or
less the same appalling way
can only be said to lack
something in their minds or
their hearts."
Borneplatz, a name that will
become meaningless once the
service center is built, is a sym-
bol of failure to come to terms
with this history.
The Jews who were able,
decades after Baggesen visited
the ghetto, to leave it sought
to integrate. They failed and
were the losers; but so are we.
The struggle to preserve
such memories must not be
lost to a municipal administra-
tion that, in Baggesen's
words, is either heartless or
mindless.
Daimler-Benz To Pay Compensation
TEL AVTV (JTA) The
Daimler-Benz Co. of West Ger-
many, manufacturers of the
Mercedes, will pay compensa-
tion to slave laborers it
employed during World War II
when it built tanks and other
mobile equipment for Hitler's
army, a company spokesman
announced in Haifa this week.
Many of the slave laborers
were Jews.
Bernd Gotschalk, chief of
public relations for Daimler-
Benz, spoke at ceremonies at
Haifa University inaugurating
the Gottlibe Schumacher
Research Center, established
at the university with a
quarter-million-doflar grant
from Daimler-Benz.
The center will study the
Christian contribution to the
development of Palestine in
the 19th century, particularly
the Templars. Gottlieb
Schumacher, for whom it was
named, was the son of a
Templar who worked in
Palestine as an engineer in the
last century.
Daimler-Benz is head-
quartered in Stuttgart in the
federal state of Wuerttemberg
where the Templar movement
was founded more than 100
years ago. The Templars came
to Palestine on extended
pilgrimages. They established
many "German colonies" in
Jerusalem, Haifa and Jaffa.
One of the best known, which
lasted until the outbreak of
World War II, was Sarona, in
what was then the outskirts of
Tel Aviv. It is presently a
government and Israel
Defense Force General Head-
quarters complex.
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E. 1st Avenue, Miami, Florida
JERGENS
Beauty Bar
3.25 oz.
1.29
Jergens
Dry Skin
Lotion
Regular
10 oz.
1.79
15oz.
s2.79
WOODBURY
Beauty Soap
3 Bars-4.7 oz.
85C
JERGENS
ALOE&
LANOLIN
Lip
Preserver
99$
DULCOLAX
Laxative
Jergens
Extra Dry
Skin Lotion
10 oz.
1.79
15 oz.
s2.79
ENCARE
Vaginal
Contraceptive .^
24
Inserts
'6.49
DULC
Laxative
Overnight Rphpl
10 Tablets ...>-.<..e.w
Qt*m Wo"*w Mew"'
s1.19 Du*co*ax
L A X A T I V
100 Tablets
s7.79
SLEEPINAL
Nighttime
Sleep-Aid
Capsules
32s
$3.99
S9fL

8
GRAPEFRUIT
Plus
Diet
Plan
.FAST---.- j

20s
s3.99
15 minutes to thour
Suppositories DUrCOicLX
7.49
ACTIFED
Capsules
ACTIFED
Jergens
Vitamin E
& Lanolin
Lotion
12 oz. Plus
6oz. FREE
s2.99
18 oz.
JERGENS
VITAMIN & LANOLIN
Skin Conditioning Bar
3.5 oz. 59c
4.75 oz. 73C
PROLAMINE
Appetite UKa?
Control LWEgtiU'r
Capsules '*,' *"" '"
50's 2.ai __
4.79 !"!-
ACTIFED
Nasal Decongestant
Antihistamine
ACTIFED
24 Tablets
s3.49
ACTIFED
12 Hour Capsules
'?( AP^j,l
a&
10's
i.99
CORTIZONE5
Creme lSdi
oi moY'
VaOZ.
s1.69
Corti
ZOIXJ4
ASPERCREME
Analgesic
Creme Rub
20 s $4.99
CONTROL
Cardi-Omega 3
FISH OIL CONCENTRATE
""fccethe Risk
factors of


Friday, October 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Right-Wing Zealot:
Is Holocaust Material Anti-Christian? Battle To Block Saudi *****Sale
Continued from Page 4-A
God to America." She also has
disparaged prelates of her own
church for warning against the
possibility of nuclear
destruction.
Father Robert Bullock,
board chairman of "Facing
History," called Price's ap-
praisal of the organization "ab-
surd." He knows its true value
as a teaching and teacher-
training unit. "It is imperative
for this valuable curriculum
concerning the Holocaust to be
used in our Catholics schools,"
he said.
It is noteworthy also that
during his American tour,
Pope John Paul II, in referring
pointedly to the Shoah
(Hebrew for annihilation) em-
phasized that he has assigned
to a special commission of
Catholic scholars the work of
preparing parochial school
texts dealing with the
Holocaust.
Some 35,000 educators and
15.000 other persons have pro-
ifited by "Facing History and
Ourselves" training courses.
| The carefully produced texts
are put to use by 450,000
school children annually, in
training seminars that bring
teachers from all over the
country to the Brookline,
Mass., headquarters of the
organization. Audiovisual
teaching aids and pertinent
material from Yale Univer-
sity's archives are
disseminated.
School administrators and
teachers in rural areas, aware
of the need to diminish
| stereotyping and to build
mutual respect among minori-
ty ethnic groups, are soon to
benefit by the supply of
teaching materials and the
assistance of members of Fac-
ing History and Ourselves,
now in its 12th year.
For a better understanding
of the firestorm about the
Holocaust teaching in the U.S.
Department of Education, the
| following facts are helpful:
"Facing History and
Ourselves" has long been ac-
credited by the Education
Department's National Diffu-
sion Network, which is man-
dated to help obtain model
teaching programs for
| dissemination.
The Department of Educa-
tion was in the process of try-
jjng to create a Program
significance Panel to deter-
mine whether a given program
would be generally acceptable
to those who provide education
| services to parents.
The proposed panel was
soon viewed by a number of
alert educators and con-
gressmen as a potential vehicle
'or censorship of superior pro-
Srams- In fact, Max Mc-
^nkey, a spokesman for the
Rational Diffusion Netowrk,
characterized the nascent
Pfnel as a body able to
Nackbal! educational pro-
grams for obvious ideological
|Purposes.
When it became clear that
nee was using her assign-
rent as a club with which to
Pummel "Facing History and
Ourselves," Ronald Preston .a
rVputy assistant secretary in
r* department's office of
pjucauonal research <* im-
provement, called the damage
a disaster and made it clear
that the department does not
want a ''stilted panel of
rightwing ideologues."
Two measures of the success
of "Facing History and
Ourselves" come from a
glance at a list of some of the
organizaitons that have pro-
vided grants, and a gratifying
undertaking in cooperation
with the famed Boston Public
Library.
Grantors include the Boston
Globe, General Cinema Corp.,
Ford Foundation, Bank of
Boston, Hearst Foundation,
the New York Times, Polaroid
Corporation, Boston Founda-
tion, Gannett Foundation,
Rockefeller Brothers Founda-
tion, Massachusetts Founda-
tion for the Arts and
Humanities and the Prudential
Foundation.
In April, when "Facing
History and Ourselves
brought an exhibit about Anne
Frank to the Boston Public
Library, 150,000 children,
teachers, and citizens from all
walks of life saw the im-
pressive displays. Prior to
that, the largest number of ex-
hibition viewers recorded by
the library was 50,000.
One deeply moved child
wrote in the guest book accom-
panying the exhibition:
"Heartbreak! Heartbreak!
Heartbreak!" People learning
of the wrong done to "Facing
History and Ourselves" by the
Education Department zealots
could well utter the same
lament.
Robert E. Segal is a former
newspaper editor and director
of the Jewish community coun-
cils of Cincinnati and Boston.
Israeli Arabs Move Closer
To West Bank Palestinians
"Feelings of Palestinian
solidarity have been gradually
developing between the Arabs
of Israel and the Arabs in the
West Bank and Gaza since the
Sue Day war." This is one of
the major conclusions of a new
study recently completed by
Tel Aviv University's Dayan
Center researcher, Dr. Elie
Rekhess.
Repercussions of the renew-
ed contact between the two
communities, the author
asserts, have affected all
segments of the Israeli Arab
political spectrum na-
tionalists, communisits and
Islamic fundamentalists alike.
Particularly influenced,
however, were representatives
of the moderate Arab camp.
These circles, Dr. Rekhess
suggests, underwent an inten-
sified process of Palestiniza
tion. Under the impact of the
West Bank and Gaza Arabs
they began to emphasize their
Arab "belongingness" and
their genuine Palestinian iden-
tity. Prominent figures such as
MKs Muhammad Watad and
Abdel Darausha have
demonstrated an increased in-
volvement in West Bank and
Gaza affairs.
The Study illustrates how
Rakah, the Israeli Communist
Party, played a decisive role in
consolidating the national, as
well as the cultural, sense of
solidarity and cohesion bet-
ween the Arabs in Israel and
those in the territories. The
party strongly relied on the
local communist cadres. Its
consisten struggle for civil and
national rights in the West
Bank and Gaza won the party
the local population's esteem
and appreciation.
Rise of the Progressive List
for Peace in 1984, however,
put an end to Rakah's
longstanding monopoly of the
presentation of the Israeli
Arabs' national aspiration.
Rekhess argues that the two
parties have begun to compete
over the question of who would
maintain better relations with
the Palestinian nationalist
leadership in the territories.
The new PLO policy was ful-
ly implemented in the West
Bank where the pro-PLO
press, for example, has seem-
ingly been instructed to direct
special attention to Israeli
Arab affairs. The nationalist
leadership in the territories
contributes its part by regular-
ly meeting with Arab leaders
from Israel and by par-
ticipating in political and
cultural events organized in
Israel by various Arab political
forces.
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
As the Reagan Administration
prepares to submit to Con-
gress a proposed arms sale
package for Saudi Arabia,
bipartisan majorities in both
the Senate and House are
making it clear that it will be
rejected. A letter signed by
225 members of the House was
delivered to the White House
and the State Department tell-
ing President Reagan that the
package will be opposed.
A letter signed by 62
Senators was delivered to
Reagan. Both letters scited a
belief that the Saudis have not
supported United States na-
tional interests in the Middle
East nor have they helped
combat international ter-
rorism as evidenced by Saudi
financial support for terrorist
groups such as the Palestine
Liberation Organization.
The House letter was in-
itiated by Reps. Larry Smith
(D. Fla.), Mel Levine (D.
Calif.), Dante Fascell (D. Fla.),
Tourists Up On
Israeli Gold Coast
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Tourism to Israel was up 25
percent during the first eight
months of 1987 compared to
the same period in 1986, the
Ministry of Immigration and
Absorption reported. The rise
was three percent compared to
1985 which was Israel's record
tourist year.
William Broomfield (R. Mich.),
Vin Weber (R. Minn.) and
Mickey Edwards (R. Okla.).
Sens. Alan Cranston (D. Calif.)
and Bob Packwood (R. Ore.)
initiated the Senate letter.
U.S. Senator Daniel Patrick
Moynihan (D-NY) and his wife,
Elizabeth, will receive the
American ORT Federation
Community Achievement
\ward at a dinner in their
honor Oct. 20 at the Sheraton
Centre in New York City.
Funds raised at the
testimonial dinner in their
honor will establish the Sen.
and Mrs. Daniel Patrick
Moynihan ORT Scholarship
Fund to assist students at ORT
vocational and technical train-
ing schools in Israel and in S3
other countries worldwide.
NOT JUST A
SUMMER CAMP EXPERIENCE
...it's a Happening!
Dear Everyone: what used t0 be the
We took a chance last ^^^oneers at the new LMffi
premier girls camp in ^?j^ week overnight camp. We were
POREST CAMP for boys and girts ^ |n fantasyland. And
scared at first but *hXfslulrnrners of our lives.
guess what we had the bes ^^ ^ want^
At Lake Forest, they **^ZS gymnastics to golf and
ssrjra--. about our *
See you soon.
TnekidsofUke Forest Gamp
LAKE FOREST CAMP
GET ACQUAINTED PARTY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 18 3:00-5:00 P.M.
HOLIDAY INN GOLDEN GLADES
2 Blocks East of Exit 826 off1-95
CALL 368-2267.. .For Details.. .Leave Name and Number


Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 9, 1987
Wiesenthal Denies Withholding
Information About Waldheim
By REINHARD ENGEL
VIENNA (JTA) Nazi-
hunter Simon Wiesenthal
denied here Monday that he
ever withheld information
regarding Austrian President
Kurt Waldheim's wartime ac-
tivities. At the same time he
referred to Waldheim as "a
burden for Austria" and
thought he should resign even
if it is determined he was not
personally involved in Nazi
atrocities but had knowledge
of them.
Waldheim's past. Fleming
thought the documents should
be published by non-Jewish
sources, Wiesenthal said.
Wiesenthal, who heads the
Nazi war crimes documenta-
tion center here, has been
criticized in the past for his
Wiesenthal spoke at a pr
to reply to
position that Waldheim, an in-
telligence officer in the Ger-
man army occupying the
Balkans during World War II,
must have known about
atrocities but had no power to
order them.
At his press conference Mon-
day, he said "If there was per-
sonal guilt and the Commis-
sion (of historians) finds out,
he (Waldheim) has to take the
consequences. If not, which I
think, if the Commission finds
out that he was one of the best
informed officers on the
Balkans without any personal,
individual guilt, he may decide
to step down from his office,
for the good of Austria."
Meanwhile, the first publicly
acknowledged meeting bet-
ween a leading Austrian
political figure and the World
Jewish Congress took place
here in an apparent *>*.?.
ease the strains which h.*
developed between A, 5fVe
r^ for nearly three hoursS
WJC president Edgar Bronf
man and other WJC offiS
He spoke in the nanTtf
Chancellor Franz Vranitzto
The participants said later that
the meeting was an import
move toward repairing |Wh
relations with Austria
press
conference called
media allegations that he
withheld information about
Waldheim. The matter was
raised after an Italian
newspaper, L'Epoca, publish-
ed a handwritten letter to
Wiesenthal from British
historian Gerald Fleming,
alluding to documents on
Waldheim's involvement in the
interrogation of British
firisoners of war who were
ater handed over to the SS
and executed.
Fleming, a member of an in-
ternational commission of
historians probing Waldheim's
past, asked Wiesenthal not to
publish the documents.
According to Wiesenthal,
Fleming wrote to him two
weeks after the West German
news magazine Der Spiegel
reported on Waldheim's alleg-
ed involvement in the inter-
rogations. Waldheim has
denied he was present but the
British Foreign Office con-
siders the allegations a fact.
Wiesenthal said Fleming's
request came during the
Austrian presidential elections
in the summer of 1986 when
there was an upsurge of anti-
Semitic sentiment in Austria
because of the World Jewish
Congress' exposure of
Israeli Army
Divided
Continued from Page 1-A
that the raid should not have
been carried out.
Gen. Bar Kochba's un-
precedented public criticism of
the Army's action has in-
furiated Chief of Staff Dan
Shomron, who has defended
the raid as a necessary strike
against an important PLO ter-
rorist headquarters.
Writing in the daily
Ha'arttz, military affairs cor-
respondent Ze'ev Schiff
defended Bar Kochba's
criticism of the raid. Although
the raid "was successful from
the purely operational point of
view" in that it "succeeded in
thwarting a terrorist attack
(on Israel)," Schiff wrote, it
was nevertheless "immoral"
to strike at PLO sites in
civilian areas.
Schiff claimed that many
Israeli Army officers endorse
the "purity of weapons" con-
cept, "and that is the reason
why Israel does not respond
immediately with heavy shell-
ings of the Shi'ite villages
whenever a katyusha rocket is
launched at the Galilee."
THE
ORIGINAL
Wolfie's 21
THE WORLD'S MOST FAMOUS DELI-RESTAURANT
"WHERE THE ELITE MEET TO EAT!"
Collins Avenue & 21st Street on Miami Beach
NOW OPEN 24 HOURS!
"In the heart of Miami Beach s Historic Art Deco District
*eAKF4
^ SPECIALS r
*
AMVffYULQfVTl
xm*, um*w en mm, *^ m
BE
SPECIALS
CHOOSE mom 6 DELICIOUS
ENTREES!
$2*5
WOM
O ENJOY 4>
WOLFIE'S
SPECIAL
MIDNIGHT SNACKS
MENU"
11 PMT0 4AM
0
TRADITIONAL
FRIDAY NIGHT
DINNER
0
Special Menu
Includes: Choice of Two
Appetizers; Choice of Soup;
Choice of Entree; Choice of
6 Desserts. Plus: Choice of
Potatoes; Tzimmess; Vegetable
or Apple Sauce. Rolls & Butter.
Coffee, Tea or Fountain
Beverage. Our famous tabla
relishes!
ENTREES:
Roaat Brisket of Baaf
Broiled Filet of Sola _
Stuff ad Cabbaga.
Roaat '/>-Chicken .
Chicken in tha Pot
.9.95
7.95
7.95
7.95
8.95
Complimentary Glass of Wins
Owned and operated by WOLFIE'S RESTAURANT, INC., Joaeph Navel, Chairman; David H. Navel. President 1


Friday, October 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
Jewish Museum Displays Dreyfus Affair Exhibit
it By ROCHELLE SAIDEL
NEW YORK (JTA)
"The Dreyfus Affair: Art,
Truth and Justice," on view at
the Jewish Museum here
through Jan. 14, 1988, is a
remarkable testimony to the
interaction of politics, art and
the press, using original works
of high and popular art,
newspapers, early cinema,
photographs and memorabilia.
This major exhibit surveys
the circumstances surrounding
the arrest and exoneration 12
years later of Captain Alfred
Dreyfus, a French army of-
ficer and an assimilated Alsa-
tian Jew.
In 1894, Dreyfus was charg-
ed in France on false evidence
of spying. He was subsequent-
ly stripped of his rank, con-
demned to life imprisonment
on Devil's Island, retried on
appeal, reconvicted, ex-
onerated, and in 1906
reinstated in the army with
high honors. The exhibit clear-
ly demonstrates that anti-
Semitism was a major factor in
the Dreyfus Affair.
Grandson of Dreyfus, Dr.
Jean-Louis Levy of Paris, said
at the opening of the exhibit
last month that Dreyfus was
isolated on Devil's Island for
1,237 days. He was able to sur-
vive only because he had
sworn an oath to his wife and
children that he would regain
the honor of his name, Levy
said.
"During the Dreyfus case,
an explorer was caught in the
polar ice. When he was
rescued, his first question was:
'Is Dreyfus free'? Levy said.
"We must never stop asking
ourselves this very question. Is
Dreyfus free?"
"The Dreyfus Affair was a
lesson for the 20th century
because it established the
modern role of politically
engaged intellectuals," exhibit
curator Norman Kleeblatt
said.
In the introductory chapter
of the exhibit catalogue,
Kleeblatt states: "The posi-
tions of the opinion makers vis-
a-vis the military, the church,
the fallen monarchy,
capitalism, and the highly visi-
Ible Jewish community were
polarized into two perhaps too
I simplistic factions the
Dreyfusards and the anti-
Deryfusards ... The Affair
established for the first time in
history a new role of social and
I political activism for writers,
I artists, and academicians, set-
ting the pace for the involve-
I merit of the same groups in the
I ever more pressing and har-
I rowing dilemmas of the 20th
Israel Beats Inflation
GENEVA (JTA) Israel
J the world in beating down
I !",V^10n ,ast ye*1" according to
I ILO Information," the mon-
I uy newsletter of the Interna-
I onal Labor Organization, a
I he Natiow agency based
I The newsletter said 1986
I 7 t^mm Point for several
25?? *?" b* &a0Pn >n-
Jjtoon In Israel, the inflation
I aS p!ummeti from 185 per-
I2L2J5 I**- bo"**
2K? '^aton from 175 per-
K, ? Percent- Argentina
KSn?! to 82 Pe^ent and
I Brazil from 228 to 68 percent.
century. In fact the term in-
tellectual as it is understood
today has its roots in the
France of the Affair."
Exhibit's blazing newspaper
headlines dramatize the per-
vasiveness of the case in
French society. In addition to
the famous "J'Accuse" of
Emile Zola in the Jan. 13,1898
Aurore, there are numerous
pro-and-anti-Dreyfus
headlines and news posters.
If Zola's "J'Accuse" an
open letter to the President of
France, which denounced the
perpetrators of the injustice
against Dreyfus was the
prototype of Dreyfusard press,
the anti-Semite Edouard Dru-
mont, editor of the journal La
Libre Parole, was the per-
sonification of the anti-
Dreyfusard press.
His journal, launched in
1892, assailed Jews in the ar-
my and the Dreyfusards. Six
years earlier, Drumont had
written La France Juive, at-
tacking Jews in finance and
rehashing medieval anti-
Semitism.
In the foreword of the ex-
hibit catalogue, Eugen Weber,
New Air Force Chief
Takes Command
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVTV (JTA) Maj.
Gen. Avihu Bin-Nun, a
Harvard-educated flying ace
credited with downing a
Soviet-piloted MIG over Egypt
17 years ago, took command of
the Israel Air Force in
ceremonies at an Air Force
base in southern Israel.
He succeeded Maj. Gen.
Amos Lapidot who is retiring
after 34 years in the military,
the last five as Air Force com-
mander. Bin-Nun, 48, married
with five children, was born in
Israel. He received a
bachelor's degree from Tel
Aviv University and a
master's degree in business
administration from Harvard.
He also attended courses at
the U.S. Air Force senior staff
college.
Bin-Nun's encounter with a
Soviet-built MIG flown by a
Russian pilot occurred over
the Suez Canal in 1970, during
the war of attrition with
Egypt. Bin-Nun takes com-
mand of the Air Force at a
time of stringent budget cuts
for the entire Israel Defense
Force, including the govern-
ment's recent cancellation of
the Lavi fighterplane project
for economic reasons.
Bin-Nun himself opposed the
Lavi, arguing that it absorbed
funds needed for other vital
weapons systems. He told
Israel Radio Tuesday that the
Air Force is a "quality ser-
vice" and would remain such,
even without the Lavi. But it
will have to re-work its long-
term plans, update its training
program and plan new
weapons systems and combat
methods, he said.
In a related story the
Defense Ministry gave Israel
Aircraft Industries (IAI) per-
mission Friday to complete a
third prototype of the Lavi
fighterplane in order to
develop a new avionics system
incorporated into the aircraft.
The Lavi project was canceled
by the government last month.
a prominent historian of
modern European history,
describes the Dreyfus Affair
as the first long-running media
event. He says:
"It was the anti-Semitic
press that pushed hesitant
military officials into pro-
secuting and convicting
Dreyfus on flimsy evidence. It
was in the press that the ad-
vocates of revision made their
case. It was a press hungry for
sensational fare to serve up to
its public that launched the
tales of Jewish, clerical,
military, or foreign plots and
counterplots, which turned a
mere court case into an Affair
and endowed it with moral and
historical dimensions. Without
the press, there would have
been no Dreyfus Affair.
Without the press Dreyfus
would not have been vin-
dicated. We may regard the
scandal of Dreyfus as the first
great triumph of the Fourth
Estate."
Regarding the anti-Semitism
that permeated the Dreyfus
Affair, Weber says: "Explana-
tions of anti-Semitism come
from as many directions as do
rationalizations of anti-
Semitism. None seems to me
as forceful as the fact that
history and cultural tradition
made Jews the resident aliens
par excellence."
French Jewry was the first
emancipated European Jewish
community, obtaining equality
with other citizens of the
French Republic in 1791.
Exhibit's collection of mass-
produced popular culture
items that reflect the Affair
can be viewed as precursors of
similar current items. Fin-de-
siecle ladies' fans, children's
cartoons, board games, picture
postcards and other curiosities
with Dreyfusard and anti-
Dreyfusard themes can be
compared with today's Oliver
North T-shirts and Pope John
Paul II masks, garden
sprinklers, and "Pope corn
the blessed in the West." But
current headlines and related
souvenirs are quickly passe,
and the Dreyfus Affair held
the French public interest for
12 years.
Highlight of the exhibit is a
room which displays and
chronicles the involvement of
some of the major artists of
the day. "It is still unsettling
to realize that it was the
Dreyfus Affair that caused the
break between two important
artists (Edgar) Degas and
(Camille) Pissarro, who had
been fast friends," Kleeblatt
says.
The Dreyfusard camp includ-
ed such prestigious painters as
issarro. Claude Monet, Mary
Cassatt, and Jean-Edouard
Vuillard; anti-Dreyfusards in-
cluded Degas, Paul Cezanne
and Pierre- August* Renoir.
"On the surface, the Affair
was as immediate as the latest
newspaper or broadside. On a
more fundamental level
more evident in the fine arts
there were basic social and
ethical issues at stake,"
museum director Joan Rosen-
baum says in the preface of the
catalogue. She refers to "the
responsibility of the press, the
power of the individual versus
the state, the role of the artist
and intellectual in society, and
the insidious nature of anti-
Semitism."
"A SPECTACULAR HIT!"
"A PRICELESS TICKET TO SOUTH FLORIDA'S
JEWISH & KOSHER MARKET!"
ITS THE OPPORTUNITY
YOU HAVE BEEN WATTING FOR...
SOUTH FLORIDA'S DYNAMIC A THRIVING
JEWISH A KOSHER MARKET WILL BE THE FOCUS...
DECEMBER 4-7.1987 MIAMI BEACH CONVENTION CENTER MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA
Join the impressive list of Kosher Food Manufacturers, Distributors, Retailers, Caterers,
Jewish Life product suppliers, providers of services to the Jewish Community and major
organizations who have already booked space for the giant show.
CONFIRMED EXHIBITORS .
TOUCH Of TORAH INC ESPLANADE HOTIl MORRIS KATZ ART STUDIO RAMAOA RENAISSANCE THE CAREFULLY CHOSEN. INC
AGRIVIN FAMIGLIAINC KINERET KOSHER FOOOS HOTEL CONTINENTAL HOTEL
ALLEGIS TRADING FE LDMFJM PUBLISHING KIPRAH-ART INC RONZONl (GENERAL FOOOSl EGBI
CORPORATON FiBREWEiGh KITCHEN ART SANK A (GENERAL FOOOSl EMBASSY RESTAURANT
AMERICAN FRIENDS FOUNTAINSUAu KOSHER KORNER SANS SOUCI HOTEL EMUNAH WOMEN OF AMERICA
Of ATERET COHAMM HILTON RESORT RESTAURANT SCHAPIRO S WINE CO LTO FFKENOS OF IDF
American friends FRIDAY S IMPORTED KOZY SHACK SETTON INTERNATIONAL GERSCHWALD PRODUCTS
Of MO EZRAH BREADCRUMBS KRUM S CHOCOLATIERS FOODS Of COPENHAGEN
AMERICAN STANOAR0 FRIENOS Of LUBAVITCH LEGUME iNC SHELSOURNE HOTEL IRON Of MIAMI
technology corp Of FLORIOA LUBKOM COMMUNICATIONS SHOTAR KOSHER FOOOS JERUSALEM PIZZA
Ml rican news! GAVLE WEISS CO MAOAN KOSHER FOOOS SHUfRA CHOCOLATES JEWISH ELORIDLAN
YOUTH FOUNDATION AMER JEWISH HOME MARC MART'S SIMCHA CANDLE CO JOPCOINC
AMTT WOMEN GENERAL f OOOS PUBLISHING CO SPICE TIME fOOOS INC MASA DA IMPORTS
M COTTONS HEBREW NATIONAL MAZEL SKULL UWTEO SYNAGOGUE NATIONAL COUNCIL Of
MAJ MTH WOMEN KOSHER fOOOS INC CAP CORPORATION Of AMERICA YOUNG ISRAEL
BARROW f COOS h J HfMZ MEHAORM DAIRY VACATION STATION TOURS PARAMOUNT BAKEMASTER
BARTONS HEISIER fOOOS MENDEL S HAY MIS" BRA NO VISUAL IMPACT soc
BERNAN FOODS HOD LAVAN TURKEY MESORAH VITA TECH SHAARE TZEDEK
am T- amerKa PROO Of ISRAEL LTD PUBLICATIONS LTD WWON f COOS INC SHELAT KOSHER FOOOS
CAlLIGRAPMERSINK HOUSE Of SEAGRAM THE MIAMI JEWISH TRIBUNE WORLO TABLEWARE MIL SHALOM TELEVISION SHOW
CASTU PREABER HOTEL IMIE MOUSTWES MC MOGEN DAVID I ANNAI ART SINAI KOSHER FOOOS CORP
CLAROGE HOUSE HTl KOSHER KOSHER MEATS IAYINCORP SUEGO BALGLEY T-SHIRTS
NURSING HOME DISTRIBUTORS MRS WEMMRGS
SUKItOMG
COORD HANKING ISRAEL GOVERNMENT FOOD PRODUCTS WE WELCOME TREE Of LIFE T\
tC* PROFESSIONAL CRYSTAL UGMT BEVERAGES TouamofncE ISRAEL HSTAORUT MUSEUM Of THE MKVEH NAT l HEBREW ISRAELI OURNEWEXMIBITORS TURfERWARE 21 KARAT
(GENERAL FOOOSl fOUNOATON GIFT CENTER ACME SUPREME Of FLORIDA VERSAILLES HOTEL
OS FAMOUS INC JASON DABTV PRODUCTS NATURAL WAY MAUS. MC AMERICAN FRIENOS OF WINN Din SUPERMARKET
DAGIMTAMOMM JEWISH BRAA.LE NATURE FRESH INC MXiOALOMR WORLO ZIONIST
ovhastygems INSTITUTE NEEMAN S ORIGINAL ART AMERICAN GATHERING Of ORGANIZATION
EATMORFOCOS JEWISH PRESS JEWISH WORLO NOAM GOURMET INC OL ANA CORP HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS AMERICAN JEWISH RADIO
Of MIAMI. INC TMAMRBfORRUBmBIMB
f I AL AMINES JOHN S RAVIOLI GROUP JUOAICA ENTERPRISES PALETA FROnmxT INTLCORP NETWORK AMRAM EGBI ART STUOO OUR IIHNHTOR ROB MR
EMPMW KOSHER %mMnw
poultry me KAREN! KAPLAN PENTA HOTEL RAMA ALE
ENTENMANN S INC KOSHER CATERERS POST CEREALS BEST HEALTH NATURAL ItMM tn BWmrt S7
ERGO MEDIA INC KASHRUS MAGAZINE 1 GENERAL FOOOSl BEVERAGES
THE EXPO WILL BE MORE THAN THREE TIME* BIOOER...AND BETTER TOO!
e Triple the size of the first Expo in New York City... More Kosher food tasting..
Mont exhibitor!.. Mora entertainment.
Mora draoiays...____________________________________ Celebrities... prizes..._______________
General Admission $6.00 Group Admission $4.00 (minimum 30 rickets)
Limited Exhibitor space available
Israel
*&"*'
/
call our office for Information and reservations.
South Florida Office
THE INTERNATIONAL KOSHER FOOOS A JEWISH LIFE EXPO
4400 North Federal Highway. Suite 210-13
Boca Raton. Florida 33431
(800) 356-4404 (tod tree in Florida) (305) 394-3795 (Boca Raton)
OFFICIAL HEADOUARTERS: DISCOUNT AIR FARES:
Hotel Sans Souo and Hotel Versailles Eastern Airiines/Barttett Travel
(800) 327-8470 (800) 332-1133
I


?age 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 9, 1987
v
Promenade Pulls Tourists
To Its Magnetic Site
By DAVID LANDAU
NEAR JERUSALEM -
One of this city's most fre-
quented tourist sites is neither
an archaeological site nor a
religious shrine and is not even
six months old. The Walter
and Elise Haas Promenade,
already fondly called "the pro-
menade," attracts hundreds of
visitors every day.
Built along a ridge some 2.5
miles to the south of the Old
City, the three block-long
walkway commands a
breathtaking view of the
Mount of Olives, Mount
Scopus, the Old City walls and
the modern city.
Of course, the view has
always existed; drivers on
their way to the suburb of East
Talpiot would peek at it as
they wound their way along
the narrow road. Or people
walking through the woods on
the steep hillside below the
United Nations Middle East
headquarters could gaze at the
historic landscape. But only
privileged visitors to the UN
building, formerly the
residence of the British High
Commissioner, could ap-
preciate the full majestic view.
Now one can stroll along the
six-yard-wide promenade,
built next to the recently
widened and straightened road
leading to the UN building and
East Talpiot, and see the full
east-to-west panorama.
The promenade was official-
ly opened on Jerusalem Day
last May, but rumor of the
superb view had spread long
before then. On Independence
Day, three weeks earlier,
groups of Jerusalemites
already were gathering there.
Indeed, the promenade,
Ida Nudel
Continued from Page 1-A
was summoned by Rudolf
Kutznetsov, head of Moscow
OVIR (emigration bureau) and
told to return to Bendery to
get her papers in order
because she had permission to
emigrate.
Nudel told the Israeli
reporters that it will take
several weeks before she
leaves for Israel, due mainly to
the volume of paper work. "I
will not remain here even one
extra moment," she said. "I
am so excited I want to cry. I
am looking forward to come
home, to Israel."
She added, "I am beginning
to accept the fact that I am not
a refusenik any more. Most of
all, I want to be a normal
Israeli citizen, and take my
place in Israeli society. And I
will, of course, work for the
release of all my friends who I
will be leaving behind."
Meanwhile, another former
Prisoner of Conscience, Yosef
Bernstein, 50, of Kiev, is ex-
pected to arrive in Israel with
his wife next Sunday. Berns-
tein, an industrial engineer,
had been seeking an exit visa
since June 1975. In 1984 he
was sentenced to four years'
imprisonment for "resisting
police." He was released a
year early after a review of his
case.
which is built in the form of a
viaduct of Jerusalem stone
with a Victorian solidity
reminiscent of the Thames and
Seine embankments, is rarely
empty. Joggers measure out a
full kilometer from the parking
lot to the end of the pro-
menade and back. Elderly
gentlemen walk briskly,
perhaps at the suggestion of
their cardiac specialists. Cour-
ting couples sit in the stone
alcoves covered with slated
wooden roofs. Numerous stone
benches line the walkway.
At night, when the pro-
menade is romantically lit by
wrought-iron lanterns, the
visitor can appreciate the
floodlighting of the Old City
walls and can easily spot the
bright lights above the
Western Wall.
Yet, the hour just before
sunset is the most popular
time at the promenade, when a
cool wind blows across the
ridge, even at the height of
summer. Then the Old City's
limestone walls reflect the
pink-gold evening light, and
the golden dome of the Mosque
of Omar glints in the setting
hills of the Judean desert
leading down to the Dead Sea.
The southern wall of the Tem-
ple Mount is clearly visible,
and the keen-sighted visitor
can just pick out signs of the
archaeological park below.
The promenade, donated by
the Haas family of San Fran-
cisco, was designed by U.S. ar-
chitect Larry Halperin and
Israeli landscape architect
Shlomo Aronson.
The area around and below
the stonework is being *
with gardens, though theS
ners point out that thev X
& Pr0tect ^e na*S
fauna of the area wWk Z~
area, which is a
transition zone between the
Mediterranean region to the
west and theJudean Desert to
the east. The breathtaking
view will improve. *
sun.
Israel Rejects USSR Offer
The promenade is now a
"must" on the itinerary of
every tourist here. Busloads of
visitors spill out onto semi-
circular stone observation
platform in the middle of the
site. They sit on the wide ter-
races of this amphitheater and
listen to their guides recount
the story of Jerusalem. It is
easier to understand the
jwth of the original City of
ivid on when you can see the
hills.
On a clear day, you can even
see the Hills of Moab in Jordan
to the east, as well as the arid
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel rejected an offer by the
Soviet Union that the two
countries open "interest of-
fices" in Tel Aviv and Moscow,
respectively, as a temporary
substitute for the re-
establishment of full
diplomatic relations which the
USSR broke 20 years ago,
Maariv reported Wednesday.
According to Maariv, the of-
fer was made by Soviet
Foreign Minister Eduard
Shevardnadze when he met
with Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres in New York Interest of-
fices, the lowest level of
diplomatic representatives
were established by Israel and
Poland earlier this year and
soon will be established by
Israel and Hungary.
Shevardnadze told Peres it
would be a "step to improve
relations" between their coun-
tries, Maariv reported. But
Peres turned him down, saying
Israel-USSR relations must be
on a higher level than relations
with Poland and Hungary.
Find out how good
we really are
in the U.S.
New York
Boston
Chicago
Seattle
Portland
Anchorage
Denver
Salt Lake City
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
San Francisco
San Diego
Honolulu
San Juan
St. Louis
Kansas City
Wichita
Des Moines
Oklahoma City
Phoenix
Palm Springs
Cincinnati
Pat Chiarotti, Flight Attendant
TWA is one of the most convenient ways to fly all over the US. You can
reach over 80 places, including Hawaii, Alaska and the Caribbean.
You'll also save money on TWA. We have affordable fares to everywhere
we fly, including terrific Super Savers. And of course you're always flying with
the dedicated people of TWA who make everything a pleasure. It begins with
the convenience of Airport Express? where all your boarding passes are taken
care of in advance, and it doesn't end until your final destination.
So call your travel agent or Today's TWA at 371-7471
KOSHER MEALS ARE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST
TODAY'S TWA. FIND OUT HOW GOOD WE REALLY ARE.


Dade's Guardianship Program Shines Amid Scandal
The fear of becoming dependent and, subsequently, incompetent
leads widowed men, especially, to decompensate quickly in
isolation.
Continued from Page 1-A
Repensek: "In some
ways you become a
minor."
step to take," Repensek says.
"What you're doing is basical-
ly removing a person's ability
to make decisions on his own.
You lose the right to vote, you
can't drive, you can't enter in-
to contracts.
"In some ways you become,
from a legal point of view, a
minor."
The court-appointed guar-
dian, in some cases, has actual-
ly had to make a decision
whether a person should have
major emergency surgery or
be removed from a life-support
system."
Yet, despite the seriousness
of a guardian taking control
over an incompetent person
there are an estimated 3,000
people in Dade County who
could be adjudicated incompe-
tent and in need of a guardian,
according to an informal
survey Repensek recently con-
ducted. And there are at least
1,000 to 1,800 persons who
could be added to that list an-
nually. The agency's current
$640,000 annual budget, per-
mits only 310 active cases.
THE HISTORY OF the
guardianship program goes
back to 1973 when the JFS,
then called Jewish Family and
Children's Services, identified
a growing elderly population,
particularly on South Miami
Beach, that was in need of
more protective services than
were available.
"Some were eating out of
garbage cans, some were liv-
ing in South Beach in hotels
where the managers would
take their Social Security
checks and give them $4 or $5
and keep the rest for so-called
rent," recalls Sam Smith, an
attorney who was the first
president of the Guardianship
Program of Dade County.
"Obviously, there weren't
families available (to act as
guardians) and the court need-
ed someone to be available to
the people who were ad-
judicated incompetent," says
Jeffrey Newman, current
president of JFS.
"I DO remember the con-
cerns the board had about
becoming a guardian and that
we had to look at the legal
Continued on Page 2-B
Argentina Weeps For Lost Jews:
America Welcomes New Emigres
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writor
Argentina may indeed have
cause to weep: After over two
decades of intermittent
political and economic unrest
with attendant anti-Semitism,
much of Argentina's once
thriving Jewish community
emigrated to Israel, the
united States and Europe.
Those who have chosen to
emain behind may fear a
Possible
resurgence of anti-
Semitic sentiment or of losing
tneir Jewish identity through
assimilation and intermar-
riage, according to some
Argentinean Jews now living
in South Florida.
"I left Argentina in my last
grade of high school," says
Yossi Teitelbaum, director of
Hebraica, a North Dade
Jewish community center
geared to Jews from Latin-
American countries.
Teitelbaum, who originally
moved to Israel, left Argentina
during a period when many
Jews decided to emigrate.
"There was a very strong
wave of anti-Semitism from
1961-63 that followed Adolf
Eichmann's capture," explains
Teitelbaum. Eichmann was ab-
ducted by Israelis from Argen-
tina in 1960. He had been liv-
ing there under an assumed
identity for ten years.
"The anti-Semitism was a
reaction caused by a na-
tionalistic feeling that the
Israelis had no right to enter
Argentina to kidnap
Eichmann," Teitelbaum
recounts.
"That was the main reason
why I left. I was very deeply
involved with the Jewish com-
munity, very visible, and I
Continued on Page 6-B
Our
UM and Barry:
FIU Plans
New Judaic
Program
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
TIME TO STAKE OUT our
turf and declare our purpose,"
says Stephen Fain of Florida
International University's
fledgling Institute of Judaic
Studies.
"We are still forming,
though," admits Fain, who is
director of the institute,
originally conceived of two
years ago "but only in its in-
fancy now."
"Most university projects
haven't succeeded without out-
side support and sponsorship,"
he explains.
Comprising a small group of
people from the university and
local community, the institute
"represents an effort on the
part of FIU to bring into the
university community aspects
of Jewish thought and culture,
and to present them in such a
way as to reflect Jewish con-
tributions to the development
of Western civilization.'
Fain contends that Jewish
contributions to disciplines
such as history, literature,
philosophy and music are often
overlooked in college courses.
"When it comes to religious
thought, most people are
familiar with Thomas Aquinas,
not with Hillel or Rashi. In
history class, most students
learn about the fertile cres-
cent, about ancient Greece .
and not the history of Jewish
contributions.'' Fain says.
THE INSTITUTE OF
JUDAIC STUDIES, he hopes,
will help change all that.
"The goal is that the in-
stitute would have impact on
relevant departments and pro-
grams in the university, and on
the community as well," says
Fain.
"At this point in time, what
we would like to do is raise the
necessary money to endow
professorships in individual
departments. For example, we
would try to acquire a pro-
fessor in the history depart-
ment with an area of expertise
in medieval, modern or ancient
Jewish history."
By encouraging the endow-
Continued on Page 3-B
4No' Vote
on Bork
Senators Lawton Chiles
and Robert Graham have
said "no" on Bork. Both
Florida statesmen spoke
on the floor of the Senate
Wednesday to indicate
they intend to vote against
confirmation of Judge
Robert H. Bork as a
Supreme Court justice
should the matter come to
the full Senate.
Community
Friday, October t, 1987 The Jewish Floridian Section B


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 9, 1987

America Welcomes Argentineans
With Religious Freedom
Continued from Page 1-B
belonged to a left-wing
group."
That organization was a
reform party seeking to
change church involvement
with public schools, according
to Teitelbaum.
"Right wing forces in the
high school were planning to
damage me," he recalls. "The
advice of a conscientious
educator was to leave the
school, or perhaps even leave
the city. When I heard that, I
thought, 'I'm going to leave
this place and go to where I
belong, where no one will point
a finger at me and say, he is a
Jew.' "
Teitelbaum made aliyah to
Israel, where he fought in
three wars. It was after the
Sue-Day War that he returned
to Argentina as a shaliach, to
work with the Jewish com-
munity there and encourage
immigration to Israel.
Many of the Jews who had
not left Argentina in the early
Have a problem
with your
subscription?
We want to solve
it to your com-
plete satisfaction,
and we want to
do It fast. Please
write to:
Jewlen Ftortdtan.
.O. Box 012973,
MUml, Fla. 33101
You can help us
by attaching your
address label
here, or copy
your name and
address as it
appears on your
label. Send this
along with your
correspondence
Moving
Simply attach the mailing label
from this paper and write in your
new address below (Please allow
4 weeKs.i
Your New Address Ooee Here
Nam*
AOOrws
:
Or
StaM
Z
Subscription
Rate:
52 issues $9 00
Z. Renewal [ New Order
For Fast
it is better to write us concern-
ing your problem and include the
address label. Also, address
changes are handled more
efficiently by mail However
should you need to reach us
quickly the following number
is available
373-4605
eJewish Floridian
MX I
,Ra J3101
sixties, spurred by the wave of
anti-Semitic sentiment, left
Argentina in the mid to late
sixties, influenced by
patriotism for Israel and by an
economic crisis in Argentina at
that time.
Teitelbaum got married in
Argentina during that period,
and then returned to Israel
with his wife.
He went back to Argentina
in 1977, this time to help the
Jews who were in danger of
becoming "desaparendos,"
the term for those who "disap-
peared" during Argentina's
military regime.
"There was a military junta
in the mid-seventies, and
almost all of my and my wife's
family were still living there.
Many of my students and
friends were among the
desaparecidos.
"The military knew that
there were about 5,000
politically-dangerous people,
and they understood that to
get to them they would have to
go through ten, a hundred
times as many people," says
Teitelbaum, citing a common
perception among the Jewish
community.
(Allegedly, the military
would arrest a person
suspected of involvement with
some political party or issue,
and then confiscate all notes
and phone books found in that
person's house. Person listed
in those books were then
arrested.)
"And then the same thing
with the next person. It was a
kind of chain," says
Teitelbaum. "If some friend
you knew was desaparecido.
the first thing you tried to do
was escape, because you were
next."
Teitelbaum, sent to Argen-
tina to establish a special pro-
gram of aliyah to the Galil,
tried to help those people who,
although innocent of any
political involvement, had
friends who had already
"disappeared" and might be
subject to arrest.
"The military would
specifically give a much harder
time to a guy or a girl with a
Jewish name, not only by tor-
turing them a little bit more,
making them suffer a bit more
physically, but also by making
them suffer more emotional-
ly," Teitelbaum recounts.
But the Jewish community
was organized to defend itself
if necessary, and "we knew
that no matter what happened,
it wouldn't be like Germany."
according to Teitelbaum.
Yet despite recalling Argen-
tina as a country where "you
are aware of waves of anti-
Semitism wherever you walk,
at every corner." Teitelbaum
is nostalgic for his country of
birth.
"I miss the people, I miss my
friends, both Jewish and gen-
tile, and I miss the streets of
the city I grew up in. I always
enjoy visiting and feel very sad
when I have to leave, but I
know that I have something
much better than what
leave."
Reflecting for a moment,
Teitelbaum adds: "And yet I
think somehow that I will
always be an Argentinean."
Teitelbaum: 'And yet
I think somehow that
I mill always be an
Argentinean.'
Margarita Terkiel left
Argentina with her husband
and the eldest of her three
children 27 years ago, because
of economic factors.
She does not recall en-
countering any anti-Semitism
in Buenos Aires, Argentina's
capital, where she was born
and lived before emigrating.
"I didn't have anv problem
in that way. but after I left,
maybe ten years later in 1979
or so, they had a military junta
and many people had problems
with anti-Semitism." Terkiel
recalls.
Anti-Semitism was often the
result of a combination of fac-
tors, such as a Jewish name,
being a student, and involve-
ment with politics," she adds.
"The Jews were more
suspect, more distrusted," she
asserts.
Terkiel believes that from
her vantage point in the
United States, she may have
been more aware of the plight
of her countrymen than many
of the Argentinean Jews
themselves.
"I was involved with the
Jewish Federation in Argen-
tina, and from the Jewish
Federation you can find out a
lot of things. I felt very bad
because we received letters
from people whose families
had disappeared.
Teitelbaum:
'Argentinean Jews
comprise a
questimated 20
percent of the Latin
Jewish community.'
An exact figure is not
available, as the
Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's
1982 demographic
study ofDade County
Jewry did not include
a question about
country of origin in
its survey.
"But when I told my
relatives there, about the
detaparecidos. about the
slaughter we found out, they
said, 'everything is fine in
Argentina.! They didn't know
anything," Terkiel recounts.
"Those were very bad
years," she says. "It was like
in the Holocaust, with the con-
centration camps."
Terkiel originally went back
to Argentina after a year and a
half, after trying to adjust to
life in the United States and
finding the transition difficult.
She subsequently returned to
Miami.
"I decided that my life would
have to be in the United
COLONIA PALACI0S
rmtmm or. uita n
V'~J0 -
Propiedad del Dr. Don Pedro Palacios
BOLETO DE COMPRA-VENTA
_ w a" > "t~ fi ^i.i v.y- w '... ,
, I L. A -, *-* M ~ ** "uj.
u. ../.' .iftcf*
... mfi JU *&,
. u..., '// .#*V &> ,
,...* ir- -*"-
to**** eV r$ MM*
S2&Z -4f
/, .;,
The deed of tale of the land for MoieesviUe in 1889. Maixlde Tropp
was born and raited in the Jewish "shtetl" of Moisesville.
States," she recalls. "I saw
many things I didn't like in
Argentina.'
What she saw, she says,
were the signs of what was to
come, with the military junta
and the desaparecidos.
Terkiel admits to missing
Argentina "the family is
more together there, I think,
the social life is better over
there." but is pleased that her
children are more American
than Argentinean.
"You can't live in two coun-
tries." she contends. "You
have to live in one. You have to
adjust."
Matiled and Angel Tropp
and their children were the on-
ly Jews in the small town of
Acevedo in Argentina, where
they had moved so that Angel
could open his medical
practice.
"We had good friends, good
years there, but there wasn't
any Jewish education
available." Matilde recalls.
The city of Rosario, where
the Tropps lived before mov-
ing to Acevedo, "used to have
a large Jewish community, but
people emigrated to Israel and
other places. They are a
minority now." according to
Matilde.
Yet even when Matilde went
to high school there, she was
"maybe the only Jew, or there
might have been one other."
She does not recall any in-
cidents of anti-Semitism.
"This is the problem. We
feel fine. You don't feel
isolated, you fed Argentinean.
That is why there are so many
intermarriages," she
contends.
"It's a sad thing in Argen-
tina for the young people."
Matilde adds. "It's so easy to
fall in love and intermarry at a
young age."
The Tropps came to the
United States to give their
children a Jewish education.
Matilde Tropp:
'Moisesville Such a
small point on the
map, but big in my
heart.'
and Matilde speaks regretfully
of "children from strongly
religious families in Argentina
getting married with members
of other faiths."'
Matilde grew up in a very-
Jewish home, in the town call-
ed Moisesville. where she says
"everyone was Jewish.''
"It was like a shtetl. The land
was bought by Baron Hirsch
from the government, for
Jews fleeing Russia. Matilde
explains.
There are not as many Jews
in Moisesville as there once
were, but Matilde says that she
cherishes the memory of how
her town used to be.
"I looked up Moisesville in a
Jewish encyclopedia, and I felt
so many emotions when 1 saw
a picture of it such a small
point on the map. but big in my
heart."
Matilde misses her family in
Argentina and admits that she
is somewhat nostalgic for
years gone by. but basically.
she says, she is "happy to be
living in this land."
For her grandchildren
someday-to-be-born. Maulde
hopes for the best of three
cultures.
"The Spanish and Jewish
culture. I think, teaches you to
think with your heart. Here in
the United States, we learn to
think with our brains Learn.
she says instead, "to male
decisions with heart ana
mind."
Thinking with both heart
and mind is not always easj^
Dr. Angd Tropp had been a
Ceatiaaed ea Pat* S-B


FIU Adds Judaic Program
To Those of Barry and UM
Friday.JMober 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Continued from Page 1-B
ment of professorships in
departments such as
philosophy, literature, music
and religion to individuals with
special interest in areas per-
taining to Judaica, Fain
believes that Jewish contribu-
tions in those fields, long
overlooked, will now receive
proper attention and study.
"These kind of people living
as a group within the universi-
ty will provide an opportunity
Overview: FIU
Institute is different
from other programs
and not in
competition with
them.
for the infusion of appropriate
Jewish contributions into our
reflections on the past, present
and future," Fain asserts.
The institute is intended to
foster both teaching and
research, according to Fain. It
is unlike other Jewish study
programs (at Barry University
and the University of Miami)
in that it does not plan to
create a course of study
towards a degree.
WHEN PEOPLE THINK
of universities starting
something, they think of a pro-
gram leading to a degree. But
universities also foster the
development of new thought,"
Fain explains.
"My vision is that we will
participate in consortia with
other universities and take
part in other joint cooperative
efforts," says Fain, who sees
the institute as being different
from other programs and not
in competition with them.
The University of Miami,
which offers a BA program in
Judaic Studies, was establish-
ed formally ten and a half
years ago, according to Dr.
Henry Green, chairman of the
program.
Dr. Stephen Fain
Students may select from
approximately 20 courses of-
fered each semester, in sub-
jects ranging from Hebrew
and Torah to the Roots of
Anti-Semitism and Jewish
Mysticism.
A faculty of a dozen pro-
lessors from various depart-
ments teaches the course
curricula.
Students interested in pur-
suing careers in areas of
Jewish concern many find
themselves teaching in
religious schools or interning
while getting credit, according
t0 Green.
Dr. Henry Green, chairman of
the BA program in Judaic
Studies at the University of
Miami.
Other options include a year
of study abroad in Israel at
Hebrew or Tel Aviv Universi-
ty, or in England at Oxford's
Jewish Studies program.
BARRY UNIVERSITY of-
fers a Master's Program in
Jewish Studies, and has been
catering to students who
either desire Jewish careers in
teaching, social work and
other related fields, as well as
instructing future rabbis and
interested laypeople for the
past five years.
Lay officials in Jewish
organizations are also among
the mainly part-time students
who take Barry University
courses in Jewish-Christian
Relations, Jewish Ethics, the
American Jewish Community,
and more.
Dr. Jeremiah Unterman,
who is both program director
Dr. Jeremiah Unterman, pro-
gram director and associate
professor at Barry Univer-
sity's Master's Program in
Jewish Studies.
and an associate professor,
feels that Barry's Jewish
Studies Program has sue goals.
"Our goals are: to serve as a
center for graduate Jewish
learning in South Florida, to
engender a spirit of learning,
inquiry and research into the
Jewish heritage within the
local community, and to
educate the interested
layperson:
"To prepare candidates for
careers as scholars and
teachers in Judaica, or as ad-
ministrators for local Jewish
schools; to enhance the Jewish
knowledge of professionals in
Jewish communal services;
and to further Jewish-
Christian understanding."
Plans to establish a research
library in Judaica are also
underway at the university,
Unterman adds.
Simchat Torah Ends
Sukkot Festival
South Florida Jewry concludes observance of the High
Holy Days Thursday and Friday, Oct. 15 and 16, as it
celebrates the holidays of Shemini Atzeret and Simchat
Torah.
Reform congregations, however, mark both holidays on
the same day, Thursday. Israel also observes them on one
day.
Yizkor, the memorial prayer to the departed, is said on
Thursday in Orthodox, Conservative and Reform
synagogues and temples.
Simchat Torah, or the rejoicing in the Torah, traditional-
ly marks the giving of the Ten Commandments by God,
through Moses, at Mount Sinai. On Simchat Torah, the
final day of the festival of Sukkot, the annual reading of the
Torah is completed, and a new cycle begun.
All of the scrolls in the Oren Kodesh (Holy Ark) are taken
out on Simchat Torah and are marched around the
synagogue.
Grenald, Weisburd, Arkin,
Singer Win Election Unopposed
Four Miami Beach city com-
missioners have been re-
elected without opposition in
the biennial voting, scheduled
Nov. 3.
Ben Z. Grenald and Sidney
Weisburd won third terms
automatically when no one fil-
ed against them. Stanley
Arkin secured a second two-
year term and Bruce Singer a
third term. None of the four
will be on the ballot, according
to Florida law.
Mayor Alex Daoud, seeking
his fifth term on the city com-
mission and second as mayor,
drew Raphael Herman, Marlin
Pritzker and Peter Pedro
Savolidis as opponents. Miami
Beach has no run-off. and the
candidate securing the most
votes Nov. 3 will be elected.
Vice Mayor William
Shockett, looking for a third
term on the commission, must
face Bart Herndon and Steve
Remsen.
Commissioner Abe Resnick,
completing his first term,
faces one opponent, Marty
Sherman.
Grenald owns a Miami Beach
pharmacy and a cosmetic
manufacturing and distribu-
tion company, Weisburd is
registrar of the University of
Miami. Arkin heads a Beach
construction company and
Singer is a Bay Harbor Islands
attorney.
how to make
yourShabbos dinner Deluxe.
First, go lo your butcher and select the
freshest, plumpest chicken.
It's a good start, but it won't make your
Shabbos dinner Deluxe
Next, prepare the dough for your famous
homemade chaBah.
Closer, but ShAbbos dinner isn't Deluxe yet.
Now, reach into the freezer and take out the
Birds Eye Deluxe Vegetables. "Sugar Snap""
snap peas bursting with garden-fresh goodness.
And add whole baby carrots, so sweet and
succulent.
You've done It! Your Shabbos dinner is truly
Deluxe.
K
Kosher
Birds Eye* Deluxe. Dinner will never be the same.


'age 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 9, 1987
Annual Survey Of Women
Ordained As Rabbis
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Four of the nine woman or-
dained as Reform rabbis last
summer have been appointed
assistant rabbis and the two
women ordained as
Reconstructionist rabbis have
been placed as solo rabbis, ac-
cording to the annual Jewish
Telegraphic Agency survey of
such placements. "Solo rab-
bis" is the term used to
describe spiritual leaders of
congregations which are too
small to need or afford more
than one rabbi.
Donna Adler of Brookline,
Mass. has been named assis-
tant rabbi at Beth Israel Con-
gregation in Hamilton, Ohio;
Beth Davidson of Sag Harbor,
NY has been appointed assis-
tant rabbi at Congregation
Ohabai Sholom in Nashville;
Lynn Goldstein of Philadelphia
has been appointed assistant
rabbi at Temple Beth Am in
Miami; and Sue Ann Wasser-
man of Pound Ridge, NY has
been appointed assistant rabbi
at the Temple in Atlanta, Ga.
Barbara Penzner of
Leawood, Kan. and Amy
Levenson of Vineland, NJ are
the solo rabbis. Penzner is at
the Greater Boston
Reconstructionist Havurah
and Levenson is at the B'nai
Israel Reconstructionist Con-
gregation in South Bend, Ind.
Susan Fletcher of Hermosa
Beach, Calif, has been named
Hillel director at Los Angeles
Valley College; Sarah Mess-
inger of Scarsdale has been
named part-time rabbi at Beth
Yehuda Synagogue in Lock
Haven, Pa. Marjorie Slome of
Letter to the Editor:
Selling God ..
EDITOR:
It is to my dismay that not
everyone is able to attend
Rosh Hashanah Services.
Recently I called the temples
in my area to inquire about
service and was told that one
needed a ticket to attend. All
tickets started at $75 per seat.
It is a crime that what is sup-
posed to be a time of hope, of
Ciise, and congruency, has
me an elitist gathering. It
is unfortunate that unless you
"buy" your way into temple a
person is unable to attend a
religious function. I might add
that one lady, when inquirinj
on the phone, made it perfectly
clear that they would be
"checking tickets at the door."
I feel saddened that because
I am unable to pay large
amounts of money for a ticket
that myself and others are
excluded.
When Jews refuse to admit
their own people, what then?
It is time to re-evaluate
Cuban-Israeli
Killed In Israel
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The fatal stabbing of a soldier
Thursday morning marred a
quiet Rosh Hashanah holiday
in Israel. The victim, Alex-
ander Arad, 43, was killed
while trying to hitch a ride
from Megiddo to his home in
Kibbutz Ramot Menashe. He
was buried at Ramot Menashe.
A suspect was arrested by
border police shortly after the
attack. He was identified as
Jillal Haj Ibrahim, 23, of Yan-
dun village, near Jenin in the
West Bank. Ibrahim reported-
ly confessed after two
bicyclists from Afula said they
witnessed the crime and inden-
tified him as the killer.
Arad, married and the
father of two children, aged
four and five, came to Israel
from Cuba 1961. A polio victim
as a child, he over' ne his
disabilities and volun ed for
service in the Israel Defense
Force.
policies and the 'country club'
style of worship.
But in spite of this, I will
spend Rosh Hashanah known -
ing that it wasn't G-d who clos-
ed his doors.
NANETTE A VERY
Miami
Cincinnati is awaiting
placement.
Two of the newly-ordained
women Reform rabbis are at-
tending graduate schools,
Esther Adler of Tarzana,
Calif, at Yale; and Miriam
Shapero of Van Nuys, Calif, at
Yale.
The total of Reform women
rabbis ordained since Sally
Preisand became the first
woman rabbi in American
history in 1972 is 111. The
number of women ordained as
Reconstructionist rabbis is 30,
for a total of 141 women rabbis
ordained since the process
began.
Although two women were
ordained as Conservative rab-
bis, one in 1985 and one in
1986 they were exceptional
situations, stemming in part
from a decade-long struggle in
the Conservative movement
over ordaining women. Amy
Eilberg of Bloomington, Ind.
was ordained as the first
woman Conservative rabbi in
1985 and Nina Beiber Feins-
tein was ordained in 1986.
Women will be returning to
the Conservative, Reform and
Reconstructionist seminaries
when studies are resumed for
the 1987-88 academic year, in-
dicating that entry of women
into the ranks of the American
rabbinate can be expected to
continue.
Martin Luther King III, son of the late civil rights leader, ream.
ly planted a tree in memory of his father in the Jewish Natvnul
Fund's Martin Luther King Memorial Forest. The ceremony tooi
place during Mr. King's eight-day tour of Israel as a guest of tin
American Anti-Defamation League. He met with Prime M\ri\ttr
Yitzhak Shamir, Foreign Minister Shimon Peres and offer
Israeli leaders active in human rights questions and Soviet
Jewry. Seen here with the son of the slain civil rights leader
Zevi Kahanov, JNF-Jerusalem representative.
Kwitney To Speak On AIDS
Alisa Kwitney, Jewish
Fhridian staff writer, will ad-
dress the Ko'ach Chapter of
Miami Beach Region of
Hadassah on Tuesday, Oct. 13,
8 p.m. at the Cadillac Hotel,
Miami Beach.
Kwitney's subject will be
"AIDS And How It Affects
The Jewish Community" bas-
ed on her recent articles on the
issue.
Kwitney is the recipient of a
writing award from Wesleyan
University.
The public is invited. For in-
formation, 864-8363.
J%ai4^ J^MM*//
Ronzoni* wants to teach you how to give
your family defccious, satisfying Italian
meab without any d/ffico/fa (difficulty). All
you have to do is serve Ronzoni* frozen
Italian entrees.
Ronzoni* entrees are rapido (quick) and
facile (easy) to prepare. They contain all
the autenbco (authentic) ingredients any
great Italian cook would use: fresh cheeses
such as ricotta, mozzarella, romano and
parmesan, imported olive oil and plum
tomatoes. And the assortmentos (choices)
are among the best-loved Italian dishes
of all time: vegetable Lasagne, Cheese
Manicottj, Spinach Cannetoni, Pasta
Primavera, Fettucine Alfredo and
Cheese and Broccoli Ravioli.
These mouth-watering selections are
all natural with no artificial additives or
preservatives. Plus, most contain 340
calories or less.
So why spend hours in the cucina
(kitchen) when you can spend just minutes
preparing Ronzoni* frozen entrees? Once
you try them, we're sure you'll agree:
Ronzoni Sono Suoru-Ronzoni Is So
Good*
e 1M7 Romom Foods Corporation
Ronzoni Sono Buoni-Ronzoni Is So Good!


Community Corner
Congregation Magen David Sisterhood presents its
Sukkot Bruncheon Sunday, Oct. 11 following 8am ser-
vices at Sephardic Jewish Center, North Miami Beach
For information, 652-2099.
Temple Zlon Israelite Center Young Jewish
Singles will meet on Sunday, Oct. 11, 11 a.m. for a
Brunch and Program. The speaker will be Dr. Aaron
Karnilow, who will speak on "Singles Effectiveness
Training."
"The Family Tree" will be the theme of the In-
tergenerational Luncheon to be sponsored by The
Women's Committee of Jewish Family Service of
Greater Miami (JFS) on Tuesday, Oct. 13 at Williams
Island. Guest speaker for the event will be JFS Clinical
Social Worker Patricia Gulino-Silverberg, discussing
the topic, "Co-Dependency in Families."
Claude Lanzmann, director of the film "Shoah," will
receive the Amit Women Humanities Award at' Amit
Women's National Convention which will run Sunday
Oct. 25 through Wednesday, Oct. 28 in Orlando'
Florida. The theme will be 'Torah and Technology
Tools For Tomorrow.'
Bus transportation from Dade and Broward to Orlan-
do can be made by calling the Florida Council office at
651-1444.
Caren Joffe, a recent graduate of the University of
Texas, has been named the new Southeast Regional
Coordinator for the University Service Department of
the American Zionist Youth Foundation. As a regional
coordinator, Joffe will be in contact with colleqe
students throughout the Southeast region which in-
cludes Florida, Texas, Louisiana, and Georgia, and will
organize cultural events, conferences and lectures Ms
Joffe can be contacted at the Miami Jewish
Federation.
Simchat Torah: "A Celebration of Jewish Unity,"
sponsored by the of Bal Harbour, is an opportunity for
Jews, particularly from the Bal Harbour, Bay Harbor
Islands, Surfside and Keystone Point communities, to
carry on the tradition of song and Hakafot. Admission
is free. Celebrants will meet in the Sukkah at the Bal
Harbour Sheraton Hotel poolside from 7-10 p.m.,
Wednesday, Oct. 14. There will be refreshments and
entertainment.
An ambulance right off the assembly line of General
Motors has been donated by Abe Stiber, of Miami
Beach and will be shipped directly to the Magen David
Adorn, Israel's Red Cross. The ambulance will be
dedicated on Oct. 11 on the Garden Terrace of the
Roney Plaza Apartments, Miami Beach, at a 1:30 p.m.
ceremony that will be attended by Rabbi Irving
Lehrman and Miami Beach Mayor Alex Daoud. Stiber is
donating the ambulance through ARMDI, American
Red Magen David for Israel.
Coral Gables resident, Dorothy Spector, is a newly
elected national vice president of the Women's Divi-
sion of the American Society for Technion-lsrael In-
stitute of Technology, the organization elected its new
slate of officers at its National Board Meeting in Bever-
ly Hills, Calif.
Friday, October 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-6
dew tower
AFFORDABLE BEACH LIVING
Spacious 1 bdr2bath
conv. apts.
Italian tiled bathrooms
with bidets
Sauna Jacuzzi, Roof top pool
Free Parking
Washer & Dryer in EACH APT,
1775 Washington Ave., M.B. 673-8393 M-F 9-5
America Receives Argentinean Jews
Continued from Page 2-B
specialist for three years in
Argentina, but found that he
had to re-do all his training as
an ear-nose-and-throat practi-
tioner in the United States.
"I was thinking it was un-
fair, although thinking
retrospectively I was treated
like anyone else," says Angel.
"I was a full doctor and all of a
sudden I became a salaried
resident it was quite a feel-
ing of humiliation.
Angel can now state that
"America has its standards,
and those standards are what
makes American medicine the
best in the world nowadays."
But he admits that "personal-
ly, it was very hard, and I
decided to go back to
Argentina."
The Tropps discovered that
re-adjusting to life back in
Argentina was as difficult, if
not more so, than adjusting to
life in the States.
"We came back during the
middle of a period of great
political turmoil and there was
a sense of unease in the whole
Jewish community.
"Many people were turning
to Israel, but as I had begun
the re-training process in the
States and spoke the language,
it was more practical to go
there," Angel recalls.
Yet the States brought a
new problem to bear on the
Tropp family.
"As a part of the Spanish
community, I was feeling a
sort of pressure or prejudice
here. It's better for the Jews in
the United States, but not as
good for the Spanish, except in
Miami," Angel contends. "At
least, that is the perception I
have."
An aspect of American
Jewish life which Angel Tropp
finds attractive is the religious
life here.
"In Argentina there is only
one type of synagogue, com-
parable to Orthodox here. But
Entrance to the Libery Street Synagogue in Buenos Aires,
Argentina.
in Argentina the traditions are
being lost more and more, and
they are not being replaced,"
Angel asserts.
"Here I see a new surge of a
combination of tradition with a
new approach to enjoying life
from the Jewish perspective."
MWMMMMIM
STAR LAKES CON DOS
ORTHODOX? Walk to Chule. ACTIVE? Swim in
pool or sparkling lake. NON DRIVER? Ride
the mini bus.
2 bdrm 2 bth custom decor $46,900
owner financing available
1 bdrm-furnished $19,000
Studio-furnished $19,000
Sales/Alvin ERA 652-3880
THE BEST
AIR CONDITIONING CO
ih-z?
Up to
17th Anniversary
s303 FPL REBATE
[
Rebate paid direct by F.P.L. Depending on model selected.
PLUS SAVE '521 YEARLY ON F.P.L. BILL
Batettd on data for alypical doling season using Dapejiirnant o' Energy standards MofJ'S compared *r< FlX/36unit *iin
a iSEEH 10 0| o< Dtlttr *'o unil .in SEER 6 00 (Most C un.ls .nstil0 % $150 REBATE OR 0% FINANCING FROM TRANE.
Buy a Trane XL 1200 heat pump now
and get a great deal.
Here's a deal that's hard to refuse. Buy and install a
Trane XL 1200 Weathertron* heat pump between
September 1 and November 15,1987, and receive
a $150 cash rebate or interest-free financing
for 12 months.*
And that's not the only way you'll come out
ahead. Because the XL 1200 heat pump is
super energy efficient. So you could actually
Call for free home survey
STATE LICENSED CACO 10860
lower your heating and cooling costs. And the
Trane XL 1200 heat pump will keep you warm
all winter .. and cool all summer.
And it comes with an exclusive manufacturer's
10 year limited warranty on the compressor and
coil twice the protection of most other brands.
Call us today for details on all the ways
you can save with Trane.
0% Financing available on approved cradit through dealer *
XL Credit Plan whan financed lor 12 month* and paid
in 12 equal payment* Offer available from participating dealer*
Offer not available to contractors and builders
POMPANO
781-4660
948-3564
HANCO Sat495
HUMIDISTAT ,msiio
m
TRANE
.....!* i".......
24 Hour Radio Dispatched 100*'. FINANCING AVAILABLE
Residential, Commercial and Industrial Sales & Service (all maKi
Contracts on A/C and Major Appliances.
Service Contracts o- Maintenance


Page6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 9, 1987
D.C. Guardianship Plan
Helps Elderly Wards
Continued from Page 1-B
liability involved. This gets
very touchy. But it needed to
be done and we were able to do
it," he recalls.
One problem with having a
bank or a lawyer appointed as
guardian is that the ward's
personal needs were unable to
be met. But in some cases, not
even institutional guardian-
ship was available.
"Where people were mental-
ly incompetent and had money
there was always a family
member, a bank, a friend, who
was more than willing to
become their guardian," Smith
says. "It's when people were
poor and senile that nobody
cared."
The JFS led the way for the
state statute change to allow a
non-profit charitable organiza-
tion to become guardian. In
1974. JFS took on its first
guardianship and between
1974 and 1979 was the only
agency acting in the capacity
of guardian in Dade County.
But, the program was limited
to Jewish clients.
In 1979, money became
available for demonstration
guardianship projects through
the Area Agency on Aging.
That body requested a pro-
posal from JFS to provide
guardianship service on a non-
sectarian and countywide
basis. Hence, the guardianship
program as it is known today.
The program, the first of its
kind in the United States, was
so needed, Smith says, that it
was formed as a corporation in
Dade County in 1982.
Bob McClaskey, an attorney
and immediate past-president
of Guardianship Program of
Dade County, says the pro-
gram established a profes-
sional social service staff
which was able to care for the
human needs of the wards and
a professional staff for
legalities.
According to Repensek, the
state has provided limited fun-
ding for two pilot guardianship
programs in Broward County
and in northern Florida but
the Dade County program
does not receive state funds.
The Dade program budget in-
cludes about $100,000 from a
Dade County grant, approx-
imately $35,000 from United
Way, $13,000 from the Area
Agency on Aging, $23,000
from the Florida Bar Founda-
tion, and $12,000 from the
Greater Miami Jewish
Federation.
Although the agency no
longer serves solely the Jewish
community, about 30 percent
of the case load is Jewish and
approximately 32 percent of
the clients are Catholic,
Repensek says.
Since 1980, the program has
served 661 people and the
breakdown has generally
stayed consistent:
33 percent male
67 percent female
83 percent white
10 percent black
seven percent Hispanic.
HISPANICS still have far
more supportive extended
family systems. They tend one
Smith: 'It's when
people were poor and
senile that nobody
cared"
way or another to take care of
their own," Repensek says.
"It's very similar in the black
community; that family and
even neighborhoods will
become involved in supporting
the elderly."
As the need for guardianship
programs grow, so does the
focus on the types of guardian-
ship programs available. The
U.S. House Select Committee
on Aging, led by Congressman
Claude Pepper, now is looking
at the issue of guardianship
and abuse of the elderly.
"BASICALLY what were
doing on a national level and in
Florida is begin to accept the
idea as we did several years
ago with abused children. Now
we're discovering abused,
neglected and exploited elder-
ly. And I think the big question
is what as a society and as a
legislative body are we going
to do about it?
Repensek said the very
government budget cuts that
sliced away social service pro-
grams, is helping create the
problem of today's declining
elderly population.
"If you don't help an elderly
person remain socially involv-
ed with his environment, he's
going to become isolated and
the isolation simply in itself is
a deteriorating process,"
Repensek warns.
One issue the Pepper com-
mittee is examining is whether
a ward is adequately
represented at a competency
hearing. The Dade guardian-
ship program does not get in-
volved with that hearing. Mc-
Claskey says, because the
agency feels it would be a con-
flict to say someone is in-
competent and then act as his
or her guardian.
The Guardianship Program
of Dade County does not select
its clients. When a determina-
tion of competency comes
before the court and it is deter-
mined the person is incompe-
tent and there is no family or
legal counsel available, the
court will contact the agency.
The program also gets refer-
rals from Aging and Adult
Protective Services and
hospitals.
The Guardianship Program
has a waiting list of about 30 to
40 potential clients, Repensek
says, but adds that the list can
be even greater because in
many instances the referring
agencies know the program is
working at capacity and are
therefore more selective in
who they recommend.
"The existence of our pro-
gram in Dade County has
given the court, in many in-
stances, an alternative that
they did not have prior to our
coming on the scene,"
Repensek says.
"In many instances, and it's
a sad fact, families often have
their own agendas when it
comes to how they're going to
Despair that stems from declining functional
abilities leads to isolation, sensory deprava-
tion and a self-imposed shrinking
environment.
take care of the incompetent
member of their family. Some
may want to conserve money
because ultimately they're go-
ing to be recipients of the
estate. I think a larger group is
just immobilized by the pro-
blems that the incompetent
elderly person confronts them
with.''
IN DADE COUNTY, out of
a population of 1.6 million,
over 21,000 are 85 years or
older and no fewer than 35,000
are 75 years and older and liv-
ing alone.
"You've got a large group of
people in a population that's
getting older and older every
year," says Repensek. And
with both spouses often work-
ing together and the elderly
needing medical care, families
today "are just not capable of
supporting and appropriately
caring for the elderly.
Some of the program's roots
with JFS are still evident to-
day, Repensek observes.
"We are very sensitive to a
person's religion and cultural
concerns. So if we have so-
meone who kept kosher all
their life, we will look for a
facility where ideally they can
keep kosher. Some males want
to go to shul. So. if they need-
ed an Adult Congregate Liv-
ing Facility, we would make
sure arrangements can be
made to get them there
everyday.
THEY MAY BE adjudicated
incompetent but they're no,
totally incapable of making
decisions of things they want
to do.
'They may be
incompetent, but
they're not totally
incapable of making
decisions.'
"Another group we have to
be particularly sensitive to are
those who went through the
Holocaust. Many of these peo-
ple were obviously arrested or
herded off to places or had to
escape or hide so that left a
horrendous imprint. Now
they're getting older, losing
their capacity to be indepen-
dent and in some ways that
horror is relived again. So-
meone comes in and says
you're going to move from
here to here."
The Guardianship Program
tries to become a surrogate
family, Repensek says, even
though "there is no way we
can replace family." In some
instances, the wards of the
program are so far removed
from life around them that
they are not aware they are be-
ing taken care of by the
agency.
When the agency is first con-
tacted about a guardianship
case, it does an evaluation
which reviews a potential
client's economic resources,
physical, medical and emo-
tional needs. Then, based on
these requirements, plans are
made to protect and utilize the
ward's own assets while plac-
ing him in an appropriate liv-
ing environment. In some
cases, a ward may be able to
live in his own home or an
Adult Congregate Living
Facility (ACLFl or a nursing
home may l>e pretVrred.
For guardianship wards with
assets of at lea '"'.the
agency will chargt a $75 hour-
ly fee for its services. This fee
must be presented to the court
for a determination of
payment.
About 70 percent of its
clients are indigent, says
Repensek. But even if the only
payment a person gets is social
security, a person who is ruled
incompetent still needs a guar-
dian. "hat is why the $640,000
annual budget is far from what
Repensek deems necessan-
"In order to realistically deal
with the problem in D8*
County we could probably use
a budget of $1.5 million, he
says.
Repensek has a masters
degree in social work from
New York University and >
masters in special educate
from Columbia University. bw
as trained as anyone on U*
guardianship staff may
there are. as Repensek M
"some fairly heav)
responsibilities."
-I CANT TELL you the
number of times we've had re-
quests for radical masectom)
on someone over 85, he .-
"If there is no one to act i-
your spokesman, the real qu
tion is who's making decisions
Continued on Page 10-B


Friday, October 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Senator Jack D. Gordon, center, ta eon-
>i luted by members of the City of Miami ci-
mmission for his leadership in obtaining
$1.5 in state funds for the construction of a
amphitheater in Bayfront Park, opposite
ntown Miami. Sen. Gordon secured
$750,000 from the State of Florida for this
year and the same amount for 1988. Shown
from teft are City Commissioner Miller
Dawkins, Mayor Xavier Suarez, Sen. Gordon,
Commissioner Rosario Kennedy and Commis-
sioner J. L. Plummer.
Prophets For Profit
By ROCHELLE SAIDEL
NEW YORK (JTA) -
'More than 60 years after its
[creation by such early
{American Zionist leaders as
j Louis Brandeis and Felix War-
burg, PEC (Palestine
Economic Corporation) Israel
Economic Corporation con-
tinues to benefit both Israel's
economy and investors in the
I holding company.
PEC recently announced
[substantial increases in earn-
ings for the first half and se-
cond quarter of 1987. For the
first six months of this year,
earnings were $4,721,949, or
64 percent per share a gain
[of 113 percent from the same
[period last year.
(In 1986, earnings for the
first six months were
$2,177,050. or 30 cents per
share; net income for all of
I that year was 60 cents per
[share.)
For the quarter ending June
30, 1987, PEC's net income
[was $2,713,183, or 37 cents
Iper share, up from 41,639,759,
jor 23 cents per share in the
Isame period during 1986.
CALL US
-^c^n^jc-sr
COMPARE OUR
PRICES
*E"A CONCEPT
SEA EAQLE RACE SKI
SANGEP. HIGH PERFORMANCE
An American company in-
corporated in Maine in 1926,
PEC was founded as a means
of fostering economic develop-
ment in the Yishuv (Jewish
community in Palestine), "the
philosophy of the founders was
that support of Israel should
not only be donations, but also
making sound economic in-
vestments," PEC president
Joseph Ciechanover told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency.
"Current results justify our
faith in the basic soundness of
Israel's economy. It was an
outstanding achievement for
Israel to reduce its inflation
rate from 500 percent in 1985
to less than 16 perent so far
this year. PEC's continued
rise in profits reflects improve-
ment in the net income of most
of the company's affiliates and
a substantial increase in net
gain on sales of investments.
Traded on the American
Stock Exchange under the
symbol "IEC," PEC
organizes, finances and par-
ticipates in the management of
widely diversified businesses
located in Israel or affiliated
with Israeli enterprise.
The two largest
shareholders are IDB Develop-
ment Corporation Ltd. (a
member of the IDB
Bankholding Group in Israel),
which owns 80 percent of the
shares, and companies con-
trolled by Edmund de
Rothschild, which hold 12 per-
cent. The other eight percent
is owned by American in-
dividuals and institutions.
Among PEC's current equi-
ty holdings are affiliated com-
panies and wholly-owned sub-
sidiaries in such fields as high
technology and scientific
research, heavy and light in-
dustry, shipping and
marketing, finance and bank-
ing, and real estate and
development.
Some of PEC's affiliations,
such as Property and Building
Corporation, one of the largest
real estate holding companies
in Israel, and General
Engineers, exclusive
distributor and agent in Israel
for General Electric Company,
predate the State of Israel.
Other PEC affiliates in
Israel include Israel Can Com-
pany, Klil Industries
(aluminum extrusions), Mul-T-
Lock (security equipment),
Tambour Paints, Elron Elec-
tronics Industries, Scitex Cor-
poration (computer imaging),
El-Yam Ships, Ofran Drive
Yourself (rental cars) and
Super-Sol supermarkets.
Continued on Page 10-B
BAJA
CALL
U BOTTOMS AND FLATS
852-5221 KEYS
371-5721 MIA.
OWN YOUR OWN BEAUTIFUL
Discount Shoe Store \
Offering over 300 top designer neme brands and over
1,500 styles at unbelievable retail prices of 6.75 and up.
All first quality merchandise. Satisfaction Guaranteed.
Andrew Geller Evan Picone Naturalizer
Stride Rite Bandolino Reebok Amalf i
9 West Gloria Vanderbilt and many more.
Handbags and accessories also. Your cash "$" invest-
ment of $12,900.00 to $39,000.00 includes beginning
inventory, training and fixtures. Call anytime.
Prestige Fashions
1-800-247-9127
(Left to right) Samuel I. Adler, Michael M. Adler and Norman H.
Lipoff, three Greater Miami Jewish Federation leaders, have
been appointed to national United Jewish Appeal (UJA) positions
for the upcoming 1987-88 year. Samuel I. Adler, the immediate
past president of the GMJF, has been reappointed a national vice
chairman of UJA. His son, Michael Adler, who serves as
Treasurer of the GMJF. has also been appointed to serve as a
UJA national vice chairman. Norman H. Lipoff, a past president
of Federation and current board member, has been reappointed a
UJA national vice chairman and has been named as chairman of
UJA's Leadership Development Committee.
NOW. YOU CAN CBT
HIGH
RATES
PUN
6 MONTH
MINIMUM
DEPOSIT
TODAY'S
RATE
----|cPuna--*..-.,-,
ATp35.ooo 7 78%TnnQr
P^TTf"; Your funds are insured to $100,000 by the
I .y.V*^' Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation,
j an agency of the Federal Government.
unncD /fivinG/ R/rocifinon

359 Alcazar Avenue
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
(306)442-2327
(RATES APPLY TO THIS LOCATION ONLV)
F YOUENJOYED
L'CHAIM* (TO LIFE)
DON'T MISS
ft
JACKIE JACOB
'THE INTERNATIONAL STAR"
IN
A N KE
ft
7P3N
A COMBINATION OF SONGS,
COMEDY AND DANCE
SHOWTIMES
FOR OCT. & NOV.
FRIDAY NIGHTS 8:00 P.M.
SUNDAYS 2:30 P.M & 7:30 P.mJ
SEATS: $10.00 plus tax,
GROUP RATES
AVAILABLE
FOR RESERVATIONS 12:00 6:00 P.M
940 7718
aitheDUNES BEACH CLUB
17001 COLLINS AVENUE
-*



' Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 9, 1987
Write
Dear Xom i
... For Advice
Dear Nomi. an advice column, will appear regularly in the
pages of The Jewish Floridian.
Dear Nomi:
I married my childhood sweetheart when we both were
very young and very much in love. Before we knew what
marriage was like, we were parents.
But despite the disappointments, we stuck it out, raising the
kids and taking pleasure in them and in each other. We were
like old, familiar friends, like brother and sister.
Now that our youngest is leaving the nest, I worry about
what will happen to me and my wife. I don't want to lose her,
even if there is no grand passion. I wouldn't mind trying to
inject a little more romance back into our marriage, but over
the years I've tried and my wife has just kept on acting loving
but in a matter of fact way.
I don't want our marriage to end; if anything, I would like
to do all the things with my wife that we never did before, like
take a honeymoon. What should I do if she says that now that
the kids are grown, she wants to break up?
Sincerely,
Empty Neat Husband
Dear Empty Neat Husband:
From what you have told me, it does not sound to me as
though your wife is contemplating ending the marriage.
However, if the children were a major factor in keeping
the two of you together over the years, it is to be expected
that both of you will wonder what, if anything, will replace
that bond now that the kids have grown up and left home.
- Obviously, the friendship, familiarity and companionship of
which you spoke will remain a strong bond between the two of
you, but it sounds to me as if you may need to re-examine
your relationship a bit.
Talking honestly with your wife about past
disappointments, decisions, and about how you feel today is a
good way to start forging a new bond. A honeymoon, giving
you both a chance to experience new things together, is
another good idea.
Yet one of the things which you may need to think about
is this; if your wife is unwilling or unable to fulfill your hopes
for "injecting new romance" or passion into your relationship,
how do you feel about your marriage and the future?
It may be that you, and not your wife, are contemplating a
possible end to the marriage, and that this idea frightens you
a great deal.
Yours,
Nomi
Dear Nomi:
My psychiatrist wants to put me on medication for
depression, but I am not sure. I have heard that there are
doctors who are overly eager to prescribe medication, and that
patients can become addicted to the chemicals, or can have
their conditions become worsened by side-effects from the
drugs.
I know that I can fall into fits of despair, but I would
rather deal with the problems through analysis and inner-
change. Yet. how can I distrust a medical professional's
advice?
Yours Truly,
Impatient Patient
Dear Impatient Patient:
You can distrust a medical professionals advice by
becoming an informed consumer, researching the kind of
medication your doctor is prescribing and its possible adverse
or side-effects, and by getting a second or possibly third
opinion.
To the best of my knowledge, medication is often used to
control the extent of depressions during the analysis process.
If you know that what you want is to undergo analysis,
your question should be whether to do it in conjunction with
medication or not, instead of wondering whether to choose
between the two options.
As some doctors rely more on medication than others, and
as a psychiatrist may have a different perspective than a
psychologist or psychotherapist, you may want to apeak to
more than one person about your problem.
And, of course, you should discuss your reservations with
your present psychiatrist. If he seems rigid or unbending, and
does not take the time to consider your objections, he may
well be the wrong doctor for you.
Yours,
Nomi
The Founding President of
the Torah Chapter of
Hadassah, Sylvia Lefcourt and
her husband, Sidney Lefcourt
will sponsor the first meeting
of the year at Temple Zamora,
Coral Gables on Monday, Oct.
12 at 11:30 a.m. and the pro-
gram will include a book
review.
The Southgate Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its regular
meeting on Monday, Oct. 14,1
p.m. at the Southgate Terrace
Room. For information,
672-5127.
The Aliyah Hadassah
General Meeting will be held
on Monday, Oct. 12, 7:45 p.m.
at the home of Gloria Zack,
8370 SW 89th St. Linda
Cicero, food writer of 77i
Miami Herald will discuss
"Jewish Cooking." For infor-
mation, 386-2588.
The I.R. Goodman Chapter
of Hadassah will hold its
regular meeting on Oct. 13 at 1
6 m. at the American Savings
ank, Lincoln and Alton
Roads, Miami Beach. Member-
ship will be highlighted. Guest
speaker will be new Miami
Beach Region President, Ricki
Igra who will present the
highlights of the Hadassah Na-
tional Convention which was
held in Baltimore, Md.
, ,
Holocaust survivor looking
for experienced Jewish
ghostwriter to help finish
my book, s future best-
seller. Mike P.O.B. 248272,
Miami 33124.
Position Wanted
Naad a secretarial -clerical
person? Call ma at S3S-1410. I
prafar parttima work. Mlsml
Beach desirable but not neces-
sary. Experienced, reasonable
Hatikvah Hadassah will be
having a Mystery Hunt Fun-
draiser and dinner Oct. 24, 8
p.m., at the University of
Miami. The cost is $20 per per-
son. For information,
255-7120.
Ceil Steinberg, of N. Miami
Beach, was elected president of
the National Ladies Auxiliary
Jewish War Veterans at the
60th "Diamond Jubilee Year"
Annual Convention held in
Philadelphia. Mrs. Steinberg
has chosen the theme "We Are
On Our Way To A Brighter
Tomorrow" for her term of
office.
PLANNING
ON MOVING
TO ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
Call no. Esther. 635-6554
and let me quote you
rates. Also local moving &
long distance moving
anywhere in the US or
overseas.
A.B. VAN LINES INC.
(of Miami)
Harriet Green has been re-elected national ince president
Na 'amat USA, and Felice Schwartz has been elected to a two-mT
term on the national board of the organization. Green, who u
president of the South Florida Council ofNa 'amat USA, also my
elected to a two-year term at the biennial national conventionhdi
in Los Angeles.
Property Tax Appeals
For hotels, apartments, shopping centers,
office buildings, restaurants, warehouses,
hospitals, specialty properties. Contingent or
hourly basis.
THOMAS R. POST, PA
ATTORNEYS
(305)379-1500
COMPUTER HELPERS
FOR ALL YOOR COMPUTER NEEDS!!
INSTALLATION SPECIALISTS
TWISTED PAIR (VOICE AND DATA) COAX TWINAX
BALUNS PATCH PANELS CONCENTRATORS
COMMUNICATION RACKS FREE ESTIMATES
LUMPinf LINE Of- PRODUCTS AND MATERIALS
BROWARD: 962-6320
DADE: 620-3579
TROPICAL GLASS
* CONSTRUCTION CO. CQC #010159
MIRROR
WALLS & CEILINGS
TABLE TOPS EMERGENCY REPAIRS STOREFRONTS
Dade 757-0651 Broward 462-3711
HAROLD ROSENSTEIN, Pres. Se Habia Espanol
7933 N.W. 7th Avenue Miami
IT'S LIKE SHE NEVER LEFT!
COUNTRY-STYLE ITALIAN REGIONAL COOKING
Wt grow our own Herb* (basil, tarragon, saga.
rosamaria. ate.)
Homa-mada garlic rolls It daassrts
(Including mow MARCELLA FRUIT COBBLER)
Prirafa Party Cafring Still a Specialty
13889 W. Dixie Hwy.
N. Miami Beach
91-2999 |
893 7658
WJ's
Warehouse Sale
ITALIAN MONOCOTTURA CERAMIC TILES:
8X8 7S sq. ft.
10X10 00* sq. ft.
12X12 90* sq. ft.
"Buy direct from the distributor and <"
ln.fN.tit, Avoi.abl.: OHjko ^J^T"
Licensed Insured 754-7737
Residential and Commercial HOURS:
OeneJ Contractor CCt2T2 Mon thru Sat. 8 a.m. to 7 p"1
tOumuet Tflfc 3frjfr


Effort To Open War Crimes
File Fails; Another Effort
Now Under Way
Friday, October 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
I Bv YITZHAK RABI
llTED NATIONS -
- The 17 former
ler-states of the United
ns War Crimes Commis-
re scheduled to meet
In October 14 for another
tot to reach agreeement
piling the defunct Com-
hn's files on Nazi war
(rials and their edi-
tors to the public.
September meeting
UN Secretary Geneal
Perez de Cuella ended
it agreement. The new
ig was set for nearly a
later to allow represen-
i of the countries time for
Stations and to receive
directives from their
ctive governments.
I issue is whether to allow
to the files to scholars,
Irians and researchers.
[files, kept at the United
mis archives in a Manhat-
liling, reportedly contain
j records of more than
NO accuse Nazi war
jnals. They are presently
fcible only to the govern-
i of UN member-states.
former member-states
le War Crimes Commis-
[are Australia, Belgium,
a d a China,
loslovakia, Denmark,
ce, Greece, India, Luxem-
\, The Netherlands, New
id, Norway, Poland, Bri-
United States and
Blavia.
fas announced before last
meeting that at least
them had informed the
iry General they agreed
mt wider access to the
J Only France and India
Jot inform him of their
tions. According to
\Le sources, the files con-
nore accusations of war
committed in France
\n any other country.
I'amat News
jinial Convention report
ia'amat USA and a
le are on tap at the
lesday 11:30 a.m.
iK of the Beba Idelson
irot'Na'amatUSAtobe
'he club room of the
-incoln Road Building,
Beach. Honorary presi-
Barah Kaufman will bring
Ighlights of the conven-
Iheld recently in Los
fcs. Kaufman was a con-
fce delegate.
Some diplomats here said
this might explain why France
continues to oppose wider ac-
cess to the archives. One
source said the French sug-
gested at last week's meeting
that scholars and historians be
allowed to view the files but be
forbidden to publish or an-
nounce their findings.
This would be in sharp con-
tradiction to the intentions of
Israel which originally
demanded the opening of the
files. For all practical pur-
poses, the reported French
proposal would still leave them
sealed.
It was discovered last year
that the archives contained the
files of former UN Secretary
General Kurt Waldheim, now
President of Austria, who has
been accused of complicity in
Nazi atrocities in Greece and
Yugoslavia when he served as
an intelligence officer in the
German army in the Balkans
during World War II.
When Israel first demanded
that the archives be opened, it
was supported by only one
former member of the War
Crimes Commission
Australia. The joining of 14
other former member states,
since then, including the
United States, represents a
major diplomatic victory for
Israel.
Diplomats here expressed
optimism Monday thast the
files will soon be opened and
that some formula will be
agreed to the 17 former
memebr nations for public
access.
'anted
Mred coll. grad.,
jlish speaking, to
d & drive visually
Ired business
it live in South
area.
' 8-10 a.m.
8-9:30 p.m.
65-4033
Bruce M. Singer, Miami Beach
Commissioner, has been ap-
pointed adjunct professor at
Barry University. Dean
George J. Petrello, of the D. In-
ez Andreas School of Business,
made the announcement.
Singer will teach in the
Master's program.
Mr. and Mrs. David Dernier
MARGOLISDERMER
Dr. and Mrs. Stephen Margolis of Miami an-
nounce the marriage of their daughter Elyse
Margolis to David Dermer son of Mrs. Yaffa
Dermer of Miami Beach and the late Jay
Dermer, former Mayor of Miami Beach, on
August 16 at Temple Beth Torah. Rabbi Max
Lipschitz and Rabbi David Lehrfield
officiated.
Sister of the bride, Cheryl Margolis served
as Maid of Honor with Esther Dermer, Danna
English, Toby Kapp and Cindy Kolker as
bridesmaids. Amy Levy and Erin Levy serv-
ed as flower girls.
Best Man James Harris was assisted by
ushers Ron Dermer, Adam Margolis and Jeff
Margolis. Ring bearer was David Levy.
The bride carried her mother's white confir-
mation Bible attached to a spray of white
cascading roses.
The groom presented his mother's wedding
band to the bride.
Both families have been active members of
the Jewish Community for many years. The
bride's parents are originally from Miami
Beach and were married 26 years ago by Rab-
bi Max Lipschitz who performed the
ceremony for the couple.
Following a honeymoon in Alaska the cou-
ple plan to reside in Miami Beach.
31
Gary M. Epstein has joined
('enTrust Savings Bank as the
Bank's general counsel and as
senior executive vice president
ami secretary. In his new posi-
tion. rJ/islein, 39. will be
responsible for nil aspects of the
Hank's general legal Junctions,
including capital markets,
regulation, real estate and
litigation.
Singles
CONNECT YOURSELF to
the Jewish Connection's
Singles Directory 1988.
Personal listings for
singles of all ages local-
ly, nationally and inter-
nationally. For application
send self-addressed
stamped envelope to: The
Jewish Connection, 23
Saturn Ct., Syosset, N.Y.
11791.
^Jtffr"

rLose Weight The Simple Way IJ
Th* Holiday* ara upon ua, and wouldn't you lor one* Ilka to walgh
L list whan thay and than you did whan thay atartad?
Wall now you can!
; BAILINTEAIathaaotutlon.
i Thia 100% natural taa has no artificial Ingradlanta, flavorings or
addltlvaa. Simply drtnk on* cup altar avary maal and wa guarantaa
, your walght will coma off In no tint* at all. No longar will you hava to
aubjact youraalf to the** painful dial*. BAI LIN TEA haa b**n provan
, to work by world famoua mlcroblologlat*.
Don't hMltat*. ordor youra white *upply last*.
30 bags $12.95 + $2.00 shipping handling
60 bags $23.95 + $3.00 shipping It handling
00 baga $33.05 + $3.00 shipping a handling
? Sand your chock or mon*yord*r to: HBH MARKETING COMPANY
136 Broadway (dapt 16)
Woodcliff Laka, N.J. 07675
FREE!!
We will give you most
designer frames that are selling
in competitor's stores for
$45 to $125 FREE of charge
with this ad & your prescription
M*5
$125.00
$29.95
^^.
$.*$
$99.95
M-MnnkKKO.
OVER 10,000 PAIRS N STOCK
Introducing to you Optic. 0.SJL prart*ari el quality <* sbMSMMS
lynui. asaajaasas, contact Iokom and aooaaaonaa.
Our Moon ml multl lingual optician* will bo happy to aaalat you. Wa ara
***W*I***I locala* at tna Intanjootton o *laoayna *ld. 4 iSJrt St
Compara our prtoaa *>% to T0% ott tha tofHtmata lateH prtoa.
16300 8BCAYNE BLVD. NORTH MIAMI BEACH. Fl 33160 I30SI 949-8687


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 9, 1987
.
Agency Aids Incompetent Wards
Prophets For Profit
Continued from Page 6-B
and what's behind the deci-
sion. Which is why hospitals,
especially with malpractice
problems, are getting more
and more reluctant to simply
authorize or to exceed certain
procedures."
There is no question that for
certain people there are no
alternatives to the guardian-
ship program. But. Repensek
cautions, "you better be darn
sure you've tried something
else.'' And there are. he notes,
alternatives if people would
seek out a competent attorney
and engage in estate planning
when they are younger. There
is such a thing as a "living
will." Rer>ensek says. "People
may want to consider and
should consider deciding
things like, if they are in an ac-
cident. : :hey want to stay on
Ufa M] | rt? Do they want to
be in a nursing home0'"
Just how detailed the guar-
dianship program can be is evi-
dent when agency workers
have to make plans to take a
ward's pet to a kennel if its
owner is required to enter the
hospital.
And as guardianship pro-
grams become more common,
the national debate is likely to
expand. According to
Repensek. there are now two
basic approaches:
The disability law front,
which views the guardianship
program with a suspicious
negative eye. Proponents are
concerned with preserving due
process and protecting in-
dividual rights.
There is another approach
which views guardianship as a
necessary evil given the
deterioration of people and the
need to protect them.
Yet. there aren't many alter-
natives. There is only guar-
dianship or nothing. Repensek
says. Some states have a con-
servator step in. usually an at-
torney who handles someone's
financial and legal matters
Sam Smith
Jeffrev Newman
without the person having to
be declared incompetent. Pro-
grams such as conservatorship
would deal with some of the
gray areas. But the problem of
custodial care (medical,
physical and emotional) needs
remains.
"ITS TOO EASY' to start
to point fingers and start
blaming this or that,"
Repensek concludes. "We are
only starting to look at the pro-
blem. As a country, we've
never really dealt with the
number of aging people today
and as a result we've never
made too many plans for it.
And this is only one of the pro-
blems that has cropped up."
spei iai 11 Mir hi rRF-\m>on^K
FUNERAL \\n BURIAL
IN THE BEST OF JEWISH TRADITION
$1,595
Lakr^J* Wnonal Park arvj Elemal L.cht Funral Dirtor arr proud 10
Hwmor rhi. uniqut program .huh .omhnn nrrvh,r <4 plot M .ur
hrautitul Manorial Park and a plan for prr.p.d funeral Mtviaal
Thi. rvrrpnonal *alu awim thai tour on* call ill put t ou in touch a ith
th* prop!* .ho hrlirte th*r* not h me dignif k-J ahout pa, inC morr tor a
traditional Jcattri funrral that HERE I* WHAT WE INCH D
Liqfrc
l^esde
Promtpt Tranarcr fraaa PUc* of
Drarh
Car* and Prrparanon of Drcraard
> Caakee and Heart*
Arraraarmrnt Duntwa of
lTad* Srrtirr*
Permit* and Brfkrfit AawManr*
> -4 hour iiipiio arrtic*
> *i. andlrv CanJ* and Brnchr.
QP w
Pird Pnat* V turanon Path
Sr*l Rrinforrrd Corwrrtr Vault
Opening and Clnung of (.ra*
Perpetual C>ramte> Care
No maintenance or *r tee.
*. Icih Tradition ,in>, |UAS
TOTAL: $1,595
No Interest Pavment Plans Available
For coanpiere information on our plot and funeral rt K( package plan
call tour Lakewde Eternal Light repeewntati.e loJat
' nerd, one call .ill handle all the detail.
BROWARD:
525-9339
DADE:
592-0690
Robert McClaskev. Jr.
Continued from Page 7-B
The only PEC investment
outside of Israel is Israel dis-
count Bank of New York, of
which PEC has 18 percent of
the shares. The Bank, PEC's
main affiliate and largest in-
vestment, is the 15th largest
commerical bank in New York
State, in terms of deposits.
Assets on June 30. 1987 were
$3.8 billion. PEC president
Ciechanover is also president
of the bank.
"PEC only invests in com-
panies in which it can par-
ticipate in the management."
Ciechanover said, "we have in-
itiated hundreds of companies,
helped them get started,
brought them to maturity, and
then, at the right time, sold
our holdings. Our holdings are
constantly turning over, as we
sell them and acquit
ones. We makeVoI
economic investments ail
so diversified we can'shll
reasonable profit." '
. Through its sister corm
in Israel. Dieount InvSj
Corportion. PEC rvS
financial and admin^T1
expertise to supervi* u
operation of its affiliated J
panies there. Experie*fl
its dinned ^gj
helps PEC to evaluate new2l
promising business oddS
tunities in Israel. m''
The results today refc,
both the foresight ofBt
and Warburg ,J
ciecnanover s current ob
vation: A souna investmenti
Israel can pn .fit 50th the cow
try's economy and u]
investor.
h
Frank G. Repensek
In Florida, guardianship pro-
grams are just in the trial
stage. The Dade County pro-
gram serves as the model pro-
gram, not only in the state but
in the country.
According to attorney
Smith, there is a need for the
state to fund agencies such as
Guardianship Program of
Dade County. But while the
state funding is important, it
also is essential to allow
private agencies to continue
operating the programs.
"It's a wonderful program."
Smith said of Repensek's
group. "It's a caring program.
It's run by people who care
and they deal with the sick,
senile and poor."
JFS president Newman says
he has no misgivings that the
JFS turned the program over
to an independent agency.
"If anything. I think, speak-
ing for myself and the board.
we feel very good about having
found this need, funding it.
getting it started and expan-
ding it to where it serves other
people as well."
New York Singles
Plan Sukkot Function
Elite Singles is planning a
Simchat Torah celebration for
people who want to avoid the
crowds.
The Singles organization is
plannig its Yom Tov function
at the New Esplanade Hotel
with the luxury of single suites
with refrigerators and the con-
venience of a Shabbos
Elevator. Situated in the heart
of the West Side, the
Esplanade is located near Lin-
coln Square Synagogue.
Catering will be done by the
Levana Restaurant, which was
recently converted to Fleishig.
After Shabbos a mixer with
musk is planned. For informa-
tion. (212) 974-5300.
When a loss occurs
away from home
M III! III Hi IMIU I III II
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York
to assure swift and
understanding service
Dade ( ountv
">:|_'_'ir*
Brtroaird Counh
k wcnMi Mem rial awpa
New York:."II MS-7M r> .. B *J I: v
NOW WITH "THE
HiMifiUli::i
SECURITY PLAN
... because the grief is enough
to handle Liter.
7i
m
1-800-343-5400


Friday, October 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Judge Richard Feder JudSe Murray Goldman
Judges Lecture At Miami-Dade
Dade Circuit Court Judges
fchard Yale Feder and Mur-
Goldman will be the lead
Itructors in the Fall Term of
People's Law School of
prida, now in progress at the
uth Dade Campus of Miami-
de ('(immunity College.
Judge Feder will teach
iutomobile Accidents and
orida's No-Fault Automobile
surance Law," Thursday,
15. Judge Goldman will
ach "Marital and Family
iw, Divorce and Child
stody," Thursday, Oct. 29.
Joth lectures are scheduled
7:45 until 9:15 p.m. in
Room 2114. The six-week pro-
gram which ends Nov. 12 is a
public service program spon-
sored by the Academy of
Florida Trial Lawyers in
cooperation with Miami-Dade
Community College.

W
y&
rt


Jack W. Gomm has been named
director of divisions planning
and administration for
Florida Power and Light Com-
pany. Gomm will be responsi-
ble for analyzing the operation
and performance of FPL's five
regional divisions and develop-
ing management systems to
meet local needs.
Historical Society
To Meet
The Southern Jewish
Historical Society, which was
organized in the 1950s under
the auspicies of the American
Jewish Historical Society, was
reactivated at a meeting in
Richmond, Virginia, in 1978.
Its meeting this year is
scheduled for Durham, North
Carolina, Nov. 6-8. The theme
of the conference is "Southern
Jews and Their Legacy."
Board member, Dr. Henry
Green, chairman of the
University of Miami's Judaic
Studies Program, will par-
ticipate. For information, (919)
929-8875.
W
IN THE TRADITION
OF OUR FATHERS...&
f THEIR FATHERS
BEFORE THEM
r
.. .personal service and
unequalled value.
The tradition continues.
Memorial1
Servm- Dade and Bnntmrd Comities
N. Miami Beach Hollywood
9494315 921-7200
Deaths
Rabbi Abraham Twersky
JERUSALEM (JTA) The oldest Hasidic rebbe,
Avraham Joshua Heschel Twersky of Machnowka, died on
the evening of Yom Kippur, in Bnei Brak. He was 93 years
old.
The aged rebbe one of the heads of the Council of Torah
Sages and of the ultra-Orthodox Agudat Israel Party, was
a practising Hasidic rebbe in the Soviet Union before com-
ing to Israel in 1966.
Rabbi Twersky had survived a 10-year sentence in a
Soviet Labor camp, some three-and-a-half of those years in
Siberia.
Harold Konover,
Hotel Owner
Harold Konover, 69, of
North Miami Beach, passed
away October 1.
He had been a resident and
owner of the Konover Hotel on
Miami Beach since 1974, com-
ing from Hartford, Conn.
He is survived by his wife
Anna; sons Henry and
Theodore (Rachel) Konover;
brother Simon; grandchildren
Ilan, Ariel and Nicole. He was
a member of the Founder's
Club of Mt. Sinai Hospital.
Services were held at Levitt-
Weinstein with interment at
Lakeside Cemetery.
Miot Named to Bank
Sanford B. (Sandy) Miot,
Florida developer and builder,
has joined CenTrust Savings
bank as a consultant, Chair-
man and Chief Executive Of-
ficer David L. Paul announced.
Jewish Standard
Publisher
HACKENSACK, N.J. -
(JTA) Morris Janoff, a
three-term president of the
American Jewish Press
Association and for more than
50 years publisher of The
Jewish Standard, a weekly
published here, died last week
at the age of 76.
GERSTEN, Bessie, s resident of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged,
October 5. Rubin Zilbert.
GROBER, Nathan H. on October 4. Ser-
vices held in Rhode Island.
PARIS, Ruben (RAY) 62. of North Miami
Beach, October 6. Menorah Chapels.
EITELBERG, Julius. 82, of North Miami
Beach, September 29. The Riverside.
SILVER, Charlotte, 95, of North Miami
Beach. Levitt-Weinstein.
TREDWELL, Marc D.. September 29. The
Riverside.
SAUNDERS, Irene, 75, of Miami, October
1. The Riverside. Interment at Star of
David Memorial Park.
SAUNDERS, Irene, 75, of Miami, October
I. The Riverside. Interment at Star of
David Memorial Park.
FELL, Irene, 58, of Miami. The Riverside.
PAUL, Sophy. 73, of North Miami Beach,
October 2. The Riverside.
BECK, Benjamin, 90, of Coral Gables,
September 30. Services were held. Inter:
ment at Star of David Memorial Park.
SH00R, Robert M., 70, of South Miami, Oc-
tober 3. The Riverside. Interment at
Lakeside Memorial Park.
SHEVER, Goldye Velick. October 3. The
Riverside. Interment at Lakeside
Memorial Park.
WEINSTEIN, John, of Miami Beach, Oc-
tober 3 Blasberg Chapel.
KAPLAN, Minnie, 83. of Miami. October 5.
Services were held. Interment at Star of
David Memorial Park.
REISCHER. Benjamin M., 92, of Miami
Beach. October 5 Eternal Light.
WEINSTEIN, Irving, of Miami Eternal
Light Interment at lakeside Memorial
Park
Through years ol dedicated service,
we have become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH "THE ASSURED PLAN"
LARRIES. BLASBERG
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
Rasi President jewuh Fune>i
Directors o' America
720 SEVENTY-FIRST STREET
IRA M. BLASBERG
Funeral Director
865-2353
MICHAELC BLASBERG
Funeai Oeecior
MiAMi BEACH FlOR'DA IV*
RUBIN-ZILBERT
DADE
538-6371
BROWARD
920-6660
ZILBERT-RUBIN
The Spirit
Of Our Tradition
Lives On.
Dignity, simp/kit}' and economy are the mandates
(tf Scripture, lakeside Memorial liirk upholds the tra-
ditions ofjetcislj burial in a heautifid, intelligently
designed setting
Lakeside, tfx- only memorialpxtrk in the south tlxit
was created to meet tlx.' needs of every Jewisl) family.
Please call for a tour of
our Garden of Heroes, an
innovation in ahoie-ground
burial modeled after tlx>
mausoleums of ancient Israel
10301 .V.tt-J5// Street
Miami. Florida 33T72
Dade (305) 592-0690
BrxAvard(305) 525-9339
W
lakeside. ,
Mpjgnal


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 9, 1987

Happenings
Dr. Brian Weiss, head of the Department of Psychiatry at Ml.
Sinai Medical Center, will discuss "Life in the Crisis Zone" at the
next Congregational Brotherhood Breakfast Forum at Temple
Beth Am on Oct. 18 in the Temple Youth Lounge.
Annual "A Day at the Races with Peppy Fields" and sponsored
by South Shore Hospital Auxiliary will take place Thursday. Oct.
15. at Calder Race Track. Peppy Fields, chairman, said admis-
sion will include a luncheon, admission to the Club House and
round trip bus transportation For information. 866-0057
The Miami Chapter of the Compassionate Friends, a support
group for bereaved parents will meet Thursday. Oct 15 at the
Plymouth Congregational Church, Coconut Grove at 7:30 p.m.
This international non-sectarian group is open to all bereaved
parents, grandparents and siblings For information, 255-2448
A major grant to expand human relations programs in the
schools has been awarded by CenTrust Savings Bank to the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai B nth ADL's Florida Regional Of-
fice will use the $75,000 grant in a three-year extension and ex-
pansion of its "A World of Difference" education project in Dade.
Broward and Monroe counties Last year. CenTrust provided the
startup underwriting for the proiect.
Peter Moser, Coral Gables and
North Dade business and civic
leader, has been selected as the
1987 co-recipient of the Claude
Pepper Community Service
Award of South Shore Hospital
and Medical Center. The honor
will be conferred upon Moser,
chairman and chief executive
officer of a national food ser-
vice company, at the hospital's
Grand Renaissance Ball
Saturday night at the Fon-
tainebleau Hilton Hotel.
Orange Blossom Manor
Stresses Kosher Meals Gold, Peariman
Voted Civic
League Leaders
Orange Blossom Manor, a
new Adult Congregate Living
Facility in Pembroke Park, has
two kitchens where Glatt
Kosher meals are prepared
under the supervision of a
mashgiach.
Orange Blossom, which
opened May 1 with a capacity
of 144 residents, also has a
shul on its premises, said facili-
ty administrator Morris
Hyman.
The facility is called Orange
Blossom because it was built
on a site that was formerly
orange groves. Today, the pro-
perty is surrounded by a park.
Owners Alex Webster and
Adolph Weiss. Chicago
businessmen, picked the Pem-
broke Park site because of its
close proximity to the Dade-
Broward County line, and its
closeness to a park, hospital'
and 1-95.
Hyman. 51. has been a resi-
dent of Florida for 17 years,
and has a background in ad-
ministration and phar-
maceutical science. He lives in
Rosen, Schwartz
Elected By
Chamber
Former Mayor Harold Rosen
and public relations agency
president Gerald Schwartz
have been re-elected to three-
year terms on the Board of
Governors of the Miami Beach
Chamber of Commerce.
Three newcomers also were
elected to three-year terms in
the balloting among 700
Chamber members.
New governors are Stuart
Blumberg, vice president of
Hotelerama. Inc., the company
which owns the Fontainebleau
Hilton Hotel; Eric Jacobs.
Lord Tarleton Hotel owner
and chairman of the Miami
Beach Visitors and Convention
Authority (VCA); and Les
Feldman. publisher of Playbill.
Rosen, partner in a Miami
Beach law firm, has served on
the board for the past four
years and Schwartz, vice presi-
dent of the Chamber, has been
a governor for the last nine
years.
Morris Hvman
Miramar with his wife Bernice
and three children.
Orange Blossom has a swim-
ming pool, jacuzi. physical
therapy department, nursing
supervision. 24-hour physician
on call, a beauty/barber shop,
shuffleboard courts, and an ac-
tivities department which
bustles with activity from
bingo to arts and crafts to
shopping trips and picnics.
Hyman says that Orange
Blossom, now one-third filled
expects full occupan:v next
April.
Orange Bio? som is located at
3535 SW 52nd Ave., Pem-
broke Park.
Murray Gold, executive
director of the Miami Beach
Resort Hotel and Motel
Association, and Sam
Peariman. attorney and hotel
owner, have been elected to
serve as a presidium for the
Civic League of Miami Beach.
They succeed Gerald
Schwartz, public relations ex-
ecutive, who served as presi-
dent for the past year and as
vice president for five previous
years.
Both Gold and Peariman are
past presidents of the Civic
League, second oldest civic
organization in Miami Beach.
At the same meeting, the
Civic League named Revy
Wilier, publisher of the Miami
Beach Citizen News
newspaper, as its 'Civic
Leader of the Year."
Civic League also selected
Billie Kern as its 'Civic
Leaguer of the Year."
Countybank Begins
Plans For
25th Anniversary
November will mark County
National Bank's 25th year o"f
service to the local* com-
munities. President. George
Apelian. noted that plans are
being drawn for an exciting
celebration throughout
November.
FREE SKIN CANCER
EXAMINATION
By Certified Dermatologist
1680 Michigan Avenue
Suite 900
Miami Beach
By Appointment Only 532-4478
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
6:39 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach, Fla. 531 2120
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Zvl Rozen Conservative
Executive Director.
Harry J. Silverman (
w
Mlnyan7 30am 30 p m
SillSwili.ni it p.m.
Shaboat tan. Sat. ftOO a. m
FrtKolNMrafcKpjn.
Sal Yon Kkxhv i a.m.
Ta*lah Owdola 7-SS p.m. Sal
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 667-6667
Leonard Schoolman, Sr. Rabbi
Mark Kram, Associate Rabbi
Lynn Goldstein, Assistant Rabbi
Frt. 7:10 p.m. RaftM Laonard Schoolman
will ofttdaia at Mia Day School a rminloua
School Conaacratlon Sarvtco
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854-3811
Jack Riemer. Rabbi
Robert Albert.
Cantor
Rev. Milton Freeman.
Ritual Director
m
Suakol Thura a Fn t am a ( p.m. Choi
HamoaO Sukkot Sat a.m. Wncftan a 45
p.m. Dally aorv. Sun. 1 a.m. 1 5 30 p.m.
Men. a Tuna. 7:30 am a 5 30 p m
wad 7 I5l m a 6pm
? ???*??
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St.. N. Miami. FL 33181
8915508 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs. Rabbi
Dr Joseph A. Gortinkel. f"Si\
Rabbi Emeritus v W)
Moshe Fhedler. Cantor
Fn. 7 p.m.
Sat 143 a.m.
Waakdayaan Won Fn a am
ton Thurm Spm Son I 30 a m
Sal Dim
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1S45 Jefferson Ave.. M.B.. FL 33139
Tel 538-4112
Rabbi Alvadla Rosenberg
Cantor Moshe Buryn
Darf, aanxcaa a-m. 7 pjn.
SatftlSajn
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
238-2601 /KN
Rabbi David H. Auerbech \ W)
Cantor Stephen Freedman **
Sttkot Frt. ftJS a.ax I___
Sal vMam Sar ktttnan Eric <
MaaaMAtMfMOeL 14. 7'SSpja. Oct 1
? 30am SMwnal Toran 4 HakafM Oct 15
7p.aa.OctiaftSSa.iit
TEMPLE METWSUoloM SM-Ttti
Chase Ave. A 41st 81.
OAWY A. OUCKSTUKutfi
1N AlPMN. CaMa*
0AV10 CONVtSER.
DNaIS J Pact F T A.. Ej
aatmM an. ana Nate*
TewhOttafaO
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N Miami Beach Blvd ^.
Dr. Max A Lipechiu. Rabbi S)
Zvee Aroni. Cantor XX-
Harvey L. Brovtn. Exec. Director
Moahnna AaboanOtl 14 7 30 a
5 30pm Swamwta Ataatwl Oct H ftM a m
Yaa10am Srmcna Toran 7 1S p m
Comawty mm Frt Imncnwn ft38 p m
StackaTanfcftSSaax
CUBAN
at .1 KnnAuli.i. a a
1700
*-*^'a. ifj w r<|a)
W^JjWf/. ***>ftnt
rR>m Epeabaum, Presldam
IWsxaluuaCommltteV^
TEMPLE EMANUEL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Bern*
Yehuda Shilman. Cantor
Maurice Klein. Ritual Directs
Gerald Taub. Executive Direct
f preach. Cantor Snirman sflataaT
S**at Cho. H.moao SSSSMltT
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive. Miami Batch
532 6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schift
tall 730 a-m. (Men. 4 Thurx MS 17 am
M. 7 pj SM. I am. ftaaary lor HWi nawn
Day*
TEMPLE ISRAEL "
Of Greater Miami
I "OA#ff rWfo/m Co**orMtfiM
137N.E.19thSt.MNjrrill7WW
BW0 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob G. Bomstein
Frt. I pin.
Sukkot OBcananoa Downtown Wm Saiam
1 Hanay Kaufman Cantonal ioo.ti Caw;
Owalaaa Bauar Dabbi Aa> ; Hinimav
a Cantor Racnaria F Ninon
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd Rtforal
Coral Gables 667-56571
Michael B. Eisenstat Rabbi
Succoth aarv Fit. fttSp.m SmcnjiTori*
Oct. 141pm Oct 15 'Oi m
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Shoshanah Raab. Cantor
I Fn 7 30 p.m.
Sat m
Onag Snaoeai will ictow
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz ^>,
Ari Fridkis. Assoc Rabbi ')
Cantor Murray Yavneh x3>
Sal. ( am Saboatr aarvica.
OaUy Mmcnan Sunoar Friday
I am andlp m
San Sam and5*Spm
TEMPLE NERTAMID 866-8345
7902 Cartyie Ave.. St*'*33
Miami Beach 33141 ;"*
Rabbi Eugene Labovit;
Cantor Edward Klein

DaHy Sar. Mon-Fn. Ia.m >30p
Sat Mwtcna ft 15 p.m.Sn ISOim.
ftSO p-m. Sat. ftaS am aar m a Lie*
Cantor Xiain
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St
North Miami Beach
661 1562
Yaakov Sprung
SHAARE TEFILLAH-
TORAH CENTER OF KENDALL
Tito SW 112 Street ***$
232-6833 > "
Rabbi Harehel Becker
aawTa^fttteawxanyawy
e) I I V*emPftw
.. ja*a ia-ft|w
atftieajn
TEMPLE SINAI 11NE**
North Dede's W^^^TO
Ralph P. Kkwekry. R***1 _S" '
Julian I. CoXAasociate Rat*.
Irving Shulkes. Cantor .
Barbara S. Ramsay. Adrmmstr'W
Fit
.SSaxtftJOa*1
Oeiit*Sa*
TEMPLE TON ISRAEL^ECENTJ
6000 MiKer Dr Const"" I
2712311 O^lv (\
Dr. Morrnan H. Shap-o. Rat*. \\
atCwESu--
1 u awaaSay* n**m
iieamiwyO. *
i,t ttr. H-
SrMM Amrct TlaAor Oet 11111
Toraw Oct 1ft Haawi Swap m
Sat"
..sn-


PUBLIC
NOTICES
T....

NOTICE OF SALE
SUANT TO CHAPTER 45
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
fcF ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
iCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
CjNTY. FLORIDA
kNERAL JURISDICTION
/1SION
SE NO. 87-6752
|C 05
C-IANCE MORTGAGE COM-
ITY i Florida corporation
h CHARTER MORTGAGE
Impany.
kntiffis)
n'os MURRAY, and the
known spouse, etc., et al.,
JendanUs)
lOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
[suant to an Order or Final
.nent entered in this case
ji pending in said Court, the
||e of which is indicated above, I
I sell to the highest and best
Jer for cash on THE SOUTH
EPS of the Dade County Cour-
se in Miami, Dade County,
pnda at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
26th following described
.jertv:
119. in Block 9. of REVISED
AT OF BLOCKS 2. 3, 4 AND 5
fARCOLA GARDENS, accor
j to the Plat thereof, as record-
pn Plat Book 50, at Page 17, of
i Public Records of Dade Coun-
I Florida.
DATED the 7th day of October.
m.
[RICHARD P. BRINKER
I Clerk of Circuit Court
jrcuit Court Seal)
[ by Maria Sama
[Deputy Clerk
Itorney for Plaintiff
enthal & Yarchin, P.A.
II Biscayne Boulevard
|te800 "
ii. Florida 33137
Wished 10/9-16_______________
I THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
HE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
bADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
I Case No. 87-42621-FC-14
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
re the marriage of
Iavid r Mcknight
letitioner
Id
mm Mcknight
lespondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
: Wendy McKnight,
residence unknown
101' ARE NOTIFIED that an
Ion for dissolution of marriage
l been filed against you and you
I required to serve a copy of
v written defenses upon: I.J.
AFF. ESQ. attorney for Pett-
ier, whose address is 633 N.E.
[ St., N.M.B. Florida 33162 on
wfore November 6th, 1987 and
I the original with the derk of
f court otherwise a default will
Mered against you.
| RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: C. P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
October 9,16, 23,30,1987
JJBE CIRCUIT COURT OF
W ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
.CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
PADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 87-41190-FC-12
FAMILY DIVISION
EL BAR 36801C
W* the marriage of
TL0RAA GRAHAM
puuoner
PUS GRAHAM
.ondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
f su Graham,
residence unknown
P> ARE NOTIFIED that an
T*> for dissolution of marriage
lV*e vour real property has
I ~T aKaln8t yu and you are
s *" wrv copy of your
AFT F^""" Qpon: U
"". ESQ. attorney for Peti-
w, whose address is 633 N.E.
If!' vM B Florid* m62 "
f?K e November 6th, 1987 and
* onPnal with the clerk of
court otherwise a default will
leered against you. The real
*"> located in Dade County,
ffc^^tl^lstadd-n
rionnah Park, PB 33 P 9
P* of Dade County (covers
intlot)me8te8d a"d adJinin
HrrSi*.1**' 30' 1987
""CHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
V .BafWa Rodriguez
|B7 ^^y Clerk
0ctober9.16,23,30.1987
Business Note
Barbara Sullivan has been
promoted to assistant vice
president for operations of Jef-
ferson National Bank, moving
up from assistant cashier. Her
election was announced by
Barton S. Goldberg, president
of Jefferson National Bank
which has offices in Miami
Beach and Key Biscayne.
Ms. Sullivan is assigned to
Jefferson's corporate head-
quarters at 301 Arthur God-
frey Road. Miami Beach.
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISON
CASE NO. 87-16187
SEC. 07
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION. A
United States corporation..
Plaintiffs)
vs.
LEAVY JOHNS, et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above. I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami, Dade County, Florida at
11:00o'clock A.M., on the 26th day
of October. 1987. the following
described property:
Lot 24. Block 43, of FIRST ADDI-
TION TO MYRTLE GROVE, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 57, Page 2,
of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
The United States of America shall
have the right of redemption pro-
vided by 28 U.S.C. Sec. 2410(c) for
the period provided therein, runn-
ing from the date of the Certificate
of TiUe issued herein.
DATED the 7th day of October.
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin. P.A.
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
Published 10/9-16
Friday, October 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-39335 CA-25
NOTICE OF ACTION
LINCOLN SERVICE
CORPORATION.
Plaintiff,
vs.
RUSSELL P ROGG.
et ux., et al.,
Defendants
TO: KATHY BLIVEN ROGG
Broadwell Road
Morrisonville,
New York 12962
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 1. Block 5. FIRST ADDI-
TION TO HOMESTEAD
LAKE PARK HOMES, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 66.
at Page 22. of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it.
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
October 23, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 17 day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk ol 'tin- Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18005 Srptembr 25;
October 2, 9. 16, 1987
The 1986 Annual Report of the
Bienenfeld Foundation Inc. is
available for public inspection at its
office, 1619 N.W. 7th Ave.. Miami,
Fla., during regular business hours
within 180 days from today Oc-
tober 9, 1987.
18030 October 9,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-12255 CA 29
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK,
as Trustee for the Housing
Finance Authority of Dade
County. Florida, under a Trust
Indenture dated as of September
1, 1983.
Plaintiff
vs.
BARBARA ADLER. et al..
Defendants.
TO: MELVIN LEWIS ADLER
and ANITA PERLMAN
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
them, and all parties having
or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the
property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County. Florida:
UNIT No. 101. of CALUSA
CLUB VILLAGE CON-
DOMINIUM BUILDING A,
according to the Declaration
of Condominium thereof, ;is
recorded in Official Book
11749, at Page 1868, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
October 23. 1987. and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 17 day of
September. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18006 September 25;
October 2.9.16, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-40023 FC01
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
No. 003473
IN RE.
BENNETT JOSEPHSON
and
NATHLIE BARRECK
JOSEPHSON
TO: NATHLIE BARRECK
JOSEPHSON
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for the Peti-
tioner, whose address is 2020 N.E.
163rd Street North Miami Beach,
Florida 33161. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before October 23,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 16 day of September 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOY BARKAN
2020 N.E. 163rd St
North Miami Beach, Fl. 33162
(305) 944-9100
18004 September 25;
October 2, 9. 16, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name CHILO'S
CAFETERIA at 13766 S.W. 84th
Street, Miami, Florida 33183 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
MARGARITO J. BELLO
13720 S.W. 32nd Street
Miami, Florida 33175
18034 October 9,16.23,30, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name INTERNACIONAL
NORTHVSIA (USA) CORP.
DBA. INTERNACIONAL NOR
THVSIA at 10550 NW 77th
COURT (UNIT-301) HIALEAH
GARDENS. FLORIDA 33016 in
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
RUDOLF M.
APPENZELLER-
PRESIDENT
18033 October 9, 16.23,30. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-2687
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
REGINA KINAS.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of REGINA
KINAS. deceased. File Number
87-2687(01). is pending in the Cir
cuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the ad
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami, Florida 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate is KLARA HERZBERG
CHAVEZ and PAUL KINAS,
whose address is 8985 Bay Drive,
Surfside, Florida 33154. The name
and address ofthe personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
EUGENE J. WEISS, ESQ.. 407
Lincoln Road. PH. NE, Miami. FL
33139.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: Oc-
tober 9, 1987.
KLARA HERZBERG CHAVEZ
and PAUL KINAS
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
REGINA KINAS
! )tM'('ilHt'((
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
EUGENE J. WEISS
407 Lincoln Road, PH-N.E.
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Telephone: (305) 534-4721
18035 October 9.16. 19*7
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of RAFAELO'S &
CHIQUITINES at 1811 1813
N.W. 20 Street. Miami, Fl. 33142
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
RAFAEL MOTOLA
MOTOGRAB INC.
17994 September 18, 25;
October 2, 9, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Giotto International
at 4086 NW 65 Avenue. Virginia
Gardens. Fl 33166 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Harold Schuller. Jr.
4086 N.W. 65 Ave.
and
The Pluton Company of Caracas,
Venezuela whose owner is Mr.
Maximo De Paulis. Address of De
Paulis and Pluton is Edificio Ex-
agon, Prolongacion Avenida
Romulo Gallegos, El Marques,
Caracas, Venezuela.
18002 September 25;
October 2.9, 16, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5666
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FRANCES J. JOHNSON
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of FRANCES J.
JOHNSON, deceased. File
Number 87-5666, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is Dade County
Courthouse 73 W. Flagler St..
Miami, Florida 33130. The per
sonal representative of the estate
is RONALD JOHNSON, whose ad-
dress is 4987 SW 25 Avenue. Ft.
Lauderdale, Florida. The name
and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: Oc-
tober 9. 1987.
Donald Johnson
As Personal Representative
ofthe Estate of
FRANCES J. JOHNSON
I Jt*t'(''ISI'll
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
ARTHUR H. LIPSON
801 Northeast 167 Street
Miami, Florida 33162
Telephone: 306-663-30:>
18032 October 9, 16, 1987


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 9, 198?
FORECLOSURE SALES-PUBLIC NC

IN THE CIRCl'IT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO IT-SIMM CA 28
NOTICE OF ACTION
BARNETT BANKS TRUST
COMPANY N A is Trustee for
the Florida Housing Finance
Agency under a resolution
adopted and dated as of Julv 1.
1984.
Plaintiff
vs.
ARCO HOME. INC. and
FRANCISCO RODRIGUEZ, et
al..
Defendants.
TO: FRANCISCO RODRIGUEZ
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against him. and all par-
ties having or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the pro-
perty herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County. Florida:
Lot 6. in Block 12. of PALM
POINT SECTION ONE. ac-
cording to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 123.
at Page 8. of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida, 33146 on or before
October 23. 1987. and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 15 day of
September. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18001 September 18,25;
October 2, 9, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURF
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO: 87-39906 02
NOTICE OF ACTION
GERD GUNTHER RUESS.
Petitioner/Husband,
and
ALBA LIZ MONDRAGON
RUESS.
Respondent/Wife
TO: ALBA LUZ MONDRAGON
RUESS
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFED
that a Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you. and that you are required to
serve a copy of your Response or
P'eading to the Petition upon the
Petitions*'! attorney, RUSSELL
K ROSENTHAL. ESQ.. 7103
102nd Avenue. Suite B.
Florida 33173. and file the
original Response or Pleading in
the office of the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court, on or before the 16th,
day of October. A.D.. 1987. If you
fail to do so, a Default Judgment
will be taken against you for the
relief demanded in the Petition.
Dated at Miami, Dade County.
Florida, this 14 day of September.
A.D.. 1987.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
By: E. LE SUEL'R
(Deputy Clerk)
17993 September 18, 25;
October 2.9.1987.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTmOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name MISS TEE FOR ME
at 13170 N.W. 43rd Avenue, Opa-
Locka. Florida intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Jerry Sue Fashions, Inc.
HARVEY D. ROGERS
Attorney for
Jerry Sue Fashions. Inc.
13170 N.W. 43rd Avenue
Opa-Locka. Florida 33054
ISMS September 25;
October 2.9. 16.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
(ASK NO. 87-4017849
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under : the United
tCf of America.
Plaintiff
VS. i
EDUARDO M ANTUNA. et ux..
et al.
Defendants.
TO: EDUARDO M. ANTUNA
and CLAUDETTE S. ANTUNA.
his wife
4626 159th Avenue SE
Bellevue. WA 98006
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 22. Block 2, of
OAKRIDGE ESTATES
SECTION THREE, accor-
ding to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 57,
Page 10. of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it.
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
October 23. 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered agaisnt you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 15 day of
September. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
17998 Setpember 18.25;
_______________October 2.9,1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 87 39*03
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARIE YOLETTE BANNA
COICOU.
Petitioner,
and
BERTHONY COICOU.
Respondent.
TO: BERTHONY COICOU
5em Ave. Bolosse, Rue Malet No.
76
Port-au-Prince. Haiti. W.I.
shall serve a copy of your Answer
to the Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage upon ANTHONY CAR-
BONE.- PA.. 612 N.W. 12th
Avenue, Miami, Florida 33136.
and file the original with the Clerk
of Court on or before October 16,
1987. otherwise a default will be ,
entered.
Dated: September 14. 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
17999 September 18, 25;
______________Octobers 9,1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 87 39601
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ROSE SILFIDA BILLY.
Petitioner,
and
ELIJAH BILLY.
Respondent.
TO: ELIJAH BILLY.
Residence Unknown, you shall
serve a copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar
riage upon: ANTHONY CAR
BONE. PA., 612 N.W. 12th
Avenue, Miami. Florida 33136.
and file original with the Clerk of
the Court on or before October 16.
1987, otherwise a default will be
entered.
Dated: September 14, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER. Clerk
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
18000 September 18. 25;
October 2.9,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name Lazaro and Elsa Ex
octic Flowers at 3300 SW 94 Ct.
Miami FL 33165 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida
Lazaro Martinez and
Elsa Martinez
18029 October 9. 16.23,30, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-08372 FC 24
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
SUSAN SCHOLNIK GOLD
Petitioner Wife,
and
WAYNE GOLD.
Respondent. Husliand
TO: WAYNE GOLD
M Beaufort Park
Finchley. London NW 11
01-458 4157
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you in the Circuit
Court, in and for Dade County.
Florida, and that the Petitioner,
SUSAN SCHOLNIK GOLD, seeks
not only a dissolution of the mar-
riage but also an award of any and
all interest and title which you
have in that certain Promissory
Note, dated October 10, 1985. in
the amount of $17,000.00 given to
you and Petitioner by Francisco
Ramon and Silvia Ramon and
secured by a Mortgage on the same
date on certain real property
located in Dade County, Florida,
and legally described, as follows:
Lot 86. Block 96, CENTRAL
MIAMI PART SIX. accor-
ding to the plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 17,
Page 8, Public Records of
Dade County, Florida.
You are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to
the Petitioner or Petitioner's At-
torney, Robert S. Korschun. whose
address is: 8603 South Dixie
Highway. Suite 210, Miami.
Florida 33143-7807 on or before
the 16 day of October, 1987, and
file the original with the Clerk of
this Court, either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter. If you fail tc
file your written response or
defense, as indicated, a Default
will be entered against you for th
relief demanded in the Petition.
PLEASE GOVERN
YOURSELF ACCORDINGLY
DATED: September 10, 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
BY: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
17988 September 18. 25;
October 2. 9, 1987
CM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 87-41190(121
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 3(8016
In re the marriage of
FLORA A. GRAHAM
Petitioner
and
SILAS GRAHAM
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Silas Graham.
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
jction for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: 1. J.
GRAFF, ESQ., attorney for Peti
tioner. whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St. N.M.B Florida 33162 on or
before October 30. 1987, and file
the original with the clerk of this
court otherwise a default will be
entered against you.
DATED: September 22. 1987
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: F. Seidl
As Deputy Clerk
18016 September 25;
October 2.9, 16, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-39663
IN RE: The Marriage of:
MARIE FANILIA TALES,
Petitioner/Wife
and
SAUREL TALES,
Respondent/Husband.
TO: SAUREL TALES,
Residence Unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage upon ANTHONY
CARBONE, PA., 612 N. W. 12th
Avenue, Miami. Florida. 33136,
and file original with Clerk of the
Court on or before November 6th,
1967; otherwise a default will be
entered.
RICHARD P BRINKER.
Clerk
By: Barbara Rodriguez
18031 October 9. 16.23,30. 1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-22151
SEC. 10
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION. A
United States corporation.
Plaint i I'll-i
vs.
JULIO E. SANCHEZ. ET AL
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above. I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami. Dade County.
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 19th day of October. 1987.
the following described
property:
Lot 2, Block 2, of CANTISANO
SUDIVTSION, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 96, Page 37, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida.
DATED the 30th day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin. PA.
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, Fl. 33137
Published 10/2-9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-39836
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI, a
United States Corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
SIDNEY NAGIOFF AND
ROSSLYN NAGIOFF. his wife,
et al..
Defendants.
TO: SIDNEY NAGIOFF and
ROSSLYN NAGIOFF.
his wife
42 Lyttleton Court
Lyttleton Road
London. England N20EB
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County. Florida:
Unit No". 1002. of VEN-
DOME PLACE CON
DOMINI!'M, a Condominium
according to the Declaration
of Condominium thereof,
dated January 18. 1980. and
filed for record July 7, 1981
under Clerk's File No.
81R180394. in Official
Records Book 11151, at Page
186 of the Public Records of
Dade County, as amended;
together with all im-
provements, appliances, and
fixtures located
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith. Mack, Lewis. Allison and
Cohen. Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address is 111 N.E 1st
Street, Miami. Florida 33132, on
or before October 16, 1987, and file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court on the 11 day of
September. 1987
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: JENNIS L. RUSSELL
Deputy Clerk
17989 September 18,25
_______________October 2. 9.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTmOU8 NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SANDY'S PRO-
DUCE at 730 First Street. Miami
Beach. FL intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
SOUTH POINTE PRODUCE, Inc.
730 First Street
Miami Beach, FL 33139
18011 September 25;
October 2. 9 16. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87 39860-07
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
VILMA R. ROSADO.
Petitioner.
and
ANTONIO ROSADO.
Respondent.
TO: ANTONIO ROSADO
3127 West Leland
Chicago. III. 60625
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
MELVIN J ASHER. ESQ.. at
torney for Petitioner, whose ad
dress is 825 South Bayshore Drive,
Suite 543, Miami. FL 33131, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
October 16. 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 14 day of September. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
17991 September 18,25;
October 2.9,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Aetioa No. 87 40457
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
RUBEN CAMACHO. husband,
and
CARIDAD CAMACHO. wife.
TO: CARIDAD CAMACHO
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on AR-
THUR H. LIPSON. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 801
Northeast 167 Street, Miami.
Florida 33162. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before October 23,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 17 day of September, 1987. i
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida ,
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
18009 September 25;
October 2.9,16, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87 40466-31
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ROBERT VINES, husband,
and
RONDA M. VINES, wife.
TO: RONDA M. VLNES
Star Route 4. Box 505
Pryor. Oklahoma 74361
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on AR-
THUR H. LIPSON, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 801
Northwest 167 Street Miami, Fla.
33162, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 23. 1987:
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 17 day of September. 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
IS00B September 25;
October 2.9.16. 1987
THE ELEVENTHj n',
CH IT IN AN, S
OADEl-oiVrSSa
Can* N. 87-4057J,,
FAMILY DlvSf
, L FL BAR 368.1.
In re the marriage o'
and
VERNEL ROGERS
Respondent
NOTICE OF AfTinv
r' V.rr,, H Ws N
Batidence unknown I
'" arenotdtbJ
ction for dissolution* "M
has been filed against v^j
are require.) serve SI
CRAF? niMm ^
GRAFF. ESQ., attorney!,,
tioner. whose addres.ii Jail
or before October 23,1987,21
the original with the derk A
court otherwise a debuh rjl
entered against you.
RICHARD P. BRISKER
Clerk of the Court
By C P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
1800' S.ptoakJ
October 2,9,16,1
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SEEV
(NO PROPERTYl
IN THE CIRCUIT C011TI
THE ELEVENTH JUDICU
CIRCUIT OF FLORfDii
AND FOR DADE C
Civil Action No. 87-u
ACTION FOR DISSOLl'
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
ALBERTO HERNANDEZ-
MENDOZA,
and
GAIL HERNANDEZ
TO: Gail Hernandez
214 SW 152nd Street
Number 64
Seattle. Washington 9811
YOU ARE HEREJ
NOTIFIED that an icul
Dissolution of Marriage bul
filed against you and you n
quired to serve a copy of yoari
ten defenses, if any. to it on 9k]
Miller, Esquire, attorney (rj
tioner. whose address is FT
MAN & KAPLAN PA.
West Flagler Street.
Florida 33135 and file thta
with the clerk of the i
court on or before i___
1987; otherwise a default WJ
ntered against you for he I
demanded ir. the compUal|
petition.
This notice shall be
once each week for four I
secutive weeks in THE i
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and tin]
of said court at Miami, Flon
this 21 day of September, 19
RICHARD P. BRINKER |
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Flondi
By T CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Stall
Steven Miller Esquire
FRIEDMAN i KAPLAN. PJ
3636 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 3313S
Attorney for Petitioner
18012 W
bsriiM
IN THE CIRCUIT C01IT J
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA]
Case
No. 87-41189 (12)-FC-
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 3W01
In re the marriage of
ARNETTA M YOl'MANS
Petitioner
CONNTELEE E Y0lHA*|
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO CONNIELEE E.
YOUMANS,
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED tWJ
action for dissolution of sW
has been filed against you m
are required to serve M
your written defenses up*"
GRAFF. ESQ.. atw^S
Uoner. whose address a
167 St. N.M.B. HondaffllS*
before October 30. 1*^\"%
the original with the *n '.
court otherwise a default *|
entered against you
DATED: September
RICHARD P BRIN^111
Clerk of I
By: F. Seidl
As Deputy l'** ,
18017 sr


Friday, October 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
NOTICE OF SALE
h'RSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
THE CIRCUIT COURT 01
JE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
RCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
fcl'NTY. FLORIDA
EnERAL JURISDICTION
TlVISION
USE NO. 87-13399
ffoCKTON. WHATLEY.
K\\S & COMPANY, a Floridm
Lrporation,
mtiff(s)
l/IS CAMPBELL.
JARON CAMPBELL, and
unknown heirs, deviates,
jiteea. creditors, or other
ties claiming by. through.
Ljrr or against them; et al..
fcfendant(s)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
Irsuant to an Order or Final
Hgment entered in this case
Lw pending in said Court, the
Vie of which is indicated above, I
1 sell to the highest and best
Sjer for cash on THE SOUTH
FEPS of the Dade County Cour-
ious!- in Miami, Dade County,
tonda at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
19th day of October, 1987.
|e following deaeribed
erty:
It" 19. in Block 72. of LESLIE
States, section five, ac-
Ming to the Plat thereof, as
fcorded in Plat Book 96, at Page
, of the Public Records of Dade
unty Florida.
DATED the 30th day of
ptember, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(irruii Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
ey for Plaintiff
enthal & Yarchin, P.A.
lite 800
l Biscayne Blvd.
ni, Fl. 33137
blished 10/2-9
NOTICE OF SALE
URSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
IE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
RCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
pUNTY, FLORIDA
SNERAL JURISDICTION
rlBION
iSE NO. 87-13731
fc.ll
IDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
Cai.K ASSOCIATION, a
kited States corporation,
lintiff(s)
I vs.
ARGUERITE FORTNER.
LIE MARY ROBILLARD. AN-
MNE DOMINQUE a/k/a AN
f>IM DOMINIQUE, and the
known spouaes, etc.. et al.,
pendantfs)
[lOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
suant to an Order or Final
ftpm-nt entered in this case
I pending in said Court, the
|l<' of which is indicated above, I
I Kfl to the highest and best
I rash on THE SOUTH
f i he Dade County Cour-
"m in Miami, Dade County,
prida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
19th day of October, 1987,
following described
rt>:
>. In Block 5, of VENETIAN
fVF.I.ni'MENT SUBDIVI
PN, according to the Plat
" f. as recorded in Plat Book
at Page 87, of the Public
cords of Dade County, Florida.
DATED the 30th day of
Jtwiber, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
I Clerk of Circuit Court
Jit Court Seal)
b) Maria Sama
I Deputy Clerk
torney for Plaintiff
"thai & Yarchin. P.A.
(800
Biscayne Blvd.
i.FI. 33137
Wished 1072-9
NOTICE UNDER
I FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
TWICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
' the undersigned, desiring to
ge in business under the fic-
w name SOUTH POINTE
FS in Dade County. Florida, in
* to register said name with
> Uerk of the Circuit Court of
[ County, Florida.
GREATER MIAMI
COMMUNITY
CONCERT BAND, INC..
[ctonda non-profit corporation
F.*L,LANTAVSS, President
Pel L. Mann. Esq.
*" for Applicant
South Dadetand Boulevard
ni, Florida 38156
October Z. 9.16.23,1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
iN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-48879
SEC. 19
STOCKTON. WHATLEY.
DAVIN & COMPANY, a Florida
corporation.
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
MANUEL FELIPE BRENNAN.
et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 19th day of October, 1987,
the following described
property:
Lot 9, in Block 43, of FAIRWAY
ESTATES, SECTION SEVEN,
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 98, at Page
67, of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
The United States of America
shall have the right of redemption
provided by 28 U.S.C. Section
2410(c) for the period provided
therein, running from the date of
the Certificate of Title isued
herein.
DATED the 30th day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Roaenthal & Yarchin, P.A.
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, Fl. 33137
Published 10/2-9
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-23816
SEC. It
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
OF MIAMI, as trustee for the
Dade County Housing Finance
Authority,
Plaintifffs)
vs.
ELAINE SPENCER, et al..
Defendant^)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami. Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M. on
the 19th day of October. 1987.
the following described
property:
Lot 23, Block 46, of FIRST ADDI-
TION TO BUNCHE PARK, accor
ding to the Plat thereof, as record-
ed in Plat Book 53, Page 61, of
the Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
DATED the 30th day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Roaenthal & Yarchin, P.A.
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami. Fl. 33137
Published 10/2-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name YOCUM PRINTING
at number 4155 East 8th Avenue,
Hialeah, Florida, intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Y PRINTING CORP.,
a Florida corporation
by: PETER ALVAREZ. President
Michael L. Mann. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
9100 South Dadeland Boulevard
Suite 1103
Miami. Florida 33156
18026 October 2,9.16,23. 1967
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-18995
SEC. 26
CONNECTICUT SAVINGS
BANK, a Connecticut
corporation,
Plaintifffs)
V8.
DONALD LESLIE BROWN, et
al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County.
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M. on
the 19th day of October, 1987,
the following described property:
The West 39 feet of Lot 2. in
Block 2. of PERRINE MANOR,
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 96, at Page
41, of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
DATED the 30th day of
September. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin. P.A.
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, Fl. 33137
Published 10/2-9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-35769 CA 24
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
as Trustee for the Housing
Finance Authority of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida under a trust indenture
dated as of September 1, 1983,
Plaintiff
vs.
JUANITA GARCIA.
Defendants
TO: JUANITA GARCIA.
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against JUANITA GAR-
CIA, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title or
interest in the property herein
described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
t Ountv, Florida:
lot 2, Block 19, PRINCETO-
NIAN SUBDIVISION SEC-
TION FIVE, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 122. at Page 86 of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has lieen filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
,214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
November 6th, 1987, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 29th day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
18022 October 2.9.16,23.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE FS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name CORAL ANIMAL
CLINIC at 2500 S.W. 107 Avenue,
Store 32, Miami, Florida, 33165 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Guguio E. Rodriguez
18010 September 26;
October 2,9,16.1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-19654
SEC. 19
STOCKTON. WHATLEY.
DAVIN & COMPANY, a Florida
corporation,
Plaintifffs)
vs.
EFRAIN S. WARENS, and the
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other par-
ties claiming by, through, under
or against him, et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami, Dade County, Florida at
11:C0 o'clock A.M., on the 19th day
of October, 1987, the following
described property:
Lot 7, in Block 39. of COUNTRY
LAKE MANORS TOWNHOMES
SECTION TWO. according to the
Plat thereof as recorded in Plat
Book 126, at Page 47, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida.
DATED the 30th day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin, P.A.
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, Fl. 33137
Published 10/2-9
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 46
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-19766
SEC. 19
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION.
United States corporation,
Plaintifffs)
vs.
MARVIN TAYLOR, et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 19th day of October, 1987.
the following described
property:
Lot 8, Block 9. PINEWOOD
PARK EXTENSION, according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 34, Page 91. of the
Public Records of Dade County,
Florida
DATED the 30th day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin, P.A.
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami. Fl. 33137
Published 10/2-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name AIR AMBULANCE
AMERICA at number 9100 South
Dadeland Boulevard. Suite 1104.
Miami, Florida intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
AIR AMBULANCE CENTRAL.
INC..
a Florida corporation
by: LARRY BERCU, President
Michael L. Mann. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
9100 South Dadeland Boulevard
Suite 1103
Miami, Florida 33156
18024 October 2.9.16.23.1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-9032
SEC. 09
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION. a
United States corporation,
Plaintifffs)
vs.
CESAR GOMEZ MARIA
GOMEZ. YVONNE BERRIOS.
RENE TRUJILLO. and the
unknown spouses, etc., et al.,
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above. I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami. Dade County.
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 19th day of October. 1987.
the following described
property:
Unit No. 604 of THE HOMES OF
WEST FLAGLER ESTATES, a
Condominium, according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, as recorded on January 9,
1985. in Official Records Book
12377. at Page 1520. of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
under Clerk's File No.
85R-007487, as subsequently
modified and amended.,
DATED the 30th day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin. P.A.
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami. Fl. 33137
Published 10/2-9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE I rill JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NUMBER: 87-5461
DIVISION: 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALEX SCHEINZEIT.
Deceased.
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the Estate
of ALEX SCHEINZEIT, Deceas-
ed, File Number 87-6461, is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagler, Street, Miami. Florida
331311
The names and addresses of the
Personal Representative and the
Personal Representative's at-
torney are set forth Mow.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this Court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE:
11) All claims against the estate
and.
(2) Any objection by an in-
terested person on whom this
notice was served that challenges
the validity of the Will, the
qualifications of the Personal
Representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the Court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 2. 1987.
PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
LILLIAN SCHEINZEIT
900 Bay Drive
Apartment 808
Miami Beach, Florida 33141
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Herbert S. Shapiro, Esquire
LAW OFFICE OF
SHAPIRO AND WEIL
1666 79th Street Causeway
Suite 608
Miami Beach, Florida 33141
Telephone: (305) 864-2369
18020 October 2.9, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-6516
Division 04
FLA. BAR NO.: 027363
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CATHERINE KOWALEWSKY
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
ofKATHERINE
KOWALEWSKY, deceased. File
Number 87-5516, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested parsons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against tin- estate and (21 any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was servo) that
challenges the validity of the will.
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
liegun on October 2. 1987.
Personal Representative:
OLGA HUGHES
Apt. 206B
3100 I'mitt Road
Port St. Lucie. Fla. 34952
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HYMAN P. GALBUT. ESQ.
(ialbut, Galbut & Menin
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: 305 672-3100
18023 October 2.9. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SUNSET PROPER
TIES at 7760 S.W. 125 Terr.
Miami, Fl. 33156 intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
J DAVID LIEBMAN
and NATALIE LIEBMAN.
his wife
17996 September 18.25;
October 2.9. 1987
U4 THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
I DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-41508 16
NOTICE OF ACTION
1 THE BINGHAMTON SAVINGS
| BANK,
i Plaintiff
vs.
MARY D. HELMS, et al..
Defendants.
TO: PERPETUAL
SAVINGS & LOAN
ASSOCIATION
229 East Park Avenue
Waterloo, Iowa 50704
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 5 of Block 41. FIRST
ADDITION TO CAROL CI-
TY GARDENS, according to
a plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 68 at Page 31 of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart H. Gitlitz. Esq., At
torney for Plaintiff, whose address
is Suite 214, 1570 Madruga
Avenue, Coral Gables, Florida,
33146 on or before October 30th,
1987, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded ir the
complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 23rd day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By John Branda
As Deputy Clerk
18019 October 2.9. 16,23.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Jack of Diamond at
376.. N.E. 163 Street. NMB. Fl
33160 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Jack Stemher
Joshua Galitzer.
Attorney for Jack Stembcr
IHII21 October 2. 9. 16.23. 1987
'


Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 9, 1987
Israeli Women
Safest Drivers
JERUSALEM A new
study of traffic accidents in
Israel shows that young
women 18 to 20 years of age
are the nation's safest drivers.
The study, prepared by a
team at the Hadassah-Hebrew
University School of Public
Health headed by
epidemiologist Dr. Eliahu
Richter, recommends that
more young women in the
Israel Defense Forces be train-
ed to drive military vehicles.
The study also found that
the rate of serious inuries in
traffic accidents on Israel's
streets and highways declined
from 1979 to 1985, largely
because a rise in gasoline
prices forced drivers to cut
back on the number of trips
they took and their highway
speed. The Hadassah team
cited an increase in the
number of buses in Israle's
public transportation fleet and
a rigorously enforced law re-
quiring seat belt use as also
contributing to the decline in
serious and fatal accidents.
But since 1985, the study
shows, the number of ac-
cidents, and highway deaths, is
once again on the rise. The in-
crease is attributed to the
design and engineering of
Israel's highways, speed, and a
dangerous mix of heavy trucks
and passenger vehicles on the
nation's roads.
The researchers recommend
that existing roads be improv-
UJA Plans Israeli
Youth Program
NEW YORK, NY. Ap-
plications are now being ac-
cepted for Lehava III, a sum-
mer (July 11-31, 1988) pro-
gram designed to enhance and
strengthen relations between
Israeli and Diaspora youth,
sponsored by the American
Jewish Forum in consultation
with the Israeli Forum and the
Jewish Agency under the
auspices of the United Jewish
Appeal.
Lehava is a three-week pro-
gram for 100 American and
100 Israeli young people. Ap-
plicants for the program go
through a formal screening
process and must have been to
Israel before. Applicants must
also have finished tenth,
eleventh or twelfth grade by
next June.
Lehava will take place July
11-31, 1988. The cost is $1,600
per person which includes air
fare, room/board, conference
and touring expenses. Applica-
tions may be obtained from
Young Leadership Cabinet,
UJA, 99 Park Avenue, New
York, NY 10016, (212)
818-9100.
ICJW Gets UN
Peace Award
NEW YORK, NY The In-
ternational Council of Jewish
Women was among the
organizations honored as a
peace messenger by the
United Nations at a ceremony
held at the UN in New York
recently prior to the opening
of the 42nd session of the
General Assembly. ICJW,
which has affiliates in 32 coun-
tries, is represented in the
United States by the National
Council of Jewish Women,
U.S..
ed, heavy truck traffic
restricted on highways travel-
ed most frequently by
passenger cars, and reduced
speed limits. They also call for
broadening existing laws to re-
quire that seat belts be worn
while driving on city streets as
well as inter-city highways,
and that children must ride in
safety seats which are built to
government standards.
Other steps recommended to
improve the safety of Israel's
roads include replacing metal
light poles with those made of
plastic, requiring trucks to
keep their headlights on at all
times to make them more visi-
ble to other driver, banning
jeeps and other open-top
vehicles from inter-city
highways and requiring that
they be equipped with seat
belts and roll-bars to reduce
the risk of injury to
passengers.
The study was presented to
the Israeli government's
Ministerial Committee on
Traffic Accidents.
'
I
u
I
Florida Power and Light Co. Senior Vice
President Leland C. "Bud" Hunter, center,
reviews the evening's agenda during a recent
cocktail reception held in his honor at the
home of Morton and Betty Ann Good, left, who
co-hosted the event with Madlyn and Steven
Schultz. Guest speaker at the reception was
veteran newsman and film-maker Robert

Mayer Evans, right. The reception wazl,
advance of the Israel 1,0th Anniversaryi
ner on Wednesday, Oct. 28, at tkeOmih
national Hotel in Miami when the StdtJ
Israel Bonds will recognize Hunter for 1
contributions to the South Florida com
and for his support of Israel.
Available al Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only. Baked Fresh Daily
PUMPERNICKEL
BREAD.................. 69*
Available al Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only.
Apple Streudel
Slices....................3 ,or n
Available at All Publix Stores and Fresh Danish
Bakeries. A Delicious Taste Treat
Rum Rings..............ch $159
Available at All Publix Stores and Fresh Danish
Bakeries. Maple Walnut
Coffee Cake.......... 1 *179


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EZETZQ453_FHGIEP INGEST_TIME 2013-06-24T20:20:01Z PACKAGE AA00010090_03062
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES