The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03061

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
' eJewislh Floridliami
.'dULAk
fol. 60 No. 40
'/Twx
Miami Friday, October 2,1987
Price 50 Cents
Senate Passes Bill
Permitting Military
To Wear Yarmulkes
By SUSAN BIKNRAIIM
NEW YORK (JTA) A
Jewish leader hailed passage
bt a Senate bill which would
Jow the wearing of religious
beadgear by members of the
Military.
Rabbi David Saperstein, co-
[lirector and counsel of the
leligious Action Center of
leform Judaism, called the
passage of the so-called "yar-
rnulke amendment" a "victory
lor religious liberty and a
demonstration of effective
cooperation by Orthodox, Con-
servative and Reform Jewish
groups."
Rabbi Saperstein also prais-
ed Sen. Frank Lautenberg
(D-N.J.), who introduced the
amendment to the Defense
Appropriations Bill that would
permit members of the armed
forces to wear yarmulkes, tur-
bans and other religious
Continued on Page 14-A
Israel Will Receive
U.S. Defense Contracts
Israeli participation in the
lesign and manufacture of
[l>th updated versions of the
irican F-16 jet fighter
[plane and a new generation
[aircraft appear to be realistic
(possibilities: in a United States
ffort to curtail the blow of
[Israel's cancellation of its
| vaunted Lavi project.
American Administration
leaders also are exploring
Beriously how to involve Israel
Aircraft Industry workers in
tlie production of spare parts
for the F-16 planes which will
replace the Lavi in Israel's
arsenal.
In a related action, the
Defense Department is looking
into giving Israel a contract in
its Star Wars project related
to ballistic missile research.
Israel is readying its Arrow
missiles to intercept ground-
to-ground weapons now being
supplied to Syria by the Soviet
Union.
What the American Jewish Heritage Commit-
tee says is the world's Largest shofar is shown
by Rabbi William Berkowitz, national 'presi-
dent of the body. Sounding of the ram's horn
Saturday evening will mark the close of Yom
Kippur services around the world.
New Effort To Open War Crimes Files Set
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) The 17 former member-
states of the United Nations
War Crimes Commission are
scheduled to meet here Oct. 14
for another attempt to reach
agreement on opening the
defunct Commission's files on
Nazi war criminals and their
collaborators to the public.
Their last meeting with UN
Secretary General Javier
Perez de Cuellar ended
without agreement. The new
session was set for nearly a
month later to allow represen-
tatives of the countries time
for consultations and to
receive new directives from
their respective governments.
Issue is whether to allow ac-
cess to the files to scholars,
historians and researchers.
The files, kept at the United
Nations archives in a Manhat-
tan building, reportedly con-
tain the records of more than
40,000 accused Nazi war
Criminals. They are presently
accessible only to the govern-
ments of UN member-states.
Former member-states of
the War Crimes Commission
are Australia, Belgium,
Canada, China,
Czechoslovakia, Denmark,
France, Greece, India, Luxem-
bourg, The Netherlands, New
Zealand, Norway, Poland, Bri-
tain, United States and
Yugoslavia.
It was announced before last
week's meeting that at least 15
of them had informed the
Secretary General they agreed
to grant wider access to the
Continued on Page 2-A
History Of Cubans
In U.S. Produced
By Florida ADL
An audio-visual project
depicting the history of the
Cuban community in this coun-
try has been developed by the
Florida office of the Anti-
defamation League of B'nai
H'rith, and delivered to the
Dade County Public Schools.
Instructional kits titled,
"Cubans in the United
States," including a full-color
35-minute filmstrip, with ac-
companying audiotape and
classroom discussion guide,
will be provided to public
schools throughout the county.
Arthur Teitelbaum, ADL's
Southern Area director, said
the filmstrip will be added to
ADL'a extensive catalog of
materials on ethnic groups and
will be distributed throughout
the I'-S. through ADL's net-
work of 31 offices.
"The project fills a Berioua
gap in accurate information on
the lives of Cuban Americans
and their rich history in this
country, which dates back to
the early 1800's," he said.
In his introduction to the
filmstrip's discussion guide,
Lisandro Perez, chairperson of
Florida International Univer-
sity's Department of Sociology
and Anthropology, observed
that although most Cubans
came to the United States as
"reluctant political exiles .
wherever they have put down
roots, they have made a
notable contribution to
American society."
"Cubans in the United
States" provides an introduc-
tion to a major ethnic group
that has yet to find its place in
the history books," said Perez.
Continued on Pajfe 2-A
Democratic presidential candidate Gov. Michael S. Dukakis met
with Vice Premier and Minister of Foreign Affairs of Israel
Shimon Peres recently in a S0-minute meeting for an exchange of
xnews on a variety of issues. The two leaders discussed an agree-
ment signed last spring by Israel and the commonwealth, of
Massachusetts to promote trade, tourism and technology ex-
changes. Known ds the General Accord on the Massachusrtts-
Isrm'l exchange, tposu cooperative initiative* in trade and
investment, in a and technology, and travel and tourism
between tkt Comn vealth and th* stab of Israel


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 2,1987
r
?
3
I
I
77te Jeirs 0/ Argentina:
Not Strangers In The Land
By AVIVA CANTOR
(Part One In A Series)
BUENOS AIRES (JTA)
With the dawn of
democracy in Argentina, this
country's Jews have plunged
into a struggle to work out a
question they have not actively
discussed in the past half-
century: how involved should
Jews be as a community with
the general society and its
pressing concerns?
And, in trying to determine
the degree of their involve-
ment with Argentine society,
Jews are also engaged in a
debate on a related and equally
controversial issue: what kind
of communal structure is most
appropriate for their relation-
ship with the general society:
monolithic or pluralistic;
speaking with one voice (as it
has done officially until recent-
ly) or many?
The flashpoint for this
debate is an issue that has
engaged all Arger.tineans
since the 1983 elections that
brought Raul Alfonsin and his
Radical Civic Union Party to
Florida ADL
Continued from Page 1-A
Project was proposed by the
ADL, and jointly underwritten
by the Dade County School
Board, the Cuban American
National Foundation and
Miami Savings Bank, each of
which contributed $5,000.
Additional information on
the filmstrip may be obtained
from the ADL office.
War Crimes
Continued from Page 1-A
files. Only France and India
did not inform him of their
positions. According to
reliable sources, the files con-
tain more accusations of war
crimes committed in France
than in any other country.
It was discovered last year
that the archives contained the
files of former I'.N Secretary
ieneral Kurt Waldheim. now
1'resident of Austria, who has
en accused of complicity in
Nazi atrocities in Greece and
Yugoslavia when he served as
an intelligence officer in the
: German amy in the Balkans
9 during World War II.
* legist /fcrtrM-tr
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office after the nightmare of
terror under the eight-year
junta rule ended: How
"invested" should they be in
the new democracy, given the
fact that all elected govern-
ments of the past 50 years
have been overthrown by
coups? How much support
should they lend to it, and how
should this support be
expressed?
Amalia Saionx de Polack,
president of Argentine WIZO
and vice president of the
DAIA (Delegacion de Asocia-
ciones Israelitas Argentinas),
the officially recognized
political umbrella organization
for Argentine Jewry, told a
delegation of North American
Jewish journalists and com-
munal leaders who recently
visited the country under the
If there's no democracy, the Jewish
community is finished.
auspices of Aerolinas Argen-
tinas (the government airline)
that "For the first time,
Argentina is trying to imple-
ment a democratic system.
The country is a social
laboratory. People who come
from the roots of a Spanish-
Catholic-Indian system (which
did not tolerate) a lot of dif-
ferent opinions are trying to
grow up and be a democratic
country."
Background Of The Debate
The debate on how far to go
in support of the new
democracy takes place against
the backdrop of political
developments that appear to
place it at risk. These include
the dissatisfaction of the arm-
ed forces with the trials of of-
ficers who perpetrated human
rights atrocities during the
reign of terror, and the
pressure the military has plac-
ed on the government to be
done with such trials; and
Argentina's severe economic
crisis.
Both of these elements go
hand in hand, because an
unresolved economic crisis
could destabilize the regime to
the point where the armed
forces would have the support
of some sectors of the public
for taking over, as has happen-
ed so many times in the past.
A 36-year-old man who said
he had lived only one-sixth of
his life under democracy told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agen-
cy at a Latin American Jewish
Congress meeting with the
North American delegation
that "the entire community is
very shaky. No one knows
what will happen next month."
Argentine Jews, in interviews
with JTA, spoke of "a per-
vasive sense of unease," and of
feeling nervous, fearful and
Continued on Page 9-A
The first Thanksgiving.
*sv Succot (the Season of Plenty) is the Jewish Festival that commemorates time of joy for the Jewish people.
And today, as it did 3000 years ago, the coming of Succot poses a challenge to mankind. Succot is a reassertion
of Mans potential for greatness. Succot brings with it the hope that one day Man will realize his full
potential in order to live in freedom and dignity. )* It is a season of joy. A period of thanksgiving. It is a time
for humanity to harvest its dreams of freedom and peace. ** It's what makes us Jews.
Kenneth J Lassman, ED., General Manager Douglas Lazarus, F.D., V.P.
Allan G. Brestin, ED. Edward M. Dobin, FD.
Leo Hack, Executive V.P. Religious Advisor William F Saulson, V.P. Family Consultant
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Guardian Chapels


Friday, October 2, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
Ceil Steinberg Heads JWV Women
PHILADELPHIA (JTA) Ceil Steinberg of North
Miami Beach, has been elected national president of the
National Ladies Auxiliary Jewish War Veterans of the
U.S.A., succeeding Donna Green of Carlsbad, Calif.
Shultz To Mideast This Month
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) The U.S. State Depart-
ment announced that Secretary of State George Shultz will
visit the Middle East this month before going to Moscow
for arms control talks. It will be his first trip to the region
since 1983.
Soviets Discuss Israeli Film
JERUSALEM (JTA) A joint Israeli-Soviet commer-
cial film venture is in the making. If negotiations now tak-
ing place here are successful, shooting will begin in the
USSR next April and later in Israel.
George Daniela, a leading Soviet director, and Russian
screenwriter Revaz Gabeiadz are in Israel to finalize a deal
with Menahem Golan, head of Cannon Films, a company
owned by Israelis that has produced major films for inter-
national markets.
Third Lavi Prototype OK'd
TEL AVIV (JTA) The Defense Ministry gave Israel
Aircraft Industries (IAI) permission to complete a third
prototype of the Lavi fighterplane in order to develop a
new avionics system incorporated into the aircraft. The
Lavi project was cancelled by the government last month.
The approval will allow IAI to employ several hundred
engineers and technicians whose jobs would have been ter-
minated otherwise.
Soldier Stabbed On Holiday
JERUSALEM (JTA) Fatal stabbing of a soldier
marred a quiet Rosh Hashanah holiday in Israel. The vic-
tim, Alexander Arad, 43, was killed while trying to hitch a
ride from Megido to his home in Kibbutz Ramot Menashe.
A suspect was arrested by border police shortly after the
attack. He was identified as Jillal Haj Ibrahim, 23, of Yan-
dun village, near Jenin in the West Bank. Ibrahim
reportedly confessed after two bicyclists from Afiila said
they witnessed the crime and identified him as the killer.
EEC Presses Syrians
STRASBOURG (JTA) The European Parliament,
acting on a motion by French Deputy Simone Veil, has ask-
ed the European Economic Community (EEC) to intervene
with the Syrian government to obtain information about
four missing Israeli soldiers, believed held captive by
Syrian forces or by militia under Syrian control. The
soldiers were captured near Sidon and in the Syrian-
occupied Bekaa Valley in eastern Lebanon over a four-year
period.
Le Pen Cancels Britain Trip
LONDON (JTA) Jean-Marie Le Pen, leader of
France's far rightwing National Front Party, has cancelled
his planned visit to Britain as anger still boiled over his
remarks on a recent radio interview that the Holocaust was
a mere footnote to the history of World War II.
Israel Inflation Down Most
GENEVA (JTA) Israel led the world in beating
down inflation last year according to "ILO Information,"
the monthly newsletter of the International Labor
Organization, a United Nations agency based here.
The newsletter said 1986 was a turning point for several
countries beset by galloping inflation. In Israel, the infla-
tion rate plummeted from 185 percent to 20 percent.
3 Terrorists Recaptured
JERUSALEM (JTA) Security forces captured three
terrorists who had escaped from Napha prison last week, a
maximum security facility in the Negev. Two were serving
life terms and the third a 46-year sentence.
According to the authorities, the three were trying to
cross the border into Egypt concealed in a truckload of hay.
Former Hungary Soldier Honored
TORONTO (JTA) A 74-year-old resident of a Toron-
to suburb, Tibor Almasy, was honored at the Israeli Con-
sulate here. He will receive Israel's highest award, enroll-
ment of his name in the Yad Vashem roll of Righteous
Among Nations, for saving the lives of nearly 400 Jews
when he was a junior officer in the Royal Hungarian Army
luring the final weeks of World War II.
Peres: Concern For Soviet Jews
Fuels Cooperative Efforts
By DAVID LAND4U
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres says he is "deeply wor-
ried" about the ongoing
shrinkage of Soviet Jewry
through assimilation, inter-
marriage and actually opting
out of Jewish identity.
"This is the reason why I
strive so hard to foster rela-
tions with the Soviet Union: so
that we can maintain ties with
the Jews who live there," he
explained.
Peres spoke to the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency in an ex-
clusive interview last week
which focused on issues high
on the agenda of world Jewry.
He said that peace between
Israel and its neighbors could
be the Archimedean point
from which the Jewish State
could shape the course of the
Jewish people. Hence, his
unceasing quest for diplomatic
progress towards peace.
"If there were peace, more
Jews would come to live in
Israel. Jews would feel closer
to Israel. After all, the extent
of Israel's attractiveness to
world Jewry is the crucial
question," he said.
Statistical And Real Jews
Returning repeatedly to his
Concern for the future of the
estimated 2.5 million Jews in
the USSR, Peres said: "There
is a big difference between
statistical Jews and real Jews
. The trend towards disap-
pearance there in the Soviet
Union seems to me very
serious indeed. The drop-out
phenomenon of Soviet Jews
who emigrate to Israel but
choose other destinations is
the other side of the coin ..."
Peres denied that he was ac-
cepting the late Nahum
Goldmann's persistent belief
that Israel and world Jewry
focus on Soviet Jewry's
domestic condition in addition
to their right to leave. "The
main thrust of our effort has to
be towards aliya (immigration
to Israel)," Peres said. "I am
not in favor of encouraging
Jewish life in the Diaspora. In
the final analysis, I am con-
vinced that the existence of
the Jewish people depends,
now more than ever, upon the
existence of the State of
Israel. That goes for both
physical existence and
spiritual existence ."
Regarding the two condi-
tions he laid down earlier this
year for Soviet participation in
Mideast peacemaking, Peres
said "There certainly is pro-
gress" on the matter of Soviet
Jewry. "We can't say there
isn't."
"They have released all the
Prisoners of Zion and not in-
carcerated others in their
place. They have increased the
number of exit permits: The
rate has gone up from a hun-
dred per month to nearly a
thousand. They allow a greater
degree of freedom for religious
worship.
"All these are changes which
I greatly appreciate. They are
not enough. There must be
more." On the second condi-
tion the resumption of
Continued on Pafc 8-A
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 2, 1987
Yom Kippur: Not Just A Fast
As we prepare to join in the Kol Nidre
prayers which mark the start of the Day of
Atonement, Greater Miami Jewry can make
its day of fasting more meaningful by expan-
ding its commitment to community
involvement.
Such involvement must go beyond atten-
ding services and joining Jewish
organizations.
It is an empty act to acknowledge our in-
dividual sins so that we can be sealed in the
Book of Life without a concurrent pledge to
make our support of institutions less sym-
bolic than real.
Yom Kippur is both the focal point of the
High Holy Days and the beginning of the
year for Jewish organizations.
There is a diversified and full menu from
which to choose. Synagogues and their aux-
iliaries, Federation Bonds, hospitals and
homes for the aged, other organizations
which support Israel and its many agencies,
the Jewish civil rights and defense agencies,
and many more.
But the Jewish tradition of Tzdakah is far
more than charity, and certainly more than
just organizational activity.
It has to do with the fact we are indeed our
brother's keeper, and each of us has many
brothers and sisters to whom we should and
must stretch out our hands.
The plight of the poor Jews who cannot
escape the still-blighted parts of South
Miami Beach, the problems of inner city
synagogues and the marginal status of all
too many senior citizens throughout Dade
County are issues which must be addressed
forthnghtly in the coming year.
An easy fast and a good year!
Rush To Judgment?
Unprecedented action by the American
Jewish Congress in calling for Israel's par-
ticipation in a Middle East peace conference
has provoked immediate protests from
several quarters.
Those attacks on the AJCongress are, in
every way, just as much a rush to judgment
as the organization's carefully-worded docu-
ment released last week.
For example, the chairman of the
American Section of the World Zionist
Organization rushed forth with a letter to
the editor saying "to indulge in public pro-
nouncements may not only be counter-
productive but also harmful to Israel."
Her statement, issued within 24 hours of
the release of the Congress statement, clear-
ly was not cleared by the broad-based
membership of the Zionist Movement in the
United States.
Indeed, the results of the recent voting for
delegates to the upcoming 31st Zionist Con-
gress clearly indicated a strong, new direc-
tion by American Zionists.
They voted to send a delegation strongly
pledged to religious pluralism, and one
whose membership is tilted heavily against
the Likud's stubborn refusal to yield even an
inch towards possible peace.
While no blanket endorsement of the
Labor Party's peace stand, as ably enun-
ciated by Foreign Minister Shimon Peres, is
warranted, the views of such an overwhelm-
ing percentage of AJCongress members
should not be muzzled.
American Jewry, which through its lobby-
ing efforts securing Government aid no less
than loans and gifts to Israel provides a ma-
jor underpinning of the Jewish State, has
decided after four decades of independence,
Israel is mature and strong enough to hear
criticism, or at least opinions, from its co-
religionists in the United States.
Leadership of the Jewish community in
this country has m. e a firm demand that it
have a far greater voice in decisions as to
how to distribute proceeds from the United
Jewish Appeal. It has asked for, and ap-
parently will secure, strengthened rights
within the Jewish Agency over such
expenditures.
The Zionist Organization of America's
charge that Congress reached "negative and
defeatist conclusions" is unwarranted, and
not backed up by any evidence.
We have every bit as much right to debate
Israel's stand on an international conference
as we do to attack the American Ad-
ministration's flawed policy in the Persian
Gulf.
Women Assume Lead
In Government, Pulpit
Accomplishments of Jewish women and
their increasingly important roles in the
general and Jewish communities are among
the highlights of the year 5747 which has
now entered history.
Jewish women have assumed key leader-
ship roles in the Dade delegation, including
both State Senators and Representatives.
Jewish women are prominent as appellate
circuit and county court judges in this
county.
The feminization of the pulpit in the Con-
servative and Reform Movements has
dramatically advanced among both rabbis
and cantors.
Jewish women have been in the forefront
of those who changed the for-men-only
stance among Jaycees, Rotary and Kiwanis
Synagogues and Jewish hospitals have
elected women presidents, and the boards of
directors of virtually every agency reflect in-
creasingly the equal status to which women
are entitled.
But even as we applaud these advances,
we are reminded that the low Jewish bir-
thrate is a problem which cannot be ignored
in this country, in Israel and around the
world.
How to simultaneously satisfy the need for
both equal rights for women and the respon-
sibility for guaranteeing the survival of our
people is a question not yet resolved.
Merely stating the dilemma is not sexist
nor is it the solution, but one must be found.
Power Chant: Kol Nidre
Bv RABBI
BERNARD S. RASKAS
Kol Nidre, which begins the
Yom Kippur service, is one of
the most popular and powerful
pieces in Jewish liturgy. Yet, it
is not a prayer and does not
even mention the name of God.
Origin of its famous melody
is unknown, and its inclusion
in the prayer book was strong-
ly opposed by several genera-
tions of prominent rabbis.
Setting of Kol Nidre is a
Jewish court. Two people hold
Torah scrolls at either side of
the cantor, thus constituting a
"beth din," a court of three
that is required for the legal
procedure of granting the
dispensation from vows. It is
preceded by a brief paragraph
invoking the Academy on
High, the heavenly body of
rabbis. Because the recitation
is in the nature of a court pro-
cedure, which cannot be con-
ducted on a holiday, it is
recited before sunset.
Text is a precise legal for-
mula in which the worshippers
proclaim that all personal
vows, oaths, etc., that they
made unwittingly, rashly or
unknowingly (and thus cannot
be fulfilled) during the year
should be considered null and
void. However, it should be
pointed out that the Talmud
(Yoma 8:9) says explicitly:
"Yom Kippur atones tor sins
against God. Yom Kippur does
not atone for sins against
another human being until one
has placated the person
offended."
In order to understand the
nature and function of Kol
Nidre, we must look to biblical
times, when it was common
practice for people to make
vows that could not possibly be
honored. After the Second
Temple was destroyed, this
practice continued among the
people. The leaders of the com-
munity were troubled, for they
viewed a person's word as his
or her bond. Failing to con-
vince the people of the
desirability of avoiding rash
promises altogether, the rab-
bis of the Talmud finally
created a formal ritual for an-
nulling those unkept vows.
No one knows for certain,
but it is probable that in ninth
century CE Rav Amram's sid-
dur contained the first, com-
plete known text of Kol Nidre,
quite different from the
talmudic legal formula. Kol
Nidre was a collective annul-
ment, unlike the Talmud's in-
dividual annulment, and it was
written in a mixture of
Hebrew and the then ver-
nacular Aramaic.
There are two other explana-
tions for its introduction. Ac-
cording to Rabbi Mordecai ben
Hillel (Germany, d. 1298), this
formula was instituted by Rab-
bi Meir ben Barukh of
Rothenberg (d. 1293) to permit
transgressors who had been
excommunicated because of
their defiance of communal
regulations to worship with
the congregation.
And toward the end of the
19th century, Joseph Bloch
had proposed the theory that
Kol Nidre arose in the seventh
century when secret Jews
who had been converted to
Christianity after persecution
by the Visigoths (590-711) -
would come to the synagogue
on Yom Kippur eve.
According to Bloch, Kol
Nidre was their expression of
overwhelming grief that their
apostasy, and was their means
of seeking absolution for vows
they had been forced to make
to an alien faith. Bloch claimed
that in subsequent centuries -
during the persecutions by the
later Byzantine rulers
(700-850), and still later under
the Spanish Inquisition
(1391-1492) the Kol Nidre
served a similar purpose.
Yet, Kol Nidre was at first
condemned by many genera-
tions of rabbis. They argued
that it offered an easy means
to avoid personal obligations.
After all, Kol Nidre
theoretically made it possible
to renege on a vow. knowing
that it could be annulled next
Yom Kippur. Accordingly, the
rabbis clearly ruled it could not
be applied to promises made to
another person. In the 12th
Century, they changed the
wording of Kol Nidre to insure
this.
Unfortunately. Kol Nidre
also served as a pretext for
anti-Semitic slander. During
the Middle Ages in particular.
Christians used the formula as
an excuse for isolating Jews
from participation in business,
claiming that the word of a
Jew could not be trusted.
The Reform movement
deleted Kol Nidre from the
liturgy until 1962. It nou
pears in the new "Gah
Repentance." The spiritual
power of Kol Nidre among the
people resisted every
challenge put to it over a
period of 10 centuries, and it
comes down to us today as one
of the most beloved liturgical
elements in all Judaism.
There have been many dif-
Continued on Paf* 13-A
eJe wish Floridian
Fred K. Shochet
Editor and Publisher
Suzanne Shochet
Executive Editor
William T. Brewer
Director ol Operations
Joan C. Teglas
Director o( Advertising
Friday, October 2,1987
Volume 60
9TISHRI574B
Number 40


Friday, October 2, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Tel Aviv U. Study
Israeli Arabs Hike Identity With West Bank Palestinians
Israel's strategic position
cannot get any better, it can
only get worse. Israel must
therefore use this "window of
strategic opportunity" to
move forward in the peace pro-
cess, said the head of Tel Aviv
1 Diversity's Jaffee Center for
Strategic Studies, Brig. Gen.
i Aharon Yariv at a press
conference held on the occa-
sion of the publication of "The
Middle East Military Balance
i." an annual volume
published by the Jaffee Center
surveying the major strategic
developments in the region.
According to Gen. Yariv, the
A rali armies have grown
significantly in size and quality
since 1973, and are today "big,
strong, heavily armored and
mobile, supported by strong
fortifications and good air
defense protection." While
Israel has always suffered
from quantitative military in-
feriority to the combined Arab
armies, today, as the Arab
states make a concerted effort
to acquire the most
sophisticated weapons
systems, Israel's traditional
qualitative advantage is in
danger of gradual erosion.
Another concern is that Arab
opinion might, in time, reach
the conclusion that a military
solution to the Arar>Israeli
conflict is feasible, a develop-
ment that would be contrary to
Israel's interests.
Mitigating factors are the
oil-related financial difficulties
of the Arab countries, Egypt's
continuing adherence to the
peace treaty with Israel, U.S.
strategic support for Israel.
and the diversion of the Iran-
Ira. | War. As long as these fac-
tors continue to divide the
Aral> world, Israel's over-all
strategic position is favorable.
This situation could change,
however, stressed Yariv,
which is why it is incumbent of
Israel to push the peace pro-
cess forward at the present
time.
In light of the fact that Israel
has reached the limits of its
quantitative military capacity
and must strive to maintain a
clear qualitative advantage,
Yariv called the recent Israeli
government decision to scrap
the Lavi fighter aircraft "very
important." The monies
formerly earmarked for the
Lavi, he said, can now be put
to use to equip the Israel
Defense Forces for the needs
of the future battlefield.
For the first time the
Military Balance contains a
section on unconventional
weapons systems, namely
nuclear and chemical weapons.
Aharon Levran, editor and co-
author along with Zeev Eytan
of the 198ti Military Rulnnce
said that while Israel was
much more advanced in its
nuclear potential than the
Arabs, the Arabs did not ap-
pear to be disturbed by this
because they viewed their own
possession of chemical
weapons as a reasonable
counter to Israel's nuclear ad-
vantage. The Arab states also
seemeed to feel that Israel
would not resort to nuclear
weapons unless its very ex-
istence were threatened and
this, of course, depended on
them. Finally it is expected
that Syria would benefit from
a Soviet nuclear umbrella in
time of need. In short, conclud-
ed Levran, Israel's nuclear ad-
vantage would not hinder the
Arabs from launching a limited
conventional war, but it would
affect the scope of the Arab
war effort.
In the area of chemical
weapons, Levran said that
given the example of the Gulf
War where Iraq used chemical
weapons only when its army
faced a clear military
catastrophe, it is not likely
that the Arabs would use
chemical weapons in a poten-
tial future war as a first strike.
The Gulf War has also
demonstrated that chemical
weapons, while dangerous, are
not decisive in the overall war
effort.
In addition to its description
of political-strategic
developments in the region, its
analysis of the overall Arab-
Israeli military balance, and its
exhaustive inventory of the
armed forces in the area and
the various local balances, the
Military Balance features a
glossary of weapons systems,
comparative tables and maps.
The Middle East Military
Balance 1986 contains 462
pages and is published by the
Jerusalem Post and Westview
Press of Boulder, Colorado.
Former Prisoner of Conscience Dr. Joseph
Begun is caught in a moment of deep reflection
in the Moscow Synagogue by noted American
photographer Ricki Rosen. Her photo essay on
Russian Jews under Gorbachev's "glasnost"
is published in poster form by the Student
Struggle for Soviet Jewry. Begun was granted
permission to emigrate from the Soviet Union
this month.
...............................................- ---------------- -------r----------iTr-i-Ti-i:iii)8 West Bank Water Drilling Prompts Key Resignation
By GIL SEDAN
Scheduled resignation of
Brig. Gen. Ephraim Sneh,
head of the Civil Administra-
tion in Judea and Samaria, has
upset the tranquil image of the
administration, a body
operating far from the public
eye. Sneh, 44, also is expected
to leave the army.
He has not said why he
decided to resign this week,
after 27 months in office. But
for the Jewish settlements.
I he water issue floated high
on the daily agenda of the
Arabs in the territories, added
w old complaints that Israel
was draining the waters in the
West Bank for its own use.
Goren, on the other hand,
contended that the drilling was
an attempt to use waters
which otherwise would have
been wasted for the benefit of
the entire population both
Jews and Arabs.
Project is still in prepara-
tion. Actual drilling is set to
begin before next year. But
the controversy inside the civil
administration over the water
issue seems to reflect much
deeper differences about the
degree of Israeli control in the
Arab mayors in the
Bethlehem region have argued
that the drilling project was in-
tended to use "Arab" waters
reports had it that he did so
over policy disagreement with
Shmuel Goren the highest
Israeli official in charge of the
territories. Their conflict was
over a controversial water-
drilling project near
Bethlehem, which Sneh oppos-
ed and Goren endorsed.
territories.
Sneh has advocated minimal
Israeli control, with delegation
of as much authority as possi-
ble to Arab officials, in line
with the proposed Camp David
autonomy plan. Although this
has also been the declared
policy of Goren, who is con-
sidered "the prime minister of
the territories," Goren has
been on record advocating a
firm hand in the territories.
As such, he backed the
strong measures adopted in
the past two years against na-
tionalist elements in the ter-
ritories, such as deportations,
administrative arrests and
closure of universities. In
brief, Goren stressed much
more than Sneh the need to
preserve Israeli interests first.
Paradoxically, although the
West Bank is one of the hot-
test issues on the national
agenda, the running of the
civil administration "the
government" of the West
Bank has never been under
close public scrutiny.
The Knesset oversight of the
territories is maintained by a
subcommittee of the Security
and Foreign Affairs Commit-
tee, whose proceedings are
usually classified. The state
comptroller oversees affairs in
the administration only as part
of the overall control of the
Defense Ministry.
Occasional reports of
mismanagement and miscon-
duct by civil administration of-
ficials ar- usually treated by
administrative measures in-
side the system.


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 2, 1987
National Newspaper
Week Begins Sunday
Community newspapers in
this year of the Bicentennial of
our Constitution conclude
their annual National
Newspaper Association con-
vention in Portland, Oregon,
kick-off for National
Newspaper Week, which
begins Sunday.
Idea of a free press is a uni-
quely American concept. But
the concept of a free press is
not an end in itself. Rather it is
a means toward the
maintenance of a free society,
the right of each of us to be in-
formed of what's going on.
whether in Washington, at the
state capital or here on Flagler
Street.
There are more than 8.000
newspapers in the United
States, many like this one,
others larger, others smaller.
National Newspaper Week
calls attention to the fact that
all of us are committed to br-
inging you accurate, timely in-
formation so you can cope with
the challenges of living, at all
levels, especially in this
community.
In our papers, we not only
bring you news of what has or
is happening, but also what is
available in the marketplaces
of the community, in goods,
services, homes, jobs.
Our public notices help alert
you to actions of local govern-
ments and boards.
And, in our letters column,
you have the freedom to ex-
press your ideas, and to
disagree with us. This dialog,
too. is uniquely American.
Observing Nationakl
Newspaper Week is not just a
time for a self-praising obser-
vance of this paper. It takes
many people to bring you this
paper regularly: not just the
more apparent members of the
staff, the publisher, editor and
news staff.
To bring you a free, respon-
sible newspaper is also the
commitment of our circulation
staff members who make sure
you get your paper on time,
our advertising people who br-
ings you information on the
latest buys and services in the
area, our production staff
members who set the type,
build the pages, make the
plates, run the presses, and ad-
dress and bundle the papers.
All of us together must en-
sure a strong, free press,
because without it, we cannot
have a strong, free society.
This is not a matter for a
one-week observance. Nor is it
a matter for only those of us
who are in the newspaper
business because freedom of
the press in a free society is
everyone's freedom.
Who Needs It?
We Do!
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AJCongress: Bernat To
Lead Development
Friday, October 2, 1987/Tbe Jewiah Floridiii Page 7-A
Rabbi Haskell M. Bernat,
former Senior Rabbi of Temple
Israel of Miami, has been nam-
ed an associate executive
director of the American
Jewish Congress, it was an-
nounced by Henry Siegman,
executive director of the
organization. He will lead up
AJCongress1 national leader-
ship and development
program.
Rabbi Bernat received his
bachelors degree ;it Columbia
I 'diversity where he studied
simultaneously at the Jewish
Theological Seminary. At the
Hebrew I'nion College, where
he was ordained in 1961, Rabbi
Bernat received prizes in
Talmud anil philosophy.
Rabbi Bernat has played a
leading role on important
social and political issues. He
was a founder of Boston
Clergy and Layman Concern-
ed About Viet Nam. and was a
member of the executive board
Rabbi Haskell Bernat
of the Chicago Conference on
Religion and Race, when serv-
ing as Regional Director of the
I'nion of American Hebrew
Congregations and as director
of its national program on
worship.
Plight Of Ethiopian Jews
To Be Aired On Cable TV
"Unfinished Exodus," a
dramatic program that
describes the continuing strug-
gle by Ethiopian Jews to move
to Israel, will be shown on
cable stations in Greater
Miami.
JFTV will broadcast the new
video Monday, Oct. 14. at 5:30
p.m. and Thursday, Oct. 30, at
7 p.m.
Eight cable stations will air
"Unfinished Exodus." Sta-
tions include Storer Com-
munications North Dade
(P29), Storer Communications
- South Dade (14), Harte-
Hanks (2), Dynamic Cable (38),
TeleCommunicators (41),
Adelphia (28B), Commander
Satellite (11) and Telesat.
Program was produced by
the American Association for
Ethiopian Jews (AAEJ), an
organization devoted to help-
ing Ethiopian Jews reach
Israel and improving the quali-
ty of life both for those Ethio-
pian Jews already living in
Israel and those hoping and
waiting to leave Africa.
Video includes comments by
Nobel Laureate Elie Wiesel,
Natan Shcharansky, Sen. Alan
Cranston and Vice President
George Bush, and features
new footage from Ethiopia
and Israel.
WWMMMNM
MM
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Telemarketing Manager
Aggressive Cemetery/Funeral combination
seek experienced individual to establish,
Staff, Train and manage Telemarketing
program. Send resume Box MM c/o Jewish
Floridian, P.O. Box 012973, Miami 33101.


mtlSlLY JACOBS' nom*
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:
as
Dr. Ismar Schorsch was inaugurated
chancellor of the Jewish Theological Seminary
of America last week. Stephen M. Peck, Chair-
man of the Seminary Board of Directors,
presided over the ceremony. Mr. Peck (right)
along with Raymond P. Scheindlin, Seminary
Provost (far left) and Michael B. Greenbaum.
Seminary Vice Chancellor (second from right)
irresented Dr. Schorsch with the official
Medallion of Office.
Israel Fights Drug Abuse By Its Youth
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Education Ministry and the
police have joined forces to
combat one of the most urgent
problems confronting Israeli
society the prevention of
drug abuse by the country's
youth.
The Ministry and police an-
nounced after a meeting at na-
tional police headquarters in
Jerusalem the establishment
of a joint team to consolidate a
comprehensive education and
information policy on drug use
and to coordinate with the
various other authorities deal-
ing with the issue. The
meeting was attended by
Education Minister Yitzhak
Navon and Police Inspector-
General David Kraus and their
senior aides.
An estimated 15,000 persons
in Israel are totally addicted to
drugs and more than 150,000
are one-time, occasional or
constant users. Almost all
criminal offenders a.-e drug
users and criminal acts to
finance the purchase of drugs
are increasing.
But the main factor that has
increased national awareness
of the dangers of drug use is
the risk of Acquired Immune
Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS),
an invariably fatal condition
which can be contracted by the
use of contaminated needles to
inject drugs.
Drug addicts were described
at the meeting as the slaves of
the 20th century. The police
complained that the courts
have been too lenient in the
punishment meted out to drug
offenders, thereby weakening
the deterrent factor. The
police charged there is insuffi-
cient cooperation between
school principals and law en-
forcement authorites in the
prevention of drug use and
treatment for users.
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Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 2, 1987
Peres: Concern For Soviet
Jews Fuels Cooperative Efforts
Continued from Page S-A
diplomatic relations with
Israel the Foreign Minister
seemed less sanguine. "I have
felt," he said, "that we ought
to reach agreement with them
before an international (peace)
conference is convened, at
least on the procedure for a
conference. And I have told
them so.
"But now they are preoc-
cupied with the disarmament
negotiations. And we, mean-
while, cannot reach agreement
among ourselves on this issue,
which to my mind is a great pi-
ty .. We are missing an im-
portant opportunity.
"In essence, what the Likud
says is that while all the other
parties talk to the Russians,
we should say 'nyet' and
refuse to talk to them.' The
Likud's entire opposition to an
international conference flows
from their rejection of Soviet
participation. '
The Soviets, moreover, seem
not to understand Peres' need
to reach diplomatic understan-
dings with them in order to be
able to persuade public opinion
in Israel to try an international
conference. "They say, we
have time, what's the hurry?
And of course the Russians do
have time ... It is very
frustrating.
The former Premier also
developed his vision of Israel-
at-peace as a guiding force in
Jewish history. 'For 40 years
Israel had been preoccupied
with defending itself. Now we
must begin to become what
Ben-Gurion called a unique na-
tion a nation at peace, play-
ing a uniquely constructive
role in the Middle East." he
stated.
Critical Of Some Diaspora
Leaders
He claimed that some Jewish
leaders abroad tended to be
inward-looking and didn't
seem to recognize the singular
importance of peace. Yet,
others did appreciate "the
broad picture," Peres said.
"We must have a clear hierar-
Peres: I am not in
favor of encouraging
Jewish life in the
Diaspora.
chy of priorities," he declared.
He conceded that he faced
"a problem" when Jewish
leaders failed to understand
and support his need to com-
promise at home over some
issues in order to mold a ma-
jority favoring his peace
policies.
"We must have a clear
hierarchy of priorities," he
declared. "And the goal that
we put at the top of the hierar-
chy must have hegemony over
all our efforts. Peace, at this
time, is the top priority of
Jewish life." He said that
many Jewish leaders did in-
deed fully understand his
order of priorities, "though
there are some who unders-
tand and disagree. The
period of Likud rule has had its
effect on world Jewry. The
view that the main thing is ter-
ritory received legitimation.
But in truth the main thing is
people, not the territory," he
said.
He was referring to the
failure of Saudi jets to force
down the Iraqi jets that attack-
ed the U.S. missile frigate
Stark in the Persian Gulf this
summer.
Concluding with a Rosh
Hashanah greeting through
the Jewish press worldwide,
Peres said 5748 would be "a
vital year in the struggle on
behalf of the Jewish communi-
ty in the USSR, and in the
struggle for peace for the
Jewish State.
"We go into this struggle as
a strong state, militarily. But
this strength must be
translated, too, into other,
positive goals."
Foreign Affairs on Video
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The Jews Of Argentina
Friday, October 2, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
feign.
Continued from Page 1-A
psychologically depressed."
[while all Argentineans live
jjth this sword of Damocles
inging over them, Jews
Specially feel its presence
knsciously and acutely. While
. junta did not touch any
Ewish institutions during its
many Jews remember
too well that Jews con-
futed a disproportionate
umber of the estimated
1.000 desaparecidos (people
a were "disappeared" and
presumed murdered), and
t Jews who disappeared or
Bio were imprisoned were
Objected to worse mistreat-
ment than non-Jews.
! Contentious Issue
[The question Jews are strug-
png with, therefore, is not
ether to support the new
tmocracy which the over-
whelming majority do but
far to go in expressing
keir support. The continuum
' opinion ranges from that of
ie leaders of DA1A, which is
Ireful and cautious whenever
communal response is called
}r, to the vibrant Hebraica
(immunity center, which
Ikes out newspaper ads in
ppport of democracy and
jman rights and whose
fibers march with those of
|e Conservative Comunidad
eth El and the small and mili-
Jewish Human Rights
lovement (JHRM) in public
imonstrations.
[Given the wide range of opi-
in the community as to
few far to go in support of
piiocracy, the various Jewish
stitutions in Argentina differ
ply, as well, on the ques-
of pluralism inside the
immunity. While all parties
i the debate argue than their
|>proach lends itself best to
h-wish survival, the dif-
mt groups have different
erarchies of worries.
[The older DAI A leaders and
T>eir supporters worry
imarily about what would
jppen physically to the
fewish community if It backed
femoeracy to the hilt and then
was overthrown. Said
Black at the meeting with the
"nerican Jewish delegation.
W'e mustn't give opinions
a- might be used against the
immunity. We don't have the
faulty that in three, four
nths, the political scenery
n't have changed." The im-
Nssion from the remarks of
lacks and other DAIA
laders was that there was a
H of "border" for their sup-
of democracy, beyond
they would not go.
I Asked about this, Herman
lull.1 Pres'dent of the
PKM and editor of the con-
pversial and outspoken
Panish-Jewish weekly Nueva
"esencia, told JTA that "that
PWer is that they are prepar-
K tor the return of the junta,
they thought the junta
uian t return, there would
01 be such a border."
tSchji|er and other ycung and
al elements in the corn-
nunity worry as well, about
Flat would happen to Jewish
" lemocracy were over-
sown. Rabbi Baruj Plavnick,
1RM?k Tr the Pu'Pit of
PKM founder Rabbi Marshall
IokLa }he Conservative
["iun,dad Beth-El, said
"Under the junta, there was
no creativity, we were a dying
community. If there's no
democracy, the Jewish com-
munity is finished."
Worried About The Jewish
Youth
They also worry about what
will happen to the community
if Jewish youth who seek to be
involved in Argentine life and
its concerns, including
democracy and human rights,
do not see the community ac-
tively dealing with these
issues. With assimilation being
rampant, their question is, can
we put our communal life in
jeopardy by losing our youth
through default? Said Paul
Warsawsky, an attorney ac-
tive in human rights causes:
"Jewish youth want to par-
ticipate more in general life.
The community may be unable
or unwilling to enter into an
engagement with current pro-
blems, but this is not the case
with Jewish youth," many of
whom drop out of the com-
munity because it does not ad-
dress the issues they are con-
cerned with.
Filmmaker Aida Bortnik,
who wrote the film script for
the Oscar-winning "The Of-
ficial Story," which dealt sen-
sitively with the aftermath of
the reign of terror, told JTA
how she "began to know I am
a Jew" when death threats
forced her into exile in Spain in
1976. Feeling herself "part of
Argentina but also very much
a Jew," Bortnik is active in
Alfonsin's Radical Party.
She said that when she and
her non-Jewish husband
visited Israel in 1984, where
they were deeply moved by
meeting Jews "who came to
build the dream" and former
ghetto resistance fighters, she
was asked repeatedly why
Argentine Jews are "so com-
promised with the Radical Par-
ty and democracy. I was told
this is dangerous and could be
a bad influence if things go
bad. But I feel we have no
other way." She continued:
"In exile, I experienced and
learned what kind of life I
want for myself and those
after me, and the responsibili-
ty of being an intellectual to
be in the middle of what's hap-
pening. I learned that if we
don't fight for elemental
rights, we can't have a
democracy."


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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 2, 1987
Ben-Gurion Foreseer Of Coming Generations
This was ivritten by Minister
of Education and Culture Yit-
zhak Navon when he was Presi-
dent of the State of Israel. It
was published in the quarterly
magazine 'Forum,' winter,
1979.
By YITZHAK NAVON
Some five years before the
outbreak of World War II.
David Ben-Gurion, whose
centennial we observed during
the outgoing Hebrew year,
said: ". the Hitler regime
places the entire Jewish Peo-
ple in peril. Hitlerism fights
not only against the Jews of
Germany. but against the Jews
all over the world. The Hitler
regime cannot long exist
without war without a war
of revenge against France,
Poland, Czechoslovakia, and
the rest of the countries where
German people reside, or
against Soviet Russia...
What strength and weight will
we have in this corner in the
Land of Israel on the terri-
ble Judgment Day, when the
great disaster erupts in the
world? Who knows. Perhaps
only four or five years if no
fewer stand between us and
that terrible day. During that
period we must double our
numbers, for the size of the
community on that day may
determine our future on the
day when everything hangs in
the balance."
Not only did Ben-Gurion
foresee the approximate date
of the outbreak of the war, the
course the war would take, and
its fateful significance, but, by
dint of his role, he had to pre-
sent to the public the plan of
action that this foresignt
demanded. The public,
however, not having gone
through the same profound
thought processes as he did in
his analysis of the events, was
incapable of intensely living
the conclusions which arose
from the analysis itself. In-
deed, enormous measures of
fervor, persuasiveness and
perseverance were required to
instigate public concern and
activity.
A PICTURE of future
events is unfolded by him
three years in advance: On Ju-
ly 1, 1945, Ben-Gurion urgent-
ly convenes a group of wealthy
Jews in New York and unfolds
before them the canvas of
events about to take place in
the near future. He argues
that it will not be long before
the British leave the land,
"and we are due for a war with
all the Arab armies. The
weaponry in our hands is
perhaps sufficient against local
bands, but will not stand up
against regular armies."
He stresses the paramount
need to establish military in-
dustry in Palestine. He
demands that these American
Jews raise the amoung need-
ed, and tells them that not a
minute is to be lost. Those
assembled are struck with
amazement and skepticism,
and doubt the accuracy of the
bleak picture being drawn
before them. The dialogue con-
tinues for i *ver seven hours.
The 18 good Jews present
are finally convinced, and
undertake the mission. A year
later 950 crates brimming with
machine parts for the military
industry arrive in Palestine.
BECAUSE WE ourselves
are a world people, in terms of
time and place, Ben-Gurion
studied the fate of nations,
their internal essence and the
processes that resulted in
coalescence or disunion. Any
event that takes place in any
part of the world touches on
the fate of our nation. At times
the connection is obvious and
apparent to all, and at times
there are only hidden threads,
woven into the general fabric.
As the captain of a tossing ship
in a fog, he mustered up all his
senses to correctly estimate
the depth of the sea. the height
of its waves and breakers, the
blowing winds and the shoals
to be expected.
He foresaw a new world in
which the step-by-step
strengthening of Asian and
African nations would be ac-
companied by a sinking of
European hegemony. He
assessed the extent of the pro-
cess and its timetable correct-
ly. Equally well, he estimated
the significance that these
world-scale upheavals would
have for the small, storm-
tossed people, to which he
belonged and was his
reference framework and
which he was called upon to
lead.
He envisioned the Soviet ex-
pansion into Africa and the
Middle East, with all that the
move portended for the State
of Israel, and over two decades
in advance accurately assessed
the place China would occupy
on the political map of the
world.
HE WAS haunted by the
knowledge that any error in
the assessment of occurrences
could be fatal for us, and knew
that one always had to
calculate a number of steps in
advance. At the time he decid-
ed on the Sinai campaign, he
appraised precisely what
would occur at its outset, the
amount of time we would have
for its completion, and the
behavior of the superpowers in
its aftermath.
He defined the objectives of
the campaign accordingly. On-
ly on two or three occasions in
the ten-year period that I had
the privilege of working with
him did I ever hear him ex-
Eress regret over something
e had done or said aloud. But
he never forgave himself after
the dramatic success of the
Sinai campaign for having ex-
panded On "the Third Israeli
Kingdom." and this in the
wake of the sober and cold
analysis he had previously
made with so sharp a scalpel.
He had allowed the storm of
his emotions to overflow.
One important Zionist leader
metaphorically compared Ben-
Gurion to that horse who pulls
a heavily-loaded wagon up-
ward on a steep hill. To the
right is an abyss and to the left
is an abyss, and there are
blinders tied to his head so that
he sees nothing but the road in
front of him for if he could
look into the abysses he would
certainly catapult downward.
But this allegory has no
foundation.
NOT ONLY did Ben-Gurion
pull the wagon without
blinders, he even stopped occa-
sionally to look, open-eyed at
the abysses, study them
knowledgeably and calculate
their depth and dimensions.
He knew that if one ignores
the abysses and their twists
one will in the end sink into
tranquility and plunge over an
edge at the first curve in the
road.
The realization that today
does not resemble yesterday,
and yesterday does not resem-
ble tomorrow is the fundamen-
tal prerequisite for weighing
historical processes. Every se-
cond of every minute
something either revealed
or hidden is happening.
"Everything flows," in the
words of the Greek
V
1

4
David Ben-Gurion at Avdat, a ruined Nabatean city in theNtgtt\
of Israel.
philosopher whom Ben-Gurion
was always quoting. In his own
words: "There is something
new under the sun, nothing is
frozen in place, neither in
nature nor in history, neither
in the material world nor in the
spiritual, neither in society nor
in a state."
The statesman's number-otj
enemy is routine, and
must wage war against
routinization of habits and i
ossification of thought.
must know everything
the entire world, and i
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clearly as it is today, not as it
was yesterday and not as we
perhaps would like it to be.
Yoav Lavi correctly pointed
out that, despite his deep in-
volvement in philosophy,
especially in Plato and
Spinoza, who both had a mark-
ed influence on his
metaphysical and political
thought, Ben-Gurion negated
the use of theoretical,
philosophical systems which
could not withstand the test of
application.
HE VIEWED such systems
as sterile, and for this reason
frequently expressed reserva-
tions about various thinkers
and schools of thought; he
disparaged, for example, the
historical materialism of
Marxism.
I concur with the judgment
that the recognition of the
ceaseless existence of the
ideological struggle of its ef-
fects and influences formed
the basis of Ben-Gurion's
historical-political conception.
However, he had little pa-
tience for the polemic as to
"whether the ideological
struggle derives from
economic, social, and political
discordance, or whether the
struggle gives rise to it, or for
that matter, whether economic
and ideological factors are in-
terrelated and inseparable"
the essential thing was to com-
prehend the practical
significance of such struggles
and their place in the "flux of
history."
Ben-Gurion was a thorough
anti-determinist, and did not
believe in the decrees of fate.
He believed that the "flux of
history" enabled man to
change his fate, to influence
events and his life. And
although there were, in his opi-
nion, "ideas which have chang-
ed economic and political
regimes, there have also been
regimes which have revived
ideas and granted them
sway."
IN 1953, at the very height
of the Cold War, we would
hear Ben-Gurion remark that
he was confident that there
would indeed be an aliya to
Israel from the Soviet Union.
And when we asked him what
he based his confidence on. he
gave a detailed assessment of
the future relations between
the United States, the Soviet
Union and China, and the
significance of this configura-
tion for the issue in question.
He also foresaw, at about the
same time, that not only would
no war break out between the
o'ocs, but that there would be
a rapprochement between the
united States and the Soviet
knion. And this he knew
would be due to two factors.
The first was the Soviet
Union's fear of China. True,
Unma was then tightly hand-
cuffed to Russia, but he
reasoned that an ancient,
civilized, talented and im-
mense nation like China would
"t long allow itself to remain
wund to the Soviet Union,
^nina would develop industry
ar"d armaments of her own,
ana to satisfy the needs of a
Population growing at a
tremendous rate,' would
naturally wish 'to regain
control.
The Soviet Union would then
aw near to Europe and the
united States so as not to be
"**ed in from both the East
and the West.
A second factor destined to
Pve thrust to this rapproche-
ment lay in the forces at work
reshaping the characters of
the regimes of the two mighty
superpowers, forces which
pushed the two peoples closer
together.
HUNDREDS of thousands
of students were completing
their studies in Russia each
year. The number of Russian
scientists was increasing at an
extraordinary rate. A scientist
cannot enclose himself in a cor-
ner, but requires ongoing
association with the whole
scientific world, including the
West. Spirit cannot be locked
up behind bars. This continu-
ing contact with the West
would bring about a slow but
steady liberalization in Soviet
Russia. The character of the
regime had to change.
Freedom of science cannot
co-exist with repression of
thought and expression, and
the Soviet regime would grow,
evermore similar to the regime
in the United States. On the
other hand, the United States
could not permit the same ex-
treme measure of in-
dependence to its various
states and to private enter-
prise for very long. The social
problems of the heterogeneous
population in America demand
handling by a central authority
and steadily increasing in-
tervention by the federal
government.
Exploitation of resources for
armament needs and solutions
to internal problems, would
necessitate greater involve-
ment on the part of the Presi-
dent and his cabinet. In this
regard, the American govern-
ment would grow more and
more similar to the Soviet
government. These two
parallel processes liberaliza-
tion and centralization
would move along different
lines but meet in the end at a
common point.
AT THE time these ideas
had the ring of heresy, or at
best were thought to be the
Friday, October 2, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
David Ben-Gurion presents President Harry
S. Truman with a chanukiah during a visit
Ben-Gurion made to the United States in 1951.
Abba Eban, then Ambassador to the United
Nations (center) looks on. Truman was the
first world leader formally to recognize the
State of Israel, which came almost immediate-
ly after Ben-Gurion. in Tel Aviv, announced
the birth of the new Jewish State.
fruit of an unbridled imagina-
tion. Reality has shown
otherwise.
Still, Ben-Gurion's thoughts
focused primarily around the
Jewish questions what
repercussions would this pro-
cess of liberalization have on
the Jews of Russia? He saw in
it a glimmer of hope for their
future, a chance that the gates
for immigration to Israel
would open. Surely it was
hardly likely that the
liberalization would leave only
the Jews unaffected. Ben-
Gurion had no doubt, par-
ticularly after Stalin's death,
that this day of release would
arrive, though he could not
foretell exactly when. He
walked about agitated, like a
caged lion. In 1959, in a radio
broadcast to the nation, he ex-
pressed his absolute con-
fidence that in the coming
decade the Russian gates
would be opened for emigra-
tion to Israel, and he demand-
ed that his cabinet ministers
begin to plan for the absorp-
tion into Israeli society of the
tens and hundreds of
thousands of immigrants
destined to arrive here.One
anxiety stayed with him the
fear that that day would be too
long in coming and that in the
meanwhile myriad Jews would
forget their heritage, so that
on the day of salvation only a
friction of the millions who
then could come would come.
The actual history of the Rus-
sian aliya is, of course, known
to us all.
In the difficult and uncertain
complex of Arab-Israel rela-
tions, Ben-Gurion wavered
between doubt and hope.
Nothing was closer to his heart
than the desire for peace. He
was forever trying to achieve a
dialogue with Arab leaders.
Time and again a spark of hope
lit in his heart when one
mediator or another appeared
on the scene.
ONCE IT was a former
American Secretary of the
Treasury and once a London
newspaper editor. He even
dispatched a hasty note to
President Tito on the eve of
Continued on Page 12-A
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridiap/Friday, October 2, 1987
Ben-Gurion Foreseer
Of Coming Generations
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Continued from Page 11-A
Nasser's visit to Yugoslavia to
request Tito's intervention in
arranging a meeting with
Nasser. He took special
precautions and sent his note
by hand with an unofficial
representative not in the
employ of the Foreign
Ministry, a close associate of
Tito's since partisan days.
But these plans came to
nothing when the Arab side
responded negatively. In
1963, although he was for
various reasons very anxious
to resign from the governe-
ment, he delayed resigning in
the hope of meeting with the
leader of Egypt.
Ben-Gurion always main-
tained that certain precondi-
tions were requisite tor a set-
tlement for peace or non-
belligerency. First, our
neighbors foremost among
them Egypt have to be not
only aware but absolutely con-
vinced that it is in reality im-
possile for them to destroy
Israel, for the price of such vic-
tory would be the total
destruction of their own
military forces and the conse-
quent undermining of their
own regimes. For this
awareness to be reinforced,
Israel must never be politically
and militarily isolated.
THE SECOND pre
condition for peace would be a
radical change in the character
of our neighbors' regime or
the emergence of an Arab
leader, first in Egypt, who
would be more concerned with
the true needs of his country
than with military show.
Without these two factors,
he said there would be no
peace. Wars would break out
every few years until the two
superpowers, for fear of
becoming entangled in the
area, would unite to impose a
solution on the area to suit
their own interests.
Even though the conditions
that Ben-Gurion saw as essen-
tial for achieving peace were
not realized in his day, he con-
tinually sought opportunities,
and never dissociated himself
from the many overt and
clandestine attempts to reach
a peace settlement.
I have tried to sketch
albeit in a limited measure
the uncommon abiity Ben-
Gurion had to foresee
chronologies and events, to
determine how we fit into
them to influence them, and
to enable us to mold our fate
with our own hands. I have not
alluded to mysticism and have
not availed myself of expres-
sions which, perhaps, are ap-
propriate in a mystic contest.
But it seems to me not out of
place here to cite partially two
of Ben-Gurion's quotations
and each of us may associate
them as he wishes:
"... Man is made of flesh
and blood, limbs, organs,
muscles, bones, sinews, cells
... but that is not all there is
to man. Man cannot exist
wihtout these, but there is
something else invisible, in-
tangible, and it is this that
gives man his preeminence.
And this wondrous thing has
no measure, weight, or dimen-
sion. It exists, however,
without being seen, acting and
activating, and through it man
understands, conceives, ar-
ticulates, sees future events,
grows attached to past genera-
tions and to days to come, and
penetrates through mists of
distance, and through the
secrets of nature. And we call
this intangible, invisible thing
'spirit' ."
AND ELSEWHERE:
"With the canonization of
the scriptures, prophecy was
ended, but the Divine
Presence did not depart. The
People were cut off from their
land and went into exile, yet
the voice of God continued to
resound in the nation's ear.
And this Divine voice speeks to
man in our time as it did three
thousand years ago. There are
those who think that the voice
comes from the heavens, and
others say that it comes from
the heart. The important thing
is the voice, and not the
dispute as to its origin. Every
man is capable of hearing this
voice, frequently or rarely, in
clear or muted tones, if only
his ear is bent to the word of
truth."
Ben-Gurion heard the voice.
62 Senators Oppose Arms Sales
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Congressional opposition to
any sale of arms to Saudi
Arabia has been stressed again
in a letter to President Reagan
signed by 62 Senators.
"A new, and we believe, un-
warranted Saudi arms request
would force an unnecessary
and unproductive confronta-
tion between the Congress and
the White House," the
Senators warned in the letter
which was hand-delivered to
the White House.
Sens. Alan Cranston (D.,
Calif.) and Bob Packwood (R.,
Ore.), who initiated the letter,
said they expected the Reagan
Administration to formally
notify Congress of the sale this
week.
However, the Administra-
tion continued to deny that
any decision has yet been
made, "we are continuing to
discuss and consult with Con-
gress on the matter and no
decisions have been made,"
Phyllis Oakley, a State Depart-
ment spokesperson, said.
The letter, signed by 16
Republicans and 46
Democrats, is similar to one
sent to Reagan two weeks ago
by Cranston, Packwood and
Sens. Dennis DeConcini (D.,
Ariz.), Alfonse D'Amato (R.,
N.Y.) and Frank Lautenberg
(D., N.J.).
Since 62 Senators have sign-
ed the latest letter the Ad-
ministration is put on notice
that there are enough votes to
defeat any proposed arms sale.
Cranston said the Senator has
been assured by enough other
Senators, who did not want to
sign the letter, that they op-
pose the sale.
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Friday, October 2, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Contributions To PACs utUr t0 the mtor
Said Essential For U.S. Jewry Writer Deplores
By MITCHELL BARD
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
When I lecture on
U.S.-Israel relations I am fre-
quently asked: "What can I do
to help?" Most people would
like to contribute to
strengthening the ties bet-
ween our two nations, but
many do not know how to go
about it. Let me suggest a few
things that everyone can do to
help.
Must important is to visit
Israel. I probably should say
"aliyah" (immigration j, but 1
realize that few people are
willing to make that commit-
ment. Nevertheless, just
visiting Israel is a major step,
because no one who goes there
ever returns unchanged. See-
ing, or rather experiencing,
Israel first-hand allows you not
only to become closer to your
own Judaism, but gives you an
understanding of the political
issues that you cannot possibly
attain from here.
For example, until you stand
on the Golan Heights or drive
through Judaea and Samaria,
you cannot fully appreciate
what is at stake when Israelis
refer to "secure and defensible
borders."
If a trip to Israel is expen-
sive or otherwise not in the
cards, there are other things
you can do for the cost of a
stamp. Write to your represen-
tatives in Congress. Pre-
written messages that arrive
in bunches are usually dismiss-
ed, but personal letters from
constituents never are. Let
your congressman and senator
know that you believe in a
strong U.S.-Israel relationship
and be specific about how he or
she can help.
For example, urge them to
vote for foreign aid and to op-
pose arms sales to Saudi
Arabia. Don't write only when
you want them to do
something; drop them a note
occasionally to thank them for
their support when they have
voted as you saw fit. We all
like to hear praise, and politi-
Yom Kippur Chant
Of Dispensation
Continued from Page 4-A
Iferent melodies for Kol Nidre.
|A popular myth advances the
|notion that a Spanish Marrano
composed the melody we use
Jtoday. Other scholars have
hypothesized that the melody
[arose in 16th century Ger-
Imany. But no one knows for
[certain, and the music's origin
remains mysterious. However,
Its emotional appeal remains
^verpowering.
A German poet, a non-Jew,
found himself in a small
synagogue for the Atonement
service. He wrote: "Suddenly,
the cantor, with a deeply
earnest heartrending melody,
neh in awe and supplication
began to sing. I had to struggle
I with a rare feeling of emotion.
1'everishly, I sighed. Hot, bur-
|nmg tears pouring from one's
I eyes east a wondrous spell and
I-" the same time purified. I fi-
led into the night and came
IJme. In that unforgettable
[house, no black speck defined
py soul." He had heard that
[mysterious brooding melody,
I'he Kol Nidre.
v.!i !? th^1 son& which cri-
g*d a Catholic priest, Aime
P'er to the synagogue. It
feught Franz yR^*nzwei
gjk to his faith when he had
pterminedtoleaveit.Agreat
M is .an theologian wrote
"" classic book "The Idea of
jHoly which speaks of the
remendem the sense of awe
We when he came home
;om a North African
;>nag0guP where he ,.
10 the Kol Nidre.
I Best-known musical setting
P this prayer came from a
t j 7' MfX Bruch- wri"en
VmCilo.and orchestra. It was
C SS,!,ned bv the Jewish
pmunity of Liverpool.
For us today, the Kol Nidre
can symbolize the need to
deepen our sensitivity toward
the resolutions which we make
in our finest moments of
spiritual decision. Kol Nidre
can remind us that only by
resolute will and self-
descipline can we hope to
lessen the distance between
what we are and ought to be,
The self-righteousness and
smugness which stand in the
way of our spiritual growth
need to be dispelled by a con-
fession in utter humility. When
accompanied by such a medita-
tion, the recital of Kol Nidre
prepares us for the soul-
cleansing experience of Yom
Kippur.
Rabbi Bernard S. Raskas
serves Temple of Aaron Con-
gregation, St. Paul, Minn.
cians are no exception.
Join the American Israel
Public Affairs cmmittee
(AIPAC). This is the organiza-
tion that lobbies on behalf of
Americans who believe in the
benefits of a strong U.S.-Israel
relationshp. AIPAC has earn-
ed the reputation as the most
powerful foreign policy lobby
in Washington and, in doing
so, has helped to strengthen
not only Israel but the United
States.
Contribute to a political ac-
tion committee, or PAC. This
should not be confused with
AIPAC, which does not con-
tribute to political campaigns
or rate or endorse candidates.
There are now more than 70
pro-Israel PACs which chan-
nel money to candidates who
believe in the importance of
strong U.S.-Israel relation.
There are people who
criticize PACs for having too
much influence or being con-
cerned too much with single
issues, but the fact is that they
are part of the political pro-
cess, and supporters of Israel
must make use of them.
If you live in South Florida,
there already exist pro-Israel
PACs in your community. If
not, you can investigate the
laws concerning establishing
one, or you can contribute to a
national PAC. You can also
make political contributions as
an individual, but your money
can be more effectively used
by a PAC. Make no mistake,
giving a candidate money does
not guarantee that he or she
will vote as you would like, but
it does insure the candidate
will be willing to listen to the
arguments of Israel's friends.
Jews make up less than
three percent of the U.S.
population; therefore, in order
to have influence we have had
to be extraordinarily active in
the political process. By voting
for candidates who support
Israel, supporting them finan-
cially and communicating with
them about your concerns,
you, too, can have influence
and help insure that the rela-
tionship between the United
States and Israel continues to
prosper.
Mitchell Bard is a foreign
policy analyst at the Universi-
ty of California, Irvine.
AJCongress Stand
EDITOR:
It is with sadness that I feel
compelled to suspend my
membership in the American
Jewish Congress because of
your unprecedented and un-
warranted intrusion into
Israel's internal affairs, with
your resolution of Sept. 22.
It is outrageous arrogance
lor the AJCongress or for
any other Jewish organization
to tell Israel what to do about
an international so-called
"Peace" conference. The only
ones who can make that deci-
sion are the Israelis,
themselves, who may have to
fight again for survival
regardless of what decision
they make or what concessions
they give. If their opinions are
divided, the Israelis have to
work that out to achieve a
workable consensus without
outside interference. So far,
they have achieved miracles.
Let us not forget recent
history. The United States
finally convinced South Viet-
nam to sign a "Peace" treaty
in 1973 so that the U.S. could
withdraw its forces. To super-
vise the Vietnam "Peace" an
International Control Commis-
sion was established consisting
of Poland, Hungary, Indonesia
and Canada which was soon
replaced by Iran.
The two communist
members made the Control
Commission a force that was
powerless to prevent the
North Vietnam treachery
when it overran South Viet-
nam in 1975. So, lor South
Vietnam, the so-called
"Peace" treaty was actually a
suicide pact. It also led to the
eventual slaughter of two
million Cambodians as the
world watched in silence.
Is there anyone other than a
"blind" communist sym-
pathizer who believes that a
Russian or communist
presence on a Commission
would add anything other than
sabotage to an already proven
ineffective procedure?
We have seen repeatedly
how the communists use the
word "Peace" to tranquilize
and mesmerize the world into
inactivity as they murder their
"victims." Do we have to learn
this lesson all over again in
Israel where Arab treachery
and terrorism have been nur-
tured by the Russians?
The Russians have supplied
tens of billions of dollars of the
most advanced military equip-
ment for repeated attempts to
destroy Israel as part of their
plan to dominate the Middle
East, as a giant step towards
world domination.
Israel is not South Vietnam,
and no one with a short
memory should try to tell
Israel what to do.
JOSEPH ABELOW
Netanyahu To
Leave Government
UNITED NATIONS -
Binyamin Netanyahu, Israel's
Ambassador to the United Na-
tions since July 1984, confirm-
ed to the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency that he will leave that
post when his term expires in
June 1988.
He said he does not intend to
renew his contract with the
Israel Foreign Ministry, and
would probably leave the
foreign service. He stressed,
however, that contrary to
various reports, he is not in-
terested in the dual chairman-
ship of the World Zionist
Organization and Jewish
Agency Executives, to be
vacated by Leon Dulzin, and
will not be a candidate at the
next World Zionist Congress.
According to close
associates, the charismatic
38-year-old diplomat may
enter Israeli politics. He is
widely admired in Israel and is
close to the Likud party.
He seems virtually assured
of a safe spot on the Likud list
in next year's Knesset elec-
tions.
To Celebrate.
Israel Discount Banktakes this holiday occasion to extend
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happy New tear to our friends and depositors.
Israel Discount Bank provides individual and corporate
customers with a full range of domestic and international bank-
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TOTAL CONSOLIDATED ASSETS EXCEED $12 BILLION


Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 2, 1987

Military To Wear Yarmulk<
Continued from Page 1-A
apparel.
Measure was prompted by
last year's Supreme Court
decision that upheld an Air
Force regulation barring a
captain from wearing his
yarmulke.
In 1986, the high court refus-
ed the appeal of Rabbi Simcha
Goldman, an Air Force
psychologist, to be allowed to
wear a yarmulke on duty in-
doors, where a military hat is
not permitted. It was the first
time the Supreme Court heard
a case involving religious prac-
tice in the military.
Rabbi Goldman left the Air
Force at the completion of his
active term of duty in 1981,
but continued the appeal by su-
ing for damages of two days'
emergency leave pay, equall-
ing about $150.
Prior to the case being taken
to court, Rabbi Goldman tried
to work out an agreement with
his attorneys to allow him to
continue working at his Air
Force position. When those
negotiations broke down, the
local Air Force authorities
pressured him to take off the
yarmulke or be subject to court
martial.
At that point, his attorneys
decided to take the matter to
Federal District Court. Bet-
ween those two times, when
negotiations failed, Rabbi
Goldman was liable to prosecu-
tion if on duty with a yar-
mulke. It was then that he ap-
plied for emergency leave,
which removed his obligation
to wear a military uniform.
Because of the Supreme
Court ruling in the Air Force's
favor, Goldman did not win the
damages. Goldman, 41, who is
now program director of the
Chabad House drug program
in Los Angeles, told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
that he is not planning to
return to the Air Force,
although "I enjoyed my years
in the Air Force," he said. He
did, however, offer interest in
getting back to the Air Force
reserves.
Friday's 55-42 vote in the
Senate on the "yarmulke
amendment" stipulates that
the apparel must be "neat and
conservative" and cannot
"interfere with the perfor-
mance of the member's
military duties." The Senate
rejected a similar amendment
last year by two votes. This
year's vote marked the first
time the Senate has approved
the proposal. The House ap-
proved the same legislation,
first offered and adopted in
1984 by Rep. Stephen Solarz
(D.-N.Y.) in its version of
legislation drafted by
Goldman's attorney, Nathan
Lewin, establishing Defense
Department programs.
The amendement, Sen.
Lautenberg said, presents
"those who are religious from
being locked out of the
services."
The Senate military pro-
grams bill still faces major
roadblocks for approval,
however, because of division
between Democrats and
Republicans over two con-
troversial amendments spon-
sored by Democrats: One of
the amendments would require
Congressional approval for the
administration to continue
providing military escorts for
Kuwaiti oil tankers in the Per-
sian Gulf; the other would re-
quire United States'
adherence to the as yet
unratified treaty limiting
strategic arms, because of
other military spending
provisions.
Opposition to the amend-
ment was voiced by Sen. John
Chafee (R., R.I.), who argued
that wearing of religious ap-
parel could be divisive. He
said, "It's a great mistake to
permit the accentuation of the
differences in our armed
forces."
The Reagan Administration,
led by the Department of
Defense, opposes the amend-
ment, although it may be ac-
cepted as part of an overall
military bill Reagan would
otherwise approve.
Lautenberg said that under
his proposal, the Defense
Department would accept the
standards for "neat and con-
servative" and could decide
when the wearing of religious
apparel would interfere with
military duties.
Lautenl>erg did not say what
precise religious apparel he
thought would he permitted
although he expressed doubt
that "the wearing of robes or
daggers would he allowed."
He said the main concern for
observant Jews was permis-
sion to wear the yarmulke in-
doors when conventional
military headgear is not
permitted.

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Friday, October 2, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page_l_5-_A_
Doctrinal Differences: Fragmented a^ Trader Of Non-Violence
:abbinical Community Seeks Consensus Stripped Of Residence Papers
By RABBI JACK RIEMER
B*th David Congregation
Some 135 rabbis, members
If the four major North
Imerican Jewish denomina-
tor, met for three days of
Jewish-Jewish dialogue, deter-
mined to heal the fissures
Irhich threaten to divide the
Worldwide Jewish community.
Participation in the fourth
Lrth American Chevra
"fellowship") Conference
^nsored by CLAL the Na-
pnal Jewish Center for Lear-
Ing and Leadership held in
[pring Glen, N.Y.,
^presented a significant
Lengthening 0f forces work-
Eg toward preventing the
lagmented, sometimes frac-
ous Jewish community from
.aring itself into Orthodox
td non-Orthodox camps un-
Klling or ineligible to marry
tch other.
This year's attendance
nost tripled that of the last
Inference held in 1985.
DNE OF the many en-
gaging aspects of the con-
Fence was a sizable increase
[the number of young rabbis
. scholars who attended.
enary speakers included rab-
and academicians such as
pgene Borowitz, Reuven
Ilka, Elliot Dorff, Arthur
[een, Eugene Lipmann,
Iskel Lookstein, Lawrence
[hiffman, Moshe Sokol,
alter Wurzburger, Sidney
hwarz and Mark Washofsky.
tabbi Jack Riemer of
ami's Congregation Beth
(vid represented the Florida
R'ish community. Rabbi
pmer led an important
Irkshop on "The Ethics of
Ind-Raising" which is an
lie that concerns rabbis
piss denominational lines.
Task of the participants at
Is gathering was to talk, to
Ifii and in learn. For many.
|s intensive dialogue led to
dissolving of denomina-
I eotypea and to
I and enriching
]
OMETIMES, to their own
part i ci pants
al they had much
on and that they could
I ich other, despite
|M"P differences in denomina-
tor principles and practices.
Despite their doctrinal dif-
J the rabbis agreed by
nsensus that they share
Feral objectives, namely to
lhance the observance of
labbat in their constituen-
& to improve the general
fel of Jewish learning, to
Wort Israel, to promote the
Ptorical consciousness of
aaism. and to provide
pnw catering at all inter-
nment events.
f,he conference concluded
r rabbls Pledging to:
ficf.i.i.... ii-
r-w \ jewisn Law) dialogue
LTeen representative
F'ars and specialists from
r ,0Ur movements,
r Challenge public expres-
ktilit lnteraenominational
' Pursue proposals for joint
Rabbi Jack Riemer
ventures such as national batei
din (rabbinic courts) on inflam-
matory issues of personal
status such as divorce, conver-
sion and who is a Jew.
Specifically, conferees called
upon all rabbis:
To refrain from
deprecating or defaming other
Jewish denominations and
their leaders from the pulpit
To challenge derogatory
references to other expres-
sions of Judaism in the name
of Ahavat Yisrael (love of
Israel)
To invite rabbis of dif-
ferent denominations to ad-
dress their congregations
To revive efforts to
achieve unified conversion
standards and procedures
To embark on Torah study
with others of different
movements,
PLENARY presentations at
the Chevra Conference focus-
ed on the most divisive issues
in Jewish life. These included
the role of women in religious
leadership, the conflict bet-
ween personal autonomy and
the authority of Halacha
(Jewish law), and the religious
status of children of Jewish
fathers and non-Jewish
mothers (Reform and
Reconstructionist accept
children of patrilineal descent.
under specific conditions, as
born Jews).
Although civility prevailed,
speakers did not pull punches.
But as speakers explored the
differences of the Conser-
vative. Orthodox. Reconstruc-
tionist and Reform expres-
sions of Judaism on some of
the prickliest issues of Jewish
life, they consistently
underscored areas of com-
munication as well.
MIAMI
BEACH S
GLATT
KOSHER
JH
The Chevra Conference of-
fered a unique opportunity for
three Jewish feminists to ad-
dress such a cross section of
rabbis in one of the most im-
passioned sessions of the three
days. They were Rabbi Rebec-
ca Alpert of the Reconstruc-
tionist Rabbinical College;
Beverly Gribetz, principal of
the Hebrew High School of the
Jewish Theological Seminary,
who is herself Orthodox; and
Rachel Adler, a doctoral can-
didate at Hebrew Union Col-
lege and University of
Southern California.
ONE EXPECTATION of
such bridge-building events as
the Chevra Conference is that
the emergence of a centrist
consensus on objectives, if not
approaches, will serve to
moderate extremes.
Another view is that for the
purpose of coexistence, con-
sensus is less critical than
recognition of the legitimate
range of possibilities for ex-
pression of Judaism.
Rabbi Eugene Borowitz,
editor of the journal Sh'ma,
cautioned that attempts to
build Jewish consensus could
be stymied by non-negotiable
matters of principle within the
movements such as the notion
of autonomy in Reform or the
authority of Halacha in
Orthodoxy.
HE SAID nevertheless that
"people of different ideologies
and temperaments can live
side by side" and that there is
"substantial basis for reaching
out to other Jews."
Rabbi Arthur Green, dean of
the Reconstructionist Rab-
binical College, urged in-
vestigation of Jewish texts
with awareness of what he
called "multi-level" in which
"more than one truth can be
true at one time." He appealed
to rabbis "from left to right"
tn "share with us in the crisis
of faith."
Rabbi Walter Wurzburger.
former president of the Rab-
binical Council of America.
and editor of the Orthodox
journal Tradition, left room
for dialogue, if not com-
promise, with other
movements, by observing that
"not every moral and religious
question is a halachic
question."
About 34 percent of the par-
ticipants affiliated with the
Conservative movement, 27
percent with the Orthodox, 22
percent with Reform and 12
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JERUSALEM Mubarak
E. Awad, director of the
Palestine Center for the Study
of Non-Violence, has been
stripped of his residence
papers by Israel authorities.
The 44-year-old Jerusalem
native, an American citizen,
was rebuked for writing a
pamphlet which encouraged
Palestinians in Judea and
Samaria (the West Bank) to lie
down in front of bulldozers
clearing land for new Israeli
settlements.
The brochure also called on
Arabs to boycott Israel pro-
ducts, not to use forms printed
in Hebrew and to engage in
other non-violent activities.
Published in California in
1983 by New Society
Publishers, the pamphlet
"Nonviolent Resistance: A
Strategy for the Occupied Ter-
ritories," was the target of in-
tense interrogation of Awad
by Israeli authorities.
They revoked his residence
status, however, because he
entered Israel on his American
passport, gained after he lived
in the United States long
enough to obtain U.S.
citizenship.
His center is financed in
large part by Hisham Sharabi,
a Georgetown University pro-
fessor who also is a
Palestinian-American.
percent with Reconstruc-
tionism. Five percent were not
identified with a specific
branch. No participant iden-
tified him or herself as
Hassidic or "classical"
Reform. Nine Rabbinic con-
ferees were women.
CLAL, through its Shamor
Department, runs Leadership
Education programs
throughout North America,
and through its Am Echad
(One People) department, runs
programs of bridge-building
amongst the four
denominations.
Activities include
establishing local rabbinical
study groups which currently
operate in nine communities,
and convening this conclave,
which was underwritten by the
Dorot Foundation and Mrs.
Joy Ungerleider Mayerson.
Rabbis Peter Knobel of
Chicago and Haskel Lookstein
of New York co-chaired the
conference. Conference coor-
dinator was Eric Levine,
associate director of Am
Echad. He was assisted by
Anne Hecht. Robert E. Loup is
CLAL's chairman, Rabbi Irv-
ing Greenberg is its president.
Paul Jeser is its executive vice
president.
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Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 2, 1987
THE GARDENS AT MOUNT NEBO
Miami's most beautiful exclusively Jewish Cemetery
72 "*
Life* i^-f^-\ *t^
*.%f


i-i
Nowhere is the Jewish concept of life eternal expressed with more
dignity, love and beauty than in Mount Nebo. Lush landscaping,
combined with more than 50 years of devoted care creates
at Mount Nebo a lasting tribute to loved ones in the highest
tradition of Judaism.This tradition is continued in the Gardens,
Mount Nebo's latest expansion.
CALL
MOUNT NEBO
Mount Nebo Cemetery 5505 N.w. 3rd Street, Miami. FL 33126


Kaparah
Ancient Ritual Of Repentance: Message For Modernity
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewixh Floridian Staff Writer
Just before sunrise on the
day before Yom Kippur, out-
side of the Lubavitch Landau
Yeshiva Center on Miami
Beach, there will be a gather-
ing of observant Jews, along
with two or three shochets or
ritual slaughterers, and a few
hundred chickens.
The gathering is for the pur-
pose of an ancient ceremony
called Kaparah, where a live
chicken is circled three times
overhead and then slaughtered
in accordance with the laws of
Kashrut. The chicken, or its
monetary equivalent, is then
donated to the poor.
Although no longer widely
practiced, the Kaparah
ceremony is still observed,
often with the monetary value
of the chicken replacing the
live bird entirely in the rite.
Stanley Weiss, owner of
Paramount Bakery and assis-
tant rabbi at Beth Israel Con-
gregation, performs the
ceremony with a live bird. He
and his family will be among
those gathered at the Yeshiva
Center.
"I buy one rooster for all the
men in my family, and one hen
for all the women," says
Weiss, "although some use a
chicken for each member of
the family."
Pregnant women take both a
hen and a rooster, but Weiss,
who has 15 children, says wry-
ly that his family "hasn't had
Continued on Page 2-B
Yom Kippur
Kol Nidre Begins Holkst of Days;
%kkot Feast On Wednesday Night
uth Florida Jews will paunch the observance of Yore
I ur Friday evening wifti traditional Kol ^idre services
Jl q the area's synagogue*.
Holiday continues through Saturday at sunset, as a time
-sting and prayer for repentance.
Yizkor, a Memorial prayer for the departed, will be
ted during Saturday's Yom Kippur observance.
The High 3BWy Day season which began with Rosh
Ha&hanah continues with the observance of Sukkot, or the
ist of Tabernacles. The holiday, also known
r estiva} of Boojhs, starts at mn
vie** at all aft doogregations.
Mota synagogues and temples will erect outdoor aukkot.
1 oths, in which to observe the festival.
Kol Nidre, the central theme of Yom Kippur eve sen' h
'.\i by Jews the world over with a melody that begins
prayers to be sealed into the Book of Life.
-
Rabbi Phineas Weberman is shown just prior
to performing the Kaparah ceremony at what
was once a private farm just west of Miami In-
ternational Airport.
A Lyrical Composite Of Dade County Cantors
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
VOLUNTEER to profes-
sional, unpaid to paid very
well, indeed. A radical inven-
tion, these modern cantors.
As the synagogue evolved so
too did the role of cantor. It
has only been in the past
decade, in fact, that women
were admitted to cantorial
schools. And it is only in the
last century that seminaries
have established cantorial
schools.
This new breed of cantors,
commanding higher salaries
than ever before, receive their
training in five year study pro-
grams compared to many of
the older cantors who never
went to cantorial school but
learned their craft by appren-
ticing under great cantors or
learning it from their fathers
who learned it from their
fathers.
There was a time when com-
munities gave priority to a
beautiful voice and musical
skill over the traditional re-
quirements of learning and
piety. Today's young cantors
generally have a mixture of
musical skills as well a
knowledge of the prayers they
chant.
And today's cantor is usually
found doing a little of
everything from solemnly
leading the High Holy Day ser-
vices to coaching a youth choir.
Dade County has a rich
variety of cantors including
two invested women cantors
for whom admission to can-
torial school and subsequent
investiture came only within
this decade.
It has cantors such as
Abraham Seif, who started
chanting here in 1950. And it
has newcomers such as Zvi
Rozen of Temple Adath
Yeshurun, who has been here
just over a month. Rozen
comes from Israel, where he
was the cantor at the Great
Synagogue of Tel Aviv. He is
best known for conducting the
first official service at the
Western Wall after it was cap-
tured by Israel in the 1967 Six-
Day War.
SOME CANTORS have
made recordings that are
distributed internationally,
while others perform in major
concerts at the Miami Beach
Theatre of the Performing
Arts.
As each cantor shares his or
her ideas about their profes-
sion, the pieces of a lyrical puz-
zle fall into place and the com-
posite portrait of a cantor
takes shape.
"The rabbi is the teacher of
law. The cantor is not only a
teacher of the liturgy, but the
one who gives expression
through music to the liturgy,"
says Rachelle Nelson, cantor
of Temple Israel of Greater
Miami, and one of only two
Continued on Page 5-B
Oiu!
Community
Friday, October 2, 1987 The Jewish Floridian Section B


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 2, 1987
i i---------------------------. i f !-------- '------'-*-~----------- '
Ancient Ritual Of Repentance
Has Message For Modernity
Continued from Page 1-B
to do that for some time."
If a person cannot hold the
live chicken himself, "So-
meone else can hold it, while
the person says the words,"
says Weiss, who admits that
an unpleasant aspect of the
ritual is that "the chicken
smells."
Weiss adds that "the con-
cept of animal sacrifice is dif-
ferent in the Jewish religion
than in other religions. Other
religions felt that their deities
needed the sacrifice, for the
blood or the fumes, or that the
deity needed to be appeased.
"In Judaism, it would be
blasphemy to think that God
needed something, and
therefore was lacking. We
sacrifice because we need it, to
remember that all that we
have is on loan from God."
Rather, sacrifice is an aid in
repentance, Weiss asserts.
"Sacrifice is a ritual which
makes you realize that all that
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you have is not yours, that
reminds you where your
wealth and sustenance come
from."
Rabbi Yochanan Zweig,
president of the Yeshiva at the
Talmudic University of
Florida, says that Kaparah is
not a sacrifice.
"Sacrifice pertains only to
animals consecrated to the
Temple, and has to be per-
formed by a High Priest. The
animal becomes a holy
animal," explains Sweig.
"This is just a chicken," he
adds, "not a gift to the
Creator."
The chicken is also not an ex-
piation of an individual's sin,
according to Zweig. "The
ceremony is between me and
myself, feeling the fragility of
life. It is a re-dedication,' he
asserts.
"It has nothing to do with
guilt, but rather with trying to
upgrade a commitment."
Some might view the
Kaparah ceremony as an
anachronism, a throwback to a
more primitive time in Jewish
history.
Zweig bridles at the sugges-
tion. "The values of what you
call our primitive times are the
values our world still lives by,"
he contends. They are ex-
tremely relevant and
meaningful."
Yet Zweig, who donates
more than the monetary value
of one chicken to the poor,
does not use a live bird in the
ceremony.
"It's difficult to present a
poor person with an unplucked
chicken, especially on the day
before Yom Kippur. Many
poor people would not be com-
fortable with the gift."
Zweig, who points out that
animals have traditionally
been used as symbols in
literature as well as in
religious ritual, adds that
plucking and cleaning the fowl
"can be a lot of work for peo-
ple used to buying prepared
chickens in the supermarket."
Asked if there is a different
feeling to the ceremony when
money is substituted for a bird,
Zweig replies that he has no
basis for comparison, having
always used money instead of
a live chicken in the rite.
Rabbi Pinchas Weberman of
Ohev Shalom Congregation
agrees with Zweig that the
Kaparah is not a sacrifice, and
that the meaning of the
ceremony is not to release a
person from guilt.
"This chicken is not for a
free lunch," he puns. "I can't
throw all my sins on the
chicken.
"A person sees death and it
makes an impression, shows us
that we are vulnerable, that
we must be righteous to justify
our existence," he says.
Weberman, as opposed to
those who let another hold the
squirming fowl or even
substitute money for the bird
in the ritual, actually
slaughters the chicken himself.
"I am licenced to perform
schita (ritual slaughter accor-
ding to the laws of Kashrut)
but I've never practiced com-
mercially," explains Weber-
man, who gets his chickens
from North Florida or Georgia
poultry farms.
Weberman observes the
Kaparah ceremony in his own
backyard, but denies en-
countering any resistance
from next-door neighbors.
"I do it around 5 a.m., when
it's still pretty dark," he adds.
"By the time they get around
to hearing and objecting, it's
all over."
Weberman's technique is "to
get one hand under both
wings, the other hand holding
both legs, and gently circle
over head."
One way in which the an-
cient ceremony has been
changed is that pregnant
women who know the sex of
their unborn child to be female
from pre-natal testing no
longer need both a hen and
rooster, according to
Weberman.
"The rooster is for the
possibility of a male child," he
says, adding that the ritual is
done for the unborn "as an
education for the parents, to
know we have responsibility
for this child" and not for any
pre-natal sin.
Weberman insists that this
ceremony is not a reminder of
an earlier, more primitive
period in Jewish history.
"We do not look at our
ancestors as primitive, but as
highly developed," Weberman
Yom Kippur Scapegoat
Today, Jews fast and meditate, but during the time of Tenrnl
service Jews also performed another ritual to atone for their sf
on Yom Kippur. *"*
The ritual, known as Azazel. consisted of the choosing of tw
goats by the High Priests. Lots were then drawn, and one eJ
was sacrificed to God, while the other was led into the desert to be
thrown off a cliff.
This goat was considered to be carrying the burden of the peo-
ple's sins; with the animal's death, the communal sins were
obliterated.
Rabbi Pinchas Weberman of Ohev Shalom Congregation ex-
plains that the "scapegoat" was not only symbolic of sin.
"But you were to see this and repent, and the repentence was
the atonement," he asserts.
The word "Azazel" has been interpreted in various and sundry
ways. Some translate the word as meaning "strongest mow?.
tain," and understand it as referring to the place where the coat
was sent to die.
Others read the word as being composed of the Hebrew term
for goat (az) and the Aramaic root "to go," and conclude that "the
goat which goes" was both the translation of the word, and the
name by which the goat was called.
Azazel is also the name of a demon in Jewish tradition, and as
the desert was often considered in the bible to be a place where
demons roamed, some interpret the ritual as being an effort to
return the sin or evil to its source.
The Jewish tradition stems from Leviticus (16:8-10): "And
Aaron shall cast lots upon two goats; one lot for the Lord, and the
other lot for Azazel. And Aaron shall present the goat upon which
the lot fell for the Lord, and offer him for a sin-offering."
AlisaKwitnei
replies. "The symbolism of a
creature sacrificed for the pur-
pose of nurturing a higher be-
ing shows us that we have to
bend our will for the will of
God."
So, on the day before Yom
Kippur, while most people are
still asleep in their beds. Rabbi
Stanley Weiss will be among
those gathered to herald the
dawn with an ancient ritual of
repentance.
"If the reasons behind this
were primitive," Weiss ad-
mits, "it would be primitive.
But it's for our needs, and our
needs haven't changed. So the
ceremony is as pertinent todav
as thousands of years ago, if
not more so."
For many, the thought of ris-
ing before sunrise to circle a
live chicken three times
overhead, and then have the
bird slaughtered, may evoke
echoes of a time when the
Jewish people routinely of-
fered up animal sacrifices.
But for Rabbi Weberman,
"everything we do ties us to
the past and to the future."
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Friday, October 2, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
JL
Joshua Stemberg built his sukkahfrom crate
hiding while he was stationed in Qui Nhon,
South Vietnam during Sukkos 1970.
i Air-Conditioned Sukkahs
And Free Palm Fronds
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
JmUk Floridian Staff Writer
hen it comes to
klebrating Sukkot, Dr.
kshua L. Stemberg let
pther the jungles of Viet
am nor the heat of South
lorida ruin his plans for
|lfilling the mitzvot of
kilding and dwelling in a
tkah.
That is why Stemberg, when
itinned in Viet Nam, made
|e time, went to great
ngths, and succeeded in
lilding that leaf-covered
jcture that serves as a
Iminder of the dependence of
|ws on God while they
andered in the desert and,
ter, the celebration of the
rvest.
s'ow Stemberg, of North
liarm Beach, and his family,
Vntinue their tradition of
pilding a sukkah in their back
rd. His is rare in that it is
-conditioned, fulfilling the
adition that a sukkah should
i a comfortable place to dwell
[Even the gardeners for the
|ty of Miami Beach help
bservant Jews out by plann-
ig their annual tree-clipping
\r next week. The palm
onds are commonly used in
puth Florida to cover the suk-
ph's roof. The covering must
something taken directly
om the soil.
I" We do it at this time of year
I a courtesy to the Jewish
knmunity and so we don't
kve to pay to get rid of these.
Fe cut the fronds and when
b temples call us, we tell
jem where we'll be cutting
hd they pick them up," says
lonald Rumbaugh, director of
bJic Services for the city of
liami Beach.
l"Many times we get so many
<>ple grabbing the palm
fonds and they fight over
Mm." adds Rumbaugh. "We
It em as fast as we can drop
Mm and people put them in
Mir vehicles/'
I The cutting will start
Wednesday, Sept. 30 and pro-
Md on Thursday and Friday
and then the following Monday
and Tuesday.
Some people may not want
to join in the fight for the
fronds.
Elliot Schiff, and his
brother, Jeffrey, started a
business several years ago
whereby they pick up the palm
fronds from the city of Miami
Beach and deliver them to
homes or synagogues. They
sell the fronds anywhere from
$1.25 to $2 each.
"A lot of people need the
palm fronds and either they're
heavy or they can't get them,"
says Schiff, the son of Rabbi
Solomon Schiff, executive vice
president of the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami.
Elliot Schiff will build a suk-
kah for his family for the
festival which begins Oct. 7. A
wood frame already is in place.
He will put a canvas frame
around it to serve as its walls,
although several people prefer
a mesh which is better for ven-
tilation. Across the top will be
three or four wood beams on
which he will lay the fronds.
Condo and apartment
dwellers may have a problem
building a sukkah on their
covered terraces, Schiff notes.
The roof must be placed so
that an occupant can see
through it to the sky and stars
and so that rain can come
through. Many apartment
dwellers have a cement
overhang that would impair
their view.
"Part of the interpretation is
you need to see the sky
because it stretches further
than our home and there's
more to life than our home and
there's more to life than our
immediate environment," says
Schiff.
"For 40 years from the time
the Jews left Egypt until the
time they entered the promis-
ed land, the Torah says that
God made sukkah booths to
protect the people from the
elements, the cold, the wild
animals. In later years, it
became more o.f an
agricultural holiday, where
people would give gratitude
for the crops."
Synagogues are also re-
quired to build sukkahs, accor-
ding to tradition, and many
area congregations will par-
ticipate in their construction,
decoration, and gather under
the sukkah for special celebra-
tions following services.
Many South Floridians today
can remember building suk-
kahs as children in northern
states.
Stemberg, who practices
nuclear medicine and en-
docrinology, remembers
"eating in a sukkah in New
York with the fur muffs on and
smoke coming out of your
mouth and you're waiting for
the hot soup."
"It's a very major holiday to
us and our children," says
Marcy Hoffman, of North
Miami Beach, who will build
the traditional sukkah outside
her home with her husband
Martin and children.
"I did it as a child," says
Marcy Hoffman. "My husband
lived in Manhattan and
couldn't build because he lived
in an apartment. Once we had
our own home in Miami it
became something special to
him because he never did it as
a child."
As a child, Hoffman
remembers her parents going
to their Far Rockaway home
basement and taking out the
frame of the sukkah which had
been stored. This took place
the day after Yom Kippur.
And it would be a full day's
project. "It is, to this day, my
most wonderful memory of all
holidays."
Decades have gone by, and
Hoffman now has children of
her own. And building the suk-
kah is still a day's project. "My
children have already started
making decorations," she
says. "We use pictures, little
pumpkins, ghourds and Indian
corn.
"Ours is more complicated,
we use a mesh screening. And
my husband's parents come
down every year from New
York because it is a big treat."
There are also sukkah-
hopping parties. Hoffman said
most of her neighbors are Or-
thodox and build sukkahs in
their back yards. It is a treat,
especially for the children, to
visit neighbor's sukkahs and
serve the children cookies and
soft drinks.
Although the Hoffmans and
most families only eat in their
sukkahs, some Jews such as
Stemberg will sleep in a suk-
kah. He builds a second sukkah
off his second floor bedrooms
balcony just for sleeping while
the main sukkah downstairs is
used for eating and guests.
"It's a mitzvah to sleep in
it," says Stemberg. "Sym-
bolically, the idea is showing
belief in God, that even if you
are in a frail place of dwelling,
God will protect you."
Real estate developer Ira
Rothstein, also of North Miami
Beach, spends about two hours
building the sukkah with help
from his wife Ricky and
children Matthew and Bari.
"It's a nice time of year
because it brings the family
together," he says.
Rothstein, who builds his
sukkah big enough to hold 24
people, uses metal flanges as a
base, filled in with marble or
concrete. He can screw in
metal pipes which form posts
(avoiding the use of nails
because the sukkah must be a
temporary structure
although one wall is allowed to
be permanent and many
homeowners have built the
permanent structure as add-
ons to their porches). Across
the post, Rothstein has cross
bars that go into the wall of
the house for a permanent
structure. On top of that he
uses pressure-treated one-by-
two lumber. He builds a grid
and then attaches them
together. He has wooden tres-
tle on which he places the palm
fronds, which he buys from
Schiff.
At least one Miami
businessman helps those who
do not want to build their own
sukkah frames by selling pre-
made frames. Steve Mishket,
owner of Economy Awning,
says he sells only about a dozen
or so frames. "It's not very
lucrative," he says, "We do it
as a courtesy." Cost is
estimated at 90 cents a square
foot, or about $63 a side for a
10-foot-by-7 frame.
Warren Berney, an accoun-
tant who is Orthodox, prefers
to build the sukkah himself
with his wife Marilyn, and son
Joshua.
He has poles that are attach-
ed to the back of the house. To
that he attaches old drapes.
His wife helps with the decora-
tions. They put up plastic fruit
and tinsel and Rosh Hashanah
cards.
Bemey, who is vice presi-
dent of Young Israel of North
Miami Beach, says: "I try
especially on a Shabbas to go
in and take a lounge chair and
read in it. You're supposed to
live in a sukkah and use it as
much as the opportunity
permits."
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' '.-''.-. /. V "' ..-.,.
Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 2, 19*7
Happenings
Children in Distress will hold their Annual Membership Lun-
cheon, at Turnberry Isle Country Club's Garden Room. Wednes-
day. Oct 7 CID is affiliated with the University of Miami School
of Medicine. Department of Psychiatry and wine reception will
begin at I 1 0 am. with luncheon to follow at 12:30. For infor-
mation call 861-8858 or 8H4-492tt.
Adlai Stevenson Democratic Women's Club will hold its regular
meeting Monday. Oct 5 at 6:30 p.m. at the tverglades Hotel
Penthouse
There will be a Vegas Night with all proceeds going to the U of
M/SEF Mental Health Research for Children, on Saturday. Od
10 8 p.m at the Omni Ballroom
Bonnie Barnett. a prominent arts supporter, has been named to
a four-year term on the Florida Arts Council which funds arts and
performing arts groups throughout the state. The appointment,
made by recently retired Secretary of State George Firestone it
effective Oct. 1 Barnett. president of Corporate Art Resources, is
curator of art at Sun Banks/South Florida. N.A.
Deborah Hospital Foundation begins a new era in Florida with
the new location of its Florida Regional Office in the University
Shoppes at 4942-44 N University Dr in Lauderhill The Grand
Opening Reception will take place on Thursday. Oct 8 from 2
p.m. to 5 p.m. The official ribbon cutting ceremony will be at 2:15
p.m.
Jonathan Greenberg. MD. former acting director of the
Neurotrauma (Shock Trauma) Unit at the Maryland Institute for
Emergency Medical Service System, has been appointed assistant
professor of neurological surgery at the University of Miami
School of Medicine He is also chief of the Head Trauma Section
for the Neurosurgical Service at Jackson Memorial Hospital
Highest Ratings For
Miami Jewish Home
The Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged at
Douglas Gardens (MJHHA)
has recently been awarded two
certifications of excellence
that are shared by only a select
number of long-term care
facilities in the State of
Florida.
MJHHA has been awarded a
superior rating from the Office
of Licensure of the State of
Florida's Department of
Health and Rehabilitative Ser-
vices (HRS), and a three-year
accreditation from the Joint
Commission on Accreditation
of Hospitals (JCAH).
'The criteria set forth by
HRS consists of 400 minimum
requirements that must be met
before HRS' survey team will
consider a facility 'superior,' "
explained MJHHA Executive
Director Marc Lichtman. "We
not only met those re-
quirements, but far exceeded
them."
The JCAH accreditation
means that MJHHA has volun-
tarily been evaluated by an
outside independent organiza-
tion of peers and was found to
be in substantial compliance
with their high standards. The
accreditation process has been
conducted in the United States
by health care professionals
since 1919, and has an im-
pressive history.
Not only did the Miami
Jewish Home receive ac-
creditation, it received a three-
year accreditation, the highest
possible rating.
"The voluntary accredita-
tion process is a proven and ef-
fective way to improve the
quality of service provided in
health care organizations,"
continued Mr. Lichtman.
"Also, voluntary accreditation
allows individual facilities to
demonstrate to the public their
commitment to excellence.
The Miami Jewish Home takes
great pride in being such a
facility."
The Miami Jewish Home is a
geriatric care facility that
serves more than 8,000 Flori-
dians each year through a
broad array of residential and
community outreach pro-
grams. It is located at 151 NE
52nd Street in Miami.
Temple Israel Oratorio:
'If Not Higher'
High Holy Day Services for
Temple Israel of Greater
Miami will be highlighted by a
new oratorio, to be performed
Yom Kippur afternoon at
Dade County Auditorium.
Temple Israel Cantor
Rachelle F. Nelson, and Rabbi
Rex D. Perimeter have
adapted Y.L. Pcretz' Yiddish
story "If Not Hir ,er," into an
oratorio to he performed
Saturday, Qct. 3 at 2:15 p.m.
The story, about the disap-
pearance of a rabbi in Eastern
Europe just before Rosh
Hashanah, will be performed
by Cantor Nelson, who com-
posed and arranged the music.
She will also conduct the
36-voice professional and
amateur chorus, soloists and
accompanists.
Rabbi Perimeter, who
created the libretto, will
deliver the narrative portions.
Paula Epstein will sign the
performance for the deaf.
Sherwood Weiser, Co-Chairman, is shown
with committee members discussing plans for
the forthcoming Jeunsh National Fund Din-
ner honoring Congressman Dante Fascell on
October 2J, at Oynni. /',,.
Joyce Newman
Joins Home
The Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged at
Douglas Gardens (MJHHA)
has announced the selection of
Joyce Newman as one of its
Community Coordinators. Ms.
Newman will be responsible
for developing support for the
Miami Jewish Home in North
Dade and Broward Counties.
GoM'S.Rooted
in tradition,
Golds
borscht

"3
Gold*
Brooklyn NY II2IH
Joyce Newman
"More and more elderly are
moving to North Dade and
Broward Counties," noted
MJHHA Executive Director
Marc Lichtman. "In an effort
to serve them, we have in-
itiated a number of community
services and programs in those
areas. We are looking to
develop grassroots support for
these services and we are sure
that Ms. Newman, who has
been a strong community
leader m Broward for many
years, will help to generate
that involvement."
4Bfor? joininS the MJHHA
staff, Newman served as the
Executive Director of the
American Friends of Tel Aviv
University.
As an active leader in the
Jewish community, Ms
Newman has served as Presi-
dent of the Jewish Federation
of South Broward County and
been a Member of the Board of
Directors of the United Way of
Broward for the past seven
years. She also serves as a
Vice President for both the
Southeast Florida Holocaust
Memorial Center and Planned
Parenthood of South Palm
"each and Broward Counties.
? a a ok a
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Friday, October 2, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Lyrical Composite Of Dade County Cantors
Continued from Page 1-B
k-time women cantors in
de County.
In Judaism, most of the ser-
is done in music because
t>elieve that God hears
hyers through song."
SOME cantors have been in-
Jsted. the equivalent of a rab-
f being ordained, after at
1st four years of study in
fctorial schools. Other can-
ts, who practiced the profes-
ln before there were can-
Vial schools, learned the
lodies that had been passed
generation to generation,
|>m father-to-son or from
kster-cantor-to-apprentice.
Uhers learned
\he melodies that
tad been passed
generation to
generation...
*om master
iantor to
ipprentice.
The role of a cantor has been
xpanded from chanting dur-
hg services to duties such as
Erecting choirs, overseeing
[eligious education and
timulating the spirit of the
ynagogue by direct interac-
pon with congregants.
"It's a wonderful, challeng-
Dg field and new things are
appening every day," says
Cantor Irving Shulkes, of
temple Sinai of North Dade.
[There are magnificient pro-
mts one can be engaged in.
for example, in our congrega-
lon, we're going to be work-
pg on a musical service com-
bsed in the early part of the
[7th century by an Italian Jew,
|alomone Rossi."
The Hebrew word for cantor
\Skaliach Zibor, which means
[messenger of the people."
\nd because a cantor is the
aison between a congregation
(nd the Almighty, he or she
ften begins with several per-
)nal prayers. One is a petition
bat God accept his prayers on
ehalf of the congregation. A
econd prayer beseeches God,
leads with God, to be granted
he gift of speech, that his
Jraise may be sung among
eople.'
The cantor, or chazzan,
ime into his own in southern
tod eastern Europe at the end
W the Renaissance era, accor-
ding to Cantor Bernard Knee,
the Aventura Jewish
enter.
Until that time, the prayer
ervice was entrusted to the
faaf TefiUah, the master of
prayer. It was a non-paying
h. He stood before the con-
regation at a lecturn and, as
[he advocate of the congrega-
tion, sang the prayers in the
familiar modes of the day.
As some synagogues became
nore affluent, so grew the
Ned to have someone with a
pained voice and with great
Musical knowledge, lead the
Congregation in prayer. So
developed the cantor who
brought to the pulpit a com-
bination of voice, musical and
religious knowledge.
LITTLE has been written
about the American cantor. In
fact, a book that took three
years to research has now
been submitted for publica-
tion. It was written by Mark
Slobin, a professor of music at
Connecticut's Wesleyan
University, with a grant
awarded to the Cantors
Assembly by the National En-
dowment for the Humanities.
"There have been cantors in
America for 300 years and un-
til now this institution has not
been systematically studied,"
Slobin says. "We tried to get
the history of the profession
including the recent changes
like the admission of women.
We interviewed about 125 can-
tors to get an idea of the living
practice today. Then, we col-
lected a sampling of the music
performed by cantors."
Slobin found that the idea of
what a cantor does besides
basically leading services, has
been in flux through the
generations. Today's cantor is
highly professionalized and
more secure in the sense than
in earlier times when there
were not professional
organizations and contracts.
That, despite the fact that the
period two or three genera-
tions ago was called: the
"Golden Age of cantors."
The Reform branch of
Judaism, which once
downplayed the cantor as a
pulpit figure, has become ex-
tremely interested in having
cantors, Slobin says. The Con-
servative movement has just
begun, after a severe shor-
tage, to invest women this
year. The Orthodox, Slobin
says, will never admit women
since they find halnchic, or
Jewish legal problems with the
concept.
Margulis, on
women cantors:
You now have a
role model for
the other half of
the congregation.
CANTOR Nelson was the
first woman cantor in Dade
County. Barbara Margulis, the
second, has been with Bet
Breira since Aug. 1. Nelson
and Margulis were invested by
the School of Sacred Music -
Hebrew Union College in New
York City.
According to Nelson, a can-
tor coming out of school today
starts at a salary of about
$40,000. But according to
Murray Yavneh, cantor at
Temple Menorah and presi-
dent of the Cantors Associa-
tion of Florida, that figure may
be inflated, especially in
smaller Orthodox congrega-
tions. Yavneh says that the
salary range in major
synagogues is from $35,000 to
$75,000. Salaries have risen
"very dramatically in the last
several years," because of a
shortage of qualified cantors
A
Cantor Aroni
Cantor Adler
Cantor Nelson
Cantor Fuchs
and the subsequent increase of
associated responsibilities.
Many congregations which
cannot afford, or choose not to
pay for a full-time cantor,
employ cantorial soloists.
Nelson, as a fully invested
cantor, has taken one of the
stronger cantorial roles. She is
active in life-cycle events such
as funerals and weddings, she
visits the ill in hospitals, is an
instructor in the school, leads
children's and adults' choirs
and, as a composer and player
of three instruments, com-
poses her own music for the
liturgy.
"I'm a Reform cantor and
therefore I incorporate both
the old and traditional style of
Europe with the modern songs
of today," says Nelson. The
first three years of cantorial
school, Nelson and her
clasmates "were drenched"
with classical, traditional wor-
ship music. "They want us to
know the past, she says.
"They don't want to let go of
those beautiful, haunting
melodies of Eastern Europe."
Her Reform movement is
also different from the Or-
thodox in that the services are
shorter have more English,
utilize musical instruments.
The serious shortage of can-
tors, Nelson says, explains the
key reason why the doors were
opened to women.
"I'M NOT A SEXIST. I'm
not a women's libber," asserts
Bet Breira's Margulis. "It's
nice having women clergy
because you now have a role
model for the other half of the
congregation."
Margulis was a music major
in college hoping to go into
opera. But as much as she lov-
ed singing and performing,
Margulis says she realized that
being a cantor would also com-
bine her love of Judaism and
music and working with
people.
For other cantors in South
Florida, there wasn't much
hesitation or question of a
profession.
"All my family were cantors
and I was raised to do that as a
child," says Temple Zion
Israelite Center Cantor Ben-
jamin Adler, a hotel owner
who studied at a yeshiva,
Wayne State University and
Florida State University.
"I followed my family tradi-
tion and basically it's a nice
way for someone to continue
his music if they have an in-
terest in liturgy and prayer
and its history which has
several thousand years behind
it.
"Unfortunately there is a
shortage of cantors and fewer
It's like a
football player
having to play
three games back
to back and then
playing the
Superbowl.
people going into the field,"
notes Adler.
"For a man, especially to-
day, the pay is not terrific. But
there are great rewards being
a cantor, being part of the
Jewish community.
It is a great calling steeped
in history, especially for the
High Holy Days. Many of the
tunes are called Misini tunes
or modes. They are said to
have been given down with
Moses on Mt. Sinai. They are
different than ones used on
sabbath and lead to more
introspection."
*:*:W:*:::W^^^
THE holidays may be the
highlight of the year but they
are also a taxing time. A can-
tor has to prepare himself to
pray with great feeling and
great emotion. "It's like a
marathon," compares Adler.
"It's a physically grueling
idea. The voice is like a muscle.
It's like a football player hav-
ing to play three games back to
back and then the next week
play the Super Bowl."
Cantor Seymour Hinkes
spent five years studying
under other cantors. He has
been a cantor for 25 years and
is now engaged at Temple
Zamora. His father was a can-
tor so he estimates that the ap-
titude is familial. "Cantors
normally have a love for their
culture and their religion and
have an ear for music," he
says.
By contrast. Cantor Edward
Klein of Temple Ner Tamid, is
the first cantor in his family.
"I had a lovely voice as a
Continued on Page 6-B
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Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 2, 1987
Cantor Margulis Cantor Yavneh
Cantor Seif
Cantor Albert
Cantor Freedman Cantor Shulkes
Cantor Klein
Overview Of The Cantorate
Continued from Page 5-B
young boy and I was influenc-
ed by another cantor at a very
young age." says Klein, who
studied both at the Jewish
Theological Seminary and the
Juilliard School of Music. Like
most cantors, he began chan-
ting at an early age and
estimates he knows literally
thousands of melodies.
Cantor Shulkes in his 18th
year at North Dade's Temple
Sinai, has been a cantor since
he was invested by the Reform
School of Sacred Music of the
Hebrew Union College
Jewish Institute of Religion.
I would say love of music,
faith, Judaism, tradition, of
working with people," drew
him into the cantorate. One of
the main functions of a cantor,
he notes, is not only to chant
the liturgy but to interpret it
just as a rabbi interprets the
Torah.
Some cantors work part-
time. For example, Rabbi
Solomon Schiff, the cantor at
the Hebrew Academy Beth-El
congregation, is also executive
vice president of the Rab-
binical Association of Greater
Miami.
DANNY TADMORE. can
tor of Temple Beth-El of North
Bay Village, also works as a
stand-up comedian, ha.* a radio
show and possesses a PhD in
philosophy from Duke Univer-
sity. He doesn't work as a can-
tor for the salary, he says, ad-
ding that he makes more
money at other jobs. But he en-
joys being "the voice of the au-
dience," the one who chants to
God.
Tadmore who was born and
"certified" as a cantor in
Israel sings in Orthodox
Ashkenazic mode. Although he
can recite the prayers by
memory, he says, "You're sup-
posed to read it as if every
time is the first time."
Several area cantors have in-
ternational backgrounds.
Yehuda Shifman of Temple
Emanu-El was a cantor in
Israel at the age of 15 for a
high holy day service. His son,
Offy Aaron, began chanting
for the High Holy Days last
year and now, at age 16, will
chant his second high holiday
service at Beth Kodesh
Synagogue in West Miami.
At Temple Emanu-El, Shif-
man is in charge of all things
musical within the synagogue,
which includes a rock ensem-
ble, jazz ensemble, and a piano
course at the North Beach
Lehrman Day School.
For Shifman, the high holy
days are extra ordinary.
"I .am praying to God on
behalf of the congregation,"
he says. "When you look at
thousands of people and lead
Considerations In
Electing A Cantor
According to sources at the American Conference of
Cantors, which serves as the Reform movement's profes-
sional cantorial union and counts 250 members, there are
variables involved in the election of a cantor.
The number of years in the cantorate is a major factor
in salary considerations but not as major as in the selection
of a rabbi. There are no neat compartments in the
cantorate.
Male/female factor is insignificant. More important is
age/maturity factor. Do older congregants relate?
Temples are divided into below and above 800 families.
In that higher range, cantors make in salary and parsonage
upwards of $40,000 to $100,000. A new cantor, fresh from
school, employed at a synagogue of 500 families or more,
will make $40,000.
The size of the congregation is a salary factor but is
always tempered by budgetary considerations and how the
cantor fulfills the needs of the synagogue.
A cantor-educator is paid more than a cantor-musical
director.
A benefit package usually includes salary/parsonage,
pension, social security taxes, major medical, convention
allowance, auto allowance and dues to the American Con-
ference of Cantors.
them in service, that makes it
different than another time of
year when you don't see that
many people in synagogue.
The Day of Atonement is sup-
posed to be the holiest day of
the year. We have to fast and
sing. I think I take the fasting
easier than anyone else,
although I am singing the
whole day, because I am in-
volved in the service to the ex-
tent that food doesn't enter in-
to my mind."
BEING a cantor was an
easy choice for him. "I love it.
I love music and Jewish music
in particular." In the secular
sphere has published seven LP
records. "I happen to do for a
living what I would have done
as a hobby, so I consider
myself the luckiest person in
the world, doing what I enjoy
doing. I don't know many peo-
ple who can do that."
A cantor must necessarily be
religious because he is the
messenger of supplication for
the congregation, says Adath
Yeshurun's Rozen, who sang
in a choir as a child, was a can-
tor in South Africa at age 17,
and is a violinist and pianist.
An inner calling drew cantor
Zvee Aroni of Beth Torah Con-
gregation into the cantorate.
"I was born in Israel and the
greatest cantors visited and
we sang with them. I was in-
spired by them and started to
study in my teens," hi- says.
Aroni sees the rabbi's role as
the intellectual part of the ser-
vice and the cantor's role as
spiritual. A cantor must be
almost as well-versed in
Judaism as a rabbi, he says.
Aroni started to sing when
he was eight with a well-
known cantor of the day,
Zalmen Rivlin in Jerusalem.
He invokes the names of can-
tors Kwartin, Rosenblatt and
Hershmann as his training in-
spiration. He has served as a
cantor in Jerusalem, Natanya,
Philadelphia, Forest Hills, Tel
Aviv and has performed in
concerts in New York's
Carnegie Recital Hall and in
Ontario, Canada.
Aroni: Rabbi-
Intellectual role
Cantor-Spiritual
role
Cantor Henry Fuchs 77, of
Beth Tfilah of Miami Beach,
has been chanting since he was
13. He came to America 39
years ago from Czechoslovakia
and was invested as a cantor in
1952 by Jewish Ministers Can-
tors of New York, and is a
member of the Cantors
Association of Miami.
"The music has to stay and
those synagogues that are
keeping up the cantors are
helping keep traditional songs
for the future generations "
believes Fuchs. A cantor can
be ageless, he says. "I believe
Cantor Tadmore
Wi
Cantor Shifman
and every doctor or professor
who teaches singing believes,
the voice is as good as the
body. If you are healthy you
can keep the voice to 95."
CANTOR Abraham Seif of
Kneseth Israel is one of the
fathers of Miami cantorial
music. He arrived in South
Florida in 1950 as young and
single and is now a grand-
father at age 62. He is the only
one of 15 children to have sur-
vived the Holocaust in his
native Poland. He recalls that
his father was musically inclin-
ed and put Seif in a choir in
Lvov, when he was nine.
The philosophy followed:
'The cantor's main role is to
interpret the prayers to make
them meaningful so the con-
gregation can concentrate on
the prayer," says Seif. Seif
beheves that a cantor's
cultural background will
always influence his music.
But he stresses a cantor must
also be ready to learn new
melodies lest pieces become
'boring."
Seif. former president of the
Cantors Association of
Greater Miami, also is a mohel,
performer of circumcisions, at
Mt. Sinai Medical Center,
where he has been on the staff
wr 30 years. His son, Rabbi
Howard Seif, mohelim and
son-.n-law. Rabbi Yitzhak
oelmar. are as well.
Asked to judge the cantorate
as he sees it today, Seif
answers that, "frankly speak-
ing, some of them lack (in
training) and some are well
prepared."
The concern that European
music may be lost as a new
generation of cantors are
American born and bred is
unfounded.
"No." he says. "It will never
oe lost because it is a music: it
Cantor Rozen
Cantor Knee
is recorded. I have watched
cantors here, when they first
came they were just so-so and
over the years, they
developed. Just like in any pro-
fession there are people who
grow and study while they
serve the community.
Cantor Ian Alpern. who left
Adath Yeshurun after 13 years
and recently joined Temple
Beth Sholom quizzed on his
choice of liturgy over popular
music, responds humorously.
"NUMBER ONE. I don't
look like Mick Jagger." Alpern
says of the rock group Rolling
Stones star. "And. the music
of the temple is very in-
teresting. There's a lot of
room for self-expression and
creativity. And the so-called
modern cantor, in most cases.
is going to be involved with the
working with choirs, and ate
teaching the kids in the school
Cantors, nowadays, are in-
volved with working
youth. I was a natural. 11"
the kids a lot.'
Music. Alpern concludes.!*
the capability of puttingpl*
on a higher plane of emotion*
existence. "If in fact the can-
tor is able to raise the music*
or aesthetic consciousness o
the congregation, then he or
she has really made a verj
strong contribution."
Perhaps in the future.!says
cantor Robert Albert of BeO
David Congregation, even**
will be able to lead thems
in prayers. This cantor
chants
on Fbe*haof the 'congregstjj
hoping for just that. In *
meantime, he bemoans v
fact there are too few
American cantors
"It is unfortunate that the
are not many cantors too
fill the synagogue I PS1UU
Continued on P* 1*"B


.
.
Friday, October 2, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Material Gains Here Keep
Israelis From Returning
By BEN GALLOB
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
Moti Peleg may be the only
I psychotherapist to base his
doctoral research on finding
out how many other Israeli im-
I migrants in the U.S. share his
feeling that material success
has not prevented guilt and
lepression about leaving
Israel.
Feleg, born in Poland, was
brought to Israel in 1950 when
he was three years old. Arriv-
ing in the United States in
1970 to study at Queens (NY)
College, Peleg earned a
bachelor's degree in
psychology, then enrolled at
Veshiva University Wurz-
uriler School of Social Work,
receiving a doctorate in social
welfare in .June 1986.
Feleg now is executive direc-
tor of the Associated
Psychotherapists of New
Jersey in Ridgewood, an agen-
cy providing individual,
marital and family counseling.
He also is a staff clinician in
the program for chemically
dependent people at Bergen
Pines Hospital in Paramus,
N'.I. He lives in Hackensack,
N.J. with his American-born
wife Toni and their sons Edan,
5, and Si van, 3.
Peleg described his unique
choice of a topic for the doc-
toral dissertation in an inter-
view with Roy Campbell,
published in the Bergen
Jewish News.
Research was motivated in
part by the hope of finding in-
formation to send to Israeli of-
ficials to help them stop or at
least slow Israel's brain drain.
An estimated 500,000 Israeli
Jews live in the United States.
Peleg reached 135 Israeli
Jews living in New York, New
Jersey and Connecticut. He us-
ed the "snow-ball technique,"
which, he explained to the
ITA, meant initially ap-
proaching Israelis here with
whom he was acquainted and
getting from them the names
of more possible respondents,
who in turn gave him more
names.
He had speculated, based on
his own experiences, that
Israeli settlers enco inter a
discrepancy between what
they expect to gain from
material success and what
they actually achieve. They
feel a separation, loss and
broken ideological commit-
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ment which at the sub-
conscious level haunts and
disappoints them.
Economic success and the
sample Peleg collected in-
dicated a fairly high economic
status among the respondents
neither alleviated the emo-
tional void nor met a more
deeply felt need for
commitment.
From his questionnaire he
reported finding that such
Israeli Jews live in a kind of
limbo, struggling for years
with feelings of guilt and reac-
tive depression. Typically,
many Israeli Jews tell
themselves that they really in-
tend to return to Israel.
Peleg said his study traces a
timeless message of return
which begins in the early in-
doctrination of the Jewish peo-
ple and continues throughout a
Jew's life.
He found that stronger than
the commitment to returning
to Israel was the attachment
to things, families and places
in Israel. In their minds and
hearts, Israeli Jews are return-
ing to Israel, Peleg told the
Bergen weekly, but in their
behavior they stay here.
Result is deeply torn people,
an outcome he readily admit-
ted also afflicted him.
He said that last year he sent
a summary of hia dissertation
to Absorption Minister Yaacov
Tzur and Education Minister
Yitzhak Navon. He said he
received no acknowledgement
from Tzur's office and a note
from an underling in Navon's
office, describing his material
as "interesting."
He said he sent "a very
substantial summary'" of his
dissertation to Amos Hadad in
the Israeli Consulate in New
York, who is in charge of help-
ing such Jews to return to
Israel. Reply: "Zilch," he said.
Peleg is bitter about Israel's
bureaucracy. He said that
Israeli officials talk constantly
about the need for research
about "yerida" (migration
from Israel). "It's just talk,"
he said.
He was heartened by the for-
mation this summer of a
Citizens Union to Prevent
Yerida, which he said compris-
ed former Knesset members
and professionals, Israelis
whom he said had clout. He
described them as dedicated to
finding effective means of
solving Israel's problems, par-
ticulary yerida. He stressed
that the new group had no con-
nection with Israel's
government.
Though Peleg failed to evoke
any response from govern-
ment officials, his research fin-
dings were widely publicized in
Israel. He said an article in the
newspaper Maariv brought an
outpouring of responses.
When Peleg longs for Israel,
he picks up his guitar. 'When I
sing the songs of Israel, I feel I
return home temporarily," he
said. Eight years ago, he
recorded the album "Songs
from Israel."
He speaks to his children on-
ly in Hebrew "because I want
them to know they are Jewish.
I want them to understand the
language of Judaism, the
language of Israel," he
explained.
He seems himself remaining
in the U.S. for several years,
declaring that "I, too, hope to
return some day." He said
that, in America, he missed the
sense of purpose and that
"something deep down" is
"compelling me to return to
my people, to my roots and to
where I belong."
But Peleg is as torn as the
respondents in his disserta-
tion. He said "the ideology of
return does not get shaken" in
the U.S. as the years pass, but
that it is also true that "the
ideology of comfort and suc-
cess gets stronger."
Jackie Jacob Stars As 'Yankel'
Opening the season at the
Dunes Motel, Miami Beach, on
Sunday Oct. 4, is Jackie Jacob
starring in "Yankel." Jackie
has added something new to
the world of entertainment by
presenting an Oneg Shabbat
show every Friday night star-
ting at 8 p.m., Oct. 9, complete
with wine, candle-ligh'ing and
the beautiful voice of Jacob
singing cantorial chants. The
Oneg Shabbat will be followed
by "Yankel."
"Yankel" tells the story of a
Jewish boy born in Romania
who is forced to leave his coun-
try and his family. He later
becomes a soldier in the Israeli
Army and then goes to the
United States. Every Jewish
family has known a "Yankel."
Reservations may be made
for all shows by calling
937-0069.
f^ff
For information
and reservations
call your travel agent ot call
I 800 KIB HTLS
In N.Y. call (212)697 5116
' KibbuU Hotels. Suite 620.60 E 42nd Street. New York. NY 10165
Temple Emanu-El of Greater Miami will present Abba Eban,
Israel's Chairman of the Knesset Foreign Affairs and Defense
Committee; television commentator Ted Koppel; opera star
Roberta Peters; Rabbi Leonid Feldman, first Soviet-born Conser-
vative rabbi in the United States; and a Cantors' Concert in the
Miami Beach Theater of the Performing Arts as features of its
1987-88 Cultural Series. The Miami Beach congregation, which
introduced the sponsorship of musical and cultural events to the
Greater Miami Jewish community more than 30 years ago, will
hold all of the events except for the Cantors' Concert in the main
sanctuary of Temple Emanu-El. Tickets may be secured at the
Temple box office or by telephoning 538-2503.
Beth Am-Arky Lecture
Features Dr. Simons
Facing and coping with the
human pain which results from
the tragic and unexpected
death of a loved one will be the
subject of a free mental health
lecture at 9:30 a.m., Sunday,
Oct. 11 at Temple Beth Am.
"Normal and Pathological
Mourning ... Is Growth Possi-
ble?" will be discussed by Dr.
Richard C. Simons, MD, pro-
fessor of Psychiatry at the
University of Colorado Health
Sciences Center and president
of the American
Psychoanalitical association.
He will explore how
members of a family adapt dif-
ferently to a shared loss: One
subsequently becomes ill, but
another seems to find a capaci-
ty for emotional growth.
The lecture, originally
presented to medical students,
received in 1986 an award
from the American Psychiatric
Association, and has now been
modified to reach both profes-
sional and lay audiences.
Also included will be a large
screen video tape of a dialogue
between a physician and the
wife of his deceased patient.
An open forum will follow with
an opportunity for exchange of
oral and written comments
and questions between the au-
dience and Dr. Simons.
The family and friends of the
late Stephen Arky, a member
of the congregation at Temple
Beth Am, are funding the lec-
ture under the auspices of The
Stephen Arky Family Caring
Program, which focuses on
providing support to adults
and children in times of crisis.
Reservations for the lecture
must be made prior to Oct. 4
by calling 854-0179.
Israel Film
Festival Returns
Following success of the
Israeli Film Festival of South
Florida earlier this year, its
parent organization, Interna-
tional Cinema Association,
Inc. announces the second an-
nual Israeli Film Festival.
It is scheduled March 20-27,
1988 at the Colony Theatre in
Miami Beach.
According to Festival direc-
tors Hank Kaufman and Nora
Swan, the festival will be part
of the extensive program now
being established for South
Florida's salute to the 40th an-
niversary of Israel.
YOUNG PROFESSIONALS
ENJOY BEACH LIVING
elan tower
1775 Washington Ave.
Mon-Fri 9-5 PM 673-8393
Our features include:
Roof-top pool & Jacuzzi
Spacious 1 bdrm, conv. 2 bath
apts.
Modern kitchens with
continuous cleaning
ovens dishwasher
Washers & dryers in each apt.
Saunas
Italian tiled bathrooms
with bidets
No pets


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 2, 1987
Writ
Dear Nomi
. For Advice-
Dear Nomi. an advice column, will appear regularly in the
pages of The Jewish Floridian.
Dear Nomi:
My wife and I share a love of
reading, and we share the
same books. What we do not
share is a habit of taking books
into the bathtub; she alone
does that, warping the covers
of new novels, making pages
wrinkle and curl, and often
causing some of the print to
run.
I say it's not fair that she
should take a brand new novel
and make it bent in the middle
like a sick camel; she says her
principal joy is soaking in a hot
tub, reading a spanking fresh
book.
This whole problem sounds
ridiculous, but it has been a
bone of contention for years.
Any suggestions?
Sincerely,
Waterlogged Book Lover
Dear Waterlogged Book
Lover:
I have three suggestions.
Either you read the books
first, preserving their new
appearance, and then sur-
render them to your wife
and the water, or, if you
canot bear to have your
bookcase filled with what
looks like the plunder of the
Titanic, buy two copies of
each book.
If neither idea appeals, you can
buy a bathtub tray, which
stretches across the tub and
provides an excellent
resting place for sponges,
soap, safety razors and
almost completely dry best-
sellers.
Yours, Nomi
Dear Nomi:
Dear Nomi:
My son brought home a
religious friend from school
last week, and I wanted to give
him and my son a snack. But
since the child was from a
kosher home, and I do not keep
the dietary laws, I did not
know what to do. What foods
are acceptable to give to a
kosher person from a non-
kosher home?
Yours,
Confused Cookie
Dear Confused Cookie:
Since cakes and cookies are
sometimes made with
animal fat, your safest bet
would be to give a kosher
person fruit or vegetables,
served on paper plates with
plastic silverware (that has
never been used before).
I would also advise you to call
the child's parents and
make sure that they ap-
prove. Perhaps they can
also give you tips on other
sorts of "safe snacks."
Yours, Nomi
Dear Nomi:
I am a teenager who wants
to do all the normal teenager
things on the days I have off
from school for the high
holidays. But my parents insist
I go to synagogue with them,
even though I feel that there is
nothing about sitting in a big
fancy room with a rabbi asking
for support for some fund
which makes me feel close to
God.
They say, 'when you leave
home, you can do what you
want, but for now, you'll act
like part of the family.' I want
to go out with my friends and
pray in private. What can I do?
Signed,
Private Prayer Advocate
Dear Private Prayer
Advocate:
You can try to come to some
sort of compromise with
your parents. If they want
the whole family to be
together in synagogue on
the high holidays, but are
not so observant that they
would forbid your going out
with your friends after-
wards, that might solve
your problem.
It might also help you to think
about the fact that if your
family were not religious
enough to want to go to ser-
vices, they would probably
not be religious enough to
send you to a school which
does not hold classes during
the Jewish holidays.
Besides, in years to come you
may look back with real
fondness on the memories
of being with your family in
synagogue. In the mean-
time, there are other school
holidays and weekends for
doing "teenager things."
Yours, Nomi
Write Nomi for advice in care of
The Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box
012973. Miami, Fla. 33101.
Students Pass
Prestigious Exam
Rabbi David Levine, Direc-
tor of Judaic Studies at the
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy-High School
division, announced that all 13
students that took the
prestigious Jerusalem Ex-
amination last spring have
passed. The Jerusalem Ex-
amination, somewhat
analagous to the Cambridge
Examination in English
Language and Literature, is
administered by the Depart-
ment of Education and Culture
of the World Zionist Organiza-
tion and the Hebrew Universi-
ty in Jerusalem.
American Universities that
grant up to 13 credits for suc-
cessfully passing the examina-
tion include Yeshiva Universi-
ty, Cornell University, Bar-
nard College, the University of
Pennsylvania, NYU and
Brandeis. The students who
successfully passed the exam
are: Elie Poupko, Jackie
Rinehart, Laurie Gottlieb,
Rivka Lieber, Tammy Gross,
Shoshana Levitz, Aimee
Rapaport, Barry Galitzer,
Yaakov Weinreb. Barry
Ginsberg,'Esther Dermer.
Eliahou Cohen and Sara Ovitz.
Hadassah
Events
The Forte Towers Chapter
will meet at the 1200 West
Ave. Auditorium on Monday,
Oct. 12, 1 p.m. for installation
of Officers and Board
Members.
Golda Meir Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its
membership luncheon on Oct.
12 at the Ocean Pavilion
Restaurant, Miami Beach.
Speaker will be Bertha
Kahansov.
Morton Towers Chapter of
Hadassah will hold their next
meeting on Monday, Oct. 12, 1
p.m. in Morton Towers
Auditorium. Program is a book
review. For information call
534-5754.
Rabbi Mitchell Chefitz, the
Director of Chavurah of South
Florida, will be the guest
speaker at the next general
meeting of the Naomi Chapter
of Hadassah. The meeting will
be held on Monday, Oct. 12, at
8 p.m. at the Tamarind Apart-
ments Clubhouse.
Renanah Chapter of
Hadassah will host a member-
ship luncheon and installation
on Monday, Oct. 12, 11:30 a.m.
at the home of Helene Wiener.
Charlotte Cooper will enter-
tain. For reservations, call
865-0238.
Hatikvah Hadassah will be
having a membership social
entitled, "Miami Dice Bunko
Night," Oct. 6, at 7:45 p.m., at
10515 SW 132nd Court. For
information, 255-7120.
Na'amat USA
Events
liana Chapter of Na'amat
USA will hold its annual pre-
Succot celebration Tuesday
Oct. 6, at 11:30 a.m. in the
civic room of Winston Tower
200, Sunny Isles. A special
Succot holiday entertainment
program will be featured along
with discussion on Na'amat's
campaign in support of more
than 1,000 health, educational,
welfare and cultural
institutions.
Bar Mitzvah
YOUR CAR
IN ISRAEL
WJSSi 1TJN
. RENT A CAR
FROM
am rmiun
PER WEEK
UNLIMITED
MILEAGE
Special low prices
i
For reservation and *
prepayment through
4 ELDAN RESERVATION CENTER o
usa. 212-6296090 s
1-800-533-8778
BEN GUBION INTERNATIONAL A'RPORT
TEL AVIV MERTZELIYA TIBERIAS
JERUSALEM NETANYA BEERSMEBA
HAIFA ASHKELON EILAT
CLAYTON FEIG
Clayton Russ Feig, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Steven
Feig was called to the Torah as
a Bar Mitzvah on Wednesday,
Aug. 26, Rosh Chodesh at the
Wall, in Jerusalem. Israel.
The celebrant was a student
in the Lehrman Day School,
afternoon religious school pro-
gram. He was in the Temple
Emanu-El Choir, and was on
the Rabbi's honor roll.
Clayton enjoys sports, com-
puters, and would like to head
his father's business someday
Mr. and Mrs. Feig hosted a
luncheon following the ser-
vices in honor of the occasion
at the King David Hotel.
Special guests included
friends from Miami, and his
grandmother. Elisa
Feldenkreis, and uncle Dr.
George Feldenkreis. Mayor
Teddy Kollek was present and
made a presentation to
Clayton along with the
Ministry of Tourism.
Youth Decorate Giant Sukkah
Students of the Lehrman
Day School and Temple
Emanu-El religious school will
join members of the Temple
Sisterhood, PTA and Forty-
Niners Sunday in an all-day
decoration of a giant Sukkah
adjacent to the Belle Lehrman
Youth Center of the Miami
Beach synagogue.
The Kadima Group will
assist Dr. Irving Lehrman,
Cantor Yehuda Shifman and
Dr. Amir Baron, educational
director of Temple Emanu-El,
in stringing fruit.
Decoration of the huge Suk-
kah will continue Monday and
Tuesday, according to
Lawrence M. Schantz, presi-
dent of the congregation.
\o
**&**
iUHtm KM am* Hi m"*"*
OVM 10,000 PAKS IN STOCK
tnlrodudng lo you Opttca U.SJL p o< quality and laaNonaWa
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OtMMonwd multMlngual optician. KI ba happy to aiilil you W. "
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*300 WSCAVNE BLVD. NORTH MIAMI BEACH, FL J3I60 IJOSl 949-W


CJW To Host Authors
Friday, October 2, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
ee authors and a
jier will form a panel to
'The Woman Behind
Bk" at the opening
ership meeting of the
fer Miami Section, Na-
Council of Jewish
L on Wednesday, Oct.
Li 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
later Miami Federation.
I speakers will be: Gloria
1 publisher of "Design
magazine; Evelyn
rson, professor of
i, l diversity of Miami,
well known author and
j-ight and Pulitzer Prize
\ee for "No Enemy But
and Rusty Rothman,
author of "How
Another Husband .
meone Who Did."
to Find
by So-
The Moderator will be Laura
Gerwinske, author of
"Tropical Deco: the Architec-
ture of Old Miami Beach."
This is a Member-Bring-A-
New Member event, featuring
a buffet luncheon.
Louise Stubins, program
chair, and Ricky Caminitti and
Esther Horowitz, co-chairs of
Membership, are in charge.
Luncheon and program are
by reservation only, with a
deadline of Oct. 7. For further
information, call 576-4747.
Vice Chairmen Named
|For Muss-Kaskel Fete
South Florida business
jvic leaders have been ap-
ed vice chairmen of the
Beach Chamber of Corn-
Tribute Luncheon
will honor Beach
Dpers Stephen Muss and
ird Kaskel Wednesday
at the Fontainebleau
Hotel.
Irving Lehrman, chair-
of the communitywide
to Muss and Kaskel,
Mayor Alex Daoud;
ly Weaver, chairman of
reater Miami Chamber of
fierce; "Neighborhood"
rman Robert Blum;
^ber vice president Stuart
erg; Chamber governor
Perks; and Chamber
lent Norman Frank as
liairmen.
rabbi also appointed as
ers of the executive com-
fte for the luncheon
tor Jack D. Gordon,
esentatives Elaine Bloom
Michael Friedman;
liber vice president Gerald
irtz; Dade County Mayor
Clark; and Beach City
(missioners Ben Z.
Might Specials
5:00 6:30
nights a week
Delicious Dining
Fabulous Selection
I. xi client Service
Generous Quantities
$9.95
Entree Selection:
fork Sirloin Steak
Roast Prime Ribs
of Beef Au Jus
Chopped Sirloin
Broiled Fresh Fish
of the Day
Half Chicken
apple raisin stuffing
Veal Monte Carlo
SwaawtU:
Sonp Da Jaw. Hotm Safes'
, ******. Paul* Dathjfcu
'CUM* Daaaart Taa/CaffaWDaeaM
1335 79TH STREET
NORTH BAY VILLAGE
7585581
Grenald, Abe Resnick, Sidney
Weisburd, Stanley Arkin,
William Shockett and Bruce
Singer.
Rabbi Lehrman said "the en-
tire community is blessed by
the service to all Greater
Miami rendered by the leaders
of the Muss and Kaskel
Organizations. Their in-
vestments in the complete
renovation and expansion of
the Doral Properties and of the
Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel,
Seacoast Towers Rental
Apartments and the Quayside
Luxury Condominium Com-
plex warrant this outpouring
of recognition."
Mayor Daoud said nearly
1,000 persons are expected to
attend the luncheon.
@fto4zo SCHWARTZDEEHL
Judge and Mrs. Robert M. Deehl announce
the engagement of their daughter, Janet L.
Deehl, to Gregg R. Schwartz, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Gerald Schwartz. Judge Deehl, a Dade
County Court Judge, and his wife, Kay, live in
East Kendall. Mr. and Mrs. Schwartz, also of
East Kendall, own a Miami Beach-based
public relations and marketing agency.
Janet Deehl is a recruitment coordinator
for the Florida law firm of Greenberg,
Traurig, Askew, Hoffman, Lipoff, Rosen and
Quentel. After graduation from Miami
Palmetto High School, she attended the
University of Florida and Florida Interna-
tional University, receiving a BBA degree
from FIU with a major in marketing and
management. Miss Deehl is a member of the
National Association for Law Placement.
Gregg Schwartz is an associate of the Na-
tional law firm of Finley, Kumble, Wagner,
Heine, Underberg, Manley, Myerson and
Casey. Schwartz is a member of the Board of
Governors of the Florida Bar's Young
Lawyers Division.
After graduation from Miami Palmetto
High School, he attended the University of
North Carolina and the University of Florida,
where he graduated with honors in 1977.
Schwartz earned his Juris Doctor degree
from South Texas College of Law, where he
was selected both for law review and moot
court. He was elected to the Savant honorary
leadership fraternity at the U. of Florida, ear-
ning a BA degree in political science.
Schwartz was a Federal Law Clerk in the
United States District Court for the Southern
District of Florida from 1981 until February,
1984, when he joined the law firm of Simon,
Schindler and Hurst. He served as assistant
Gregg R. Schwartz and Janet L. Deehl
city attorney and acting city attorney of
North Miami before joining Finley, Kumble in
1985. He is former co-chairperson of the
Media Relations Committee of the Young
lawyers Section of Dade County Bar Associa-
tion, served on the Greater Miami Chamber
of Commerce's Sports Action Committee and
is a member of Tiger Bay Political Club. He is
a member of the Texas Bar and the Federal
Bar as well as of the Florida Bar.
Community Corner
The South Florida Chug Aliyah Group will hold a
meeting on Sunday, Oct. 11, at 7 p.m., at the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation.
The newly formed Isaiah Unit of B'nai B'rith will meet
Tuesday, Oct. 6 at 7:30 p.m. in the 1200 Building of
Forte Towers, when guest speaker William F. Saulson
will take "A Look at the Future."
The Point East Chapter of American Red Magen
David for Israel is having its regular meeting Thursday,
Oct. 8, at noon in the Rose Samuel Room.
The American Red Magen David for Israel (ARMDI)
newly developed Travel Chapter will hold its first
organizational meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 13 at 8 pm. at
the Shawnee Hotel (formerly the Barcelona), Miami
Beach.
Restaurant Guide
ITS LIKE SHE NEVER LEFT!
COUNTRY-STYLE ITALIAN REGIONAL COOKING ,
We grow our own Herbs (basil, tarragon, saga,
rossmsrls, ate)
Home-made garlic rolls a dssssrts
(Including tamooa MARCELLA FRUIT COBBLE*!
Prltata Party Catering Still a Specialty
13889 W. Dixie Hwy.
N. Miami Beach
91-2999 .
893 7658
V^ Introduces its *
Introduces its
NEW SEASON MENU
NEW EARLY BIRD DINNER $6.95
HOMEMADE DESSERTS
ALSO COMPLIMENTARY GLASS OF WINE
EARLY BIRD: 5 TO 8 P.M.
NOW ALSO FEATURING
A LA CARTE
Veal Normandie Veal Cordon Bleu
Shrimp Scampi Duck a L'Orange
Steaks and Pasta
OPEN BREAKFAST,
LUNCH, DINNER

we accept credit cards
1009 Kane Concourse
3 blocks weat of Collins on 96 St.
*t4t4/Wf
864-2049
House of Prime Steaks
owned by Robert Former Manager of Prime Steak House
Welcomes All Old & New
Customers To A Fiesta
Foooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooc
I Rreakfust (r.., T a.m. 1 .99
lunch Salad Rar *2.50
Famous Karly Kird "> |.m.-| I p.m.
Prime Rib of Reef Au Jus
Filel of Flounder
1/2 Rroiled or Fried Chicken $050
1/2 Roast Duck O
Includes French Onion Soup or Soup of
the Day, (burden Salad, Raked Potato.
Chocolate Parfait
125th & W. Dixie Hwy,
S.K. < ormr I miiim rl\ I urn- l{. -Inn ml
mooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooc
RESERVATIONS ACCEPTED 895-6529


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 2, 1987





JAP Jokes Not Funny, Seen As Anti-Semitic
By MARLENE GOLDMAN
Increasingly popular
"humor" lampooning the
"Jewish American Princes"
(JAP) is considered to be a
serious anti-Semitic and sexist
attack by Jewish feminists.
Whether in the form of ver-
bal cracks, graffiti, greeting
cards or other abusive slurs,
the JAP defined as self-
serving, manipulative,
materialistic, and sexually cold
has become the stereotype
for Jewish women and even
non-Jewish women who con-
form to the image.
Links between anti-JAP and
anti-Semitic abuse are promi-
nent on some college cam-
puses. In the fall 1987 series
" 'JAP'-Baiting on Campus"
in Lilith magazine, incidents at
several universities pointed to
a non-humorous stereotype.
The stereotype, according to
Sherry Merfish, chair of the
Women's Issues Committee of
the American Jewish Commit-
tee's Houston chapter,
"derogates Jewish women .
attacks the religion and fosters

Singles
MALE, JEWISH, 42 yrs.
Interested in meeting
female ages 30's and 40's
for possible relationship.
Enjoys all sports especial-
ly swimming, golf, football,
etc. Has sense of humor.
Currently working in Dade
County in Property
Appraiser's office. Box
MJ c/o Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami,
Fl. 33101.
2 ATTRACTIVE Israeli-born
businessmen, both 31,
fond of sailing and the
beach, would like to meet
attractive Jewish women
22-31, with Yiddishkeit, for
possible relationship.
Please include telephone
number. Box WW c/o Jew-
ish Floridian, P.O. Box
012973, Miami, Fl. 33101.
CONNECT YOURSELF to
the Jewish Connection's
Singles Directory 1988.
Personal listings for
singles of all ages local-
ly, nationally and inter-
nationally. For application
send self-addressed
stamped envelope to: The
Jewish Connection, 23
Saturn Ct., Syosset, N.Y.
11791.
SMART AND SASSY 31
year old professional, tan
5"7 brunette with curva-
ceous, womanly figure,
looking for traditional
Jewish male, 30-43 for
serious committed rela-
tionship. If you concen-
trated on career or intel-
lectual pursuits or were
simply too shy to build the
kind of warm, nurturing
family life you now desire,
like long walks by the
beach and Jewish folk
music, you might just be
the guy for this old-fashion-
ed gal. Send picture and
note with phone number to
Box NJ c/o Jewish Florid-
ian, P.O. Box 012973,
Miami, Fl. 33101.
anti-Semitism." Merfish ad-
dressed about 115 concerned
Jews at the AJCommittee's
Conference on Current
Stereotypes of Jewish Women
held recently in New York.
Jewelry and clothes have
replaced the large noses and
yarmulkes as the objects for
anti-Semitic attacks, she said.
Houston stores carry JAP
greeting cards, including the
"Official Application for the
JAP Olympic Games," featur-
ing the stereotypical long-
nosed, frizzy-haired, plump
woman wearing a Star of
David, and jumping hurdles to
a clearance sale.
The five Olympic rings hold
diamonds and the races in-
clude the "bank vault," a
"chutzpah-thon," and "cross-
country-kvetching," the latter
explained as an irritating
whine by a spoiled 3-year-old
or a JAP at any age.
Other items are "Slap-a-
JAP" t-shirts that picture a
Jewish woman waiting to have
sponges thrown at her and
"JAP-buster" shirts.
At Syracuse University,
trendily-dressed women last
year risked being "JAPped" at
football games. While walking
in front of the stands, certain
women were targeted by ap-
pearance by members of the
pep band, who shouted "JAP
JAP JAP," spreading the
chant throughout the stadium.
Among the graffiti cited
from S.U., Lilith reported such
slurs as "Solution to the JAP
Question: When they go for
their nose jobs, have the doc-
tor tie their tubes as well."
''Stereotypes permeate,"
said Irving Levine, director of
the AJCommittee's national
affairs department, at the con-
ference. "JAP jokes are not
benign. But reflecting on a
history of prejudice should tell
us and teach us they are
lethal."
"It (stereotyping) can choke
or kill the group," he con-
tinued, ". and it's killing the
chances of our forbears to live
an effective life in society."
While JAP jokes are ac-
cepted and told by many peo-
ple, including Jews, the anti-
Semitism inherent in them re-
main unnoticed, according to
Susan Weidman Schneider,
editor of Lilith. "It is hidden
behind a scrim of
misogyny,"she said at the con-
ference. Allowing these at
tacks on Jewish women
ultimately permits "more
direct and classic anti-Semitic
jokes and verbal abuse," she
added.
Depiction of Jews as loud
and vulgar, self-serving and
dishonest traces back to the
anti-Semitic tract "Protocols
of the Elders of Zion,"
Schneider explained.
Jewish women must be alert
to two implications of these
jokes, according to Schneider.
First, their self-esteem could
be critically damaged by the
stereotypes. Citing part of the
Lilith series. Schneider told of
a student's encounter at State
University of New York at
Binghamton. where the word
JAP was spray-painted on a
dormitory door. But it was not
clear whether the graffiti was
meant for the young woman
with the dozen expensive
sweaters or her roommate
with the high scores on her law
school placement exams.
"Jewish women are just do-
ing what others are taught to
do," said Schneider to be
self-sufficient and care about
their appearance.
She also warned that the
relationship between Jewish
women and Jewish men is be-
ing harmed as both attempt to
escape from this stereotype,
often by distancing themselves
from their Jewish identity.
"This leads to a path to inter-
marriage and diluting strength
as a community," she said.
These barriers between
Jewish men and women were
first constructed in popular
literature, noted Francine
Klagsbrun, author of "Married
People: Staying Together in
the Age of Divorce." She call-
ed Herman Wouk's "Marjorie
Morningstar" the "Great-
grandmother of Jewish
princesses," and cited Brenda
in Philip Roth's "Goodbye,
Columbus."
"These were written by men
trying to find their own voice
in America." Klagsbrun said.
"It's easier to show the
pushiness and vulgarity of
Jewish women than to say how
difficult it was to find their
own way."
Women are still the targets
of men's insecurities, accor-
ding to Klagsbrun. Women
struggle to balance careers
and home lives and Jewish
women are becoming religious
and lay leaders, yet they are
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labelled as spoiled, ridiculous
princesses, she claimed.
Klagsbrun continued that
when Jews use the term JAP,
it is a code word for self-
hatred, forcing Jews to set
themselves apart from other
Jews because of their own self-
doubts and insecurities.
When many of the women
began to protest the issue in
recent years, they were told to
"lighten up," because JAP is
just part of the language. But
complacency, according to
Schneider, is "being party to a
dangerous coalition of anti-
women, anti-Semitic feelings."
Those attending the con-
ference called for action to
stamp out the term JAP. Mer-
fish succeeded in persuading
the rabbis in her community to
realize the latent
Semitism inherent Li
humor, and the Houstl
bmical Council pas^L
tion addressing the mS
consciousness-raising T
was the conference iueij'
AJC's Houston chapter J
also developing an edffl
packet on JAP.stereo,S
be distributed to 2*1
throughout the country 1
By overlooking the irohUl
he Jewish c-ommunitSI
ting JAP stereotyping, SI
ding to Ruth Septee chair!1
the AJC Women's IssuesC
mittee. "The Jewish comma
ty must seriously examine t
subject, and we must
recognize that JAP jokes i
not funny: they are ugh a
they must end."
Kosher ACLF Opened On Beach
''Care. Support.
Supervision."
These are the goals of Miami
Beach's newest adult con-
gregate living facility (ACLF),
according to Joyce Galbut.
RN, administrator.
Plaza South opened this
week to provide a worry-free
environment for ambulatory
senior citizens. The facility's
comprehensive package in-
cludes three Glatt Kosher
meals a day, 24-hour
assistance, medication super-
vision, personal care, social ac-
tivities, and transportation as
well as housekeeping and per-
sonal laundry services.
All rooms are completely
furnished; each has color
television and air conditioning.
Emergency and fire alarm
systems employee state-of-rvl
art technology,
Plaza South is the latest p
ject of the Galbut famihtfl
companies. According tol
Russell Galbut. presided
"Our main concern is thebl
piness and well being of |
residents."
The company's first ACLFbl
the Plaza at James.
Plaza South is at 1685 Jama |
Ave.
Gordon Roofing'
and Sheet Metal
Works, Inc.
1450 NW 21st Street
Phone 325-8287
Have your roofrepaired ion.
you will save on a new roofkir
Satisfactory WofK By
Experienced Men
i\
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& CONSTRUCTION CO CGC #010159
MIRROR
WALLS & CEILINGS
TABLE TOPS EMERGENCY REPAIRS STOREFRONTS
Dade 757-0651 Broward 462-3711
HAROLD ROSENSTEIN, Pres. SeHaWiftpW
7933 N.W. 7th Avenue Miami
Property Tax Appeals
For hotels, apartments, shopping centers,
office buildings, restaurants, warehouses.
hospitals, specialty properties. Contingent or
hourly basis.
THOMAS R. POST, PA
ATTORNEYS
(305)379-1500
i
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Friday, October 2, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
_j leadership of the Greater Miami Jewish
^aeration's Healing Arts Division gathered
: the home of Dr. Douglas Miller to discuss
ans for Federation's 50th year Golden
nniversary Campaign. Seated from left are
Stanley Sutnick, Dr. George Jacobson,
Dr. Stephen Sutnick, Dr. German Fraynd,
and Dr. Mark Gordon. Standing from left are
Dr. Douglas Miller, Healing Arts Division co-
chairman; Dr. Elliot Gordon, Dental Divi-
sion, chairman; and Bennett Bramson,
Federation campaign associate.
Sun Spa Beckons
/hen the rich and famous
: overworked, overweight or
plain overwhelmed by the
ess and strain of everyday
t, they go off to exclusive
1 spas where chefs
epare gourmet diet meals,
^ere they can swim, work
and be entertair.ed, and
ngle with old friends and
iv acquaintances.
Jut even the not so rich and
nous can treat themselves
la similar vacation, accor-
kg to Chris Livulpi, general
pager of Florida's SunSpa,
ated in Hollywood, by the
in.
|*This place has everything
yone could want," she pro-
ems. "People come from all
;r the United States,
lada, Europe and Israel, to
^e a good time, to relax, to
(e weight or make
Imselves over."
the spa, which has 172
?ms, but also caters to
ests not staying in the hotel
en room permits, is open
October through mid-
u'wlv remodeled under the
nership of Jack Leib and
m Brown, the spa offers
golf, low impact aerobic
ercise classes, water exer-
and yoga, reducing equip-
t, dry heat and steam
Unas, two whirlpools, and
fen's and women's solaria
pre people can aquire a
nplete tan.
Swedish, American and
riental massages are
iilable for people who like
a firm, deep muscle
ssage or for those who
efer a lighter, more relaxing
touch.
Dance lessons by four male
and two female instructors in
everything from disco to
ballroom dancing also are
available. Since the spa has
nightly dancing to a live band
in the evenings, the education
in fancy footwork is a practical
one.
But guests, who dress for-
mally for dinner and entertain-
ment in the evenings, must be
on their guard; the chef
prepares everything from diet-
conscious salads and yogurts
to lambchops and chocolate
mousse desserts.
Luckily for those who cannot
resist the more fattening offer-
ings on the menu, a doctor and
dietician are on the premises
to help individuals plan ap-
propriate exercise and diet
regimes.
Temptation at the spa is not
only on the menu; there is a
boutique which carries
everything from exercise
clothes to jewelry and evening
gowns; a sundry shop for gifts
and magazines; and a beauty
shop where guests can get one
facial and make-over free.
And if all of this tires you
out, the latest movies are
shown on Tuesday nights on a
large screen in the dining
room.
Says Livulpi, "Most of the
staff has been here for many,
many years. It's affordable
luxury, and we have both
everyday and famous people
coming to us."
Among the best known
clientele are judges, Buddy
Hackett's sister, and the
mother of William Shatner (of
Star Trek fame).
Over the years, says Livulpi,
couples have met, fallen in love
and returned to the spa as
newlyweds; matches have
been made between the
children of SunSpa guests; and
lasting friendships have been
forged among people living in
different states, or even
countries.
People often come to
celebrate their anniversaries
and birthdays at the spa.
"One man will soon come
with his wife to celebrate a
very special birthday-his
100th," Livulpi says.
Other large celebrations in-
clude the spa's gala New
Year's Eve party and the an-
nual Passover Seder with the
nine-man Victory Singers, who
perform in both Hebrew and
English.
So you don't have to be ex-
travagantly rich or interna-
tionally famous to enjoy the
kind of health-spa escape that
movie stars and billionaires
are fond of taking.
But you do have to be warn-
ed that the spa may be habit-
forming.
"People have been turning
to us for 20 years, coming back
year after year," says Livulpi.
The secret to the spa's success,
however, is neither the abun-
dance of good food, entertain-
ment, nor the health facilities.
"The secret is the warm at-
mosphere," Livulpi asserts,
"and the chance to have great
fun."

Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
6:47 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach, Fla. 531 -2120
Rabbi Dow Rozencwalg
ADATHYESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947 1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
{Cantor. Zvl Rosen Conservative
Executive Director
Harry J.SHverman
Mlnyan 7:30 Saw, 4 : JO p.m
Sal. a Sun. 11.111. k p.m.
Shabbat aan. Sat. 8:00 am
Frl Kol Nldra f:30 p m
Sal Yom Klppur m
Tafclah Oadola 750 p.m Sal
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 667-6667
Leonard Schoolman, Sr. Rabbi
Mark Kram, Associate Rabbi
Lynn Goldstein, Assistant Rabbi
Yom Klppur Frl. : JO p.m. 4 S p.m.
Ratal Laonard A. Schoolman will apaak.
Yom Klppur aar will Da hatd throughout
th. day on Sat
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854-3911
Jack Rlemer, Rabbi
Robert Albert,
Cantor
Rev. Milton Freeman,
Ritual Director
Mlnchahat1:30p.m
Dally Mlnyan
Mon 4 Thura ,7:30 a.m.
Tuaa., Was.a Fri. 7:44 a.m.
Sun. a.m. Eianlnga 4:30 p.m
Kol Nldra Frl 3:44 p.m Yom Klppur Sal. 3:15
a .m. BaSSI Joofc Wjwr oonduot Barrioaa
aaalHaS by Cantor W atari Aabort a Baatt.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave., Miami Beach
534-7213 534-7214
Barry J. Konovitch, Rabbi
Sergio Qrobtef, President
Sholem Epelbaum, President,
Religious Committee
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shltman, Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
Yom Klppur Mr at T.O.P.A- Conducted by
Of. Irving Lehrman. Cantor Shltman will
chant. KS NWn Frl. 7:30 p.m Yom Klppur
S.I.t:30a.m Ylrtor Sat.12noon
SukkotTnur.aFri.8am.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREQATION
2400 Pinetree Drive. Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schitl
Dally 7:30 am (Mon. 4 Thura. 7:1 SI 4 7 p.m
Fri 7 p.m Sat 8 am ftaaan lor High Holiday
Day.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Ot Greater Miami
Nam/'a Mowc Reform Coagraeaf ton
137 N.E. 19th St. Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor Rschelle F. Netson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob Q. Borneteln
Fri.Sp.rn.
Yom Klppur aervlcM will beheld al
Dada County Auditorium Rabbi Re> D
Failmatar topic -la TtXe Tha Real Woricrr
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
222S NE 121 St., N. Miami. FL 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs, Rabbi
Dr. Joseph A. Gortlnkel, / >
Rabbi Emeritus \W)
Mosho Frledler, Cantor
Fri.7p.rn.
Sat. 3:40 am
Weekday aan. Mon.Fri. S am
Mon -Thura. I p.m. Sim. : JO am
Sat 8:45am
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jetferson Ave., MB., FL 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Alvadla Rosenberg
Cantor Mo*he Buryn
Dotty aarvtoaa 3 am. S 7 p.m
Sat 3:15 a.m.
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
238-2801 (
Rebbl David H. Auerbach \
Cantor Stephen Freedman
A tarn
Sal 3:30 am
Kol NKJre Fri. 7 p.m Yom Klppur Sat. 3 a.m.
Sukkot Wad 7 30 p.m. Thura a Fri. 3:30 am
TEMPLE BETreH6L6M 538-7231
ChsseAve 41st St. Liberal
DM. LEON KRONISH, Senior Founding Rabbi
OARY A. OlrCKSTBN, Santa Rabbi
HARRY JOLT, AuxMerv RabU
JASON 0 WASOOFF. AjiU'anl Rabbi
IAN AL PERN, Carrtor
DAVID CON VISER, Cantor Emarttua
DENNIS J RICE, FT A. Eecu1le Director
Vent Klppur Fri. 3:15 p.m. Sat.i g a.m. Ylrtor
4 p.m. iukkol Wad. 7:30 pm. Thur 10:46 am
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREQATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Beech Blvd. l/SS
Dr Max A. Llpschltz, Rabbi (W)
Zvee Aroni, Cantor JsV
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Kol NMn 345 p.m. Fri. Yom Klppur Sat 3. JO
a.m. YMkor 12 noon. Sukkot Wad. 3:30 p.m.
4 Thura .4 Frl 3:2Sa.m 3 5:30 p.m
TEMPLE JUDEA
5600 Granada Blvd. Relorm
Coral Gables 867-5657
Michael B. Elaenatat, Rabbi
PitSpja.
TEMPLE KINO SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rom
Shoehanah Raab, Cawtor
Saotoaa Fri 7:33 pja.
Sat. *:S0 aju.
Onag Shabbal w I
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St., Miami Beech 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowttz
Arl Frldkls, Aaaoc. Rabbi
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sal. 3 a.m. Saaea _
Oany Mlnohah eiattoay-rriaiay
3am anal3pm
Sat 3 a m. anal 3:13 pj*
86B-834S
866-9833
TEMPLE NER TAMID
7902 Cartyte Ave.,
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovttz
Cantor Edward Klein
Dally Sar. Mon Frt 3 am 3:30 p.m
Sal Mlncha 3.13p.m Sun 3:30ajn.
3:30 pjn Sat.:Wi.r aan by Rabbi Labowtx.
Cantor Klatn
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
ot North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
851 1562
Yaakov Sprung
SHAARE TEFILLAH
TORAH CENTER OF KENDALL
7880 SW112 Street
232-6833
Rabbi Hershel Becker
Dally San. 7 am Fit 10 mm. alta candla-
llgntlngtlma Shabboa 3 a.m. Shabboa
Mwtoha 10 mm. botota oanaSa Sytilliig ttma
Sun-SJOaJW.
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dade's Reform ComregatJon
Ralph P. Klrtgsley, Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
6000 Miller Dr. Conservative
271-2311 m
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi ('
Beniamln Adler, Cantor ^
David Rosenthal, Auxiliary Cantor
Mmyan 7 am Monday. 4 Thuraoay
Sunday 3 am Frl. 3:15 pjn
luctad by Or. Norman N. Shapiro
Sat. boot. 3 a.m.


?age 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 2, 1987
Resnick Elected Chairman
Of Fla. Athletic Commission
Deaths
Jimmy Resnick, Miami
Beach developer and civic
leader, has been elected chair-
man of the State of Florida
Athletic Commission. Resnick,
son of Miami Beach City Com-
missioner Abe Resnick, suc-
ceeds former Florida Attorney
General Robert Shevin as
chairman.
There are five members of
the commission, an official
PUBLIC NOTICES ^ ***.
Resnick was an original
member of the Athletic Com-
mission, appointed by then
Gov. Bob Graham, and
established by the state
legislature, when it began
operations in October, 1984.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-39836
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI, a
United States Corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
SIDNEY NAGIOFF AND
ROSSLYN NAGIOFF. his wife,
et al..
Defendants.
TO: SIDNEY NAGIOFF and
ROSSLYN NAGIOFF,
his wife
42 Lyttleton Court
Lvttleton Road
London, England N20EB
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Unit No. 1002, of VEN-
DOME PLACE CON
DOMINIUM. a Condominium
according to the Declaration
of Condominium thereof,
dated January 18, 1980, and
filed for record July 7, 1981
under Clerk's File No.
81R180394. in Official
Records Book 11151, at Page
186 of the Public Records of
Dade County, as amended;
together with all im-
provements, appliances, and
fixtures located
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis, Allison and
Cohen, Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address is 111 N.E. 1st
Street, Miami, Florida 33132, on
or before October 16.1987, and file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court on the 11 day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: JENNIS L. RUSSELL
Deputy Clerk
17989 September 18,26
October 2. 9, 1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-22151
SEC. 10
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION, A
United State* corporation.
Plaintiffs)
vs.
JULIO E. SANCHEZ, ET AL..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 19th day of October. 1987,
the following described
property:
Lot 2, Block 2, ofCANTISANO
SUDIVISION. according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 96, Page 37, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida.
DATED the 30th day W
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clark of Cireait Cert
(Circa* Coart Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal A Yarchin, P.A.
Suite 800
3050 Biseayne Blvd.
Miami. Fl. 33137
Published 10/2-9
He was reappointed by
Governor Bob Martinez when
he took office.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5359
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
Harry Abe Shugar
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Harry Abe Shugar, deceased,
File Number 87-5359. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagwr
Street, Miami, Florida. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 26, 1987.
Personal Representative:
Irving Shugar
756 Lake view Drive
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Jack Ankus, Esq.
801 North Venetian Drive
Miami. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 374-3599
18018 September 25;
October 2, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5208
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HARRY BANK
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of HARRY BANK, deceased. File
Number 87-5208 (02), is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 W. Flagier
Street, Miami. FL 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJ EC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 26, 1987.
Personal Representative:
DAVID BANK
P.O. Bos 244
Tarreytown. NY. 10591
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
NELSON & FELDMAN. P.A.
1135 Kane Concourse, Bay Harbor
Islands, FL 33154
Telephone: 866-5716
18014 September 25;
October 2, 1987
Abba Kovner, Hero Of Vilna
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Funeral services were held at
Kibbutz Ein HaHoresh for Ab-
ba Kovner, 69, commander of
the partisans of the Vilna
Ghetto uprising against the
Nazis, and a noted author and
poet in Israel during the past
four decades. Kovner died of
cancer at the kibbutz, where
he had lived for over 40 years.
Prior to his funeral,
Kovner's body lay in state at
the entrance to the Bet
Hatefutsot Diaspora Museum
in Tel Aviv, for which he had
been one of the initiators and
driving forces.
Brief eulogies were
delivered at the museum on
the Tel Aviv University cam-
pus by the museum director,
Jewish Agency Chairman
Leon Dulzin, and by Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin and
Tel Aviv Mayor Shlomo Lahat,
Kovner's former colleague in
the Israel Defense Force.
Kovner recounted his ex-
periences in the ghetto in the
documentry film, "The Par-
tisans of Vilna," describing the
heroic resistance of the young
Jews.
In the ghetto on New Year's
RANTER, Bernard, 79. of Kendall,
September 28. Services in New York.
TELISMAN. Bill. Services in Texas.
C.LAZER, Helen G.. 97. of Rii Harbour,
September 27. The Riverside.
KLEIN. Arthur, 90. of North Miami,
September 27. The Riverside.
LIEBOWITZ. Eleanor, of North Miami
Beach, September 26. Eternal. Light. In-
terment at Lakeside Memorial Park
DRAZEN, Elizabeth, of Miami Beach
Rubin-Zilbert.
KRUCHTER. Morris. 90. of Miami Beach
Rubin-Zilbert.
FUCHS, Max. 89, September 16. Services
were held.
GOLDMAN. Bernard, .16. of Miami.
September 25. Levitt-Weinstein.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every DayC/osed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888
Eve, 1941, the young poet
Kovner read aloud a
manifesto, "Let Us Not Be
Led Like Sheep to the
Slaughter."
It was this call to resist the
Nazis that led to the formation
of the United Partisans
Organization, which brought
together Jews of different
political parties into one
underground group.
The Red Army liberated the
Vilna Ghetto in 1944; 600 Jews
remained of the original
87,000.
SCHATZ, Esther, llf North ^ ^
HAVIS. Edith, of Miami RllhiB,,.
GROSSMAN, Paul f Kay H'ri"iT
September 22. Sen,^*^1**
SIESHOLTZ, Herher W*if, m
Miami Beach. EtmSl ug& "'^
Lakeside Memorial I'Vrk Wrmm,
TAUBE.Dorothv.S6.fMiamil,
24. Serves an,! interr^**
Nebo ( emeler\ ''
APPELSTEIN. Mrs. R,** u u.
Beach. Rubin-Zilbert "*
ZIFF
Mary. 86, of Miami BmtJ mm*
S.-|.tem*r23.Mrs.Z,ffhai,B13*i2
here f..r the pact 12 nanzl T*
Akron. Ohio sh. -', ,, ,
National Asthma,,. ..o-r HeE&*
Dr. Stated (Hebene) Zlff. Ade^
KloKerman and Clarice ,M,l,oni EJ
Miami. Services and interment at Ml tt
Ometery. ""
26640 (ircenfieldRd.
Oak Park. Michigan 482.T7
(3131 543-IQ2
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of Greater Detroit
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with
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away from home.
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to assure swift and
understanding service
Dade County
M2-20JW
Browjrd Countv
Represented hy Riverside Memorial Chapel. Im
New York: (7 IHI^K:i-7H(M> Queens Hlvd. & 7Hth R<1 Forest Hills. N V
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Care and Preparation of Deceased
Casket and Hearse
Arrangement Direction of
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Permits and Benefit Assistance
24 hour emergency service
Shiva Candles, Cards and Benches
Gravesite ,
Paved Private Visitation P>th
Steel Reinforced Concret. Viult
Opening and Closing of On"
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(en
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call your Lakeside Eternal Light representative today-
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BROWARD:
525-9339


Friday, October 2, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
I IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF ,N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND rOR DADE CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
(ASK NO. 87-13399
I STOCKTON. WHATLEY. .
DAVIS & COMPANY. a Honda DAVIN & COMPANY, a Florida
corporation. corporation.
PlaintiflW I'l;iintiff)s|
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-48879
SEC. 19
STOCKTON. WHATLEY.
HARVI9 CAMPBELL.
SHARON CAMPBELL, and
lh, unknown heirs, debates.
grantees
creditors, or other
parties claiming by. through.
under or against them: et al..
illtlSl
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
ini ,,, ati Order or Final
Judgment entered in thfai cae
nding in said Court, the
[ st>u- ol which is indicated above, I
.'II in the highest and best
I i,i.i.r for cash on THE SOUTH
I STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami. Dade County.
IFlorida at 11:041 o'clock A.M.. on
the 19th day of October. 1987.
(he following described
property:
Lot 19, in Block 72. of LESLIE
lESTATES, SECTION FIVE, ac-
Icording to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 96, at Page
the Public Records of Dade
| County Florida.
DATED the 30th day of
I September, 1987.
Kit HARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
| (Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
| Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin. P.A.
Suite 800
| 1060 Hiscayne Blvd.
Miami. Fl. 33137
Published 10/2-9
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-13731
SEC 15
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION, a
United States corporation,
Plaiimffls)
vs.
MARGUERITE FORTNER.
ELIE MARY ROBILLARD. AN-
TOINE DOMINQUE a/k/a AN
TOl.NE DOMINIQUE, and the
unknown spouses, etc., et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County.
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 19th day of October, 1987.
the following described
property:
Lot 5, in Block 5. of VENETIAN
DEVELOPMENT SUBDIVI-
SION, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
45. at Page 87. of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida.
DATED the 30th day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal A Yarchin. P.A.
Suite 800
M50 Biicayne Blvd.
Miami. Fl. 53137
Published 10/2-9
MANUEL FELIPE BRKNNAN.
et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in tins case
now pending in said Court, the
Style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dad.- County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County.
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 19th day of October. 1987.
the following described
property:
Lot 9, in Block 43, of FAIRWAY
ESTATES, SECTION SEVEN,
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 98, at Page
67, of the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida.
The United States of America
shall have the right of redemption
provided by 28 U.S.C. Section
2410(c) for the period provided
therein, running from the date of
the Certificate of Title isued
herein.
DATED the 30th day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Depaty Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin, P.A.
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, Fl. 33137
Published 10/2-9
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-23816
SEC. 19
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
OF MIAMI, as trustee for the
Dade County Housing Finance
Authority,
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
ELAINE SPENCER, et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above. I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M. on
the lth day of October. 1987.
the following described
property:
Lot 23, Block 46. of FIRST ADDI-
TION TO BUNCHE PARK, accor-
ding to the Plat thereof, as record-
ed in Plat Book 53. Page 61. of
the Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
DATED the 30th day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin, P.A.
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, Fl. 33137
Published 10/2-9
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY.FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-18995
SEC. 26
CONNECTICUT SAVINGS
BANK, a Connecticut
corporation.
Plaintifflsl
vs.
DONALD LESLIE BROWN, et
al..
Defendants)
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered m this case
n" pending in said Court, the
style of which is Indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and beat
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County four-
thouse in Miami. Dade County.
Florida at II (Ml o'clock A.M. on
the 19th day of October, 1987,
the following descrihed property:
The West 89 feet of Lot 2, in
Block 2. of PERRINE MANOR.
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 96. at Page
41, of the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida.
DATED the 30th day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin. P.A.
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami. Fl. 33137
Published 10/2-9
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-19651
SEC. 19
STOCKTON. WHATLEY.
DAVIN & COMPANY, a Florida
corporation.
Plaintiff(s|
vs.
EFRAI.N S. WARENS. and the
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other par-
ties claiming by. through, under
or against him. et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
in the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE SOUTH STEPS of
the Dade County Courthouse in
Miami. Dade County. Florida at
11 mi o'clock A.M.. on the 19th .lay
of October. 1987. the following
described property:
Lot 7, in Block 89, of COUNTRY
LAKE MANORS TOWNHOMES
SECTION TWO, according to the
Plat thereof as recorded in Plat
Book 126. at Page 47, of the Public
Records of Dade County. Florida.
DATED the 30th day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin, P.A.
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami. Fl. 33137
Published 10/2-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SOUTH POINTE
POPS in Dade County. Florida, in
tends to register said name with
'he Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
GREATER MIAMI
COMMUNITY
CONCERT BAND. INC..
1 Florida non-profit corporation
by. ALLAN TAVSS, President
Michael L. Mann, Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
"l" South Dadeland Boulevard
s"ite 1103
Miami. Florida 33156
WW October2,9, 16,23, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name YOCUM PRINTING
at number 4155 East 8th Avenue,
Hialeah. Florida, intends to
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-35769 CA 24
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
as Trustee for the Housing
Finance Authority of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida under a trust indenture
dated as of September 1, 1983.
Plaintiff
vs.
JUANITA GARCIA.
Defendants.
TO: JUANITA GARCIA.
Residence Unknown
If alive and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against JUANITA GAR-
CIA, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title or
interest in the property herein
described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
Countv, Florida:
lot 2. Block 19, PRINCETO-
NIAN SUBDIVISION SEC-
TION FIVE, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 122. at Page 86 f
the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Shcppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Mad ruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
November 6th. 1987, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 29th day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguei
As Deputy Clerk
18022 October 2, 9. 16, 23,1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-19766
SEC. 19
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION, a
United States corporation.
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
MARVIN TAYLOR, et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and tiest
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 19th day of October, 1987,
the following described
property:
Lot 8, Block 9, PINEWOOD
PARK EXTENSION, according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 34, Page 91, of the
Public Records of Dade County,
Florida.
DATED the 30th day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin, P.A.
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, Fl. 33137
Published 10/2-9
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-9032
SEC 09
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION. a
United States corporation.
I'laintiffls)
vs.
CESAR GOMEZ MARIA
GOMEZ, YVONNE BERRIOS.
RENE TRIJILLO. and the
unknown spouses, etc.. et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this CBM
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and besl
bidder for cash on TDK SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami. Dade County.
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 19th day of October. 1987.
the following described
property:
Unit No. 604 of THE HOMES OF
WEST FLAGLER ESTATES, a
Condominium, according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, as recorded on January 9,
1985, in Official Records Book
12377, at Page 1520, of the Public
Records of Dade County. Florida,
under Clerk's File No.
85R-007487, as subsequently
modified and amended.,
DATED the 30th day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin, P.A.
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, Fl. 33137
Published 10/2-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE !S HEREBY GIVEN
reinster said name with the Clerk that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the Do-
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun
ty. Florida.
Y PRINTING CORP.,
a Florida corporation
by: PETER ALVAREZ. President
Michael L. Mann, Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
9100 South Dadeland Boulevard
Sun.- 1108
Miami, Florida 33156
18026 October 2, 9. 16,23. 1987
titious name CORAL ANIMAL
CLINIC at 2500 S.W. 107 Avenue,
Store 32. Miami, Florida, 33165 in
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Guguio E. Rodriguez
I go 10 September 25;
October 2, 9. 16. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name AIR AMBULANCE
AMERICA at number 9100 South
Dadeland Boulevard, Suite 1104,
Miami, Florida intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
AIR AMBULANCE CENTRAL.
INC.,
a Florida corporation
by: LARRY BERCU, President
Michael L Mann, Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
9100 South Dadeland Boulevard
Suite 1103
Miami. Florida 33156
1WI24 October 2, 9, 16,23, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5516
Division 04
FLA. BAR NO.: 027363
IN RE: ESTATE OP
KATHERINE KOWALEWSKY
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
ofKATHERINE
KOWALEWSKY, deceased. File
Number 87-5516, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the ad
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
hegun on October 2. 1987.
I'ersonal Representative:
OLGA HUGHES
Apt. 206B
3100 1'iuitt Road
Port St. Lucie. Fla. 31952
Attorney for I'ersonal
Representative:
HYMAN P. GALBUT. ESQ.
i,. ill hi i Galbut i Menin
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: 305 672-3100
18023 October 2.9. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SUNSET PROPER
TIES at 7760 S.W. 125 Ten-
Miami, Fl. 33156 intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
J. DAVID LIEBMAN
and NATALIE LIEBMAN,
his wife
17996 September 18,26;
October 8,9,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NUMBER: 87-5461
DIVISION: 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALEX 8CHEINZEIT,
Deceased.
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the Estate
\i.K\ SCHEINZEIT, Deceas
ed. File Number 87-5461, is |m-h
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
Counts. Florida. Probate Division,
the address of which is 7:i West
Flagler. Street. Miami. Florida
::::i:iu
The names and addresses of the
Personal Representative and the
Pel onal Representative's at
torney arc set forth below
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this Court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE:
ill All claims against the estate
ami.
(2i Any objection by an in-
terested person on whom this
notice was served that challenges
the validity of the Will, the
qualifications of the Personal
Representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the Court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 2. 1987.
PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
LILLIAN SCHEINZEIT
900 Bay Drive
Apartment 808
Miami Beach, Florida 33141
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Herbert S. Shapiro. Esquire
LAW OFFICE OF
SHAPIRO AND WEIL
1666 79th Street Causeway
Suite 608
Miami Beach, Florida 33141
Telephone: (806) 8.,4 2369
180211 October 2, 9,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-41508 16
NOTICE OF ACTION
THE BINGHAMTON SAVINGS
BANK.
Plaintiff
vs.
MARY D. HELMS, et al..
Defendants.
TO: PERPETUAL
SAVINGS & LOAN
ASSOCIATION
229 East Park Avenue
Waterloo. Iowa 50704
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 5 of Block 41. FIRST
ADDITION TO CAROL CI-
TY GARDENS, according to
a plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 68 at Page 31 of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defense*, if any. to it
on Stuart H. Gitliti, Esq., At-
torney for Plaintiff, whose address
is Suite 214, 1570 Madruga
Avenue. Coral Gables. Florida.
33146 on or before October 30th,
1987. and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded ir the
complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 23rd day of
September. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By John Brands
As Deputy Clerk
18019 October2,9. 16,23, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
thai the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name .lack of Diamond at
8766 N.E 163 Street, NMB. Fl
88160 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Jack Stember
Joshua C.alitzer.
Attorney for -lack Stember
18021 October 2,9, 16.23, 1967


.'age 14-B The Jewish Floridufl/Friday, October 2, 1987
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
4
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-33043C CA 28
NOTICE OF ACTION
BARNETT BANKS TRUST
COMPANY. N.A.. as Trustee for
the Florida Housing Finance
Agency under a resolution
adopted and dated as of July 1,
1984.
Plaintiff
vs.
ARCO HOME, INC. and
FRANCISCO RODRIGUEZ, et
al..
Defendants.
TO: FRANCISCO RODRIGUEZ
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by. through,
under or against him. and all par-
ties having or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the pro-
perty herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 6. in Block 12. of PALM
POINT SECTION ONE, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 123,
at Page 8, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
October 23, 1987. and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 15 day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BR1NKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18001 September 18.26;
October 2.9,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURF
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO: 87-39906 02
NOTICE OF ACTION
GERD GUNTHER RUESS.
Petitioner/Husband,
and
ALBA LUZ MONDRAGON
RUESS,
Respondent/Wife
TO: ALBA LUZ MONDRAGON
RUESS
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFED
that a Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you, and that you are required to
serve a copy of your Response or
Pleading to the Petition upon the
Petitioner's attorney. RUSSELL
K. ROSENTHAL, ESQ., 7103
S.W. 102nd Avenue. Suite B,
Miami. Florida 33173, and file the
original Response or Pleading in
the office of the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court, on or before the 16th
day of October, A.D.. 1987. If you'
fail to do so, a Default Judgment
will be taken against you for the
relief demanded in the Petition.
Dated at Miami, Dade County,
Florida, this 14 day of September,
A.D., 1987.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
By: E. LE SUEUR
(Deputy Clerk)
17993 September 18,26;
October 2.9,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name MISS TEE FOR ME
at 13170 N.W. 43rd Avenue. Ope
Locka. Florida intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Jerry Sue Fashions, Inc.
HARVEY D. ROGERS
Attorney for
Jerry Sue Fashions, Inc.
13170 N.W. 43rd Avenue
Opa-Locka, Florida 33064
18003 September 26;
October 2. 9.16.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY '
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-40178-09
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United
States of America.
Plaintiff
vs.
EDUARDO M. ANTUNA. et ux
et al..
Defendants.
TO: EDUARDO M. ANTUNA
and CLAUDETTE S. ANTUNA,
his wife
4626 159th Avenue SE
Bellevue. WA 98006
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 22, Block 2, of
OAKRIDGE ESTATES
SECTION THREE, accor-
ding to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 57,
Page 10, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gabies, Florida, 33146 on or before
October 23, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered agaisnt you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 15 day of
September. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
17998 Setpember 18,25;
_______________October 2. 9.1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 87 39(03
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARIE YOLETTE BANNA
COICOU,
Petitioner,
and
BERTHONY COICOU,
Respondent.
TO: BERTHONY COICOU
5em Ave. Bolosse, Rue Malet No.
76
Port-au-Prince, Haiti, W.I.
shall serve a copy of your Answer
to the Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage upon ANTHONY CAR-
BONE, P.A., 612 N.W. 12th
Avenue, Miami, Florida 33136,
and file the original with the Clerk
of Court on or before October 16,
1987. otherwise a default will be
entered.
Dated: September 14, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
17999 September 18, 26;
October 2, 9,1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 87 39601
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ROSE SILFIDA BILLY,
Petitioner,
and
ELIJAH BILLY,
Respondent.
TO: ELIJAH BILLY,
Residence Unknown, you shall
serve a copy of your Answer tc the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon: ANTHONY CAR-
BONE, P.A.. 612 N.W. 12th
Avenue, Miami, Florida 33136,
and file original with the Clerk of
the Court on or before October 16,
1987. otherwise a default will be
entered.
Dated: September 14, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER, Clerk
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
18000 September 18,25;
October 2,9,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name NEVADO PASO
FTNO FARM, INC. at 7330 S.W.
45th Street, Miami. Florida 33155
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Nevado Paso Fino Ranch, Inc.
17978 September 11,18.25;
October 2, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-08372 FC 24
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
SUSAN 8CHOLNIK (.OLD
Petitioner/Wife
and
WAYNE GOLD
Respondent/Husband
TO: WAYNE GOLD
51 Beaufort Park
Finchley, London NW 11
01-458 4157
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you in the Circuit
Court, in and for Dade County,
Florida, and that the Petitioner,
SUSAN SCHOLNIK GOLD, seeks
not only a dissolution of the mar-
riage but also an award of any and
all interest and title which you
have in that certain Promissory
Note, dated October 10, 1985. in
the amount of $17,000.00 given to
you and Petitioner by Francisco
Ramon and Silvia Ramon and
secured by a Mortgage on the same
date on certain real property
located in Dade County, Florida,
and legally described, as follows:
Lot 86. Block 96, CENTRAL
MIAMI PART SIX. accor-
ding to the plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 17,
Page 8, Public Records of
Dade County. Florida.
You are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any. to
the Petitioner or Petitioner's At-
torney, Robert S. Korschun, whose
address is: 8603 South Dixie
Highway, Suite 210, Miami,
Florida 33143-7807 on or before
the 16 day of October. 1987. and
file the original with the Clerk ol
this Court, either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter. If you fail tc
file your written response or
defense, as indicated, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Petition.
PLEASE GOVERN
YOURSELF ACCORDINGLY.
DATED: September 10, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
BY: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
17988 September 18.26;
October 2.9.1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87-31148 FC-04
Fla. Bar No.: 124946
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ORINTHIA BONNER.
Petitioner,
and
JESSE LEE BONNER,
Respondent.
TO: JESSE LEE
BONNER
(address unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Samuel S.
Sorota, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 801 N.E. 167th
Street, Suite 308. North Miami
Beach, Florida 33162, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before October
9th, 1987; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief prayed for in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 4th day of September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Samuel S. Sorota, Esq.
801 N.E. 167th Street,
Suite 308
North Miami Beach, FL 33162
Telephone: 652-7777
Attorney for Petitioner
17979 September 11, 18,25;
October 2,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-18049 (CA 12)
AMENDED NOTICE OF
ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI, a
United States Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANTONIt) CARDET. et al..
Defendants
TO: ANTONIO CARDET.
Individually and as Trustee
199 Ocean Lane Drive
Apt. 1112 South
Key Biscayne. Florida
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
VISTA DEL LAGO
CONDOMINIUM
PHASE V
A portion of Tract "A"
"VISTA/PASEOS" accor-
ding to the plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 115 at
Page 81 of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida, being more par-
ticularly described as follows:
Commence at the Northeast
comer of said Tract "A";
thence South 63 degrees 01
minutes 09 seconds West for
74.19 feet; thence South 86
degrees 56 minutes 54
seconds West for 150.00 feet;
thence South 67 degrees 00
minutes 00 seconds West for
299.54 feet; thence South 57
degrees 45 minutes 00
seconds West for 202.00 feet
to the Point of Beginning of
the following described
parcel of land; thence North
70 degrees 06 minutes 00
seconds West for 165.71 feet
(said last mentioned five
courses being coincident with
the Northerly boundary line
of said Tract "A"); thence
South 19 degrees 54 minutes
00 seconds West for 138.51
feet; thence South 44 degrees
59 minutes 24 seconds West
for 90.00 feet; thence South
18 degrees 37 minutes 49
seconds West for 99.89 feet;
thence South 45 degrees 00
minutes 36 seconds East for
168.20 feet; thence South 0
degrees 00 minutes 36
seconds East for 74.73 feet;
thence North 89 degrees 59
minutes 24 seconds East,
along the Southerly boundary
line of said Tract "A," for
457.51 feet; thence North 0
degrees 00 minutes 36
seconds West for 20.00 feet;
thence North 89 degrees 59
minutes 24 seconds East for
27.71 feet; thence North 0
degrees 00 minutes 36
seconds West for 23.00 feet;
thence North 45 degrees 00
minutes 36 seconds West for
105.74 feet, thence South 44
degrees 59 minutes 24
seconds West for 65.38 feet;
thence South 89 degrees 59
minutes 24 seconds West for
243.76 feet; thence North 0
degrees 00 minutes 36
seconds West for 55.00 feet;
thence North 4 degrees 37
minutes 21 seconds East for
130.21 feet; thence North 16
degrees 00 minutes 15
seconds East for 176.27 feet
to the Point of Beginning, ly-
ing and being in Section 12,
Township 54 South, Range
39 East, Dade County,
Florida.
VISTA DEL LAGO
CONDOMINIUM
PHASE VI
A portion of Tract "A"
"VISTA/PASEOS" accor-
ding to the plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 115 at
Page 81 of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida, being more par-
ticularly described as follows:
Commence at the Northeast
corner of said Tract "A";
thence South 63 degrees 01
minutes 09 seconds West for
74.19 feet; thence South 86
degrees 66 minutes 54
seconds West for 150.00 feet;
thence South 67 degrees 00
minutes 00 seconds West for
299.54 feet; thence South 67
degrees 45 minutes 00
seconds West for 202.00 feet;
thence North 70 degrees 06
minutes 00 seconds West for
165.71 feet to the Point of
Beginning of the following
described parcel of land;
thence continued North 70
degrees 06 minutes 00
seconds West for 246.29 feet;
thence South 54 degrees 36
minutes 00 seconds West for
229.47 feet (said last men-
tioned seven courses being
coincident with the Northerly
boundary line of said Tract
"A"); thence South 35
degrees 24 minutes 00
seconds East for 203.14 feet;
thence South 45 degrees (Ml
minutes 36 seconds East for
178.00 feet; thence South 4-1
degrees 59 minutes 24
seconds West for 13.35 feet;
thence South 45 degrees 00
minutes 36 seconds East for
106.79 feet; thence South 0
degrees 00 minutes 36
seconds East for 13.75 feet;
thence South 89 degrees 59
minutes 24 seconds West for
40.75 feet; thence South 0
degrees 00 minutes 36
seconds East for 43.00 feet;
thence North 89 degrees 59
minutes 24 seconds F"
along the Southerly boundary
line of said Tract "A" for
126.00 feet; thence North 0
degrees 00 minutes 36
seconds West for 74.73 feet;
thence North 45 degrees 00
minutes 36 seconds West for
168.20 feet; thence North 18
degrees 37 minutes 49
seconds East for 99.89 feet;
thence North 44 degrees 59
minutes 24 seconds East for
90.00 feet; thence North 19
degrees 54 minutes 00
seconds East for 138.51 feet
to the Point of Beginning, ly-
ing and being in Section 12,
Township 54 South, Range
39 East, Dade County,
Florida.
VISTA DEL LAGO
CONDOMINIUM
PHASE VII
A portion of Tract "A"
"VISTA/PASEOS" accor-
ding to the plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 115 at
Page 81 of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida, being more par-
ticularly described as follows:
Commence at the Northeast
corner of said Tract "A";
thence South 63 degrees 01
minutes 09 seconds West for
74.19 feet; thence South 86
degrees 56 minutes 54
seconds West for 150.00 feet;
thence South 67 degrees 00
minutes 00 seconds West for
299.54 feet; thence South 57
degrees 45 minutes 00
seconds West for 202.00 feet;
thence North 70 degrees 06
minutes 00 seconds West for
412.00 feet; thence South 54
degrees 36 minutes 00
seconds West for 229.47 feet;
to the Point of Beginning of
the following described
parcel of land; thence con-
tinue South 54 degrees 36
minutes 00 seconds West for
233.54 feet (said last men-
tioned seven courses being
coincident with the Northerly
boundary line of said Tract
"A"); thence South 45
degrees 00 minutes 36
seconds East for 397.89 feet;
thence South 68 degrees 01
minutes 34 seconds East for
107.47 feet; thence North 55
degrees 56 minutes 07
seconds East for 72.08 feet;
thence North 89 degrees 59
minutes 24 seconds East for
27.00 feet (said last mention-
ed two courses being coinci-
dent with the boundary line
of said Tract "A"); thence
North 0 degrees 00 minutes
36 seconds West for 43.00
feet; thence North 89 degrees
59 minutes 24 seconds East
for 40.75 feet; thence North 0
degrees 00 minutes 36
seconds West for 13.75 feet;
thence North 45 degrees 00
minutes 36 seconds West for
106.79 feet; thence North 44
degrees 59 minutes 24
seconds East for 13.35 feet;
thence North 45 degrees 00
minutes 36 seconds West for
178.00 feet; thence North 35
degrees 24 minutes 00
seconds West for 203.14 feet
to the Point of Beginning, ly-
ing and being in Section 12,
Township 54 South, Range
39 East, Dade County,
Florida
VISTA DEL LAGO
CONDOMINIUM
PHASE VIII
A portion of Tract "A"
"VISTA/PASEOS" accor-
ding to the plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 115 at
Page 81 of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida, being more par-
ticularly described a, folk,,,.
Commence at the Northeas,
corner of sa.d Tract ^v'
thence South 63 degrees 01
mmutes09T>ndsXS,f
74.19 feet; thenc. suth J
degree,, 66 minutes
seconds West fr 150.00fj,
thence South fi? degrees^
minutes (Hi second, West t.
f'.54fee,.,n,eSou!ht
degrees 45 minutes 00
thence North .-Megnwos
ratautMOOsewndsWoab
412.00 feet; thence Sort.
"BTee. 36 minutes 00
seconds West for 168.0] |m
to thei Point f Beginning of
the follow,.in described
parcel of land, thence con-
tinue South 54 degrees 36
minutes 00 seconds West for
192.99 feet; thence South 46
degrees 11 minutes 02
seconds West, radial to the
next described course for
40.51 feet; thence
Southeasterly along a cir-
cular curve to the left having
a radius of 2360.00 feet and a
central angle of 14 degrees
12 minutes 3K seconds for an
arc distance of 585.31 feet;
thence North 31 degrees 58
minutes 26 seconds East.
radial to the last described
curve, for 200 00 feet (said
last mentioned ten courses
being coincided with the
boundary line of Tract "A"),
thence North 58 degrees 01
minutes 34 seconds West for
107.47 feet, thence North 45
degrees 00 minutes 36
seconds West for 397.89 feet
to the Point of Beginning, ly-
ing and being in Section 12,
Township 54 South, Range
39 East, Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and yo
are required to serve a copy o
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis. Allison 1
Cohen. Plaintiff's attorneyi.
whose address is 111 N.E. IK
Street, Miami. Florida 33132, on
or before October 16,1987. ami fit
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or immediate
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 8 day of |
September, 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
17984 September 11,18,25
October 2,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA DJ
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
Civil Action No. 87-34K2 (071
ROBERT E. HESSION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MERCEDES MORALES, et al..
Defendant.
TO: MERCEDES MORALES
Address Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
action to quiet title to the follows*
property in Dade County. Flon*
Lot 3, Block 1, of HELMS
SUBDIVISION, according to
the Plat thereof recorded in
Plat Book 6, at Page 61, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
has been filed against you and y
are required to serve a copy
your written defenses, if any.
on Willard K. Splittstoesser, fc*j.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
dress is: 13122 West Du
Highway, Suite B, North VW
Florid. 33161. and file the ong
with the clerk of the above*J
court on or before October ft
1987, otherwise a default: *
entered against you for the rew
demanded in the compUmt of
^"notice shall ^ -
once eh week for fo**J
secutive weeks in THE J6"
FLORIDIAN. ^
WITNESS my hand and U*~
of said court at Miami, Flon*'
this the 8 o^y of September'*
RICHARD P. BRINKEK
as Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Fton* z
By: BARBARA R0DWGl
as Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Willard K. SpBttstoewrr. t*
13122 West Dixie Highwy-
North Miami, Florida 33161
Attorney for Petitioner g.


Friday, October 2, 1987/The Jewiih Floririiap Page 15-B
rQRECLOSURE SALES-PUBLIC NOTICES
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5240
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
R0SE BRENNER Deceugd
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
( RoSE BRENNER, deceased,
File Number 87-5240 (04), is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 W.
Pllfltr Street, Miami, FL 33130.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
tired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TI0NS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 25, 1987.
Personal Representative:
LUCILLE FAILLA
Unit 414.
2920 Point East Drive
No. Miami Beach, FL 33160
Attorney for Personal
Representative
NELSON & FELDMAN. P.A.
1135 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands. FL 33154
Telephone: 865-5716
18013 September 25;
October 2.1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-38180 (08)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
CYNTHIA WASKO.
Petitioner/Wife,
and
JOHN DA. WEBER.
Respondent/Husband.
TO: RESPONDENT
JOHN DA. WEBER
1955Lakspur, Apt. 1112
San Antonio, TX 78213
VOt ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
gainst you and are required to
serve a copy of your written
I defenses, if any. to it on HAR-
R0LD A. TURTLETAUB, at-
I torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
| dress is 9995 Sunset Drive. Suite
108, Miami, FL 33173, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before October
9th, 1987; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
| r petition.
This notice shall be published
I once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
| H.0RIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
"iis 3rd day of September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
I tUrcuit Court Seal)
HAROLD A. TURTLETAUB
95 Sunset Drive. Suite 108
ff"*mi, FLA 33178
Telephone: (305) 271-4000
17M?*y f0r Petition''
"91 September 11,18,25;
October 2.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-12255 CA 29
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK,
as Trustee for the Housing
Finance Authority of Dade
County, Florida, under a Trust
Indenture dated as of September
1. 1983,
Plaintiff
vs.
BARBARA ADLER. et al.,
Defendants.
TO: MELVIN LEWIS ADLER
and ANITA PERLMAN
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
them, and all parties having
or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the
property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
UNIT No. 101. of CALUSA
CLUB VILLAGE CON
DOMINIUM BUILDING A.
according to the Declaration
of Condominium thereof, as
recorded in Official Book
11749. at Page 1868. of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida, 33146 on or before
October 23. 1987. and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 17 day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18006 September 25;
October 2,9,16.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 87-41190 (12)
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
FLORA A. GRAHAM
Petitioner
and
SILAS GRAHAM
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Silas Graham.
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I. J.
GRAFF, ESQ., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St N.M.B. Florida 33162 on or
before October 30, 1987, and file
the original with the clerk of this
court otherwise a default will be
entered against you.
DATED: September 22, 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: F. Seidl
As Deputy Clerk
18016 September 25;
October 2.9,16,1987
p,J20TICE UNDER
JTTTIOU8 NAME LAW
I J*"* S HEREBY GIVEN
* u>e undersigned, desiring to
'"W m business under the fie
MrS n*me SANDY'S PRO
WCE at.780 First Street. Miami
**. FL intends to register said
^ with the clerk of the Circuit
M*of Dade County. Florida.
SOUTH POINTE PRODUCE. Inc.
730 First Street
I 1801*WniBe*ch' FL 88139
September 26;
October 2.9,16.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICT1TIOU8 NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fk-
titious name Geotto International
at 4086 NW 66 Avenue, Virginia
Gardens. Fl 33166 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Harold Schuller, Jr.
4086 NW. 66 Ave.
and
The Pluton Company of Caracas,
Venezuela whose owner is Mr.
Maximo De Paulis. Address of De
Paulis and Pluton is Edificio Ex-
agon, Prolongacion Avenida
Romulo Gallegos, El Marques,
Caracas, Venezuela.
18002 September 26;
October 2,9.16.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-39335 CA-25
NOTICE OF ACTION
LINCOLN SERVICE
CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RUSSELL P. ROGG,
et ux., et al.,
Defendants
TO: KATHY BLIVEN ROGG
Broadwell Road
Morrisonville,
New York 12962
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 1. Block 5. FIRST ADDI
TION TO HOMESTEAD
LAKE PARK HOMES, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 66,
at Page 22, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
October 23, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 17 day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18005 Septembr26;
October 2,9,16,1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-40023 FC01
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
No. 003473
IN RE:
BENNETT JOSEPHSON
and
NATHLIE BARRECK
JOSEPHSON
TO: NATHLIE BARRECK
JOSEPHSON
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for the Peti-
tioner, whose address is 2020 N.E.
163rd Street North Miami Beach.
Florida 33161, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before October 23,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
nective weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 16 day of September 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOY BARKAN
2020 N.E. 163rd St.
North Miami Beach. Fl. 33162
(305) 944-9100
18004 September 26;
October 2.9,16.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of RAFAELO'S &
CHIQUITINES at 1811-1813
NW. 20 Street. Miami, Fl. 33142
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
RAFAEL MOTOLA
MOTOGRAB INC.
17994 September 18.25;
October 2,9.1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87 39860-07
FAMILY DIVISION-
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
VILMA R. ROSADO,
Petitioner,
and
ANTONIO ROSADO,
Respondent.
TO: ANTONIO ROSADO
3127 West Leland
Chicago, III, 60625
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
MELVIN J. ASHER, ESQ.. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 825 South Bayshore Drive,
Suite 543, Miami. FL 33131. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
October 16. 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 14 day of September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
17991 September 18.25;
October 2,9.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87 40457
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
RUBEN CAMACHO. husband,
and
CARIDAD CAMACHO, wife.
TO: CARIDAD CAMACHO
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on AR-
THUR H. LIPSON, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 801
Northeast 167 Street, Miami,
Florida 33162, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before October 23,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 17 day of September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
18009 September 25;
October 2.9,16,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. Hi
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87 40466-31
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ROBERT VINES, husband,
and
RONDA M. VINES, wife.
TO: RONDA M. VINES
Star Route 4, Box 605
Pryor. Oklahoma 74361
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on AR-
THUR H. LIPSON. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 801
Northwest 167 Street Miami. Fla.
33162. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 23. 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 17 day of September. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18008 September 26;
October 2.9.16.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 87-40575-26
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
KATHERINE B. ROGERS
Petitioner
and
VERNEL ROGERS
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Vernel Rogers,
Residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.J.
GRAFF, ESQ., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St. N.M.B. Florida 33162, on
or before October 23, 1987 and file
the original with the clerk of this
court otherwise a default will be
entered against you.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
18007 September 25;
October 2,9, 16. 1987
NOTICE OK ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-40972(27)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
ALBERTO HERNANDEZ-
MENDOZA,
and
GAIL HERNANDEZ
TO: Gail Hernandez
214 S.W. 152nd Street
Number 64
Seattle, Washington 98148
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Steven
Miller. Esquire, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is FRIED-
MAN & KAPLAN. P.A., 3636
West Flagier Street, Miami,
Florida 33136. and file the original
with the derk of the above styled
court on or before October 23,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for he relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 21 day of September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Steven Miller. Esquire
FRIEDMAN &. KAPLAN. P.A.
3636 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33135
Attorney for Petitioner
18012 September 25;
October 2.9.16, 1987
IS THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case
No. 87-41189 (12) -FC-
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
ARNETTA M. YOUMANS
Petitioner
and
CONNIELEE E. YOUMANS
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: CONNIELEE E.
YOUMANS,
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I. J.
GRAFF, ESQ., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St. N.M.B. Florida 33162 on or
before October 30. 1987, and file
the original with the derk of this
court otherwise a default will be
entered against you.
DATED: September 22. 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Cleric of the Court
By: F. Seidl
As Deputy Clerk
18017 September 26;
October 2, 9, 16, 1987


Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 2, 1987 **V% *.
The Cantorate ..
^
Continued from Page 6-B
in the United States in spite of
several cantorial schools.
Perhaps this is because there
is such a variety of other
musical and related fields,"
says Albert. "And more
lucrative fields. I was for-
tunate that I grew up in a
traditional family and I was
nurtured at the age of eight
singing in a choir and devoted
my youth to the music of the
synagogue. We should try to
encourage more young people
to search out professions of
the synagogue.'
THE ROLE of the cantor
has changed even ir, recent
years, according to Cantor
Stephen Freedman of Bet
Shira congregation.
"Traditionally, the service
was conducted by the cantor
and the rabbi only spoke and
gave a sermon two or three
times a year. The weight of
responsibility for liturgy of
service was entrusted to the
cantor. Today that has chang-
ed somewhat, especially with
the inclusion of reading in
English and with the advent of
the late Friday night service,
where now responsibility for
the liturgy is shared by cantor
and rabbi."
Dade County is home to the
president of the Cantors
Association of Florida, Murray
Yavneh, of Temple Menorah.
According to Yavneh, more
than 50 cantors are in the
association, which includes
members of all denominations.
Yavneh's father, Zalmon
Wiis president of the national
cantor's association Jewish
Ministers Cantors Association
of America and Canada. His
father, he says, was entirely
self-taught and grew up in a
small town in Russia "where
you sort of absorbed it through
your bones."
YAVNEH studied music in
high school and college and
had his own popular-music
band. At one point he thought
of being a concert pianist and
didn't really think seriously
about becoming a cantor.
"When I was a boy and grow-
ing up, the only cantors I
heard were my father and the
great ones on records. It never
dawned on me that I could ap-
proach that type of
excellence."
Its
"Schach"
Time Again!
The Finest
Palms for
Your Succah.
Call
Elliot Schiff
531-5389
When Yavneh was 20, he
took a holiday job in a choir in
the ( at skills and noted that
the cantor made $5,000 for
just the special services. "It
sort of opened my eyes,"
Yavneh said.
It would be faulty to suggest
that it is the monetary com-
pensation that encourages a
talent to take that talent to the
pulpit. Rather, the cantorate is
a calling, most especially at
this sacred time of year. The
passion to plead, to offer sup-
plication on behalf of the con-
gregation, and to do so in ex-
quisite and emotional tones
prompts the pulpit-presence.
Tonight, when the Kol Nidre
is chanted, that passion is most
notable. Says Temple Sinai's
Irving Shulkes:
"KOL NIDRE is one of the
most majestic, significant
prayers and I'm sure no two
cantors chant it alike because
every cantor brings to the
liturgy his feelings, his
emotions."
mmmmm'!mmmm'mm^m'mm^mM
LEVITT
MEMORIAL OUFH.
In a ceremony marking the beginning of con-
struction to enlarge their funeral service
facility at Beth David Memorial Gardens, ex-
ecutive of Levitt-Weinstein Memorial Chapels
and Weinstein Brothers prepare to turn the
first shovel. The addition will nearly double
the size of present chapel building and will
help Levitt-Weinstein provide a greater level
of service from the Hollywood location of 3201
N. 72nd Avenue. Participating in the
ceremony are: from left Norman Cm
Weinstein Brothers; Robert BemtrTf
David Memorial Gardens; Arthur Gn
Guaranteed Security Plan; Sow* M
Levitt-Weinstein Memorial Chapelt Jj
Weinstein, Weinstein Brothers An
Cleatte Fritz of North Lauderdalt km
the expansion, which is expected to in
pleted by December.
Publix

V- -
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only. Top with Publix Premium
Ice Cream
APPLE PIE... ^h$l49
Available at Publix Store* with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only. Nutritious. Delicious
Three Seed
Bread................... $119
(Three Seed Raisin and Walnut Bread., lib. loaf $1.69)
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only, Chocolate Cake Filled with Cherries
and Topped with Whipped Cream
Black Forest
Cake.....................7,'h*4"
Available at All Publix Stores and Fresh Danish
Bakeries. For the Health Conscious
Bran Muffins........ t" *129
Available at All Publix Store, and Fresh Danish
Bakeries. Butter Strcusel
Coffee Cake..........lt*V9
Prices effective Thurs.. October 1 thru U/.H
Indian River and SCcWcSft.*


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