The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03060

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
Jewish Floridian Expanded Circulation This Issue
' JewIslb Floridiami
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Vol. 60 No. 39
Miami Friday, September 25,1987
Price $3.00
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Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 25, 1987
i
a

00
I
Intermarriage Poses Ongoing Problems
By ALISA KWITNEY
^wA FJoridtan St<^" Writer
Few people have faced the
issues surrounding intermar-
riage between Christians and
Jews with more success than
Paul and Rachel Cowan.
But Paul, the child of
assimilated Jewish parents,
and Rachel, formerly a
Unitarian and the descendant
of Mayflower Pilgrims, did not
think about the implications of
interfaith marriage when they
wed in June of 1965, with a
Christian chaplain officiating
at the non-sectarian ceremony.
"The issues that an inter-
marriage poses are far greater
than most couples realize,"
says Paul, the author of An Or-
phan in History. "They may
be religious issues, but they
are also likely to be ethnic
issues."
Paul and Rachel Cowan have
done more than merely
acknowledge that there are
difficulties in marrying outside
of one's faith. They have writ-
ten a book together, Mixed
Blessings, on the subject,
drawing on the testimony of
other interfaith couples, as
well as on their own
experiences.
Says Paul in the book's first
chapter, "In the sixties,
(Rachel and I) would have
bridled at the suggestion ...
that differences in ethnic and
religious backgrounds can
become "time bombs" in rela-
tionships, especially after
children are born."
But today, both Paul and
Rachel, now a convert to
Judaism and a rabbinical stu-
dent at Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Institute of Religion,
conduct workshops for inter-
faith couples who may feel now
as they did then.
In an interview with the
Jewish Floridian, Paul and
Rachel Cowan discussed inter-
marriage, its implications, and
their book.
More and more American
Jews are marrying members
of other faiths. Is this a
negative development for the
Jewish community?
"It's certainly a fact,
whether it's positive or
negative," says Paul. "But it's
also probably going to keep
happening, and what comes of
it depends very much on the
couple."
According to Rachel, the in-
creased rate of intermarriage
"shows the index of success of
Jews in America, shows that
Jews have found a safe en-
vironment in which to prosper.
+Je*istifk)rldttan
1 fn4 Shock*
Phone:(305)373-4605
Published weekly every Friday
since 1927 by The Jewish Flori-
dian. Office and Plant 120 N.E.
6th St., Miami, Fla. 33132. Phone
(305) 373-4605.
Second-Class Postage paid in
Miami, Fla. USPS 275320.
Postmaster: Form 3579 return to
Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box
012973, Miami, Fla. 33101.
The Jewish Floridian does not
guarantee the Kashruth of the
merchandise advertised In Its
columns.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: In ad-
vance (Local Area) One Year
$9.50 (Anniversary Special). Out
of town, country, upon request.
By Mall $1.45 per copy.
r- %
Paul and Rachel Cowan
It has also broguht a lot of
Jews to an understanding of
what it means to them to be
Jewish, in a way they wouldn't
have had they been married to
another apathetic Jew.
"And it has brought in a lot
of Jews by choice," she adds.
Paul points out that "it pro-
bably never happened before
in the Diaspora that Judaism
has been able to compete in the
marketplace with other
religions.
"Now, if a Jew falls in love
with a non-Jew who wants to
convert, the non-Jewish part-
ner does not have to feel that
he or she will lose social status.
In fact, being Jewish can be a
mark of intellectual status in
some circles," he contends.
The fact that Jews once in-
termarried to escape their
heritage, and now may inter-
marry yet still desire to main-
tain their traditions, helps
make conflicts between inter-
faith couples prevalent today,
according to the Cowans.
Yet conflicts that may tear a
couple apart "may not be ap-
parent at first, especially if the
couple meet as lawyers, doc-
tors, or on a college campus so
that they have something in
common which occupies their
attention," says Paul.
"They may not notice the
differences between them ex-
cept in joking terms, then once
they get married or at some
time during courtship, what
we call time bombs in the rela-
tionship go off.
"Those are time bombs of
religious or ethnic feelings,"
he explains.
Christmas is one event
which often sets off those time
bombs. ^j
"In many of the couples
we've seen and talked to,
there's an atmosphere of ten-
sion around Christmas and
Chanukah. Non-Jews may see
the Jewish partner's not wan-
ting a Christmas tree as a sign
of stubborneas; Jews may feel
that they will be betraying
their people if they have a
tree," says Paul, citing ways in
which the holiday season can
bring conflict instead of peace.
Rachel points out "it may be
difficult for people who are not
Jewish to recognize that
Christmas isn't just an
American holiday. Yet Jews
feel % real concern over loss of
identity.
"Christmas, something
which wasn't a part of their
lives, becomes part of their
lives, and they may feel that
they are no longer living in a
Jewish home."
Says Paul, "The Christian
partner may feel that the
Jewish partner is stubborn yet
feel guilty himself about being
insensitive, and the Jewish
partner may feel guilty about
having some authentic
antipathy.
"Both partners feel that
they are a bit crazy to be hav-
ing a fight over this joyous
holiday, not realizing that
other people are having this
same conflict."
The other large event which
may precipitate an explosion
in an interfaith marriage is the
arrival of a child.
Rachel asserts that when it
comes to deciding how a child
should be raised, it is not
always possible to be fair.
"People always define
things in terms of fairness, but
we are not talking about pro-
perty rights, child care respon-
sibilities, or where to live
those are concrete, objective
issues that can be measured.
Religion is not quantifiable,"
she explains.
According to the Cowans,
other than choosing one
religion for their children,
couples basically have three
alternatives.
"You can try to explain that
this is mommy's religion and
this is daddy's, both equally
important, but that often ends
up with a horrible emphasis of
Christmas nd Channukah
presents, doesn't convey the
heritage or the orientation,"
says Rachel.
Couples also can reduce ma-
jor holidays in both religions to
"winter solstice festivals," or
else they can "explore both
religions thoroughly as two
paths to God."
Paul admits that even
though in the book "there is a
couple who have a completely
bi-religious household, where
the tads were taught both
Catholicism and Judaism, it
takes a lot of work and educa-
tion, and most people can't do
it.
"It's safer and more sensible
not to try it," he concedes.
Most people don't know what
the price is. You basically have
to decide on one religion for
the children."
Yet most couples do not deal
with the issues of children and
religion until just after the
children are born, or even
later.
"Parents who ignore
religious differences transmit
those repressed conflicts to the
children," warns Paul. "You
develop a high emotional state
in a marriage where these
issues aren't discussed."
Adds Rachel, "Children of
friends of ours who were rais-
ed as neither Jews nor Chris-
tians look back and wish they
had been given some religious
background."
"One of the most poignant
moments for a Jewish partner
in an interfaith marriage,"
says Paul, "is when the child
refers to Jews as 'you' instead
of as 'us.' "
Why is it that Jews are often
more adamant about transmit-
ting Judaism to the children
than Christians are? Is it
chauvinism?
"I don't think other people
feel as strongly," Paul_
"Intermarriage is 7k!?*|
the Jewish cXuii^JH
to the Christian comS*
Rachel agrees. "ChriJ
don t come from a tndSI
that binds them as S&
she contends. "Christian^
about helping people uj
the world but with Je^JI
feeling of being one peopL^
helping Jews all aroufffl
world.
"For Christians, it'sakl
ing of all men being brotwl
it's universal. With Jews ft!
feeling of shared fate."
Rachel adds that "1 4
always have certain persor4|
ty traits, having been bortJ
New England WASP, baf
feel now that I am a'jet.L
don't think whenever I J
another WASP, 'Oh ttaf
am.'
"I do feel linked to the fal
of the Jewish people. I 3I
really see in my life what||
difference is."
Ethnic differences, suchi
Continued on Page 14-A
Mount
Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street Miami
INVITES YOU TO ATTEND
Special
Memorial Services
Sunday
September 27, 1987
Conducted by
TEMPLE JUDEA
Rabbi Michael Eisenstadt
10:00 a.m.
667-5657
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
Dr. Irving Lehnnan
11:00 a.m.
538-2503
TEMPLE BETH KODESH
Rabbi Max Shapiro
11:30 a.m.
854-3053
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
Rabbi David Auerbach
12:45 p.m.
238-2601
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Special Service* at Richter Mausoleum SiU.
Section K
12:30 p^.
573-5000
CONGREGATION BETH DAVID
Rabbi Jack Beimer
Rev. Milton S. Freeman
1:15 p.m.
854-3911


dfewislh. FloiridiaiiL
^s^/(
*rA**x
JoTeO No. 39
Miami Friday, September 25,1987
Price $3.00
AJCongress Supports Mideast Peace Parley
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jeunsk Floridian Staff Writer
The American Jewish Con-
fess, in a move that may be
hprecedented among Jewish
merican organizations, hack
a plan for an international
Inference on Mid-East peace,
topic that has caused a bitter
division in the Israeli Knesset.
A compromise solution must
be reached, the AJC said,
because the Arab population,
including 1.5 million Arabs liv-
ing in the Israeli-occupied
West Bank and Gaza Strip, is
expanding.
If the population continues
'IJ" J^p
to grow, Arabs would be in the
majority in Israel. And if
Israel continues to be a
democratic nation, Arabs
would vote in the governing
body.
If, on the other hand, the
Arabs in Israel are denied the
vote, then Israel is no longer a
democratic state, Jewish
leaders said.
Neither option is desirable,
said Henry Siegman, ex-
ecutive national director of the
AJC.
"The fundamental question
of what kind of a state Israel
will be, whether it will remain
\
Veo-Nazi Jean Marie Le Pen, candidate for president of
France in 1988, drew the ire of world Jewry and numerous
French leaders when he said the Nazi Holocaust was "a minor
'nnt in the history of World War II." Le Pen is the leader of
' extreme rightst National Front party.
Shiite Moslem terrorist Fawaz Younis, seen in this artist's
rendition during arraignment before a United States
magistrate, was indict-ed for masterminding the 1985 hijack-
ing of a Jordanian airliner with four Americans aboard.
Lebanese Shiites this week demanded his release.
both Jewish and a democratic
state, profoundly affects the
relationship of the state of
Israel to American Jewry and
all of diaspora Jewry,"
Siegman said.
In Israel, the Labor party,
led by Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres, has strongly
campaigned for a meeting with
Jordan at a negotiations table
also attended by the United
States, the Soviet Union,
France, Great Britain and
China.
But the Likud party, the
Continued on Page 7-A
Breakthrough
Seen In
Turkish Ties
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) An unprecedented
meeting between the Foreign
Ministers of Israel and Turkey
will be held in New York next
week. This will be the first
ever meeting between Israel's
and Turkey's Foreign
Ministers.
Sources at the UN said
Israel's Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres and his Turkish
counterpart, Vhait Halefoglu,
will meet following the Rosh
Hashanah holiday. Both
ministers are in New York to
attend the UN General
Assembly.
In the view of diplomats
here, the meeting between the
two officials is likely to create
a breakthrough in Turkish-
Israeli relations. Turkey, a
Moslem country, does not have
full diplomatic ties with Israel.
The two countries only have
consular level representations
between them.
The Turkish media reported
that Ankara has agreed that
some 30,000 Iranian Jews will
go to Israel from Iran through
Turkey.
Major Knesset Parties Seek End To Strife
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Leaders of all but two Knesset
factions attended a meeting
convened jointly by Premier
Yitzhak Shamir and Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres this
week to seek an end to the
ongoing strife between the Or-
thodox and secular com-
munities which has erupted in
violence in recent weeks,
mainly in Jerusalem.
AH present pledged to
cooperate to prevent
lawlessness during the High
Holidays, and in the months
ahead. A prestigious commit-
tee was established to review
the religious status quo and
recommend changes if
necessary. Only factions ab-
sent from the meeting were
the Communists and the ex-
tremist Kach Party.
It was held following a quiet
Sabbath in Jerusalem, the first
after five successive weekends
of rioting by ultra-Orthodox
Jews against the screening of
films on the Sabbath. With a
"cease-fire" now apparently
evolving, an era of conciliation
and co-existence seems
attainable.
Nevertheless, secular and
religious Knesset members
emerged from the meeting
with different forecasts. Dedy
Zucker of the Citizens Rights
Movement said film shows
would be resumed after Yom
Kippur. But Avraham Shapira
of Agudat Israel vowed never
on the Sabbath.
Jerusalem's secular popula-
tion now hopes that the soccer
stadium, long delayed by Or-
thodox protests, will finally
get Shamir's approval, and
work will start on its
construction.
Shamir, who is acting
Minister of Interior, has sided
with the religious on the issue.
He faces court action, in-
cluding a suit filed by Reuben
Rivlin, chairman of the Herut
branch in Jerusalem who also
is chairman of the Betar soccer
team.


Page 4-A The Jewish Floridum/FricUy, September 25, 1967


New Year 5748
Arrival of the Year 5748 brings with it
ongoing challenges for Jewry both on
global and local levels.
Certainly there is good news in the
positive steps towards a treaty between
the United States and the USSR
eliminating medium range nuclear
missiles. And the release of several pro-
minent refuseniks and the emigration of
some 800 Soviet Jews a month quite
likely were a prelude to the announce-
ment of the agreement in Washington
by President Reagan.
An Israel strong enough to scrap its
Lavi fighter plane project, to reduce in-
flation dramatically and to maintain
clear military supremacy against its im-
mediate neighbors is on the plus side.
In South Florida, the dramatic expan-
sions of synagogues and Jewish com-
munity centers display renewed vigor as
leading congregations prepare to mark
such milestones as their 75th and 50th
anniversaries.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation
will observe a half century of service as
the central fund raising and planning
agency for a population now accepted as
a mature member of America's major
Jewish communities.
And The Jewish Floridian celebrates
its 60th anniversary of service to South
Florida Jewry with a commitment to
strengthening its role as the indepen-
dent voice of all segments of our
community.
But problems still abound, and even as
we repent we must renew our pledge to
meet the challenges still with us. At
least 400,000 Soviet Jews are still in vir-
tual captivity, too many Jews among us
still face poverty and old age without
sufficient resources, and Israel has the
added dimension of internal religious
strife to add to the lack of real peace.
When one considers that the State of
Israel will celebrate its 40th anniversary
of independence this spring, that
American Jews are a center of attention
from matters ranging from the visit of a
Pope to the national political scene, and
that Greater Miami Jewry simultaneous-
ly maintains its older congregations and
builds new ones, the overall picture is
positive.
Knowing that much remains to be
done, but that much has been done, we
join in welcoming 5748 with a hearty
Happy New Year.
Jews Have Major Stake
How involved should American Jewry be
in the bitter confirmation battle concerning
the nomination of Judge Robert Bork to the
Supreme Court?
Many major organizations such as the
American Jewish Congress, National Coun-
cil of Jewish Women, Na'amat, B'nai B'rith
and Jewish War Veterans of the USA are
actively opposing Bork's approval.
Some Jewish agencies, in the forefront of
the fight for civil rights, stand on the
sidelines.
With the "Jewish seat" held by legal
giants Frankfurter, Cardozo, Brandeis and
Goldberg now clearly history, there seems
every reason for a stand on the nomination
of Judge Bork.
His confirmation would not only tilt the
Supreme Court dearly to the right, but also
would put in ardy the narrow decisions
of recent ye: concerning school prayer,
women's rights and the right of privacy.
AHisro^cexcHANQe
vTIA'
It is Judge Bork's outdated concept of
"original intent" overriding two centuries of
court decisions that is the fundamental
reason why he should be rejected.
That doctrine, so clearly held by the
nominee, would override his pronouncement
to the Senate Judiciary Committee that he
would view every case without preconceived
conservative or liberal views.
While the case for Jews opposing Judge
Bork may not be as clear as for unions,
women, blacks and other minorities, it is
compelling.
Jesse Jackson Again
Reaction of the Reverend Jesse Jackson to
a question on his past anti-Semitic ut-
terances again focuses attention on the pro-
blems which his candidacy for President pre-
sent to the Jewish community, the
Democratic party and to all Americans.
At the same time, preliminary successes of
the Reverend Pat Robertson in his quest for
the Republican nomination raise the
religious issue to the fore on another front.
Fortunately, the "major league" status of
Vice President George Bush, Senator
Robert Dole and Representative Jack Kemp
will relegate Robertson to the sidelines long
before the GOP convention.
But Jackson, who has questioned "Jewish
relations with South Africa" and has said
"let the Jews speak for themselves" in his
latest remarks, is a more serious problem.
The withdrawal of Gary Hart and the
refusal of Cuomo, Nunn, Bradley and others
to enter the Presidential sweepstakes give
Jackson a pivotal role in he 1988 campaign.
So-called "Super Tuesday" presents the
possibility of Jackson garnering enough
strength to make final selection of the
Democratic nominee impossible without his
blessing.
It will be a test of their leadership
capabilities for the active Democratic field
to see which come forward to repudiate any
renewal of bigotry on the part of the
Reverend Jackson.
With Jewish support reportedly critical to
any Presidential nominee, the reactions of
those in the chase against Jackson will be
measured carefully.
Arafat, PLO Offer New Image
By EDWIN EYTAN
GENEVA For three days
running this month, Yasir
Arafat and the senior PLO
leadership used a United
Nations-sponsored conference
on Palestine to present a new
image of their organization
and themselves to the Western
Land.
Breaking with a tradition of
outright hatred and non-
recognition of Israel's very ex-
istence, the PLO was clamor-
ing for an international peace
conference and direct talks
with Israel. Israel was no
longer a dirty word to be
avoided even in private by any
self-respecting PLO leader,
but was described as a future
negotiating partner.
Arafat himself proclaimed in
front of the participants at the
Geneva conference and, later
at a press conference: "I am
not like those (in Israel) who
refuse to cooperate with me or
even pronounce my name. I
want to sit and negotiate with
Israel, and Israel will naturally
be represented at any peace
conference by the Israeli
government. All I want is for
the Palestinians to be
represented by the PLO."
Have the outlook and mores
of the PLO leadership really
changed? Some of the Israeli
peaceniks attending the con-
ference said it was possible
that the PLO has become more
realistic in the face of its
repeated military defeats, its
disillusionment and the
treason of the Arab states.
On the other hand, official
Israeli sources said the PLO
only has undergone a facelift
to help it carry out "Operation
Charm" to seek to win the
sympathy of Western public
opinion.
Outwardly, however, the
change was striking. In the
elegant bar of the Palais Des
Nations, the UN headquarters
here, Faruk Kadumi, tftj
PLO's Foreign Minister and
the advocate of terrorist
methods, puffed away on
thick cigar.
Dr. Fathi Arafat, Yssr/j
brother and head of tiie
Palestinian Red Crescent, sip-
ped coffee and discus*"
medical problems. Abu Jib*
Continued on Page 13-A
Fred K. Shochet
Editor and Publisher
eJewish Floridian

Suzanne Shochet
Executive Editor
William T. Brewer
Director ol Operations
Friday, September 25,1987
Volume 60
Joan C. Teglas
Director ot Advertising
2TISHRI57JJ
Number 3


Friday, September 26, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-a
Jerusalem Mayor Sees Tensions Continuing For 100 To
200 Years ^^^ '
Veteran Teddy
Kollek At 76
JERUSALEM Current
elisions in Israel's capital are
If no real concern to veteran
layor Teddy Kollek. He is
[mfident they will be resolved
ia mailer of 100 to 200 years.
At age 76, having run the ci-
I'or the past 22 years, Kollek
nalyzeB the situation with an
Imost historical perspective.
prom the mayor's office, on
he third floor of the ancient
Jerusalem municipality
iiilding, the dramatic events
If the past year marking the
|0th anniverary of the
eunification of the city do
Jot seem especially dramatic.
"Jews from 103 different
jltures for them to reach
Dme social unity, it takes
ime," Kollek said in an ex-
iusive interview with the
ewish Telegraphic Agency.
je. Kollek conceded, 20
ears is a short time in which
change things, but the last
|0 years have pushed
erusalem far forward. "It is
ill a matter of expectations,"
explained.
Ask any of the people who
^ork closely with the mayor,
nd they will tell you that it is
Sfficult. Kollek demands a lot
his workers and is~ not
iways patient. Yet, his
loyees all thank their lucky
^ars for the privilege of work-
UK with the man who guided
M capital in the historic hour
^hen the city was reunited in
67, and in the stormy years
hat followed.
The Viennese-born Kollek. a
liseiple of the late Premier
lavid Ben-Gurion and as such
[true representative of the old
lapai (Labor) Party, enjoys
Hoe popular support. In a city
kiminated by the Likud in the
Inesset elections, Kollek
pays has won an electorial
ajority.
He is known throughout the
^orld as "Mr. Jerusalem." As
i talented fund-raiser, he has
Wected millions of dollars into
he city through his Jerusalem
foundation.
Kollek likes to stress the
"ty's progress the
reenery, development of
nucational centers, the Israel
luseum, the Birkat Sultan
nphitheater, the Jerusalem
Ntival and the fact that
erusalem draws more than
ne million tourists a year.
Kollek even boasts of the
?e addition of yeshivot, an
Kpression of the rapid growth
the religious population in
city. But at the same time
is concerned by the growing
jnsion between the religious
f"tne secular population.
"The ultra-religious Jews
Hieve that they were the ones
rjo preserved Judaism
W" the centuries. But
Maism was preserved both
fcu ox Judasm and the
LiJi ../,the tfietto," Kollek
ma- After the ghetto tumbl-
aown, ultra-religious
,a&\sm "as preserved a circle
Jews which is getting
na|ier and smaller. More and
[Continued on Page 11-A
Josef Begun, right, greets Alexei Magarik, a 28-year-old Jewish
activist as Magarik steps off a train in Moscow. He returned to
the Soviet capital after beng released from a Soviet labor camp
where he was sentenced for his activism. Begun's own emigration
to Israel has been announced by the Kremlin. AP Wirephoto
Endanger
NEW YORK (JTA) Ab-
ba Eban, chairman of the
Knesset's Foreign Affairs and
Security Committee and
former Israel Foreign
Minister, warned here that an
Iranian victory in the Persian
Gulf war would gravely jeopar-
dize both the security of Israel
and vital Western interests.
He also expressed serious con-
cern over demographic
realities which could deprive
Israel of its "Jewish character
or our democratic principles"
unless the problem of the 1.3
million Palestinians in the
Israel-administered territories
is soon resolved through
negotiations.
Eban, a Labor MK, was
guest speaker at a celebration
held by the American
Associates at Ben-Gurin
University marking the close
of the David Ben-Gurion
Centennial Year, 100th an-
niversary of the birth of
Israel's first Prime Minister.
The occassion honored Jack
Weiler, a prominent New York
businessman and philan-
thropist and Ben-Gurion
Centennial Fellow who has
been associated with the
university since its founding in
1969.
Eban, who also is former
Israel Ambassador to the U.S.,
said: "The mistaken policy of
supporting Iran by the
dispatch of arms is one which
both the United States and
Israel should regret and aban-
don. The most tragic result of
the Gulf war would be a
decisive victory for Khomeini's
Iran. A Middle East
dominated by a fundamentalist
interpretation of Islam would
make it difficult of Israel to en-
joy any degree of peace or
stability and Western interests
would be fatally injured. No
threat from Iraq would be
equal to this danger, and U.S.
policy is now in the right
direction."
He said that Israel, since the
early years of its founding,
"has been a great and noble
adventure" and "has succeed-
Continued on Page 12-A
mim
TM
"He gave me these two tablets and ..aid to call him
in the morning."


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September25, Jj7_


Maestro Shmuel Fershko To Receive Twin
Tributes Sponsored By JNF
Maestro Shmuel Fershko,
one of Israel's most acclaimed
composers and pianists, will be
honored Jan. 19 at a com-
munitywide dinner at the Cas-
tle Premier Hotel in Miami
Beach sponsored by the Jewish
National Fund.
The next day, Fershko will
receive another tribute to his
brilliant career at a concert in
the Theater of the Performing
Arts which will co-feature
renowned Israeli vocalist Yaf-
fa Yarkoni.
For Fershko, whose music
has been sung by Israelis from
pre-statehood days to the pre-
sent, the events will recognize
his distinguished service as
musical director of the Kol Zva
Haganah L'Israel the Voice
of the Israel Armed Forces.
Born in Poland, Fershko was
recognized as one of Poland's
foremost composers as his
Warsaw-written works were
published and heard in Vienna,
France, Italy and England.
But his Zionist beliefs soon
brought him to Palestine,
where he joined the Palmach,
which became the strike force
of first the Haganah. and later,
of the Israel Defense Forces.
He quickly was put to work
writing songs and books for
the fledgling Israeli army.
He has four books and four
major Israeli films to his
credit, including "Faces of
Israel," narrated by Frank
Sinatra. It received an award
at the Cannes Film Festival in
France.
While heading the musical
division of the Voice of the
Israel Armed Forces, Fershko
came to the United States to
study microphone technique
and other electronic innova-
tions. In New York, he wrote
the music for three Broadway
shows "Sound of the
Negev," "Israel Through the
Ages" and "Never Too Late
for Happiness."
After coast-to-coast tours
sponsored by the Zionist
Organization of America pro-
moted his songs to a point
where they were sung by the
likes of Harry Belafonte, Hazel
Scott and the Ames Brothers,
Fershko moved to Miami
Beach.
Together with his wife,
Ahuva, a former model in
Israel, he became involved in
Parliament Of Europe
Hits UN Racism Edict
STRASBOURG (JTA) -
The Parliament of Europe
voted 181-3 to repudiate the
resolution equating Zionism
with racism, adopted by the
United Nations General
Assembly in 1975.
Statement, adopted on the
eve of the opening of the 42nd
session of the General
Assembly in New York,
asserted that "Zionism cannot
be equated to racism" and
declared the 1975 resolution
"unacceptable."
It called on the foreign
minister of the 12 member-
states of the Parliament
which are also the member-
states of the European
Economic Community (EEC)
to "make clear to the (cur-
rent) session of the General
Assembly that member-states
reject the principle that
underlies the 1975 resolution,
which can only increase the
misunderstandings that divide
the peoples of the Middle
East."
It asked the foreign
ministers to make clear as
well, in all international
organizations, the European
Community's commitment to
oppose all types of racial
discrimination and to uphold
the inalienable rights of all
peoples to self-determination
and their legitimate aspira-
tions to live within secure, in-
ternationally recognized
borders.
many institutions supporting
the Jewish State, particularly
the Jewish National Fund. The
Fershkos' two children gave
family support to his countless
hours on behalf of JNF and
other causes.
For 12 years, Fershko pro-
duced "Israelis Are Coming"
at TOP A. He brought the
Israeli Music Hall, starring
Shoshana Damari, to the Fon-
tainebleau Hotel's famed La
Ronde Room before sold out
audiences.
Fershko was seen for 10
years on Channel 10 religious
programs in Miami after
earlier stints in New York
where he produced and
directed "Echoes of Israel"
and "Echoes of Poland" on
shows seen on Channels 5 and
13 and the Dumont network.
Chairpersons for the
January twin tributes to
Maestro Shmuel Fershko are
Lady Blanka Rosenstiel, presi-
dent of the Chopin Foundation
of ISA. and Mr. and Mrs.
Haim Wiener. Wiener is presi-
dent of American Equity
Group and a prime supporter
of cantorial concerts in Israel
and Miami Beach.
Reservations and informa-
tion on both the Jan. 19 dinner
dance and the Jan. 20 concert
at TOPA may l>e secured at
the Jewish National Fund
offices.
Shmuel Fershko
Thousands March
Against Neo-Nazi
PARIS i .1 T A) -
Thousands of peopleI
demonstrated here demand^ |
that Parliament lift the iij.
munitv of rightwinj; leader!
Jean Marie I.e I'en > that he
can le tried for inciting racial
hatred and defending Nazi war |
crimes
Demonstrators were pro
testing Le Pen's public state-
ment doubting the existenceof 1
Nazi gas chambers and the
reality of the Holocaust Le
Pen also downgraded the
massacre f millions
during the second World War |
BS "a minor historical detail.''



I
w^ News -
Roundup
Arafat May Seek UN Invitation
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) Diplomatic sources said
at the opening of the 42nd session of the General Assembly
Tuesday that they do not rule out an invitation to Palestine
' Liberation Organization chief Yasir Arafat to address the
I world body. The sources said the PLO will request that the
UN Secretariat invite Arafat, but noted that in the last two
years, similar requests by the PLO were rejected. Arafat
I addressed the General Assembly only once, in 1975.
Bulgaria May Seek Israel Ties
JERUSALEM (JTA) Agreement signed by Israel
land Hungary in Switzerland to establish interest sections
in their respective countries follows a pattern established
by Poland earlier this year which may extend to other Com-
munist bloc states that severed diplomatic ties with Israel
during the 1967 Six-Day War. Some are suggesting that
Bulgaria may be the next Eastern bloc country to emulate
Poland and Hungary.
Jabotinsky Foundation Honors 4
NEW YORK The late civil rights leader Bayard
Rustin, Soviet dissident Ida Nudel, former Israeli diplomat
Ishlomo Argov, and Dr. Israel Eldad are the recipients of
[the 1987 $100,000 Defender of Jerusalem Award from the
[jabotinsky Foundation.
|jWB Helps Military Greet 5748
NEW YORK Jews in the U.S. armed forces stationed
[throughout the continental U.S. and around the world,
I their families, and patients in VA hospitals once again are
[receiving the support and help needed to observe Rosh
iHashanah and Yom Kippur thanks to the assistance of
[Jewish chaplains and lay leaders affiliated with the JWB
[Jewish Chaplains Council.
Summit Will Hear Soviet Jewry
WASHINGTON More than 200 leaders of national
[Jewish agencies and local communities, former refuseniks
[and legislators, participating in a Leadership Convocation
[convened by the National Conference on Soviet Jewry
|(NCSJ), vowed to continue the fight for human rights for
[Soviet Jews, and to demonstrate publicly during the an-
ticipated US-USSR summit later this year.
[Amit Women Honor 'Shoah' Director
NEW YORK Claude Lanzmann, director of the film
["Shoah," will receive the Amit Women Humanities Award
[at Amit's national convention, Oct. 25-28 Lanzman will
[describe the creation of the 9Mr-hour film that took more
[than 11 years to complete.
|ADL Fights Costa Rican Nazi
NEW YORK The Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith called upon the President of Costa Rica "to rescind
|the temporary residence status granted last week to accus-
ed Nazi war criminal Bohdan Koziy and order his deporta-
tion as an undesirable alien."
|B'nai B'rith Hosts Catholics
WASHINGTON Five Jewish and Catholic leaders who
met with Pope John Paul II in Rome recently will par-
ticipate in a symposium on Jewish-Catholic relations spon-
sored by B'nai B'rith at its headquarters Oct. 13. Topic for
the one day event is "Jewish-Catholic Relations. The
earch For Common Ground." Participants are Rabbi
lordecai Waxman, chairman, International Jewish Com-
juttee for Interreligious Consultations; Rabbi Leon
Jenicki, director of Inter-Faith Affairs, Anti-Defamation
eague of B'nai B'rith; Seymour D. Reich, International
resident, B'nai B'rith; The Most Rev. William H. Keeler,
chairman of the Committee for Ecumenical and Inter-
rehgious Affairs of the National Conference of Catholic
iishops; and Dr. Eugene Fisher, executive secretary,
secretariat for Catholic-Jewish Relations, National Con-
ference of Catholic Bishops.
Ieo-Nazi Wins In Germany
BONN A candidate of a neo-Nazi party won a seat in
Parliament of the federal state of Bremen in northern
errnany, to the surprise and consternation of liberals and
conservative alike. Hans Alterman, a rightwing extremist,
^presented the Deutsche Volksunion (DVU), a party head-
by neo-Nazi Gerhard Frey. Frey publishes the Munich- 8
sed weekly National Zeitung which claims to have
jjcientific" proof that the Holocaust was a fiction and the g
chambers "Zionist propaganda." '.
r:':-:*:-:::;::^
Friday, September 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A

I
AJCongress Supports Mideast Parley
Continued from Front Page
other major faction in Israel's
coalition government, under
the leadership of Premier Yit-
zhak Shamir, has vowed to
fight against any outside na-
tion, especially Russia, from
joining in the peace process
and insists that direct negotia-
tions with Jordan is the only
route to go.
Shamir vowed this week that
Israel will never participate in
an international conference as
long as he is Prime Minister in
the unity government.
President Reagan pledged in
his speech to the United Na-
tions General Assembly this
week that the United States
"will continue to be an active
partner" in the search for
peace in the Middle East.
But the single brief
paragraph devoted to that sub-
ject did not contain any
reference to an international
conference for Middle East
peace.
Theodore Mann, president of
the 50,000-member Congress,
said that the statement
which called for an end to per-
manent Israeli rule over 1.5
Continued on Page 15-A
'KWtSH Jewish National Fund
J^nBo1 (Keren Kayemeth Leisrael)]
Redeems, Reclaims, Rebuilds the Land of Israel
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FOR ALL OCCASIONS
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Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 25, 1987

'Glasnost/Diaspora Unity Cited As Year's Highlights
By MARLENE GOLDMAN
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
In a year of bleak and op-
pressive headlines from
"Irangate," AIDS and the
Persian Gulf to rampant
airplane disasters the news
of the Jewish community
wasn't all negative in 5747.
At least it wasn't according
to nine North American
Jewish leaders and other
notables who reflected for the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency on
important events or trends in
the past Jewish year and what
significance they may have in
5748.
Abraham Foxman, national
director, Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith: One
of the most noteworthy topics
of 5747 in general was Soviet
Jewry and the hope we as a
Jewish community have in
"glasnost" as the beginning of
a process which saw the
release of Prisoners of Zion
and a rise in Soviet
emigration.
We witnessed more move-
ment in the question of Soviet
attitudes toward human
rights. It is a ray of hope an
increase of emigration signifi-
cant in the hundreds compared
to the tens as in the past. The
freedom of one additional Jew
is of great value. That is one of
the changes related to the
series of events under the
rubric of glasnost.
Relatively speaking, we have
seen an increase in emigration.
We are hopeful it will continue
in 5748. It cannot be worse
than it was this year.
Cecily Peters, president,
Hadawah-WIZO of Canada:
In Canadian Jewish news,
after 40 years, finally there is
legislation that will allow for
persecution of Nazi war
criminals. This will definitely
be positive once it is in force.
The Deschenes Commission
(that investigated Nazi war
criminals living in Canada) has
the names of 80 known war
criminals in Canada and we
feel they will be prosecuted
and brought to justice.
Internationally, peace in-
itiatives and the defeat of con-
troversial bills on Jewish iden-
tity were important. But peace
will depend on the new elec-
tions and which party is
elected to power.
On Jewish identity, I hope
the bill will not go through in
the next year. It will certainly
have a bad effect on the rela-
tionship of Israel with
Diaspora Jewry.
Robert Cohn, president,
American Jewish Press
Association: One of the most
interesting aspects about 5747
was the apparent coming of
age in the relationship bet-
ween American Jewish leaders
and Israeli Jewish leaders on a
variety of issues.
The relationship is assured
to the point that Morris Abram
(chairman of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations) can
publicly take issue with (Israeli
Premier Yitzhak) Shamir on
the Pollard spy case and on the
transit of Soviet Jews, and
other American Jewish leaders
can be candid without jeopar-
dizing the closeness of that
relationship.
Also, the fact that Israel
achieved an unexpected
degree of financial recovery is
immense.
The coalition government
also continues to survive
despite the split over the inter-
national Mid-East peace
conference.
There is a lessening of the
escalating tempo of ultra-
violent terrorism. Hopefully
the coming year will continue
this trend.
There is also a healthy ex-
change between the Vatican
world and the Jewish com-
munity. This shows the matur-
ing of relationships of Jewish
organizations; they can res-
pond to matters of concern
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and effectively bring healthy
results.
That Jewish leaders disagree
with Israeli leadership on how
Soviet Jews should be transit-
ted proves we can disagree
with our Israeli counterparts
and have a healthy
relationship.
In 5747, the fact that there
were almost daily reminders of
the Holocaust the (Klaus)
Barbie trial, the "Ivan the Ter-
rible" (John Demjanjuk) trial
and the death of Rudolf Hess
all trials and events remind
us as Jews that we still have to
come to terms with the
significance of the World War
II period. We must keep it in
mind in all we do in the future.
Nat Hentoff, Village Voice
columnist: The most impor-
tant trend in 5747 was a series
of things intensifying in
rhythm and impact in time.
The awareness of American
Jewish leaders of the need to
support Israel by being able to
publicly criticize Israel, in-
stead of pretending everything
is harmonious as with the inva-
sion of Lebanon. We could
have helped Israel if we had
said something.
A Jewish delegation went to
the Israel government about
an issue that was bothering
them the use of (Jonathan
Pollard (as a) spy and I hope
there will be more of that in
the next year.
The traditional arguments to
MIAMI
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silence American Jew.
been that if we argue in ^
the non-Jews will thir/X
not united and we'll lose 22
support, and also (Israelis^
if you re not there, what S
do you have to criticize' %
last^argument is beginni^
The Diaspora should act
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Friday, September 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
use we care about Israel
.n't want to let things to
en that might injure it.
loshana Cerdin, presi-
Council of Jewish
e'rstions: The most signifi-
event is the coming
tther of an organized
fch American Jewish com-
litv on an issue about
they felt strongly to
in concert. Irrespective
he issue, it's the first time
re is a consensus of
ora Jewry.
_spora Jewry has the
onsibility to express con-
j to the leadership of the
reign state of Israel. It's
nportant change that was
big for some time, but only
Jntly crystallized. This
cts a sincere concern and
ual responsibility of
.ora Jewry. !t also shows
nterdependence between
pora Jewry and Israel.
elieve the dialogue will
Inue. American Jewish
prs will feel comfortable
essing concern on issues
will affect Diaspora Jewry
knada and the U.S. It is a
kive sign of Diaspora
' and of concern for "Clal
el."
thua Toledano, executive
president, American
hardi Federation: The
tion of "Who is a Jew?" is
Df the most difficult ques-
the Jewish community
face in the year 5747,
no solution has been
I am afraid concerns
spill over to 5748. It has
ed a division in the
sh community in the U.S.
i Israel. There is also fric-
etween the Diaspora and
estion is most acute in the
where intermarriage is
I rampant. From the view-
t of the Jewish communi-
prael should be a unifying
r. But the division within
pewish community in the
3 now spilling into Israel.
I will create such an ir-
hcilable division within the
fh community that there
t be a lack of dialogue bet-
f different factions of the
ph community. Unless
is some coolheadedness
?ring people to talk
her and find a solution, it
ens the unity of the
ph people in Israel and in
diaspora.
long as religion and
[ are mixed in Israel, it
only get worse. I don't
whether the American
fn community should mix
Turs of the state or shake
atus quo in Israel. The
Wb identity question
both extremes more
and extreme breeds
ne.
less we find some com-
Itorm of language these
RJjffl continue and inten-
I who does one blame?
Fone says their way is
F. which is no starting
Ms for either to talk.
F R"b, retired ex-
C A*i Jewiri
>uuty RelaUoos Cow-
f.1 San Francisco:
rican Jews survived
p. several activities of
f groups and the efforts of
I members to Christianize
F'can institutions. All
Invents ended up with no
f effect on the American
F-out the fact tha they oc-
* at all left Jews a little
Jews should be more con-
cerned about all the events in
the Middle East than those in
America because (the former)
are liable to diminish
America's support of Israel.
The year ends with events in
the Persian Gulf. As
Americans increase their
preoccupatipn with developing
relationships with Arab coun-
tries, it might negatively af-
fect their support of Israel.
Gary Tobin, director of the
Cohen Center for Modern
Jewish Studies, Brandeis
University: I think the Pope's
meeting with Jewish leaders
was an important step in the
face of Holocaust revisionism
and the ongoing pushing on
the part of Jewish leadership
for different religious and
governmental institutions to
face their relationship with
world Jewry, including the
Vatican's refusal to recognize
Israel.
Most important part of this
is not necessarily the resolu-
tion of all these issues, but the
continued willingness of
Jewish leadership to confront
them openly.
In some ways the norms that
restrict expression of anti-
Semitism in the post-
Holocaust period seem to be
wearing off, so the open
discussion of issues concerning
anti-Semitism, particularly as
relates to the Catholic Church,
are very important now.
In addition, there is a
younger generation of Jews in
the United States that seems
to be less participatory and
less knowledgeable about
"tzedakah." It is essential that
Jewish philanthropic organiza-
tions and religious institutions
educate younger Jews about
tzedakah. Younger Jews just
don't give in the way that the
past generations of Jews has,
and it's not because there isn't
enough wealth.
Education Gap Widens Among Israeli Jews
TEL AVIV (JTA)
Education gap between
Ashkenaxic and Sephardic
Jews in Israel has widened in
recent years, and Sephardim
even lag behind Israeli Arabs
in academic degrees, accor-
ding to a survey by Dr. Yaakov
Nahon of the Jerusalem In-
stitute for Israel Studies.
Nahon found that only 6.1
percent of Sephardic Jews bet-
ween the ages of 30 and 35
have attended institutions of
higher learning, against 28.3
percent of Ashkenazic Jews in
the same age bracket. Among
young Arabs, 8.8 percent hold
bachelor degrees as opposed to
H. 1 percent of Sephardic Jews.
According to Nahon the gap
is narrower for the older
generation, where 2.7 percent
of Sephardim had an academic
background, compared to 10.7
percent of Ashkenazim.
Canada Law
OK's Action
Against Nazis
OTTAWA (JTA) Bill
C-71, a law that allows the pro-
secution in Canadian courts of
war criminals whose acts were
committed outside of Canada,
was given Royal Assent
Wednesday, a day after it was
adopted by Parliament
without amendment.
Jeanne Sauve, Governor
General, signed the bill on
behalf of the Queen, a formali-
ty making it the law of the
land. No other country has
ever enacted similar legisla-
tion, although a bill of the
same type has been introduced
in Australia.
The law was drafted on the
recommendation of the special
commission headed by Quebec
Superior Court Justice Jules
Deschenes which conducted a
two-year investigation of Nazi
war criminals living in Canada.
The day
Man met his
soul.
As the Shofar is sounded on Rosh Hashana, it summons humanity to unite in the cause
of freedom and justice. It bids mankind to heed the pleas of all who suffer from oppres-
sion and slavery. It rekindles the spirit of hope and peace for humanity. It evokes die day
in which Man met his soul. It's what makes us Jews.
Kenneth J. Lassman. F.D.. General Manager Douglas Lazarus. F.D.. V.P.
Allan G. Brestin. F.D. Edward M. Dobin. F.D.
Leo Hack. Executive V.P.. Religious Advisor* William F. Saulson, V.P., Family Consultant
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Guardian Chapels


Page 10-A The Jewish FIoridian/Friday, September 25, 1987
South African Jews Oppose Israel Action
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Inner Cabinet's decision
to impose far-reaching sanc-
tions against South Africa af-
fecting almost every aspect of
Israel's relations with that
country has drawn sharp
criticism from South Africa's
Jewish community.
But it is "within the accep-
table framework of differences
of opinion between us,"
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency in a
special Rosh Hashanah eve
interview.
The concerns and interests
of South African Jewry "cer-
tainly were" taken into con-
sideration during the Inner
Cabinet's deliberations, Peres
said. "The Jewish considera-
tion caused us to weigh our
decisions very, very
carefully."
The South African Board of
Jewish Deputies and the
Zionist Federation issued
statements deploring the
Israeli decision and asserting
it would not promote the crea-
tion of a just society in South
Africa.
The Inner Cabinet, the
government's top policy-
making body, is composed of
five Labor and five Likud
Ministers. But the unanimous
decision was adopted by the
six Ministers present. Three
Likud Ministers are absent
abroad, including Ariel Sharon
who is known to be opposed to
tougher measures against
South Africa.
In addition to the sanctions,
the Inner Cabinet resolved
that the government will help
establish a special fund for
assistance in educational and
cultural projects for South
African black and colored
students studying in Israel.
Measures adopted are much
more severe than Israel had
Jews, Blacks Warn
Of Klan Activity
NEW YORK (JTA) A
half dozen members of the
Jewish Defense Organization
(JDO). backed by black youths,
warned residents of a working
class, multi-ethnic
neighborhood that one of their
newest neighbors meant
trouble.
He is local Ku Klux Klan
leader Hank Schmidt, who told
a local newspaper that he had
moved this summer to the
Astoria section of Queens to
mobilize whites for the usual
Klan activities of driving away
non-whites.
The JDO attracted 300 peo-
ple, most of them quiet
bystanders, to its rally in front
of the three-story apartment
building in which Schmidt
lives. JDO leader Mordechai
Levy spoke constantly through
a megaphone, supported by
chanting JDO members
holding two placards reading
Death to the Klan."
At first he urged the
neighborhood to petition the
landlord to expel Schmidt
because of his Klan allegiance
and because he was violating
local zoning by using his apart-
ment as a Klan office.
But as some residents
grumbled that the block had
been peaceful until the rally
and one vocally challenged
Levy's promotion of violent
tactics. Levy intensified his
oratory.
He declared that if the Klan
burned a cross it "would bring
down a lot of heat" on the
neighborhood.
And if the Klan were to hold
a march. Levy said, nearby
black residents would respond
with a riot and perhaps gun-
fire. About two dozens black
youths stood with the JDO and
shouted their agreement.
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previously taken against the
apartheid regime in Pretoria.
They bring Israel into line with
most European countries in
the matter of sanctions but are
less tough than those imposed
or recommended by the U.S.
government and by many
Third World states. Israel's
military relations with South
Africa are not affected nor are
regular trading ties.
Last year Israel imported
about $i81.1 million of goods
from South Africa, mostly
^irSnTSStfofrS8. E?olim ?SM3 ETn Eriar< -*
here stressed that was a *"! s I*"*8' ^T,*Z absorptYm^ W relatively low level of trade, eluding houstng, are Mped^ proceeds ophe Combed J^
The figures do not include i^cPHr rlS"""^ communities. This u their fa
military- items.
Rosh Hashanah in Israel.
L'Shanah
Tovah
For over 70 years. Exotic Gardens
has proudly helped South
Floridians celebrate the Holidays
With elegant fresh floral center-
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This year, let us help you make
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Corporate Office .2700 Mi.Uar> Trail. PO Box 259005. Boyn.on Beach Horlda 33423. .305. 495-2*


Friday, September 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Jerusalem Mayor Kollek Sees Tensions Continuing
kntinued from Page 5-A
Lre Jews either assimilate or
|rn Conservative and
fcform."
According to the mayor, one
the purposes of the State of
rael was to solve this pro-
Lm. He believes that the con-
fct between the state and
fra-Orthodox Judaism is a
tter to be reckoned with
jer 100 to 200 years.
lerefore, one should not lose
Ipe every time tension
ightens.
| would like to see Jerualem
the renter of the Jewish
rld." said Kollek. "If it does
become a center which is
fee I" Conservative and
Iforni lews, then it cannot
tome such a center."
Ilek has not given up hope
Lt the two major political
Is will realize thai me can-
It mt "anything" from the
|i^iiiii> parties, because they
not give up their prin-
llt's. One must minimize
\\r influence on the State of
pel and on our daily life," he
|eacknowledged that Presi-
dium llcrzog was right
en he said Jerusalem should
nerve its special character.
t, in reference to the pre-
\\ controversy over whether
operate cinemas on Friday
hts. Kollek said that the
tnger generation should be
|en care of and have the op-
tunity for weekend enter-
nnient. He also supports the
ktruction of a controversial
I tadium.
the positive side. Kollek
I that in the past 20 years
pro|.....lion of students of
idle Eastern origin at the
brew I'niversity has
Teddy Kollek
jumped from two to 25 per-
cent. "Today they have
become officers, bankers,
directors and even Knesset
members," he added.
This has implications for
democracy here. Of the
113,000 students who attend
the Jerusalem schools this
year, some 69 percent are of
Middle Eastern origin, com-
pared to 25 percent in Tel Aviv
and 17 percent in Haifa.
If one takes into account the
125,000 Arabs living here, one
sees that about 90 percent of
the population has not been
raised in a democracy. Kollek
noted. He was referring to the
Arabs, the Jews of Middle
Eastern origin, the ultra-
religious population and Jews
who came from Communist
countries.
"This is a difficult situation
to work in, but if you see how
neighborhood committees,
both Jewish and Arab,
We Wish All Customers & Friends
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1000 KANE CONCOURSE, MIAMI BEACH
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operate, you realize that we
are doing more to educate
about democracy than others,"
he explained.
Looking at the issues of the
capital on the 20th anniversary
of the reunification, he men-
tioned the problems of Jews
and Arabs last, perhaps becuse
he is aware that one cannot
detach this issue from the
overall Israel-Arab conflict.
"I think that on this matter
we have shown great
restraint," he said. He is proud
that Moslem religious rights
on the Temple Mount have
been assured, despite
challenges by a small group of
Jews. At the same time, he
said, "the school system re-
mained Arab in character, and
no one was forced to give up
his Jordanian citizenship."
Kollek does not regard as
serious the intention of Arab
personalities such as
newspaper editor Hanna
Siniora to run for municipal of-
fice, but he said the city should
think of ways and means to
make life for its Arabs more
comfortable. At the same time,
he stressed, one should tell
them clearly that Jerusalem
will remain the capital of
Israel.
The mayor does not like to
answer questions on a possible
political solution for Jerusalem
which would also be acceptable
to the Arabs in an overall
peace settlement.
"We cannot meet all their
demands, because then they
will want Jaffa as well. But we
should consider some form of
self-government in Jerusalem,
perhaps in the form of dividing
Continued on Page 13-A
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For 2,000 years,
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Thanks to the heroism of
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was liberated In 1967
Celebrate 20 years of United Jerusalem-
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During the
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buy Israel Bonds
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Triday, September 25, 1987

*
Alaskan Exploration Issue Impacts On Oil Dependency
By MORRIS J. AMITAY
A major decision that the
Congress is expected to face
this fall will undoubtedly have
important ramifications for
U.S. foreign policy in the Mid-
dle East and Israel's security
more than 10 years from now.
And unless our elected
representatives are sufficient-
ly farsighted, we could pay
dearly for a wrong decision, or
inaction. The issue Congress
must decide is whether to open
up a comparatively tiny por-
tion (one percent of the total
acreage) of the Arctic National
Wildlife Refuge (ANWR -
usually referred to as "An-
war," as in Sadat) for oil ex-
ploration or designate it as
an inviolate wilderness area,
or by doing nothing prevent
development.
For friends of Israel who
recognize the danger of grow-
ing U.S. dependence on
foreign source, and particular-
ly Middle East oil, there should
be little hesitation in suppor-
ting legislation permitting
exploration.
With the current flow of
close to two million barrels of
oil per day from the adjacent
Prudhoe Bay field declining
steadily and due to run out by
the end of this century, poten-
tial production from the new
finds in ANWR would be the
only substitute from a
domestic U.S. source.
Already, the trend of im-
ports is alarming, with almost
half of U.S. oil now being im-
ported. And while increased
conservation measures and
more attention to the develop-
ment of alternative energy
sources must also be sup-
ported, the most urgent
energy issue to come before
the Congress in the near
future will be the issue of drill-
ing for oil in ANWR.
Debate on Capitol Hill will be
influenced heavily by the conti-
nuing turmoil in the Persial
Gulf, and rightly so. The large
flotilla of American warships
now deployed there is a telling
sign of how energy
dependence dictates foreign
policy.
In this connection the latest
Joint Program Plan put out as
guidance to 11 national and
113 community Jewish agen-
cies contains a very important
warning citing the "inexorable
increase in the amount of oil
being imported to the U.S."
The plan also states that "The
ability of our government to
formulate and conduct foreign
policy undominated by energy
considerations, and without
fear of economic reprisal, must
be a clear, conscious and fun-
damental objective."
the efficacy of environmental directly impact
on
future
Eban
Continued from Page 5-A
ed beyond expectation in its
capacity for survival against
assault, for economic growth,
for cultural dynamism, for
social consolidation and for un-
paralleled service to the rescue
and pride of Jews
everywhere."
Nevertheless, Eban warned,
"We come to the next decade
in a mood of crisis and confu-
sion about our structure, iden-
tity and values." He declared
that Israel is "exercising a
coercive jurisdiction over a
foreign population embracing
1.3 million non-citizens who
have no definition of their civil
rights or their national per-
sonality and who neither give
nor owe any devotion to our
flag, our faith, our tongue, our
national vision, our Zionist
principles, our Jewish solidari-
ty or our historic experience.
"Within a dozen years there
will be 4.5 million Jews and 3.5
million Palestinian Arabs in
the enlarged area of the Land
of Israel. We shall face the
danger of losing our Jewish
character orj our democratic
principles or both. Nothing but
a peace settlement with the
determination of agreed boun-
daries and effective security
arrangements and com-
mitments can resolve this
structural disharmony," Eban
said.
He stressed that "The new
structure has to be negotiated.
It cannot be unilaterally
resolved, nor can there be a
total return to the fragile
situation out of which subse-
quent wars have erupted.
What Secretary (of State)
George Shultz, one of the
Jewish people's most faithful
friends in all our history, has
diagnosed as 'the demographic
time-bomb' has come near to
explosion. ."
rnienuu ouj^uv. safeguards"should win the day. U.S,Israel relations I?*
Opposition to exploration of J^ ^^ ^ f C
WR, we should all be aX
breathe a little easier Tn?
face of any attempts at 1
blackmail a decade from now
Morris J. Anntay is/,^
executive director 0( li.
A merica Israel Public Affair!
this region comes from en-
vironmental groups whose ma-
jor fear is that the caribou
(local reindeer) herds may be
adversely affected. Ex-
perience with Prudhoe Bay
(only 60 miles to the west)
however, shows that these
herds have tripled since
development there. The part
of the arctic coast in question
is so bleak and remote that
there is hardly any other place
in the entire country where
drilling would have less
adverse impact on both
humans and wildlife. In fact.
the few hundred hardy souls
living in this region support
development enthusiastically.
Already, the New York
Times, the Wall Street Jour-
nal, and the Washington Post
have come down on the side of
development in three tightly-
reasoned editorials. A
respected columnist recently
put it this way: "(if) one has uf"
choose between caribou and
country, it is hard to see how
there is a choice."
It will not be easy to allay all
the fears of opponents of drill-
ing who fear disturbance of
what they call "a unique
ecosystem." They have
mobilized massive letter-
writing campaigns to members
of Congress, many of whom
are loathe to antagonize this
vocal constituency. In the end,
however, common sense, the
Prudhoe Bav experience, and
What
task is to get more people to
realize the inextricable link
between our national security
and greater energy in-
dependence, and to get the
leadership in the American
Jewish community to
acknowledge how this could
Committee (AIPAi',),
Operation Moses brought these Ethiopian Jewish women to
Israel. With the assistance of funds provided through CJA drives
in Florida Jewish communities, the new immigrants are finding
their place in Israel. They attend schools, learn trades and con-
tribute to the growth of the country after initial training, and
will observe Rosh Hashanah this year as free women.
Foreign Affairs on Video
QUESTION ANSWER
....I haw* quit* a few
tapes from Israal and
other foreign countries
In PAL and SICAM.
Some ara foreign TV-
hows that frlands
taped off the air. Some
event tapes, some ara
European asovlas In the
original format and
language. I know, all of
them will not play on
my American TV.
Where can I purchase
a VCR that plays mU my
tapes In HIPI Stereo? Do
I need an additional tor -
elgn TV set 7 very body
says to hava them con*
verted Into MTSC for-
mat, but the going rate
Is 1100.00 par hour and
I haard a special VCR
M.A., CHICAGO.IL.
As a rule muitistnndard ma-
chines are very cosily and always
require multistandard monitors
None of them offer HiFi Stereo
There is. however one device
that does not require the purchase
of a monitor The IMAGE
TRANSLATOR from Instant Replay
is a full featured American VCR
It plays all PAL and SECAM
speeds and has all luxury NTSC
features such as multi-speeds, ca-
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effects, multi-event programmer.
VHS HIFI and even SUPER VHS
HQ
All this on most regular TV's III
even has a unit that plays and re
cords in all 3 standards anywheit
in the world
This machine would allow your
family, friends and business part-
ners abroad to play tapes that you
recorded here in USA for them and
at the same time to record pro-
grams in Israel for you For more
information: INSTANT REPLAY
2951 South Bayshore Drive
Miami. FL 33133 (305) 448-7088
On the eve of the Greater Miami Jewish Federations Golden Anni-
versary, we wish you and your family Shana Ibvafrom the Officers,
Board of Directors and Staff.
May the New Year 5748, the 40th anniversary of the State of Israel
and our 50th year of community building, renew our strength to
meet our peoples changing needs, refresh our compassionjor all
who live in want, and reawaken our resolve to seek contentment,
peace and freedom.
GREAT ER MIAMI JEWISH F ED E RAT KM!
OFFICERS
PRESIDENT
Aaron Podhurst
mm MATE PAST PRE SIDE NT
Samuel I Actor
VICE PRESIDENTS
Norman Bremen
Steven J. Krevrtz
Donald ELanon
Nancy Upolf
Forrest Raff*
Howard R. Scharhn
SECRETARY
Marina E.Schwartz
ASSOCIATE SECRETARY
HarbartCanancfc
TREASURER
Michael MAdtor
ASSOCIATE TREASURER
AtanHafcanmin
EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT
Myron J Brodw
ASSOCIATE EXECUTIVE
VICE PRESIOEMT
Elton J.Kerneea
ASSISTANT EXECUTIVE
VICE PRESIDENT
Arthur L. Far*
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
DavWAbramowRz
LJulaaArkln
Richard M.BacaN
Harold Bach
SabyBahar
JackBatoch
HetoneBerger
Jeffrey L. Berkowltz
RicnardABerkowitz
RoatynBamn
Benjamin Botwinick
Arvm Uoyd Brown
Jack Burstoin
Sharman Cantor
Ralph Charran
Sidnay Cooparman
IrvtooCypan
Amy Dean
Terry Drucker
MyraFarr
Pal P Fine
David B Fleeman
Harvey Friedman
MorreFutornick
Harry Gampel
Gary Of son
QokJie R Goldstein
Martin Goodman
Joseph Handtoman
Samuel Herte
Charlotte He
IRXXM I WeWOwffu
Arthur Horowitz
MaVtinKatt)
M**vm L Kavtzmv
iiooeno aaaaai
EzraKatz
ShapardKIng
Jonathan KaJak
CalKovena
M. Ronald Krongotd
Sidnay Leteourt
WWarn Lehman. Jr.
iH Levme
Harry A (Hap) Levy
Joel Levy
Norman Lieberman
Norman HUpoff
AnrttoMafta
Elton Mandtor
Isaac MHdenberg
Dr Douglas Miser
LaonardMMtor
Linda Minkaa
Stanley C Myers
Gal Newman
Jeffrey Newman
Gerald On
MXhaetOkn
NedraOren
David Paul
Dorothy Podhurst
Nan Rich
EeenRoea ^^
ftobtx David Sattrran
Sandi Samoa
David Sc*aeeier
RwwsndSchat*
Michael S*
Gerald KSchwarO
SidShneider
Fred K. Shot**
NcnwSho*
ElaHeSirverston
HerryB Smith
Shirley Spa*
EkTimoner
Robert Treung
ErKTuretoky
PhiapT Warren
Norman W""*
NormaKon-Witw"
MaryanneWWun
Barry S.Yerch*
GREATER MIAMI JEWISH FEDERATION
THE CENTRAL ADDRESS Of THE JEWISH COMMUNITY


[letters to the Editor
[Pope's Visit: Another View
EDITOR:
My thoughts have come full
ring about the Pope's visit to
,iami and the Church's evolv-
ng position toward the Jews. I
^st admit that my first
nought was that the position
hat a Jew should take was
wt of a spectator, a passive
Je. After all, the Pope is not
spiritual leader.
jince he is loved by millions
, poeple and came to the
[fnited States to repair his
hurch, why should Jews take
nything but a passive role?
/hy should we risk offending
atholics? By being vocal and
lemanding to the Pope,
louldn't this offend the
tatholics?
J As I reflect, I realize that I
las being more sensitive to a
ossible Catholic reaction than
) my Jewish brethren. Both
itholics and Jews believe in
he truth and we should not
kr the truth or the consc-
iences of telling the truth.
I The Second Vatican Council,
1 the promulgation of Nostra
letate, turned a welcome cor-
V in Catholic-Jewish rela-
bns. It was the church that
quested an audience with
h leaders in Miami.
Friday, September 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
| Jews have every right to ex-
ess our concerns to the
atholic Church in particular,
1 specifically to the Pope. If
rs have learned anything
om the Holocaust, we have
ely learned the dangers of
; passive.
| We have every right to de-
nd that the truth be told
that our sensitivities be
^spected. As we should
spect the sensitivities of
atholics.
I The Golden Rule do unto
hers as you would have them
unto you is a cornerstone
both Christianity and
pdaism. We must all strive to
1 true to this most basic of all
pmandments. I have no pro-
em with the Pope meeting a
of state, especially a
heavily Catholic State.
But to meet Kurt Waldheim,
an unrepentant Nazi, and
praise him as a man of peace
without also recounting his
Nazi past is an insult to the
truth and to the Jewish people.
After countless centuries of
persecution and anti-
Semitism, culminating in the
Holocaust, Jews have every
right to demand that the
Church officially recognize
Israel.
Anti-Semitism is real. This
sickness is alive and well both
in the United States and
throughout the world.
Catholics as well as Jews are
distinct minorities in many
communities. As two great
moral and ethical religions, we
should move together for the
betterment of ourselves and
mankind. We have much to of-
fer and can both teach the
world that the truth is to be
pursued and told. Without the
truth there can be no justice
and no peace. Without the
truth Catholic-Jewish relations
will never be normal.
Let the truth be told. It is an
insult to the Jewish Communi-
ty that the Pope met with Kurt
Waldheim without condemn-
ing his Nazi past. The failure
to recognize Israel will always
be a barrier to a normal rela-
tionship between Catholics
and Jews. It is so because it is
a perception that this official
church position is a continua-
tion of other past positions
that have since been
repudiated by the Church.
I applaud the meeting with
the Pope and the continuing
dialogue between our two
great faiths. I am confident
that a time will come when
members of all faiths will not
only call each other brothers
and sisters, but also believe it.
When that time comes we will
surely have peace.
Sincerely,
MARTIN E.LE VINE
Thank You ...
DITOR:
[We write to express our ap-
reciation for the beautiful
ory about Beth David which
ppeared in your newspaper
gently. It was truly a
parkable description of the
rnagogue's past and present
N future.
I We feel our responsibility as
fiami's pioneer synagogue
N our motto is: "75 Years
Pd-and Looking Forward."
w goal in this 75th year is
only to revel in the
fhievements of the past,
Pnd as they are. but to focus
on the tasks that face us in the
present and on the plans that
we must make if we are to be
equal to the challenges of the
future.
The Floridian has been our
partner and our help all
through these years and we
are most grateful for your en-
couragement and support in
the present, as reflected in this
wonderful news story that you
have done.
RABBI JACK RIEMER
ALBERT J. BEER
President,
Beth David Congregation
American-Born Israeli
Died Aiding Commander
can-
leir
SV^K Amerk-
n Lt Alexander Singer.
L \T ,srael Defense
,./', ld'ers killed when
"Patrol was ambushed by
Lin 'StS Jn the SOUth
K .security zone, died
inHin yin-to hell) his com-
* VfflCer- &* Ishai
" Weizman. who was
' wounded by the first
fusillade, the IDF disclosed.
Singer, who met death on his
25th birthday, was buried Fri-
day. His funeral was delayed
to allow his family time to
come to Israel. Funeral ser-
vices were held earlier for
Weizman, 22. and the third
fatality, Pvt. Camille Oren, 19,
who was killed while trying to
assist the fallen officers.
Washington Conference Scheduled To
Press Claims Against Arabs
Arab states bear respon-
sibility for absorbing and in-
tegrating Palestinian refugees
who live in their midst as
well as for paying compensa-
tion to hundreds of thousands
of Jewish refugees forced to
flee their countries in the wake
of Arab aggression against the
new-born state of Israel in
1948.
This theme will be the focus
of the third international con-
ference of the World Organiza-
tion of Jews from Arab Coun-
tries (WOJAC) Oct. 26-28 in
Washington, D.C.
The Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations is coor-
dinating the event in coopera-
tion with the American Jewish
Committee, American Jewish
Congress, Anti-Defamation
League, B'nai B'rith, National
Jewish Community Relations
Advisory Council and World
Jewish Congress.
In a "Call to the Con-
ference," Kenneth J. Bialkin,
who will chair the event,
described the plight of the
600,000 Jewish refugees from
Arab lands who "left behind
the real property and a
lifetime of possessions,
cultural and religious
treasures amassed over many
generations, yet have never
been compensated for this pro-
perty or for their suffering."
Bialkin said the conference
would demand that Arab
states allow their remaining
Jewish populations the right to
emigrate freely, and "fully ab-
sorb and integrate their
brethren Palestinian refugees
who reside in their midst."
Bialkin, immediate past
chairman of the Conference of
Presidents and of the Anti-
Defamation League, said that
the application of United Na-
tions Security Council resolu-
tion 242, affirming the necessi-
ty for achieving a just settle-
ment of the refugee problem
as an essential element in the
establishment of a Mideast
peace, 'must take into con-
sideration the historic plight of
Jewish refugees from Arab
lands."
Kollek
Continued from Page 11-A
the city into boroughs," he
said.
"What we cannot offer them
is what President Sadat of
Egypt suggested once to
keep a unified city with a divid-
ed sovereignty. This means a
divided police force and a
divided legal system. As a
result, the wall (that divided
the city from 1948-67) would
reappear within a very short
span of time and I don't
think you will be able to find
today Arabs in Jerusalem who
want the city redivided."
Kollek has not declared
whether he will run for
another term in office. "I will
judge by the prospects to
achieve a majority for a sane
policy," he explained.
If, as he put it, "the ultra-
Orthodox will link with the ex-
tremist nationalists," Kollek
will bid farewell to city hall.
Arafat, PLO Offer New Image
Continued from Page 4-A
who runs the PLO's terror
squads, socialized with the
Israeli representatives.
Raymunda Tawil, who ran a
pro-PLO news agency in
Jerusalem and who now lob-
bies for the organization in
Paris and Washington, was
chic in a flowery silk dress. She
exchanged smiles and
greetings with the Israeli cor-
respondents, Shafiq Al-Hout,
the PLO representative in
Beirut who commands the
Palestinian commandos in
Lebanon, wore battle dress,
but it was white and impec-
cably ironed.
Only Arafat himself Abu
Amer, as his followers call him
wore his traditional khaki
uniform and a checkered red
queffiah. And he still sported a
two-day beard.
But even Abu Amer has
changed over the last few
years. His uniform has become
well cut in what appeared to be
a good quality English cloth,
his speeches were delivered in
a calm and somewhat
monotonous voice and he
seemed to use every oppor-
tunity to show his "good will."
The new Palestinian line, if
it is to be believed, seems to
rest on political and diplomatic
action, and its main target is
Israel and especially Israeli
public opinion.
In a private conversations,
the PLO leaders who no
longer avoided the Israelis
here, especially the Israeli
press hammered away at
one main point: "We are open
to all suggestions. We want
the fighting to end; 40 years is
enough. The time has come to
sit down and talk. You (the
Israelis) will find us far more
reasonable and moderate than
you imagine."
In public, Arafat went much
further than ever before,
which seemed to indicate that
he enjoyed the support of all
major Palestinian factions, in-
cluding the more extremist
ones. He told a press con-
ference here:
"If I want to take part in a
peace conference, it is not to
sit down and negotiate with
the representatives of the
Arab countries, but with
Israel. I want to discuss with
the enemies against whom I
have fought for many years to
elaborate a lasting, just and
global peace.
"I hope the Israeli leaders
will hear me. The entire world,
both East and West, now
backs an international peace
conference. The chances for
such a meeting are today bet-
ter than even before and may
not reoccur again. Some
Israeli leaders, like (Foreign
Minister Shimon) Peres and
(Minister-Without-Portfolio
Ezer) Weizmann, understand
this, but they make a major
mistake by playing the Jordan
option instead of talking to the
Palestinians themselves."
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< '
Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. September 25. 1987
Intermarriage Poses
Ongoing Problems
Fascell Sponsors Attack On AIDS
Continued from Page 2-A
whether people punish a part-
ner with words or with silence
after an argument, can also
cause friction in a relationship.
These differences also may
be elements which attract
partners to each other. But the
Cowans advise people to be
conscious of deeper underh
differences in beliefs wl
can widen into gulfs during
periods of stress.
"If I had loved Paul for emo-
tional qualities, for his op-
positeness. but hadn't liked his
Jewishness, my goal would
have been to draw out his emo-
tions but to draw him away
from Jewishness," Rachel
reveals.
"That would have been
disastrous for both of us, for
our marriage," says Paul can-
didly. "There would have been
no way that my growing com-
mitment to Judaism would
have weakened, and I would
have wanted a more and more
Jewish home."
People who have
underestimated the impact of
religious and ethnic dif-
ferences may need to
reevaluate their feelings and
even re-organize the marriage,
the Cowans assert.
"People have to decide if
their ethnic and theological
differences are surmoun-
table," Paul admits, "but it's
best to lay it out on the table.
Talk can be painful, but it can
also be funny and can bring
people closer together, and it
is exciting to learn more about
yourself, to learn about a new
culture."
One of the elements which
can rip an interfaith marriage
apart at the seams is the same
element which may have
helped to create the union:
Jewish ambivalence toward
other Jews.
"It's incredibly important
for Jews to look at their views
about Jews," says Paul, poin-
ting out that many Jews have a
negative self image about
other Jews, and hence marry
outside the religion.
"These views often have
their roots in a culture which
has a norm of Christian anti-
Semitism, and you can't help
but inherit some of those ideas
and turn them on yourself,"
Paul explains.
"What you really are is a
mirror of the dominant
culture's view of Jews," he
adds. "But you don't recognize
that. Jews have to look at their
inability to fall in love with
Jews of the opposite sex."
In the course of a marriage,
assimilated Jews may come to
feel a growing fondness or ap-
preciation for their heritage,
or, under stress, may grow to
think that the non-Jewish part-
ner harbors anti-Semitic
feelings.
Perhaps, then, when Jews
resolve their conflicted feel-
ings about themselves, their
Peace Fellowship
Elects President
Rabbi Philip Bentley of
Jericho, N.Y. has been elected
president of the Jewish Peace
Fellowship, succeeding author
Naomi Goodman of New York.
culture and their religion, they
lglC
)fO!
will be more likely to forge suc-
cessful marriages both with
other Jews ana with non-Jews.
Contradictory as it may
sound, it may take making
Jews feel better about
themselves to make interfaith
marriages a winning
proposition.
Congressman Dante Fascell
(Dem.-Fla.) has joined in spon-
soring legislation that would
launch a major attack on the
problem of AIDS and in-
travenous drug use.
The Intravenous Substance
Abuse and AIDS Prevention
Act of 1987 would provide
$400 million for the establish-
ment of grant programs for
treatment services for in-
travenous drug abusers, for
demonstration projects to
reduce or prevent the in-
cidence of AIDS in infants and
to provide support to infants
who have such infections, and
for projects directed toward
preventing AIDS among in-
travenous substance abusers.
Two-hundred million dollars
of these funds would be used
for grants to public and
private non-profit .,rkraniM
tions to provide treatment ser
vices to intravenous substano
abusers. Priority 75 percen,
of the funds would be riven
to those areas with the higher
incidence of drug abuse
Florida ranks third in the na
tion, behind only New York
and New Jersey, and would
therefore, be one of the
highest recipients of these
grant funds, Fascell said.


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Friday, September 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
'We Are A Democratic Community,
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
The media has noted that
Jewish leaders showed dishar-
mony by jockeying for too few
seats at an audience with Pope
John Paul II in Miami last
week.
In addition, news accounts
reflect Jewish leaders being in
disagreement about whether
they should even have met
with the pontiff.
And a recent front page
story in The Miami Herald,
carries an attack by one
Jewish leader on Rabbi
Mordecai Waxman, honorary
president of the Synagogue
Council of America, for chang-
ing the wording in a pre-
written statement to the pope
from "anger" to the more sub-
dued "distress."
The article was headlined:
"U.S. Jewish leaders find uni-
ty is elusive."
But rather than take this
media coverage as a sympton
of concern, some Jewish
| leaders are viewing their
disputes as a healthy sign.
"We are a democratic com-
munity. We believe in
democracy and therefore, dif-
ferences are a part of the pat-
tern of Jewish life," said Dr.
Irving Lehrman, rabbi of Tem-
ple Emanu-El, and a past
president of the Synagogue
Council of America.
The Synagogue Council of
America is a national Jewish
organization that has under its
umbrella two representatives
from each of the three major
Jewish movements, Orthodox,
I Conservative and Reform.
The Herald article reported
that Franklin D. Kreutzer,
president of the United
Synagogue of America one
of the Conservative members
of the SCA had threatened
to pull his group out of the
SCA because of his own
distress over Rabbi Waxman's
I word change.
Kreutzer. a Miami lawyer,
told The Jewish Floridian, that
he is not leaning toward such a
I drastic measure.
"'I don't think that
(withdrawl from the SCA) was
an accurate statement,"
Kreutzer said. "I don't think
we'll pull out, but it (the issue)
is something that will have to
be put on the table."
Further, Kreutzer said, the
fact that the speaker deviated
from the prepared text, which
had been drafted by leaders of
several major Jewish organiza-
tions, is an internal problem.
That there was a consensus
statement in the first place
"shows unity," he said.
The word "anger" had been
used in the prepared text to
express the feeling of Jews
about the audience the pope
granted this summer to
Austrian President Kurt
Waldheim, an accused Nazi
war criminal who has been
banned from this country by
the Justice Department.
Most major Jewish organiza-
tions took a stand not to at-
tend the Miami meeting of
Jews and the pope, unless he
had agreed to meet with them
in advance for substantive
talks.
The pope did grant that re-
quest, and a delegation of nine
Jewish leaders conducted a
private meeting with him in
Rome.
After that meeting, all but
the Orthodox sectors of the
SCA agreed to continue the
Miami meeting with the pope.
Rabbi Waxman was selected
as a substitute to read the
statement to the pope after the
Orthodox sector of the SCA
objected to SCA president
Rabbi Gilbert Klaperman as
spokesman because of Rabbi
Klaperman's Orthodox affilia-
tion. Rabbi Waxman is a
representative of the Conser-
vative movement.
"There's a big difference
between distress and anger,"
insisted Kreutzer. "Distress
indicates everything from
minor to not-too-important to
it really doesn't make a
difference.
"That was not the view of
the American (Jewish) com-
munity. It was anger, which is
being greatly concerned about
a situation that causes us much
grief and frustration."
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The Herald article noted
that while strides had been
made toward Jewish-Catholic
solidarity that "No one has yet
figured out how to achieve
Jewish solidarity."
According to Rabbi
Lehrman, American Jewry "is
not monolithic. It is a
democratic, pluralistic society
comprised of many groups
with a multitude of varying
opinions."
While the Jewish community
does not have a hierarchy,
Rabbi Lehrman added, it does
have several national coor-
dinating or umbrella organiza-
tions such as the SCA, the
Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish
Organizations and the
American Zionist Federation.
These organizations speak
only when there is a unified
opinion of its constituents and
differences are neither
unusual nor undesireable, he
said.
"On matters such as support
for Israel, for Soviet Jewry,
for human rights, the
American Jewish community
usually speaks with one voice,
because these are concerns
that touch the vital core of
Judaism," Rabbi Lehrman
said.
The statement prepared for
Rabbi Waxman to read to the
pope was a consensus of
thought representing the rab-
binical and synagogual
organizations, he noted.
"Rabbi Waxman understan-
dably looked up at the pope
several times during the
presentation and if he deviated
from the prepared text in one
or two words during the
18-minute message, for exam-
ple, substituted distress for
anger, it in no way misinter-
preted the concerns of those in
the meeting with the pope,"
Rabbi Lehrman concluded.
Rabbi Herbert Baumgard
almost was the one in Rabbi
Waxman's spot. Rabbi
Baumgard. founding Rabbi
Emeritus of Temple Beth Am,
is the immediate past presi-
dent of the Synagogue Council
of America.
Rabbi Baumgard, who is a
leader in the Reform move-
ment, said from his knowledge
of the Herald article, the
report sounded like "sensa-
tionalism," and was "not bas-
ed on a sober consideration of
the total situation."
The truth, he said, is that
Jewish leaders work together
on many issues, and there is a
unity of working on inter-faith
problems except when it in-
volves theological issues."
"I knew he (Kreutzer) didn't
mean "pull out" even if he said
it in a moment of anger," Rab-
bi Baumgard said.
"I would say that on the
whole Rabbi Waxman did an
extremely good job in
representing the Jewish peo-
ple. If he didn't do everything
to suit my own personal
desires or the desires of the
Reform movement, the fact re-
mains that he did a wonderful
job and I don't know anyone
else who could have done a bet-
ter job."
As for Jewish disharmony,
Rabbi Baumgard said the
Catholic church has problems
Rabbi Lehrman
Rabbi Baumgard Kreutzer
that are manifest in all
religions today, namely that it
has its own liberals and
traditionalists.
"What is true is that the
right wing of the Orthodox
movement is finding it difficult
to cooperate with it's own left
wing and with Jewish
organizations in general.
However, they (the Orthodox
sectors) are still a part of the
Synagogue Council, and that
indicates they want to
cooperate on a certain level,"
Rabbi Baumgard said.
When it comes to Catholic-
Continued on Page Hi-A
AJCongress Supports
Mideast Peace Parley
Continued from Page 7-A
million Palestinian Arabs in
the West Bank and Gaza,
broke a tradition under which
the American Jewish organiza-
tions have refrained from
speaking out on issues affec-
ting the peace process.
/
The Congress would not
have gotten involved if the
Israel government had clear
positions on the peace process,
the AJC said. But because the
government of Israel itself is
divided and deadlocked over
how to approach the peace pro-
cess, the organization said, it
was "necessary and ap-
propriate" for American Jews
to participate.
An 18-member Congress
task force visited Israel in ear-
ly July, and held discussions
with Israeli government of-
ficials, academicians and
foreign policy and defense ex-
perts representing the entire
range of Israeli opinion.
The result was the policy
statement approved by a
220-member delegation of the
Congress' National Governing
Council on Sept. 13.
Within the next 20 years,
Israel could see an Arab
population that equals the
Jewish population and unless
"political adjustments" are ef-
fected, Israel will be forced to
choose between becoming a
non-Jewish state or a non-
democratic state," the state-
ment said.
But the proposal that the
Arabs of the occupied ter-
ritories be granted full Israeli
citizenship is both unrealistic
and impractical, the Congress
said. "Jews would become a
minority in their own land, and
the vision of a Jewish state
would be rendered
meaningless."
The Congress disagrees with
any call for maintaining the
status quo or the annexation of
the occupied territories. While
it offers understanding that an
international peace conference
is not the ideal path to go, the
Congress states that Jordan's
King Hussein has "made it
clear" that he requires an in-
ternational "imprimatur" to
protect him from PLO ex-
tremists and will engage in
tentative negotiation with
Israel only in the context of an
international forum sponsored
by the five permanent
members of the UN Security
Council.
On the other hand, the Con-
gress said, the written
understandings reached bet-
ween Peres and Hussein and
the safeguards they contain
have not been adequately
st ressed.
These understandings pro-
pose that the goal of the con-
ference is to involve Israel and
Jordan in direct negotiations
and that the Soviet Union will
be obliged to restore
diplomatic relations with
Israel and liberalize Jewish
emigration.
The Congress statement
conceded that there were risks
in joining such a conference,
for example, having to leave
the conference table and suffer
condemnation as the party
that broke up the conference.
A delegation of Miamians
participated in the meeting in
New York at which the over-
whelming majority approved
the statement.
Among those delegates was
Norma Orovitz, regional presi-
dent of the Congress.
Orovitz said she had some
concerns about whether or not
an American organization
should be judgmental of the
Israel-Palestinian problem.
"In the end we chose to en-
dorse (the resolution),"
Orovitz said. "And I believe
we're the first American
Jewish organization to do so.
It's better to talk with all the
parties than not to talk."


Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 25. 1987


We Are A
SA5
Democratic Community
Continued from Page 15-A
Jewish relations, Catholics do
look to the Vatican for leader-
ship, but Catholics also know
which American groups they
can turn to for guidance, and,
they indeed do, he says.
These agencies include the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith. the American
Jewish Congress and the
American Jewish Committee.
As for an apology from the
Pope about his reception of
Kurt Waldheim, Rabbi
Baumgard said heads of state
don't make that kind of
apology.
"You can get what you seek
from them in other ways.
Anyone who would insist on a
formal apology shows his lack
of sophistication in intergroup
negotiation. EP
Meanwhile, Kreutzer said he
still has not directly con-
fronted Rabbi Waxman about
the change of words. "It will
be done at the next (SCA)
meeting," he said.
Kreutzer does agree with an
article written by Washington
Post columnist Richard Cohen
that basically lambasted
American Jewish leaders for
wimping out and failing to
press the pope on key issues.
Cohen said Jewish leaders
did not get any change on the
pope's opinion on Waldheim
"not even a public explanation
that Austria insisted on the au-
dience and that it was granted
because the pope sees all heads
of state.
"John Paul's audience with
Waldheim represented a vir-
tual papal pardon for the
Austrian head of state. As
such, it is an insult to Jewish
and non-Jewish Holocaust vic-
tims. But instead of reacting
with outrage and criticism,
Jewish leaders seemed
downright grateful just to
have their own importance
certified by a papal meeting.
They thanked the Pope for his
time. What he gave them was
more like the breeze," Cohen
wrote.
Said Kreutzer: "Audiences
with the pope are inap-
propriate. We need dialogue. I
dont think the meetings (in
Rome and Miami) mark pro-
gress. Clearly, the progress
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end of it means you have made
accommodations, concessions
and arrangements, and I'm
not talking about viewing
Judaica and having exhibits."
There is somewhat of a con-
sensus among Jewish leaders
that Catholic-Jewish relations
must be carefully nurtured and
that over the course of the past
22 years, almost 2,000 years of
mistrust and contempt are
slowly, slowly being turned
around.
The difference seems to be
that some Jewish leaders are
accepting tidbits as progress,
while others want a Vatican
turnaround to be delivered by
Express Mail.
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Friday, September 25,1987 The Jewish Floridian Section B
New East Berlin Rabbi Greeted
NEW YORK Rabbi Isaac
Neuman, East Berlin's first
resident rabbi in nearly two
decades, officially met his new
congregation at dedication ser-
vices for the re-opening of
East Berlin's only synagogue
in time for Rosh Hashanah.
Rabbi Neuman, a Holocaust
survivor from Champaign, 111.,
recently arrived in East Berlin
to assume his new post, a
result of four years of efforts
initiated by the American
Jewish Committee. An AJC
leadership delegation was on
hand to greet Rabbi Neuman
upon his arrival.
Joining Rabbi Neuman were
Dr. Peter Kirchner, president
of East Berlin's Jewish com-
munity, Cantor Ingster of the
GDR and Cantor Friedman of
Budapest who carried in the
torahs, young members of
East Berlin's Jewish communi-
ty, high ranking East German
government officials, and
various ambassadors to re-
open the Rykestrasse
Synagogue just before the
start of the Jewish New Year.
Constructed in 1903, it was
once one of the main
synagogues for East Berlin's
175,000 Jews. Damaged in
November 1938 during the
Nazi rampage known as
Kristallnacht (Night of Broken
Glass), it was then taken over
by the Nazis and used as a
horse stable and storage area
for military equipment. In
1945 the synagogue reopened
and became the first post-war
"working" synagogue in
Berlin.
Greater Miami Rabbis
Ready Holiday Sermons committee Named For
Israel's 40th Anniversary
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jtwuk FloridUm Staff Writer
For 40 years, Rabbi Max A.
Lipschitz has been preparing
Jigh Holy Day sermons. And
or 40 years, sure as the sum-
der rains, the labor over his
MBMge is intense.
"After 40 years on the
luloit. I still agonise over the
ligh Holy Days," says
|iipschitz. the spiritual leader
" Beth Torah Congregation.
"Number one, it is the high
olidays. They are the Days of
Lwe. You stand in fear and
[embling in the presence of
"Second reason is you do
we your entire congregation,
fhere you don't have them in
ch large numbers the rest of
the year. So you want to im-
pact on them four sermons
which have to be four home
runs.
"Third, there's probably a
bit of ego. Because of the large
attendance, you want to make
sure you make the most mark-
ed impression."
Rabbi Lipschitz is not alone.
Many rabbis are quick to point
out without devaluing their
weekly sermons that a bit
more time and labor is fed into
the Rosh Hashanah and Yom
Kippur messages.
Obviously, this phenomenon
is attributed to the fact that
the holidays draw the biggest
crowds most synagogues see
in a year.
But this seasonal set of ser-
mons comes at the time known
as the Days of Awe, and this
prompts many rabbis to do
some soul-searching of their
own before they ask their con-
gregations to do the same.
Rabbi Lipschitz begins
preparing his High Holy Day
sermons sometime around
mid-summer. This year he will
focus on the moral degeneracy
of America. He is not alone.
Several rabbis, incuding him,
say they will point to the Wall
Street insider trading case of
Ivan Boesky.
"He (Boesky) has embar-
rassed us. It's the height of im-
morality and ethics. The Jew
cannot desecrate the name of
Continued on Pag* 3-B
The National Committee for
Israel's 40th Anniversary has
issued a 25-page guide listing
hundreds of events and perfor-
mances scheduled during the
next 18 months. The organiza-
tion has been designated as the
national coordinating body and
clearinghouse for anniversary
activities by the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations.
Howard M. Squadron is
chairman of the 40th Anniver-
sary committee.
Six national organizations
have provided the vice
chairmen for the coordinating
body.
The American Zionist
Federation, Council of Jewish
Federations, National Jewish
Community Relations Ad-
visory Council, Synagogue
Council of America, State of
Israel Bonds and the United
Jewish Appeal each
designated their respective
presidents.
Morris B. Abram is chair-
man of the Conference of
Presidents.
Hungary Matches Grant To Repair Martyrs Temple
BUDAPEST (JTA) A
heck for $80,000 to repair the
flartyrs Temple here was
(resented to leaders of the
Hungarian Jewish community
fy Rabbi Arthur Schneier,
Resident of the Appeal of
onscience Foundation.
, The Foundation is an inter-
B'th group that seeks to pro-
note religious freedom around
ne world. The gift was made
"sible, Schneier said, "by
he generosity of Ronald
auder, U.S. Ambassador to
Austria and an associate of the
tPPeal of Conscience
foundation."
Hungarian government of-
fals led by Miklos, head of
"e Hu"ganan Church Office
'a Post equivalent to that of
mister of Religion took
F1 in the ceremony at which
"e Appeal of Conscience gift
P .fewpted by Jewish com-
ply leaders.
LS a reception given by
[WosmSchneier's honor, the
Kl?an off,cial announced
C government would
L? a matching grant to
,e.nvate the synagogue.
Ilkl<* told the reception^
his government "values and
appreciates" the 20-year rela-
tionship between the Founda-
tion and all religious groups in
Hungary.
The Martyrs Temple was
built in 1919 on the grounds of
the giant Dohany Synagogue
as memorial to the 10,000
Hungarian Jewish soldiers kill-
ed in action during World War
I. It seats some 350 worship-
pers and is used by the
Budapest Jewish community
during the fall and winter
months because it is easier to
heat than the Dohany
Synagogue, the largest Jewish
house of worship in Europe.
The Martyrs Temple was
rededicated after World War
II as a memorial to the 600,000
Hungarian Jews who perished
at the hands of the Nazis and
Hungarian fascist
collaborators.
Lauder told the reception:
"My family and I have been
blessed, and I believe it is only
right to contribute to this wor-
thy cause as a measure of
gratitude and of the respon-
sibility we bear for one
another."
Lauder, who is Jewish, told
his hosts that his grandparents
had come to the United States
from Satorarjaujhely, a town in
Hungary, 90 years ago. The
Appeal of Conscience gift was
accepted by Dr. Andras Loson-
ii, president of the Hungarian
Jewish community.
'H
United Way To
Hit The Streets
Volunteers from 10
Dade County communities
are preparing to take to
the streets for United
Way's 1987 communities
campaign effort, under the
direction of Communities
co-chairs Sue Miller and
Electra Spillis.
Volunteers will turn to
neighborhood residents,
professionals and small
businesses, after the
general kick-off of the
campaign on Tuesday,
Sept. 22.
"1 tU-"(T,*g."Vi.', :,fi3f',"J^,,|.,
TO
^,ye IP***1*
c-,--;"> ^rfwi'V .JC JW 5' -""VL''
"-tfij",i y^ifw p^v>', B"p| '-
JERUSALEM Page from a unique, hand-written High Holi-
day mahzor, dating from Spain in the Hth century and following
the Catalonian rite is pictured. The mahzor is in the manuscript
collections of the Jewish National and University Library of the
Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The mahzor, which is decorated
in the margins with micrographic drawings made up of passages
from the Psalms, was donated to the library by New York philan-
thropist Ludwig Jesselson.


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 25, 1987
Likud Knesset Member, 'Moderate9
Palestinian Attempt Peace Moves
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Disclosure this week that
Likud Party figures had con-
tacts with pro-PLO Palesti-
nian nationalists over the
future of the West Bank seems
to have shaken Israelis and
Palestinians alike, with dif-
ferent results.
While Moshe Amirav, the
Likud Herat MK who confirm-
ed meeting the Palestinians,
got a tongue-lashing from a
fellow Likud Knesset member,
and Premier Yitzhak Shamir
disavowed any knowledge of
his actions, one of the Palesti-
nians involved was badly
beaten by masked youths,
believed to be students at Bir
Zeit University in the West
Bank.
Likud is vociferous in
demanding legal action
against Israeli leftists and
doves who defy the ban
against contacts with
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
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tion members. Likud contacts
with PLO supporters were
first disclosed by the small
Jerusalem newspaper, Kol
Ha'ir.
According to the report,
Amirav, a senior Herat figure,
held meetings with Dr. Sari
Nusseibeh, a lecturer in
philosophy at Bir Zeit, and
Palestinian activist Feisal
Husseini, presently under ad-
ministrative detention for
alleged anti-Israel activities.
Nusseibeh also reportedly met
with another Likud MK, Ehud
Olmert.
Amirav told the newspaper
Hadashot that in the course of
his meetings with the Palesti-
nians they stated "that they
not only recognize the State of
Israel but are even prepared to
go (along) with an autonomy
settlement, the Likud's plan."
"I reported this to the Prime
Minister as well as to other
central Likud members,"
Amirav said. Shamir declared,
"This surpasses all imagina-
tion. I had no knowledge of
those meetings whatsoever."
He added that he hardly knows
Amirav, a member of the
Herat Central Committee.
Avirav maintained that
while Likud may be "viewed
by the public as dogmatic,
various opinions are under
consideration concerning the
road to peace. Despite the fact
that my plan has not been of-
ficially adopted by the Likud,
it is known, and has been
presented for discussion
several times," he told
Hadashot.
According to Amirav,
Nusseibeh arid Husseini, the
Palestinian activists, accepted
the plan he said he explained
to them for the West Bank.
Florida Supreme Court
Jtisttce Gerald Kogan ofMiamx
will address members of th<
B'nai B'rith Bench and Bar
chapter Wednesday at a 7 n n
dinner at the Biscayne Bav
Marriott Hotel.
Muss, Kaskel To Get
Honor From Chamber
n
Hotel owners and nationally
prominent developers Howard
Kaskel and Stephen Muss will
be honored by the Miami
Beach Chamber of Commerce
at a Community Tribute Lun-
cheon Wednesday, Oct. 7, at
noon at the Fontainebleau
Hilton Hotel.
Muss and Kaskel will be
feted for "their outstanding
contributions and faith in the
future of Miami Beach and
Greater Miami," according to
announcement by Dr. Irving
Lehrman, general chairman of
the Chamber's luncheon
committee.
Kaskel is the principal owner
of the Doral Properties of
Florida, including the Doral
Hotel on the Ocean and the
Doral Country Club.
Muss heads the Muss
Organization, which owns and
operates the Fontainebleau
Hilton, Seacoast Towers Ren-
tal Apartments and the
Quayside Luxury Con-
dominium Complex.
I
I
At ELITE SINGLES Over
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Greater Miami Rabbis
Ready Holiday Sermons
Friday, September 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-L
Continued from Page 1-B
|(;,| in the presence of the
I world-"'
Rabbi Lipschitz also
[remembers the words of his
father, who warned that a rab-
|bi should always feel as if he
were en trial, even though he
lhas B life contract with a
[synagogue. There is a rabbinic
[saying, "Oh ye wiseman, be
careful with your words,"
[because of the danger of being
[misinterpreted and also of
Imisrepresenting the Torah and
I tin Judaism that you teach.
For that reason, Rabbi Rami
[Shapiro, leader of the
[Reconstructionist congrega-
tion at Temple Beth Or, says
the High Holy Days are no dif-
ferent, because rabbis always
[should be careful what they
I say in front of a congregation.
Because of the large holiday
Icrowds, however, Rabbi
[ Shapiro says he wants to make
[sure he is speaking directly to
their needs, which, for him,
means avoiding political ser-
[mons and social commentary.
"I'm much more concerned
I with life crisis, what they may
[be struggling with at the
1 moment.
"The other factor that
I comes into play," he says, "is
the nature of the holiday. It's
certainly one time of year
when people are taking stock
of themselves. You want to
speak to the notion of 'Where
[ am I? Where am I going?' "
This year, Rabbi Shapiro
I says he will discuss why people
don't change; why last High
Holyday season the con-
gregants say what they intend-
ed to do and why, a year later,
they haven't changed. People
are frightened to death of
change, he concludes.
Rabbi Brett S. Goldstein,
leader of Temple Shir Ami,
would prefer not to use the
word "agonize" to describe his
holiday sermons because it is a
word associated with labor
pains.
"One strives to compose ser-
mons that are meaningful and
timely and that speak to the
issues of the day, and conse-
quently once the sermon
[ comes forth it's like giving
birth to something you've
created," says Rabbi
Goldstein.
This year, he will address
several topics, including one
generated by Judith Viorst's
book, "Necessary Losses."
"We'll be dealing together
with the concept of friendship,
what we do when friends
disappoint us or when they fail
to live up to our expectations
and the different kinds of
friendships we deliver.
"Another theme," says Rab-
bi Goldstein, "will be the need
K> take a risk in life. Abraham
gambled when God told him in
[he beginning of Genesis to
eave his place of birth and go
to a new place. He picked up
bis family from Babylonia and
wok a risk. And so today we
nave a risk every time we
">oose a mate, contemplate a
lamily, choose a career."
fiet Shira Congregation
leader, Rabbi David Auerbach,
nds the Holy Day sermons
nave gotten both easier and
harder.
"It gets easier because you
have more experience at what
you're doing. It gets harder
because after a number of
years you've spoken on all the
major issues there are to speak
on."
Rabbi Auerbach concedes
that rabbis probably do craft
their holiday sermons with a
little more care, not so much
because of the numbers, but
because he faces a group he
often gets to address only once
or twice a year.
This year, his theme will be
children; how to make children
not only our physical heirs but
our spiritual heirs.
Congregations may be used
to being admonished over the
High Holy Days, but Auerbach
says it's not necessary "to hit
them over the head with a
hammer.
"We're dealing with con-
gregations today that are bet-
ter educated in the general
sense, but Jewishly they're not
educated. On the one hand,
you have to teach basic things,
and on the other hand you
have to get them to see how it
relates to them.
"In my congregation we
have close to 1,000 children.
One of the reasons I will talk
about children besides what
it says in the Torah is
because I have a lot of young
parents who want to know
'how I can raise my kids so
they will have the same values
1 have, the same concerns I
have, etc' What I'm hoping to
get them to see is however
they want their children to be,
that's the way they have to
be."
Each sermon that Rabbi Pin-
chas Weberman, of Ohev
Shalom Congregation, pro-
duces is labor, the rabbi says,
but on the High Holy Days the
subject would be different
because it is more hardhitting,
more demanding, "because we
have to make an accounting of
our souls, an introspective
search.
"We have to look to the past
year," Rabbi Weberman says,
"and find fault and try to make
a decision to eliminate these
faults. These are important
days. They are days of
judgement.
Rabbi Weberman only ex-
pects 10 percent more of a
crowd for the holiday .sermons
than for sabbath services.
"Our congregation has
matured in the last 10 years,"
he says. "There's a new
generation among Orthodox
circles which takes religion
more seriously all year."
Expectations are high this
time of year, says Rabbi Gary
Glickstein, spiritual leader of
Temple Beth Sholom.
Rabbi Glickstein Rabbi Weberman Rabbi Lipschitz
Rabbi Goldstein Rabbi Auerbach
Rabbi Freedman
He spends anywhere from a
month to a week preparing for
a regular Shabbat service.
"But the high holidays are
always on my mind. From the
moment they are over I think
of how I approach the next
high holidays.
The holidays bring anticipa-
tion that change will take
place. That is why Rabbi
Glickstein says there are
stories about famous repen-
tance experiences which take
place this time of year. One '.lX
such story is about Franz
Rosenzweig, who became a
famous Jewish educator in
Germany but who had been on
the verge of converting to
Christianity when he went to a
Yom Kippur service as his last
tie with Judaism, but instead
found his bond to Judaism
Continued on Page 10-B
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Ronzoni Sono Buoni-Ronzoni Is So Good!


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 25, 1987
Community Corner
An exhibition of the paintings of Andre Zwi Berger,
entitled "Kabbalistic Images: 'Creation' will be held
at Temple Beth Sholom's Lowe-Levinson Art Gallery
through Oct. 19. _____
American Jewish Congress, Justine-Louise Wise
chapter, will meet Wednesday, at 12:30 p.m. as the
American Savings and Loan Association Bank Building
at Alton and Lincoln Roads. The program will include
guest speaker Norma Orovitz and a mini-lunch hosted
by Sylvia Kaplan. ____
The Michael Ann Russell Jewish Community Center,
in conjunction with its Cultural Arts program, will hold
a ten week course in Calligraphy beginning Wednes-
day, from 10 a.m. to noon, at the Center. Students will
learn the basic semi-formal italic hand.
'Nu, What's New?" is the name of the talk to be given
by William F. Saulson, guest speaker for the Women's
American ORT meeting on Thursday, Oct. 1 at 1 p.m. in
the Morton Towers Auditorium. Mr. Saulson, a family
consultant, is Riverside Memorial Chapels' director of
the public service Speakers Bureau.
B'nai B'rith Women is forming a new chapter for
women in their 20's. The group will hold its next
meeting on Tuesday, at 7:30 p.m., at the Hillel Jewish
Student Center on the University of Miami campus.
So. Shore Hospital Names
Pepper Its 'Man Of Century
E$Sb ****"
AU Roo **"'",
Color TV SR*'*^0'
Fully Air Conditional
Strictly DfWjLiw*
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SUCCOTH or Wgjg"
OCT. 7-11 t4AA ptfpMM
5 DMSI4 N/GHTSS1U0-0CC
\ r .. i 1IFALS DAILY (3Me* Shabtws %**
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Gen. Uzi Narkiss
Jewish Satellite
Network Enables
Live Broadcasts
The Jewish Satellite Net-
work is a new service utilizing
communications satellites to
enable Jewish organizations to
deliver live broadcasts to their
branches, offices, schools or
synagogues.
Miami, as a member of the
Council of Jewish Federations,
is one of 23 communities to
subscribe to the CJF Satellite
Network, the first in house
system set up through the
Jewish Satellite Network.
The World Zionist Organiza-
tion, a charter member of the
new satellite network, will be
the first to use the system,
through its information
department headed by Uzi
Narkiss, to provide programm-
ing to Zionist and other
organizations.
FLORIDA'S
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BROWARD
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For Yr Shopping Convenience SUN SPA Has A Mini-Bus
Compl entary Transportation To Leading Shopping Plazas
Congressman Claude Pep-
per will be honored as the
"Man of the Century" by
South Shore Hospital and
Medical Center at its Grand
Renaissance Ball Saturday
night. Oct. 10, at the Fon-
tainebleau Hilton Hotel.
Rep. Pepper, who served for
almost 14 years as Florida's
United States Senator, was
the recipient of the Miami
Hcuh hospital's first com-
munity service award which
was then named in his honor
nil to than a decade ago.
The Claude Pepper Com-
munity Service Award for
1987 will be presented at the
Renaissance Hall to a com-
munal leader to be .-fleeted by
the medical center's board of
directors.
South Shore is affiliated
with the University of Miami
School of Medicine and is a
community hospital specializ-
ing in geriatric care, education
and research.
Announcement 0f ,i
tribute to Pepper, who f
represented South ?\Zh
the Congress since w?*
has almost 40 years S
in the two houses WL 2
by Marshall H Berk^S
dent and chairman XI
board, and by I)r Willil
Zubkoff, executive dirm!*,
South Shore. "a,rector<<
JWV Elects
New Commander
Jack Lite, of Cherry Mm
was elected Nations] (\1
mander of the Jewish fc
Veterans of the l\S.A.at
organization's 92nd annual 2
tional conventi. n in Kiamesha
Lake. PO .
Lite, a Korean war veterar.
has been active in the Jewi*
War Veterans for more than
".'1 years and has held various
leadership positions on the
local, state, and national
levels.
High Holy Days in
CURACAO
Visit
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ISRAEL
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museum and delve into history
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Friday, September 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
osher Expo Lauded For Beach Location Temple Emanu-El
Miami Beach's Mayor Alex
Daoud proclaimed December
4.7 "Kosher Foods and Jewish
j jfe Week." in honor of the In-
ternational Kosher Foods and
Wish Life Expo to be held at
Ithc Miami Beach Convention
Center.
In his proclamation. Mayor
haoud said, "I am sure this
kvent will be a huge success,
flu- selection of the Miami
JJeach Convention Center is a
Reflection of your understan-
ding that our city has a great
kotential for the marketing of
kosher food and .lewish life
Droducts.
The Miami Beach Expo is
tolled "the biggest celebration
kf Jewish life ever seen," by its
fereator, Irving I. Silverman,
president of Nancy Neale
Enterprises. He directed the
Expo held at the Jacob K.
Davits Center in New York in
March.
According to Silverman, the
Jxpo was created in response
|t<> the increasing national de-
nand for kosher food pro-
ducts. It attracted an
estimated 42,000 visitors to
the more than 190 exhibits.
The Miami Beach Expo will
jiclude 650 booths and feature
pxhibits of Judaica, art, books,
nusic, an Israeli and Interna-
tional Pavilion, a mini-
khopping mall, as well as
Alex Daoud
tastings of delicious kosher
foods.
Silverman chose Miami
Beach as the site of the second
Expo because South Florida
has the second largest Jewish
population in the nation, se-
cond only to New York. He
adds, "More than 10 cities ask-
ed to showcase the Expo, but
we chose Miami Beach because
of its vital young growing com-
munity, its history of Jewish
tradition and its hospitality."
Jewish civic and educational
groups, as well as religious
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Now the community has something good to celebrate.
The Fontainebleau Hilton has invested $2 million in
an all-new Kosher Banquet Facility. We now offer:
Completely separate facilities dedicated
strictly to Kosher food.
Capability to serve up to 10,000 Kosher
meals at a sitting.
All food preparation under strict rabbinical
supervision.
For great weddings or bar mitzvahs, the Fontainebleau is
just the beginning. Contact our catering department at
538-2000, extension 3521.
leaders have welcomed the In-
ternational Kosher Foods and
Jewish Life Expo, and are en-
couraging members to
participate.
Rabbi Solomon Schiff, of the
Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami, said "This is a
fine opportunity for the Jewish
community to come together
to enjoy the wide spectrum of
kosher foods and Jewish
books, artifacts, Judaica and
literature. At a time when
many Jewish people, especially
our young people, are looking
Sets Music Program
Most comprehensive music
program in the history of Tem-
ple Emanu-El of Greater
Miami has been announced for
1987-88 by Lawrence M.
Schantz, president of the
Miami Beach congregation.
Cantor Yehuda Shifman will
coordinate the extensive pro-
gram for both Temple Emanu-
El and the Lehrman Day
School, Schantz said.
Cantor David Conviser.
formerly of Temple Beth
Sholom in Miami Beach, has
l>een designated to lead the
Temple Emanu-El Choir,
which will sing at most Sab-
bath and holiday services.
A Children's Choir, under
the direction of Sharon
Chazan, will meet Sundays
from 10 a.m. until noon and
Saturdays from 9:30 a.m. until
11:30 a.m.
Cantor Conviser also will
direct the volunteer Temple
Emanu-El Chorale, which will
augment the Temple Emanu-
El Choir at many services.
Prof. J.B. Dyas, head of the
jazz department at Miami-
Dade Community College, will
coach a jazz ensemble Sunday
mornings. Music programs at
the Lehrman Day School will
involve instruction by Cantor
Shifman. Sharon Chazan. Hilit
Shifman, Aley Sheer and Elise
Bernstein.
Other aspects of the music
program include the Mi-
nyonaires, which will be con-
ducted by Dr. Irving Lehrman
every Sunday at the Lehrman
Day School. The half-hour
morning services will include
different musicians and
singers drawn from the Tem-
ple Emanu-El music program.
Dr. Lehrman, whose chan-
ting of Neilah service during
the High Holy Days is an an-
nual highlight of the congrega-
tion's religious activities, is
working closely with Cantor
Shifman in enlarging the scope
of the music program, Schantz
said.
Sheldon S. Cohen, former com-
missioner of the Internal
Revenue Service, will speak on
"Current Legislation Affecting
Charities" at the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's
15th Annual Tax Seminar on
Tuesday, Oct. 6 from S-5 p.m.
at the Biscayne Bay Marriott.
The seminar, which is being
presented by the Federation's
Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies, will also include a
panel of attorneys and accoun-
tants who will discuss tax plan-
ning techniques. The event is
free of charge.
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Page 6-B Tte Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 25, 1987
Sen. Gordon Elected
By Jewish Colleagues
Senator Jack D. Gordon
(Dem.-Miami Beach) has been
elected Southern regional vice
president of the National
Association of Jewish
Legislators. He is one of four
regional vice presidents
selected, and also will serve on
the 12-person national board
of directors of the NAJL.
Headquartered in Albany,
N.Y., the organization was
founded 10 years ago as a
loose-knit body of state
legislators of Jewish descent.
Purposes are to exchange ex-
periences and information, to
provide a forum for the Israel
Ambassador to the United
States, American State
Department officials and
others on matters affecting
Israel.
The NAJL serves as a quick
referral source for any Jewish
legislator seeking information,
pro and con, on any issue affec-
ting Jews, and acts as a chan-
nel of communication between
legislators and Jewish national
organizations, if asked. It also
serves as a data bank on issues
pertinent of Jewish legislators.
Sen. Gordon stressed NAJL
is "not a caucus. It doesn't
seek power. It will have no
'line.' It will not take stands on
specific bills, and is a non-
profit, educational organiza-
tion. It will not formulate posi-
tions on issues which divide
Grenald Markets
New Perfume
Distribution of a new pro-
duct, Tiffan 'E' perfume, has
begun in three Southeastern
states and in France, Spain,
Venezuela and Israel. Ben Z.
Grenald, a pharmacist and
cosmetics manufacturer who
has served four years on the
Miami Beach city commission,
announced the international
marketing effort.
Grenald said the perfume,
packaged in crystal imported
from France, is being produc-
ed in one-ounce and half-ounce
sizes. He describes the
fragrance as a delicate blend of
oriental and floral fragrances.
Twice Vice Mayor of Miami
Beach, Grenald heads the
city's clean-a-thon efforts.
Restaurant Guide
V>^ Introduces its V
NEW SEASON MENU
NEW EARLY BIRD DINNER $6.95
HOMEMADE DESSERTS
ALSO COMPLIMENTARY GLASS OF WINE
EARLY BIRD: S TO 8 P.M.
Sen. Jack Gordon
the Jewish community."
Former President Pro Tern
of the Florida Senate, Sen.
Gordon is the senior member
of the Dade delegation to the
state legislature, and former
Dade chairman. He served on
the Dade County School Board
prior to his election in 1972,
and has won re-election by
decisive margins ever since.
He represents a district com-
prising Miami Beach and its
neighboring communities, part
of Miami and Key Biscayne.
Sen. Gordon is national vice
president of the American
Jewish Congress.
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Home-made garlic roll* A daaaarta
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Friday, September 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Happenings
The Gloria Luria Gallery announces the opening of an exhibi-
tiofl by New York artist Jack Ox on Priday evening. Oct. 9. from
7 30 to 9:30 p.m. The exhibit will continue through Saturday
Oci 31.
Democratic Party presidential contender Congressman Richard
Gephardl of Missouri, will address the monthly Democratic
Breakfast Forum Thursday. Oct 1 from 8-5) a.m. in the Trianon
Room of the Intercontinental Hotel.
South Dade Center Players, a class in Creative Drama meets
every Thursday. 1:30 to 3 p.m at the South Dade Jewish Com-
munity Center. Under the direction of Gin Rossak. drama teacher
and social worker, participants study voice projection, lighting, set
decoration, make-up. costuming, acting and creating original
plays The class is ongoing
AMI Palmetto General Hospital and the Miami l.akes Athletic
Club are offering cholesterol screenings for the public on Tuesday.
Oil <>, from 5:30-930 p.m. at the Miami Lakes Athletic Club
Alan A. Lewin. MD. has been named Medical Director of the
Regional Cancer Treatment Center at Baptist Hospital An
honors graduate of the George Washington University School of
Medicine. Dr Lewin has served as the Associate Director of the
( enter since its opening in 1982.
[*he liases will be loaded at the 1 Ith Annual World's Longest
Softball Game being held Oct 2-4 at the University of Miami's
Mark Light Stadium Proceeds from the event will benefit the
Diabetes Research Institute at the University of Miami School ol
Medicine sponsored by the Coral Gables Jaycees Games atari ai
6 p in Frith) and finish Sunday at 4 p.m.
Cynthia Zeigkr of South Dade has been promoted to Assistant
Director of the Zoological Society of Florida, the major support
and fund raising organization for Metrozoo. Zeigler has been with
the Zoological Society since 198.5 as director of development and
director of membership
Miami business leader Abel Holtz has been named 1987 chair-
man for the second annual Miami Children's Hospital's inter-
national pediatrics Hall of Fame induction gala. Nov. 7.
Property Tax Appeals
For hotels, apartments, shopping centers,
office buildings, restaurants, warehouses,
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Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 25, 1987_
-
Write
Dear Komi
For Advice
Dear Nomi. in advice column, will appear regularly in the
pages of The Jewish Floridian.
Dear Nomi:
Is there a basic difference
between the problems of Jews
and those of non-Jews? I have
a considerable number of non-
Jewish friends both at college
and at home and we discuss
our parents, our futures, and
share many of the same
concerns.
But sometimes when my
mother and father are discuss-
ing something in front of a
non-Jew, they will exchange
looks and then change the
subject.
Are they being old-
fashioned? Are there some
things that are supposed to be
inappropriate to discuss with
non-Jews?
but also shows that he doesn't
trust me to act honorably if
something should happen to
our marriage.
What should we do? He
refuses to marry me without
the agreement; I'm not sure I
want to get married with it.
Sincerely,
Bride To Be, or Not To Be?
Dear Bride:
Almost nobody gets married
for the first time thinking,
'we'll get married, live
together for a few years,
grow apart, begin to dislike
each other, get divorced and
then argue bitterly about
who gets what assets from
the marriage.'
Yours,
Troubled
Dear Troubled:
It is my firm belief that human
beings the world over share
many of the same problems
and concerns. While
cultural and ethnic dif-
ferences may effect how
people deal with their pro-
blems, there is no reason
why people of different
faiths and backgrounds
should Hot attempt to
bridge that gap through
dialogue.
But there is an unwritten rule
that most Jews, as well as
members of other ethnic
groups, religions and
minorities, tend to follow.
That rule is; while you may
speak freely, complain, even
jokingly insult members of
your own group in the com-
pany of other members of
that group, you choose your
words more carefully in the
presence of a person who
belongs to another group.
The reasoning behind this un-
written rule is that there is
a bond between members of
a group, much like the bond
between members of a fami-
ly. You may complain about
your mother to your sister,
but would you speak the
same way to your friend,
even your best friend?
Probably not, because no mat-
ter how close you are to
your friend, he or she did
not grow up with you, and
so does not share the same
belief system.
Your parents are probably
following this unwritten
rule when they decide to
change the subject of a con-
versation in the presence of
a non-Jew.
Yours, Nomi
Dear Nomi:
I am getting married for the
first time to a divorced man.
We love each other very much,
plan to spend the rest of our
lives together, and have
children.
But my husband-to-be feels
his ex-wife took advantage of
him, and insists upon having a
pre-nuptial agreement. I feel
this shows not only a lack of
faith in the enduring quality of
our commitment to each other,
But quite a few people who
have been married and then
divorced badly think this
way; many of them refuse to
ever take the chance and
get married again.
I can't tell you what is right
and what is wrong, only
what is realistic; your fiance
is unlikely to get married to
you without that agree-
ment, and the plain facts
are that in today's society,
many marriages do end up
in divorce.
Perhaps your optimism and his
caution could make for a
good match. But if you want
the kind of man who will
say, 'what's mine is yours,
what's yours is mine, until
death us do part,' you may
need to search for another
partner one who has not
lived through a bad divorce.
And that, of course, provides
no guarantee that you will
not end up possibly getting
a divorce even a messy
one.
Yours, Nomi
Write Nomi for advice in care
of The Jewish Floridian, P.O.
Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101.
New Baryshnikov Film 'Dancers'
To Premiere In Miami Oct. 10
"Dancers," a film starring
Mikhail Baryshnikov and
members of the American
Ballet Theatre, will make its
Miami premiere at a gala
screening Oct. 10, according to
Concert Association of
Greater Miami president Judy
Drucker. The film travels to
Miami only after special world
premiere showings in New
York and Los Angeles.
The preview will take place
at the Castle Premier Hotel,
Miami Beach.
"The Concert Association is
delighted to host this very
special evening, donated to us
by Cannon Films, with the
generous support of the
Hirschfeld family, owners of
the Castle Premier hotel," said
Drucker.
The evening will include a
Champagne reception, and
dinner and dancing following
the screening.
Mikhail Baryshnikov
May
the year
5748
_bless
you with
health and
happiness.
American
savings^
OF FLORIDA
(iti^^AjJ^*
hepard Broad
Chairman
Executive Committee
Morris N. Broad
Chairman
of the Board
SERVING SOUTH FLORIDA SINCE 571


WetkUnty
Friday, September 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
-
r. and Mrs. Scott Everett Mesh
GULBRANDSEN-MESH
[Sandra Lynn Gulbrandsen, daughter of
\>bbi and Carl Gulbrandsen, Jr., and Scott
verett Mesh, son of Sandy and Howard
Mesh were married August 16 at the Hotel
bofitel. Rabbi David Auerbach and Cantor
Stephen Freedman officiated.
The bride wore a gown of white satin and
English net with an A-line skirt hemmed in
Venice lace, a touch of schiffli embroidery,
lustrous flowers and pearls over ball gown
sleeves and a princess bodice dipping to a bas-
que waist, forming a chapel train. Her veil fell
from a headband of flowers and pearls to
match the gown.
The bride's maids of honor were Virginia
Munson and Gloria McAnary. Bridesmaids
and matrons were Terry Dalegowski and
Caren Papacosta, sisters of the bride, Donna .
Barber, the bride's cousin and Ronna Weiner,
the groom's sister. Junior bridesmaid was
Ashley Dalegowski, the bride's niece. Beth
Weiner, the groom's niece, was flower girl.
The groom's best man was Ron Peters.
Ushers were Dan Stein, Doug McCandless,
Mike Bruney and Bill Lewe.
The bride's two grandfathers took their
places. One is an 89 year old, first generation
Miamian, Carl Gulbrandsen, Sr. Her other
grandfather is Harold Harter, Sr. of Deltona.
The groom's grandmother, Rose Mesh, was
escorted down the aisle by her nephew, Jerry
Kanter of Cincinnati.
Scott is a mortgage broker with Davis Mor-
tgage Consultants. Sandy works for Bell
South Advertising and Publishing Co. of
Jacksonville, where they reside.
Hadassah
Events
Udimah Chapter of
dassah will hold its first
ting of this season on Mon-
Oct. 5 at 1 p.m. in the
jitorium of the Surfside
nmunity Center. Guest
ker will be from Young
ea.
r/ie Hannah Senesch
^pter of Hadassah will hold
next general meeting Tues-
Oet. 6 at noon, at the
klborne Hotel.
lenorah Chapter of
dassah announces the open-
meeting of the 1987-88
at Temple Israel Kendall
| Monday, at noon. Donna
den and Lucille Alterman
present a musical in-
duction of new officers.
he Youth Activities Lun-
on of the Stephen S. Wise
forter of Hadassah will be
on Monday, Oct. 5 at
30 a.m. at the Ocean
Ivilion, Miami Beach.
plighting the afternoon,
P White will review the
K Raquela, by Ruth Gruber
owed by a film on the life of
|ne Frank. Guests are
(cme. Rose Klein and Bet-
chaffer are in charge of
srvations.
Inward Gillman
toest Speaker
[fward Gillman, account
^visor with Seitlin and
npany Insurance was the
F speaker at the Davie
inocratic Club's monthly
ng the Davie Town Half.
fillman spoke on the sales
on services and the Sales
JnP"0ppressin8 People
Ip ^mpaign. According
J"'lman, notwithstanding
I ct that the insurance in-
py gained their exemp-
ts mthe past legislative ses-
there are dozens of ser-
fs we utilize that are taxed
l"*111, ultimately result in
!', "isurance costs
[surpers.
.-


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 25, 1987
Greater Miami Rabbis
Ready Holiday Sermons
'OTZMA' Participants Begin
Year Of Service In Israel
Continued from Page 3-B
stronger.
This year Rabbi Simcha
Freedman has talked himself
into being less uptight about
his sermon. Still, as you get
closer the responsibility and
recognition of the opportunity
to address so many individuals
becomes more foreboding,
says the spiritual leader of
Temple Adath Yeshurun for
the past 13 years.
He wants to produce a ser-
mon that will last a whole year,
that will effect their lives,
motivate them, change them,
improve them.
Over the years 25 all
together his attitude has
changed.
"In the past, very often, I
courted the congregation,"
Rabbi Freedman says. "I ad-
monished them and rebuked
them for lack of more loyal at-
tendance. That's only a result
of frustration. Now, I think it's
more important to recognize
that that doesn't work and if
you want to get people to come
to a synagogue you have to ap-
proach them on a personal
level."
His thesis this year: God is
waiting for us to change and
man has the capacity to
change. "It has to do with
eace, with happiness and it
to do with the meaning of
life itself. That's why the
holidays are so significant. It
deals with things that really af-
fect who we are and what we
do."
Labor pains continue after
21 years for Temple Judea
spiritual leader, Rabbi Michael
B. Eisenstat. "Every year I
struggle to find themes that
will be both timely and
timeless," he says.
"Other than making an ap-
peal for Israel which I do
every year on Yom Kippur, I
stay away from any kind of
solicitation. I don't want the
congregants to feel that they
are coming to synagogue once
a year to be asked to give
money. I want them to feel
that they've gotten something
rather than they have to give
something."
Twenty-one years at it have
given Rabbi Eisenstat a better
understanding of the role the
Jewish tradition can play in
lives.
He also figures he was much
smarter 21 years ago, because
then he knew all the answers.
Now he realizes there are no
simple answers.
The large attendance does
tend to showcase the rabbi. It
is, Rabbi Eisenstat recognizes,
Rabbi Shapiro
a time for a congregation to
size up its rabbi and to
establish levels of credibility
and competence.
"If members see him as a
stumbling, bumbling object on
the pulpit they won t feel com-
fortable coming to him for
other things during the year."
Next year marks the 50th
anniversary of Temple
Emanu-El. Spiritual leader,
Rabbi Irving Lehrman, sees
this as a challenge to
strengthen the synagogue as a
house of prayer, study and
assembly. Lehrman notes that
Public Health Trust
Board Appointed
The Board of County Com-
missioners of Dade County has
appointed three new members
to the Board of Trustees of the
Public Health Trust which
governs Jackson Memorial
Hospital. Three members were
reappointed.
New members are Joshua
High, Irene Canal-Petersen,
and Stanley C. Tate.
Reappointed were Thelma
A. Gibson, R.N., Melvin N.
Greenberg, attorney; and
Joseph A. Robbie.
The appointees will be sworn
in as members at the Oct. 8
meeting of the PHT Board of
Trustees.
Country Club Dry Cleaners
436 NE 125th St. #mmh*..-*.,
No Miami 893-6101
Happy New Year
American Mailing Service
5050E.llthAve. fiQ
Hialeah Oo5-O401
Happy New Year To All
it also is the 50th year of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, and therefore marks a
challenge to meet the needs of
the community of Jews in the
full sense of the word: cultural-
ly, morally and spiritually.
Rabbi Lehrman says he
works on his holiday sermons
throughout the year.
"This is an occasion when
most of the congregation is
present. Also, the High Holy
Days themselves motivate us
spiritually to reach higher
goals," Rabbi Lehrman say
In light of the Pope's visit,
he says he will speak about the
responsibility of Jews to help
build bridges and reach across
the boundaries of different
religions and ethnic groups.
"I will refer to some of the
unethical practices on Wall
Street and elsewhere that are
contradictory absolutely a
violation of Jewish ethical
values and moral principles
that have been handed down
from the centuries.
"As a rabbi I'm trying to
teach Judaism and Torah, and
I try to interpret our tradition
in light of the problems which
we face in the world today,"
Rabbi Lehrman adds.
All the rabbis have one thing
to add. That is, have a sweet
and healthy New Year.
Miami is one of the com-
munities which helped launch
the second year of the 'OTZ-
MA' young leadership pro-
gram, for participants ages
18-24.
Fifty-seven young men and
women on the 'OTZMA' pro-
gram have just arrived in
Israel to begin the first part of
their program, a year of com-
munity service in Israel, to be
followed by a year of service in
their home communities Un
their return. f"
The program, deisgned m
strengthen bonds Ej
srael and Jewish comm2
in North America?H
sored by the Council of JeS
Federations, the Israel Fo2
and the Jewish A^* J
cooperation with the W
and Hechalutz Departmen
the World Zioni.
Organization.
Rescue Of Italian Jews Soon A Bool
Papers delivered at the Na-
tional Italian American Foun-
dation's conference on the
rescue of Jews during the
Holocaust in Italy will be
published by the University
Press of America, NIAF
Chairman Jeno F. Paulucci
announced.
Editor for the publication is
Ivo Herzer, who was chairman
at the conference, held in
Boston late last year Project
Coordinator is Dr. Maria LoJ
bardo, education director of
NIAF. The book is expected to
be published in early 1988
Papers were delivered at the I
conference in conjunction with
NIAF, Boston University, the
American Jewish Committee
National Endowment for the |
Humanities and the Jeno F
Paulucci Family Foundation.
The Hebrew Educators Alliance
mourns the passing of one of its Founders
and a leading teacher
for more than a generation at the
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Academy
Of Greater Miami
Shoshanna Spector Asness
MAY HER MEMORY BE A BLESSING
Presidium Orty Alexander Sarah Sznol
RUBIN-ZJLBER
DADE
538-6371
BAOWAffi
92O-6660
ZILBERT-RUBI
The Spirit
Of Our Tradition
Lives On.
Dignity, simplicity and economy are the mandates
of Scripture lakeside Memorial Park uphokis tlv tra-
ditions of Jewish hurial in a beautiful, intelligently
designed setting
Lakeside, the only memorial park in the south that
was created to meet the needs of ei Please call for a tour of
our Garden of Heroes, an
innovation in abofe-ground
hurial modeled after the
mausoleums of ancient Israel.
10JO1N.W 25th Street
Miami, Florida 33172
Dade(305) 5920690
Broward<305) 125-9339
w
lakeside. .


Friday, September 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Shoshana Spector Asness,
Pioneer Educator
lone of the pioneering Hebrew
Tiers in Dade County, respon-
fu for educating an entire
Lration in the Miami area
Lhanna Spector Asnes passed
fay on Friday, September 11, in
L Lauderdale.
fchoshanna Spector Asness was
lm in Israel and always remain-
I an ardent lover of Israel. Her
Eher build the first hotel in Yaffo
Jthe early 1900's.
(Almost from the first years
fcr the founding of the Rabbi
lexander S. Gross Hebrew
fcademy of Greater Miami,
Lshanna Spector Asness was
L first grade Hebrew teacher
|io taught hundreds of children
iere, providing them with their
rst steps towards Jewish learn-
jr. She was known as a superb
jcher who inspired her students
Eh a love for the Hebrew
Inguage and of the Jewish
eritage.
JHer teaching and activities were
It limited to the Academy. She
k one of the founders of the
fcbrew Kducators Alliance, the
professional organization of
Jewish teachers that has enhanc-
ed the status and security of
Jewish teachers throughout
Greater Miami.
Following her retirement and
move to Ft. Lauderdale, she
taught for a number of years in
the Community Hebrew Ulpan
Program where she soon gained a
devoted following. She even
taught Hebrew at Grossinger's
Hotel during the summer for
many years. An author of several
popular books, including books for
children on Chanukah, Passover,
and the Rescue at Entebbe. She
was among the pioneers of Jewish
education in South Florida.
Morris Janoff
Morris Janoff founder and
publisher of the Jewish Stan-
dard, Teaneck, N.J. passed
away this week after a lengthy
illness. The publication found-
ed in 1931 is now operated by
his son Jaime.
NEWMAN
Sylvia, of Miami Beach, a resident here for
41 years. Former owner of Pennway Phar-
macy for 35 years. Beloved wife of Abraham
Newman, of Miami Beach. Cherished
mother of Carole (Marshall) Waldman of
Miami and Harriet Leve of Beverly Hills,
California. Loving grandmother of Hara,
Abby and Bonnie. Dear sister of William
(Sylvia) Bodenstein of New Jersey. Adored
aunt, Mrs. Newman was a life member of
the Sisterhood Temple Emanu-EI. Life
Member of Barbara Haven Cancer League.
Member Prime Ministers Club, Israel Bonds
and Bronx Links. Services were held Sun-
day at Temple Emanu-EI. Miami Beach.
Rubin-Zilbert Memorial Chapel in charge of
arrangements.
RUBENS
Gayle H.. 48, of Miami Beach, passed away
September 21. Survived by her husband
Merle; mother of Wendy and Gary;
daughter of Bernard and Adele Kotzen and
granddaughter of Eleanor Kotzen. Funeral
services were conducted at Lakeside
Memorial Park. The Riverside.
SIESHOLTZ
Herbert William of North Miami Beach,
passed away September 23. Survived by
beloved wife Minnie; sons. Robert (Sonia),
Stephen (Mona), Jerome; daughter Sara;
brother Allen and five grandchildren.
Funeral services were held Wednesday at
I .iik.shI. Memorial Park. Eternal Light
Funeral Directors in charge of
arrangements.
TWO CEMETERY PLOTS
FOR SALE
Moved to Tamarac, have 2 ceme
tery lots for sale at Lkslde
Memorial Park in Miami at dis-
count. Call attar 6 pjn. Bl Andron.
Broward 726-0991
COHN, Ralph Sol, 88, of North Miami,
September 17. The Riverside.
FRIEDMAN, Nathan, 84, of North Miami
Beach, September 15.
FUD1N. Morris, of North Miami Beach.
September 18. Eternal Light.
GOLDSTEIN, Harvey S., September 18.
Blasberg Chapel. Interment at Star of
David Memorial Park.
WEINBERG, Edith, 79, of Kendall,
September 18. Services and interment at
Star of David Memorial Park.
BLEIER, Benhamin S 73, of North Miami
Beach. September 16. Eternal Light
HARRIS. Harry A., 94, of Bay Harbor
Island, September 15. The Riverside.
LIEBERWITZ, Harry. 87, of Miami. The
Riverside
SOLOWAY. Mrs. Lillian of AUanta, Ga
formerly of South Miami, September 16
Services held in Atlanta, Ga.
SIRESKY. Mrs. Henrietta. 69 of Miami
Beach, September 15. Services were held.
SHUMINER. Sarah Levine. of Miami
Beach, September 15. Services held in
New York.
ROTH. Mary. 76, September 15 Services
held in New York.
GOTTLIEB, Ephriam Edward, 80. of
Hallandale. September 22 Levitt
Weinstein.
KISSIN, Rose, of North Miami Beach,
September 22. Menorah Chapels.
SOMMERS, Allan L, of Miami Beach.
Eternal Light.
TUCKER. Nat, of Miami Beach, September
17. Services in New York.
FRIEDMAN. Lillian J.. 87, of Miami Beach,
September 20. The Riverside.
MITTMAN, Milton, of Miami. September
20. Blasberg Chapel.
SCHNEIDER, Theodore I. 94. of Miami,
September 21. The Riverside.
SPIEGEL, Henry. September 20 Services
in Philadelphia.
GREEN, Norman, of North Miami Beach.
September 18. The Riverside.
Through years ol dedicated service,
we have become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH "THE ASSUREO PLAN"
LARRIE S. BLASBERG IRA M. BLASBERG MICHAEL C BLASBERG
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
Past President Jewish Funeral
Directors ol America
no seventy first street
Funeral Director
865-2353
Fu"'t Di's>CtO*
MIAMI BEACH FLORIDA JJi<
When a loss occurs
away from home.
0
in ii 11/
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service
s
Dade ( ounty
Broward County
532-21WH
Represent*! by Riverside Memorial Chapel, Inr.
New York: (T IK)>;:(-7600 SPECIAI l.lMI'M !> PRE-NEED OFH K
FUNERAL AND BURIAL
IN THE BEST OF JEWISH TRADITION
$1,595
r>.de Mrmorial Park and Eternal Light Funeral Director* arc proud M
keiuuful Mrmorial Park and a plan for prepaid funeral tervice*.
Thi> ricentional value iwim thai your one call will pui vu in ouch with
traditional Jewi.h funeral that vou have to.
HF.RF. IS WHAT WE INCLUDE:
etERNAL
LiQhr
H
I* Promp, Tramfii from Place of
Deith
[ Care ,nd Preparation Deceaied
la 4*,kr'lnd Hear*
Arrangement Direction of
I '"""ide Service.
I uZ"" "^ Brnrfi' AwiMance
I a ci. "nrrgenev erviee
^'i Cagdlta, C'anli. and Benches
Graveaitr
Paved Private Vititation Path
Steel Reinforced Concrete Vault
Opening and Closing of Crave
Perpetual CJraveailea Care
No maintenance or ervicc fee*
A Jewi.h Tradition ince luSS
TOTAL: $1,595
No Interest Payment Plans Available
hrcaa.pl,,, information on our pkt and funeral nrvk package plan
Mil rout LakeiJi Eternal Light repreentatiM- today.
In time of need, one call will handle all the detail*.
DADE:
592-0690
BROWARD:
525-9339
If you want a
traditional Jewish funeral,
then you want a
family-owned funeral chapel.
Levitt-Vfemsteinisi Riverside is not!
Levitt-Weinstein Memorial Chapels
has been Jewish family-owned-and-
operated for over 4 generations.
Presently there are 7 Levitt and
Weinstein family members licensed
as Jewish funeral directors.
The tradition continues.
However, Riverside is operated by
the Houston public conglomerate,
SCI. They also own over 300 non-
Jewish funeral homes in the U.S. and
the National Cremation Society, and
are traded on the New York Stock
Exchange.
But at Levitt-Weinstein... the Jewish
tradition continues.
"Family-owned" should be mean-
ingful and beneficial to you:
Our family serves you on a sincere,
personal level.
We have more Jewish funeral direc-
tors than any other major funeral
chapel in Florida.
We respect the Sabbath; we conduct
no services on Jewish holidays.
We offer unequalled service and value.
And foremost... our primary com-
mitment is to the families we serve.
Remember... there is a Mr. Levitt.
There is a Mr. Weinstein. There is no
Mr. Riverside.
The tradition continues.
dieiM-wmMiiii
Memorial Chapels
N. Miami Beach
18840 West Dixie Highway
949-6315
Hollywood
1921 Pembroke Rd
921-7200
Boca/Deerf ield Beach
7500 N. State Road Seven
427-6500
West Palm Beach
5411 Okeechobee Blvd.
689-8700
BETH DAVID Memorial Gardens
3201 North 72nd Avenue
Hollywood 963-2400
(located on the grounds)


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 25, 1987
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
6:56 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach. Fla. 531-2120
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig
ADATHYESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947 1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor: Zvl Rozen Conservative
Executive Director. ,,
Harry J. Si I verm an ,'*)
Mlnyen 7:30 a.m. 8 8:30 p.m.
Sal. Son ta.m. a8 p.m.
Sh.obat ear*. Sat. 800 am
Sal. 30 p m Seitcfcot earn.
TEMPLE BETH AM
8060 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 667-6667
Leonard Schoolman. Sr. Rabbi
Mark Kram. Aaeoclate Rabbi
Lynn OoMatein, Assistant Rabbi
Fit kit ftaaM Lym QataMekt, AaeMaM
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave Miami Beach
534-7213 534-7214 ^
Barry J. Konovitch. Rabbi {$)
Moshe Buryn, Cantor \ J'
Sergio Grobier. President
Sholem Epelbaum. President.
Religious Committee
J
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shitman. Cantor
Maurice Klein. Ritual Director
Gerald Taub. Executive Director
Roeh Maahanah aam. at T.O.P.A. Conducted
by Or. Irving Lanrman Cantor Shllman will
chani Thura. Frl a 15 a.m. (preliminary
aav.) a a.m. Aui. eenr. at Temple oonduclad
by MbW Mai Swear a Cantor Stuart Kenae.
Youth een. 10:30 a.m. Now Momboi Shabbat
Sat. 8 a.m.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetrse Drive. Miami Beach
5326421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schill
Dairy 7:30 a.m. (Mon. a Thura. 7:15) 17 pjn.
Frl. 7 p.m Sat ( ajn. tan. tot Mt
Day*.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2629 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854-3911
Jack Werner, Rabbi
Robert Albert,
Cantor
R#v. MHton Fr#nnn.
Ritual Director
mnekutianpjit.
DBttty MHif ttn
bWn. S Tnura. 7:30 e.m.
Ttme, We\ 8 Frl. 7:48 a.m.
Sun. I a_m. Erantnoa 5:30 p.m.
Aooh Heenenoh eerv tWa.tlSa.m.
Frl. C15 am Shabbat in. Sat a.m.
??
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami, FL 33181
801-5506 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs, Rabbi
Dr. Joseph A. Qorflnkei, /:,
Rabbi Emeritus \W)
Mosha Frledlar, Cantor "*?
Frt.7p.rn.
Sat :48 a.m.
Weekday an. Mon.- Frl. a a.m.
Mon.Thura. 8 p.m. tun. 30 a.m.
Sal 1:48 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1546 Jefferson Ave., M.B., FL 33130
Tel. 538-4112
RabW AJvsdU Rosenberg
Cantor Mosha Buryn
Dattt eeryteee 8 a.m. a 7 p.m.
at.* IS a.m.
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
236-2601 f
Rabbi David H. Aoerbach \
Cantor Stephen Freedman
Aooh Meahenan earrtcoe Frt. m
Shabbal aarrtooa Frl I p m. Sat 8:30 am
TgMPLEBgTHHoLoM Mtyav
Chess Ave.* 41st St.
OS. ItOM KNOaHSM Santa. N
oaky a. ouciurfe*, i
HANMY XH.T, Amman ItabM
JASON OWASOOFF, XeeletaM I
IAN ALFP.N,CaMe
DAVID CONV1SIA, Cantor Emertue
DENNIS J. MCt. F.T.A., txacMMn Director
wooh Haenana* ear* Wad, 8:1 S p.m.
Thura. SiUiJitFrl. Ml a-m. i tOJj*.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
mamn taw SaAwi CooBraoarJca
137 NE. 19th St. Miami, 573-5900
N. Kendall Dr., 806-6066
Rabbi Rax D. Perimeter
Cantor Rachel le F. Nelson
Cantor Emertt ua:
Jacob G. Bomateln
Frl. I e-m. Shabbat Shtnral.
Duwiiluwn. rUaaJ Noa D raiawiUi
conduct a dlacuaalon on the apodal reedmoe
tor Cantor RecheMe F. Nekton w* conduct
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667-5667
Michael B. Elsenstat, Rabbi
FrtaeJit
TEMPLE KINO SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rosa
Shoshanah Raab, Cantor
Servtcee Frl. 7:30 a.m.
Sat. t:30 a.m.
Onog Shabbat win tone*.
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St., Miami Bsach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Art Frldkis. Assoc. Rabbi (
Cantor Murray YavneJi
Sat. I a.m. tabSaSi aantoa
Dally Mlnch.h Sunday Friday
t a.m. and I p.m
Sat. am and 8:18 p.m
TEMPLE NER TAMID 866-8345
7902 Carlyle Ave., 866-9633
Miami Beach 33141 con.*,..,,.
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Cantor Edward Klein f
Dally San. Mon Frl a ajn. 830 p m *J
Sat. ailncha 8:18p.m. Sun. 1:30a.m.
830 p m Sat K48 a.m een by Rabbi Labomti.
Cantor Klein
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
ol North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St
North Miami Beach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung
SHAARETEFILLAH
TORAH CENTER OF KENDALL
7660 SW 112 Street jfWaw*
232-6633 xSS*/
RabW Hershel Backer > >
Dally lm. 7 a.m. Frl. 10 mm. attar canoe-
""'jt""* nebboe t a.m. ahabboa
Mlncha 10 mm. Bator, candla HgMmg lima
._______________Sim. 8:30 ajn.
TEMPLE SINAI 18601 NE 22 Ave
North Dado's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Klnoskty, Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbers S. Rsmsay, Administrator
Shabbat Shu*an eon Frl 8 p m I
Sat 10:30 a.m. HaHarah wW ba chanted
by poet Sat atltnah Cheryl Moth
Keether Mw wttt be named
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd. -jr-
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz. Rabbi ( S, I
Zvee Aroni, Cantor S-X-
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
(toon Haehaneh Wed 7 p.m. Thur 8 am 8
8:15 pm. Frl. 8 a m 8 8:48 p.m Keer Ayol
10:30 a.m. Sunday at lakeeide Memorial Park.
TEMPLE 2ION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Millar Dr. Conservative
271-2311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi (
Benjamin Adler, Cantor v -
David Rosenthal, Auxiliary Cantor
Mlnyan 7 a.m. Monday* 8 Thuraday.
Sunday ( a.m. Frl. 8:15 p m
Conducted by Or. Norman N. Shapiro.
Sat eon. ( a.m.
Bat Mitzvah
Daniel Lawrence Denner
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
. "Give ear. ye heavens, and I will speak: A r>d let the mk i
the words of my mouth" vensandl
HAAZINU
HAAZINU Moses" song beginning "Giveear, m
will speak" contains the principal elements in the unioueral
ship between God and his people Israel. Moses opens witha n
heaven and earth to witness his declaration Fron 'he hem
of time. Moses asserts, the Lord had choaei I nin
place among the nations of the world. He had first -in"^*^
Israel in the desert, whence he lovingly led them into the uZ
Canaan. But Israel. Moses prophesies, would abandon their?^
for foreign idols. Then Cod would send a cruel nation to en.]
and torment the children of Israel. Eventual. howevwS
would have compassion on His Moved :
vengeance on Israel's tormentors. All the natii
behold how the Lord had avenged the blood of His -<>\ int-
had made expiation for the land of His people A-i
Moses prepares to ascend mount N'ebo. in the land of Moab Fro
there at a disUinee he is to glimpse the Promised Land and die-!!
Aaron had died at mount Hor. "Because ye trespassed against)-
in the midst of the children of Israel at the waters o(
Meribathkadesh. in the wilderness of Zin: because ye sanctified
Me not in the midst of the children of Israel" (Deuttnmm
(The recounting ol the Weekly Portion ot the Law is e.lracted ann tmm
upon The Graphic History ot the Jewish Heritage," edited by P Woiiman!
Tsamir. $15. published by Shengold. The volume is available at 75 Min.
Lane, New York, N.Y 10038. Joseph Schlang is president 0t the Z
distributing the volume.) *
Michael Cash
MICHAEL CASH
Michael Cash, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Vernon A. Cash, Jr., will
be called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday at 10:45
a.m., at Temple Beth Sholom.
Rabbi Gary Glickstein will
officiate.
DANIEL DENNER
Daniel Lawrence Denner,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Elliott
Denner was called to the
Torah as Bar Mitzvah on
Thursday September 17 at 10
a.m. at Temple Emanu-El,
Miami Beach.
The celebrant attends Lear
School, where he is in the 7th
grade. Daniel collects stamps,
coins and baseball cards. He
won first place in the Science
Fair of his school when he was
in the 6th grade.
Mr. and Mrs. Denner hosted
a Kiddush following the ser-
vices in honor of the occasion
and a reception at the Castle
Premier Hotel on Saturday
evening.
Special guests included
Daniel's grandparents, Sol and
Goldie Goldstein. His grand-
mother is an officer of the
Temple Emanu-El Congrega-
tion, and a past president of
Sisterhood. His grandfather
serves on the Board of Direc-
tors. Out of town guests in-
cluded Marvin and Dorothy
Goldstein of New Jersey.
Bar Mitzvah Celebrant
Gives To Cancer Lab
When Damien Maisler was
Bar Mitzvah at Temple Beth
Sholom in Miami Beach, he
decided to donate some of the
money he received to children
who don't have much to
celebrate, those who suffer
from cancer.
So, Damien sent a $220
check to Charity Mrs., a group
of 25 women who are the
Grand Benefactors of the
Miami Pediatric Oncology
Laboratory at Jackson
Memorial Hospital. The lab
does all blood work for
children who are cancer vic-
tims without
Ainslee Ferdie Elected President
Fla. Lawyers Legal Insurance Coi
Coral Gables attorney,
Ainslee R. Ferdie who was
elected President of the
Florida Lawyers Legal In-
surance Corporation to suc-
ceed Michael McNerney of Ft.
Lauderdale at the annual
meeting in Orlando, held in
connection with the Florida
Bar presided at his first
, meeting last Friday at Tampa.
The Florida Lawyers Legal
Insurance Corporation, is a
nonprofit corporation, whose
aims are to serve the public by
the promotions of prepaid
legal insurance and the
delivery of legal services to the
public and was originally fund-
ed by grants and loans of
Florida Bar.
The corporation now insures
about 40.000 Floridians in
plans underwritten by
Midwest Legal Services, and
maintains a statewide open
panel of lawyers.
Ainslee R. Ferdie, who has
served on the Board of Direc-
tors since the Corporations' in-
ception, was admitted to prac-
tice in Florida in 1954 after
graduation from the Universi-
ty of Miami Law School..
served on active duty with I
U.S. Army as a Lieuten
from 1954-56 when he reti_.
ed to private law practice i
Miami. He is managing par
ner of Ferdie and Gouz. a Crti
Litigation. Property.
General Practice Law Firm t]
Coral Gables. Ferdie is a i
president of the Coral Gablsl
Bar Association and was Cl
President of the Younprl
Lawyers section of the hi
ter American Bar. He also hi
been an Associate Judge a
West Miami, was National
Commander of the Jewish War!
Veterans of the U.S.A. ami
Chairman of the Dade Countj|
Urban Renewal Agency.
Mr. Ferdie is currently;
President of the Florida Henll
Zionists, a Past Presidents
Temple Zamora. Past Pres-I
dent of Gilbert Balkin Boaj
B'rith Lodge. Past Presided!
of the Greater Miami BBYOI
Board, a former member it
the Executive Committee |
the National Jewish Commuurl
ty Relations Council, and thj
Organization of Presidents |
Major Jewish Organizations.
LflaJ
Women's American ORT, Dade South region, rfeen%lA
1987-88 installation of officers. Pictured (standing. Jrom wj .
past presidents Mary Ellen Peyton, Nina ^'""f' t
Chekanow and Loisbeth Emanuel. Seated from l*fl*' v^l
mediate past president Laurel Shapiro; Southeast Du^rv vi
dent Pepi Dunay, who also was installing officer; and <* ^
president Joan Cohen. Not pictured are rice Pm~fYna,M
Barber. Ann Ferre, Paula Woolf; treasurer Ann AM^"^ '
secretary Joan Mobrin; and recording secretary Roty"


Friday, September 25, 1987/The Jewish FJoridian Page 13-B
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
I THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
If El EVENTH JUDICIAL
fnRCTIT OF FLORIDA
1 IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
rMe No. 87-32774 CA-21
, NOTICE OF ACTION
bKKU. HOME LOAN MOR
CE CORPORATION.
Lntiff
IREDOPINI, ft ux., et al..
I
fcLFREDOPINl
Rendence Unknown
|jVl. nd it dead all parties
l^ing interest by,.through.
luniltT or against Ai.rKt.uu
ll'INI. <"' ;l11 parties having
or claiming to have any right
I,,,!,. or interest in the proper
^herein described
ltn ied that an
to foreclose a mortgage on
Billowing property in DADE
Ltv.FI i
[ Block I. i" LAKE
Crks at WESTWIND.
-plat of wl cl record-
jinPtai Book 120, Page 60.
\ Isol Dade
lunt). FV
en filed against you and you
jquired to serve copy of
lrnt> enses. if any, to it
V H Uitlitt, Esq., Al
L: Plaintiff, whose address
[ 214 1570 Madruga
,.. Coral Gables, Florida,
on or before September
1987, and file the original
[the clerk of tin.- court either
Mrvki Plaintiffs at-
Italy thereafter,
\uii in' entered
ist you for the relief demand'
hunt.
TNESS mj hand ami the seal
court tin- 24th daj of
ICHARDP BRINKER
rk of the Court
B> Bai gues
\- Deput) I lerk
August 28;
September 1,11,18, 1987
{NOTICE OF ACTION
INSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
,THK CIRCUIT CM'RT OF
E ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
|R('I IT ok FLORIDA, IN
Ml FOR DADE COUNTY
Tfl IctioB No. 87 39860-07
FAMIL1 DIVI8ION
riiiN for DISSOLUTION
HI MARRIAGE
E: The Marriage of
Mar. rosado,
bNIOROSADO,
ANTONIO ROSADO
pl^~ West Leland
1 111. 60826
11 A R E II E R K B *
pMEIi thai an action (or
llutum ol Marriage has bean
I you and you are re
i 'eacopj of your writ-
any, to it on
MN J ASHER, ESQ., at-
I Petitioner, whose ad-
In825 South Bayshore Drive.
[543. Miami, FL 33131. and
I original with the clerk of
u rt on or before
*r W, 1987; otherwise a
will be entered against you
f reliefdemanded in thecom-
[ petition.
SESS my hand and the seal
J court at Miami. Florida on
b4 day of September, 1987.
RICHARD P, BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
1 B> C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
fit Court Seal)
September If, 25;
October 2,9, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
'['THUS NAME LAW
;ICE ls HEREBY GIVEN
"* undersigned, desiring to
:< in busmeas under the Be-
JMM DELTA IMPORTED
*ERS u 7162 N.W. 50th
i "w Florida 88186 In-
h'rT nld name with
'rk"f '" Circuit Court of
fuwnty. Florida
** S FLOWER
"CHANGE. INC.
B> KeaU, Raclfurdie,
rn nl.-nt
. Augual 28;
I 11.18 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87-31148 FC-04
H;i Bar No.: 124946
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ORINTHIA BONNER,
Petitioner,
and
JESSE LEE BONNER,
Respondent.
TO: JESSE LEE
B< INNER
(address unknown I
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that an action for Diaaolu
turn of Marriage ha.- been filed
againat you and you ire required
to serve a copy nt' your written
defenees, if any, to it on Samuel s.
Sorota, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 801 N E. 167th
Street, Suite 808, North Miami
Beach, Florida 88162, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
-tyled court on or before October
8th, 1887; otherwise a default will
Ik' entered against you for the
relief prayed for In the complaint
or petition
Tins notice shah be published
once each week for four con
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
oi said court at Miami, Florida on
tins 4th dav of September, 1887,
RICHARD I' BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dad.- County. Florida
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy 'lerk
(Circuit Court Scab
Samuel S. Sorota. Eat)
koi N.E. 167th Street,
Suite 308
North Miami Beach, FL 8816S
Telephone: 668-7777
Attorney for Petitioner
17978 September 11, 18.26;
Octobers, ins?
IN" THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87 MM
Division M
IN RE ESTATE OF
BERNARD FLIEGELM W
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of BERNARD FLIEGELMAN
deceased. File Number 87-1008, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
hade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
Weal Elagler Si Miami. Florida
38180, The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the peraonal representative's at-
torney are set forth Mow
All interested persons are re
quired to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 18, 1987.
Personal Representative:
DR. BERTRAM FELGEN
55-44 Little Neck Parkway-
Apartment 3-0
Little Neck. New York 11362
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
WAYNE A. CYPEN
CYPEN &CYPEN
P.O. BOX 402099
Miami Beach. FL 33140
Telephone (305) 532-3200
17985 September 18, 86 1981
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name "Joyeria La
Favorite" at 211 Lincoln Rd.,
Miami Beach, FL 88189 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade C >un
ty, Florida
Jack Matalon and
Ramon Nunez
a- officers of
211 Corporation
17''~:l September4. II;
is. >:,. |987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 87-41190(12)
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
FLORA A. GRAHAM
Petitioner
and
SILAS GRAHAM
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
T( i: Silas Graham,
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I. J.
GRAFF, ESQ., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St NJI.B. Florida 38182 on os
before October 80, 1887, and file
the original with the clerk of this
court otherwise a default will In
entered against you.
DATED: September 22. 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: F Seidl
As Deputy Clerk
18016 September 26
October 2. 9. 16, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name NEVADO PASO
FINO FARM PNC al 7880 S.W
loth Street. Miami. Florida 83166
intends to register laid name with
the Clerk of the Circuit "Court of
I lade County. Florida
Nevado Paso Fino Ranch. Inc.
17978 Septembei n
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
(nil Action No. 87-38180 (08)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
CYNTHIA WASKO.
Petitioner/Wife,
and
JOHN DA WEBER,
Respondent/Husband.
TO: RESPONDENT
JOHN D.A WEBER
1955 Lakspur. Apt. 1112
San Antonio. TX 78218
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Diaaohl
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and are required to
Serve a copy of your written
defenses, if anv. to it on HAR
ROI.D A. TURTLETAUB, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 9995 Sunset Drive, Suite
108, Miami. FL 33173, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
Styled court on or before October
9th. 1987; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 3rd day of September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HAROLD A. TURTLETAUB
9995 Sunset Drive, Suite 108
Miami. FLA 33173
Telephone: (305) 271-4000
Attorney for Petitioner
17981 September 11. 18, 25;
October 2, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87 40457
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
RUBEN CAMACHO, husband,
and
CARIDAD CAMACHO. wife.
TO: CARIDAD CAMACHO
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if anv. to it on AR-
THUR II l.ll'SON. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is Kill
Northeast 167 Street. Miami.
Florida 38162, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before October 28,
1987; otherwise a default will lie
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition,
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
tins it day of September, 1987
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Cl' COPELAND
v Deputy clerk
18'"'!' September 26;
October 2,9, 16, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Harsel Income Ta\ A
Bookkeeping Service at I618A
Alton Road. Miami Beach. Florida
33139 intend te register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
ACCOUNTING BUSINESS
CORP
By: Seymour .lacobson
Seymour .lacobson. President
ALAN R. LORBER. PA.
Attorney for Accounting Business
Corp.
1111 Lincoln Road. Suite 680
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
17962 September 4.
11. 18.25. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the Ik
titioua name NEW STAR SUPER
MARKET at 1217 71s' Street.
Miami Beach, FL88141 intend.-to
register -aid name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of DadeCoun
ty. Florida
MERCEDESSOTO
,-,,-., September 4, 11.
|fi 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titioua name of ROBERT BESEN,
M ii at number 2000 N.E. 120th
Road, in the Crtj of North Miam .
Florida, intend to register the said
number with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
Dated at North Miami. Florida
this 26 dav of August. 1987,
ROBERT HARRIS BESEN.
M.D.. I' A
By; ROBERT BESEN, MI).
['resident
MORTON B ZEMEL. ESQUIRE
Attorney for Applicant
17962 September 4,11;
18. 25. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name CORAL ANIMAL
CLINIC at 2500 S.W. 107 Avenue.
Store 32, Miami. Florida. 33165 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Guguio E. Rodriguez
18010 September 25;
October 2. 9, 16, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5240
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROSE BRENNER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
if ROSE BRENNER, deceased,
File Numlx-r 87-6240 (04). is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 W
Flagler Street, Miami. FL 331311.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney-
are set forth below.
All interested persona are re
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS (IE
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE; (1) all claims
against the estate and (21 am ob
lection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will.
the qualifications of the peraonal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TTONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice ha-
begun on September 26, 1987.
Personal Representative
LUCILLE FA1I.LA
Unit 414.
2980 Point East Drive
No. Miami Beach, FL 33160
Attorney for Personal
Representative
NELSON & FELDMAN. P.A.
1186 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands. FL 33154
Telephone: 865-57 Hi
18013 September 26;
October 2. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5208
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HARRY BANK
Deceased
NOTICE OK
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of HARRY BANK, deceased. File
Number 87-5208 (02). is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 W. Flagler
Street. Miami. FL 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
-onal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persona are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 25, 1987.
Personal Representative:
DAVID BANK
P.O. Box 244
Tarreytown. NY 10591
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
NELSON & FELDMAN, P.A.
1135 Kane Concourse. Bay Harbor
Islands, FL 33154
Telephone: 865-5716
18014 September 25;
October 2,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME L.iW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie-
titious name HYSTERICS
CLOTHING intend to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
( AKVAJAL ENTERPRISE INC.
9815 SW 40th St.
Miami FL 88166
17968 September 4.
11. 18,25. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the fie
titioua name Integrated World
Enterprises at 8020 N.W, 60th St,
Miami. Fl 33166 intends to
register said name With the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida
Elba Serrano
I 794 i Aiic .
Septembei 4, II, 18, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name VELVASCURGE at
9807 Northwest 80th Avenue, Bay
1 IK. Hialeah Gardens. Florida in
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
gkeg Mclaughlin
LUCIANO P DELGADO
.MAN GIRON
STEVEN M OTTAVi \
RANDALL i: RUSH
JOSH1 A D BASH.ESQ.
Attornej for VELVASCURGE
SUITE 228
1926 HOLLY Wool. BLVD
HOLLYWOOD, FL 33020
306-922 1 K"1 940 1200
17%l September 4.11;
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-39336 C A-2.1
NOTICE OF ACTION
LINCOLN SERVICE
CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RUSSELL P. ROGG.
et ux., et al.,
Defendants
TO: KATHY BLIVEN ROGG
Kroadwell Road
Morrisonville,
New York 12962
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property;
Lot 1. Block 5. FIRST ADDI
TION TO HOMESTEAD
LAKE PARK HOMES, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in 1'lat Book 66,
at Page 22. of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it.
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whii-i address is suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida. 33146 on or before
October 23. 1987 and file Un-
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
lie entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 17 day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18005 Septembr25;
October 2,9, 16,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA DO
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-12255 CA 29
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK.
as Trustee for the Housing
Finance Authority of Dade
County, Florida, under a Trust
Indenture dated as of September
1. 1983,
Plaintiff
vs.
BARBARA ADLER, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: MELVIN LEWIS ADLER
and ANITA PERLMAN
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
them, and all parties having
or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the
property herein described
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
UNIT No. 101. of CALUSA
CLUB VILLAGE CON-
DOMINIUM BUILDING A.
according to the Declaration
of Condominium thereof, as
recorded in Official Book
11749, at Page 1868, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
October 23, 1987, and file the
org-rial with the clerk of this court
eitiier before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the se3l
of this court this 17 day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18006 September 25;
October 2,9. 16,1987
The Annual Report of the
Bienenfeld foundation, In,
available for public inspection at
it's office, 1619 N.W. 7th Asa .
Miami. Fla during regular
business hour- within ISO
from today, September 25, 1987
18016 Sepl i 1987


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. September 25, 1987
FORECLOSURE SALES-PUBLIC NOTICES
IN THE CIRCl IT COURT FOR
DAI)K COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 8M1M
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
AARON DAVID KI CHOCKI,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
(Florida Bar Nol 048326)
The administration of the estate
of AARON DAVID Rl'CHOCKI.
deceased. File Number 87-5237. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
AH interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 18. 1987.
Personal Representative:
ROSE DAUM RUCHOCKI
9801 Collins Avenue, Apt. 19W
Bal Harbour, Fla. 33154
ALAN R. LORBER. PA.
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
By: ALAN R. LORBER
1111 Lincoln Road. Suite 680
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-1401
17987 September 18.25, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 87 39603
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARIE YOLETTE BANNA
CO1C0U.
Petitioner,
and
BERTHONY COICOU.
Respondent
TO: BERTHONY COICOU
5em Ave. Botoase, Rue Malet No.
76
Port-au-Prince, Haiti, W.I.
shall serve a copy of your Answer
to the Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage upon ANTHONY CAR-
BONE. P.A., 612 N.W. 12th
Avenue, Miami, Florida 33136,
and file the original with the Clerk
of Court on or before October 16,
1967, otherwise default will be
entered.
Dated: September 14. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
17999 September 18,25;
October 2,9.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURF
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO: 87-39MM 01
NOTICE OF ACTION
GERD GUNTHER RUESS,
Petitioner/Husband,
and
ALBA LUZ MONDRAGON
RUESS.
Respondent/Wife
TO: ALBA LUZ MONDRAGON
RUESS
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFED
that s Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you. and that you are required to
serve a copy of your Response or
Pleading to the Petition upon the
Petitioner's attorney, RUSSELL
K. ROSENTHAL. ESQ.. 7108
S.W. 102nd Avenue, Suite B.
Miami, Florida 33173. and file the
original Response or Pleading in
the office of the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court, on or before the 16th
day of October. A.D., 1987. If you
fail to do so, a Default Judgment
will be taken against you for the
relief demanded in the Petition.
Dated at Miami. Dade County.
Florida, this 14 day of September,
A.D.. 1987.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
By: E. LE SUEL'R
(Deputy Clerk)
17993 September 18,25;
October 2. 9. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 87-38513
FAMILY DIVISION 31
IN RE: The marriage of:
MYRTLE MARSHALL,
Petitioner wife
and
AARON MARSHALL
Respondent husband
TO: AARON MARSHALL
Residence Address:
YOU. AARON MARSHALL,
residence unknown, are required
to file your answer to the petiton
for dissolution of marriage with
the Clerk of the above Court and
serve a copy thereof upon the peti-
tioner's attornevs. COHEN.
COHEN & COHEN. 622 S.W. 1st.
Street. Miami, Florida. 33130, on
or before October 9. 1987, or else
petition will be confessed.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court, at Miami. Dade County.
Florida, this September 1. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
By: E. Seidl
Deputy Clerk
17970 September 4, 11;
18. 25. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-330436 CA 28
NOTICE OF ACTION
BARNETT BANKS TRUST
COMPANY, N.A., as Trustee for
the Florida Housing Finance
Agency under a resolution
adopted and dated as of July 1,
1984. %
Plaintiff
vs.
ARCO HOME. INC. and
FRANCISCO RODRIGUEZ, et
al..
Defendants.
TO: FRANCISCO RODRIGUEZ
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against him, and all par-
ties having or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the pro-
perty herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 6, in Block 12, of PALM
POINT SECTION ONE. ac-
cording to the Plat thereof.
as recorded in Plat Book 12S,
at Page 8, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Fiber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida. 33146 on or before
October 23, 1987. and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 15 day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18001 September 18. 25;
October 2.9, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 87 39601
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ROSE SILFIDA BILLY.
Petitioner,
and
ELIJAH BILLY,
Respondent.
TO: ELIJAH BILLY.
Residence Unknown, you shall
serve s copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar
riage upon: ANTHONY CAR
BONE. PA., 612 N.W 12th
Avenue, Miami. Florida 33136.
and file original with the Clerk of
the Court on or before October 16.
1987, otherwise s default will be
entered.
Dated: September 14. 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER. Clerk
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
18000 September 18. 25;
October 2. 9,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-32973 CA 24
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United
States-r>f America.
Plaintiff
vs.
VICTOR MANUEL ARRIAS
DOS SANTOS, et ux et al..
Defendants
TO (ONCEPCION VIZOSO
ESTEBAN
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Foreclosure of Mortgage on the
following described property:
Lot 4. Block 40. BENT
TREE SOUTH, according to
the plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 105 at Page 80
of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it.
on Stuart H. Gitlitz. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida. 33146 on or before
October 2, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 27 dav of August.
1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
17960 September 4,11;
____________________18,25.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-40178-09
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United
States of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
EDUARDO M. ANTUNA, et ux
et al..
Defendants
TO: EDUARDO M. ANTUNA
and CLAUDETTE S. ANTUNA,
his wife
4626 159th Avenue SE
Bellevue, WA 98006
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure ot Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 22, Block 2, of
OAKRIDGE ESTATES
SECTION THREE, accor
ding to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 57.
Page 10, of the Public
Records of Dade County
Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
October 23, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered agaisnt you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 15 day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By T CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
17998 Setpember 18,25;
October 2, 9, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name EPM Construction
Inc. at 9301 SW 92nd Ave No
B116, Miami. FL 33176 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Edward P. Mitchell
17955 September 4.11;
18. 25. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY FLORIDA
(JENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASK NO. 87-18049 (CA 12)
AMENDED NOTICE OF
ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI, a
United states Corporation,
Plaintiff.
vs.
ANTONIO CARDET, et al..
Defendants.
TO: ANTONIO CARDET.
Individually and as Trustee
199 Ocean Lane Drive
Apt. 1112 South
Key Biscayne, Florida
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County. Florida:
VISTA DEL LAGO
CONDOMINIUM
PHASE V
A portion of Tract "A"
"VISTA/PASEOS" accor-
ding to the plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 115 at
Page 81 of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida, being more par-
ticularly descrilied as follows:
Commence at the Northeast
comer of said Tract "A";
thence South 63 degrees 01
minutes 09 seconds West for
74.19 feet; thence South 86
degrees 56 minutes 54
seconds West for 150.00 feet;
thence South 67 degrees 00
minutes 00 seconds West for
299.54 feet; thence South 57
degrees 45 minutes 00
seconds West for 202.00 feet
to the Point of Beginning of
the following described
parcel of land; thence North
70 degrees 06 minutes 00
seconds West for 165.71 feet
(said last mentioned fi\e
courses being coincident with
the Northerly boundary line
of said Tract "A"): thence
South 19 degrees 54 minutes
00 seconds West for 138.51
feet; thence South 44 degrees
59 minutes 24 seconds West
for 90.00 feet; thence South
18 degrees 37 minutes 49
seconds West for 99.89 feet;
thence South 45 degrees 00
minutes 36 seconds East for
168.20 feet; thence South 0
degrees 00 minutes 36
seconds East for 74.73 feet;
thence North 89 degrees 59
minutes 24 seconds East,
along the Southerly boundary
line of said Tract "A," for
457.51 feet; thence North 0
degrees 00 minutes 36
seconds West for 20.00 feet;
thence North 89 degrees 59
minutes 24 seconds East for
27.71 feet; thence North 0
degrees 00 minutes 36
seconds West for 23.00 feel;
thence North 45 degrees 00
minutes 36 seconds West for
105.74 feet; thence South 44
degrees 59 minutes 24
seconds West for 65.38 feet;
thence South 89 degrees 59
minutes 24 seconds West for
243.76 feet; thence North 0
degrees 00 minutes 36
seconds West for 55.00 feet;
thence North 4 degrees 37
minutes 21 seconds East for
130.21 feet; thence North 16
degrees 00 minutes 15
seconds East for 176.27 feet
to the Point of Beginning, hy-
ing and being in Section 12,
Township 54 South. Range
39 East. Dade County
Florida.
VISTA DEL LAGO
CONDOMINIUM
PHASE VI
A portion of Tract "A"
"VISTA/PASEOS" accor-
ding to the plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 115 nt
Page 81 of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida, being more par-
ticularly described as follows:
Commence at the Northeast
corner of said Tract "A";
thence South 63 degrees 01
minutes 09 seconds West for
74.19 feet; thence South 86
degrees 56 minutes 54
seconds West for 150.00 feet;
thence South 67 degrees 00
minutes 00 seconds West for
299 54 feet; thence South 57
degrees 45 minutes 00
seconds West for 202.00 feet;
thence North 70 degrees 06
minutes 00 seconds West for
165.71 feet to the Point of
Beginning of the following
described parcel of land;
thence continued North 70
degrees 06 minutes 00
seconds West tor 246.29 feet;
theme South 54 degrees 86
minutes 229.47 feet (said last men-
tioned seven courses being
coincident with the Nortnerh,
boundary line of said Tract
"A"); thence South 86
degrees 24 minute- no
econdt Kast for 208.14 feet;
thence South 48 degrees 00
minutes 36 seconds East for
178.00 feet; thence South 44
degrees 59 minutes 24
seconds West for 13.35 feet;
thence South 45 degrees 00
minutes 36 seconds East for
106.79 feet; thence South 0
degrees 00 minutes 36
seconds East for 13.75 feet;
thence South 89 degrees 59
minutes 24 seconds West for
40.75 feet; thence South 0
degrees 00 minutes 36
seconds East for 43.00 feet;
thence North 89 degrees 59
minutes 24 seconds F"
along the Southerly boundary
line of said Tract "A" for
126.00 feet; thence North 0
degrees 00 minutes 36
seconds West for 74.73 feet;
thence North 45 degrees 00
minutes 36 seconds West for
168.20 feet: thence North 18
degrees 37 minutes 49
seconds East for 99.89 feet;
thence North 44 degrees 59
minutes 24 seconds East for
90.00 feet; thence North 19
degrees 54 minutes 00
seconds East for 138.51 feet
to the Point of Beginning, ly-
ing and being in Section 12.
Township 54 South. Range
39 East. Dade County.
Florida.
VISTA DEL LAGO
CONDOMINIUM
PHASE VII
A portion of Tract "A"
"VISTA/PASEOS" accor-
ding to the plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 115 at
Page 81 of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida, being more par-
ticularly described as follows:
Commence at the Northeast
corner of said Tract "A";
thence South 63 degrees 01
minutes 09 seconds West for
74.19 feet; thence South 86
degrees 56 minutes 54
seconds West for 150.00 feet;
thence South 67 degrees 00
minutes 00 seconds West for
299.54 feet; thence South 67
degrees 45 minutes 00
seconds West for 202.00 feet;
thence North 70 degrees 06
minutes 00 seconds West for
412.00 feet; thence South 54
degrees 36 minutes 00
seconds West for 229.47 feet;
to the Point of Beginning of
the following described
parcel of land; thence con-
tinue South 54 degrees 36
minutes 00 seconds West for
233.54 feet (said last men-
tioned seven courses being
coincident with the Northerly
boundary line of said Tract
"A"'); thence South 4u
degrees 00 minutes 36
seconds East for 397.89 feet;
thence South 58 degrees 01
minutes 34 seconds East for
107.47 feet; thence North 56
degrees 56 minutes 07
seconds East for 72.08 feet;
thence North 89 degrees 59
minutes 24 seconds East for
27.00 feet (said last mention-
ed two courses being coinci-
dent with the boundary line
of said Tract "A"); thence
North 0 degrees 00 minutes
36 seconds West for 43.00
feet; thence North 89 degrees
59 minutes 24 seconds East
for 40.75 feet; thence North 0
degrees 00 minutes 36
seconds West for 13.76 feet;
thence North 45 degrees 00
minutes 36 seconds West for
106.79 feet; thence North 44
degrees 59 minutes 24
seconds East for 13.35 feet;
thence North 45 degrees 00
minutes 36 seconds West for
178.00 feet; thence North 35
degrees 24 minutes 00
seconds West for 203.14 feet
to the Point of Beginning, ly-
ing and being in Section 12,
Township 54 South, Range
39 East, Dade County,
Florida.
VISTA DEL LAGO
CONDOMINIUM
PHASE VIII
A portion of Tract "A'"
"VISTA/PASEOS" accor-
ding to the plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 115 at
P8 81 of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida, being more par-
ticularly described as follows:
Commence at the \,,,
coraerof .,-,.'
as
299.54
degn-.
n,"iut M
RMh
"'""' N,r'" 7("i*rm
minute. *
"?. :t,; minu, M
the ,f.....>W"g desert
PW-Jrf land: ,h*c,'
tinue South 54 degrees!
minutes no Tonds WN f
degrees 11 minutes
seconds West, radial to th,
next described course (,,
J0-6I fee,; ,*
Southeasterly along a or
cular curve to the left hwn,
a radius of i!3t;n.oo fowl,
central angle of 14 degree,
12 minutes w seconds for an
arc distance of 585.31 feet
thence North SI degrees 58
minutes 26 seconds Em
radial to the last described
curve, for 800.00 feet isnd
last mentioned ten courses
being coincided with the
boundary line of Tract A't
thence North 58 degrees 01
minutes 34 seconds West for
107.47 feet, thence North 45
degrees 00 minutes !,
seconds West for 397.89 feet
to the Point of Beginning, hy-
ing and being in Section 111
Township 54 South. Range
39 East. Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you andy
are required to serve a copy i
your written defenses, if any.'idj
on Keith. Mack, Lewis, Aihso
Cohen, Plaintiff's attorn
whose address is 111 N.E
Street, Miami, Florida 33132, (
or before October 1(5,1987, andl
the original with the Clerk of i
Court either before service i
Plaintiffs attorneys or imn
ly thereafter; otherwise, a de'ii
will be entered against you for t
relief demanded in the compaat|
WITNESS my hand and staid
this Court on the 8 day
September, 1987
RICHARD P BRISKER
Clerk of the Court
By: BARBARA R0DRICIB]
Deputv Clerk
17984 September 11. Ill
October 2, If
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT Of
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL |
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICI
Civil Artioa No. 87-3M42 (W |
ROBERT E. HESSI0N.
Plaintiff.
va.
MERCEDES MORALES. etiL
Defendant.
TO: MERCEDES MORALES
Address Unknown
YOU RE NOTIFIED HaiBl
action to quiet title to the foUosajl
property in Dade County. Fkr*l
Lot3. Block 1. of HELM'S
SUBDIVISION. aceordinf
the Plat thereof recortW
Plat Book 6. at Pag*
the Public Records of Da*
County. Florida ,
has been filed against you m I"l
are required to serve i copy j|
your written defenses, ifwy."1!
on Willard K. SplittstoeMjrJN
attorney for Petitioner. **|
dress is: 13122 West DtI
Highway. Suite B. North Wl
Florida 33161. and file the or**!
with the clerk of the &"**?!
court on or before October I
1987, otherwise a default: wii"l
entered against you for the rel
demanded in the compW1 I
petition. ujj
This notice shall be publ*"
once each week for W*|
secutive weeks in THE H I
FLORIDIAN. J
WITNESS my handtndw
of said court at Miami, FW*
this the 8 (Uy of September1
RICHARD P BRINKER
as Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Fjon*.
By: BARBARA R0DWw
as Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I .
Willard K. Splittstoesser. Wi
13122 West Dixie High**)'
D
North Miami, Florida 3316'
Attorney for Petitioner
17983 ^SSJrsri


Friday, September 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
rQRECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
L THE "TH JUDICIAL
IriRCl'IT. IN AND FOR
ADECOUNTY. FLORIDA
BNERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
ASE NO. 86-UI84 (CA 23)
NOTICE OF ACTION
I METROPOLITAN
bEBAL SAVINGS AND
In ASSOCIATION.
sinuff.
OUW I'RIME (FL), INC.
fendants
llAN LLOYD-JONES nd
' ANN LLOYD-JONES.
-jence unknown, if they are liv-
land if they are dead, to all par
IrlaiminK interest by. through.
Lr or against the said IAN
lYD-JONES and LISA ANN
VD-JONES, and all other par
-avingor claiming to have any
C ntle or interest in the pro-
therein described.
\UARE HEREBY
fIFIED. that an action to
tost amort gage on the follow
[described property in Dade
ktv. Florida:
St 9 in Block 32, of SNAP-
E R C R E E K
DWNHOUSE. SECTION
;VEN, according to the
t thereof, recorded in Pl.it
J 96. at Page 76. of the
bhc Records of Dade Coun-
, Florida
i filed against you and you
.quired to serve a copy of
written defneses. if any, to it
[eith. Mack. Lewis. Allison &
i, Plaintiff's attorneys,
address is 111 N.E. 1st
K. Miami, Florida 33132, on
[fore October 2, 1987, and file
final with the Clerk of this
ther before service on
i attorneys or immediate-
reafter; otherwise, a default
_e entered against you for the
[demanded in the complaint.
TNESS my hand and seal of
lourt on the 31 day of August,
RICHARD P KRINKER
Clerk of the Court
fj DIANA CAMPBELL
Deputy Clerk
September 4.
11. 18.25.1987
J THE CIRCUIT COURT
1FTHE11TH JUDICIAL
VlRCriT IN \M) FOR
iW COUNTY. FLORIDA
[PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 87-3449
DIVISION 04
|K ESTATE OF
|AN JOSE GARCIA,
Decc.i.-ed
I notice OF ACTION
f.0Kll>\li\|{ NO. 184878)
INY PERSONS HAVING OR
IIMING in HAVE IN
EST IN Till- ESTATE OP
JJ081 kRCIA.
)' ARE NOTIFIED that a
Determine
I I I.....n this
in i-eauirad to
[ it rtttsn sjsjee-
m h petition on
R Turner, Esquire,
Miller U.
' -hi, P.A.. at-
ibi personal represen-
f *'"'" ll Museum
I W Flagler Street.
fcFlorios 13130, on or before
' 1987, ind file the original
(Clerk of the court either
Ml the personal
"Native attomaj or im-
^thereafter otherwise an
*ill in- entered against you
' relief requested in the
Wl.
P* this 14 day of September.
k'HARD IV BRINKER
: HOLLIS L. LANGE
"fPuty Clerk
September 18.25. 1987
fcJSHfB UNDER
Pm0U8 NAME LAW
ill HEREBY GIVEN
, ""krsipied. detiring to
"> business under the fic-
' name Virginia Miller
f\W Ar,tsP; Art-
.2ni'a,.Mi,ler Galleries;
' Miller Gallenes/ArtSDece-
! 169 Madeira Avenue!
. Florida 33134 intend
TZ? namw with **
pm* Miller Gallery. Inc.
September 4,11;
18,25, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-36210 (FC 26)
FAMILY DIVISION
FLORIDA BAR NO. 549551
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
RUSELL ROGG.
Petitioner/Husband,
and
KATHY ROGG,
Respondent/Wife.
TO: KATHY ROGG
Broadwell Road
Morrisonville, NY. 12962
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced in this
court and you are required to serve
acopy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on MARIA BREA
LIPINSKI, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 15912
S.W. 92nd Avenue. Miami, Florida
33157 and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on
or before October 2, 1987; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 31 day of August. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By DIANA CAMPBELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MARIA BREA-LIPINSKI,
ESQUIRE
15912 S.W. 92nd Avenue
Miami, Florida 33157
Attorney for Petitioner
(Phone) (305) 253-7557
17966 September 4.
11, 18.25.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87 5041
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
.IORGINA AJTELL1.
Decease. I
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of .IORGINA AJTELLI, deceased,
File Number 87-5041. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad
dram of which is 7:i West Flagler
St, .Miami. Florida 88180. The
names and addresses of 11
sona) representative and the per
sonal representative'! attorney are
set forth baton
All interested parsoni are re
quired to file with tins court.
WITHIN THRKK MOM IIS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
gainst the estate and cii any ob-
jection by an interested person Ml
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will.
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jnrisdie
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 18, 1987.
Personal Representative
Luciano Ajtelli
421 Sevilla Ave.
Coral Gables, Fl. 33134
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Herbert J. Lerner
801 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Fl. 33140
Telephone (305) 673-3000
17986 September 18.25. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SUNSET PROPER
TIES at 7760 S.W. 125 Terr.
Miami. Fl. 33166 intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
J. DAVID LIEBMAN
and NATALIE LIEBMAN.
his wife
17996 September 18.25;
October 2.9. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5130 (02)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
TERRY G. B. HALCROW
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of TERRY G. B.
HALCROW. deceased. File
Number 87-5130 (02). is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler,
Miami, Florida 33130. The per-
sonal representative of the estate
is CAROL A. HINKLE. whose ad-
dress is 9311 S.W. 88th Terrace.
Miami, Florida. The name and ad-
dress of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
cjualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ILL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
A ND OBJ F.< Tit )NS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first publication of
tins Notice of Administration
September 18. 1987.
Carol A Hinkle
Ai Personal Representative
of the Estate of
TERRY G. B HALCROW
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
STEPHEN I. RASKIN
7000 B.W 68nd Ave No, 580
South Miami. Fl. 88148
Telephone: 667-8707
17996 September 18, 25. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-34437 CA-17
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK OF
MIAMI AS TRUSTEE FOR THE
HOUSING FINANCE AUTHORI-
TY OF DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA UNDER A TRUST IN
DENTURE DATED
DECEMBER 1. 1981,
Plaintiff
vs.
ROBIN G. RAIMONDI,
et a! ,
Defendants.
TO: ROBIN G. RAIMONDI
721 Curtiss Parkway
No. 2
Miami Springs. Florida
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Condominium Parcel No.
27 14 in ROZLAND CON-
DOMINIUM, according to
the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof, recorded
September 17, 1981. in Of
ficial Records Book 11216, at
Page 1593 of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Stuart H. Gitlitz. Esq., At-
torney for Plaintiff, whose address
is Suite 214. 1570 Madruga
Avenue. Coral Gables, Florida,
33146 on or before October 9th,
1987, and file the original with the
clerk of this court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorney or
immediately thereafter, otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 1st day of
September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
17971 September 4, 11;
18,25.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-08372 FC 24
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
SUSAN SCHOLNIK GOLD
Petitioner/Wife,
and
WAYNE GOLD.
Respondent/Husband
TO: WAYNE GOLD
51 Beaufort Park
Finchley, London NW 11
01-458 4157
YOU ARE HEREBY
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87 4040
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RUTH GOLDSMITH.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Ruth Goldsmith, deceased, File
Number 87-4040, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. Room, 307, Miami, Florida
33131. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the cout.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 18. 1987
Personal Representative:
NORMA CAFFREY
2216 Ryder Street
Brooklyn, New York 11234
Attorney for Personal
Representative
Wavne A. Cvpon
CYPEN &CYPEN
P.O. Box 402099
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Telephone: (305) 532-3200
17997 September 18, 25. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case
No. 87-41189 (12)-FC-
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
ARNETTA M. YOUMANS
Petitioner
and
(O.NNIELEE E. YOUMANS
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO CONNIELEE E.
YOUMANS.
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I. J.
GRAFF, ESQ., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St. N.M.B. Florida 33162 on or
before October 30, 1987, and file
the original with the clerk of this
court otherwise a default will be
entered against you.
DATED: September 22. 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: F. Seidl
As Deputy Clerk
18017 September 25;
October 2,9. 16.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of RAFAEIAJ'S &
CHIQUITINES at 1811 1813
N.W. 20 Street. Miami, Fl. 33142
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
RAFAEL MOTOLA
MOTOGRAB INC.
17994 September 18.25;
October 2,9,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-5359
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
Harry Abe Shugar
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Harry Abe Shugar. deceased,
File Number 87-5359, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami, Florida. The names
and addresses of the personal
NOTIFIED that a Petition for representative and the personal
Dissolution of Marriage has been representative's attorney are set
filed against you in the Circuit forth below.
Court, in and for Dade County. All interested persons are re-
Florida, and that the Petitioner, quired to file with this court,
SUSAN SCHOLNIK GOLD, seeks WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
not only a dissolution of the mar THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
riage but also an award of any and THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
all interest and title which you against the estate and (2) any ob
have in that certain Promissory jection by an interested person on
Note, dated October 10, 1985, in whom this notice was served that
the amount of $17,000.00 given to, challenges the validity of the will,
you and Petitioner by Francisco the qualifications of the personal
Ramon and Silvia Ramon and representative, venue, or jurisdic-
secured by a Mortgage on the same tion of the court.
date on certain real property ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
located in Dade County. Florida, TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
and legally described, as follows: FOREVER BARRED.
Lot 86. Block 96. CENTRAL Publication of this Notice has
MIAMI PART SIX. accor- begun on September 25, 1987.
ding to the plat thereof, as Personal Representative:
Irving Shugar
755 Lakeview Drive
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
recorded in Plat Book 17,
Page 8, Public Records of
Dade County, Florida.
You are required to serve a copy Attorney for Personal
of your written defenses, if any. to Representative:
the Petitioner or Petitioner's At Jack Ankus. Esq.
torney. Robert S. Korschun, whose 801 North Venetian Drive
address is: 8603 South Dixie Miami. Florida 33139
Highway. Suite 210. Miami. Telephone: (305) 874-3599
Florida 33143-7807 on or before 18018 September26;
October 2.1987
the 16 day of October, 1987, and
file the original with the Clerk ol
this Court, either before service on .JEEXZ HvES ,
Petitioner's attornev or im FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
mediate";j therXr H you fail te NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
file your written response or ** undersigned, desiring to
defense, as indicated, a Default ?W ,n bu*'"essD***,?
will be entered against you for the UtJO,"sc.T.eC^ REALTY-INC.
relief demanded in the Petition. 28fl S W Avenue' M,am,j
PLEASE GOVERN El0"0* '"tend to register said
YOURSELF ACCORDINGLY.
DATED: September 10, 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
BY: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
17988 September 18, 25;
October 2. 9. 1987
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
CROP DATA LEASING. INC.
By Calvin L. Bass. President
17953 September 4.11;
18. 25. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-4858
Division (02)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BEVERLY RUTH LANDAU.
I laosasad
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of BEVERLY RUTH LANDAU.
deceased, File Number87 i-
I lending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
Dade County Courthouse 7.1 Weal
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
88180. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's it
torney are -et forth below
All interested persons are re
quired U> file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE id all claims
gainst the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will.
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 18. 1987.
Personal Representative
RITA F. NORTON
19 West Flagler St.. Suite 1201
Miami, Florida 88180
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
RITA F. NORTON
19 West Flagler St.. Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 374-3116
Florida Bar No. 183030
17990 September 18.25. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name "MUEBLISIMO" in
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Sanel Furniture, Inc.
d/b/a Eduardo Furniture
17965 September 4.
11.18.25,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11 Til JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-39836
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI, a
United States Corporation.
Ilaintiff.
vs.
SIDNEY NAGIOFF AND
ROSSLYN NAGIOFF. his wife.
SI al..
Defendants
TO SIDNEY NAGIOFF and
ROSSLYN SACK IFF.
his wife
42 Lyttleton Court
Lyttleton Road
London, England N20EB
YOU IRE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose s mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Unit No. 1002. of VEN-
DOME PLACE CON-
DOMINIUM, a Condominium
according to the Declaration
of Condominium thereof,
dated January 18. 1980, and
filed for record July 7. 1981
under Clerk's File No.
81R180394, in Official
Records Book 11151. at Page
186 of trie Public Records of
Dade Ciunty, as amended;
together with all im-
provements, appliances, and
fixtures located
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis, Allison and
Cohen, Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address is 111 N.E. 1st
Street. Miami. Florida 33132. on
or before October 16. 1987. and file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court on the 11 day of
September. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: JENNIS L. RUSSELL
Deputy Clerk
17989 September 18.25
October 2.9.1987



Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 25, 1987
Orthodox Leader Says Bork Probe Not Jewish Issue
"Recent statements by
several national Jewish
organizations have given the
impression that 'the organized
Jewish community' has taken
a collective position against
President Reagan's nomina-
tion of Judge Robert Bork to
the United States Supreme
Court.
Hadassah Zionist Youth
Announces Appointments
Sylvia Herman and Linda
Minkes, co-chairpersons of the
Florida Hadassah Zionist
Youth Commission, announce
the appointments of David
London as regional director of
Young Judea, Walter Synalov-
ski as area coordinator, Keith
Herman as senior advisor, and
Michelle Fink as ofarimJtsofim
coordinator.
London, who has studied in
Israel, has been a campus
representative for AZYF at
Palm Beach Junior College,
and an area coordinator for
Young Judea in the Palm
Beach area. He is newly mar-
ried to past Young Judean
Karyn Weldon.
Synalovski, originally from
Puerto Rico, where he was an
active Young Judean, has held
many leadership positions in
the movement and is on the
regional board. He is also a
graduate of Young Judea's
Year Course in Israel.
The late Ernest Hemignway's
hfe is featured in "Papa, a
play which has a world
premier at Miami Beach's Col-
ony Theater Oct. 1 Philip M.
Church is director.
To report the local news on the
Headline News Channel,
Dynamic Cablevision has nam-
ed Steve Schiff news director
and anchor. Schiff is a news
veteran with ten years of ex-
perience at KMOX-TV, the
CBS-owned and operated sta-
tion in St. Louis.
Berman, who has worked as
a regional high school educa-
tion programmer for Young
Judea, also participated in the
movement's Year Course in
Israel. He is president of the
college-age level of Hashachar.
Fink, who will be working
with grades 3-8, Young
Judea's youngest members,
worked at Camp Judea this
past summer as Merakezet
Ofarim.
"This is not the case," said
Sidney Kwestel, president of
the Union of Orthodox Jewish
Congregations of America.
Kwestel continued by saying
that "the Orthodox Union has
traditionally not taken a posi-
tion on judicial nominees
unless the nominee's stated
views were perceived as a
clear danger to our vision of
the freedoms that mean so
much to us as Americans and
as Jews."
"The United States Senate
has a constitutional obligation
to examine Judge Bork's views
and to vote on his nomination.
We are disturbed by those who
would prejudge the Judge's
suitability before he has had an
opportunity to testify before
the Senate Judii
Committee."
A special public
Lubavitcher
Rebb
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Bonos do Israel
Tuesday, Sept. 29 at *
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well as to Israel Rut*
AMralia. South Afrun
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ISRAEL BONDS
BEFORE MATURITY
For our bot prtcM Call Harold A. Lit win
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1-800-330-1818
LITWIN SECURITIES INC.
761 Arthur Godfrey Rd. Miami Beach, Florida 33140
STOCKS, BONDS ft OPTIONS / COMMISSION DISCOUNTS
Happy
Rosh Hashanali


"dTewislhi Floridlaim
Friday, September 25,1987
Section C
5747 ... The Year in Review
| April. 1987
JERUSALEM Foreign
Minister Peres visited Spanish
officials and drummed up sup-
port for his international peace
[conference proposal. Premier
Shamir had hoped Peres would
fail. Pores also met Soviet of-
ficials in Rome, reportedly to
[discuss resumption of
I diplomatic relations.
Hi INN Chancellor Helmut
Kohl, in his strongest public
[statement on the Nazi era,
called the Holocaust a crime
["unprecedented in history"
[which cannot be forgotten.
[The comments came during a
luncheon for Israeli President
IChaim Herzog, the first Israeli
[head of state to visit Germany.
PARIS French counter-
intelligence arrested eight
[men believed to be terrorists
[planning to blow up El Al and
|t\V'A airliners.
TEL AVIV Some 1,500
[university students staged a
bowdj demonstration outside
[the Premier's office to protest
the government's failure to
[discuss students' grievances
|over plans to raise tuition.
BALTIMORE Milton
iBartz. a Jew who retired from
[the Baltimore Fire Depart-
ment because of medical dif-
ficulties he said were related
I to religious harassment, was
[awarded $30,533 in back pay
|by the state Human Rights
|Commission.
DENVER City and Coun-
|ty of Denver were seeking pro-
posals to redevelop and
manage the house here in
[which the late Israeli Premier
Golda Meir lived from 1913-14
[with her sister and brother-in-
law. The dilapidated house still
[sits on steel beams in a city
I park.
NEW YORK World
Jewish Congress accused At-
torney General Edwin Meese
of protecting Nazi war
[criminals and impeding justice
[for Karl Linnas, who came
within hours of receiving
political asylum in Panama. He
njinji rniD nxfi
would thus have escaped
deportation to the USSR. But
a week later he was deported.
He would die in prison in July.
WASHINGTON After
much resistance, Meese added
Austrian President Kurt
Waldheim's name to a "Watch
ear M
List" of people barred from
entry into the U.S.
JERUSALEM West Bank
riots were halted, but tension
ran high after Jewish settlers
rampaged through Arab
villages, destroying property
and burning fields in retalia-
tion for the fire-bombing of a
car that killed a woman and
burned five others.
ATHENS The centennial
of the birth of Israeli founding
Premier David Ben-Gurion
was celebrated here, reflecting
an about-face in the Greek at-
titude toward Israel. The an-
niversary was celebrated in-
ternationally throughout the
year, often with the renaming
of streets in his memory.
WASHINGTON The
B'nai B'rith Youth Organiza-
tion announced it would in-
clude eighth graders as full
members for the first time.
JERUSALEM The
Palestine National Council,
meeting in Algiers, was the
site of PLO reunification and
condemnation of the Camp
David accords, yet Peres con-
tinued to hope for the interna-
tional conference.
DALLAS Annette
Strauss was the first Jewish
woman to be elected mayor of
a Texas city with her poll vic-
tory here.
WASHINGTON More
than 100 members of the
House signed a letter urging
the Soviets to free Raoul
Wallenberg, the Swedish
diplomat who^aved thousands
of Hungarian Jews from the
Nazis.
May
WASHINGTON Rep.
Jack Kemp (R., N.Y.) introduc-
ed legislation to close the
PLO's two offices in the U.S.
and to make it a felony to aid
the organization.
WASHINGTON The long-
awaited Iran-Contra hearings
began before a joint congres-
sional committee with retired
Air Force Gen. Richard Secord
saying Iran was furious at the
quality of the first 18 of 80 I -
Hawk missiles delivered by
Continued on Page 3-C
Why Bork's Confirmation Is A Jewish Issue
By JOHN ROTHCHILD
Chorus of voices opposing
Judge Robert Bork's confirma-
tion as a justice of the United
Pates Supreme Court in-
Pludes wide array of organiza-
>ns that have traditionally
united in pursuit of the ideals
W individual dignity and equal
[justice for all.
^Civi'rights groups, organiz-
labor, women's organiza-
ns, environmentalists, con-
J"er groups, gay rights
troups, and others have all
lne . te to withhold its im-
Fimateur from President
i,V^an s mst controversial
pudicial nominee.
,.aYet on voice in this chorus
| ""characteristically muted.
Only a handful of Jewish
organizations has publicly
placed themselves in the camp
of the opposition.
Absence of a strong Jewish
presence in this coalition is
both puzzling and troubling:
puzzling because it represents
a deviation from the longstan-
ding tradition of Jewish in-
volvement in matters of in-
dividual rights, and troubling
because it suggests a
misunderstanding on the part
of the leaders of American
Jewish opinion of the impact
that the confirmation of a
judge like Bork to the nation's
highest court may have on the
interests of American Jews.
It is difficult to conceive of
any explanation for the
relative apathy of the Jewish
community on Bork's nomina-
tion other than unfamiliarity
with Bork's record. Ronald
Dworkin, a leading
jurisprudential scholar, has
described Bork as "a constitu-
tional radical" whose views
"do not lie within the scope of
the longstanding debate bet-
ween liberals and conser-
vatives about the proper role
of the Supreme Court."
During his five-year tenure
as a federal appeals judge,
Bork has proven to be far more
conservative than Reagan's
run-of-the-mill judicial ap-
pointments. A study by the
Columbia Law Review
discovered that while Reagan
appointees, who are generally
conservative, voted on the
liberal side of nonunanimous
cases 31 percent of the time,
Bork did so in less than 10 per-
cent of such cases.
Another recent study, by the
AFL-CIO, showed that Bork
voted against civil rights and
civil liberties claimants in 18 of
the 20 nonunanimous cases in-
volving such issues in which he
participated; that he voted
against access to federal
courts in 16 out of 16 cases;
that he voted in favor of the
employer in five out of seven
labor cases; and that he voted
in favor of business in 10 out of
10 consumer and rate-
regulation cases.
Same study concluded that
Bork's "judicial record has
displayed a pattern of reaching
for results contrary to the in-
terests of labor, minorities, en-
vironmentalists, consumer
groups, and those seeking vin-
dication in the courts for viola-
tions of their civil rights and
liberties, while at the same
time consistently protecting
business interests from
regulation."
In his non-judicial writings
and speeches, Bork has been
equally adamant in criticizing
judicial doctrines that are pro-
tective of individual rights. In
the area of voting rights, he
has attacked the line of cases
that established and im-
plemented the "one man, one
vote" principle.
As for racial equality, he has
branded as unsupportable a
Supreme Court decision
Continued on Page S-C


Page 2-C The Jewish Floridian/September 25, 1987
Israel Festival Spring 1987
The Cultural Highlight Of The Year
By ANITA ERLICH
Evening begins to fall over
the ancient city of Jerusalem
as a lone individual makes his
way across the Valley of Hin-
nom, once a natural no man's
land separating the East and
West sides of the city.
Thousands of onlookers watch
with bated breath as the tiny
figure of Philippe Petit dares
to defy gravity on a high wire
stretched across the valley.
For some it was Barnum and
Bailey's Circus visiting the Le-
vant; for others it was an ap-
propriate symbol of 20 years of
a united city and a most ex-
citing start to the 1987 Israel
Festival.
Flags lined the streets,
decorative murals covered the
face of major public buildings
and strange sculptured biblical
figures popped up in the most
unexpected places: they stared
down from the roof of the
downtown Hamashbir depart-
ment store or confronted you
in tranquil parks.
Due in part to the 20th An-
niversary of the reunification
of the city, the Jerusalem
Municipality and Festival
organizers had gone all out
this year to turn Jerusalem in-
to a party for the arts.
AND WHAT a party it turn-
ed out to be! Some 700 foreign
artists gave 170 performances
to 122,000 ticket holders. Due
to daylight savings time the
Festival days were long and
balmy, offering an opportunity
for an additional street
festival.
Young and aspiring artists
tumbled, swallowed fire, sang,
danced and put on their own
plays outside the theater and
on the downtown Ben Yehuda
mall. There were several fr-
inge productions for children
their parents and
neighborhood residents who
strolled over to "Festival Ci-
ty," the area around the
Jerusalem Theater, every
afternoon for the day's enter-
taiment. Others browsed in the
crafts market which displayed
everything from stained glass
windows to imaginative
jewelry.
The variety of performances
catered to every taste and age,
and to quote the words of Time
Magazine editor Henry Luce,
were "Not above the
Continued on Page 6-C
A scene from Bambino Bambino performed by
the French group Casse Simple, at the
Jerusalem Theater during the Israel Festival.

LILLIAN C.ALEINIKOFF
Wishes Everyone A Happy New Year
ZALMAN BACHEIKOV, D.D.S.
420 Lincoln Rd., Suite 344 Phone 532-6795
Wishes His Clients & Friends
A Happy & Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. BERNARDO BATIEVSKY
Wish Friends, Family and
The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year
Sincere Wishes For A Very Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. DONALD BERKOWITZ
and Family
MR. and MRS. AL BERKOWITZ
and Family
MR. AND MRS. ABE BERKOWITZ
and Family
MR. and MRS. HAROLD BERKOWITZ
and Family
DR. and MRS. LEO BRAVERMAN
and Family
MR. WALTER MACKAUF and Family
JUDY and IRA BLITT
DIANE, STUART, JERILYN and PHILIP BOTWINIK
CYNTHIA, MICHAEL, WILLIAM
and ANDREW KORENVAES
A Very Happy New Year
DR. and MRS. JACK BRENNER
Wishes Family, Friends and Patients
A Happy and Healthy New Year
LEWIS, BARBARA and LAURI COHEN
DIANNE and EDWARD SCHMIDT
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy New Year
DR. and MRS. MAXWELL DAUER
MR. and MRS. ROGER DAUER
DR. and MRS. EDWARD DAUER
Wish All Their Friends A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. MAX DEAKTER
and Family
Wish To All A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. GABRIEL DEUTSCH and Family
Wish Friends A Happy and Healthy New Year
MILDRED S.FALK
Wishes All The Good People Of Miami Beach
A Happy Holiday
DR. and MRS. JEFFERY FEINGOLD
and Family
Wish Patients and Friends
A Happy and Healthy New Year
DR. and MRS. GEORGE FELDENKREIS and FAMILY
Wish All Our Friends A Happy New Year


September 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-C
5747 ... The Year In Review
Continued from Page 1-C
Israel on behalf of the U.S. He
added that some U.S. officials
wanted to blame Israel.
BOSTON Jozef Mlot-
Mroz, an accused anti-Semite,
resigned as president of the
Holy Name Society affiliated
with the St. John the Baptist
Church in Salem, Mass.,
following protests by Catholic
and Jewish leaders.
BUDAPEST WJC held an
enlarged Executive meeting in
the Hungarian capital, the
first major Jewish conference
in a Communist country.
Delegates paid tribute to
Wallenberg and congratulated
Meese for barring Waldheim
from entering the U.S.
JERUSALEM The Inner
Cabinet rejected Peres' bid for
the international Mideast
peace conference while it
became clear the Labor party
didn't have the votes to
dissolve the Knesset and call
new elections. Peres soon
after visited the U.S. to make
his case.
CHICAGO Former
Chicago policewoman Arlene
Gold received $140,000 from
the city in settlement of her
lawsuit saying the department
violated her rights by refusing
to adjust her work shift off
Saturdays. She became a prac-
ticing Orthodox Jew after 10
years on the force.
LYON The Klaus Barbie
trial began with "the Butcher
of Lyon" declaring he was
"illegally kidnapped and il-
legally brought to France." He
was allowed to be absent from
the proceedings.
NEW YORK The JDC
said it would publish the first
siddur since World War II in
Hungary.
BOSTON "Certain condi-
tions in Boston" apparently
Orthodox pressure convinc-
ed the president of the (Or-
thodox) Rabbinical Council of
America, Rabbi Milton Polin,
to withdraw from a program
on Jewish unity here that
would have included his
Reform and Conservative
peers.
VIENNA Waldheim blam-
ed "a lobby on the East Coast
of America" for influencing
the U.S. Justice Department
to bar his entry into the U.S.
JERUSALEM Shamir
pledged in writing to the ultra-
Orthodox Shas Party to seek
to change the law within 60
days to give the Israeli Chief
Rabbinate the power to ap-
prove all conversions to
Judaism for those seeking
Israeli citizenship. This in ex-
change for Shas support in
blocking early Knesset elec-
tions. Rabbi Yitzhak Peretz of
Shas was appointed Minister-
Without-Portfolio. He resign-
ed as Minister of the Interior
last year rather than comply
with a Supreme Court order to
register U.S. immigrant
Shoshana Miller, converted to
Judaism by a Reform rabbi, as
Jewish.
GENEVA The Israeli Am-
bassador to the UN here, Pin-
chas Eliav, protested the inclu-
sion of books denying the
Holocaust at the International
Book Fair here.
WASHINGTON The
Supreme Court ruled that
Jews and Arabs are protected
against discrimination by
federal civil rights legislation
adopted in 1886. The ruling
allowed Shaare Tefila Con-
gregation of Silver Spring,
Md., to sue vandals for
damages under the civil rights
law.
NEW YORK The New
York Board of Rabbis called on
its members representing
every branch in Judaism in the
U.S. to encourage their con-
gregants to obtain, in the
event of a civil divorce, a
Jewish divorce (get) as well.
JERUSALEM The two
official probes into the Pollard
affair found Israel's top
political leaders and the in-
telligence community respon-
sible for grave mishandling of
the episode, but no one was
urged to resign.
TEL AVIV The Shin Bet
internal security service was
found to have fabricated
evidence that sent IDF Lt.
Azat Nafsu to prison for
treason.
WASHINGTON The
Federal Commission of Fine
Arts rejected designs for the
U.S. Holocaust Memorial
Museum here, saying part of it
would protrude too far into the
street.
WALTHAM, Mass. -
Brandeis University voted to
divest of all stock in companies
doing business in South Africa
except those providing medical
goods, humanitarian services
or reporting the news.
JERUSALEM Police and
border police fought street
battles with hundreds of Arab
youths late in the month in the
worst anti-Israel rioting in the
Old City in years.
JERUSALEM A judicial
commission was appointed to
investigate alleged Shin Bet
misconduct.
August 1987
TEL AVIV Israel ended a
ban by its top three leaders
against interviews with NBC-
TV, imposed in response to the
network's critical program
about Israel. The network
agreed to air Israeli objections
to "Six Day Plus 20 Years: A
Dream Is Dying."
SAN FRANCISCO -
United Israel Appeal criticized
the Jewish Federation here for
diverting $100,000 from
Jewish Agency funds to its
own Israel programs.
WASHINGTON Israel's
foreign aid and strong rela-
tionship with the U.S. survived
the Iran-Contra hearings as
the Jewish State was not link-
ed to diverting funds to the
Contras.
NEW YORK The Interna-
tional Jewish Committee on
Interreligious Consultations
(IJCIC), based here, accepted
an invitation to meet with
Pope John Paul II in Rome by
early September.
MANCHESTER, England
British Jews were concern-
Continued on Page 18-C
MR. and MRS. AINSLEE FERDIE
And Their Children
Wish The Entire Jewish Community, Friends
and Fam'y
A Happy and Healthy New Year
DR. and MRS. M.S. FOX
Wish The Entire Jewish Community and Patients,
Friends and Family A Happy and Healthy New Year
MRS. LOUIS QADON and FAMILY
Wish Friends and Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MRS. PAUL GAIER
Wishes Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. GARY GERSON
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MS. ROSALIND GETTIS and
MR. LES WINSTON
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy New Year
MRS. MYRIAMGINGOLD
Wish All Friends and Family
A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. BARTON S. GOLDBERG
Wish Family and Friends
A Happy New Year
DR. ROBERT GOLDBERG
Podiatrist
1205 Drexel Ave., Miami Beach 534-1271
Wishes Patients and Friends
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. HOWARD GORDON
Wish Family and Friends
A Happy and Healthy New Year
HARRIET and MILT GREEN
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. JERRY ISAN
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MRS. JOSEPH LANDSMAN
Wish Friends, Family and
The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year
DR. and MRS. BENJAMIN LEIGH
Wish All Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year


Page 4-C The JewishFloridian/September 25, 1987
Hillel Much More Than
A Home-Away-From-Home To Students
By ALICE FISHER
After Barry Yarchin's Bar
Mitzvah, he "forgot" he was
Jewish and continued with his
life's plan to become a respon-
sible and successful member of
the community specifically,
an attorney. In his mind, one
thing had nothing to do with
the other.
In undergraduate school at
Boston University and law
school at the University of
Miami, Yarchin was aware
that Hillel Houses existed, but
he had neither the desire nor
the inclination to enter the
buildings. In fact, he thought
Hillel was a refuge for ultra
religious Jews or nerds.
TODAY, Yarchin, a real
estate attorney in a downtown
Miami firm, of Rosenthal and
Yarchin, is president of Hillel
and one of its most en-
thusiastic supporters. He is
constantly working to educate
the public about Hillel's role in
the community and create
fund-raising activities to sup-
port the organization. Self-
described as a man "obsessed
with the importance of Hillel,"
he is also completely in touch
with his sense of Jewishness.
This complete turn-about
surprises Yarchin more than
anyone. "I was one of those
people you read about." he
says, "the ones who go on a
mission to Israel and return
home as 'zealots.' After going
on a Federation-sponsored trip
to Israel in 1980, I knew that I
Barry Yarchin
wanted to be part of the
Jewish experience. I had been
missing out too long. A friend
suggested that I become active
in Hillel."
The rest is, as they say,
history. Hillel became Yar-
chin's pet project from day
one.
"I am eternally grateful to
the Federation for getting me
in touch with my Jewishness,"
he says. "If not for them, I
might have missed out on one
of the most important parts of
my life."
YARCHIN IS determined
that other young people don't
repeat his mistake. His goal is
to have students want to walk
into a Hillel House and
discover "home" one that
not only caters to such
religious needs as holding
High Holy Holiday services
and Seders, but also offers
emotional help when needed,
holds social gatherings, and
gets young people tuned into
political issues that are impor-
tant to Jews.
On today's campuses, Hillel
offers all of these options and
more. But it is still, too often,
perceived as simply "the
Jewish address on campus."
In reality, Hillel has come a
long way since it was first
founded on the campus of a
Midwestern college more than
60 years ago. Locally a
beneficiary of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation,
there are now 300 units
throughout the world. In Dade
County, Hillel has a presence
at the University of Miami;
Barry College, where they ser-
vice students from a car;
Miami-Dade Community Col-
lege; Florida International
University; and the Southeast
College of Osteopathic
Medicine.
"HILLEL," says Dick
Goldstein, executive director
for the past six and a half
years, "is not only the Jewish
voice on campus, but has ex-
tended its influence to the sur-
rounding Jewish community as
well. It is the place that
handles responses to major
Jewish problems, such as anti-
Semitism."
As an example, Goldstein
cites the recent Hatem Hus-
saini incident in Tampa. Hus-
saini, a PLO member, was on a
round of personal appearances
on campuses nationwide and
was scheduled to appear at the
University of South Florida.
When Hillel got word of his ap-
pearance, they began organiz-
ing a response.
First, they notified campus
security that a controversial
guest speaker was appearing,
so necessary precautions could
be taken. Second, they
organized a group of students
to attend the lecture equip-
ped with intelligent questions
that would challenge Arab
propaganda.
THIRD. Hillel organized the
off-campus Jewish community
to attend and help distribute
leaflets presenting opposing
points of view.
"The results," says Golds-
tein, "couldn't have been bet-
ter. The audience totally
defeated Hussaini's objective.
Our campaign was so effec-
tive, he had to change his
presentation at the next col-
lege speech."
Through such hands-on ex-
perience, Hillel teaches
students that important
changes can come about, and
just how to make them hap-
pen. It raises their political
consciousness and awareness
of Jewish problems. Most im-
portant. Hillel helps produce
the next generation of Jewish
leaders.
"Leadership development"
says Yarchin, "is the most im-
portant part of the national
Hillel movement because this
will insure the thriving and
growth of the Jewish people."
YARCHIN feels that Mark
Slotnick, a student at the
University of Miami, will most
likely be one of these leaders.
Slotnick is one of the main
forces behind UM's current
"400,000 Pennies for Their
Thoughts" campaign, a pro-
gram to support Soviet Jewry.
The idea is to collect 400,000
pennies, one for each
Refusenik still in the Soviet
Union. Like Yarchin, Slotnick
was inspired after a mission to
Israel and the Soviet Union,
where he actually met with
several Refuseniks.
"Slotnick is a success story,"
says Yarchin.
So is Wayne Firestone, ac-
cording to Goldstein.
Firestone joined Hillel at UM
and got turned on to Jewish
life after a trip to Israel and
the Soviet Union. He was so
touched by the ordeal of the
Refuseniks that he wrote a
play entitled "Trial and Er
ror;" it has been presented in
Miami and in Israel.
"I feel that Hillel was a ma-
jor factor in helping Firestone
reach his potential as a writer
and as a Jew," says Goldstein.
SINCE HILLEL doesn't
Continued on Page 20-C
MR. and MRS. EDWARD LUSTIG
Wish Family and Friends
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. MARTIN MAYER
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
DR. JULES and LINDA MINKES
and FAMILY
Wish A Happy New Year
COUNCILMAN and MRS. TED NELSON
Happy New Year To Everyone
DR. and MRS. SOL NUSSBAUM
Wish The Entire Jewish Community,
Friends, Patients and Family
A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. FRED OBER
and HEIDI LEE
Wish Their Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. HOWARD PELZNER
Wish Their Friends, Family
And The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year
DR. and MRS. PAUL RICHMAN and Family
Wish All Patients and Friends
A Happy New Year
MR. LESTER ROGERS
Wishes Clients and Friends
A Happy and Healthy New Year
BOB, GLORIA, RENEE SH ARI,
and TODD ALAN ROSEN
of 9242 SW 78th Place
Pepperwood, Miami
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Happy and Healthy New Year
DR. MORTON ROSENBLUTH
Wishes Patients, Friends and Family
A Happy New Year
Happy New Year
To All Our Relatives and Friends
THE ROSS FAMILY
Barry, Elaine, Sheri and Marc


Septeml>er 25. 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-C
Why Bork's Confirmation Is A Jewish Issue
Continued from Page 1-C
disallowing enforcement of
racially restrictive covenants.
In 1968 he published an article
ailacking a proposed federal
law prohibiting racial
discrimination in public accom-
modations as an improper in-
terference with the rights of
whites to avoid unwanted
association with blacks; that
proposal became part of the
landmark Civil Rights Act of
1964.
On the occasion of the hear-
ings for his confirmation as
Solicitor General in 1973, Bork
stated that he had changed his
opinion on the advisability of
this law.
Bork is if possible less com-
promising on the issue of the
right to privacy. He believes
that the Constitution does not
confer any such right, and that
the cases recognizing this
right are therefore il-
legitimate. Consistent with
this view, Bork advocates tur-
ning hack the clock to a time
when state legislatures were
permitted to ban the sale of
contraceptives to married
couples on the ground that
their availability was injurious
to morals.
<>n the same grounds he has
denounced Roe v. Wads, the
landmark case establishing a
woman's right to abortion, as
"an unconstitutional deci-
sion." In 1985 Judge Bork
acted on these views, author-
ing a decision that allows
discrimination against
homosexuals.
This brief review of Bork's
record as both legal commen-
tator and judge reveals a man
whose views are antithetical to
the ideals of equal justice and
individual dignity for which
Jews have long fought, as ex-
emplified by the memorable
image of Abraham Joshua
Heschel marching side by side
with Rev. Martin Luther King
in Selma, and Yoachim Prinz's
stirring oration on the same
occasion.
No further proof is needed to
demonstrate that Bork's
record places him squarely in
conflict with the high ideals to
which Jews have long subscrib-
ed and in furtherance of which
they have been willing to make
great sacrifices.
Even if Jews were determin-
ed to abandon their dedication
to the ideal of fair treatment
for all, they would be ill-
advised to sit out this fight.
The indications are that Bork's
presence on the Supreme
Court would have a direct and
negative impact on Jews
themselves.
Although Bork's judicial
writings do not disclose his
position on the First Amend-
ment guarantee of the separa-
tion of church and state, a
speech that he delivered in
1984 provides some insight in-
to his views on this issue. The
First Amendment forbids
government participation in
any "establishment" of
religion, and guarantees the
"free exercise" of religion by
all.
In his speech Bork
characterized the trend of giv-
ing expansive readings to
these two principles as the
"privatization of morality."
Bork explained that the
modern source of the notion
that morality is a private mat-
ter is John Stuart Mill's
famous essay On Liberty. (Mill
argued that the government
may not restrict individual
liberties except insofar as ex-
ercise of those liberties
threatens harm to others. Mill
defined what constitutes harm
narrowly enough to exclude
such "moral injuries" as the
spectacle of one's neighbor
practicing an unfamiliar
religion.
Thus in Mill's view one's
relationship with God was not
a matter for government
regulation. This is the princi-
ple that underlies Jefferson's
metaphoric "wall of separation
between church and state":
since an individual's practice
of religion is a purely private
matter that threatens no harm
to others, the government has
no right to regulate in this
area.
While stopping short of a call
for abandonment of this Jef-
fersonian ideal, Bork pointed
out that there is an alternative
conception of the role of
government in policing
religious values, according to
which religious belief and prac-
tice are considered to be not
private but public matters.
Adoption of this "com-
munitarian view," as he term-
ed it, would entail "a relaxa-
tion of current rigidly
secularist doctrine," perhaps
involving "the reintroduction
of some religion into public
schools and some greater
religious symbolism in our
public life."
It is obviously impossible t<>
predict on the basis of one
speech how Justice Bork might
rule on such concrete issues as
school prayer, government
funding of religious schools,
publicly sponsored displays of
religious symbolism, and so
forth.
But Bork's favorable disposi-
tion to "a relaxation of current
rigidly secularist doctrine"
ought to raise a red flag to
Jews, given their minority
status in our society.
Bork has proven himself to
be lacking in many of the
qualities demanded of those
selected to sit on the nation's
highest court. The Jewish com-
munity should not hesitate in
speaking out against the con-
firmation of one who would be
a Justice in name only.
John Rothrhild is a inemlier
of the Task Force on the
Judiciary of the American
Jewish Congress, and is
associated with the
Washington, D.C. law firm of
Bredhoff and Kaiser.
Jeffrey M. Loewy, newly-elected president of the New York
Association for New Americans (right), presents a specially-
designed menorah to outgoing president, Paul R. Alter, in
recognition of his four years of leadership.' Loewy was elected to
his post unanimously by the Board of NY AN A, this country's
largest regugee resettlement agency under Jewish auspices.
MR. and MRS. HOWARD SCHARLIN
and Family
Wish The Entire Jewish Community,
Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
DR. JULIEN and DR. SCHATZ
1680 Meridian Ave., M.B. 531-3476
We Wish All A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. LEONARD SCHWALB
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
SHELDON, RIBOTSKY, LEVINE, P.A.
Extends A Happy New Year
To All Our Friends and Clients
CLARA and SEYMOUR SMOLLER
New Year's Greetings To All Our Friends
MRS. REBEL SOLLOWAY
BENES and ALAN QLACKMAN
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. JOSEPH SURES
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. EDWARD SWERDLIN
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
DR. and MRS. HUGH UNGER
Wish Patients and Friends
A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. JOEL VOGEL and Family
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy New Year
GREETINGS
From
ALBERT ZEMLOCK
I


Page 6-C The Jewish Floridian/September 25, 1987
Israel Festival Spring 1987
The Cultural Highlight Of The Year
Continued from Page 2-C
understanding of a truck
driver and not insulting to the
intelligence of a professor."
Entertainment locations rang-
ed from the austere Domition
Abbey on Mount Zion to the
small" stark theater in the
basement of the Jerusalem
Theater.
PERHAPS IT was not by
chance that the Abbey's first
Festival performance were the
requiems of the rivals Mozart
and Salieri sung by the
Palaestrina Choir from
Nuremberg. The Hall's superb
acoustics were to later
reverberate to the tones of the
Bruckner Mass and King
David Oratorium sung by the
90 member Kolner Kantorei.
Oscar Rosenfeld, an
American visiting his daughter
in Jerusalem, has for many
years enhoyed the recordings
of the Tokyo String Quartet.
"It was such a pleasure seeing
them in real life," he told me.
as he settled in to his seat in
the new Henry Crown Theater
for his third performance in
the cycle of Beethoven String
Quartets.
Contemporary music buffs
had their senses jolted with the
highly controversial electronic
music of Philip Glass, but even
more popular was the jazz
Amit Women
(Formerly American Mizrachi Women)
633 NE 167th St., Suite 815
North Miami Beach 651-1444
A Happy and Healthy New Year
YIDDISH CULTURE WINKLE
Happy New Year
Menathe Felde t eln, Prea Ident
Sarah Kaufman, Honorary Vice President
Josaph Bemhaut, Vice Prealdent
Sheva Borland, Financial Sacratary
_______RoaoLueky, Recording Sacratary
Temple Bnai Zion
200 178th St.
No. Miami Beach 932-2159
A Joyous New Year To All
Temple Zion Israelite Center
8000 Miller Dr.
Miami 271-2311
Wishes The Entire Community and Members
A Happy and Healthy New Year
guitarist John Mc Laughlin in
a joint performance with the
Flamenco guitarist Paco De
Lucia.
The Philobulus Dance
Theater turned out to be as
unusual as its name which
means phototropic fungi. The
audience at the Mount Scopus
Amphitheater delighted in the
interlocking bodies sculptured
against the dark hills, and
were far from disappointed by
the evening's climax which
turned into a play of rolling
bodies and barrels.
PEOPLE WERE astounded
to find the conventional
Jerusalem Theater transform-
ed into "theater in the round"
by the Arena Theater from
Washington. The setting con-
sisted of bare rafters wich ex-
posed the backstage, and
bleacher-like seats around a
contrived wooden stage.
The play. Arthur Miller's
"Crucible." an American
classic which depicts the Salem
witch hunts, was seen by many
as a convincing allegory to the
politics of the day. where the
need to find a scapegoat in the
various 'affairs' appeared
vital. But. politics aside, the
many immigrants who attend-
ed reveled in the language and
familiar theme.
Language posed no problem
when it came to the theatrical
hit of the festival the Polish
version of Dostoyevski's epic
story "Crime and Punish-
ment." The impact was strong
and the message clear.
Directed by Andzej Wajda. the
performance had already been
acclaimed at the Edinburgh
Our warmest greetings to all our Friends
May the New Year bring peace
throughout the world
Officers and Staff of the
American Friends of
The Hebrew University
Ezra and Tati Katz of
Miami announce the birth
of their son, Jason Aaron,
on Friday, September 11.
Jason's grandparents are
Jose and Lucia Poyastro.
of San Jose. Costa Rica,
and Jacob and Gisela Katz.
of Cleveland. Ohio.
BEST WISHES
FOR THE
NEW TEAR
New Sanctuary Complex .Searing Completion

START THE NEW YEAR AT SOUTH DACE'S
MOST DYNAMIC CONSERVATIVE CONGREGATION
David H. Auerba
For Membership and High Holy Day Information
Call the Synagogue Office at 238-2601
R*bb'____________________Stephen Freedman. Cantor
Festival, and the Israeli au-
dience was no less impressed.
Tickets were hard to come by,
despite the fact there were six
performances.
ANOTHER BOX office sell-
out was Peter Brook's version
of "Carmen." Three alter-
nating casts presented the
Bizet clasic. each with its own
personal interpretation. At the
performance, half the audience
was seated-on the stage itself,
which had been converted into
a sandy arena. The wiles of the
seductive Carmen from close
up and the theatricality and
contemporary mood of Brook's
staging, enthralled the au-
dience. "I never really liked
opera much." said 19 year old
Yoav. "but that changed after
I saw Carmen." Yoav's en-
thusiasm echoed the general
euphoria of the audience.
A summarv of the Festival
could not be complete without
mentioning the outstandS
dance performances: enti *
families turned out for m!
Stuttort Ballet's "Tarn^t
he Shrew." Shakespeare
transferred into the medium of
dance, turned out to he a uni
que combination of comedv
and drama with outstanding
solo performances and vividlv
colorful 12th centum
costumes. J
On the other hand. Martha
Clarke s burlap garbed dance
troupe drew accolades as this
innovative troupe ran the
gamut of the Garden of Eden
to heaven and hell in less than
one hour. The dancers flew
through the air, crawled in
purgatory, and gave full and
very graphic interpretations of
the seven deadly sins. The au-
dience delighted in it as thev
did in all the Festival's
offerings.

"^ Mb z=
Jtl IfcT^
Beth law Goncregation Benny RokOmus 1051 North Miami Beach Boulevard North Miami Beach, FL 33162 (305)947-7528 "A Conservative Synagogue That Cares" Wishes The Entire Community and Members A Happy and Healthy New Year Dr. Max A Lipachltz, Rabbi Z#ee Aroni. Cantor. Rev Mordechal Adlef. Ritual Director Harvey L. Brown, Executive Director Rhea Schartzbarg, Religious School Director Shulamlt Glttelaon. Early Childhood Director David Brook. Youth Director Stephanie Enoelbarg, Actle Adulta Director Robert Bllllg. PraakJant
Temple Emanu-El
of Greater Miami
Dr. Irving Lehrman
Rabbi
Lawrence M. Schantt
President
A Joyous New Year To All
The Sisterhood The Men s Club The P. TA.
The Players The Forty-Niners The Family League
and all Affiliated Youth Groups
Temple Israel
of Greater Miami
*
raeaaw Oeaawaeei
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
Rabbi Rax D. Perimeter
Cantor Rachelle P. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus Jacob G. Bomstem
Wishing the Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year


n
September 25, 1987/The Jewish Kloridian Page 7-C
Weizmann Institute Forms
Young Leadership Division
<[>
fecal
Ent
Wishing All Customers
& Friends A Happy & Healthy
1 New Year
ALUMINUM KAq OR07/QO
PRODUCTS Ooo-OOOY/OO
4111N.W.132St.,Bay1
Members of the newly-formed Young
readership division of the Florida region of
the American Committee for the Weizmann
Institute will gather Sunday evening, Oct. 4,
at the Miami Beach home of Barbie and Bud-
dy Levine.
Buddy Levine will serve as chairman of the
new group, which was formed to help fund
the research undertaken at the Weizmann In-
stitute in Rehovot, Israel.
His grandfather, Harry Levine, was a
founder of the Weizmann Institute and his
father, Morton (Babe) Levine of Delray Beach
is a member of the board of the American
Committee.
(iuest speaker at the reception will be Got-
tlieb Hammer of Bay Harbor Islands, lone
surviving founder of the Weizmann Institute
and chairman of the Florida Region's ex-
ecutive committee.
The Weizmann Institute of Science was
founded in 1934 by Dr. Chaim Weizmann,
distinguished scientist and Zionist leader who
became the first president of Israel.
noxju

RJCK3
National Bank
BayPoint Branch Office
576-4200

Buddy and Barbie Levine
A Happy New Year To All
Temple Beth Moshe
2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami. Fla. 33181
Israel Jacob*
Rabbi
MelvynTrnte
President
Joseph A. Gorflnkel. Ph.D.
Rabbi Emeritus
Mosbc Friedler
Cantor
Irving Jaret
Executive Director
Israel Aliyah Center
Wishes You
nnu niu
Happy New Year
4200 Blscayns Boulevard, Miami, Florida 33137 (305) 573-2556
\i T
Temple Sinai of North Dade
18801 N.E. 22nd Ave. North Miami Beach 33180
Phone-932-9010
Wishes Our Members and the Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year
Ralph P. Kingeley, Rabbi
Julian I. Cook, AssociaU Rabbi
Irving Shulkea, Castor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
George J. Berlin, President
New Year Greetings From
Dep. of Florida Indies Auxiliary
Jewish War Veterans of U.S.A.
Rita Saslaw, President
**1".umorS
"obttmorrhj.^^
"**-Schoolmen
Temple Beth Am
Msrk*.Kra
Lynn H. OOMMwn
AMkMant Robot
SSM N. Kendall Dr., Miami M7-SM7
Wtthtt re Jmrfg* Community Mea/Mr Mew rear
Hadassah
Wishes The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year
M'AMI BEACH REGION
mc*l'aP.A.Prealdent
MIAMI REGION
MILDRED RIESENBERQ. PrMld.nl
IN THIS
SACRED SEASON
WE WISH YOU
AND YOURS
JOY PEACE AND
FULFILLMENT.
City Of Hope
AIDS Benefit
City of Hope, recently
designated by the National In-
stitute of Health as an AIDS
research center and patient
care facility, will hold a special
"way-off Broadway" perfor-
mance of Michael Bennet's
Tony Award winning musical
"See-Saw" as part of its drive
to raise funds for AIDS
research.
The play will be presented at
the Ruth Foreman Theater on
Fill's Bay Vista Campus, Oct.
7. Donation will include admis-
sion, and there will be a chance
to meet the cast after the
show, refreshments, prizes
and surprises.
Histadrut
Israel's Jewel
America's Best Kept Secret
DO YOU KNOW THAT HISTADRUT helps 85% of Israel's total
population receive complete medical care in Kupat Holim, Histadrut's
medical network?
DO YOU KNOW THAT HISTADRUT builds and supports
numerous children's villages which house thousands of children from
broken and deprived homes?
DO YOU KNOW THAT HISTADRUT has a network of 100
Vocational and Technical High Schools known as Amal?
DO YOU KNOW THAT HISTADRUT supports and maintains homes
for senior citizens throughout the State of Israel?
COME JOIN US
Share the excitement of helping and loving the State of Israel.
Help South Florida do its part to build a better Israel.
WISHING YOU A HAPPY AND HEALTHY NEW YEAR
ISRAEL HISTADRUT CAMPAIGN OF SOUTH FLORIDA
2460 Hollywood Boulevard
Suite 606
Hollywood, Florida 33020
Broward: 920*8601 Dade: 94 9760
ELLIOTT ENQELBAUM, Executive Director
::>:-:-:-;-x-:-^^^ fSftUSmSftfSSWSfSSi


Page 8-C The Jewish Floridian/September 25, 1987
Martin Luther King III, son of the slain civil
rights leaders, poses with Jerusalem Mayor
Teddy Kollek at a memorial to his father in
the city's Liberty Bell Park. King travelled
with SI other American leaders for a first
hand look at Israel in an effort to improve
relations between Jews and blacks. JTA/World
Zionist News Photo
Happy & Healthy
Rosh Hashanah
CountyDonk
COUNTY NATIONAL BANK MOf SOUTH FLORIDA
(305)651-7110
YOU'RE BIG BUSINESS TO US.
t&
MEMBER FDIC
Th North Dado Vaad Ha-Kashmth wtahea tha entire community a haalthy,
happy and paacaful Naw Yaar.
Aa tha Naw Yaar la about to begin allow ut to remind you that tha following establish
manto and only thaaa aatabliahmanta are undor our upervtaton.
MENDELSON SONS KOSHER
MEAT MARKET
1354 N.E. MJM Streat
NEW DEAL KOSHER
MEAT POULTRY MARKET
13S2N.E. 163rd Street
NORMANDY KOSHER
MEAT MARKET
1112 Normandy Drhw
SURF KOSHER MEAT
ft POULTRY
7432 <
BAYSHORE CONVALESCENT CENTER
IftSSO W. Dixie Highway
EXECUTIVE CATERERS OF BETH TOR AH
CONGREGATION
1061 North Miami Baach Boulevard
TAKE OUT GOURMET
1730 N.E. Miami Qardona Drive
! Rabbi Max Lipachitz.
President
Rabbi Beth Torah Congregation
Rabbi Simcha Freadman,
Vic* President and Secretary
Rabbi Temple Adath Yeshurun
Fire Guts Boston's Hadassah Thrift Shop
BOSTON The local damage, double that when ad-
Hadassah chapter is seeking a ding the value of its contents.
temporary alternative location The 10,155 square-font s^
for its Thrift Shop, which was was Hadassah's largest gross-
ing thrift shop in the :ountry
according to the Jewish Ad-
vocate, taking in $350,000 an-
nually from the sale of donated
items. The fire affected a
block, and busied 115
firefighters .
gutted by a four-alarm fire.
The store will be rebuilt on its
original site within nine mon-
ths, according to chapter presi-
dent Rachel Albert.
The shop sustained an
estimated $200,000 worth
Federal
Discount Pharmacy
HAPPY NEW YEAR
45NE1atAve.
Miami
358-5165
Mr. & Mrs. Stanley C. Myers
and Family
DUa%i m*uii
mica
TR*U>
/Association
0l~ g^tft
ev miami
The Dade County members of the Association, comprised
of Orthodox, Conservative, Reform and Reconstruct
tionist Rabbis extend warm wishes for a Shanah Tovah
to the entire community.
The Association encourages Jewish education and
philanthropy and fosters civic betterment and interfaith
communications.
May the New Year, 5748. usher in an era of peace for
Israel and all mankind.
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Rabbi David H. Auerbach
Rabbi Herbert M. Baumgard
Rabbi Yehuda L. Benhamu
Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan
Rabbi Mitchell Chefitz
Rabbi Julian I. Cook
Rabbi Michael B. Eisenstat
Rabbi Edwin Farber
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Rabbi Gary A. Glickstein
Rabbi Brett S. Goldstein
Rabbi Lynn Goldstein
Rabbi Stuart Grant
Rabbi Jason Gwasdoff
Rabbi Rachel Hertz man
Rabbi Israel Jacobs
Rabbi Harry Jolt
Rabbi Warren Kasztl
Rabbi Ralph P. Kingsley
Rabbi Maurice Klein
Rabbi Mark Kram
Rabbi Leon Kronish
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
Rabbi Max A. Lipachitz
Rabbi Norman S. Lipson
Rabbi Meir Matzliah
Meuuned
Rabbi Jehuda Melber
Rabbi Sadi Nahmias
Rabbi Jack Riemer
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Rabbi Samuel Rudy
Rabbi David B. Saltzman
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Rabbi Leonard Schoolman
Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro
Rabbi Rami M. Shapiro
Rabbi Bernard A. Silver
Rabbi Shmaryahu T.
Swirsky
Rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff
Rabbi Nathan H. Zwitman
Rabbinical Association
of Greater Miami
4200 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Florida 33137
Telephone 576-4000
Rabbi David Saltzman
President
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Executive Vice President


Shoshana Cardin
Shoshana Cardin To Speak At
Federation Women's Division Retreat
She is the current president
of the Council of Jewish
Federations, the national coor-
dinating body of Federations
in North America; the first
woman to ever serve in that
position. .Her name is
Shoshana Cardin, and she is
coming to South Florida to
speak to members of the
Women's Division of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion at their annual retreat to
be held Oct. 5-6 at Hotel
Sofitel in Miami.
"We are thrilled to have a
woman of Shoshana's stature
coming to speak to us," said
Renata Bloom, Women's Divi-
sion retreat co-chairwoman
along with Elaine Richman.
"We are sure Shoshana will
provide us with much insight
and information on issues in-
volving women as well as
Jewish life."
Other speakers for the two-
da) retreat include Janet
Chusmir, executive editor of
the Miami Herald, discussing
th changing community; Brian
finis, political outreach
director for the American
Israeli Public Affairs Commit-
tee, who will give a political
update, and Craig Ullom,
director of Human
Resources/Leadership
Development for the Universi-
ty of Miami, speaking on the
art of being creative. In addi-
tion to the workshops, a varie-
ty of social activities are also
planned, with a Judaica art ex-
hibit to be displayed.
Young Israel Of
Sunny Isles To
Dedicate Plaque
Young Israel of Sunny Isles
will inaugurate its Chai
Building Fund Campaign for
the new synagogue building
under construction at Yom
Kippur Yizkor Service on
Saturday morning, Oct. 3.
Mr. Hillel Price, president of
Young Israel Congregation,
stated that the Chai Builders
Plaque, honoring donors of
$1,800 or more, will take place
at the same time.
Rabbi Rubin R. Dobin
spiritual leader will conduct
the service and will speak on
"The Vision, The Courage,
and the Joy."
September 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-C
,.
2 m
Women's Cancer League of Miami Beach
Board Members celebrated the birthdays from
left Sylvia Samtz, Lill Blasberg, Helen Mer-
witzer and Ceil Block. The foursome share
Virgo birthdates in addition to their commit-
ment to the League's support of the Com-
prehensive Breast Center and Radiation On-
cology Department at Mount Sinai Medical
Center.
Singles
SMART AND SASSY 31
year old professional, tan
5"7 brunette with curva-
ceous, womanly figure,
looking for traditional
Jewish male, 30-43 for
serious committed rela-
tionship. |f you concen-
trated on career or intel-
lectual pursuits or were
simply too shy to build the
Kind of warm, nurturing
family life you now desire,
ke long walks by the
beach and Jewish folk
music, you might just be
me guy for this old-fashion-
ed 9al. Send picture and
note with phone number to
ox NJ c/o Jewish Florid-
an. P.O. Box 012973,
M|ami,Fl. 33101
BwLaw wishesjm a joyous
NEW YEAR
bankleumi nmhpn


BaakLeumil.e-lsiaelB.M. Head Office: 24-32 Yehuda Halevi St Tel Aviv 65546 Tel: (03)632111 Telex: 33586 LF.UMIIL Miami Atracs 407 Lincoln Road Mall Sui(e7B Miami Beach. FL 33139 Tel: (305)531-3378/9 Telex: 153522 New York* LoaAafeWi* Eacfao* MM Ckkaio* Philadelphia-ToroMo Member FDIC Montreal London Leeds Paris Marseilles Strasbourt Lyons Zurich Geaeva r ran a furls M Milan Antwerp Montevideo Punts del Lite WKho.ei BaeaoeAarta Mo Paulo Santiafo, Chile Mexico Cits Panama (in (ay ma* Islands Caracas 4tt branches and

Curacao
Johannesburg
Hong Kob(
Melbourne


Page 10-C The Jewish Floridian/September 25, 1987
Rosh Hashanah A Time To Take Stock
By DVORA WAYSMAN
Once a year, most businesses
prepare a balance sheet. They
make a profit and loss account,
do a stocktaking and estimate
what kind of a financial year it
has been. Then they examine
the weakenesses and try to
make projections so that the
coming year will be more
profitable.
We are given the same op-
portunity. Every year, during
the Hebrew month of Ellul,
Jews begin a period of spiritual
stocktaking. It is a time for ex-
amining the state of our soul,
and of 'returning' or making
'teshuvah.' Even before Rosh
Hashanah, devout Jews begin
saying special penitential
prayers called 'Selihot.'
ALTHOUGH Rosh
Hashanah is the Jewish New
Year, it is very different from
the Gentile new year which is
marked by parties and mer-
rymaking, although new year
resolutions are common to
both. Rosh Hashanah is an am-
bivalent holiday in one
respect it's very solemn, and in
another it's festive Yom
Harat Olam the birthday of
the world.
The ten days that begin with
Rosh Hashanah and end with
Yom Kippur, the Day of
Atonement, mark a concen-
trated period of introspection
when we are meant to ask
forgiveness of anyone we may
have hurt during the year in
order to be permitted to ask
pardon for sins against God.
Many Jews who do not at-
tend synagogue throughout
the year make an exception on
Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kip-
pur. For many the dramatic
blast of the shofar stirs
memories of childhood and
beloved parents or grand-
parents to whom heritage and
tradition were important.
They participate in the oral
confession of transgressions
which are recited in unison and
somehow feel cleansed at the
awe-inspiring ritual.
FOR ME, Rosh Hashanah is
a very special festival, more so
since I came to live in Israel.
The holiness and purity of the
day seem to envelopm all of
Jerusalem. There is almost no
traffic on the roads, so that the
usual noises of the city are
muted. People walk solemnly
to synagogue wearing new
clothes in honor of the day.
But the physical aspects of the
holiday are dwarfed by the
spiritual significance.
I find Rosh Hashanah a
wonderfully optimistic
festival. We give expression to
our belief that God exists
that things do not happen by
mere chance but are part of a
Divine plan. And, no matter
how morally lax we may have
been in the past, we are given
another chance to improve
ourselves through acts of
repentance, prayer and good
works. At a time when
pessimism and despair seem to
reign throughout much of the
world, it is very comforting to
be given this opportunity to
wipe the slate clean and begin
anew.
So, like Jews everywhere,
we pray. We draw together as
families. We eat apples dipped
et new year. The extra dimen-
sion felt in Israel is that we are
living in our own land. We are
Levinson Loans
Miami 0/l-04o7
Happy New Year
Southeastern Public Service Co.
P.O. Box 41000
(Normandy Branch)
Miami Beach
Happy New Year
866-7771
all one people, a family sharing
a common destiny. No matter
how polarized our society may
be, we know that what will be
a good year for one will be
good for all, because we have a
common goal. It is this shared
destiny that binds Israelis
together, no matter how dif-
ferent the ethnic and cultural
background may be.
New Deal Strictly Kosher
Meat & Poultry Market
1362NE163St. A-_ *%-.
North Miami Beach 949-2512
Wishes A Healthy and Happy New Year
To All Our Customers a) Friends
Federal Discount Pharmacy
1120West49thSt. rr~ -rt-
Hialeah 556-5270
New Year's Greeting
&
WHEN WE made aliya 16
years ago, the poster in our
ulpan classroom stated: "We
never promised you a rose
garden!" True, there have
been thorns and the past year
has had its share of scandals,
bitterness and violence. But
when I make my annual
balance sheet. I place on the
credit side all the assets of liv-
ing in my own land, among mv
own people.
Then I realize how much I
personally have profited and
that Israel has survived
another year. Finally, there is
always the hope and prayer
that more Jews will come
home making good their
Passover pledge "Next year in
Jerusalem!"
A 20th Century Indian shofar from the Israel
Museum collection.
L' SHANA TOVA
A Happy, Healthy
New Year To All
Shalom From
MAYOR
ALEXDAOUD
Mother, Evelyn Daoud Rosenthal
And Entire Daoud Family
Pd POI A0V
*,
> **4MMMMHMMMMMM
MAY YOU ALL
BE BLESSED WITH HEALTH
PEACE AND HAPPINESS
FOR THE
NEW YEAR
0
COMM.
SIDNEY
&ELAYNE
WEISBURD
Pd Pol AOY


There's Definitely
Something Fishy About
The New Crop
September 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-C
KIBBUTZ KETURA, Israel
I Question: What has fins and
| scales and grows in the desert?
Answer: The newest crop at
kibbutz Ketura, a settlement
in the Arava desert bordering
[ Jordan.
The kibbutz, founded in 1973
Iby members of Hadassah's
Young Judaea Zionist youth
I movement, has become the
[latest desert settlement to
Ifarm fish as well as vegetables.
Members of the cooperative
agricultural settlement 20
I miles north of the Red Sea
[resort town of Eilat are grow-
ling sea bream known locally
s Dennis fish is an ex-
erimental process developed
the Ministry of
,'griculture's Israel
)ceanographic and Lim-
nological Research Company.
Ketura, which was awarded
the prestigious Knesset Prize
its contribution to the
quality of life in Israel, is one
of seven Arava kibbutzim that
; formed a consortium call-
IAIDAG to raise and market
kpecially bed bream. Other
Consortium members are
Silot, Yotvata, Grofit, Lotan,
lifaz and Samar.
The bream are bred at a hat-
chery and sea pond facility
Eilat using advanced bio-
chnology. The first harvest
bf 20 tons of sea bream was ex-
orted to Italy for European
narkets where the fish is con-
sidered a delicacy and sells for
pour dollars a pound.
Ketura and its new patners
l "mari-culture" intend to
Establish commercial hat-
bheries to supply other Israeli
fish breeders as well as raise
keafood crops including
khrimps, oysters and sea bass.
The shellfish are intended for
^xport only, since religious law
ans Jews from eating them.
Israel's new mari-culture is
^xpected to create 120 jobs
' boost settlement in the
egion as production reaches
an estimated 3,000 tons and
annual sales of $11 million
over the next five years.
Ketura was established in
the barren wastes of the Arava
desert by members of Young
Judaea, the largest and oldest
Zionist youth movement in the
United States to help
Americans and Israelis of all
religious, political and cultural
backgrounds make the transi-
tion to the kibbutz way of life.
Today, the kibbutz* 120
members including 63
young children raise and
market melons, peppers and
onions year round. Ketura also
grows date palms, mangoes
and experimental fruit trees
and maintains herds of dairy
cattle and horses.
Hadassah, the Women's
Zionist Organization of
America, played a central, sup-
portive role in establishing the
kibbutz as part of its network
of health care, education,
youth welfare and land
reclamation projects
throughout Israel. The largest
Jewish women's volunteer
organization in the U.S. and
the largest Zionist organiza-
tion in the world, Hadassah is
celebrating its 75th anniver-
sary this year.
South Florida Youths
Visit Poland, Israel
Jennifer Tescher of South
Dade and Randye Jacobson of
Tamarac were among 62 high
school students who were sent
to Poland on a one-week trip
by United Synagogue Youth,
high school affiliate of the
United Synagogue of America.
The South Florida pupils
were among some 700 USY
participants in a five-week
pilgrimage to Israel, and
visited concentration camp
sites in Poland afterwards.
Auschwitz and Treblinka were
included.
SM&W.
W wish
off our frimnds
a hoppy^Vond healthy
NewX \Y9ar
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Nevel
and Family
Wolfie's Restaurant
Miami Beach
Pershing Auto Leasing
1545 Alton Road,
Miami Beach
Phone: 538-5313
Del Amo Plumbing
7323 N.W. 8 St. nn A ,*_- 0
Miami 264-9712
Happy New Year To All
Strictly Tennis Inc.
8505 Mllli Miami, FL 6771 Rod Road
271-1300 Miami
Town I Country In the Pavllllon 606-6067
Happy New Year
Aileen L. Novick is the new ex-
ecutive director of Hadassah.
She moved up to the top post
after two years as director of
Hadassah'8 national services
division and nine years as na-
tional organization director of
Na'amat USA. She is a summa
cum laude graduate of Queens
College.
Jewish Population
12.881 Million
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
number of Jews worldwide fell
by one million from 1970-1985
but rose by almost the same
figure in Israel, a
demographer said here. Dr.
Roberto Bach, professor of
statistics and demography at
Jerusalem's Hebrew Universi-
ty, said the world's Jewish
population now stands at
12.881 million.
Alan Heilpern and Heather
??????????????????????????????????????????????^
J.M. Lipton
Insurance Agency
Ronald A. Lipton, President
7000 SW 62 Ave., Suite C-219
S. Miami, Florida 33143
662-2862
Best Wishes for a Happy New Year
To Our Clients A Friends
????????????????????????????????????????????????
lapsp naio row*-?
ftf 4tftti tuuC ftflftttfffitftf
fat NM< AHtl ti&44. IfAH btddsWl
1

COMM.
ABE & SARITA
RESNICK
AND FAMILY
Pd Pol ADV
H^H^I
&*&*>
MMWMMMMMI
Marc Civa Tova
May You Be Inscribed
In The
Book of Life
With Good Health,
Love
Prosperity and Peace
COMM. BEN
ANDSELGRENALD
AND FAMILY
MMMMMI
IMiaMMMaWNW
MaMWMMMMMMIM
Pd. Pol Adv
WWMM


Page 12-C The Jewish Floridian/September 25, 1987
Keep Time, Take Time And Make Time: Rabbi
By RABBI
BERNARD S. RASKAS
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
We usually measure time by
years, hours, minutes and
seconds. Actually, it is all bas-
ed on building the minute out
of 60 seconds defined as nine
billion-plus cycles of a
vibrating cesium atom. But
not everyone reckons time by
that method.
Some do it this way: The
first light, sun comes over the
mountains, rises higher,
declines, shadow climbs up
mountains, sun goes,
darkness. Others measure
time by insects chirping, birds
calling, goats going out,
animals drinking, cattle retur-
ning home, etc.
The oldest Hebrew writing
that we know of is an inscrip-
tion of seven Hebrew lines. It
is the Gezer calendar and its
script is 10th Century BCE, or
about 3,000 years old.
First few lines of the calen-
dar read: "First two months
fruit picking, particularly
olives. Then two months of
grain saving. One month of
flax harvest, one month of
barley harvest, two months of
vine pruning and vintage."
What is the implication of
this? The measurement of time
is really subjective. Or, to put
it another way, time is what
happens to us; and if we are
happy, time goes quickly, and
if we are sad, time drags.
We have all these percep-
tions of time on various occa-
sions in our lives. Ecclesiastes,
the wisest book in the Bible,
puts it this way: "There is a
time for every thing and for
every event under the sun."
Based on this, I would like to
offer three suggestions on the
use of time: Keep time, take
time and make time.
Keep time with the clock of
the universe. Certain things
happen over which we have no
control whatsoever, so we may
as well just cooperate with the
inevitable. Someone once
estimated that 70 percent of
life, no more, was essentially
controllable.
The balance consists of
cancer, accidents, the plumb-
ing backing up, etc. There is
absolutely nothing we can do
to change it. So why should we
fall apart because we can't do
a thing about it?
A man carrying a
sledgehammer, a huge rock
and a large suitcase called on
the director of a large televi-
sion variety show. "In my
act," the man told the direc-
tor, "I put a rock on my head,
and my assistant breaks it with
a sledgehammer. Then 1 take a
bow and walk off the stage
unhurt."
"If that's all you do," the
director said, "why do you
carry that suitcase?"
"For my aspirin," said the
man.
Why beat ourselves over the
head about something over
which we have no control?
I rather like the attitude of
the woman who, although she
was widowed for years, had
reared her six children and
adopted 12 more. In spite of
her busy and useful life she
was noted for her charm and
poise. In an interview she was
asked how she managed. "You
see," she replied, "I'm in a
partnership."
"What kind of partnership?"
asked the reporter.
And she answered, "One day
a long time ago I said, 'Lord,
I'll do the work and You do the
worrying,' and I haven't had a
worry since."
Next, take time. Enjoy the
beauty of the world both the
human-made and the natural.
Let's face it, you're going to be
here only once.
Abraham Heschel, the great
American-Jewish theologian,
once asked me as I was walk-
ing him home, "Do I need to
listen to Brahms?" And then
he answered his question. "On-
ly when I listen to Brahms do I
realize that I need to listen to
Brahms."
There is so much good
music, good theater, good art,
good religious services going
on in every community that we
only diminish ourselves if we
don't take the time to ex-
perience them.
Every year Forbes Magazine
lists those who have assets of
$250 million or more. I would
wager that most of us miss the
list. But, think for a moment
about our real assets: the
moon, the stars, the flowers in
the spring, the birds that sing,
the sunbeams that shine, the
people who love us our
families and friends.
In all truthfulness, are not
the words of the Talmud most
relevant here? "Who is hap-
py?" it asks. "He who is con-
tent with his lot." Take time to
enjoy the world.
Finally, make time. Don't
just let time happen to you.
Use it properly and make it
yield its richest rewards for
you and your dear ones. Give
time direction and purpose.
Use it.
George Bernard Shaw that
wise, witty and shrewd
observer of life, said: 'Life is
no brief candle for me. It is a
sort of splendid torch which I
had got hold for a moment and
I want to burn it as brightly as
possible before handing it on
Continued on Page 11-C
From our family to yours
Best wishes
for a year of peace
and abundant blessings.
THE ARK1N FAMILY
Its
"Schach"
Time Again!
The Finest
Palms for
YourSuccah.
Call
Elliot Schiff
531-5389
WPS
The people of CenTrust sincerely wish
you and your family the happiest, healthiest
and most prosperous ofNew Years.
ALTON ROAD OFFICE: 1801 Alton Road.
_________
41st STREET OFFICE: Sheridan Financial Center, 400 41st Street.
NORMANDY ISLE OFFICE: 1166 Normandy Drive.
SUNNY ISLES OFFICE: 16830 Collins Avenue.

5URFSIDE/BAL HARBOUR OFFICE: 9556 Harding Avenue.
CenTrust
Savings Bank
Your future is our future"
C1966 011W1


I
Supreme Court Justice
September 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-C
Benjamin Nathan Cardozo Honored
Between February 1, 1790
when the United States
Supreme Court first met in
I New York City, and October 7,
11935 when the justices conven-
| ed in their present building in
Washington D.C., the court
held session in a dozen dif-
ferent places including
Philadelphia's Independence
Hall, the basement of the
Capitol, and even at Long's
I Tavern in Washington.
The Supreme Court Building
I was built thanks to the efforts
to President and later Chief
Justice William Howard
iTaft.
Thus, in 1929 Congress ap-
propriated $9.74 million for
the Supreme Court Building.
It was completed under budget
... and $94,000 was returned
to the U.S. Treasury! The
classic Greek-Corinthian style
structure is depicted on a
handsome new art medal
issued by the Magnes Museum
I in honor of the Bicentennial of
the United States Constitu-
Ition. Beneath, is a quote from
lone of the High Court's most
[distinguished jurists: "The
Final Cause of Law is the
[Welfare of Society."
The nine men who first sat in
[the new Supreme Court
| Building included its first two
[Jewish-American jurists
[Louis Dembitz Brandeis, ap-
pointed by President
[Woodrow Wilson in 1916, and
Benjamin Nathan Cardozo,
named in 1932 by President
Herbert Hoover to fill the seat
vacated by Oliver Wendell
Holmes. Brandeis was the
third person inducted into the
Jewish-American Hall of Fame
(1971), and Cardozo is the
honoree for 1987.
Sculptor Gerta Ries
Wiener's sensitive high relief
portrait of Benjamin Cardozo
superbly captures his delicate
features, as described by
Judge Sidney Asch: "His nose
is straight and proud. Silver
hair falls across nis forehead.
But the most arresting feature
of his noble head are the eyes.
They peer out as if into the
future, and at the same time,
they are clues to the unfathom-
ed emotions that pulsated
within the man."
Cardozo was a member of a
distinguished Sephardic family
that fled to Holland after their
expulsion from Portugal. His
great-great-grandfather,
Aaron Nunez Cardozo,
emigrated to the American col-
onies in 1752; other relatives
include revolutionary patriot
Gershom Mendes Seixas and
"New Colossus" poet Emma
Lazarus, both of whom have
been previously honored by
the Jewish-American Hall of
Fame.
Born in 1870 as a twin, Ben-
jamin Cardozo grew up in his
family's Madison Avenue
home in New York City. His
early education was carried
out at home and his tutor
was Horatio Alger, who was
already a world famous author
of "rags to riches" books. Car-
dozo enrolled at Columbia
University before his 16th bir-
thday, becoming its youngest
student. He graduated with
the highest scholastic record in
its history. Cardozo began to
practice law after completing
only two years of law school
... and soon became known as
a "lawyer's lawyer."
In 1913, following the urging
of civic reform leaders, Car-
dozo won a seat on the New
York State Supreme Court.
After serving for only a few
months, the governor named
him to the more prestigious
Court of Appeals where he
served with great distinction
until President Hoover called,
on him to serve on the United
States Supreme Court. This,
was done in spite of the fact;
that the President was a con-
servative Republican and Car-
dozo was a Democrat who
championed the rights of the
"little man" ... in spite of the
fact that there were already
two New Yorkers on the High
Court and in spite of the
fact that another seat was held
by a Jew!
Cardozo's opinions are easily
recognized by their "clarity,
conciseness suffused with
moral luminosity, and a com-
mand of historical material
that is unrivaled in the entire
common-law tradition," accor-
ding to Judge Asch. Cardozo is
particularly noted for his
original thinking as expounded
in his books: "Nature of the
Judicial Process" (1921),
"Growth of the Law" (1924),
"Paradoxes of Legal Science"
(1928), and "Law and
Literature" (1930) .. where
he emphasized that a judge
had to look beyond the legal
authorities to meet respon-
sibility to those seeking
justice. He was a bulwark in
defense of New Deal legisla-
tion, ruling in favor of the con-
stitutionality of important
social programs such as social
security and old-age pensions.
In countless law offices all
over the United States, a por-
trait of Benjamin Cardozo has
encouraged excellence for over
a half century; now his Jewish-
American Hall of Fame medals
can offer inspiration to new
generations of Americans.
The Supreme Court Justice
Benjamin Nathan Cardozo
medals are uniquely rounded
trapezoidal shape, two inches
in diameter; each is individual-
ly serial numbered. Both the
bronze and silver Cardozo
commemoratives weigh two-
and-a-half troy ounces, while
the impressive gold version is
over a quarter of a troy pound
about three-and-a-half troy
ounces. They will be
meticulously minted by the
craftsmen of Medallic Art
Company in very small quan-
tities limited to 500 antique
bronze, available for $18; 250
Continued on Page 21-C
GROUPS! GOOD SEATS STILi AVAILABLE
BUT GOING FAST
GALA JEAN ANN RYAN'S
OPENING
Friday
NGV6
ALL NEW
I A SIZZLING MUSICAL SPECTACULAR
GROUP DISCOUNTS
Aak for Rosalie Dade 865-7511
Dining & Dancing
Broward 925-5406
Sheraton Bal Harbour
9701 COLUNS AVENUE BAL HARBOUR. FLORIDA 33154 .
Newman Insurance
Agency, Inc.
A Happy New Year To All
ROSE AND IR VING NEWMAN
JEFFREYM. NEWMAN
1558 NE 162 Street
North Miami Beach, Florida
Dade 940-7515 Broward 921-0616


Page 14-C The Jewish Floridian/September 25, ^^87
Keep Time, Take Time and
Make Time: Rabbi
Continued from Page 12-C
to future generations."
We live for a purpose. We
fulfill our mission on earth
when we do something for
others. We serve as husbands
or wives, parents, brothers or
sisters, sons or daughters,
neighbors, members of a com-
munity, citizens. We have a
role to fulfill, and we must
make time to fulfill it.
Spending the summer at the
beach, a young boy wandered
into the water beyond his
depth and began screaming for
help. A bather nearby heard
the youngster, jumped into the
sea and brought him ashore.
After several minutes of ar-
tificial respiration, the lad
regained consciousness, realiz-
ed what had happened, and
gratefully said to the stranger:
"Thank you, kind sir, for sav-
ing my life."
"It was nothing," said the
man, "nothing at all. But see
to it that your life was worth
saving.
A talk by Sir Immanuel
Jakobovitz, the Chief Rabbi of
the British Commonwealth,
contains some wise words. He
recalled that when Sir Robert
Mayer, the famous pioneer of
children's and youth concerts,
was about to celebrate his
100th birthday, a distinguish-
ed friend organized a concert
to be attended by the Queen in
his honor.
The friend warned him mon-
ths ahead. "Robert, if you die
before your birthday, I will
never speak to you again."
And he lived happily and ac-
tively for over four more
years.
If any of you die this year,
people will never speak to you
again at least in this life. So
just go on being active and
healthy and live to the fullest
for the coming year.
Rabbi Bernard S. Raskas
serves Temple of Aaron Con-
gregation, St. Paul, Minn.
Q
UNIVERSAL
NATIONAL BANK
The Board of Directors,
the staff and their families
extend our best wishes
to the Jewish Community
for a happy and healthy
New Year
George Feldenkreis
CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Larry Perl
VICC CHAIRMAN
Robert L. Brunner
PWSIOtNT
Molses Chorowski Gary Dlx Allen Fuller Isaac Lift Carolyn Miller Sam B. Topf
Main Of lie.
Universal National Bank Building
17701 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33160
(305) 937 BANK
MamtorFMC
Sans Souci Branch
In Sans Souci Plaza
2142 N.E. 123rd Street
North Miami, Florida 33181
(305) 895-BANK
rE
rara
uroi
From Our Family To Yours...
Peace, Good Health and Happiness
Throughout the New Year!
Congressman and Mrs. Lawrence J. Smith
Grant and Lauren
PJ (w bv Uny SflMh lor Congrni Campaign Jowph A Epunn CPA Treasurei
DO YOU KNOW
HOW YOUR HEALTH IS?
Keeping Healthy Is Not A Secret <<3&
Visit
Westchester Clinic Center
24 Hour Service
T
Eys Doctor
Dentist
Medical Specialist
Lab
X*Ray
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We Accept Any Type of Ins.,
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Join The Clinic Plan For Only $27.00
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DECEMBER 4-7. 1987 MIAMI BEACH CONVENTION CENTER MIAMI BEACH FLORIDA
THE EXPO HAS CAPTIVATED ALL OF SOUTH FLORIDA!
CONFIRMED EXHIBITORS
t TOUCH OF TO"*K MC
uncanuoMC
coOMncm
uocunuaoi
wan conum
n*u> nnos or
mini
**Ci STAHOM0
iitmxoci co"
iKKuraw
TOUTH (0UMUT
AWdOIKN
MlDmoat
UUMC
lUKKMUKt
UMCM I0OO5
unions
MIMAS FOOOS
OT-aMIKl
CAU16MPMW s
CASin "Him' mot!,
ClMOGi HOuSf
nuRSMSnOHl
coono nuMMGFoa
mortssnuLS
cnrsiAiuCni
KVfMMS
Glnjaju FOODS'
onus r. mm
iai an foods of
nu mc
II U AMM!
[wnnow
nouwn mc
tnTtwumswc
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tsrunAOt hotii
ruaciuNC
mown ufcnnG
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mTOnntsonr
inaOAl S amoniMC
Mtiocnum
inninos or tuuwrcn
oi none*
GATll WIISS CO
'tn jfwisoHow
GtnfnAi FOODS
GOlOIS SOT foods
~ OSHin 10005 a*
HJ HfM2
winlooos
nOO iatan Tunn(T
nnoo of sntii iio
HOUSt OF StiGnau
*nt MOUSllMS MC
ml i >oshc o
DSTnatUtciajS
>s*ii GOvinsms'
TOomsi OTFlCl
tnAli HaJTAOnuT
FOunOATOS
j*son oun Mooucis
JlWSHiaAA.LiatSTm.Tt
x.s- Miion*. >wno
,i .IwSn 0*J5
;0Hnsnvioi GftOun
juo*c* (ni(nmsis
ts* raias
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<*SH*usiucon
OHM atj m STUDC
Min(T>osn(n>ooos
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KICnCnUTT
OSsIA lonnin
nisi*u OJ'ShaO
>nuu s cnocoiTns
.ICuMI MC
.I.K0M COtWUWOTiOnS
uunnoSMin foods
n*nc null nvii co
*m Muil c* conn
>19MD1*
MLSh*TWSh
WSOIUm
*Uddl H| VU*
jtwSHineuM
TSV FOODS
0CinD*>e
0S"tn WITS
uns niMMncs
foochiooucts
WjSIOUOFT-1 w.e-
ui.Hfimit sn*i.
cmcisn*
S*lun*l *AT MxtS MC
n*iuni >ms- mc
sinus s onaGWAi Ml
SOU C0UMK1 NC
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nniiiarnoianju"
mi.conn
ntsi* hoiii
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untui FOOOS
nu*D* n<\*iss*XI
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Ginm*. fooos
5*N>*
Gfsfna. FOOOS
SAW SOuCi hOHi
SCHA*
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FOOOS
SHfitounM hoti.
Saoana aOSHtn fooos
nwn*C"0C0iT|s
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snci ma foods
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.*cts lines 'ouns
.itt 1|Ch
*M0* FOODS MC
OniO'*Mn| s'i
uns* hit
t. conn
WE WELCOME
om mm ivmmn
mn n*oesiion
MST h|jh s*iun.
H.inncis <
thi cin..T
ChOMS 1C
COnTMIST*. "OHl
IHt*SST FOODS
(Mts*- nOWs
of lutac
CJn.5TOSO*CHD*S-
mosof num
.in.s.ii':;
jiwSHF.onoas
.once sc
USACK Mnonn
soc
SHtAW Tnoo
$n(lT 0S"in FOOOS
SnUaOSntn FOODS CO*
SUOOMClIT
SU> I0MC
*o.s tews'
0KCvIT0s
S410S*. COUSC -
V .Qosc sntl.
TMMHSmiMCMlSinC
ouoiinnnTonnoi'i"
BOOTH SPACE IS SELLING FAST! DON'T MISS THE OPPORTUNITY
OF EXHIBITING AT THE EXPO!
Where you can sell your products
Where the trade and puClic can sample your products
Where you can have face to face contact with ouyeis wholesalers and dastpuWl
Over 50 000 visitors from Florida and 20 states are epecteo to attend
Contact our South Florida Ofice The International Kosher Food* 4 Jewish Lite Expo
i-_^ -J00 North Federal Hiohwav Suite 2t0'3
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IpL-'r* (800) 356-4404 toll tree ir Fi0r.o OFFICIAL HEADQUARTERS: DISCOUNT AIR FARES:
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oh.. ream ana ja..tH t i ..
Hotel Sans Souci
(800) 327-8470
anc. Hotel Versailles.
Easte"- Airiire* Bar'ief
(800) 332-1133


September 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-C
Israel's first skin repository
Junded by a grant from the
Revlon Foundation in New
York, has been formally
dedicated in ceremonies at the
Hadassah-Hebrew University
Medical Center here. Ronald 0.
Perelman, chairman of the
Board of Revlon, Inc., the
cosmetics firm, made the gift
through the Revlon Foundation
to establish Israel's only skin
bank after the Ministry of
Health and the Israel Defense
Forces designated the Medical
Center as the site for the na-
tional facility.
Plans for the annual costume ball of the Young
Presidents Club of Mount Sinai Medical
Center are mapped by leaders of the Dec. 5
dinner and dance at the Fontainebleau Hilton
Hotel. From left are Robert and Nancy Frehl-
ing and Fredi and Robert Consolo. The four
rn-chairmen have adoped a Rockin'Rio theme.
.*:*>
I
piUSALEM Azriel and Chaya Heuman, formerly of
tooklyn, proudly display their sabra sons triplets born in
Hadassah-University Hospital on Mount Scopus. The
irenis, offspring of New York area rabbis, made aliyah to Israel
s year and are now residents of a new settlement, Neve Aliza.
nelistheson of Rabbi and Mrs. Fred Heuman of the Bronx.
Uya's parents are Rabbi Yakov and Mrs. HUsenrath of
Ighland Park. N.J.
L.P. EVANS MOTORS
9696 Northwest 7th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33150
Wishing Clients A Friends
A Happy & Healthy New Year
HESHEY&JOANNIAD
From
Kezreh Kosher Meats
1025E. Hallandale Beach Blvd. AAe mmM tr-t-rc
Hallandale 305-454-5776
Wishes All Customers 6 Friends
A Happy & Healthy New Year
U-JTii
IfUll.K SAIIS
I.I Ml I,
2198 N.E. 163 St.
North Miami 33162
Wau19 4" Coatomara Friends
* "ppy 6 Healthy New Year
Don Mullen Favorite Fashions
I^ST'6 mm 443-3009
m
Happy New Year
THANK YOU
L'Shana Tova Tikatevu
As we begin a New Year, we wish to thank our community for its support of our
Thrift Shops during the past year.
Your generous donations of resalable merchandise and your continued
patronage of our stores, have enabled us to provide quality health care and needed
social services to thousands of indigent elderly persons.
DOUQLAS GARDENS THRIFT SHOPS
A division of the Miami Jewish Home & Hospital for the Aged.
5713 N.W. 27 Awe., Miami 5629 W. Hallandale Beach Blvd., Hallandale
Irving Cypen, Chairman of the Board Harold Beck, President
Aaron Kravltz, Chm. Thrift Shop Comm. Marc Uchtman, Executive Director
Free pickup 751-3966 (Dade) 961-6245 (Broward)
Good Merchandise at a Good Price.
JORDAN MARSH
WISHES YOU A
HAPPY NEW YEAR
FILLED WITH PEACE
AND CONTENTMENT
We hope-the coming months will be
filled with many shining moments.
Including the warmth of new friendships
and me |oy of old ties with those you
love and surmounting them all,
the happiness of dreams come true.
Jordan /Harsh
Rirtofvonrstvle.
Ill *


Page 16-C The Jewish Floridian/September 25, 1987
Jay Yoskowitz Named National Field
Director Of JNF
i
Jay Yoskowitz
Veteran Jewish organizational leader Jay
Yoskowitz has recently been appointed na-
tional field director of the Jewish National
Fund.
Upon accepting the appointment, Mr.
Yoskowitz said, "I'm tremendously excited
by the opportunity to be part of an organiza-
tion whose priority lies in transforming
Israel's land and upgrading the quality of life
of all of her citizens."
Mr. Yoskowitz's new responsibilities in-
clude the development of fundraising cam-
paigns carried out by the JNF regional offices
and councils, the recruitment and training of
executive staff members, and the develop-
ment of effective lay leadership throughout
the country.
From 1986 to 1987, Mr.Yoskowitz served
as executive director of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greenwich, Conn., where he organized
the annual fundraising campaign and coor-
dinated local activities with the Jewish and
non-Jewish communities. From 1981 to 1986,
he was the director of the personnel services
department of the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions, supervising personnel activities and ex-
ecutive recruitment across the country. He
has also served as executive director of the
Jewish Federation of Greater Des Moines,
associate executive director of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Houston and regional
director of the B'nai B'rith Youth Organiza-
tion of Texas and Oklahoma.
JNF is the agency responsible for afforesta-
tion and land reclamation in Israel.
PRESSED FOR TIME?
GOING ON VACATION? TRAPPED AT HOME'
HERE'S YOUR
HAND
Well do your shopping, run errands, walch your house, your doq.
your kids. If you're lonely, or need non-nursing companronshipTfll
visit, read (o you, cook a meal Our services are as varied as m>
needs, so, make your life a little ^ ^ ^ ^ >. mJ/\
easier, give us a call. O00~0o74
/^W^jW / 19U*U. One.
UCENSED AND INSURED
Nudel: No Secrets
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Long-time refusenik Ida Nudei
has produced a lengthy and
detailed account of her work as
an economist in the technical
evaluation section of a
microbiological institute con-
cerned with the needs of
agriculture and the food in-
dustry, according to the Na-
tional Conference on Soviet
Jewry.
Employed there 16 years
ago when she applied to
emigrate, Nudel, 55, writes
that if her section was con-
cerned with issues other than
food and agriculture, "I was
not and am not aware of
them." She adds that although
some sections of the institute
were "closed," her own work
was based on general areas,
which the authorities have
classified as merely "second-
degree security."
TOLD IN 1971 by an official
at the Moscow OVIR, "You
had a second-degree security
clearance until September
1971 ... we know that you do
not possess any secret infor-
mation, but you could have
overheard something," Nudel
was advised that her emigra-
tion 'is undesirable until
1977."
In 1978, Nudel hung a ban-
ner from her Moscow apart-
ment window which stated
"KGB, give me my visa."
When agents tore the banner
down, she replaced it with
others, and finally with a cloth
bearing the Star of David. For
this, she was arrested, im-
prisoned and sent into exile on
charges of malicious
hooliganism.
She has been living in the
Moldavian city of Bendery,
where she has been frequently
followed and harassed. On oc-
casion, she has been able to
visit friends in Moscow.
Nudel seeks to join her
sister, Elana Fridman. in
Israel.
Let the Feast
of the Trumpets
Herald a New
yMtBHSHB
GOLD COAST
SAVINGS BANK
Our high return on CD's
keepspeople
returning far mare.
Annual Interest
90 days CD
6 months CD
7.50%
8.00%
Raul Distributors
282N.E.2ndSt.
3rd Floor
Miami
373-7250


Wishing All Customers & Friends
A Happy & Healthy New Year
|
Minimum deposit is $2,500.
Insured up to $100,000. by FSLIC. This is a limited offer
that may be withdrawn at any time without notice.
Substantial penalty for early withdrawal
(M) MIAMI SAVINGS BANK
i^
Mun Off ce: 261 NJE. 1st Street. Miami. FL 33132. (306) 358-6620 Little Haven.: 1800 S.W. 8th Stree'
"S T JEft ?6) W2-3800 Westehestor: 8693 S.W. 24th Street. Miami, FL 33155. (305) 262 3530
Bird Road: 5827 S.W. 40th Street, Miami. FL 33155. (3061662-2887 South Beich: 1265 Washington Avenue.
Miami Beach. FL 33139. (306) 673-2600 Hialeah: 1290 West 49th Street. Hialeah, FL 33012. (305) 556-9830*


September 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 17-C
vsident Chaim Herzog of Israel greets leaders of the Cantors
\sembly 'it their 1,0th anniversary convention in Jerusalem.
\tofthi Assembly. Right, Cantor Solomon Mendelson of Lido
ach. N.Y-. "'ho was elected president at the convention.
9&.
r
[researcher at Technion makes a blood substitute for medical
urgencies. Artificial blood' is similar to natural blood in
ygen-carrying capacity and works for at least 72 hours, long
to stabilize patients and to obtain supplies of natural
Roz and Marshall Simmons
Happy New Year
MAY THE NEW YEAR
BRING YOU
GOOD HEALTH AND HAPPINESS
THE SINGER FAMILY
<'OMMISSIONER RRl'IT. SINOER
RONNIE FURLONC SINGER
JENNIFER ft ANDY
Wi. SSTUJL
'Tnited Synagogue of (America
SOUTHEAST REGION
The Association of Conservative Congregations
282 S. University Drive, Plantation, FL 33324
Broward (305) 474-4606 Dade (305) 947-6094
HAROLD WISHNA
Executive Director
LINDA HORNIK
Field Worker
MARLENE LUSSKIN
Financial Secretary
FRANKLIN D. KREUTZER
International President
MICHAEL EXELBERT
Southern Council VP
MARSHALL BALTUCH
Treasurer
LOU MELTZER
Regional President
BRUCE R. KLASNER
Youth Director
DR.ALANMARCOVITZ
Recording Secretary
WISHES ALL A HAPPY AND HEALTHY NEW YEAR
AND INVITES YOU TO AFFILIATE WITH AND TO
WORSHIP IN ONE OF THE FOLLOWING CONSERVATIVE
SYNAGOGUES IN SOUTH FLORIDA
anan
rws9
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avanua
Miami Baach, FL 33138
538-2503
RABBI DR. IRVING LEHRMAN
CANTOR YEHUDA SHIFMAN
Lawrence M. Schantz, PraaMant
Qarald Taub, Exacutlva Dlractor
ADATH YESHURUN SYNAGOGUE
1025 NE Miami Qardana Drtva
North Miami Baach, FL 33178
847-1435
RABBI SIMCHA FREEDMAN
CANTOR ZVIROZEN
Isaac Franco, PraaMant
Harry Sllvarman, Exac. Dlractor
BETH DAVID CONG REG ATION
2625 SW Third Avanua
Miami, FL 33128
8844811
RABBI JACK REIMER
CANTOR ROBERT ALBERT
Albert J. Beer, President
Ruth Frtand, Administrator
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th Street
Miami Baach. FL 33141
8564)221
RABBI MAYER ABRAMOWITZ
CANTOR MURRAY YAVNEH
Larry Elglarsh, PraaMant
Marcta Lavy, Administrator
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
TEMPLE BCTHSHMUEL
1700 Michigan Avanua
Miami Baach, FL 33138
634-7213
RABBI BARRY J. KONOVTTCH
Mtquai Karpat, Praaldant
Aron Ketton, Exac Dlractor
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
4867 Hood Road
Palm Baach Qardana, FL 33418
0841150
RABBI WILLIAM MARDER
CANTOR EARL J. RACKOFF
Alan Gordon, PTMWont
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
180 N. County Road
Palm Baach, FL 33480
832-0804
RABBI JOEL CHAZIN
CANTOR DAVID FEUER
Richard A Lynn, MD, Praaldant
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
7100 W. Oakland Park Boutavard
Ft. Laudardala. Ft 33313
742-4040
RABBI DR. HOWARD ADDISON
CANTOR MAURICE A NEU
Stuart Epstain, PraaMant
Rhoda Ginsberg, Administrator
TEMPLE SINAI OF HOLLYWOOD
1201 Johnson Straot
Hollywood, FL 33019
820-1577
RABBI RICHARD J. M ARGOLIS
CANTOR MISHA ALEXANDROVICH
Max Margoliaa, Praaldant
Snails Rlgar. Administrator
TEMPLE SAMUEL OR OLOM
9353 SW 152 Avanua
Miami, FL 33186 / 382-3668
RABBI EDWIN FARBER
ASSOCIATE RABBI SAMUEL RUDY
CANTOR PAUL GOLDSTEIN
Laonard Shubltz, Praaldant
Murray H. Knopf, Exac. Director
TEMPLE BETH EL
NORTH BAY VILLAGE
7800 Hlspsnols Avanua
North Bay VMaga, FL 33141
861-4006
RABBI YAAKOV (JORY) LANG
CANTOR DANNY TADMORE
Mttohatl Pottar, Praaldant
, Sam Savin, Rallgloua Chairman
I BETH TORAH CONGREGATION
1051 N. Miami Baach Boulevard
North Miami Baach, FL 33182
847-7528
RABBI MAX LIPSCHITZ
CANTOR ZVEEARONI
Robart Bllllg, Praaldant
Harvay Brown, Exac. Dlractor
TEMPLE SON ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Millar Drlva
Miami, FL 33155
271-2311
RABBI DR. NORMAN SHAPIRO
CANTOR BENJAMIN ADLER
Mtehaat ExaBrart, Praaldant
Norm Pollack. Exac. Dlractor
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2226 NE 121 Straat
North Miami, FL 33181 / 881-6608
RABBI ISRAEL JACOBS
CANTOR MOSHE FRIEDLER
Joaaph Gorllnkls, Rabbi Emarttua
Maivyn Trute, Prasldant
Irving Jsrst, Exac. Dlractor
jti&*%
KRf
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
OF BOCA RATON
18140 Lyons Road
Boca Raton, FL 33434
483-6667
RABBI DONALD 0. CRAIN
CANTOR JOSEPH M. POLLACK
Or. Joti n Low*), PrMiooftt
TEMPLE BETH EL
2816 N.FIaotar Drlva
Wast Palm Baach, FL 33407
833-0339
RABBI ALAN L COHEN
CANTOR NORMAN BRODY
Gall Pariaar, Praaldant
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7600 SW 120 Straat
Miami, FL 33156
236-2601
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH
CANTOR STEPHEN FREEDMAN
Robart Shapiro, Praaldant
Hlllal Lavy, Exac. Dlractor
AVENTURA JEWISH CENTER
2872 Avantura Boulevard
North Miami Baach, FL 33180
935-0686
RABBI DAVID SALTZMAN
CANTOR BERNARD KNEE
Jacob Cohan, PraaMant
TEMPLE NER TAMID
7802 Csrlyls Avanua
Miami Baach, FL 33141
886-6345
RABBI EUGENE LABOVITZ
CANTOR EDWARD KLEIN
Philip Brooks, PraaMant
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 NW 4th Avanua
Boca Raton, FL 33432
382-8566
RABBI THEODORE FELDMAN
CANTOR ELLIOTT DICKER
Lawranca Schecht arm an, Pree.
Klmball Msrsh, Exac Dlractor
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
200 Cantury Boulavsrd
Ditlald Baach, FL 33442
421-7060
RABBI JOSEPH LANQNER
CANTOR 8HABTAI ACKERMAN
S?on#y Ivi#r, PnM Kwnt
TEMPLE SHOLOM
132 SE 11 Avanua
Pompano Baach, FL 33060
842-6410
RABBI SAMUEL APRIL
Dr. Philip Rubinstein, Pros.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH/
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER
9101 NW 67th Straat
Tsmsrac, FL 33361 / 721-7860
RABBI KURT F. STONE
CANTOR QRIQORY QROYSMAN
Saymour Wlldmsn, PraaMant
Arthur Knopfmachiar, Exac. Dlrac.
TEMPLE BETH AM
7206 Royal Palm Boutavard
Margata. FL 33063 / 8746650
RABBI PAUL PLOTKIN
CANTOR IRVING GROSSMAN
Plncua Yacknowttz, PraaMant
Harry Hlrsch, Exac. Dlractor
Stavan S. Qraana, Administrator
TEMPLE BETH AHM
9730 Stirling Road
Hollywood. FL 33024
431-6100
RABBI AVRAHAM KAPNEK
HAZZANERIC LINDENBAUM
Andrew MaMMNf PrMktonl
Philip Sacks, Exacutlva VP
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER
TEMPLE 8HAARAY TZEDEK
4088 N. Plna laland Road
Sunrlaa, FL 33361
741-0296
RABBI RANDALL J. KONIQSBURQ
CANTOR BARRY BLACK
Philip Nelson, President


Page 18-C The Jewish Floridian/September 25, 1987
The Year In Review
Continued from Page 3-C
ed by the report that
synagogue marriages there
dipped to 1,097 in 1986, the
lowest annual total in the cen-
tury by one percent.
OTTAWA A secret appen-
dage to the Deschenes Com-
mission report on war
criminals living in Canada was
released heavily censored.
The Rodal Report nevertheless
showed that Canada sheltered
suspected Nazi war criminals
through 1983.
WASHINGTON Opposi-
tion to the Lavi fighter jet
grew as the State Department
officially urged its termina-
tion. That followed the iden-
tical request from two major
Knesset committees. Foreign
Minister Peres said the U.S.
warning couldn't be
discounted.
TORONTO A second trial
was set for Jan. 4, 1988 for
Ernst Zundel, the Canadian
school teacher whose convic-
tion of publishing lies about
the Holocaust was overturned.
TEL AVIV Likud
Minister- Without-Portfolio
Ariel Sharon broke his five-
year silence on the Lebanon
war with a four-hour speech.
The architect of the 1982 inva-
sion as Defense Minister said
the Cabinet had backed him all
the way. In a rare show of
unanimity, his former Cabinet
colleagues all accused him of
lying.
SAN FRANCISCO The
American Bar Association
voted to continue i its con-
troversial "Declaration of
Cooperation" w|ith the
Association of Soviet Lawyers.
JERUSALEM The
credibility of two documents
experts testifying for the
defense in the John Demjanjuk
trial was weakened by pro-
secution questions. Demjanjuk
is accused of crimes commit-
teed as the Treblinka guard
"Ivan the Terrible."
JERUSALEM Israeli and
Soviet officials talked secretly
in Bonn, and the relationship
was said to be improving.
TEL AVIV Forty-five
Deborah Brodie Stevens, an ex-
perienced fundraiser in the
South Broward Jewish com-
munity, has recently been ap-
pointed director of the Jewish
National Fund Council of
Greater Broward and Palm
Beach.
people suffer from AIDS in
Israel, 237 are carriers and 33
have died, the Health Ministry
reported.
JERUSALEM The ex-
perimental introduction of Fri-
day night movies in certain
sections of the city prompted
demonstration from Orthodox
Jews and counter-
demonstrations from the
secularists over several
weekends.
NEW YORK Rabbi Isaac
Newman of Champaign, 111.,
was appointed the first rabbi
for East Berlin in 25 years.
JERUSALEM After
myriad postponements, the
Cabinet voted 13-12 to discon-
tinue manufacture of the Lavi,
against the wishes of Premier
Yitzhak Shamir. Peres,
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin and the U.S. apparently
had agreed that the U.S.
would instead provide addi-
tional assistance to Israel, in-
cluding a piece of the U.S.
figher jet pie. Israeli Aircraft
Industry workers protested
the decision by disrupting
highways and runways and
threatened to leave the coun-
try to seek aeronautical work.
ROME A nine-man Jewish
delegation, led by IJCIC presi-
dent Rabbi Mordecai Waxman,
met with Vatican officials to
prepare for their meeting the
next day with the Pope.
September
CASTEL GANDOLFO -
The nine-man Jewish delega-
tion met with the Pope at his
summer residence to discuss
the Vatican attitude on the
Holocaust and anti-Semitism,
its lack of diplomatic relations
with Israel, the Pope's
meeting with Waldheim and
improving communications
between the Pope and Jewish
leaders. Not all issues were
resolved, but the way was
cleared for the previously en-
dangered Sept. 11 meeting
with Jewish leaders in Miami.
JERUSALEM Minister-
Without Portfolio Moshe
Arens (Likud), a former air-
craft engineer, resigned from
the Cabinet over the Lavi
decision.
VIENNA An ostensibly
independent international
commission convened by the
Austrian government began
its investigation of President
Waldheim's wartime service
behind closed doors.
NEW, YORK The Soviet
Union told several prominent,
long-time Jewish refuseniks
including Iosif Begun, Viktor
Brailovsky, Vladimir Lifshitz,
Arkady Mai, Lev Sud and Se-
myon Yantovsky they could
emigrate. It later gave the
same permission to five more
of them, including Lev Elbert.
BONN Rabin made the
first visit of an Israeli Defense
Minister to West Germany.
MIAMI The Pope's
meeting with 1986 Jewish
leaders the first Papal
meeting with Jews on U.S. soil
came off warmly and frank-
ly. The Pope spoke of the uni-
que Jewish experience in the
Holocaust and condemned
anti-Semitism, but supported
the work of Pope Pius XII dur-
ing World War II. Holocaust
scholars have argued that Pius
capitulated to the Nazis. The
Pope encountered Jewish pro-
testors here, and would later
in San Francisco as he failed to
announce recognition of Israel
nor regrets at his reception for
Kurt Waldheim.
GENEVA Israel and
f
WESTCHESTER
GENERAL HOSPITAL
2500 SW 75th Ave.
MIAMI
Happy New Year

i
Federal Precious Metal
250 N.E. 17th Terrace ___ _.
Miami 33132 Phone 379-5772
Wish All Clients ft Frlenda The Entire
Jewish Community A Happy ft Healthy New Year
Spec's Music Co.
1570 So. Dixie Hwy. _. mMm^
Miami 661-3451 t
Happy New Year To Our Friends ft Customers
? ?
Hungary agreed to establish
interest sections in each
other's country, the lowest
level of official diplomatic
relations.
UNITED NATIONS Ex-
pectations of the upcoming
General Assembly included the
long-hoped-for opening of the
files compiled by the UN War
Crimes Commission.
TEL AVIV Alexei
Magarik, the last Prisoner of
Conscience, was released from
a Soviet labor camp.
WASHINGTON
The
State Department 7aid ,
would close the information,, ,
fhP IhTNe Kf the PL0; ho*evet'
the UN observer office in NJ
York would remain open.
JERUSALEM israe| B
nounced ,t would imp
economic sanctions asES
South Africa that affect EX
investment, cultural ex
changes and tourism.
Memorial Services Sunday
There will be special
memorial services held at
Mount Nebo Cemetery, 5505
Northwest 3rd Street, on Sun-
day, Sept. 27, by various rab-
bis throughout the morning
and early afternoon.
At 10 a.m., Rabbi Michael
Eisenstadt of Temple Judea
will conduct services, followed
at 11 a.m. by Dr. Irving
Lehrman of Temple Emanu-
El. Rabbi Max Shapiro of Tem-
ple Beth Kodesh will officiate
at 11:30 a.m., and Rabbi David
Auerbach of Bet Shira Con-
gregation will perform ser-
vices at 12:45 p.m.
There will be special services I
at the Richter Mausoleum Site
in Section K, with Rabbi Rex
D. Perimeter of Temple Israel
at 12:30 p.m., and Rabbi Jack
Reimer of Congregation Beth)
David and Rev. Milton
Freeman will conductl
memorial service at 1:15 p.m. I
Happy New Year
Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Flink
sacs
3S
POTAMKIN
South Dade Auto Mall
21111 S.Dixie Hwy.
Miami, Fla. 33189
238-0000
FROM BENJIE FRUMER
Wishes All Customers & Friends
A Happy A Healthy New Year
264-5252 j 1
j
<*|
HOLIDAY INN
Golden Glades
14eNWl67St. -.- A4
No. Miami Beach 949-1441
Happy Now Year To Everyone
Golden West Tours
6626 West Atlantic Ave. 496-1106
Delray Beach 800424-3088
Wishes Clients, Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
And Many Happy Trips To American West
Centro Vasco
2235 S.W. 8 St.
Miami, Fla. 33135
Wishing Friends ft Cuatomen
A Happy ft Healthy New Year
643-9606


lar Kochba Warriors
[ad Head Lice Woes
September 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 19-C
JERUSALEM The war-
Lrs who fought with Bar
lochba in the Jewish revolt
fcainst Rome 18 centuries ago
Sffered from the same head
fe that afflict as many
tildren in Israel today.
(This was revealed in
search carried out at the
[ebrew University of
Irusalem that was presented
|r the first time at the third
lediterranean Conference on
Trasitology. held at the
Diversity. The conference
_ sponsored by the Israel
xiety for Parasitology, and
tolved the participation of
|me 100 scientists from
Iriiad and 50 fiom Israel.
Lice and lice eggs from the
. Kochba and other ancient
riods were examined by Dr.
> Zias of the Department of
Itiquities and Museums of
I Ministry of Education and
llture.
Their research was carried
using hair and combs ex-
ited in archaeological ex-
ditions in the Judean desert,
I Negev and Massada.
he researchers examined
combs from the year 68
found in the Qumran caves
he famous Dead Sea scrolls
eight combs dating from
year 135 CE from other
rby caves. Lice and lice
were found in eight of the
nbs from the desert caves.
On one of these combs the
scientists found four lice and
88 eggs, and on another they
counted 12 lice and 27 eggs.
Thirteen other combs, ranging
from the first century BCE to
the eighth century CE that
were discovered in Negev ex-
cavations, also were examined.
In four of the Negev combs the
researchers found lice and lice
eggs.
By measuring various
dimensions of the lice. Dr.
Mumcuoglu and Dr. Zias found
that the ancient lice were iden-
tical with the lice prevalent
today.
Conference of Parasitology.
held on the Mount Scopus cam-
pus of Hebrew University, was
supposed to have been held
two years ago in Morocco.
When Prof. Brouria Feldman-
Muhsam of the Hebrew
University, who is the head of
the Israel Society for
parasitology, sought to clarify
whether Israel scientists
would be able to participate,
the Moroccan organizers
responded in the negative. As
a result, that conference was
cancelled and rescheduled for
this year in Israel.
Although research carried
out in cooperatioon with Egyp-
tian scientists was presented
at the conference, there were
no Egyptians in attendance.
Stanley I. Batkin of New
Rnehelle. N.Y. WHS recent 11/
named National Chairman of
the Chancellor's Council, an-
nounced Dr. Ismar Schorsch.
Seminary Chancellor. Mr.
Batkin. who is active in
numerous religious, educa-
tional, charitable and medical
organizations, can trace his
ancestry back to Rabbi
Solomon Ben Isaac, familiarly
known as Rashi.
?????????????????????.????????????????????????
Comfortably Elegant
Exquisite Swiss Continental Cuisine
Reservations are suggested: 891 OSOS
10999 Biacayne Boulevard North Miami

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r^siV.
FEDERATED INCOME TAX
ACCOUNTING SERVICES
House of Your Income Tax
l1626Alton Rd
|Mjami Beach' 674-1681
Wishing All Customers & Friends
A Happy & Healthy New Year
Rabbi Leon Kronish. senior founding rabbi of
Temple Beth Sholom on Miami Beach, was
honored Sunday with a "This is Your Life
Toast" and the dedication of Kronish Plaza on
Chase Plaza. He was honored for his leader-
ship as rabbi and humanitarian and as a
skillful fundraiser for the state of Israel.
Miami Beach Mayor Alex Daoud presented
Kronish with a medallion and chain. Pictured
is Kronish flanked by his wife Lillian and
U.S. Sen. Claude Pepper.
*?
STAR-K KOSHER CERTIFICATION
ORTHODOX JEWISH COUNCIL VAAD HAKASHRUS
7S04 Seven Mile Lane / Baltimore. Maryland 2I208-4S3I / (301) 484-4110
RABBI YAAKOV KULEFSKY
Rosh Bais-Din (Rabbinic Board)
RABBI SAMUEL ROSENBLATT Z'L
LEONARD J. SPERLING
HILLEL SOCLOF
Honorary Presidents
RABBI MOSHE HEINEMANN
Rabbinic Administrator
RABBI AVROM POLLAK
President
RABBI ELIYAHU SHUMAN
Director of Supervision
A.J. LEVIN
Vice President
MARVIN SOBER
Secretary
HAYIM POLLACK
ARYEH WEINBERG
Treasurers
The Orthodox Rabbinical Council of South Florida proudly
announces its kashruth affiliation with the Star K of
Baltimore, Maryland, Moshe Heineman, Rabbinic
Administrator. The following establishments are now under
the Star K:
Abraham Bakery
Abraham Bakery
Dine & Nosh
Eatmor Muffins
Embassy 41
Embassy Peking
Embassy Steak House
Everything's Kosher
Golan Steak House
Jerusalem Pizza
Kosher Korner
Kosher Magic
Leasa Tofu
Mrs. B's Hot Cookie
Natural Fruit Co.
Reg's Fish Market
RH Hammond Co.
Sara's Pizza
Sara's Pizza
Sofitel Hotel
Sprout Delights
Wall to Wall Nuts
Falat'el Place Shishkabob
7423 Collins Ave.
759 NE 167th St.
420 41st St.
6731 NE 4th Ave.
534 41st St.
1417 Washington Ave.
1023 E. Hallandale Blvd.
1344 Washington Ave.
175 Sunny Isle's Blvd.
761 NE 167th St.
2701 Collins Ave.
1839 Miami Gardens Drive
6105 NW 6th Court
4431 SW 75th Ave. (pareve only)
285 W. 27th St.
16476 NE 164th St.
1300 SE 10th Court
2214 NE 123rd St.
1898 W. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer field Beach
5800 Blue Lagoon Dr.
13090 NW 7th Ave.
2009 NE 163rd St.
93 NE 167th St.
Look for the Star-K to insure the highest kashruth 'standards
and consistency.


Page 20-C The Jewish Floridian/September 25, 1987
Hillel Much More Than A Home-Away-From-Home
Continued from Page 4-C
have merely one profile or pur-
pose, it is able to help many
people in many ways. Indeed,
its role often changes accor-
ding to community needs.
Programs like ''My
Brother's Keeper''
demonstrate how sensitive
Hillei is to the Miami communi-
ty and its particular personali-
ty. In this program, college
students are "twinned" with
an "adopted" grandparent in
the area. Not only does this ac-
tivity enrich the lives of the
senior participants, but the
students benefit tremendously
from the experience.
"One young man was glow-
ing," Yarchin recalls, "when
he described his relationship
with his "adopted" grand-
mother on South Beach. He
values her opinion and talks to
her all the time about what's
going on in his life.
Although the programs of-
fered at Hillel may be varied,
Goldstein says they have one
important thing in common:
"Hillel just doesn't do it. They
do it right."
GOLDSTEIN remembers
that "the political, cultural and
ideological" trip he took to
Israel was one of the best
times in his life.
"It was election time in
Israel, and the students got in-
volved in all the campaign ac-
tivities; we met the candidates
and learned about the dif-
ferences in the parties. And we
all experienced election night
first-hand, the thrill of victory
and the agony of defeat."
Yarchin says that the
challenge Hillel now faces is to
compete for the shrinking
dollar in order to support first-
class activities.
"We even get the kids in-
volved," he says. "Early on,
we teach them the tradition of
tzedakah, which is the joy of
giving. The philosophy is that
even if we have little, there are
people who have less, and we
should be charitable."
UNDER HIS presidency,
Yarchin hopes to get Hillel's
Board members more involved
in fund-raising projects; he
also wants to create more ex-
citing ways to raise money. He
hopes to make the community
more aware of Hillel's purpose
and activities, and to expand
its role in the community.
A tall order, but Goldstein
feels that Yarchin is the man
to accomplish all of this.
"Barry is very active on all
the committees and always
gets totally involved," he says.
"I am very impressed that
with his busy schedule as an at-
torney, he does give Hillel all
that time."
Yarchin is flattered by
Goldstein's appraisal. His
response: "Hillel has been
good for me. But I think that I
am also good for Hillel since I
am involved in both B'nai
B'rith and Federation and am
sensitive to feelings in both
groups. I can bridge both
worlds."
OF ALL his goals, Yarchin
feels that one of the most im-
portant is to keep Hillel flexi-
ble to make sure that pro-
grams fit into the changing
needs of the times.
"We want to attract new
kids all the time," he says.
"We never want to lose one,
because then we'll become
stagnant."
As someone who was once
separated from the Jewish ex-
perience, Yarchin knows
whereof he speaks.
AmeriFirst Unit Specializes In
Loans To Medical Community
AmeriFirst Federal has
organized a medical financing
unit that will be led by two of
the company's veteran bank-
ing officers.
James A. Dougherty,
AmeriFirst division vice presi-
dent for credit policy and ad-
ministration, an experienced
lender to the health care in-
dustry, will oversee the new
STITCHES & STONES, INC.
Notion; Trimming*. Lacn, Braid; Button; Rhlniatona;
Nallhd; Nofltlm; Bridal Dipt.
Wlthea Cuatomara 1 Frlanda A Nappy ft Haalthy Naw Year
20612 W.WxtaHwy.N.M.B. 0:30*00 P M
935-4469 I Mon.-Sat.
FEDCO
1605 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach
Happy New Year
531-5583
Pyke Bros. & Son Body Shop
2LNrst- 573-6800
Happy New Year
financing unit.
Ted Salb, Jr., formerly an
AmeriFirst business lending
officer in Dade County, will be
directly responsible for
development of loans to
hospitals, nursing homes,
health maintenance organiza-
tions, adult congregate living
facilities and related health-
care providers.
The medical financing unit is
specially targeted to Dade
County, said Sherry Barrat,
AmeriFirst senior vice presi-
dent. "With our roots in this
area and a knowledgeable len-
ding team, we can respond
promptly and efficiently to the
medical community's special
financing needs," Mrs. Barrat
said.
Dougherty, 37, lias 18 years
of corporate lending ex-
perience, beginning with
Manufacturers Hanover Trust
Company in New York. He
joined AmeriFirst in 1983.
Salb, 35, who has been with
AmeriFirst for 10 years, has
experience in both retail bank-
ing and business lending.
Patron Financial Service, Inc.
2121 Ponce de Leon Blvd.,Suite450 M- ~-.
Coral Gables 448-0614
Wishing All Friends & Customers
A Happy New Year
Happy New Year
Silver Plumbing & Sewer
Service Inc.
Phone 672-1744
1071 NE 79 St.
Miami, FL 33138

aS King Wah
9*1 CHINESE RESTAURANT
170th St. Cinema Theater Shopping Ctr.
Happy New Year

/.
Dorothy A. Wicks has been ap-
pointed Director of Nursing
for Bnai Israel Rehabilitation
and Convalescent Center,
North Miami Beach. She will
be responsible for the direction
and planning of nursing care
services for all residents of the
facility.
Hillel's famous hot dog stand for kosher lunches.
** *t**~1ttl*
w*
r Sswca,
JEWISH VOCATIONAL SERVICE
318N.W.25St. W0 Alton Rd. 8353S,W.124St. 12550 Blsc. Blvd.
576-3220 872-2184 235-0482 8919832
Holbert Electric Co.
1434 Alton Road CTO CC11
Miami Beach O/Z-OOll
Happy New Year To All Our Friends A Clients
Here's Gift Center
607 Lincoln Rd. Mall -_- j-Afi
Miami Beach 673-1/1)0
Happy and Healthy New Year
Floridian Furniture
4795 SW 8th St. iiOOCnQ
Miami. Fla. 44o-ZOO
Happy New Year
Normandy Supermarket
369 Normandy Dr. occ 711fi
Miami Beach OtKW I <
Wish All Customers A Friends
A Happy & Healthy New Year
Hearne Electric
14801 NE 20 Ave.
No. Miami Beach
944-7799
Happy New Year
Florida Lace and Braid Inc.
Bf** 573-8020
Happy New Year


Zionists To Participate In
Combat Anti-Zionism Week'
September 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 21-C
JnEW YORK (JTA) -
Lrnice Tannenbaum, chair-
Jgj, of the World Zionist
Irganization-American Sec-
Ion hailed "Combat Anti-
Lism Week" Project
lASAZ as an important
Intinuation of the campaign
L condemn as a shameful
[nard the 1975 United Na-
|ons General Assembly
lesolution 3379 equating
lonism with racism.
"The WZO-American Sec-
ton is pleased to join the spon-
Irs of CASAZ, the Interna-
bnal Association of Jewish
hwyers and Jurists, in declar-
[Education Gap
Between
Ashkenazim
id Sephardim
}eL AVIV (JTA) The
lucation gap between
Ihkenazic and Sephardic
ks in Israel has widened in
ent years and Sephardim
lag behind Israeli Arabs
academic degrees, accor-
jto a survey by Dr. Yaakov
hon of the Jerusalem In-
(tute for Israel Studies,
Wished last week.
tlahon found that only 6.1
ent of Sephardic Jews bet-
en the ages of 30-35 have at-
^ded institutions of higher
ning compared to 28.3 per-
|it of Ashkenazic Jews in the
age bracket. Among
ling Arabs, 8.8 percent hold
fchelor degrees as opposed to
] percent of Sephardic Jews.
cording to Nahon the gap is
Tower for the older genera-
where 2.7 percent of
phardim had an academic
pkground compared to 10.7
rcent of Ashkenazim.
[ustice Honored
ontinued from Page 13-C
silver at $85; and a
nuscule 50 solid 10 karat
pieces priced at $1,145.
W of the cost can be con-
I as a tax-deductible
tion to the non-profit
nes Museum, 2911 Russell
H, Berkeley, California
i,
Ny orders are strongly
fommended by Jewish-
encan Hall of Fame Direc-
[. Mel Wacks, who indicates
most past issues quickly
ut and many ^ virtually
"able to locate at any
Jne release date for
'^ardozo medal is set for
F a, marking the opening of
! new Supreme Court ses-
% collectors should allow
lL30f[o 60 days for
Ef of bronze and silver
. and up to 90 days for
"M pieces since these will
<*e to order.
/
N
ing November 7 through 14
1987, to be Combat Anti-
Zionism Week. We will help in
every way to promote the
observance of this project as
an effective public education
and counter-propaganda
effort."
She added: "I will call upon
our American Jewish com-
munities everywhere to con-
duct events during this week,
and to invite their non-Jewish
neighbors to join them."
Noting that the WZO's
worldwide campaign against
this nefarious UN resolution is
achieving major results, Tan-
nenbaum praised the chair-
women of CASAZ, Judge
Hadassa Ben Itto and Frances"
Bernstein, for their leadership.
Project CASAZ events are be-
ing planned for New York, Los
Angeles, Washington, Boston,
Chicago, Denver, Houston and
Orlando, and college
campuses.
Supreme Court Justice Benjamin Nathan
Cardozo has been chosen by the Magnes
Museum Jewish American Hall of Fame to be
honored in 1987 by a portrait plaque and a
series of commemorative medals in gold,
silver, and bronze for private purchase. Car-
dozo, named by President Hoover to fill the
Supreme Court Seat vacated by Oliver
Wendell Holmes in 19S2, came from a
distinguished Sephardic family which arrived
in the United States in 1752.
Happy New Year
Hershel Rosenthal and Family
Immediate Dllv
Kenneth Myers
70% Off
MACRAME WICKER
FABRIC PVC METAL
FREE Shop
At Nome Service
PERFECTION
IN BLINDS
13886 W. DIXIE HWY., NORTH MIAMI
895-2128 891-7374
Mr. and Mrs. Myron Brodie
Extend New Year Greetings
Charade Restaurant
2900 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables
448-6077
HAPPY NEW YEAR
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??????????????????????????????????????????????
The Staff of the
Jewish Floridian
Wish You
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I
PROFESSIONAL
?
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??????*
PROFESSIONAL BANCORP
SHALOM
5748
from
your friends
at
PROFESSIONAL SAVINGS BANK
SECURITY SAVINGS BANK
PROFESSIONAL BANCORP
MORTGAGE COMPANY
Member f illC
Equil HoutinK li-ndrt
Mrmber f eder*l Homo lojn Bank Board


Page 22-C The Jewish Floridian/September 25, 1987
^ '
Iff
# f I
jim
Congressman Dante Fascell (Dem.-Fla.) met
ivith students from the Hebrew Academy on
the steps of the U.S. Capitol during their re-
cent visit to Washington, D.C. The Wth-grade
students toured the nation's capital.
Proud mothers show off their newborn "test
tube" babies, born within 2J, hours and all the
result of in vitro fertilization at the
Gyneeolom and Obstetrics Department in the
Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center
at Bin Karem. The new mother, from left, are
Dora Weinberg, Pnina Vanunu and Min
Lankri, all with their daughters, and Rivka
Peled, with her son.
Courtesy of:
MIAMI
SAVINGS
MIAMI SAVINGS BANK
W
Main Of flea
261 NE 1st St.
Miami, FL 33132
(305)368-6620
Waatchastar
8593 SW 24th St.
Miami, FL 33155
(305) 262-3530
South Baach
1265 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach, FL33139
(305)673-2500
Littla Havana
1800 SW 8th St.
Miami, FL 33135
(305)642-3800
Bird Road
5827 SW 40th St.
Miami, FL 33155
(305)662-2887
Hlalaah
1290 West 49th St.
Hlaleah, FL 33012
(305) 556-9830
Wishing All Customers A Friends A Happy A Healthy New Year

FREE SKIN CANCER
EXAMINATION
By Certified Dermatologist
1680 Michigan Avenue
Suite 900
Miami Beach
By Appointment Only 532-4478
0
May the coming year bring
to you and yours
all the blessings of
Peace, Health and Happiness
American Committee for
Shaare Zedek Hospital in Jerusalem
Sidney L. Olson. Chairman, Southeast Hcjjion
Minna V Rhine, President, South Florida Womens Committee
Saul M. Zabel, Executive Director
Edythe and Elton Kerness
Wish All Their Friends A Happy and Healthy New Year

Happy New Year
Hazel and Irving Cypen
and Family
t=j* ESEC
Wishing Our Customers & Friends
A Happy A Healthy New Year
TRUMAN
SWINGS
& LOAN ASSOCIATION -
1410 NE. 163rd Street. North Miami Beach. FL 33W
(3061945-4400
'. 1M7 Truman Saving* a. Loan Auociation


September 25, 1987/The JewishJ'loridian Page 23-C
Katz Joins Flagler Federal Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Business And Professional Women
Flagler Federal Savings and
Loan Association announces
the appointment of Dave Katz,
as Sales Manager. His job
responsibilities will be develop-
ment and success of the Sales
and Telemarketing
Departments.
Katz, a Southwest Miami
resident, joins Flagler, with
more than 13 years experience
in the Sales and Marketing
field. His educational
background includes an
Associate Degree in
Marketing from Atlantic Col-
lege of New Jersey and a
Bachelor of Education from
the University of Miami. He is
currently completing his
Masters program.
Active in the community,
Dave is involved with the
North Dade Chamber of Com-
merce, Florida Restaurant
Association, Hurricane Club
and the University of Miami
Alumni Association.
Stockholders
Approve Merger
Stockholders of both holding
companies have approved the
acquisition by Jefferson Ban-
corp. Inc.. headquartered in
Miami Beach, of Broward Ban-
corp of Broward County.
The merger, which already
has received approval by
il and State regulatory
authorities, is expected to be
completed this month accor-
il announcement
II. Courshon, chair-
man : the board of Jefferson
Inc., and Leonard
airman of the Board
I Bancorp.
isaction provides for
nge of up to 244.438
Jefferson stock for
the 222.217 outstanding
shares of Broward Bancorp
stock.
To Hold Opening Event
Dave Katz
Joint On rid Mullah has been
elected a name partner in tl><
Miam\ Beach law firm oj
Fuller, Feinoold and Mallah.
The professional association
was formerly known as Fuller
and Feingold. Other i
partners include Bernard
Fuller, Lawrence A. Fuller,
Allen Fuller, John Fuller and
Laurence Feingold.
SeaView
SERVING SOUTH FLORIDA SINCE 1948
3750 NW 46 St. Miami
Wishing Customers A Friends A Happy New Year
Bade Broward Palm Beach
(633-9650 960-0110 734-4339
J*
9
Chez Philippe Restaurant
13505BiscayneBlvd. tt,c COAT
North Miami Beach 945-0007
Wishing All Customers & Friends
A Happy & Healthy New Year .
Dade Tire Co. Inc.
1501 N. Miami Ave.
Miami 33136
The Business and Profes-
sional Women, of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's
Women's Division, will hold its
opening event at the Hyatt
Hotel in Miami on Wednesday.
The meeting which begins at
6 p.m. will discuss the topic:
"Developing your flare for
fashion A day and night
guide for the Business and
Professional Woman."
"The evening will feature
the latest fashions from
Europe's top designers," said
Lisa Leuchter Treister, BPW
chairwoman.
Peggy Landers, fashion
editor of the Miami Herald will
be the featured guest speaker.
A light buffet dinner will be
served. More information can
be obtained by calling the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
Orlando Youth
To Head AZA
Michelle Blumenthal of
Dallas has been elected inter-
national president of B'nai
B'rith Girls, succeeding Suri
Duitch of Colorado Springs,
Colo. Marc Blattner of Orlan-
do has been elected interna-
tional president of AZA, the
B'nai B'rith boys' group, suc-
ceeding Brian Hafter of
Millbrae, Calif.
Let The
Search Begin
Let the search begin .
Miami Beach High,
graduating class of 1948,
hopes to locate Sol Widener.
Jo Anne Moses. Edward Gall-
ic and other class members.
The '48 class Is planning its
40th anniversary, next May
18-1;"). All members are urged
to contact Fred Diamond,
557-005!) in Dade for details.
tion's Women's Division.
The opening event is being
co-chaired by Barbara Black
and Susana G. Levine.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name MISS TEE FOR ME
at 13170 N.W. 43rd Avenue. Opa-
Locka, Florida intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Jerry Sue Fashions, Inc.
HARVEY D. ROGERS
Attorney for
Jerry Sue Fashions, Inc.
13170 N.W. 43rd Avenue
Opa-Locka. Florida 33054
18003 September 25;
October 2.9. 16.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87 40466-31
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OK
ROBERT VINES, husband,
and
RONDA M. VINES, wife.
TO: RONDA M. VINES
Star Route 4. Box 505
Pryor, Oklahoma 74361
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your rit
ten defenses, if any. to it on AR-
THUR H. LIPSON. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address
Northwest \>u Street Miami, Fla.
38182, and file the original with
the clerk uf the alove styled court
on or before October 28
other* isc default will entered
agamat you tor the relict' >
ed in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and tlK
of said court at Miami, Florida on
thi* 17 day of September, I
RICHARD P. BROKER
Al Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
H> c P COPELAND
Al Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18008 Septcmi.
October 2.'.'. 16
Welcome
to Merchants:
The big hometown
bank with neighborhood
convenience
MERCHANTS BANK
OF MIAMI
950 SW 5 7th Avenue (Red
Road). Miami / Branchesi
6600 SW 8th Street. 11401
Bird Road / Phone 266-1000
Member mil An Equal Housing Lender
Affiliate of Florida Commercial Banks
Inc. a registered fcd* molding company
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-40023 FC01
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
No. 003473
IN RE:
BENNETT JOSEPHSON
and
NATHLIE BARRECK
JOSEPHSON
TO: NATHLIE BARRECK
JOSEPHSON
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for the Peti-
tioner, whose address is 2020 N.E.
163rd Street North Miami Beach,
Florida 33161, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before October 23,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 16 day of September 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOY BARKAN
2020 N.E. 163rd St.
North Miami Beach. Fl. 33162
(305) 944-9100
18004 September 25;
October 2,9, 16, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SANDY'S PRO-
DUCE at 730 First Street, Miami
Beach, FL intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
SOUTH POINTE PRODUCE, Inc.
730 First Street
Miami Beach, FL 33139
18011 September 26;
October 2,9, 16, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Geotto International
at 4086 NW 65 Avenue, Virginia
Gardens. Fl 33166 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Harold Schuller, Jr.
4086 N.W. 65 Ave.
and
The Pluton Company of Caracas,
Venezuela whose owner is Mr.
Maximo De Paulis. Address of De
Paulis and Pluton is Edificio Ex-
agon, Prolongacion Avenida
Romulo Gallegos, El Marques,
Caracas, Venezuela.
18002 September 25;
October 2,9,16, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 87-40575-26
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR .168016
In re the marriage of
KATHERINE B. ROGERS
Petitioner
and
VERNEL ROGERS
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Vernel Rogers
Residence unknown
l"OU ARE NOTIFIED that an
feCDOn for dissolution of marriage
has lieen filed against you and you
are required to lerve a copy of
your written d) ipon I J,
GRAFF. ESQ for Peti-
r, whose address is 683 N E,
187 St N..M.B. Florida 88162, on
or before October 2,'i, 1!87 and file
tin' original with the clerk of this
court otherwise default will he
entered against you.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the i
By C.I' COPE!
As Depur. I
18007 September 25;
Oct ber2,M 16. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-40972(27)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
ALBERTO HERNANDEZ-
MENDOZA,
and
GAIL HERNANDEZ
TO: Gail Hernandez
214 SW. 152nd Street
Number 64
Seattle, Washington 98148
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serves copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Steven
Miller, Esquire, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is FRIED
MAN & KAPLAN. P.A., 3636
West Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida 33135, and file the original
with the cJerk of the above styled
court on or before October 23,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for he relief
demanded in th< complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 21 day of September, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Steven Miller, Esquire
FRIEDMAN & KAPLAN, P.A.
3636 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33135
Attorney for Petitioner
18012 September 25;
October 2,9. 16. 1987


Page 24-C The Jewish Floridian/September 25, 1987
r
An Israeli folk dance troup rehearses out oj
doors as new techniques in dance greet the
New Year. Some folk dances are based on
modern disco steps, others on classical Itndi
folk dances.
Fig Bundt Cake makes a perfect ending to the
holiday meal.
A Special Cake To Sweeten The
Jewish New Year Holiday
Rosh Hashanah, the beginn-
ing of the Jewish New Year,
commences Wednesday, Sept.
23, at sundown. When Jewish
families gather to celebrate,
the traditional dinner includes
challah, tzimmes, honey-
sweetened dishes, dried figs
and almonds all symbolizing
the hope for a sweet year
ahead.
Not only do certain foods
have special significance, the
classic round shape of the holi-
day challah represents a sweet
circular new year. Cakes also
are baked in rounds, even car-
rots and sweet potatoes for
tzimmes are cut into coins for
a rounded or complete year of
peace and harmony.
It is customary to begin the
festive meal with a slice of
challah or apple dipped in
honey and to end it with honey
cake. After the first night of
Rosh Hashanah, a fig and al-
mond cake makes a different
dessert, for a dairy dinner or
between meals.
The fig almond cake, baked
in a bundt or tube pan for its
traditional appearance, layers
a rich sour cream batter with
chopped California dried figs
and almonds. Dark Mission or
light brown Calimyrnas, sun-
dried figs from California, not
only add natural sweetness
and chewy texture, but pro-
vide a bonus in essential
vitamins and minerals. While
nutrition may not be high on
your list of priorities at this
festive time, remember
California dried figs on your
market list for this important
holiday and everyday meals.
Let this fig almond cake br-
ing "sweetness and plenty" to
the Jewish new year.
CALIFORNIA FIG
BUNDT CAKE
1 cup butter or margarine
1% cup sugar
2eggs
1 cup dairy sour cream
1 Tsp. vanilla
2 cups sifted all-purpose flour
1 Tsp. baking powder
ViTsp. baking soda
*k Tsp. salt
1 cup (8 oz.) chopped
California dried figs
1 cup almonds, chopped
1 Tsp. cinnamon
1 Tbsp. sugar
Cream butter with IV2 cups
sugar until fluffy; beat in eggs.
Stir in sour cream and vanilla.
Sift together flour, baking
powder, soda and salt; add to
creamed mixture and blend
well. Mix together figs,
almonds, cinnamon and 1
tablespoon sugar. Spoon 1/3 of
batter into greased and
floured bundt pan or 9-inch
tube pan. Sprinkle half the fig
mixture over batter. Repeat
layers of batter and fig mix-
ture. Spread remaining batter
on top. Bake in 350-degree
oven l'A hours, or until cake
tests done.
Cool on rack. Makes 9-inch
Bundt or tube cake.
Yacov Scheesinger, who has
studied under Cantors Moshe
Stern and Naftali Herstig of
the Jerusalem Synagogue, will
be cantor at the Shire Club
Hotel in Miami Beach for the
Succoth holidays.
horniniaacribed
hare left a legacy of loan to the Jewiah
allak
iaapiratioa for
timmmmting
andthe
be aauafalllag light for aHwbofonom
HeibertAbrmau Edith Glazer
HerryA.Achtcr Frieda Gold
Erich Alexander Eetaer GoJdbera
Harry Albinder Lacffie GoMaadtb
Esther Goodaaaa
David Gordon
RoseGoald
George Qtoea
MorrleGreeedleM
Myron Retaky
RoeeRieh
loahliiuiiw
cuiiimdattniMJiihiiii
Mlkooi
Cecily Berger
Henrietta rteriJner
Helen BernetetB
idiBttfeh
Penl R. Ulan
Edward Brand
SfcwaM. Breeder
NoelBrin*
Daniel Brody
Edna Bendy
Bsajaiatn Broegol
FayBockner
E. Franklin Carson
WOUmm Chersky
Elisabeth Cohen
Leeds G. Cohen
Jordan Davidson
LeeDeLsViez
Henrietta Dolch
RoeeDnbin
IrriaBpeUn
Nathan Epstein
JaoahRatrcicher
(-.
Harry Kurznaa
Irving L.nu la
Saaeoei Lazsrae
Deeothy LebovRa
WHHam Levensoa
Hoe Levin
Leeds Levy
Beomel Lincenberg
Charles Lippon
Arthao Leopold
Rose]
H<
Lauxette
Fannie Mi
Benjamin
Martin Minkoff
Blanche Swift Morris
Use Oppenheimer
JL Leads Pelley
Evelyn Plato a
ShirlajRsdttass
Robert BjsiiSfl
J-cobA-Sachs
Irma SaasBSls
EveSchaeht
Edwmrd Sehtoesel
Bernard Seharakler
Alexander Inhnahlirnus
Edward Schaohssan
Ferry Schwsrea
Charles Schwarts
Rsnnsh Schwarta
Jerome Schwarta
Murray A. Seifcrt
Samuel Shiger
Rose Shioss
Betty Siegel
Philip Siegel
Morris Silver
Benjamin Simon
Harry Sley
Marilyn K. Smith
Marie Solomon
Louis Spiegel
Lillian Stein
Hymen Stera
Stella Strelssar
CelieStugf
George;
Jack stsdi
to
MMI7
5MHL
E57S-4000.


* eJewishi Floridian
Friday, 8tpmbf 26,1987
S#cllonD
jiappyNow year 5748
1 iamn naiv nj6
\JT^


rage z-u The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 25, 1987
yona Boqale
ethiopian Jewish LeaoeR
Iai6 to Rest in isR&el
By HILARY KAYE
Yona Bogale, the great
Ethiopian Jewish scholar and
leader, was laid to rest Aug. 16
at the age of 79 at the Givat
Shual Cemetery in Jerusalem.
Those who witnessed the
funeral described it as an "in-
credible" scene. Busloads of
Ethiopian Jews followed the
body as it was transported
from Yona's home in Petach
Tikvah to Jerusalem, where
Yona requested to be buried.
About 4,000 mourners came
to pay their respects to this
great patriarch of the Ethio-
pian Jews. Among them was
the speaker of the Knesset,
Shlomo Hillel, who delivered
one of the main eulogies.
ANOTHER was delivered
by Prisoner of Zion Gedaliah
Uria, who survived terrible
torture from the Ethiopian
secret police for continuing to
teach Hebrew and Jewish sub-
jects against the government's
wishes.
Yona left Ethiopia as a
youngster with Prof. Jacques
Faitlovitch, a French social
scientist who spent many
years working to help the
Ethiopian Jews. Faitlovitch
took Yona to Israel to study
Hebrew and other Jewish sub-
jects, and then to Germany for
study at an Orthodox school in
Frankfort-Am-Main.
He later studied in both
Switzerland and France.
Ultimately, Yona spoke nine
languages fluently.
WHEN HE returned to
Ethiopia in 1932, he taught at
the school Faitlovitch opened
and eventually became prin-
cipal. In addition, after World
War II, Yona was hired by the
Ethiopian government to work
in the Ministries of Finance
and Education.
In the 1950s, Yona supervis-
ed more than 20 Jewish
schools opened in villages in
Ethiopia by the Jewish Agen-
cy, and he remained involved
with Jewish education in his
homeland until 1979, when
Yona and his wife.Tayitu,
were brought to Israel by the
American Association for
Ethiopian Jews.
On Nov. 15, 1979, Yona
went to Montreal, where he
addressed the General
Assembly of the Council of the
Jewish Federation, appealing
to 2,500 North American
Jewish leaders to assist the
Ethiopian Jews in their desire
to immigrate to Israel. He had
become convinced that im-
migration to Israel was the on-
ly way his people could be
saved.
DURING THIS past decade
in Israel, Yona graned
numerous interviews to jour-
nalists and scholars, despite
his failing health, so that they
HAPPY HOLIDAY
Lilyan Cortez
6700 NE 77th Ct. Phones: 592-8000
Miami or 592-8111
Wall-Co-Imperial- "Walt ex''
"Imperial Scrubbal Glendura"
We An The Wall Covering Leader In The South
Seybold Building
36 NE 1st St. Miami
374-7922
Wish All Tenants A Friends
A Happy A Healthy New Year
Southgate Towers )
Hotels & Apartments
"WATERFRONT RENTAL APARTMENTS'
Wishes Friends, Clients e) Family
A Happy A Healthy New Year
900 West Ave. on the Bay.
Miami Beach
672-2412
would save for posterity his
recollections of the history of
the Ethiopian Jews in the
Twentieth century.
Among the others who at-
tended Yona's funeral were
members of the Knesset and
cabinet; the Mayor of Petach
Tikvah; Terezka Levin
widow of the author Meyer
Levin, the man who, in the ear-
ly 1970s, made the first film of
the Ethiopian Jews; represen-
tatives of American Jewish
organizations, such as Dr. Will
Recant of the American
Association for Ethiopian
Jews.
Also, reprtesentatives of
Shaare Tzedek Hospital, who
named Yona Bogale "The Man
of the Year" in 1985;
Ashkenaszi. Sephardic, and
Ethiopian religious leaders;
over 100 Ethiopian
scholareship students funded
by the AAEJ; Ethiopian
Jewish soldiers who were
given special leave to attend
the funeral, and many Israelis
who participated in Operation
Moses and the subsequent ab-
sorption effort.
YONA LEAVES his widow
and five children. As the
funeral procession broke up,
young Ethiopians began a col-
lection to pay for a monument
to be dedicated in honor of this
great Jewish leader.
Yona Bogale
Wishing All Clients and Friends
A Happy and Healthy New Year
^GLEMMLE
V FEDERAL
te
dLERT
PEST CONTROL COfflMflY
ALL WORK SUPERVISED BY A
GRADUATE ENTOMOLOGIST
Lawn and Tree
Spraying
Tent Fumigation
Real Estate Reports
Monthly Pest
Control Service
Termite Control
Sanitation Inspection
RADIO DISPATCHED VEHICLES
NORMAN GOLDENBERG
Prtd*nt/Entonolo9ift
SERVING ALLOF DADE
AND BROWARD COUNTIES
751 -1700
264-6262
505 N.W.103RD STREET
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33150
4796S.W. 751H AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33155


Friday, September 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-D
. '' .i.i.i ,
pROflie: aqam OffshoRe
By SANDY DIX
"Thou shalt have no graven
images before thee." Thus
spake the master when at long
last his work was complete. In-
deed the "Father of Kinetic
Movement" had found a per-
manent home for his ultimate
creation. With Biblical com-
mandment in mind, the artist
would conclude 10 months of
labor aboard Carnival Cruise
Line's superliner "Celebra-
tion." In his most massive
enterprise to date, Agam has
unveiled 23 abstract pieces
that bedeck 48,000 tons of
"Fun Ship."
Billed as a "floating
museum," the new ship fulfills
the wish to find yet one more
special setting for a man and
his art. Already Agam designs
dress such prominent places as
the Elysee Palace in Paris,
Port Authority in New York,
the NBC Today show set, the
National Convention House in
Jerusalem, and Dizengoff
Square in Tel Aviv.
Locally, his work is featured
I in Miami's Hyatt-Regency
Hotel and the Villa Regina
condominium on Briclcell
Avenue. This time around the
sea would offer "an ideal set-
ting cut off from the regular
environment," Agam
| explained.
Unlike conventional
I museums, a cruise ship
"allows the possibility of living
with the art." Captive au-
dience intact, 2,000
[ passengers each week enjoy at
least a taste of Agam.
From one deck to another,
sculptures, serigraphs, and
paintings reflect the artist's
message. Since, according to
Agam, the notion of beauty
does not exist, it is "value
which must be considered.
Agam's "value" is a grand af-
firmation of "unity between
God and the world He
created." A lifetime of art is
simply one man's way of giv-
ing expression to the integrity
of that universe.
YAACOV AGAM manifests
his theme in grand style. With
missionary zeal, he transfers
the spirituality of thought into
his works. His experiments
with light and movement make
each piece a mini-universe un-
to itself, what the artist terms
"a piece of life." The absence
of precise, conventional image
lets the viewer go beyond the
limits of visual perception.
Vibrant color combines with
multi-dimensional shape and
avant garde ventures in mo-
tion to reveal something bold
and daring. It is not surprising
that Agam contends that his
work, "like life itself, is always
more than you can see."
The man behind the design is
just as complex as the state-
ment he makes. Agam is a
short, full-bearded figure who
looks older than his 59 years.
Be it prophetic patriarch or
anachronism of the sixties, his
weathered look defies the
trends of today. A heavy ac-
cent makes him more the out-
sider in local circles. He's been
called "arrogant," "absent-
minded," "difficult," and
"bizarre."
At the same time, Agam has
managed to attract a wide and
ever-surging wave of populari-
ty. This was evidenced by the
sale of more than $140,000 in
Agam works during the 1987
Artsfest III on behalf of the
National Foundation for Ad-
vancement in the Arts. Accor-
ding to cruise auctioneer
Larry Aberman, "it was an
emotional happening; I've
never seen people react to art
that way."
EXCITEMENT is
generated each weekend as
the latest group of vacationers
gets its first sampling of Agam
a-sea. To Florence Hecht of
Miami Beach who bought an
Agam lithograph before he
was ever famous, "his sense of
color is fascinating. He is say-
ing a lot with all that move-
ment. Everything he does is so
striking." Dr. David Light of
Bay Harbor is impressed by
the transfer of media from one
of Miami's buildings to one of
its ships.
Lenore Toby of Miami called
it "a privilege to meet such a
talent of his stature," while
Dorothy Winston of Miami
Beach can now sport a per-
sonal Agam design, since he
signed her black and white
leather shirt using a heart to
replace the letter "A." Other
fans bring home similar
mementos from plates to ten-
dollar bills bearing the Agam
autograph.
It took Janet Greene of
Miami and Prescott, Ariz.,
"three and a half years years
to track him down. I followed
him from France to Israel and
finally found him on the sea."
Here she could enjoy an assort-
ment of originals plus an
Agam reproduction in her own
cabin.
FOR art-lovers, detractors,
and novices alike, it would be
eternally difficult to escape
Agam. Piece by piece has a
story to tell, each infused with
Judaic reference. The son of a
rabbi in Rishon Letzion, Israel
is clearly motivated by
religious thought. Early
Biblical and mystical influence
surfaces throughout his work.
For Agam, the ultimate goal of
Judaism remains "everlasting
Sabbath and universal love."
Shipboard works reflect this
obsession with universal con-
cerns. In "Beyond the
Horizon" Agam tries to "open
imagination, create a feeling of
life ... so that the visitor's
NACHA5!
Happy New Year
Tfoflfol
IE GREYHOUNDS J FLY.
SEE
NW 37th Avenue at NW 7th Street, Miami
Artist Yaacov Agam designs a T-shirt on shipboard.
eyes don't
surface."
stop at the
The work itself was inspired
by the dove with olive branch
in the Noah's Ark story, a sign
of hope that the world would
not be destroyed. This cove-
nant between God and man
resurfaces in "Super Galaxy,"
the ship's masterwork located
in the center of the bursar's
lobby. Between 400 and 500
colors depict shapes when
viewed in one direction and
rainbows, Noah's ultimate sign
of peace and hope, from the
other.
THESE AND other pieces
come to the Port of Miami
after a long creative process.
Each design must be executed
according to plan. AH the
cabinetwork is built at Agam's
studio in Paris. Then
laboratory technicians in
Israel apply a highly-toxic
paint to the mirror-polished
stainless steel.
The latest collection has
found an ideal home, explained
NFAA co-founder, Lin Arison,
where "blank walls lend
themselves to his busy designs.
From one end of a ship to the
other, people live with the art
for a week. Here the work sub-
consciously becomes part of
them."
Fans and critics alike will
agree that one concentrated
impact has been produced. Six
decades into career, Agam
Continued on Paf 14-D
L'Shana Tova
in
inK
The bright way to bank.
Member FDIC
A SunTrust Bank


Page 4-D The Jewah Florkiian/FTiday, September 25, 1967
WARm wishes fom isRael Bonds Can Look Back With
the people Of ispael
By YITZHAK SHAMIR
Priss* Minister of Israel
As we embark on the 40th
anniversary year of the foun-
ding of the State of Israel. I
send you warm wishes from
the people and the government
of Israel. May this be a year of
health, peace, progress, and
joy for all our people.
Forty years is but an instant
in Jewish history. Yet not
since the infancy of our nation
has there been a period so
fateful, so inspiring and so rich
in achievement as the past 40
years. To remember Rosh
Hashanah of 40 years ago
when the tiny, poorly armed
"yishuv" in Eretz Israel faced
possible destruction even
before the state was born is
to realize how far we have
come. It has been a saga of in-
comparable courage of a peo-
ple transformed, of a nation
reborn.
The miracle of Israel is the
miracle of the Jewish people,
the creation of the Jewish
spirit, the Jewish mind, and
Jewish blood. It has erased the
humiliation of the Diaspora. It
has given every Jew a new
sense of pride, of national and
cultural cohesion, and of a
common lofty goal. Israel has
become the center of Jewish
thought, consciousness, and
aspiration.
Israel's existence embodies
the age-old seminal prayer:
"Next year in Jerusalem."
Like the prayer, it ties all Jews
to this land. It is a tie with
obligations as well as
privileges. None of us can af-
ford to succumb to self con-
gratulation if the Jewish peo-
ple and the State of Israel are
to grow and thrive.
Today a huge part of the
Jewish Diaspora the Jews of
the Soviet Union is still en-
dangered and oppressed.
Similarly, there are still
thousands of Jews in Ethiopia,
many of them parents cruelly
separated from children for-
tunate enough to reach Israel,
Yitzhak Shamir
who must be saved.
None of us in the free world
can feel free until our brothers
and sisters in the Soviet Union
and in Ethiopia are free. To
save them is our national mis-
sion, our historic privilege, our
sacred duty.
Nor can we afford to neglect
Aliyah from the free countries.
Lack of Aliyah is a failure of
the Zionist dream and a threat
to the Jewish character of the
State of Israel. Aliyah from
the West can make an in-
calculable contribution to the
state, and Israel can more than
reciprocate with its unique
cultural environment, its pur-
poseful life, and its sweeping
sense of peoplehood and
mission.
It is time our neighbors
realized that we are here to
stay, and that they should
follow Egypt's example by
coming to the negotiating
table for direct talks with us.
Only then can we hope that
after 40 years of wandering in
the desert of war shall we
come to the promised land of
peace.
I wish the whole House of
Israel a Happy New Year
5748. May it be a year of con-
solidation, peace, and further
progress for Am Yisrael and
Eretz Yisrael.
new yeaa QReetmqs from
Sen. Bob QBaham
Dear Friends:
This morning I awoke to
read the good news that Josef
Begun is free to leave the
Soviet Union after waiting 16
years. Half-way around the
world, we share Mr. Begun's
ioy as he exclaims: "I am the
happiest man alive."
On this note of hope, I send
special greetings to Florida's
Jewish Community as prepara-
tions are made to celebrate the
New Year. The High Holy
Days offer a time to rejoice in
our freedom and to recommit
ourselves to fight tyranny
wherever it oppresses the
human spirit.
Hopefully freedom for Mr.
Begun is a sign of jr^od things
in the New Year. D .ng these
holidays, may our strength be
renewed for a productive and
joyous year.
With warm regards from the
Graham family to your family.
Sincerely,
BOB GRAHAM
United States Senator
pRide In helping to Build isRael
By M. RONALD KRONGOLD
General Campaign Chairman
State of Israel Bonds
On the eve of the High Holy
Days, our community can look
back with deep pride at our
role in helping Israel build an
economically secure future
through the Israel Bonds
campaign.
The year now drawing to a
close has seen the continuation
of one of the most remarkable
and encouraging chapters in
world Jewry's partnership
with Israel.
It was just a few years ago
that Israel was wracked by
tidal waves of inflation.
What changed the picture
from gloom to hope was
Jewish unity. Faced with an
economic crisis, the people of
Israel rallied behind the
Government's recovery pro-
gram. Friends of Israel
throughout the free world join-
ed the effort, providing record
amounts of loan capital
through the Israel Bonds pro-
gram and helped accelerate
development of the country's
most productive sectors.
The results were truly
dramatic. Inflation was slowed
down and then cut from well
over 400 percent to less than
20 percent, where it was
stabilized. This enabled several
important underlying trends
to register on the national
balance sheet.
Israel's exports last year
were three times greater than
they were just 10 years ago,
reflecting a 30 percent in-
crease in industrial productivi-
ty and a rise of 80 percent in
the agricultural sector over
the same period. The results:
for the first time in well over a
decade, Israel reduced its
foreign deficit.
During this year's High Holy
Day Appeals for Israel Bonds
in our community, which will
commemorate the 20th An-
niversary of Jerusalem's
reunification, we can help to
Symbol
...for
Mats
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ing Industry since
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1967 and now with the
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Facilities throughout Florida.
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ensure Israel's continued pro-
gress in its efforts for
economic independence.
Every Jewish family in our
community should consider in
vesting in Israel's new !
dividual Variable Rate ha,
(IVRI) Bond, which is current
ly paying an attractive and
competitive annual interest
rate.
Israel is poised for new
economic growth, especially a
the high technology r.arketsof
the world. Let us a,, -espond
on Rosh Hashanah and Yom
Kippur to the maximum of our
financial ability and provide a
record amount of Israei Bonds
loan funds to accelerate
Israel's industrial
development.
Best Wishes For A
Healthy New Year
Dr. Barry N. Burak
Burak Chiropractic Center
Located at Affiliated Care Centers, Inc.
m% SW 7th Avenue Miami, Florida 53143
(M5) *M-8883
The Officers and Staff of
BARNETT BANK
Wish All Of Our
Friends
Happy
New
Year
arnetl
anK
MwnbsrWOtC
Barnett Bank of
South Florida, N.A.


Rosh hashanah message
faom miami fe&eaation
By AARON PODHURST
President
And MYRON J. BRODIE
Executive Vice President
Rosh Hashanah, a joyous oc-
casion on the Jewish calendar,
is a time to give thanks for the
year that hs passed and to look
forward to the year ahead.
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation takes special pride
in this New Year, as we
prepare to celebrate our 50th
anniversary of community-
building in Dade County.
This is a "Golden Anniver-
sary Year" for the entire
Jewish community. The
Federation, for half a century
has been "the central address
of the Jewish community," the
place where all Jews join
together in a common effort
and a common goal... to build
and maintain Jewish social
justice.
Through this unity we have
become a viable community, as
well as one of the leading
Jewish communities in the
United States.
On the eve of Rosh
Hashanah, 5748, the Jewish
people are faced with impor-
tant issues that will determine
their quality of life.
The strong bonds which
unite our people and our sense
of responsibility for all of our
fellow Jews will enable us to
safeguard the strength and
vitality of Jewish life at home
and abroad.
Israel, although surrounded
by an uneasy peace with its
neighbors, continues to search
for a more comprehensive
peace in the Middle East and
security for its people.
It has been a slow and pain-
ful process, requiring vast
measures of personal energy
and public expenditures to in-
sure adequate defense. Israel's
economic problems, the result
of its huge defense expen-
ditures and tremendous infla-
tion, have forced major cuts in
the public budget for vital
social service programs.
It is the responsibility of
world Jewry to provide fun-
ding for a significant portion
of these human services.
Israel depends on us to help
fund social services, medical,
educational and resettlement
programs.
In Greater Miami, our ability
to serve the ever-growing
needs of the Jewish communi-
ty is endangered by continuing
cost hikes that attempt to out-
Pace the amount of available
funding.
Our efforts to provide a
wider variety of services to an
ever growing number of
c'ients are limited by the
resources at our disposal,
rederation-funded programs
touch almost every member of
our community from the
youngest child in day care to
o'aer children participating in
our Jewish day schools, High
acnoo in Israel, and Hillel
activities.
Our growing elderly popula-
"n depend on a vareity of
programs and services such as
hot-meals, housing, transpor-
tation, medical services and
counseling.
The question might be asked
on the eve of our Golden An-
niversary, "Are our greatest
years behind us or do they lie
in our future? The future is the
key.
Together, working harder
than ever, we will continue to
support the agencies that
maintain the programs and
services that serve our fellow
Jews.
As we enter 5748, let us do
everything we possibly can to
assist this ongoing effort.
Through our active involve-
ment and generosity we can
help shape the destiny of our
people. Each of us must make
a personal commitment to care
more and to do more by get-
ting involved in Jewish We.
On behalf of the officers,
board of directors and staff of
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, we wish you and
your family a year of health
and happiness. May we all be
inscribed in the Book of Life,
and may 5748, our 50th year of
community building, be a year
of unity, peace, fulfillment and
celebration for the Jewish
people.
Aaron Podhurst
Myron J. Brodie
Friday, September 25, 1967/The Jewish Florknan Page 5-D
miAmi Rabbis extend
WApmest Wishes to ail
By RABBI
DAVID B. SALTZMAN
President
And RABBI
SOLOMON SCHIFF
Executive Vice President
Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami
It is our privilege, on behalf
of the Rabbinical Association
of Greater Miami, to extend
warmest wishes to our fellow
Jews for the year 5748. May
the New Year bring Israel and
mankind closer to peace by
"all fellowship to do His will
with a perfect heart."
As spokesman for the rab-
binate, the fourth largest
Jewish community in the
United States, we are par-
ticularly sensitive to the deep
spiritual scars that need to be
healed on the body organism of
our society to make our hopes,
our aspirations and our
prayers for the New Year
more than poetic expressions.
ABOVE ALL, the Rab-
binical Association attempts to
fulfill its sacred task by serv-
ing as the religious informa-
tion and coordination center of
the Jewish community. In the
closest relationship with the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, and the leadership of the
total community, the Associa-
tion analyzes and guides the
total development and growth
of its people.
Our rabbinic organization is
comprised of colleagues of all
branches of American Judaism
Orthodox, Conservative.
Reform and Reconstructionist
and meets on a monthly
basis for a discussion of cur-
rent problems.
Rabbis represent the
Association in many communi-
ty bodies, agencies, and in-
stitutions spanning the spec-
trum from Jewish education,
Israel, youth, chaplaincy,
through community relations.
Thus, the rabbis have their
continuous input into the shap-
ing of our community pro-
grams and, in turn, are kept
informed of the lay points of
view on all issues.
The Rabbinical Association
also sponsors educational pro-
grams through the com-
munication media.
AMONG THESE programs
are the "Still Small Voice" on
Channel 7; the "Jewish Wor-
ship Hour" on Channel 10;
"Viewpoint" on Channel 2, an
Rabbi David Saltzman
interfaith program; and
special educational material
that appears regularly in The
Jewish Floridian. From time
to time, special programs are
prepared and presented by the
Association on other television
and radio stations.
The Community Chaplaincy
Service, sponsored by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion in association with the
Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami, provides
visitation and spiritual
counseling to unaffiliated Jews
in hospitals, nursing homes,
homes for retarded, Hospice,
correctional and other
institutions.
This, representative rab-
binate works with all major
Jewish organizations for im-
portant causes. At the same
time, it is in close contact with
the school authorities from
elementary to university, pro-
viding them with calendars of
Jewish holidays so as to avoid
conflicting events.
The Rabbinical Association
works closely in the area of in-
terfaith activities and many
projects in cooperation with
the Catholic Archdiocese of
Miami and with the
Metropolitan Fellowship of
Churches, the Ministerial
Association, the National Con-
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
ference of Christians and
Jews, the Miami Citizens
Against Crime, the Religious
Leaders Coalition of Greater
Miami, and other appropriate
organizations.
WE WORK closely with
JFTV, sponsored by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, on the development and
operation of Cable Television
which is a new source of educa-
tion for our comunity.
This new year is a special
milestone year, with the com-
memoration of the 50th year of
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and the 40th year
of the State of Israel.
We will note thes momen-
tous events with unceased
devotion to these and other
vital causes in the Jewish com-
munity. We also note the
General Assembly of the Coun-
cil of Jewish Federations
which will be held in our com-
munity this November. We
wish for every success of this
important event.
We hope that in the New
Year we will be able to further
extend and deepen our ac-
tivities for an even more com-
mitted and more dynamic
Jewish life in our South
Florida community.
S)^
| Jose Ventura Renee de Paris

<>
<>




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865-7131
Happy New Year
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Miami Beach, Fl.
534-3600
Susan Tojeiro, Manager
North Dade Branch
(Route 441 & Miami Gardens Dr.)
18405 N.W. 2nd Ave.
Miami, Fl.
653-6500
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Efrain Cano, Manager
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Page 6-D The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 25, 1987
pOlURfc
appeal For Un&eRstan&inq in Son's Case
The sentencing of Jonathan Jay Pollard as a spy for Israel to
prison tvas one of the major stories of the Outgoing Hebrew year.
This report is reprinted by permission of the St. Louis Jewish
Light.
By ROBERTQ COHN
And CAROL B.
LUNDGREN
Jonathan Jay Pollard con-
siders himself intensely loyal
to the United States and
Israel, but is deeply dismayed
by what he perceives as a
betrayal by both, according to
his parents, Morris and
Mildred (Mollie) Pollard.
Pollard, a former U.S. Navy
analyst, currently is facing life
incarceration at the federal
facility in Springfield. Mo., for
having sold secrets to the
Israeli government, informa-
tion he believes did not en-
danger American security and
which should have been made
readily available between
allies.
WHILE HIS parents openly
aknowledge that their son
broke the law as Pollard
himself also has admitted
they express unabashed shock
at the severity of the sentence.
"We wish there could have
been another way," stated
Morris Pollard. 71, a professor
of biological sciences and
director of the Lobund
Laboratorv at Notre Dame
University. Mollie Pollard. 69.
currently is taking law classes
at the university.
The paradox of the harsh
punishment. Dr. and Mrs.
Pollard say. is that it was
handed down for selling
secrets, not to any enemy but
to an ally.
POLLARDS WIFE of
almost two years. Anne
Henderson Pollard, also has
been imprisoned, serving two
concurrent five-year terms at
a medium security facility in
Lexington. Ky. Anne. 27. a
public relations specialist, was
never accused of espionage,
but instead was convicted of
having classified information
on her person.
Moris and Mollie Pollard
visited Springfield last week to
meet with Jonathan, to whom
they refer as Jay, his middle
name. On their way home to
Indiana, after two six-hour
sessions with their son, they
agreed to an exclusive inter-
view with the St. Louis Jewish
Light.
On the advice of their son.
the Pollards declined to be
photographed in connection
with this story, citing concern
over security and threats
against Pollard from neo-Nazi
and Muslim groups which led
to his transfer from the facility
at Petersburg, Va.. to the
medium security prison at
Springfield.
THE POLLARDS seem
very much an amalgamation of
parents concerned with their
imprisoned son's plight, but
also the epitome of academia.
focusing on some of the issue-
involved, rather than dwelling
on the emotional.
This Interview wrai
several visits, where they were
able to meet and talk with
their son face-to-face, without
the encumbrance of a glass
separation, at the Pollards'
specific request.
They recalled how they in-
itially had been horrified,
upset, even angry when they
learned of Jonathan's ac-
tivities. Although still not in
agreement with his illegal
methods, their anger abated as
they became better acquainted
with the type of information
that had been transmitted.
Since then, they have felt
simultaneous bitterness
toward the harsh sentence,
and disappointment with
Israel's response to the entire
affair, and have l>een hearten-
ed by the outpouring of sym-
pathy from other sources for
their son. who turned 33 last
July.
Far from becoming a pariah
at Notre Dame, where he ha^
been on staff since 19H1. Dr.
Pollard has received more than
150 letters of support from his
fellow faculty members. He
also reported that at the same
time, however, the famih has
received virtually no backing
from their local Jev
community.
They did say, however, that
many Jews and non-Jews alike
have offered their assistance
telling the Pollards that "this
is unconscionable for him to be
so punished for helping an al-
ly.' The Pollards refused to
name any of these individuals
out of necessity and respect
for their privacy.
As well, after Anne made an
appearance on Israeli televi-
sion, the family received an
outpouring of moral support
from the grass-roots Israeli
public, in contrast to their
government's official reaction.
MORRIS and Mollie IMlard
put Jonathan's plight into
perspective by talking about
their home life and his develop-
ment as a youth. Pollard is the
youngest of three child
Harvey. 11 years
an MD PhD; his
41. plays the viola at;
ecutiv
The Pollai -ibe
themselves as "I >i
inclination.' Membi
Sinai Synagogue, an I in
congregation which recently
shifted its orientatioi to the
89 NE 27 St.
Miami
Sofas & Chairs
573-0760
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Miami Tobacco & Candy Co.
8601 NW 61st St. Miami
594-0063
Happy New Year To Our Friends 6 Customers
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662-5649
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Miami
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Reuben's Restaurant
1201 Lincoln Rd. fi-0 QilA-
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Wishing All Customers A Friends
A Happy & Healthy New Year
Dade Dental Assoc.
1225 Washington Ave. 532-4009
Miami Beach 532-3300
NEW YEAR GREETINGS
147 Miracle Mile
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Biscayne Miracle Mile
Cafeteria
444-9005
HAPPY NEW YEAR
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5050 Biscayne Blvd. Miami
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Libby's Hair Styling
1656NE 123rdSt. -J\ mAq
N.Miami 891-2848
HAPPY NEW YEAR TO OUR CUSTOMERS 4 FRIENDS


Friday, September 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-D
Conservative movement.
Contributors to the United
Jewish Appeal, they do not
consider themselves a part of
the organized, established
Jewish community, although
they do feel deeply about their
religion. Mollie does maintain
a life membership in
I Hadassah.
JONATHAN WAS born in
Galveston, Tex., where the
Pollards were members of a
Reform temple, noted for the
[excellence of its Sunday
I school, and also were affiliated
with an Orthodox synagogue,
which maintained what they
[considered an outstanding
Hebrew school.
When Morris Pollard joined
the Notre Dame faculty and
the family moved to South
Bend. Ind.. they joined a
Reform temple until it was
time for Jonathan's Bar Mitz-
vah. However, the rabbi there
did not approve of his Israel-
centered Bar Mitzvah speech,
according to Mollie Pollard.
"so we moved to the Orthodox
and it was quite satisfying."
Even then, at age 13, it
seems almost prophetic that he
spoke on Isaiah: "Israel will be
a light among nations."
At public school in South
Bend, the Pollard family
senses an underlying anti-
Semitism, and moved their son
to a private school, where "he
blossomed into a real scholar,"
recalled Morris Pollard.
AND WHILE in high school.
Jonathan attended a summer
science session at the Weiz-
mann Institute. So enthralled
was he with the country that
he wanted to remain there, but
at his parents insistence,
returned home to complete his
high school education.
The winner of the National
English Teachers Award,
Pollard was accepted at every
college to which he applied,
settling on Stanford, where he
earned a BA degree in politial
science and economics.
After postgraduate stints at
Notre Dame and Indiana
University, he enrolled in the
Fletcher School of Law and
Diplomacy, attended by such
luminaries as Henry Kissinger
and Daniel Patrick Moynihan.
He did not receive his
masters, however, opting in-
stead to embark on a career.
Long interested in submarine
warfare, he was accepted into
the Offrce of Naval In-
telligence for a civilian post.
FOR THE first several
years, according to Morris
Pollard, "they were highly en-
thused with him there," and he
was given two citations for his
contributions to the national
defense and won the second-
highest civilian award by the
secretary of the Navy during
the Carter Administration.
Jonathan met his wife,
Anne, a year before he mar-
ried her on Aug. 9, 1985. Her
parents. Elaine and Bernard,
are now separated. Although
her parents were not of the
same religion (her mother is
Jewish, her father is not),
Anne was raised as a Jew in
their Brooklyn home.
Her father, who previously
was director of public relations
for Quaker State, was in the
process of helping Anne set up
her own public relations
business at the time of her ar-
rest. Prior to that, she had
done public relations work for
the National Rifle Association.
WHILE JONATHAN
seems to be faring well in
prison, apparently Anne is
not. She suffers from a rare
gastrointestinal ailment,
which Jonathan claims is not
being treated properly in Lex-
ington, and her weight has
dropped below 95 pounds.
The couple tries to write
often, but all mail between the
two is heavily censored. In
fact, according to Mollie
Pollard, often all that is spared
by the black magic marker is
"Dear Jay," and "Love,
Anne." However, Morris and
Mollie Pollard reported that
their own letters seem to ar-
rive intact.
The Pollards stressed that
their son appears to be very
well treated at the Springfield
facility in contrast to the harsh
treatment he endured at
Petersburg, which Mollie
Pollard calls "a real Black
Hole of Calcutta."
POLLARD WAS transfer-
red from Petersburg to Spr-
ingfield after numerous
threats to his life were receiv-
ed from fellow prisoners linked
to neo-Nazi groups like the
Aryan Nations or the Nation
of Islam, according to the
Pollards.
"He's in a much better situa-
tion at Springfield," says Mor-
ris Pollard. "It is a medium
security facility, and despite
the fact that he is kept in isola-
tion from other prisoners, he is
visited by a local rabbi and is
Continued on Page 15-D
1311 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dipper Dan
Ice Cream Shoppe
673-1242
SENDS A HAPPY JEWISH NEW YEAR TO ALL
August Bros. Bakeries
10777 NW 36 Ave. -QQ 004.
Miami OoO"8o15
Happy New Year To All Our Friends & Customers
Professional Arts Pharmacy
1150 NW 14 St. OQ. AQAO
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Gordon Roofing &
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1450 NW 21 St. OOK QOQ7
Miami OLD'OLiO I
Wishes A Happy Jewish New Year To All Our Friends A Customers
Heritage House Convalarium
2201 NE 170 St. N.M.B.
945-1401
ROBERTA CORTEZ Administrator
The Forge Restaurant
432 Arthur Godfrey Rd. Miami Beach
538-8533
Extends To The Entire Jewish Community A Very Happy New Year
NEW YEAR GREETINGS
The Bikini Shop
1022 71st Street Miami Beach 864-0619
Ladies Swimwear
Beach Coverups
Mail Order &
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Linen Chest of Florida
931-8530
18703 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami
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423 Arthur Godfrey Rd. CO"! 7CCO
Miami Beach OO1" #DO
Wish Friends and Customers
A Happy and Healthy New Year
Central Hardware Co.
545 Arthur Godfrey Rd. Miami Beach
531-0836
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Page 8-D The Jewith Floridian/Foday, September 25, 1987
museum design AppROved;
Site Is Cleaped foR ConstRuction
This design of the United States Holocaust Memorial
Museum was approved by the federal Commission of
Fine Arts on June 19. The memorial Hall of Remem-
brance is at right in this view of the Raoul WnUenberq
place (formerly 15th Street) entrance to the Musetn
Architect James I Freed'* design ha* ',.,
as rich in symbol and illusion and undertated
metaphor.
Final approval was given
for the acclaimed design of the
United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum by the
federal Commission of Fine
arts on June 19. The site is be-
ing cleared for construction,
which is expected to take ap-
proximately two and a half
years.
The design calls for a hex-
agonal memorial, the Hall of
Remembrance, connected to a
five-story museum structure
featuring a sky-lit, atriumlike
Hall of Witness.
Museum director Arthur
Rosenblatt, formerly vice
president of the Metropolitan
Museum of Art in New York,
praised James I. Freed of I.M.
Pei and Partners and his team
of architects for meeting the
Council's goal of a museum "of
symbolic and artistic beauty,
visually and emotionally mov-
ing in accordance with the
solemn nature of the
Holocaust."
COUNCIL Chairman
Harvey M. Meyerhoff hailed
the design as befitting a na-
tional museum which will tell
the story of the darkest days of
human history.
He said, "The Museum will

meet our goal of remembering
the past for the sake of the
future. It will tell the story of
degradation and inhumanity,
but it will also convey the spirit
of bravery and determination
that existed alongside the
misery. It will record for
posterity the sucessful efforts
to preserve human dignity dur-
ing the Holocaust."
Washington Post architec-
ture critic Benjamim Forgey
said Freed "is a sensitive,
talented architect. His design
in most respects is ingenious,
intelligent, splendid. The floor
plans accommodate a variety
of functions with seeming ef-
fortlessness the mark of an
excellent design team."
TIME MAGAZINE'S ar
chitecture critic Kurt Ander-
son, under a headline,
"Washington will get a
deliberately disturbing
Holocaust Museum," describ-
ed the design as "full of allu-
sion to the Holocaust. Inside,
rough brick and exposed steel
trusses unsettlingly mimic
deathcamp construction
techniques, though not its
precise forms; two rows of
four towers recall the
camps' ubiquitous guard
towers. Even the dimensions
(cramped) and lighting (bleach-
ed) of the passenger elevators
are designed to make visitors
feel appropriately
uncomfortable."
Freed told Time that he
wants his design to evoke
"mystery, fear, a sense of
unbelieving."
The Museum's permanent
exhibit will tell the story of
the Holocaust and will focus
on the victims of the
Holocaust; six million Jews,
including one million
children.
THE STORY of five million
other victims of Nazi genocide,
including Poles. Gypsies,
resistance fighters and others
selected by the Nazis in their
insane quest for "racial puri-
ty," will also be told.
The Museum, with its learn-
ing center, library, archives
and a computerized interna-
tional data retrieval center,
will serve as a national and in-
ternationl educational
resource on the Holocaust.
In fulfilling its mission to
remember and educate, the
Museum will support the
highest level of academic
research, curriculum develop-
ment and teacher training
serives. The archival, artifact
and llibrary collections will
provide fundamental
resources for visitors,
students, teaches and scholars
It will work to integrate the ar-
chival collections of Holocaust
institutions throughout the
world.
THE MUSEUM will coet
estimated $45-50 million to
build, another $15-20 million
for the permanent exhibition
and $5 million for computers
and other equipment lor the
interior. All museum expenses
are being raised from private
sources.
Balogh Jewelers
Wishes Their Clients it Friends
A Happy Healthy Naw year
The Brick-walled, glass-ceilinged Hall of
Witness features a grandstaircase leading to
the Hall of Remembrance. A dramatic floor-to-
ceiling crack along one wall that greets
vwttors reinforces the feeling of being in a
deliberately disturbing place that this ex-
perience should be unsettling as well
unforgettable.
I
Werner Kabn Studio
935 Arthur Godfrey
Miami Beach
531-1872


Friday, September 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-D
exploRinq the mysteRy op the holocaust: who Our heRoes
A Rabbi's new Ano PROvocative appRoach
By JOEL SAIBEL
The Holocaust, far from be-
ing a divine punishment for
man's sins, was an instrument
of God's grand design as
foretold by the Prophet
Ezekiel to bring redemption
to the Jewish people through a
renaissance of Torah learning
and observance.
This provocative thesis is ad-
vanced by Rabbi Bernard
Maza. a prominent Talmudic
scholar in his book, "With
Fury Poured Out: A Torah
Perspective on the
Holocaust." The volume,
published by Ktav Publishing
House (235 pp., $15.95), bears
the imprimatur of Rabbi
Maza's teacher, the late Rav
Moshe Feinstein, the leading
decisor of Jewish law until his
death in 1986.
NEARLY TWO decades in
the making Rabbi Maza first
postulated his theory in 1970
- the controversial volume
traces the eclipse and
resurgence of Torah Judaism
in this century. This revival,
the author maintains, could
take place only the wake of a
fury of unprecedented
proportions.
Rabbi Maza bases his
premise on the verse in
Ezekiel: "As I live, says the
Lord, only with a strong hand
and an outstretched arm
and with fury poured out
will 1 be king over you."
Ezekiel thus prophesied that
the beginning of redemption
would be preceded by a "great
fury."
This verse, the author main-
tains, holds the key to a proper
understanding of Jewish pain,
survival and rebirth, for it is
the measure of the Jewish peo-
ple's dedication to Torah that
has determined the Jewish ex-
perience through all the cen-
turies of their history.
THE BASIS of Rabbi
Mil/;, 8 theory lies in his asser-
tion that Torah Judaism was in
eclipse around the world on
the eye of World War II in-
creasingly abandoned by the
lewisii youth of Eastern
Europe, obliterated in Soviet
Russia by the repressive anti-
religious strictures of the Com-
munist regime, attenuated in
the United States by the drive
for assimilation and accultura-
tion by the sons and daughters
of pious Jews who had fled to
escape pogroms and persecu-
tion in Europe, and engulfed in
Palestine by waves of secular
Zionists who sought to
substitute nationalism for
traditional observance.
Thus, the author argues, a
new locus would have to be
found where Torah could
flourish once again. The
Jewish people would have to
Je redeemed. And that
redemption could come only
through the fulfillment of
Mekiel's prophecy.
Redemption, says Rabbi
Mazi m quoting the Talmud,
f mes ln four stages: release
"P"1 oppression, ingathering
,' the exiles, return to
Jerusaiem and the coming of
ne Kingdom of David, which
ls the Kingdom of Heaven.
Ought to Be
Rabbi Bernard Maza
THEREFORE, he argues,
the road to the Kingdom ol
Heaven, beginning with libera-
tion from oppression would
have to be preceded by the
"fury poured out" of the
Holocaust.
In attempting to explain the
inexplicable the "why" of
the Holocaust, a subject that
Jewish theologians have
pondered for 40 years Rabbi
Maza does not seek to discover
why the Kingdom of Heaven
was to be preceded by a "fury
poured" in which six million
Jews died. Rather, he focuses
on the Almighty's intention in
permitting the Holocaust to
happen.
His answer is a highly con-
troversial one. Quoting the
Talmud, Rabbi Maza writes
that the redemption and the
resurgence of Torah Judaism
called for mass martyrdom by
the righteous a martyrdom
that would sanctify God's
name and bring God's blessing
so that the sun of Torah
would rise again.
WITH THE rebirth of Israel
and the renaissance of Torah
studies both there and in the
United States day schools,
yeshivoth, kollelim and the pro-
liferation of the tshuva move-
ment Torah Judaism is once
more ascendant. Ezekiel's pro-
phecy is fulfilled.
Controversial and pro-
vocative, Rabbi Maza's book
presents a traditionalist's view
of God's divine design to
redeem His eternal people. It
deserves a careful reading by
all those who believe that
Jewish history has a plan and a
purpose.
In Belzec, Poland, Miles Lerman, chairman of the U.S. Council's
International Relations Committee, signs the agreement opening
up Polish archives on the Nazis to the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. He is watched by Prof. Dr. Kazimierz Kakol.
Director of Poland's Commission for the Investigation of Nazi
Crimes in Poland, left, and Dr. David Weinstein, executive direc-
tor of the Council.
The Hebrew Educators Alliance
mourns the passing of one of Its Founders
and a leading teacher
for more than a generation at the
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Academy
Of Greater Miami
Shoshanna Spector Asness
MAY HER MEMORY BE A BLESSING
Presidium Orly Alexander Sarah Sznol
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
Who now are among
America's top national heroes,
and how long will they stay
perched on their pedestals?
The Pesident has designated
Lt. Col. Oliver North as one.
Many of our countrymen
regard Bernhard Goetz, the
man who fired the New York
subway shots heard round the
world, as another.
Shortly after Goetz shot four
teenagers in a subway late in
1983, an ABC-Washington
Post poll indicated 45 percent
o7 those offering opinions ap-
proved the deed, while 46 per-
cent opposed it. There's little
doubt, now that Goetz has
been found not guilty of 11 of
the charges against him, that
the approval rate of th
vigilante action will far
outweigh the number of those
in disapproval.
Many legal authorities and
other concerned people have
made the significant point that
the verdict indicates only that
those prosecuting the case had
not proved the man with the
gun was guilty beyond doubt.
DESPITE ALL the rejoic-
ing over the acquittal, it was in
no way a judgement of Geotz's
way of going about his subway
misadventure. Said one pro-
fessor of criminal law: "It was
a legal event rather than a
legal precedent."
Goetz's annoyance at being
accused by the wayward
panhandlers is understan-
dable. He had faced trouble at
the hand of thugs in 1981.
Three men waylaid him, tried
to steal $100 worth of elec-
tronics equipment from him,
and inflicted painful injuries.
This impelled him to try to ob-
tain a permit to carry a gun. In
September, he is to face a gun-
packing charge in connection
with the 1983 episode.
Other problems help to ex-
plain his defensive stance, his
feeling that life is unfair. The
son of a Jewish mother and a
German-born Lutheran father,
Goetz, according to his sister,
escaped from Vietnam war-
time draft by feigning mental
illness. His marraige of four
Lt. Col Oliver North
years ended in divorce.
But there is one strong plus
arising from the subway
shooting and all the sensa-
tional tabloid coverage that
followed: Public officials,
criminologists, police
authorities, lawmakers and
civic activists are obliged to
take a fresh look at subway
fears, the degree of security
and insecurity there, crowded
court agendas, crowded jails
and prisons, easy access to
guns and the persistence of
violent as well as petty crime.
SOME PLACE a part of this
burden on the shoulders of
those considered soft on crime.
Prof. James Q. Wilson of Har-
vard, long a student of
criminality, has commented
wryly: "In New York there are
no liberals anymore on the
crime and law-and-order
issues. All the liberals have
been mugged."
Overhanging the search for
an end to subway anarchy is
the certain realization that ter-
ror is international in scope. If
we can spend billions of dollars
on the Strategic Defense In-
itiative, we have good reason
to ask why we cannot ap-
propriate at least a few more
millions to deal with terror in
subway, on highways, in city
streets and in our homes.
Our genuine national heroes
are not Ollie North and Ber-
nhard Goetz. They are, they
must be, solvers of problems
such as those besetting urban
jungles and haunting our
hearts.
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Page 10-D The Jewish Ftoridjan/Friday, September 26, 1987
RepORt details Wal&heim's nazi past
By ELAN STEINBERG
The sordid record of Kurt
Waldheim's Nazi past, conceal-
ed fromthe public for more
than 40 years, is summarized
and set forth in a published
report released during the
outgoing Hebrew year by the
chairman of the United States
Section of the World Jewish
Congress, Rabbi Wolfe
Kelman.
"This is a chronicle of the
deceit, the shamelessness, and
the heinous activities of the
man who was UN Secretary
General," Rabbi Kelman
declared upon releasing the
report.
Supported by rare wartime
photographs and excerpts
from original archival
documentation, the report is
the product of an 18-month in-
vestigation by the World
Jewish Congress. The United
State Section of the WJC
represents 33 national Jewish
organizations.
THE REPORT chronicles
the stream of disclosures about
Waldheim's wartime record
beginning with the initial ex-
posure of his previously-
undisclosed Nazi background
in March of 1986 and
culminating in April, 1987
with the findings of the U.S.
Justice Department that he
had engaged in acts of
"persecution during World
War II."
The revelations originate
with exposure of Waldheim's
"big lie" that he was
discharged from the German
armed forces in 1941 and
range through a series of ever-
more startling findings which
include those from 1948 of the
Un War Crimes Commission
holding him responsible for
numerous massacres of
civilians in Nazi-occupied
Yugoslavia.
The UN Commission's
long.-secret criminal file on
Waldheim is among the
published documents; that file
calls for Waldheim's arrest
and trial for "murder" and
"putting hostages to death" as
a Nazi intelligence officer.
It has since been learned
that the 1948 Commission ses-
sion which made the deter-
mination in the Waldheim case
was chaired by the represen-
tative of the United Kingdom,
Sir Robert Craigie.
WALDHEIM'S repeated
denials that he was a Nazi in-
telligence officer are shattered
by publication in the report of
a captured German war docu-
ment which explicitly iden-
tifies him in his intelligence
capacity with responsibility for
"prisoner interrogation" and
"special tasks."
Documents originating from
archival sources in a dozen
countries were used in compil-
ing the published material. An
Austrian document, a 1940
court application bearing
Waldheim's name and
photograph, shows his
membership in the pre-War
Nazi stormtroopers (the
"Brownshirts") and the Nazi
student union. To this day,
Waldheim flatly denies
membership in any pre-War
Nazi organizations and issues
protestations of a firm "anti-
Nazi background."
From United States ar-
chives, investigators turned up
a post-War U.S. Army
"Wanted List" containing
Waldheim's name. As publish-
ed in the report, the Wanted
List contains a one-word entry
in the column labeled reason
wanted: "murder."
West Germany was the
source of a secret Nazi war
document from 1943 which
records a briefing by
Waldheim on arrangaments
for the deportation of tens of
thousands of Italian soldiers to
German forced labor camps.
THIS PUBLISHED docu-
ment was personally initialed
by Waldheim and bears his
typewritten name. In a
photograph reproduced in the
report, originating from
Greece, Waldheim is seen
relaxing in Nazi-occupied
Athens in the company of his
fellow German officers who
carried out the Italian
deportations.
Yugoslavia was the source of
several published documents
including Waldheim's citation
as a member of the "command
staff of the German unit that
executed the "Kozara
massacras" a Nazi atrocity
in 1942 which resulted in the
deportation of 68,000
Yugoslavs to concentration
camps. Also reproduced is the
1947 dossier on Waldheim of
the Yugoslav War Crimes
Commission which brands
Waldheim a "war criminal"
responsible for "murders and
slaughters."
Other published material in.
elude photographs of Waldhci
m uniform, reproduction of hi
"Eastern Front Medal"
awarded for participation in
the invasion of the Soviet
Union, and the decision follow
ing the year-long investigation
of the U.S. Justice Depart
ment barring his entry into the
country.
IN ALL, there are 59
separate entries in the report
which summarize in a
chronological format the major
disclosures associated with the
"Waldheim affair." Rabbi
Kelman noted that "what
emerges as shocking is not on-
ly Waldheim's reprehensible
past but his continuing lies to
cover it up."
The report concludes with an
observation by Elie Wiesel, the
Nobel Peace Laureate and
Holocaust survivor:
"Waldheim's election by the
Austrian people is a stain on
Austria and all of mankind."
Entitled "Waldheim's Nazi
Past: Chronology of the
Revelations," the report is
available from the WJC Inter-
national Department of Infor-
mation in New York.
Miller Decorating Centers
33 Years Experience
16507 NE 6th Ave. 947-2020
n.m.b. New Years Greetings
Kane's Masterbuilt Furniture
5851 NW35th Avenue coo Ac-*
Miami DOO-Uo4z
Happy New Year Greetings To All
The Studio Restaurant
2340 SW 32 Ave. Miami
445-5371
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Bay Harbor Fine Foods
PHONE ORDERS PRIME MEATS FANCY CROC
1077-95th St. Phone
Bay Harbor Island 865-0331
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Diabetes Research Institute
8600 NW 53rd Terr. .- 0A07
Suite 202 Miami 4# i'0*101
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Lawrence Plumbing Supply
^57Ave- 266-1571
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Laura McCarthy Inc.
8601 Biscayne Blvd. Miami Shores
751-1641
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Decor Inc.
9487 Harding Ave.
Surfside
866-0905
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Electronic Equipment Inc.
4027 NW 24th Street Miami
871-3500
HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
Flo & Ben Kram Print-Rite Co.
748 NE 79th St. .- -4C0
Miami 691-545*
Happy New Year To The Entire Jewish Community
Rothman's Shoe Salon
9700 Collins Ave. Miami Beach
866-1172
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Rolf es Optical Dispensary
81MERRICKWAY CORAL GABLES
445-7959
HAPPY NEW YEAR


Friday, September 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-D
La Salle Cleaners
2341 Le Jeune Road
444-7376
Happy New Year
Fine Distributing Co.
3485 NW 65 St., _^ ^^
Miami 691-0231
Holiday Greetings To The Entire Jewish Community
Happy New Year To All
Arkin Construction Co.
1827PurdyAve., o-n-
Miami Beach 530-8721
Gino's Italian Restaurant
1906 Collins Ave. Miami Beach
532-6426
Happy New Year
Crown Discount Furniture
7545 West 20 Ave.
Hialeah 558-8502
Extends To The Entire Jewish Community
A Very Happy New Year
S&S Discount World
7306 CoUins Ave. Qfil nfiQ
Miami Beach OOl-Uo94
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Adam's Kosher Butcher
1405 Washington Ave. ct%r% f.A --
Miami Beach OOZ-U I Uo
Happy New Year
Royal Embassy
5750 Collins Ave. QOO .QAO
Miami Beach, Fla. 33140 OO0-0o57Z
Wishing Friends & Tenants A Happy New Year
9700 Collins Ave.
Bal Harbor
C*l&lmbiancc
861-9700
Wishing All Customers & Friends
A Happy & Healthy New Year
Food Spot Stores
7901 S.W. 67th Ave. fi A?
Miami ObO-Uo4J
Happy New Year
Monahan's Electric Company
4050 NW 29th St. Q
Miami O71-Olbo
NEW YEAR GREETINGS
Certified Poultry & Egg Co.
763West 18St. QQ_ _.
Hialeah OOf'fOsl
HAPPY NEW YEAR
The Palette
Mtmf26St- 573-0980
Happy New Year
Farr Tours & Travel
2323 Collins Ave. co-l COOT
Miami Beach OO I "OoZ I
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Meridian Apothecary Shop
1608 Meridian Ave.
Miami Beach
538-0424
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Rand Income Tax
27 N.W. 37th Ave. 445-7948
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Carpet Mart
-_5So.0.xi,Hwy. 232-2430
Happy New Year
Miam
Mandarin Garden Restaurant
446-9996
3266 Grand Avenue
Coconut Grove
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Fu-Manchu Restaurant
325-71st Street Miami Beach
866-4303
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Fox's Sherron Inn
6030 So. Dixie Hwy. fiJfi OOOA
Miami OOO-ZZoU
HAPPY NEW YEAR


gMI 12D The Jewish Ftoridian/Friday, September 25,1987
IMPORTS
14800 Biscayne Blvd., fti|- 4AAH
Miami Telephone 5J4/-1UUU
Wishes All Customers & Friends A Happy New Year
Edward Don & Co.
2200 SW 45th Street OH A 01 Ol
Ft. Lauderdale (Dade) 074-OlZl
Wishes Happy New Year To All Customers & Friends
A-l Ideal Business Machine
3672 Coral Way, Miami
1206 NE 163rd St., No. Miami Beach
Happy New Year
448-2784
944-3917
Flair of Miami
1051 East 32 St.
Miami
835-2744
Mr. Carmen Beauty Shop
1604 Washington Ave. rr%A r\r\r\r\
Miami Beach 534-2900
Happy New Year
LEE JUBELIRER From
Bellmar Flowers & Gifts
17508 Biscayne Blvd. QAf\ C-170
North Miami Beach 33160 JHU'D I / 0
Wishes Happy Holiday To Friends & Clients
CU Associates Inc.
Electrical Contractors CCA m-,r\n
Miami 551 -4700
Wishes The Entire Jewish Community
Hsppy New Year
Associated Photographer
19SW6thSt. Q
Miami OfO-4774
Happy New Year
Joe's Stone Crabs Restaurant
227 Biscayne St. at Washington
Miami Beach
Holiday Magazine Award Since 1961
Open For Lunch Weekends
673-0365
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Southern Wine & Spirits, Inc.
1600 NW 163 St. eo- AAnA
Miami 0^0"4l #1
A JOYOUS NEW YEAR WALL
Endurance Floor Co.
18460 NE 2 Ave. ft-0 ft-Q-|
Miami O0^-O4o I
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Andalusia Bake Shop
248 Andalusia Ave. MAC oCQfi
Coral Gables 440-0030
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Animal Lovers West
8454 SW 24 Street
Happy New Year To All
233-7141
Mario Chuy Hair Salon
715 NE 167th St. North Miami Beach
651-4061
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Cynthia Apts.
2115 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach
WISH YOU A GOOD YEAR
Juvenile Centers Inc.
2031 NE 163rd St. 18844 So. Dixie Hwy
947-1771 235-6531
No. Miami Beach Miami
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Tropic Spa 'n Pool
6801 SW 81stTerr. ao~ QOQA
South Miami OOl-OtJOO
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Bardi's Shoes
12858 Biscayne Blvd. No. Miami
891-0672
HAPPY NEW YEAR
/. Brown Sales
4380 East 11th Ave. CQC 7COO
Hialeah OOO- lOZZ
Wishes All Their Customers And Friends A Happy New Year
Captain John Callan
Of The "Helen C"
16375 Collins Ave. Miami Beach 947-4081
HAPPY NEW YEAR


Friday, September 25, 1987/The Jewith Floridian Page 184)
Nature's Garden Bakery
600 Collins Ave. Miami Beach 534-1877
Salt & Sugar Free Wheat Free Hi-Fiber
Bread, Rolls & Cake
Elsie Undergarment Co.
8295 W. 20th Ave. Hialeah 822-6981
Isaac & Elsie Silverberg and Family
Wish Friends and Family A Happy New Year
Central Cab
740 Alton Rd. CCCC
Miami Beach DoZ-OODO
Wishing All Friends & Customers
A Happy & Healthy New Year
smArTi parties
HALLMARK CARDS GIFTS STATIONERY PARTY SUPPLIES
411 ARTHUR GODFREY ROAD, MIAMI BEACH 532-8111
Wishing Friends & Customers A Happy New year
Dade Pipe & Plumbing
975 NK ltt3SL CkAto AOA1
No. Miami Beach y49-UoUl
li(l/)/)Y W'll ) ( SOL and ELEANOR ROSENKRANZ
And Family
Wish All Their Friends and Family
A Happy New Year
American Plumbing
And Electrical Supply
1735 Alton Road, Miami Bch. 532-3446
Happy New Year To Our Friends & Customers
Coconut Grove Flower Shop
3137Commodore Plaza iliiefiCCC
Coconut Grove 44b-9b50
We Wish All Our Jewish Friends
A Happy & Healthy New Year

! &Assocates, tnc
Happy New Year
147S0NW77thCt.
Suite 320
Miami Lakes Corporate Centra
Miami Lakes, FL 33016
(305) 364-7800
Reliatex Inc.
2201 NW 72 AVE. ^^^
miami 592-3220
Happy New Year
Frame Factory and Gallery
Do It Yourself or Custom Framing
1405 West 49th St. 558-0412
Happy New Year
The Bresser Cross
Index Directory
853 NE 79 St. Miami
Happy New Year
758-6787
Martha's Flower Shop
3921 Alton Rd. KQQ KKOq
Miami Beach, Fla. 33140 00Om0D6O
Happy New Year
DORWIN'S
1574 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach
532-4061
Happy New Year
Holland Machinery Co., Inc.
Happy New Year
SW57Ave- 885-2575
Atlas Metal Industries
|H35NWl59Dr.
Miami
Wishes All Their Clients & Friends
A Happy & Healthy New Year
A1A Employment
1325 NE1 Ave.
Miami
379-8401
Happy New Year
Joseph Custom Tailor
220 Miracle Mile, Suite 206 A A n 0n*\rt
Coral Gables WO-OOVO
Happy New Year
Wong Shanghai Restaurant
891-4313
Happy New Year
[2420 Biscayne Blvd.
MIAMI
Lear School
11211 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami
893-5351
Happy New Year


f age 14-D The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 25, 1987
the economic yeaR
positive tpenos Ano impROved peRfORnunce
By SIMON GRIVER
The past year has been a
dramatic upturn in Israel's ec-
nomic fortunes. Business is
generally booming despite
political tensions between the
partners in the national unity
government and many op-
timists feel that after nearly
40 years of independence
Israel is finally getting its
economic act together.
Most economists are less
hopeful. They conceded that
inflation has fallen, unemploy-
ment has fallen, exports have
risen, and growth has been
sustained. But they also point
to negative trends like increas-
ed imports and most especially
the continued high level of
public expenditure.
NEVERTHELESS, even
the most cautious and
outspoken critics of the
government's ecnomic policies
are forced to admit that last
year's economic performance
has outstripped all expecta-
tions. Most conspicuously of
all, inflation has dropped
remarkably to just 19 percent
in 1986 and even lower in 1987
from a horrific high of 44 per-
cent in 1984.
One immediate effect of
lower inflation has been the
stabilization of the new shekel.
Unlike its predecessors, the
lira and the (old) shekel, the
new shekel has not become a
national joke. On the contrary,
an average of $100 million per
month has been flooding into
Israel from overseas and con-
verted into shekels as in-
vestors take advantage of the
high interest rates offered by
Israeli banks.
As a result Israel's foreign
currency reserves were
boosted to a record $4.6 bilion.
This has ruined the Bank of
Israel's policy of monetary
restraint as commercial banks
offer both businessmen and
consumers new credit lines.
IN PART, the growth
stimulated by this credit has
helped bring unemployment
down from a peak of 7.9 per-
cent to 5.7 percent in the first
half of 1987 with a further
drop anticipated. Thus, as
much by accident as design,
Israel has belied the supposed-
ly inverted relationshp bet-
ween inflation and unemploy-
ment by decreasing them both.
Uneployment has also been
eased by the country's export
boom. Overseas sales climbed
to a record $6.3 billion in 1986,
13 percent above the 1985
figure. Furthermore, statistics
from the early months of 1987
show an additional 9 percent
increase in exports. Successful
sectors include polished
diamonds, where exports rose
32 percent from $1.26 billion in
1986, and electronics and
metal where exports rose 14
percent from $1.92 in 1985 to
$2.2 billion in 1986.
Tourism, a big foreign
currency-earner, also picked
up. The threat of international
terrorism caused a sharp drop
in the number of visitors to
Israel in 1986 when only 1.2
million people came to the
country. But over 700,000
tourists visited Israel in the
first six months, of 1987. and
the expected 1.5 million
visitors this year will spend
almost $1.5 billion in foreign
currency.
OTHER SECTORS struggl-
ed. Many high-tech concerns
fought to stave off bankruptcy.
Well-known names like Scitex
and Elscint had disastrous
years with Elscint recording a
$120 million loss in 1986, while
Scitex lost $35 million. Some
blamed overseas marketing in-
experience, while others
pointed to a shortage of
domestic capital. The
agricultural sector also faced
increasingly hard times with
bankrupcy staring many
farmers in the face.
Moreover, the balance of
payments gap barely narrow-
ed because increased exports
were almost outweighted by a
rise in imports. The price of oil
rose sharply from $10 a barrel
to around $18. Sales of im-
ported consumer durables
soared with double the number
of new cars being imported,
while micro-wave ovens and
compact discs became the
latest consumer fad.
The government did take
some steps towards putting its
own house in order by cutting
annual public expenditure by 5
percent to $24.5 billion. This
cut was left most keenly in the
health and education sectors
with hospitals, schools and
universities facing crises.
Social and welfare services
were also cut drastically, but
while teaches, students and
nurses could strike to publicize
their plight, the elderly and
sick were less able to articulate
their own cause.
Most economists and
businessmen are demanding
further public expenditure
cuts as well as tax and capital
reforms that will ease the tax
burden. Some socialists are
worried that economic growth
will be achieved at the expense
of the country's
disadvantaged.
However, in the mainstream
of middle and working class
Israel, the year 5747 was
characterized by the prover-
Fate of the Lavi jet-fighter was a major issue
during the outgoing Hebrew year. Some $1.5
billion was spent on its development and was
met with keen resistence by the United States.
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin claimed that
the depicted defense budget could not support
the project.
bial feeling that the average
Israeli "had never had it so
good."
WITH THE political parties
already squaring up for next
year's election campaign, they
might do well to note the
underlying cynicism of the
Israeli public. According to
opinion polls, the Israeli in the
street does not credit either
Labor or Likud with increased
prosperity but rather feels
that economic well being has
been achieved in spite of the
politicians.
agam Off shORe
Continued tram Page 3-D
lives in Israel and works in
Paris. Father of three, mar-
ried to Clila, a Sabra from
Rehovot, Agam has used the
Israeli connection as home
base for his innovative method
of early childhood education.
With the accent on visual
powers, he invented an
alphabet based on images
rather than words.
It remains his dream that
visual art serve as an interna-
tional means of communica-
tion, the key to avoiding war
and conflict. More than 50
schools in Israel have used the
Agam technique since it won
initial approval at the Weiz-
mann Institute in 1982.
AGAMS OWN informal
education in synagogue rather
than secular school made him
first understand the value of
fantasy, imagination, and
other unwritten forms of ex-
pression. Official training later
on at the Bezalel Academy of
Arts and Design in Jerusalem
was supplemented by travel
and observation throughout
Europe.
In 1949, he gave up the
chance for further study at the
Illinois Institute of Technology
for the bohemian life offered in
Paris. Encouraged by the Sur-
realists, he had found a place
where his own distinctive
school could evolve. The family
ties he reestablished in Israel
some seven years later have
helped the artist maintain nor-
malcy amidst the heat of the
public eye.
Still, little of Agarns art
qualifies as middle-of-the-road.
His product is designed to
counteract the limited.
material notion of reality he
disdains in the Biblical Golden
Calf.
TODAY AGAM is still look-
ing for striking ways to ex-
press that timeless, higher uni-
ty which flows throughout his
work. The shipboard medium
is just the latest adventure in
color, shape, and movement.
Now the traveler can dabble
offshore in something more
than bingo, buffets, and black-
jack. It's an excursion that
even the most seasoned sailor
can hardly resist.
Diamonds, Israel's single largest export in-
dustry, whose sales rose 32 percent over the
past year.


Friday, September 25, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-D
m
pOllAP6 APPal fog Un6eRstan6inq in Son's Case
Continued from Page 7-D
otherwise being well treated."
He adds that Pollard has
become something of a celebri-
ty among the fundamentalist
Christians on the staff as well
as among the prisoners. "Most
fundamentalist Christians
have a high regard for Israel
and feel it must succeed, and
they admire Jonathan's efforts
to protect its security."
WHILE JONATHAN and
his parents appreciate the sup-
port they have received on a
quiet basis from Jewish and
non-Jewish Americans who ob-
ject to the severity of his
sentence, they are extremely
bitter over what they feel is a
"betrayal" of Jonathan by the
organized Jewish community
as well as by the governments
of the United States and
Israel.
The Pollards feel that there
must be a change of ad-
ministrations both in
Washington and in Jerusalem
before a reduction of their
son's life sentence will even be
considered. They are extreme-
ly bitter over the harshness of
the sentence, especially when
it is compared to the relatively
light sentences for those con-
victed of selling secrets to the
Soviet Union.
"A spy passed along a
photograph to the Soviets
which helped the Russians
figure out how to defeat our
defenses, and he only got five
years, while Jonathan, who
was passing along information
to a friendly ally; got a life
sentence." said Morris
Pollard.
THE POLLARDS are
especially bitter over Defense
Secretary Caspar W.
Weinberger's statements that
the information passed to the
Israelis by Pollard was ex-
tremely damaging to
American security and that
Pollard should have been ex-
ecuted for his crime.
"In Weinberger's Defense
Dept.. Jay was operating
behind enemy lines,' Morris
Pollard continued. He added
that Pollard had assumed that
Israel was routinely receiving
intelligence information from
the United States similar to
the vast quantity of such infor-
mation which the Israelis were
sharing with the Americans
under terms of the strange
defense accord signed by
President Ronald Reagan and
Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak
Shamir four years ago.
"But Jonathan soon learned
that anti-Israel elements in the
Navy wanted Israel to have
only enough information to
scare the hell out of them,'
while extremely urgent infor-
mation was held back," said
Morris Pollard.
Mollie Pollard pointed out
that the Israelis captured a
!viet-made weapon from the
Syrians during the Lebanon
*ar which the United States
nad never seen before, and im-
mediately turned the weapons
wer to the United States for
analysis,
Ji'^HEN ISRAEL simplv
asked the U.S. to share the in-
formation learned about the
*epon which they had sup-
plied, they were told the infor-
mation was classified and were
turned down," Mollie Pollard
said.
The Pollards added that
after their son became
frustrated in his efforts to
make sure that Israel received
urgent information through
normal channels, he resorted
to passing along the material
covertly.
He accepted money for the
material only at the insistence
of his Israeli contacts, "but his
sole motivation was the securi-
ty of the people of Israel,"
stressed Mollie Pollard.
AMONG THE most impor-
tant items of information
which Pollard passed along to
the Israelis were:
The floor plans of the head-
quarters of the Palestine
Liberation Organization in
Tunis, Tunisia, which aided the
Israelis in the retaliation
against a PLO incident in
Cyprus.
The exact location of
Syrian facilities which are be-
ing used to manufacture
poison gas.
Information on continued
efforts by Iraq to develop an
independent nuclear capability
in the aftermath of Israel's
successful destruction of the
nuclear plant in Baghdad.
"The Israelis were absolute-
ly stunned over the quality as
well as the quantity of infor-
mation which was being held
back by the Defense Dept."
Morris Pollard said, "in an ap-
parent effort to enable the
Arabs to gain the military up-
per hand against Israel."
LOOKING TOWARD the
future, the Pollards have fired
their son's attorney, Richard
Hibey, and have replaced him
with Alan Deshowitz, a highly
respected lawyer and member
of the faculty of the Harvard
Law School.
"When I called Dershowitz,
he said, "What took you so
long?'," Morris Pollard
stated. He added that
Deshowitz's brother, Nathan,
has assumed the role of
Hibey's brother, James, on
behalf of Anne Pollard.
The Pollards were
dissatisfied with Hibey's ef-
forts on their son's behalf, and
were especially shocked when
the attorney, a Lebanese
Christian, told them, in a
private session that he agreed
with the assertions that
"Zionism is a form of racism."
Morris Pollard says he
believed that Dershowitz "will
be as effective on behalf of our
son as Mr. Sullivan was on
behalf of Oliver North during
the recent congressional hear-
ings. We did not feel that
Hibey was providing that kind
of defense. '
THE POLLARDS still do
not condone their son's break-
ing the law to help Israel, but
hope that by telling the story
of what led up to his decisions
that he will no longer be
perceived as a traitor and that
a groundswell will develop
toward a reduction or com-
mutation of his sentence.
"We have received an
avalanche of letters of support
from all over the country,"
said Mollie Pollard. And the
Pollards are encouraged by the
support they have received
from their colleagues at Notre
Dame. They are bitter over the
fact that the Israelis "let him
twist in the wind," and over
the harsh denunciations from
the organized Jewish
community.
"Despite all that has happen-
ed to him, and despite his
regret over breaking the law,
he continues to love Israel and
honestly believes that the in-
formation he shared will save
Jewish lives and help assure
the survival of Israel," noted
Morris Pollard.
"IN TIME," he added, "it
will become clear that our son
is not a traitor and that he
does not deserve to spend the
rest of his life in prison."
A pRayep Of RememBRAnce
foR yom kippuR
By DVORA WAYSMAN
The Day of Atonement is the
most awesome of the Hebrew
calendar. From sunset to
sunset Jews pray and abstain
from food and drink, until the
blast of the shofar, the ram's
horn, announces that the
Scrolls have been shut for
another year. By then it will
have been decided who will live
and who will die, who will wax
rich and who will be poor, who
will rise in the world and who
will be brought low, who will
live in peace and who will not.
There are many impressive
prayers included in the Yom
Kippur ritual, but there is one
that is unique. About half-way
through the Morning Service,
after the Reading of the Law,
you will notice that the
synagogue is suddenly filled to
capacity particularly the
women's gallery, which usual-
ly has vacant seats here and
there during the long day's
ritual.
SUDDENLY, not only is
every seat filled, but people
are standing in every space at
the back and between the
aisles, as with a single thump
on the Bima a voice announces
one word, Yizkor.
THE SOUND of weeping
can be heard from some parts
of the synagogue, and people
rockback and forth intoning
the Yizkor prayer in memory
of close relatives who are no
longer with them. The prayer
book calls this the Memorial of
the Departed, but the literal
translation of Yizkor is "He
shall remember." This special
prayer is said on only three
other occasions during the
year Shemini Atzeret (the
last day of Sukkoth, the last
day of Passover and on
Shavuot."
Excessive mourning is not
part of the Jewish tradition,
which is perhaps why the
Yizkor prayer is said rarely. It
is written in Jeremiah 22:10:
"Weep ye not in excess for the
dead, neither bemoan them."
But on Yom Kipur it is per-
mitted to give vent to one's
true feelings of despair and
loss as one recalls beloved
parents, brothers and sisters,
children, husbands or wives,
who once added a dimension of
joy to our lives but are no
longer with us.
IT IS believed that the
custom of Yizkor dates back to
the Hasmonean wars (165
BCE) when Judah the Mac-
cabee and his men prayed for
the souls of their fallen com-
rades and brought offerings to
the Temple in Jerusalem as
atonement for the sins of the
dead (11 Mace. 22:39-45). To-
day it has become a custom to
donate charity on behalf of lov-
ed onces so that their souls
may enjoy eternal life.
Historically, Yizkor gained in
significance through the
Crusades and severe persecu-
tion that took place in Eastern
Europe during the 17th Cen-
tury when thousands of Jews
died as martyrs. They were all
inscribed in the death rolls
(yizkor-bukh) of their com-
munities and commemorated
in memorial prayers on the
four annual occasions to which
we still adhere today. In time,
the death rolls included not on-
ly the names of martyrs, but
other member of the communi-
ty and the custom of Yizkor
evolved.
The prayer is not only heart-
rending, but serves to remind
us of how short a time we are
on earth. Before we ask for
remembrance of the souls of
loved ones, we recite the
words:
Lord, what is man that thou
regardest him? Or the son of
man, that thou takest ac-
count of him?
Men is like to vanity; hi* days
are as a shadow that passeth
away.
In the morning he bloometh
afresh, in the evening he is
cut down and withereth.
So teach us to number our days
that we may get us a heart of
wisdom ..
i
Prayerbook open at the Yizkor prayer and
ynhrzeit' (memorial) candles to remind us of
clots family members who are no longer with
us.


Page 16-D The Jewiah Floridian/Friday, September 25, 1987
.
in Loving memoRy
Harriet S. Jackman
uMt and (JAas. 8du/a/td QMiMen QlSbm
xtend <&* qii^cs Sfc*
o4 SMapw and cPnospe*ws uAlew 9J>* 9b uW
^aAfaaita giC&nan
.M CMM#* 5Mma| Oletrf. CaWV Sue
and u^ndq ^David rvtend best wtsnes fa*
u^ SWappq and ^Paospewus o\lew 9Jea* 9*0 iAW
jMfc. and l>Ma. Sam SeifAn
kW ^est ^lltsnes 9c*
^ SWappq and 3>*oape*ous lAIcw QJaw 9*0 ^CP
and sons u*dam Scott and 9fo u* SMappq and 'IVspe** cjUa/tc ^can g/teenfce0d, (rPsq. and uWte. g/tcen^efd
^nd Cnifthen 8m a*d ^usttn 9o* ^ 9=*appH and ^*ospe*ous o^icu; QJea* 9o JM
^U/t. and ^Uas. Stephen <^acfeman
Jnd Cnlto**. cH* Q^ ^W<"fe. a*d ^A/endf and Sfcpfatf
*tend <$est ^A/isies xfc*
-^ ^appq and --TVspwws -^lew ^ea* 9o M
Seitlin and Company
Insurance
8125 N.W. 53rd Street, Suite 200, Miami, Fl. 33166
Phone (Dade) 591 -0090 (Broward) 763-6771
!
our smceRe
wishes
fORa
happy new yeaR
VI
re
rrrrr
rr
^j


Full Text
Jewish Floridian Expanded Circulation This Issue
"eJewislfo Floi-idiami
*AX
/ol. 60 No. 39
Miami Friday, September 25,1987
Price $3.00
O
'*. i, i
. vV./v OV.,'
.;.*.; ;.,< v..

987 ^Rosli SMastonaft Q/teetags 5748


Page 20-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. September 18. 1987
Rosh Hashanah Recipes
KASHA VARN1SHKES
AND TOFl
I cup Kasha
.'Ups water
] Tsp. salt
4 Tsp pepper
- Tsp garlic ftmrnm
h Tsp. onion powder
reasoned water to a
boil. Add Kasha, cover with
- 20 minutes over
medium flame.
Now cook separate
1 cup Bowtie noodles
1 cup tofu
5 Tsps margarine or oil
1 medium or.
Magen David
Adorn Honors
Donors Sept 29
More than 100 amouiance
contributors and biood carter
donors will be honorec
American Red Mager. David
for Israel a; a Patrons Lun-
cheon at the Omni Hotel Sen:
The even: is co-chaired oy
Jack Kwartner. Hermia
Reinhard and Seymour
Remhard
An intensive drive for addi-
tional ambulances is erur-er.: ;
underway, according to
Robert >cr.waru. ARMD1
region director Magen David
Adorn currently maintains a
modern ambulance fleet of 643
vehicles in Israel These
vehicles must oe replaced a:
the rate of 80 per year as they
necome obsolete
Saulson
To Speak
(diced and sauted)
Cook and drain Bowties.
r>ine cooked Kasha, cook-
ed noodles, sauted onior. and
diced tofu. Toss with oil.
Serves 4.
BAKED FARFEL AND
MUSHROOMS TOFl
4 or tofu (chopped'
2 Tbsps. oil
1 onion idicedi
4 at. mushrooms
8 oz. uncooked egg barley
2 cups water
ay. salt
Mi Tsp. pepper
'* Tsp. garni powder
* Tsp. onion po
Heat oil and saute onion and
chopped tofu in 2-quan
saucepan When onio:
brown, add mus and
saute one minute Then add in
order: egg baney water,
seasonings. Cook over I m
- for appr: xirr.atel'y 20
minutes. Stir occasionally.
Serves 4.
From: Office Of
Congressman
Dante B. FasceU
(D Fla.)
All young men and
worrit apply to
t-t Military. Naval. Air
e. and Merchant
Marine Academies for the
class entering in mid-1988.
art resides:
South Dade and Monroe
Counties may submit their
applications with their
Congressman. Dante B.
Fascell.
All applicants must sub-
mit the results of either
SAT or the ACT ex-
ams to Fascell prior to
Nov. i. the deadline for
applications.
All interested young
men and women of the
Congressional
District should write to
Congressman Dante B.
Facet 7855 SW 104
Street Suite 220, Miami.
Florida 33156.
Publix
YOUTH DIRECTOR"
... With large metropolitan BBYO
Effective Fall, 1987. Supervision and
work with growing organization. m$vv
equivalent preferred. Excellent benefits
resume and salary requirements to:
E. Reichman JCCA,
2 Millstone Campus,
St. Louis, MO 63146
Or call 314-432-5700, ext. 167
PRESSED FOR TIME?
GOING ON VACATION? TRAPPED AT HOME)
HERE'S YOUR
HELPING HANI
Well do your shopping, run errand*, watch your house, your fa I
your kids If you're lonely, or need non nurang comparinnjhnL
v*rt, read to you. cook a meal Our services are as varied */[
needs, so. make your Me a fettle ^ \ t\ r r\ m .
**" 688-6874
/4 *&c&+ ^Wy -HtuuHi
'Int.
UCEHSED AND |

fc
Turning Point" is the pom:
of focus for the Pom: East
Discussion Group that wil r*
presented by William F.
Sauisoc Wednesday Sept 30.
a: 7:30 p.m m the Clubhouse
of Pom: East at NE 177 Street
and Biacayne Boulevard.
Mr Sauisor.. a faml'y consur-
tant. is widely active u>e
Jewish and secui&r com-
munities of Soutt Florida He
is k vice president of the B
side Memorta. Chapeis an: :n*
director of their public service
Speakers Bureau
Barry U. To Host
Jewish-Christian
Lecture Series
The fourth annua. Smtu
Jew:sh-C* .-: .an Le:
Series a: Barry University wil:
negir. Sunday. Sept 27 it. the
Andreas Building. a: 2 p.rr.
The topic of the first lecture
will be "Reflections on the
Pope's Visit." Co-lectures aafl
be Sister Trmita Flood. 0J\.
farmer president of Barry
University, and W.lliair.
Grabnck. executive director of
the American Jew : s r.
Committee
The
by Edith iacnhfi in
at her patent*, to encourage
between Jews and
The ptabbc
tf*%
IS IT-
Available ai Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Onlv. In Celebration of Breadtest
RAISIN
PUMPERNICKEL
BREAD................. a 99*
Available ai Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakenes Onlv Blueberry or Cheese
Crumb Cakes ...6.or *189
Available ai Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Onlv. Topped with Cream Cheese Icing
Carrot Bar Cake ^ *249
see MaatGszr* dm
Apple
Bran Muffins........ \2*lm
r^*1*"^ *" PuW,x S,or ""d f'esh
Danish Bakeries.
Danish
Apple Strip
Mb
SJ99
R, S 25fll R,?ntt rrv*d Onlv m Daoe
neaeshoppng
sopasosuw,

DANISH


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