The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03057

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
T sJewislhi Floridliajm
.*^Lf/n
Vol. 60-No. 36
Miami Friday, September 4,1987
50 Cents
*
AGAINST MOVIES Thotuandt of ultra-
mwdm Jew reunite at a Pray-In in
!'"' Co prut/ that "the prayers unll rite
j" /""" and influence our mistaken
brothers, s, cular Jews want to see films Fri-
APAVide World Photo
day nigkt but thus is forbidden in Orthodox in-
terpretation. Tension between secular and Or-
thodox is highest since the bus-shelter burnings
of a couple of years ago.
Historic Meeting
Jewish Delegation
Meets With Pope
Joint Communique Page 7-A
NJCRAC Anticipates Encyclical Page 13-A
By EDWIN EYTAN
CASTEL GANDOLFO (JTA) An international
Jewish delegation met Tuesday for over one hour with
Pope John Paul II for what a member of the delegation
described as "a historic meeting which would have been in-
conceivable to previous generations."
The Pontiff and the nine Jewish representatives discuss-
ed all the issues which have been troubling Jewish com-
munities throughout the world, including the Waldheim af-
fair, relations with Israel and recent revisionist trends in
western Europe.
Although the Pope did not respond directly to all the sub-
jects according to one of the participants. Rabbi Marc
Tanenbaum, he "listened carefully and patiently and
responded in general terms."
Pope Approves Three Decisions
The Pope also approved the three decisions reached by
the delegation in its meetings Tuesday morning with
Agostino Cardinal Casaroli and during its negotiations
with high ranking church officials Monday.
The elaboration and the release of a Church declaration
explaining its stand on the Holocaust, its condemnation
of revisionist tendencies and tracing the roots of anti-
Semitism. The Pope praised this decision and said he
hoped it will have important consequences. The Pope
also reminded the delegation that Tuesday. Sept. 1. was
the 48th anniversary of Poland's invasion by Nazi Ger
many: "I know what a tragedy this meant. It is fitting
we meet today."
Providing for a mechanism which would enable the
Catholic Church and the Jewish community to keep in
closer contact so as to prevent such "surprises" as the
Pope's meeting with Austrian President Kurt
Continued on Page 10-A
U.S. Pledges To Help Israel Find Alternative To Lavi
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
[WASHINGTON (JTA) -
[he Reagan Administration
fromised to help Israel find an
IIternative to the development
the Lavi jet fighter -which
Bf Israel Cabinet voted to
Ifcontinue last Sunday as
fell as lessen any economic
[fficulfles caused by the
lension.
"We recognize this was a
very difficult decision for
Israel," State Department
spokespeeson Phyllis Oakley
said of the Cabinet's 12-11
vote. "But we believe it will
best serve Israel's interests."
The Cabinet vote culminated
months of bitter debate and
came under pressure from the
United States, the Israel
Finance and Defense
ministries and many Israeli
military officers. They all
argued that the project was
too costly and would take
money from Israel's other
defense needs.
Oakley noted that the U.S.
"pledged' to Defense Minister
Yitzhak Rabin during his visit
here in Julv that "we would
work closely with Israeli of-
ficials in a number of areas to
maximize the benefits of every
U.S. security assistance dollar
and to help idenitify ways to
ameliorate the dislocation
caused by the decision to ter-
minate the Lavi.
"Our joint efforts will con-
tinue in an established
bilateral framework to assure
the maintenance of Israel's
qualitative edge over its poten-
tial adversaries during the
coming years."
While Rabin indicated dur-
ing his July visit that he no
longr supported the Lavi,
Oakley's remarks were the
first public confirmation by the
Continued on Page 6-A
Temple Beth Am
Rabbi Schoolman To Be Consecrated As Senior Rabbi
UhTlifi1 S feil special day
^upWllfcbe1 With a visit w'th
l00ntKhn,Pauln and nearly
PtofX,\ lne-ArtS' ex"
rMiZ ~ a show|ng that
tramw- drraged as pro-
h Tnd" nTh Cngrega-
Klmanwllh eVemng'
Jewish people,'' said
Schoolman. "Because of the
size of Beth Am, there are
many constituencies. They
need to be served in a
multitude of ways. It is serving
the members that is most im-
portant to me as I begin my
tenure as senior rabbi of the
congregation."
Meeting the Pope on the
same day as the consecration
ceremony is not as in-
congruous as it sounds for
Schoolman. After all,
Schoolman was meeting
Vatican officials in Rome in
1986 arranging details of
the exhibit when he was ask-
ed to become the senior rabbi
of Temple Beth Am.
When the visit of Pope John
Paul II to the United States
materialized and the Pope's
interest in meeting Jewish
leaders became known the
Center for the Fine Arts and
its Vatican exhibit became the
obvious choice for the site.
Also instrumental in arrang-
ing the exhibit was Robert
Frankel. new director of the
center arid Beth Am member.
To Schoolman, it all represents
"the fulfillment of a long-held
dream."
When he assumes the leader-
ship of Beth Am, Schoolman
will be only the second rabbi to
lead the largest synagogue in
the Southeastern United
States. Founded in 1955 by 13
families with Herman
Feldman as its first president,
the congregation first called
itself The South Dade Jewish
Community Center. A number
of temporary facilities housed
the temple activities until
1958. By that time, members
had purchased land on North
Kendall Drive and had built a
Continued on Page 8-A


'age 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 4, 1987
Rabbi Hopes Ceremony
Allays Distress Of
Parents Of Olim
By BEN GALLOB
A Brooklyn, N.Y., rabbi has
devised a ceremony in his
synagogue which he hopes will
help ease the consternation
felt by some parents of im-
migrants to Israel (olim).
The project was described by
Rabbi Abraham Feldbin, a
member of Parents of North
American Israelis (PNAI), in
an article in The Bridge, the
official PNAI publication. He
told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency that he believed the
project was the first under
synagogue auspices.
He said when parents learn
that he and his wife Betty are
planning a visit to Israel, they
ask that he contact their olim
children to try to persuade
them to return to the United
States. The Feldhins
themselves have two married
daughters and seven grand-
children in Israel.
Such appeals conflict with
the Feldbins' deepest values as
Jews and Zionists. They feel
instead that as American
Jewish parents wholly suppor-
tive of their children settled in
Israel "we want to make the
reluctant parents proud and
happy." They also want to
make "the already happy
(American) parents boastful
that they have a piece of
themselves in Israel and part
of its future."
But it is a fact of American
"ionist history and culture
that Jews who pay homage to
+Jeni*i> floridian
Phone: (305) 373-4605
Published weekly every Friday
since 1927 by The Jewish Flori-
dian. Office and Plant 120 N.E
6th St., Miami, Fla. 33132. Phone
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SUBSCRIPTION RATES In ad-
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By Mail $1 45 per copy
the ideal of aliyah may feel dif-
ferently when their children
take that historic step.
Speaking as president of the
Brooklyn chapter of the
Zionist Organization of
America, Feldbin commented
that "as an organization, or as
individuals in our local com-
munities, or even as active
members of a Zionist organiza-
tion, perhaps we cannot do
much to stem the tide of yerida
(emigration from Israel) on the
part of Sabras or those who
have been in Israel since
childhood."
But he added that, except
for PNAI. he felt that too little
was done to prevent the return
of American Jews who went to
live in Israel "with such high
hopes and dreams. We have to
help the parents in every way
we can."
Pondering what his con-
gregation, Shaari Israel, might
do for that goal, he decided
four years ago to honor the
parents of olim during the an-
nual Israel Bond breakfast.
"These parents were urged to
invite other personal guests to
the breakfast, and many did,"
the rabbi explained.
Each set of parents "was
presented with a specially
designed and appropriately
worded framed certificate of
honor," he reported. "They
were suitably praised, several
responded with pride, and the
certificates hang proudly on
walls in most of their homes."
He noted also that he and
Betty shortly thereafter
visited Israel, where he con-
tacted the olim, "arranged a
get-together in Jerusalem, and
presented each one with a
duplicate of the certificates
their parents had received."
He thought few of his
honored congregants had ever
received special recognition
before. He acknowledged that
one such event was unlikely to
have ;i strong impact on
Jewish parents who did not
want their children to settle in
Israel, hut he hoped it carried
a meaningful message
He said he planned another
ceremony when the number of
parents is again sufficient.
William Mandel, an American who
spearheaded a drive In restore the Jewish
Cemetery in Kielce, Poland, stands in front of
BB Canada Urges
Action On
Alleged Nazis
HAMILTON, Ontario -
(JTA) The national officers
of B'nai B'rith Canada (BBC),
meeting here, have passed
three resolutions calling on the
Canadian government to take
immediate action in response
to the revelations of Nazi war
criminals living in Canada as
contained in the Rodal report
released Aug. 6.
The 600-page report
documented among other
things that in 1983 two alleged
Nazi war criminals, one with a
background in the Waffen SS,
were admitted to Canada with
the complicity of a senior
member of the Roval Canadian
Mounted Police (RCMP), who
destroyed vital immigration
documents.
BBC has urged the govern-
ment to commence pro-
ceedings to remove the two
former Nazis, and to take
disciplinary action against
those responsible for their ad-
mission and the disappearance
of the files.
AP/Wide Worl.l Photo
a monument to J,2 Jens massacred .
fellow Poles on July 4, 1946.
U.S. Undersecretary of Health and Human
Services Don N. Newman (left) pauses during
a tour of the Hadassah-Hebrew University
Medical Center in Jerusalem with Dr. Samuel
Penchas. director general of the Hadassah
Medical Organization, to see Israel's only
lithot. ipter in action a device which uses
electrically-generated shock waves to 'smash'
kidney stones.
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Klan Marches
'Invisible Empire' Exploit Davie
Event For Their Own Advantage
Friday. September 4. 1!*87/The Jewish Floridian Page ."{-A
Bj A LISA KVVITNKY
in Staff Writtr
This is another attempt of
the 'Invisible Empire.' the
Knights of the Ku Klux Klan.
to exploit a local event for con-
troversy, to their own advan-
tage." says Arthur
Teitelhaum, regional director
of the Anti-Defamation
League of B*nai B'rith here in
South Florida, in response to
the Klan demonstration in
Davie last Sunday, Aug. 30.
The Klan, which marched on
Davie Road near WAVS-AM
radio, was showing support for
a group of Davie residents who
had held a demonstration one
week earlier. The Davie
residents had been protesting
a Haitian demonstration
against the radio station, held
for political reasons.
White Davie residents
gathered nearby the Klan
demonstration, however, did
not welcome the Klan
demonstration any more than
they had welcomed the Haitian
protest, and have announced
that their objection to the Hai-
tian action was not inspired by
racism.
"The Invisible Empire has
only a handful of members in
South Florida," says
Teitelbaum, '"and this is the
third time in three months that
they have tried to demonstrate
through local
IS. In each ease
nonstrated their
being unable t<>
musti than a corporal's
guard men."
Teitelba im admits that the
actions of the citizens of Davie,
who demonstrated against the
Haitian protest with Con-
federal and placards
with suggesting that
the Haitian- be deported, were
not bla
"Then certainly the
possibility of seeing racism in
the counter-demonstrators'
behavior, but their response t<>
the Klan si ivs the complexity
W 'he situation." states
Teitelhaum.
"The folks of Davie were ob-
viously intolerant of the First
Amendment rights of those
demonstrating the radio sta-
tion, while expressing their
own freedom of speech
through staging their own
counter-demonstration.
"But those who were
demonstrating against the
Haitians obviously did not
want to be portrayed as
gutter-level racists,"
Teitelbaum adds.
The Klan, according to
Teitelbaum, was seeking to
find a platform in order to
garner publicity and new
recruits, but "the citizens of
Davie made it clear that they
view the Klan as
troublemakers and outsiders."
Judy Gilbert, associate direc-
tor of the Community Rela-
tions Committee of the. Jewish
Federation of Greater Miami,
responds to the events in
Davie by saying that "the fact
that the community of Davie
didn't want the Ku Klux Klan
involved was definitely
positive.
"But I wouldn't go so far as
to say that because of one inci-
dent, racial tensions will disap-
pear. It takes understanding.
it takes dialogue, and it takes
the willingness to understand
the differences between
people."
Yet Davie. which has
displayed it- reluctance to ad-
mit the tensions and strife of
outside groups into its com
munity, may have to learn to
deal with such issues.
"Like the rest of South
Florida. Davie is going to
grow, ami as it grows it is go-
ing to become more diverse
ethnically," Gilbert predicts.
"It will have to confront
more problems of various
ethnic groups, and hopefully
tlie community will be able to
resolve them peacefully,
without outside help from
groups like the Ku Klux Klan."
says Gilbert.
The people of Davie should
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be applauded for realizing that
Klan tactics are inappropriate,
according to Mark Freedman.
Southeast Regional Director
of the American Jewish
Congress.
"Davie is a residential,
placid community and they
were probably concerned that
there might be violence at the
radio station (during the Hai-
tian protest). That turned out
not to be the case." says
Freedman, giving a possible
explanation for the counter-
protest held by Davie
residents.
"The situation in Florida is
very fluid. South Florida has
undergone a tremendous
change in the past 20 years in
terms of racial and ethnic com-
position, and building a
cohesive community takes
hard work," Freedman points
out.
But people who point fingers
at South Florida should take a
second look at the strides the
area has made.
"In the past several years,
the intensity level of inter-
^5>
Gralnick
Gilbert
racial and ethnic conflicts has
reduced considerably," Freed-
man contends.
"There have been a number
of writers who have taken it
upon themselves to do some
Florida-bashing recently, and
perhaps it's time for them to
look at their own communities
and not at ours," he
suggests.
Bill Gralnick Southeast
Regional director of the
American Jewish Committee,
says that "the Klan has always
had a historical base in Davie,
and that was an incident that
was made to order for the
Klan, because they're not only
anti-Semitic and anti-black,
they're also anti-immigrant.
"The people of Davie are
Teitelbaum Freedman
threatened by changing
lifestyles, and that is part of
what makes the Klan tick.
Still, it's not significant that
the Ku Klux Klan
demonstrated. What's signifi-
cant is that they had no appeal.
"I don't think the good and
decent people of Davie want
their feelings expressed by the
Klan." Says Gralnick, "You
can be anti-development and
pro-small town and not be a
member of the Klan. You can
be against the Haitian protest
and not resort to axe handles
and sheets and bullhorns to ex-
press yourself."
Which is, it seems, exactly
what the residents of Davie
felt, and what the Ku Klux
Klan may have just learned.
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Page 4-A The Jewish Fk>ridian/Friday, September 4, 1987
, i
Meeting With The Pope;
Much Is At Stake
Much is at stake in the two meetings between
the Pope and Jewish leaders one, earlier this
week, on Tuesday in the Vatican; the second,
late next week, on Sept. 10 and 11 in Miami.
Nothing earth-shattering is likely to occur on
either occasion. One side offers its written
presentation. The second side follows in a
presentation of its own. If anything, the much
smaller meeting in the Vatican suggested the
possibility of a livelier exchange.
Then what is the value of both? The answer is
that one has already occurred, and the second is
yet to occur: that Jewish and Catholic leaders
seemed determined to air their opinions on the
future of the relationship between them.
In itself, this is of profound significance.
Perhaps this spirit began in the agony of the
Nazi era. Perhaps it emerged with greater form
in the crucible of Noutre Aetate. But it occurred
a growing Catholic awareness that some
1,900 years of Christian-Jewish history needed
modification and, indeed, significant change.
It is not likely that we could have foreseen
this, say, 75 years ago. Or even 50 years ago. It
is not that Jews could hardly envision a Catholic
church, given its history, not just willing but
anxious to make things better. It is that Jews,
themselves, turned timid by the rage of their
own history, would have been disinclined to
participate.
The two meetings this and next week show
otherwise. Indeed, the Waldheim affair may
have been a blessing in disguise in that it has
demonstrated just how deeply mortified the
Church was by Jewish anger at the Papal-
Waldheim meeting and how determined it was
that the meeting not deter the future Catholic-
Jewish agenda.
For starters, that is a good thing.
Demjanjuk Trial Gives
Topsy-Turvy View
Mark O'Connor, the defense attorney for John
Demjanjuk in his trial in Jerusalem, whom Dem-
janjuk fired last month for "incompetence,"
from the beginning provided a variety of public
sentiment of the proceeding abroad that sug-
gested a topsy-turvy view of things.
O'Connor came to Israel to defend Demjanjuk
against the charge that he was "Ivan the Terri-
ble" in the Treblinka death camp during the
Nazi era. He had prepared himself for a long
time before, aiming to demonstrate that the
former Ukrainian guard who became an Ohio
automobile worker was himself a victim.
First, Demjanjuk would be presented as a
prisoner of war of the Nazis who did no more for
them during his imprisonment than those
routine duties that POWs were expected to per-
form. Second, O'Connor persisted in his theory,
which he turned into Demjanjuk's ultimate
defense, that his client was a victim of mistaken
identification.
By the time O'Connor got going in Jerusalem,
he had managed to turn the tables on the
Israelis, presenting Israel's legal system as be-
ing incapable of staging a fair trial of Demjan-
juk. If anyone or anything was on trial, it
was not Demjanjuk but the Israeli court itself.
If Demjanjuk fired O'Connor, as he called it,
for "incompetence," the real reason was that
O'Connor's rather theatrical methods were
clearly not working. Too many witnesses iden-
tified Demjanjuk as Ivan. So did documents
from the Soviet Union, which West German ex-
perts declared to be genuine and showing Dem-
janjuk to be exactly what the court said he was.
Still, after O'Connor's departure from the
case, the theatrical flavor, at least from an inter-
national point of view, nevertheless seemed to
linger. Into this atmosphere came wafting an
American expert witness on the genuineness of
documents to dispute the accuracy of testimony
given by two oth< experts German police in-
vestigator Ken irt Altmann and Israeli an-
thropologist Patricia Smith both of whom
howed, by c mbining sections of a disputed
photo of Demjanjuk affixed to his alleged Nazi
vJTA
identity card, was really Demjanjuk as the pro-
secution declared him to be.
American witness Anita Pritchard used
methods which prosecutor Michael Shaked
demonstrated were not scientific and concluded
that she was ignorant of morphology, which
deals with forms, proportions and measurement
of facial features. In fact, Shaked concluded,
Pritchard was little more than a skilled
manipulator of phrenology, which he described
as "judging personality by the contours of the
skull, and the reading of palms."
Pritchard did not react well. Indeed, the next
day, she attempted suicide in Tel Aviv, was
treated for attempting to slash one wrist and
swallowing a large number of aspirins, and an-
nounced that she would leave Israel
immediately.
Whether or not Demjanjuk was wise in
dismissing O'Connor and one brand of
theatricality for witnesses in his behalf like Prit-
chard, who rose to even newer heights of fan-
ciful and dramatic presentation in a court of law.
remains to be seen.
So far, however. Demjanjuk. who insists on his
innocence, has done little to demonstrate that
allegation. Once more he is a victim: this time of
soap opera-type melodrama.
Beneficial Presbyterian Statement On Jews
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
Thanks to the loving concern
of a professor of Old Testa-
ment studies, the Presbyterian
Church (USA) has produced
and adopted a carefully con-
structed and largely beneficial
policy statement on
Presbyterian-Jewish relations.
The document, '' A
Theological Understanding of
the Relationship Between
Christians and Jews," benefit-
ted from the chairmanship of
the Rev. W. Eugene March of
the Louisville Presbyterian
Seminary, a scholar
thoroughly familiar with
Hebrew teachings.
Minor changes were
demanded in large part by a
few Presbyterians who had
labored in Arab lands and by a
few Jews who are now
Presbyterian ministers.
Most strongly opposed was
the Rev. Salom Sahiouny, head
of the National Synod of Syria
and Lebanon, representing
50,000 Presbyterians in Arab
countries. He fought unsuc-
cessfully to have the
3.1-million-member church
ditch the document.
Disturbed by the reference
to Israel as "the Promised
Land for Jews," the Rev. Ben-
jamin Weir, held hostage for
16 months in Lebanon, fought
for more modifications. Weir
recently headed this largest
Presbyterian body in America.
It is worth noting that other
hostages, especially England's
Terry Waite. have blamed
Israel for their plight.
If architects of the state-
ment could have had it their
way, Yom HaShoah (Holocaust
Remembrance Day) would
have been included in the
Presbyterian church calendar.
This proposal raised the
hackles of the Rev. Albert
Isteero, President of the Cairo
Theological Seminary. Embit-
tered, he wanted to have only
European churches wrestle
over that tender idea, asking
why American churches
should participate in the
Holocaust remembrance day.
In addition, he said Israel has
launched current Holocausts.
Among Arab propagandists,
this outrageous accusation
often shares airing with the
canard known as the Zionist-
racism billingsgate.
Quite properly, the
Presbyterian assembly de-
nounced bigotry and prejudice
encountered by Moslems and
Arabs in the United States, a
move consonant with the
Supreme Court's recent action
broadening the scope of
legislation protecting all
minorities.
Varying views were aired in
the meetings on such issues as
whether the finished document
might be considered more
political than theological, the
thorny matter of conversions
and the biblical Promised Land
assurance.
There came forth eventually
a reaffirmation that the God
who addresses both Christians
and Jews is the living and true
God. Jews, the Presbyterians
asserted, are in covenantal
relationship with God. The
Presbyterian churchmen see
"the continuing significance of
the biblical promise of land."
On the endurance of the
Christ-killer accusation, the
Presbyterians have had more
than enough of that indulgence
in scape-goating that helped
launch the Crusades and
spawn the Holocaust. "We
now stand determined," they
averred, "to put an end to the
'teaching of contempt' for the
Jews."
Here is a giant step,
especially when contrasted
with statements on the deicide
issue published by other
denominations.
Robert E. Segal is a former
newspaper editor and dirtetof
of the Jewish community rela-
tions councils of Cinrin'Kil'
and Boston.
Fred K Shochet
Editor and Publisher
Jewish Floridlaja
Suzanne Shochet
Executive Editor
William T Brewer
Director of Operations
Friday, September 4,1987
Volume 60
Joan C. Teglas
Director ot Advertising
10ELUL5747
Number 36


Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Prim*1 Minister Yitzhak Shamir (right) and
his Air Force officer son, Col. Yair Shamir,
during the filming of a new monthly talk show,
'From Generation to Generation: Fathers and
Sons,' which will be screened on Israel Televi-
sion later this year.
Apparent Mercy Killing Of AIDS Patient
Reintroduces Euthanasia Debate
By GIL SEDAN
Recent reports of the ap-
parent mercy killing last year
of an AIDS sufferer has
brought to the fore once again
a persistent moral dilemma
whether it's permissible to end
the suffering of a terminally ill
patient by artificially ending
his or her life.
The patient was killed by his
friends, who put him to sleep
with a large dose of morphine.
following the professional ad-
vice of a physician who was not
present al the time of the
lethal injection.
The affair was first pubiiciz
in a new hook. "The
Eleventh Plague," by
Jerusalem Posl writer Joanna
Yehiel. The doctor who was
mentioned in the book con-
firmed the mere} killing in a
radio interview in which he did
not identify himself.
The doctor recalled that the
patient had asked for the
euthanasia. At first the physi-
cian rejected the idea,
although he had known that
the patient was at a fatal
stage. Later that same night,
the doctor received a
telephone call from the pa-
tient s family, telling him that
the patient insisted on seeing
The patient once again asked
he doctor to kill him. When
H lr foisted in his
efusal, the patient's friends
^a they would do the killing.
^suggested injecting air
'"to the veins, but the doctor
KmT?ded morPhine. The
fomLlef\and wa* lat" i^
SMhe friends that the
Patient had died.
thek^?1JiJshai'chairmanof
Je Israel Medical Association,
hat *" lntfrviewer recently
S^y killing was both a
o mS ,ffense a"d contrary
ggfcal ethics. Once mercy
d o! Permitted fr AIDS
oul5anCer patients- said, it
^spread tosickelderly pa-
PaUems aHdS and mental
^nv'derlr Is how to
minal 12, % who ,s a ter-
* Pal,ent. Perhaps this is
the situation today, and in two
or three days the situation will
change and the treatment will
affect him. To speed up death
just like that? It is dangerous,
forbidden, and does not comp-
ly with the rules of medical
ethics," he explained.
Rabbi Yona Metzger of
North Tel Aviv holds the same
view. He was quoted as saying
that AIDS is a case in point
where mercy killing has no
foundation, because every day
there are reports on new
medication for the illness.
"Judaism absolutely forbids
bringing forward the death of
a person." said Metzger,
"even if he is dying. However,
one can pray for the early-
death of a dying patient."
Israel has seen a number of
mercy killings in the past 25
years. A massive public cam-
paign led in 1964 to the release
of Gisella Kafri, who killed her
deaf-dumb-blind son. In 1975.
Fani Pinsler killed her 13-year-
old son, Avi, who suffered
from epilepsy.
In 1975. Aliza Helman shot
to death her son. Uri, 37. who
suffered from a deadly disease.
Two years ago. Hahman Ariel
killed his retarded son and
daughter-in-law and then com-
mitted suicide.
Some 11 Israelis are
reported to be suffering from
with 33 dying from it. only one
as a result id'a mercy killing.
Giving Drugs On Time
REHOVOT. Israel A
method that may improve
responsiveness of AIDS pa-
tients to azidothvmidine
(AZT), and cancer sufferers to
some forms of chemotherapy
has been suggested by Dr. Zvia
Agur of the Weizmann In-
stitute, an expert in
mathematical biology.
Using computer and
mathematical models that help
place certain biological events
into their proper perspective
(by noting their effects on
other biological activities), Dr.
Agur has hit upon what she
believes is a critical factor in
determining the most ef-
ficacious way to schedule the
administration of these drugs.
Because AZT and some anti-
cancer drugs act by poisoning
cells during their division
periods, they can also kill nor-
mal cells, for example, in the
bone and liver, which, like
diseased cells, also multiply
rapidly. However, the
reproduction-cycle lengths of
AIDS virus and cancer cells
differ from those of normal
cells, and, significantly, the cy-
cle lengths associated with the
diseased cells are more
variable than those of normal
cells. This situation implies
that if high drug doses were
administered in appropriately-
timed pulses, rather than in an
arbitrary or uniform way, the
drug-susceptible life-phase of
the normal cells could be made
to coincide quite closely with
the drug-free intervals,
resulting is less damage to nor-
mal cells.
Today, AZT and anti-cancer
drugs are usually given at ar-
bitrary intervals or kept at
uniformly high levels long
enough to kill every cancer cell
or AIDS virus when it enters
its dividing stage. These
methods can hardly
discriminate between normal
and malignant calls. If in an at-
tempt to reduce damage to
normal cells, the doctor
reduces the drug dose, the
malignant cells may become
drug-resistant. This occurs, ac-
cording to Dr. Agur, when the
environment is rich in the
drug, but not rich enough to
completely obliterate the
malignant population. As a
result, cell mutations that are
drug-resistant proliferate.
Based on Dr. Agur's sug-
gested protocols. Dr. Bilha
Continued on Page 15-A
Shamir To Address
CJF General Assembly
In Miami Beach
To commemorate the upcoming 40th anniversary id'
Israel. Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir will he the
featured speaker at the 56th General Assembly of the
Council of Jewish Federations. Nov. is-22 at the Fon-
tainebleau Hotel in Miami Beach.
The Assembly, the largest annual gathering of North
American Jewish community leaders, is expected to draw
over 3,000 delegates who will participate in more than 300
meetings, including plenaries, business sessions, forums,
symposiums, workshops, seminars, receptions and other
events.
The theme of the Assembly is "Dor L'Dor: From Genera-
tion to Generation Building Community and Continuity
Through People." Shoshana S. Cardin, president of CJF,
will speak on this subject in a Keynote Address delivered
during the opening plenary session on Wednesday evening,
Nov. 18.
Throughout the Assembly, a wide range of other topics of
interest and significance to the global Jewish community
will be explored, including:
Transmitting Jewish Knowledge, Commitment and
Values;
Israel and North America: Sustaining the Partnership
Across the Generations;
Israel as "Strategic Ally": Changing Constellations of
U.S. Support;
Soviet Jewry: Rescuing the Next Generation;
Ethiopian Jewry: Completing the Task;
The Role of Campaign in Reaching the Next
Generation;
Overlooked and Uninvolved Populations: Faculty,
Students, Singles;
Religious Unity and Diversity: A "Trialogue" with Or-
thodox, Conservative and Reform Rabbis;
Are Jewish Adolescents a "Lost" Generation?:
Crowing Instability in the Arab World Consequences
for Israel, the U.S. ami Canada;
Recruiting a New Generation of Professional Leaders.
The Council of Jewish Federations is the national associa-
tion of 200 Jewish Federations, the central community
organizations which serve nearly 800 localities embracing a
Jewish population of more than 5.7 million in the United
States and Canada.
Number Of Young Arabs In
The Administered Areas Are
Adopting Khomeini's Doctrine
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Shef-
fy Gabai, the eminent Arab af-
fairs correspondent of Maariv,
reported that the number of
young Arabs in the ad-
ministered territories who are
adopting Khomeini's doctrine
is growing year to year.
They are organized in cells
throughout the territories and
occasionally try to intimidate
other Moslem believers, Gabai
says, quoting a Moslem cleric
in East Jerusalem following
the recent capture of a ter-
rorist squad that planned to
plant a car-bomb in Jerusalem.
According to the cleric, the
young Khomeini followers in
the territories are heavily
financed by the Iranian leader-
ship, whii i wants to set up a
Khomeinist core in both .'
dan and the territories.
It is known that Hizbullah
leaders in Lebanon have
received permission from Iran
to cooperate with Fatah in
perpetrating terrorist attacks
in Israel and in kidnapping
foreigners under the rubric of
"Al-Jihad Al-Islami for the
Liberation of Palestine."
It was under this name that
two recently apprehended ter-
rorist squads operated in
Israel: the car-bomb squad and
the squad that carried out the
Dung Gate attack late last
year, the Maariv reporter said.
The newly-recruited Kho-
meinists are often past
members of Islamic
movements which operate
freely in the territories and do
not rule out the use of firearms
in the belief that only in this
way can tht .slamie revolution
in the region be fomented.
The majority of the Moslems
in Israel and >he territories
belong t< moderate trends and
reject tht mpts of the Kho-
meinist s i> mpose their will.



Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 4, 1987

U.S. Pledges To Help Israel
Canadian Jewish Congress Director: Find Alternative To Lavi
Most Of All, Cuban Jews Need Rabbis
By BEN KAYFETZ
Contrary to published
reports, the 800 Jews of Cuba
had no difficulty receiving or
distributing Passover supplies
sent from Canada, according
to their community leaders.
They told the visiting Ed-
mond Lipsitz, executive direc-
tor of the Canadian Jewish
Congress in Ontario, that
reports of lateness of delivery
of the food indicated only
scheduling or weather pro-
blems with ships. Indeed,
unleavened bread is the least
of the community's problems.
"I found that everyone who
wanted matzohs was provided
with it," Lipsitz said recently
Ever since the American
boycott of Cuba following the
Castro revolution in 1959,
Cuban Jews have received
religious supplies either from
Mexico, from Lubavitch
emissaries in Brazil or from
Canada.
The Cubans Jews received
this year tons of matzoh,
horseradish, grape juice, meat
and cooking oil. The latter is
welcome because the staple in
Cuba is lard.
"The fact is," said Lipsitz,
"we are sending more matzoh
than they need. The crying
need is kosher meat, either in
frozen or tinned form."
The food donated by CJC is
sold at a synagogue. The resul-
tant income comprises a com
munity welfare fund to assist
needy families and individuals
(who receive Passover supplies
at no cost) and. according to
Lipsitz. "is the main source of
revenue maintaining the
Jewish institutions."
Lipsitz was in Cuba at the
same time as World Jewish
Congress president Edgar
Bronfman and WJC executive
director Israel Singer. They
met with Cuban leader Fidel
Castro and other top leaders.
including the Communist Par-
ty official in charge of religious
affairs. However, no reports of
the meetings have been made
public.
But at a reception held at a
Havana synagogue, Bronfman
discussed his efforts to ease
travel restrictions and visa
regulations for Jews living in
Communist countries.
The Cuban Jewish communi-
ty is markedly smaller than
before the revolution, when it
numbered 10,000, and even
than in 1965. when this
reporter last visited. Then the
community totalled 2,500,
with five synagogues in
Havana.
Three shuls still exist the
Ashkenazi Adath Israel and
Patronato and the Sephardi
Centra Sefaradi although
the latter is only partially func-
tioning, with many members
attending Adath Israel.
Cubans are rationed 1.5
pounds of meat every two
weeks, and Havana's shochet
(kosher butcher). Avraham
Bereznyak, is open alternate
Thursdays. However, at age
80 he is in poor health and is
training a 2(1-year-old
assistant.
With their small congrega-
tions, the synagogues supple-
ment their incomes by renting
space to government agencies
or youth groups. The
Patronato, formerly a well-
appointed synagogue/com-
munity center cum club, has
sold a section of its property to
the government Yet. none of
the congregations can afford
to keep their synagogues in de-
cent repair.
Internal dissension and fac-
tionalism have broken up the
community's former umbrella
organization, the Coordinating
Committee of Jewish
Organizations, which compris-
ed the synagogues, various
mrcm
TM
charities and the Anti-
Tuberculosis Committee. Lip-
sitz encouraged the
synagogues to work more in
unison and sent a plan to that
effect.
The intermarriage rate is
estimated at 70 to 80 percent
of the Jewish community.
There has been no Jewish mar-
riage in 10 years, and bar mitz-
vahs are rare, although one is
expected in less than two
years.
Lipsitz p r a i seil the
Lubavitch emissaries for help-
ing to keep the traditions alive.
They work with mixed families
only when it's the mother
who's Jewish, he added.
The Jewish community
library at the Patronato lends
books in English. Hebrew,
Spanish and Yiddish.
In place of the Albert Eins-
tein secular school of the
19 (id's. Moises A sis. a
beekeeper employed by the
government, teaches six
children. Oeographical disper
sion and a poor mass transit
system make the classes a
logistical headache, however.
But Cuban Jewry leans more
toward the latter years. The
elderly, too, are spread
throughout Havana, and have
no central meeting place
B'nai B'rith has survived the
death of its longtime lodge
leader. Marco Pitchon. who
edited the bulletin, convened
meetings and translated the
ritual into Spanish. The lodge
has 30 nominal members and
up to a dozen who regularly at-
tend the meetings at the
Patronato. Luis Szklarz. who
works in the Oil Price Depart-
ment of the Ministry of
Foreign Trade, is lodge
president.
Cuban Jewish leaders told
Lipsitz that they much ap-
preciated the help of Jill
Elizabeth Sinclair, a Jew who
is Canadian vice consul and Be
cond secretary of the Embassy
in Havana.
Besides numbers and
money, Lipsitz said the com-
munity is lacking a spiritual
focus. "There are. of course,
the obvious material needs
the shortage of kosher meat
and fats, the needs of the very
young and elderly, the
transportation crisis." he
explained.
"But even more vital is the
need for spiritual leadership
and guidance someone who
could provide moral substance
and solid Jewish content that
would bind together this com-
munity so close in distance yet
so far away in our comprehen-
sion and communication."
"OK, so I don't own a diamond necklace and
earrings, but add them anyway...any burglar
with enough chutzpah to break into my apartment
should go crazy looking for the jewels."
PLANNING
ON MOVING
TO ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
Call rr.o. Esther, 635-6554
and let me quote you
rates. Also local moving &
long distance moving
anywhere in the U.S. or
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A.B. VAN LINES INC.
(of Miami)
Continued from Page 1-A
U.S. that inducements had
been offered by the Reagan
Administration.
One incentive was Israeli co-
production of the next genera-
tion of the U.S. F-16 jet, the
Agile Falcon fighter. "The
government of Israel has
several options to explore for
possible co-production with
current F-16 aircraft as an
alternative to the Lavi."
Oakley said. She added that
the U.S. "will be consulting
closely" with Israel on this.
Oakley would not comment
on a letter delivered by U.S.
Ambassador Thomas Picker-
ing to Premier Yitzhak
Shamir. Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres and Rabin
The 10-point letter reported-
ly expressed U.S. approval of
using some of the $1.X bihon in
annual U.S. military
assistance to cover the cost of
cancelling contracts for the
Lavi and agreement to in-
crease to $400 million the
amount of the military aid that
could be converted to Israeli
currency. This means Israel
could use the money to develop
its own weapons rather than
buy American arms.
The Cabinet also agreed to a
proposal from Peres to
allocate $100 million to Israel
Aircraft Industries, which was
to have built the Lavi. to
develop "future technologies"
based on the developments tor
the Lavi for use in an Israeli-
made jet fighter in the 21st
Century, already called the
Lavi 2000.
This is expected to save the
jobs of some 5,000 t<> 6,000
engineers and technicians who
had been working on the Lavi
However thousand- ol
workers are still expected to
be laid off as a result of the
Cabinet decision.
Aircraft Workers Demonstrate
Against Cabinet Decision
By OIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Thousands of disgruntled
workers from Israel Aircraft
Industries carried out their
threats and disrupted traffic in
Tel Aviv and central Israel in
protest against the Cabinet
decision Sunday i" scrap the
Lavi warplane project
The workers forced hun-
dreds of cars to use alternate
routes by blocking off the
Jerusalem-Tel Aviv highway
with burning tires Tourists
missed flights out of the coun-
try because of the traffic jams.
Others marched through the
streets of Tel Aviv to Labor
party headquarters, blocking
traffic on central roads. The
IA1 workers wen- incensed
with Labor Party leader
Shimon Peres who led the op-
position to producing the Lavi.
Police refrained from using
force to disperse the
demonstrators.
An atmosphere of gloom
pervaded at IAI offices at Lod
Airport Monday as Ovadia
Harari, head of the Lavi pro-
ject, announced that he was re-
quested to lay off 3,000
workers with a second round
of 3,000 soon to come. State-
owned IAI is Israel's largest
employer with some 20,000
workers. Harari said the im-
mediate dismissals would in-
clude 1,000 engineers.
"Many asked me what we
should do? I told them: Don't
do anything, iust sit at home
and wait to be fired." Harar
said. Some retorted We
won't wait we shall leave the
country on our own"
The workers warned thej
would continue their protests
A meeting between represei
tatives oi the demonstr
worker- and Premier Y
Shamir during
Shamir promised an effort to
bring the '.-sue to a second
Cabinet vote eased tensions
Minister-Without-Port folio
Moshe Arena, who threatened
to resign over the Cabinet
decision announced he would
delay his resignation until the
prospects for a second vote
were clarified Visrael Kessar
Histadrut Secretary I K
also promised IAI work'
would try to exert his in
fluence to reverse the decision
Peres cautioned against rais-
ing false hopes among the
workers and rejected the od-
tion of a second vote saying it
would bring no change
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin said there was no need
for immediate layoffs and pro
mised to coordinate the
dismissal process with the
Minister of Labor and Welfare
so that many workers will be
absorbed in other industries.
Some 125 smaller plant!
throughout the country will
also feel the effects of the
discontinuation of the Lavi.
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
Telemarketing Solicitors
Housewives, Retirees
Salary & Commission Morning & Afternoon Shifts
Please Call Ms. Teglas For More Information 9-5
373-4605
The Jewish Floridian


Goldfarb Asks Soviet
Consulate For A
Visa To Moscow
Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
B, JUDITH COLP
WASHINGTON OTA) -
, ,. .,,-,. David Goldfarb
and his wife. Cecilia, were lett
ifter visiting the
. nsulate here whether
,11 a temporary
, to MOSCOW I" visit
(jhter. Olga.
,. officials -aid the
irould be considered,
lid have to
m Moscow, the
Goldfarb's son, Alex, told the
graphic Agency
the 15-minute meeting at
which he also was present.
"I don't know what will hap-
pen," Alex said. "The ball is in
their court. We have to sit and
wait." Mt' described the Con-
sulate as "noncommittal, for-
mal and polite."
Alex Goldfarb said they
(stressed to the Soviet Con-
sulate the need for a decision
:o be made on the visa as soon
possible for medical
reasons. Goldfarb suffered a
stroke in June. They were in-
formed that the final decision
for the visa would be made in
Moscow.
Goldfarb, 69, a retired
geneticist, came to the I'.S.
nearly a year ago on hoard the
jet of billionaire industrialist
Armand Hammer in a private
deal worked out with Soviet of-
ficials. A seven-year-refusenik,
Goldfarb did not go through
the normal procedure in which
Soviet emigres must relinquish
their citizenship. Hut as Soviet
citizens they still require per
mission to go in and out of the
Soviet Union.
Goldfarb said in New York
that he was prepared to risk
going to Moscow without the
promise that he would be
allowed to return to the U.S.
But he hopes that Olga and her
family, whose emigration is
pending, will be allowed to join
them in New York.
SEEKS VISA Alex Goldfarb tinge the bell
nt the Soviet consulate in Washington to seek
admission for his wheelchair-bound father
David Goldfarb. The M-year-old amputee.
AP/Wide World Photo
who left the Soviet Union lost year, is re-
questing n temporary risn to see his daughter
in Moscow.
Catholics And Jews
Issue Joint Communique
The two delegations issued a joint communique ;:
reiterating their decisions and expressing the hope for a 8
future better understanding. ::
At a joint press conference. Bishop William Keeler. ::
Bishop of Harrisburg and chairman of the American :
Bishop's Conference for Inter-religious Affairs, said that ::
Jews and Catholics will work together in elaborating and ::
drafting the Vatican document on the Holocaust and the :
roots 01 anti-Semitism. :j:j
Keeler said American Catholics "need such a document
as much as our Jewish brethren." Waxman explained that :;
the Jewish delegation has expressed its shock and outrage 3
over the YValdheim affair and the Vatican expressed its
own reasons for the meeting. ;;
He concluded: "Now that we have all made our position :j:
clear it is time we move forward." 1
Charny Case Highlighted By Mass. Attorney General
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/CXJP HOSTS: THE GALBUT FAMILY
By SUSAN BIRNBAL'M
NEW iDRK (JTA) The
Attorney General of
Massachusetts, .lames Shan-
non, has added his voice to
that of a host of Massachusetts
lawmakers, religious and com-
munal figures in asking the
Soviets to permit the emigra-
tion of cancer patient Ben-
jamin Charny of Moscow.
whose brother Leon lives in
Needham, Mass.
Shannon held a meeting in
his Boston office several days
ago at which he initiated an ef-
fort to make the Charny case a
priority with attorneys general
across the country, according
to the New England regional
office of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, which
has been instrumental in ef-
forts on behalf of Charny.
Shannon said he will urge a
representative group of U.S.
attorneys general who will be
traveling to the Soviet Union
in October to raise the Charny
case in specific, and human
rights in general, with pro-
secutors general there.
Benjamin Charny, an eight-
year refusenik, suffers from
malignant melanoma (skin
cancer), as well as neck and
thyroid tumors which Soviet
oncologists agree cannot be
surgically treated because of
severe heart failure and
chronic hypertension.
Appraisal of his condition by
a Montreal oncologist. Gerald
Batist, who saw Charny last
year in Moscow, has lent
credence to the belief that
Charny could avail himself of
advanced medical techniques
available in the West. The New
England Medical Center in
Boston has had a long-
standing offer to treat Charny
free of charge if only he would
l>e allowed to emigrate.
The 49-year-old mathemati-
cian is unable to work because
of his medical condition and
because of his refusenik
status, accorded him in 1979
by virtue of knowledge of
"state secrets." His published
papers on -mathematical for-
mulas have long been part of
the general international
mathematical literature and
reveal no secrets, says Leon,
34. who emigrated in 1979 just
weeks before his brother's
cancer was diagnosed. Ben-
jamin has been a father figure
to Leon since the early deaths
of their parents.
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Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 4, 1987
Rabbi Schoolman To Be Consecrated
As Senior Rabbi Of Temple Beth Am
Continued from Page 1-A
structure to hold the first ser-
vice. Congregants had renam-
ed the synagogue Temple Beth
Am, which means "House of
the People" in Hebrew.
Rabbi Herbert M. Baumgard
was spiritual leader of Beth
Am from 1959 until two mon-
ths ago. Assisted by a number
of young rabbis, many of
whom went on to serve as
leaders of their own congrega-
tions, Baumgard now holds the
title of Founding Rabbi
Emeritus.
Beth Am is an important
Reform Jewish organization
and supports a wide variety of
programs for members of
every age. The religious school
enrolls 700 students, with hun-
dreds of Bar and Bat Mitzvahs
taking place annually. The con-
firmation class numbers 75 to
100 youngsters each year. The
day school, with classes from
pre-nursery through sixth
grade, was a pioneering effort
in the Reform movement and
is recognized for its outstan-
ding educational contribution
to the community and to
Reform Judaism in the United
States and Canada.
Helping Schoolman meet the
spiritual needs of 1,646
member families are associate
Rabbi Mark Kram and assis-
tant Rabbi Lynn Goldstein.
The new temple administrator,
Joseph Boston, assumed this
position upon the recent retire-
ment of David Stuart, who
served since 1970.
The rabbi's consecration in
the temple sanctuary at 5950
North Kendall Drive has been
arranged by Iris Franco and
Dr. William Silver, co-chairs of
the consecration committee.
Dr. Alfred Gottschalk, presi-
dent of Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Institute of Religion
and professor of Bible and
Jewish thought in Cincinnati,
Ohio, will speak and officiate
as the consecrating
clergyman.
Gottschalk, president of the
Reform institution since 1971,
heads the oldest center of
higher Jewish learning in
America, with branches in
New York, Los Angeles and
Jerusalem. He has introduced
study programs in Jerusalem
for all first-year rabbinic,
social work and cantorial
students. Gottschalk also or-
dained the first woman rabbi
in history and the first Israeli
Reform rabbi in Jerusalem. He
founded the School of Jewish
Communal Service in Los
Angeles and established ties
with the University of
Southern California, New
York University, the Universi-
ty of Pittsburgh and Hebrew
University.
Gottschalk has conferred
with religious leaders of all
denominations and heads of
state. He was invited to deliver
the prayer at the second in-
auguration of President
Reagan.
Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Institute of Religion,
founded in 1950, was formed
from two earlier training in-
stitutions Hebrew Union
College in Cincinnati (started
in 1875 by Rabbi Isaac Mayer
Wise) and Jewish Institute of
Religion of New York (created
in 1922 by Rabbi Stephen
Wise).
Rabbi Herbert Baumgard
and Melvin L. Merians, vice
chair of the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations of New
York, also will participate in
Schoolman's consecration.
Also involved will be Samuel
Steen, past president of Beth
Am and current president of
the Southeast Council of
UAHC and Paul Frank, presi-
dent of the UAHC South
Florida Federation.
Schoolman, a 1963 graduate
of Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Institute of Religion, is
married and has two
daughters.
American Jews Asked To Support
Middle East Peace Process
Jewish layleaders from com-
munities in California, Ohio
and Florida are calling for the
American Jewish community's
support of the Middle East
peace process. Returning from
the first political study mission
conducted by the Friends of
Labor Israel, mission par-
ticipants expressed their
astonishment that American
Jews had not done more to ap-
plaud the dramatic
breakthrough for peace
achieved by Israel's Vice
Prime Minister and Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres.
"We now understand that
our relative silence on this
issue is not only inexplicable, it
is unconscionable," mission
participants stated.
Florida State Senator Gwen
Margolis, co-leader of the FLI
mission, expressed her sur-
prise that the organized
Jewish community had not
done as much to support this
historic peace initiative as had
been done at other times in
response to crises in Israel.
After so many years of
frustration and uncertainty, a
breakthrough has finally been
made. "Should we not," asked
Margolis, "do all in our power
to encourage the government
of Israel, as well as our own, to
take advantage of this historic
moment?" Margolis added
that "this is an unprecedented
opportunity to initiate a pro-
cess which may finally lead to
a secure and durable peace in
the Middle East and it should
not be lost."
State Senator
Gwen Margolis
Declaring that "this is a
critical moment in the Arab-
Israeli conflict," Dr. Jack
Schuster, of the graduate
faculty at Claremont College
in California and as co-leader
of the FLI study mission, con-
cluded that "we must do all
that we can to promote the
peace process." Schuster, who
is serving this year as a
Research Fellow at
Washington, D.C.'s
prestigious Brookings Institu-
tion, also pointed out that "the
thoughtfully crafted proposal
to create a framework, in
which direct bi-lateral negotia-
tions between Israel and Jor-
dan could be conducted, is the
singular instrument available
to Israel which can facilitate
genuine negotiations."
Margolis and Schuster,
representing the consensus of
their delegation, as well as
Truly Burton, said "after hav-
ing spent more than 39 years
waiting for the chance to make
peace with Jordan and to final-
ly move toward a solution of
the Palestinian problem, it
would be a painful mistake for
Israel not to grasp the
moment."
The report of the FLI study
mission has spurred an
organizational initiative to
mobilize FLI's 21,000 nation-
wide membership and com-
munity leaders in an effort to
promote the peace process.
This campaign is being
targeted at the vast majority
of American Jews who share a
vision of an Israel which is
peace seeking and democratic.
American Jewish organiza-
tions and concerned in-
dividuals are being asked to go
on public record in support of
the American government's
effort to bring the parties to
the conflict to the peace talks.
FLI is coordinating its ef-
forts with the popular nation-
wide campaign in Israel to con-
vince the leaders of the right
wing Likud Party to join Labor
in this historic peace initiative.
Friends of Labor Israel is a
new American organization of
political liberal minded in-
dividuals. FLI functions as a
representative voice of
American Jewry within the
Labor Party and community in
Israel as well as a represen
tative voice of the progressive
Israel community in America.
Rabbi Leonard A. Schoolman
| History Of Beth Am
8 1955
I
SPRING
Dwight Eisenhower beginning his third term as president
State of Israel is seven years old.
First meeting of the Founders 13 couples at the home of David and Julia Kal I
Ed Roth elected temporary chairman.
SEPTEMBER
The South Dade Jewish Community ("enter meets in the South Miami Community
Hall to approve the constitution and elect its first officers.
Herman Feldman elected first president
Annual dues are $15
OCTOBER
First Hebrew School classes start in South Miami Baptist Church with 17 children in
attendance.
155 children start Sunday School dases at the University of Miami. Lillian R
Director.
NOVEMBER
Purchase of 7/t acres on North Kendall Drive for Temple site.
1956
FEBRUARY
Vote on joining the Union of American Hebrew Congregations.
Orthodox 0.
Conservative 46.
Reform 54.
MAY
Membership stands at 17(1 families
Groundbreaking for Social Hall.
Kirsi contract with Rabbi Baumgard as a part-time rabbi, sharing the job .
director.
Firsl service held at Sunset Ele nentan School Assembly Hall
Dues rise to $100
SEPTEMBER
Firsl meeting of Sisterhood.
High Holiday services conducted b) Rabbi Baumgard in Beaumont Hall at the
I mvcrsily of Miami.
Herman Feldman elected to second term
1957
MAY
First i mifirmation Class consisting of five young men
Temple choir inauguiated under the direction of Selma Baumgard.
SEPTEMBER
High Holiday services held
Membership reaches 300 families.
I
X
X
f
8
i
<:::
1958
AUGUST 22
First religious service held at the new temple now known as Temple Beth Am (Houl
of the People), constructed by Miller and Solomon.
Eugene Fleischer takes over as president.
SEPTEMBER 14
High Holiday services held with first cantor, Charles Kodner.
1959
FEBRUARY
Gn.undbreak.ng for the Mark A. Light Memorial School Building
JUNE 12
Naw temple building dedicated
First summer camp registration.
AUGUST 28
Indication of Mark Light Memorial School
Inauguration of the first Board of Trustees for Endowment Funds.
SEPTEMBER
Robert Newman elected to serve as president
Hrst classes of religious school in Mark Light Memorial School. Enrollment n-
from 41..to.
Start of Beth Am Nursen Scho .1
Rabbi Baumgard called to pulpit as full time rabbi
1961
FF.UKI Ain IS *
j-.lcanor Rooseveil comes to Beth Am and Inapirci Bt pereanl plrtieipaHon ii
Board approve! plant for expansion
I


Friday, September 4. 1987/The Jewish PJoridian Pa>;e 9-A

mmsmm
1962
:: ijgn* ipproved for new Sanctuar) School buktings and Youth Lounge Awembly ::
. .i;i,.i of Mr and Mr* Josh Segal, graduates from Both Am High 8
She .- notable for having been the rim Bel Mittvah al Beth Am. >:
hip reaches 676 hmOiee. g
1963 I
S :<
I JAM ARY ^
i Groundbreaking i"r the Banetuary. ::::
1964 1
IANI \KY 17
mm iervke in the new sanctuar>
Eiu, Robbini (iral tempk administrator
,1 phaae of Mark Light School and Youth Lounge.
1965
. i Mtitutad.
Cantor Michael Kyrr bo cornea official member of the Beth Am professional itaff.
Tenth anniversary dinner dance is held al the Deauville Hotel.
1966
\ ,1 Keaalar announeaf ihat Irving Jacobaon ii appointed ai new temple
administrator
g) ries continues.
ConBrenation reachea 780 families.

1968
jin
H.'ih \r.. hires n- : '"i Rabbi, A.ihur Steinberg
^l,r, i Rabbi Banmgard wins the Interfaith Ministerial Golf
Tournament
DECEMBER 14
l<, > \.....bratei Iti Bar Mittvah al toe Pour Ambassadors
1969
SEPTEMBER
Lerner appointed new temple administrator.
1970
L.Lk \ IKUM. H II
The Yeshiva University Library has been
awarded a New York State grant of$21,,22b to
help preserve more than 900 rare manuscripts
in the University's collection. Here, Pamela
Weiman of the Library staff measures a text
for a special box. Funds from the state grant
offered under the "Conservation/Preserva-
f .
tion Discretionary Program" will be used
to create the boxes, made of acid-free material
and fitting the specific measurements of each
manuscript. The manuscript collection, which
includes items dating back to the 15th Cen-
tury, is housed in the Rare Book Room of the
University's Gottesman Library.
OCTOBER
Mai M Lerner disappears furda miming,
Lerner spprebended ami Indicted
NOVEMBER
t i -' lart tilaetad as. lesnporary administrator
1971
UPTEMRRR
First 11 utses of the Beth Am Day School.
Rabbi Steinlieru liecomes a Corpus Christian.
Rabin Ban) Altman installed a." assistant raWn
1972
SEPTEMBER
(iuanlian Drive for the teenage building.
1974
SEPTEMBER
Opening of the Herbert Kaumgani Teenage Building.
Beth Am hires its first associate Rabbi for Education Kabbis Fred Davidow and
then Julian Cook serve consecutively.
Rabbi Chefiti begins longest term as assistant rabbi (1974-1979). Establishes
Havurah of South Florida.
Subseq,ientl\ Beth Am is served bv Rabbi Mort Hoffman as Rahbi and Cantor
(1979-1981).
Rabhi Stuart Weinblatl (1980 1982)
Rabin Robert Goldstein (19821984)
Rabbi ,limm> Simon (1984-1987)
1980
Land purchase made for Grave property on the South Side and home property to the
Easl 9 k adjoining the temple.
FEBRUARY
our new Learning (enter
Temple membership peaks at 1780 families.
Daj School population at 610,
1984
NOVEMBER
I the new courtyard and lobby/.ludaica Museum
1986
s
Sard S.-hivolman chosen as associate MCCaaaor rahbi.
1987
<> ship at IBM,
Da> Sch
p ipulama ai 860
ol BH Tim students.
Hiding Rabin Baumgard retires To liecome KaMii Emeritus
olman U-comes senior rabbi.
Rabbi Mark Kram appointed.
Assiauni Rabbi l.ynn Goldstein appointed
'nip adiniiustrator David Stuart retires
'seph Beaton becomes n.-w temple administrator
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 4, 1987
#X*tt$$#8^^
SWSWSWS^^
Member of Knesset Abba Eban (standing),
head of the Knesset Foreign Affairs and
Defense Committee's subcommittee in-
vestigating the Pollard affair, submits his
report at a recent press conference at the
Knesset. With Eban (left to right) are Micha
Harish, David Magen and Ehud Olmert,
fellow-members of the subcommittee.
U.S. Again Demands That Rafael Eitan
Be Dismissed From His Position
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
U.S. has again demanded of
Israel that Rafael Eitan, who
was head of the Scientific-
Liaison Bureau which was
dismantled in the wake of the
Jonathan Pollard spy affair, be
dismissed from his current
position as Board chairman of
Israel Chemicals as a precondi-
tion for any final disposition of
the Pollard case, Maariv
reported.
The paper quoted
authoritative sources in
Jerusalem who are handing
this as saying that Israel re-
jects the U.S. demand. They
add that all the contacts are on
a semi-official basis, so that
theoretically it could even be
maintained that no such de-
mand was ever made.
Formally, the contacts are
continuing between Israeli
lawyers and U.S. prosecution
officials regarding the latter's
request to lift the immunity of
Eitan, Irit Erb and Yosef
Yagur. They received immuni-
ty when they testified before
U.S. committees investigating
the Pollard case. But the
American officials now say the
three did not tell the whok
truth.
Regarding the damand for
Eitan's dismissal. Maariv said
there are officials in Jerusalem
who would consider this, but
only if the U.S. promised that
this would spell the end of the
Pollard affair. However, the
U.S. is continuing to insist that
Israel give it the names of
other Americans who helped it
in the same way Pollard did.
Washington does not believe
Israel's claims that no such
persons exist.
According to reports
reaching the Israeli team
handling the matter, the
Americans believe that even
without Jerusalem's help they
will be able to expose addi-
tional "Pollards."
Maariv said that the subject
is getting top-level treatment
in Jerusalem, with ongoing
matters being handled by a
team consisting of Brig. Gen.
Azriel Nevo, the Prime
Minister's military secretary;
Hanan Baron, former Deputy
Director-General of the
Foreign Ministry; and former
Ambassador to the U.S. Meir
Rosenne.
CharlesR. Allen, Jr., a leading
expert on international ter-
rorism and on Nazi war
criminals living in the United
States, will be the guest speaker
at the Greater Miami Israel
Bond Organization > dinner OH
Thursday, Oct. 28, in celebra-
tion of Israel's J,Oth anninr-
sary. Leland C. "Bud"
Hunter, senior via prwidt m
of the Florida Power and Light
Co.. will be honored at the
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Pope John Paul II
Historic Meeting
Continued from Page 1-A
Waldheim, his invitation to Palestinian Liberation
Organization leader Yasir Arafat and the beatification of
: Edith Stein. This mechanism will also provide for
regular meetings between representatives of the Jewish
community and the Vatican State Secretary.
| Access to the Pope "whenever the need arises" for fur-
: ther frank discussions.
'A Historic And Moving Occasion'
: All the nine Jewish representatives seemed emotionally
: moved as they left the Papal palace. Rabbi Henry Siegman
: of the American Jewish Congress said after the meeting,
5 "it was a historic and moving occasion. It is the first time in
i history that the head of the Catholic Church engaged in a
general conversation with members of the Jewish com-
munity, something which would have been inconceivable to
: earlier generations."
I Rabbi Gilbert Klaperman, president of the Synagogue
j Council of America, said the meeting with the Pope
; "makes new relationships with the Catholics now
i possible."
Tanenbaum, director of International Relations of the
American Jewish Committee and one of the veterans of
: Jewish contacts with the Vatican, said after the meeting,
I that the Pope responded to all the issues raised though not
: always directly and more in a generalized sort of way.
About Israel, the Pope responded, according to Tanen-
baum, "in careful and even circumspect words, he did not
want to go beyond the official Catholic church's known
i position."
Klaperman, who raised the issue once again towards the
: end of the meeting said the Pope, who had visited
: Jerusalem as a Bishop of Cracow some 15 years ago, said
: he "would like to revisit it." The delegation assured him he
: would be warmly welcomed.
The Pope also went out of his way to stress his deep
> understanding of the role Israel played in the con-
I sciousness and sentiments of the Jewish people. Tanen-
baum said the Pope spoke with what seemed like personal
; affection about the Jewish State.
:j Joint Recitation Of A Psalm
The delegation had what some Jewish delegates describ-
: ed as "a strong conversation" on this subject earlier in the
|: day with Casaroli. The nine Jewish representatives and the
:j Pope started their historic meeting by reciting in turn, in
; Hebrew and in Latin, a psalm in front of an open Bible.
Continued on Page 11-A
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United Synagogue Of America Appoints
Region Convention Chairman

Louis Meltzer, president of
the Southeast Region of the
United Synagogue of America,
has announced the appoint-
ment of Marvin J. Fish of Pen-
sacola, to serve as region
chairman for the forthcoming
United Synagogue Biennial
Convention which will take
place Nov. 15-19 at the Con-
cord Hotel in Kiamesha Lake.
NV
The convention, with the
theme. "One Generation Shall
Praise Your Works to
Another.'' from Psalm 145.
will launch the organization's
75th anniversary year, with a
series of special events to
highlight its longevity as the
central body serving the Con
servative congregations of
North America.
Thest now number 860 in
the United States. Canada.
and Mexico, with additional af-
filiate- in the State of Israel
and South America
Dr Ismar Schorsch,
ellor of the Jewish
ilogical Seminary of
America will keynote the eon
vention and Natan Sharan-
ivorld-famous former
Soviet refusenik, and Dr. Ruth
A'estheimer noted psychoses
ual therapist and Holocaust
survivor will be among the
featured speakers.
In celebration of the 75th an-
niversary, a video show will he
presented encompassing 75
years of service to the < lonser
Louis Meltzer
vative movement, and there
will Ik- a gala inaugural ball
and reception to mark the
occasion.
Task Fore sessions will
assess the dilemmas and op
tions for the future of the
movement in the areas of
youth, education, commitment
and observance, social policy.
and outreach to the unaf
filiated ami uninvolved.
Solomon Schechter Awards
will l>e conferred upon those
congregations which have had
outstanding projects in all
categories of synagogue life,
and the 40th anniversary of
the State of Israel will be
marked in special ceremonies.
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including greetings from
Shlomo Hillel. Speaker of the
Knesset.
Seminars will address major
concerns of the Conservative
synagogue today, offering
practical recommendations on
new technology, young leader-
ship development, the future
of the Jewish family, single
parenting, congregational
standards. Jewish substance
abuse, inter and mixed
marriages.
A Torah Institute Weekend
with Seminary Chancellor
Schorsch will precede the con-
vention Roy Clements of
Forest Hills. N.Y., is conven-
tion chairman, and Franklin I >
Kreutzer of Miami is interna-
tional president.
Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
J/VUiniriniVinruVUWWllftiUUUUU U uVUIArUUUUUUUUU'U U U >:;:-:-:-:->:;:-:;:-:-:<-:-:<<-:<-:<-:i:iX-:-:->:i:i*>>:*>K \Historic Meeting I
Continued front Page 10-A
j:j Both Jewish and Catholic spokesmen said this joint %
:j: reading was meant to symbolize their joint heritage. As if I
:j: to further stress the informal nature of the meeting, the
jj: Pope sat apart but on the same level with the other :
| participants.
The long awaited meeting, which many hope will mark a :j:
j:i turning point in the often tortuous relations between Jews
j:; and Roman Catholics, took place in the Pope's summer j-j
jjj residence, a 17th Century palace 20 miles south of Rome. j:j
j-j A Ceremonial Beginning j-j
| < The nine Jewish representatives and six high ranking :
:|: Catholic officials arrived together aboard a cavalcade of -j:
:j: Vatican limousines. The Swiss guards, in their yellow :j:
:j: uniforms with blue and red stripes, raised their lances, a jjj
traditional gesture of welcome, and Vatican officials j-j
: greeted them at the gate. j-j
The delegates were introduced into one of the Pope's j:j
j:j private rooms on the fourth floor of the palace The 15, nine jij
lews and six Catholics, sat in a semi-circle facing a throne 5
:: from which the dais had been removed. Between the two ij:
:j: lay an open Bible on a low table. :j:
:|: Emotion-Laden Atmosphere
The Pope, dressed in his usual white robes and a red :|:
| skullcap, entered the room at exactly VI noon. He moved :|:
ij; slowly along the line of Jewish delegates shaking hands and j-j
j:j greeting each one of them starting with Rabbi Mordecai jij
| Waxman, chairman of the International Jewish Committee ;:
!;i on Interreligious Consultations (IJCIC), who headed the I
I delegation.
The tormal and at times emotion-laden atmosphere was :
;j; broken by Rabin Alexander Schindler, president of the :j:
;:; Union of American Hebrew Congregations As the Pope S
I walked up to him Schindler said "my onh claim to fame S
j:: lasts from your visit to New York (in 1979). I was at Si j-j
jjj Patrick's Cathedral and held up a little boy saying:
I 'Remember for the rest of your life that it was a rabbi who
jjj helped you see the Pope Vatican spokesperson Juaquim jjj
jjj Navarro who was present told reporters that the Pope |
I burst out laughing dispelling the tension in the room. :j:
The conversation took place in English which, some of jj:
:j: the participants said, "is obviously not the Pope's main jjj
jjj language." The Pontiff replied generally to several of the j-j
| delegates but often after a short pause as if trying to better
I formulate his words. To a certain extent this turned the ::'
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 4, 1987
wm News j
lioiiudup
U.S. To Return Envoy To Syria,
But Will Continue Sanctions
WASHINGTON (JTA) The State Department announc-
ed Friday that it will return the United States Ambassador to
Damascus in "response to positive steps" Syria has taken
against terrorism. U.S. envoy William Eagleton was recalled
last October after Syria was implicated in the attempted bomb-
ing of an El Al plane in London in April 1986.
"Our information shows a decrease in levels of Syrian sup-
port for terrorist activities and some other groups," said State
Department spokesperson Phyllis Oakley. "Syria has closed the
Abu Nidal organization offices.'Tn Damascus and expelled all
known Abu Nidal organization personnel." she added. Oakley
said the decision to return Eagleton was not related to the
escape earlier this month of journalist Charles Glass from cap-
tors in Lebanon. "We*ve certainly expressed our appreciation
for the efforts that the Syrians made on behalf of Glass," she ex-
plained. "I don't think we had ever spelled out our problems with
Syria in terms of hostages, it was always in relationship to their
support of terrorism."
Magazine Profits To Finance
Exhibition Of Judaica
PHILADELPHIA (JTA) Profits from the sale of
"Welcome" a new, glossy magazine devoted to next week's
Pope John Paul IPs visit to America will be used to help
finance a traveling exhibition of Judaica from the Vatican
Library, it was announced by Albert Wood, a spokesperson for
the National Committee for the Vatican Judaica Exhibition. A
number of U.S. Catholic charities will also benefit from sales of
the publication. The Vatican Judaica Exhibition contains Jewish
manuscripts produced between the 8th and 18th Centuries. The
works are on loan from the Vatican Library's collection of 800
Judaica manuscripts. A chapter in "Welcome" is devoted to the
exhibition. The Pope is scheduled to bless the exhibition, which is
now showing at the Miami Center for the Fine Arts, in Miami on
Sept. 10.
Gang Of Terrorists Discovered
TEL AVIV (JTA) A gang of West Bank terrorists was
recently discovered before it carried out planned attacks against
Israel. Israel Radio reported that the gang members were from
Tulkarm, Kalkilya, Nablus and Bethlehem, who acted under
orders from Amman.
The gang included a man trained in Afghanistan by Afghan
rebels in the use of remote-controlled explosives, and a 25-year-
old woman who had been instructed to serve as a suicide bomber,
driving an explosive-laden car and detonating it with herself in it
in a crowded Israeli center.
Jewish Journalist Tapped As
Next U.S. Envoy To Austria
WASHINGTON (JTA) Henry Grunwald was a teenager
when he fled his native Vienna in 1940 to escape Nazi occupa-
tion. Twenty-eight years later, he is expected to return to vienna
next year as the next U.S. Ambassador.
Although Grunwald, editor-in-chief of Time magazine, will
not be the first Jewish ambassador to Austria the current am-
bassador Ronald Lauder is also Jewish his background and the
current political situation in Austria makes Grunwald's nomina-
tion particularly significant. Last year the Austrians elected as
President Kurt Waldheim, the former Secretary General of the
United Nations, who has been accused of involvement in
atrocities while serving in the German Army from 1942 to 1945.
Earlier this year the Department of Justice placed Waldheim on
its "Watch List" of undesirable persons which bars him from en-
try into the U.S.
Grunwald, who was scheduled to retire from Time at the end
of the year, reportedly apparently resigned from Time last week.
He could not be reached for comment.
Iranian Embassy In Brazil
Circulating 'Protocols'
NEW YORK (JTA) The Iranian Embassy in Brazil has
been circulating a reprint of the "Protocols of the Elders of
Zion," the notorious anti-Semitic hoax, on paper bearing the
Embassy's imprint, the American Jewish Committee reported
here.
The Committee noted that the distribution of the
"Protocols" has prompted a series of articles in the Sao Paulo
daily, Folha de Sao Paulo, the firsto f which appeared on July 4,
headlined "Iranian Embassy Publishes Anti-Semitic Work in
Brazil." This anti-Jewish Iranian campaign is described in a
report of the AJC's International Relations Department,
prepared by Jacobo Kovadloff, AJC director of South American
Affairs.
The article, the AJC stated, discussed the history of the
"Protocols," from their mid-nineteenth Century origin until the
oresent day, focusing on recent local developments.
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NJCRAC
Anticipates Encyclical
Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
In New York, members of
the National Jewish Communi-
ty Relations Advisory Council
(NJCRAC) will meet Thursday
ggpt 3) to review the Vatican
meeting between Jewish
lers and the Pope,
NJCRAC executive vice chair-
man Albert D. Chernin told
The Jewish Floridian.
Chernin said X.K'RAC's role
js tll formulate advisory
guidelines for the 13 national
nizations and 118 com-
munity agencies that fall
under its umbrella including
the various South Florida
Jewish Federations as well as
the Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith, the American
Jewish Committee and the
American Jewish Congress.
Chernin said several of the
nine Jewish leaders who went
to the Vatican for Tuesday's
meeting with Pope John Paul
II will address the NJCRAC
board.
The board also will discuss
whether NJCRAC chairman
Michael Pelavin will l>e among
the 200 delegates slated to at-
tend a ceremonious meeting
with the Pope in Miami on
Sept. 11. "I anticipate Pelavin
will go to Miami but a final
decision will be made Thurs-
day." Chernin said.
Meanwhile. Rabbi James
Rudin. National Interreligious
Letter to
the Editor
EDITOR:
Judith Coin's recent report
in The Jewish Floridian ap-
pears to be helping Rev. Jesse
Jackson to clean up his act
with the Jewish community
now that he is making a run
for the Democratic nomination
to the presidency.
This is something Jackson
has himself ken trying to do
since 1984, when he really
spoke the truth about his feel-
mgs for Jews. How can we, in
1987, accept Jackson's sudden
sensitivity" so far as Jews
are concerned? A leopard
doesn t change his spots.
Rabbi David Saperstein is
reported as saying that "we
should respond to the fact that
r 'Jackson) is going out on a
b to reach us." Why?
We must not forget that it is
Jackson who chose his rela-
onsh.p with anti-Semite
F^rakha"Wemustnot
Jjget that Farrakhan is a
gcher of the worst kind of
rnn /ar as farrakhan is
!?ed' *" Jackson <*"
J'are ls that Farrakhan ig
Nit2nect0d with his own
fiSLcam?aiKn-Is that a11
iced8,th^'kr,n,publicly
enny PLOk vorst
Arafat u-i ha,rman Yasir
,i \\h> *ould we now
whoTi'^'^of a man
too ., ,u,-i There is just
that T .'" *"***' Pas.
Wk about momt, to
Affairs Director of the
American Jewish Committee,
told the Jewish Floridian the
meeting between Jewish
leaders and the Pope Tuesday
was "very, very positive."
Rudin said he is looking for-
ward to 8 papal encyclical be-
ing issued on the Holocaust
and Jewish relations. An en-
cyclical is the highest teaching
of the Catholic church, and
sUch position statements have
been issued by the Vatican on
areas such as birth control.
Another important outcome
of the meeting, according to
Rudin. is that there should be
closer communications bet-
ween the Jewish community,
both in the United States and
overseas with the Vatican to
help prevent shocks such as
the Pope's recent reception of
accused Nazi war criminal
Kurt Waldheim and the Pope's
1982 meeting with PLO leader
Yassir Arafat.
The process of the Vatican
discussions was itself un-
precedented. Rudin said.
"I know for newspaper peo-
ple the word 'process' isn't
sexy, but these meetings in
Rome and the meetings com-
ing up in Miami are all part of
this ongoing process of how
Catholics and Jews are
building a new culture. So 1
consider this (Rome) meeting
and the meeting in Florida to
l>e significant not just
cosmetic but significant
steps in improving Catholic-
Jewish relations throughout
the world."
Some people probably "got
so swept up with high expecta-
tions. That was never the in-
tention of the meeting and
that's not the intention of the
Miami meeting," Rudin said.
"Changing people's attitudes
of one another is the hardest
job in the world and that's
what we're doing in Catholic-
Jewish relations."
Members of the Jewish Theological Seminary
of America's Chancellor's Council were in-
cited to a recent daylong Retreat at the
Seminary's New York'City Campus. Retreat
Chairman Joyce Arnoff Cohen (right) and
Seminary Vice Chancellor Dr. John Ruskay
(to her immediate left) greet panelists. From
left are Jeff Greenfield, correspondent. ABC
Nightline; John Chancellor, senior correspon-
dent, NBC News; Joseph Berger, religion
reporter, the New York Time's; Dr. John
Ruskay; and Joyce Arnoff Cohen.
Vanunu And Police Struggle At Courthouse Door
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
struggle erupted Monday in
front of Jerusalem District
Court between former nuclear
technician Mordechai Vanunu,
on trial for alleged espionage
and treason, and police escor-
ting him. The tussle arose
when Vanunu tried to remove
the motorcycle helmet which
he has been forced to wear to
keep him from communicating
with the press.
I Ipon entering the court and
upon his departure, Vanunu
tried to take off the helmet to
yell something to the press.
Police guarding him thwarted
him by force, and operated
their sirens to drown out his
voice.
The trial of Vanunu, charged
with leaking detailed plans of
the Dimona nuclear facility to
The Times of London, began
Sunday behind closed doors. It'
convicted, he faces life
imprisonment.
On Sunday, Vanunu was
brought to the courthouse in a
blue police van with the win-
dows painted over to prevent
his being seen or com-
municating with reporters.
The van entered the court
compound Sunday out of sight
of the dozens of journalists
waiting to get a glimpse of the
defendant. On Monday,
however, journalists were able
to get closer to the van.
Vanunu's attorney, Avigdor
Feldman, told the press Sun
day that his first aim would he
to have at least part of the trial
opened to the public. Feldman
contended that the "cir-
cumstances under which
Vanunu was brought to
Israel" negated the ad-
missibility of confessions
which were presented to the
court, as well as the court's
jurisdiction in the case.
Vanunu's confessions were ad-
mitted as evidence on condi-
tion that the court would even-
tually reject Feldman's
argument.
Vanunu's younger brother,
Asher. was not allowed into
the courtroom and stood in the
corridor of the courthouse,
waiting for word of the trial's
proceedings. He said that
although the rest of the family
would not come to the court,
the family stood behind the
defendant.
The first prosecution
witness called to the stand
Sunday was Shimon Savir,
head of the police unit in-
Continued on Page 14-A
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Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. September 4. 1987
chance tor peace, will look to
American history. Fifty-four
.cars a n) the U.S.
acknowledged that no state
has the right to intervene in
the internal or external affairs
of another. And our lone
honored Neutrality Act makes
it a crime to subsidize or
prepare an armed exped
against a nation at peaci
our country.
Nicaraguan Peace Possible
If We Squelch Our Paranoia vanunu And Police struggle
Bv ROBERT E. SEGAL
A Central American nation
slightly smaller and less
populous than Iowa is attrac-
ting the bright glare of the in-
ternational spotlight these
days. That country is
Nicaragua, which with its ris-
ing peace hopes is beginning to
see a softened attitude from
President Reagan. For as the
curtain descends slowly on the
"Irangate" debacle, two well-
reasoned peace plans are
generating optimism.
Reagan, who graciously
acknowledged that he can be
stubborn, has actually revers-
ed course and is touting as his
own peace formula the plan
first advanced by Rep. Jim
Wright (D., Texas), Speaker of
the House. The President also
appears to favor the promising
new Central American com-
pact known as the "Procedure
for the Establishment of a
Strong and Lasting Peace in
Central America."
Granted, several dubious
statesmen are not enthusiastic
about either proposition. But
let us note two significant
points about the plans: First,
although U.S. enthusiasts for
the Contra rebels have warned
that Nicaragua is too close to
Texas for true anti-Communist
comfort, one Texan not wor-
ried about that prospect is
Wright himself.
Second, the plan drawn up
by five concerned Central
American nations near
Nicaraguan battlefields owes
much to the brilliant Costa
Rican President. Oscar Arias
Sanchez. When the plan's
theme was brought to
Washington's attention a few
months ago, it was quickly
jettisoned.
This is not to say that
Nicaragua's Sandinista
government has no respon-
sibilities in bringing about
peace. Surely there must be a
return of press freedom, so
essential to civic health in a
democracy. And with
Nicaragua being 91 percent
Catholic, many people no
doubt miss the now in-
operative Catholic radio sta-
tion which Miguel Cardinal
Olando Bravo is seeking to
have resumed.
Then there is the need to
release scores of political
prisoners. History holds that
no nation as far to the left as
Nicaragua has made such a
turnabout with its political
prisoners, but it's too soon to
bury the hope.
Nicaragua has a high rate of
literacy and a longing for
democratic-style elections. In-
deed, honest and free elections
are vitally needed.
The Nicaraguans have battl-
ed illness, hunger, disease and
homelessness during the years
of upheaval. Their sym-
pathizers have come into the
icaraguan countryside to
help. Any peace plan adopted
must promise humanitarian
aid especially help for
refugees and displaced
persons.
Finally, unless the Contras
are disarmed, there will be no
peace. Nor will the storm clear
if the Soviet Union and Cuba
continue their ventures in the
reirion
Three major shadows BtiU
hang over the peace expects
tions: the determination of the
American right to continue
military aide for the Contras;
the lasting portrayal of
Nicaragua as a major Com-
munist threat despite the con-
tinued private ownership of 60
percent of its businesses; and
pat
Nic
the resolve of Nicaragua and
its neighbors to ensure that
other nations respect their
right "to freely determine,
without outside interference of
any kind, their economic policy
and social model."
On the last point, one hopes
that all Americans, especially
Continued from Page 13-A
vestigating serious crimes.
Savir reportedly testified on
the police interrogation of
Vanunu. The last prosecution
witness completed his
testimony on Monday, and
Vanunu was to begin his own
testimony the next day.
The first stage of the trial is
expected to end this week The
defense will then call in ex-
perts from abroad to testiK on
the general dangers and alleg-
ed illegality of nuclear
weapons.
There were press reports
Monday that Vanunu had been
nominated for the 1988 Nobel
Peace Prize.
those skeptical about the
1
1
1
1
' i
1
1
' i
' i
i
'
'
1
1
1
1
1 i
1
1
'
'

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Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15:A^
Ma Bell In The
'Mama Loschen'
By BEN GALLOB
The "Monticello Mystery,"
which for years baffled the
New York Telephone Co. and
exasperated people by com-
plicating their attempts to
make phone calls, was solved
recently by a combination of
deduction and dialogue.
The unusual development
was reported in a recent issue
of Coalition, the newsletter of
Augdath Israel of America.
The report was amplified by a
spokesman for the utility in
response to inquires by the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency.
The mystery used to emerge
on schedule about an hour
before Friday in the summers
- and last 25 hours. The many
Orthodox Jewish vacationers
in the Monticello, N.Y., area in
the Catskills would remove
their telephone receivers from
the cradle so as not to be
bothered during the Sabbath
bj i'ii- ring.
When thousand s of
telephones are off the hook for
any period of time, all
telephones in a particular area
can be affected. The result was
dial tone delays of several
minutes and a buildup of busy
circuits. For non-Jews and
non-Orthodox Jews in the Cat-
skills, an additional buildup
was annoyance and
frustration.
To deal with the problem, ac-
cording to the Coalition
report, the utility began a
policy of disconnecting from
the network the telephones
taken off the hook.
That action solved one pro-
blem no more five-minute
waits for dial tone service
but created another: angry
customers sans phones strug-
gling to get through to
telephone repair service to
have their service restored.
"It could have built up to a
very antagonistic situation,"
said George Lakestream, at
the time the utility's opera-
tions manager in the Mon-
ticello area.
Instead, utility officials in-
vestigated and learned why so
many telephones were "off-
the-hook" during that par-
ticular around-the-clock
period. The utility stall'
developed a pamphlet il-
lustrating how a telephone
could be disconnected at any
time without causing service
problems: pull the telephone
unit out of its socket.
The staffers found a Yiddish
typesetter in Brooklyn. The
result was 1,000 copies of a
four-page flyer in English and
in Yiddish, providing instruc-
tions on how an observant Jew-
could keep his telephone from
ringing on the Sabbath
without creating troubles for
Ma Bell.
Copies of the flyer were
mailed to the utility's Catskill
mailing list last June.
Repairmen carry copies with
them and hand them out when
needed on trouble-shooting
calls.
Historic Meeting
Jewish Delegation
Meets With Pope
Continued from Page 11-A
'wise free and frank conversation into somewhat of "a
ii "ii the Jewish side ami a monologue on the part of
the Pope," Mime participants Baid.
Miami Meting Looming As A Success
the Pontiff showed, however, a definite understanding
Jewish worries and preoccupations. He indicated that
ntends to use his Miami Sept. 11 meeting with
representatives of the Jewish community for "a substantial
ment and not a formal address," in the words of one of
the participants. Most of the participants were convinced
that the Miami meeting will be a huge success.
Alter the one-hour-and-five-ininute formal meeting, the
delegates and the Pontiff spent another 10 minutes in what
was described as "a friendly exchange." Tanenbaum told
hmi thai Polish friends who remember the Pope from his
j racow days had assured him that John Paul II "was the
I'est Polish bishop with whom the Jews had ever to deal."
The Pope, known for his continued contacts with his native
country, seemed pleased.
Pope Cites Continuing Source Of Hope
The Pope concluded the meeting by citing the Exodus of
the Jews from Egypt as continuing source of hope. He also
"pressed his conviction that "with the Lord's help, evil
can be overcome and even the awesome evil of the Shoah
overcome and somewhat repaired."
Earlier the delegation conferred with Cardinal Casaroli,
"c second highest ranking Vatican official. Tanenbaum
wter said that Casaroli "agreed to meet with us again as
TO opportunities demand to prevent further surprises
w"iai.taking place' such as tne p0Pes meetinS witn
"aldheim, his invitation to Arafat and the canonization of
*u? Stein. Such contacts would prevent Jewish-Catholic
Matrons from being shocked and disturbed. Such consulta-
tions would also help the church understand what is hap-
Pg m the Jewish community."
^ntnliaum added "obviously we shall also have access to
"' ope if and when circumstances warrant it."
-W371 V^'tA
Visitors to the Weatem Wall in Jerusalem
"ill have the Hotel Museum to answer their
quest for information about this sanctified
symbol for World Jewry. Contemporary in 'is
technotopy, the Kotel Museum will provide
audio-visual displays and viewer-operated
Giving Drugs On Time
presentations depicting the Kotel. the Tempi*
mill their history, mid the Jewish pres* nee for
a-, r 3,000 years in Jerusalem. Exterior qfth*
Kotel Museum leas distatoi/ by I la ml Gofili,
exhibit consultant for tad Vashem ami the
Diaspora Museum.
Continued from Page 5-A
Schechter and Prof. Ruth Ar-
non of the Chemical Im-
munology Department at the
Institute have conducted in
vitro experiments with tumor
cells treated with cytosine
arabinoside, a commonly used
anti-cancer drug. The results
support the theoretical model
and are thus very encourag-
ing. Experiments on mice are
also under way. In parallel, Dr.
Agur, Dr. Schechter and Prof.
Arnon are conducting ex-
periments to determine if AZT
is less toxic to the host when
administered at intervals
targeted to kill the AIDS
virus.
The application of
mathematical models to
medicine is not, according to
Dr. Agur, something new.
Mathematicians have for some
time recognized that processes
occurring within the body may
be formally described in equa-
tions, whose results may
become the basis for useful
predictions.
Convinced that traditional
models seldom yielded broad,
clinical applications mainly
because they were overly com-
prehensive and therefore dif-
ficult to analyze and apply. Dr.
Agur has turned to
minimalism. She attempts to
use mathematics to evaluate
the relative importance of
various biological factors in
the system, and to emphasize
only the most important ones.
"Like Japanese sculptures,"
she explains, "minimalistic
models are significant because
of what the designer purposely
omits," with the emphasis on
"purposely."
By continuing to apply logic
and the "formal rules of
mathematics, rather than in-
tuition or persuasion," Dr.
Agur hopes to uncover addi-
tional strategies to reduce the
risks of drug treatment to the
patient.
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5713 N.W. 27th Avenue, Miami
5829 Hallandale Beach Boulevard, Hallandale
A division of the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged at Douglas Gardens


Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. September 4, 1987
Amb. Netanyahu To Address Israel Bonds' Leaders
Israel's Ambassador to the
United Nations, Binyamin
Netanyahu, will address the
1987 North American Israel
Bonds Leadership Conference
in Montreal on Sunday, Sept.
13, at the Queen Elizabeth
Hotel, it has been announced
by David B. Hermelin of
Detroit, international cam-
paign chairman.
Israel Finance Minister
Moshe Nissim will come from
Israel to speak at the con-
ference dinner on Saturday
evening, Sept. 12.
More than 400 Jewish
leaders, representing 56 major
communities in the United
States and Canada, will attend
the four-day conference begin-
ning on Thursday, Sept. 10.
Representing the local Bonds
at the conference will be
Greater Miami Campaign
Chairman M. Ronald Krongold
and his wife, Glenda; Howard
Goldstein, Marcy
Taubenkimel, Ina Felsher and
Judith Bramson of the South
Dade New Leadership Divi-
sion; Larry and Roberta
Gotlieb and Eli and Joanne
Papir of the North Dade-South
Broward New Leadership
Division; and Howard Klein,
executive director of the
Greater Miami office.
High on the conference
agenda will be the finalizing of
plans to help the 1987 cam-
paign exceed the record $603
million in Bond proceeds
mobilized for Israel's economic
development last year.
Other highlights of the con-
ference will include a com-
prehensive, multi-visual an-
nual campaign report by Brig.
Gen. (Res.) Yehudah Halevy,
president of Israel Bonds;
discussions of the organiza-
tion's Israel 40th Anniversary
effort in Jewish communities
and in the business world; and
special panel sessions devoted
to the Synagogue, Women's
and New Leadership Divisions
activities.
Howard Klein
Ronald Krongold
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Senator Lawton Chiles Speaks
Out On Media And Politics
Senator Lawton Chiles
By ALISA KWITNEY
And ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jeunsh Floridian Staff Writers
Extensive media coverage of
events such as the Iran-Contra
Hearings has effected the
nature of politics somewhat,
but there is no cause for con-
cern that the American public
will vote for candidates with
more personality than plat-
form, according to Senator
Lawton Chiles, (D., Fla.), who
met with Jewish Floridian
reporters for an exclusive in-
terview on Wednesday.
"A lot of people are very
frustrated with the soap opera
mentality (of the Iran-Contra
Hearings) but you can't judge
things like that immediately,
in the time frame that they
happen," says Chiles.
"You've got to be able to
stand back and look at many
things in a 10-20 year span.
Give the American people a
longer period of time and
they'll adjust to the media and
make pretty good choices,"
......... ,...,,. 6uuu imuivc.i, i mi ii.--! r ,11 M mi. we nave inuiea
*:<:::::::: x
contends Chiles, who feels that
candidates chosen for their
charm will eventually disillu-
sion their constituents.
"This is a little bit what is
happening with President
Reagan now," says Chiles. "A
lot of people embraced hiin,
because he was a consummat-
speech reader and actor, but
now I think people are
understanding that there's
another side to it. That's the
nice thing about our govern-
ment. It learns from its
mistakes."
Chiles, who is chairman of
both the Senate's Budget
Committee and the Appropria-
tions Subcommittee on Health,
Education and Welfare, is also
on the Democratic Steering
Committee and the
Democratic Leadership Com-
mittee. Not surprisingly, he
has strong words to say about
President Reagan's manage-
ment of the national budget.
"During the Reagan ad-
ministration, we have tripled
our national debt, and yet he's
supposed to be this conser-
vative, fiscal president.
"He never presented a
balanced budget to congress in
the entire time he was in of-
fice, never really addressed
the issue. He always said, 'no
new taxes, yet we've got to
have more money for
defense,' states Chiles.
"He was perfectly willing to
cut social programs, and take
all the money out of there. It
reached a point where Con-
gress said, 'wait a minute, we
don't want that any more,' "
recounts Chiles, who believes
that although the national
budget must be balanced, this
should not be done at the ex-
pense of valuable projects.
Some of those projects have
to do with social programs:
Chiles came to Miami to par-
ticipate in a hearing about the
high school drop-out problem
in Florida, which has the se-
Continued on Page 7-B
Dr. Schorsch:
Jews Today Are Hungry For Yiddishkeit
Bj ELLEN ANN STEIN
in Staff WriU r
There is a lot of spiritual
leprivati in among today's
foung Jews and they are less
rebellious and more hungry for
ludaica. They are searching,
i this search lias resulted in
Be highest enrollment ever in
Ihe 101-year-old Jewish
Nieological Seminary of
America, said the institution's
lancellor Dr. Ismar
pchorsch.
Schorsch, a renowned
Scholar and Jewish historian,
pas m South Florida Tuesday
> welcome the opening of the
Seminary's new headquarters
Hollywood, which will func-
1,1,1 M the southeast region
undraising headquarters and
M a source for arranging
Jewish scholars to speak at
ft synagogue!.
The Seminary is the only
American school which ordains
>'is and cantors in the Con-
N'rvatiu- movement. The
peminary, based in New York,
m played a vital role in
wilding Judaic studies in
America. But the growth in
P* field has only reinforced
P* mission of the Seminary,
'hnrsch told The Jewish
nondian in an exclusive
interview.
'"Many of the students stu-
ffing m our summer program
PJ not our own students. That
true for graduate students
JJ rabbinical students," he
fctoifc* of our graduate
lf,intS,,are comi"g today
fc^T8 whe'e they
"Severed Judaica at the cof-
fer?il?Vel- More yu"8 People
|Ba JrtSted in Juda&nTTne
Ivant T,shVv? (return to obser-
Iwhlh udaism) movement
withVendsLt0 ** identified
l^a m, eu.rthodox immunity
l's a much larger phenomenon
We are the beneficiaries of the
same search for religious
meaning."
Schorsch. 51, is a second
generation Conservative Jew.
His father was a Conservative
rabbi. Born in (Jermany, his
family came to the United
States shortly after
Kristellnacht and alter his
father spent three weeks in
Buchenwald concentration
camp. Similarly, most of the
faculty at the Seminary today
are American-born and, as
Schorsch said, Conservative-
bred.
"So there is less of a cultural
gap between students and
faculty. That is a dramatic
change," Schorsch noted.
"The students that we have
today are different than the
students of 30, 40 years ago.
They tend to come from the
left and not the right. Thirty
years ago we were getting at-
trition from the Orthodox.
Now they are coming from the
Reform movement, the secular
community. They are in search
of more Yiddishkeit. Thirty or
40 years ago they were in
rebellion against an Old World
Orthodoxy that was alien to
American society.
"In many ways, our students
are less hostile, less rebellious.
It's a much more inviting stu-
dent body to teach because
they're more hungry. They
have fewer hangups."
Back about 40 years ago,
Mordechai Kaplan, the father
of the Reconstructionist move-
ment, was the dominant
theological figure at the
Seminary and attracted the
loyalty of more students
perhaps than any other faculty
member because his position
was so thoroughly anti-
Orthodox. Today, Schorsch
said, "Kaplan's theory at the
Seminary is utterly passe."
And the students, he said, do
not have to be taught what Or-
thodoxy isn't. They have to be
guided into what Judaism is.
In other ways, teaching in
the Seminary has not changed
from 30 years ago.
"We, in the Rabbinic school,
continue to devote 60 to 70
percent of the time devoted to
Rabbinic studies, but these
texts are studied from the
perspective of modern scholar-
ship," Schorsch said. "It is to
be distinguished from Reform,
where they don't spend much
time studying rabbinic texts,
and from Orthodoxy, where
they totally reject modern
scholarship."
The historic function of Con-
servative Judaism, according
to Schorsch, is to weld the
American Jewry into a single
community.
"American Jewry is
threatened by polarization and
bifurcation, which is much
more advanced in Israel. What
I think the times call for is a
reinforcement of a vital center
that will bridge the extremes,
that will serve to restrain the
extremes that will provide a
viable option for the large ma-
jority of Jews."
There is an extraordinary
amount of consistency in the
history of Conservatism com-
pared to Reform, which is
marked by a lot of "flip-flops."
Schorsch said, citing as an ex-
ample, the Reform move-
ment's position on Israel.
"Conservatism has always
been strongly identified with
Zionism, it has always had a
strong commitment to the
Hebrew language, it's always
had a deep commitment to the
study of Talmud and the
development of Halacha. You
Continued on Page 10-H
Chancellor Dr. Ismar Schorsch
Ouif
Community
Friday, September 4,1987 The Jewish Floridian Section B


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 4, 1987
American Jewish Committee
To Honor Tibor Hollo
Tibor Hollo, the founder,
president and chairman of the
board of Florida East Coast
Properties, Inc., will be
honored by the Institute of
Human Relations of the
American Jewish Committee,
at a private award dinner on
Sept. 17 at the Eden Roc
Hotel, Miami Beach.
Hollo will be presented with
the 1987 Institute of Human
Relations Award for "the
breadth and depth of his com-
mitment to the highest prin-
ciples of humanitarianism,"
according to dinner chairman
Abel Holtz, president of
Capital Bank.
Born in Budapest, Hungary,
Hollo emigrated to this coun-
try in 1948, where his first job
was with a New York con-
struction company.
"The United States is very
important to me, and I con-
sider civic work to be my duty
as much as a privilege," he
said.
Hollo, a champion of mid-
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eJewiah Floridian
PO. Box 012973, Miami, Fla 33101
Tibor Hollo
town city development,
focuses his creative efforts on
the quality of life in Miami.
His longstanding commit-
ment to the city extends to
civic, religious, cultural and
educational organizations. He
is a member of the Society of
Founders of the University of
Miami, and a trustee of Barry
University. He serves as a
director of The City of Hope
and of Temple Emanu-El, and
is a member of the Sunflower
Society, an organization
dedicated to helping retarded
children.
He formerly served on Gov.
Reuben Askew's Florida Task
Force on Housing and Com-
munity Affairs, and on the
Downtown Miami Advisory
Committee, and the city's com-
mittee on Ecology and
Beautifi cation.
Among Florida East Coast
Properties' several prominent
developments are the Biscayne
Bay Marriott Hotel and the ad-
joining Venetia Town
Residences, Plaza Venetia,
Rivergate Plaza and the U.S.
Justice Department building in
downtown Miami.
Senator Margolis
Appointed To
Select Committee
Senate President John Vogt
has appointed Senator Gwen
Margolis (D-North Miami
Beach) as Chairman to the
Select Committee On Local
Government Infrastructure
Funding and Impact Fees.
Senator Tom Brown (D-Port
Orange) will serve as Vice-
Chairman. Also selected to
this committee were Senator
George Stuart, Senator Bob
Johnson, and Senator John
Grant.
The committee's respon-
sibilities will be to identify
state and local sources of fun-
ding to meet the infrastruc-
ture requirements so that
state and local comprehensive
planning and land develop-
ment regulation laws can be
fully carried out.
The committee will also ex-
amine the appropriate role of
impact fees in relation to
growth management and the
funding of infrastructure and
recommend appropriate
legislative action. Senator
Margolis stated "how timely it
is to have this review since
Dade County is considering an
impact fee.
Rep. Dante B. Fascell
NCJW Award To
Rep. Fascell
The 17th Annual Child Care
luncheon of the Greater Miami
Section, National Council of
Jewish Women, will take place
on Wednesday, Dec. 2, at the
Doral Beach Hotel at 11:30
a.m.
The highlight of the day will
be the awarding of the Hannah
G. Solomon Award to the Hon.
Dante B. Fascell for his
outstanding achievements as a
United States Congressman.
Mrs. Solomon was the founder
of the National Council of
Jewish Women.
After Mr. Fascell's accep-
tance there will be an enter-
taining program, many
valuable prizes, a beautiful
souvenir ad journal, all in addi-
tion to a special menu for the
luncheon.
Myra Farr, Norma Jean
Ober and Joan Glickstein are
co-chairwomen of the event. A
large, energetic committee has
been working all summer on
the resplendent floral center-
pieces, prizes and a myriad of
details to provide a memorable
day.
Carol Grunberg, President
of Greater Miami Section, an-
nounces that the theme of the
luncheon is "Today's Children
Tomorrow's World."
The luncheon is open to the
public. For further informa-
tion please call the NCJW of-
fice, 576-4747.
Kislak Family
Donates $500,000
The Senior Adult Vacation
Center, a unit of New Jersey
YM-YWHA Camps, has
received a gift of $500,000
from the family of the late
Julius I. and Sophie Kislak.
The statewide service will be
named the Kislak Senior Adult
Vacation Center.
The four members of the
Kislak family are active in
their respective communities
including Jay Kislak, who
heads the J.I. Kislak Mortgage
Company in Miami. He is
chairman of the Investment
Committee of the Miami
Federations Foundation. He is
a member of the Board of
Governors of Hebrew Union
College and on the Library
Committee of University of
Miami.
FOR RENT
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Carl D. Appelbaum. son of Richard A. Appelbaum. Miami, has
completed training in fundamental military skills at the Armv
ROTC Camp Challenge at Fori Knox. Ky Appelbaum is ,i student
at New Mexico Military Institute. Roswell.
The Suburban League for the Diabetes Research Institute at the
University of Miami School of Medicine will hold their annual
New Member Luncheon on Tuesday. Sept. 29 at Valenti s on
Sunset Drive in Miami Last month Suburban League held their
annual membership orientaton and recruited 19 new members br-
inging their total to over 125 members.
The Seventh Annual South Florida Regional Home Show will
be held at Miami Beach Convention Center Sept IN through
Sept 27. The show will be open daily from 6 p.m to 1(1 30 p m
and from noon to 10:30 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays It will
be closed for two days Sept 23-24 in observance of the Jewish
holidays.
The Northeast Branch Library located at 29,30 Aventura ftlvd
in North Dade County will present the film classic Rebecca on
Saturday, at 2 p m There is no charge for this event and informa-
tion can be obtained by calling the library
The Adlai Stevenson Democratic Women's Club will hold their
next board meeting on Thursday. Sept 10. at 10 30 a m at the
Surtside Community Center Regular meeting will follow at II
a.m. Rep Mike Friedman will speak on "Legislative I udate and
Malpractice Insurance, and How it Effects You "
The Dade Hroward Lupus Foundation's regular monthh
meeting at Parkway Regional Medical Center, will be held on
Wednesday Sept 10 at 8 p.m. Featured speakers Atly Donald
Slesnick of Miami and Susan Rachleff of the Dade Underwriters
Insurance Agency will discuss the topic "How To Secure Fmploy-
ment and/or Health Insurance For People With Lupus." The
meeting is open to the public
Jewish Floridian salute
to our centenarians
The following individual is already 100 years old or
will be 100 by Dec. 31. 1987:
NAMK
BIRTHDATE:.................
PRESENT ADDRESS:
APT:................CITY:..... CITY OF BIRTH: ....... ............ STATE
STATE:................ ZIP: .. COUNTRY
-----... _.
SUGGESTED BY:
ADDRESS:...........
CITY:...............
PHONE:........
Enclose a photograph of the centenarian if possible
and mail to 100 YEARS YOUNG. The Jewish Floridian.
P.O. Box 012973. Miami. Fla. 33101.
tti!ATd9d WiDE Jewish
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Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Congregation Shaare Tefilah Of Kendall Dedication Sept. 6th
Congregation Shaare
Tefilah of Kendall will hold, the
dedication ceremonies of their
now building on Sunday, Sept.
,; i p.m., when a Torah pro-
eession beginning at SW 120th
Street on LSI will parade to
the new location of Kendall's
0nly Orthodox synagogue.
The board of the congrega-
tion had been searching for a
location for the past few years,
during which time the
synagogue's services were
held at the facility of Samu-El
on Shabbat and at the Golds-
tein Hebrew Academy of
South Dade on weekdays.
The new location of the
synagogue will be celebrated
with a chupah ceremony,
Klezmer music, and
refreshments, as well as by a
special visit from New York by
Rabbi Henoch Leibowitz, dean
of the Rabbinical Seminary of
America and rabbi-teacher of
Congregation Shaare Tefilah's
spiritual leader, Rabbi Hershel
D. Becker.
Rabbi Becker, musmach of
Rabbinical Seminary of
America and Yeshivas Chafetz
Chaim in Queens, N.Y., ac-
cepted his present pulpit one
year ago. Previously, he was
assistant rabbi at Congrega-
tion Ahavas Achim in Queens
and lectured for a few years at
Queens Torah Seminary. He
also has been involved in
various forms of adult educa-
tion in New York and Los
Angeles.
Congregation Shaare Tefilah
will also be given a new name,
Shaare Tefilah-Torah Center
of Kendall, on Sunday, as the
synagogue plans to serve as a
place of study for Jews of all
backgrounds.
Raul Moscowitz is president
of the synagogue. Vice
presidents are Dr. Edward
Bloch and Larry Sherry and
administrative vice president
is Michael Zimmerman.
Rabbi Hershel D. Becker
Property Tax Appeals
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office buildings, restaurants, warehouses,
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hourly basis.
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New home of Congregation Tefilah of Kendall
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Auschwitz Exhibit Of Artifacts
On Display At Main Library
"Auschwitz, A Crime
Against Mankind," an exhibit
of Holocaust artifacts,
documents and photographs,
will be on display at the Main
Library, Metro-Dade Cultural
< 'ciiter, from November 12-29.
Sponsored locally by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, the exhibit has been made
available for a two-year na-
tional tour by the United
Jewish Appeal, which
negotiated with the Polish
government.
David Schaecter, himself an
Auschwitz survivor as well as
the chairman of the Federa-
tion committee responsible for
bringing the exhibition to
Miami, has expressed the hope
that Miamians from l>oth the
Jewish and non-Jewish com-
munities, children as well as
adults, will take advantage of
the opportunity to educate
themselves about this in-
famous Polish death camp.
Volunteers are needed to act
as tour guides while the ex-
hibit is in Miami. More infor-
mation is available through the
Greater Miami Jewish
Federation.
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation is planning to
celebrate its 50th anniversary
with a series of special events
beginning in October with the
Mission of a Lifetime.
The mission, slated for Oct.
11-21, will include approx-
imately 150 Dade County
Jewish residents, including
past Federation presidents,
campaign chairmen, founders,
and their families, who will
travel to Israel to learn more
about the country's historical
past and the behind the scenes
reality of her political present.
Over 3,500 Jewish leaders
from across the nation will
converge on Miami for the
council of the Jewish Federa-
tion's 56th annual General
Assembly, from Nov. 18-22.
The gathering, which will be
based in Miami Beach's
Fontainbleau-Hilton Hotel,
will feature Israeli Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir as
keynote speaker.
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation will play host to
the delegates.
Davida and Harry A. "Hap"
Levy are overall chairmen of
the 50th anniversary celebra-
tion. "Mission of a Lifetime"
chairmen are Marvis and
David Schaecter. and honorary
Mission chairmen are Martha
and Stanley G. Myers.
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Sabbath Morning Service
9 a.m.
We Welcome Our Rabbi
Back From Israel
Dr. Irving Lehrman
will preach
at 10:30 A.M.
99
"Israel Lights and Shadows
CANTOR YEHUDA SHIFMAN WILL CHANT


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 4, 1987
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Jews, Catholics, And Protestants Tie A Ribbon To
Each Other To Show Unity At Barry U.
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
The age of Aquarius dawned
at least for two hours Sun-
day night at Barry University,
where harmony and
understanding, peace and uni-
ty in Dade County were
enacted through psalms, song,
prayer and dance.
More than 1,000 members of
the Greater Miami area par-
ticipated in the multi-media
event, "South Florida Unites:
One Peace at a Time."
The event, which drew a
handful of Jewish community
leaders, was filled with sym-
bolism in an appeal for the
various segments of this diver-
sified community to unite in
anticipation of the Sept. 10-11
visit of Pope John Paul II.
Each chair in the Broad
auditorium had a one-yard
piece of white ribbon behind it.
Special guests began by tieing
their ribbons with one another
Jew to Catholic, Catholic to
Protestant, politician to a food
bank director, rabbi to ar-
chbishop and Puerto Rican to
Cuban. Then, every member in
the audience turned to their
neighbor and tied the ribbon
until the result was a
1,000-yard-long ribbon united
piece by piece, or, one "peace
at a time."
At least one meml>er of the
Jewish delegation said he
wished more Jews had been
able to witness the ceremony.
"I think at best, the Jewish
community is ambivalent
about the visit (by the Pope)
because of Waldheim and
Arafat and the refusal of the
Vatican to recognize Israel."
said Rabbi Gary Glickstein,
spiritual leader of the Reform
congregation, Temple Beth
ShoTom. Glickstein was referr-
ing to the Pope's reception of
alleged Nazi war criminal Kurt
Waldheim, Austria's president
and of PLO leader Yassir
Arafat.
But Glickstein, after the
ceremony was over, said, "I
think it's our loss," referring
to the small number of Jews.
"The spirit that (Barry Presi-
dent) Sister Jeanne
O'Laughlin and Barry pro-
motes in both the Jewish-
Catholic community and
Catholic and other com-
munities the spirit is so con-
tagious. It can't fail to excite
you. There may be some
Catholics who have a hidden
agenda. But not this group."
Glickstein said Sister Jeanne
has been invited to speak at
Temple Beth Sholom the night
of the papal visit.
Rabbi Irving Lehrman, who
had tied his ribbon with Miami
Archbishop Edward McCar-
thy, called the event, "a very
uplifting evening," and, he
said, "the message is peace
and therefore so meaningful
today."
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Guests were invited to sign a
large display as they entered
the auditorium that contained
a pledge, which the guests
were later asked to recite: "I
work to create peace within
myself, my family and my city.
I seek to forgive those in the
Sister .li-tiniw O'LdiKjhlin. mid Dr. Irving Lehrman
Rabbi Gary Glickstein and Bishop Cod
inn srtmhiii
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community who have offended
me and I ask forgiveness of
those whom I have offended. I
believe that South Florida is
more at peace because of my
efforts."
The event also included
representatives of the Mic-
COStlkee Tribe of Indians. B'hai
Faith, Bahama Agency. Miami
Archdiocese, the Dade State
Attorney's Office, the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, the
Polish American Club of
Miami and the United Protes-
tant Appeal.
A special theme song was
written for the ceremony by
Barry music major Ann Marie
DiNoniH) and was recorded at
Criteria Studios in North
Miami.
The theme was created in
the spirit of the popular "We
Are the World" Bong. Its
refrain went: "One peace at,
time. It can be done LiS
sections of a puzzle, united 0^
by one. One peace at a time
we will be the light. Fire a
die for the world, and keep^t
burning through the night %
can do it, one peace at a time."
The religious and community
leaders were asked to speak a
few words of inspiration and
their prayers ranged from the
hope that the world will unite
in peace under one God. to a
plea for an end to poverty and
greed.
The ceremony (-(included
with the auditorium emptying
out in a line, each person
grasping a piece of the white
ribbon. Outside, in the Univer-
sity courtyard, each person fit
a candle and Sister Jeanne
lighted an eternal flame of
peace. Then fireworks explod-
ed in the night air.
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Artist, Sculptor To Dedicate Sculpture
At University Of Central Flo.
Artist-Sculptor
Leonard Nierman
Artist/sculptor Leonardo
Nierman, will dedicate "Flame
of Hope," a 9'/2-foot bronze
sculpture at the University of
Central Florida on Sept. 9.
The Jewish artist was born
in Mexico City and developed a
passion for classical violin,
switching to painting and
sculpture some 30 years ago.
His works are mainstays of
Jewish museums, including ex-
hibits at New York's Jewish
Museum, Chicago's Spertos
and San Francisco's Magnes
Museum. The American
Jewish Committee commis-
sioned a Nierman lithograph.
His works are also on display
Nierman Sculpture 'Flame of Hope', University of Central
Florida
at Haifa and Jerusalem Shaare Zedek Medical Center
museums and his 33-foot in Jerusalem,
stainless steel sculpture is the Nierman current|y ,ives in a
centerpiece at the Plaza of vi,,a in San Angel
Dr. Irving Lehrman To
Report On Trip To Israel
Dr. Irving Lehrman will
a five-week mission
to Israel Saturday at 10:30
luring the Sabbath morn-
hich begins at 9
I le Emanu-EI of
Lehrman's Bermon,
el Lights and
will feature his
of the Jewish
iring a July and
p to Israel on which
he was accompanied by Mrs.
Lehrman. The rabbi has
visited Israel more than 50
times, including at least one
trip ,ach year since the state
was founded in 1948.
He made an in-depth inspec-
tion of the Alexander Muss
High School in Israel, named
after the late vice president of
Temple Emanu-EI and
dedicated by his son, Miami
Beach developer and Temple
tmanu-El vice president
Stephen Muss. The school is
located in a Tel Aviv suburb,
and annually trains hundreds
American high school
students.
Dr Lehrman is past national
President of the Synagogue
Council of America, former na-
tional chairman of the UJA
Singles
MALE, JEWISH, 42 yrs.
Interested in meeting
female ages 30s and 40s
for possible relationship.
Enjoys all sports especial-
ly swimming, golf, football.
etc. Has sense of humor.
Currently working in Dade
County in Property
Appraiser's office. Box
MJ c/o Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973. Miami.
Fl. 33101.
Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Miami Jewish Home Gets Grant
From Woldenberg Foundation
The new concepts in care,
treatment and staff training
that are proving to be so effec-
tive on the special Alzheimer's
Unit of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Ag-
ed (MJHHA), will now be ex-
tended to other nursing units
and more residents within the
facility, thanks to a generous
grant of $350,000 from the
Miami-based Woldenberg
Foundation.
The Woldenberg Founda-
tion, founded by New Orleans
liquor magnate Malcolm
Woldenberg in the 1950's, cur-
rently administered by his
daughter, Leslie Halperyn.
The Foundation usually en-
dows institutions of higher
learning and charitable
organizations.
"Using the Woldenberg
Foundation's grant, we exnert
to be able to extend the
specific techniques developed
in this special 29-bed unit to an
additional 80 persons afflicted
with Alzheimer's Disease," ex-
plained MJHHA Associate Ex-
ecutive Director Elliot Stern.
In the first year of this three-
year grant, $150,000 will be
used to extend the level of care
in at least two more nursing
units, train additional staff
and to develop a prototype
concept of a nursing home
devoted solely to Alzheimer's
sufferers.
In the second and third
years, $100,000 will be used
each year for a new
Alzheimer's residential care
unit. This money will be mat-
ched by additional dollars ob-
tained from other grants and
private sources.
AmH Women
Coral Gables Chapter of
Amit Women will welcome
family and friends to their first
meeting of the season on Tues-
day, Sept. 1, at noon, at
Zamora Temple, in Coral
Gables. Lunch will be served.
Hatikvah-Miami Beach
Chapter has planned a lun-
cheon meeting to commence
their year's activities on
Thursday, Sept. 10 at noon at
the Kneseth Israel Social Hall
in Miami Beach.
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2 for $$9S
with coupon only one coupon per party
Fine Food
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
Rabbinic Cabinet, chairman of
the board of governors of the
Israel Bonds Organization of
Greater Miami, chairman of
the Jewish National Fund
Foundation of Florida, na-
tional vice president of the
Zionist Organization of
America and a member of the
national board of the National
Conference of Christians and
Jews.
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Guatemala Hondurae Puerto Rico.
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ABOUT THE PAPAL VISIT
Rabbi Brett S. Goldstein served as spiritual
leader of Temple Israel of Greater Miami
from 1975-1980. In 1981, he established
Temple Shir Ami of Kendall a congrega-
tion active in ecumenical endeavors.
On FRIDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 4th
at 8 P.M., the rabbi will discuss:
ft,
'A Final Thought
On the Pope's Visit
TEMPLE SHIR AMI
7205 S.W. 107 Avenue
279-7311
99
Rabbi Brett S. Goldstein


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 4, 1987
Miami Native Marcia Sussman Ballerina
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By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
From the time Marcia
Sussman put on her first ballet
shoes, the Miami native knew
she wanted to be a dancer.
Sussman's career was laun-
ched when she was invited to
join the Israel Ballet at age 17.
After six years in Israel,
Sussman spent the next three
years dancing in the Big Apple
with the Feld Dance Company.
Now, at age 27, Sussman has
been able to return to her
native city to do the thing she
loves most dance.
The formation of the Miami
City Ballet one year ago made
this possible. Sussman signed
a contract with the Miami com-
pany three weeks ago and
received high praise in reviews
after her first performance
this past weekend.
Life has a way of being cir-
cular. The Miami City Ballet is
preparing to take its first
foreign tour in December. It is
in Israel, and thus Sussman
will join her new troupe danc-
ing in the nation where she
began her professional career.
Of course, being back in
Miami means that her parents,
Robert and Barbara Sussman,
of Miami Beach, and "lots of
cousins" and old chums from
Coral Park High School will be
able to see her local
performances.
Sussman started dancing
when she was about six, study-
ing under Miami dancers
Thomas Armour and Martha
Mahr.
"I've always wanted to be a
dancer," Sussman says with
certainty. "That's all I ever
wanted. I knew no other way."
Sussman, a single young
woman, left high school and
Miami in the 12th grade when
she received early admission
into Purchase University, a
Fine Arts school in New York.
At the end of her year of
study at Purchase, Sussman
took dancing classes in New
York City. The director of the
Israel Ballet was in New York
at the time, and, after wat-
ching her class, invited
Sussman to sign a one-year
contract with the Israel Ballet.
(Sussman's story will reveal
that she was selected to join
two other companies in the
same fashion; people saw her
dance and liked what they
saw.)
At age 17, Sussman asserts,
it is not too young to join a
company as far as dancing ver-
sus continued education in the
arts goes. "By then you either
have what it takes or you
don't," she says, adding, "a
dancer's life is very short. By
the age of 40 your body can't
physically do what you do
when you're 20."
So she was off to Tel Aviv,
where the Israel Ballet was
based. It was her first trip to
Israel and her first time
abroad. By that time, she had
just turned 18.
"When I first went there,
my parents actually wanted
me to go," says Sussman.
"They said 'go one year. It's
one year of your dancing
career, learn a new language,
meet new people.' After I
started signing more contracts
year after year, I'm sure they
would have preferred I be
closer to them."
Sussman did not know the
Hebrew language when she ar-
rived in Israel, but she decided
to go to Ulpan, an intensive
Hebrew course, and now
speaks the language fluently.
When she first arrived in
Israel she lived in an absorp-
tion center, but shortly after-
wards got an apartment with
another company member.
"Culturally, they (Israel) are
very advanced," Sussman
says. "I'd say more in music
everybody goes to the Philhar-
monic and dance also. Their
modern dance there is a bit
more popular. Modern dance
startd in Israel and then came
classical ballet."
There was not a particular
Israeli flavor to the ballet
because classical ballet is
universal, Sussman says. She
danced the lead roles in ballets
such as Giselle, Concerto
Barocco and Graduation Hall.
The audiences were very
receptive. During her years
with the Israel company, she
adjoined the troupe on tours in
Greece, Italy, South America
and two tours of the United
States.
About three and a half years
ago, Sussman had just finished
a tour in the United States,
and was visiting her two older
sisters in New York City,
when one of her teachers sug-
gested she take a class with
Eliot Feld, who has a dance
company in New York. At the
end of that class, Feld asked
Sussman if she would join his
troupe. She went back to
Israel, finished the season, and
decided it was time to come
back to America.
"It's definitely a step up
from a country that's on the
other side of the world to be in
big New York City," Sussman
says, adding, tht just going
from Israel to New York was a
big change in itself. Also, the
company in New York was
more contemporary with less
of an emphasis on classical
ballet. Sometimes they danced
in sneakers, jazz shoes, and
soft ballet shoes as opposed to
point ballet shoes. They per-
formed Feld's original works
at his Joyce Theatre in New
York City.
A practice day for Sussman,
which is virtually every day,
can take her from 10 a.m. until
7 p.m., stopping only an hour
for lunch.
"It's about 50 percent
talent, and 50 percent sheer
desire and discipline,"
Sussman acknowledges.
New York was very "ex-
citing" and "very busy."
Then, last year, her parents
moved from Miami to Miami
Beach and Sussman found
l^L1" week off and
gelded to see their new
. "I fell in love with it. It was
right across from the beach "
|he says. About that time.
hussman 'earned that there
was a new dance company in
Miami and called them to see if
she could practice with them to
stay in shape while she was in
Miami. Then, what happened
in her other career moves, hap-
pened here: they asked if
Sussman would be interested
in joining the company.
Sussman went back to New
York and thought about it. She
also thought about "sunny
Florida," and decided it was
time to leave New York and
live nicely on the water.
"It is wonderful" to perform
in her home town. Sussman
says. It is also nice, she adds.
to be able to give her family
some "nachus."
The troupe will leave for
Israel in December and a
special committee h;is been
formed to assist in under-
writing the expenses of the
program that will be presented
in Israel and, upon the com-
pany's return, in South
Florida.
Members of the "Friends of
Miami City Ballet in Israel "in-
clude the Ted Arisons. the Jay
Kislaks, the Gary Gersons, the
Forrest Raffels, the Pro-
gressive Corporation, Da
Fleeman and Donald Lefton.
"How wonderful it is *jj
there's a company for me w
come home to, Sussman says.
"Without the company and uw
support the community n
given it, I wouldn't be here.
I've waited all my life f>r *<
to be a professional lompan
here in Miami. And it wiD oni)
go forward from here_


Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Out On Media And Politics
Senator Lawton Chiles Speaks
Continued from Page 1-B
cond worst rate of drop-outs in
the nation.
As a state, we have not
spent enough money on poor
families and children, and
I that's where the vast majority
of drop-outs come from," he
I explains.
"We need to pay more atten-
I tion t<> the students who are at
risk." says Chiles, who agrees
[hat the large percentage of
new immigrants in Florida,
and the resultant language
problems, are factors in this
I state's high drop-out rate.
think that bilingual educa-
tion is very neccessary,"
states Chiles, "but the goal of
[bilingual education should very
(lefinitely he English proficien-
cy, otherwise you are not do-
[inj; people a favor.
"I also don't think it's the
I taxpayer's responsibility to
[promote another culture,
whether it be Haitian, Irish,
Spanish or anything else. The
I melting pot idea has been
healthy for this country, and if
people want to maintain
separate cultural itentities.
that's the role of the family
[and the community," Chiles
I maintains.
Foreign Aid is often one of
Ithe first items politicians sug-
gest be cut when discussing
I how to reduce the national
deficit, which worries many
I American .lews, as Israel is the
[largest recipient of U.S.
Foreign Aid.
Chiles, who proposes that all
[programs "share some of the
| pain" of reducing the deficit,
supports the tradition of a
large Foreign Aid package to
Israel.
The amount, he says, that
Israel receives is "high in
dollars, but as a percentage of
the gross national product, the
[terms are not high.
"We don't quarter troops in
the Middle Bast, and we don't
quarter ti tops in Israel,
| because we hi ve a valuable al-
ly there We spend a hell of a
I"' of money in Europe where
we have to have troops station-
ed. I think that if you equate
those things, the aid package
to Israel ($3()0 billion) is not as
expensive as it looks in
numbers."
\\ hat a a- expensive,
tojjwer, was the Israeli Lavi
nghter jet. which was suppos-
," >" <> into production in
wrael but never got off the
Rfound because of cost over-
runs, and American pressure
to cancel plans for the Israeli-
made and designed planes.
Was there any hidden agen-
aa jn the American pressure
on Israel to discontinue plans
> produce the Lavi, as oppos-
m Al0r mo(,ifying American
made fighterjets?
agen-
"I don't see a hidden
"' says Chiles. "It's" in
,.,rael s interests to have the
[fi\ Partnership with the
1 nited States."
, 5t 'sn't Israel now depen-
g* upon the United States
J arms while the United
22 als" sells advanced
H?" '" cou,trie8 who are
lsrael b adversaries*
been able to stand on its own,
nothing would have been bet-
ter than to have Israel develop
it But when it got to the point
where all this was being done
totally at our expense, that's
something else," Chiles
contends.
"We can't pay for the cost
overruns of our own weapons
systems,' Chiles points out. "It
was a pit that didn't seem to
have a bottom."
President Reagan, known in
the early years of his Ad-
ministration for being a strong
proponent of building up the
country's defense system, has
spent more and more time
negotiating with the Russians
over a possible arms control
agreement.
"The Russians know that the
president is having some im-
age problems now and they are
taking advantage of a
weakness in the Administra-
tion. They sense that the presi-
dent wants to be known in
history books as the person
who got a major arms control
aggreement," says Chiles.
"He no longer has the same
strength of position here, but
the Russians can negotiate for
years, because that's the way
their minds work. If something
happends 50 or 100 years from
now, that's fine with them.
Americans want something
tangible now. and that's the
reason why I think you have to
look very carefully at the kind
of agreement they come up
with." Chiles contends.
"They're going to trade
harder." he adds.
Chiles, who says that he has
"always been in favor of direct
negotiations," when it comes
to the Middle East Peace Pro-
cess, sees no reason to include
the Soviet Union in an interna-
tional conference for Middle
East Peace.
"It would just raise their
status," he explains.
One area where Chiles is in
agreement with President
Reagan is on the subject of aid
to the Contras, although, he
allows, there have been
mistakes made in terms of the
United States' approach to the
issue.
"I find a lot wrong with our
policies there that we never re-
quired the Contras to speak as
a single voice, that we have
been dealing with four groups
instead of one. We didn't re-
quire the kind of accountability
for funds that we should."
Chiles admits.
"There are some bad guys
with the Contras. running
drugs and the like, other
things, and I think that we fail-
ed to bring them together and
insist that they behave like a
government in exile ought to
l>ehave, like they're prepared
to win and run the country,"
says Chiles.
"If they are just a rag-tag
bunch of people down there
shooting up some villages,
they are not going to win a lot
of support that way," com-
ments Chiles wryly.
"With all of that, the San-
dinistas are a Marxist group
who are consolidating power
and exporting revoluton, they
are puppets of the Russians
and the Cubans and are caus-
ing trouble in Costa Rica,
Guatemala, the Honduras and
El Salvador.
The only way I see to
restrain them them is to put
some outside pressure on them
and try to get some democratic
countries in the region to
reach some sort of accord with
them." he concludes.
But Chiles does not feel that
Reagan's decision to place
American flags on Kuwaiti
tankers in the Persian Gulf
was thought through enough.
"I disasgreed with the way
we took action, without explor-
ing the situation a lot more and
determining what the conse
quences would be," says
Chiles.
Now that the decision has
been made, I think we have to
back it up. Our problem in the
BetwIorah Ooncregaton
Benny I^Campus
1051 No. Miami Beach Blvd., No. Miami Bch., FL 33162
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cultural and religious
Early Childhood, Hebrew School, Hebrew High,
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Special membership fees for singles and young couples
Auxiliary High Holy Day Services for non-members
OPEN HOUSE Wednesday, September 9th
7p.m.-9p.m.
For Information 947-7528
Middle East today is that we
flip-flop around too much. We
said it was in our strategic in-
terest to put marines in
Lebanon we should still be
there, although I don't think
that we should have had our
troops there to begin with.
"Now we've said that flagg-
ing those ships in the Persian
Gulf is in our best interests
because of the oil in the region,
and yet the price of oil was
cheaper then than it is now,"
Chiles observes.
Will the flagging of the
Kuwaiti tankers lead armed
conflict between Iran and the
United States?
"I hope not," says Chiles.
"We have to push for the
United States to place
sanctions."
Senator Chiles, who was an
undergraduate at the Univer-
sity of Florida, where he also
graduated from law school,
was first elected to the United
States Senate in 1970, when
he was known as "Walkin'
Lawton." for the 1.013 miles
walk he took across the state
while campaigning.
Recalling his 91-day trek
from the small town of Cen-
tury near the Alabama border
to Key Largo. Chiles says that
he learned two main things
from the experience.
"I learned to listen, because
it's easier to get company if
you're a listener rather than a
talker. And I learned that peo-
ple around this state are more
similar than dissimilar. You
think that people in North
Florida are different from peo-
ple in South Florida, but
they're not. They have the
same aspirations and goals,
and the same fears," says
Whiles.
After 17 years in the Senate,
"Walkin Lawton" is not yet
ready to put up his feet and
take a rest; in 1988, when he
will be up for election again, he
plans a fourth term.
Soccer Program
Registration has now begun
for the South Dade Jewish
Community Center's Youth
Soccer Program. The 13 week
program is open to both boys
and girls grades K-5. The cost
includes a uniform and trophy.
Practices are on Mondays
and Wednesdays or Tuesdays
and Thursdays, from 4:15-5:30
p.m. Games will be played on
Sunday mornings, at the JCC
The program will begin or
Tuesday, Sept. 8. For more in
formation please call Pau
Frishman athletic director al
251-1394.


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, Septemher 4. L987
Write
Dear Aomi
Art Exhibit Currently At MJHHA
For Advice
Hear Nomi. an advice column, will appear recularlv in the
pagCH (if The Jewish llnridiun
Dear Nomi:
My husband and I lived
together for three years, got
married, and almost im-
mediately after had a baby.
For the first few days after our
son's birth, my husband was in
seventh heaven; you would
think his every prayer had
been answered.
But quickly enough, things
changed. He began to stay out
late, leave for weekend trips
and then he informed me that
he wanted a separation. Even-
tually I found out that he was
seeing another woman.
My husband doesn't want a
divorce, and would like to be
able to come back and live with
me and the baby from time to
time "until he gets everything
sorted out.' Despite
everything, I still love him,
and I don't know what to do.
Will there be a better chance
for us getting back together if
I leave my door open to him?
Yours Truly,
Young Mother
Dear Young Mother:
If you leave your door open,
there is a better chance for
a reconciliation and then
a very good chance of your
husband leaving you all over
again.
The reality of a new baby is
overwhelming at first for
most people but most
people learn to cope with
the new responsibility. Your
husband seems to want not
only to run away from the
commitments he has made,
but to be able to continue to
enjoy them when it suits
him.
Even though you still love him,
my advice is, get a divorce.
To him, not having a divorce
probably will mean that he
has you and the baby to go
back to while he goes off,
has affairs, and acts like a
single person.
To you, not having a divorce
will probably mean that you
are biding your time, taking
care of the baby on your
own, waiting to see if your
husband will return to you.
So get a divorce and get on
with your life. It won't be
easy, but it will be easier
than living with a man who'
might just leave at any
time.
Yours, Nomi
Dear Nomi:
My husband n< /er s me
an anniversary gift, even
though every year I go to
great pains to buy him
something nice. On my birth-
day, he usually gives me a book
or some flowers, while on his
birthday I get him the golf
clubs he was yearning for, or a
custom-made leather suitcase.
I am tired of this. I used to
drop hints that I would love a
heart locket or a ring, but now
I think I might as well give up.
What should I do, resign
myself to never getting the
kind of presents I would really
like?
Sincerely,
Not Always Better
To Give Than To Receive
Dear Giver:
Gifts are more than merely ob-
jects to delight in (or not
delight in). They are also
symbols of affection, caring,
how much we value a per-
son, and so on.
If your husband is not insen-
sitive or uncaring in any
other area, it may just be
that he has not been raised
to understand the meaning
of gift giving, and has not
"grown up" enough to
spend some effort on show-
ing how he feels.
I would discuss with your hus-
band what kind of present
you would really like long
before the date approaches.
It might take some of the
joy out of the surprise, but
it's better than nothing.
If your husband manages to ig-
nore even an out-and-out re-
quest, it sounds to me like
disguised hostility, or at the
very least an indifference to
your feelings. My sugges-
tion? Stop buying him ex-
pensive gifts try a bouquet
of daisies and a card and
confront him on the issue.
Yours, Nomi
Write Nomi for advice in care
of The Jewish Floridian, P.O.
Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101.
Personal Note
Ruth and Al Lev have
returned from their three-
month honeymoon in
Europe. The couple, who
were married by Rabbi
Haskell Bernat at Temple
Israel on May 22, held
their wedding luncheon
after the ceremony at the
Studio Restaurant in
Miami.
By MARSHA G. KOSSAK
Exhuberant. diverse,
thought-provoking, powerful,
colorful, dramatic ... the art
currently on exhibit at the May
Visitors Center of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged (MJHHA) is all of
that and more. Located on the
Douglas Gardens campus, 151
NE 52nd Street, the exhibit
may be viewed free of charge
from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., seven
days a week.
"Our art exhibit series is our
affirmation that joy in and in-
volvement with life need not
diminish because of age or
frailty," said Harold Beck,
MJHHA President.
Staged by Ralph Vonner, the
show features eclectic offer-
ings from four local artists. It
includes photographs by Tad
Cypen, ceramics by Yana
B'em, wood sculpture by
Kevin F. Duffy and paintings
by Phyllis Parker. The exhibit
is part of a series arranged by
the Next Generation, a sup-
port group of MJHHA which
has endowed the Grand Salon
of the May Visitors Center.
The Parker works on display
are six large canvases which
pulsate with the "intense col-
ors found only in South
Florida, a unique environ-
ment," according to the artist.
Ms. Parker's themes revolve
around family, "the segment
of society that is most impor-
tant to me and of which I have
the most intimate knowledge,"
she explains.
Kevin Duffy, by contrast,
has "created a marriage of two
dimensional and three dimen-
sional forms; abstract forms
cut from wood," according to
the artist who has six works on
display at the May Visitors
Center. The Duffy offerings
feature delicate pigmentation
which provides a whimsical
context.
Also whimsical, but much
less subtle are the 13 hand-
built, hand-painted functional
and decorative ceramic pieces
by Czech-born artist Yana
B'em. Taking her inspiration
from Florida's flowers, sun
and water, Ms. B'em's pieces
bespeak the happy coexistence
of the ultra-modern lines of
our new and growing skyline
and the idyllic gentleness of
our tropical environment.
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KSI.K
Centenarian Mollie Merlub admires a piece of abstract scutptm
,w display iti the Miami Jewish Home's May Visitor* Center.
It is the 23 powerful color
photographs by Miami Beach-
Iwrn Tad Cypen. however,
which evokes the broadest
range of emotions. Boldly
depicting timeless human
themes in his works "Remem-
brance." "Father and Son."
"Femme Sphere" and "Tzad-
dik." Cypen achieves his ar-
tistic goal of "incorporating
the human element into each
of my pieces."
All four artists are part of
the 15-member South Florida
Art Center Gallery, a non-
profit co-op located al 945 Lin-
coln Road. Exponents of the
boom in art consciousness on
South Beach and widely
displayed in galleries
throughout South Florida,
these four SFAC Gallery
members will be sharing their
unique gifts with residents and
visitors to the Miami .Jewish
Home and Hospital tor the
Aged.
Community Corner
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center
will hold an evening of Israeli folk dance as part of its
Cultural Arts program every Sunday from 7:30-10:30
p.m.
Beth Torah Singles, ages 21-45, brings back "Harold
Collins" world renowned Mentalist, from London.
Known as "The Funniest Mind-Reader In The World,"
he has entertained audiences throughout the U.S. and
Europe. The event will be Thursday, Sept. 17 at Beth
Torah Synagogue at the Jennie Gherman Youth Center
building, at 8 p.m.
Rabbi Rubin R. Dobin, who has just returned from an
extensive stay in Israel, will give a series of three lec-
tures on his experiences in the Holy Land, according to
an announcement by Mr. Hillel Price, president, Young
Israel of Sunny Isles. The lectures will be given at the
Synagogue. Sunny Isles, at the Sabbath morning ser-
vices of the Congregation on Sept. 5, 12 and Sept. 19.
Foreign Affairs on Video
QUESTION ANSWER
....I hava quit* a few
tapes from Israal and
other foraign countries
In PAL and SECAM.
Some ara foreign TV-
shows that friends
taped off the air. Some
mrm homemade family
event tapes, some mrm
European movies in the
original format and
language. I know, all off
them will not play on
ay American TV.
Where can I purchase
a VCR that plays all my
tapes In HIPI Stereo? Do
I naad mn additional for
Ign TV set7 Everybody
sayi to hava them con-
verted Into NTIC for
at, but the going rate
Is $100.00 per hour and
I haard a special VCR
would bachaapar.
M.A., CHICAGO. IL.
As a rule multistai
< hines are very cosiu
require mullisi,''
None of them offer H.f-1-
There is. however
that does not require
of a monitor The IMAGE
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It plays all PAL and SECAM
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features such as multi-speeds C*
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All this on most regular T v"s IR
even has a unit that plays and re
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This machine would allow you'
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information INSTANT REPl*T
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\tmi are Joseph, his wife Judy, and daughter, Adina.
Human Interest
eph, grandson of Sunny
Sol Buxbaum of North
ni Beach, will l>e com-
his PhD in neuro-
Ln, ai the Weizmann In-
ite in Rehovot, Israel. His
I Judy is a mid-wife-nurse.
ouple have one daughter,
lia. and are expecting
her addition to their fami-
November.
pndson Benjamin isstudy-
|for the Rabbinate at the
Hatorah Yeshivah in
Isalem. and his wife,
Jlah. is employed by the
eli government
isheva Chana, the Bux-
ladassah
Events
Different View of the
[East "will be presented by
pam F. Saulson for the
(iing Green Chapter of
ssah in the Auditorium at
NE 191 St. on Monday,
I 14 at 1:30 p.m.
fychologist Stephanie
ch will be the guest
ker at the next general
Jting of the Naomi Chapter
ladassah on Monday, Sept.
[at the Tamarind Apart-
p Clubhouse, SW 112th
land North Kendall Drive,
I Dr. Hirsch will have a
ftiim and answer session
Wnnieii ii, Transition at all
psand Aires."
Chapter of
will h-.ld their first
I th< new year on
MatHadassah
t1"11 Headquarters in the
National Hank Building.
1 et. Miami Beach. The
1 I Board and General
Jbership meeting will
r1 a' 11 a.m.. when plans
Fro year will be discussed.
lunch will be served at
i. and there will be a
Ft and slide presentation
[Harriet Cohen regarding
1 national Convention in
pmore.
M Hadassah's Bowling
ue will begin Tuesday,
? f 9:30 a.m. at Don
ers Lanes. Bowling Night
I1* Saturday, Sept. 12 at 8
r Don Carter's Lanes.
Im |)ler of Hadassah
L"J*t Monday, Sept. 14 at
P"1- at the Kendalltown
IJhouse for their first
f rai meeting and fashion
L *** Backroom
baum's granddaughter,
teaches Judaic Studies in
Jerusalem, and the Buxbaum's
son is presently residing in
Hong Kong, where he works
as an international attorney.
The Buxbaums plan on
visiting their grandchildren in
Israel for Channukah.
B'nai B'rith
Women
Chapters Meet
B'nai B'rith Women will
hold the second meeting to
organize a new chapter for
women in their 20's on Tues-
day, Sept. 15 at the Hillel
Jewish Student Center on the
University of Miami campus at
7:30 p.m. For information con-
tact Ann P. Fernandez at
279-0659.
B'nai B'rith, Lake Carmel
Unit will hold their first
meting of the season on Mon-
day, Sept. 14 at Adath
Yeshurun at 7:30 p.m. All are
invited and members are en-
couraged to bring new
members. Dancing and
refreshments will be featured.
The board of members and
President Harvey Berman
have announced that their
feeding project for the needy
will be named "The Sally
Denowitch Fund For The
Needy," after the woman who
started the enterprise.
Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Na'Amat USA Chapters
A Champagne Membership
Luncheon honoring long-time
member Rose Gerson of Miami
Beach and all grandparents
and great grandparents, spon-
sored by the Chai Chapter of
Na'amat USA, will be held on
Grandparents Day, Sunday,
Sept. 13 at noon at the Raleigh
Hotel, Miami Beach.
Gershon, membership vice
president of the club, has con-
tributed years of service to the
Chai Group, including enter-
taining as a soloist at many of
the fund raising functions. She
will also sing at the Sunday
luncheon, where she will be ac-
companied by the accordianist
Sharon. Gershon has also per-
formed at other Na'amat
events of the South Florida
Council.
Eva Kaufman, president,
has arranged for each new
member and a sponsor of a
new member to receive an
original piece of jewelry
designed by "Miss Ada."
Reservations for the glatt
kosher luncheon may be
secured by telephoning Kauf-
man at 673-2772.
Installation of officers and
musical program are on tap at
the Wednesday, 11:30 a.m.
meeting of the Beba Idelson
Chapter of Na'amat USA to
take place at the Club Room of
the 100 Lincoln Road Building,
Miami Beach.
Honorary president Sarah
Kaufman, a former president,
will conduct the installation,
with a special salute to Irene
Raczkowski, who will under-
take the presidency for a se-
cond term.
Other officers to be installed
are Esther Weinstein, vice
president; Sabina Meyerson.
and Rose Luchter, treasurers;
Frances Singer, financial
secretary; and Anne Hanken,
recording secretary.
Michael Skorr, accordianist,
will head the entertainment
portion of the afternoon with a
repertoire of English, Hebrew
and Yiddish songs.
Refreshments will be served
by hostesses Sarah Kerbs and
Mildred Frank who said the
meeting is open to the public.
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Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 4, 1987
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
... "When thou goest forth to battle and seest among the cap-
tives a woman of goodly form and wouldest take her to thee to
wife"
(Deuteronomy 21 .10-11).
KITETZE
KI TETZE "When thou goest forth to battle against thine
enemies, and the Lord thy God delivereth them into thy hands,
and thou earnest them away captive, and seest among the cap-
tives a woman of goodly form, and thou wouldest take her to
thee to wife; then thou shalt bring her home to thy house And
it shall be if thou have no delight in her, then thou shalt let her go
whither she will; but thou shalt not sell her at all for money"
(Deuteronomy 21.10-H). "If a man have a stubborn and rebellious
son ... all the men of his city shall stone him with stones, that he
die" (Deuteronomy 21.18-2). The body of a hanged man "shall not
remain all night upon the tree, but thou shalt surely bury him the
same day; for he that is hanged is a reproach unto God; that thou
defile not thy land" (Deuteronomy 21.2S). "Thou shalt not see thy
brother's ox or his seep driven away, and hide thyself from them;
thou shalt surely bring them back unto thy brother"
(Deuteronomy 22.1). "Thou shalt not take the dam with the young;
thou shalt in any wise let the dam go, but the young thou mayest
take unto thyself (Deuteronomy 22.6-7). "When thou buildest a
new house, then thou shalt make a parapet for thy roof, that thou
bring not blood upon thy house, if any man fall from thence"
(Deuteronomy 22.8). "Thou shalt not plough with an ox and an ass
together. Thou shalt not wear a mingled stuff, wool and linen
together" (Deuteronomy 22.10-11). The man who "lays wanton
charges" against his wife shall be chastised by the elders of the ci-
ty. "A bastard shall not enter into the assembly of the Lord"
(Deuteronomy 2S.S). "If brethren dwell together, and one of them
die, and have no child, the wife of the dead shall not be married
abroad unto one not of his kin: her husband's brother shall go in
unto her, and take her to him to wife, and perform the duty of a
husband's brother unto her. And it shall be, that the first-born
that she beareth shall succeed in the name of his brother that is
dead" (Deuteronomy 25.5-6). "An Ammonite or a Moabite shall
not enter into the assembly of the Lord;. because they met you
not with bread and with water in the way, when ye came forth out
of Egypt: and because they hired against thee Balaam the son of
Bear from Pethor of Aram-na haraim, to curse thee Thou
shalt not seek their peace nor their prosperity all thy days
forever. Thou shalt not abhor an Edomite, for he is thy brother,
thou shalt not abhor an Egyptian, because thou wast a stranger in
his land. The children of the third generation that are born unto
them may enter into the assembly of the Lord" (Deuteronomy
2S.U-9). Finally, the portion ends with a reminder of eternal enmi-
ty against a dread foe: "Remember what Amaleh did unto thee by
the way as ye came forth out of Egypt" (Deuteronomy 25.17).
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion ot the Law is extracted and based
upon The Graphic History ot the Jewish Heritage." edited by P. Wollman
Tsamlr, $15. published by Shengold. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
Lane. New York, N.Y. 10038. Joseph Schlang Is president of the society
distributing the volume.)
Investiture Of Circuit Court
Judge Ursula M.-Ungaro Friday
Investiture of Dade Circuit
Court Judge Ursula
M.-Ungaro will be held Friday,
at 12:15 p.m. in Courtroom 6-1
of the Dade County Cour-
thouse. The ceremonies are
open to the general public.
Judge Ungaro was ap-
pointed by Governor Robert
Martinez to replace Judge
Donald Stone, who resigned
last summer. Judge Ungaro
was nominated by the Judicial
Nominating Commission. Born
in Miami Beach, she now lives
in Coral Cables.
Chief Judge Gerald Wether-
ington will preside at the in-
vestiture for Judge Ungaro,
who has been assigned to the
criminal division of circuit
court.
Former Florida Attorney
General Robert Shevin, a
former law partner of Judge
Ungaro, and State Rep. Elaine
Bloom of Miami Beach will be
among the speakers at the
investiture.
Michael Nachwalter, a direc-
tor of the Florida Bar, and
Judith Korchin, president of
the Dade County Bar Associa-
tion, will represent their
respective organizations.
A graduate with honors of
the University of Florida Col-
lege of Law, she earned a
bachelor's degree in English
Literature wjth honors from
Judge Ursula M.-Ungaro
the University of Miami, and
also attended Smith College in
Northampton, Mass. She was
a member of the editorial
board of the Florida Law
Review, and graduated from
North Miami High School.
In 1982 she became the only
woman partner nationally of
Finley, Kumble, then the na-
tion's second largest law firm.
She has served on the board of
directors of United Family and
Children's Services, the se
cond largest United Way agen-
ev in Dade.
Bat Mitzvah
* 1
Steven Resnick
PAUL AUERBACH
Paul Scott Auerbach, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Steve Auerbach
will be called to the Torah as
Bar Mitzvah on Saturday, at
8:30 a.m. at Adath Yeshurun
Synagogue. North Miami
Beach.
The celebrant is a student in
the Adath Yeshurun Hebrew-
High and is an active member
of Kadima. He attends
Highland Oaks Junior High
School where he is in the
eighth grade. Paul achieved
Honor Roll in seventh grade
four times.
Mr. and Mrs. Steve Auer-
bach will host the Kiddush
following the services in honor
of the occasion.
Special guests will include:
Uncle Ari Srebnik from Paris;
Uncle Herb Altman from New
York; Janet Wexler from New
York; Aunt Mitzi Katz from
New York; cousins Gayle,
Sheri and Scott Katz from
New Jersey and cousin Stuart
Altman from Cleveland. Ohio.
DANIEL LIPNER
Daniel Lipner, son of Mr.
and Mrs. J. Kenneth Lipner
will be called to the Torah as
Bar Mitzvah on Saturday at
8:45 a.m. at Temple Ner
Tamid.
Daniel is an eighth grade
student at Horace Mann
Junior High School and a
member of the El Portal Boy
Scouts. North Miami Beach
Optimist and Biscayne Park
Baseball League.
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Lipner
will host the Kiddush following
the services in honor of the
occasion.
STEVEN RESNICK
Steven Jason Resnick. son of
Mr. and Mrs. James Resnick
will be called to the Torah as
Bar Mitzvah on Saturday at
10:30 a.m. at Temple Emanu-
El, Miami Beach.
The celebrant is a student at
the Hebrew Academy where
he is in the eighth grade. He
was President of the Elemen-
tary School Student Body.
Mr. and Mrs. Resnick will
host a Kiddush luncheon
following the services in honor
of Steven on Saturday at Tem-
ple Emanu-EI, Friedland
Ballroom.
Congratulations to the
grandparents. Mr. and Mrs
Peisa Rok, and Commissioner
and Mrs. Abe Resnick. and
K.reat-grandparcnts, Mr. and
Mrs. Jacob Litvak.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
7:19 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach, Fla. 531-2120
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig
ADATHYESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947 1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Zvl Rozen Conservative
Executive Director A
Harry J. Sllverman
m
Mlnyan 7:301.111. 6:30 p.m.
Sat. t Sun 11.111. > 8pm
Shabbat aan. Sal. 8:3d am
Bar Mltnah Sal 8 30 a.m.
Paul Scolt Auarbach
Ulryln: Robert Qraanhalph
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 667-6667
Leonard Schoolman, Sr. Rabbi
Mark Kram, Associate Rabbi
Lynn Goldstein, Assistant Rabbi
Frl. 8:15 p.m Rabbi Schoolman will apaak
on "Tha Popa Comai To Miami
CUBAN HEBREW CONtKfi
Tempi. Beth Shmuel EGAT|*
1700 Michigan Ave Miami a.
534-7213 53472141 ***
Barry JKonovltch. Rabbi ,,
Moshe Buryn, Cantor f|]
SargloGrobler, President '*'
Sholem Epeibaum, rreaCi,
Religious Commit,*"1
TEMPLE EMANUEL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell
Yehuda Shifman. Cantor
Maurice Klein. Ritual Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
KaboalatShabbatitipm
Sat. M Rabbi lahrm.n wIlipL..,
^"I-Ughiaashado^'
Bar Mltnah Sl.an jn .,,,
Dally BervkM8a m 7pm
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive. Miami Beidi
532 6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schift
DaHy7:30..v(Mon 4 Thur, 7:1817,.
Frl. 7p.m. Sal.ta.m Raaarv io< High nil
Day. ft'nal Mltnah Sal,1 m NldSatZ
Jay Juiim
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854-3911
Jack Riemer. Rabbi
Robert Albert. /Sjv
Cantor [Ml
Rev. Milton Freeman. "J*'
Ritual Director
Mlnchah al 7:20 p.m.
Dally Minyan
Mon S Thura. 7 30 a.m.
Tuaa., Wad S Frl. 7:45 a.m.
Sun. 8 a.m. Evanlngs 5:30p.m.
Frl. 8 p.m. Family Sa>n
Sal. 9 a.m. Rabbi Rlamar will conduct aarvlcaa
aaalttad by Cantor Robart Albari.
Kidduah wllllollow
Bar Mltnah Laa Simon.
BETH KODESH
Conservative
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 856-6334
Cantor: Joseph Krissel
Rose Berlin: Executive Secretary
Sanlcaa Monday a Thuraday 7:30 a.m.
Sat 8 45am
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami. FL 33181
8915508 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs. Rabbi
Dr. Joseph A. Gorf inkel. f
Rabbi Emeritus \
Moshe Friedler. Cantor
Frl. 7 p.m
Sat 8*5am
Waakdayaan Mon Frl 8am
Mon Thura. 5 p.m. Sun. 8:30 am
Sat .8:45 a.m.
)
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jeflerson Ave., M.B.. FL 33139
Tel. 536-4112
Rabbi Aivadia Rosenberg
Cantor Moshe Buryn
Dally aantcaa 8 a.m. a 7 p.m
Sal. 8.15 am
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
238 2601 /sgv
Rabbi David H. Auerbach \ W)
Cantor Stephen Freedman *
aSUfS 'n,'","on Jannllar Taachar
aa Proa, ol H.Nagar Ragion USY Raport on
Taan ActMtiaa
Sat 9:30 am Bar Mltnah
Oragon MonatU.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Maml'a Plont Kmloim ConoraQaimn
137 N.E. 18th St. Miami 573 5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
Rabbi Rax D. Perimeter
Cantor: Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob Q. Bornstein
Downtown: Frl. 8 p.m. Rabbi t 0 Panmw
will tpaak on tha topic "Whuhar Th. Warn
Cantor Rachalla F. Nalion will condua
tha liturgy
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Relom
Coral Gables 667 565'
Michael B. Eisenstat. Rabbi
Frl. 8 p.m
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534 9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Shoshanah Raab. Cantor
Sanlcaa Frl. 7:30 p m
Sat.: 30 am.
Onag Shabbat will ioiio
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Ari Fridkis, Assoc. Rabbi [
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sat.8a.rn Sabbath aanlca
Dally Mlnchah Sunday Friday
8 a.m. and 8 p.m
Sat 8 a.m. and 5:15 p.m
TEMPLE NER TAMID 866*345
7902 Carlyle Ave.. 866-9833
Miami Beach 33141 cowan-a.
Rabbi Eugene Labovit* ,S\
Cantor Edward Klein
Dally San Mon.-Frt. 8am 6 30pm "*
Sat. Mlncha 8:15 p.m. Sun. 8.30 m
8.30 p.m. Sat. 8:45 am aarv By "6t Law*
Cantor KMn Bar Mltnah Dan* lay* _
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St
North Miami Beach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM 53e-7231
Chase Ave. A 41 st St. -,*
waatfioWaS.^1
IAN ALPERN, Cantor^"' *""
DENNIS ?N.Tr c^"'0* ""I"*
DENNIS J RICE. F.T.A.. E.acuti Dl.aclo.
Frl. 8:15 p.m. Sal. 1045 a.m.
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
C0O5NGRE.GAT.ON 9477528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd. ,-
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz. Rabbi f StA
Zvee Aroni, Cantor 'X.'
Harvey L. Brown. Exec. Director
BaftB**L.Mf4aV
SHAARE TEFILLAH
TORAH CENTER OF KENDALL
7860 SW 112 Street
232-6833
Rabbi Hershel Becker
Dally San. 7 a.m. Frl lOmln altar""*
lighting tlma Shabbos 9 m SMW"
Mlncha 1 m.n. balora candl. HgnW""
Sun 8:30*" -
TEMPLE SINAI
18801 NE 22 Art
North DadVs Reform ^ConajWJ
Ralph P. Klngsley. Rabbi m**
Julian I. Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. AdminuM*
Frl. 7:J0 p.m. Family Wonahop &JJB!*
during month, ol Aug. 4 ^ **
t*a?alngSat. 1*30am B.I"""
Jalmy Schloaabaro.
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
6000 Miller Dr. Constri*
271 2311 au f
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro. RabW ',
Benjamin Adler, Cantor
David Rosenlhal. Auxiliary Canw
Mmyan 7a.m. Monday.*^'
Sunday 9 am. Fr. '*",,.
ConductadbvD. Norm.*SW ,
Rabbi, liturgy Cantor Adlar
Mltnah Janat E.albart.


[ews Today Hungry
For Yiddishkeit
ontinued from Page 1-B
find Conservatism
,ting positions and then
diating them," Schorsch
Lt it does lake time for the
Ejrvative movement to
ti changes, such as mixed
ling and the ordination of
L'ii as rabbis and cantors,
done within the past
tic.
gut once they arc adopted
to stick because they
to be more moderate,'
brsch said.
borsch declines to label
Conservative movement as
nnstream" Judaism and
|its to classifj ii as "cen-
" Judaism. Conservative
jam, he said, is marked by
c things.
L first is the method of
v. which is an immersion
ndiu'onal texts from the
Ispective of modern
Warship.
he second is the form of
ler "Our synagogues are
litional yet egalitarian.
is increasing within the
Iservative movement.
nen arc called to the Torah
give sermons." Yet the
i is not on egalitarianism
bn the traditionalism of the
rice. The service is still
lominantly Hebrew and
la full-length reading of the
fch. So there is a mix of the
lernand traditional.
be third factor is the way of
Conservatism is "not just
jsembodied ethical code, it
prescribed way of living."
le relationship between
[movements in this country
fairly civil, and there is a
Of healthy competition, no
lement exercises power
T the other," Schorsch said.
Miat makes the Israeli
ation so unhealthy," he
frved, "is the intrusion of
I state into religious mat-
which gives the Orthodox
Monopoly. That is why
r* is so acrimonious in
N- As long as the religious
petition is left to the free
pet it seems to be produc-
ed healthy for the entire
fsn community. Once a
lement has power to ex-
[e another movement, then
Monies destructive."
t training, Schorsch is a
fern Jewish historian.
P. ne said, gives him a sen-
yty to issues that he would
I have had if he were an
Rity on ancient Judaism.
J mam devotion now is to a
Ption of the Conser-
ve movement.
_ think that it is also ex-
2i'pPOrtant t0 build
Pjnui Conservative move-
K^1 a"d that's one of
P'ngs I ve devoted a lot of
F to th,s year. I think that
leioueSpe,;ate|y needs a
ES;...a,t"ntiv to
Cr Urthodoxy or nothing.
Vt^r^1"6 ^in this
l*nt of Arsch sad. "^
Wdhpi merican Jewry
KonSt t0 Judaism. The
Reason we can risk that in
PSfeause'tis a Jewish
During his tenure with the
Jewish Theological Seminary
of America, Schorsch saw the
first class of women admitted
to the rabbinical and cantoris)
schools.
The decision was reflective
of mainstream Conservativism
and really was the first time
the Seminary had to take a
religious stand, Schorsch said.
There's no question that
egalitarianism is becoming the
prevailing norm and Schorsch
predicts that the feminist
movement will impact on Or-
thodoxy just as it has within
other movements.
Schorsch, addressing the
opening of the new Seminary
regional office on Sheridan
Boulevard, said the office is
important because it expresses
a sense of permanence.
"We're here to stay. We are
determined to create a visible
and fruitful presence in the
Miami area. The Seminary has
been here for many years, hut
much of the Seminary's in-
terest in those years was the
snowbirds.
"But this office is interested
in the permanent residents of
the metropolitan area. This is
a large and vital Conservative
Jewish community and the
Seminary has much to offer it
and seeks to develop a much
closer relationship with that
community."
The office will include new
Southeast Region Executive
Director Jacquelynne
Reichbaum, who lives in
Hollywood. Reichbaum was
formerly with the American
Friends of Hebrew University
as the director for Dade Coun-
ty and prior to that was
Women's Division Director for
the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale and
the National Council of Jewish
Women.
"What makes this seminary
different from other fund rais-
ing organizations is we're the
Center for Conservative
Judaism," Reichbaum said.
"It's the center of religious
education for rabbis, cantors
and Jewish educators who go
out into the communities so
the effect this Seminary has on
the American Jewish com-
munity is much broader than
just an educational
community."
The chairman of the
Southeast Region Board is
Norman Sholk, of Kendall.
Yiddish Class
George Miller
Comedian Invited
To Eastside At
The Surfside
NnerhQPerc,ent are forced
Enemfelves nationally
'"Lrelin-inin-i
Girt Bossak's "Sounds of
Yiddish: The Jewish Connec-
tion" class enters its eighth
year Tuesday, Sept. 8.
Sessions in the ongoing class
take place every Tuesday,
1:30-3 p.m. at the South Dade
Jewish Community Center.
Conversational Yiddish is of-
fered to Beginner and In-
termediate students, who are
taught vocabulary, folkways,
beliefs, and Jewish culture.
Call Helene Leibowitz,
251-1394, for information.
At age 40. comedian George
Miller has joked his way on to
national television shows that
are the mark of success. He is
an old-timer on shows such as
Johnny Carson and David
l.etterman.
Miller has been invited to ap-
pear at the grand opening of a
new hot comedy spot in Miami.
"Eastside at the Surfside" at
the Surfside Hotel on Collins
Avenue. He will appear Sept.
l-'i.
Miller's fall series "Comedy-
Club" will premier as a na-
tional PBS special on Sept. 19.
"I guess I just inherited it."
Miller said of his humor. "I had
six funny uncles."
Born in Seattle, Miller now
lives in Los Angeles. Like
other comedians who have
made the big time. Miller got
his start at the Comedy Store
in Los Angeles.
Miller says he just says
whatever he thinks is funny,
such as, "I worked at a
restaurant when I first started
out. I was a salad bar cheater
spotter."
Mid/Life Service
Foundation
Functions
Mid/Life Services Founda-
tion sponsors a support group
to help men and women deal
with problems of the middle
years.
This active group invites all
interested men and women to
its first meeting of the Fall
season on Wednesday, Sept. 9.
The group will meet each
Wednesday evening, 7:30-9
p.m., at the Holiday Inn op-
posite the University of Miami.
The moderator will be Dr.
Marshall Farkas, formerly a
clinical psychologist and
presently an attorney who
specializes in marriage and
family law. He was recently on
the Oprah Winfrey Show with
a member of the Support
Group.
Mid/Life Services Founda-
tion is also forming a Support
Group for Widows and middle
aged persons with Widowed
Mothers, catering to the
critical needs of widowhood.
Those interested in atten-
ding an introductory meeting,
may contact the Foundation.
Classic Films
Classic films, both foreign
and domestic, will continue to
appear this year on a monthly
basis at the Colony Theater on
Miami Beach from September
to May. There will be both
afternoon and evening show-
ings. A diverse collection of
Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian^ Page 11-B
Lubavitch Institute A
Sunday Mini-Yeshiva
The Lubavitch community
has instituted a Sunday morn-
ing mini-Yeshiva geared for
lay members of the communi-
ty, a move Lubavitch said is in
keeping with a call from
Lubavitcher Rebbe Menachem
M. Sehneerson that Torah
learning should be increased
during the month of Elul.
The course will offer
Chassidic Philosophy,
Shulchan Oruch (Code of
Jewish Law) and various other
Torah subjects.
The classes are free and con-
ducted in the Beis Midrosh on
Alton Road.
Rabbi Abraham Korf,
Chabad Regional Director,
said. "The month of Elul which
precedes the Rosh
Hashanah/Yom Kippur holiday
period is especially ap-
propriate for an increase in
one's Jewish awareness as it is
Rabbi Abraham Korf
the month designated for
Tshuva a return to one's
heritage and Jewish roots."
House of Prime Steaks
owned by Robert Former Manager of Prime Steak Houxe
Welcomes All Old & New
Customers To A Fiesta
ooooooooooooooooooooooooc
Full Breakfast from : a.,,, 1 .99
Lwtch Salad Bar *2.50
Famous Early Bird ."> p.m.-1 I p.m.
Prime Rib of Beef An Jus
Filel of Flounder
1/2 Broiled or Fried Chicken $050
1/2 Roast Duek O
Includes French Onion Soup or Soup of
the Day, Garden Salad, Baked Potato.
Chocolate Parfait
125th & W. Dixie llwy.
S.l\. Corner I'orilU -rl\ I inn- Hi -Inn ml
RESERVATIONS ACCEPTED 895-6529
% m m tt ? ? tt
Miami Parrot Club,
Inc.
1st Annual
Cage-Bird
Show
*) Sunday,
September 13
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
at
The Biltmore Hotel
1200 Anastasia Avenue
Coral Gables
for information call
Regina
251-3895


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 4, 1987
Deaths
Leo Steinman, Foster
Father To 70 Kids
Leo Steinman, a former
B'nai B'rith president in South
Florida and one-time foster
parent to more than 70 disad-
vantage kids, died Aug. 27 at
the Miami Jewish Home for
the Aged. Mr. Steinman, 76,
had Parkinson's Disease.
During his 10 years as Presi-
dent of B'nai B'rith's Coral
Gables chapter, Mr. Steinman
served as B'nai B'rith's na-
tional commissioner for com-
munity and veteran affairs. In
1969, he helped to establish
the Jewish community's in-
volvement with the Salvation
Army by volunteering to man
the annual brass kettle
Christmas drive.
A native of St. Paul, Minn.,
Mr. Steinman became involved
with the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith after
moving to Miami in 1938.
"He always took the causes
that no one else wanted," said
his son, Alan, "the kids with
cystic fibrosis who shook,
Seminole Indian kids living in
the Everglades and boys
without families living at
youth homes."
In 1945, Mr. Steinman
BOLOTIN
Sidney Roy. 86, of north Miami Beach, a
resident of Miami for 19 years formerly o!
Chicago, 1L. passed away Aug. 26. Beloved
and devoted husband of Lillian for 61 years,
loving father to Zenia B. Revitz and
Beatrice Lowe, adored grandfather of Ran-
di Blementhal, Jerilynn Gidney. Iris Revitz,
Barry Lowe, Peter Lowe and Sherri Ann
Lowe and wonderful greatgrandfather to
Candice Gidney, Charles Blumenthal, Ben-
jamin Gidney and Jesse Blumenthal. Mr.
Bolotin owned Bolotin Camera Exchange in
Chicago and was a life long philanthropist.
Who supported many causes in Chicago.
Miami and Israel. He and his wife built the
Lillian and Sidney Kolotin Diagnostic
Center in Israel anil were the nKipitfltl "'
many awards and honors, including thotc
from ti.. --iii i I-';n Bondi B'nai B'rith
Youth and Anti-Defamation League,
>RT, \KMIH AM1T Vt
National Fund, I Club
where
. .i Katl H
ilarship in
nscrih-
Mr Bolotin
Me m installed in the
Prime Minister'! Club and the President*!
r Ins support of Israel Bonds and he
was a member of the Aventura Jewish
Center Sen i hold at Ifenorah
North Miami Beach
c055Tetf>tV


,-,?<
w i
started helping raise other
people's kids through Florida's
Foster Parent Program. He
remained with the program
until his disease left him
hospitalized. More than 70
boys many coming from
state-run youth homes in
Okeechobee and Dade
County's Youth Hall have
stayed in his comfortable,
three-bedroom house outside
downtown Miami. Most of the
boys stayed a couple of weeks
or months, but a few, his son
recalled, remained for years.
Mr. Steinman also made
sure other disadvantaged and
handicapped kids were able to
participate in community pro-
jects and services. In 1964 he
was honored as Dade County's
Outstanding Citizen and in
1970 was named Dade's
Outstanding Community
Volunteer.
Besides his son, Mr. Stein-
man is survived by another
son, Stuart, and a daughter,
Donna Burke.
A memorial service was held
at the Miami Jewish Home for
the Aged.
KOHN
Frida Friedman. 85, of North Miami Beach,
passed away August 28. Survived by her
daughter Gloria (Forrest) Raff el; brothers
Moishe and Jacob Auerhan; sisters. Helen
Wilder and Margaret Grunwaid; grand-
children Dr. Marc (Jeanne) Rubenson and
Ellen (Thomas) Erlanger. Services and in-
terment in Pittsburgh, Pa. Arrangements
by LevittWeinstein.
ABRAMS. Rom 77, formerly of Miami
Beach The Riverside.
EPSTEIN, Perrj S3, of Miami Beach.
August 81. The Riverside
FIUTH David, Bfl of Miami, August 81.
Service* and interment held at Mt Nebo
SHl'LMAN William of North Miami.
Augusl 31 Eternal Light
COOKE, !. i 7 1 tugusl 29. The
GREENBERG, ibraha
gust 30, The River i
ROSEN, .i.ii i i, August 31,
ROSENBERG, Seymour 69 I Miami
August 31. The River
LEVY, Marvm. August 80. Servio I d
in New Vork
KAPLAN, George, 7;; Services were held.
KLINGER Bertie /. 73, of Sui
August 26 The Riverside
GRAVER, Abraham L of North Miami
Beach Rubin-Zilhert.
LTTMAN, IfoUie. 96, of Miami Beach.
August 21 The Riverside
I.EVITCH. David Eternal Light.
LIFTIN, Hilda. 85. of Miami Beach The
Riverside.
BOLTANSKY. Salomon, of Miami Beach
Rubin Zilbert.
Leo Steinman
Founder Of
Zim Line
TEL AVIV (JTA) Naf-
tali Wydra, founder of the Zim
Israel National Shipping Line
and later founder and manager
of the Israel Shipping and
Aviation Research Institute,
died Aug. 26 at age 78. Wydra
was born in Leipzig, Germany,
and educated at German
universities before im-
migrating to Palestine in 1933,
when he opened a shipping and
customs clearing agency.
In 1936, he took over the
Jewish Agency's Maritime
Division and in 1947 organized
and managed the Zim Shipp-
ing Company, serving as its
general manager until 1966.
He developed it from a one-
ship company to an interna-
tional concern operating 150
vessels, 70 of them its own.
In the early 1960's, Wydra
founded and organized the
Black Star Shipping Lint- for
Ghana and the Five Star Line
for Burma.
Wydra served from 1969-81
as chairman of the Israel Ports
Authority, and then founded
the research institute that he
managed until his death.
GELB
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Open Every DayClosed Sabbat*
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888
When a loss occurs
away from home.
m
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Dade County
M221WH
Brovv.ird County
:
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Mr. Steinman will be sorely missed by his
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hA u.'fT 8 m'<);']
Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian P^ge 13-B
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
iTHF CIRCUIT COURT OF
Vv FIFVENTH JUDICIAL
"CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Ciw No. 87-32774 CA-21
J NOTICE OF ACTION
Iderm- home loan MOR
Pecorporation,
Tlaintiff
L-KEimiMNl.ctux.. etal..
A,.|Vn,iaiits
I ALFREDO I'INI
| Residence Unknown
Ljrc nd If dead, all parties
rctaimiiV inUT.-i by. through
under OT against ALFRLUO
PINT, and all parties having
or claiming'" have any right,
tide or interest in the proper-
h herein described.
Larehereb) notified that an
L to foreclose i mortgage on
[following propert) in DADE
Intv. Hi
fi' K Block I. in LAKE
MARKS AT WESTWTND,
M h was record-
t ,t Book 120. PmwBO,
If the Public Records ofDnde
fountv Florida
[been'file' against you and you
j required to erve copy of
|r writti ,f an>'-t0 '
Tstuart 11 Gitlitt. Esq., At-
Jin for Plaintiff, whoseaddreaa
Is'uiti' 214, 1570 Madruga
Inui'. Coral Gablee, Florida,
|;. or before September
I .- the original
fcthederk of this court either
jprr terries on I'lamtiffs at-
: >telv thereafter.
twite a defaull will i^ entered
Ln*t you l"r trie relief demand-
In the complaint
I'lTNKS.- mj hand and the teal
|thi> court this 24th day of
RICHARD P. BRINKER
the Court
Bj Barbara Rodriguei
A- Deput} Clerk
)4i> August 28
i. 11.18, 1987
(THE! IKt I IT COURT OF
IIIK ELEVENTH JUDICI \l.
IclRCIITOF FLORIDA IN
{AND FOR DADE ( OUNTY
pENERALJI RISDICTION
DIVISION
|i \>l N(l K7-3I098 ( \ M
SOTK I 01 UTION
I
I
I
I tK.etal..
1
t LINDA ;. !i|. vn.F.y
mown
fOl A R K II I R K |i V
pTIFIED action for
I '! rtgage on the
1 i property:
il."i 12 Block :; of GRIFF
|IMi BISCAY \i: PARK
-STATES, sccording to the
jrlat tl:. .ir,i,.,j ;n
IPlai B.>k ",. Page 83, of the
IPntJlie Records of DadeCoun-
|'y. Florida
been filed against you and you
I require.! to serve a copy of
|*mdefeniea,h*By.toitl
Vheppard Faber, AltorMJ for
pmtiff, whoai address is Suite
,[ ranoa, Coral
* Florida. 33146 on or before
tptember IS [987 and file the
P"al with the Clerk of this
r."' -erne, on
Pnujl I attorney or immediately
"natter; otherwise a default will
.entered against you for trK,
I uide.1 in the complaint.
l.k ,. s'"> "and and the seal
[ this 14 "WARD P. BRINKER
Rv!C,k'rk"f,1'e Court
* BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
0i As Deputy Clerk
August 21, 28;
September 4,11,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-34781-15
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK,
AS TRUSTEE FOR THE DADE
COUNTY HOUSING FINANCE
AUTHORITY,
Plaintiff
vs.
PATRICK THOMAS
BLIIBELLO. et ux et al.,
Defendants.
TO: PATRICK THOMAS
BLUBELLO and
DIANE M. BLUBELLO,
his wife
1592 Pirkle-Road
Norcross, GA 30093
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of
Mortgage on the following
described property:
Lots 13. 14 and 15 less the
South 70 feet. Block 12.
BUNKI8T GROVE,
according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book Page 49 of the
Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any,
to it. on Stuart H. Gitlilz,
Attorney for Plaintiff, whose
address is Suite 211. 1570
Madruga Avenue. Coral Gables.
Florida, .'t.'ti4ti on or before
September 11, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
I'lamtiffs attorney Of
immediately thereafter; otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal "f this Court this 10 day of
August. 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
17924 August it. 21, 28;
September 4, 1987
HEREBY GIVEN
.....ring to
, mderthefjc-
IMPORTED
k-- \, 162 \\V 60th
166 in
d name with
I ourt of
'FLOWER
i
August 28;
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
\M> FOR DADE COI \n
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
( \si: NO. 87-84538 27
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE \ssoi [Al ION ai
ition organist d an i existing
under the laws of the United
State- of America.
Plaintiff
\s.
JONI G DOLE, et al.,
I Mandanti
TO JONI <; DOLE
27l!i N.W, 23 rd Street
Forth Worth, Texas 76106
TOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property,
Lot 2. Block 34. BENT
TREE CENTER, according
to the plat thereof, as record-
ed in Plat Book 109 at I'ai a
82 of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida.
has batn filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it.
OK Stuart H. Gitlitz. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruge Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
September 11. 1987 ami file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
I'lamtiffs attorney or imme.li.it eh
thereafter; otherwise a default will
lie entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 7 day of August,
I'AST
RICHARD P. BRINKER
A- ( Terk of the Court
By JOHN BRANDA
As Deputy (Terk
17921 August 14.21.28;
September 4. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME I.WN
NOTICE IS MKKKin GIVEN
that the undersigned, deaii
engage m buaJIMMM iin'loi
titious name ORDONEZ Til
720 SW 100 Ct Circle Miam
i to register said nan
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
County Fli
ORDONEZ ENTERPRISES,
INC
I72r> August I4.*1.2B:
September I 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87 4232
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MADELEINE LIGETI
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of MADELEINE
LIGETI. deceased. File Number
87 4232. is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County. Florida,
Prolate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida. The personal
representative of the estate is
ACNES FRKUND. whose address
is 6485 S.W. 52nd Street, Miami,
Florida 33155. The name and ad
dress of the personal represon
tativc's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above curt a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall In-
stated If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall In- stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
Claim to the clerk to enable the
dork to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF TH E Fl RST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
the) ma) have thai challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the pi
tentative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FORE V ER
BARRED
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administi
August 28, 1987.
AGNESFREUND
\- Personal Representative
of the Estate of
MADELEINE LIGETI
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
NELSON C. KESHEN, ESQ.
B906 S.W 87th Avenue. Suite 209
Miami. Florida 88176
Telephone: (806) 696-1688
17940 August 28.
September 4. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Integrated World
Enterprises at 8020 N.W. 60th St.
Miami, Fl 33166 intend.- to
register said name with the Clerk
Of the Circuit Court of Hade Coun-
ty Florida.
Elba Serrano
17944 August 28.
September 4. 11. 18, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Daphne's Cleaners,
Inc. at number 12117 S Dixie
Highway, in the City of Miami,
Florida intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
( ourt of Dade County. Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 8
day of May. 1987
Carhsori li
, By: Don DiGiaconm. President
i William C Susaman
1 Attorney for Applicant
! 100 North Biacayna Boule
Smte ISlo
Miami. Florida 81130
I.-,711 Ma\ 16,22.29;
June
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-4774
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
VINCAS BITINAS.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that the administration of
the estate of Vincas Bitinas.
deceased. File Number 87-4774. is
(lending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which Is T.'i
W Flagler Street, Miami, FL
38180, The personal roproson
tative of the estate is Dalia N.
PlepyS, whose addn-ss is 105
Dewberry, Lake Jackson, Texas
77566. The name and address of
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth bsjow,
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to Tile with the clerk .if
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
maj have Each claim must he in
writing ami must indicate the basil
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or Ins agent or
attorney, anil the amount claimed
If the claim is not yet due. the date \
when it will become due shall In-
stated If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall lx- stated. If the'
claim is secured the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver Sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per
tonal representative,
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a cop) of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
D \T F. OF T H E I 1 RST
PUBLIC ATI ON OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objection,
they maj have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualification- of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS. HI M VNDS
ANDOBJEI TIONS NOT. SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Dati ion ol
tin.- Notice of Ad
August 28, 198*
Dalia N. Pk
As Personal Repn ive
of thi I -
Vincas Bil
11, > i
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
HENRY M WAITZKIN
BOO 71st Stn
I'd Box 41-4681
Miami. FL88141-4631
Telephone (80S) 86
17949 August 28;
September i. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name VELVASCURGE at
11807 Northwest 80th A\enue. Bay
I IB, Hialeah Gardens, Florida in-
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida
GREG M.I.Al GHLIN
LUCIANO P. DELGADO
JUANGIRON
STEVEN M OTTAWA
RANDALL E RUSH
JOSHUA D. BASH ESQ
Attorney for VELVASCURGE
SUITE 228
1926 HOLLYWOOD BLVD
HOLLYWOOD, FL 88020
:tn.Y!l22 I 100/940- 12(H)
17961 September4, II;
I- 26, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under tl
tious "amc NACHO APART
MI NTS at 14190 W Dixie
Highway, No Miami. Fl 88161 in-
tend to register said name with the
(Terk of the Circuit Court ol Dade
County, Florida
Shirley Ash and
WuTard K Splittstoeeaer I
Attorneys for Applicants
13122 Wc.-t Dixie Highway, Suite
H
North Miami. Fl I
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87-36913 (28)
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
YRAIDA LOGSDON.
Petitioner,
and
MICHAEL LOGSDON
Respondent.
TO: MICHAEL LOGSDON
Last Known Residence:
2916 East College Ave.
Apt. 114
Boulder. Colo. 80808
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu
tion of Marriage has boon filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on MELVIN
I A8HER, E8Q., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 826
South Bayahore Drive, Suite 648,
Miami. EL 88181. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
September 25. 1987; otherwise a
default will lie entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 24th dav of August. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As (Terk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By .lenms L. Russell
As DePUt) Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
17946 August 28.
September 1.11,18, nS7
IN THE CIRCUIT (OURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-4650
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
PAUL ABRAHAM
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
Ml. ABRAHAM, deceased,
File Number >7 1660, is pending in
the Circuit Court for DADE Coun-
ty, Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is 78 West
Flagler Street, M in Florida
n The nan* Iresses
onal rep'.-, i tative and
personal rep'
' '"
All inter, ire re-
quired to file v. court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST ITHI.K VTION OF
nils NOTICE (1) claims
against the cstal. in) ob-
n b) an inten
whom tins notice was lerved that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications ol tne pt
representative, venue, or juriadic
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJ EC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
Ft i U EVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice ha.-
begun on August 28. 1987
Personal Representative
SAMUEL ABRAHAMS
276 Webster Avenue
Brooklyn, Nav, York 11880
Attorne) nr Personal
Representative:
MYRON ALBERT
275 Webster Avenue
Brooklyn. New York 11280
Telephone: (712) 863-7464
17960 August 28.
September 4,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in busines- under the fie-
i i t i o u s n a m c T A C A
DISTRIBUTORS hi 8076 S.W
107 Ave No. Ill Miami. Fla
88178 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the In cuit
Court of Dade County, Florida
TARQUINO CALIXTO
8n7."i S W 107 Ave
Miami Fla.
I7!H", August V 14.21 I5W'
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME I. \w
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN
that the undi ng to
engage in bu>me>- under the tic
name PROPERTY IN
\ ESTMENT SYSTI '<
>\\ 1st S: Miai
tend to register -. 'h the
Clerk of the Circuit I
( ount>. Fl'
RAl'l. \ OUVA
\N \ G OI.IV \
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-818
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANDRES DELGADO.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ANDRES DELGADO. deceas-
ed. File Number 87-818, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida. Probate Division.
the address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at
tome) are set forth Ih-Iow.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
Till FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (21 any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the |iersonal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TH INS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice was
begun on September 4, 1987.
Personal Representatives:
ArisG. Del Valla
567 E :t 1 st Street
Hialeah. Florida :l) 13
Aida T. I Mai
9997 N.W. 6th Avenue
Miami. Florida 38160
Attorney for I'ersonal
Representative:
Sylvan Holtzman
HOLTZMAN, KRINZMAN A
EQUELS
8686 Sunset Drive. Suit,' l!i
Miami. Florida 38148
Telephone: (806) .....
17957 September 4, 11, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-.il 1.17 CA-17
NOTICE OF \( tion
FLORIDA NATION \l RANK OF
MIAMI AS TRUSTEE FoR THE
HOUSING FINANCE v'THOKI
T Y O F D AI N T >
FLORIDA INUI- I; A TRUST IN
D E N T l< R I DAI
DECEMBER i
Plaii
vs
ROBIN (, RAIMONDI.
et al..
Defendants
TO: ROBING RAIMONDI
721 Curtis- Parl
No. _'
Miami Springs. Florida
YOU ARE NOTIFIED thai an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Condominiun Parcel No
27 li in ROZLAND CON
DOMINIUM, according to
the Declaration of Con
dommium thereof, recorded
September 17, 1981, in Of
ficial Records Book 112115. it
Page 1593 of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
arc required to serve a copy of
your written defense.-, if any. to it
on Stuart II Gitlit/. Esq., At-
I torney for Plaintiff, whose address
is Suite 214. 1670 Madruga
Avenue. Coral Gables, Florida.
:i,(i4i; on or before October 9th,
1987, and file the original with the
clerk of this court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorney or
immediate!) thereafter, otherwise
i default will U' entiled against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint
WITNESS m\ hand and the seal
of this court this 1st da) "!
September,
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As (Terk of the Court
B) Barbara Rodriguei
As Deputy Clerk
17971 Septen lier I, II;
18.26. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FKTITIOl S N Wll I \\\
NOT* 1 III :l \ IS UIVEN
that the und
engage in b
titious name La K\ ^
.,ii- :
Dadi i
.lack \'


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 4, 1987
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES

IN THK CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-6620
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JAMBS I. C.ARRETT.
Dmnd
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of JAMES I. GARRETT. deceas-
ed, File Number 86-6620. is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida. Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the ancillary personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
T10NS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 4, 1987.
Ancillary Personal
Representative:
IRVING CYPEN, ESQ.
825 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MYLES G. CYPEN, ESQ.
CYPEN &CYPEN
825 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Telephone: (305) 532-3200
17956 September 4, 11, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-14165 FC (08)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage of
BARBARA HYLDIGATH
ABRAHAMS.
Petitioner,
and
ALTY FERNANDIE
ABRAHAMS.
Respondent.
TO: Mr. Alty F. Abrahams
25 Pembroke Hall Drive
Kingston. Jamaica W.I.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
ROBERT M. JASINSKI, ESQ., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad
dress is The Roney Plaza, Suite
M-8, 2301 Collins Avenue, Miami
Beach. Florida 33139, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
September 18. 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 12 day of August. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ROBERT M. JASINSKI. ESQ.
The Roney Plaia. Suite M-8
2301 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
"H August 21,28;
September 4. 11,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
M 'TICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
' in business under the fic-
titious name Coconut Grove Stain-
ed Gtas* at 2923 S.W. 30 Court.
Coconut Grove. Florida 33133 in-
to rtgflter Mid name with
I k nf the Circuit Court of
Dado < lounty, Florida
Barbara Schuman. 50%
loan ('. Teglas. 50%
August SI, SB;
SeptemUr I, I !
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-3581 (02)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RALPH PAPE,
, a/k/a RALPH C. PAPE.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
1 TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
I AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration of
the estate of RALPH PAPE, a/k/a
RALPH C. PAPE, deceased. File
Number 87-3581 (02), is pending in
the Circuit Court for DADE Coun-
ty. Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 3rd Floor,
Dade County Courthouse, 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
33130. The personal represen-
tative of the estate is THOMAS A.
PAPE. whose address is 324 Spr-
ing Valley Court. Huntsville,
Alabama, 35802. The name and ad-
dress of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
August 28. 1987.
THOMAS A. PAPE
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
RALPH PAPE, a/k/a
RALPH C. PAPE
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
MICHAEL G. BASS. PA.
8900 S.W. 107th Avenue.
Suite 206
Miami, FL 33176
Telephone: (305) 595-9300
17941 August 28;
September 4. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Virginia Miller
Galleries; Artspace; Art-
space/Virginia Miller Galleries:
Virginia Miller Galleries/Artspace;
ArtSpace at 169 Madeira Avenue.
Coral Gables, Florida 33134 intend
to register said names with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Virginia Miller Gallery. Inc.
17954 September 4, 11;
18, 25. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name WESLEY
FASHION. WESLEY SPORTS
WEAR. CEST LA VIE at 4150
N.W. 7 St Suite 207. Miami. Fl
33126 intends to register
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade (dunty. Florida.
Tropical Storm, Inc.
(ownerl
August 28;
BapMfflber I, n 18, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
(nil Action No. 87-36279 09
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
LUIS GABRIEL OQUENDO.
Petitioner,
and
CARMEN SEGUNDA BERNAL
OQUENDO,
Respondent.
TO: CARMEN SEGUNDA
BERNAL OQUENDO
Residence:
Tercera Avenida con
Segunda Transversal
Edificio Excelsior
Piso 8 Apt. 36
Loas Palos Grandes.
Caracas. Venezuela, S.A.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
HAROLD CEASE. ESQ.. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 2720 West Flagler Street,
Miami, FL 33135, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
September 26. 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and theseal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 18 day of August, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By JOHN BRANDA
As Deputy Celrk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HAROLD CEASE. ESQ.
CEASE & CEASE
2720 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33135
17937 August 21.28;
___________September 4,11,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-4284
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BETTY LEVNER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of BETTY LEVNER, deceased.
File Number 87-4284. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is Dade County
Courthouse, 73 W. Flagler Street.
Miami, Florida 33130. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) anj ob-
jection by an interested person to '
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
AIL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 4, 1987.
Personal Representative:
Lawrence Milliard Levner
201 East 42nd Street
New York, New York 10017
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler Street. Suite 1201
Biscayne Building
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 374-3116
Florida Bar No. 059023
17974 September 4. 11,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie-
UtiOUl name NEW STAR SUPER
MARKET at 1217 71st Street.
Miami Baadl, FL 33141 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit (Hurt of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
MERCEDESBOT0
September 4, II;
IN" THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 87-4896
Division: 04
IN RE ESTATE OF
LAWRENCE L. PRBI88,
I >. -i sated
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION"
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHE PER
SONS INTERESTED IN THE
ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of LAWRENCE
L. PREISS, deceased, File
Number 87-4896, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33131. The
co-personal representatives of the
estate are URSULA PREISS and
LEON POMERANCE. whose ad-
dress is c/o Ursula Preiss, 11
Island Ave., Apt. 1010, Miami
Beach, FL 33139. The name and
address of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
September 4. 1987.
LEON POMERANCE as Co
Personal
Representative of the Estate of
LAWRENCE L. PREISS.
Deceased
URSULA PREISS
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
LAWRENCE L. PREISS
Decease
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
KATHLEEN MARKEY, PA
Shea & Gould
1428 Brickell Avenue. Suite 700
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 371 9041
17969 September 4. 11.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-4409
Florida Bar No. 251143
IN RE: ESTATE OF
PHILLIP ELLINGTON.
ITORNKVK.iKl.KKs'llVul
REPRESENT ATI \V. MM
5PRE8ENTATIVE
Richard I Kroop(l28028i
Kwitney. Kroon &
P.A

NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name "Joyeria La
Favorita" at 211 Lincoln Rd..
Miami Beach, FL 33139 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Jack Matalon and
Ramon Nunez
as officers of
211 Corporation
17973 September 4, 11;
18.25. 1987
Deceased u L"u"U\R"M S""" Ml
Deceased Mlalnl Beadl p^^. i-
lelcphone: (806) 538
nUfBM '
___________ s,,l't<'mber4,19
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of PHILLIP ELLINGTON,
deceased, File Number 87-4409, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami.
Florida 33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob TO: MICHAEL W CHARLES
jection by an interested person on 2654 N.E. 135th Street
whom this notice was served that North Miami. Floridi 331911
challenges the validity of the will, YOU ARE II K r'f'b'i
the qualifications of the personal NOTIFIED that an action
representative, venue, or jurisdic- Foreclosure of Mortgage on
tion of the court. following described property
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 28. 1987.
IN THE CIRCUIT roi-BTnl
THE ELEVENTH jffi 1
CIRCUIT OF FLOR,Rll
AND FOR DADE COIstv
GENERAL JURISIlK
DIVISION m\
CASE NO. 87-33371 CAM1
NOTICE OF ACTION
SOUTH FLORIDA SAVINcs
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
Plaintiff
vs.
MICHAEL W. CHARLES .
Defendants.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
thai the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the lie
titious name HYSTERICS
I '!.< (THING intend to register amid
name with the Clerk of the ( ircuil
Court of Dade County, Florida
CARVAJAL ENTERPRISE INC
9818 SW 40th Si
Miami Fl. 88165
17968 September 4,
II. 18,26, 1'I.--7
Personal Representative:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MARTIN W. WASSERMAN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
17951 August 28;
LOT 1. BLOCK 1. of
HIDDEN COVE TOWN-
HOUSES, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in I
Plat Book 119, Page 64, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida. AND th,
West 30 feet of Tract B HID
D E N C 0 V II
TOWNHOUSES. Plat Book I
119, Page 64, of the Public]
Records of Dade Countv
Florida,
has been filed against you and j.
are required to serve a copy c.
your written defenses. ifany,Ui<
September 4,1987 on Sheppard Faber, Attorney I
------------------------ Plaintiff, whose address is !
- 214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, I...
Gables, Florida, 33146 on orbefoi
September 11, 1987 and filet
original with the Clerk of
Court either before service
Plaintiffs attorney or immeduN
thereafter; otherwise ;. default 1
be entered against you for
relief demanded in the complaint|
WITNESS my band and the
of this Court this 6 da) of As
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUOJ
As Deputy Clerk
17923 August 14.21.1
September 4. lid
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-3623
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BENJAMIN RUBIN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration of
the estate of BENJAMIN RUBIN.
deceased, File Number 87-3623, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami.
Florida 33130. The personal
representative of the estate is Jack
Rubin, whose address is 66
Tedesco St., Marblehead.
Massachusetts 01945. The name
and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attornry, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE I
IN THE CIRCUIT ((II RTOFl
THE ELEVENTH JlDICIAll
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IS |
AND FOR DADE COUNT!
Civil Action
No. 87-36957 (291
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION |
IN RE: THE MARRIACK OF
BERNADETTE JULOT.
Petitioner/Wife
and
DANIEL JULOT.
Respondent/Husband
TO: Mr. Daniel Julot
80 Spruce St. No. 6F
Stanford. Conn. 06902
YOU ARE HEREBY N0TII
FIED that a petition fur DissoluJ
tion of Marriage has been filed 1
commenced in this court and y*|
are required to serve a copy
your written defenses, if any. to itl
on Leonard Selkowtir
torney for Petitioner, whose *H
dress is Suite 810 Biscayncl
Building, 19 W. Flagler Street. I
Miami, Florida 33130. and file the I
original with the clerk of the above I
styled court on or beforel
September 25. 1987. otherwise >l
claim is secured the security shall d*fault *'" be entered (gain*) you
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FII
ED WILL BE FOREVER Telephone:(808)868-29M
BAKRED 17947 Am
for the relief demanded in the com
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four eon-
secutive weeks in THK JEiwIeU
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 24th day of August. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: E. Seidl
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner
Leonard Selkowitz. .1 l>
Suit 810 Biscayne Building
19 Wrst Flagler Btreel
Miami. Florida 33130
BAKRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration
August 88, 1987.
Jack Rulnn
\ I'' r-onal Representative
of the Estate of
BENJAMIN Rl BIN
September 4. II

For Legal Forms
Call 373-4605


Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
FORECLOSURE SALES-PUBLIC NOTICES
,N THE CIRCUIT COURT
,K THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADECOUNTY. FLORIDA
KNERA1. JURISDICTION
0t DIVISION
fASE NO. 86-14184 (CA 23)
NOTICE OF ACTION
vK\V METROPOLITAN
FEDERAL SAVINGS AND
[nAN ASSOCIATION.
Plaintiff.
COLORADO PRIME (FL). INC.
ltd..
ivfendants
TO IAN LLOYD-JONES and
USA ANN LLOYD-JONES.
residence unknown, if they are liv-
ing and ifthey are dead, to all par-
ties claiming interest by, through,
under or against the said IAN
IA0YDJONES and LISA ANN
LLOYD-JONES, and all other par-
lies having or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the pro
nertv herein deKribad.
[yOU A RE HEREBY
NOTIFIED, that an action to
jrtdott mortgtgoon the follow-
ing described property in Dade
County, Florida
Lot 9. in Block 32. of SNAP-
PERCREEK
TOWNHOUSE, SECTION
SEVEN, according to the
Rat thereof, recorded in Plat
B-*.k 96, il Page 76, of the
Public Records i if Dade Coun-
ts Florida
i been filed against you and you
ire requireil U) lerve I copy of
tour written defneeea, if any. to it
in Keith. Mack. Lewis. Allison &
tahea. Piaintiff'i attorneys,
hose address is 111 N.E. 1st
tout, Miami. Florida 33132, on
irbefore(Ktolr ^. 1967, and file
leoriginal with the Clerk of this
lurt either before service on
laintiff s attorneyi or immediate
) thereafter, otherwise, a default
be entered against you for the
lief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seil of
usCourt on the 31 day of August.
"IT.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: DIANA CAMPBELL
Deputy Clerk
September 4.
11.18,25.1987
NOTICE I NDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
at the undersigned, desiring to
Ingage in business under the fie-
itraus name CDL REALTY. INC.
k 2851 S.W. 31 Avenue. Miami,
flonda intend to register said
ame with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
| CROP DATA LEASING. INC.
By Calvin L Bass. President
September*. 11;
18.25.1987
NOTICE OF SALE
IN RSIANT TO CHAPTER 45
X THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
HE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
BCUTT, IN AND FOR DADE
OUNTY. FLORIDA
:RAL JURISDICTION
ani "VISION
,., :ASE NO 87-25930
EDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
CACE ASSOCIATION. A
aittd Sute, corporation.
Uintifftsl
-
URENCEE.COWART.etal..
Wwdint(s)
WnCE IS hEREBY GIVEN
2* to an Order or Final
"jnwnt entered in this case now
?""in said Court, the style of
* indicated above. I will sell
"* Wgest and best bidder for
on The SOUTH STEPS of
*? Dade County. Florida at
JO. dock AM., on the 21at day
I^^Wr. 1987. the following
UL1^ 10' LINCOLN
^ATES FIRST ADDITION.
22y> the PUt thereof.
fie. & ->
S\RJ?P BRINKER
WfClrcu* Court
u^'< Court Seel)
0puty Clerk
fcjj [r Plaintiff
Sftsar
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-36210 (FC 26)
FAMILY DIVISION
FLORIDA BAR NO. 549551
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
RUSELL ROGG.
Petitioner/Husband,
and
KATHY ROGG,
Respondent/Wife.
TO: KATHY ROGG
Broadwell Road
Morrisonville. N.Y. 12962
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced in this
court and you are required to serve
acopy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on MARIA BREA-
LIPINSKI. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 15912
S.W. 92nd Avenue. Miami, Florida
33157 and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on
or before October 2, 1987; other
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four BOD
secutive weeks in JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 31 day of August, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DIANA CAMPBELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MARIA BREA-LIPINSKI,
ESQUIRE
15912 S.W. 92nd Avenue
Miami, Florida 33157
Attorney for Petitioner
(Phone) (305) 253-7557
17966 September 4.
11.18,25.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Caae No. 87-38513
FAMILY DIVISION 31
IN RE: The marriage of:
MYRTLE MARSHALL.
Petitioner/wife
and
AARON MARSHALL
Respondent/husband
TO: AARON MARSHALL
Residence Address:
YOU, AARON MARSHALL,
residence unknown, are required
to file your answer to the petiton
for dissolution of marriage with
the Clerk of the above Court and
serve a copy thereof upon the peti-
tioner's attorneys, COHEN.
COHEN & COHEN, 622 S.W 1st
Street, Miami. Florida, 33130. on
or before October 9. 1987. or els*'
petition will be confessed.
WITNESS my hand and seal ol
this Court, at Miami, Dade County.
Florida, this September 1. 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
By: E. Seidl
Deputy Clerk
17970 September 4. 11.
18.25.1987
of
Wished 9
"4-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name "MUEBLISIMO" in-
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Sanel Furniture. Inc.
d/b/a Eduardo Furniture
17965 September 4,
11.18.25.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SHOPCEN III IN
VESTMENTS at 1500 San Remo
Avenue. Suite 125. Coral Gables.
Florida 33146 intends to register
laid name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
SHOPCEN III INVESTMENTS.
INC.
AND
PNR III INVESTMENTS. INC.
17919 August 14.21.28;
September 4.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-4899
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILLIAM W. SHAYNE
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of WILLIAM W.
SHAY'NE. deceased, File Number
87-4899, is pending in the Circuit
Court for DADE County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 78 W. Flagler Miami. FL.
33130. The personal represen-
tative of the estate is Beatrice E.
Shayne. whose address is 9 Island
Ave No. 414. Miami Beach. FL.
33139. The name and address of
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall lie stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
September 4. 1987.
Beatrice E. Shayne
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
WILLIAM W SHAYNE
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
William O'Neil III
1111 Lincoln Road No. 505
Miami. Fl 33139
Telephone: (305) 532-1761
17964 September 4, 11.1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 87-35990 (01)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
MARGARETH R. AMBROISE,
Petitioner,
and
EVANS JEAN JOSEPH
AMBROISE.
Respondent.
TO: EVENS JEAN JOSEPH
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon MARGARETH R. AM
BROISE. Petitioner, 9952 North
Kendall Drive, Apartment 3-E,
Miami. Florida 33176, and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before September 18, 1987; other-
wise a default will be entered.
August 19, 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. CASAMAYOR
17963 August 21,28;
September 4. 11.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name EPM Construction.
Inc. at 9301 SW 92nd Ave No.
Bl 15. Miami. FL 33176 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Edward P. Mitchell
17955 September 4,11;
18,25.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87 4774
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
VINCAS BITINAS,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of Vincas Bitinas.
deceased, File Number 87 4774. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
W. Flagler Street, Miami, FL
33130. The personal represen-
tative of the estate is Dalia N.
Plepys. whose address is 105
Dewberry. Lake Jackson. Texas
77566.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must lie in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amoung claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will lie come due shall be
stated If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall lie Mated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one cup to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
September 4.
Dalia N. Plepys
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Vincas Bitinas
I 14 H '# '4 S4 *( 1
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
HENRY M WAITZKIN
800 71st Street
P.O. Box 41 4631
Miami. FL 33141-4631
Telephone: (305) 865-0353
17959 September 4, 11. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Harsel Income Tax &
Bookkeeping Service at 1618A
Alton Road, Miami Beach, Florida
33139 intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
ACCOUNTING BUSINESS
CORP.
By: Seymour Jacobson
Seymour Jacobson, President
ALAN R. LORBER, P.A.
Attorney for Accounting Business
Corp.
1111 Lincoln Road. Suite 680
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
17962 September 4.
11.18,25.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87 4837
Division 04
IN RE:ESTATE OP
FAY POHOLSKY a/k/a FAY
POHL
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of FAY POHOLSKY a/k/a FAY
POHL, deceased. File Number 87
4837, is pending in the Circuit
Court for DADE County, Florida.
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street,
Probate Division. Room 307,
Miami, Florida 33130. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative.venue. or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TS )NS N'( )T S( I FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
iH-gun on September 4, 1987.
Personal Representative
ARNOLD POHL
Route 58
Pleasant Run Road
Flemington. New Jersey 08822
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Wayne A. Cypen
CYPEN&CYPEN
P.O. Box 402099
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Telephone: (305) 532-3200
17958 September 4. 11. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 07-4904
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HYMAN EPSTEIN,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of HYMAN EPSTEIN, deceased.
File Number 07-4904. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is Dade County
Courthouse. 3rd Floor, 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33130. The names and address
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) am ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 4. 1987.
Personal Representative:
PENNY MARLIN
c/o Greater Miami Jewish
Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Barry A. Nelson, P.A.
46 S.W. 1st Street
Suite 201
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 358-1515
17975 September 4.11,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name NEW YORK SHIRT
at 7225-7227 NW 7 Street. Miami,
Florida intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida
New York Wholesale Handbags.
Inc.
Joshua D. Manaster, P.A.
Attorney for
New York Wholesale Handbags.
Inc.
17928 August 21,28;
September 4. 11,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
Uat the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of ROBERT BESEN.
M.D. at number 2000 N.E. 120th
Road, in the City of North Miami,
Florida, intend to register the said
number with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Dated at North Miami, Florida,
this 25 day of August. 1987.
ROBERT HARRIS BESEN.
M.D.. P.A.
By: ROBERT BESEN. M.D..
President
MORTON B. ZEMEL, ESQUIRE
Attorney for Applicant
17952 September 4,11;
18.25.1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-5135
SEC. 24
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION, A
United States corporation,
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
ADOLFO SOLIS. et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above. I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on THE SOUTH
STEPS of the Dade County Cour
thou.se in Miami. Dade County.
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M.. on
the 16th day of September. 1987.
the following described
property:
Unit No. 6. of EASTERN
SHORES GARDEN APART
MENTS, a Condominium, accor-
ding to the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof, as recorded in
Official Records Book 11158, at
Page 1926, of the Public Records
of Dade County, Florida.
DATED" the 3rd day of
September. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Kosenthal & Yarchin, P.A.
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Fl. 33137
Published 9/4-11
aintiff
Rosentha) & Yarchin, P.A.
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Fl. 33137
Published 9/4-11
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-32973 CA 24
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United
States of America,
Plaintiff
VI.
VICTOR MANUEL ARRIAS
DOS SANTOS, et ux.. et al.,
Defendants
TO: CONCEPCION VIZOSO
ESTEBAN
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Foreclosure of Mortgage on the
following described property:
Lot 4. Block 40. BENT
TREE SOUTH, according to
the plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 105 at Page 80
of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Stuart H. Gitlitz. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida, 33146 on or before
October 2. 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 27 day of August,
1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Ai Deputy Clerk
17960 September 4, 11;
18.25.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name A Able North
American at 12555 SW 130 Street
Miami. Fl. intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
A Able Moving & Storage, Inc.
Marvin I Moss.PA
Attorney for
A Able Moving & Storage. Inc.
17932 August 21.28;
September 4, 11.1987



Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Frkiay. September 4. 1987
Styne Makes Music, And The Party Continues

By GERRY MORRIS
Everything is still coming up
"music" for composer-
producer Jule Styne. who has
23 entries in the Broadway
sweepstakes, including lilting
scores for "High Button
Shoes," "Two on the Aisle.'*
"Mr. Wonderful,'* "Fade Out.
Fade In," "Funny Girl."
"Gentlemen Prefer Blondes."
"Gypsy." and "The Bells are
Ringing."
The most prolific and suc-
cessful post-war tunesmith on
Broadway, Styne ranks
alongside Jerome Kern. Cole
Porter, Harold Arlen. Richard
Rodgers and Irving Berlin as
one of the most important
composers in modern musical
theater.
Thumbing through his hit
songs is a melodic trip through
time: '"It's Magic,'
"Everything's Coming Up
Roses." "It's Been a Long.
Long Time" and many more.
Add to that the scores for 20
movies.
Styne was born 81 years ago
in London's East End ghetto
to Orthodox Jewish parents.
He grew up in a home filled
with cantorial and classical
music, but his addiction to the
greasepaint world soon
surfaced.
At age three he bounded on
the stage of the Hippodrome
and sang a duet with Sir Harry
Lauder. the Scottish enter-
tainer. At age eight Jule mov-
ed with his family to Chicago,
where he showed unusual
pianistic talents.
"At eight-and-a-half years of
age I won a scholarship, and at
nine I was a guest soloist with
the Chicago Symphony." he
said.
But. he smilingly recalled, he
had other, less popular
endeavors. My father wasn't
exactly thrilled over my suc-
>s as a songwriter. He would
say. i never paid for you to be
a composer. I paid for you to
be a concert pianist.' He would
tell people. You ought to have
heard him play when he was
eight years old.' Then he'd say.
Play something I can like.'""
he said.
Styne lost the sense of touch
in an index finger after a
serious accident, and it was
then that his interest moved
seriously toward popular
music. He played piano in Ben
Pollack's orchestra that in-
cluded Benny Goodman. Glenn
Miller and other jazz immor-
tals, after which he organized
his own yazz band.
It was the age of
^MafceaMS, ootlegging and
mob rule, and Chicago was
wild. "Listen, whatever mu-
I write, whatever musical in-
tuition I have, it was all made
in Chicago. I've drawn on
Chicago for show after show.
There was Louis Armstrong.
Jack Teagarden. Eddie Con-
don. Harry James. Gene
Krupa. Muggsy Spanier. Bix
Beiderbeck. Earl Hines.
George Wettling and Charlie
Spivak. Never before and
never since has so much
musical talent been gathered
in anv one spot on earth at any
one period. It was a feast." he
said.
A move to Hollywood
brought a job at 20th Century
Fox as a vocal coach for Alice
Faye. Tony Martin and Shirley
Temple. He then landed a job
at Republic Pictures writing
for Roy Rogers and Gene
Autry. "I wrote five or six
songs for each picture. I wrote
country* and western music. I
wrote music for cattle and
mules and pigs and dogs. I did
just about everything I was
asked to do," he recalled.
In the 1930's and 40's he
churned out a raft of movie
credits, pairing most notably
with the talented and ir-
repressible lyricist Sammy
Cahn. In 1948 they parted, but
were reunited long enough to
win the 1954 Academy Award
for "Three Coins in the
Fountain."
"I've had a lot of great fun
with Sammy. We had fights,
we hated each other, we made
up. Now we're good friends."
he said.
Asked why theater has
always been his foremost pas-
sion, he matter-of-factly
responded: "I found it a free
medium where I could write
what I wanted to write. In
Hollywood you were a
songwriter, but in New York
you were a composer."
Styne and Cahn first invad-
ed Broadway theater in 1947
with the smash success "High
Button Shoes." Highlights of
his career include his teaming
with lyricist Leo Robin for
"Gentlemen Prefer Blondes."
which made a star of saucer-
eyed Carol Channing. Her ren-
dition of "Diamonds Are a
Girl's Best Friend" became a
permanent credo for devious
gold-diggers. "The Bells Are
Ringing" was another tower-
ing home run for Styne: this
time he was wedded to lyric
and book writers Comden and
Green.
About this time Styne's
obsession with gambling found
him dancing on the proverbial
edge. He was a well-known
big-stakes horse player. The
racing form is no longer his
favorite form of reference. "I
just slip across the street occa-
sionally to bet six bucks across
the board at the Off-Track Bet-
ting Shop." he said with a
mischievous twinkle in his eye.
He may not have made the
winner's circle very often at
the track, but he sure paraded
some great entries on Broad-
way which, in the 1950's and
60's. continued to break the
tape ahead of the field. "Gyp-
sv" was the crowning achieve-
ment of Styne's career a lov-
ingly crafted work which prov-
ed that Styne was a dramatic
composer on par with Broad-
way's best.
But he didn't stop there.
"Barbra Streisand," he went
on. "was born for her part in
Funny Girl." The score made
her. and what a score." he ex-
claimed. "It's a powerful
score." he repeated, proudly
unencumbered by false
modesty.
What was his greatest thrill
on the musical stage? "Open-
ing night of 'Gypsy' in
England." he said with a broad
terrific nights in London
beam. "It was one of the most
theater Angela Lansbun^J
llcurtam calls and on ,M
one she calmed evervon. j*I
and said: This ev^SS
belong to me. It belon^S!
thur Laurents (LZ\
Stephen SondheJ'ftj
and Jule Styne.'The au2
stood up and we came forJ!l
to the stage and took J
bowS. HesmUedbeninilv2
said: "You know, theTjA
are so respectful of 9
creative people."
Although Styne's beauJ
standards continue to ride nil
udly along, he is not onetoi
on his ASCAP royalties
sing old songs. He rr,
prefers writing new ones.
He will be back on the L,
next season with "The
Mitzvah Boy" and a
based on 'Treasure Islanfl
called "Pieces of Eight." Ttl
quote conductorcomposal
Morton Gould at a Av
Fisher Hall tribute to Sty
"As long as we are play
Jule Styne music, the
far from over."


Full Text
Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir (right) and
his Air Farce officer son. Col. Yair Shamir,
during the filming of a new monthly talk show.
'From Generation to Generation: Fathers and
Sons,' which will be screened on Israel Televi-
sion later this year.
Apparent Mercy Killing Of AIDS Patient
Reintroduces Euthanasia Debate
.
By GIL SEDAN
Recent reports of the ap-
parent mercy killing last year
of an AIDS sufferer has
brought to the fore once again
a persistent moral dilemma
whether it's permissible to end
the suffering of a terminally ill
patient by artificially ending
his or her life.
The patient was killed by his
friends, who put him to sleep
with a large dose of morphine.
following the professional ad-
vice of a physician who was not
present al the time of the
lethal injection.
The affair was first publiciz-
ed in a new book. "The
Eleventh Plague." by
Jerusalem Posi writer Joanna
Yehiel. The doctor who was
mentioned in the book con-
firmed the mercy killing in a
radio interview in which he did
not identify himself.
The doctor recalled that the
patient had asked for the
euthai asia. At first the physi-
cian rejected the idea,
although he had known that
the patient was at a fatal
stage. Later that same night,
'he doctor received a
telephone call from the pa-
tient s family, telling him that
the patient insisted on seeing
The patient once again asked
he doctor to kill him. When
the doctor persisted in his
2S' the Pint's friends
^d they would do the killing.
SuUggested 'njecting air
"to the ve.ns. but the doctor
dSmTnded morphine. The
fo2LwftVand was 'ater fat
SEJ $** Wends that the
Patient had died.
A*** Yishai, chairman of
he Israel Medical Association,
Z ,ntf"tewer recently
crimiJTkki"ing was both a
o mS ,ffenLse and contrary
&? al CthicS- 0nce mercy
and 1 Pt,mitted for AIS
ould ,nCer ?atients- he ^d, it
^spread to sick elderly pa-
SeSnts.lnVa'idS and *
medTicallv"r1,,rlem is how to
mina ,t'lt,f,ne who is a ter-
31 patle"t. Perhaps this is
the situation today, and in two
or three days the situation will
change and the treatment will
affect him. To speed up death
just like that? It is dangerous,
forbidden, and does not comp-
ly with the rules of medical
ethics," he explained.
Rabbi Yona Metzger of
North Tel Aviv holds the same
view. He was quoted as saying
that AIDS is a case in point
where mercy killing has no
foundation, because every day
there are reports on new
medication for the illness.
"Judaism absolutely forbids
bringing forward the death of
a person." said Met/.ger.
"even if he is dying. However,
one ran pray for the early-
death of a dying patient."
Israel has seen a number of
mercy killings in the past 25
years. A massive public cam-
paign led in 1964 to the release
of Gisella Kafri, who killed her
deaf-dumb-blind son. In 1975,
Fani Pinsler killed her 13-year-
old son, Avi, who suffered
from epilepsy.
In 1975. Aliza Helman shot
to death her son. I'ri. .'57, who
suffered from a deadly disease
Two years ago, Hahman Ariel
killed his retarded son and
daughter-in-law and then com-
mitted suicide.
Some 44 Israelis are
reported to be suffering from
with 33 dying from it. only one
as a result of a mercy killing.
Giving Drugs On Time
REHOVOT, Israel A
method that may improve
responsiveness of AIDS pa-
tients to azidothvmidine
(AZT), and cancer sufferers to
some forms of chemotherapy
has been suggested by Dr. Zvia
Agur of the Weizmann In-
stitute, an expert in
mathematical biology.
Using computer and
mathematical models that help
place certain biological events
into their proper perspective
(by noting their effects on
other biological activities), Dr.
Agur has hit upon what she
believes is a critical factor in
determining the most ef-
ficacious way to schedule the
administration of these drugs.
Because AZT and some anti-
cancer drugs act by poisoning
cells during their division
periods, they can also kill nor-
mal cells, for example, in the
bone and livei, which, like
diseased cells, also multiply
rapidly. However, the
reproduction-cycle lengths of
AIDS virus and cancer cells
differ from those of normal
cells, and, significantly, the cy-
cle lengths associated with tla-
diseased cells are more
variable than those of normal
cells. This situation implies
that if high drug doses were
administered in appropriately-
timed pulses, rather than in an
arbitrary or uniform way, the
drug-susceptible life-phase of
the normal cells could be made
to coincide quite closely with
the drug-free intervals,
resulting is less damage to nor-
mal cells.
Today, AZT and anti-cancer
drugs are usually given at ar-
bitrary intervals or kept at
uniformly high levels long
enough to kill every cancer cell
or AIDS virus when it enters
its dividing stage. These
methods can hardly
discriminate between normal
and malignant calls. If in an at-
tempt to reduce damage to
normal cells, the doctor
reduces the drug dose, the
malignant cells may become
drug-resistant. This occurs, ac-
cording to Dr. Agur, when the
environment is rich in the
drug, but not rich enough to
completely obliterate the
malignant population. As a
result, cell mutations that are
drug-resistant proliferate.
Baaed on Dr. Agur's sug-
gested protocols, Dr. Bilha
Continued on Page 15-A
Shamir To Address
CJF General Assembly
In Miami Beach
To commemorate the upcoming 40th anniversary of
Israel. Israeli Prime Minister Vit/.bak Shamir will be the
featured speaker at the 56th General Assembly of the
Council of Jewish Federations. Nov. 18-22 at the Fon-
tainebleau Hotel in Miami Beach.
The Assembly, the largest annual gathering of North
American Jewish community leaders, is expected to draw
over 3,000 delegates who will participate in more than 300
meetings, including plenaries. business sessions, forums,
symposiums, workshops, seminars, receptions and other
events.
The theme of the Assembly is "Dor L'Dor: From Genera-
tion to Generation Building Community and Continuity
Through People." Shoshana S. Cardin, president of CJF,
will speak on this subject in a Keynote Address delivered
during the opening plenary session on Wednesday evening,
Nov. 18.
Throughout the Assembly, a wide range of other topics of
interest and significance to the global Jewish community
will be explored, including:
Transmitting Jewish Knowledge, Commitment and
Values;
Israel and North America: Sustaining the Partnership
Across the Generations;
Israel as "Strategic Ally": Changing Constellations of
U.S. Support;
Soviet Jewry: Rescuing the Next Generation;
Ethiopian Jewry: Completing the Task;
The Role of Campaign in Reaching the Next
Generation;
Overlooked and Uninvolved Populations: Faculty,
Students, Singles;
Religious Unity and Diversity: A "Trialogue" with Or-
thodox, Conservative and Reform Rabbis:
Are Jewish Adolescents a "Lost" Generation?;
(irowing Instability in the Arab World Consequences
for Israel, the U.S. and Canada;
Recruiting a New Generation of Professional Leaders.
The Council of Jewish Federations is the national associa-
tion of 200 Jewish Federations, the central community
organizations which serve nearly SOU localities embracing a
Jewish population of more than 5.7 million in the United
States and Canada.
Number Of Young Arabs In
The Administered Areas Are
Adopting Khomeini's Doctrine
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Shef-
fy Gabai, the eminent Arab af-
fairs correspondent of Maariv,
reported that the number of
young Arabs in the ad-
ministered territories who are
adopting Khomeini's doctrine
is growing year to year.
They are organized in cells
throughout the territories and
occasionally try to intimidate
other Moslem believers, Gabai
says, quoting a Moslem cleric
in East Jerusalem following
the recent capture of a ter-
rorist squad that planned to
plant a car-bomb in Jerusalem.
According to the cleric, the
young Khomeini followers in
the territories are heavily
financed bv the Franian leader-
ship, whii i want! to set up a
Khomeinist core in both .'
dan and the territories.
It is known that Hizbullah
leaders in Lebanon have
received permission from Iran
to cooperate with Fatah in
perpetrating terrorist attacks
in Israel and in kidnapping
foreigners under the rubric of
"Al-Jihad Al-Islami for the
Liberation of Palestine."
It was under this name that
two recently apprehended ter-
rorist squads operated in
Israel: the car-bomb squad and
the squad that carried out the
Dung Gate attack late last
year, the Maariv reporter said.
The newly-recruited Kho-
meinists are often past
members of Islamic
movements which operate
freely in the territories and do
not rule out the use of firearms
in the belief that only in this
way can tht islamic revolution
in the region be fomented.
The majority of the Moslems
in Israel and the territories
belong t< m< derate trends and
reject t In mpts of the Kho-
meinists t. mpose their will.


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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 4, 1987
Meeting With The Pope;
Much Is At Stake
Much is at stake in the two meetings between
the Pope and Jewish leaders one, earlier this
week, on Tuesday in the Vatican; the second,
late next week, on Sept. 10 and 11 in Miami.
Nothing earth-shattering is likely to occur on
either occasion. One side offers its written
presentation. The second side follows in a
presentation of its own. If anything, the much
smaller meeting in the Vatican suggested the
lability of a livelier exchange.
Then what is the value of both'.' The answer is
that one has already occurred, and the second is
yet to occur: that Jewish and Catholic leaders
seemed determined to air their opinions on the
future of the relationship between them.
In itself, this is of profound significance.
Perhaps this spirit began in the agony of the
Nazi era. Perhaps it emerged with greater form
in the crucible of .Wrv. Aetatr. But it occurred
a growing Catholic awareness that some
1.900 years of Christian-Jewish history needed
modification and. indeed, significart change.
It is not likely that we could ha -e foreseen
this. say. 75 years ago. Or even 50 yuan ago. It
is not that Jews could hardly envision a Catholic
church, given its history, not just willing but
anxious to make things better. It is that Jews,
themselves, turned timid by the rage of their
own history, would have been disinclined to
participate.
The two meetings this and next week show
otherwise. Indeed, the Waldheim affair may-
have been a blessing in disguise in that it has
demonstrated just how deeply mortified the
Church was by Jewish anger at the Papal-
Waldheim meeting and how determined it was
that the meeting not deter the future Catholic-
Jewish agenda.
For starters, that is a good thing.
Demjanjuk Trial Gives
Topsy-Turvy View
Mark O'Connor, the defense attorney for John
Demjanjuk in his trial in Jerusalem, whom Dem-
janjuk fired last month for "incompetence."
from the beginning provided a variety of public
sentiment of the proceeding abroad that sug-
gested a topsy-turvy view of things.
O'Connor came to Israel to defend Demjanjuk
against the charge that he was "Ivan the Terri-
ble" in the Treblinka death camp during the
Nazi era. He had prepared himself for a long
time before, aiming to demonstrate that the
former Ukrainian guard who became an Ohio
automobile worker was himself a victim.
First. Demjanjuk would be presented as a
prisoner of war of the Nazis who did no more for
them during his imprisonment than those
routine duties that POWs were expected to per-
form. Second. O'Connor persisted in his theory.
which he turned into Demjanjuk's ultimate
defense, that his client was a victim of mistaken
identification.
By the time O'Connor got going in Jerusalem,
he had managed to turn the tables on the
Israelis, presenting Israel's legal system as be-
ing incapable of staging a fair trial of Demjan-
juk. If anyone or anything was on trial, it
was not Demjanjuk but the Israeli court itself.
If Demjanjuk fired O'Connor, as he called it.
for "incompetence." the real reason was that
O'Connor's rather theatrical methods were
clearly not working. Too many witnesses iden-
tified Demjanjuk as Ivan. So did documents
from the Soviet Union, which West German ex-
perts declared to be genuine and showing Dem-
janjuk to be exactly what the court said he was.
Still, after O'Connor's departure from the
case, the theatrical flavor, at least from an inter-
national point of view, nevertheless seemed to
linger. Into this atmosphere came wafting an
American expert witness on the genuineness of
documents to dispute the accuracy of testimony
given by two ot \perts German police in-
vt-stigator Ren rt Altmann and Israeli an-
thropologist Patricia Smith both of whom
>howed. by I mhining sections of a disputed
photo of Demjanjuk affixed to his alleged Nazi
identity card, was really Demjanjuk as the pro-
secution declared him to be.
American witness Anita Pritchard used
methods which prosecutor Michael Shaked
demonstrated were not scientific and concluded
that she was ignorant of morphology, which
deals with forms, proportions and measurement
of facial features. In fact. Shaked concluded.
Pritchard was little more than a skilled
manipulator of phrenology, which he described
as "judging personality by the contours of the
skull, and the reading of palms."
Pritchard did not react well. Indeed, the next
day. she attempted suicide in Tel Aviv, was
treated for attempting to slash one wrist and
swallowing a large number of aspirins, and an-
nounced that she would leave Israel
immediately.
Whether or not Demjanjuk was wise in
dismissing O'Connor and one brand of
theatricality for witnesses in his behalf like Prit-
chard. who rose to even newer heights of fan-
ciful and dramatic presentation in a court of law.
remains to be seen.
So tar. however. Demjanjuk. who insists on his
innocence, has done little to demonstrate that
allegation. Once more he is a victim: this time of
soap opera-type melodrama.
Beneficial Presbyterian Statement On Jews
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
Thanks to the loving concern
of a professor of Old Testa-
ment studies, the Presbyterian
Church (USAI has produced
and adopted a carefully con-
structed and largely beneficial
policy statement on
Presbyterian-Jewish relations.
The document. ''A
Theological Understanding of
the Relationship Between
Christians and Jews." benefit-
ted from the chairmanship of
the Rev. W. Eugene March of
the Louisville Presbyterian
Seminary, a scholar
thoroughly familiar with
Hebrew teachings.
Minor changes were
demanded in large part by a
few Presbyterians who had
labored in Arab lands and by a
few Jews who are now
Presbyterian ministers.
Most strongly opposed was
the Rev. Salom Sahiouny. head
of the National Synod of Syria
and Lebanon, representing
50.000 Presbyterians in Arab
countries. He fought unsuc-
cessfully to have the
3.1-million-member church
ditch the document.
Disturbed by the reference
to Israel as "the Promised
Land for Jews." the Rev. Ben-
jamin Weir, held hostage for
16 months in Lebanon, fought
for more modifications. Weir
recently headed this largest
Presbyterian body in America.
It is worth noting that other
hostages, especially England's
Terry Waite. have blamed
Israel for their plight.
If architects of the state-
ment could have had it their
way. Yom HaShoah (Holocaust
Remembrance Day) would
have been included in the
Presbyterian church calendar.
This proposal raised the
hackles of the Rev. Albert
Isteero. President of the Cairo
Theological Seminary. Embit-
tered, he wanted to "have only
European churches wrestle
over that tender idea, asking
why American churches
should participate in the
Holocaust remembrance day.
In addition, he said Israel has
launched current Holocausts.
Among Arab propagandists,
this outrageous accusation
often shares airing with the
canard known as the Zionist-
racism billingsgate.
Quite properly, the
Presbyterian assembly de-
nounced bigotry and prejudice
encountered by Moslems and
Arabs in the United States, a
move consonant with the
Supreme Court's recent action
broadening the scope of
legislation protecting all
minorities.
Varying views were aired in
the meetings on such issues as
whether the finished document
might be considered more
political than theological, the
thorny matter of conversions
and the biblical Promised Land
assurance.
There came forth eventually
a reaffirmation that the God
who addresses both Christians
and Jews is the living and true
God. Jews, the Presbyterians
asserted, are in covenantal
relationship with God. The
Presbyterian churchmen see
"the continuing significance of
the biblical promise of land."
On the endurance of the
Christ-killer accusation, the
Presbyterians have had more
than enough of that indulgence
in scape-goating that helped
launch the Crusades and
spawn the Holocaust. "We
now stand determined." thev
averred, "to put an end to the
'teaching of contempt' for the
Jews."
Here is a giant step,
especially when contrasted
with statements on the deicide
issue published by other
denominations.
Robert E. Segal is a form r
newspaper editor and director
of th* Jewish community rcl"-
tions councils of ('inci)iiui'i
and Boston.
Fred K Shochet
Editc* and Publisher
eJewish Floridian
Suzanne Shochet
Executive Editor
William T Brewer
Director ot Operations
Joan C. Teglas
Director of Advertising
Friday, September 4,1987
Volume 60
10ELUL5747
Number 36