The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03056

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

Jewi]b Floif idllami
,*!>
lol. 60 No. 35
Miami Friday, August 28,1987
50 Cents ^/A**
!*'"%
k
mm
af^

[SCIST SALUTE: An unidentified rightwing demonstrator dressed in a T- AP/Wide World Photo
irt withSwastikaeinblemand portrait of Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler gives the the previous afternoon. Hess was the sole inmate ofSpandau, which will be torn
ItS&JiSmL S&ebK S& XiitfL ;t^Sr 25 mo-fascist youth 9athered t0 ^momtrate *"* *pHsm
^racing for Violence
Hess' Hometown Expects Strutting of the Nazi Faithful
JONN (JTA) The normally peaceful
/arian town of Wunsiedel near the
fchoslovakian border braced for violence and
ror over the weekend as the funeral for Adolf
tier's deputy Rudolf Hess, who died last week in
apparent suicide, drew throngs of European
>-Nazis under heavy police protection.
>olice said Sunday more than 200 had arrived in
Hess' hometown for the funeral expected to take
place Wednesday and many more were in transit
including neo-Nazi sympathizers from Britain and
The Netherlands. Police detained 88 neo-Nazis in
the area in the past two days.
A GROUP of neo-Nazis dressed in black and
some masked marched into the cemetery where
Hess requested to be buried, shouting "Revenge
for Hess," and signaling the "Heil Hitler" Nazi
salute. Local officials later banned all open gather-
ings in the town related to Hess and closed off the
cemetery to the unwelcome visitors.
In Frankfurt, police arrested two young neo-
Nazis who placed a bomb which did not go off in the
city's central railway station.
Continued on Page 2-A
Bitter Debate
.
Over Who'll Meet With Pope in Vatican
\
*
BY MARGIE OLSTER
NEW YORK (JTA) An
increasingly bitter debate
within the American Jewish
community over who will at-
tend the Sept. 1 meeting with
Pope John Paul II at his sum-
mer home in Castel Gandolfo
points to a lack of consensus
on who represents American
Jewry, according to observers.
Representatives of at least
eight Jewish organizations vy-
ing for a place on the delega-
tion to the Vatican met here
last week in an unsuccessful
attempt to resolve what ap-
pears to be the last outstan-
ding issue for the meeting:
Who will attend the scheduled
one-and-a-half hour dialogue
with the Pope?
IN A RELATED develop
ment, Nobel Laureate Elie
Wiesel told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency Thursday
he will postpone a visit to
Rome to meet with the Pope
which he characterized last
week as a "long-standing in-
vitation" that he received
before the Vatican issued its
invitation to other Jewish
representatives.
"When the news of my in-
vitation to the Vatican reached
members bf the Jewish groups
that have asked to meet with
Pope John Paul II, some of
them requested that I
postpone my journey to Rome.
Since they represent various
Continued on Page 10- A
John Paul II
How Protestants See the Jews ... Page 1-B


i

I
Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 28, 1987
Hess Buried
Son Has Stroke,
Neo-Nazis Are Arrested
MUNICH (JTA) Rudolf
Hess. Hitler's deputy, was
buried Monday in secret at an
unknown location. German
Radio said the federal govern-
ment ordered his immediate
burial to prevent further neo-
Nazi demonstrations and ef-
forts to try to turn the former
Spandau prisoner into "some
sort of martyr."
The Mayor of Wunsiedel,
Hess' home town where the
burial was scheduled to take
place Wednesday afternoon,
said that Hess has not been
buried anywhere in or near the
city.
Restore MFN
For Rumania,
Shamir Says
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Prime Minister Yitzhak
Shamir has come out in sup-
port of Washington's restoring
Rumania's Most Favored Na-
tion status of which it was
recently deprived by the U.S.
Congress because of American
concern over human rights
violations in Rumania.
Shamir, who paid an official
visit to Bucharest last week,
told visiting U.S. Sen. John
Breaux (D., La.) this week that
he wished the Jews in the
Soviet Union received the
same treatment as the
Hungarian minority in
Rumania.
It is the treatment of this
minority that has been the
focus of much concern in
Washington.
SHAMIR ADDED that
Rumania was the only country
in the Communist bloc which
enabled its Jewish community
to enjoy a full Jewish life.
Bucharest, moreover, had per-
mitted free Jewish emigration
over the years and indeed the
great bulk of the community
had gone to live in Israel.
Shamir said these aspects of
Rumanian policy should be
taken into account in
Washington.
During his visit to
Bucharest, Rumanian officials
denied that President Nicolae
Ceausescu was seeking
Shamir's help in Washington.
But observers nevertheless
felt this was one of the impor-
tant factors involved in the
Rumanian President's invita-
tion to the Israeli Premier.
* Jenisti FkridbrJir)
fnd Shochtl
Phone: (305) 373-4605
Published weekly every Friday
since 1927 by The Jewish Flori
dian Office and Plant 120 N.E
6th St., Miami, Fla 33132 Phone
(305) 373-4605
Second-Class Postage paid in
Miami. Fla. USPS 275320
Postmaster: Form 3579 return to
Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box
012373, Miami, Fla. 33101.
The Jewish Floridian does not
guarantee the Kashruth of the
merchandise advertised in its
columns.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: In ad-
vance (Local Area) One Year
$9.50 (Anniversary Special). Out
of town, country, upon request.
By Mail $1.45 per copy
IT IS NOT known whether
Hess' widow, Lisa, 87, attend-
ed the ceremony. His son,
Wolf-Ruediger, 50, is still in
the intensive care unit of a
Munich hospital after suffer-
ing a stroke Saturday evening
at his Munich home.
Hess died last Monday (Aug.
17) in Berlin's four-power
Spandau Prison for war
criminals where he had been
serving a life term. A British
military coroner had said the
93-year-old Hess died of
asphyxiation after choking
himself with an electric wire in
a suicide attempt.
The four-power Allied con-
trol over Spandau Prison is
scheduled to end Monday
when the U.S. guard will
march out. The red brick fort
will be razed to prevent it from
becoming a neo-Nazi shrine.
The federal government
ordered Hess buried secretly
and without delay as neo-Nazi
demonstrations took place
throughout West Germany
over the weekend.
IN WUNSIEDEL alone. 76
neo-Nazis were arrested after
a crowd of several hundred
massed outside the cemetery
gates. Police said sym-
pathizers had come from as far
away as north Germany,
Bavaria and nearby
Nuremberg to attend a banned
demonstration. Police found
Nazi flags, armbands and Nazi
posters in some of the search-
ed cars.
After the news of Hess'
burial broke, local state and ci-
ty police increased patrols
near the city and cordoned it
off from the main highways.
Entrance into the cemetery
itself was banned and local of-
ficials confiscated flowers and
wreaths placed outside the
cemetery wall.
Many West German papers
Monday continued printing
lengthy reports, often in a
sympathetic tone, on Hess' life
and the 40 years he spent in
prison.
HESS' FORMER
Nuremberg trial lawyer,
Alfred Seidel, Monday accused
the four Western Allies of hav-
ing kept Hess in prison in spite
of his age and poor health.
Seidel, who gave a press con-
ference in Munich, said that
the Allied claim that it was the
Soviet Union which had vetoed
Hess' liberation "was only an
excuse taking refuge behind
the skirts of the Soviet Com-
munist Party.
END OF AN ERA: Wolf-Ruediger Hess
(right), son of former Nazi leader Rudolf Hess,
stands in front of the gate of Spandau Prison
last week (Aug. 18), but he wasn 't let inside. He
was in Berlin to see the body of his father, who
died the day before at the age of 93. Left is
AP/Wid- World PI
lawyer Alfred Seidl. Rudolf Hess was th.
of the Nazi leaders confined to Spandau di
alone for the last 21 years of his life. Two other
occupants, Baldur von Shirach and Albert
Speer, were long since released and are nou-
dead.
Throngs Gather
Family Asks for Second Autopsy
f
Continued from Page 1-A
Hess' funeral was delayed by
a request for a second autopsy
by his son Wolf-Ruediger
Hess, who has since suffered a
stroke after disputing the fin-
dings of prison officials that
Hess, 93, committed suicide
with an electrical wire. Hess
died in Spandau, controlled by
the four wartime Allied
powers, the U.S., France, Bri-
tain and the Soviet Union. He
was the sole prisoner in Span-
dau for more than two
decades.
Hess sympathizers
demonstrated outside the em-
bassies of the four Allied
powers over the weekend and
distributed flyers claiming
Hess did not commit suicide
but was actually murdered.
WEST GERMANY'S Inter
nal Security Service prepared
for increased neo-Nazi
violence and terror and beefed
Uy security all around the
small town.
Hess, the last remaining
high ranking official in the
Nazi hierarchy, lived in Spar
dau since 1946 when he M
sentenced to life imprisonment
at the Nuremberg trials. Ht
was captured in Scotland ir.
1941 when he parachuted into
Britain in what sonic clairr
was an effort to negotiate a
peace between Britain and
Germany.
i
THl FIKST...
'AND STILL )HI FiNUT
li
J
P;i.
10-Year Calm Ending Rabin
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Middle East is nearing the end
of a six-to-10-year period of
"relative calm," Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin said in
an address before graduates of
the Israel Defense Force Staff
and Command College
Thursday.
He noted that in the past few
years the threat of imminent
war with the Arab armies had
been remote, but he added that
Israel has erred in predicting
the outbreak of war. He said
the State must "learn the
lesson and be attentive to
changes which may occur."
He added that unlike some
other armies, the IDF cannot
assume there will be no war in
the next few years.
In two weeks, Rabin is
scheduled to go on a four-day
official visit to West Germany,
where he will hold talks with
West German defense officials
and visit Holocaust sites. He
will be the first Israeli Defense
Minister to visit Germany.
Northern Command Mai
Gen. Yossi Peled, a Holocaust
survivor, will accompany
Rabin. 3
Oouthgate "JLower*
Hotels & Apartments
"Waterfront Rental Apartments"
900 West Ave. On The Bay
Miami Beach, Fla.
672-2412
1 & 2 Yr. Leases Available
Marine and Fishing Pier
Planned social activities
to fill your hours happily
Pool & Shuftleboard
Restaurant ft
Lounge
FURN. & UNFURN. EFFICIENCY
FURN. & UNFURN. 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH
Beauty Parlor on Premises



Decision on Lavi Fighter's Future
Postponed Again by Cabinet
By JTA Services
JERUSALEM Israel's oft-postponed decision whether to
built the Lavi jet fighter will be delayed again. Premier Yitzhak
Shamir and Foreign Minister Shimon Peres decided last Friday
to scrap plans for a Lavi vote at the Sunday Cabinet meeting.
The cited reason is the lack of a majority of Ministers in sup-
port of the second-generation Israeli jet.
The defense establishment, which wants the project stopped
because it says the expense would detract from defense
necessities, is concerned that some wavering Ministers may
eventually vote for the project.
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Finance Minister
Moshe Nissim both firmly rejected last week various package
proposals from Ministers in support of the jet and Israel Aircraft
Industries, its designated manufacturer.
DISCREDITED DEMJANJUK TRIAL
WITNESS ATTEMPTS SUICIDE
JERUSALEM Anita Pritchard, the Swedish-born and
U.S.-trained physiognomy expert whose evidence was
discredited by the prosecution in the John Demjanjuk war crimes
trial here last week, attempted suicide in Tel Aviv last Fridav
(Aug. 21). y
Defense counsel Yoram Sheftel took her to the hospital after
Pritchard swallowed a large amoung of aspirins and slashed one
wrist in her hotel room. She was treated and released. Sources
said she intended to leave Israel immediately.
Pinchard, from Houston, Tex., last week challenged the
assertions by prosecution expert witnesses that the face of
defendant Demjanjuk matched that on the World War II identity
card that the prosecution claims belonged to "Ivan the Terri-
ble," the sadistic Treblinka guard.
But prosecutor Michael Shaked impugned Pritchard's exper-
tise and academic credentials, and got her to admit she had
overextended herself in offering opinions on various key tecnical
points.
VANUNU'S BROTHER TO ASK BRITAIN
FOR POLITICAL ASYLUM
TEL AVIV Meir Vananu, brother of Mordechai Vanunu
who is awaiting trial in Israel on charges of selling the State's
.nuclear secrets to a British newspaper, will ask Britain for
political asylum, according to a Jerusalem Post report.
"I have no desire to set foot in Israel for many years," Meir
Vanunu told the Post's London correspondent.
Meir has attempted to drum up support for his brother
abroad. This week. Vanunu said he plans to visit Paris to meet
, with the "council for the defense" group set up there to work on
I behalf of his brother. He said he will also visit Italy where a
magistrate has launched an investigation into reports that the
[Mossad illegally spirited Mordechai out of Italy.
Meir claims an attractive female Mossad agent lured his
jbrother from London to Italy, drugged him and brought him
[against his will to Israel aboard an Israeli vessel.
Moderchai, a former technician at the Dimona nuclear facili-
|ty, had emigrated to Australia and converted to Christianity
I when he sold to The Times of London a detailed account
((including pictures) of an allegedly secret facility at Dimona for
[the production of nuclear weapons.
NEW LICENSING TEST FOR DOCTORS
MAY KEEP SOVIET JEWS FROM ISRAEL
TEL AVIV A group of Soviet Jewish physicians is recon-
sidering plans to immigrate to Israel due to a new Israeli law re-
quiring all new-immigrant doctors to undergo professional tests
[before being licenced to practice medicine in this country.
Ephraim Feinblum, chairman of the Association of Im-
I migrants from the Soviet Union in Israel, said he received this
[news over the phone from Soviet Jewish activists in Moscow.
'This amendment will have disastrous consequences for aliya,"
! he said.
The Health Ministry said some recent immigrant doctors
! have shown a low professional level, so the tests are necessary.
Since 1971, about 3,700 doctors from Eastern Europe have settl-
ed in Israel, according to Feinblum.
Friday, August 28, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
Police were asked to intervene when a youth
movement associated with Meir Kahane's
Koch Party was found to be giving illegal
weapons training at a summer camp near
JTA/WZN News Photo
Jerusalem. Above are young women-
participants wearing Kach T-shirts at the
camp.
Europe Heaves Sigh of Relief for Hess' Death
Six Gush Settlements Abandoned
TEL AVIV (JTA) Six Gush Emunim settlements in the
West Bank have been abandoned, Al Hamishmar reported Fri-
day. Gush Emunim comprises Orthodox Jewish settlers.
THE NEWSPAPER reported that a correspondent who
visited the Har B.-acha settlement near Nablus on Wednesday
found locked buildings and a pile of two-month-old unclaimed
mail. After an hour of wandering, he encountered a lone woman
settler from one of the four families still at the site out of 34.
"It's sad to see this place empty," she said.
Uri Elitzur, a member of the Amana Gush Emunim settle-
ment organization, said a social crisis had caused the families to
leave. He admitted that five other settlements are in a similar
situation.
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Western
Europe, with a few rare excep-
tions, heaved a sigh of relief at
the death of Rudolf Hess,
Hitler's former deputy, who
died last Monday (Aug. 17) at
the age of 93 in the British
military hospital near the four-
power Spandau war crimes
prison where he had been serv-
ing a life term.
A British official was quoted
by German Radio on Tuesday
as saying that Hess had ap-
parently committed suicide.
The official was reported as
saying that Hess walked into a
small cabin next to his exercise
ground inside the prison com-
pound. When a guard looked in
a few minutes later he found
Hess' body lying on the ground
with an electric wire round his
neck.
THE FORMER Nazi leader
was said by his son to be
depressed and had asked on
several occasions to be freed
or put to death. German Radio
commentators expressed
belief that Hess' suicide might
provoke new neo-Nazi
demonstrations and
strengthen the nationalist
elements inside Germany. It
already has.
Many West European
leaders had given in to West
German requests and backed a
demand for Hess' release;
others who had not gone that
far feared that his continued
detention risked turning him
into a martyr, strengthening
the neo-Nazis and other ex-
treme right-wing movements.
Hess' body was released to
his family and flown to West
Germany for burial after an
autopsy. The body was flown
to Frankfurt by a British
military aircraft, and second
autopsy was performed at the
request of Hess' family. Hess
is survived by his wife and son.
The three western powers,
America, France and Britain,
had been in favor of his release
on humanitarian reasons
because of his age. The Soviet
Union had always opposed
such a move. Moscow released
a statement Tuesday
reiterating its position: no par-
don and no forgetfulness for
Nazi crimes.
AFTER THE announce-
ment of his death, neo-Nazis
and members of rightwing
organizations demonstrated in
several West German cities.
Skin-heads, young toughs with
closecropped hair, placed a
wreath of red and white carna-
tions at the foot of the Span-
dau prison wall in West Berlin.
In Hamburg, demonstrators
marched Monday night on the
British and American Con-
sulates carrying torches and
posters reading "Rudolf Hess
A Martyr for Peace." In
Frankfurt, two men in their
early twenties threw gasoline
bombs on U.S. military
vehicles. No one was injured,
and there were no damages.
The French press and televi-
sion stressed Tuesday, in the
words of Le Monde, that "40
years after the war many in
West Germany feel that the
time has come for the world to
take into consideration the
new Germany and often con-
sidered (Hess' continued im-
prisonment) as a form of
relentless revenge."
NAZI HUNTER Serge
Klarsfeld said he was gtad
Hess died behind bars.
Klarsfeld, who spoke on televi-
sion, said "Hess played an ef-
fective role in the rise of
Nazism and in measures taken
against the Jews. He was a
close aide to Hitler and sought
to help him by trying to
negotiate separate peace."
WATER YOU CAN
BUY IS
3500 YEARS 0U>.
The Mountain Valley Water being bottled
today fell as rain over Hot Springs. Arkan-
sas, 3500 years ago, when there were no
pollutants, no urban wastes, no additives
It flows from the earth today pure and
enriched with a complement of good miner
als, including calcium and magnesium
MOUNTAIN VALlf Y WATER
SPRING WATER FROM HOT SPRINGS ARK
Purely for drinking.
DADE
696-1333
BROWARD
563-6114


Pag4A Tk Jawkh Ftorkban/Friday, August 28, 1987
Jewish Leaders Pushing
To Be First in Line
Pope John Paul II, who will be coming to
Miami Sept. 10 and 11, may not know it, but
suddenly he is a matinee idol. Among Jews,
that is we wouldn't presume to speak for
the faithful of his Church.
American Jewish leaders are tripping all
over themselves, acting as if they were in a
theatre in which a prankster has just
shouted "Fire!," trampling those ahead of
them to get first in line for the Sept. 1
meeting with the Pope in the Vatican.
For the Sept. 11 meeting with the Jews in
Miami, there has been, we are meant to
understand, no such chaos, since, according
to Rabbi Solomon Schiff, executive vice
president of the Greater Miami Rabbinical
Association, and chief chaplain of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Chaplain-
cy Service, just who will be privileged to at-
tend, and in what capacity, has been ordain-
ed by "national."
We are not quite sure who "national" is.
And while we share the relief that the
meeting here has not taken on the dimen-
sions of a teen-age crowd crushing in upon
their latest rock obsession, we fault the com-
ing event here with the same liability as the
Sept. 1 event in the Vatican.
Where Are Our Intellectuals?
As we see it, there are altogether too
many rabbis and too many Federation in-
dividuals, with not even a representative
smattering of Jewish intellectuals not af-
filiated either way. Were there a far larger
body of Jews permitted to attend these
meetings, then the number of our spiritual
and Federation leaders would be as welcome
as anyone else.
Restricted as the representation must be,
their numbers are outsized and non-
representative. Where are our college pro-
fessors? Where are our scientists and ar-
tists? Where are our leading philosophers
and humanitarians? Is all of Judaism em-
braced only by those who serve in
synagogue pulpits and on the boards of
Federations? Are these our spokesmen
exclusively?
Take the case of Nobel Prize-winning mar-
tyrologist Elie Wisel, who has had a long-
standing invitation from the Vatican to meet
with Pope John Paul. We suspect that
Wiesel and the Pope, in a private discussion,
would have much in common.
Ideological Shortsightedness
They could have covered more ground
significant to the concerns of Jews
everywhere, particularly Wiesel's reaction,
say, to the Pope's private meeting with Kurt
Waldheim, than all of those Jewish
representatives due in the Vatican Sept. 1.
Not to mention Miami Sept. 11.
And what did these representatives do?
They asked Wisel to get out of their way
not to come while they would be in the
Vatican. In their view, Wiesel would be an
irrelevant intruder, although it is hardly
likely that his meeting with the Pope would
have been combined with theirs. They could
have had the stage to themselves anyway.
This ideological shortsightedness is an of-
fense to the best interests of Jews. Worse, it
smacks of rank elitism, if not frank
politicization and absolutely certain
sycophantism. For Shame.
JNF's Tree Terrorism'
A wave of fires is sweeping Israel. Fires
are devastating Jewish National Fund
forests to such an extent that the JNF has
been forced to launch a campaign for finan-
cial assistance.
Some $2 r on is needed to replace trees
that have ju.-. oeen burned, and in addition,
there is an urgent need for $5 million to buy
I warn ^ou rKrfto j\
endanger world peace*)
fire-fighting equipment against future
occurrences.
What has been established is that much of
these disasters constitutes a new kind of
"tree terrorism." Some two months ago,
three boys from the village of Bar Ta'ah
were stopped on suspicion that they were ar-
sonists. Questioning revealed that they in-
deed were responsible.
Others have since also been caught and
identified. The common ground among them
is that they were motivated in their acts of
arson "on nationalistic grounds."
So far, what that means, is not quite clear.
The Jewish National Fund insists that those
Newsgathering
detained do not constitute an effort to iden-
tify Arabs as the main agents of the arson.
In fact, says David Angel, a JNF
spokesman, many JNF workers are Arabs
who perform trusted and important tasks.
Then is disaffection among some Jewish
Israelis turning them into enemies of the
Jewish State?
The JNF's Martyrs' Forest itself, planted
to honor the memory of Jews killed in the
Holocaust, recently suffered a forest fire.
Was it set by other youths "on nationalistic
grounds"? Then we have come a long way
from the most cherished principles of the
JNF itself in helping to found that state.
What's Behind the Decision-Making I
?
By JIM SHIPLEY
It has long been a question to
ponder: Is there less news on
weekends because there is less
happening, or is there less
news on weekends because
news staffs are cut back come
Friday evening? The broader
question then is, I guess, is
news news or is it news when
the media decides it is news?
McCluhan stated a genera-
tion ago that the medium is the
message. Perhaps. But we are
a much more sophisticated au-
dience today. And news is in
the eye of the beholder. Not
the audience, but the newsper-
son or th^ir assignment editor.
THE DECISION of what to
broadcast, what to print, what
to tape, is made every day. I
have a friend who is a widely-
read syndicated columnist. He
claims that the bias in news
reporting is not with the an-
chors or the writers but rather
what he euphemistically calls
the "gatekeepers" those
folks who determine what
stories will or will not be
covered, who will or will not be
interviewed, and how much
time will be devoted to a given
story.
Are there patterns? Well,
the close alliance with the
Luce family and international
oil interests has been long-
standing. Who but Time
Magazine would publish a
cover wherein the dove of
peace would be a bloody corpse
on the Star of David?
I woke up one day and realiz-
ed that everything corning into
my house was influenced by
the Luce interests. I read
Time. Sports Illustrated and
Fortune. That stopped the day
the story on the Lebanese
massacre of Palestinians was
so distortedly reported.
NBC SEEMS to take par-
ticular delight in trashing
Israel. David Sarnoff, the
Jewish founder of RCA and
the network, must be spinning
in his grave. Who could be
behind the constant NBC anti
Israel reporting? Jews control
the media, don't we?
A few weeks ago, in the Cen-
tral Florida city of Eatonville,
they had a centennial celebra-
tion. Eatonville is, of course,
the oldest chartered black city
in America. The Ku Klux Klan
announced that they would at-
tend the celebration and
march in the parade. Their
stated purpose was to com-
mend Eatonville on being a
segregated city. It is not. This
did not deter the Klan
So, came the Saturday of the
parade, and they were there
three, count 'em. thru
Klansmen. The pres^ which
had ballyhooed the promised
Klan appearance for a month
had enough personnel in atten-
dance to have a half-dozen
reporters assigned to even
Klan member. They were all
dutifully interviewd. tapeo
and quoted. Who made this
decision and why?
JUST TWO weeks before
the Eatonville parade, the
Klan had a "membership'
meeting in a small town up in
the scrub oak and palmette
pine of North Volusia County
This time, there were 30 Klan
people in attendance. Again.
the press outnumbered the
Klan, and the story was
number one on all three Orlan
do TV stations.
What would have happened
if the press did not show up at
the "membership" meeting
What if, during the Katonville
parade, the cameras had turn
ed away from the Klan
Continued on Page 13-A
Fred K Shochet
Editor and Publisher
"Jewish Floz-idian
Suzanne Shochet
Executive Editor
William T Brewer
Director ot Operations
Joan C Teglas
Oirector ot Advertising
Friday, August 28,1987
Volume 60
3ELUL5747
Number 35


Friday, August 28, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A

4
Yuli Edelstein Never Set Out To Become A Symbol
By SUSAN BASS
Yuli Edelstein never set out
to become a symbol of the
struggle for Jews to leave the
Soviet Union. Sitting in the liv-
ing room of his apartment in
Alon Shvut, a settlement in
Gush Etzion between
Bethlehem and Hebron, Edels-
tein explained: "Of course I
did not want to be sent to the
prison camp. All I wanted to
do was to sit at home and drink
coffee with my wife. But I had
no choice."
Edelstein first applied for
permission to leave the Soviet
Union in 1978, at the age of 20.
At that time, the Soviets refus-
ed him permission because he
I did not have the required
number of close relatives liv-
I ing in Israel. He was expelled
from the university, and began
working as a manual laborer
I and street cleaner.
IT WAS in the same year
{that Edelstein began to study
[Hebrew. A gifted and
motivated language student,
i he made rapid progress. The
following year, Edelstein mov-
ed from Chernovich to
i Moscow, where he joined a
[Hebrew study circle. He soon
gan to teach Hebrew to
traps of students, and also to
participate in a Moscow
lebrew seminar called Dibur,
|or speech.
Speaking fully fluent and
eloquent Hebrew, Edelstein
.lied the demanding level
r>f this seminar: "The first
ding we did was to forbid the
speaking of Russian there. We
had many visitors from abroad
vho were surprised by the
high level of Hebrew and by
phe questions asked and
jiscussed there."
On the evening of August 24.
1984, the KGB searched the
Melstein's apartment and 11
lya later arrested Edelstein
trumped-up charges of
assessing a prohibited drug
rid keeping narcotics without
special permit. In his final
tatement to the court during
iis trial. Edelstein declared. "I
go not plead guilty to any of
I charges. I did not keep any
rugs in my home. If the court
evertheless finds me guilty I
ist that my God and my peo-
Sot*!*
'I did not want to be sent to prison camp. All I
wanted was to sit home and drink coffee with my wife.'
pie will help me on the long
journey which I am destined to
make before reaching my
homeland."
DESPITE THE paucity of
evidence against him, the
court sentenced Edelstein to
three years in prison camp. He
was sent to a camp near the
Mongolian border where most
inmates were criminals (as op-
posed to political prisoners).
Edelstein recalls that during
the early part of his imprison-
ment "the camp inmates were
encouraged by the administra-
tion to beat me and to make
conditions impossible for me.
Eventually, however, many of
them came to the conclusion
that I was not the man the of-
ficers had made me out to be
and their attitude toward me
improved."
Edelstein recalls that fellow
camp inmates gradually began
to take an interest in him and
often asked him if he felt
angry at the government or at
the KGB. He replied that his
situation was much the same
as theirs: "You are here
because you stole 50 rubles,
and I because I wanted to
make aliya to Israel."
On January 29, 1986, Edels-
tein fell while working in the
camp, suffering multiple frac-
tures to his legs and pelvis and
a ruptured urethra. No
medical treatment was given
him for several weeks, and it
wasn't until July that he was
transferred to a hospital for
surgery. His wife, Tanya, was
told that he probably would
not survive, for as a result of
his ordeal his weight had drop-
ped 55 pounds to a weight of
99 pounds.
TANYA traveled across
Russia to visit Yuli in the
hospital, which involved a
seven-hour airplane flight, six
hours on a train and a walk of
four kilometers. She was per-
mitted to see him for less than
10 minutes. Tanya recalls the
emotional support she receiv-
ed throughout the ordeal, from
people she knew and from
many she did not know. Most
important to her at the time
was the knowledge that people
were "praying for him every
day in Moscow."
After his initial recovery
from surgery, Edelstein was
transferred to a prison camp in
Siberia, where he was sent to
work in a factory assembly
line. Because of his weakened
condition and his low
resistance to infection, he
became ill and was hospitalized
for a month in the spring of
1987. The government denied
repeated requests for his early
release.
But in May, 1987, Tanya was
informed in Moscow that
Yuli's sentence would be
reduced by four months, and
that he was about to be releas-
ed. On May 4, Israel's In-
dependence Day, the day of his
Continued on Page 12- A
Overwhelming Loneliness
Sends Many To Seek Telephone Advice
By RICK RAEL
"An overwhelming sense of
loneliness. That's the primary
reason why people in Israel
decide to use our services,"
says Moshe Kron, director of
Jerusalem's telephone hotline,
ERAN, which provides emo-
tional support to people in
need.
"This loneliness can be ex-
pressed in various ways and is
not confined only to socially
isolated types. A wife who is
unable to communicate openly
issues of today. I think Israeli
society is going through its
own growing pains. Socially
and politically it's trying to
find its own identity and that
'We hear from army-bound
who are a bit scared.'
A young girl gets advice from
hotline in Jerusalem.
with her husband may ask for
help; a teenage boy unhappy
with hia relationship with his
parents, or perhaps a young
office worker who just needs
to unload about a boss. The
common denominator is a dif-
ficulty in reaching those near
to them."
Founded in 1971 when the
first branch was established in
the capital, ERAN now has six
additional centers throughout
the country, including a
recently opened office in the
rural northern Galil. In a
typical month, ERAN will
receive between 3.000 and
4,000 telephone calls that
Kron identifies as "calls of
distress."
IF I had to note one signifi-
cant change over the last
decade," says Kron. "I'd say
that Israeli callers have been
getting younger and younger.
Although their problems tend
to reflect the universal dif-
ficulties of youth ge'
along with parents ai
teachers, establishing peel
friendships young people
seem more influenced by the
leaves young people more
vulnerable. They desperately
look for direction from
society."
In direct response to the in-
creasing volume of calls from
young people, ERAN's Tel
Aviv branch has introduced a
special hotline exclusively for
juveniles. Over 200 calls are
coming in a month.
"We hear from 17-and-18
year-olds who are about to
enter the army and are secret-
ly a bit scared about leaving
home and having to adjust to
army life, and there are those
with problems related to
pressure to achieve in school.
Passing graduate examina-
tions, or 'bagrut,' is crucial for
many young Israelis and we
often receive calls from youth
who express their fear of
failure." explains a volunteer
in the Tel A iv office.
HOW DO Israeli adults cope
with the numerous stresses
and strains of a society beset
with a host of formidable pro-
blems? What prompts the in-
Continued on Page 14-A



Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 28, 1987
Defense Requests Recess
To Sept. 7 in Demjanjuk Case
JERUSALEM (JTA) The trial of John Demjanjuk
has recessed until Sept. 7 following a request by the
defense at the end of last Wednesday's session.
Court President Dov Levin had announced some weeks
ago that the court would recess from Aug. 25 to Sept. 7
because of prior commitments on the part of te bench.
HOWEVER, he had refused to allow any extra time, in
addition to that week, for the defense to prepare its case.
Defense Counsels John Gill and Yoram Sheftel had
claimed that Mark O'Connor, the former head of the
defense team who was dismissed by the Demjanjuk family,
had left them unprepared.
On Wednesday, after the credibility of the two expert
witnesses for the defense was apparently shaken by pro-
secutor Michael Shaked, the defense appealed again ft it-
more preparation time, and on this occasion the request
was granted.
Expert Witness Buckles
Under Pressure of Prosecutor
American Attempts Suicide Page 3-A
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The second expert witness
brought by the defense in the
Jerusalem war crimes trial
began to lose confidence and
credibility last week under the
ruthless cross-examination of
prosecution counsel Michael
Shaked.
Shaked used the same
methods with which he had
questioned the expertise last
week of document specialist
Edna Robertson. Utilizing a
formidable amount of
background preparation on the
subject, Shaked demonstrated
faps in the testimony of
wedish-born and U.S.-trained
physiognomy specialist Anita
Pritchard.
Pritchard has disputed the
accuracy of testimony given
for the prosecution by two ex-
perts German police in-
vestigator Reinhart Altmann
and Israeli anthropologist
Patricia Smith.
ALTMANN HAD utilized
photo montages that he had
prepared, combining sections
of the disputed photo of defen-
dant John Demjanjuk on his
alleged Nazi identity card with
undisputed photos of Demjan-
juk, to show that there was a
"very great likelihood" that
the ID photo was genuine.
Smith had shown the court a
video method, again combining
sections of undisputed photos
with the disputed one. Dem-
janjuk claims that the ID card
is a forgery, and that he is not
the man, known as "Ivan the
Terrible," who butchered hun-
dreds of thousands of Jews at
the Treblinka death camp.
Pritchard showed the court a
series of photo montages she
had made combining sections
of faces of different male
models cut, she said, "at ran-
dom" out of magazines. She
said that the sections looked as
if they matched, thus challeng-
ing the validity of Altmann s
method.
PRITCHARD also showed
the court a series of examples
of pictures which create visual
illusions, making people see
only what they are conditioned
to see. One example she used
was a seemingly conventional
picture of Abraham Lincoln.
Only on close scrutiny could
the viewer disassociate himself
from the portrait in order to
see it was made up of small pic-
tures of animals.
Shaked's aim was to prove
that Pritchard's was not an ex-
act science. He referred to
another of her visual illusion
examples two horizontal
lines of equal lenth, one with
two outward-facing ar-
rowheads at either end, and
the other with two inverted ar-
rowheads for ends. The viewer
automatically presumes the
first line to be longer. How
could one persuade the viewer
of the equal length of the lines,
Shaked asked. "By measuring
them," was Pritchard's reply.
Judge Dalia Dorner referred
to Altmann's measurements of
the facial features in his photo
montages, and said that he had
not relied only upon the visual
impression the montages had
created. Pritchard admitted
she had made no such
measurements on her random
montages. She also admitted
that she had no knowledge of
morphology, the science of the
forms, proportions and
measurement of facial
features.
SHAKED THEN proceeded
to chip at Pritchard's use of
apparently scientific ter-
minology in her testimony.
She had to admit her ig-
norance of the scientific im-
plication of use of terms such
as "random sample" and "cor-
relation," reducing her to con-
cede that as English is her se-
cond language, maybe she had
used those words
"inadvertently."
And then Shaked challenged
Pritchard's area of expertise
itself psysiognomy, the
science of judging character
from facial features. He
quoted basic textbooks of
psychology, which relegate
physiognomy to "the company
of phrenology (juding per-
sonality by the contours of the
skull), and the reading of
palms."
Although Pritchard has bas-
ed much of her testimony on
distortions in perception, and
had declared that the right
side of the brain has a
"holistic" comprehension of
visual images, Shaked got her
to admit that she had no basic
knowledge of the workings, of
the eye, nor of the basics of
perception.
IDENTIFICATloS NEEDED: An Israeli
Defense Forces soldier ducks ID o) Jabalya
refugee camp rest/lent last im k (A ug. 19) nut-
side barbed wire barriers closing Off the camp
in the second day running of a curfeir impost d
AP/Wide World FIm
ON the area in the Gaza Strip
Israelis iren seriously WOWtded wkti
assailants opened f"'i ON an Israel vekifk
The Israeli passengers fired back
Decision Defended
To Transfer Two Convicted Terrorists
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Minister of Public Security
Haim Barlev is defending the
transfer of two convicted
members of the terrorist
Jewish underground from
prison to the prison system's
"rehabilitation yeshiva" in
Afula.
Knesset member Mordechai
Virshubski of the Citizen
Rights Movement had com-
plained to Barlev that the
transfer of Yitzhak Ganiram.
serving six-year and nine-
month prison term, and
Yehuda Etzion, serving a
seven-year sentence, indicated
that they were getting
preferential treatment. Vir-
shubski demanded that the
two be returned to prison.
Barlev said, "The
underground prisoners have
been treated just like any
other prisoners. The prisons'
commission is not required to
go beyond the terms of the
punishment prescribed by the
court."
l'hey had both completed
Majorette Crowned
NIAGARA FALLS, N.Y. -
nTA) rrT Fourteen-year-old
binny Tennenbaum of Colum-
bus, Ohio, has been crowned
International Miss TU Ma-
jorette," Twirling Unlimited's
world majorette for her aire
Ki-oup. She won a North
American competition here
Aug. 1.
more than a quarter of their
sentences and thus, after
meeting criteria set by the
rehabilitation committee, were
eligible for the rehabilitation
program. Barlev said. The
Minister said he would be will-
ing to grant the same
privileges to eligible Moslem
and Christian prisoners, if
similar religious seminaries
were opened in Israel.
Ganiram and Etzion, who
were jailed in April. 1984. art
now serving the remainder
their sentences together
15 other convicts at the Afub
Yeshiva, from where they art
taken to work at various loca-
tions. They also receive
weekend leave.
The inmates are taught bj
Rabbi David Grossman. I
Migdal Haemek. and art
supervised by a prison con::1
sion official. i<
KVETCfH
TM
A I
fetMPOMtl Bofmn and Mark Sunuf Angi"
"That's the last time we send Howie to pick up
some lox and bagels."


[Orthodox Vow Violence in Answer
To Saturday Movies in Jerusalem
Friday, August 28, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
f
;s
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
thodox leaders in Jerusalem
irned Sunday that their com-
inities would respond
igorously" next weekend to
opening of four cinema
kbs here last Friday night.
secular leaders, buoyed by
ligh turnout at the film
|bs, vowed to open two more
{t week.
spokesman for the Eda
edit ultra-Orthodox com-
inity, centered in Mea
;arim, said the community
"behaved like good boys
Kt Shabbat, but we will not
Biavi' that way next time."
H^vraham Yosef Lezerson,
I Agudat Yisrael councilman,
Bmed last Friday night "a
Hck Shabbat" for Jerusalem,
d said Mayor Teddy Kollek
and the film organizers would
Krry a heavy responsibility"
for tlic consequences. "The
status quo has been torn apart
^H we will not stand idly by,"
Ltterson warned.
HERE WERE only
poradio incidents of rioting in
Busalem during this past
Sabbat, due to a strong rein-
^cemert of the city's police
:e. Mounted and riot-
lipped policemen patrolled
exits to Mea Shearim on
lay night, and allowed only
^en groups of Orthodox to
re carefully limited pro-
m against the film screen-
On Saturday afternoon
police had to use water
moris to contain a renewed
>reak, but by and large the
s of wholesale violence in
isalem proved premature.
Haifa, however, Orthodox
lonstrations against Sab-
desecration there turned
ty, and three Israel Radio
porters were severely
ten. The town's Ashkenazi
;f Rabbi, Shear-Yashuv
t>
are
t :
A'
are
?
ms Workers
In Dispute
By HUGH ORGEL
IL AVIV (JTA) More
1,000 workers of the
t Soltam arms and muni-
factory at Yokneam in
the Emtk returned from an
ftrced five-week vacation
Sunda> and locked themselves
and heads of the plant and its
padrut Koor industrial com-
owners inside the
ing.
e factory area was still
Bed and fenced off by Mon-
I afternoon, with no sign of
Beak in the dispute on immi-
nent dismissals.
Histadrut's central corn-
was scheduled to meet
iday night to discuss the
doff but demanded that
management "hostages"
be released.
e employees have been
red by a Koor decision to
iss many of the workers in
wake of sharp reductions
ilitary and civilian orders,
m has been a major pro-
r of heavy military equip-
t for the army and
rer of tank and personnel
ers.
it cuts in the defense
et have led to the
dilation of many orders,
demand for the company's
ian products has also fallen
Cohen, called on religious
residents to help police bring
the miscreants to justice.
The Orthodox and ultra-
Orthodox communities in the
capital prepared, meanwhile,
for a mass show of strength at
the Western Wall Monday
afternoon. Leading Aguda-
affiliated rabbis, among them
Rabbi Shlomo Zalman Auer-
bach, a noted halachist, and
Rabbi Shalom Eliashiv, a
former leading dayan. called
on religious people from all
over the country to participate
in a prayer-demonstration and
tens of thousands are expected
to attend.
Kollek, meanwhile, plans to
set up a select committee to
consider ways of offering
nonreligious Jerusalemites
Friday night cultural activities
without offending the sen-
sibilities of the Orthodox.
THE SECULARIST front,
comprising Mapam, Citizens
Rights Movement, Shinui, the
Reform movement and unaf-
filiated secularists has called
on the city officials to
recognize that the high tur-
nout at the film clubs on Fri-
day there were 1,000 people
turned away from the Beit
Agron cinema club alone for
lack of tickets shows the
need for entertainment and
culture in the capital for the
non-Orthodox sector.
In a related incident, Israeli
police bused in hundreds of
reinforcements to Jerusalem
Friday as tensions in the city
rose dangerously following the
shearing-off of a young Or-
thodox boy's peyot (side curls)
last Thursday night.
Photographs of 11-year-old
Nahum Hanun before and
after the thug clipped the
peyot in a Mea Shearim street
were featured prominently in
most Israeli papers Friday
and sent a shudder of shock
through the entire country.
The imagery immediately con-
veyed to many people's minds
was that of the Holocaust, and
secular and religious leaders
joined in condemning the act.
NEVERTHELESS, police
feared the attack would ex-
acerbate an already tense
situation. After three straight
weekends of rioting over the
Friday-ni^'ht cinema issue
here, Orthodox rabbis have
called for a mass prayer
meeting at the Western Wall
Monday night, where more
than 100,000 people were
expected.
Students Ulli Fellig of Miami (right) and
Mark Coen of Los Angeles join together to
review an important text in the Talmud dur-
ing the recent annual all-night Torahthon set
for high school students at Yeshiva Ohr
Ekhonon Chabad, the Los Angeles Chabad
high school. Ulli is one of 10 students from the
Miami area currently at the California
Yeshiva, accredited for more than two decades
by the Western Association of Schools and
Colleges.
Rafsanjani: Pressure Israel on Prisoners
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) In a
rare interview on American
television, the Speaker of the
Iranian Parliament, Ho-
jatolislam Hashemi Rafsan-
jani, has proposed that the
United States pressure Israel
to swap Lebanese Shiites be-
ing held in Israeli prisons for
American hostages. The inter-
view was telecast on the "To-
day" show Thursday.
Rafsanjani told NBC foreign
editor Henry Champ that
although "Iran does not in-
terfere in other countries," he
agreed that Iran has influence
among Lebanese Shiites
because they do, in fact, turn
to Iranian religious leader
Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini
"for guidance."
BUT, said Rafsanjani,
responding to Champ's ques-
tion on the possibility of Iran
interceding with the Lebanese
Shiites for the American
hostages' release, "Why sould
we do it when you have hostile
attitudes toward us and such a
naval build-up in the Persian
Gulf?" Rafsanjani then sug
gested that the U.S. put
pressure on Israel to release
Lebanese prisoners being held
in Israel. "You have done this
before. Why don't you repeat
that?"
When Champ asked him,
"Are you suggesting a trade?"
Rafsanjani succinctly replied,
"Yes, we do."
Rafsanjani said, "I don't
think I have absolute power to
do that (release hostages). I
only promise I will do my
best."
A commentator on NBC
News following the interview
said that the Israeli govern-
ment had publicly responded
to the suggestion by saying it
would not negotiate with Iran
over release of Lebanese
prisoners in Israeli prisons.
But CBS News later claimed
that Israeli spokespersons in-
dicated that Iran had not made
such a direct offer to Israel for
any consideration of it to be
made.
BARUKH BINAH, press
spokesperson at the Israel
Consulate in New York, said,
"We don't take this very
seriously. He (Rafsanjani) can
say whatever he likes on televi-
sion. Our stand concerning ter-
rorism is known."
Rafsanjani also said that
"The Islamic way of thinking
should be propagated
everywhere. This is what we
believe in, and this is what we
work for."
Rafsanjani said he is not op-
timistic about an early end to
the Gulf War between Iran
and Iraq. However, he also
suggested that if the U.S.
came out with a statement
that Iraq had started the war,
"Iran would end the war. I
think we could expect that."
ICOQOBOOOOOOI
'Jewish Jewish National Fund
5*080*(Keren Kayemeth Leisrael)]
Redeems, Reclaims, Rebuilds the Land of Israel
SUPPORT THE JNF
FLORIDA* tfl SPA VaXLUll WltQMT LOS QUAWANTIID
m
ifi
'.'
"Weekend"
4 Days/3 Nites
1
SO of 174 rooms
Package price for 4 full days 4 3 nltea
[ Lose Weight-Feel Great-Super Rate" at Harbor Island Spa
"Atmerica' Most Affordable Spa "
3 nutritionally balanced
meals dally
Weight loas plane
Nutritionist
Massage
Facial or herbal wrap
Sauna steam Jacuzzi
Exercise yoga classes
Water exer.-Ises
Spaa for man A women
Free tennl* clinic
Gala cocktail party
HBO/Cable
Day ft evening activities
Nltely Dinner Dancing
Show* a Entertainment
PLANT TREES IN ISRAEL
FOR ALL OCCASIONS
Plant as Many Trees as You Wish
($5 Per Treel
18 Trees-Chai
25 Trees-Cluster
36 Trees-Double Chai
50 Trees-Jubilee
75 Trees Arbor
10( Trees -Garden
300 Trees-Orchard
1000 Trees-Grove*
I >i'dnalion ( 'eremonv in Israel and a
Special Plaque in the Forest is Included
n Holiday Greetings j
? Birthdays
D Anniversary
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
D Wedding
Graduation
? In Honor
In Memory
? Get Well
D Good Wishes
New Baby
New Year
D Special Occasion
U In Gratitude
D.______
Call for Information & Reservations
1-800 SPA-SLIM
7900 LARRY PASKOW WAY. N BAY VILLAGE. FL 33141
inc ii Group Rates: Call Jack Buchsbaum
Ksiiiblish an Annuity with the .JNF
KememiMT the .1N F in your Will
Link your Nairn- hlernally with
lhi" hand of Israel
JKWISH NATIONAL FIND
420 Lincoln Rd.. Suite 353. Miami Beach. FL 33139
Phone 538 6464
KMOOOOOOOOOOO


Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 28, 1987
China Ready
But What Would Its Role
Be in Middle East Conflict?
LONDON Discussions on
the composition of an interna-
tional peace conference on the
Arab-Israeli conflict often
overlook China. While China's
readiness to engage in Israel-
Arab affairs and Israel's will-
ingness to accept Chinese in-
volvement depend on many
factors, such a breakthrough
would have momentous
consequences.
This is the opinion published
in a report by the Institute of
Jewish Affairs here.
As Yitzhak Shichor says in a
new Research Report: "For
China the establishment of
relations with Israel is a key
not merely to the international
conference in the Middle East
but to a greater role in interna-
tional politics."
CHINA'S attitude towards
the Middle East must be seen
in the context of a general
change in policy and self-
image. No longer unstable
domestically or an outcast in-
ternationally, China wishes to
assert herself as an important
world power. She is thus seek-
ing to normalize relations with
other countries. So far China
has kept out of the Middle
East conflict although she did
tacitly support the Camp
David Agreements (so as to
isolate the Soviet Union) and
Vienna Photos
In Switzerland
By TAMAR LEVY
GENEVA (JTA) An ex-
hibit of photos showing the life
of Viennese Jewry before
World War II has been on ex-
hibit this month at the
Zilberhorn hotel in the moun-
tain resort of Grindelwald,
Switzerland.
"The Isle of Matzot:
1918-1938" comprises black-
and-white photos showing the
everyday life of Leopold
Strasse, where the Jews lived,
as well as depictions of the
post-war horror, when the
street was destroyed.
THE EXHIBIT was
organized by the Austrian
Foreign Ministry in an at-
tempt to improve the image of
Austria and its citizens in Tight
of the controversy over the
Nazi past of Austrian Presi-
dent Kurt Waldheim.
Zilberhorn owner Meir
Wagner, a part-time cor-
respondent for the Israeli
newspaper Hatzofe, said that
the Austrian Ambassador to
Switzerland, Franz Parak,
personally asked him to host
the exhibit. The hotel attracts
Jews from 'roughout the
world.
Parak was re of the
Jewish hostelry bectUM the
Austrian military attache had
visited there in winter with the
Israeli military attache in
Switzerland, Mordechai Allon.
They were invited to the an-
nual skiing and hockey com-
petition organized by the
Swiss Army.
THE EXHIBIT opening
featured not^d Austrian ac-
tress Angelica Schitz of the
Bourg Theatre in Vienna, who
read poems by Jews, many of
which described Nazi horrors.
has expanded her trade, in-
cluding arms sales, to the Arab
countries.
Recently, however, she ex-
pressed willingness to join the
United Nations Truce Supervi-
sion Organization and has sup-
ported the idea of an interna-
tional peace conference to be
held under the auspices of the
five permanent members of
the United Nations Security
Council.
While relations between
Israel and China remain unof-
ficial and reports of mutual
trade agreements, especially
in arms, are exaggerated,
China is attracted to Israel for
two reasons. Firstly, Israel has
something to offer in
agriculture, technology and
military matters (since Israel
is experienced in countering
Soviet weapons). Secondly
China believes she will benefit
diplomatically through the
perceived 'Jewish lobby' in the
United States.
THE MAIN drawback to im-
proved relations between the
countries is the extent of
China's trade with the Arab
world, greater than her trade
with almost every other
region. The $25 billion earned
from the Middle East and
North Africa make such trade
agreements indispensable to
China's economy.
China has also traditionally
supported the Arab position
and the PLO. Any attempt to
back out of the Arab commit-
ment 'could lead to heavy
penalties,' such as the damag-
ing of China's "political and
ideological credibility, not only
in the Middle East but in the
Third World as a whole."
Prof. Shichor perceives the
existence of contradictory
tendencies within the Chinese
leadership. The "conser-
vatives" are more ideological,
more anti-American, more
anti-Soviet and more inward-
looking. Hence they will not
seek closer ties with Israel.
The "reformists" are more
amenable to ties, but they too
would not want to pay too
heavy a price. It is therefore
unlikely that anything more
than a strengthening of infor-
mal links between China and
Israel will take place in the
near future, thus laying the
basis if and when the time is
ripe for official ties.
ISRAEL MAY well make
such ties a pre-condition for
participation of a superpower
in an international conference,
and China's desire to par-
ticipate partly to ensure
that the Soviets do not gain an
advantage over them could
lead to such a development. On
the other hand the Chinese
may argue that by avoiding
this involvement, they are re-
maining true to the Arabs
while the Soviets would be ac-
cused of "selling out."
But China does not yet have
diplomatic relations with some
Arab countries, most impor-
tantly Saudi Arabia. Until such
relations are established it is
unlikely that China will make a
dramatic move towards Israel.
Yet if an international peace
conference is seriously in the
offing this could well con-
stitute an opening for Chinese
diplomatic activity in the Mid-
dle East.
AP/Wide World Phota
meeting on the future of the Lavi fighter, a
project whose continuation the United States
rigorously opposes. Both Israeli leaders are
for the continuation of the project.
PROLAVI: Israel's Prime Minister Yitzhak
Shamir (left) and Deputy Prime Minister and
Foreign Minister Shimon Peres at the cabinet
table last week before the start of a high-leivl
ForJNF
Fires Are Like 'Tree Terrorism'
m
By SUSAN BIRNBAL'M
NEW YORK (JTA) A
wave of fires that has
devastated Jewish National
Fund forests in Israel this year
has prompted the JNF to
mount an all-out drive for im-
mediate financial help. The
JNF needs a minimum of $7
million: $2 million to replace
trees recently burnt and $5
million for fire-fighting equip-
ment urgently needed to
forestall future disasters.
Arson is strongly suspected
in about 25 percent of the
fires. The scope of this "tree
terrorism" is unprecedented,
striking at the very soul and
soil of Israel.
"JNF is opening an im-
mediate nationwide crusade to
people of all faiths to help
preserve the safety and in-
tegrity of our national
forests," Samuel Cohen, JNF
executive vice president, said
in an interview at JNF head-
quarters here.
LAST WEEK, JNF in Israel
(Keren Kayemeth L'Yisrael)
organized an unprecedented
nationwide fire-prevention
campaign that will include
widespread educational
efforts.
On July 29 alone, a day the
Israeli media said "will be
remembered as the worst
forest fire day in Israel in the
last decade,,T four different
fires near Jerusalem started
within a few hours of each
other, ravaging 1,150 acres of
forest that included 80,000
trees.
The JNF estimates the
damage for that one day's fires
alone at $2 million, making it
apparent that much more will
be needed to replace trees that
have been lost to fires since
January alone.
The four fires of July 29
disconnected Jerusalem's
western neighborhoods from
its electric supply for several
hours, and badly damaged
telephone posts as well as the
water-pumping system that
connects the Mediterranean
coast with Jerusalem.
THESE FIRES affected 25
acres of pasture in the area of
Mevasseret Yerushalaim; 50
acres of forest and orchards
near Nataf; 150 acres in a
65-year-old forest near Ma'ale
Hahamisha and Kiryat
Anavim that were dedicated to
Israel's national poet. Chaim
Nachman Bialik; and 50 acres
of the Children's Forest
located in the B'nai B'rith
Martyrs' Forest, trees planted
by children for children who
were killed during the
Holocaust. In addition, 875
acres of natural woodland
were destroyed in the area, in-
cluding oak, carob, pistachio
and pine trees.
JNF President Joseph
Sternstein called the fires "a
national tragedy and a matter
of national urgency." He said
that During the High
Holidays, it is imperative that
we declare ourselves to the
replacement of every one of
these forest, especially in the
face of those who are employ-
ing this latest form of ter-
rorism, arson. 14 years after
the Yom Kippur War."
In the northern Galilee, fire-
fighters told Cohen that there
were over 150 fires in that
region alone since January
more than in any prior
12-month period. There, said
^ohen "the foresters are ab-
solutely convinced that the
tires are caused bv PLO-
onented Arabs."
YITZHAK HATUEL,
regional supervisor of af-
"restation for JNF, told
sraeh newspaper Hadnshot
that workers from the West
Bank who travel to work and
return home each dav cross
the Beit Shemesh bridge and
stop to throw incendiary
devices, made of matches tied
with string around lit cigaret-
tes, into flammable shrubs
alongside the forest. "When
the fire reaches the matches.
they ignite in one blow," said
Hatuel. The workers are about
20 kilometers down the road to
Hebron by the time the fire is
detected, making apprehen-
sion almost impossible.
The day the four fires were
set near Jerusalem, a pilot for
JNF, Uri Goldschmit, was on a
routine inspection flight wen
he saw a column of smoke ris-
ing and three men running
away. Two of them succeeded
in escaping, but a third had
stopped to change from khaki
clothes to an Arab djellaba.
Goldschmit shadowed him and
radioed for help.
The man was caught and in
terrogated, and he identified
his two partners. The three ,
were from the village of
Ararah. They are being detain
ed on suspicion of trying to set
fire to Iyron Forest "<>n na-
tionalistic grounds." That
same week, three youths from
the village of Bar'Ta'ah were
stopped on suspicion that they
belonged to a gang that set
forest fires "on nationalistic
grounds."
TWO MONTHS prior, three
youths who were residents of
the area around Hebron were
caught while attempting to set
fire to Netiv Halamed Hay
After several hours' interroga-
tion by Beit Shemesh po'lce-
they reportedly confessed
Said Cohen: "WWjj
devastating and this is "*
is heart-rending -ist hat son*
of these fires are clearly aimw
at touching on the nerves,
the emotions, of Israel "
do you replenish a i>re-s
trees that were planted .
Continued on P*e 9-A


\Gas Going Up
How To Avoid A Replay of '74-75
Friday, August 28, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
By WILLIAM GRALNICK
(Whoops. Have you noticed?
is prices almost everywhere
live breeched the dollar mark,
le American Automobile
ssociation sees still higher
ices to come. Are the gas
^es of 1974-75 just around
corner? Not likely. Are
>se gas lines out of the ques-
i? Also not likely. With in-
eased prices comes increas-
vulnerability.
le should view with utmost
icern the recent increase in
lericas's energy vulnerabili-
U.S. dependence upon
reign oil imports was 25 per-
it greater in 1986 than it
in 1985. This increase has
le largely from the Arab
EC countries, and the
ngerous trend is continuing.
lany experts predict that
ported oil will exceed 50
rcent of domestic consump-
early in the 1990's due to
oil demand and lower
lestic production.
(OREOVER, a lesser share
our oil imports is coming
^m regions such as Canada,
;xico and the United
lgdom and a greater
^ount from more vulnerable
i/or distant areas such as
onesia, Nigeria and Saudi
abia.
for example, imports from
udi Arabia have increased
100,000 barrels per day
1985 to over 700,000 barrels
day in 1986. Crude oil
bs have increased from an
rage of $14 per barrel in
B to $19 per barrel now. Oil
fe single largest item in the
trade deficit.
fspite the ominous security
economic implications of
wing U.S. energy
erability, the American
ic and our government
largely to have forgotten
1973 crisis, and the
irupling of oil prices that
kwed. Policies have been
William A. Gralnick is
Southeast Regional Director of
the American Jewish
Committee.
abandoned that encouraged
conservation and the use of
those domestic energy
resources that are plentiful.
BECAUSE OF the long
time needed to influence the
U.S. energy infrastructure, we
must act now to decrease our
vulnerability. We must urge
the United States to set as a
primary national goal a
substantial reduction of U.S.
dependence on imported
energy supplies.
Such an energy program
should reduce wasteful energy
consumption, encourage fuel
switching to domestic supplies,
increase domestic supplies and
assure an adequate Strategic
Petroleum Reserve. This pro-
gram requires a partnership
between government and the
private sector working
together and with a sense of
urgency.
HERE'S A laundry list of
specific energy policy
recommendations:
Increase public awareness
In Israel, 45 Have AIDS,
And 33 Have Already Died
By HUGH ORGEL
!L AVIV (JTA) -
y-five people suffer from
m Israel and 33 have
I, Israeli Health Minister
Jshana Arbeli-Almoslino
losed.
I'enty new carriers of the
S antibody have been
avered each month but this
i not mean they will
Wop the disease or pass it
* others, Arbeli-Almoslino
Balth Ministry sources said
he beginning of July, 237
pie had been found to be
fiers of AIDS and another
, were discovered this
kth.
^ur men and four women
suffered from AIDS-
ed ailments said they
heterosexuals.
'li-Almoslino said she
considering legislation
fch would require all pro-
ves in Israel to be examin-
jfor AIDS. She said she
Ud also distribute one-time-
throw-away syringes to
vn drug addicts in an at-
9t to avoid multiple use of
needles which could transmit
contaminated blood to other
users.
An Israel Radio health af-
fairs reporter disputed the
Health Ministry figures and
claimed that of 80 prostitutes
examined to date, eight and
not five as reported by the
Ministry were found to have
the AIDS virus. Seven of the
women worked in the Tel Aviv
area and one in Haifa.
of the dangers of U.S. energy
vulnerability.
Enact conservative
measures, specifically with
respect to fuel efficiency of
automobiles and trucks.
Impose oil import and/or
gasoline and diesel fuel taxes.
Encourage domestic pro-
duction of oil and gas.
Encourage production of
electricity where it replaces oil
imports and the promotion of
non-oil-fired power plants.
Regulate and utilize
reorganization to achieve
greater plant utilization and
efficiency.
Create an adequate
Strategic Petroleum Reserve
for emergency protection.
Demand federal support
for research and development
(including engineering
facilities) for alternatives to
imported oil.
Support federal en-
couragement of diversification
of sources of oil imported into
United States. They should be
called the nine
commandments.
IN ADDITION, an informed
citizenry should support the
proposed modification of Sec-
tion 232 of the Trade Expan-
sion Act which requires the
President to submit to Con-
gress with his yearly budget a
three-year projection of U.S.
oil production, demand and
imports.
The Act would provide that
if the projection showed im-
ports reaching 50 percent of
consumption, the President
would be required to submit to
Congress a plan of action
designed to limit imports. The
Amendment known as the
Energy Security Act of 1987
does not give the President
any new powers nor does it
make specific recommenda-
tions re energy policy.
The Amendment is worthy
in that it serves to underscore
te hseriousness of the energy
problem. It must not, however,
be viewed as a substitute for
the comprehensive U.S.
energy program (along the
lines recommended above)
which must be implemented
now if we are able to avoid the
emergency that the framers of
the Amendment seek to
ameliorate.
Moreover, the amendment
should not be viewed as
discharging the duty of Con-
gress and the President to
make the longer-range hard
choices in energy policy
necessary to assure U.S.
energy security.
"The Cellular Service Center"
LORIDA AUTOPHONEI
New Cellular Car Phone!* $3995 pfZ
CALL FOR DETAILS ABOUT
8.5 TO 30% SAVING ON AIR TIME.
Motorola
hand-hold portabla with tho works
M79500
Omyr"tegrmnlwquHd.
599-5222
AlfTMCXWtD Gf NT FO
CELLULAR ONE
FlOWOACtllUtAB ttlfPHOHt COMPNV

United Jewish Appeal leaders put the finishing touches on the
program for UJA a UOth Anniversary Mission II. The mission
features an itinerary including briefings by top Israeli govern-
ment officiah. Bernard Borine of Philadelphia (left), Judith A.
Levy of Boston, National UJA Women's Division chairman, and
Alan R. Crawford of Milwaukee, mission chairman, were among
leaders from different communities who met recently in.Chicago
for a special planning session.
For JNF: Tree Terrorism'
Continued from Page 8-A
children in honor of children
who perished in the Holocaust?
And the very fact that there
was a fire in an area known as
the Martyrs' Forest to honor
the memory of Jews who were
killed during the Holocaust
can't be accidental. It's a terri-
ble, terrible blow."
The JNF is not singling out
Arabs as the main agents of
arson. Many JNF workers are
Arab, performing the most
trusted, and crucial, tasks,
from planting to guarding the
forests. The JNF spokesman
in Israel, David Angel, told the
press that most forest fires are
caused by farmers wo burn
crop by products, unauthoriz-
ed and unsupervised by JNF.
In addition, there are fires
started by careless hikers who
toss smoldering cigarettes, or
by campers who do not proper-
ly extinguish bonfires. There
are also incidences of fires
begun as a result of army
training exercises, in which a
single spark from a bullet or
artillery shell Suffices to ignite
combustible growth, Angel
explained.
ISRAEL, and JNF
specifically, are ill-equipped to
contend with disastrous fires.
Hundreds of volunteers from
kibbutzim, moshavim and
other settlements fought the
blazes with hoses and fire-
beaters, while crop dusters
dropped water on the flames.
The only official fire-fighting
unit that could attend the fires
in the Jerusalem area came
from Beit Shemesh. Fire-
houses in Rehovot and Ramla
could not respond to the ap-
peals because they were busy
with local fires in fields and
woods. Cohen said that JNF is
now seeking to establish a
sophisticated communications
network between foresters
and a central post; purchase
additional, modern fire-
fighting trucks; and lease
special planes. Cohen spoke of
the 'hurt and anguish' he saw
in the eyes of the foresters. A
veteran forester told him and
JNF chairman Moshe Rivlin,
"When you saw the flames,
you heard the trees crying."
Klaperman Elected
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Rabbi Gilbert Klaperman of
New York has been elected
president of the Synagogue
Council of America, which
comprises the rabbinic and
congregational branches of
Conservative, Orthodox and
Reform Judaism. He succeeds
Rabbi Herbert Baumgard of
Miami. Klaperman is past
president of the Rabbinical
Council of America, an Or-
thodox organization.
TOP CASH PAID
OLD FUROTTURE
ORIENTAL RUGS
OLD oil paiivnm;s
Objects of Art
Brlc-a-Brac
o Tapestries
o Bronzes
o Pianos
o Silver
Single Items or Complete Estates
DADE ESTATE GALLERIES BROWARD
751-4770 6914 Blscayne Blvd. 462-0730
** IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
Telemarketing Solicitors
Housewives, Retirees
Salary & Commission Morning & Afternoon Shifts
Please Call Ms. Teglas For More Information 9-5
373-4605
The Jewish Floridian
sesss


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 28, 1987
Bitter Debate
Over Who Will Get
To Meet With Pope
Continued from Page 1-A
Jewish organizations, and I
represent no one, I chose not
to create the impression that I
interfere with their plans and
thus informed the Vatican of
my wish that my visit be
rescheduled at a later time.
"I hope the meeting between
the Jewish groups and Pope
John Paul II will bring much
needed results," Wiesel said.
At the same time, some
Jewish officials welcomed the
publication last Wednesday
(Aug. 19) of a letter from the
Pope to an American Catholic
leader on the Holocaust which
was widely viewed as a gesture
to mollify Jewish anger over
his audience with Austrian
President and accused Nazi
war criminal Kurt Waldheim
in June.
THE VATICAN issued an
invitation about two weeks ago
formally to the International
Jewish Committee for Inter-
religious Consultations which
comprises five Jewish
organizations: the Synagogue
Council of America; World
Jewish Congress; B'nai B'rith
International; American
Jewish Committee; and Israel
Interfaith Association. The
Pope has requested no more
than five representatives at-
tend the meeting.
Initially, IJCIC intended to
compose a delegation from its
member organizations. But
shortly after news of the
meeting became public, a
number of other organizations
requested that they be includ-
ed in the delegation.
The Union of American
Hebrew Congregations,
American Jewish Congress,
and the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith all sent
representatives to the meeting
in hopes of carving out a place
for themselves on the
delegation.
Some of the representatives
at the meeting Wednesday
night suggested a larger
delegation be sent to meet
with high-ranking Vatican of-
ficials during the two-day visit
while only five or six would
meet with the Pope.
Lay leaders have complained
that the delegation would not
be representative of American
Jews because only rabbis
would be included. The Zionist
Organization of America
castigated IJCIC for failing to
include any Zionist represen-
tatives in the delegation. The
Labor Zionist Alliance called
on the American Jewish com-
munity to "boycott any
meeting with Pope John Paul
H" in light of his granting an
audience to Waldheim.
MILTON SHAPIRO, ZOA
president, criticized IJCIC for
neglecting the input of major
American Jewish organiza-
tions and the entire Zionist
movement in forming the
agenda for the meeting. A
more appropriate forum for
establishing an agenda would
have been one of the major um-
brella organizations like the
Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish
Organizations, Shapiro said.
The issue of Jewish
representation is further com-
plicated by the injection of
political issues into a dialogue
traditionally centered on
theological and interfaith
concerns.
Although the groups have
not and probably will not work
out a solution which is satisfac-
tory to all. the four-point agen-
da for the meeting has
widespread support. The
delegation will raise the con-
cern over rising anti-Semitism
in Europe and especially in
Austria in light of the
Waldheim controversy. The
Holocaust and the Vatican's
refusal to establish diplomatic
relations with Israel will also
be presented as issues of
concern.
The fourth item on the agen-
da, contradictory Vatican
statements on Jews and
Judaism, goes to the heart of
the historical antagonism bet-
ween the two faiths.
ACCORDING to one partici-
pant in the formation of the
agenda, the Pope has alter-
nately made positive
statements on Jews and
Judaism when speaking to an
interfaith audience but has
made some distressing
references in meetings with
Catholic audiences.
Last year during an Easter
Mass in Rome the Pope quoted
from the Gospels, thereby
reviving a theology denounced
two decades ago within
Catholicism that the Jews
were to blame for the death of
Jesus.
On the other end of the spec-
trum have been statements
not unlike the Pope's letter
released last Wednesday pro-
moting mutual respect and
friendship between the two
faiths.
The Pope's letter to Ar-
chbishop John May of St. Louis
took on increased significance
in light of the tension between
the two religions caused by the
Waldheim meeting. The
Pope's letter thanked Ar-
chbishop May for preparing a
book entitled "On Jews and
Judaism 1979-1985," which
chronicled the Pope's
statements on the topic.
The cover letter which ac-
companied the Pope's letter
noted that it was "most ap-
propriate following recent
events involving the visit of
the President of the Federal
Republic of Austria, Dr. Kurt
Waldheim, to the Holy
father."
THE POPE recounted in his
letter his efforts to "develop
and deepen our relationship
with the Jews, 'our elder
brothers in the faith of
Abraham." But he devotes the
greater part of the letter to
discussion of the Holocaust
and its meaning.
"With our hearts filled with
this unyielding hope, we Chris-
tians approach with immense
respect the terrifying ex-
perience of the extermination,
the Shoah, suffered by Jews
during the Second World War,
and we seek to grasp its most
authentic, specific and univer-
sal meeting.
"As I said recently in War-
saw, it is precisely by reason of
this terrible experience that
Whit* H..u>* Phot,,
Greenspan New Federal Reserve Board Chairman
President Reagan looks on as Dr. Alan
Greenspan (center) is sworn in as a member
and chairman of the Federal Reserve Board.
The swearing-in ceremony in the East Room
of the White House kwk place on Aug. S, In
remarks at the ceremony, the Presid. rti
Greenspan '$ 'experience in both the public nnd
privaU sectors spanning the last threv ilicndes
(which! superbly qualifies hitnfor this impor-
tant and challenging position.'
the Nation of Israel, her suf-
ferings and her Holocaust are
today before the eyes of the
Church, of all peoples and of
all nations as a warning, a
witness and a silent cry."
BEFORE the vivid memory
of the extermination, as re-
counted to us by the survivors
and by all Jews now living, and
as it is continually offered for
our meditation within the nar-
ration of the Pesah Haggadah
as Jewish families are ac-
customed to do today it is
not permissible for anyone to
pass by with indifference.
Reflection upon the Shoah
shows us what terrible conse-
quences the lack of faith in God
and a contempt for man
created in His image can
lead."
The Pope concluded with his
wishes for furthering the
"spirit of peace and universal
fraternal solidarity" with
American Catholics and Jews
in his upcoming visit.
A meeting with Jewish of-
ficials has been scheduled for
Sept. 11 in Miami. Many of the
organizations originally par-
ticipating in the meeting con-
sidered boycotting it after the
Pope met Waldheim. The
groups have called on the Pope
to make some statement defin-
ing his views on the Holocaust
as a prerequisite to their par-
ticipation in the Miami
meeting.
Formula Rapped
Miamians Who'll Be At Sept. 11 Meet
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jeu-ish Floridian Staff Writer
Local Jewish leaders may
not have been satisfied with
the formula, but the leadership
on a national level decided that
80 percent of the audience that
will witness an exchange of
statements between Pope
John Paul II and Jewish
leaders in Miami on Sept. 11
will come from the national
level.
That leaves only 20 percent,
or 39 out of 196 seats,
available for local Jewish
leaders.
THE LIST of names of the
local Jewish leadership who
will participate does not in-
clude people who are not af-
filiated with a Jewish organiza-
tion or institution, such as
university professors or
leaders of Hadassah and B'nai
B'rith, among others.
"I would have liked to have
seen many more seats," said
Rabbi Solomon Schiff, ex-
ecutive vice president of the
Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami. "The selec-
tion, the designation, was not
ours. The limited numbers
were mandated to us, and we
had to do the best we could."
The Jewish leadership who
selected the names on the list
are members of the organiza-
tions participating in the plan-
ning of the Papal visit. Thev
include the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami.
American Jewish Congress,
American Jewish Committee
and Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith, as well as the
Synagogue Council of
America.
SCHIFF SAID he received
"some calls" from members of
the Jewish community who
were not invited to attend the
45-minute session on the mor-
ning of Sept. 11. There, Pope
John Paul is expected to read a
statement, and a member of
the Jewish leadership is also
expected to read a statement.
There is to be no discussion
between the Papal party and
the Jewish leadership at that
meeting.
There are plans, however, to
hold a dinner the night of the
Papal visit. The Pope would
not be present, but the Vatican
will be represented by Car-
dinal Jans Willebrands, presi-
dent of the Holy See Commis-
sion on Religious Relations
with Jews. Invitations have
been sent out to an estimated
300-to-500 Jewish leaders for
the $35 per-person dinner.
The two largest local groups
represented at the Papal visit
are the Jewish Federation and
Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami, with 12
delegates each.
RKPRESENTING the
Jewish Federation will be
Aaron Podhurst, Samuel I.
Adler, Norman Braman.
Michael M. Adler. Alex
Halberstein. Mvron .1. Brodie,
Steven Kravitz, Donald Lef-
ton, Howard R. Scharlin. Max-
ine Schwartz, Harry A Levy
and Norman Lipoff.
Representing *.he Kaobinical
Association of Greater Miami
will be Rabbis Haskell Bernat.
Schiff, Irving Lehrman.
Herbert Baumgard, I'avid B.
Saltzman, Menachem Raab,
Carl Klein, Morton Malavsky
Max A. Lipschitz. Leonard A
Schoolman, Gary A. Cliokstein
and Samuel Z. Jaffe.
The synagogues will be
represented by Jack Burstein.
Orthodox; Samuel Steen,
Reform; and Louis Meltzer.
Conservative.
The Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith. as wej
as the AJCongresa and
AJCommittee. all have four
delegates.
ADL DELEGATES are
Leonard L. Abess. JeronM*
Homer, Arthur Pearlman, Ar-
thur N. Teitelbaum.
AJCongress delegates are
Norma Orovitz. Bernard
Mandter. Brent Routman.
Mark Freedman.
AJCommittee delegates are
David B. Fleeman. William *
Gralnick. Michael Bander and
Faith Mesnekoff.
Sam Oolie Elected
EAST ORANCK. NJ.'
(JTA) Sam Oolie ha***
elected president of the l mi^
Jewish Federation '
MetroWest. nicceeding'
Schwarz.
James


Pope Refused To Convert Child
Against Parent's Wishes
Friday, August 28, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) The
personal story of an American
Jewish man who as a child dur-
I ing tne Holocaust was hidden
by a Polish Catholic couple
I demonstrate! a respect for
[Judaism by the young priest
I who became Pope John Paul
II.
In an account of the saving
i,if little Shachne Hiller. record-
|ed in "Haaidic Tales of the
Holocaust" (Avon Books.
K.V., li82). Hiller. renamed
E tanl ey Berger, told
kiiithor/editor Vaffa Eliach
that in 1946 a newly ordained
priest named Karol Wojtyla
refused to baptize him a
Catholic despite a request by
[he woman who had cared for
im as her own.
BERGER TOLD Eliach that
trough a letter from the
Voman in Poland who had sav-
him. he learned that she.
Irs. Yachowitch. had ap-
oached "a newly-ordained
larish priest who had a repute-
[on lor being wise and
rustworthy" to convert him
a true Christian and
fvout Catholic" after she
new for certain that his
irents had died in the
h'inatoria.
I The priest refused after ask-
what was the wish of the
pys' parents in entrusting
tin to their Christian friends,
lachowitch acknowledged
lat his parents, in face of
leir almost certain death, re-
bested that their son be rais-
as a Jew, to which Father
rojtyla replied that "it would
unfair to baptize the child
[hile there was still hope that
V relatives of the child might
iistorian Awaits
'anel's Approval
By YOSSI LEMPKOWITZ
| BRUSSELS (JTA) A
eminent Belgian historian
iraits government approval
serve on an international
km mission of inquiry into the
|orld War II activities of
istrian President Kurt
raldheim.
Jean Van Welkenhuysen,
|rector of the Research
enter on World War II here,
been asked to participate
the Austrian-sponsored
?mmission as a private
tizen. Nevertheless, as a civil
fcrvant, he sought as a
^urtesy the backing of the
iucation Ministry.
Education Minister for
}e Dutch sector, Daniel
Dens, reportedly approves.
)wever, his colleague for the
fench sector, Antoine Du-
lesne, reportedly is
^sitating under the influence
Vice Premier and Justice
^nister Jean Gel. Gol, the
lie Jew in the government, is
fid to advocate a "harder" at-
Jde toward Waldheim.
[Belgian Foreign Minister
eo Tindemans has spoken in
'or of the commission
ause he said "the accusa-
ons against Waldheim must
rst be proven." The commis-
3n is scheduled to begin its
^rk in September.
take him."
In 1942, when the boy's
parents, Helen and Moses
Hiller, realized what their pro-
bable fate would be in the
Cracow ghetto where they liv-
ed, Helen Hiller took her little
son, Shachne, to trusted
Catholic family friends on the
Aryan side in the town of
Dombrowa to be hidden. She
left with her son three letters
and a will.
In a letter to Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph Yachowitch, the Hillers
asked that the couple bring the
boy up as a Jew and return him
to his people in case of his
parents" death. The Hillers in-
cluded in that letter the names
of relatives in Montreal and
Washington.
IN A LETTER to Shachne.
his parents wrote how much
they loved him, told him of his
Jewish heritage and that thej
wanted him to grow up proud
of this.
The third letter contained a
will written by Helen {filler's
mother, Reizel Wurtzel. and
was addressed to her sister-in-
law in Washington. Jenny
Berger. Describing the true
conditions in the ghetto, the
deaths of family members and
the deportations, she wrote
that her grandson had been
"given to good people," but
that if none of them should
return to please take the child
and "bring him up righteous-
ly." She also asked that the
Yachowitches be rewarded for
their efforts to save Shachne.
The Cracow ghetto was li-
quidated in March, 1943. Many
inhabitants were sent to
Auschwitz. The Yachowitches
inquired constantly after the
Hillers and finally learned they
had perished.
The Catholic family moved
around frequently, at times
even hiding in barns and
haystacks. Shachne and the
Yachowitches became increas-
ingly attached to each other,
and the boy attended mass
with them regularly. In 1946,
the request that the child be
baptized was made to Wojtyla,
who refused, saying "there
was still hope that the
relatives of the child might
take him."
YACHOWITCH then mail
ed the letters to the relatives
in the U.S. and Canada, and
both responded affirmatively
their desire to take Shachne. A
legal battle ensued for four
years because Polish law for-
bade Jewish orphan children to
leave Poland. However, in
1949 the Canadian Jewish
Congress received permission
from the Canadian govern-
ment to bring 1,210 orphans to
that country. Shachne was
among them because a Polish
judge had awarded the boy to
representatives of the Cana-
dian and American relatives.
In 1950, he was sent to
Washington, D.C., where he
was adopted and grew up as
Stanley Berger, and continued
to write to his foster parents in
Poland. In October, 1978,
when Karol Wojtyla became
Pope John Paul II, Mrs.
Yachowitch wrote to Stanley
Berger, revealing to him for
the first time that she con-
sidered converting him to
Catholicism, but was denied
this wish by a well-meaning
Priest who had now become
ope.
Left to rigkl an keynote speaker Hirsh Good-
man and Masha Lvbelsky, secretary general
ofNa'amai Israel, being welcomed to the Wth
national biennial con rent inn njS'n'nmai I'SA
by national President Gloria Elbling, and
East Berlin
convention chairwoman, Marjorie C. Moidel,
both of Pittsburgh, just prior to the opening
session ofth* convention. The gathering was
held at th* Century Plaza Hotel in LosAngeles
Aug. 9 to IS.
Gets Rabbi After Quarter-Century
NEW YORK (JTA) For
the first time in almost a
quarter-century, the small
Jewish community in East
Berlin will have a rabbi of its
own, the result of a four-year
effort spearheaded by the
American Jewish Committee.
Rabbi Isaac Neuman, a
65-year-old Auschwitz sur-
vivor from Champaign, 111.,
will leave for East Germany on
Sept. 10 to assume his post
and prepare for the High Holy
Days. As his first rabbinical ac-
tion, he will attend the Inter-
national Ecumenical Con-
ference in East Berlin on Sept.
13 as the official represen-
tative of the less than 600 re-
maining East German Jews.
The Reform rabbi, who is a
member of the U.S. Holocaust
Memorial Council, will become
the only permanent American
rabbi ministering in all of the
East Bloc nations.
"I AM going because there
are Jews who are in need of
spiritual service in this place
out of which so much evil and
destruction once emanated,"
said Neuman. "It is my joy to
try to rebuild and reconstruct
and provide for the needs of
this Jewish community."
He added: "What I hope to
bring is the information that
will help them understand the
oneness of the Jewish people,
their shared history and
experiences."
Eugene DuBow, director of
AJC's Community Services
Department, who has over-
seen this project since its con-
ception, noted that "the pro-
cess of having a permanent
rabbi placed in East Berlin to
help revive and rejuvenate the
Jewish population there took a
lot of time and energy on the
part of concerned individuals,
but we know that we have ac-
complished something in-
credibly worthwhile."
DuBow offered the following
chronology of .-vents leading
to Neuman's appointment:
IN THE FALL of 1983, an
AJC leadership delegation to
Germany became the first
postwar American Jewish
group to visit East Berlin. The
president of the Jewish com-
munity there asked for AJC
help in obtaining kosher wine,
prayer shawls, German
language prayer books, and a
rabbi to conduct High Holy day
services. In early 1984, AJC
shipped the materials and ar-
ranged for a rabbi from
Chicago to go to the German
Democratic Republic (GDR) to
conduct services.
In the fall of 1985, an AJC
delegation returned to East
Berlin and was informed of the
overwhelmingly positive reac-
tion of the Jewish community
to the rabbi's visit. East Ger-
man Jewish community
leaders discussed the possibili-
ty of finding a more perma-
nent religious figure with the
delegation, in an effort to
maintain Jewish life and help
young people discover their
Jewish heritage. After a long
search, AJC suggested
Neuman for the position.
In the summer of 1986, Rep.
William Lehman (D., Fla.)
heard about AJC's project and
offered his help. He, along
with AJC leaders, held several
meetings with U.S. State
Department officers and East
German officials.
IN JANUARY, 1987, the
State Secretary for Religious
Affairs of the GDR arranged
for Neuman, Lehman, DuBow,
and State Department officials
to go to East Berlin for
Passover to meet with leaders
of the Jewish community there
and to "firm up" Neuman's
appointment.
Neuman's position was of-
ficially confirmed by the East
German government early last
month.
Strvlef l 6IM1 KMher Mull
Dally 3 On Tm Sibbiih
Eictttai EmvuUmmM
OUmrt HhM ftti MvM Mien
Health Sm Smm
PmIiIM TlMfMMtlC WMrlM
Liiir TV In All mtm
wily SynigagiM Mulcts
OCEAN NAMWAU
GlAIT
(y)
KOSHfcH
SUMMER SPECIALS
Any 5 Oiyt A 4 Nites
To Sept 8
HflAPM Pe'son
I -U double occ
Any 4 Oiyt A 3 Nile*
To Sept 8
IQC Pe' P'Sn
V double occ
INCLUDING MEALS
Reserve Now lor The
HIGH HOLY OAYS
A SUCCOTH
Services Conducted by
Prominent Cantor
Your Hosts The Berkowilz & Smilow Families
Phone 531-5771
OPEN ALL YEAR
RESERVE NOW FOR THE
HIGH HOLY DAYS & SUCCOTH
SUCCAH ON PREMISES
2 Meals daily plus lunch Private
Beach Olympic Pool, right on the
ocean Rooms with COLOR TV &
k Fridge Entertainment Synagogue
Mashgioch on Premises Free
Partung Personal Attention
i Hosts me Mrtowtt & OrtrMand FamMM
Phone 538-7811
FREE!!
JUICE* TEA
and SNACKS
SERVED TO
YOUR ROOM
THROUGHOUT
THE NIGHT
BY REQUEST


Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 28, 1987
Yuli Edelstein Never Set Out
To Become A Symbol of Struggle
Continued from Page 5-A
release from the camp, she
traveled to Siberia to meet
him.
THROUGHOUT the three
year ordeal of Yuli's trial and
imprisonment, Tanya Edels-
tein had worked actively and
unceasingly for her husband's
release. Shortly after his ar-
rest, she began a 40-day
hunger strike and started
writing letters and filing com-
plaints and petitions with the
courts on his behalf. At the
same time, she worked to
arouse world opinion.
Edelstein comments,
"Tanya began it all. She is an
extraordinary woman. Of
course she could not have
helped me without the support
of many others both Jews
and non-Jews. But she began it
all. She aroused a noise heard
all over the world, until even-
tually the government had no
choice but to let me go."
Like Yuli, Tanya was raised
in a non-religious family. She
too studied Hebrew in Moscow
and underwent a process of
Jewish identity building.
Shortly before Yuli's arrest,
the couple had begun to
become religiously observant.
Yuli explains that they stood
under the chuppah together
for a Jewish wedding
ceremony in 1984; "Before
that, we did not know what a
chuppah was." Today, they
give every appearance of fit-
ting comfortably into the
religious community of Alon
Shvut.
ALON SHVUT, a communi-
ty of 150 families located south
of Jerusalem, began working
actively on Edelstein's behalf
shortly after his arrest.
Zalman Deutsch, a resident of
Alon Shvut, had visited the
Edelsteins in Moscow.
Edelstein's arrest, Deutsch
encouraged the community to
'adopt' the Edelstein family; to
attend public demonstrations,
to write letters and file peti-
tions on their behalf, to speak
to the family by telephone and
to prepare a place for them to
live in Israel. What's more,
over two years ago, residents
of Alon Shvut set aside a seat
in their synagogue, reserved
for Yuli Edelstein.
When the Edelsteins finally
received permission to
emigrate, the community
began working feverishly to
prepare an apartment for
them. Shimshon Saltzman,
who works in the community
recalls, "An awful lot of hours
went into fixing up the apart-
ment. They wanted it to be
perfect. Everybody did
something. Everything in the
apartment was donated by the
people of Alon Shvut the
furniture, the television, the
books, the pictures on the
wall."
Zalman Deutsch made a
welcoming poster, now cover-
ing the door to the apartment,
which reads "And the sons will
return to their borders.
Welcome!" and he brought the
poster to every home in the
community so that every resi-
dent could sign it.
YULI EDELSTEIN
believes that personal connec-
tions such as those
established by Alon Shvut with
his family are vital to the
morale and the ultimate fate of
other refusenik families. He
hopes that Jews and non-Jews
in Israel and around the
world will realize the impor-
tance of adopting a refusenik
family; that they will begin to
write to the family and to go to
demonstrations with the
family's name and
photographs; and then to let
the family know that they did
so.
This gives refuseniks great
spiritual support, and also
works to arouse world opinion.
Edelstein firmly believes that
the Russian refuseniks' only
hope is loud public demonstra-
tions on their behalf, combined
with quiet diplomacy. "They
must go together. One without
the other will not do."
Edelstein sees the dropouts
who elect to go to the United
States as a danger to the en-
tire aliya movement. He sees
Israel as the only hope for the
future of the world's Jewish
community; the only way to
avoid the twin threats of anti-
Semitism and assimilation.
Edelstein himself plans to
build his future in Alon Shvut,
to study linguistics at the
Hebrew University, and to
work with young tourists who
visit Israel from abroad, whilst
Tanya will resume her career
as an engineer. Yael, the
Edelsteins' 12-year-old
daughter, will begin school in
Alon Shvut. Her parents only
hope that she will soon forget
how she suffered as a child in
the Soviet Union, and settle
down to a full and happy life in
Eretz Israel.
mf/mvtjacok koshe*
ML
:
:
ajj. Rooms Huff***"
tofTV*BoM9rttof
Fu*1 Air CondHion^l
Str(etrrWtryU*.
Music entarWnmant
SocJoJProow* <*'
Cata/fo^Mdl^D**
R.DWnte*' SupanrlaJon
H.,tdant Maihg'ach
BOAWWALX HOTEL
,*"roi Wm0t^SL Mrvod *y poo*"*
Ul.ll 'g r^KWcoma Gift.
HIGH HOLY DAYS $349
SEPT. 23-OCT. 4 ^ p*.on
12 DAYSI11 NIGHTS "*
7-DAY SPUT S1*' *- k- --
:
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E. 1st Avenue, Miami, Florida
Miirinf-____- .
PlusS TQQgT
Mi/fine
l redness
removal
soothes
moistunies
rotated
Murine
Murine
Plus
EYE
DROPS
I I .
10Z.
$2.19
=FAULTLESS
ICE
BAG
Ice-
Bag
#
9"
$4.79
FAULTLESS
Water
Bottle
FAULTLESS
Combination
Douche
OmblnMlon pnom,
ipuj^iwn.vw"*"'' i enema
Syringe
And
Water
Bottle
m
55.59
PHISODERM
Skin Cleanser
5oz. 82.19
i6oz s4.99
PHISO-BUFF
Disposable Puffs
36's s2.29
FAULTLESS
Folding
Douche
Syringe
Campo-Phenique
Cold
Sore
Gel
.23 oz.
1.99
.5oz.
s2.99
ban
ROLL ON ANTI PERSPIRANT
DEODORANT
Regular
Powder Fresh
1.5 oz.
s1.89
LOREAL-
STUDIO
LINE
STYLING
GEL
5.2 oz.
s2.99
balsam ."P"*
r
nVM
batsam
IK"
WELLA
BALSAM
Shampoo And
Conditioner
All Types
16oz. I .yy each
WELLA
KOLESTRAL
Conditioning Treatment
For Hair & Scalp
----------------Men
PLCSTRAL wmi
*4$.
Twin Pack
2 Tubes 1.75 oz. s1.79
LOREAL
FREEHOLD
STYLING MOUSSE.
Regular Hold
Extra Hold
5oz.
s1.99
Faultless
Sonata
Deluxe
Feminine Syringe
$5.39
ANUSOL
Suppositories
. s2.99
24 s s5.29
TUCKS
PreMoistened
Hemorrhoidal/Vaginal
Pads
40's
s2.99
TAKE-ALONG
12 Pads s1.99
-j .
Y
,
WELLA
SO FINE
Conditioning
Mist
All Types
$2.19
ANUSOL
Ointment
QflMlggj
ioz.$2.19
2oz$3.99
ILLIPS
MILK OF
MAGNESIA
A
PHILUPS'
aim oi
H.NIM*
Regular
And
Mint Flavor
26 oz.
s3.99
rn.


Friday, August 28, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
kK

>hoto Exhibit in S. Miami
motograpk of a young boy by legally blind photographer Harry
vr/u'ld. which will be shown in an exhibition ofGarfield's work
itith1'! 'Young At Art Bridging the Generations' at the Miami
with Museum in the South Miami Bakery Centre, 5701 Sunset
rive, beginning Sept. 1. Exhibitions ofGarfield's work have ap-
kared in museums and galleries throughout the United States,
y. tt (lermany and Holland.
AJCong. Hails Creche Victory
In Case Against Chicago
| CHICAGO Hailing last
eek's decision by the United
tates Court of Appeals
plding Chicago's City Hall
eche unconstitutional as a
ajor victory, Theodore R.
inn, president of the
nerican Jewish Congress,
lid that "the Court's ruling is
I welcome and much needed
*-ersal of the District Court's
Wding that 'America is a
pristian nation."
Pointing out that the deci-
bn is not hostile to religious
pebration, Mann said that
Court's opinion "does not
ban that religious symbols
pst be invisible, or confined
the home, church or
nagogue. It means only that
by may not be placed in a
olic context which connotes
alliance between church
state."
THE LAWSUIT, American
rish Congress vs City and
unty of Chicago, was filed in
85 by American Jewish Con-
ess lawyers on behalf of
elf, other Jewish organiza-
ns and residents of Chicago
challenge the City's long
piding practice of having a
che displayed in City Hall at
ristmas time.
the full text of Mr. Mann's
Itement follows:
[Several months ago, a
It net Court held that the Ci-
|of Chicago was entitled to
p a creche in City Hall
ause America was a Chris-
i nation and entitled to act
nrdingly. Yesterday's deci-
l by the Court of Appeals
fudiating that decision is an
'"rtant reaffirmation of
ft principles. It is a welcome
much needed reversal of
District Court's holding
V America is a Christian
nation.'
"The Court held that "like
the nativity scene itself, City
Hall is a symbol a symbol of
government power. A creche
in City Hall thus brings
together church and state in a
manner that unmistakably
suggests their alliance. The
display at issue in this case ad-
vanced religion by sending a
message to the people of
Chicago that the city approved
Christianity."
"That in our view sums up
exactly what is wrong with
religious displays in city halls.
"The Court's ruling is
especially gratifying as the
latest in a series of opinions
reflecting judicial recognition
of the dangers of an overly
broad reading of the Supreme
Court's disturbing 1984 deci-
sion allowing a municipality to
sponsor a creche.
"Religious displays are a
significant aspect of the
celebration of many holidays.
The Court's decision means
only that they cannot be spon-
sored by government which we
as a people have agreed should
be neutral in matters of
religion. It does not mean that
religious symbols must be in-
visible, or confined* to the
home, church or synagogue. It
means only that they may not
be placed in a public context
which connotes an alliance bet-
ween church and state.
"We are pleased that
municipal authorities in
Chicago have indicated that
they will not appeal, and
therefore thai the Court's
decision will be allowed to br-
ing an end to what has long
been a deeply divisive practice
in this City.
Newsgathering
What's Behind the Decision-Making?
Continued from Page 1-A
members (chicken by the way,
to wear their sheets in a black
town in 1987 so there is
progress).
Would the cause of
newsgathering suffer? Would
the public have been cheated?
Who makes these decisions,
anyway? It is hard to believe
that any news editor with any
integrity at all would make
either of these incidents a ma-
jor story. But they did. For
what? Half a rating point?
Where is the morality?
OK BUT YOU are going to
say: "Morality in the press
hah!" There really is in many
cases. Let us no forget
Watergate, et al. There is a
problem though. It lies with
the level of intelligence and
judgment at the local level and
the hidden agendas of ex-
ecutives at the national level.
And the problem lies with
you. You like your stories to
have a sensational hook, to
have a length that will not tax
the attention span of a four-
year-old and cram all the news
into 22 minutes an evening.
EW Scripps said: "Show the
people the light, and they will
find their own way." I still
believe that. But we must de-
mand that the light be bright,
direct and broad. Not through
a prism. In a bright light,
choosing real news, the Klan
would die, Israel would be en-
nobled and Yasir Arafat
wouldn't have to bother to
shave at all.
Our Readers Write
Editors Should Apologize for Column
EDITOR:
Recent publication of a col-
umn about the nomination of
Judge Robert Bork to the U.S.
Supreme Court by Edwin
Black carried in some English-
Jewish newspapers describes
the National Federation of
Temple Sisterhoods as
"notoriously docile." We find
Mr. Black's column confused.
We are confident that respon-
sible editors of English-Jewish
newspapers will delete this of-
fensive and inaccurate state-
ment about us.
A major purpose of organiz-
ing NFTA in 1913 was to pro-
vide a vehicle for women ol
Reform congregations (tht
first co-equal partners in tht
Jewish religious community'
to express their prophetic
mandate to "create a just
society."
More often that not, NFTS
has been the first Jewish
women's organization (and in
some cases the first Jewish
organization) to speak out
publicly on issues of social
welfare, women's rights and
civil liberties.
In 1965, for example, our
Assembly adopted a position
supporting the right of choice
of reproductive freedom and
social and civil rights for
homosexuals we were the
first in the Jewish community
to do so. We are in the
vanguard as well in inter-
religious coalitions dealing
with social issues.
We are a Federation of
peers. Unlike other national
organizations, we do not have
"local chapters" to whom we
issue directives. The local
group determines whether it
will act in the name of the
group or as individuals.
However much we respect
the programs of other Jewish
women's organizations, and
strongly committed as we are
to cooperative or coalition ef-
forts wherever possible, we do
not look to these associations
to determine our positions. We
look solely to the value system
of Reform Judaism and the
special policies of our partner
organization, the Union of
American Hebrew
Congregation.
We believe it is appropriate
that a written retraction or
apology should be carried if
Mr. Black's unfortunate
remarks about our agency
were included in his column on
Judge Bork's nomination.
ELEANOR R. SCHWARTZ
Executive Director
National Federation of
Temple Sisterhoods
New York City
EDITOR'S NOTE: We were
offered and carried Mr.
Black's column briefly, calling
a rapid halt to its publication
for reasons unrelated to its
editorial content. We are not,
however, sure that "responsi-
ble" editors delete statements
from columns if it appears to
them in advance that in-
dividuals and/or organizations
may find them "offensive" or
label them as "inaccurate."
Musicians Wear Yarmulkes
At Concert in Austria
SALZBURG (JTA) -
Two internationally-renowned
musicians wore yarmulkes
during a concert appearance at
the Salzburg Festival, saying
they intended the gesture as a
protest against Austrian
President Kurt Waldheim.
Violinist Pinchas Zukerman
and pianist and composer
Marc Neikrug made no state-
ment on stage, but told
reporters during the intermis-
sion that they did not normally
wear the religious head cover-
ings while performing and that
"We don't normally perform
in a country which has a Presi-
dent who was sufficiently
suspect not to be allowed into
our country."
The U.S. Justice Depart-
ment has placed Waldheim on
its "Watch List" of
undesirable persons, citing
evidence that he was involved
in atrocities while serving in
the German army from 1942 to
1945.
Israeli-born Zukerman said
of his decision to perform in
the yarmulke: "It's not a
political statement but a feel-
ing from inside that I must
speak. I wear this as a symbol
of the Jewish people."
U.S. Ambassador to Austria
Ronald Lauder was among
those attending their perfor-
mance of works by Mozart,
Beethoven and Richard
Strauss.
WELCOME TO A
HEW EXPERIENCE
in sophisticated Retirement Living
MANOR
Where Caring Comes naturally
0
3535 5.W. 52nd Avenue rembroke Tark. I loiirta 33023
A COMPLETE LIFESTYLE
IH A KOSHER ENVIRONMENT
Tastefully Decorated
nursing Supervision 24 Mrs.
Physicians on call 21 hrs.
3 meals daily and snacks
Daily activities, arts ft crafts
Social activities
Transportation provided
Swimming Pool ft Ja< U2ZJ
Beauty Shop
Religious services daily
Easily accessible
WE WELCOME ENQUIRIES rLFASE CALL 961 8111


Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 28, 1987
Jerusalem Hotline
For Those Who Are Overwhelmed by Loneliness
Continued from Page 5-A
dividual to dial ERAN? Kron
believes that contemporary
events can often motivate
citizens to pick up the phone.
This, however, is often a
pretext for a discussion of
more personal concerns.
"Volunteers find that a news
headline, the Pollard affair, for
example, will increase the
number of incoming calls. Peo-
ple at first only want to talk
about international relations,
but gradually the conversation
shifts to more immediate pro-
blems. Then we discover
what's really troubling them."
The Demjanjuk trial in
Jerusalem has resulted in
many calls to ERAN from
Holocaust survivors, who, now
elderly and mostly alone, are
as a result of the trial, once
again reliving their horrifying
experiences. They need to talk
and to verbalize their painful
recollections, despite the
passage of 45 years.
Frequently ERAN has to
confront the emotional
burdens of the offspring of
people who lived through the
Holocaust. These children are
often from homes where
parents never discussed their
experiences.
VOLUNTEERS are trained
carefully to provide a sym-
pathetic ear and to help callers
gain a perspective on their
thoughts and feelings. When
appropriate, volunteers will
provide individuals with a list
of agencies to turn to for ongo-
ing counseling and support.
The Jerusalem staff includes
over 80 volunteers who
udnergo a thorough screening
and six months of intensive
training before they begin
manning the ERAN hotline.
ERAN carefully protects the
iden'.ty of both caller and
counselor. "Anonymity is
critical to the callers," says
Kron. "In many cases it
enables them to really open
up."
"Sexual problems generate
a great deal of calls," says
Kron, "especially from the
ultra-religious communities
where there is little access to
basic facts about sex. Confu-
sion on sexual issues is not
limited to one segment of
society, however, and callers
express their fears or ask ques-
tions on a wide range of topics,
including AIDS. During the
last several months, calls to
ERAN about AIDS have in-
creased greatly.
Israelis now recognize the
serious nature of the problem
and want to know more about
it. For those who fear they
may have contracted AIDS,
we refer them directly to local
hospital clinics for a more
careful screening."
OVER HALF the callers to
the Jerusalem branch are men,
according to Kron, and this
surprises him. In mental
health centers, for example,
far more women seek
assistance than men, Kron
Israelis Welcomed
PHILADELPHIA (JTA)
Israel's eight Special Olym-
pians were officially welcomed
at City Hall here by Mayor
Wilson Goode as they returned
from international competition
in South Bend, Ind.
observes. "It's an interesting
phenomenon that reflects an
Israeli male population still
holding to a traditionally stoic
male role, at least in public.
And yet when the stigma of
getting help is removed via an
anonymous phone conversa-
tion, men, too, show their will-
ingness to discuss emotions in
an attempt to solve personal
problems."
The Jewish calendar of
festivals and family gatherings
can take a significant toll on
those responsible for their pro-
tection. Before the Passover
holidays, for example, ERAN
receives frequent calls from
women in distress.
Explains Kron, "Cleaning
for the Passover season can be
* monumental task that re-
with other family members so
that the responsibilities can be
shared. We help give women
the support they need so thev
can improve their situation."
The Jerusalem ERAN pro.
gram hopes to expand its ser-
vices to include the Arab
population of the city in the
near future. Kron remarks
"Presently, we receive few
calls from Arabic speakers
quires many days to complete. Yet, we hope that by trainine
Women, just after Purim,
begin to anticipate the job and
often panic. We receive many
calls of this nature which are
really motivated by a desire to
communicate more openly
Arab volunteers and letting
their local community know
that we exist, we will en-
courage many more people to
take advantage of our
telephone hotline."
f
i
i
i
'
1 i
1
1
'
i
1
1
1
1
'
0*0*0* 0*000*0* 0**0-** ** **
.0*0* 00-00"0*<0*** 0*.
THE
ORIGINAL
Wolfie's 21
THE WORLD'S MOST FAMOUS DELI-RESTAURANT
"WHERE THE ELITE MEET TO EAT!"
Collins Avenue & 21st Street on Miami Beach
NOW OPEN 24 HOURS!
"In the heart of Miami Beach s Historic Art Deco District"
J^AKF^
SPECIALS
WOtFirS FAMOUS ROLLS OB
BAGELS, CREAM CHEESE,
UTTER. COFFEE OH TEA.........
OR
MOOS, ANY STYLE, GRITS
OR POTATOES, CREAM CHEESE,
BUTTER ROLLS, MINI DANISH.
l COFFEE OR TEA.................
19
Jv ENJOY A
*r WOLFIE'S
SPECIAL
"MIDNIGHT SNACKS
MENU"
11 PMT0 4AM
TRADITIONAL
FRIDAY NIGHT
DINNER
Special Menu
Includes: Choice of Two
Appetizers; Choice of Soup;
Choice of Entree; Choice of
6 Desserts. Plus: Choice of
Potatoes; Tzimmess; Vegetable
or Apple Sauce. Rolls & Butter.
Coffee, Tea or Fountain
Beverage. Our famous table
relishes I
ENTREES:
Roast Brisket of Beef
Broiled Filet of Sole _
Stuffed Cabbage
Roast v Chicken
Chicken in the Pot
9.95
7.95
7.95
7.95
8.95
Complimentary Glass of Wine
.
Owned and operrted by WOLFIE'S RESTAURANT, INC., Joseph Nevel, Chainr..,,; David H. Nevel, President
mm0m*tmm*0*0mmmm0imm0m r ~~ ~r rt rr 0* nrr *% r_______________-


Friday, August 28, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
'Transfer' of Arabs from Jerusalem
Called 'Absurd' by Israeli Hero
AlVWide World Phot.)
IN DAMASCUS: A beaming Charles Glass ar-
at the Syrian Foreign Ministry in
Damascus last week (Aug. 18) hours after he
tea ped from 62 days of captivity in Moslem
West Beirut's Shiite Moslem suburb ofBir El-
Abed. Glass, 86, later left the Syrian capital
for a reunion with his wife and five children
in London.
Pianist in U.S.
Soviet Hopes Family Will Be Happy
NEW YORK (JTA) Ac-
[claimed refusenik pianist
I Vladimir Feltsman, who wag-
jed an eight-year battle to
[emigrate from the Soviet
Union, asrrived here lastTues-
Iday afternoon (Aug. 18) with
Ihis wife, Anna, a biologist, and
[their four-year-old son, Daniel.
At a press conference at
Kennedy Airport, Feltsman
laid, "I have a feeling that I
im back to normal and in a
free world. My only hope is
that my family will be happy.
lVe have paid a high price for
retting here." Feltsman
thanked "all Americans" for
eir help: "Without it, this
lay would never have come."
FELTSMAN arrived to an
|automatic job. Dr. Alice
Chandler, president of the Col-
' ^ge at New Paltz of the State
'niversity of New York, who
lad worked hard in his behalf
ind visited him in Moscow,
greeted the Feltsmans, bring-
ing the definite offer of a
teaching position at the college
*nd throughout the State
L niversity system, which will
illow him time to concertize.
Feltsman already has a
lefinite concert date set up.
le will play the White House
Sept. 27.
: Between 1979, the year the
eltsmans applied to
tmigrate, and this year, the
!>oted musician who once gave
toncerts throughout Europe,
Was not permitted to play in
najor cities in the USSR, and
s recordings were removed
from the shelves and airwaves.
lowever. Western music
lovers and critics were enabled
to hear some of Feltsman's
recordings, including those
made at the residence of then
U.S. Ambassador to Moscow
Arthur Hartman, who
befriended the pianist.
These recordings were
released by CBS Masterworks.
At the age of 15, Feltsman
won first prize in the Concer-
tina International Competition
in Prague, followed four years
later by the Marguerite Long
International Competition in
Paris in 1979.
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) The
commander who led the Israeli
forces that liberated the Old
City of Jerusalem in the 1967
Six-Day War, says that the
idea calling for the "transfer"
of the Arab population of East
Jerusalem and the West Bank
is "absurd, impractical and
immoral."
Brig. Gen. (Res.) Uzi
Narkiss, who was the chief of
the Central Command during
the 1967 war, said that Israel
is facing a situation that can-
not be altered. "Look," he said
in an interview here, "any
Arab who wants to leave is
free to do so. But to force any-
Arab on the West Bank to
leave against his or her will is
simply absurd."
TWO WEEKS ago an
Israeli politician. Deputy
Defense Minister Michael
Dekel of Likud, called for the
"transfer" of the Arab popula-
tion in the West Bank t<> other
countries. His suggestion rais-
ed a storm of protests in Israel
and was widely reported
around the world.
"I believe that Mr. Dekel
talks of transfer because he
wants to be in the news and be
elected again to the Knesset,"
Narkiss said, stressing once
more that the idea of transfer
is ''groundless and
impossible."
Narkiss arrived in New York
as part of a delegation of 12
commanders and officers of
the Israel Defense Force units
that liberated Jerusalem more
than 20 years ago. Members of
the delegation will visit Jewish
communities in the United
States and Canada in the next
three weeks to participate in
the Israel Bond campaign's
"Operation Jerusalem.'
The Jerusalem-born Narkiss,
who is now the head of the
World Zionist Organization's
information department, ex-
pressed concern, however,
that Jerusalem might face a
situation in the future in which
the anti-Zionist elements in
the city will be the majority.
"SINCE THE majority of
Israelis, I would say about 90
percent of the population, do
not want a territorial com-
promise on Jerusalem, we do
have to face the problem of the
growing anti-Zionist elements
in the city that include the
Arab population and the ultra-
Orthodox who do not believe in
the Jewish State."
Noting that although the
present majority of the city's
population is Jewish and
Zionist, with 30 percent Arabs
and 10 percent Haredim (anti-
Zionist religious Jews) Narkiss
saiii that, nevertheless, if
measures are not taken now
Zionist .lews might !"- their
majority in the city.
"Israel must eno jrage
young Israelis tocome .'"i live
mi Jerusalem by offering them
a ffordable housi i and
employment." Nark-- sug-
gested. He said that world
Jewry can help, too: "Jews
around the world must come
on aliya in growing numbers
and settle in Jerusalem."
Recalling the awesome days
of the liberation of Jerusalem,
Narkiss said that when he and
his troops entered the gates of
the Old City on the third day of
the war, "we felt and we knew
that we were creating history.
We felt that this is an historic
occasion, the fulfillment of
2,000 years of dreams and
longing.
"AFTER TWO days of in
tense fighting, during which
we lost 183 soldiers, we sud-
denly faced a real Jerusalem, a
city of stone that could be
touched and felt. It was a uni-
que experience, a one-time
event in a nation's life. I feel
very proud that I was part of it
all," Narkiss ^id.
<&&
fj^y^-
4j&
l<&
&
4*
&
w

**>.
^
J&
.C*
^^CHALLENGE AIR
^ Real People. Who Really Care
When you fly Challenge All all you pay is the
low fare Everything else is complimentary
Chivas Regal lohnine Walker Black Cham
pagne MOUUXICadetWiMI Liqueurs Delicious
meals A fresh flower for every lady Steaming
hot towels
And everything is served with that little extra
caring that makes such a bigdifference
So call us today for reservations or information
Whether you're in the .>ir or on the ground
you'll find that the Challenge Air Tuxedo Service
never stops
For Reservations Call ()05) 594-0017 or 1-800-343-1222 or See Your Travel Agent.


Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday^August 28^1987^
The Russians Are Going
Now, Goldfarb Wants To Return To Moscow And His Children
with a prosthesis, which kJ
yet comfortable. His]*,*!
blem has cleared up andK
"no sequel from 2\
. Prager said. "Htal
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Nearly a full year after Prof.
David Goldfarb arrived sud-
denly in the U.S. from Moscow
on board the private jet of
billionaire industrialist Ar-
mand Hammer, he wants to go
home for a visit.
On Monday, Goldfarb held a
press conference here in the
apartment of his son, Alex, to
announce that on Tuesday
morning he and his wife
Cecilia would go to the Soviet
Consulate in Washington to
ask for a temporary visa to see
their daughter Olga "for a few
weeks."
AS WAS the case last Oc-
tober, when the ailing retired
geneticist arrived on a stret-
cher to the glare of intense
publicity, Goldfarb was once
more turning to the media to
advance the cause of family
reunification.
Goldfarb, 69, seated in a
wheelchair and speaking very
softly told the crowd of
reporters that he and his wife
"miss our daughter and grand-
daughters very much and can-
not go on any longer without
seeing them. They cannot
come here, so we decided to go
there." He read from a
carefully-prepared written
statement and then answered
questions from the press as hot
television lights beat down on
him, his wife and son.
THE ELDER Goldfarb said
he wanted to make it clear
"that it is not interpreted as
our disappointment in the
United States or rejection of
any aspect of our life here. The
reasons for our decision are
not political but personal."
Although it has been
variously reported by private
Girl
Beats Odds
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
five-year-old girl awoke ap-
parently fine from a five-day
coma in an Afula hospital last
Thursday (Aug. 20) following
her near drowning in Lake
Kinneret. Doctors said she
began breathing without the
help of a life-support system,
recognized her parents and
showed no signs of brain
damage.
The family, from Rehovot,
had been vacationing near the
lake last Sunday. Upon realiz-
ing the girl was missing,
bathers searched the area. One
searcher spotted her body and
pulled it from the water. She
had no pulse and had turned
blue.
No trained medical person-
nel were available, but a boy
on the shore recollected a
demonstration he had seen on
television and applied pressure
to her chest until a Magen
David Adorn intensive care
ambulance arrived. Six
minutes elapsed before she
received oxygen.
For five days the girl re-
mained in a coma at the Emek
Hospital, attached to life sup-
port machines. Doctors said
her recovery without brain
damage from a five-day coma,
after six minutes without ox-
ygen, is "extremely rare."
individuals that some Soviet
emigres have been permitted
to visit the Soviet Union and
return to the U.S., Goldfarb's
case is different because he
and his wife still retain Soviet
citizenship.
When he was abruptly taken
from his hospital bed last Oc-
tober and flown here in a
private deal between Hammer
and high Soviet officials,
Goldfarb, a seven-year
refusenik, did not go through
the normal procedure in which
Soviet emigres must relinquish
their citizenship.
GOLDFARB came to this
country as a medical emergen-
cy under a provision called
"humanitarian parole," and he
and Cecilia still retain their
Soviet passports. "As Soviet
citizens, we need Soviet per-
mission both to go in and get
out of the Soviet Union."
Goldfarb said.
Olga Goldfarb, now 34, was
permitted to visit her father
here last November when he
underwent surgery for lung
cancer. The move was unex-
pected from Soviet authorities
and lent hope to the family
that they would soon be
reunited in New York.
However, Olga's emigration is
still pending along with that of
her two daughters, Katya, 10.
and Nadia, 4, and Olga's hus-
band, Yuri Lev, 37.
In June. Goldfarb suffered a
transient stroke in which an
embolus traveled from his
heart to his brain. At the time.
he was unable to speak, but
after about two days his symp-
toms were dispelled, said his
physician Kenneth Prater of
Columbia-Presbyterian
Hospital. Prager sent a cable
to the Soviet Embassy asking
that Olga again be permitted
to visit as she had last year
after the doctor sent a similar
cable. This time, said Alex,
"the condition have changed,"
and their situation is not con-
sidered special.
GOLDFARB said he is
aware of his precarious
medical condition, but "I do
not have the time to wait for
years. I do not have the
strength to wage a war of at-
trition to get them out." He
acknowledged that he "will
not get there proper medical
attention if needed. I do not
know whether we will be
allowed back out. But life
without our girls is unbearable
and we decided to take this
risk."
I'rager said that "It's a
damn good thing he came
when he did" last year, suffer-
ing as he did from acute
diabetes and an ulcerated foot
that threatened his remaining
leg. He lost the other in World
War II. He has been fitted
had
cancer
travel, but there is a risk"?1
doctor said.
Goldfarb said he would ra
the chance of being allowed.]
to the Soviet Union wife!
the promise that he J
return to the U.S. Ideailv s
desire is that Olga and,,
family be allowed to job tj!|
in New York. (
In 1984. Goldfarb wJ
portedly offered visas M
himself, his wife, daughter*!
her family if he would help J
KGB entrap Amerbl
reporter Nicholas Daniloff^1
U.S. News and World RepvJ
in some form of espiajJ
Alex said they rece*
postcards announcing &]
visas awaited them. Hotnej
Alex admitted, they neverai
the visas.
Publix
Available al Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
oakeries Only. Delicious
KEY
UMEPIE........*$*>
ku?A?XL?'ii% S'Sf" *'h F'> Danish
Baker** Only. Fresh Baked
Sour Dough
Baguette................. eacn 99<
r^.riS'oi^Ahr^.S/0,e, ""^'""Danish
wineries only. A Delicious. Differ*nt Treat
Orange Cake
Donuts.................6 ^ 99*
Gourmet
Brownies........... k $J99
Blueberry Muffins t $ 169
JJth Your Purchase rf a 3-Tle, o, Urger Wedding Cake
Wedding Cake
Ornament.......... FRFFt
($15.00 Value) (Expires August 31. 1987) nC>t-"
yOkeectooeeCoumi;, "' lndlan Riv' "


What is this young Hebrew student's future in America's Protestant-dominated social order?
What Are Christian Children
Being Taught About Jews?
Bv ELLEN ANN STEIN
And ALISA KWITNEY
I FUrridim Stuff W\
There was a time when a
fish child, going to school in
predominantly Christian
^ighborhood, could expect to
ir the epithet, "Christ-
ler," at least once before
selling adulthood.
Lnd now, even as Jewish
Christian leaders hold for-
il meetings here and
lughout the world in order
(discuss how best to improve
it ions between their two
Jgions, the real arena for
termining whether there
II be harmony or discord bet-
ten the two faiths is still the
lyground.
/HAT CHILDREN think
feel about other races and
ligions is determined in large
rt by what they are taught
home and in Sunday or
lligious school. In a survey
^is week, The Jewish Flori-
in asked some of Miami's
^otestant pastors, Ministers,
Id reverends: What are
iristian children being
jght about the Jews in 1987?
["We view Jews as people
Ho need Christ, just as all
people do. We believe that peo-
ple are lost without Christ,"
said Pastor Steven Kimmel, of
the Central Baptist Church.
"The Jewish faith is an im-
portant part of the Christian
faith since we were born
through Judaism. We believe
that Christianity is the conclu-
sion of Judaism, Christianity
begins where Judaism is left
off."
KIMMEL SAYS he teaches
his own children that Jews and
Southern Baptists believe in
the same God, but the dif-
ference is that Jews do not
believe Christ is the savior.
"I don't ever see a
theological resolution of the
difference in the view of
Chri6t, but that doesn't mean
there can't be social peace and
harmony among us."
Kimmel agrees that Jews
are not outspoken about con-
verting people, whereas he
and those who share his beliefs
are. "We take a text from Mat-
thew to make disciples out of
all people, to teach them and to
baptize them."
Although Kimmel states
that he has "never ever heard
of any allusion to the
Holocaust being connected to
some kind of divine punish-
ment," he admits that, as a
Baptist, he would say that "all
people are lost without Christ,
meaning that they will be
separated from God for all
eternity, and being separated
from God is pure hell."
One cannot earn one's way
into heaven with good deeds,
according to Kimmel's inter-
pretation of the New Testa-
ment, because "the gift of
eternal life is through Jesus."
QUOTING FROM the
Gospel according to Paul the
Gospels, according to Jews,
are the traditional sources of
Christian anti-Semitism
Kimmel adds that "Jews lost
their elect status with God
when they rejected Christ, and
that status (of being God's
chosen people) was given to
what is called the New Israel,
the church."
One of the seven points in a
recent Presbyterian USA reaf-
firmation statement calls for
"A willingness to ponder with
Jews the mystery of God's
election of both Jews and
Christians to be a light to the
nations."
How does he respond to
that?
Kimmel said that "sounds
like they (Presbyterians) are
softening theologically. It's
unlikely that Baptists would
draw such a statement.
"Our kids are taught that
anyone who dies without
Christ is lost, although we
don't necessarily focus on
Jews."
PASTOR JOSHUA M. Gar
vin, the black leader of the
New Life Baptist Church of
Carol City, has participated in
the annual dialogue between
Christians and Jews.
Still, Garvin says he teaches
the youth of his church that
Jews were God's chosen peo-
ple "and because of their
disobediance to God, not to
man, God removed the salva-
tion from them and gave it to
the Gentiles.
"We also teach them that
the Jews are still God's chosen
people, and the first disciples
were Jewish, and Jesus Christ
himself was a Jew. The respon-
sibility we have now as Chris-
tians is to deliver salvation to
all people, including Jews.
That was the Jews' mission in
the beginning, but they felt
that God was just for them.
Some of them still do, Jews, as
well as anyone who doesn't ac-
cept Christ, are lost.
During the Jewish-Christian
dialogue, Garvin says "we
agreed on a lot of things." But,
he adds, some of the rabbis
believed that Jesus was "just
another prophet. I can't agree
with that," Garvin concedes.
GARVIN ALSO teaches
that Jews, as well as anyone
who does not accept Jesus as
the Messiah (in Greek,
Christos, hence Christ) is
"doomed to hell."
"I have Jews who come by
my church," Garvin said. "We
do quite a bit of debating. I've
found most Jews go by tradi-
tions and customs, what they
are taught at home, not by stu-
dying what the Bible says.
Jews believe in just the Torah.
We believe in the whole Testa-
ment, the New Testament."
Why should anyone go to
hell?
"Because the Bible says so,"
Garvin answers.
Jews need to study the scrip-
Continued on Page 2-B
Centenarian
Our
::
Community
See Page 3-B | Friday, August 28,1987 The Jewish Floridian Section B
*x::::-:-:*:-:-:::v:v:*:v:w ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 28, 1987
What Are Christian Children
Continued from Page 1-B
tures more, asserts Garvin,
but when asked if the average
Christian studies the scrip-
tures, he answers, "No, they
don't. They're lost too."
GRADY PERRYMAN,
associate pastor of the Miami
Shores Presbyterian Church,
says his views differ from that
of Southern Baptists.
Perryman said he read the
major points of the
Presbyterian USA statement,
and his group is a member of
that umbrella organization. "I
don't see it as being controver-
sial at all. It's a very tame
document that will not upset
people at all," he said.
The points in the
Presbyterian reaffirmation
state:
A reaffirmation that the
God who addresses both Chris-
tians and Jews is the same
the living and true God.
A new understanding by
the church that its own identi-
ty is intimately related to the
continuing identity of the
Jewish people.
Have a problem
with your
subscription?
We want to solve
it to your com-
plete satisfaction,
and we want to
do it fast. Please
write to:
Jewish Flortdian,
P.O. Box 012973,
Miami, Fla. 33101
You can help us
by attaching your
address label
here, or copy
your name and
address as it
appears on your
label. Send this
along with your
correspondence
Moving
Simply attach the mailing label
from this paper and write in your
new address below (Please allow
4 weeks.)
Your New Address Goes Here
Nme
Mdwn
*pi
City
SUIt
Z.P
Subscription
Rate:
52 issues $9 00
D Renewal New Order
For Fast
Service ..
... it is better to write us concern
ing your problem and include the
address label. Also, address
changes are handled more
efficiently by mail. However,
should you need to reach us
quickly the following number
is available:
373-4605
'Jewish Floridian
P.O. Box 012973, Miami. Fla. 33101
An acknowledgement by
Christians that Jews are in a
covenant relationship with
God, and a reconsideration of
the implications of this reality
for evangelism.
A determination by Chris-
tians to put an end to "the
teaching of contempt' for the
Jews.
A willingness to
acknowledge the continuing
significance of the promise of
the land (of Israel) to the peo-
ple of Israel.
A readiness to act on the
hope which Christians share
with Jews in God's promise of
a peaceable kingdom.
"YES, we think God is the
same," Perryman said. "One
of the Southern Baptists said,
five, 10 years ago that God
doesn't hear the prayers of
Jews. That would mortify the
Presbyterians. We just would
totally disagree. First of all, I
think God would hear the
prayer of an atheist, although I
don't put Jews in a category
with atheists. God is not own-
ed by Christians. God is free to
hear any prayer he wants."
Perryman said his church
still teaches that Jews are
God's chosen people. He adds,
"that because of Jesus Christ,
Christians are also God's
chosen people, and so Jews
don't have any longer an ex-
clusive claim on the title."
"The issue always comes
down to salvation. That's
where Southern Baptists make
it clear that we must accept
Jesus Christ as Lord and
savior in order to go to heaven.
We would not disagree with
that. But I would prefer to say
that every person who is saved
is saved by the grace of God."
FROM HIS days as a stu-
dent in a seminary until pre-
sent, Perryman said he was
taught that Judaism "is a part
of who we are. The Jewish
tradition is our tradition as
well. And we are also followers
of Christ. Hebrew scriptures,
the Old Testament, are our
scriptures as well. Father
Abraham is my father too.
He's not just a father to the
Jews."
Perryman said the
Holocaust is "not taught ex-
plicitly" in his congregation.
"The Holocaust was about as
evil as anything we could com-
prehend," Perryman said.
"There would be great sym-
pathy for the people who were
both killed and survived the
Holocaust."
A central theme of the
Presbyterian Church is not to
limit God, according to
Perryman.
"God can offer the gift of
salvation to whomever he
pleases. And the God that we
personally know as best ex-
pressed in his son, Jesus
Christ, is not a stingy God.
He's a free-spender so far as
salvation is concerned. So for
me to run around limiting
whom God can love, or whom
God can hear the prayers of. is
to me just .. foolishness. I
don't fully understand God,
and that probably should be
my first affirmation of faith."
JIM BEST, pastor of the
North Dade Presbyterian
Church, which is not a member
of the Presbyterian USA
assembly, says: "We believe in
the one God and the trinity.
We believe that Jesus is the
Messiah, but essentially I
would say the God of
Abraham, Jacob and Issac is
my God.
"In regard to whether Jews
would go to heaven if they
don't accept Christ, I would
say any man or woman, Jew or
Gentile, as I understand the
scriptures, if they refuse to ac-
cept Christ as Lord and
Savior, they will go to hell.
And you have to keep in mind
that the New Testament is
essentially written by Jewish
men. Paul the Apostle was a
Jew; Peter and John were
Jews; so it is a Jewish testa-
ment concerning the life and
teachings of Jesus Christ."
Best believes his doctrine
teaches that the church in the
Old Testament is in the nation
of Israel. The New Testament
deals with an international
Church. "It's no longer a na-
tional church, but it's open to
include all people, and that
was foretold in the Old Testa-
ment. I have held, since
becoming a Christian, that the
Jew and Gentile has been link-
ed all along."
BEST ALSO teaches that
the covenant was not intended
just for Jews. "It has as its
purpose to include all people, I
would think at a certain point
that the Jews began to
misinterpret it. They failed to
see that there was a much
broader application that was
intended."
Best says he believes that
God has elected both Jews and
Gentiles in his plan of salva-
tion. Christians, he teaches,
should reach out to the Jewish
people in dialogue in an at-
tempt to win them to Christ.
"God's promises are still to the
Jews, and he believes they will
eventually be included in God's
kingdom because they will
turn to Christ."
A Jew should not be singled
out and held in contempt. Best
agrees.
"I would say the Jewish peo-
ple have a very specific place
in history. They have con-
tributed greatly to the culture
of the world. The old and new
Testaments are essentially
Jewish documents, and the
very religion that I subscribe
to comes from the minds of
Jewish people. So in that
respect I would speak highly of
them. We're very much in-
debted to them. Our savior is a
Jewish savior."
There is still only one way to
salvation. Best maintains.
"The litmus test is who ac-
cepts Christ, and who rejects
him."
REV. ROBERT M. Finch,
of the Kenneth C. Blitch
Methodist Church, says that
"if there's any people we
would feel a particular kinship
to, it would be the Jews .
our faith accepts basically
what a Torah Jew would ac-
cept, although there would be
slight differences in
understanding."
No Methodist child learns in
Sunday school that "Jews are
to be hated for what they did
to Our Savior," says Finch.
"There should be a love and
acceptance of the Jewish peo-
ple. It wasn't a people which
put Jesus on the cross. It was
sin, and sin includes all
mankind."
Regarding the Jewish peo- fight to be a people and a na-
tion, and we ought to be sup-
portive and not turn our backs
r\r\ f Lhm
pie's long history of trials and
tribulations, Finch asserts that
"we would certainly feel along
with what the Jewish people
have gone through with their
"We would not feel that they
Continued on Page 10-B
Jackie Mason One Man Show
Just when you thought it was safe to ignore Jackie Mason, the
"Rambo" of repartee opens fire again in a new arena, the one
man show.
Born and raised on the lower east side of Manhattan, Mason
grew up surrounded by rabbis; his three brothers are rabbis. Ins
father was a rabbi, his grandfather, his great grandfather and his
great, great grandfather, were all rabbis. So it comes as no sur
prise that Mason was a cantor until the age of 25, when he was or
dained as a rabbi.
Three years later he quit the synagogue to become a comedian
because, as he says, "Someone in the family had to make a
living."
He's been making a living ever since as a filmmaker. Broadway
star, and stand-up comic on television and in night clubs.
Mason has acted in such films as "The Stoolie." B love StOrj
duced by Mason, and directed by John Avidsen; "The J<
directed'by Carl Reiner; Mel Brooks'"History of the World Part
I"; and the upcoming comedy "Stiffs." about a funeral parloi
which he co-stars with Jimmy Walker."
Also. Mason wrote, produced and starred in the 1970 Broad
show, "A Teaspoon Every Four Hours."
For a brief time in the 60's, Mason decided that he would
"making a living" aside and follow a more virtuous secular call
ing. He ran for mayor of New York City, and got the 80,000 pel
tion votes required to put his name on the ballot.
But he changed his mind when he found out he had to campaign
during the summer."
"Who stays in New York City in the summer?" he asked. "It -
too hot."
Mason returned to what he knew best, making people laugh,
managing to touch his audiences' funny bones and Achilles' heels
at the same time, telling morsels of truth in the guise of
outrageously absurd anecdotes.
He wrote some of his observations down in his 1983 book,
"Jackie Mason's America," in which he commented on such
American mainstays as farmers and singles bars, among others
Now this cantor, rabbi, comic, actor, author, producer and Btorj
teller is ready to take on the whole world.
Jackie Mason has just issued a comedy album. "The World A
cording To Me," which has just l>een released by Warner Bn>-
Records from an original Broadway recording.
Property Tax Appeals
For hotels, apartments, shopping centers,
office buildings, restaurants, warehouses,
hospitals, specialty properties. Contingent or
hourly basis.
THOMAS R. POST, PA
ATTORNEYS
(305)379-1500
Jewish Floridian salute
to our centenarians
The following individual is already 100 years old or
will be 100 by Dec. 31. 1987:
NAMK:................................................
HIKTHDATK:.........................................
PRESENT ADDRESS:.................................
APT ................CITY:.................STATE:
CITY OP BIRTH:............................
STATE:................ ZIP: COUNTRY
SUGGESTED BY:
ADDRESS:......
CITY:............
PHONE
APT
ZIP
Enclose a photograph of the centenarian if possible
and mail to 100 YEARS YOUNG, The Jewish Floridian.
P.O. Box 01297:1. Miami. Fla. 33101.
-................._________________...............
'
<


Centenarian
Friday, August 28, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
t
Etta Balsam
'Religion Keeps Me Going'
By ALISA KWITNEY
JtwM Floridian Staff Writer
All that Etta Balsam wanted
out of life was to be "a useful,
Jewish person," and for most
of the ten decades of her life,
she was, working side-by-side
with her husband, raising her
two sons, active in Jewish
organizations, and observing
the traditions of her faith.
But now, at 100 years of age,
Etta finds it hard to be useful,
which is why her religious con-
victions are more important to
her now than ever before.
"I'm not happy about being
100." she admits. "I don't
understand it. I can't do things
like I used to. I can't do much
of anything. I just sit and have
three meals a day, and see no
one except my children."
ETTA SIGHS, and then
says. "Thank God I'm not a
lonesome person who sulks.
My religion keeps me going."
Etta, who lives at Douglas
Gardens in the Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged,
where she attends Shabbat
services, recalls the frame
liouso in Brooklyn where she
was born on the 22nd of May,
1887.
Her father owned a shoe
store, and both her mother and
father spoke several languages
to their four daughters and
one son. They were not poor.
Etta's mother had a maid to
help her with housework, and
Etta describes her family as
"religious, but modern."
But they were not complete-
ly modern.
"My sisters and I weren't
taught by Hebrew teachers
because it wasn't thought
necessary for girls to speak
Hebrew then," says Etta with
some regret.
ETTA PLAYED piano from
six years of age, especially the
Italian operas of which her
father was so fond. She
belonged to the local library as
soon as she was able to read
and married, at the age of 21, a
young man who was also in the
shoe business.
Etta, who before her mar-
riage had worked as her
father's bookkeeper and
typist, handled the books for
her husband's business until
the workload increased.
"It was most important for
me to be useful, to have pur-
pose in my life," Etta states.
"Both sons have followed in
my footsteps."
Thinking about what she had
just said, Etta asked that it not
be printed, "don't write that,"
she said. "That's boasting."
HER ELDEST son, Mickey,
visits her every week, and her
other son visits as well. But
her one surviving sibling lives
in California, and the two are
no longer in contact, a conse-
quence of their advancing
years.
"My sister is nine years
younger than I am, and I
haven't seen her in about ten
years," Etta reveals. When we
could write, we
corresponded."
Age and infirmity have
taken their toll on the strong
woman who can still say that
she "could not improve upon
my life. I always held a job .
I would live my life the same
way."
Yet Etta feels her long life
may be more burden than
blessing at this point.
"I remember everything I
did but it's too much. I'm liv-
ing too long, I think, because I
can think as well as when I was
a young girl, but I can't do
anything anymore," she
laments.
"I'M JUST going along. I
sometimes wonder how long
I'm going to live, and I don't
like it. I don't like it because I
can't be useful anymore."
Perhaps someday society
will discover how to utilize
precious resources such as
Etta's and will find a method
for tapping the young girl's
mind trapped in a body which
has weathered one-hundred
changes of the seasons.
Until then, her Jewishness
and faith sustain her. and the
love of her children is the
tangible proof that she did in-
deed live a useful life.
Rabbi Solomon Schiff, director
of chaplaincy for the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and
executive vice president of the
Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami will be one of
the guests on channel 2's
"Viewpoint" program to air
on Sunday, at 5 p.m. The
September visit to Miami of
Pope John Paul II will be the
focus of the WPBT/Channel 2
Interfaith Viewpoint hosted by
Rodney Ward.
Miami Beach To Host
Chabad Convention
Etta Balsam visits with her eldest son. 100, he serenaded her with gvit Mickey. At her last birthday, when she turned
Jackie Jacob To
Star In
Tanker
Jackie Jacob, who has been
called "Argentina's Jewish
Tom Jones" will star in
"Yankel," comedy, dance and
song, at the Surfside Com-
munity Center on Sunday with
two shows at 3 p.m. and 7:30
p.m.
Jacob's career began 18
years ago when he and other
Jewish athletes from Argen-
tina in Tel Aviv for the 1969
Maccabi Games, visited a
cabaret. Jacob got on stage
and sang a popular Jewish love
song and so impressed the
cabaret owner that he was of-
fered his own weekly show.
Yankel, a one-man show,
tells the story of a Jewish boy
growing up in Romania who is
forced to immigrate to South
America. He serves for awhile
in the Israeli Army and then
goes to the United States.
Jacob, 48, welcomes the
chance to communicate one-
on-one with the audience and
says he is trying to give life to
the Jewish theatre.
Moorings BB
Women To Meet
"What Is Your Address?" is
a simple, yet provocative,
question that William F.
Saulson will ask of the B'nai
B'rith Women of The Moor-
ings in their Auditorium in
North Miami Beach at 1 p.m.
on Tuesday, Sept. 8.
Miami Beach has been
chosen to host the 26th Annual
Mid-Winter Convention of
Neshei Ubnos Chabad. the
women's arm of the Chabad
Chassidic Movement.
More than 1.000 delegates
from all over the United States
and Canada will attend the
convention from Feb. 5
through 8 at the Castle
Premier Hotel on Miami
Beach, said Channa Rubin, a
member of the presidium
which heads the local
Lubavitch Women's
Organization.
'It is a distinct honor for our
community to have been
chosen to host the Convention
which marks the beginning of
a second quarter century of
education and service to the
Jewish community,"' said
Rubin.
Channa Rubin
GUARANTEE MORTGAGE CO.
951 S.W. 42 Ave. Suite #206
Lie Mortgage Brokers
Do you know what an adjustable rate "equity
line" ls?7?
It is a Second Mortgage on your home that can
go up-down like a yoyo! I!
We offer second mortgages, for any purpose
at FIXED RATES
15years 11.1%
12 years 10.8%
10 years 10.7%
We also have 1st mortgages for purchase or
refinance. If the program exists "we have Itl!!" ____
Rales Subject to change
without notice.
441-0381
TMH
en "< octM At itiwit
OPEN
ALL YEAR
THE PROGRAM INCLUDES:
Rimodld Accommodation*
Two QLATT KOSHER MEALS
Daily.
Exciting Entertainment.
Refrigerator and Color TV In
Every Room.
Family Style Room
w/Blg Screen TV.
Olympic Size Pool with
Privileges.
Full Time Social Director with
Dally Actlvttlee.
Private Fenced In Beach.
Monthly Tripe.
24 Hour Security.
Dally Maid Service
Individually Controlled A/C.
RESERVE NOW
FOR HIGH HOLY DAYS
& SUCCOT 9/23 10/4/87
12 DAYS/11 NIGHTS
FROM $29000 pP dbi occ i.i. i,
4x
Under the supervision of
Robbi Joseph N Kaufman
FOR INFORMATION
AND OUR BROCHURE
CALL: 531 -2206
YOUR HOSTS: THE GALBUT FAMILY


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 28, 1987
Dr. Josef Nower
I V
Writes A Play About Love Triangle
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Dr. Josef Nower, a retired
dental surgeon and journalist.
pulls a manuscript out of a
manila envelope in his Century
Village apartment in West
Palm Beach.
The envelope contains a play
that Nower wrote in the 1960s
about a tragic triangle love
story set to the backdrop of
the horrors of World War II in
Nower's native country,
Poland.
HE WROTE the play in the
1960s and spent nearly 20
years re-working its transla-
tion from Polish into English.
He completed it about two
years ago. Now, Nower is 87.
"My doctor says I am in ex-
cellent health, 100 percent.
But I am depressed, I am
alone," says Nower, who lost
his wife and best friend, Dr.
Leah Nower, four years ago.
They met while they were both
studying dental surgery in a
Warsaw university. They were
married 58 years when Leah
died.
Nower, who has produced
other plays and written exten-
sively for Polish newspapers,
including coverage of Nazi
criminal Adolf Eichmann's
trial in Jerusalem for the Nowy
Sunat. a Polish paper in New
York, says he is now
negotiating to have his play
produced on stage.
"I AM sentimentally con-
nected with it because this
play was written not with ink.
only with blood," he says.
Nower has lived in Century
Village for 17 years. He moved
here with Leah from Brooklyn.
His wife had come to New
York for the World's Fair in
1939. and they were separated
for seven years when the war
broke out. Leah remained in
America; Nower, "by thou-
sand of miracles." wen. to
Russia where he escaped death
in Poland. All family members
but a sister were killed in the
Holocaust.
He calls his play "docUD
tary fiction."
"I wrote about a castrated
man. I met a man who was
castrated by the Germans,"
Nower says.
THE PLAY was dedicated
to the memory of Dr. Henryk
Goldszmit. a writer, educator
and humanitarian, who found-
ed an orphanage in Warsaw.
His pen name was Janusz
Korczak. and he lived in
Poland from 1878 until 1942.
Nower says a scene in his play
about Korczak is the most true
and authentic part of the play.
The scene describes how the
German police surrounded the
orphanage and marched its oc-
cupants out to head for the
Treblinka death camp.
Although Korczak refuses to
leave the children alone to
their fate, and. with one child,
scooped in his arms, and
Professional Cleaning/
Carpet Specialists
Specializing In commercial bldgs.
offices, vacant ho vacant
condos A apartmt 40 yrs.
xpenenca.
386-2223
Nower, who has produced other plays and
written extensively for Polish newspapers,
including coverage of Nazi criminal Adolf
Eichmann's trial in Jerusalem for the Nowy
Sunat, a Polish paper in New York, says h is
now negotiating to have his play produced on
singe.
NOWER NOW says his days
have been lonely since his wift
died. He is active in several
organizations, including
Zionist Organization 01
America, the Histadrut Foun-
dation, and ARMDI.
In recent years, he has gone
to Israel with the organiza-
tions. While he is lonely, his
cabinets are filled with yellow-
ing publications that show
Nower left his mark as a
writer many years ago.?
another held by the hand, he
marches out with the children
of the orphanage to death.
Nower says the play is also
designed to "show how the in-
stinct for cruelty was
developed in normal people
during the war." He confronts
the problems survivors had
and the torment many felt that
they suffered because all their
relatives had been murdered
while they were left as
survivors.
Dr. Josef Nower
Israel And Soviet Officials Meet For 10 Hours In Bonn
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
"The gaps are still wide but
we are talking." This is the
essence of top Foreign
Ministry aide Nimrod Novik's
public confirmation of a
10-hour meeting last weekend
between him and a senior
Soviet official at the Soviet
Embassy in Bonn.
Novik indicated that Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres would
meet with Soviet Foreign
Minister Eduard Shevard-
nadze at thp United Nations
General Assembly next month
and that there may be further
meetings between officials
before that.
HE INDICATED, too. that
the two sides had agreed to
t channel of com-
munications between them.
"Thus the presence of the
Soviet Consular delegation in
>1 the sum total of
the evolving dialogue." Novik
told Galei Zahal. the IDF radio
station.
Novik's interlocutor was
Vladimir Terassov, deputy to
Vladimir Polyakov, head of
Middle East policy at the
Soviet Foreign Ministry.
Peres gave first word of the
meeting Monday to the
Knesset Foreign Affairs and
Defense Committee, saying it
was a cause for "cautious
optimism."
Novik noted that this was
the first time the Soviets had
approved of official publicity in
the wake of such a meeting. In
the past, meetings of this kind
which had never, he added,
lasted for more than two hours
had not been officially con-
firmed, at the insistence of the
Soviet side.
FORMAL DIPLOMATIC
dialogue between the two
countries began with an of-
ficial meeting last August in
Helsinki. But that broke up
after 90 minutes without anj
apparent breakthrough. In
April. Peres met with
Polyakov and another Soviet
expert in Rome.
Novik made it plain that
there had been several un-
publicized encounters in bet-
ween. Other Israeli sources
have indicated that the Soviet
consular team in Tel Aviv is
believed to be empowered to
conduct political talks, too
though thus far such talks
have not been held and both
sides are rigidly sticking to the
formula that the Soviet team is
here on purely Consular
business.
Meanwhile. Prime Minister
Yitzhak Shamir began his
talks last Tuesday (Aug. 18) m
Rumania with President
Nicolae Ceausescu and his
aides. On the plane from Tel
Aviv sources close to the
Premier told reporters Shamir
certainly intended to try
through Rumania to promote
Israel's dialogue with other
Warsaw Pact nations.
THEY NOTED that Shamir
had conferred in Jerusalem,
before his departure, with the
Israeli diplomat heading the
interests office in vt
Ambassador Mordechai
I'altsur.
Israel Television
that agreement I
reached with Hungary for in-
-t offices to be -
Budapest and T<
-SHIPPING SMALL PARCELS^
Venezuela Chile Ecuador El Salvador*
Guatemala Honduras Puerto Rico.
Call Caribbean Sun
477-8003
Se habla espanol. Flat rates per box
& we provide the boxea.
wood Epstein it tin
JWB director of\ I ser-
7 lead a JWB
Departm* ni oj !' rsontu >" <-
thai has '"' ntljf bet n
ponm
.->../ /,// ./.
munity I YM
)' WHA a e rot No rt h
Arm


Melvin Greenberg:
1987 Campaign Chairman
For United Way Of Dade
Friday, August 28, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 6-B
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Of the 40 major metro-
politan areas which raise
money for United Way to
benefit their communities,
Miami has come in 39th in
terms of fundraising for many,
many years, according to
Melvin N. Greenberg, 1987
campaign chairman for United
Way of Dade County.
"The other communities
which rank near us are other
new, frontier cities," says
Greenberg, who is one of the
founding attorneys of the legal
firm of Greenberg, Traurig,
Askew, Hoffman, Lipoff,
Rosen and Quentel.
"Before the 1960's, Miami
was a resort town, a retire-
ment town, so most people
came from other places and
didn't have roots here. There
were no institutions, and
therefore there was less
charitable giving."
WITH THE arrival of the
Cuban community in the
1960's, there was even less of a
feeling of community
togetherness, Greenberg
recounts.
"We can all agree that the
perception of Miami nationally
and internationally is of a com-
munity with deep social pro-
blems." says Greenberg, in-
cluding racial and ethnic ten-
sions, a high crime rate, a
great deal of trafficking in il-
legal drugs, and corruption in
the very agencies meant to en-
force the law.
"This can have an effect on
the self-esteem of people living
long time in Miami, and
that has ramifications oil the
mmunity," I i reenberg
contends.
United Way. which caters to
the needs of every segment of
Miami's diverse ethnic and
cultural population, could be a
forum for unifying the com-
munity, according to
INITED WAY supports
over 70 health and human care
agencies from Hialeah to
Homestead, Liberty City to
Miami Beach. Throughout
Dade County, these agencies
serve the elderly, disabled,
working people, families and
children. The Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Ag-
ed, Jewish Vocational Ser-
vices, Jewish Family Services,
and various Jewish community
centers are among the many
agencies which benefit from
the United Way.
A United Way panel of com-
munity volunteers headed by
Elaine Silverstein, reviews the
requests of the various agen-
cies and decide which pro-
grams the community needs
most, and funds are allocated
accordingly, this reviewing
process is a four-month effort;
the rest of the year is given
over to raising the money to be
allocated, along with other
projects.
"We need some measurable,
growth over the previous
year."
BAYSIDE IS an example of
a "positive effect," according
to Greenberg, who believes
that "we are too focused on
negative things in Miami.
We're just starved for
something positive. This com-
munity needs to resolve its
social problems and United
Way is an umbrella covering
all segments of the
community."
Why should Jews fund an
umbrella organization when
the Jewish Federation sup-
ports agencies and causes that
directly relate to Jewish needs
and issues?
"United Way supports agen-
cies which are not Jewish, but
which Jews utilize, everything
from rape centers to the Girl
and Boy Scouts," Greenberg
points out. "Also, it has a
positive economic effect on the
community, and will ease the
divisiveness among the dif-
ferent segments of the
population.
"IF YOU can get the whole
community involved in suppor-
ting the United Way, it would
have a healing effect on the
community, bringing them
together behind a common
goal," Greenberg asserts.
"The idea that Miami could
have a community-wide effort
that could rank at the top of
the country would raise our
own self-esteem in a way that
would he visible to others," he
feels.
Greenberg admits that his
aim. to make Dade County's
United Way campaign the
"best" in the nation, is a
challenge.
"There are mergers taking
corporations away from
Florida." he acknowledges,
"hut we have rnre volunteers
than ever before, we're going
to alter our strategy and ask
smaller businesses for support,
including condominiums, and
we have a commitment from
local TV and radio stations for
free commercials for United
Way," Greenberg explains,
outlining his campaign
strategy.
Kickoff of the campaign will
be the Pacesetters lunch, to be
held Wednesday, Sept. 2 in the
Dade County Auditorium.
AT THE lunch, businesses
which have committed
themselves to contributing
early to "set the pace" for the
rest of the community will
have representatives go up to
give their reasons for being
Pacesetters.
"They will tell their reports
in the style that the actors in
"A Chorus Line" told about
themselves," says Greenberg.
More "soul-baring" of
Pacesetters will take place
when participants give their
positive effects to take place in ciosingFreports on Sept. 22 at
Miami, states Greenberg. 1 the Knight Center in the Hyatt
have my sights set on making
ours the most successful cam-
paign in the country not in
terms of being the largest cam-
paign, but in terms of having
the largest incremental
Regency Hotel at the end of
the Pacesetters part of the
campaign and the kick-off of
the general campaign.
"Over 1,000 people are ex-
pected to attend," Greenberg
reports.
GREENBERG says that he
knew all along that becoming
campaign chairman would
cause him some anxiety and a
great deal of work. Still, he
maintains, he did not realize
how much anxiety and how
much work.
"But I would definitely do it
all over again," he concedes.
"It is tremendously satisfying
to do something for a com-
munity that's been so good to
me."
Sounds as if Miami is
reclaiming her place in the
sun.
Melvin Greenberg, 1987 campaign chairman for United Way of
Dade County.
English Summer Camp In Givat Olga

Anu rii-t voluntet r Jennifer Schoemeit (left),
from the University of Minnesota, with new
friend at English Summer Camp in Givat
Olga. it Project Renewal neighborhood in
Ibidem, Israel. Jennifer is one of 400 young
Americans who spent the summer in their
hometowns' twinned Project Renewal com-
munities, part of the outreach by American
! ws helping Israelis through the UJA-
Federation < ampaign.
ABOUT THE PAPAL VISIT
Rabbi Brett S. Goldstein served as spiritual
leader of Temple Israel of Greater Miami
from 1975-1980. In 1981, he established
Temple Shir Ami of Kendall a congrega-
tion active in ecumenical endeavors.
On FRIDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER
at 8 P.M., the rabbi will discuss:
4th
it,
'A Final Thought
On the Pope's Visit
TEMPLE SHIR AMI
7205 S.W. 107 Avenue
270-7311
99
Rabbi Brett S. Goldstein


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 28, 1987
Cure AIDS Now Rallies For
Attention Of Reagan And Pope
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridan Staff Writer
Leaders of Cure Aids Now,
an agency that has been work-
ing internationally to get
money to research a cure for
AIDS, said they plan to hold a
rally they hope will attract
thousands of supporters when
the eyes of the world turn
toward Miami Sept. 10, where
Pope John Paul II and Presi-
dent Reagan are expected to
meet.
"I believe the Pope and
Reagan are in a state of
denial," said Miami's Bob
Kunst. a gay rights activist
and director of Cure Aids
Now.
THE PURPOSE of the ral-
ly is to war on AIDS, not sex,
and get politics out of this local
medical emergency. Here we
have Ronald Reagan and Pope
John Paul, who really put out a
lot of energy honoring the
perpetrators of the last
Holocaust: Reagan going to
Bitburg and the Pope meeting
with (alleged Nazi war
criminal, Austria's President
Kurt) Waldheim. And yet,
because of their extreme indif-
ference to the AIDS crisis,
they are literally creating a
mass murder of the planet."
Kunst says his argument is
based on facts and figures.
The World Health Organiza-
tion predicts 100 million infec-
tions of AIDS-related viruses
in the next five years, doubling
annually. Now, 122 countries
admit AIDS problems, Kunst
says.
IN MIAMI, the problem is
more specific, Kunst adds.
Florida has the third largest
number of cases of AIDS.
Miami is the fifth largest. In
Florida, 40 percent of all cases
of AIDS, or Acquired Immune
Deficiency Syndrome, are
heterosexual.
Bob Kunst
The rally is scheduled to take
place at Vizcaya where at 6
p.m. a visit between the Pope
and Reagan is slated to take
place.
"Reagan has waited for
nearly eight years to get even
a remote consciousness that
there is a crisis," Kunst
asserts. "The National
Academy of Sciences recom-
mended two billion annually be
spent on AIDS. Congress is
still arguing over the first
billion."
THE ORGANIZATION has
said $5 billion is needed for
research on an international
scale. "We have too few scien-
El Al Israel Airlines Announces
Financial Turnaround
First Profitable Year Since 1979
"El Al Israel Airlines,
Israel's national carrier, has
posted its first annual profit in
nearly a decade," announced
Rafi Harlev, president of the
airline. El Al's on-time perfor-
mance and load factors are
among the highest in the in-
dustry, and during the past
year El Al carried over 1.5
million passengers.
As a result of managing
operations carefully, El Al
Israel Airlines has substantial-
ly reduced its debt burden and
is showing a net profit of 15.2
million dollars on revenues of
approximately 567 million
dollars, for the fiscal year that
ended March 31. For the same
period last year, El Al
reported a loss of 6.7 million
dollars on revenues of 491
million dollars.
Factors that have con-
tributed significantly to El
Al's brighter financial picture
are: the airline's scheduling
improvements, which include
an 84 percent on-time perfor-
mance record for the year, a
load factor of 77 percent of the
North Atlantic route, the
streamlining of operations, the
judicious utilization of man-
power, aggressive cost-cutting
measures and expanded non-
stop service.
Other measures which El Al
has adopted to expand its
market penetration include en-
try into the package tour
business to Israel with special
programs to Poland,
Czechoslovakia, Hungary and
Israel, and extensions to Lon-
don, Cairo and Eilat. El Al
recently inaugurated services
to Israel from Madrid, Toronto
and Boston.
"On the eve of Israel's 40th
anniversary, we are proud to
announce that El Al is becom-
ing a financially sound airline
and we remain committed to
serving our loyal passengers
with the same level of quality
and personal care." said
Harlev.
tists, too few experiments, and
meanwhile we have six AIDS
virusus that they can identify.
The HIV virus has over 1,000
mutations around the world,
and now they discover that ,
there's a 15-year incubation
period."
Kunst says that as a Jew he
is offended by the Pope's visit
with Waldheim and Reagan's
going to Bitburg. "while the
people are dying of AIDS.
lust as Jews have Keen
deemed expendable
throughout history, so are
homosexuals, who are largely
affected by AIDS, now viewed
as expendable, Kunst believes.
"THE JEWISH community
of all communities should
recognize the handwriting on
the wall, and we should be tak-
ing a leadership role and
understanding what it is like to
be held expendable and
exterminated.
"The very survival of the
planet is at stake because the
people who are in charge don't
care. And if we don't care
who's going to care? If it
wasn't for the gay community
screaming about AIDS, who
would shout?
"The essence of our whole
point here is 'heal, don't
judge.' If that is not the
essence of Jewish faith and
consciousness, nothing
exists."
During the rally, Kunst said
a poem written by a North
Miami Beach resident will be
read. Howard Goldman. 48, a
former warehouse manager
who is now on disability for
back problems, said he wrote
the poem out of "anger."
ALTHOUGH Goldman says
he is a heterosexual who is
married with grown children,
he is angry that government
officials do little about the pro-
blem of AIDS because it is
viewed primarily as a disease
that afflicts homosexuals.
Judith Eitelberg has been ap-
pointed to director of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion '8 Alliance (Highrise) Divi-
sion announced Myron J.
Brodie, Federation executive
vice president. In her new posi-
tion, Eitelberg will be responsi-
ble for directing major fund
raising campaigns for Federa-
tion's Combined Jewish Appeal
in the high rises of Dade
County.
Moshe A rod, new Israeli Ambassador to Washington, say
among Israelis far transcends differences' which fcaw rea
\ recent attention. Ambassador Arad spoke at a recept
Ins honor organized by the Conference of Presidents of I
American Jewish Organizations. Above are Arad (righti
Morris Abram (left), chairman of the Conference of Presidents,
and Malcolm Hoenlein, executiw director.
Hillel Community Day School
Prepares For 1987 Fall Term
The Samuel Scheck Hillel Community Day School.
located in North Miami Beach, is the largest Hebrew Day
School in the southeastern United States. It currently has
an enrollment of over 850 students in a program ranging
from Pre-Schooi through 12th grade.
Since the school's inception in 1970, Hillel has provided
quality education both in the Judaic studies as well as the
general studies. The entire general studies faculty is fullv
licensed by the State of Florida and the Judaic Studies by
the Central Agency for Jewish Education. Many of the
teachers possess masters degrees in their fields, and are
constantly encouraged to expand their knowledge and
skills as pedagogues.
Hillel is a Community Day School funded to meet the
religious needs of the community. The educational
philosophy is to inculcate traditional Jewish values to the
students, and to teach the students how to study and
discover the excitement of learning. The small class size,
averaging 20 students per class, allows the teacher to
develop a positive relationship with the class and achieve
these goals. Hillel emphasizes traditional Jewish values,
and is a member of the National Commission on Torah
Education. Hillel is also recognized by the National Society
of Hebrew Day Schools and has received full accreditation
from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools u
well as the Southern Association of Independent School-
Rabbi
Modern orthodox congregation in beautiful
suburb of Boston seeking full-time, experi-
enced orthodox Rabbi.
250 families, attractive facility, growing
membership, and several day schools in
vicinity.
Please send letter and resume no later than
December 15,1987 to:
Chairmen Rabbinical Search
Committee
Congregation Beth-El Atereth Israel
561 Ward Street
Newton Centre, MA 02159


Friday, August 28, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
:.:.:.:.;.:.:.;.:.:.:.:.:.:::.:.:::::;:::::::;:::::;:.:::-:.:.:;:.:::.:.:.x
I Dante Fascell Labor Day Picnic
The Annual Congressman Dante Fascell Labor Day Pic-iiii
nic on Monday, Sept. 7 will take place at Tropical Park*:
located at SW Bird Road and the Palmetto Expressway.;:;:
The picnic will begin at 10 a.m. and end at 3 p.m. Pit No. IS
is the exact location.
1987 picnic Chairman, Dean Oddy states "Our 1987 pic-$
nic is dedicated to the 200th Anniversary of the U.S. Con-1
stitution, a document we all revere. Let there be no doubt:;
however, that the 1987 Picnic will provide good food and a
good time for all who attend. We especially encourage
families to spend this last holiday of the summer with us.
There will be plenty to eat and fun for children of all ages."

Historian Calls For Release Of
British Documents About Hess
Officers of the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion 's Women's Division have been named to
serve on the Council of Jewish Federations
(CJF) National Women's Division Cabinet.
Their term will begin at the 1987 General
Assembly in Miami, in November. This
Cabinet will also meet at the spring and fall
quarterly meetings of the CJF. The follotving
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Women's
Division officers have been appointed: Ellen
Mandler, Women's Division president; Micki
Hochberg, Women's Division vice president,
campaign designate; Terry Drucker, vice
president, community education; Elaine Ross,
vice president, leadership development; Robbie
Herskowitz, secretary.
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) A
leading British historian has
called for the release of secret
British documents about
Rudolf Hess, Hitler's deputy
who died last Monday in Berlin
aged 93.
Robert Rhodes James, a
Conservative member of
Parliament who in recent mon-
ths has been sharply critical of
Austrian President Kurt
Waldheim, said the
documents, which are not due
to be declassified until 2017,
would cast light on Hess' dar-
ing solo flight to Britain in
1941.
In landing in Scotland six
weeks before the German blit-
zkrieg against Russia, Hess
hoped to persuade leading
British politicians to make
peace with Germany, thus en-
suring that Hitler would not
have to wage war on two
fronts.
WINSTON CHURCHILL,
Britain's wartime leader,
refused to seo Hess, and had
him locked up in the Tower of
London. But this has never
dispelled Soviet suspicions
that the Western Allies
wanted Germany to destroy
the Soviet Union, a factor
which strengthened Moscow's
determination that Hess
should stay locked up till his
death.
The war over, Hess was put
in the dock at Nuremberg
alongside the other Nazi
leaders. Most were put to
death or committed suicide,
but Hess, who was not charged
with crimes against humanity,
BBYO Fall
Meeting Set
B'nai B'rith Youth Organiza-
tion's top regional, council and
chapter officers from
throughout the state of Florida
will gather in Plantation dur-
ing the weekend of Sept. 11-13
for the Region's annual Fall
Executive Meeting. The
weekend will include a variety
of social, religious and educa-
tional activities.
The Gold Coast Council of
BBYO is making plans for its
fall athletic season. Beginning
in September the Council will
sponsor a flag football league
for boys and a volleyball league
for girls. Games will be played
each Sunday at the Jewish
Community Center in Fort
Lauderdale. Several hundred
Jewish teens who belong to the
various AZA and BBG
chapters throughout the North
Dade, Broward and Palm
Beach areas will participate.
was jailed for life.
BRITISH PRESS com
ments Tuesday generally
deplored the failure to release
him. However, it also em-
phasized Hess' complicity in
Hitler's campaign against the
Jews.
Lord Elwyn Jones, one of
the Nuremberg trial pro-
secutors, was quoted as saying
history would condemn Hess
for his part in "the vilest crime
in modern history the
Holocaust." Hess, he added,
"was right in the thick of the
Nazi movement right from the
beginning. He played a major
part. He signed the
Nuremberg decrees against
the Jews."
Hess was born in Alexandria
of a German father and Swiss
mother. Less known is the fact
that Hess's father was
honorary German Consul in
Jerusalem early in the century
and that young Rudolf spent
some time there, moving in
European and missionary
circles before he was sent to
boarding school in Germany
when he was about 13.
Canadian War Crimes Bill
Closer To Enactment
OTTAWA (JTA) The
Canadian Parliament, meeting
in special session, has moved
closer to amending the
Criminal Code to allow for the
prosecution of alleged Nazi
war criminals residing in
Canada.
The House of Commons ap-
proved a second reading of the
bill, and promised a third and
final reading by the end of
August. Government leaders
had hoped Parliament would
pass the bill in a hurry before it
recessed for the summer June
30, but couldn't gain the
unanimous approval needed to
circumvent committee
consideration.
The approval was welcomed
by B'nai B'rith Canada. "We
applaud the federal govern-
ment for living up to its com-
mitment to deal with this pro-
blem that has been a black
mark on our nation's history
since World War II," said
Frank Dimant, executive vice
president.
ADDED DAVID Matas,
St. Francis Hospital Appoints
New Board Members
George Storer, a resident of
Miami Beach, and Jorge Gross
of Coral Gables have l>een ap-
pointed members of the Board
of Trustees for St. Francis
Hospital, Miami Beach.
Storer, a community leader
whose family is prominent in
business and society, lead com-
panies in the communications
and air travel fields. He is a
strong supporter of local
health care facilities.
Gross, a partner at Price
Waterhouse, has an extensive
background in tax service and
finance. He has published and
spoken on various tax and
business subjects. Gross gives
his time to committees involv-
ed in both the arts and
economics in the Miami area.
HILLEL HAS A HIGH SCHOOL
Pre-School thru 12th Grade
Accredited by The Southern Association
of Colleges and Schools
NOW SERVING BOCA RATON,
CORAL SPRINGS & MARGATE,
DADE & BROWARD COUNTIES
Modern Facilities
Csftillad Tach*ra
Individualized Instruction
Successful Prop-Curriculum
Inter School Sports League
Strictly Koahsr Hot Lunches
Flno Judaic Secular Education
Door to Door Transportation
Available
Specialists In Math, Reading,
Science, Computer
and Guidance
The Samuel Scheck
HILLEL COMMUNITY DAY SCHOOL
HILLEL COMMUNITY JEWISH HIGH SCHOOL
19000 N.E. 25th Ave., No. Miami Beach, Florida 33180
P.O. Box 630-158 OJUS Miami, Fla. 33163
(Adjacent to Jewish Community Center)
931-2831
(Dade)
524-8688
(Broward)
REGISTER NOW!
senior counsel for the League
for Human Rights of B'nai
B'rith Canada," After 42
years we are relieved to be
moving closer to seeing that
provisions are in place to en-
sure that Nazi war criminals
are brought to justice.
Gan Eden Wines
Premium California Varietal Wines that are kosher? Of course!
And why not! In early 1985, Craig Winchell, a graduate of the
University of California Davis' School of Enology and Viticulture,
was able to procure long-term funding to open California's only
winery totally devoted to the production of kosher wine. Mr. Win-
chell has won medals for his wines in open competition each year
since his first efforts. He continues to do so with even greater fre-
quency in his own facility. As an Enologist, he is committed to the
production of high quality products. As an observant Orthodox
Jew, he is also fully committed to the concepts and practice of
Kashrut. It is, therefore, axiomatic that both principals be follow-
ed in his own facility.
Mr. Winchell's credentials as a winemaker are impeccable. A
1983 graduate of Davis, he began taking prizes with his first ef-
forts and most recently a Cabernet Sauvignon that he produced
for Vena Vista Wineries took a Gold Medal in the Orange County
competition. His Camay Beaujolais took a Silver Medal at the
California State Fair ir August 1987. His own winery has to date
two vintages. Gan Eden wines took six medals for two of their
1985 wines. As of mid-July, the 1986 vintages have won 11
medals in open competition. Gan Eden Winery is entirely under
his control and has been designed, by him, to facilitate the
meticulous observance of Kashrut.
He also does not boil or heat the wines or place additives in
them to change their flavors that would have them conform to the
concept of Mavushal. This decision, while limiting certain
marketing avenues, is made in order to preserve quality. Indepen-
dent observers have noted the absence of flavors of madeiraza-
tion. The same observers have remarked that it is a "living" wine.
Craig Goldwyn, publisher of "International Wine Review" and
noted wine critic, has posed the fifth Passover question: "Dear
G'd will there ever be a good modern kosher wine?" The answer is
a resounding "yes." It has happened at Gan Eden wines!
jMsL
Beth Iorah Congregation
1051 No. Miami Beach Blvd., No. Miami Bch., FL 33162
YOUR MEMBERSHIP AND AFFILIATION IS CORDIALLY
INVITED IN
"A CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUE THAT CARES"
Full range of activities educational, social,
cultural and religious
Early Childhood, Hebrew School, Hebrew High,
Adult Education, Dynamic Youth Program
Special membership fees for singles and young couples
Auxiliary High Holy Day Services for non-members
OPEN HOUSE Wednesday, September 9th
7p.m.-9p.m.
For Information 947-7528


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 28, 1987^
The Chosen Ones
By MARGIE OLSTER
NEW YORK (JTA) A
minyan of Jewish represen-
tatives has been chosen to at-
tend an historic meeting with
Pope John Paul II and high-
ranking Vatican officials next
week, according to a
spokesman for the delegation.
Representatives of the Inter-
national Jewish Committee for
Interreligious Consultations,
the organization of five Jewish
groups which received the
Vatican's invitation, would not
release the names of the
delegates until Monday. IJCIC
scheduled another meeting
Monday night to finalize the
list of those who will meet with
the Pope.
But representatives of the
organizations involved said
members of IJCIC and several
other organizations met
repeatedly last week to debate
who would meet the Pope at
his summer home in Castel
Gandolfo outside Rome. The
Vatican had requested that no
more than five Jewish officials
attend the meeting with the
Pope scheduled for Sept. 1.
GUNTHER LAWRENCE,
the spokesman for the delega-
tion who will attend the
Vatican meetings as press of-
ficer, said the group hoped
that more than five would be
admitted to the session with
the Pope.
The nine other Jewish of-
ficials set to attend the
meeting include: Mordechai
Waxman, chairman of IJCIC,
who will lead the delegation;
Rabbi Gilbert Klaperman,
Synagogue Council of America
(SCA) president; Rabbi Marc
Tanenbaum, American Jewish
Committee director of interna-
tional relations; Seymour
Reich, president, B'nai B'rith
International.
Rabbi Leon Klenicki, direc-
tor of interfaith affairs, Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith; Gerhart Riegner, co-
chairman of the World Jewish
Congress governing board;
Rabbi Henry Siegman, ex-
ecutive director, American
Jewish Congress; Rabbi Alex-
ander Schindler. president,
Union of American Hebrew
Congregations (UAHC); and
Dr. Geofrey Wigoder of the
Israel Interfaith Committee.
ALL THE delegates are af-
filiated with one of the five
IJCIC member organizations
which include: Synagogue
Council of America, World
Jewish Congress, B'nai B'rith
International, Israel Interfaith
Committee and American
Jewish Committee.
The meeting in Rome is one
of several signs of a thaw in
Vatican-Jewish relations,
which soured after the Pope
granted an audience to accus-
ed Nazi war criminal and
Austrian President Kurt
Waldheim last June.
Last week, Catholic
American officials released a
letter from the Pope to the
president of the National Con-
ference of Catholic Bishops
highly sympathetic to Jewish
suffering in the Holocaust and
conciliatory in its tone on
Catholic-Jewish relations.
Pending the outcome of the
Rome meeting, represen-
tatives of major Jewish
organizations may meet the
Pope in a ceremonial meeting
in Miami Sept. 11 during his
10-day visit to the U.S.
ELIE WIESEL, Nobel
laureate, announced last week
that he will postpone a visit to
the Vatican until after the
Pope's meeting with Jewish
leaders because he did not
want to interfere with their
mission. Wiesel said he receiv-
ed his invitation to meet the
Pope before the Vatican in-
vited the IJCIC members but
decided to postpone his
meeting on request from some
Jewish officials to do so.
Wedding
Mr. and Mrs. Mark Arthur Dettelbach
STRAUSSDETTELBACH
Andrea Strauss and Mark Arthur Det-
telbach were married Aug. 15 at Temple
Israel.
The bride is the daughter of Harold and
Libby Strauss of Miami. Harold is a professor
of business at the University of Miami and
Libby is region coordinator for Brandeis
University National Women's Committee.
The groom is the son of John and Cynthia
Dettelbach of Shaker Heights, Ohio. John is u
stockbroker in Cleveland and Cynthia is
editor of the Cleveland Jewish News.
The bride was attended by her sisters,
Charlotte Zinder and Valerie Strauss and the
groom's sisters Kim and Anne Dettelbach.
The groom was attended by cousins Michael
Dettelbach, as best man, Mark Israel and
friends Ethan Cohen and Allan Rimland.
Both Andrea and Mark are graduates of
Yale University. The groom, a Phi Beta Kap-
pa history major as an undergraduate will
enter his second year at the Yale Medical
School in the fall. The bride, also a history
major at Yale, recently completed her first
year of law school at the University of Miami.
Na'amat USA
The first meeting of the fall
season of the liana Chapter of
Na'amat USA will feature a
movie on the life of a
Holocaust victim. The session
will take place on Thursday,
Sept. 3 at 12 noon in the
auditorium of Winston Tower
400, Sunny Isles.
According to Lillian Hoff-
man, president, a mini lunch
will be served and the public is
invited to attend. Hoffman will
also deliver some brief
highlights from the biennial
convention of Na'amat held
last week in Los Angeles
where she was a delegate.
Vice president Mildred
Silverman announces the up-
coming October annual Lun-
cheon and Card Party to
benefit the Child Rescue Fund.
Jewish Communal Work Grants Available
With the help of the Scheuer
Family Foundation of New
York, the Hornstein Program
in Jewish Communal Service
at Brandeis University here
has introduced scholarships
for adults wishing to change
careers or begin one in Jewish
communal service.
Each student designs a two-
year course of study in
cooperation with a faculty ad-
visor that includes course
work and work experience.
The study culminates in a
Master's degree. The first
reception of the scholarship is
Judith Baach of Tampa, Fla.,
Students Protest Play Which
Suggests Nazi-Zionist Complicity
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) Nearly
100 Jewish students
demonstrated in Edinburgh
against the first public perfor-
mance of "Perdition," a play
which suggests Zionist com-
plicity in the Nazi Holocaust.
Jewish youth groups, some
of which traveled from Lon-
don, Manchester and Glasgow,
stood outside Edinburgh's
Royal Lyceum Studio Theater
and held placards, distributed
leaflets and gave pavement
readings of literature about
the Holocaust.
The play has been the center
of controversy since last
January when London's Royal
Court Theatre scrapped the
premier at only two day's
notice.
Performances have also
been abandoned in other cities
following protests by Jewish
groups that the play is
malicious distortion of events
in Hungary in 1944.
Playwright Jim Allen, a left-
winger who claims flawless
anti-racist credentials, said
that he was out to counter the
"Hollywood version" of the
Holocaust and the State of
Israel epitomized by the til in.
"Exodus."
His theme, dramatized in the
form of a post-war libel action
in a London court, is that
Hungarian Zionist leaders
entered a conspiracy of silence
with the Nazis about
Auschwitz, thereby sharing
responsibility for the death of
more than half a million people
deported there from Hungary
Allen, hailing the showing as
a victory for free speech, now
intends to seek more venues
for "Perdition." However,
Monday night the young
Jewish protesters had the last
word. As the Edinburgh au-
dience dispersed in the setting
sun, they stood in a circle in
the road and sang Hatikva.
Happenings
The Men's Club of the Jewish Community Center will be engati
ed in a discussion of Minhaftim or Mishaiiaos?' with William I
Saulson at 9 30 a m on Wednesday. Sept 8 in the Senior
Center at (510 (Lspanola Way
Temple Zamora Sisterhod is sponsoring a Labor Da)
Weekend' at the Tarleton Hotel, in Miami Beach, from I nd.i>
Sept 4 through Monda>
Ton-' stirated CAD (Computer-Aided-
iiii i. Illinois to design n measuring
cka\I *'"'' dystrophy patients
Dr. Amnon Meller, a project advittr oi tin
College of Applied Enguutring in h-rusnlem,
assists Uri Detain who uses one of Boys
FREE SKIN CANCER
EXAMINATION
By Qualified Dermatologist
David A. Rodriguez, M.D.
1680 Michigan Avenue
Suite 900
Miami Beach
By Appointment Only 532-4478


Friday, August 28, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B

N^

22 from 2-4 p.m.
For information or register-
ing, call the University.
truce Nagler and Jan Eckstein of Dania, pictured poolside
loard the new flagship of Carnival Cruise Lines, "Celebration,"
st before sailing out of The Port of Miami on a seven day holi-
ly cruise.
Art Class In Antiques
Carol Wien, artist and
Author, will facilitate a class
sing offered for the first time
"Antiques," which she
leveloped for the University
){ Miami School of Continuing
Studies.
The class will visit antique
khow rooms in South Florida
ncluding tours by
Knowledgeable professionals.
i'ht' class meets for five
Tuesdays beginning Sept. 29
from 10 a.m.-12 noon. Ms.
Vien will also co-instruct a
^lass in "Interior Design" with
professor Edward D. Levin-
Ion, author and architect for
six Tuesdays beginning Sept.
Friends Of Douglas Carol Anne Wien
Gardens Fish Fry
The South Dade Friends of
)ouglas Gardens will host a
family fish-fry from 3:30 to
7:30 p.m. on Sept. 20 at the
South Dade Jewish Communi-
ty Center.
The South Dade Friends are
support group of the Miami
piewish Home and Hospital for
he Aged at Douglas Gardens.
Jewly-elected President
elma Rappaport noted that
he "Miami Jewish Home
ares for people of all ages
li rough its many residential
nd community programs. To
lelp sustain these programs,
we want to involve families;
eople of all ages."
Singles
SLIM, PRETTY 62 year old
female desires wealthy,
generous male who is
loyal, kind for serious
relationship. Age and looks
unimportant. Box SP, do
Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box
012973, Miami, Fl. 33101.
Knesset Israel
Dedicates
Auditorium
Mr. Hy Schechet, President
of Knesset Israel announces
the dedication of the Morris
and Anna Eisenberg
Auditorium.
The Eisenbergs are known
for their deep devotion and
dedication to Jewish causes in
the Knesset Israel family.
Morris who recently passed
away was Gabbai and read the
Torah for the congregation for
many years and Anna was in-
volved in the Sisterhood since
she moved to Miami Beach.
A few months ago Mrs.
Eisenberg donated a substan-
tial sum of money for further
refurbishing the facilities.
Rabbi Yossi Heber, is spiritual
leader of the Congregation.
Hadassah Events
President Irma Rashkind an-
nounces the first board
meeting of the year for
Menorah Chapter of
Hadassah. It will be held Mon-
day, at the home of Carolyn
Leibow.
The I.R. Goodman Chapter
of Hadassah announces that
the first meeting of the new
fiscal year will be held on Tues-
day, Sept. 8, 1 p.m. at the
American Savings Bank, 2nd
Floor, Lincoln and Alton
Roads, Miami Beach. The
meeting will highlight the Holy
Holidays with a Candle-lite
Ceremony and discussion of
coming events for Hadassah
including celebration of the
40th anniversary of State of
Israel.
Morton Towers Chapter of
Hadassah will hold their next
meeting on Monday, Sept. 14,
at 12:30 p.m., at Morton
Towers Auditorium.
The Hannah Senesch
Chapter of Hadassah will hold
their first general meeting of
the season at noon Sept. 15 at
the Shelborne Hotel on Miami
Beach.
Rabbi Phineas Weberman
spiritual leader of Ohev
Shalom Congregation will be
the guest speaker when the
Ko'ach Chapter of Miami
Beach Hadassah holds their
first meeting Tuesday, Sept. 8
at 8 p.m., in the Cadillac Hotel,
Miami Beach. Rabbi Weber-
man's topic will be "The
Changing Calendar." The
public is invited and member-
ship is welcome.
The first meeting of the
1987-88 season of the Stephen
S. Wise Chapter of Hadassah
will be held on Monday, Sept.
14 at 12 noon at the home of
Mrs. Tillie Yates, 1145 Nor-
mandy Drive in the Recreation
Room. Members are urged to
bring a brown bag for lunch.
A Board Meeting will
precede the Regular Meeting
at 10 a.m. to discuss plans for
the current year.
ARMDI Forming
Travel Chapter
The American Red Magen
David for Israel (ARMDI). the
sole support arm in the U.S.
for Israel's emergency medical
services, announces that it is
forming a Travel Club Chapter
which will be open to the com-
munity at large. The first
meeting to organize the group
will be held at the Howard
Johnson's at the Golden
Glades interchange off 1-95 in
North Miami Beach on Thurs-
day, Sept. 10 at 7:30 p.m. in
the Cloverleaf Room.
M.B. 74th St. Lg. 1 Bdr.
Furn/Unfurn. Near Bus,
Shops, Beach Adults.
865-9769
TROPICAL GLASS
CONSTRUCTION CO. COC #010159
MIRROR
WALLS & CEILINGS
TABLE TOPS EMERGENCY REPAIRS STOREFRONTS
Dade 757-0651 Broward 462-3711
HAROLD ROSENSTEIN, Pres. SeHabla Espanol
7933 N.W. 7th Avenue Miami
Write
Dear Nomi
... For Advice
Dear Nomi, an advice column, will appear regularly in the
pages of The Jewish Floridian.
Dear Nomi:
Back in college, everyone
said to me that I was going
straight to the top, and with
my first job, a prestigious posi-
tion with a major company, it
seemed that their predictions
were coming true.
But my job became routine, I
was never promoted, and I
ended up leaving, only to find
myself with a similar position
in another company. I work
hard, and yet it does me no
good. I even take work home,
and volunteer for
assignments, but my superiors
always pass me by for some
young graduate when it comes
time for moving up the ladder
of success.
How do I get out of this rut?
Sincerely,
Going Nowhere
Dear Going Nowhere:
If what you have been doing is
not giving you the results
you want, try something
else. If hard work isn't
enough, maybe you need a
specialized course to hone
your skills. Or you might
consider a leadership train-
ing program to improve
your ability to handle a posi-
tion of authority.
If the young graduates are the
ones being chosen, figure
out what they have that you
don't; is it ambition? Is it
drive? Is it the capacity to
come up with new and ex-
citing ideas? You can work
on these areas.
Or perhaps you are simply in
the wrong field for your
talents. Consider other
possible lines of work, and
what training might be
necessary for them. It's not
too late to make the predic-
tions of your college peers
come true, if you choose to
believe in them and in
yourself.
Yours, Nomi
Dear Nomi:
My teenage son used to be a
model child, helping around
the house, doing little favors
for me, and so on. Now he
won't even clean his room, or
lift a finger to take out the gar-
bage. When I tell him to do
something, he tells me,
"later."
My husband says that this is
the age when a child needs to
feel independent. I say he is
still living off of our money, in
our house, asking to use our
car, and eating our food, so
he's hardly independent. Ex-
cept independent of any
responsibility!
Yours Truly,
J.S. of Miami
Dear J. S.:
Your husband is right. This is
the age when children need
to feel their own in-
dependence. What could
make a child feel more in-
dependent than doing the
shopping for the entire
household, taking care of
having the car fixed when it
breaks down, helping to
figure out the budget for
the house for the coming
month, and cooking supper
for the family on occasion?
Your son should have more
responsibilities around the
house, not less. He should
also have the experience of
holding down a job, either
one which will bring him
some money of his own, or
one which will help him
decide what career he even-
tually wants to go into.
I would add that your son
should certainly have
enough free time to just laze
about, see friends and have
fun. But living off of one's
parents without doing any
chores is bad for the parents
and worse for the child.
Replace his old chores with
ones that demand a bit more
initiative and maturity, and
your son will have a taste of
what independence is really
going to be like.
Yours, Nomi
Write Nomi for advice in care
of The Jewish Floridian, P.O.
Box 012973. Miami. Fla. 33101.
AUTO SHIELD the alarm place
PROTECT YOUR CAR!
REMOTE CONTROL CAR ALARM
FEATURING:
SAMSON SECURITY SYSTEMS ES11
INCLUDES:
ELECTRONIC SIREN POINT OF ENTRY PROTECTION NO
ENTRY DELAY AUTOMATIC SHUT OFF & INSTANT RESET
MOTION SENSOR TO PREVENT TOWING i JACKING 2 REMOTE
CONTROL TRANSMITTERS INSTALLATION
1YEAR
WARRANTY
ON PARTS
AND LABOR
******
Please call for appt. Open 6 days a week
6782 W. FLAGLER ST. I 261-021
HABLAMOS ESPANOL 9 (! YOUR CHECK IS WELCOME


Page 10-B The^Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 28, 1987
What Are Christian
Children Being
Taught About Jews?
Continued from Page 2-B
were being punished for their
sins anymore than any other
person is punished for his
other sins." Finch adds.
AS TO THE issue of salva-
tion. Finch would leave the
matter "in the hands of a just
God. simply because we don't
know. There are those Chris-
tians who would say that
anyone who hasn't accepted
Christ as their personal savior
will go straight to hell. For us,
that would be a dangerous
statement."
Despite asserting that he
would want to be "loving and
non-judgmental, and not force
faith on anyone," Finch admits
that he would want to bring
Jews closer to Jesus.
"If anyone had a cure for a
disease like cancer, if they
didn't want to share that cure
with someone looking for it
that would be a terrible sin.
"So any Christian would
want to share his knowledge of
the personal savior with
anyone who didn't know it.
"I don't mean to say that be-
ing Jewish is like having
cancer," Finch amends, ex-
plaining that life at its most
hopeless can feel like a ter-
minal disease to any person
who does not have faith.
PASTOR NEAL Greatens
of the Concordia Lutheran
Church, asserts that "we try
to approach the issue (of Jews
in Christian teachings) in a
Christian sense. We are open,
and, I like to think, non-
prejudiced."
Yet there is no way a Jew
can enter the kingdom of
heaven without accepting
Jesus as the messiah, accor-
ding to Greatens. "Good works
do not get us into heaven," he
explains. "It's a gift from God,
that only he can give through
accepting Jesus as our lord and
savior. That's what scripture
says."
Says Greatens, "personally,
I would respond to any person,
whether they be Jew or Gen-
tile, who tells me that they do
not believe that Jesus is their
lord and savior, by having a lot
of care and concern for their
spiritual welfare."
Greatens would advise his
children to approach Jewish
children they might meet in
school "with love and accep-
tance, because although they
might not individually be able
to change their friends' faith,
they might be able to plant a
seed which the Holy Ghost
could later use."
Greatens does not believe,
however, that the Jews as a
people are responsible for the
crucifixion of Jesus, or that
their subsequent losses in the
Holocaust and in other tragic
historical events were divine
retribution.
"The sin of all people put
Jesus on the cross. We don't
teach that the Jews as a people
are responsible," Greatens af-
firms. "And although God
does allow trials and tribula-
tions for people, God does not
necessarily punish, because
we've all sinned. We all fall
short of God's glory."
FATHER TOBIN of St.
Thomas' Episcopalian Church
says that he cannot speak for
all Episcopalians or Anglicans,
but that at St. Thomas, "we
teach that the heart of the
gospel is not only love and ac-
ceptance of God, but love and
acceptance of others
therefore intolerance and re-
jection of others, no matter
what they might believe, is
intolerable."
Tobin responds to the ques-
tion of whether or not Jews
can get to heaven with a quota-
tion from the gospel according
to St. John, where Jesus tells
his apostles that in his house
there are many mansions.
"Which is to say that heaven
is, in terms of a spiritual reali-
ty, an enormous kingdom, and
therefore the way to the
kingdom is accessible to enor-
mous numbers of people,"
Tobin explains.
"It is clear that the gospels
and most Christian tradition
teaches that the way to the
father is through Jesus Christ.
It is equally clear that it is not
our concern who 'makes it' to
heaven or not. God is a
welcoming, accepting God,"
Tobin adds.
'The kingdom (of heaven) is
going to be more inclusive
than exclusive, and the gospel
of Jesus Christ is much more
concerned with how we live in
this world than in how we get
to the next."
WERE THE Jews as a peo-
ple responsible for Jesus'
death?
"It's very difficult, I think,
for anyone to make a case that
one people were solely respon-
sible for putting Jesus Christ
on the cross. The people of
Israel, the Romans, Judas, the
apostles all of creation were
responsible.
"The Jews today are no
more accountable than you or
I. If a child from St. Thomas'
Episcopal Sunday or day
school went up to a Jewish
child (and accused the child of
killing Jesus) then we would
not have done our homework,"
Tobin asserts.
Tobin feels that the misfor-
tunes suffered by the Jews as a
people are not a form of divine
retribution.
"I would not say that
persecutions and anti-
Semitism are anything other
than evil, anti-God, and as far
as Christians are concerned,
anti-Christian," Tobin
contends.
"I CANT see how anyone
could justify it on any
theological or scriptural
grounds whatsoever. I think
that one could even make a
case that even though God
came into the world as Jesus
and messiah, there is still room
for the Jews as God's chosen
people ... I don't know, I
would have to study more,"
Tobin admits.
Theological differences bet-
ween the two faiths will per-
sist, but Tobin does not
necessarily feel that it is bad
that Christians and Jews will
have to work at continuing
their dialogue.
"There are no simple
answers. We're not looking for
formulas to plug into children
to turn them into spiritual
automotons. Jesus Christ died
to take away our sins, not our
minds, and we expect people to
struggle with questions of
Marcia Sage, left, was one of two Greater
Miami representatives of the New Leadership
Delegation to Israel who met with top Israeli
officials including Minister Moshe Arens, se-
cond from right. Also traveling to Israel was
Steven Silverman, not pictured. Meeting
Arens along with Sage are, Tom Weinberger
of Rochester, and Deborah and Michael BaUcin
of Detroit. In addressing the delegates at a
private reception at his residence. Herzog
paid tribute to the role of the Bonds Organiza-
tion in helping Israel build an infrastructure
for its advanced technical capability.
"Without this infrastructure, we would not
have been able to achieve our great progrtsx.
he emphasized.
faith, intellectually as well as
spiritually," he explains.
FATHER ELIAS of the
Greek Orthodox Church St.
Athanasios says that "the only
differences between Jews and
Christians is that Jews are
missing a link in the chain of
Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and
Moses, that is, Jesus Christ."
It is as if a wife sent her hus-
band out to the store for
cheese, and he came back with
milk, saying, "here, make
cheese out of this." argues
Elias. Jews are milk, and
Christians are cheese.
Yet milk and cheese may
both be able to attain
salvation.
"Why should Jews go to
hell?" asks Elias. "That's such
nonsense. Christ made it clear
that if a person abides with
God, if he lives a good life, he
can go to heaven."
Are the Jews as a people
responsible for the death of
Jesus?
"There was a clan there, the
Pharisees, whose interests
were hurt by the new
teachings, and people are
quick to listen to bad counsel
. it's the easiest thing in the
world to mislead people," says
Elias.
WAS THE Holocaust, along
with other misfortunes in
Jewish history, punishment for
the Jews' role in the
crucifixion?
"Once you do something
wrong, you have to pay for the
consequences. Unfortunately,
the Jews had to. It is unfair to
say that the Jews were punish-
ed by the Holocaust because it
hurts, but if you are in trouble,
try to find out what you did.
and then repent," says Elias,
whose father helped save
Jewish co-workers from the
Nazis in Greece during World
War II.
"I wouldn't use the Jews'
punishment for Christ's death
in a sermon, because it might
be misinterpreted," Elias con-
cedes, "but I might criticize ac-
tions non-religious Jews
mess around with the stock
market, and work to prevent
religious education, or to pre-
sent it in a stupid way."
"Jews are not 100 percent to
blame, though." Elias admits.
"Bad Christians are involved,
too."
IN The Jewish Floridian's
interviews. Father Elias, the
only non-Protestant spiritual
leader we talked to, came
closest to espousing Christian
principles that Jews have long
feared the most:
Jews "mess around" with
the stock market.
Jews are responsible for
the crucifixion "There was a
clan there, the Pharisees,
whose interests were hurt by
the new teachings.
The Holocaust was punish-
ment for the Jews' failure to
accept Jesus and their role in
the crucifixion "Once you do
something wrong, you have to
pay for the consequences."
But many of the Protestant
pastors and ministers came
close to this themselves,
although some were more
careful than others to shy
away from hewing to this
same, ancient line.
ENLIGHTENED Pro
testantism is the backbone of
America. Enlightened Pro-
testantism sparked the na-
tion's Founding Fathers. Do
these interviews reflect that
*La Cage Aux Folles' Opens
"La Cage Aux Folles," the
Jerry Herman/Harvey Fiers-
tein, spectacular multi-Tony
Award-winning Best Musical
which scored a resounding
sellout success when it played
South Florida's Christmas-
New Year holiday season of
1984-85, returns for a one-
week limited run opening in a
77ie Officers, Directors and Founders of the
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged
at Douglas Gardens mourn the passing of our
dear friend and colleague,
Arnold Ganz
A kind, intelligent and generous man, his
impact will long be felt In our community
and In our hearts. Sincere sympathy Is extend-
ed to his wife, Ellie. his children, Charles,
Susan and Amy, and his parents, Pauline
and Abraham.
Irving Cypen Harold Beck Marc Lichtman
Chairman ol tha Board MJHHA Praaldant Exacutlva Dlractof
Louis Stein
Foundara Praaldant
Stephen E. Rose
Director ol Davalopmant
enlightened Protestantism
today?
Some Jews may well con-
sider otherwise and that they Jl
must continue to fear for their
children's future if it is just as
their parents and grand-
parents did in earlier genera-
tions here and in Europe.
And that these children may
also reasonably expect to be
called "Christ-killer" at least
once before reaching their
adulthood.
Mass Pray In
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The two Chief Rabbis and the
aged Hasidic Rabbi of Gur
were among Orthodox and
ultra-Orthodox figures who
took part Monday evening in a
mass pray-in at the Western
Wall against Sabbath desecra-
tion in Jerusalem. The turnout
many thousands was
somewhat less than the
organizers had hoped for hut
nevertheless impressive. The
prayers ended with the soun-
ding of the shofar.
low-priced preview Wednes-
day, Sept. 9, to be followed by
the official opening Thursday.
Sept. 10 through Sunday.
Sept. 13 as a pre-season. non-
subscription "special," laun- j
ching producer Zev Bufnian s
1987-88 theatrical season at
Miami Beach's newly-named
Jackie Gleason Theater of the
Performing Arts.


Friday, August 28, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
.. "Thou shall. set him king over thee, whom the Lord thy God
shall choose; one from among thy brethren"
(Deuteronomy 17.1-5)
SHOFETIM
SHOFETIM "Judges and officers shalt thou make thee in all
thy gates, which the Lord thy God giveth thee, tribe by tribe; and
they shall judge the people with righteous judgment Thou
shalt not plant thee an Asherah of any kind of tree beside the altar
of the Lord thy God, which thou shalt make thee. Neither shalt
thou set thee up a pillar, which the Lord thy God hateth"
(Deuteronomy 16.18-22). "At the mouth of two witnesses, or three
witnesses, shall he that is to die be put to death; at the mouth of
one witness he shall not be put to death" (Deuteronomy 17.6). "If
there arise a matter too hard for thee in judgment. thou shalt
arise, and get thee up unto the place which the Lord thy God shall
choose And thou shalt do according to the tenor of the
sentence, which they shall declare unto thee from that place
which the Lord shall choose" (Deuteronomy 17.8-9). If, like the
other nations, the children of Israel in Canaan should desire a
king, "Thou shalt in any wise set him king over thee, whom the
Lord thy God shall choose; one from among thy brethren shalt
thou set king over thee; thou mayest not put a foreigner over
thee, who is not thy brother. Only he shall not multiply horses to
himself. Neither shall he multiply wives to himself. Neither
shall he greatly multiply to himself silver and gold ... He shall
write a copy of this law in a book, out of that which is before the
priests the Levites. And it shall be with him, and he shall read
therein all the days of his life; that he may learn to fear the Lord
his God" (Deuteronomy 17.15-19). The children of Israel may ex-
pect prophets to rise in the Promised Land, men of God like
Moses himself. "And it shall come to pass, that whosoever will not
hearken unto My words which he shall speak in My name, I will
require it of him" (Deuteronomy 18.19). How may the Israelites
distinguish a true prophet from a false one? "When a prophet
speaketh in the name of the Lord, if the thing follow not, nor
come to pass, that is the thing which the Lord hath not spoken;
the prophet hath spoken it presumptuously, thou shalt not be
afraid of him" (Deuteronomy 18.22) The portion also treats of the
cities of refuge. It cites the speech that the priest and officers are
to make to troops before battle, and states the laws of warfare
that apply to any city not of the seven Canaanite nations. The por-
tion ends with the regulations dealing with the heifer offered as
atonement when a slain person is found in the field and the identi-
ty of the murderer is not known.
(The recounting ol the Weekly Portion of the Law Is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman-
Tsamlr, SIS, published by Shengold. The volume Is available at 75 Maiden
Lane, New York, N.Y. 10038. Joseph Schlang Is president of the society
distributing the volume.)
Nation's Newest Pharmacy
College Opens Aug. 31
A charter class of 50
undergraduate students will
begin their first day of training
at the nation's newest college
<>f pharmacy in North Miami
Beach on Aug. 31.
The Southeastern College of
Pharmaceutical Sciences, the
only pharmacy school in South
Florida, was developed to off-
set the critical shortage of
pharmacists in the state.
Moving toward the establish-
ment of a "health sciences
university" the college of
pharmacy will share campus
facilities with the seven-year-
old Southeastern College of
Osteopathic Medicine, the first
affiliation between a pharmacy
college and an osteopathic
medical school. The campus is
located at 1750 N.E. 168
Street.
To date, the college has 15
full-time faculty members and
more than 40 part-time in-
structors for student rotations
at local institutions, including
lackson Memorial Hospital
and Mount Sinai Medical
Center.
A two-day registration and
orientation program starts on
Sunday, Aug. 30 at 2 p.m. for
all students and family
members. Rep. Fred Lippman
(D-Broward), a licensed phar-
macist and Vice President of
Pharmaceutical Affairs at the
new pharmacy school, will in-
troduce administrative officers
of both schools and
distinguished guests. The
Hollywood legislator was
president and executive
member of the 3.100-member
Florida Pharmacy Association
and former president of the
Broward County Pharmacy
Association. In 1984, Lippman
was given the coveted Hubert
Humphrey award by the
American Pharmaceutical
Association.
Among others who will ex-
tend greetings are Rep. Elaine
Gordon (D-Dade), Jim Powers,
Executive Vice President of
the Florida Pharmacy Associa-
tion and Joseph Moffet, newly-
elected Mayor of North Miami
Beach. Moffet will present a
proclamation declaring Aug.
31 as "Southeastern College of
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Charter Class Day."
FPL Relocates
Division Office
Florida Power and Light
Company's Southern Division
Office has relocated from 4200
Flagler St. to 1001 S.
Bay shore Drive.
Relocation of FPL's division
office, provides the utility with
a central downtown location
while enabling FPL to con-
solidate other operations at its
Flagler facility.
The Southern Division Office
provides administrative sup-
port for FPL's business offices
and service centers in Dade
County. Major departments in-
clude personnel, engineering,
claims, consumer affairs, com-
mercial services, governmen-
tal affairs and land
management.
Rabbi Harold Kushner
Rabbinical
Association To
Hold High
Holiday Seminar
Rabbi Harold S. Kushner,
spiritual leader of Temple
Israel of Natick, Mass. will
conduct a High Holiday
Seminar for the members of
the Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami on Tuesday,
Sept. 1 at Temple Beth Shalom
of Hollywood.
Rabbi Kushner is the author
of "When Bad Things Happen
To Good People," a book which
helps individuals cope with
suffering.
In announcing the seminar,
Rabbi Jack Riemer of Beth
David Congregation, chairman
of the seminar stated, "This
program is a most meaningful
way to develop a mood of
reflection and contemplation
appropriate for the High Holy
Day season."
Net Profit
For Bank Leumi
The adjusted profit before
tax of the Bank Leumi group
amounted to NIS 168.3 M
($104.6 M) for the first half of
1987 as compared with NIS
87.8 M ($54.6 M) for the same
period last year. This
represents a growth of 91.7
percent. The adjusted net pro-
fit of the group in the first half
of 1987 was NIS 64.4 M ($40
M) as compared with NIS 20.1
M ($12.5 M) for the same
period last year, a growth of
220 percent. The net yield on
equity, calculated on an an-
nual, basis reached 9.4
percent.
Taxes on income in this
period were 55 percent of the
adjusted pre-tax profits com-
pared with taxation of 68 per-
cent for the same period last
year.
The adjusted equity grew at
a rate of 5 percent from NIS
1,397 M ($868 M) at year end
1986 to NIS 1,467 M ($912 M)
as at June 30, 1987.
Total adjusted assets of the
Bank Leumi group as at June
30, 1987 amounted NIS 38.8
billion ($24.1 billion), similar to
the figure at the end of 1986.
Saulson To Speak
The Men's Club of the Miami
Beach Jewish Community
Center, Senior Center at 610
Espanola Way will be engaged
in a discussion of: "Minhagim
or Mishagaos?" with William
F. Saulson at 9:30 a.m., Tues-
day, Sept. 8.
Synagogue
Listing
Candleliqhting Time
7:26 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach. Fla 531 2120
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig
ADATHYESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947 1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor: Zvl Rozen Conservative
Executive Director: ^>v
Harry J. Silverman '?!
Mmyan 730 a.m. A 6:30 p m.
Sal. A Sun 8 a.m. ft 6 p.m.
Shabbat sarv Sal 8.30 am
Bar Mltzvah Sal. 8:30 am
Jallray Rothanbarg
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 667 6667
Dr. Herbert Baumgard.
Senior Rabbi
Rabbi Leonard Schoolman
Frl.avanlng 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Lynn
Qoldiiam. Aasoc. Rabbi will apaah
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Bath Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave., Miami Baach
534 7213-534-7214 _.
Barry J. Konovitch, Rabbi t k\
Moshe Buryn. Cantor \%'
Sergio Grower, President
Sholem Epalbaum, President,
Religious Committee
CW
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Bergei
Yehuda Shilman, Cantor
Maurice Klein. Ritual Director
Gerald Taub. Executive Director
Kabbalat Shabbat al 6 p.m.
Sal. 8 a.m. Rabbi Maiwall Bargar will apaak
Cantor Yahuda Shilman will chant
Dally Sarvica 8 a.m. t 7 p.m.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive. Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schilf
Dally 7:30 a.m. (Mon. t Trims 7:1S) t 7 p.m.
Fit. 7 p.m. Sat. 9 a.m. Rasarv lor High Holiday
Daya. B'nal Mltnah Sat. 9am Nicholas Martin
_______________* Jay Justin_______________
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854-3911
Jack Riemer, Rabbi
Robert Albert, /Sift
Cantor \W)
Rev. Milton Freeman,
Ritual Director
Minchah at 8:00 p.m
Dally Mlnyan
Mon. 4 Thurs 7:30 am
Tuas Wad 4 Frl 7:45 a.m.
Sun Sa.m Evanlnga 5:30p.m.
Sat. am Rabbi Rlamar will conduct aenrices
aaalatod by Cantor RotMrt Albart
Kldduah will lollow
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Miami's Pionttr Rilorm Conpraoal'on
137 N.E. 19th St. Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Rebbl Rax D. Perimeter
Cantor: Rachella F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob G. Bornstein
Downtown: Frl. 8 p.m. Rabbi Ran D Portmatar
will apaah on tho topic "A Prophat'a Prollt."
Cantor Rachalla F. Nalaon will conduct
tha liturgy.
BETH KODESH
Conservative
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 850-6334
Cantor Joseph Krissel
Rosa Berlin: Executive Secretary
Samoa* Monday 4 Thursday 7:30 a.m.
Sat 8 45 a m
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667 5657
Michael B. Eisenstat, Rabbi
Frl. p.m.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami, FL 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs, Rabbi
Dr. Joseph A. Gorf Inkel. i/SkY
Rabbi Emeritus %W)J
Moshe Frledler, Cantor ^*^
Frl. 7 p.m.
Sat. 8:45 a.m.
Waatday aan. Mon Frl S a.m.
Mon Thurs S p.m Sun 8:30 a.m.
Sat 8 45 a.m
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave.. M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Alvadla Rosenberg
Cantor Moshe Buryn
Dally aarvtoaa 8 am a 7 p m
Sat. 8:15 a jn
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
238-2601 /
Rabbi David H. Auerbach v
Cantor Stephen Freedman
Frl. Samoa* 8 p.m.
Sat sarv 8 SO a m
Dally aanrlcaa: Sun 8:30 am
Mon., Tuaa. A Thur*. 7:30 *.m
Wad 7:30pm
Sat 8:30 a m Bar Mltrvah
Jallray Allan Kallsh
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM 538-7231
Chase Ave* 41st St. Ub*m
DR ICON KRONISH, Santo. Founding Rabbi
QARY A. QLtCKSTElN, Sanlac Rabbi
HARRY JXXT, AuiMary Rabbi
JASON O W ASOOF F. Aaalalawt Raobi
IAN ALPEPJN, Cantor
DENNIS J puce. FT A. EtraeuMva OMctor
Frl 8:15 pm
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Baach Blvd. ^-,
Dr. Max A. Lipschltz. Rabbi IWJ
Zvee Aronl, Cantor v ~ '
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
'
Samoa* Frl. 5 30 p.m.
Sat 8:25*.m 4 7.25 p.m.
Dally aamea* Mon Frl 7:10 a.m. 4 5:10 p.m
Sunday 8am 4 5 10pm
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rosa
Shoshanah Raab, Cantor
Samcaa Frl 7:30pm
Sat 8:30 am
Onag Shabbat wMI toHow
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St., Miami Baach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowltz
Ari Fridkls, Assoc Rabbi (
Cantor Murray Yavnah '?.
Sat 8 am Sabbath aantca
Dally Minchah Sunday Friday
am and*
Sat. I a.m. and
I pun.
5:18 pn
TEMPLE NER TAMID 8664345
7902 Carlyle Ave 866-9833
Miami Baach 33141 Conaanatn*
Rabbi Eugene Labovltz /fiv
Cantor Edward Klein ()
Daily aan Mon -Frl.Saj" 4 8:15 pjn
Sat Mtnoha 8:15 p.m Sun 8:30 am 4
8:15 p.m
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Baach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Baach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
232-6833 Mod* omodo.
Rabbi Hershel Backer
Sal. 8:10 am aarvto* at
Tamp4a SamuEl
83*JW1S2Ava.
S ol N. Kandan Dr.
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave
North Dade's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kingsley, Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
Frl *pm Rabbi Ralph P Kmgatay apaaka on
-Coming Homa la Hah ma Fun "SaiTo 10 am
I'nal MHnrah Adam Kromaay 4
Marc Wollanhagan
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Millar Dr. Conservative
271 2311
Or Norman N Stiaparo. Rabbi f
Benjamin Adler, Cantor ^
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Mmyan 1 am Monday*4Thuraday.
Sunday S am Frl 8:15 p m
Samoa* oondtsOad by mambare ol usy I
Kadtma Sat. S a.m. aan. conducted by
-JfeM Shapiro 4 Wurgy ohantad by
Cantor Adla. Sun. 10-12 n
OaNee.


Page 12-B The Jgwuh Florkhan/Friday. August 28, 1987


Deaths
Shaike Ophir, 58
Dr. ArkadiM. Rywlin, Of ML Sinai
Dr. Arkadi M. Rywlin, interna-
tionally renowned Pathologist and
Director of Pathology and
Laboratory medicine at Mt. Sinai
Medical Center of Greater Miami
and Professor of Pathology at the
University of Miami died on
August 22. He was 64 years old.
Born in the Free city of Danzig
in 1923, Dr. Rywlin went to school
in Danzig and when his family was
forced to flee the Nazi he then at-
tended schools in Paris,
Barcelona. Tel Aviv, Beirut and
Geneva. Switzerland. He
graduated as a Doctor of Medicine
in 1949, from the University of
Geneva, Switzerland and served
on the faculty there until 1952.
In 1952 he came to the United
States and was a pathologist at
Michael Reese Hospital in
Chicago. He then served as a Cap-
tain in the U.S. Air Force Air
Borne Division, at Ft. Campbell,
Ky. In 1963 Dr. Rywlin. became
Chief Resident of Medicine at Mt.
Sinai Medical Center of Greater
Miami and has been Chairman of
the Department of Pathology and
Laboratory Medicine since 1967.
Dr. Rywlin's medical writings
have been published in over 150
publications and he is an interna-
Dr. Arkadi Rywlin
tionally renowned lecturer
throughout the world as an
authority on pathology and her
matology. He was in the process
of updating his most famous work
"Histopathopathology of the Bone
Marrow."
He was proficient in seven
languages. Dr. Arkadi Rywlin was
Arnold Ganz, 54,
Stock Investment Adviser
certified by the American Board
of Pathology in anatomic and
Clinical Pathology and was a
member of the Arthur Stout
Society of Surgical Pathologists;
the American Society of Der-
matopathology and the Council of
Hematology of the American
Society of Clinical Pathologist. He
was an executive and founding
member of the American Society
of Hematopaphology, and the
Associate Editor of Human
Pathology. American Journal of
Dermapathology; and on the
editorial board i>f the Mt. Sinai
Medical Journal. He was a former
National American Physicians
Fellowship President. Dr. Rywlin
was among other awards the reci-
pient of the Distinguished Medical
Scientist of Florida.
Prior to his death, Mt. Sinai
Medical Center of Greater Miami
honored Dr. Rywlin by naming his
department the Arkadi M.
Rywlin, MD Department of
Pathology and Laboratory
Medicine.
Dr. Rywlin is survived by his
wife, Hava; son, Daniel Rivlin,
MD; mother Berta Rywlin and his
brother Fima Rywlin.
Friends have established the
Arkadi M. Rywlin, MD Pathology
Fellowship. Services were held at
Temple Emanu-El on Miami
Beach.
Arnold Ganz, the guru of South
Florida stock market analysts, the
expert's expert, died Friday of
cancer. He was 54.
Mr. Ganz was a director of
several businesses, including
Safeguard Scientifics. Equity
Bank of Delray Beach and
Skylake State B*ank of North
Miami Beach.
Through his tireless philan-
thropic i-t't'orts. it also include
-mate.
ile helped people in bo manj
different worlds,' Charles Ganz
Hf dedicated his whole life
to helping other people, with the
investments, with the personal
problems, helping people to help
themselves."
A founder and director of the
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged, Mr. Ganz also was
chairman of the investment com-
mittee of the Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies.
"If you have money" he once
said, "don't show it. Use it for
philanthropy. Do some good with
it."
In 1971. he moved to Miami and
opened his own firm.
In addition to his son Charles.
"i's include his wife F.linor:
daughters Susan and Amy;
parents Abraham and I'auline
"Ian/.; and sister Isabelle
Lipschultz.
Services were held at Blasberg
Memorial Chapel.
SPECIAL LIMITED PRE-NEED OFFER
FUNERAL AND BURIAL
IN THE BEST OF JEWISH TRADITION
$1,595
LakrsiJr Memorial Para and Eternal Light Funrral Directors arr proud to
sponsor this unique program which combines ownership of a plot at our
beautiful Mrmorial Park anJ a plan for prr-paid funrral services.
rhis < .notional value assures that vour onr call will put vou in touch with
thr people who hrlirvr thrrr i nothing dignified about paving more for a
traditional Jewish funeral that vou have to.
HERE IS WHAT WE INCLUDE:
Prompt Transfer from Place of
Death
Care and Preparation of Deceased
Casket and Hearse
Arrangement Direction of
(raveside Service*
Permits and Benefit Assistance
24 hour emergencv vervice
Shiva Candles. Card* and Renchrs
(iravrsiir
Paved Private Visitation Path
Steel Reinforced Concrete Vault
Opening and C'losing of Crave
Perpetual Crasesifes Carr
No maintenance or service fees
A Jewish Tradition since lSS
TOTAL: $1,595
No Interest Payment Plans Available
For complete information on our plot and funrral service package plan
call vour lakeside Eternal Light rrprrsentatiM- lodav.
In time of need, one call will handle all the details.
DADE:
592-0690
BROWARD:
525-9339
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Shaike Ophir, Israel's
foremost mime and one of its
leading comic actors and
entertainers, died last week
after what was described as a
lengthy illness. He was 58
years old. Virtually the entire
Israeli press described Ophir
as the "prince of the Israeli
comic stage."
Friends and colleagues were
aware for some time that he
was suffering from a terminal
illness. The general public
might have been aware that
something was wrong because
of the sudden increase in radio
rebroadcasts of his earlier
taped performances.
Ophir's friends said that a
scheduled "Salute to Shaike"
gala performance would be
held last Thursday (Aug. 20) as
planned, in his memory. For
many years he performed in
New York and Hollywood
under the name of Shai K.
Ophir.
Ophir was born and raised in
an observant Jewish family in
the Mea Shearim quarter of
Jerusalem and left school at an
early age to join the Palmach
underground" in the years
leading up to the 1948 W<
Independence.
ar of
Arnold (Janz
PRANK I'.-i.t Joshua, 28 I California,
formerb of Plantation, Fla AuguM 20
1,.'\ itt-\\ t'insW'in
POLLOCK, H 'f Miami,
18 llmorah Chapaii
DA\ is. Solomon C ol Miami Beach
Rubin-Zilbert.
GOODY, Eva, T, of Miami Beach. Au>mst
21 Si-rvhi-s mra held.
GOLDFISCHER, Harold, 76, Ala] i
Srr\ loaf were held
BERN'S. Gary Paul. 42. Ainmst 2:i Eternal
Light
KREI'I). Jacob. 85. of Miami Beach. Au^st
I'l Services were held
CROSS, Leopold. U8. of Miami Beach
August 22. Services were held.
LICHTMAN. Mary (Jerry) of North Miami.
August 23. Services were held.
SCHOYCHID. Sam, 78. of North Miami
Beach. August 22. Services were held.
WEISS. Saul. 66. August 22 Services and
interment at Star of David Memorial
Park.
JOSEPH. Dr. Geoffrey Stephen Memorial
services were held.
KAIL, Leon of Boston. Eternal Light.
MYERS, Louis. 93. of Miami Beach Ser-
vices held in Chicago.
ROSENBERG, Anita M 65. of North
Miami Beach Eternal Light
GLAS8MAN, Michael J 72, August 17
Services held in New Jartaj
GOLDSMITH. Louis. 92. ofMmmi Beach
August 18. Levitt-Weinstein.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
simum
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
s
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service
Dade County
r>:,2 20W
Broward County
RepretenUri In Riverside Memorial ('hapvl. Irn-
New York: (718)268 760O<|uwni Blvd. RUBIN 1 RUBIN-ZILBER
ZILBERT
CHAPEL
MONUMENT CO
CIM1T1RY COUNSELING
10CHAPELS SERVING
DADE
BROWARD
v PALM BEACH
DADE
538-637 i
BROWARD
920-6660
ZILBERT-RUBIN
He was one of the founders
of the Army's first entertain-
ment troupe, the Chizbatron
which first brought him to the
stage.
After the war he went to
France and studied mime
under the great French
mimist. Marcel Marceau >
returning later to Israel to
establish his own mime troupe.
Chain. Rose, 73
Chaim Rose, who presented his
credo of entertainment, education
and enlightenment to tne people
of Miami Beach through free
cultural programs, died Monday
of a heart attack. He was 73.
Mr. Rose developed a popular
lecture and cultural series in the
1960's and 1970's called "The
People Speak Town Hall Forum."
For 23 years, Mr. Rose, who left
no immediate family, worked for A
the city of that time at Friendship
Corner, on Washington Avenue
and Second Street.


Investiture Of Judge Melvia Green
Friday, August 28, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 18-B
Investiture of Dade County
Court Judge Melvia B. Green
will be held Friday at 12:15
p.m. in the Dade County Cour-
thouse, Courtroom 6-1, Miami.
Judge Green was appointed
by Governor Robert Martinez
upon recommendation by the
Judicial Nominating Commis-
sion. She fills the unexpired
term of Judge Arthur
Roihenberg, who was elevated
to the Circuit Court by Gov.
Martinez, also upon recom-
mendation by the Judicial
Nominating Commission.
Mayor Robert Ingram of the
City of Opa-Locka will offer
the invocation at the in-
vestiture, which is open to the
general public. Richard Pet-
tigrew, former Speaker of the
House of Representatives of
the State of Florida, will speak
on behalf of the Florida Bar.
Judith Korchin, president of
the Dade County Bar Associa-
tion, will speak on behalf of the
DCBA.
Judge Green's husband,
Joseph Green, an ad-
ministrator in the Dade Coun-
ty Parks and Recreation
Department, will robe Judge
Green following her swearing
in by Chief Judge Gerald
Wetherington, who will
preside at the investiture
ceremonies.
A native of Miami. Judge
Green is a member of the
American Bar Association,
Florida Bar, National Bar
Association and of the Dade
County Bar Association. She is
33 years old and lives in South
Dade.
Resumption Of Israeli-Hungarian
Relations Said To Be Imminent
By MARGIE OLSTER
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Hungary and Israel are ex-
pected to resume diplomatic
ties, broken after the Six-Day
War in 1967, this week, accor-
ding to knowledgable
j American Jewish figure.
The resumption of
| diplomatic ties has been
rumored for some time, but a
formal announcement is immi-
nent, he said. The two coun-
I tries have agreed to exchange
diplomatic representatives but
I will not resume full diplomatic
i relations which would mean an
exchange of Ambassadors.
The arrangements will resem-
Ible that of Israel and Poland
which have exchanged con-
sular officers.
The development follows a
long process of increasing
cultural, commercial and
economic exchanges between
Israel and Hungary and a
general normalization of
Israel's relations with the East
European bloc.
The IDF Is
Walking Taller
WIV (JTA) The
IDF is ordering tie* and
longer beds for its soldiers -
not becaU8e the beds have
shrunk, but because its new
recruits are an inch-and-a-half
taller than they were 10 yean
ago.
I he new beds now being
ordered are expected to
answer the requirements for
sleeping stretched out for all
except six percent of the
tallest new recruits. These
unlucky soldiers will have to
sleep with bent knees or with
their feet sticking out of the
end, the IDF quartermaster
-aid. As far as is known, no
research has yet been con-
ducted to determine why to-
day's recruits are taller than
those a decade ago.
Blank Named
President
Hurton W. Blank has been
'ained president of Margaret-
ten Securities Corporation.
headquartered in North Miami
Beach, He was also named a
!tor of Margaretten
Financial Group, the parent
>mpany of the securities firm.
OBSERVERS also say the
renewal of diplomatic ties
could not have come about
without Moscow's ac-
quiescence and probable en-
couragement. A Soviet official
met with an Israeli official in
Bonn last weekend for an un-
precedented 10 hours since
diplomatic ties were broken.
It is believed that the Soviet
Union, which is interested in a
negotiated Middle East peace
settlement, is lurching toward
repairing its relations with
Israel in order to play a larger
role in that process.
In recent months, there have
been several clear signs of a
thaw between Hungary and
Israel. In May, the World
Jewish Congress Executive
met for the first time in East
Europe in Budapest. Three
weeks later, the Memorial
Foundation for Jewish Culture
also met in Hungary.
James ./. Slitter has been pro-
moled to the position 'i/iliree-
tor of internal audit of Jeffer-
son Bancorp. Inc., the publicly-
held bank holding company
which owns mid operates Jef-
f rmm National Banks in Dade
and Palm Beach counties. His
promotion was announced by
Arthur H. Courshon, chair-
man of the board of Jefferson
Bancorp, Inc., and of Jefferson
National Banks.
Honors And
Appointments
ATLANTA (JTA) Yoel
Levi, the Rumanian-born,
Israeli-trained violinist and
conductor, has been chosen to
succeed Robert Shaw as music
director of the Atlanta Sym-
phony Orchestra. Levi will
assume his duties next
August.
CHERRY HILL. N.J. -
(JTA) Businessman and
Jewish philanthropist Roger
Davis has received the Daniel
B. Toll Humanitarian Award
for Community Service at the
Woodcrest Country Club In-
vitation Pro-Am Golf Tourna-
ment. Proceeds from the tour-
nament go to the local Jewish
Community Center scholar-
ship fund tor children.
Miami attorneys Don Feldman and Charles Levy have received
attention from national business media for their victory over pa-
tent rights to "voice store and forward" technology. Their battle
include representing clients against corporate giants such as
IBM and Wang Laboratories. Pictured are Levy and Feldman
examining a patent.
Anton T. Loew Named First VP
Of Bank Hapoalim
Anton T. Loew, corporate
banker with broad commercial
and international lending ex-
pertise, has been appointed
First Vice President and Cor-
porate Manager for Bank
Hapoalim New York. The
announcement was made by
Jacob Elinav, Executive Vice
President and Manager of the
Bank's New York Branches.
Am pal Announces Increase
In Second Quarter
NEW YORK Ampal-
American Israel Corporation
iA IS.A) reported that
revenues for the quarter ended
June 30. increased 13.4 per-
cent to $29,752,000, up from
*2<;. 237.000 for the same
period in 1986. Revenues for
the first six months of 1987 in-
creased 9.7 percent to
$58,038,000. up from
$52,922,000 for the same
period in 1986.
FORECLOSURE SALES-PUBLIC NOTICES
IN THE CIKCl IT COl RT FOR
DADE i hi NTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Pile Number B7-4342
Illusion III
IN RE ESTATE OF
LILLIAN ROSEN
I leceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of LILLIAN ROSEN, deceased
File Number 87 1842, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dude County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad
dresa "f which is 7.'i West Flagier
Street. Miami. Florida 38181. The
names ami addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per
tonal representative's attorns) are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE ii) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested penoil <>n
whom this notke Was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualification! of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 21, 1987
Personal Representative:
Carl I. Rosen
12850 Osborn N E
Alliance. Ohi 14601
Attornej for Pet
999 Waal ii
Florida Bai N
IN Til! CIKCl IT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-3188
Division 03
IN Kl i STATE OF
llll DA FREEM \N
Deci
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
(Florida Bar No. M83M)
The administration of the estate
of HILDA FREEMAN lea
File Numbei pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West FUgier
Street, Miami. Florida 38131. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
-onal representative's attorney are
el forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file With this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claim-
gainst the estate and (2i an] ob-
jection by an interested [x-rson on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the ipialilicatioiis of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Noti -
begun on August 21, I
Personal Representative:
Raymond Schall
18368 Collins Street
\partmen! 219
11356
\i \\ i; i ORBER, P A
Personal
Bj Vlan K Lnrber
llll I R
Tele, 140]
August -
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERA
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIKCUTCOl R1
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
( IK( CITOF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87*3C913(28)
family division
action fok dissolution
of marria<;k
IN RE: The Marriage of
YRAIDA LOGSDON,
Petitioner,
and
MICHAEL LOGSDON,
Respondent.
T(): MICHAEL LOGSDON
Last Known Residence
2916 Last College Ave.
Apt. 114
Boulder, Colo. 80808
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on MELVIN
J A8HER, ESQ.. attornej for
Petitioner, whose address is 826
South Bayshore Drive. Suite 648,
Miami. FL 83131, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
September 26, 1987; othet
default will Ik- entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com
plaint or petition
WITNESS m. hand and tl i
i COUrt it Miami. Florida on
this 24th day of August. 19
RICHARD P BRINK
Aa< Ilerk, Circuit C
Bj Jennis L Ru
A- D
II ircuil Cou
IN THE CIRI I IT COl R1 FOR
DADE CO! NTY. FU IDA
PROBATE in
File Numbei
Division 02
IN RE ESTATI
r\l I. ABRAH \M
I'c ceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of thi estate
PAUL ABRAHAM deceased,
File Number 87-4660 is pending in
the Circuit Court for DADE Coun-
ty, Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is Til West
Flagier street. Miami, Florida
33130, The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
tornev are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOK EVER BARK F.I)
Publication of tins Notice has
begun on August 28, 1987.
Pi -onal Representative:
SAMUEL ABRAHAMS
275 Webster \\
Brooklyn. New York 11230
Attornej for Pi
Representative
MYRoN ALBEI
A ebster Ave
\, i \


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 28, 1987
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-30858-27
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Petition of
luana M. Sanabria Mid
Pedro Sanabria for the adoption
of a minor child
TO: Hector Rafael Neuron
Residence Unknown
YOU ARK HEREBY
NOTIFIED that petition for
ADOPTION has ban filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, it any. to it
on ALAN SCHNEIDER, Esq..
Alan Schneider PA., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 2720
West Flakier Street. Miami.
Florida 33135 and file the original
with the dark of the above styled
court on or before September i
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this Jury 31, 19*7
RICHARD P. BRISKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By B.J. Frej
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
Alan Schneider. PA.
2720 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33135
(Phone) (305) 643-6988
17907 August 7. 14. 21. 28, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 87 4442
DIVISION: 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SHIRLEY F. BOOXBAUM
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
(FLA. BAR NO. 184878)
The administration of the Estate
of Shirley F. Booxbaum, deceased,
File Number 87-4442. is pending in I
the Circuit Court for Dade County, I
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
cha'lenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 14, 1987.
Nathan Siden
Personal Representative
5890 S.W. 100 Street
Miami. Florida 33156
DENNIS R. TURNER
Attorney for Personal
Representative
STEARNS WEAVER MILLER
WEISSLER ALHADAFF &
SITTERSON. PA.
2200 Museum Tower
150 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33130
(305) 789-3200
17917 August 7, 14,21.28.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Cielito Lindo
Restaurant intend to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Sikaffy Sikaffy & Aguilera. Inc.
by Rafael Aguilera President
Herbert J. Lerner. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
801 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Florida .(3140
Phone: (806)678-3000
17916 August?. I4.21.tt. ISfll
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-3581 (02)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RALPH PAPE.
a/k/a RALPH C. PAPE.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
TOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration of
the estate of RALPH PAPE. a/k/a
RALPH C. PAPE. deceased, File
Number 87-3581 (02). is pending in
the Circuit Court for DADE*Coun-
ty. Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is 3rd Floor.
Dade County Courthouse. 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33130. The personal represen-
tative of the estate is THOMAS A.
PAPE. whose address is 324 Spr-
ing Valley Court. Huntsville.
Alabama. 35802. The name and ad
dress of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be ,
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
' estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
I representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
August 28. 1987.
THOMAS A. PAPE
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
RALPH PAPE. a/k/a
RALPH C PAPE
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
MICHAEL G. BASS, PA.
8900 S.W. 107th Avenue,
Suite 206
Miami. FL 33176
Telephone: (305) 595-9300
17941 August 28;
September 4. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-36279 09
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
LUIS GABRIEL OQUENDO.
Petitioner,
and
CARMEN 8EGUNDA BERNAL
OQUENDO.
Respondent.
TO: CARMEN SEGUNDA
BERNALOQUENDO
Residence:
Tercera Avenida con
Segunda Transversal
K.lificio Excelsior
Piso8 Apt 36
Loas Palos Grandee,
Caracas. Venezuela, S A
YOU ARK II E R E B Y
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
HAROLD CEASE, ESQ., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 2720 Want Flagler Street.
Miami. FL 3313a. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
September 26, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall l>e published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and theseal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 18 day of August, 1987.
RICHARD P HRINKER
A- Clark, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
B) JOHN BRANDA
\- Deputy Celrk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HAROLD CEASE. ESQ.
CEASE & CEASE
2720 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33135
17937 August 21.28;
September 4. 11. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name A Able North
American at 12555 SW 130 Street
Miami, Fl. intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit'
Court of Dade County, Florida.
A Able Moving & Storage, Inc.
Marvin I. Moss.PA
Attorney for
A Able Moving & Storage, Inc.
17932 August 21.28;
September 4,11,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name PLACE DES ARTS
at MAYFAIR IN THE GROVE
BLD I Room 308 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
ELIE GUIGUI
16895 July 31;
August 7. 14.21. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87-02038 FC 30
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
ON RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JOHN SANTORO.
Petitioner-Husband
and
ROSE SANTORO.
Respondent-Wife
TO: ROSE SANTORO,
189 Bay 26th Street
Brooklyn, NY. 11214
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on EDWIN
A. WILLINGER. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 1655
Drexel Avenue. Miami Beach,
Florida 33139. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before August 7th.
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my ha-d and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 6th day of July, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EDWIN A. WILLINGER,
1665 Drexel Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone. 538-5756
16838 July 10, 17. 24.31, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE HEREBY IS GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Law At Your Door in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
lack Werner, Owner
I7WI August 21, 28;
September 4, 11. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-4255
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SUSANNE SONDHELM.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of SU8ANNE SONDHELM.
dm-witi File Number 87-4266, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is
Dade County Courthouse, 73 W.
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addr. tees
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below,
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE; (l) all cialms
against the estati and (2) an] ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom notice M IS mailed that
challenges the valklit) of the will.
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdk
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARKED
Publication of this Notice lias
begun on August 21, 1981
Personal Representative:
HENRY NORTI "N
19 W. Flagler St Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 W. Flagler Street Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 38180
Telephone: (306)374-3116
Florida Bar No. 069028
17986 August 21 :: 19S7
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-4411
Dnision (02)
IN RE; ESTATE OF
MAROARET NEUMANN
1 as.
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of MARGARET NEUMANN
deceased. File Number XT 4414. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
Dade County Courthouse. 73 VY
', Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
; of the personal representative and
j the personal representative's at-
' torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
I whom notice was mailed that
! challenges the validity of the will.
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 21. 1987.
Personal Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler St., Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler Street, Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 374-3116
Florida Bar No. 059023
17935 August 21.28, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-4409
Florida Bar No. 251143
IN RE: ESTATE OF
PHILLIP ELLINGTON,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of PHILLIP ELLINGTON,
deceased. File Number 87-4409. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida, Probate
1 iivision. the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) am ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT so FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice ha.-
begun on AuguM 28, 1981
Personal Representative
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MARTIN W WASSERMAN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 38139
Telephone (806)672-8100
17951
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL^
REPRESENTATIVE:
Richard I. Kroop (128023)
Kwitney. Kroop & Scheinberir
PA. *
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 612
Miami Beach. Florida 38139
Telephone: (305) 688-7675
17942 Augusts
September ; .;
IN THE CIRCUIT COLRT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDIciAI
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDK TION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-33371 (A M
NOTICE OF ACTION
SOUTH FLORIDA SA\ INL-
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
Plaintiff
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Integrated World
Enterprises at 8020 N.W. 60th St.
Miami. Fl 33166 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Elba Serrano
17944 August 28;
September 4. 11,18, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name PROPERTY IN
VESTMENT SYSTEMS at 2025
SW 1st St Miami. FL 33135 in-
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida
RAIL A OI.IVA
ANAG. OLIVA
17913 August 7.14.21.28.1987
MICHAEL W CHARLES
Defendants.
To MICHAEL W.CHARI.K-
2664 N.E. 136th Btn
North Miami. Florida 33181
yOU A RE II E RE BY
NOTIFIED that an
Foreclosure of Mortgage
following deacribad propertj
LOT l. BLOCK i. of
HIDDEN COVE TOWN
III H'SES. according to the
Plat thereof, as rei
Plat Book 119. Pag' 64
the Public Records of D
County. Florida. \.\l
West SOfeetofTract B, HID
D E N C 0 \ E
TOWNHOUSES, PuU I
119. Page 64, of the Public
Records of Dad< i
Florida.
ha.- been filed against you
are required to serve
August 2*: your written deft
September4, 1987 on Sheppard Faber. At)
Plaintiff, whose address liti
214, 1670 Madruga Aven
Gables, Florida, SSI 16
September 11. IOC
original with the Cleri
Court either before
Plaintiffs attorney or in I
thereafter: otherwise .,
be entered against .
Deceased relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand si
of this Court this 8 OB]
1961
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of tin- I
By BARBARA RODRIGl'EZ
As Deputy Clerk
17!t2:i August 11
September; -
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-3623
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BENJAMIN RI'BIN
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSON'S HAVING
CLAIMS OR I) E M A N 11 S
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that the administration of
the estate of BENJAMIN RUBIN,
deceased. File Number 87-3623. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street. Miami,
Florida 33130. The personal
representative of the estate is Jack
Rubin, whose address is 66
Tedesco St., Marblehead.
Massachusetts 01945. The name
and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SER\ ICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87-36957 (29)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE oF
BERNADETTE JULOT,
Petitioner/Wife
and
DANIEL JULOT.
Respondent/H usband
TO: Mr. Daniel Julot
80 Spruce St. No 61
Stanford. Conn. 060
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for I
tion of Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a cop) "f
your written defenses, if Bit)
on Leonard Selkowtn. J I> at
torney for Petitioner, wh
dress is Suite 810 Bii
Building, 19 W. Flagler Si
Miami. Florida 33130, and file the
original with the clerk of tin
styled court on or before
September 25. 1987; other.
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four coo-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Fl
WITHIN ** 24th day of August, 1981
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
August 28. 1987.
Jack Rubin
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
BENJAMIN RUBIN
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: E. Seidl
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner
Leonard Selkowitz, J.D.
Suite 810 Biscayne Building
19 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 358-2900
17947 Au>f!-
September4. 11
For Legal Form8
Call 373-4605


Friday, August 28, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
('as.- No. 87-32774 (A -21
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL HOME LOAN MOR
TGAGE.CORPORATION,
Plaintiff
vs.
ALFREDO PINI, et ux.. et al..
Defendant*.
TO: ALFREDO PINI
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against ALFREDO
PINI, and all parties having
or claiming to have any right,
title or interest in the proper-
ty herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County. Florida:
Lot 38. Block 1. in LAKE
MARKS AT WESTWIND.
the plat of which was record-
ed in Plat Book 120, Page 50,
of the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
mi Stuart II Citlitz, Esq., At-
torney for Plaintiff, whose address
is Suite J14. 1670 Madruga
Avenue, ''oral Cables. Florida.
88146 on or In-fore September
25th, 1981, and file the original
with the clerk of this court either
re service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter.
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
i he complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 24th day of
August, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRISKER
As Clerk of the Court
Bj Barliara Rodriguez
' As Deputy Clerk
17948 August 28;
September 4.11,18, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-31098 CA 02
NOTICE OF ACTION
LINCOLN SERVICE
CORPORATION,
Plaintiff
vs.
VIRGINIA I. CLARK, et al..
I lefendants.
!" LINDA I. DE ATLEY
Residence Unknown
> <' I' ARK HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
in of Mortgage on the
a ins, lescribed property:
Lot 4J Block 3, of GRIPP-
ING BISCAYNE PARK
VIES, according to the
Plat thereof as recorded in
Plal Book .">. Page) the
Public Records of Dadel !oun
tj Florida
sen filed against yon and you
required to serve a cop) ol
your written defenses, if any. to it,
' eppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whoas addreas is Suit.-
214. 1670 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida, 88146 on or before
September \x. 198" and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before servic. M
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 14 day of August,
1987,
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
17981 August 21.28;
September 4, 11. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
thai the undersign.il, desiring to
engage bl business under the fic-
titious name NEW YORK SHIRT
>t 7226-7227 NW 7 Street. Miami.
Florida intends to register said
name with tne Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florid.
New York Wholesale Handbags,
Inc.
Joshua I). Manaster, 1' \
\ti rney for
New York Wholesale Handbag:-.
Inc
August 21 28
lietambsi I, 11. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-34781-15
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK.
AS TRUSTEE FOR THE DADE
COUNTY HOUSING FINANCE
AUTHORITY,
Plaintiff
vs.
PATRICK THOMAS
BLUBELLO, et ux.. et al.,
Defendants.
TO: PATRICK THOMAS
BLUBELLO and
DIANE M. BLUBELLO.
his wife
1592 Pirkle Road
Norcross. GA 30093
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of
Mortgage on the following
described property:
Lots 13. 14 and 15 less the
South 70 feet. Block 12.
SUNKIST GROVE,
according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 8. Page 49 of the
Public Records of Dade
County. Florida,
has been Bled against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any.
to it. on Stuart H. Citlitz.
Attorney for Plaintiff, whose
address is Suit.- 214, 1670
Madruga Avenue, (oral Cables.
Florida, 38146 on or before
September 11. 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either ln-l'ore service on
Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise
a default will In- entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the
leal of thi- Court this Id day of
August, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By T CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
17924 August 14. 21, 28;
September 4. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-34538 27
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United
States of America.
Plaintiff
VI
JON1 G DOLE, ei al.,
Defendants.
TO JON1 G DOLE
2719 N w 28rd Street
Forth Worth. Texas 76106
YOU ARK NOTIFIED thai an
action for Foreclosure of Mortfl
on the following described
prop.
Lot 2, Block 34, BENT
TREE CENTER, according
to the plat thereof, a> record-
ed in I'lat Hook 109 at l'..i I
B2 of the Public Records of
Dade County. Klorida.
has been bled against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it.
on Stuart H. Citlitz. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1670 UadrUge Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida, 88146 on or before
September 11, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either In-fore service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
then-alter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded m the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 7 day of August.
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By JOHN BRANDA
As Deputy Clerk
17921 August 14,21,28;
September 4.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, dcsinnc, to
engage in business under the fie
mious name ORDONEZ TILES at
72o SW 100Ct Circle Miami33174
intend U) register said name With
the Clerk of the Circuit Court ol
Dade Countv. Florida
ORDONEZ ENTERPRISES
INC
August 14,21.28;
Septembei
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87 4232
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MADELEINE LIGETI
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of MADELEINE
LIGETI. deceased. File Number
87 4232, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami, Florida. The personal
representative of the estate is
AGNES FREUND. whose address
is 6485 S.W. 52nd Street, Miami,
Florida 33155. The name and ad
dress of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON
TILS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the aluive court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have, Each claim must be m
writ inn and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall In-
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall In- stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
he described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
(his Notice of Administration
August 28, 1987.
ACNES FREUND
\- Personal Representative
of the Estate of
MADELEINE LIGETI
Deci
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
NELSON C. KESHEN. ESQ
8906 S \\ 87th Avenue Suite 209
Miami. Florida 38176
Telephone (806) 696-1688
17940 August 28;
September I, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOI S NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SHOPCEN III IN-
VESTMENTS at 1600 San Remo
Avenue, Suite 125, Coral liable--.
Florida 3314(1 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
SHOPCEN HI INVESTMENTS.
INC.
AND
PNRIII INVESTMENTS. INC
17919 August 14,21,28;
September 1.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name w* E S L E 1
FASHION, WESLEY SPORTS
WEAK, CES'T LA VIE at 4160
N W 7 St Suite 2(17. Miami, Fl
33126 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court I ounty, Florida
Tropical Storm. Inc.
i ner)
17946 Augi
September 1.11, 18, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-4774
Division 02
IN RE:ESTATE OF
VINCAS BITINAS.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration of
the estate of Vincas Bitinas,
deceased. File Number 87-4774, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
W. Flagler Street, Miami, FL
33130. The personal represen-
tative of the estate is Dalia N.
Plepys, whose address is 105
Dewberry, Lake Jackson. Texas
77566. The name and address of
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must Ik- In
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or Ins agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed,
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall In-
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall lie stated. If the
claim is secured the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
August 28, 1987.
Dalia N. Plepys
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Vincas Hitinas
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
HENRY M WAITZKIN
son 71st Street
I'd Box 41-4631
Miami. FL 33141-4681
Telephone: (8061
17949 August 28;
September i. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie-
t i t i o u s name T A I \
DISTRIBUTORS at 8075 S.W
107 Aw No, III Miami. Fla.
33173 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida
TARyl INOCALIXTO
Hii7."> s w 107 Ave
Miami. Fla
17915 August 7. 14,21.28, 1981
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-35990-01
IN RE The Marriage of
MARGARET!! R AMBROISE,
Petitioner,
and
E V E N S .1 E A N .! 0 S E P H
AMBROISE.
Respondent
TO: EVENS JEAN JOSEPH
AMBROISE
Residence unknown, you shall
Serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS
Attorney. 612 Northwest 12th
V.. Miami. Florida. 88186, and
file original with Court Clerk Ml or
before September 18, 1987, other
wise a default will Ik- entered
August 17 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
BY I CASAMAYOR
August 21 28;
September I, I
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-1954
Division 02
IN RE:ESTATE OF
ZOLTAN NAGY
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of ZOLTAN
NAGY. deceased. File Number
86-1954, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 W. Flagler Street.
Miami, FL. 33133. The personal
representative of the estate is
GABRIELLA NAGY AND
KLARA VOROS. whose address is
1114 Kendale Rd. North, Colum-
bus, Ohio 43220 and 20 Edmonton
Dr.. Willowdale. Ontario. Canada.
respectively. The name and ad-
dress of the personal represen-
tative'! attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON
TILS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state
men! of any claim or demand they
may have Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate tin- basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall In-
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall In- stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim tt) the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
1 late of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: August
21, 1987.
GABRIELLA NAGY
And KLARA VOROS
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ZOLTAN NAGY
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
EUGENE J WE1S3
io7 Lincoln Rd PUNK
Miami Reach. Fl. 33139
Telephone 305/584-4721
17930 August 21.28, 1987
NOTICE I'.NDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
tious name NACHO APART
ME NTS a I 14190 W. Dixie
Highway. No. Miami. Fl. 33161 in-
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Shirley Ash and Nigel Ash
Willard K. Splittstoesser. Esq.
Attorneys for Applicants
13122 West Dixie Highway. Suite
B
North Miami. Florida 33161
17905 August 7, 14.21.27. 19S7
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage Ul business under the fic-
titious name DELTA IMPORTED
FLOWERS at 7162 N W 60th
Street, Miami. Florida 88166 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
\ ,V S FLOWER
EXCHANGE, IN(
Bj Keith MacMurche.
I'resident
17848 Augv
September 1,11 i-
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87-33133 (29)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE
LIBIA E. PIZARRO.
a/k/a LIBIA E. GARCIA
and
JOSE GABRIEL GARCIA.
TO: JOSE GABRIEL
GARCIA
Carrera 47 No. 5.
E/57No. 1001 B
Cali, Colombia
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on EMILIO
C PASTOR, PA., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is I'll I
155 South Miami Avenue.
Miami. Florida 33130, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
September 4th, 1987; otherwise
default will Ix- entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com
plaint or petition
This notice shall lie published
ones each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
tin- 29th day of July, 1987
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
1 lade County. Florida
By: John Hranda
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EMILIO C. PASTOR, P.A.
I'll I 166 South Miami Ave
Miami. Florida 88180
Telephone: 372-0088
Attorney for Petitioner
17902 August 7. 14. 21. 28. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-14165 FC (08)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage of
BARBARA HYLDIGATH
ABRAHAMS,
Petitioner,
and
A L T Y V E R N A N I) I E
ABRAHAMS,
Respondent.
TO Mr. Alty F. Abraham!
26 Pembroke Hall Drive
Kingston. Jamaica W.I.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED thai an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has beei
filed against you and you are re
quired to serve a copj ofyoui
ten defense
ROBERTM JASINSK1 ES torne) for Petitioner
- The Rom P
M 2301 Collins Avenue Mian
Beach, Florida 33139, and file Un-
original with the clerk of the
styled court on or before
September is. 1987; otherwise a
default will In- entered against you
for the relief demanded in the cum
plaint or petition
This notice shall Ik- published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and tin- seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 12 day of August. 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade Counts Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
ROBERT M JA8INSKI, ESQ
The Roney Plaza. Suite M-8
2301 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 88189
17926 August 21,28;
September 4. 11,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
thai the undersigned, desiring to
engage m business under the fic-
titious name Coconut (irove Stain
ad Glass al 2928 S W. :i Court
Coconut Grove, Florida 88188 in
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of (he Circuit Coin I of
I lade I 'ounty. Florida
Barbara Schuman
.loan C. Tegiai
Aus:
1. 11. 1987


Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 28, 1987
i'
Reiterating Boycott Denial,
Safeway Says It Buys From Israel]
Representatives from government and the
world of music join in congratulating
Mstislav Rostropovich (second from right),
music director of the National Symphony Or-
chestra and internationally renowned cello-
virtuoso, upon being named 'Man of the Year'
by the Jewish National Fund of Washington,
D.C., at a recent black-tie dinner at the
Mayflower Hotel in the nation's capital. Join-
ing in the festivities are (left to right). Richard
N. Perle, former Assistant Secretary of
Defense and keynote speaker at the event; Eric
Fox, former president. National Symphony
Orchestra; David Lloyd Kreeger'. farmer
president, American Opera Society;
Rostropovich, and Joseph Wolinshy, tm
dent, JNF of Washington.
Day School Won't Admit Boy Whose
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Safeway Stores, Inc.,
reiterating its claim of in-
nocence of 449 alleged viola-
tions of the U.S. law against
boycotting Israel, said
Wednesday that it has con-
sistently purchased Israeli
products.
In addition, the Safeway
statement said that company
officers including chairman
and chief executive Peter
Magowan "have demonstrated
strong personal commitment
to the State of Israel and have
received many awards from
American Jewish
organizations."
The Northern California
Jewish Bulletin reported Aug.
7 that Magowan "has a per-
sonal track record of support
for the Jewish State,'* in-
cluding the hosting of lun-
cheona for visiting Israeli
dignitaries and visiting Israel
twice with groups of
businesspeople.
IN THE STATEMENT,
Magowan noted that Safe J
has bought and sold rX*!
of dollars worth ,,flsr37|
ducts'" Safeway" a
counsel Bernat Kosner 21
that the company "hasal
history of resisting
demands to participial
boycotts wherever thev tail
place and regardless of'thehj
tensity of pressure "
According to Magowan tJ
boycott charges by the V $ I
Commerce Department's Ofl
fice of Antiboycott ('ompliaid
involve 10 supermarkets J
Saudi Arabia and Kuwait thai
Safeway has never owned bj
with which Safeway has'hail
service agreements. J
If found guilty by a CoJ
merce Department add
ministrative law judge!
Safeway could be fined mor|
than $4 million or >= 1 (i.ihki perl
violation. Rosner said "poten-l
tial fines are ludicrous, andi
intend to defend ou
vigorously."
Mother Is Not t
Halachically
Jewish
AMSTERDAM (JTA) -
A Jewish day school here has
refused to admit a 13-year-old
boy because his mother is riot
halachically Jewish.
The board of the Jewish
Maimonides Lyceum, the only
Jewish secondary school in
Amsterdam, has stated it will
not admit Aram Bruckner for
the upcoming school year
despite his parents' desire to
give the boy a Jewish educa-
tion. The school denied
Bruckner admission last year
also. The boy's father, Robert
Bruckner, said he will present
his son for admission despite
the board's statement. He has
already initiated legal pro-
ceedings to force his son's
admission.
The father filed suit in the
Amsterdam Lower District
Court which ruled in favor of
the school. He then appealed
to the Amsterdam Higher
District Court which ruled that
the boy must be admitted
because barring him would be
tantamount to racial
discrimination, a punishable
offense under Dutch law.
The court also ruled that for
each day the boy is not admit-
ted, the school must pay a fine
of about $500.
The Maimonides Lyceum ap-
pealed the second ruling to the
Supreme Court which will not
hear the case for at least a
month. In the meantime, the
school has filed for an injunc-
tion to reduce the fines.
Local press has given con-
siderable attention to the
Bruckner story, depicting it as
an example of Orthodox
Jewish rigidity. One Amster-
dam daily ran an interview
with Aram in which he said he
wanted to attend the Jewish
day school because he ex-
perienced much anti-Semitism
during the six years he attend-
ed a village elementary school
in the province of Voralsberg
in Austria.
CELLULAR
PROFESSIONALS
The GE Carfone.
We make the technology affordable.
Its that simple. ^J/^
authorized agent of
BellSouth Mobility
CF-1000
18 Button keypad
10 Number memory
Last number redial
24 Digit dialing
Electronic lock
Back lit LCD di
* 3 YEAR
-WARRANTY-'
This one time only, incredible
deal, has been put together
by Cellular Depot as a
market introduction offer.
Phones are brand new and
have a three year warranty.
This phone actually retails
for $999.00 without
installation.
Stop by or Call
(305) 625-4646 625-5445
5481 N.W. 159th Street
Miami, Florida 33014
Plus $75.00 for Installation and Antenna Q,,nm.
for Be., South Mob,ly to oZ^ZlZl^lT "'


Full Text
Paga-4-A Taa Jawiaa flocidianfTriday, August 28, 1987
Jewish Leaders Pushing
To Be First in Line
Pope John Paul II. who will be coming to
Miami Sept. 10 and 11. may not know it. but
suddenly he is a matinee idol. Among Jews,
that is we wouldn't presume to speak for
the faithful of his Church.
American Jewish leaders are tripping all
over themselves, acting as if they were in a
theatre in which a prankster has just
shouted "Fire!." trampling those ahead of
them to get first in line for the Sept. 1
meeting with the Pope in the Vatican.
For the Sept. 11 meeting with the Jews in
Miami, there has been, we are meant to
understand, no such chaos, since, according
to Rabbi Solomon Schiff. executive vice
president of the Greater Miami Rabbinical
Association, and chief chaplain of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Chaplain-
cy Service, just who will be privileged to at-
tend, and in what capacity, has been ordain-
ed bv "national."
We are not quite sure who '"national" is.
And while we share the relief that the
meeting here has not taken on the dimen-
sions of a teen-age crowd crushing in upon
their latest rock obsession, we fault the com-
ing event here with the same liability as the
Sept. 1 event in the Vatican.
Where Are Our Intellectuals?
As we see it. there are altogether too
many rabbis and too many Federation in-
dividuals, with not even a representative
smattering of Jewish intellectuals not af-
filiated either way. Were there a far larger
body of Jews permitted to attend these
meetings, then the number of our spiritual
and Federation leaders would be as welcome
as anyone else.
Restricted as the representation must be.
their numbers are outsized and non-
representative. Where are our college pro-
fessors? Where are our scientists and ar-
tists? Where are our leading philosophers
and humanitarians? Is all of Judaism em-
braced only by those who serve in
synagogue pulpits and on the boards of
Federations? Are these our spokesmen
exclusively?
Take the case of Nobel Prize-winning mar-
Urologist Elie Wisel. who has had a long-
standing invitation from the Vatican to meet
with Pope John Paul. We suspect that
Wiesel and the Pope, in a private discussion,
would have much in common.
Ideological Shortsightedness
They could have covered more ground
significant to the concerns of Jews
everywhere, particularly Wiesel's reaction,
say, to the Pope's private meeting with Kurt
Waldheim. than all of those Jewish
representatives due in the Vatican Sept. 1.
Not to mention Miami Sept. 11.
And what did these representatives do?
They asked Wisel to get out of their way
not to come while they would be in the
Vatican. In their view, Wiesel would be an
irrelevant intruder, although it is hardly
likely that his meeting with the Pope would
have been combined with theirs. They could
have had the stage to themselves anyway.
This ideological shortsightedness is an of-
fense to the best interests of Jews. Worse, it
smacks of rank elitism, if not frank
politicization and absolutely certain
sycophantism. For Shame.
JNF's 'Tree Terrorism*
A wave of fires is sweeping Israe
are devastating Jewish National
Fires
Fund
forests to such an extent that the JNF has
been forced to launch a campaign for finan-
cial assistance
Some $2 r >n is needed to replace trees
that have ju oeen burned, and in addition,
there is an urgent need for $5 million to buy
fire-fighting equipment against future
occurrences.
What has been established is that much of
these disasters constitutes a new kind of
"tree terrorism." Some two months ago.
three boys from the village of Bar Ta'ah
were stopped on suspicion that they were ar-
sonists. Questioning revealed that they in-
deed were responsible.
Others have since also been caught and
identified. The common ground among them
is that they were motivated in their acts of
arson "on nationalistic grounds."
So far. what that means, is not quite clear.
The Jewish National Fund insists that those
Newsgathering
detained do not constitute an effort to iden-
tify Arabs as the main agents of the arson.
In fact, says David Angel, a JNF
spokesman, many JNF workers are Arabs
who perform trusted and important tasks.
Then is disaffection among some Jewish
Israelis turning them into enemies of the
Jewish State?
The JNT's Martyrs' Forest itself, planted
to honor the memory of Jews killed in the
Holocaust, recently suffered a forest fire.
Was it set by other youths "on nationalistic
grounds"? Then we have come a long way
from the most cherished principles of the
JNF itself in helping to found that state.
What's Behind the Decision-Making?
By JIM SHIPLEY
It has long been a question to
ponder: Is there less news on
weekends because there is less
happening, or is there less
news on weekends because
news staffs are cut back come
Friday evening? The broader
question then is. I guess, is
news news or is it news when
the media decides it is news*
McCluhan stated a genera-
tion ago that the medium is the
message. Perhaps. But we are
a much more sophisticated au-
dience today. And news is in
the eye of the beholder. Not
the audience, but the newsper-
son or their assignment editor.
THE DECISION of what to
broadcast, what to print, what
to tape, is made every day. I
have a friend who is a widely-
read syndicated columnist. lie
claims that the bias in news
reporting is not with the an-
chors or the writers but rather
what he euphemistically calls
the "gatekeepers" -those
folks who determine what
stories will or will not be
covered, who will or will not be
interviewed, and how much
time will be devoted to a given
story.
Are there patterns? Well.
the close alliance with the
Luce family and international
oil interests has been long-
standing. Who but Time
Magazine would publish a
cover wherein the dove of
peace would be a bloody corpse
on the Star of David? "
I woke up one day and realiz-
ed that everything coming into
my house was influenced by
the Luce interests. I read
Time. Sports Illustrated and
Fortune. That stopped the day
the story on the Lebanese
massacre of Palestinians was
so distortedly reported.
NBC SEEMS to take par-
ticular Jelight in trashing
Israel. David Sarnoff. the
Jewish founder of RCA and
the network, must be spinning
in his grave. Who could be
behind the constant NBC anti-
Israel reporting? Jews control
the media, don't we?
A few weeks ago, in the Cen-
tral Florida city of Eatonville.
they had a centennial celebra-
tion. Eatonville is. of course,
the oldest chartered black city
in America. The Ku Klux Klan
announced that they would at-
tend the celebration and
march in the parade. Their
stated purpose was to com-
mend Eatonville on i t-ing a
segregated city. It is n : This
did not deter the Klan
So, came the Saturday i if the
parade, and they were there:
three, count "em. 'href
Klansmen. The press which
had ballyhooed the promised
Klan appearance for a month
had enough personnel in atten-
dance to have a halt-dozen
reporters assigned to even
Klan member. They were all
dutifully interviewed, taped
and quoted. Who made this
decision and why?
JUST TWO weeks before
the Eatonville parade, the
Klan had a "membership"
meeting in a small town up in
the scrub oak and palmetto
pine of North Volusia County
This time, there were 30 Klan
people in attendance Again.
the press outnumbered the
Klan, and the story was
number one on all three Orlan-
do TV stations.
What would have happened
if the press did not show up at
the "membership" meeting.
What if. during the Eatonville
parade, the cameras had turn-
ed away from the Klan
Coatiaaed on Pag* 13-A
Fred K Shochet
Eoitof ana Put>icnr
Jewish Floridian
Suzanne Shochet
Executive Editor
William T Bre*er
Director 0< Ot>ration$
t
Joan C Teglas
Director ot Advertising
Friday, August 28,1967
Volume 60
3 ELUL 5747
Number 35


Friday, August 28, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Yuli Edelstein Never Set Out To Become A Symbol
4>
r
.
By SUSAN BASS
Yuli Edelstein never set out
to become a symbol of the
struggle for Jews to leave the
Soviet Union. Sitting in the liv-
ing room of his apartment in
Alon Shvut, a settlement in
Gush Etzion between
Bethlehem and Hebron, Edels-
\n explained: "Of course I
lid not want to be sent to the
prison camp. All I wanted to
do was to sit at home and drink
coffee with my wife. But I had
[no choice."
Edelstein first applied for
rmission to leave the Soviet
nion in 1978, at the age of 20.
t that time, the Soviets refus-
him permission because he
id not have the required
umber of close relatives liv-
g in Israel. He was expelled
om the university, and began
working as a manual laborer
mixd street cleaner.
[ IT WAS in the same year
:4hat Edelstein began to study
Hebrew. A gifted and
Motivated language student,
fee made rapid progress. The
Ibllowing year, Edelstein mov-
d from Chernovich to
Wioscow, where he joined a
Hebrew study circle. He soon
"* egan to teach Hebrew to
roups of students, and also to
Participate in a Moscow
aebrew seminar called Dibur,
speech.
Speaking fully fluent and
poquent Hebrew, Edelstein
called the demanding level
f this seminar: "The first
ling we did was to forbid the
eaking of Russian there. We
ad many visitors from abroad
Bfto were surprised by the
high level of Hebrew and by
the questions asked and
iKscussed there."
S (>n the evening of August 24,
19S4. the KGB searched the
ielstein's apartment and 11
^ys later arrested Edelstein
trumped-up charges of
ssessing a prohibited drug
" keeping narcotics without
special permit. In his final
fctement to the court during
t trial, Edelstein declared. "I
not plead guilty to any of
i charges. I did not keep any
igs in my home. If the court
vertheless finds me guilty I
st that my God and my peo-
*
'I did not want to be sent to prison camp. All I
wanted was to sit home and drink coffee with my wife.'
pie will help me on the long
journey which I am destined to
make before reaching my
homeland."
DESPITE THE paucity of
evidence against him, the
court sentenced Edelstein to
three years in prison camp. He
was sent to a camp near the
Mongolian border where most
inmates were criminals (as op-
posed to political prisoners).
Edelstein recalls that during
the early part of his imprison-
ment "the camp inmates were
encouraged by the administra-
tion to beat me and to make
conditions impossible for me.
Eventually, however, many of
them came to the conclusion
that I was not the man the of-
ficers had made me out to be
and their attitude toward me
improved."
Edelstein recalls that fellow
camp inmates gradually began
to take an interest in him and
often asked him if he felt
angry at the government or at
the KGB. He replied that his
situation was much the same
as theirs: "You are here
because you stole 50 rubles,
and I because I wanted to
make aliya to Israel."
On January 29, 1986, Edels-
tein fell while working in the
camp, suffering multiple frac-
tures to his legs and pelvis and
a ruptured urethra. No
medical treatment was given
him for several weeks, and it
wasn't until July that he was
transferred to a hospital for
surgery. His wife, Tanya, was
told that he probably would
not survive, for as a result of
his ordeal his weight had drop-
ped 55 pounds to a weight of
99 pounds.
TANYA traveled across
Russia to visit Yuli in the
hospital, which involved a
seven-hour airplane flight, six
hours on a train and a walk of
four kilometers. She was per-
mitted to see him for less than
10 minutes. Tanya recalls the
emotional support she receiv-
ed throughout the ordeal, from
people she knew and from
many she did not know. Most
important to her at the time
was the knowledge that people
were "praying for him every
day in Moscow."
After his initial recovery
from surgery, Edelstein was
transferred to a prison camp in
Siberia, where he was sent to
work in a factory assembly
line. Because of his weakened
condition and his low
resistance to infection, he
became ill and was hospitalized
for a month in the spring of
1987. The government denied
repeated requests for his early
release.
But in May, 1987, Tanya was
informed in Moscow that
Yuli's sentence would be
reduced by four months, and
that he was about to be releas-
ed. On May 4, Israel's In-
dependence Day, the day of his
Continued on Page 12-A
Overwhelming Loneliness
Sends Many To Seek Telephone Advice
By RICK RAEL
"An overwhelming sense of
loneliness. That's the primary
reason why people in Israel
decide to use our services,"
says Moshe Kron, director of
Jerusalem's telephone hotline.
ERAN, which provides emo-
tional support to people in
need.
"This loneliness can be ex-
pressed in various ways and is
not confined only to socially
isolated types. A wife who is
unable to communicate openly
issues of today. I think Israeli
society is going through its
own growing pains. Socially
and politically it's trying to
find its own identity and that
'We hear from army-bound
who are a bit scared.'
A young girl gets advice from
hotline in Jerusalem.
with her husband may ask for
help; a teenage boy unhappy
with his relationship with his
parents, or perhaps a young
office worker who just needs
to unload about a boss. The
common denominator is a dif-
ficulty in reaching those near
to them."
Founded in 1971 when the
first branch was established in
the capital, ERAN now has six
additional centers throughout
the country, including a
recently opened office in the
rural northern Galil. In a
typical month, ERAN will
receive between 3.000 and
4,000 telephone calls that
Kron identifies as "calls of
distress."
IF I had to note one signifi-
cant change over the last
decade." says Kron, "I'd say
that Israeli callers have been
getting younger and younger.
Although their problems tend
to refle< : the universal dif-
ficulties of youth getti'
along with parents ai
teachers, establishing peer
friendships young people
seem more influenced by the
leaves young people more
vulnerable. They desperately
look for direction from
society."
In direct response to the in-
creasing volume of calls from
young people, ERAN's Tel
Aviv branch has introduced a
special hotline exclusively for
juveniles. Over 200 calls are
coming in a month.
"We hear from 17-and-18
year-olds who are about to
enter the army and are secret-
ly a bit scared about leaving
home and having to adjust to
army life, and there are those
with problems related to
pressure to achieve in school.
Passing graduate examina-
tions, or 'bagrut.' is crucial for
many young Israelis and we
often receive calls from youth
who express their fear of
failure." explains a volunteer
in the Tel A' Iv office.
HOW DO Israeli adults cope
with the numerous stresses
and strains of a society beset
with a host of formidable pro-
blems? Whal prompts the in-
Continued on Page 14-A


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EC0M06O8M_VLK91D INGEST_TIME 2013-06-24T18:01:25Z PACKAGE AA00010090_03056
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES