The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03055

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
Jewl]hi Floi* idliaini
60 No. 34
Miami Friday, August 21,1987
*ia!L5/
Price 55 Cents
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Jews Mount
Opposition
To Bork
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JTA/WZN New* Photo
VO-HOUR TALK: U.S. Envoy Charles Hill
V meets with Israel's Prime Minister Yit-
k Shamir in Jerusalem last week for talks
ch lasted more than two hours. Shamir
unavailable for comment, but Hill, who is
mtive assistant to U.S. Secretary of State
woe Shultz, would only say that he gained
*eres Warns:
Reckon With Anti-Lavi Sentiment
'useful insights' and that a 'whole range of
problems' was discussed. Hill, who also met
for similarly lengthy talks with Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres, was in Israel to
pressure the government into getting the stall-
ed Middle East peace process moving again
and to give up on the Lavi jet-fighter project.
By JUDITH COLP
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Opposition to the nomination
of Judge Robert Bork to the
Supreme Court is mounting in
the Jewish community. The
Jewish War Veterans last
week become the fifth Jewish
organization to voice its
protest.
"Contrary to the Ad-
ministration rhetoric surroun-
ding Bork's nomination, the
issue is one of ideology and the
Supreme Court is not well-
served by extremist posi-
tions," said the statement
issued by Edwin Goldwasser,
the group's national
commander.
The statement by the Jewish
War Veterans, a mainstream
organization, suggests the ex-
tent to which Bork's nomina-
tion is meeting opposition in
the Jewish community. Wor-
ried about Bork's stand on
minority and women's rights
and church-state issues, some
Jewish groups which do not
traditionally oppose presiden-
tial appointments, consider
Continued on Page 14-A
20 Vow
They Saw No Evidence Of
Sandinista Anti-Semitism
[By DAVID LANDAU
tUSALEM (JTA) -
|lgn Minister Shimon
said Wednesday (Aug.
it the Israel government
"have to take account"
\he latest, toughest
lean warnings not to go
with the Lavi warplane
.
es spoke on Israel Radio
wake of a formal call by
[.S. State Department for
to "terminate" the Lavi
im.
the Foreign Minister and
Party leader has hither-
m counted among the
jrters of the project
he always stressed that
jfense budget must be in-
if the project is to go
rd. Peres has argued
the Lavi would require a
tion in living standards
part of the Israeli public
that this is worthwhile
the importance of the
kct to Israel's entire
tological infrastructure.
REMARKS, however.
Inside
?Sharon Defends
Lebanon War...Page 2-A
?Jews Who Were
pke Nazis... Page 5A
'iesel Charms Them
Brazil. Page 7-A
late Dep't.:
Saudi Sale. Page 9-A
>lish Jews In
liami Exhibit...Page 1-B
seemed to imply that in the
face of this firm and public
American position, the Israel
Cabinet will have to think long
and hard about approving the
project's continuation.
American urgings against
the project were intensified
Wednesday. Secretary of
State George Shultz sent per-
sonal messages to Premier
Yitzhak Shamir, Peres,
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin. Finance Minister
Moshe Nissim, and Minister of
Economic Coordination Gad
Yaacobi, urging them to sup-
port the abandonment of the
Lavi project by Sunday's
Cabinet meeting.
Rabin, in a TV interview
Wedneday night, said it was
"inconceivable" to him that
the Cabinet might decide to
continue with the project
within the present budgetary
Continued on Page 2-A
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) A
group of 20 American Jews
who spent two weeks on a fact-
finding tour of Nicaragua with
Witness for Peace a
Washington-based, interfaith
organization committed to
nonviolence, as well as in-
dependence from the
Nicaraguan government
report that they were unable
to substantiate charges of
systemic anti-Semitism by the
Sandinista government.
The Jewish Witness for
Peace delegation, comprising
men and women ages 24-55,
was in Nicaragua March 10-24
in order, according to a report
submitted to the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency, "to learn
more about education, the
economy, religion, the in-
frastructure, health care and
political expression in
Nicaragua under a Sandinista
government; observe the im-
pact of U.S. foreign policy on
Continued on Page 11-A
PLO's Offices in U.S.
Blind to Terrorism Against U.S. Citizens
WASHINGTON "It's
unacceptable that PLO
representatives openly
operate an 'information office'
in our nation's capital, while
American citizens are
murdered by the PLO in ter-
rorist incidents across the
globe."
This is the opinion of
Florida's Sen. Lawton Chiles
(D.), a primary sponsor of the
1987 Anti-Terrorism Act to
which six additional Senators
added their support by the end
of July.
Other signatories include
Sena. Bob Graham (D.. Fla.).
Frank Lautenberg (D., N.J.),
Howard Metzenbaum CD.,
Ohio), Robert Dole (R.. Kan-
sas), Charles Grassley (R.,
Iowa) and Rudy Boschwitz (R.,
Minn.).
THE LEGISLATION,
m hich has also been filed in the
Mouse of Representatives,
Sen. Lawton Chiles
makes it unlawful for the PLO
to maintain an office anywhere
in the United States or for
anyone in the U.S. to receive
or spend PLO funds.
"Since its inception 23 years
ago, the PLO continues to be
the major force in interna-
tional terrorism," Chiles
explained.
One of the PLO's most re-
cent atrocities. Chiles noted,
was the brutal murder of I.eon
Klinghoffer, a wheelchair-
hound passenger aboard the
Achille Lauro. Chiles added
that the PLO reelected Kl-
inghoffer's murderer, Abu Ab-
has. to a leadership position on
the PLO's 20-man Executive
Committee at the recent
Algiers Palestine National
Council meeting.
"While our country shares
an abhorrence for terrorism.
we also share a love for
Continued on Page 14-A


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 21, 1987
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AP/Wide World Photo
WAR TALK: Former Israeli Defense Minister Ariel Sharon uses
a pointer as he explains the 1982 war in Lebanon during a lecture calling it a soul-wrenching experience. Behind Sharon are two
at Tel Aviv University. Sharon broke a lengthy silence about the maps of Lebanon with arrows marking the Israeli Army's inva-
controversial war last week, insisting it was a success, while also sion route.
Sharon's Defense:
Cabinet, on Daily Basis, Directed Lebanon War
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Lebanon war was a "great suc-
cess ... a war of salvation .
the most carefully pre-planned
and implemented war in
Israel's history." Moreover, it
was directed on a daily basis
by the Cabinet, which was fully
privy to every move made,
Ariel Sharon declared in a
prepared four-hour address to
a VIP audience at Tel Aviv
University Tuesday night
(Aug. 11).
Sharon's speech, in which he
quoted extensively from the
minutes of Cabinet and
military staff meetings and
briefings of senior army of-
ficers, was intended to "tell
the truth and clear my name."
But it has been followed by the
reopening of the Lebanon war
debate, with renewed sharp at-
tacks on Sharon and his
veracity.
INTRODUCING Sharon to
the packed audience of senior
government officials, senior
army officers and academics,
Maj. Gen. (Res.) Aharon Yariv,
head of Tel Aviv University's
*Jewisti fkridlictr
Phone: (305) 373-4605
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SUBSCRIPTION RATES: In ad-
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By Mail $1.45 per copy.
Jaffee Center for Strategic
Studies, which sponsored the
meeting, said that Sharon had
come under fierce attack dur-
ing a JCSS a symposium on
the Lebanon war two months
ago, "and we thought it only
proper to invite him now to
present his case."
But JCSS sources said that
Sharon himself had decided to
break his five-year virtual
silence and had insisted on his
right to appear, requesting the
widest possible press
coverage.
Observers suggested that
Sharon might now want to
present his case in view of
possible early Knesset elec-
tions and his possible bid to
head the Likud.
Sharon, who entered the
campus via a side gate to avoid
a crowd of anti-Sharon
demonstrators, said that the
plans to attack Beirut had
been prepared years before
the 1982 start of the war (wen
Ezer Weizman was Defense
Minister) in what had been
code-named "Operation
Oranim."
HE INSISTED that the
Cabinet, in 92 sessions (some
twice a day), had been briefed
on every new move made by
the Israel Defense Force.
Many critics, including former
Cabinet ministers, have claim-
ed that the government had
been misled by Sharon, then
Defense Minister, who had
reported many of his moves
only after they had been
implemented.
Opening his lengthy address,
which left no time for the
many critical questions ex-
pected from people intimately
connected with the war,
Sharon said: "I did not come
here to respond to various
charges. I have come to state
the truth, to tell things as they
were, for the first time, on the
fifth anniversary of the expul-
sion of the PLO terrorists
from Beirut." He said the PLO
expulsion had been the "high
point and major objective of
the war."
Sharon said the war was a
"war of salvation, and I am
proud to have been one of its
organizers, a war against our
main enemy the Palestinian
terrorism that has been
fighting us for 100 years."
Perspiring heavily in a hot
auditorium, Sharon went into
minute details of some moves
during the fighting, with a
minute-by-minute report of
what he had said during
various meetings and what he
claimed had been said to him.
FORMER CHIEF of Staff
Mordechai Gur said im-
mediately after Sharon's ad-
dress that his lecture had been
"full of lies and half-truths."
Weizman, who Sharon said
had prepared a plan for the in-
vasion of Beirut, said: "Sharon
is famous for his inaccuracy."
Weizman said Sharon had
possibly laid himself open to
criminal prosecution for hav-
ing read in public parts of the
minutes of Cabinet and
general staff sessions. But
Rafael Eitan, Chief of Staff
during the war, said last
Wednesday he had checked the
minutes referred to by Sharon
and had a different version.
Observers commented
Wednesday morning that
Sharon had appeared intent on
spreading the blame for the
Lebanon war as widely as
possible and ensuring that
none of the decision-makers at
that time could claim they did
not know what was going on.
YET, Arye Naor, the
Cabinet Secretary at the time,
said Sharon had overlooked
the fact that at the Cabinet
meeting on the eve of the war,
from whose minutes Sharon
quoted, the Cabinet had
ratified an invasion of only 40
kilometers inside Lebanon.
Naor said the former
Defense Minister had made
"selected use" of what he
claimed were stenographic
records of Cabinet and staff
meetings and conferences with
senior army officers to
strengthen the claims he has
frequently made that the
Cabinet agreed with his
"defense conception," on
which the war had been based.
"That is incorrect," Naor
said. "The Cabinet never
discussed his conception
(ousting the PLO from
Lebanon and setting up a pro-
Israel Maronite Christian
Continued on Page 16-A
Israel Must
Reckon With
Lavi Feelings
Continued from Page 1-A
framework. That dec
would be "impossible to imple-
ment There simply will not
be the money," he said.
Such a decision would mean
"the kind of cutbacks in the
IDF's strength, including that
of the Air Force, that 1 doubt
whether there would be any
need for a Lavi in the Air
Force any more ..."
RABIN APPEARED to im-
ply that he would feel forced to
resign if the Cabinet took this
course, though he did not say
so specifically.
He said the budgetary short-
fall was around $220* million
and the state not the
already truncated defense
budget must provide it if the
Lavi project was to continue.
Rabin indicated that he did Dot
realistically see any possibility
of this sum in fact being pro-
vided by higher taxation or
further cuts in other (non-
defense) government
spending.
Meanwhile, the Knesset's
prime committee, the joint
panel of the Foreign Affairs
and Finance Committees, has
decided not to reopen its
debate on the Lavi until after
the Cabinet has made its deci-
sion. The decision came from
Finance Committee Chairman
Avraham Shapira (Aguda
Yisrael), despite pressure from
Foreign Affairs Committee
Chairman Abba Eban (Labor)
to reopen the debate and call
for a new vote.
In a previous vote, a large
majority of the joint commit-
tees 22 to 6 supported the
Lavi. It was this, in the view of
many observers, that pro-
mpted the U.S. State Depart
ment to go public with its for-
thright opposition to the
warplane project.
It's Blackman Again
NEW YORK -(JTA l -
Julius Blackman of San Fran
cisco has been reelected presi-
dent of the Association of
Hebrew Free Loans.
?outhgate JLo-w-ei*s
Hotels & Apartments
'Waterfront Rental Apartments"
900 West Ave. On The Bay
Miami Beach, Fla.
672-2412
Pool & Shuffleboard
Restaurant a
Lounge
1 & 2 Yr. Leases Available
Marine and Fishing Pier
Planned social activities
to fill your hours happily
FURN. & UNFURN. EFFICIENCY
FURN. & UNFURN. 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH
Beauty Parlor on Premises
,
'
">


Trudeau Asked To Explain
Opposition to Nazis' Prosecution
Hy JTA Srrncrs
MONTREAL A prominent Canadian Jewish leader called
Friday on former Premier Pierre Elliott Trudeau to explain
"why he opposes prosecution of Nazi war criminals living in
Canada."
Frank Dimant, executive vice president of B'nai B'rith
Canada, said in a statement here that it is time to end "the great
Canadian cover-up" of Nazi war criminals, and let the public
know what was done to find and prosecute suspected Nazis.
Trudeau has been accused by Alti Rodal, author of a semi-
secret report on Canada's immigration policy, that he privately
vetoed taking legal action against suspected Nazi war criminals
in Canada.
ISRAEL'S IRAN
ROLE MINIMIZED
WASHINGTON A former consultant to the National
Security Council who first explored the possibility of making
contact with Iranian officials that eventually led to the nation-
wide scandal, said Friday that Iran initiated the proposal to buy
arms from the United States.
Michael Ledeen. speaking before the Heritage Foundation, a
conservative think-tank, greatly downplayed Israel's role in the
Iran arms sales. He said the Israel government was deeply divid-
ed over the advisability of selling arms, and simply served as a
conduit for the U.S.
"Israel did, as far as I know, what we asked them to do.
Israel had no leverage over the United States in this matter. It's
hard to imagine that they could have any. Iran is a serious
geopolitical issue for us (the U.S.), and would be a serious issue
for us with or without Israel," said Ledeen, who testified closed-
door before the Senate-House committees investigating the
Iran/Contra affair.
CONTROVERSIAL PLAY
ABOUT HOLOCAUST
LONDON A public reading of the controversial Holocaust
play, "Perdition," was given Monday in Edinburgh, Scotland.
British playwright Jim Allen's work caused a widely
reported controversy in January, when it was pulled from per-
formance at the Royal Court Theatre here two days before its
premiere. It also has been rejected by other theaters here, in
Dublin, Edinburgh and Manchester.
Leading historians slammed it as a travesty of the truth and
a malicious piece of anti-Zionist propaganda like that peddled for
many years by the Soviet Union.
The author has dismissed most of the criticisms, and blames
the controversy on the power of the Zionist "establishment."
The play bases its allegation of Zionist-Nazi collaboration on
an idiosyncratic interpretation of desperate attempts by Jewish
leaders to "buy" lives in Hungary in exchange for trucks and
other material needed by the Germans.
FOUR JDL PLEAD
GUILTY TO CHARGES
NEW YORK Three Jewish Defense League leaders who
pleaded guilty last Thursday (Aug. 13) to federal charges in con-
nection with terrorist bombings face up to 20 years' imprison-
ment and $25,000 in fines.
The three, all New Yorkers, are Victor Vancier, who said he
resigned as JDL national chairman in November, and Jay Cohen
and Murray Young, JDL board members. They are free on $1
million bond each.
A fourth defendant, Sharon Katz of New York, could spend
three years in prison and pay a $5,000 fine after pleading guilty
to carrying a teargas bomb into a Sept. 2 performance at Lincoln
Center here of a Soviet troupe, the Moiseyev Dance Company.
Four thousand spectators were evacuated, and 20 were injured.
She is free on $100,000 bond.
The other three admitted responsiblity for at least five other
bombings over the past three years and a scam to divert to JDL
money raised ostensibly on behalf of New York Gov. Mario
Cuomo.
Rudolf Hess, Former Hitler
Deputy, Dead in Spandau, 93
BONN (JTA) Rudolf Hess, Hitler's former deputy,
died Monday in a British Military Hospital in West Berlin.
The 93-year-old Hess was the sole remaining prisoner in
Spandau Prison there.
HE PARACHUTED into Scotland in 1941 and was
captured. His reasons for the jump have remained a
mystery. He was convicted and sentenced to life imprison-
ment at the Nuremberg war crimes trials in 1947.
Last year, Chancellor Helmut Kohl sent a personal
pledge to the leaders of the Big Four wartime powers to
pardon Hess, who had been hospitalized. Kohl's bid to
"mercifully release the prisoner into the bosom of his fami-
ly" met with criticism by many, including the head of
Poland's Commission for the Investigation of Nazi Crimes.
However, Kohl's plea was an echo of many letters and
rallies in West Germany over the years calling for Hess'
release.
Friday, August 21, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
An estimated 8,000 ultra-Orthodox Jews turn
out in a mass demonstration protesting the
screening of movies in Jerusalem on Friday
MMntnp. They maintain this causes the
.ITA/WZN New* Photo
desecration of the Sabbath. The demonstra-
tion, and a counter-demonstration of secular
citizens, had to be broken up by tear gas.
New Wire Service Book Details Barbie Trial in Lyon
PARIS (JTA) "The
Barbie Trial: Agence France-
Presse Tells the Story" is the
title of the first book ever to be
written by the French wire
service Agence France-Presse
(AFP). Published by Hachette,
the book retraces the entire
trial of Nazi war criminal
Klaus Barbie, which took place
between May 11 and July 4.
Summaries of the 37 ses-
sions, the testimonies of sur-
viving concentration camp
prisoners and all the evidence
presented in the trial are in-
cluded in the 272-page book.
AFP president Jean-Louis
Guillaud explained the reason
for this first in this company's
history.
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Page4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. August 21, 1987
The Wooden Horse
Of Jerusalem
Special U.S. Envoy Charles Hill's trip to
Jerusalem to meet, among others, with Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir and Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres, reminds us of the poet Homer in
his Iliad.
In the poem, Homer has Laocoon warn the
Trojans not to bring a great wooden horse,
which seemingly appeared out of nowhere, into
the walls of Troy. But it was the Greeks
themselves, the enemies of Troy, who dragged
the horse to the foot of the walls, having secretly
fabricated it and filled it with invading Greek
troops to begin with.
To counter Laocoon's suspicious warning
against this blandishment and to "beware of
Greeks bearing gifts," the Greeks lied, declaring
that thv wooden horse was merely an effigy of
the Palladium, a statue of Pallas Athena, on
whose safety the preservation of Troy
depended.
Of course, Laocoon's warning was ignored
and he was promptly attacked by sea serpents
who "proved" that he was wrong. The Greek in-
vasion was a success, and Troy subsequently
succumbed.
The U.S. Agenda
These days, what Israel must do is to beware
of American envoys bearing gifts. But this may
be mere tragic hindsight. Increasingly, it is clear
that Israel is already sorely afflicted by too
many American gifts.
Hill came to Jerusalem last week with two
items on his agenda. One was the apparently
hapless fate of the Lavi jet-fighter, which the
United States helped fund and which the
Reagan Administration now wants to scrap on
the pretext that it would be too expensive to
produce.
That it would also give Israel the wherewithal
technologically to resist future Arab aggression
effectively, even if the United States and other
of Israel's "allies" were to cut off military aid to
the Israelis, as was done in the 1972 war, seems
almost beside the point to the Reaganites these
days.
The other item on Hill's agenda was the Ad-
ministration's growing impatience with Israel's
failure to accept the current sentiment in
Washington that, one way or another, a Middle
East peace conference must soon be scheduled,
and that the conference, reluctantly or not, will
include all permanent members of the United
Nations Security Council, even the Soviet
Union, some of whom don't even have formal
diplomatic relations with Israel. Not to mention
representatives of the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
Too Much Help
Envoy Hill's job was to drag the Reagan Ad-
ministration's wooden horse, filled with all man-
ner of anti-Israel enemies, including some in the
very ranks of the State Department and the Ad-
ministration itself, smack into the center of
Jerusalem, past the walls of the city and the op-
tion Israel still has to fend for itself so far as its
future safety is concerned.
Israel is not ancient Greece in many ways. But
there is a good argument to be made by some
observers that Israel's reliance upon the United
States as a nation whose principles would never
compel it to force Israel into accepting decisions
that are obviously detrimental to its safety and,
indeed, preservation, is profoundly misplaced.
That is precisely what Hill was in Jerusalem
for last week. Though he insisted otherwise, Hill
was there to force the Israelis to accept his agen-
da for them. And there is growing evidence that,
having suckled too long at the generous bosom
of American foreign assistance, Israel is now too
weakened to resist Homer's wooden horse,
however much it may recognize that ancient
Laocoon was after all right about gifts from
strangers.
Hess Death Ends Era
At age 93, Rudolf Hess is dead, having passed
away at Spandau Prison near Bonn in West Ger-
many on Monday. Now, the world will never
know and will only be able to speculate on the
reasons behind his parachuting into Scotland in
1941 after Hess' unflagging devotion to his
Fuehrer, Adolf Hitler.
History suf ts otherwise, but that is all it
can do. It cari not state categorically that Hess'
flight to Scotland was Hitler's bid to end the war
PU6H-PUUL 1%1?SM>1
iJTA
with the British and to establish an alliance with
them in the cause of an all-out campaign to
destroy the Soviet Union.
We do know that Hitler was frank in his ad-
miration of the British and believed, up until the
very moment of the declaration of the war
against him, that England would never fight
against him. Except for leaders like Winston
Churchill, he saw and was drawn by a "racial"
tie that in his view bound the two countries
together and that he thought the British felt too.
Did Hess find all this nonsense? And was his
flight a bungled effort to abandon Hitler to his
lunatic visions of world domination?
Facts suggest that Hess was as delusional as
Hitler himself on this score and that Hess went
to Scotland on behalf of Hitler's plan for the
British-German campaign against the Soviets.
Because it didn't work, as prearranged between
them, Hitler branded Hess a traitor to obscure
his real intentions.
All of this is so star-crossed that it hardly
deserves excessive speculation other than it's
tragic coda. It was the Soviets, the enemy that
Hitler and Hess apparently thought the British
would join the Nazis in defeating, who to the bit-
ter end refused what West Germany's
Chancellor Helmut Kohl called a "merciful
release (of) the prisoner into the bosom of his
family."
Hess died in Spandau alone. The last Nazis in-
carcerated there. Albert Speer and Baldur von
Shirach, had long since been freed decades
before.
Labels
They Make for Painful Ambiguities
By JIM SHIPLEY
It is getting increasingly dif-
ficult to label things, isn't it?
"Left," "Right," "Conser-
vative," "Liberal" they just
don't work like they used to.
Either it is time to reevaluate
labels or better yet, give them
up completely.
Jews have always been iden-
tified with "Liberal" causes.
Ergo, Jews are to the "Left."
most Jewish immigrants from
Eastern Europe had socialist
leanings. They came as op-
pressed workers from a feudal
system. As the American
system worked its wonders,
children of the socialists
became Roosevelt Democrats,
and their sons became
Republicans (well, some of
them did).
ISRAEL WAS once the
darling of the "Liberal Left."
No more. As Israel asserted its
right to existence, as it refused
to be a victim, the "Left" sud-
denly found much wrong with
the Jewish State including
the phalanx of Jews who still
are to be found in the leader-
ship of organizations still pro-
ud to be labeled "Left-
Liberal."
Those of which I speak are
those who have espoused the
most radical of social changes
for the United States and for
the world. More revolutionary
than evolutionary, this small,
vocal group has found a home
in organizations like Students
for a Democratic Society and
their outcroppings.
In the tumultous days of the
1960's, dissent was a vouge
and needed in our society. But
this group took the opportuni-
ty, the war, the confusion to
further their plans which
would transform America into
a socialist state at best, one of
complete anarchy at worst.
THE LEADERS of these
groups, overwhelmingly
Jewish, have always expressed
a hatred of Israel as a Jewish
homeland. They have found in
Israel an ideal target for their
rhetoric and espousal of
radical ideas. They ally
themselves with outspoken
enemies of Israel, including
the PLO.
Perhaps the most blatant of
these organizations is the one
called the New Jewish Agen-
da. This one is dangerous. It is
my belief that self-hatred is
self-destructive. Self-hatred
among Jews is dangerous to
more than the individual ex-
periencing this sad, negative
approach to life.
Like a bomber whose
weapon blows up in a crowded
room, many innocents are
taken down along with the
perpetrator. To find Jews
arguing the legitimacy of
Israel in 1987 is ludicrous.
Labels. In the mid-'40's.
when the debate on the viabili-
ty of a Jewish State was at its
peak, there was a conservative
group of Jews known as the
Council for Judaism. They
were virulent anti-Zionists.
ALLIED WITH the ultra
religious, with whom they had
nothing else in common, this
group of mostly wealthy, Ger-
man Jews lobbied hard against
the creation of the State. But,
despite the religious, the Coun-
cil and 80 million Arabs, Israel
became a reality.
Labels. Here it is 40 years
later, and the cudgel of the
right (rejected immediately
after the creation) is taken up
by the radical left. The New
Jewish Agenda stands for
peace and justice, it says. Ter-
rific. Who doesn't? The Con-
Continued on P*e 13-A
Fred K Shochet
Editor and Publisher
JewI]fo Floridian
Suzanne Shochet
Executive Editor
William T. Brewer
Director ot Operations
Friday, August 21,1987
Volume 60
Joan C Teglas
Director of Advertising
26 AB 5747
Number 34


Probing
The Nether World
Of A Jew Accused
Of Nazi Crimes
Friday, August 21, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
By ARTHUR J. MAGIDA
1'i'pynqht Hiiilinmri Jrunnh Time*
All PuUieation Ki-iht* Km rmd
Twice a day, Jacob Tannen-
haum faithfully walked the 20
minutes from his home in
Brooklyn's Brighton Beach to
the minyan at Temple Beth El.
In the morning around 6:30
a.m., and again just before
sundown. Tannenbaum would
leave his small, beige
bungalow, shuffle down Lawn
Court the unpaved. one-
Nock long street he lived on
reach the corner and head
south toward his temple.
The minyan counted on him.
He was its gabai, the con-
gregant responsible for the mi-
nyan. He unlocked the
synagogue in the morning and
decided who would read the
Torah. He often opened the
parochet, the curtain at the ark
that protects the Torah. Three
years ago, in fact, Tannen-
baum had presented that same
curtain to the congregation in
honor of his parents, five
sisters, wife and six-month-old
daughter killed by the Nazis.
When the temple's rabbi,
Leonard Goldstein, was asked
last year to choose a few
members of the congregation
to light memorial candles at a
ceremony at nearby Holocaust
Memorial Mall, he immediately
thought of Tannenbaum.
JACOB TANNENBAUM
no longer attends the minyan
at Beth El. Chances are he
never will. The U.S. Justice
Department is trying to deport
Tannenbaum. charging that
his U.S. citizenship should be
revoked because he persecuted
prisoners at Goerlitz, a Nazi
forced-labor camp 55 miles
east of Dresden.
Survivors of Goerlitz claim
that as the camp's chief kapo,
or overseer, Tannenbaum kill-
ed, beat and crippled many in-
mates, all of whom were Jews.
These actions, they say, in-
variably occurred in the
absence of Nazi SS guards,
who most former kapos con-
tend forced them to commit
their atrocities.
Survivors of Goerlitz have
been located who say Tannen-
baum fatally beat their
brothers, fathers and other in-
mates. One survivor said Tan-
nenbaum ordered 300 Jews in
February. 1945 to board
trucks bound to the death
camp of Gross Rosen. Others
said Tannenbaum habitually
beat prisoners with a rubber
hose, an iron pipe or his bare
fists.
THE TANNENBAUM case
is perhaps the most sensitive
to emerge from the Office of
Special Investigations (OSI),
the Justice Department's
eight-year-old Nazi-hunting
unit. Never before has OSI ac-
cused a Jew kapo or not
of participating in Nazi-
inspired crimes.
And never before has it
charged a kapo with excessive
violence. That a kapo was-,
violent was a given. Violence
was inherent in the task for
which he had been recruited.
Kapos were surrogates of the
Nazis. They were ordered to
beat and pummel inmates, to
starve and humiliate them.
The Tannenbaum case rests on
whether he performed these
tasks perfunctorily enough to
satisfy the SS or whether he
did them with relish and aban-
don and. most important, on
his own, without urging by the
Nazis.
In effect, the case takes OSI
into a nether world, one where
morality was almost moot, and
the persecuted could be as in-
human as the persecutors. And
since one Goerlitz survivor,
Leon Zelig, said, "I was more
afraid of Tannenbaum than of
the SS," the case may even
take the OSI into a realm
where the brutality of Jewish
kapos exceeded that of the SS.
"WHEN DEALING with
mreiti
TM
> 1987 David S Bowman and Mark Saundars Alt rignia rasarvad
kapos, you need an extra level
of analysis," said Allan Rvan,
OSI's head from 1980 to 1984.
"Some kapos beat inmates to
protect them from worse
beatings from the SS. Others
were as brutal and as savage
as the SS. I told my staff we
would prosecute them the
same as we would prosecute an
SS member."
"It is impossible to equate a
kapo and an SS member,"
retorted Rabbi Marvin Hier,
dean of the Simon Wiesenthal
Center in Los Angeles. "The
SS volunteered for their jobs
and enthusiastically endorsed
the policies of Adolf Hitler.
Kapos were recruited. You
can't say Patty Hearst played
the same role as her captors.
The same is true of any kapo.
If Tannenbaum is convicted,
giving him the same penalty as
an SS member would be a
distortion of history."
Allan Ryan said the OSI in-
vestigated six to ten kapo
cases while he was at the
Justice Department. "After a
great deal of soul searching,"
according to a senior OSI of-
ficial, the Tannenbaum case
I>ecame the first of these to be
filed.
ACCORDING TO other
sources, the government
began ^'thering data on Tan-
nenbaum as early as 1979.
Evidence came from the
Israeli government and from
survivors of Goerlitz living in
the U.S.
"This was the worst of the
kapo cases," said Washington
The U.S. Justice Department is trying to
deport Jacob Thnnenbaum, who is charged
with being a concentration camp kapo.
But it's a murky area. How does a Jew
act in a society based on sheer survival?
attorney Martin Mendelsohn,
head of OSI from 1979 until
early 1980. "He was a nasty,
nasty guy. There were a lot of
witnesses who remembered
him and his bestiality."
By 1980, the case was on the
verge of being filed. Then it
disappeared. Apparently, the
dilemma of a Jew committing
atrocities against other Jews
under the Nazi aegis was too
daunting. A senior federal at-
torney in Brooklyn reportedly
told a friend in OSI that he
could not bring himself to try
the case.
The case was revived recent-
ly when an OSI memo about
Tannenbaum was leaked to a
daily New York law journal.
Some Jewish organizations
have speculated that the case
was leaked by some certain
segments of the Ukrainian or
Baltic communities.
DISTURBED BY recent
OSI prosecution of Estonian
Karl Linnas and Ukrainian
John Demjanjuk, the memo
may have been leaked to
"harm or sabotage" the OSI
and divide the Jewish com-
munity, according to the head
of one Jewish organization.
"This was not fulfilled," said
the executive. The Jewish
community is for the prosecu-
tion of everyone who commit-
ted crimes during the
Holocaust, regardless of their
ethnic or religious origin. Just
as there is no collective guilt,
there is no collective
innocence."
WHAT DID Tannenbaum
really do?
Jacob Tannenbaum is now in
hiding. Death threats and
press inqui iea were too much
for this 75-year-old man whom
neighbors describe as a quiet
gentle grandfather who feu
stray cats.
"Everybody's surprised,"
said one neighbor. "Nobody
has anything against him."
In recent interviews with
New York newspapers, Tan-
nenbaum called the charges
against him "absolute gar-
bage." But accounts of his
wartime experiences have
been contradictory.
One of Tannenbaum's three
children, Sonny, 34, recently
told the New York Times that
his father had told his im-
mediate family and some close
friends that he had been a kapo
at Goerlitz. But Tannenbaum
had previously told the New
York Times that he had not
been a kapo, but a personal
aide to the camp commandant,
Oskar Zunker. This, he said,
had given him the only
prerogatives different from
other prisoners: Occasional
trips into town for supplies.
Tannenbaum said he had
Continued on Page 13-A


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 21, 1987
and not as much as a frown
about the darker past that the
Austrian President has strug-
gled to hide." The Times said
the "effect is to slight all vic-
tims of Hitler's war."
ATLANTA JOURNAL
questioned the Pope's inten-
tion, saying "even if the
Pope's original decision to ac-
cept the visit were forgivable,
his florid and unfettered praise
of the man was not. We would
hate to see any repetitions of
this sad and sorry scene in any
more world capitals."
The ADL's survey of "Big
50" columnists disclosed
almost unanimous criticism of
the Vatican meeting. Of 22 col-
umns, only four did not find
the meeting completely objec-
APWide \W!.i
REMEMBERING WALLENBERG: Swedish
Charge d'Ajfairs. Ulf Jertonsson, takes part
in a Capitol Hill rally in Washington last
week, remembering the 75th birthday ofRaoui
Wallenberg, who as a young man in war-torn
U.S. Press
Hungary during World War 11. helped -"
nearly ioo.aoo psopU from the Nazis. From
hi) iiv Mrs Annette Lantos. founder Uu In-
ternational Fret Wallenberg Committee,
tonsson; and Rep. Tom Lantos iD. Calif.).
Critical of Meet With Waldheim
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Pope John Paul II's recent
meeting with Austrian Presi-
dent Kurt Waldheim was
criticized by the vast majority
of America's largest circula-
tion newspapers that com-
mented on the controversial
Vatican visit, according to the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith. The ADL also
said that most newspaper col-
umnists and cartoonists
reacted negatively to the June
25 meeting.
In making public the ADL's
"Big 50" survey of the na-
tion's leading dailies, Abraham
Foxman, ADL's national
director, said 19 of the 50
largest circulation newspapers
commented editorially on the
Pope-Waldheim meeting in a
total of 24 editorials on the
subject (some newspapers
commented more than once).
Most said the meeting
reflected poor judgment with
15 expressing dismay that it
might strain Catholic-Jewish
relations. Some, however, sug-
gested that the visit could be
used positively.
EIGHT EDITORIALS -
including those in The New
York Times, Boston Sunday
Globe, Atlanta Constitution
and New York Newsday
noted that the Pope missed an
important opportunity to con-
demn Waldheim for his in-
volvement in Nazi atrocities
and raise public awarenes.- of
the Holocaust.
Three in the Hartford
Courant, Chicago Sun-Times
and Los Angeles Herald Ex-
aminer while in general
agreement that an important
opportunity had been missed,
said the Pope had the right to
meet with whomever he wish-
ed. Two newspapers The
Seattle Times and The
Milwaukee Journal were
concerned that the Pope's ac-
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tionable. The rest were strontr.
ly critical of the Pope's deci
sion to welcome Waldheim
without acknowledging m
Nazi past. Some columnists
said the meeting was an
tagonistic to the Jewish com-
munity and harmful to rela-
tions between Jews and
Catholics.
Ten "Big 50" newspapers-
New York Newsday, The
Philadelphia Inquirer, Pitt-
sburgh Press, Seattle Times
San Diego Union, Los Angeles
Herald Examiner, Kansas City
Times, Miami Herald, New
Orleans Times-Picayune,
Houston Post published
editorial cartoons critical of
the Waldheim-Pope meeting.
More Israeli Soldiers Wounded,
IDF Responds With Mortar Fire
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTAi Six
Israeli soldiers were wounded
lightly last week when mortar
shells were fired at them in tin-
central section of the security
/one in south Lebanon. The
mortar fire originated outside
the security /.<>ih-. according to
an Israeli Army spokesperson.
Israeli troops responded
with artillery and mortar fire
directed at the source of the
attack outsule the security
zone. Israeli gunships fired a
missile at a vehicle near
Nabatiyeh, 20 miles form the
border, according to Israel
Radio.
The attack claimed the
largest number of wounded
Israeli troops since a roa
bombing in May injured f<
The attack in the security
/.one was the second in -\
hours. Earlier, Katyusha
rocket- fired from outside the
security zone bj Amal
militiamen landed in northern
Israel, according to military
sources, Thi came ap-
ently in retaliation for an
Israeli bombing of pro Iranian
Hezbollah targets. Military
sources said Amal had
retaliated after an Israeli air
attack on the Amal-controlled
village of Soultaniye.
Lebanon's National Syrian
Socialist Party claimed respon
sihility for the Katyusha at-
tacks, saying they were
retaliation for Israeli atl
on Syrian-controlled an
cording to Israel Radio
Military sources sa: believe Syria supplied the
long-range missiles for the
KatVUSha attack.
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Waldheim to meet with other
international figures and
dignitarii
The survey included the
following sampling of p
comment: The Miami Herald
said that Pope John Paul II
"disappointed and offended a
large segment of the world
population" by receiving
Waldheim. adding that
"Catholics and -lews, especial-
ly, find repugnant the Pope's
praise of Mr. Waldheim ."
The New York Times assail-
ed the Pope's "praise for
(Waldheim's) past good work
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Nobel Laureate Elie Wiesel (left) in Brazil to
receive the Grand Cross of the Ordem
Cruzeiro do Sul. the highest civilian honor
conferred by the Brazilian government, meets
iriih Paulo Tarso Flecha de Lima. Acting
Foreign Minister. Wiesel also addressed
Brazil's Constitutional Assembly and confer-
red with President Jose Sarney. (Right) is
Rabbi Henry I. Sobel of Congregacao Israelita
Paulista of Sao Paulo, the largest synagogue
in Latin America, who was Wiesel's host in
Brazil.
In Brazil
Wiesel Defines Favorite Constitution
BRASILIA, Brazil (JTA)
- Characterizing the Bible as
[his "favorite constitution,"
|Elie Wiesel urged the
Brazilian people to adopt a
iemocratic constitution that
iould reflect scriptural values,
including respect for human
rights, concern for the poor
land defenseless and an open
[door to those in need of refuge.
"Give a haven to those who
Ifeel alienated from their
I former world," he said, ad-
ding: "A society is judged by
its attitude towards
[strangers."
Wiesel, here to receive the
Grand Cross of the Order of
the Southern Cross highest
civilian medal awarded by the
Brazilian government made
|his remarks Monday (Aug. 10)
overnment officials charged
rith creating a new constitu-
tion for the country, which is
(making the transition from
|militarv rule to democracy.
THE AWARD, presented
[by Abren Sod re, Brazil's
Foreign Minster, was given to
\\ itst'l for his contributions to
international peace. While in
Brasilia, the contry's capital,
the Nobel Peace Prize reci-
pient also met Monday with
Brazilian President Jose
[Sarney and other government
[officials and dignitaries.
Rabbi Henry Sobel, spiritual
(leader of the Congregacao
Israelita Paulista in Sao Paulo,
largest Jewish congregation in
Latin America, accompanied
Wiesel during his three-day
visit to Brazil. The Nobel
laureate is a guest of the con-
gregation and the Con-
federacao Israelilta do Brasil,
the central body of the
Brazilian Jewish community,
which is affiliated with the
| World Jewish Congress.
Sobel pointed out that Brazil
iwas the "largest Catholic
[country in the world" with
some 117 million Catholics -
land that leading Catholic
is so identified with Israel, will
also focus sympathetic atten-
tion on Israel's role as a free
and democratic nation in the
Middle East."
Earlier this year, a commis-
sion of 10 Catholic and Jewish
leaders headed by Sobel issued
a 187-page "Guide for a
Catholic-Jewish dialogue in
Brazil."
IN HIS address to the Con-
stitutional Congress, Wiesel
noted that "as a son of the
Jewish people, I view Scrip-
ture as the most eloquent
moral code of behavior for na-
tions, groups and individuals
alike."
He said that as a Jew his ex-
perience made him aware of
perils that could threaten any
society as well as of "hopes
that must be offered to any in-
dividual anywhere." He urged
the Brazilian leaders to view
their projected constitution
not as a contract but as a
"covenant between govern-
ment and the citizens."
No people, he said, is
superior or inferior to another,
and no nation is holier than
another. "No religion," he ad-
ded, "is closer to truth or to
God the source of truth
than another." Racism, Wiesel
pointed out, "is sinful and
ethnic discrimination
outrageous."
Praising Brazil as a nation
that has been immune to
racism, he also urged the rejec-
tion of religous fanaticism as a
course that "leads to hate, not
to salvation, just as political
extremism begets hostility,
not security."
HE ALSO urged that the
country speak up for Soviet
Jews "whose only desire is to
join their families in Israel .
Speak up for dissidents
everywhere whtf use non-
violent methods to obtain
freedom for themselves and
their friends," Wiesel said.
"Based on the moral im-
Tuesday night (Aug. 11) ad-
dressed Sobel's congregation
at the Sao Paulo synagogue.
More than 5,000 persons, in-
cluding government officials
and Catholic church
dignitaries, attended.
Brazil's 150,000 Jews make
up the second largest Jewish
community in Latin America.
Only Argentina's Jewish
population is larger. In Brazil,
relations between the Jewish
community and the Catholic
Church are marked by
"theological and political sen-
sitivity, commitment and vi-
sion," according to Sobel.
Lansky Appointed
FORT WAYNE. Ind. -
(JTA) Vivian Lansky, a
university alumni director
here, has been appointed ex-
ecutive director of the Fort
Wayne Jewish Federation.
oooooooooooo
Friday, August 21, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Swastikas, Obscenities Painted
On Jewish Store in Washington
By CRAIG DEGGINGEK
JOYCE. Wash.-(JTA)-A
local Jewish group has an-
nounced a reward for informa-
tion leading to the arrest and
conviction of the person or
persons who painted swastikas
and obscenities on the general
store co-owned by a Jewish
woman here.
During the evening of July
81, the anti-Semitic graffiti
was painted on an outside wall
and garage at the Joyce
General Store owned by Diane
Pfaff, who is Jewish, and her
husband. Roland Pfaff. The in-
cident occurred on the eve of
this tiny northwestern
Washington community's an-
nual Joyce Daze festival, of
which Roland Pfaff is
president.
CLALLAM COUNTY
Sheriffs office is investigating
the incident, according to
Diane Pfaff, who added she
believes the vandalism was the
work of an individual rather
than an organized anti-Semitic
group.
"Nothing like this has ever
happened before," sne said.
"We've always been quite
open about our being Jewish."
The Pfaffs are active in the
Port Angeles area Jewish com-
munity and the Washington
Association of Jewish Com-
munities. Diane Pfaff is one of
several Port Angeles area
women who meet regularly for
Jewish study.
"It's shocking when
something like this happens to
you," she said, describing
herself as "numb" when she
saw the five large swastikas
painted on the store. At the
urging of people, including
Rabbi Anson Laytner of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Seattle, who oversees WA-
JCO. Roland Pfaff read a
statement before the Joyce
Daze parade condemning the
vandalism.
"WE DEPLORE the van-
dalism, particularly the
swastikas which put a very
negative. anti-Semitic and
very ugly sign on things,"
Pfaff told* the crowd.
Dianne Pfaff said she and
Roland have received an out-
pouring of support from the
people of Joyce, some of whom
aided in cleaning off the anti-
Semitic slurs.
Ribalow Prize-Winner
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Aharon Appelfeld has won the
1987 Harold U. Ribalow Prize
for his novel, "To the Land of
the Cattails." (Wiedenfeld and
Nicolson). The prize is award-
ed annually by Hadassah
Magazine for a work of fiction
on a Jewish theme. Appelfeld
lives in Jerusalem, and the
novel was translated by Jef-
frey Green.
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Apt No
prelates would be greeting the peratives that would be part of
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Nobel laureate. "Mr. Wiesel's
jvisit." he said, "will
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Gatholic-Jewish understan-
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peace is in danger."
All contributions to JNF are tax deductible
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND, INC.
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f age 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, Augugt 21, 1987
to school during the day and
drive his cab nights. Later, he
plans to start training for a
new career in computers.
Flagler Federal
Modernage. and
new career in computers. Tt's not a matter Qf
Nerenberg is grateful to the mainly," he explains. "It s fn
Jewish Family Service, the children."
State Dep't. Denies U.S. Will
Sell $1 Billion in Arms to Saudis
By JUDITH COLP
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Tlie State Departement denied
reports Monday that it has
decided to plan a $1 billion
arm.- sale to Saudi Arabia ear-
ly next month.
"There have been no new
provements to weapon
already in the Saudi arsenal.'
Sources have said there u
nothing new in the Ad
ministration intention to
resubmit the arms sale But
they said they expect the
White House to inform Con
developments and there is" no ^*J* sal'la ?*!
current active consideration of '> ^submitted Legislators
this Sue." said State Depart- complained in June that thev
Soviet Jewish immigrant Elik Nerenberg and
his turn sons, Mark, 12, and Steven, 2, admire
the view from their temporary new home in
North Bay Village. The sixth floor condo has
been contributed to Jewish Family Service by
Flagler Federal Savings and Loan
Association.
Soviet, His Kids
New Life With Help of Miami Friends
A Soviet Jewish immigrant
and his two young sons are liv-
ing in an apartment with a Bis-
cayne Bay view today
thanks to the hard work of the
Jewish Family Service of
Greater Miami and an in-
novative program by a Dade
financial institution.
Elik Nerenberg, 39, has had
a lot of bad luck since he mov-
ed to America from Russia
eight years ago. His wife died
of cancer last year, leaving him
with the care of their two sons
- Mark, 12, and Steven, 2.
HIS OTHER problems have
included illness and getting
mugged four times in his job as
a taxi-driver. He found himself
and his children dependent on
friends for a place to live, and
his life at a seeming dead-end.
He had no way of knowing it,
but at this very time an idea
was emerging from the mind
of Herschel Rosenthal, presi-
dent of Flagler Federal Sav-
ings and Loan Association.
Like many South Florida in-
stitutions, Flagler Federal had
a stock of condominium units
on hand most of them turn-
ed back by owners with finan-
cial difficulties.
It occurred to Rosenthal that
these condos were going to be
around for a while. From his
involvement in numerous com-
munity activities, he knew of
something else that was
around the needs of people
with problems.
ROSENTHAL came up with
a plan, which he took to the
Jewish Family Service. The
result: Flagler Federal pledg-
ed to make a condo unit
available to the JFS for
periods of at least six months
for the next five years. The
JFS set the six months period
that's the time they feel
they need to get people with
problems back on their feet
and self-sufficient.
Furthermore, Rosenthal
fired off letters to the
presidents of several other
Dade financial institutions,
urging them to consider
similar contributions to a
private or public service agen-
cy of their choice.
The Jewish Family Service,
which is funded by the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation,
walked the Nerenberg family
right through the door of their
new apartment in the Islander
Club of North Bay Village.
THEY WATCHED his two
sons dip their hands into the
club's swimming pool, and
they watched the man and two
boys stand on the balcony
overlooking beautiful Biscayne
Bay. The Nerenbergs arrived
on the same day the furniture
donated by Modernage arriv-
ed, too.
Now, Nerenberg hopes to go
ment spokeswoman Phyllis
Oakley. "There is no hidden
agenda, there will" be no sur-
prises on this issue. As we pro-
ceed I can assure you that the
Administration will consult
fully with the Congress."
But Oakley said the Ad-
ministration has already
stated that it will resubmit an
arms sales to Saudi Arabia
"when it considers it
appropriate."
OAKLEY was responding to
a question about a Washington
Post article which stated that
the Administration, in light of
recent developments in the
Persian Gulf, is planning to
submit the Saudi arms
package to Congress when it
convenes Sept. 9. The article
said the Administration will
argue that a strong Saudi
Arabia could be an effective
deterrent to the Iranians in the
region.
The $1 billion arms package
reportedly would include the
1,600 Maverick anti-tank
missiles whose sale was
withdrawn in June in face of a
Congressional override. The
sale would also include 12 to IS
F-15 fighter planes valued at
$500 million and i m -
were not given advance warn
ing about the Maverick missile
sale.
CONGRESSIONAL pposi
tion to the $360 million
Maverick sale increased after
Saudi Arabia failed to come to
the assistance of the U.S.
missile frigate Stark attacked
last in May by an Iraqi jet in
the Persian Gulf. The anger
grew when the Saudis balked
at assisting the 11 Kuwaiti
ships to be flagged as
American ir the Gulf.
Monthly Consumer
Index Rises
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The monthly consumer price
index rose only 0.2 percent
during July. The official
figure, released Friday, was
much less than government
and independent analysts had
predicted. The Central Bureau
of Statistics attributed the low
inflation rate to substantial
drops in the prices of fruit and
vegetables, and of clothing.
during July. The July figure
means that employers will not
have to pay a cost-of-living in-
crement until at
November.
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Friday, August 21, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Wiesel Says He's Considering
Papal Invitation to Vatican
CLOSE SCRUTINY: Judge Dov Levine,
presiding judge over the three-judge panel
hearing the John Demjanjuk trial in
Jerusalem, examines through a magnifying
glass the Traumiki Card, a piece of prosecu-
AP/Wide World Photo
tion evidence which an American documents
expert from Florida has declared -not authen-
tic. Demjanjuk is accused of being Ivan the
Terribl*. a brutal guard in the Treblinka
death camp during World War II.
U.S. Airman:
Lavi Differences Won't Hurt U.S. Ties
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) An
American Air Force official
said here Monday that
Israel-U.S. relationships would
not be damaged if Israel went
ahead with its Lavi jet plane
project "but I think we will be
very disppointed," he said.
Air Force Secretary Edward
Aldridge, here on a five-day
visit, was received at Defense
Ministry headquarters Mon-
day morning and later met
with Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin and senior defense of-
fieials. During his stay in
Israel, his first, Aldridge
visited Air Force bases and
military installations, in-
eluding the Israel Aircraft In-
dustries which manufactured
the Lavi.
QUESTION E I) b y
reporters about the Lavi pre-
set, he said that the decision
to halt or go ahead with if'is.
[ 'ours,., an Israeli decision
with many facets and manv im-
portant hut difficult problems.
I ur view is that it would not be
m the best interests of the
Israeli government because of
' he impact it will have on other
programs which are equally
important."
Aldridge added that "We
understand the difficulty of
making such a decision. We
are disappointedit had to be
delayed, and we are sorry a go
or no-go decision was not
made. But we understand the
lit.ticulties with that." He was
referring to the Cabinet deci-
sion Sunday to defer until next
Sunday a vote on the fate of
|trie Lavi project.
The American official, who
I is an aeronautical engineer by
profession and received train-
ing m the U.S. space program,
a so told reporters "I don't
negative effect (if the Lavi pro-
ject continues). We will be
disappointed. But it is an
Israeli government decision
it is their decision to make.
Our views about the program
are well known and we would
be disappointed. But as far as
our relationships exist, it will
not affect those relationships.
^ THE CABINET'S decision
Sunday to delay voting on the
Lavi followed public urgings
last week by the State Depart-
ment and personal messages
by Secretary of State George
Shultz to top Israeli govern-
ment leaders to ground the
Lavi.
In addition, a growing
number of Cabinet Minister
now favor scrapping the jet.
Premier Yitzhak Shamir and
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres resolved privately and
recommended jointly to the
Cabinet that it defer a vote for
a week or two.
Peres said Monday that the
Cabinet will deal with the Lavi
project at its next session. He
By MARGIE OLSTER
NEW YORK (JTA) Elie
Wiesel said Thursday (Aug.
13) that he is "seriously con-
sidering" a long-standing in-
vitation from the Vatican to
meet privately with Pope John
Paul II later this month and
will probably accept. Wiesel
said he would decide on the
meeting within a week.
Wiesel said that he received
the invitation weeks ago,
before any discussion arose of
a meeting between other
Jewish leaders and the Pope at
the Vatican.
The Pope has invited a
delegation of five Jewish
religious leaders to meet with
him in Rome on Sept. 1.
Wiesel's meeting, should he
accept the offer, would be
prior to Sept. 1.
WIESEL SAID he will not
represent any delegation or
organization in his meeting
with the Pope but will be
speaking to him as a private
person.
Wiesel has been critical of
the Pope's granting of an au-
dience on June 25 to Austrian
President Kurt Waldheim, ac-
cused of complicity in Nazi war
crimes. But Wiesel has also
censured Pope John Paul II for
misinterpreting the Holocaust
by denying its uniqueness as a
Jewish tragedy. Instead, the
Pope has acknowledged that
Jews suffered more than other
peoples but consistently
stresses the Catholic victims of
Nazism.
Wiesel said he would discuss
his view of the Holocaust
among other issues with the
Pope but refused to elaborate
on a possible agenda. He said
he hopes the meeting will be
private and the discussion will
remain a secret.
THE VATICAN had arrang-
ed a meeting between the
Pope and Jewish religious
leaders on Sept. 11 in Miami
during his visit to America.
After the Pope's audience with
Waldheim, however, many of
the Jewish groups scheduled
to participate in the meeting
withdrew in protest.
Many of the same organiza-
tions are now reconsidering
their participation pending the
outcome of the Sept. 1 meeting
with the Pope.
New Zundel
Trial Slated
By BEN KAYFETZ
TORONTO (JTA) The
second trial of revisionist Ern-
st Zundel, previously convicted
of deliberately publishing lies
about the Holocaust, will com-
mence January 4, 1988.
A Canadian court in March,
1985 convicted Zundel, a Ger-
man native living in Canada, of
one count of wilfully
publishing false information
likely to cause racial or social
intolerance.
Zundel published a number
of books and pamphlets, in-
cluding "Did Six Million Really
Die?" which claimed that
Zionists invented the hoax of a
Holocaust to extort repara-
tions from post-war Germany.
He also claimed nobody had
seen Jews being gassed to
death.
THE COURT sentenced
Zundel, 48, to 15 months' im-
prisonment and prohibited him
from publicly discussing the
Holocaust. Zundel appealed
the verdict and the Ontario
Court of Appeal later ordered
a new trial. The Supreme
Cou t of Canada refused to
hear an appeal of the Ontario
Court's decision.
Zundel's lawyer, Douglas
Christie, said the second trial
would take four to six months
and substantial new evidence
would be presented. Christie
claimed the court did not per-
mit him to present this
evidence to the jury in the first
trial.
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 21, 1987
Caeserea
Disruption
Puts Digs
In Shadows
J{> HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Ac-
tivities by ultra-Orthodox
zealots to disrupt ar-
chaeological digs in Caesarea
have diverted attention from
significant finds unearthed at
other digging sites throughout
Israel this season.
The included a unique
1.800-year-old mosaic floor un-
covered two weeks ago at
Tsipori, in lower Galilee, and
the ruins of a Bronze Age port
dating back 5,000 years at Tel
Rami, south of Atlit.
The six-by-five-meter floor
at Tsipori, once the most im-
portant city of Galilee, seat of
the Roman governors and a
major Jewish center where the
Sanhedrin officiated after the
destruction of the Second
Temple, shows an almost
lifesize portrait of a beautiful
young woman and of 15 Greek
gods, including Dionysus, all
named in Greek.
THE PICTURES are picked
out in tiny colored mosaic
stones, with the young
woman's cheeks in four shades
from flesh color to rouge. The
gods are depicted in motion,
regarded as rare for ancient
mosaics.
The archaeologists, from the
Hebrew University of
Jerusalem and Duke Universi-
ty of North Carolina, believe
the portrait may have been of
a woman guest of the governor
who was entertained in this
very room which, from its size
and position, may have been
the Roman governor's recep-
tion hall.
Tsipori was the home of Rab-
bi Yehuda Hanassi, who com-
piled and edited the Mishna,
second only to the Pentateuch
in Jewish holy writ, for the last
17 years of his life, at the
beginning of the Third
Century.
The third season of digging
at Tel Rami brought to light
Israel's oldest known port city,
dating back 5,000 years.
EXCAVATED by a Haifa
University team aided by
researchers and students from
the U.S. and Europe, this
year's work turned up a wide
range of stone and clay tools,
jewelry and weapons "show-
ing that in the late Bronze Age
Tel Rami was an important sea
traffic station," according to
Dr. Michal Artzi, head of the
university's maritime civiliza-
tions department.
This season's important
finds here included a
storehouse dating from 3,000
BCE, the first of its kind found
in the country, as well as a
sewage system.
Archaeologists in Ashkelon
uncovered a large dog
cemetery and what appeared
to have been a Philistine
brothel, with erotic wall
decorations.
The Atra Kadisha Jewish
cemetery protection associa-
tion which halted the Caesarea
dig apparently decided that
work at these three sites did
not endanger Jewish graves,
and the researchers were not
molested there.
FINALLY FREEDOM: Soviet pianist Vladimir Feltsman
(right) smiles as he arrives at Vienna's Schwechat A irport last
week with his wife, Anna, and son, Daniel, after being greeted by
U.S. Ambassador Warren Zimmermann (rear). Feltsman. who
has struggled for eight years to leave the Soviet Union, said his
family would travel to France for a few days, and then to New
York, where they plan to live.
No Surprise
U.S., Soviet Lawyers Won't Break Formal Agreement
By WINSTON PICKETT
SAN FRANCISCO (JTA)
Bay Area Soviet Jewry ac-
tivists are disturbed but not
surprised that two efforts to
end a formal agreement bet-
ween American and Soviet
lawyers failed last week.
And although the American
Bar Association overwhelm-
ingly refused to abrogate its
1985 "Declaration of Coopera-
tion" with the Association of
Soviet Lawyers, a local Jewish
lawyer is hopeful for a tur-
naround next year.
Attorney Ephraim Margolin,
one of the strongest opponents
of the ABA-ASL agreement to
speak at the ABA convention
here last week, contended that
"we won the debate but lost
the vote."
HE AND other activists
pushed abrogation on the
grounds that the ASL is an
arm of the KGB and not an
equivalent of the ABA. The ac-
tivists said they were sure
many ABA leaders were
educated on the plight of
Soviet Jews during the week.
On Monday, (Aug. 10), the
ABA assembly voted 156-32 to
reject a resolution to abrogate
the ABA's agreement with the
ASL, a group charged directly
with Soviet rights violations
and anti-Semitic policies.
Denunciations reached a
fever pitch at that session,
when a representative from
the American Foundation for
Resistance International call-
ed for an "economic boycott"
of lawyers who supported the
ABA's cooperative agreement
with the Soviets. AFRI
members include former UN
Ambassador Jeane
Kirkpatrick, conservative col-
umnist William F. Buckley and
Republican presidential
hopeful Rep. Jack Kemp
human (N.Y.).
ON TUESDAY, the ABA's
House of Delegates killed by
voice vote a resolution by the
Arizona Bar Association that
sought to delete what its sup-
porters saw as anti-human-
rights portions of the pact bet-
ween the two legal associa-
tions. David Waksberg, direc-
tor of the Bay Area Council for
Soviet Jews and vice president
of the Union of Councils for
Soviet Jews, which had earlier
staged a protest calling for
cancelation of the ABA-ASL
agreement, said the abroga-
tion defeat was "a tragic-
mistake, and my feeling is that
innocent victims are going to
pay for the arrogance and ig-
norance of the ABA
leadership."
Appearing at the BACS.l
protest outside the Fairmont
Hotel here, where the ABA
convention was held, former
Prisoner of Conscience Zachar
Zunshain told approximately
60 supporters that the
American-Soviet agreement
would be used as a pretext to
prosecute more Soviet Jews.
Raizes Reelected
HOUSTON (JTA) -
Harold Raizes has been elected
to a second term as president
of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Houston.
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20 U.S. Jews
Say No Sandinista Anti-Semitism
Friday, August 21, 1987/The Jewish Floridian___Page 11-A

Continued front Page 1-A
the Nicaraguan people and the
rovemment of Nicaragua; in-
vestigate charges of systemic
anti-Semitism; to witness and
share in the daily lives of peo-
ple living in a war zone."
THE DELEGATION
members returned unanimous
|n their condemnation of the
Contra rebels, whom the
roup charges with kidnapp-
ing and murder of civilians,
terrorizing the Nicaraguan
neople and dismantling their
[ife-support system. The group
witnessed firsthand results of
:ontra attacks in which entire
towns' power and water
lystems were destroyed,
townspeople recounted for
[hem long lists of family
lembers kidnapped and
presumed dead.
The delegation took upon
tself the investigation into
Jlegations of systemic anti-
jemitism raised by the Reagan
administration and some
?wish groups. Before leaving,
16 group read reports by a
ride spectrum of Jewish
rganizations as well as the
rst Jewish delegation to visit
Nicaragua with Witness.
reryone interviewed spoke
an intrinsic belief in "peace
^iii justice" as it is expressed
Jewish teaching.
Most Jews fled the country
irer a period of yean after the
indinistas took power in
RABBI MyraSoifer, head of
Reform congregation in
|eno, Nevada, joined the
legation because of "a com-
itment to issues of peace and
Jstice. As a person, I was fair-
confused, from the repor-
ing we gpet, as to who the
Havers were, what each side is
about. As an American, 1
lave always felt wherever we
I been involved it is almost
Iways wrong to be involved
ith bombs and military aid
father than humanitarian."
Malcolm Newman, an
pngineer from Huntington.
ong Islam), was part of a
; p o f fo ur f r o m
teconstructionisl synagogue
hillath Shalom in Cold Spr-
it i Harbor, that included bis
I Esther, tin- synagogue
Cleveland
History
CLEVELAND (JTA) -
V\ here could one take a ritual
ath in 1937 in Ohio's largest
[city? The answer to that and
|"t her questions is now more
[convenient than usual to find
jwith the publication in paper-
back of Lloyd Gartner's
["History of the Jews of
[Cleveland."
The hardcover edition,
published in 1978, had been
out-of-print for more than five
years, according to the
K leveland Jewish News. Both
editions cover local Jewish
[history from 1840-1945.
The softcover edition, con-
taining an enlarged index and
president, Sam Goldman, and
Rabbi Arthur Schwartz, who
organized the contingent.
Newman said that "about
two-thirds of the group was in-
to prayer. The one-third who
were not really believers went
along with it and said it really
opened their eyes, that they
were moved by the prayers,
and they felt that it had a great
deal of meaning.
"WE HAD no prior idea of
the extent of danger to which
we would be subjected,
although no one hid from us
the danger. Every time we got
someplace safely where there
were dangers involved in get-
ting there which was all the
time we said a
shehecheyanu, so this delega-
tion was in the great Jewish
tradition."
The group said that after in-
terviewing a host of people, in-
cluding the last remaining Jew
in Managua, journalists and a
list of political figures, in-
cluding Contras and San-
dinistas, as well as ordinary
citizens, they could not
substantiate charges of anti-
Semitism. In addition, they
also maintained a constant
lookout for signs of anti-
Semitic graffiti.
Roland Najlis, the lone re-
maining Jew in Managua, told
the group that he could not in
any way support allegations of
anti-Semitism.
Najlis is caretaker of the
Jewish cemetery. A retired
businessman, he came to
Nicaragua from Europe with
his family when he was a
young child. Najlis told the
group he was never aware of
anti-Semitism in Nicaragua,
nor is he aware of it now. The
group also met with Jewish
American journalist Barbara
Stahler-Sholk. who had herself
done what they described as
extensive investigating of the
allegations of anti-Semitism.
Her findings could not support
the charges, they said.
ALTHOUGH THEY found
no indications of systemic anti-
Semitism, they claim that
"there exists in Nicaragua
serious confusion regarding
the terms 'anti-Semitism."
'anti-Zionism" and "anti-
Israel." This thev ascribe to
Israel's long standing military
support of Nicaragua, going
back to the days of the Somoza
regime and continuing into the
present with sales of arms to
the Contras.
The delegation spoke to
Carlos Aleman Ocampo of the
Ministry of the Exterior, Divi-
sion of" Mideast Affairs, who
told them he "distinguished
between Israel as a State and
the Jewish people," and said
that Nicaragua "recognizes
the sovereignty of Israel, its
right to exist, as well as that of
the Palestinian people."
Esther Newman, an occupa-
tional therapist and rehabilita-
tion counselor, told JTA,
"Look, I'm very sensitive to
anti-Semitism. I've leen an
identified Jew, a committed
synagogue member, for all of
life. Our family lived in
Nicaragua, as well as another
in 1984. She said she never en-
countered any anti-Semitism
in all her trips there, even in
talks with "the most
outspoken people." Taylor
said that the Nicaraguan
Minister of Tourism, Herty
Lewites, is Jewish, and that
one of the four main markets
in Managua is named for his
brother, Israel Lewites.
Taylor, a hospice nurse in
Philadelphia, is a long-time
civil rights activist who work-
ed on an interfaith task force
on Central America. She was
aware of her Jewishness, be-
ing frequently the sole Jew on
a team of committed civil
rights workers whose belief in
their cause came from a "faith
base. The invitation to come to
Nicaragua came from the
Nicaraguan churches, and not
from the government. Witness
for Peace is not only commit-
ted to nonviolence but to
political independence from

Theological Seminary of
America and the Western
Reserve Historical Society, in
cooperation with the Jewish
Community Federation of
( leveland.
the Nicaraguan government,"
Taylor explained.
Rebecca Rosenbaum, a
writer from Iowa City, Iowa,
who was part of the delega-
tion, said, "I grew up in New
York. Now, living in the
Midwest where there is a
small Jewish population my
peace work is involved with
church people who connect
their religious beliefs with
peace and justice. I've grown
increasingly hungry for a
Jewish way to act on my
beliefs.
"ALSO, I feel that the
Jewish community has been
used by the Reagan Ad-
ministration, which is trying to
woo us to support their cause
the Contras by invoking
Sandinista anti-Semitism."
At the Jewish cemetery in
Managua, the group recited
the Kaddish. Soifer drew a
poignant parallel between that
Kaddish and an unexpected
ceremony to which the group
was brought in an isolated
mountain village, an '"ascendi-
miento," where the survivors
of Contra attacks have "a
small measure of protection."
and where "We saw the worst
malnutrition we saw anywhere
. and houses without walls."
Soifer described a scene
where "campesinos"
(peasants) kept arriving to
meet the group, to tell them of
personal tragedies of relatives
who had been kidnapped by
the Contras, "people who they
didn't know for sure were dead
but probably were." They
heard a long list of
"desaparecidos" (disappeared
ones) that included children
and their parents, entire
families vanished.
Everyone interviewed
agreed that Nicaragua is a na-
tion in turmoil, that it faces
numerous problems, and that
there is repression. Although
there have been reported in-
stances of anti-Semitic
reference to price-gouging in
the official Nicaraguan press
since their visit, the group em-
phasized that the solution is
not to engage in war and not to
use the charge of anti-
Semitism in Nicaragua to en-
tice American Jews to support
the Administration's pro-
Contra policy.


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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 21, 1987
Religious Leaders Gather At Top
Of Japanese Mountain of Hiei
By RABBI MARK GOLUB
Forty-two years ago this
month, atomic bombs fell on
the Japanese cities of
Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The
bombs brought World War II
in the Pacific to an abrupt and
merciful end, saving more
than a million Allied and
Japanese lives.
But those horrific explosions
also marked the beginning of a
new kind of existence for all
mankind existence in a
nuclear age, an age in which
man has the power to destroy
his entire planet.
LAST WEEK 20 world
religious leaders gathered at
the top of the Japanese moun-
tain of Mt. Hiei to participate
in a Religious Summit calling
for yet another age an age
of world peace without nuclear
weapons.
Representing American
Judaism at this prestigious
gathering of religious leaders
was Rabbi Joseph Glaser, the
executive vice president of the
Central Conference of
American Rabbis, the profes-
sional association of Reform
rabbis in the United States,
Canada and abroad.
As the only American par-
ticipating in the Religious
Summit, Glaser also has the
honor of representing the
United States clergy at Mt.
Unionists
Told To Cut
S. Africa Ties
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Histadrut Secretary-General
Yisrael Kessar has ordered all
industrial enterprises controll-
ed by the trades union federa-
tion to break all commercial
ties with South Africa, once
present contracts have
expired.
His move followed a com-
plaint by Civil Rights Move-
ment Knesset member Ran
Cohen that Iskoor, a company
owned by the Histadrut's giant
Koor Industries, last year
bought $25 million worth of
steel and scrap iron from
South African.
Cohen charged that Iskoor
had set up a front company in
Switzerland called Talronics to
conceal its dealings with South
Africa. The Jerusalem Post
wrote Thursday (Aug. 13) that
Kessar had initially refused to
respond to Cohen's charges,
but Wednesday (Aug. 12) sum-
moned heads of Hevrat Haov-
dim, the Histadrut's holding
company, and of Koor In-
dustries to impress on them
that they must follow the
Histadrut's policy of ending all
trade links with South Africa.
They reportedly told Kessar
they had aleady given such in-
structions but noted that
Iskoor last year signed a five-
year contract with South
Africa which would be too ex-
pensive to cancel.
Cohen said he would con-
tinue his investigations. into
the Iskoor affair, claiming that
other European countries had
broken even more expensive
contracts with South Africa.
Hiei. which is known as the
cradle of Buddhism in Japan.
Initially, Glaser was the only
Jewish representative to be in-
vited to participate in the
summit.
HOWEVER, at Glasers
suggestion, the Japan Con-
ference of Religious Represen-
tatives added invitations to
one Orthodox rabbi from
Israel and one from South
America: Israel Lau, Chief
Rabbi of Netanya, and Pinchas
Brenner of Caracas,
Venezuela.
Other world religious
leaders participating in the
Religious Summit included
two Catholic representatives
from the Vatican, the Ar-
chbishop of Canterbury, the
Greek Orthodox Archbishop of
Jerusalem, the General
Secretary of the World Coun-
cil of Churches, three Buddhist
leaders, two Islamic leaders,
and a Hindu, Sikh, Dao and
Confucian leader.
The gathering was coor-
dinated by the Japan Religious
Committee for the World
Federation, an organization of
religious groups in Japan
established in 1945 after ex-
periencing the nuclear bomb-
ing at Hiroshima and
Nagasaki. The Committee's
principal proposal is that the
year 2001 should be named
"Year One" of the Age of
Peace for Mankind, an age
free from the threat of all
nuclear weapons.
DURING THE week long
conference. Glaser and his
wife, Agathe, joined with the
other participants in touring
some of Japan's cultural
marvels and in com-
memorating a number of local
memorials. The week also in-
cluded a visit to the cities of
Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
But the central moments of
the Conference occurred last
Monday (Aug. 3) and Tuesday
during the two-day Religious
Summit at the top of Mt. Hiei,
a mountain located on the out-
skirts of the Japanese city of
Kyoto.
Each religious leader was
asked to speak on two occa-
sions during the summit on
Mt. Hiei, first sharing
thoughts on "The Way to
Peace" and later offering a
personal "Prayer for Peace."
During his remarks to the
world gathering, Glaser spoke
of the Jewish concept of peace.
"OUR HEBREW word
shalom means more than
cessation of war," explained
Glaser. "It means wholeness
and completeness. Since one
side to a conflict cannot have
shalom without the other, it
follows that both sides must be
part of this wholeness.
Everyone is involved or there
is no shalom. Not only
everyone is involved, but the
demands of wholeness require
everything; justice, freedom,
plenty."
Glaser characterized the
transcending task of religious
leaders to be that of "hearing
the cry of the oppressed, the
victims, the prisoners, the
hungry." And ultimately, the
mission of every religious
leader is "to teach" a sense of
compassion to all mankind a
compassion that would lead to
a world of peace.
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.117/) KATZ: He claims Tannenbaum shipped him to a death camp.
"amp 'Kapo'
World of Jews Accused of Nazi Crimes
(Continued from Page 5-A
Ice threatened to turn over
i the SS an inmate who had
ken more than his share of
r) Another time, he had us-
a rubt>er hose to chase in-
\\v< away from kitchen gar-
;e. hut only because "the
Irmans put some white stuff
] this garbage, some poison."
iND DURING the final
k's of the war, Tannenbaum
id. he led an escape of 50 in-
>tes from Goerlitz. "We cut
wire, and we were free,"
said.
Tannenbaum's lawyer said
pse are the "ramblings" of
ill, confused 75-year-old
in. "1 can't get three con-
cutive sentences out of
said Manhattan at-
rney Elihu Massel.
^lassel conceded that his
lent had been a kapo,
though he preferred the
)rd "overseer," since
MX)" has emotional over-
Vs. But he said the brutality
*h which Tannenbaum has
Jen charged would have been
Ificult, if not impossible,
Ice he was not physically fit
I the time he arrived at
lerlitz: In a previous forced
lor camp, Wola in Galicia,
Ms had blinded him in one
p and severely injured his
|ck in a beating.
IND IF Tannenbaum's ac-
lunt about helping prisoners
rape from Goerlitz is true,
f'i Massel, then "he couldn't
tve done the things with
tiich he has been charged. He
luldn't have been a leader,
ly would have followed
fn- And anyway, most of the
li'lly bad kapos never left the
fnpa alive. The prisoners
fide certain of that.
But different stories about
Tannenbaum have come from
former inmates of Goerlitz.
They say he was Goerlitz's
chief kapo, not merely an aide
to the camp commandant.
Former prisoners claim he
raped women and beat, tor-
tured and killed male
prisoners.
Well-groomed and well-fed,
they say, he escaped the priva-
tions of life in a forced-labor
camp. Described by some as a
"wild," "cold-blooded" man,
Tannenbaum, according to ac-
counts, was hated and feared
by fellow Jews.
Goerlitz was constructed
during the summer and early
fall of 1944. Construction was
nearly complete when Leon
Zelig arrived there in August,
1944. Tannenbaum arrived
there a few days later.
"He was six feet tall, blond,
good looking," said Zelig, 58,
now a resident of Los Angeles.
"No one who spends time in a
ghetto or forced-labor camp
looks that well."
WHEN Tannenbaum came
to Goerlitz, he was a kapo, ac-
cording to Zelig. A few days
later, he said, Tannenbaum
was the chief kapo, in charge
of Goerlitz's eight other kapos,
one for each bloc in the camp.
David Katz, 65, arrived in
Goerlitz about the same time
as Zelig. "Tannenbaum didn't
seem too bad at first," he said.
"But when the new prisoners
came from (the ghetto of) Lodz
in September, 1944, he chang-
ed. He became a wildman."
Leon Hostig is now a
67-vear-old resident of the
East Flatbush section of
Brooklyn. In the ghetto of

Lodz, two SS men had beaten
his mother. She died two days
later. His father was sent to
the ovens in Auschwitz.
Hostig, then 23, and his two
brothers, Avram, 19, and Joel,
24, were also in Auschwitz in
July and August, 1944. In
September, they were among
the approximately 500 men
from Lodz sent to Goerlitz.
"WE DIDN'T know where
we were heading," said
Hostig. "But we knew it was a
labor camp, and that meant
survival."
Before leaving Auschwitz,
Hostig had been given
relatively sturdy clothes a
jacket, a shirt, pants, decent
shoes. Upon arriving at
Goerlitz, he stood in the
camp's courtyard in the first of
two rows of incoming
prisoners. Tannenbaum, stan-
ding about 15 feet from
Hostig, faced the new inmates.
"He wore beautiful pressed
pants, shined shoes, a cap with
a brim," said Hostig. "He was
the king of the camp."
Tannenbaum looked at
Hostig's shoes and ordered
him to remove them and get
some wooden clogs from a sup-
ply room. "I didn't move too
fast," recalls Hostig. "After
all, he was another Jew. What
could he do?"
Tannenbaum then strode
over to Hostig, raised both his
hands in the air ana slammed
him on the head. Hostig fell
sprawling into the dirt.
LATER THAT day. the
prisoners in Bloc No. 4, where
Hostig's younger brother,
Avram bad been assigned.
were ordered into the cour-
tyard. Avram, thin and frail.
<......
Friday, August 21, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
U.S. Group
Sees No
Anti-Semitism
Continued from Page 4-A
tras, the Sandinistas, the
Cubans, the PLO and Idi Amin
are all under that banner.
The New Jewish Agenda
shares platforms with the
PLO. The New Jewish Agenda
believes in the establishment
of a Palestinian State by the
PLO. Agenda does not believe
in the State of Israel as a
Jewish State. Agenda is a
radical political movement
masquerading under the label
of an "alternative" Jewish
philosophy. Nonsense.
BUT HERE is the danger.
The New Jewish Agenda is
seeking legitimacy by joining
Jewish Federations around the
country under the "alter-
native" label. There, from the
haven of Jewish Establish-
ment, they can with credibility
foment their self-destruction
and try to take the rest of us
down with with them. We can-
not permit that.
Labels need no longer trap
or limit us. Things must be
identified. An anti-Zionist is a
Jew-hater, even if he is a Jew.
Let us just strip away the mas-
quarade of labels. Let the New
Jewish Agenda speak for
itself, but not from the safety
and protection of a Federation
forum.
Any so-called Jewish
organization which would
espouse a Palestinian State in
Judea and Samaria does not
deserve legitimacy, specifical-
ly, when they do it from the
safety of America. The New
Jewish Agenda is self-
destructive, self-hating Jewry
at its 1980's purest. Keep
them outside the pale, and let
them self-destruct. They will.
was slow to move. Tannen-
baum went into Avram's bar-
racks and, according to
Hostig, stood in the doorway
next to the boy's bunk and
"beat his lungs out." The
beating was witnessed by the
prisoners in the courtyard.
The next day, Avram went
to Goerlitz's "hospital," a
room with three beds and a
Jewish physician who was
given no medications. The boy
died the following day.
"Tannenbaum is responsible
for my brother's death," said
Hostig, who had sneaked his
brother into the trucks from
Auschwitz heading to Goerlitz.
"Avram weighed about 80
pounds. He was only flesh and
blood. He wouldn't have pass-
ed the inspection at Auschwitz
that approved prisoners being
sent to Goerlitz. I risked my
life so he would have a chance
to survive."
"Tannenbaum was responsi-
ble for a lot of killings," said
Hostig, "not with a weapon,
not with a stick, but with his
hands. We didn't have any
Germans killing us because
there were hardly any
Germans."
ACCORDING TO Hostig,
there were only three Ger-
mans at Goerlitz: the camp
commander, the lager fuhrer,
who lived in a house on a hill
above Goerlitz; a shoemaker
who essentially ran the camp
who had been convicted for
killing his wife; and a Wer-
macht officer who ran the
kitchen
I ater that month, said
Hostig. a rabbit had escaped
from a small cage next to the
Continued on Page 15-A
Inmate Wants
Kosher Diet
EDINBURGH (JTA) -
An inmate is demanding a
kosher diet at Perth Prison
and is attempting to sue the
Secretary of State for
Scotland, Malcolm Rifkind.
The Jewish Echo reports
that Peter Martin, 27, of Edin-
burgh contends that the
absence of kosher meat has
limited his diet, thereby
damaging his health. He abs-
tains from pork and bacon, but
according to his attorney,
Cameron Fyfe, eats corned
beef "against his religious
belief."
"He also says he is being
denied gefilte fish, matzos
bread and that he has to eat
meat with dairy products dur-
ing meals," the attorney
continued.
Scottish law says that
"every prisoner shall be re-
quired on admission to state
his religious denomination and
shall continue to be treated as
a member of that denomina-
tion," the Echo noted.
Yet, prisons do not supply
kosher food or comply with
other ethnic diets, according to
Alfred Finer, chairman of the
Jewish After-Care Association
of London. Jewish prisoners
may opt for a vegetarian diet.
but this is not necessarily
satisfactory-


Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 21, 1987
U.S. Jews
Mount Opposition to Bork Okay
Continued from Page 1-A
this one fight where they can
not remain on the sidelines.
ALONG WITH the Jewish
War Veterans, the Union of
American Hebrew Congrega-
tions (UAHC), American
Jewish Congress, B'nai B'rith
Women, National Council of
Jewish Women and New
Jewish Agenda are opposing
the Bork nomination.
The National Jewish Coali-
tion has come out in support of
the nomination, maintaining
that Bork is "eminently
qualified" to serve on the court
and that "neither ideology nor
political opportunism should
prevent him from doing so."
David Coyne, executive
director of New Jewish Agen-
da, said he was "very en-
couraged" by Jewish opposi-
tion to Bork. He noted that a
year ago, during the nomina-
tion of Justice Antonin Scalia
and Chief Justice William
Rehnquist," the Jewish com-
munity was almost nowhere to
be found."
IRMA GETLER, president
of B'nai B'rith Women, an
organization which did not op-
pose the two previous court
nominations, said her
members are showing an
unusual interest and concern
about the Bork appointment.
"As a Jewish women's
organization we felt compelled
to speak out in opposition to
Bork because he has spoken
out on many subjects affecting
women and Jews on which we
are on record," said Getler.
But sources are saying that
other Jewish groups will have
to oppose Bork if the Jewish
community is going to have an
impact on the nomination. The
Chiles: PLO
'Unacceptable'
In U.S. Offices
Continued from Page 1-A
freedom of speech as
guaranteed by the First
Amendment.
"THE ANTI-terrorism Act
was carefully written so as not
to violate the spirit or letter of
the First Amendment. The Act
does not limit the constitu-
tional right of anyone to ex-
press an opinion in support of
the PLO.
"The Act makes a distinc-
tion between an 'advocate' of
the PLO and an 'agent' of the
organization. Thus* the bill
prevents the PLO from
operating in the U.S. any of-
fice it directly funds or con-
trols," Chiles declared.
Braille for Teens
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Materials to help visually
disabled Jewish youngsters
celebrate a Bar or Bat Mitzvah
are available free of charge
from the Jewish Braille In-
stitute of America. The non-
profit Jewish agency reports it
has helped to facilitate nearly
1,000 such ceremonies in its 56
years. The visually impaired
students can study alongside
their sighted peers, according
to the institute.
Washington Jewish Week
recently reported that three
Jewish Senators invited
several Jewish organizations
to send representatives to a
closed-door meeting to urge
them to take a stand on this
issue.
Sen. Alan Cranston (D.,
Calif.), reportedly told them
that by opposing Bork, Jewish
groups could show that they
are interested in Issues besides
Israel. Sens. Carl Levin (D.,
Mich.) and Howard Metzen-
baum (D., Ohio) also reported-
ly attended the meeting.
Rabbi David Saperstein, ex-
ecutive director of the
UAHC's Religious Action
Center, said that some
Senators who will be swing
votes on the Bork nomination
could be influenced by the
Jewish community's stand on
this issue.
"I THINK what the Jewish
community does is going to
send a profound signal rippling
through the Senate that may
well determine the outcome of
this battle," he added.
But some Jewish organiza-
tions invited to the meeting
are still debating whether to
oppose the nomination and say
they might decide to remain
neutral. The Anti-Defamation
We re just trying to be ob-
jective about it. That's whv
they're having a hearing. Whv
have a hearing if everyone's
taken a position on this?" said
David Brody, A D L
Washington representative.
The American Jewish Com-
mittee has a tradition of not
commenting on Supreme
Court and Cabinet nomina-
tions which are presidential
prerogatives, explained David
Harris, the group's
Washington representative
But he added: "We'll be wat-
League of B'nai B'rith is cur- ching the hearings closely, and
rently reviewing Bork's deci- we reserve
sions and writings. reconsider."
the right to
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Friday, August 21, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
wouldn't have done the same
thing if I was in his place."
It is this context that puts
the Tannenbaum case in a
legal and moral word of its
own. In the stinkhole of
Goerlitz, volition and motiva-
tion came from survival in-
dividual survival and the
only code was to make it
through one more day. Morali-
ty and decency kind
thoughts and kind actions
were almost aberrations.
THE WORLD that the
Nazis so craftily created was a
world no one on the outside
can comprehend. At
Auschwitz, the SS occasionally
forced Jewish prisoners to
throw alive into the ovens
Jewish inmates who had warn-
ed new prisoners of the
crematoria that awaited them.
In the numerous Judenrat, the
Jewish councils in eastern
Europe under Nazi occupation,
Jewish leaders decided which
Jews to ship for certain death
to concentration camps.
The Germans forced Jews in-
to the sewers of Warsaw to
flush out other Jews who were
hiding after the ghetto's
famous 1943 uprising. As
LEON HOSTIG: Holds Tannenbaum responsible for his brother's death.
The 'Kapo'
World of Jews Accused of Nazi Crime
Continued from Pace 13-A
kitchen. The 21-year-old in-
mate who had turned it into a
meal was apprehended by
Tannenbaum.
"In front of Bloc No. 1,
where I lived, was a pole," said
Hostig. "Tannenbaum beat the
boy, then tied him to the pole
with his hands above him. I
slept in the top bunk next to a
window. The boy moaned and
moaned. I couldn't sleep.
Then, there was silence around
3 a.m. The boy had
'lied." "ALL THE kapos were
very selfish," said Hostig.
"They wanted to show more
than was required of them by
the Germans. There was no
lecency among them. There
were no good kapos. They
were Tannenbaum's little ar-
my. He didn't have to order
other kapos to beat us. They
didn't need orders. They did it.
"Being a kapo was being in
heaven. Tannenbaum got his
'wn barber, his own tailor,
special food. He never had it so
tfood before the war."
Other survivors of Goerlitz
also tell chilling stories about
Tannenbaum's behavior. At
one point, the kapo reportedly
refused to let coal be used to
heat the "hospital." Coal
smuggled by healthier
prisoners was used only at
night so Tannenbaum would
not discover the subterfuge.
ANOTHER TIME, Tannen
baum reportedly called
45-year-old Jacob Adler a
"Hungarian prostitute," then
slammed him across the back
with an iron bar, killing him in-
stantly. According to survivor
David Katz, Tannenbaum had
the run of the women's bar-
racks and "raped anyone he
wanted," including a very
religious Chasidic girl with
whom he wanted to live.
In February, 1945, said
Katz, Tannenbaum selected
300 Jews to be gassed at Gross
Rosen, a nearby concentration
camp. And two days before
Chanukah, 1944, said Leon
Zelig, Tannenbaum came into
the washroom where Zelig's
father, Moshe, a Chasidic rab-
bi, was leading some prisoners
in prayer. Swinging a rubber
hose, Tannenbaum killed the
rabbi. Twice before, Zelig had
seen Tannenbaum beat his
father.
To date, the only person who
has a kind word for Tannen-
baum is Aaron Miller, now a
76-year-old Chasidic cantor in
Brooklyn. Delighted with
Miller's concerts on Sundays,
the prisoners' one day off from
12-hour work days, Tannen-
baum once gave Miller some
extra food. But Tannenbaum
also once offered to make
Miller a kapo.
"God forbid," responded
Miller, "and have everyone
under my boot?
"It can't be that Tannen-
baum is not guilty," said
Miller. "He was wild. He was a
murderer. What they say
about him is true. He just
didn't do anything to me. He
was kind to me."
SURVIVORS DIFFER on
what happened to Tannen-
baum after the war. Some say
he disappeared a few days
before the Soviets liberated
the camp on May 8, 1945. A
few say he lived briefly in the
town of Goerlitz. Another says
he lived for a while in Rumania
with the Chasidic girl he had
repeatedly raped in the labor
camp. In 1946, Leon Zelig
tried to track down Tannen-
baum in Bucharest, where he
had heard he was living Zelig
was ready to gouge out Tan-
nenbaum's eyes. He never
found him.
According to the Justice
Department, Tannenbaum
entered the United States
from Italy in 1949. Six years
later, he became a U.S. citizen.
Survivors have had varying
reactions to Tannenbaum's
resurfacing. Leon Hostig was
"furious, furious," to learn
that Tannenbaum had been liv-
ing about two miles from him
in Brooklyn.
"MY BLOOD hasn't stop
ped running," he said. "I
would like to be his killer. If I
had known he was ten minutes
away, he never would have
survived. I don't care about my
life. I never had a life. There
wasn't a night for me that I
didn't have a dream from
those days. People say,
'Forget.' I can't forget."
If given a chance, survivor
David Katz "would cut off one
of Tannenbaum's fingers
every day. I would show him
what sadism is."
But Leon Zelig would have
preferred that Tannenbaum
had never been discovered. His
exposure before his family and
friends and synagogue, said
Zelig, "is punishment
enough."
"Tannenbaum was a vic-
tim," said Zelig. "He had lost
his family as I did. Nobody was
human in those days. The first
thing I did when I heard that
Tannenbaum had killed my
father was rush to my father's
bunk and take it apart, sear-
ching for bread to eat that he
may have hidden for religious
services. That is not a very
human thing to do."
While noting that kapos
were generally forced by the
SS to commit certain
brutalities, Zelig added that
Tannenbaum had gone
"beyond the bounds. A kapo
didn't have to be a sadist. Tan-
nenbaum went beyond the
bounds. Yet, I cannot say I
Goerlitz survivor Leon Hostig
said, "Everyone was looking
for his own survival. It was
brother against brother, child
against parent."
The Tannenbaum case does
not rest easily with some Jews.
Despite the Jewish com-
munity's official endorsement
of the case's prosecution, one
detects a wariness that it will
expose old wounds, that it will
reveal the depths to which not
only Nazis, but also Jews, sank
during the Holocaust.
"It hurts the heart to talk
about one Jew against
another," said Bella Miller,
wife of Goerlitz survivor
Aaron Miller. "But if a Jew
could do something like this,
maybe we are not such a good
people."
That a whole people should
be or, even, can be judged
by the actions of one man is.
perhaps, myopic. Such think-
ing emanates from the mirror
image of racism. But it also in-
dicates the magnitude of roil-
ing emotions that the Tannen-
baum case has unleashed. And
a sign of what is to come as the
case slowly progresses to trial.
Jerusalem Electric Co. Workers
Oppose Cabinet's Restrictions
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
There were protests and
demonstrations by workers at
the Jerusalem District Elec-
tricity Company following the
Cabinet's decision to restrict
JDEC's operations exclusively
to Arab consumers.
The Cabinet approved, by a
vote of 15-5, the recommenda-
tion of Energy Minister Moshe
Shahal to reduce the scope of
the debt-ridden JDEC's opera-
tions so that the company
would cease serving the new
Jewish suburbs of Jerusalem
and West Bank Jewish
settlements.
THESE WILL now receive
their electricity directly from
the Israel Electric Corporation
(IEC), the government-owned
Israeli power monopoly. The
JDEC will confine itself to sup-
plying Arab sections of
Jerusalem and the West Bank,
the Cabinet rejected an alter-
native proposal that the JDEC
be closed down altogether.
The company will be re-
quired to dismiss some 350 of
its staff of more than 500. It
will l>e required to purchase all
of its electricity from the IEC.
Hitherto it has generated five
percent of its electricity, and
purchased 95 percent from the
IEC. The five percent capacity
will henceforth be used in
emergencies only.
The JDEC is the largest cor-
poration in the administered
areas, and its staff is widely
reputed to include politically
radical elements among its
leadership. The company's
fate, therefore, has long been
seen as a political as well as
economic problem.
THE COMPANY'S chair
man, Hanna Nasser, said he
deplored the Cabinet's deci-
sion to reduce the JDEC's con-
cession, but he did not reject
the entire plan. Apparently he
hopes for concomitant govern-
ment aid to help bail the com-
pany out of its financial
troubles.
Jewish residents of East
Jerusalem and the settlements
were generally plased at the
Cabinet's decision, because
JDEC's antiquated equipment
has often broken down in the
past, causing lengthy power
lapses.
TOP CASH PAID
OLD FURNITURE
ORIENTAL RUGS
OLD OIL PAINTINGS
Objects of Art
Bric-a-Brac
Tapestries
Bronzes
Pianos
Silver
Single Items or Complete Estates
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The Jewish Floridian
SSSC3


Page 16-A The Jewish Fteridaivyriday. August 21, 1967
Sharon's Defense:
Cabinet Directed War in Lebanon
Cunwd fro- Pic* 2-a
mmMM I staai m
Lebanon i. but -~y tr.e vanoos
i asecativt itepi and
developiEt".:-- :' :re f^haaj
as presented H :; Sharon.
Tbe only overall Cabinet ded-
".or. was the r.e reft
the aMriaaaaai er.:- "
Lebanon.
COL. RAM COHEN ?.
the war aa*
!i>: laaaB] -ate.:
i Maparr protal
. it -
I
"He stands as the aaaaad a
a
which
Lehaa _- ar ff.c:a..y at-
- ""
quiry." he aal We cannot
allow Sharer Baaafei
haaaif from the accuse-: .-.:-
the acem
Rec Sharon's data*
thai the :r_y 9Bf*M
Likud ac:
bombing of the Baghdad
nuciear reactor and the war.
came from Labor Party head-
quarters. Labor.te Foreign
JLnister Shuccn Peres toid
Israel Radio Wednesday more-
mgr. "Absolutely no truth to
aa accusation."
He satd the Labor Party had
teen informed cf the war pians
First Woman Prexy
ATLANTA iJTAi -
Denoe Roccoowkz has been
ejected the first wemar. rres-
f the :
Israel svr.agogue
here
only after the IDF had already
crossed and had
thea baaa I '''--' '~~
ng would last only three
:>r four ciavs and would
Israel: forces
4
<:.: meters frcrr. the torOer
PERES SAID thai under
questiomrig at that time the
Labor leaders had :*e-
tr.ere aaaa t>e no approa.
Beirut and no confrontation
with the Syrian*.
We van al laaa
rial far what aa:
-
w* aa I exactly
eaatrarj : ed
Pere? stress* :
Premier Mer.acr.crr 5
haase:"- td bk he was sarpria-
I .- m amk
old rheck with Shan -
Peres aatei the Leoanon
war had
:" laatna paa
and ended a rxtreaaat
I a at
PLO. m control of a I
Lebanon.
Share c hac said thi war
started after a long per;
attacks on Gaulee Settlements.
and had ended with the defeat
af the PL
Peres sa>3 he had until now
opposed tee :dea of a commis-
sion of inquiry into the
Lebanon war. but Sharon's
speech Tuesday night had
possibly made essencai such
an offica. Jivesogatiaa.
WEIZMAN SAID Wednes-
day that Sharon's
af pearea to oe _
Reacts* I aaa*a*l state-
-r.er.: regard:ng 1.980 plans to
aarer. Bant, Weianan
sail: We nad -
pass. Tai la jerataad
- the genera) stafl ; -
r.e .:."
eaa a
fancy piar
r.e ever.:? ?-cr. as strike
ana
1967 -..oh had r area
aa
:- .- aj -
at raad aa f
- ^ 7-- nry cor/ |
plans a -
aa R
raa
fMr. S
;c -r rr.e
m a
--
1

( -
"AND BACK -
-
-
rease
71. ::- rt
- -: Not i jr.-:: was f -
al
"Ami da
*e starte- '. ii-
tr.e anerr.ttec assass-rat::r. :'
ir Arr.cassa." :
The put :e:a:e
Sharon's version of the
Lebanon war is ikely to con-
- ~ '
renewed atcar :s :
for a cooanaaor. : r oon into the war. and
by Likud for ar. B
aif] aaaaaB c
i
;'.
, .- nkannivt xtd'$Ind* Dim
'- Hidajutah-H-

' >*Ktr. i

termec : -
Labor Pa-
ar
Independent-* L
al Cent* r -
Shevardnadze Rejects Link
Between Talks, Ties to Israel
By TAMAR UTfl
GENEVA (JTAi Soviet Foreign Minister Eduarc j
Shew rejected Israeli Foreign Minis:-
Peres riew that 5o%iet participation in a peace o rierewt
- afionV East be linked to the reaumntko of
I : anc rela: i nj 'etween Israel and the USSR and u ]
terimg -*ider the gates to Jewish err.:gratx>a
HE TOLD a press conference here last Friday thi"!
re was no Iinxage between the resumption of c.piomaot'
-eiarjons and the USSR's participation in the conferanj
Regarding the conference, he said: "The USSR is rr.ostifr
:crested m having it convened and is doing all :t can topn^
mote ;:." He added that he was gratified to note that thai
is a growing awareness in the international community tha |
- -er.ee was a necess
ugbt that Per-
et participa-
I
TH WORLD ACCDRDiMB TD ME H
Prothicad oy Broocs Artnur for Our DaMQPters Mus.c
I assooatior aahL -<3a Goklner Parry
Execute P-ocuce Aa ace A: ^ecorc Stores Carywtara.
On Warner Bros Facords and Cassettes
.'. NNEB OP 1967 TCNY AW*9D
= z- z.-s-as-: S3 --=*-= :a.a:-e.eve.-
vari nm
C X scsagt trc *tO.
*l
cay.
I
I
I
I


I




A Collection of Anguish
ADL Photo Exhibit Of Disapearing Polish Jews
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Fhridian Staff Writer
Polish Jews are a people on
tie verge of extinction. In
300, three-quarters of all the
ews in the world lived in
foland. In 1939, the 3.5 million
polish Jews formed the second
rgest diaspora. By 1980,
jut 5,000 of them were left.
These Polish Jews are all
nat remains of a people whose
fes had once been full of col-
|rful traditions and customs.
low, in Lublin, it is even dif-
|cult to find enough Jews to
tiake a minyan.
A ROMAN Catholic
lusband-and-wife photojour-
lalist team noticed the silence
if the once vibrant communi-
f. They set out to track down
tie members of that Lublin mi-
lyan. They found the last
losher butcher in Poland.
icy found a society of Jews
[here the median age was 70
(I loneliness prevailed.
It was a five-year effort that
|ften used up their own
esources. But they kept at it.
hie result is a book called,
[Remnants: The Last Jews of
Poland."
The photographic documen-
iry, currently on exhibit in
le National Press Club in
/ashington, D.C., will make
\,s way to Miami's Historical
luseum in the Cultural Center
i downtown Miami Sept. 1-30.
fhe exhibit is being sponsored
iy the Anti-Defamation
[league of B'nai B'rith and the
listorical Museum of
fouthern Florida.
"THE REMNANTS exhibit
an important and poignant
?minder of the glory now lost
^f the Polish Jewish communi-
said Arthur Teitelbaum,
out hern area director for the
iDL.
'The 500 Jews who remain
Poland offer a fragment of
hope that the memory of the
ens of thousands of Polish
lews who were lost in the
lolocaust will not be
forgotten."
The colorful and sensitive
vriting that accompanies the
[ihotographs was done by
lalgorzata Niezabitowska, a
surnalist, playwright, screen-
writer and lyricist who holds
lejrrees in law and journalism
rom the University of War-
law. She was active in
Solidarity and wrote for the
ovement's newspaper until
Solidarity was quashed with
he clamp of martial law in
981.
SHE RECENTLY com
pleted a year of study at Har-
vard University where she was
recipient of the 1986 Nieman
fellowship for Journalism.
Her husband, Tomasz
'omaszewski, is one of
oland's leading
photographers and also work-
ed for Solidarity Weekly. They
cere both born in Warsaw,
lere they live with their
(ight-year-old daughter,
Iaryna.
Besides financial problems,
/hich were alleviated when
rriendly Press in New York
^igned a contract for their
ook, the couple faced other
problems.
Niezabitowska writes about
them in an introduction of the
sk called, "Why?"
Jews of Poland ADL Photo Exhibit, Sept. 1-30.
"WHEN I began, I never
dreamed of how difficult it
would turn out to be. Above
all, because taking up such a
painful and complex subject re-
quired me to begin with
myself: to overcome my own
ignorance as well as my often
unconscious presuppositions
and stereotypes not only about
Jews and Poles but also about
their mutual relations.
"It was difficult because it
also meant overcoming the
mistrust of many Jews still liv-
ing in Poland and gaining ac-
ceptance in the closed circles
where a goy is always an out-
sider and every Pole is an anti-
Semite."
Niezabitowska and
Tomaszewski discussed their
project with The Jewish Flori-
dian, in a telephone interview.
WHAT DID they learn?
"First of all, we are very
lucky that we made this
record," says Tomaszewski.
"It was really the last moment
of thousands of years of
history of Polish Jews. But this
is not just our impressions.
They are the impressions of
the hundreds of Jews which we
interviewed and who we met in
five years.
"They call themselves 'The
Last.' Even the young people,
about 35-40 years old, feel they
are the last ones. There is no
hope for the Jewish life. It's
hard to find a minyan in the
shtetls, in the small Jewish
towns."
Tomaszewski notes that
their book is the first to deal
with contemporary Jews in
Poland since the Second World
War.
BEING CATHOLIC, he
acknowledges, ''our
knowledge was very, very
small about Polish Jews. We
learned a lot, and we unders-
tand Yiddish right now, and
we know how to behave in the
synagogue. Many of the people
who became heroes of the book
are our friends now."
Their book was also publish-
ed in German and is available
in West Germany. "This is the
country which created the
Holocaust. I think it's very im-
portant to show to this public
this kind of book."
Anti-Semitism is not a big
problem in Poland today, says
Niezabitowska. "Freedom of
religion in Poland is big. Poles
are very Catholic, and no one
is prosecuted for going to
church. Jews have synagogues
and rooms of prayer. The only
problem is there aren't even
enough Polish Jews to form a
minyan."
The story will not end with
this book. "I cannot imagine
ourselves staying apart of
Jewish life in'Poland. It was
very important for us, it was
the biggest emotional and pro-
fessional experience in our life.
It gave us a deep knowledge
and understanding that we
didn't have before, a love, and
we are very glad it happened."
THEY DIDNT always have
an easy time. Niezabitowska
often relates her experiences
in the book with passages such
as this:
"How many of you are there
today"
"A handful.
"But do you still have a mi-
nyan for prayers?
"For the important holidays
everybody comes. They come
from other places from
Continued on Page 6-B
Ouif
Community
Friday, August 21,1987 The Jewish Florldlan Section B


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. August 21. 1987
OVIR Official Says USSR Is Easing
Family Reunification Process
NEW YORK (JTA) The
head of the Moscow OVIR
emigration office said that the
Soviet government is acting in
accordance with its "interna-
tional obligations'* to ease
family reunification pro-
cedures for emigration, and
that Soviet Jews with relatives
in the West will be permitted
to join them without obtaining
an invitation from relatives in
Israel, according to the Na-
tional Conference on Soviet
Jewry.
Rudolf Kuznetsov told the
weekly Soviet journal Sovoye
Vrema that "in keeping with
the Constitution and the inter-
national obligations of the
USSR, the letter and spirit of
the documents of the Commit-
tee on Security and Coopera-
tion in Europe, and also of last
year's conference in Bern, the
Soviet government is making
human contacts and issues of
reunification of families
easier."
IN EFFECT, according to
Kuznetsov. Soviet Jews with
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relatives living in the West will
be allowed to join then, thus
bypassing the current require-
ment that an invitation must
be obtained from Israel. He
said that former Soviet Jews
residing in countries that have
diplomatic relations with the
Soviet Union can invite their
relatives to join them.
Kuznetsov also said that it
will be possible for trips to be
made to and from the Soviet
Union, "for meetings not only
with close relatives but also
with other relations and even
with friends."
The publication's inter-
viewer. Lev Yelin, asked if a
former Soviet Jewish national
could invite a Soviet Jewish
relative for permanent
residence in the West, to
which Kuznetsov replied.
"Yes. he can."
However. Kuznetsov subse- Updated
quently took a swipe at Soviet
emigres who applied to go to
Israel and then went to other
countries instead. "Those peo-
ple assured us that all they
ever wanted was to live in that
country (Israel) and nowhere
else but in fact they never
even put one foot on Israeli soil
. But that is their business."
said Kuznetsov.
At Har Haruach. near Moshav Kesalon.
tinder-dry conditions and a strong westerly
wind whipped up 60-foot walls of flame (above)
that swept across 875 acres of natural
woodlands and 50 acres of the memorial forest
for child inctims of the Holocaust in Ism,!. On
July 29, four different fires near Jerusalem
ravaged 1,150 acres of forests, including
80,000 trees, at an estimated damage of
million.
Phantom
Aircraft
MEANWHILE, hopes that
cellist and Hebrew teacher
Aleksei Magaryk might win
early release from his three-
year sentence in labor camp

'. jya Ratner,

when I is im-
- told that he
would have to serve his full
sentence. Last April, his term
was cut in half, and he is due
for relea.-e sometime in
September.
TEL AVIV (JTA) An
updated version of the Phan-
tom aircraft, which has been in
service with the Israel Air
Force for some 16 years, was
shown to the press here on
Tuesday (Aug. 11).
The updated version of the
plane, with new Israeli-
developed electronic systems
said to be equal to those incor-
porated in the F-16s just
delivered to Israel, is planned
: the operational life
of the Phantom 2000 by -
1 years.
The first model of the up-
dated Phani
by its Air F>
the first time Tu
cond prototype will l>e flown
by next March. But the tlrst
squadron of improved Phan-
tom 2000s is due for delivery
to the Air Force only by the
earlv 1990's.
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
Telemarketing Solicitors
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The Jewish Floridian
Jewish Floridian salute
to our centenarians
The following individual is alreadv 100 vears old or
will be 100 by Dec. 31. 1987:
N \ \l E
BIKTHDATI
PRESENT ADDRESS
\l'l (TIN
CITY OP BIRTH
81 \ I I.
STATI
/.I I'
<<>( \ nc
SI GGESTEDBY
IDDRI SS
< I I N
PHONE
ZIP
Enclose a photograph of the centenarian if possible
SBd mail to KM) YEARS YOUNG. The Jewish Floridian
P.O. Box 012973, Miami. Fla 33101.
Bagels Through The Ages
It is said that more than three centuries ago in Vienna. Austria.
a grateful baker created a special gift for the King of Poland for
saving his country from Turkish invaders. And thus, in 1683. the
hagel was horn. The hard roll, shaped to resemble a stirrup
Igel" in Austrian), *U *aid to commemorate the king's
favorite pastime horseback riding.
A- bage 1 spread from country to country, they took on a .
ty of different uses. In Poland they were given at gifts to Wi
in childbirth for good luck in producing a health) child. M
them to their babies as nutritious teething rings In
Russia bagels Jled "bul were sold on strings in the
; nourish the town folk.
Baf ;ik and p igicsl po
> bout Uh round chewy bread

the V.S. I en igrants ii
..
ii

work
today l. k
In 1955 the I.> i to pack... i
much-in-denuu
- the pr r:>; their product, thus spawnii.
national distribution of bagi
The popularity of bagels spread across the country in the 19
but it was not until the '80s that bagels really began to boon
day's fast-pact imers appreciate the convenienci
sliced, toaster ready frozen bagels. With only 150 calories
plain bagel, they're just right for the calorie conscious consunu r
too. The varieties are great for any hostess in a jam: plain
onion, rye. raisin 'n honey, raisin "n wheat, sesame seed, pur
nickle. poppyseed and garlic. The serving possibilities foi
bagel are limited only by one's imagination.
Looking into the future, bagels are seen in every home's
freezer. They've moved from the breakfast table to silver hors
d'oeuvre trays and teyond. There's no right way or wrong way to
eat a bagel. Whether you slice it. scoop it out and fill it. or q
it with cream cheese, a bagel is a delicious experience which
everyone should enjoy.
Bagel Serving Suggestion Is
LOX N CREAM CHEESE OR BAGEL N NOVA
Referred to affectionately as "lox 'n cream cheese" by many.
this classic combination of smoked salmon and cream eh*
last becoming a popular treat for all modem tastes How about a
bagel buffet brunch featuring smoked salmon and crean. I I
ai Well as other delicacies such as: sturgeion. creamed hei
smoked white-fish, cheddar cheese ball, assorted slued chei
herb cheese spread, mast beef. Serve warm.
Property Tax Appeals
For hotels, apartments, shopping centers,
office buildings, restaurants, warehouses,
hospitals, specialty properties. Contingent or
hourly basis.
THOMAS R. POST, PA
ATTORNEYS
(305)379-1500


Defies Easy Classification
Friday, August 21, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Autistic Child: A Developmental Disability
'i'ih^j^^^^^^^^
Paula, is autistic, a developmental disability that
defies easy classification. It occurs in an
estimated 15 of 10,000 births and usually is
diagnosed by the age of 3. Symptoms include an
inability to process external information,
leading to problems in learning, communication
and behavior. An autistic child can be erratic,
self-destructive, hyperactive or totally
withdawn. Many autistic children also have
other handicaps.
:-ivi-i-!-!-iW^
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Gershon Kuzecki is a father
who does not have a pleasant
picture of his daughter's early
years to show. The picture he
has shows his daughter Miriam
with a tube in her stomach.
She was so withdrawn, doctors
could not get her to eat any
other way.
Miriam Kuzecki, the
daughter of Gershon and
Paula, is autistic, a
developmental disability that
defies easy classification. It oc-
curs in an estimated 15 of
10,000 births and usually is
diagnosed by the age of 3.
Symptoms include an inability
to process external informa-
tion, leading to problems in
learning, communication and
behavior. An autistic child can
be erratic, self-destructive,
hyperactive or totally
withdrawn. Many autistic
children also have other
handicaps.
"MY WIFE noticed it early,
just after the nursing age, but
the pediatricians told my wife
at that time that they really
didn't feel anything was wrong
with our daughter and that she
was being a hysterical
mother," Kuzecki, an Or-
thodox Jew and public school
teacher in Cleveland, said.
Kuzecki came to Miami,
though, with news of optimism
for other children in South
Florida like his daughter, who
is now 7. He had found a school
in Japan that helped his
daughter more than any other
program she had been in. Now
that school is opening a branch
in Lexington, Mass. It is
scheduled to open this fall as
the Boston Higashi School.
Kuzecki's purpose is two-
fold. Besides spreading word
about the school and the op-
portunity it gives autistic
children, Kuzecki is also mak-
ing an appeal to the public to
help him meet the costs of the
tuition for a child in the school,
which can run upwards of
$25,000 annually.
He has been able to meet the
expensive costs for his
daughter's special education
through previous appeals to
the Jewish community.
Talking to Miriam before she
went to the school in Japan
was like talking to a wall,
Kuzecki said.
"Now, she's much more
aware, and she understands a
great many things. For exam-
ple, she really understands
when you tell her to go
upstairs and bring your shoes
down, have a seat at the table
or, if she's dropped something,
to pick it up and put it in the
trash."
The problem, Kuzecki says,
for him and others is that his
Gershon Kuzecki
insurance will not cover the
costs of the school because it is
not a hospital. Yet it is the
school, and not a hospital,
which can help his child,
Kuzecki said.
"WE'VE ALSO tried to get
governmental and organiza-
tional help, and none of these
sources has really come across.
So we've had to go out and try
to raise the funds to keep her
in the school because it is real-
ly helping her. This has been
very difficult. We have three
other children who are healthy
to take care of."
Because of their child's il-
lness, Kuzecki said he and his
wife learned about many op-
tions for treating autistic
children. One year, his wife
went to a national autistic con-
vention in California, and
there were represented pro-
grams from all over the world.
"This one (the Japanese
school) by far seems to be the
very best," Kuzecki said.
"They feel that the autistic
child, through his education,
Scholarships For
Young Artists
America's most talented 17
and 18 year olds will be vying
for $3 million in scholarships,
$400,000 in cash awards and
the chance to be named a U.S.
Presidential Scholar in the
Arts through the national
1987-88 Arts Recognition and
Talent Search (ARTS).
Sponsored by the National
Foundation for the Advance-
ment in the Arts (NFAA) and
administered by Miami-Dade
Community College, ARTS is
the only national program to
recognize young artists in all
arts disciplines dance,
music, theater, visual arts and
writing. ARTS is open to all 17
and 18 year olds, whether they
are in high school, attending
college or out of school.
Interested young artists
have until Oct. 1 to apply. A
portion of the $35 application
fee may be waived, depending
on eligibility. ARTS applica-
tions are available at high
schools, or can be obtained by
writing or calling ARTS.
can become independent, but
other people we come in touch
with really don't believe that.
Other parents who have
autistic children, especially
young ones, should definitely
look at this school. You must
have the child in a very in-
tense, specialized autistic pro-
gram such as this one, or the
child will grow up not being
able to do much of anything."
KITAHARA'S Mushashino
Higashi Gakuen School, as the
program is called in Japan,
teaches autistic children in
small groups of up to 10 with
one or two teachers. This is to
avoid a dependence that can be
fostered in a one-on-one ap-
proach. Once the child has
mastered basic social skills, he
or she is transferred into a
larger class with normal
children.
Vigorous activity is what
transforms the students from
the "shell of autism, according
to Dr. Kyo Kitahara. Once the
shell is broken, she believes,
intellectual progress and the
blooming of often exceptional
talent is possible. Music,
drama and a wide variety of
arts are used to draw the
children's potential.
Vigorous activity is what
transforms the students from
the "shell of autism, according
to Dr. Kiyo Kitahara. Once the
shell is broken, she believes,
intellectual progress and the
blooming of often exceptional
talent is possible. Music,
drama and wide variety of arts
are used to draw the children's
potential.
KUZECKI SAYS the
outlook for his daughter is not
good if she doesn't continue in
the school.
"Honestly speaking," he
said, our daughter is in a situa-
tion where if she doesn't get to
go into this program then who
knows what will happen to
her?"
Requests for information
may be addressed to Kuzecki
at 2420 Milton Road, Universi-
ty Heights, Ohio 44118.
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Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 21, 1987^
UJA Explains Rare Move
Into Political Scene
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jeu-ish Floridian Staff Writer
Martin F. Stein, national
chairman of the United Jewish
Appeal, said that this year's
campaign may be the single
most successful in UJA
history. In a special
teleconference call with 12
Jewish newspapers around the
country on Wednesday, Stein
also explained why the UJA
was making a rare move into
the political scene of Israel by
opposing the "Who is a Jew"
legislation.
A major portion of the UJA
funds come from Conservative
and Reform Jews, yet the
"Who is a Jew" bill that
recently was defeated by the
Knesset would have denied a
convert Jewish status in Israel
unless they were converted by
an Orthodox rabbi according
to strict interpretations of
halacha.
"In America, it's a very,
very key religious issue,"
Stein said. "In Israel, it's a key
political issue."
A UJA delegation visited
Israel to discuss this issue with
top Knesset members, Stein
said, not to "use the hammer
of money and say if you dont'
do this we won't give you
money." but to inform key
political leaders of the
"seriousness of the issue."
The delegation was received
well. Stein said, and plans to
return to Israel within the
next few weeks "to get this
religious hot potato in America
off the political table" in
Israel.
"We are also encouraging
Knesset members who don't
understand pluralism to come
to America." Stein said.
"What they think of pluralism
is a rabbi and priest together
under a chupah performing a
wedding. That is not
pluralism. We need a place
where they can get together in
a retreat setting and unders-
tand how (American Jews)
have differences but share the
great love of Judaism."
When asked if it was a basic
change for UJA from a role of
collecting money to getting in-
volved with Israeli issues.
Stein said, "I believe we have
to be involved in issues of
mainstream Judaism. I think
our constituency expects more
than that." He added that
UJA has no plans to withhold
funds over this issue.
As for the UJA's general
campaign this year, Stein said
that as of Aug. 13, the fund
had raised $652.1 million com-
pared to $585.4 million on this
date last year, which
represents an 11.4 percent in-
crease or $66 million. Stein
said "communication" bet-
ween UJA officials and local
communities has been the key
to this success. Stein said he
has logged over 225,000 miles
visiting local Jewish Federa-
tions as well as visiting Israel
six times and Jews in the
Soviet Union, Czechoslovakia,
Poland and England.
Drawing on his own ex-
perience as a retailer and phar-
macist, Stein explained that
you have to be sensitive to the
needs of the communities.
Looking to the future. Stein
said, the UJA has sponsored a
number of retreats for young
men and women in leadership
and he agrees that it is impor-
tant to involve young Jews in
the organization. The retreats
have also been provided for
campaign chairman and com-
mittee members.
"The results of the retreat
has been, number one, a
significant increase in their
own commitment to the cam-
paign. And in a constant ex-
change of ideas we continue to
move ahead in meeting needs
and anticipating needs."
On Sunday, a "Concorde
Mission" will leave for Israel,
with travel on the ultra-
modern iet making the trip
reduced to six and a half hours
"This year we hope to have
close to $40 million in fundrais-
ing from this group."' Stein
said. There also will be mis-
sions for other groups ranging
from $100,000 donors to $500
donors.
Soviet Jews are a major con-
cern of the UJA, Stein said.
Addressing the issue of the
Soviet policy of "glasnost" or
openness, Stein said. "(Soviet
leader Mikhail) Gorbachev, of
all the Soviet leaders of recent
memory, is one of the smartest
and most politically astute. I
believe he is using the Soviet
Jews as a bargaining chip with
the U.S. government and he is
a very capable, able, cunning
Soviet leader who has in fact it
on his agenda to let out enough
Jews to get what he wants."
Stein said he has seen "no
major changes" in the Soviet
policy regarding refuseniks
and asserted that there were
more Soviet Jews in forced
labor camps under Gorbachev.
"I don't trust him," Stein said.
"He has no concern for human
rights."
On the other hand, should a
large number of Soviet Jews.
as well as Ethiopian or other
blocks of Jews be allowed to
emigrate to Israel en masse,
the UJA would have to go into
a contingency plan to boost the
facilities such as absorption
centers.
"If we could improve the
situation of those who make
aliyah. we could improve the
numbers who go to Israel
rather than the U.S." Stein
said.
Absorption centers and im-
migration takes up about lil
percent of the l.IA budget.
Rural settlements account for
about 19 percent, research. 2h
percent, youth aliyah 17.1 per-
cent and vocational training,
five percent. About 8.2 per-
cent goes toward interest on
the Jewish Agency's borrow-
ing debt which has been reduc-
ed from about $650 million to
$450 million.
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Sophia X. Fischer '"/.> '.. ap-
pointed to the position of com-
munications associaU for the
Gr\ r Miami Jewish Fed* ra-
tion, announced Myron ./.
Brodie, Federation executiw
vice president
Marriage Rate
Declines
MANCHESTER, England
- (JTA) Synagogue mar
na^es in Britain dipped to
1.097 in 1!8. the lowest an-
nual total this century, accor-
ding to a survey of the Jewish
community's vital statistics by
the Board of Deputies of
British Jewry Community
Research Unit.
The 1986 total was one per-
cent below that of the previous
low, 1,110 in 1982. In 1985,
1.144 marriages took place in a
synagogue. The Jewish
Telegraph notes that the Or-
thodox experienced a smaller
decrease than did the I'm
gressiv.'s, and London increas-
ingly has more such marriages
than do the provinces.
Meir Rosenne, Israel's e,^ I
Ambassador to the r"" I
States, has bee,, >,nu>d!lm
man of Internal u^lfo,^ I
for the Shaare Zedektt.
Center in Jerusalem r2*
who will be WrfTj
Africa/ Center JfnJ*
unll represent Shan re Z^ \
international health ,
ferences and develop ^
ties with the health mnnstZ
of foreign govern m,,
>
H
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Friday, August 21, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Former Refusenik Crafts
U.S. Constitution Medals
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) A
Soviet Jewish emigre who
once held a prestigious posi-
tion as a sculptor-engraver at
the Leningrad Mint has etched
his name into United States
history. Alex Shagin, now of
Los Angeles, has designed two
medals commemorating the
U.S. Constitution in honor of
its bicentennial.
One is a multi-sided design
whose outline matches the
drum engraved on its reverse
side. Upon the drum lies the
parchment reading, "We, the
People of the United States,"
with drumsticks resting on
top. On the flip side is a man in
early American clothing with
open mouth as though declar-
ing liberty, and bearing a flag
with a semicircle of stars curv-
ed around the date September
17, 1787, the day the Constitu-
tion was completed.
CALL IT MY drum medal,
and I felt like we have to drum
up the meaning of the docu-
ment that moved the modern
era, modern society, modern
history, and influenced all
civilized countries in the last
two centuries," Shagin, 40,
said.
"But above all, I wanted to
show a man, a town crier an-
nouncing that event, as if he is
crying, 'Citizens, listen,
something is happening
around here that is going
to shake up the entire world
and affect our future."
The other medal is even
more intricate. It shows on one
side a group of delegates to the
Constitutional Convention, in-
cluding George Washington.
Benjamin Franklin and James
Madison. The reverse depicts
three Colonial figures with
d rum. flag and the
Constitution.
In the early 1970*8, Shagin
was considered one of the
Soviet Union's most gifted
young artists. He was
graduated from the Vera
Muchina School of Art and
Design in Leningrad, then
worked at the Leningrad Mint
from 1973-77. There he
prepared the designs for many
of the coins that were later
issued to commemorate the
1980 Olympic Games in
Moscow.
BUT FEELING deprived of
creative and Jewish
freedom, Shagin applied to
emigrate 10 years ago. He was
immediately dismissed from
the mint and denied a source of
income for the 14 months he
waited for permission to
emigrate. In 1979, Shagin left
the USSR in the big wave of
Soviet Jewish emigration and
settled in Los Angeles.
His first job in Los Angeles
was in the jewelry business,
then in graphic design and
journalism. He was a co-
founder of An Almanac
Panorama, which serves the
Los Angeles Soviet
community.
His first break in medallic
art came in 1981 "from the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Los Angeles, for whom he
designed the "Wall-Builders
Medal" dedicated to those who
provided funds for construc-
tion of the federation's head-
quarters. Since then he has
received a half dozen commis-
sions from the Federation, in-
cluding award medals that
depicted the prophets Isaiah,
Jeremiah and Micah.
HE HAS also designed com-
memorative medals depicting
Maimonides, Sigmund Freud,
the Lubavitcher Rebbe, Simon
Wiesenthal, Albert Einstein,
Anatoly Sharansky and Elie
Wiesel.
Shagin grew up knowing lit-
tle about Judaism. He said his
grandmother spoke Hebrew
and Yiddish, and was brought
up in the Jewish religious
tradition, but not so his
parents. They in turn kept
Shagin "totally unaware of my
Jewish culture. They wanted
to protect me against anti-
Semitism, especially in the
1950's, in Stalin's last years,
when it was virtually impossi-
ble to teach a child anything
Jewish. So it was a process of
eventual assimilation into
Soviet culture," he recalled.
"My artistic career didn't
allow me anything of the

Jewish cultural values. So
when I decided to enter the
professional world of visual
arts, I knew I would be con-
stantly very closely watched
by ideological bosses, by my
artists' union and by mint
authorities." He said those
restrictions combined with the
Six-Day War inspired him and
his friends to emigrate.
So how did he even begin to
envision the giants of Jewish
history?
"To bring me to a recovery
of my Jewish roots, I spent a
lot of time trying to reeducate
myself, trying to learn more
about Judaica, tradition and
history," he said.
HE ENROLLED in many
local Jewish education pro-
grams. "I'm not very far away
from the level of the beginner,
but I felt like you don't have to
dig very deep," he said. "Your
Jewish background eventually
will show itself off?
Shagin said that in his work
with Judaica subjects, "I
always feel like I am enriching
myself. Especially since I'm a
great admirer of classical art,
and I feel like the best Jewish
artists in art history for me in
my particular case are
Michelangelo and Rembrandt,
who weren't Jewish. But they
gave me a lot of inspiration in
how. can I visualize,
materialize my visions for
Jewish history and Judaica
subjects."
The Constitution medals
were designed in consultation
with New York Times
numismatic editor Ed Reiter.
A cast bronze example of the
drum medal, of approximately
two by three inches, costs $87.
The medal is hand-finished,
numbered and personally
signed.
Israel Bonds
Bonos de Israel______
THE MEDAL portraying
the signers of the Constitution
is round, about two-and-a-half
inches in diameter, and
weighing five ounces in pure
silver. This medal is available
in both proof-like and antique-
finish forms, costing $115
each.
Shagin has also designed a
sepia-ink litho-print of a group
of Constitutional Convention
delegates, priced at $50. A set
of the litho-print, bronze medal
and one of the silver medals
costs $200. Each medal is ac-
companied by a certificate of
authenticity signed by Shagin.
Orders and inquiries should be
sent to Shagin, 1319
Havenhurst Drive, Suite 1,
Los Angeles, CA 90046.
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290


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 21, 1987
ADL Photo Exhibit Of Disapearing Polish Jews
Tomasz Tomaszewski
Malgorzata Niezabitowska
Continued from Page 1-B
Wlodowa, from Lukow, from
Siedlce.
"Who belongs to your
minyan?
"Zoberman, who has been
pleasant, even warm until
now, suddenly stiffens. 'Oh,
that I can't say.' "
THE AUTHOR points out
early in the book that Poland
was both paradise and hell.
"Poland was a paradise
because for nine centuries
there were no pogroms, and
Jews who had been
disinherited and persecuted
elsewhere found secure
asylum in Poland, and long
possessed an autonomy that
was close to sovereignty.
"This bore fruit in a great
flourishing of civilization and
spirit. Here arose one of the
most powerful currents of
Jewish religion, Chassidism;
here giants of literature,
thinkers, reformers, scholars,
and politicians grew up and
worked.
"Poland was a hell because
this is the land of the
Holocaust, a cursed place
marked with the stigma of
crime. And even though that
crime was planned and carried
out by the Germans, its
shadow fell upon the country
and the people who were its
witnesses and, what is worse,
who did not always
sympathize."
THE PHOTOS introduced
the viewer to intimate insights
as the project gained momen-
tum, and the author and
photographer became more
entwined in the Jewish
community.
There is a picture of a Jewish
mother with a small child, a
sight the authors say is rare in
Poland. There is another
woman eating matzah by
herself in a sparse kitchen.
There is one phcto that
shows nothing but thousands
and thousands of aging shoes
piled next to each other on the
grounds of the Auschwitz-
Birkenau death camp, where
more than four million people
were gassed, shot, hanged or
tortured to death.
AS NIEZABITOWSKA ap-
proached the Jewish communi-
ty, she had received
everything from a warm
welcome to a peep through a
door and an urging to go away.
When she was allowed en-
trance, she used her own
knowledge to probe her way
into the Jewish soul and
psyche.
She got one woman, Leiba
Fiksman, to confide that her
husband had died, and now she
is the "last Jew in town." She
falls silent and then adds, after
a moment: "I am left alone not
only in this town, but alone in
the world. Thev are all gone,
all dead."
Then Fiksman turns to
Niezabitowska and asks her
through her travels to find so-
meone whom she can share her
life with.
"This book is about some
forgotten people," says
Tomaszewski.
IT IS important to let people
living in the United States
know that Poland still has
Polish Jews. "Because of this
book, we had people write let-
ters, even fly to Poland to
meet some of our friends.
There are some small founda-
tions that were created after
the book was published to help
raise money for monuments,
synagogues and cemeteries.
We have over 400 Jewish
cemeteries all over Poland.
Most of them are in very, very
bad shape.
"We didn't finish the story.
The story still goes. There are
still some people, Jewish peo-
ple, who need help in Poland."

,



Friday, August 21, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
M
latgorzata Niczabitowslca was born
in Warsaw, Poland. After graduating from
Warsaw University with degrees in law and
journalism, she worked as a reporter for Kul-
tura, a leading Polish periodical. She resigned
because of tightened censorship and only re-
turned to journalism to become a regular con-
tributor to Solidarity Weekly, which was closed
upon the advent of martial law. She has
recently been awarded the Nieman Fellowship
for Journalists at Harvard University.
T
A or
.omasz lomaszewski is one of
Poland's leading photographers. He has been
exhibited in major one-man and group shows
both in Poland and throughout western
Europe. Along with Malgorzata, he was a reg-
ular contributor to Solidarity Weekly until it
was shut down.
Malgorzata and Tbmasz are married and
live in Warsaw with their daughter Maryna,
who is eight.


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 21, 1987
Jack and Katie Dernis
Jack Dernis And Katie Dernis
Celebrate Golden Anniversary
The 50th anniversary of the marriage
of Jack and Katie Dernis was
celebrated at a cocktail party on Sun-
day, Aug. 16. Giving the party are the
children and their spouses: Devera and
Rabbi Harold Chaim Richter, David
and Pamela Dernis, and Sanford and
Marilyn Dernis, all of South Florida.
All seven grandchildren: Lisa Arnold,
Melanie Dernis, Joseph, Miriam and
Saul Richter, and Mitchell and Mat-
thew Dernis, will attend. Also atten-
ding will be Katie Dernis' brother and
sisters and their spouses: Harold and
Violet Grodsky, Sophie and Morris
Goldberg and Ethel and Ben
Sonenschein. Family will be arriving
from Pittsburgh, New York,
Washington, Chicago, Ft. Worth, and
Phoenix.
The maid of honor, Sophie Goldberg,
and the best man, Fred Katz, who will
attend with his wife, Hazel, will help
revive memories of the wedding
festivities.
Jack and Katie Dernis were married
in Pittsburgh on August 22,1937. They
moved to Miami Beach in 1945 and
operated Jack's Courtesy Gift Shop un-
til their recent retirement. Katie Der-
nis is past president of North Shore
Chapter of B'nai B'rith Women and re-
mains an active member. They are
charter members of Temple Menorah
of Miami Beach.
The cocktail party was held at the
home of Devera and Chaim Richter in
Hollywood.
Stephanie Paige
Newman, daughter of Dr.
and Mrs. Michael B.
Newman of North Miami
Beach, made her debut at
Hollywood Memorial
Hospital on Tuesday, July
21. Mr. and Mrs. Irving
Newi in and Mr. and Mrs.
Edwar.l Singer are the
proud grandparents.
Dr. Newman is an Op-
Birth
Announcement
tometrist with an office in
Boca Raton and serves as
a Board Member of Beth
Torah Congregation in
North Miami Beach. Mrs.
Newman is an RN at the
North Miami Medical
Center.
They also have a son
Jared Keith, three-and-a-
half years old.
Workshop
Boycott
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Social education instructors
from religious-governmental
schools have refused to par-
ticipate in joint workshops
with Arabs in a two-week sum
mer course conducted by the
Ministry of Education and
Culture's youth division, ac-
cording to media reports.
Organizers of the course
were forced to establish a
separate workshop for the
religious participants, while
the Arabs were assigned to the
workshops of the secular
Jewish participants.
ff%:*:::y.v.v.y^^^
Wedding
e
::
Mrs Oliver James Herzfeld
Mr. and Mrs. Michael D. Orovitz announce
the marriage of their daughter Judith Kim to
Mr. Oliver James Herzfeld. son of Mr. ami
Mrs. Sigfried Herzfeld of New York City, on
Thursday, Aug. 13 in Jerusalem, Israel. Rabbi
Moshe Salzl>erg. of Jerusalem, officiated.
Following a traditional ceremony near The
Western Wall, the bridal couple was feted at
a wedding supper at The King David Hotel
Attending the bride were her sisters Lisa and
Robin Orovitz. William Herzfeld served as ln>
brother's best man.
The former Miss Orovitz was graduated
With Distinction from The University of
Michigan and attends Columbia University
School of Social Work. The bride's father is
executive vice-president of City National
Bank of Florida. Her mother, Norma A.
Orovitz, is president of the Southeast Region
of American Jewish Congress.
Mr. Herzfeld, a Phi Beta Kappa, was
graduated Magna Cum Laude from New
York University. Presently a data processing
consultant with International Systems Ser-
vices in New York, he will attend Columbia
University School of Law in September. The
bridegroom's father is the retired president
of International Machine, Co., New York. His
mother. Brim a Herzfeld, is the director of
The St. Matthew and St. Timothy Day Care
Center, New York.
The bride is the granddaughter of Pearl ami
the late David Achsen, and the late Ruth ami
Max Orovitz. The bridegroom is the grandson
of the late Irma and William Herzfeld
originally of Frankfurt, Germany and the late
Gemma and Rabbino Leone Leoni, originally
of Ferrara, Italy. Rabbino Leoni served as
Chief Rabbi of Ferrara from 1930 to 1951 and
as Chief Rabbi of Venice from 1951 until
1961.
Following a wedding trip through Israel.
Mr. and Mrs. Herzfeld will reside in New
York City.
Let 'em Eat Vegetables
COPENHAGEN (JTA) A member of Partial**1
rias called on the Justice Minister to draft a law making itJ
?thod>
i7 ~\7" I" OUiM: wimisujr Loaran a taw iiiaking1 ,
legal tor Moslems and Jews to continue with their me
of ritual slaughter of animals.
PIA KJERESGORD. a member of the Progressive
Party, said in a TV interview that Moslem and Jewish
ntual slaughtering methods violate Denmark's legal, fj
and cutural customs. "Animals must be protected, f&
said, if people want to eat, let them eat vegetables
Denmark's Chief Rabbi Bent Melchior said JjJ
Kjeresgord s proposal has little chance of being adopted,
the Parliament. A move to ban Jewish and Moslem ntuai
slaughter is also now underway in Holland.


Friday, August 21, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page9J3

*SF
>
imen's American ORT, Southeast District has formed a Blue
tibbon Committee to help in this year's celebration of their 60th
[nniversary. Among those on the committee are: Standing Joan
\aron, Elaine Stark, Ann Linden, Estelle Tishler Cooper. Sit-
ing: Margaret Newman Stern, Lil Rosenblatt, (Chairman),
farqaret Newman Stern, Gertrude Tillis Handelsman.
Committee To Plan
For ORT's 60th Year
jLil Rosenblatt of Surfside
has been appointed chair-
man of a Blue Ribbon An-
niversary Committee that
will plan a series of special
events to celebrate and
publicize Women's
American ORT's 60th year.
The committee members
were appointed by Pepi
Dunay, who is president of
the Southeast District,
which encompasses seven
southeastern states.
Other local committee
members include Joan
Baron, Bert Zalles, Estelle
Tishler Cooper, all of Miami
Beach, and Elaine Stark of
Keystone Point. All are past
region presidents. Ann
Linden of Miami Beach
along with Bert Zalles, is a
current member of the
district. Other members of
the committee are Sarah
Greenberg of North Miami;
Margaret Newman Stern of
West Miami; Hedi Carlin of
South Miami and Dutch
Hoff of Miami Beach.
The committee has made
plans for an "ORT Women
of Excellence" contest. On
the drawing board is a song
competition that will
celebrate ORT's many
facets. An idea for a travel-
ing exhibit of ORT
memorabilia is also being
explored.
The theme of this anniver-
sary year is. "From Genera-
tion to Generation."
Organizers say this is
especially a significant
theme because ORT is mak-
ing a special effort to at-
tract young women to en-
sure the health of the
organization for at least the
next 60 years.
Women's American ORT,
begun in 1927 in Brooklyn
and boasting such members
as Mrs. Albert Einstein and
the Baronness de Gunz-
bourg, was founded to help
support the worldwide ORT
program of vocational and
technical schools.
Papal Visit
Highlights
TV Show
The September visit to
Miami of Pope John Paul II
will be the focus of a
WPBT/Channel 2 Interfaith
Viewpoint on Aug. 30 at 5 p.m.
Viewpoint host Rodney Ward
and guests Monsignor Bryan
Walsh, Catholic Archdiocese
of Miami; Rabbi Haskell Ber-
nat, the Rabbinical Association
of Greater Miami and Rev.
Luther Jones, Chaplain,
Jackson Memorial Hospital,
will discuss several issues sur-
rounding the Papal visit. They
include: Jewish-Catholic rela-
tions in light of the Pope's
meeting with Kurt Waldheim;
the expense of the visit to
Dade County taxpayers; the
negative publicity generated
over the public relations firm
that was fired, the use of
school buses, the closing of
1-95 and State Road 836; and
the expected achievements
and ramifications of the visit.
Concert Association
Names Director
Of Development
Samuel V. Tannenbaum,
CFRE, a veteran of nearly two
decades of fund-raising ex-
perience, has been named
director of development for
the Concert Association of
Greater Miami, according to
president Judy Drucker.
Tannenbaum comes to
Miami from Fort Lauderdale,
where he was president-
institutional advancement for
Haney Associates, Inc., serv-
ing as a philanthropic consul-
tant to nonprofit organiza-
tions. Prior to that, he was
director of funding develop-
ment for Covenant House, also
in Fort Lauderdale.
He also has previously serv-
ed as development director for
the American Heart Associa-
tion of Greater Miami and as
pacesetter director for the
Greater Miami Jewish
Federation.
Robin Bienenfeld of Miami Beach helped keep patients smiling at
Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem.
People In The News
A Miami Beach teen-ager
who said, "I wanted to do
something for Israel," recent-
ly capped off a year of study-
ing at the Jerusalem College of
Women by working as a
volunteer at Shaare Zedek
Medical Center in Jerusalem.
Robin Bienenfeld, 19, was
graduated from the Hebrew
Academy of Greater Miami.
Although Robin said she has
no ambition to become a nurse,
she is seriously thinking of
becoming a social worker and
sees her future in Israel.
After a year of Jewish
studies in Jerusalem, Robin
spent some time with the
Medical Center's 0 p -
thalmology and Orthopedics
department, doing everything
from escorting a patient home
and taking others for X-rays,
to answering phones, serving
meals and even taking care of
bed pans.
"What I tried to do was keep
the patients smiling ... it is
easy to become depressed
when you're ill."
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Women's Division met recently to discuss
plans for the upcoming "12th Annual
Women's Division Retreat" to be held on Oct.
15 and 6, at the Hotel Sofitel in Miami. Pic-
tured from right (first row) Marsh Olin, South
limit ret rent representative; Connie Nahnunl
[South Dade retreat representative: Bunny
lAdler, Major Gifts chairwoman; Elaine
uiichman. Retreat co-chairwoman; Mieki
Hochberg, vice president, campaign designate;
Renata Bloom, retreat co-chairwoman:
Worothy podhurst. nominating committee
Khairwoman; Gail Meyers, South Dade chair-
woman; bark row: Linda James, South Dade
retreat representative; Selma Rappaport,
South Dade, vice chairwoman, Leadership
Development; Elly Wolff, South Dade nee
chairwoman. Leadership Development;
Elaine Ross, vice president. Leadership
In relo/nnent; Shirley Bergman, North Dads
chairwoman; Janet Trail ins. North Dade
retreat representative; Sandy Belkind, North
Dock via Chairwoman, Leadership Develop-
ment; Val Katz, Southwest Dade via chair-
woman, Leadership Development; and Helm
A,Her. retreat committee member.
Myron M. Behrman Elected
Chairman Of AmeriFirst
Florida Trust Company
Myron M. Berhman, promi-
nent South Florida
businessman, has been elected
chairman of the board of
AmeriFirst Florida Trust
Company, the trust subsidiary
of AmeriFirst Federal.
Behrman is also an AmeriFirst
Federal director, a position in
which he will continue to
serve.
A leading figure in the
Florida real estate market for
three decades, Behrman for
many years was the majority
stockholder and president of
Oscar E. Dooly Associates. He
was also active with the late
Frank J. Rooney in the
development and ownership of
office buildings in Washington,
one of which was the
Securities and Exchange Com-
mission headquarters building.
Prior to moving to Florida,
Behrman practiced law in New
York for more than 25 years.
He received his law degree
from the New Y rk University
School of Law and a business
degree from the university's
School of Commerce.
Since moving to Florida.
Behrman and his wife, Clara
K. Behrman, have been active
in the South Florida communi-
ty. The Behrmans were
founders of Mount Sinai
Hospital as well as the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged. They are also
Myron M. Behrman
benefactors of Cedars Medical
Center.
The Behrmans currently
reside in Bal Harbour.
Founded in 1980,
AmeriFirst Florida Trust
Company has grown to become
one of South Florida's largest
trust firms, providing a wide
range of personal trust ser-
vices as well as corporate ser-
vices that Incus on administra-
tion of employee benefit plans.
AmeriFirst's trust subsidiary
has an office in Miami at
AmeriFirst Park, 11800 S.W
147th Ave., and in Boca Raton
at 7008 Beracasa Way.


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 21, 1987
IKcw School Tear Begi
"s
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
The first day of school can
mean many things to a child. It
can mean a chance to be reac-
quainted with old friends,
meet new ones, and be a
welcome change from the
long, hot. lazy days of summer.
It can also be a cause of
great anxiety, particularly if
the child is new to the school,
or has had trouble fitting in
and being accepted by his or
her classmates in the past.
How can children make the
new school year a fresh start?
The Jewish Floridian asked
this question of teachers, child-
care professionals, and the
real experts the children
themselves as back to school
is just ahead.
"SOME KIDS develop a
real fear about going to
school," warns Susan Rubin,
clinical director of Miami's
Jewish Family Services. "Kids
may resist, cry, and be unhap-
py about leaving home.
Parents should understand
this, but should also set clear
limits, and not encourage this
behavior by giving in to it com-
pletely," says Rubin.
"Especially if the child is go-
ing off to school for the first
time, the anxiety can be as
great for the parents as for the
child. It's a big step for both,"
she adds.
There can be many reasons
why a child is frightened of
starting the school year. It
could be the fear of a new and
unknown place, or a child
might worry about being able
to handle the work in a new
grade.
Another cause of anxiety
might be uncertainty about fit-
ting in socially; children are
notorious for being cruel to a
child who for some reason or
another appears different or
strange to them.
"KIDS SHOW you if they
are having problems at school
through their behavior," ad-
vises Rubin. "They might
practice delaying tactics in the
morning before leaving home,
even develop somatic symp-
toms such as headaches, and so
on.
"Try to find out what is hap-
pening at school that is caus-
ing the particular problem,
whether it's a problem with
the teachers, the other kids, or
school work," she instructs.
"For example, a child with a
learning disability, such as
dyslexia, which makes it more
difficult for a child to learn to
read, might be ridiculed by
)ther children," says Rubin.
But children must learn to
expect a certain amount of
teasing in the school environ-
ment. "One of the things you
want to teach your child is how
to ignore teasing. If a child
does not react to provocation,
there is no reason for the other
child to continue taunting."
Helen D. Cohen Early Childhood Program
off Temple Judea
5500 Granada Blvd., Coral Gables(KraMfromuhi
Registration Available
Supertots through Pre Kindergarten
Hebrew & Religious School
667-5657
Sinai Academy
of Tfcmple Sinai
of North UkIt
Share the Experience!
Temple Sinai of North Dade offers the most exciting
educational alternative at North Dade's only Liberal Jewish
Day School.
FULLY ACCREDITED BY THE
Florida Council of Independent Schools
Limited spaces available tor the Fall
In First through Sixth Grades
(Watting list for Klndwgarten)
Call RABBI COOK at
932-9010
for details
Sinai Academy does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or
ethnic origin.
m*m.
Susan Rubin, clinical director
of Miamis Jewish Family Ser-
vice, acknowledges that beginn-
ing school can cause as much
anxiety for the parent as for the
child.
RUBIN'S ADVICE to
parents whose children are
starting a new school is to
have the family visit the school
in advance so as to orient the
child.
"It might also be helpful to
identify another child who
might be going to the same
school and could walk with
your child. Parents should help
their children find at least one
or two friends in the beginn-
ing," advises Rubin.
This may be accomplished by
"encouraging activities where
your child can meet a friend
with common interests, and by
inviting other children home
after school or on the
weekend."
The biggest problems that
children may have, however,
are their parents.
"When parents are having
problems, and they put the
child in the middle, the kids
have a lot of trouble handling
it," Rubin cautions.
CHILDREN WHO have
trouble handling their pro-
blems may become aggressive
and act the part of the bully at
school, or they may become
withdrawn and isolated, and
wind up becoming an outcast.
or the class scapegoat.
"If your child is breaking in-
to games, trying to lead all the
time, and can*t stand losing,
you might prepare him or her
with alternate behaviors to
try," suggests Dr. Michael
Fish, a child psychiatrist with
the Child Psychiatric Center in
Miami, and the Counseling
Care Center in Fort
Lauderdale.
"If on the other hand, your
child is excluding him or
herself from games out of fear
of rejection, try to find an ac-
tivity that taps into one of the
child's strengths, rather than
one which pushes at his or her
weaknesses," Fish urges.
Individual, rather than team
sports, might be options for a
non-athletic child; non-
sporting pursuits in areas that
the child excels in are also
esteem-building possibilities.
FOR BOTH the overly-
aggressive child and the
withdrawn, overly-reclusive
one, a structured school en
vironment might be best.
Lois Pataky, a teacher at Hillel
Community Day School, sug-
gests that children refrain
from judging who they think
their friends will be and won't
be on the very first day of
school.
"A structured environment
would probably be good for
such children because it
doesn't give them as many
decisions and possible
mistakes to make," says Fish.
"And parents can help a lot
by teaching young children
through playing games with
them. Parents can teach
children to focus on interac-
ting, rather than solely on
winning."
One problem fairly common
to children is having an older
or younger sibling who is a
"star," an excellent student,
athlete or creative talent, and
is therefore very popular at
school.
"IT'S IMPORTANT for
parents to work with the other
child on his or her strengths,
and to reinforce them. Parents
shouldn't minimize the 'star'
sibling, but they shouldn't set
that sibling up as an example,
either." Fish advises
Fish also suggests the
following Do's and Don'ts for
the first day of school
Do:
Sit back a little and
observe before jumping in and
approaching a group 0f
children.
Approach one child in the
group who looks most recep-
tive. Test the waters by asking
for advice or directions,
Let the child introduce you
to the group. Groups tend' to
unite against strangers in
their midst, so it's best to
begin with one-on-one.
Think what you have to of-
fer in the way of abilities, and
see what the group values.
Don't:
Withdraw and give up try
ing, or wait for someone to ap-
proach you. They probably
won't. The other children will
think that you have no self-
confidence, and children
respect self confidence.
Try to act too cool or be too
aggressive. Children quickly
see through bravado.
Don't try to stand out too
much, or act the clown during
class; don't outshine the other
kids in the group.
LOIS PATAKY. who
teaches secular subjects I
and 6th graders at Hillel I
munity Day School, has a w
Do's and Don'ts of her own tor
children, based on her ^." .
of teaching experience
"Be friendly to everyoi
first," she advises. "You don't
know whom you want ;
friendly with yet, so don't
make snap judgments about
whom you like and whom you
don't like. (Jive it time."
Pataky also suggests
parents make sure that their
children have some school sup-
plies and have read the school
**&&
\o
ov
It's possible
for your child to
attend the Hebrew
Academy this year. Attend our
innovative early childhood prosrams
nationally recosnized Elementary School or
our academically excellent Hish School.Vour child
will discover the qualities of character and intel-
lect that blends our sreat tradition of Jewish
leamms with state of the art educational strate-
Sies desisned to help unlock a student's promise
and potential. Our exceptional faculty links the 40
year tradition of the Hebrew Academy with 4000
years of Jewish values in an excitins, creative and
nurturins learnms environment. The Hebrew
Academy is distinctive and distinctively different.
Doms what it takes to be the best.
Explore you-options-arranse a 4
visit Transfer to tne Hebrew ^ aJ "V*
Academy-This year! ^%*C^^ %
for information
call Michael Fischer,
Executive
Vice Prevdent
a: 535-6421
2400 Pine Tree Drive
Miami Beach, FL 33H0


<


Friday, August 21, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
[guidebook, outlining the rules,
regulations, and dress code, by
the first day of school.
'You have to make sure that
tyour child tells his or her
teacher if the seating in the
classroom is inappropriate
jecause of vision or hearing
problems. If your child is too
shy to speak up, you have to let
fhe teacher know if your child
las trouble hearing or seeing
Ifrom certain seats," Pataky
Recommends.
PATAKY urges children
/ho are having difficulty with
fche workload or who find their
pchoolwork too easy to speak
up.
"Maybe the child needs a dif-
ferent class or some alter-
native forms of education,"
ays Pataky, adding that her
['final advice to parents is to be
contact with the teacher all
le time. Don't wait for a pro-
blem to develop."
Parents can also stay involv-
with their children's educa-
tion by asking them about
leir day at school, discussing
Reading assignments with
lem, and repeating questions
jut things like multiplication
ibles, which need to be
lemorized, according to
*ataky.
Varda Adar, who teaches
nd and 3rd graders their
lebrew and Jewish subjects at
lillel's day school, stresses the
ipact that the teacher can
ive on a child's social stan-
Jing with his or her peers.
"I TALK about incidents
rom my childhood, how I used
bully children and then met
lem years later and felt ter-
ribly guilty. I tell my students
try and think ahead,
ecause you can never tpke
>ack what you do or say," says
Vdar.
"With younger children, I
llso use role-playing a lot. I set
ip a situation so that the child
in more or less experience
/hat it feels like to be bullied
. or discriminated against,"
Vdar reveals.
Children from South
imerica and Israel often suf-
fer from l>eing discriminated
[gainst, she adds.
This can produce a poor self
Jmage, and a child with low
self-esteem may wind up
becoming introverted and
lilent in classes. Or he or she
Both 7-year-old David Klein (left) and 10-year-old Rachel Klein
share their experiences and adince on how to make the new year of
school a fresh start.
may become a bully, in an at-
tempt to get attention.
SEVEN-year-old David
Klein knows all about the pro-
blems a child from a foreign
country can endure.
"I knew a boy who was ac-
ting very nasty, making fun of
people, and using bad words,"
recalls David.
"He was a new kid, and he
didn't speak English. He used
to punch people, because he
was scared. Very scared.
Then, one day the teacher
gave him paper to draw a pic-
ture, and he drew such a nice
rainbow that people liked him
more," I sat next to him at
lunch after that, because he
sat alone," David says.
Although it is not good to
become aggressive and bully
other children because of in-
security, it may be just as bad
for a child to reveal that in-
security, and act vulnerably.
Children often respond to fear
with cruelty, as nine-year-old
Mickey Abraham knows.
"I DON'T show that I'm
scared inside," says Mickey. "I
take that scared and put it in-
side me, and then go about do-
ing my homework, raising my
hand in class, and I try to be
myself."
Minding one's own business
and being friendly is an almost
fail-safe way to make friends
in the adult world. In grade
school, however, few children
will escape without being teas-
ed sometimes.
"Everyone makes fun of my
Beth Torah Congregation
BENNY ROK CAMPUS
1051 No. Miami Beach Blvd., No. Miami Bch., FL 33162
Welcomes Your Application For The 1987-88 School Year
GHERMAN-RANCE EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER
6-20 month "Mom and Tots" Classes
20-30 month Parent Co-op Classes
2 and 3 year old Nursery Classes
Pre-Kindergarten and Certified Kindergarten
Half and Full Day Programs
Early Bird Drop-off, Extended Day
Transportation available
HAROLD WOLK RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
Sunday School:
Religious School
Judaica High School:
1 Kindergarten-2nd Grade
Grades three thru six
Grades 7-12, Preconfirmation,
Confirmation and
College Credit Courses
SAT ELLITE CLASSES GRADES 3-6 ALSO HELD AT
HIGHLAND OAKS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
TRANSPORTATION AVAILABLE.
For more information, call the school office
947-7528, 949-2481
name, and they sometimes
pick on me for no reason," ad-
mits Mickey. "They want you
to be sad, because they think
that if you are sad, they're
happy. If you don't act sad,
they walk away."
And if he were to get angry,
his tormenters would most
likely redouble their efforts,
Mickey observes.
ANOTHER useful technique
for ending a bout of teasing is
to try to get the other people
onto your side by turning the
situation into a game, accor-
ding to Mickey.
"Sometimes kids call me
names, and they say things
like, 'you're a potato.' So I try
to play along and say, 'I'm a
potato? Well, how do I taste?
Am I a brown potato or a
sweet potato?' Mickey
reveals.
Humor can save a bad situa-
tion and prevent it from
escalating. Benjamin Andron,
11, recalls seeing three boys
playing by a pool while he was
on vacation in Egypt.
"Two of the boys were mak-
ing fun of the third boy, saying
to him, 'no girls in the pool,'
Benjamin remembers.
"I went over, even though I
didn't know them, and said,
'Well, I guess we'll all have to
get out of the pool, then.' "
ANOTHER TIME. Ben
jamin was with a group of
Jewish children when an older
girl began to make fun of the
kids.
"Then she called me a name,
specifically, and 1 said to her,
'so we have something in com-
mon,' says Benjamin. "I like
to show that I'm starting out
Strong, but that I have
something even stronger
behind it."
Benjamin has something
much stronger than a mere
put'down behind him. His
lather, Michael, isalith degree
black belt Karate master
Yet Benjamin, far from pick
me, fights, says that he has
"always been a peacemaker. I
don't know how I do it, but my
remarks don't make people
sullen and mad, but makes
them ease down. It's impor-
tant to let people know that
you're the boss of a bad situa-
tion," Benjamin contends,
"but do it with humor."
HALYE ABRAHAM, 12,
stresses the importance of tak-
ing cues from other kids in a
new school in order to fit in
and make friends.
"There was this girl who
was new t<> the school, and she
talked about where she used to
live before she came to our
school and about her younger
brother all the time. Everyone
else talked about movies,
clothes, and what they did on
vacation, so they thought she
was a little weird.
"She didn't really go up to
people to talk to them, either,
so no one talked to her. You
got the feeling she would
rather have been back in her
old school," says Halye.
Have something interesting
to talk about, don't always talk
about the same thing, be
outgoing and involved with
things at school, Halye
advises.
But if people give out signals
that they do not want to be
friendly, don't push them.
"You can't make people like
you, so stay away from the
people who don't," Halye
counsels.
RACHEL KLEIN. 10 years
old, says that she thinks "that
a lot of kids are just mean.
They don't care enough to be
nice, they feel they have
enough friends already. But
there's always room for more
friends," says Rachel.
Approach the people in a
class who look friendly and try
not to overreact when people
are nasty to you, Rachel
advises.
"I sometimes feel uncomfor-
table with one or two people,
and it makes me feel like
everything is bad, I'm the
worst at gym, and it's only me
that is wrong," she admits.
On the subject of peer
pressure. Rachel says that
"you need to say to yourself, 'I
don't need to do this because
other people do it.' A lot of
girls in my grade wear makeup
to parties, and they say that I
should wear makeup, too.
"My mother thinks I'm too
young for makeup, and at first
-Continued on Page 12-B
Benjamin Andron, 11, uses
humor to ease him through
tense situations.
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Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. August 21, 1987
Hebrew Academy
The Hebrew Academy will
offer students a course in
Human Sexuality this fall, a
new addition to the curriculum
that school officials said was
related to tin- AIDS scare in
America.
The course will be offered to
10th and 12th grade students.
Jessica Schultz, assistant prin-
cipal of the junior and senior
high school will be teaching the
course primarily from a
biological view and Rabbi
Yossi Heber, principal of the
Academy, will teach the course
from a biblical, and halachic
perspective.
"The issue of sex education
became very critical as a result
of the AIDS scare in
America," Heber said.
But while leading scientists
and physicians have recom-
mended the use of condoms
during sexual relations, Heber
said students at the Academy
will be advised against their
use.
"The use of condoms is
against Jewish law unless
specific rabbinical approval is
given as a result of medical
complications," Heber said.
According to Schultz, the
course will encourage students
to join discussions on topics
such as saying no when
pressured by peers. The course
will also touch upon
physiological changes teen-
agers go through, a woman's
pre-menstrual syndrome, and
the role, beauty and
significance of sex in the
Jewish home.
Such a course might pose
problems in a public school,
Heber asserts, because, he
says.who would be the judge of
which values to teach
students. That problem will
not occur at a school like the
Academy, Heber says, because
"in a Jewish parochial school
the values are intrinsic."
Temple Judea
Temple Judea is now open-
ing its doors to new and retur-
Back To School
Continued from Pa*e 11-B
I was really upset, because it
seemed that everyone else was
wearing it and making fun of
me. But then I decided to
believe the people who told me
that my face was pretty
enough without it," Rachel
recalls.
IGNORING CRUEL
remarks is necessary, accor-
ding to Rachel.
"If other kids tease me for
speaking up, I'll think, 'I'm not
showing off. I'm doing what
I'm supposed to do in school. If
the teacher asks me a ques-
tion, I'm going to answer it
right,' Rachel asserts.
Besides, adds Rachel, why
worry about what the other
people in your class say?
"Real friends stay with you
no matter what," she sagely
concludes.
Beginning school in the fall
is an exciting, frightening,
necessary step which almost
every child has to take. With
some idea of how to avoid the
pitfalls, this step can be made
a much simpler jump onto
the ladder of success.
ning students, beginning their
seventh year of existence as
the only Jewish pre-school in
Coral Gables.
Under the direction of Har
Wasserman, a profea
mally run science progtai
: a "Something special for
Shabbat" program Have been
added to the pre-school cur-
riculum. Also, there will now
be a Fine Arts teacher at the
school.
The Hebrew and Religious
School, under the guidance of
Roy Berman, continues the
children's Jewish education,
beginning with Sabbath School
for 5-year-olds, 3-day a week
religious school including
Hebrew Studies, Junior High
and Confirmation classes.
The program is unique in
that Hebrew and Religious
studies are integrated and pro-
vide opportunities for the child
to experience the Jewish way
of life in a warm and nurturing
atmosphere.
Sinai Academy
Sinai Academy of Temple
Sinai in North Dade has
recently become the first
Liberal Jewish Day School in
Florida to be accredited. Rabbi
Julian I. Cook, the school's
director, proudly announced
that the Florida Council of In-
dependent Schools (FCIS) had
recently completed its evalua-
tion of the school and accepted
it into full membership status.
FCIS is one of the largest
state accrediting agencies for
private schools in the country,
with over 100 member schools.
While accreditation of
private schools is not man-
datory in Florida, Sinai
Academy has chosen to met
the challenge of measuring
itself not only against its own
standards of excellence, but
also against those of a deman-
ding parent organization.
Sinai Academy, an elemen-
tary school encompassing
Kindergarten through Sixth
Grade, will open for its
seventh year this Fall. Noting
the school's relative youth, Mr.
John Cotton, chairman of the
Evaluation Team, commented
that Sinai Academy gave the
impression of being mature
and accomplished beyond its
years. In particular, the facul-
ty was praised for creating a
warm, nurturing environment
for children and stimulating
caring interrelationships
among students.
Gherm an-Ranee Early
Childhood Center
Concern for the develop-
ment of the whole child
socially, emotionally, physical-
ly and intellectually is the
hallmark of Beth Torah's
Gherman-Rance Early
Childhood Center.
The highly trained certified
staff of teachers at Beth Torah

NVM



. i
/'" ....
7

h, '".....
..
fcvy.;v.-;'-'
K v
j : ~ y
provides for each child's in-
dividual needs in an at-
mosphere that is warm, loving
and challenging to each child's
capacities.
Beth Torah has a variety of
programs available for
children aged six months
through kindergarten, for non-
members as well as members
of the synagogue. Each pro-
gram involves the parents as
well as the teachers in the
growth and education of the
child.
The school will offer half-day
(9 a.m. to noon), extended day
(9 a.m. to 1 p.m.), and full-day
(9 a.m. to 3 p.m.) programs.
There will be an "early bird
dropoff at 8 a.m. and an ex-
tended optional afternoon pro-
gram from 3 to 5:30 p.m.
Harold Wolk
Religious School
Beth Torah's Harold Wolk
Religious School is open for
students to register for the
1987-88 school year. The
The faculty
are always there
totaMovou...
they practically live there.
A student at the Hebrew Academy has
ready access to 80 of the best learning
resources: our faculty.
They help all of our children unlock their
potential and promise in an oasis of learning.
They build within each child qualities of char-
acter as well as intellect by linking the 40 years
of tradition of the Hebrew Academy with 4000
years of Jewish values. The faculty are
demanding. They are supportive and encour-
aging. Bright. Creative. Innovative. And they're
always there to talk to your child and to you. If
you think that this kind of exciting, active and
nurturing learning environment is for your
child-arrange a visit to our beautiful campus.
Discover the Hebrew Academy.
BETH DAVID EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER
Pre-School Ages 1-5 Yrt.
Mommy & Me JStSSSS^
Play Group @Jp&$H38k
Nursery
Extended Hours vx*x>
Lunch A Trips
2625 SW 3rd Avenue, Miami, FL 854-3994
Early Childhood Program:
2 yr. old Playgroup
Nursery
Pre-Kindergarten
Kindergarten
Elementary Division:
grades 1-6
Secondary Division:
grades 7-12
For further information call Michael Fischer,
Executive V President at 532-6421
HEBREW ^
x\G!DEmy
2400 Pine Tree Dr
Miami Beach,
Florida 33140


Friday, August 21, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
r school caters to the needs of
students from kindergarten
[through 12th Grade.
The school recommends that
i children begin their religious
education no later than 3rd
grade, as there is a five-year
.Judaic education requirement,
lin order for children to
celebrate their Bar/Bat Mitz-
jvah in a Conservative
[Synagogue affiliated with
|United Synagogue of America.
Parents are encouraged to
Asit Beth Torah's Religious
School for free academic place-
ment counseling.
Special classes for children
iges 8-11 will be held at both
the Benny Rok South Campus
ind the Benny Rok North
Campus, located at Highland
Oaks Elementary School until
|a new school building is
completed.
Beth Am
Beth Am Preschool and Day
School is an established in-
stitution with an enrollment of
>ver 600 students. The schools
ire designed to provide a uni-
que blend of quality Jewish
ind secular education.
All classes are taught by
licensed teachers dedicated to
promoting each child's max-
imum potential in a loving and
raring atmosphere. The in-
tegrated curriculum is design-
ed to challenge children, and to
foster their love of learning by
presenting material in creative
vays.
The Day School includes a
Hebrew program, computer
llab, and extra-curricular ac-
tivities, after-school programs,
ADATH
YESHURUN
102S N.E. Miami Gardens Drive
9474431
NOW IS
THE TIME
TO
REGISTER
NURSERY
2-6 Yra.
Full, Half and Extended Day*
Accredited Kindergarten
MOMMY & ME
6 moo tha to 24 moo the
Co-op
SYr.-ZMYr.
INFANT-TODDLER
PROGRAM
MVn.
7-J0AM-6PM
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
Kindergarten to Grade 12
SUNDAYSCHOOL
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
PRECONFIRMATION AND
CONFIRMATION CLASSES
JUDAICA HIGH SCHOOL
and "Mommy and Me"
programs.
Highlights of the school year
are the Annual School Fair
Exhibit and the publication of
the Annual Yearbook,
prepared each year by
students.
Beth Am's methods of
education have been recogniz-
ed nation-wide as the first suc-
cessful day school in the
Southeast, and as a pioneer in
the Reform Day School
movement.
Beth David
Beth David Early Childhood
Center has been expanding
and growing over the past
year under Janet Bass, the
new Early Childhood director.
The Center sponsors holiday
workshops, guest speakers
and discussion groups
throughout the year, in an ef-
fort to educate parents about
child growth and development
and Jewish life.
Parents are invited to join
the Early Childhood Center
Council, which meets regularly
during the school year in order
to provide ideas, suggestions,
and other input into the
program.
School Directory
ECE DIRECTOR
JOAN BERGMAN
EDUCATION DIRECTOR.'
ROCHELLE BALTUCH
RABBI S1MCHA FREEDMAN
Adath Yeshuran
Registration for the 1987-88
school year is now taking place
for the Sylvia and Eugene
Udell Religious School of
Adath Yeshurun.
Classes are available for
kindergarten through 12th
graders. Kindergarten, first
and second graders attend
clases on Sunday mornnigs,
study basic prayers, reading
readiness, learn about Jewish
holidays and history, have
Arts and Crafts, a music pro-
gam, and much more.
Students entering 3rd grade
begin a three day a week pro-
gram, learn to read Hebrew
fluently and continue the study
of prayer, history and
holidays.
Pre-Confirmation for 8th
graders and Confirmation for
9th graders is part of the
overall program. These
classes, as well as college
credit classes for grades 10-12.
are held in conjunction with
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education.
The school's goal is to instill
an appreciation of and love for
Judaism and to inculcate a
sense of pride in being Jewish
in the students.
MIAMI
Temple Tifereth Jacob
(Conservative)
951 E 4 Ave.
Hialeah 33010
887-95%
One-Day-a-Week Classes After-
noon Hebrew School.
Temple Israel (Reform)
137 NE 10 Si.
Miami 33131
573-5900
One-Day-a-Week Classes After-
noon Hebrew School Confirma-
tion Program Judaica High School
in cooperatioon with Central
Agency for Jewish Education.
MIAMI BEACH
Bais Yaakov School (Orthodox)
7055 Bonita Drive
Miami Beach 33141
865-0763
Affiliation: Torah U'Mesorah,
Grades: Girls. 6-12.
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy (Orthodox)
2400 Pine Tree Drive
Miami Beach 33140
532-6421
Affiliation: Torah U'Mesorah,
Grades: Nursery/Kindergarten
through 12. (Girls and boys in
separate classes in grades 9-12).
Lubavitch Educational Center
(Orthodox)
1140 Alton Road
Miami Beach 33139
673-5664
Affiliation: Lubavitch. Grades:
Nursery through 8. (Girls and
boys in separate classes).
Louis Merwitzer Mesivta High
School (Orthodox)
1965 Alton Road
Miami Beach 33139
538-5543/531-5196
Affiliation: Torah U'Mesorah.
Grades: Boys, 6 through 12.
Toras Ernes Academy of Miami
(Orthodox)
7902 Carlyle Ave.
Miami Beach 33141
868-1388
Affiliation: Torah U'Mesorah,
Grades: 1 through 6 (Girls and
boys in separate classes from 5th
grade up).
Yeshivas Toras Chaim
(Orthodox)
765 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach 33140
672-7113
Affiliation: Torah U'Mesorah
and Yeshivas Chofetz Chaim,
Grades: Boys Only. 7 through 10
(Bais Midrash classes for young
men available).
Lehrman Day School
(Conservative)
727 77 St.
Miami Beach 33141
866-2771
Affiliation: Solomon Schechter
Day School Associaton. Grades:
Nursery; Nursery/Kindergarten
through 8.
Temple Moses (Orthodox)
1200 Normandy Drive
Miami Beach 33141
861-6308
Pre-school One-Day-a-Week
Primary Classes Afternoon
Hebrew School.
Temple Emanue-EI
(Conservative)
1701 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach 33139
538-2503
Daily Nursery/Kindergarten
One-Day-a-Week Primary Classes
Afternoon Hebrew School
Confirmation Program.
Temple Menorah (Conservative)
620 75 Street
Miami Beach 33141
866-2156
Daily Nursery/Kindergarten
One-Day-a-Week Classes After-
noon Hebrew School Confirma-
tion Program Judaica High
School in cooperation with CAJE.
Temple Beth El of North Bay
Village
(Conservative)
7800 Hispanola Ave.
Miami Beach 33141
861-4005
One-Day-a-Week Classes After-
noon Hebrew School.
Temple Beth Sholom (Liberal
Reform)
4144 Chase Ave.
Miami Beach 33140
538-7231
Daily Nursery/Kindergarten
One-Day-a-Week Classes After-
noon Hebrew School Confirma-
tion Program Judaica High
School in cooperation with CAJE.
NORTH DADE
Samuel Scheck Hillel Communi-
ty Day School (Community)
19000 NE 25 Ave.
Miami 33180
931-2831
Affiliation: Nat'l. Comm. on
Torah Education, Grades:
Nursery/Kindergarten through
12.
Toras Ernes Academy of Miami
(Orthodox
195 NW 156 St.
Up-To-Date Immunization
As the start of the new
school year approaches,
parents are reminded that
Florida law requires all
children attending school to
have up-to-date immunization
records.
Children are required to be
immunized against polio,
measles, mumps, rubella,
diphtheria, tetanus and
pertussis.
"Although it seems that no
one has these diseases any
more, some diseases are ac-
tually on the rise," stated
Henry Janowski, director of
the HRS Immunization
program.
"For example, measles has
occurred in many areas of
Florida over the past year.
Measles can be very harmful,
causing hearing loss,
pneumonia, and, in some
cases, mental retardation or
death."
Immunizations are available
through private physicians or
local county public health
units.
"As the school yuear ap-
proaches," Janowski said,
"lines at the health units get
long and doctors' schedules
may be booked. We hope peo-
ple will call to schedule an ap-
pointment today so they don't
leave their children
unprotected"
Miami 33180
947-1959
Affiliation: Torah U'Mesorah.
Grades: Nursery/Kindergarten.
Sinai Academv (Reform)
18801 NE 22 Avenue
Miami 33180
932-9010
Affiliation: Union of American
Hebrew Cong., Grades:
Kindergarten through 6.
Beth Moshe Congregation
(Conservative)
2225 NE 121 St.
N. Miami Beach 33161
891-5508
Daily Nursery/Kindergarten
One-Day-a-Week Primary Classes
Afternoon Hebrew School
Judaica High School in coopera-
tion with C.AJF.
Beth Torah Congregation
(Conservative)
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
N. Miami Beach 33162
949-2481
Daily Nursery/Kindergarten
One-Day-a-Week Primary Classes
Afternoon Hebrew School Con-
firmation Program Judaica High
School in cooperation with CAJE.
Sephardic Jewish Center
(Conservative)
17100 NE 6 Avenue
N. Miami Beach 33162
652-2099
Afternoon Hebrew School
Temple Adath Yeshurun
(Conservative)
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
N. Miami Beach 33179
947-1435/947-4431
Daily Nursery/Kindergarten
One-Day-a-Week Primary Classes
Afternoon Hebrew School
Confirmation Program Judaica
High School in cooperation with
CAJE.
Temple Sinai of North Dade
(Reform)
18801 NE 22 Ave,
N. Miami Beach 33180
932-9010
Daily Pre-School One-Day-a-
Week Classes Afternoon
Hebrew School Confirmation
Program Judaica High School in
cooperation with CAJE.
SOUTH DADE
Arthur and Anna Goldstein
Hebrew Academy of South Dade
(Traditional)
12401 SW 102 Ave.
Miami 33176
253-2300
Affiliaton: Torah U'Mesorah.
Grades: Kindergarten through 6.
Continued on Page 15-B
beth am
day school
2>^
5950 North Kendall Drive
Miami
6654228
LEONARD A. SCHOOLMAN
Senior Rabbi
CEIL COON IN. Director
SANDI KRAMER, Preschool Director

2Vi yrs. through Grade 6
A Reform Day School
Dedicated to Fostering A Love for Learning
A full curriculum of Secular and Judaic Studies
After School Program Available


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 21, 1987
Divorced Or Soon-To-Be
Sandor Genet Represents
Members Of United Fathers
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Sandor Genet is a happily
married Orthodox Jew with
six children. He also is an at-
torney who represents many
members of United Fathers,
an organization of divorced or
soon-to-be-divorced fathers
who want equal rights when it
comes to child-rearing.
Sometimes a divorced father
will not pay child support or
have an interest in taking care
of his children after a divorce.
It is those kinds of fathers that
United Fathers frowns upon
because, as one member said,
they spoil it for the fathers
who want to have a say in their
child's religious, educational
and financial development.
WE PROMOTE parental
responsibility and involve-
ment," said Genet, 38. "The
fathers generally are not
treated equally in the court
system in the regard to
custodial rights of their
children."
I'nited Fathers was in-
strumental in lobbying the
Florida state legislature to
adopt in 1982 the Shared
Parenting Responsibility Act.
That Act helped reduce the
almost certain chances that
the mother would receive sole
custody of the child.
It also gives a father access
to all his child's records in
school and a shared respon-
sibility in raising the child,
whereas before that, respon-
sibility was primarily given to
one parent.
THERE ARE about l.......
members of the Dade County
chapter f I'nited Fathers.
rganization's presi-
dent, Bill Greenberg. About 35
to 4o embers attend the
regul.v eetings held once a
montl le meetings usually
begin 1 ih a question and
answer ession because new
member usually have a lot of
questioi Greenberg says.
One !;. her came home ami
the wife the child, his fur-
niture 1 'I his hank account
Sandor Genet
were gone. So he came to the
meeting and wanted to know
what he could do," Greenberg
says.
The meetings also include
guest speakers who discuss
issues ranging from child
psychology to legalities involv-
ed in divorce proceedings.
Several times a year, the
organization, which is non-
denominational, holds
demonstrations in front of the
Dade County Courthouse, with
signs that have slogans such as
"Fathers have rights to
children too," and "Children
need both mother and father."
GENET SAYS he became
involved with the organization
l>ecause he is interested in
children and children's rights
and parental access
"Notoriously in Florida.
mothers control the children,
and therefore when fathers
are divorced from mothers,
their real participation is
generally limited.
"The Shared Law is help toa
lot of people, and when you're
dealing with people who
follow the law. you have no
problem." says Genet. "But in
a reasonable number of cases
seen by the courts, after the
divorce is entered, there'- ,,
lack of participation between
CHIROPRACTIC OFFER:
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Back M
a Headache
Sciatica
SPt CIALIZING IN:
Auto Accidents
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wad up 10
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Consultation
S Exam
DR. STUART KAPLAN
386 NE 167 St. 7645 Hlwd. Blvd.
945-5530 NMB 962-0663 Pemb Pmee
THE PA1 ENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS THE RIGHT
TO REFUSE TO PAY. CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY
OTHER .ERVICE. EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED AS A RESULT
OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE
DISCOUNTED OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE. EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT.
STEPHEN Wtt. TESSLER. D.D.S.
is pleased to announce
the opening of his new office
for the practice of
General and Cosmetic Dentistry
2627 NE. 203rd Street
203rd Center. Suite ll 2
North Miami Beach. Florida 33160
Telephone (305) 931-3010
the custodial parent and the
father who has visitation.
There's no rapport."
THE traditional argument
that a mother is more fit to
raise a child than the father
does not fly with Genet.
"There are many fathers to-
day who would be more fit
than mothers," he says.
"What we have is women to-
day who are using drugs,
drinking, just like some men.
Women have the same social
problems that men have, the
same work problems that men
have."
As an Orthodox Jew, Genet
also believes that divorces are
necessary "in hopefully a
limited amount."
The Shared Responsibility
Act and other strides toward
more equal footing for divorc-
ed parents have caused
"substantial changes" over
the years. Genet asserts. "You
get a reasonable amount of
fairness from a lot of judges.
The problem is, we're not close
to equal."
That is because the mother
still gets primary care of a
child in 90 to 95 percent of the
cases, Genet says. He won't
use the word "discriminatory"
because that is a constitutional
term, he says. Genet prefers to
view the situation as
"inappropriate."'
GREENBERG and Genet
agree that the "deadbeal
dads." the term for a father
who won't pay child support,
puts a crimp on the positive
image that I'nited Fathers is
trying to create.
"United Fathers is an indica-
tion socially that we are having
more and more divorces. And
these are not fathers who split.
These are fathers who want to
take care of their children and
provide a reasonable amount
of child support."
Greenberg moved from
Brooklyn to Miami in 1972 and
was married here around
1973. He got divorced in Dade
ll ty in 1980. The couple
had one daughter who is now
almost in years old.
"1 WENT to go for ;, divorce
and was told by my attorney
that I stood no chance of gain-
ing custody of my daughter
and that the very best I could
do was have a couple of days'
visitation during the week.
Prior to the divorce, I always
took care of her because my
ex wife works from early mor-
ning until late at night."
He only gained visitation
rights with his daughter one or
two days a week and went
back to court to have that
legally moved to four days a
week, Monday through Thurs-
day. Now, Greenberg says he
is back in court trying to gain
full custody of his daughter.
STAR LAKES BEAUTY
Orthodox thul* across street.
Bus tervlca lor shopping. 2 BT. 2
Bath. Immaculate. Owner financ-
ing. Sales/Alvln. Inc.
352-8880
Write
Dear HTomi
For Advice
Dear Nomi, an advice column, will appear regularly in the
pagea of The Jewish Floridian.
Dear Nomi:
I've met a wonderful woman
who likes all the same things I
do; cooking French cuisine,
playing chess, and listening to
Classical music. She even
seems interested in my hobby
breeding poodles and
wants to get involved.
My problem is this; she
wants to get married. I have
recently become divorced and
would like to wait at least a
year before contemplating
marriage. She says that she
wants to know whether or not
she's wasting her time,
because she wants marriage
and a family before it's too late
(we are both in our mid-
thirties).
I don't want to lose this
woman, but 1 don't want to
move too quickly, either. What
should 1 do?
Signed,
Not Readv
For Wedding Bells
Dear Not Ready:
It sounds to me as if you would
consider marrying this
woman given enough time
to be certain of your connec-
tion with her. If this is true,
maybe the two of you could
consider the coming year a
sort of tentative ene:a^re-
ment period.
Hut you should make clear to
her that you need this year
to explore the relationship,
and that you cannot
guarantee anything; a lot
can Happen in a year.
Also, a \ear of waiting is pro-
bably a good idea for her. as
well. She needs to discover
whether or not she wants to
marry you. or whether
just wants to he married.
Yours. Nomi
Dear Nomi:
M wife is Jewish and 1 am
not. and we have decided to
raise <>ur children according to
her faith, not mine, I think
that this is a very large com-
promise on my part, but one I
willingly, l i ligion is
more important to my wife
than it is to me.
But now that my wife is ac
tually pregnant, 1 realize thai
although I have no qualms
about having our child raised
to he Jewish. I do not want a
son of ours circumcised. It is
an unnecessary operation
which is potentially dangerous
(I have heard of mishaps) and
which cuts down on a man's
sensitivity.
My wife is adamant that she
wants this ritual mutilation
performed. Have you any ad-
vice for us?
Sincerely.
Covenant Shy
Dear Covenant Shy:
First of all, I am not an expert
on circumcision, but my im-
pression has always been
that when a surgeon per-
forms the operation, it is
almost perfectly safe. Some
surgeons are also mohels,
(the Jewish functionaries
who traditionally perform
the rite.)
Secondly, I have not heard anv
reports of circumcision cut-
ting down on a man's sen-
sitivity, and for years this
operation was performed on
almost all male babies born
in the United States, so if
sensitivity were an issue, I
am sure that it would have
been investigated by now.
But even though some people,
including doctors, arjrue
that circumcision is
beneficial in terms of
hygiene and preventing in-
fection, there is no question
that it is not a necessarv
operation in terms of health
or bodily welfare.
The reasons for it are
religious, traditional,
cultural and spiritual. A
male child will have troubles
if he is raised as a Jew but
remains uncircumcised,
which is why many Soviet
Jews opt to have the opera-
tion even though they are
already past the ajje where
the procedure is relatively
painless and trauma-free
Consult with your wife ami
speak with doctors, rabbis,
and other parents of your
acquaintance who
decided for or against cir-
cumcision. You should learn
more about what circumci-
sion means in tern
Jewish history and
Jewish religion, as well as .|
learning more about
issues you have rai -
By the way. my die':
describes mutilatioi
following manner: "To
deprive a person or annual
of a limb or essential |
to maim.'' The foreskin, to
m y iimit ed m i I
knowledge', is neither i
nor an essential part.
Yours. Nomi
Write Nomi for advice in c are
of The Jew ish Floridian. 1' 0.
Box 012973, Miami. Fla. 33101.
Women Lawyers
To Sponsor
Debate
The Florida Associal
Women Lawyers. Dadi '
ty Chapter, will he spoi
a' debate between Hill H
and Steve Zaek, candidates tor
President-Elect of the Florida
Bar. 1988-89. This event will
be held at the Grand Ba> Hotel
on Thursday, Aug. 27. There
will l>e a cash bar from 11:80
a.m. until 12:15 p.m. Ll'nch
will be served at 12:15 p.m.
FIELD REPRESENTATIVE
m** awaaaal Jala* Oajaaaim
tfytwHle. crMttm. wmaMlo. '""'
Fund WiUlHgiOriMp PmUpWim *"
o. f MAT Oo JwMi Ftaridtan. P.O. *
01M73.Waml.Fl.M101
I WILL DO LITE SECRETARIAL
clerical dutlee preferably on a
partllme beala. I would prw
Miami Beach. ReaeonaWe.
Box HJ c/o Jewlah Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami 33101.


\ Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
... "Thou shall set the blessing upon mount Gerizim, and the
[curse upon mount Ebal"
(Deuteronomy 11.29).
RE'EH
IRE'EH "Behold, I aet before you this day a blessing and a
[curse: the blessing, if ye shall hearken unto the commandments of
I the Lord your God, which I command you this day; and the curse,
lif ye shall not hearken" (Deuteronomy 11.16). When the Israelites
lenter Canaan, six tribes are to stand upon Mount Gerizim and
Ibless all those who will keep God's commandments, and six tribes
[are to stand on Mount Ebal and curse all those who will disobey
God's commandments. Sacrifices are to be offered only in the
place that God shall choose. He who wishes to offer a meat
crifice which he may eat, and lives too far from the proper place
f offering may slaughter the offering in his own house, but it will
not be considered a sacrifice. He must be careful not to consume
my of the blood. Those who incite others to idolatrous acts are to
exterminated. The portion goes on to state the rules defining
Burity and impurity in regard to animals, fish and foul the basic
ritual dietary laws. The portion also contains the rules regarding
kithes, money moratoria, a prohibition on interest, and regula-
tions regarding the Hebrew slave, the first-bom of animals, and
he three pilgrim festivals.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
Ipon "The Graphic History ot the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman-
tsamir. $15, published by Shengold. The volume Is available at 75 Maiden
Lane, New York. NY. 10038. Joseph Schlang Is president ot the society
listrlbuting the volume.)
Ichool Directory
I Continued from Page 13-B
kth Shira Solomon Schechter
|j School (Conservative)
S\V 12(1 St.
inn 153156
2606
affiliation: Solomon Schechter.
Bdes: Nursery/ Kindergarten
nigh >.
|th Am Day School (Reform)
N Kendall Drive
ami 33156
5 6228
Affiliation: Union of American
? Ii r e w Cong., Grades:
Irsery Kindergarten through 6.
kaare Tefillah of Kendall
rthodox)
595 SW S2 Circle Lane. No. 12
ii 3.3183
3343
y Day a Week Primary Classes
ternoon Hebrew School
asses meet at 12401 SW 102
le.
!t Shira Congregation
onservative)
"SW 120 St.
Hlli 33156
2601
lily Nursery/Kindergarten
le Hay a Week Primary Classes
[Afternoon Hebrew School
ifirmation Program Judaica
h School in cooperation with
UK
pth David Congregation
lonservative)
SW 8 Avr
ami 33129
H 3911
Nursery/Kindergarten
May-a-Week Primary Classes
Afternoon Hebrew School
hfirmation Program. Week-day
Uses meet at 12401 SW 102
imestead Jewish Center
lonservative)
|3 NE 8 St.
Iami 33030
18-5724
Hi- Day-a-Week Classes.
m Jewish Community Center
lonservative)
l<>. Box 1332
Ivernier 33070
15-5285
f>v day-a-Week Classes.
I'm pie Samu-EI/Or Olom
Conservative)
M SW 152 Ave.
[iami 33196
12-3668
Li
fuly Nursery/Kindergarten
I e Day-a-Week Primary Classes
Friday, August 21, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
Lisl Schick of Clearwater has
been elected a National Vice
President of Hadassah. the
Women's Zionist Organization
qf America. A Life Member Hadassuh, Schick serves on
Hadassah's National Member-
skip Task Force and is Co-
Chair of the organization's
pilot membership program
Project tOOt, in five Florida
regions. She also is a member
ofHadassah's National Major
Gifts Tusk Force.
Afternoon Hebrew School
Confirmation Program Judaica
High School in cooperation with
CAJE.
Temple Zamora (Conservative)
44 Zamora Ave.
Coral Gables 33131
448-7132
Two-Day-a-Week Religious and
Hebrew School.
Temple Zion Israelite Center
(Conservative)
8000 Miller Road
Miami 33155
271-2311
Daily Nursery/Kindergarten
One-Day-a-Week Primary Classes
Afternoon Hebrew School
Confirmation Program Judaica
High School in cooperation with
CAJE.
Temple Beth Am (Reform)
5950 N. Kendall Drive
Miami 33156
666-2536
Daily Nursery/Kindergarten
One-Day-a-Week Classes After-
noon Hebrew School Confirma-
tion Program Judaica High
School in cooperation with CAJE.
Temple Israel (Reform)
9990 N. Kendall Drive
Miami 33156
595-5055
Please see listing in Miami
section.
Temple Judea (Reform)
5500 Granada Blvd.
feral Cables 33146
667 5667
Daily Nursery Kindergarten
One-Day-a-Week Primary ("lasses
Afternoon Hebrew School
Confirmation Program Judaica
High School in cooperation with
CAJE.
Temple Shir Ami (Reform)
P.O. Box 161971
Miami 33136
253-9666
One-Day-a-Week Religious and
Hebrew School.
Congregation Bet Breira
(Liberal Reform)
9400 SW 87 Ave.
Miami 33176
595-1500
One-Day-a-Week Classes After-
noon Hebrew School Confirma^
tion Program Judaica High
School in cooperation with CAJL.
Temple Beth Or
(Reconstructionist)
!>.() Box 160(181
Miami 33116
596-4528
One-Day-a-Week Religious and
Hebrew School.
DADE
Hebraica Community Center
12(l(i NW 20 St.
N. Miami Beach 88167
652-0761
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center
18900 NE 25 Ave.
N. Miami Beach 33180
932-4200
South Dade Jewish
Communitv Center
124H1 SW "102 Ave.
Miami 33176
251-1394
Miami Beach Jewish
Community Center
1221 Pine Tree Drive
Miami Beach 33140
534-3206
Amit Women
The Vered Chapter of North
Miami Beach will start the new
season off with a Gala Hat
Show Designers' creations
by Geri's Hats on Tuesday, at
8*p.m., at the home of Debbie
Hirsch.
There will be an Installation
of New Officers with door
prizes and refreshments.
Singles
ATTRACTIVE, ACTIVE,
Healthy, Elderly Jewish
Gentleman, Likes To Walk.
Seeks a Companion 65-80
Years Young For Possible
Marriage. Looking for a
Woman who Enjoys Cook-
ing, is Healthy And A Non-
Smoker and Is Interest-
ed In Sharing Family Life
And Good Times With A
Sweet Loving Widower
Who Lives At The Deauville
Hotel 67th and Collins
Avenue Miami Beach.
If interested Write To LA
c/o Jewish Floridian, P.O.
Box 012973, Miami,
FL 33101.
Synagogue Listing Candlelighting Time 7:33 p.m. CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION Temple Beth Shmuel 1700 Michigan Ave., Miami Beach 534-7213-534-7214 Barry J. Konovitch, Rabbi (St\ Moshe Buryn, Cantor x* Sergio Grottier, President Sholem Epelbaum, President, Religious Committee
BETH YOSEPH CH AIM CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue Miami Beach, Ra. 5312120 Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig TEMPLE EMANU-EL 1701 Washington Avenue /Si*, Miami Beach \y) Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger Yehuda Shit man. Cantor Maurice Klein, Ritual Director Gerald Taub. Executive Director Kabbalal Shabbat at 8 p.m. Sat 8 a.m. Rabbi Ma.wall Bargar will apaak. Cantor Yahuda Shllman will chant. Dally Sarvlca 8 a.m. 8 7 p.m.
AOATH YESHURUN 1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive North Miami Beach 947-1435 Rabbi Simcha Freedman Cantor: Zvl Rozen Conservative Executive Director *%* Harry J. Sllverman f) Mlnyan 7:30 a.m. 8 6:30 p.m. Sal. t Sun 8a.m. 1 (p.m. Shabbat wry Sal. 8:30 a.m. Bar Mltzvah Sat. 8:30 a.m. Mam Panchanaky
HEBREW ACADEMY BETH-EL CONGREGATION 2400 Pinetree Drive. Miami Beach 532-6421 Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schiff Dally 7:30 a.m. (Mon. 8 Thura 7:15) 8 7 p.m. Fri. 7 p.m Sat. 8 a.m Raaarv for High Holiday Daya
TEMPLE BETH AM 5950 N. Kendall Dr. S. Miami 667-6667 Dr. Herbert Baumgard. Senior Rabbi Rabbi Leonard Schoolman Frt. 1:15 p.m. Rabbl Mark Kr.m will apaak.
TEMPLE ISRAEL Of Greater Miami Mlam/'a Pionaar fta'onn Congragatlon 137 N.E. 19th St. Miami, 573-5900 9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055 Rabbl Rex D. Perimeter Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson Cantor Emeritus: Jacob G. Bornstein Fri. 8 p.m. Downtown: Rabbl Ra D. Parimatar 8 Cantor Rachalla F Nalson will conduct mualcal catabratlon 8 ralnauguratlon of Radio Broadcaata on WTMI-83.1 FM.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION 2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854 3911 Jack Riemer. Rabbi Robert Albert. /St* Cantor [Wj Rev. Milton Freeman. "*"* Ritual Director Mlnchah al 800 p.m. Dally Mlnyan Mon. 4 Thura. 7:30 a.m. Tuaa.. Wad. 1 Fri. .46 a.m. Sun ft a m Evanings 5 30 p m Sat. 9 a.m. Rabbi Rlamar will conduct aarvlcaa aaalatad by Cantor Robart Alba.t Kldduah will loilow
TEMPLE JUDEA 5500 Granada Blvd. Reform Coral Gables 667-5657 Michael B. Eisenstat. Rabbi Fri. 8 p.m.
BETH KODESH Conservative 1101 S.W. 12 Ave. Rabbi Max Shapiro 858-6334 Cantor Joseph Krissel Rose Berlin: Executive Secretary Sanrlcaa Monday Thursday 7:30 a.m. Sat.fc4ta.rn. TEMPLE KING SOLOMON 910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776 Rabbi Marvin Rose Snoshanah Raab. Cantor Sarvicaa Fri. 7:30 p.m. Sal 8:30 a.m. Onag Shabbat will follow.
TEMPLE MENORAH 620 75th St., Miami Beach 33141 Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz ^~. Arl Fridkis. Assoc. Rabbi ( ) Cantor Murray Yavneh --K-' Sal 9 a.m Sabbath aarvlca Daily Mlnchah Sunday-Friday ft a m and 8 p.m Sat. 8 a.m. and 5:18 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE 2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami. FL 33181 891-5508 Conservative Dr. Israel Jacobs, Rabbi Dr Joseph A. Gortinkel. '"$*', Rabbi Emeritus -fJ Moshe Friedler, Cantor Fri. 7 p.m. Sat 8:45 a.m. Waakday aarv Mon. Fri. 8 am Mon.-Thura. 5 p.m. Sun. 8:30 a.m. Sat. ft 45 a m
TEMPLE NERTAMIO 866-8345 7902 Carlyle Ave.. 866-9833 Miami Beach 33141 conaonativo Rabbl Eugene Labovltz ,>. Cantor Edward Klein ( S) DaNy aarv. Mon.-Frt. 8 am 8 8 15 p.m Sal MlnchaH5pm Sun fcSOa.m 8 8:15 p.m
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL 1545 Jefferson Ave., M.B., FL 33139 Tel. 536-4112 Rabbi Alvadia Rosenberg Cantor Moshe Buryn Dally aarvlcaa 8 ajn.8 7 p.m Sal 8:15am SHAARAY TEFILLAH of North Miami Beach 971 Northeast 172nd St. North Miami Beach 651-1562 Yaakov Sprung
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION 7500 S.W. 120th Street 238-2601 :'Sy. Rabbi David H. Auerbach v.?' Cantor Stephen Freedman Fri. Sarvicaa 8 p.m. Sal. aarv. 8:30 a.m. Dally aarvlcaa: Sun 8:30 a.m. Man.. Tuaa 8 Thura. 7:30 a.m. Wad. 7:30 p.m. SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL 232-6833 Modam Orlhodoi Rabbi Hershel Becker Sat. 8:30 a.m. aarvlca at Tampia Samu-EI 93S3SW152Aa S. of N. Kandall Dr
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave. North Oade's Reform Congregation Ralph P. Kingsley. Rabbi 932 9010 Julian I. Cook. Associate Rabbi Irving Shulkes, Cantor Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator Fri. 8 p.m aarvlca will ba conductad by Rabbi Julian t. Cook Cantor living Shulkaa aaalatad by Mr and Mrs. Joaooh>alan Sat aarv 10:30 a m
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM 538-7231 CtMM AVB i 41 St St. Llbatal DR. LEON KRONISH, Santor Founding Rabbi QARY A. OUCK8TBN. Santot Rabbi HARRY JOLT, Au.lllary Rabbi JASON OWASDOFF. Aaalalant Rabbi IAN ALRERIN, Cantor GENNIS J. MCE. F.T.A.. EucuMva Dtraclor Frt.fc1Sp.rn.
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE CONGREGATION 947-7528 1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd. -g-*-. Dr. Max A. Lipschitz, Rabbi at) Zvee Aroni, Cantor V-S Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director Ssrvlcaa Fri. 5 30 p m Sal. 8:25 a.m. 8 7:28 p.m. Dally aarvlcaa Mon Fri 7:30 a.m. 8 5:30 p.m. Sunday 8 a m 8 5:30 p.m TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER 8000 Miller Dr. Conservative 271-2311 ,^. Dr. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi f W )) Benjamin Adler, Cantor N-^> David Rosenthal, Auxiliary Cantor Mlnyan 7 a.m. Monday 8 Thursday Sunday 8 a.m. Fri. 8:15 p.m. Sarvicaa will ba conductad by Dr. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbl 8 liturgy chantsd by Cantor Banjamln Adlar. Sarmon "In Contamplallon Sat. aarv. 8 a.m. oonducfd by Dr. Norman N. Shapiro


Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. August 21, 1987
Deaths
Harold Thurman,
Community Leader
Harold Thurman, a leader of
Greater Miami's communal ac-
tivities passed away at the age of
83 on August 15 after a long
illness.
He was a native of Boston and
resident of Coral Gables for 40
years. Mr. Thurman was a
graduate of the Boston Latin
School, Harvard University and
Harvard Business School. Harold
Thurman was the President of
Thurman Flour Company which
still exists today. He was past
president of Big Brothers in
Boston. During World War II he
was head of the compressed food
department in Washington, D.C.
Mr. Thurman moved to Coral
Gables in the 1940s because of
fragile health. He, however,
became extremely active in the
business and community life of
Miami. He served as past presi-
dent of Temple Israel of Greater
Miami and the past campaign


G

t e t t i t 6
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel 261 7612
chairman of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. He was an of-
ficer of both Miami Jewish
Federation board of directors and
its foundation. Other organiza-
tions that he was involved with
were Sr. Citizens of Dade County,
Hillel Foundation of the Universi-
ty of Miami, Bureau of Jewish
Education, executive committee
of the Harvard Club, board of
directors at Cedars Hospital and
board member of various other
organizations.
He is survived by his wife of 52
years, Melanie; two daughters,
Jane (Al) Sharon of Minneapolis,
Deborah (Barry) Haiman, Miami;
six grandchildren; and three
sisters. Services were held at
Temple Israel of Greater Miami.
HIBSHMAN
Melvin, a food broker, died August 14. He
was 62. Mr. Hibshman was a native of
Cleveland, Ohio He moved to Florida in
1979. He is survived by his wife Betty
daughter. Lynne Schuchmann of Us Vegas,
a son Randy Hibshman of Spring Valley.
New York and four grandchildren. Services
were held.
LANDAU
Beverly. 36, of Kendall, passed away
August 11 Mrs Landau had made her home
here for the past 11 years, coining from
Hartford, Ct. She was a graduate of the
School of Nursing at New Britain. Ct.. she
was a nurse at Cedars Medical Center for 11
years. Member of Temple Samu-EI/Or
Olom. She is survived by her husband Ezra;
father Lewis Feldsher of Kendall; father-in-
law Kabbi Sol (Gahriele) Landau; sister in
law of Tamara Landau; and aunts. Fneda
Pollack. Molly Greenberg, Grace Dubrow
and Alice Chiron. Services were held at
Temple Samu-EI/Or Olom with interment
followed at Star of David Memorial Park.
MORDKOFF
K;ihhi Lao, 86. of Miami Krai h. pasa
on Saturday Aafual 15, In Indianapolis.
Born in Poland. Rabbi Ifordkoff aervad ai
rabbi, mohel, ahochat, all around clergy.
nmst notably m Catakill and Albany, Nan
York For tha las) IS years, ha and ins laic
wife .Iran roaidad in Miami Beach Ma ii
mourned by his brothers, Hurra) and
ind, and Dora
i his children H d Bar
nard, four grandchildren and two
grandchildren.
AVEDON
Ethel M 77. of North Miami Beach, paaaed
August IS. She had bean n
here for tha paat W yean coming front
Nea York Chj She ii nirvived bj I
Arnold (Jane) Avedon of Miami, grand
children Debra, Wendy, Khnber
Greggorj <)r.i\. ,. ud inter
held al Mi Nebo Cemetery
GOLDMAN
Beatrice Ruth, 82, of Miami Beach, paaaed
awaj AuguM 19 She had been a n
.uh Florida for 48 .war-,
from Chicago. || She by her
ind, Irving, niecei Natalie Freund
and Harriet wolf and nephew George
Goldman Servkaa were held at The
Riverside, Alton Road Chapel,
Leonard Rosen,
Real Estate
Pioneer
Leonard Rosen, 72, longtime
resident of Baltimore, Miami and
Las Vegas, passed away August
14 in Valley Hospital after a brief
illness. He was a pioneer in
establishing national marketing
and real estate corporation over
the last 40 years.
In the late 1950's, Leonard
Rosen started the Gulf American
Corporation, which developed the
city of Cape Coral.
Throughout his life, Leonard
Rosen was actively involved in
many Jewish causes. He helped to
establish and maintain Hebrew
day schools in Miami, Baltimore
and I^as Vegas. A dynamic fun-
draiser for Israel, he was ap-
pointed to Israel's Prime Minister
Club by Menachem Begin for his
'exceptional participation in the
State of Israel's economic
development program."
He is survived by his wife,
Sonia; former wife, Dorothy,
three children, Linda Sterling,
Ronald Rose, and Sandy Ray-
mond; two stepdaughters, and six
grandchildren. Services and inter-
ment in Baltimore.
BECKER. Jean, of Miami Beach. August
14. The Riverside.
FARB, Mrs, Sylvia, of Miami Beach Rubin
Zilbert.
FRIEDMAN. Daniel Todd (Fred). 24. of
Opa Locka. Levitt Weinstein.
WATSKY. Julius. 96, of North Miami
Beach. Services held in New York
CANTOR, Daniel, 85, of North Miami
Beach. The Riverside.
GELLER, Rose Kolber, 95. of Kendall.
August 17. Graveside services and inter
ment held at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
JOHNSON. Ethel. 90, of Miami, August 18.
Services were held.
MORDKOFF. Rabbi Leo. M, of Miami
Beach. August IS Service! were held
CLASSMAN. Michael J.. 72. August 17
Services held in New Jersey The
Riversidt-
GOODRICH, Samuel. 84, of Miami Beach,
August 18. The Riverside.
BEL80N. RoeefRommeU), of Miami Baach,
August 16 Service! held in Boaton
WEINER, Helen Lois of North Miami
Beach, August 16, Service! held in
Philadelphia.
SPINARD, Ruby, 78, of North Miami
Beach A iguat 1". The Rival
STARK, Alfred M of Miami Man
Chap
KINK Joseph L. Dr., 90, of Kej Biaeayna
August 14. The Riverside Internet
Star of David Cemetery.
FREEDMAN, I ,-t i.v Sen i
held in Philadelphia
I 'I 'BETSZTEJN, Siymon, of Mi imi. Kubm
Zilbert.
LEWIS. Murra] I.. Rubin Zilbert
FRIEDLAND, Nal B8 I M in Shoree,
12 Levitt Weinstein.
GREEN, Bertha. 88 of North Mian:; H. .
August 12 Mt in. r.di 11
SIMBERG, Alex R. infant, Auguat II
Blasberg i
SIMON Minnie 98, of Man. Beach
August 12 Blasberg i
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Erery DayClosed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888
When a loss occurs
away from home.
smwrz mimes
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service
Dade County
Broward County
5:12 20W
Represented 1>> Kiverside Memorial Chapel. Ine.
New YorkMTIKI^ITWMtguefn.sBlv.i &7rithK.i Kortst Hills N V
Eugen Loebl, Jewish Official
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Eugen Loebl, one of the
Jewish officials in postwar
Czechoslovakia who was ar-
rested and tried in the in-
famous Slansky trial in 1952,
died here last week after a
heart attack. He was 80 years
old.
A former First Deputy
Foreign Trade Minister, he
was one of 14 people, 11 of
them Jews, forced to confess
to treason and espionage dur-
ing the 1952 trial.
Loebl and two co-defendanh
were sentenced to life ;
prisonment. The rest J!
hanged. After serving
years, he was released anri
named director of ik,
Czechoslovak State Bank ii
Bratislava in 1963. He im
migrated to the United States
in 1968 and became a State
Department consultant and i
teacher. He taught economics
and political science at Vassa
College in upstate New Yor5
from 1969 until he retired i
1976.
Cabinet Decision
Sparks Protest
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
There were protests and
demonstrations by workers at
the Jerusalem District Elec-
tricity Company following the
Cabinet's decision to restrict
JDEC's operations exclusively
to Arab consumers.
The Cabinet approved, by a
vote of 15-5, the recommenda-
tion of Energy Minister Moshe
Shahal to reduce the scope of
the debt-ridden JDEC's opera-
tions so that the company
would cease serving the new
Jewish suburbs of Jerusalem
and West Bank Jewish
settlements.
THESE WILL now receive
their electricity directly from
the Israel Electric Corporation
(IEC), the government-owned
Israeli power monopoly. The
.IDEC will confine itself to sup-
plying Arab sections ofl
Jerusalem and the West Bank [
the Cabinet rejected an alter
native proposal that the JDEcl
be closed down altogether.
The company will be re-l
quired to dismiss some 350 o.'|
its staff of more than 500.1: |
will be required to purchase i*-
of its electricity from the IEC
Hitherto it has generated five]
percent of its electricity, anril
purchased 95 percent from the I
IEC. The five percent capacity]
will henceforth be used in|
emergencies only.
The JDEC is the largest cor-
poration in the administered I
areas, and its staff is widely
reputed to include politically!
radical elements among its
leadership. The company1!
fate, therefore, has long been
seen as a political as well as[
economic problem.
28840 Greenfield Kd.
Oak I'ark. Mirhiuan 18X17
l.U.l) 543-1622
Hebrew Memorial Chapel
of (.renter Detroit
Efficient. tit-liable. Traditional
with
Dignity and I nnVrstundiny
Complete Shippinic ScrvMV Kmnt I luridu \rtst
Your First Call to Us Mill
Handle All Funeral Arrangements
SPECIAL LIMITED PRE-NEED OFFER
FUNERAL AND BURIAL
IN THE BEST OF JEWISH TRADITION
$1,595
I afcwidc Memorial Park anJ I u-rn.il I ighi I mural Director-. *"' P"""1''
qwnanr ilu- unique program which comhmev ovvnrrvhip of a plot Ji '"'
beautiful Manorial Park and a plan for prepaid funeral attvicaa.
Thiv exceptional value wuro thai vour one call will put mum Much "ill1
the people who believe there i nothing dignified about pavingaaor*ft*I
traditional Jawiall funeral that tou have eo.
HEM is WHAT WI INCI lilt:
LiQbx:
Prompt I ransli-r from Plan of
Death
Cat* and Preparation of Decratrd
Ca.ket and Heanve
Arrangement Direction of
'"'hiJi Sanlaaa
Permit* and Hrnrfii A.n.tance
24 hour emergencv vervue
Shia Candle*, Card, and Beruhr.
QPL^
Oravaalft
Paved Private Violation Paih
Steel Reinforced Concrete Va*
Opening and Clewing of ''"'
Perpetual C.raveite tare
No maintenance or venue
A Jewi.h Tradition .in.' ^'^
TOTAL: $1,595
No Interest Payment Plans Available
Fivr complete information on our pk>t and funeral vervicr package pl"
call vour Lakeidr Eternal I ighi representative lodav
In time of need, one call will handle all the detaiU.
DADE:
592-0690
BROWARD:
525-9339


Friday, August 21, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 17-B
Larry Freedberg Named
Regional Training Manager
Larry Freedberg has been
named regional training
manager of American Future
Corporation, a 102-year-old
commodity trading firm with
an office in North Miami
Beach.
The announcement was
made by Bret Cannyn,
manager of Florida-New York
Districts of American Futures
Corporation.
According to Cannyn,
Freedberg will be responsible
for introducing commodity
brokers to American Futures
Corporation's unique com-
modity training program. He
brings more than 10 years of
extensive business experience
to his position.
American Futures Corpora-
tion was originally founded in
1885 under the name of
Weinberg Bros, and Co. The
company is one of the oldest
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Kile Number 86-1954
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ZOLTAN NAGY
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
VGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSON8 INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE
YOU ARE M K R E H V
NOTIFIED thai i!i' sdministrs
lion "i' the .-slate .if ZOLTAN
S'AGY, deceased, FOe Number
86 1964, it pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade < iounty, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 7:i w. Flakier Street,
Miami. FL. 88188. The personal
representative of the estate is
GABRIELLA NAGY AND
KI.AKA VOROS. whose address ll
llii Kendale Rd. North. Cohim
Ohio 43220 and jo Edmonton
Dr. Willowdale, Ontario, Canada.
respective!] The name and ad
the personal represi
. >'- attornej are -it forth
All persons having claims or
against the estate are re
quired, WITHIN THREE MON
Ills FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
t COUrt a written state
' of any elaim or demand the)
' ich claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basil
lor the claim, the name and ad
Ires- of the creditor or his agent Of
attorney, and the amount claimed
If the claim I- not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated If the claim is Contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall Mated If the
claim i- secured, the security shall
! described The claimant .hall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one COD] to each |xT
tonal representative,
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has bean
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
I' \ TK OF TH E FI RST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challcnn"' the
validity of tin. decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
\\D OBJECTIONS NOT 80 FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Hate of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration August
2\. l OABRIELLA NAGY
And KLARA VOROS
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ZOLTAN NAGY
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
EUGENE J. WEI8S
'"." Lincoln Rd PHNE,
Miami Reach. FI. 38189
Telenhorii I 1721
17930 August 21,28, 1987
Larry Freedberg
family-owned commodity
firms in the nation. In 1983,
Weiberg Bros, diversified its
activities and changed its cor-
porate futures and options
name to American Futures
Corporation.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
\('TK'E IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
i ngage m husmess under the He
titious name Coconut Grove Slain
ed Class at L'!'j:i S W 30 Court.
Coconut drove. Florida 88188 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of tin' Circuit Court of
I lade County. Florida
Barbara Schuman, 50
.loan C. Tegbu, -Mi
179219 August 21,28;
September4, II, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the ti.
titious name PROPERTY' IN
VESTMEN1 SYSTEMS al 202a
SW Is) St Miami. FL 33135 in-
tend lo register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida
RAUL A OLN \
\\.\ G OL!\ \
17913 August 7, 11 21
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
(ASF. NO. 87-31098 CAM
NOTICE OF ACTION
LINCOLN SERVICE
CORPORATION,
Plaintiff
VIRGINIA I. CLARK, el al.,
Defendants
TO LINDA I. DE ATLEY
Residence I Inkn m i
YOU ARE 'I b R E H V
NOTIFIED thai an action for
Foreclosure of Mortgage on the
following described property:
Lot u. Block 8, of (JRIFF-
INC BISCAYNE PARK
ESTATES, according to the
l'1-it thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book B, Page B8, of the
Public Records of Hade Coun-
ty. Florida
has been filed against you and you
an required to terve s copy of
your written defenses, it an). to it.
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, l"'"11 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Cables. Florida, 38146 on or before
September ih. I9S7 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before servia on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediatoU
thereafter; otherwise a default will
lie entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS mj hand and the leal
Of this Court this 14 day of August.
1987
RICHARIi P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
B) BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
17931 August:.'!
September4, II
Floyd Pearson
Names Partners
The law offices of Floyd
Pearson Richman Greer Weil
Zack and Brumbaugh, P.A.,
announce that Thomas Meeks
and Debra Goodstone have
become partners with the firm,
and that Andrew H. Friend,
Morgan R. Rood, Robert A.
Schreiber, Michael Criden, and
Edward Newman have become
associates of the firm.
Meeks, a 1979 graduate of
the University of Florida
School of Law, serves on The
Florida Bar's Civil Procedure
Rules Committee and
specializes in the trial of
business disputes, fraud,
breach of contract, and
business torts.
In 1976, Goodstone
graduated from Florida State
University. She specializes in
real estate and corporate law.
She was recently elected to
serve as the 1987-1988 presi-
dent of The Florida Council of
Bai Association Presidents.
Mr. and Mrs. Stephan Igra of Bay Harbor, were special guests at
a dinner for Founders ofHadassah at Hadassah's 7Srd annual
National Convention here. With them is Ruth W. Popkin, Na-
tional President ofHadassah (extreme left). Mrs. Igra is Presi-
dent of the Miami Beach Region ofHadassah. Founders are ma-
jor donors to the Hadassah Medical Organization in Israel,
which encompasses the Hadassah-University Hospital on Mount
Scopus and the Hadassah-Hebreiv University Medical Center at
Fin Karein in Jerusalem.
If you want a
traditional Jewish funeral,
then you want a
family-owned funeral chapel.
ri if m
Levitt-Weittstein is; Riverside is not!
Levitt-Weinstein Memorial Chapels
has been Jewish family-owned-and-
operated for over 4 generations.
Presently there are 7 Levitt and
Weinstein family members licensed
as Jewish funeral directors.
The tradition continues.
However, Riverside is operated by
the Houston public conglomerate,
SCI. They also own over 300 non-
Jewish funeral homes in the U.S. and
the National Cremation Society, and
are traded on the New York Stock
Exchange.
But at Levitt-Weinstein... the Jewish
tradition continues.
"Family-oumed" should be mean-
ingful and beneficial to you:
Our family serves you on a sincere,
personal level.
We have more Jewish funeral direc-
tors than anv other major funeral
chapel in Florida.
We respect the Sabbath; we conduct
no services on Jewish holidays.
We offer unequalled service and value.
And foremost... our primary com-
mitment is to the families we serve.
Remember... there is a Mr. Levitt.
There is a Mr. Weinstein. There is no
Mr. Riverside.
The tradition continues.
Memorial Chapels
N. Miami Beach
18840 West I )imo I lighway
949-6315
Hollywood
1921 Pembroke Rd
921-7200
Boca/Deerf ield Beach
7500 N. State Rod Seven
427-6500
West Palm Beach
S4.10keediobooBlvd.
689-8700
BETH DAVID Memorial Gardens
3201 North 72nd Avenue
Hollywood 963-2400
(located on the grounds)


Page 18-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 21. 1987
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCl'IT COl'RT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
WD FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-30858-27
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Petition of
Juana M. Sanahna and
Pedro Sanabria for the adoption
of a minor child
TO: Hector Rafael Negron
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
ADOPTION has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, it any. to it
on ALAN SCHNEIDER. Esq..
Alan Schneider PA., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 2720
West Flagler Street. Miami,
Florida 33135 and Tile the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before September 4,
1987: otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this July 31, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By B.J. Frey
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
Alan Schneider, P.A.
2720 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33135
(Phone) (305) 643-6988
17907 August 7, 14,21,28. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-32647 29
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JORGE LUIS LINARES,
and
MARGARITA MENERVA
RIVERA PARRA.
TO: Margarita Menerva
Rivera Parra
Central Fructuoso
Rodriguez
Limonar
Matanzas. Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Steven
Miller, Esquire, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is FRIED-
MAN & KAPLAN. PA.. 3636
West Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida 33135. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before August 28th.
1987; otherwise a default ."ill be
entered against you for the rel'ef
demanded in the complaint ir
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 27th day of July. 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: John Branda
As Deputy Cleric
(Circuit Court Seal)
STEVEN MILLER. ESQUIRE
Friedman & Kaplan. P.A.
3636 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33135
Attorney for Petitioner
16896 July 31.
August?. 14.21, 1981
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN
thai the undersigned, desiring to
engage in buaiiMM under the fic-
titious name NEW YORK SHIRT
I 7226 7227 NW 7 Street, Miami
Florida intends to regiilet nid
BUM with the Clerk of the Circuit
Cowl of Dade Counts. Florid;.
New York Wholesale Handbag!
Inc.
.lostiuii ll Manast.r. P.A.
Attorney for
Nan York Wholesale Handbagi.
Inc.
August 21.28;
SeptemU-r I. II. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87 31940-19
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
K( GENE HUNTINGTON
.ind
DENISE ANN GREEN
HUNTINGTON
TO: DENISE ANN GREEN
HUNTINGTON
888 Hamilton Avenue
Paterson, New Jersey
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street North Miami Beach; Florida
33162. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
or before August 28, 1987; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 22 day of July, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
16884 July 31;
August 7, 14,21, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-4342
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LILLIAN ROSEN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of LILLIAN ROSEN, deceased.
File Number 87-4342. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33131. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
Al! interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OK
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJ EC
TIONS NOTSO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 21, 1987.
Personal Representative:
Carl L. Rosen
12850 Osborn N.E.
Alliance, Ohio 44601
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Abraham A. Galbut, Esq.
999 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
Florida Bar No.: 210889
17927 August 21. 28. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name CHIPS (or) CHIPS
COMPUTER INSTRUCTION
AGENCY at 1340 NE 174 St N
Miami Beach. Fl 88162 intends to
register said name with the Clark
of the Circuit Court of Dade COUI
ty. Florida.
Tina Freiman
16888 July $1,
______ Auguat7.14.21.1887
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name PLACE DES ARTS
at MAYFAIR IN THE GROVE
BLD I Room 308 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade CuUn
U. Florida
EUEGUIGU1
July 81;
August 7. 14,21, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-36279 09
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
I.I 'IS GABRIEL OQUENDO.
Petitioner,
and
CARMEN SEGUNDA BERNAL
OQUENDO.
Respondent.
TO: CARMEN SEGUNDA
BERNAL OQUENDO
Residence:
Tercera Avenida con
Segunda Transversal
Edificio Excelsior
Piso 8 Apt. 36
Loas Palos Grandes.
Caracas. Venezuela. S.A.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on
HAROLD CEASE. ESQ.. at
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 2720 West Flagler Street.
Miami. FL 33135. and file the
i inginal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
September 25. 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and theseal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 18 day of August. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By JOHN BRANDA
As Deputy Celrk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HAROLD CEASE. ESQ.
CEASE & CEASE
2720 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33135
17937 August 21, 28;
____________September4. II. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87-02038 FC 30
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JOHN SANTORO.
Petitioner-H usband
and
ROSE SANTORO,
Respondent-Wife
TO: ROSE SANTORO.
189 Bay 26th Street
Brooklyn. N.Y. 11214
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on EDWIN
A. WILLINGER. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 1655
Drexel Avenue, Miami Beach,
Florida 33139, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before August 7th,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 6th day of July. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Barbara Rixlriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EDWIN A WILLINGER.
1655 Drexel Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone: 6884768
16838 July 10. 17. 24,31, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE HEREBY IS GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in tiusiness under the fie
titious name Law At 'lour I ?. m r in
' register mid name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
I lad. (lount) Florida
Jack Werner. (Iwner
17888 August 21
September I, II, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
tious name NACHO APART
MENTS at 14190 W. Dixie!
Highway. No. Miami. Fl. 88161 in-
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Shirley Ash and Nigel Ash
Willard K. Splittstoesscr. Esq.
Attorneys for Applicants
13122 West Dixie Highway. Suite
B
North Miami. Florida 33161
17905 August 7. 14. 21,27. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-4255
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SUSANNE SONDHELM,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of SUSANNE SONDHELM.
deceased. File Number 87-4255. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is
Dade County Courthouse. 73 W.
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) an) ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 21, 1987.
Personal Representative:
HENRY NORTON,
19 W Flagler St., Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 W. Flagler Street, Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 374-3116
Florida Bar No. 059023
17936 August 21, 28. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name A Able North
American at 12856 SW 188 Street
Miami. Fl. intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
A Able Moving & Storage, Inc.
Marvin 1. Moss,PA
Attorney for
A Able Moving & Storage, Inc.
17982 August 21,-28;
September 4. 11. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-4414
Division (02)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARGARET NEUMANN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of MARGARET NEUMANN,
deceased, File Number 87-4414, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
Dade County Courthouse, 73 W.
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
88180. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 21. 1987.
Personal Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler St, Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler Street. Suiu? 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone (806) 374-3116
Florida Bar No. 069028
17986 August 21. 28. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FKTITIOUSNAMKUw
NOTICE IS HERKH ,f*,. |
,h ""fersigned. ds, ffi
engage m butJnen ,, ,h"7"
htloui name Cielit,, \J'?\
Restaurant intend to ,,,.
name with the Clerk I
Court of Dade Count,
Sikaffv Sikafh A A
by Rafael Aguilera
Herbert J. Lernw, Eaq
Attorn*) for Appficani
801 Arthur Godfrej H
Miami Beach. Florid.,
Phone: (806)878-31.....
17916 August 7. 14, 2| .
IN THE CIRCUIT < <>i kt i J
DADE COUNTY, Fl.OR,, !"
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-318)
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HILDA FREEMAN.
NOTICE OF Kmi
ADMINISTRATION
(Florida Bar No. 1148:126)
The administration of th. .
of HILDA FREEMAN *
FileNumber 87-3.83.,,...
thedrcuitCourtforlla,,,,,,,^'
Florida. Probate Hi.
dress of which is 78 W( I Flagler
Street. Miami, Florida 33131 Th,
names and addresses ol
oral representative and the per'I
sonal representative's attorney-w
set forth below.
All interested person- are re-
quired to file with this com
WITHIN THREE MONTHS Of
THE FIRST PUBLICATION of
THIS NOTICE: (I) all ^
against the estate and (2) am
jection by an interested person on,
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will.
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 21. 196.
Personal Representative
Raymond Schall
18355 Collins Street
Apartment 219
Tarzana. California 91356
ALAN R LORBER. PA
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
By: Alan R Lorber
1111 Lincoln Road. Suite 680
Miami Reach, Florida 38139
Telephone: (305) 538-14111
17884 August 21.28 I98T
CmkIUii.. Uaatl af OwillloM ml
I Miami. Fla.____________
l.rovegate Har.k
June 30. 1987
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Friday, August 21, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 19-B
FORECLOSURE SALES-PUBLIC NOTICES
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-33371 CA 20
NOTICE OF ACTION
SOUTH FLORIDA SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff
vs.
MICHAEL W. CHARLES, et al..
Defendants.
TO: MICHAEL W. CHARLES
2654 N.E. 135th Street
North Miami. Florida 33181
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Foreclosure of Mortgage on the
following described property:
LOT 1, BLOCK l.of
HIDDEN COVE TOWN-
HOUSES, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 119, Page 64, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida, AND the
West 30 feet of Tract B, HID-
DEN C O V E
TOWNHOUSES, Plat Book
119. Page 64. of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
21 1. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
(ishlss. Florida. 33146 on or before
September 11. 1987 and file the
riginal with the I'lerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
hereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
f 'his Court this 6 day of August.
RICHARD P BRINKEF
\- Clerk of the Court
BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
A- Deputy Clerk
Aiigu>! 14.21,28;
ptember I, I K
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
lllK ELEVENTH JUDH IAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASK NO.: 67-31987
I I ORIDA BAR N<> 549851
U TION FOR DISSOLI TION
OF MARRIAGE
tl nil \i VRRI Mil OF
VRL B SPRINGI R
I
MALVINA SPRINGER
Respondent Wife
M VLVINA SPRINGER
Lawson Drive
Fort Bragg,
North Carolina
YOU ARK HEREBY NOT1
I IKH that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if anv. to it on MARIA
BREA-LIPIN8KI, Plaintiffs at-
lorney, whose address is 16812
- W ;i2nd Avenue. Miami. Florida
38167, on or before August 28,
1987, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
Mrvios on plaintiffs attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
DATED: July 84, 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKKR
As Clerk of the Court
BY Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
16888 July 81;
August 7. 14.21. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
ge in business under the fie
i t i ii u s n a in e T A I \
rRIBlTORS S.Vt
1 .7 Ave No ill Miami, Fla.
ti lids to register Mid
name with the Clerk >l
i 'ouri i I'.I'll ount). Florida
TARO.I IN'" VLIXTO
mi S 'A 10"
M ii
Ho Augu
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-34781-15
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK.
AS TRUSTEE FOR THE DADE
COUNTY HOUSING FINANCE
AUTHORITY,
Plaintiff
vs.
PATRICK THOMAS
BLUBELLO, et ux.. et al..
Defendants.
TO: PATRICK THOMAS
BLUBELLO and
DIANE M. BLUBELLO,
his wife
1592 Pirkle Road
Norcross. GA 30093
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of
Mortgage on the following
described property:
Lots 13, 14 and 15 less the
South 70 feet. Block 12,
SUNKIST GROVE,
according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 8. Page 49 of the
Public Records of Dade
County. Florida,
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any.
to it. on Stuart H. Gitlitz,
Attorney for Plaintiff, whose
address Is Suite 214. 1570
Madruga Avenue. Coral Gables.
Florida, 88148 on or before
September 11, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise
a default will Ik- entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint.
WITNESS mj hand and the
seal of tins Court this 10 day of
August, 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
B) T CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
17924 August 14. 21
September I,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COI Ml
GENERAL JURI8DH TION
DIVISION
c \sk No. 87-34688 27
NOTICE OF ACTION
I EDERAL NATIONAL
MORTG VGE ASSOCIATION an
iation organized and existing
under the laws of the United
States of America.
Plaintiff
y -
JONI G DOLE, el al.,
Defendants.
TO; JONI G. DOLE
8719 N.W. 28rd Street
Forth Worth. Texas 76106
YOC ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
(in the following described
property:
Lot 2, Block 34. BENT
TREE CENTER, according
to the plat thereof, as record-
ed in Plat Book 109 at Page
82 of the Public Records of
Dade County. Florida
has been filed against you and yott
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it.
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruge Avenue. Coral
1 iablss Florida. 88146on or before
September II, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise 1 default will
be entered again.-' you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS mj hand and the seal
of this Court thl \i uat,
RICHARD P BRINKER
ouri
B) .11'UN BRANDA
\ 1 leputj lerk
17921 L21.28;
1 1981
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-1954
Division 02
IN RE:ESTATE OF
ZOLTAN NAGY
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of ZOLTAN
NAGY. deceased, File Number
86-1954, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the addres" of
which is 73 W. Flagler Street,
Miami, FL 33130. The personal
representative of the estate is
GABRIELLA NAGY AND
KLARA VOROS. whose address is
1114 Kendale Rd. North, Colum-
bus, Ohio 43220 and 20 Edmonton
Dr., Willowdale, Ontario, Canada
respectively. The name and ad-
dress of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have, Kai h claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall In-
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall l- Stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
scribed. The claimant -hall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to ill,- clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one eopj to each per-
sonal n I"
All i
. pj
Notice of Admin.
1 are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THK
DATE OF THK FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
V iTH T to f in) objections
they
validit) of the d 1 ill, the
qualifications of the pi
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the curt
ALL CLAIMS DEMANDS,
VNDOBJECTIONS NOTSOFIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
August 11, 1987
GABRIELLA NAG^
KLARA VOROS
As Personal Representatives
of the Estate of
ZOLTAN NAM
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
EUGENE J. WEISS
407 Lincoln Rd. PHNE.
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Telephone 808/584-4781
17922 August 14. 21. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage ; business under the fic-
titious name SHOPCEN III IN-
VESTMENTS at loi"1 San Remo
Avenue, Suite 126, Coral Gables,
Florida 38146 intends to register
SBld name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dads County
Florida
SHOPCEN III INVESTMENTS
INC
AND
PNR III INVESTMENTS INC
September I, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
I'H iinoi s \ Wli: LAH
NOTICE IS HEREBY C.I\ EN
that tl

-
Audk
p let
osl 7.11.1
url of tb
NOTICE I NUKR
FICTITIOl S N Wll LAW
NOTICE l> HI Kl !'> 1
that the und
titiousnameORDONI ZTII ;
intend to iv.
Clerk ol
ORDO
INI
'
NOTICE I NDEH
FICTITIOl S NAME LAV>
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN
that 'i "8 '"
engage in busiro '"' "<'-
. SHIRLEON VPAR1
MENTS il
e with
til Court of
Willard K
B
\
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-4315
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ETHYL B. GUBERNICK
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
Florida Bar No. 027105
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of ETHYL B.
GUBERNICK, deceased, File
Number 87 4315 (02). is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami, Florida 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate is GEORGE J. ALBOUM.
whose address is 333 Arthur God-
frey Road-Suite 104. Miami Beach.
Florida 33140. The name and ad
dress of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FRO MTHE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall In-
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated If the
claim is secured, the security shall
he described Tin- claimant shall
deliver sufficient Copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail OM copy to each per
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
to whom a copy ot this
Notice "i Administration ha
piired WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIR SI
BLICA1 ION OF THIS
NOTICE to file an;
they ma> I
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualil of the pi
representative, or the venue or
......
ALL CLAIMS DEMANDS
VND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FORE\ER
BARRED
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration
..-ust II. 1987.
GEORGE I ALBUM
\. Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ETHYL B. GUBERNICK
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
ESTELLEG. FURLONG
383 Arthur Godfrey Road
Suite 104
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Telephone: (305) 538 6741
17920 August 14, 21.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name LOVE YOUR
CARPET al 12180 S.W. 107 Ave.
Miami. PI. 88176 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Cum
ty, Florida.
MI'R Photographies! Supply Inc
16886 July 81;
August*?, 14,81,1987
ELEVENTH CIRCI IT COURT
DADF. COUNTY, FLORIDA
(ASK NO: 87-3688841
IN RE: Tin Marriage of:
MARGARETH R VMBROISE
Petiti
anil
E V E N JEAN I OSE I'll
VMBRI
Respi n
in EVI N< .H \N JOSEPH
VMBROISI
... shall

\i 11
HOLAS
v .
\.. v
R|( I R
\:\ OR
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87-32418 FC 09
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ANA LUCIA GAUDINO,
Petitioner,
and
BILLY W. GAUDINO,
Respondent.
TO: Billy W. Gaudino
3040 82nd Street
Jackson Heights
Queens. New York
Present Residence
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on Samuel S.
Sorota. Esq., attorney for Peti-
tioner. whose address is 801 N.E.
167th Street, No. Miami Bch.. FL
33162. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before August 28. 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 24 davof July. 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Had,- County. Florida
By: ("larinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
SAMUEL s sorota
801 N.E, 167th Street
Suite 308
North Miami Beach. FL 38162
Attorney for Petitioner
July 31;
August T 14.21, 1987
IN THK ( 1RCI IT COURT
OF THK 11TII .11 DICIAL
CIRCI IT IN \\l> FOR
DADE t Ol Ml FLORID \
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 87 1442
DIVISION: 03
IN HI ESTA
SHIRLEY F BOOXBAUM
I lei .
NOTB E <>l
VDMINISTR CHUN
(FLA. BAR No 184878)
fthel
>f Shirley F Booxbaum, den
File Number I pending in
the Circuit Courl f Hade County.
Florida, Probate Di. -mil. the ad
dress of which 1- i3 Weat Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 38180. The
names and addressee of trie per
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative'sattornc) are
set forth below,
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS \NI) OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 14, 1987
Nathan Siden
Personal Representative
6890 Stt 100 Street
Miami. Florida 33166
DENNIS R TURNER
Attorney for Personal
Representative
STEARNS WEAVER MILLER
WEISSLER Mil \i'MT- I
SITTERSON P \
2200 Museum T
160 Wesl Flaglei Street
Miami. Floi

17917 Vugusl i I 1 21.28
NOTH 1 NUKR
111 iinoi s \ VME l.\v
\nl n 1 1- HI Rl BY Gl\ EN
that tl
engagi
I Gl \i:h
UFA! I "i ''' Sabal
'
register
- k of the
County.
I..
II.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87-33133 (29)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
LIBIA E. PIZARRO,
a/k/a LIBIA E. GARCIA
and
JOSE GABRIEL GARCIA,
TO: JOSE GABRIEL
GARCIA
Carrera 47 No. 5.
E/57 No. 1001-B
Cali. Colombia
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has l>een filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on EMILIO
C. PASTOR, PA., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is PH I
155 South Miami Avenue,
Miami. Florida 33130, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
September 4th. 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 29th day of duly. 1987.
RICHARD P, BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: John Branda
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EMILIO C. PASTOR. P.A.
I'll I 166 South Miami Ave.
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone 372
Attorney for Pi titioner
17902 August T. 14.21.28, 1987
NOTH I Ol ACTION
CONSTRI < TIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THK (Mil I IT COURT OF
THK ELEVENTH Jl DICIAL
CIRCI ITOl : LORIDA, IN
\M> FOl I "i NT!
i ml Wtior, S i -T-l 1166 PC(081
\i riON I : DISSOLI TION
ol EIAGE
IN RE I
BARBAR GATH
VBRAH \
and
A 1. T'i N A N H I E
ABRAHA
Respondi I
I'll Mr Alt) F
26 Pen I roke Hall Drive
Kins ca W I
Y 0 U A R E H E K K B V
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution if Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses il any, to it on
ROBERT M JASINSKI, ESQ. .at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
s The Roney Plaza, Suite
M-8. 2801 Collins Avenue. Miami
Beach. Florida 88189, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
September 18. 1987; otherwise a
default will l>c entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the leal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 12 day of August. 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As i lerk. I 'ircuit Court
Dade County, Florida
Bj BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
\ Deput) I 'lerk
(Circuit i !ourl Seall
ROBERT M JASINSKI, ESQ.
The Ronej Plasa Suite M -
2301 Collii \.'
Miami Bead Flonda 88189
17926 August 21.28;
r 1.11, 1987

NOTH 1 I NOER
FICTITIOl S NAME LAW
NOTICI i- HI :.1 \:\ GIVEN
that thi lesiring to
engage der the Re
VDAMS, II! NTER
ANGONI S VI) VMS, ADAM.-- &
Md LI Flagler
Miami, I
the Circuit
Florida
P A
16889 .In-.


Page 20-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 21, 1987
*
Miami resident Leon Eisen, son of Jamie and
Miriam Eisen, is working this summer as a
research assistant in immunology at Yeshiva
University's Albert Einstein College of
Medicine in New York through the Univer-
sity's Roth Institute Scholars Program. The
program is a component of the Ernst and Hed-
ung Roth Institute of Biomedieal Sen
Education, established in 1978 to improw
education in the biological and related
sciences at Yeshiva College and Stern Colkyt
for Women, the University's und< rgraduat,
divisions of liberal arts ami set,><>.
HAPPENINGS
BlM a) ne Chapter Women's American ORT v> ill hold the,r
meeting Ml Thursday. Sept. 3 at 1 p.m. in Morton T "
Auditorium.
%.,
Yiddish classes for beginners will start on No\ 3 For a 12 w I
session at 7 p.m. on Tuesday evenings Classes are limited i015
people.
The Community Care Day Center at Douglas Gankm has J
vited William F. Saulson to lead a discussion of dlasnosi J
What's new. what's open for the Soviet Jew? scheduled |J
Wednesday at 1 p m in the Ruby Auditorium
Spec A Scott F Leviton. son of Rhonda M and Seym*
l.eviton of North Miami, has been decorated with tlv Army Com
mendation Medal in South Korea. Leviton is a vehicle meclwncl
with the 702nd Maintenance Batallion He is a lilH/i graduated
North Miami Senior High School
Temple Ner I amid will hold their 30th annners.m \earRft.
mon Dance and Social beginning 7 p.m. Aug 3(1 in the Skbr
ballroom Music will be provided by Bob Ncn.uk and|,|
orchestra
The Irvine C Spear Democratic Club will feature State Rq
Michael Friedman at its next meeting 7:80 p.m on Sept I u Surfside ('ommumt> (enter Friedman will report on the 198:)
1 cuislame session
Teachers Confab
Monroe County public school
teachers will sharpen their
human relations skills in a day-
long training conference at
Hawk's Cay in Marathon on
Friday. The conference is co-
sponsored by the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith (ADL) and the Monroe
County School Board as part
of the "A World of Dif-
ference" project now in its se-
cond year. It is a follow-up to
an August 1986 seminar which
explored prejudice issues and
the role oi schools in preparing
students for citizenship in our
multicultural society.
The day's agenda will in-
clude a panel discussion, films,
lesson demonstrations, and
school-based planning ses-
sions. Participants will hear
from colleagues who have
developed special programs
based on "A World of Dif-
ference" resources. WPLG
Channel 10's "Eye of the
Beholder" experiment will be
the focus of a discussion on
teacher expectations and
multiculturalism. ADL and
Monroe County schools staff
will facilitate lessons on ethnic
and religious stereotypes. Ar-
thur Teitelbaum, Southern
Area Director for ADL, will be
the keynote speaker.
"A World of Difference" is a
joint project of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, WPLG Channel 10,
Greater Miami United and
CenTrust Savings Bank.
Spertus College
Unveils Center
CHICAGO (JTA) The
Spertus College of Judaica has
unveiled a new center on its
campus here, the Joseph Car-
dinal Bernardin Center for the
Study of Eastern European
Jewry. The center will be
home to institutes for advanc-
ed Jewish study and the
Christian-Jewish experience
and will highlight the rem-
nants of that civilization saved
during World War II by chur-
chmen, private individuals and
governments.


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