The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03054

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
T **i/>n
Vol. 60 No. 33
Miami Friday, August 14,1987
Price 55 Cents
^/A*AV
Jewish Hospitals in U.S. Troubled
APAVide World Photo
TEARS FOR A FRIEND: Three Israeli military policewomen
cry during the funeral last week ofCapt. Ron Tal, commander of
the military police in Gaza, who was killed there on Aug. 2 while
driving his car into which an Arab on the street fired point blank
and then fled. Tal, 22, ofZahala near Tel Aviv, had served for the
past four months as head of the Gaza military police unit. APAVide
Gaza Curfew Lifted
IDF Captain Murdered by Terrorist Laid to Rest
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
curfew which was imposed on
the city of Gaza after an Israeli
army officer was shot dead
there Sunday will be lifted
Tuesday night. But the street
in the center of the city where
Captain Ron Tal was killed by
a terrorist will remain under
curfew.
In addition, the ban on Arab
residents entering or leaving
the Gaza Strip by land or by
sea, which was also imposed
Sunday, will be lifted as Arabs
began observances marking
the four-dav holy festival of Id-
Al-Adha.
Israeli Army Chief of Staff
Lt. Gen. Dan Shomron, who
visited Gaza last Tuesday
(Aug. 4). stressed that the
Israel Defense Force did not
intend to harm the Gaza Strip
residents. But. he added, the
residents must realize that the
ongoing search for Tal's killer
may make life hard for them.
Intensive security searches
have been going on since Sun-
day but Tal's car has not yet
been found.
Security sources were bitter
because no one had
volunteered any information
that could lead to the ap-
prehension of the killer. The
sources noted that the attack
Continued on Pare 12-A
4 Give Up
Their
Affiliations
By HAVIVA KRASNER
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Jewish-affiliated hospitals in
Denver, Milwaukee and Min-
neapolis have announced they
will merge with or sell to near-
by non-Jewish hospital"
primarily for economic
reasons, despite concern by
some local Jews that the
reorganization will mean a loss
of care sensitive to Jewish
needs.
These moves apparently are
the first of their kind for
Jewish hospitals in the rapidly
changing health care industry.
However, most Jewish
hospitals have consolidated
services with other hospitals
without merging, Warren
Green, president of Mount
Sinai Hospital of Minneapolis,
told the Wisconsin Jewish
Chronicle.
The 1986 "Jewish Directory
and Almanac" lists 46
hospitals and medical centers
in its Yellow Pages.
IN DENVER, the 70-year-
old Beth Israel Hospital has
been sold to St. Anthony
Hospital for an undisclosed
amount. The merger agree-
ment is set to be completed in
September. The two hospitals
have worked together for
many years, sharing medical
staff.
According to a Beth Israel
spokesperson, the merger will
"enable us to better serve the
needs of the community and
combine our expertise." The
new name of the hospital has
not been decided.
Beth Israel, with 167 beds,
also operates a nursing home.
Continued on Page 14-A
Florida Reacts
To Spiraling Cost of Pope's Sept. 10-llVisit in Miami
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jtwuk Floridian Stuff '''''''
A diverse group Chris-
tians. Jews, atheists and the
National Organization for
Women, to name a few par-
ticipants has united with
one common goal: to scrutinize
the almost $4 million in state,
county and federal dollars that
will fuel the massive papal visit
to Miami on Sept. 10 and 11.
The group, scheduled to hold
its second meeting this week,
is called the Citizens Commit-
tee for a Constitutional Papal
Visit, and its chief purpose is
to make certain that the public-
expenditures do not create a
violation of separation of
church and state.
WHILE THE organization
is not designed to bring a
lawsuit against a government
body if it finds improprieties,
the committee's findings could
result in other groups filing
legal protests, said a key
organizer. State Rep. Mike
Friedman.
"In 1979 in Philadelphia,
after the last papal visit.
Philadelphia got excessive like
Miami has a tendency to do.
They paid for a number of ac-
Who Will Visit With Pope in the Vatican?
Rep. Mike Friedman
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Jewish leaders got what they
asked for, a meeting with high-
ranking Vatican officials and
the Pope himself. They also
got it when they asked for it -
before a Sept. 11 meeting
between Jewish leaders and
Pope John Paul II in Miami.
But unlike the Miami
meeting which was to be
largely ceremonial, Jewish
leaders who are scheduled to
attend the preliminary
meeting at the Vatican are
calling it nothing short of
signific and historical.
THE .IEETING itself,
tentatively scheduled for Aug.
31 and Sept. 1, will take place
behind closed doors, off limits
to the press and the world's
eye. The nature of the
dialogue, too, is being kept out
of the public's eye by Jewish
leaders who have united in the
position not to air their
intended plans regarding the
Continued on Page 16-A


,,. '- / '.
Page 2-A The Jewish Flo'ridian/Friday. August 14, 1987
More Victims
Molotov Cocktail in Car
Injures W. Bank Couple
By HIGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
Jewish couple from the West
Bank settlement of Alfe
Menashe near Kalkilya were
injured when a Molotov
cocktail was thrown into their
car as they were driving to
Ben-Gurion International Air-
port for a trip abroad Thurs-
day morning.
The incident occurred near
the same crossroads where
Ofra Moses, also of Alfe
Menashe, was burned to death
by a petroleum bomb thrown
into the family car four months
ago. Her son died of his in-
juries some weeks later.
EDNA REGEV, 40, was
taken to the hospital with
third-degree burns on her head
and chest, but her husband,
Menashe, 47, received lighter
burns on his back.
The gasoline bomb was
thrown into the back seat of
the car, setting Edna Regev's
clothes on fire. She remained
conscious but was unable to
get out of the car and was
dragged away from the burn-
ing vehicle by her husband.
who rolled her on the ground
to extinguish the flames.
Security forces clamped a
curfew on Kalkilya and the
surrounding area.
Edna Regev, a schoolteacher
in Alfe Menashe, told
reporters in the hospital that
the family including her two
teen-aged children would
not be deterred by the attack
but would continue to live in
Alfe Menashe, where they had
made their home for the last
four years.
CENTRAL Command Maj.
Avraham Mitzna, who visited
the scene of the attack, said
that it could not immediately
be established whether there
was a direct connection bet-
ween Thursday's attack and
the attack on the Moses family
at the same spot.
But he said a terrorist gang
appeared to be active in the
general area of Kalkilya, and
the IDF was stepping up its
security precautions.
Rabbi Attends Japan Conference
To Mark Atomic Anniversary
By ROBERT ISRAEL
HIROSHIMA (JTA) The
survivors of the atomic bomb
dropped here 42 years ago are
both distinct from and con-
nected to the survivors of the
Nazi Holocaust, according to
Rabbi Joseph Glaser, ex-
ecutive vice president of the
Central Conference of
American Rabbis.
"In the case of the Jews, it
was a calculated, cold-blooded
plan to murder an entire peo-
ple," he explained in an inter-
view here. "In the case of the
Japanese, the bombings were a
cruel act of war."
However, he added, "the
survivors of both events are
linked by the fact they have
suffered and have a respon-
sibility to tell their story to
humanity to insure neither will
ever happen again."
GLASER was in Japan to at-
tend two major gatherings. On
Thursday (Aug. 6), he joined
an estimated 55.000 people in
Robert hrael, editor of the
Rhode Island Jewish Herald, is
on special assignment in
Japan reporting on sunnvors
i of the atomic bombings.

I
I
+Jeni*t lh,i h ti
Fnd Shoch*
Phone: (30S) 373*4605
Published weekly every Friday
since 1927 by The Jewish Flori-
dian. Office and Plant 120 N.E
6th St., Miami, Fla. 33132. Phone
(305) 373-4605
Second-Class Postage paid in
Miami, Fla. USPS 275320
Postmaster: Form 3579 return to
Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box
012973, Miami, Fla 33101
The Jewish Floridian does not
guarantee the Kashruth of the
merchandise advertised in its
columns.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: In ad-
vance (Local Area) One Year
$9 50 (Anniversary Special). Out
of town, country, upon request
By Mail $1.45 per copy.
the Peace Memorial Park here
for a memorial service for the
victims of the bomb that
devastated the city. On
Wednesday, Glaser laid a
wreath at the Memorial Cen-
topath in memory of the
bomb's dead.
The rabbi also was par-
ticipating in the World Con-
ference on Religion and Peace,
which has brought together
500 religious representatives
from various branches of
Judaism, Christianity, Bud-
dhism, Shinto, Islam and
Confucianism.
The conference began last
week at Mt. Hiei in Kyoto, a
site sacred to Buddhists. The
participants, who also included
Rabbi Michael Schudrich of the
Jewish community of Tokyo,
then came here for the
ceremony and travelled to
Nagasaki before returning to
Kyoto.
"There has been a great feel-
ing of camaraderie among the
participants," Glaser, the only
American cleric participating,
said in an interview here.
"Now, when we return to our
countries, we must see to it
that we continue our interfaith
work."
THE RELIGIOUS leaders
have offered proposals to solve
international conflicts such as
apartheid and the escalating
nuclear arms race. At Mt.
Hiei, they conducted a silent
vigil for world peace and rang
a peace bell at the Enryaku
Temple.
Glaser said wherever he has
traveled throughout Japan he
has been asked about the Nazi
Holocaust.
"The Japanese have told me,
'Our witnesses are dying off.
and many of them are unwill-
ing to share their stories with
others.' I told them this is true
with the Jewish survivors, too.
Often I have heard survivors
Continued on Page 15-A
GAZA CLOSED: Armed Israeli troops twin a
roadblock just north of Gaza after Ismeli
authorities closed off the' city folloinng the ter-
rorist murder of an Israeli army officer.
AP/Wide World IV
Capt. Ron Tal, there early last u.....k No out
was permitted to leaiv the Gaza Strip, and
one not heing in Gaza wax allowed to enter.
Surprise Vote
Supports Continuing Lavi Project
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
joint meeting of the Knesset's
Defense and Foreign Affairs
and its Finance Committees
voted Sunday by 22-6, with
three abstentions and half of
the committees' members ab-
sent, to continue the Lavi
project.
The surprise decision has no
binding value, and can only be
regarded as a suggestion to
the Cabinet for next Sunday's
crucial government vote on
the issue. The Israel Defense
Force general headquarters
and senior Defense and
Finance Ministry officials ex-
pressed shock and surprise at
the go-ahead vote.
Haaretz wrote Monday that
the vote was received with
astonishment in the defense
establishment and the IDF.
primarily because of the lop-
sidedness of the vote. Until
two weeks ago it was
estimated that most members
of the committees opposed the
plane.
DEFENSE establishment
sources claimed that Knesset
members who were not pre-
sent at previous meetings
voted without any idea of the
project's data and significance,
which were elaborated on
earlier.
The sources said that a deci-
sion to continue the Lavi could
bring about a sharp American
reaction, which would gravely
affect mutual military pur-
chases and thus would harm
the Israel defense
establishment.
Meanwhile, the Finance and
Defense Ministers will submit
a joint proposal at the
Cabinet's next meeting for
halting the project.
Earlier this year U.S
Defense Secretary Dov
Zakheim spent five days in
Israel trying to convince its
political and military leaders
that the Lavi. financed by IS.
grants, is too costly to pro-
duce. Zakheim urged the
Israelis to abandon the Lavi in
favor of an already tried and
tested aircraft.
He proposed as options the
F-16. manufactured by
General Dynamics, and the
F-18, each of which would be
produced under license in
Israel and modified by the
Israelis according to their
needs.
LAST MONTH Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin and
Finance Minister Mosht
Nissim concluded that the Lavi
project must be abandoned for
budgetary reasons. They said
there was no way to increase
the defense budget and
without extra funds, the Lavi
could not be produced.
An Haaretz economic affairs
correspondent quoted Rabin a.*
saying Sunday that "in such a
difficult period we must decide
what are the army's proper
priorities.
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In Interview
Archbishop Explains Catholicism for Jews in Miami
Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
By WILLIAM A. GRALNICK
What are the origins of
Christianity and the Catholic
Church?
Christianity is the composite
of the faith inspired by Jesus
Christ, the teaching and moral
practices He communicated,
the spirituality He urged on
His followers and the conse-
quent form of civilization
which for two millennia have
been called Christian.
The followers of Christ were
not, per se, called Christians
until the first century A.D., in
the city of Antioch. Jesus was
known as Jesus of Nazareth.
"Christ" is the Greek word for
"anointed;" for it was always
thought that the Messiah
would be the "anointed" one
of God.
The Christian Church is the
community of believers; the
assembly of all who believe in
Christ.
The Catholic Church was the
first or original Christian
Church before there was such
a thing as Protestantism or Or-
thodox Christianity. The term
"Catholic" means "universal."
In general, today the term
"Catholic" refers to those
Christians who profess a con-
tinued tradition of faith and
worship and who hold the
apostolic succession of bishops
and priests since the time of
Christ.
When did Christmas begin?
Christmas, which is the
celebration by Christians of
the birth of Jesus, was not
celebrated on December 25 un-
til the 4th century. Since no
one officially recorded the ac-
tual birth date of Jesus, we
know only that He was born
around the year 3 or 4 before
the beginning of the Common
Era.
MIAMI'S ARCHBISOP EDWARD McCARTHY
We know that the practice of
the time was for great pagan
leaders to have publicly iden-
tified and celebrated bir-
thdays. The church wished to
give the new converts from
paganism a reason to replace
the pagan celebration of Sol
Invictus. This celebration,
which took place on December
25, coincided with the date
traditionally thought of as
Jesus' birth date. That is how
the 25th became Christmas.
Before the date was official-
ly set for December 25, dif-
ferent church communities
celebrated the birth of Christ
at different times of the year.
What is Protestantism?
Protestantism is the collec-
tive term for the many bran-
ches of Christianity which
formed after Martin Luther's
break with the church. Some
of the major branches of Pro-
testantism are: Lutheran,
Methodist, Presbyterian,
Episcopal and Baptist. Each of
the many denominations dif-
fers in varying degree one
from the other, as well as from
Catholicism.
There are varying beliefs
within the Christian churches,
although the central belief is in
Christ. Only the Catholic
Church sees the Pope as the
visible head of the church and
as the symbol of unity among
Catholics.
Who is a Pope?
Pope is the title of the visi-
ble head of the Catholic
Church. He is called Pope
(Greek word pappas, a child's
word for father) because his
authority is supreme and
because it is to be exercised in
a paternal way, after the ex-
ample of Christ.
The Pope is the spiritual
leader of the Catholic Church;
he is the Bishop of Rome which
is the seat of the church. His
teachings are viewed as infalli-
ble. The most common term
used for the Pope is "the Holy
Father" or "His Holiness." He
is the direct descendant of the
authority of St. Peter, the first
Bishop of Rome.
What are priests, mon-
signori, bishops and
cardinals?
Catholics call the person
who is an ordained minister a
priest. Unlike rabbis and some
Protestant ministers, priests
are intermediaries between
man and God.
Monsignor is an honorific
title given to a priest for some
special work worthy of ec-
clesiastical recognition. He has
no added power of priesthood.
William A. Gralnick is
Southeast Regional director of
the American Jewish Commit-
tee, with offices in Miami. In
an interview with Archbishop
Edward A. McCarthy of
Miami, Gralnick poses a set of
key questions to which the Ar-
chbishop responds. The inter-
view anticipates the meeting
Sept. 11 in Miami between
Pope John Paul II and leaders
of the local and national
Jewish communities.
Bishop is the term used by
Catholics (Orthodox Christians
and some Protestants as well)
for the person who is ap-
pointed by the Pope as the
leader of the priests and a
"shepherd over an entire
flock" of worshippers of a par-
ticular area called a diocese.
The priests pledge obedience
to the bishop of their area. The
bishop is also the ad-
ministrator of his diocese. The
archbishop is the ecclesial
coordinator of various dioceses
within his province. He,
however, has no power over
other bishops.
A cardinal is usually an ar-
Continued on Page 2-B
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 14, 1987

1
Atom Bomb
Anniversary Thoughts
The 42nd anniversary of the dropping of the
atom bomb on Japan has resulted in an outpour-
ing of genuine concern about the future of
mankind. There is good reason for this. In the 42
intervening years since then, we have perfected
the capacity of nuclear weapons to destroy
human civilization within virtually minutes.
But last week's anniversary observance has
also led to a good deal of sentimental drivel. A
case in point is Rabbi Joseph Glaser, executive
vice president of the Central Conference of
American Rabbis, who declared of the occasion
that "the bombings were a cruel act of war."
We are, it seems to us, all too prone to ex-
onerate the Japanese of any culpability. As
Americans stream this summer on their vaca-
tions to Japan where, somehow, they manage to
get their consciousness raised in a skewed way,
they ought first to stop and visit the site of the
mostly-sunken USS Arizona at Pearl Harbor in
order to refresh their history about how it all
started.
We agree: two wrongs don't make one right.
But at least a fair recollection of the calendar of
events of World War II in the South Pacific
would help to rectify our increasingly out-of-
focus self-flagellating view of things. We were
not what a then more innocent world later came
to call us: the ugly American.
Consciousness-Raising
Nor is there all sweetness and light in Japan
these days either so far as Jews are concerned.
The Japanese still conveniently bow to the Arab
boycott against Israel even when it does not
have to, since the Arabs are as anxious for a
limitless flow of Toyotas. Datsuns and Sony elec-
tronics as anyone else and wouldn't dream of
jeopardizing it were the Japanese to insist upon
shipping some of their produce to Israel, too.
Furthermore, the Japanese are coolly indif-
ferent to Israel diplomatically and refused only a
few weeks ago to invite Jerusalem to Japan's up-
coming gathering of ancient cities in that
country.
And more and more, we come to hear about
anti-Semitic publications in Japan, including the
inflammatory work of Masami Uno entitled "If
You Understand the Jews, You Can Understand
the World."
Anti-Semitism in Japan would be is a
strange phenomenon, with no religious, political
or economic roots there. But Uno never fails to
remind his countrymen of the "international
Jewish capital" that is allegedly ruining the
Japanese economy.
There is no doubt that the whole world's con-
sciousness must be raised about the dangers of
nuclear holocaust, including our own
consciousness.
But so do the Japanese need some
consciousness-raising of their own, even if it
isn't focused on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. They
do that automatically. Consciousness-raising
about their own nationally inverted tender mer-
cies whether in the strange area of their nas-
cent anti-Semitism or even in their questionable
business practices is certainly in order.
Rep. Friedman's Concern
State Rep. Mike Friedman and other in-
dividuals and organizations interested in the
booming cost to the Dade County taxpayer, and
to Floridians generally, of the Pope's visit to
Miami on Sept. 10 and 11 are validly centered on
what is a clear violation of the separation of
church and state principle.
It is not simply the dollar cost involved. Also
at issue are religious symbols scheduled to be un-
furled at state-owned institutions in greeting to
Pope John Paul II when he comes to visit.
The outpouring in South Florida of defense in
the cost of these outlays and these violations is
only to be expected. One irritated prelate was
last week quoted as observing that the pope will
get nothing out of his visit here but a bed to
sleep in anyway, so why the fuss?
On the other hand, he declared in justification,
everybody is just aching to see the Pope and to
hear his words.
This is a shortsighted, parochial absurdity
which will only wash in South Florida, where a
dramatically burgeoning Catholic community
clearly agrees. But, in the wake of all the hoopla
about the Pope, Austria's President Kurt
>/TA
Waldheim and the Jews, all of us need remin-
ding that the Pope's visit has a religious agenda
a Roman Catholic agenda almost
exclusively.
Mainly, this agenda is rooted in an American
Catholic Church whose membership, unlike in
most other parts of the world where Catholicism
predominates, is educated, financially secure,
politically powerful and uniquely Am riran in its
perceptions, with an independence of spirit that
runs contrary to traditional Catholic im-
peratives, among others on such issues as abor-
tion, contraception and personal freedoms
This is why Pope John Paul II is coming to
America, even if it is not why he is coming to
Miami, where some of these considerations at-
tendant to American Catholicism generally are
not yt't apparent. And for those such as Rep.
Friedman who understand this, it is therefore
wrong for Miami to pay for the Pope's visit, to
place public school and university ached i
upheaval and to erect religious symbol
owned institutional grounds.
No Real Jew-Hatred
Still, We Need Our Own Agenda
By JIM SHIPLEY
Let us suppose, through
some papal hocus-pocus. Pope
Pious XII, who ruled the
Vatican in the 1930's and 40's
was brought back to life. And
suppose he visited Miami.
Would the Jewish community
leadership turn out to meet
him? Would they kneel before
the papal ring and ask: Why?
Why did you not even speak
out on the horrors of the Nazi
terror going on all around vou?
Why?
Well, we won't be getting an
Italian pope from four decdes
ago. We will get a Polish pope
who globe trots like a robed
Bob Hope doing his routines in
front of sellout crowds in most-
ly Third World countries. But.
when he gets to Miami, we can
ask him: Why? Why Arafat?
Then adding insult to the
ultimate injury, Waldheim.
Why?
WALDHEIM. hoo boy. He
and Col. North would do well
as a team on the old TV show.
"To Tell the Truth." They
could both stump the experts.
Chat with those who were at
the UN when Waldheim was
secretary general. Where was
the secretary general's protest
when the "Zionism is racism"
resolution was passed. Don't
look for it. It doesn't exist.
Why?
In the final days of the Euro-
pean War in 1945, American
and British bombers were
devastating the German and
Polish countryside. Thousands
of tons of bombs fell from the
sky on cities, towns and fac-
tories. Germans were killed.
Poles were killed, innocents
died.
But the planes were never
allowed to bomb the train
tracks leading to Auschwitz.
Sometimes the target area
was just two miles awav.
Bombs were left over, but
there was not a single one to
stop the killing trams on their
way to Auschwitz. Gen. Hap
Arnold and President
Roosevelt aren't around
anymore for us to ask: Why'.'
IS THERE then a common
denominator in all this? is
there a reason why? 1 think
there is. I think there is a com-
mon thread in the Pope's indif-
ference, in Waldheim's sneer
m the route of Allied Bombers!
in the basic acceptence of the
Palestinian line. It is not as
we might believe. a basic
hatred of Jews as Jews. The
Nazis, the I'kraniansand some
others did have that, in
spades. But not the others.
No, in their attitude is
perhaps something more in-
sidious. In letting someone
else handle the "final solu-
tion, they just underline the
tact that Jews are just not high
on anyone's agenda except
our own. r
So the Pope is coming to
Miami. Ami the debate gOffl
on. Will the Jewish community
and its leadership meet with
him. or will they not? (Editor's
note: There is little doubt now
that they will, following the
Vatican's desicion to the Pope
to meet with Jewish leaders
there Aug. 31-Sept 1 to
discuss the Waldheim affair
and relate issues.) Will they
pass up this "historic .p[.r-
tunity" to be there? Or will
they kneel l>efore His Holiness
and mend some fences'.' I don't
know.
I DO know that if the) >i"
take the "opportunity,'' none
of the hard questions will he
raised in Miami. It just isn't
lone at a gathering of this
sort. So, there again will !>e the
suppliant Jew kneeling in front
of a proven enemy. Enemy:
"The Friend of my enemy is my
enemy."
Is it not time for us to put
perspective on the scale of in-
terest of the rest of the world*
Isn't it time to reeval late the
endless dialogue with Arabs
and Catholics and hidden anti-
Semites and all the rest?
ISN'T TIME we reevaluate
our own position? Since the
1967 war, the world has had to
grasp the fact that the Jew is
no longer going to be a victim.
Since the Entebbe rescue of
Continued on Page 6-A
Fred K Shochet
Editor and Publisher
eJewish Floridian
Suzanne Shochet
Executive Editor
William T. Brewer
Director of Operations
Joan C. Teglas
Director of Advertising
I
Frday,Auguat14,1987
Volume 60
19 AB 5747
Number 33


m
New Book Examines
Whether Outside Jews
Failed the Holocaust
Friday, August 14, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A

By ALFRED LIPSON
Dr. David Kranzler, a noted
historian and author of
"Japanese, Nazis and Jews:
The Jewish Refugee Com-
munity of Shanghai
1938-1945" (New York:
Yeshiva University Press,
1976) and other scholarly
works, has just published
another important volume,
"Thy Brother's Blood: The Or-
thodox Jewish Response Dur-
ing the Holocaust." (New
York: Mesorah Publications.
Ltd., 1987). While his former
book has become an
authoritative and frequently
quoted account of one of the
most unusual chapters of the
Holocaust a haven in the
Far Fast for over 20.Odd Euro-
pean Jews, including many
prominent rabbinical scholars
ami yeshiva students literally
[saved from the jaws of the
Nazi killing machines his
latest work deals with the
much larger aspects of rescue
attempts to save the Jews of
Occupied Europe from com-
plete annihilation.
Much has been written on
the failure to save the victims
of the Holocaust the indif-
ference of the Allied govern-
ments, the silence of the
[Vatican, Britain's refusal to
open the gates of Palestine.
I discriminatory immigration
policies in the United States,
and the perfidy of our State
I Department. And what about
I the role of the free and
Alfred Lipson is author of
'The Book ofRadom: The Story
of a Jewish Community in
Poland Destroyed By the
Nazis' and research associate
at the Holocaust Resource
Center and Archives of
Queensborough College. City
University of New York. Dr.
Kranzler is professor of
hisiory at the City University
of New York and author of
inunrn us works in his field,
including three volumes having
to do with thf Holocaust
/> rimi.
numerically Uronz Jewish
community in America?
"AT A TIME when millions
were dying says Dr.
Kranzler in his introduction,
'"only united Jewish efforts
could have had a major impart
upon events. But just the op-
posite was the case. American
Jews split along ideological
lines and clung stubbornly to
courses of action dictated by
their loyalties the assimila-
tionists to government policy
and the greater war effort,
most of the Zionists to the goal
of a postwar Jewish state.
According to Kranzler, while
the fate of European Jewry
was at stake and emigration
could have saved millions dur-
ing the early years of Nazi
persecution, the American
Jewish leaders, especially the
influential German-Jewish ele-
ment of the Our Crowd varie-
ty, feared that a mass influx of
'During the Holocaust, American Jews split along
ideological lines and clung stubbornly to courses of
action dictated by their loyalties/
refugees would be detrimental who had helped Franklin D. Rabbi Stephen Wise, and
to the image of the assimilated Roosevelt to the presidency Justices of the Supreme Court
and well-to-do patriotic Jews. and were the architects of the
Some of the Jewish leaders New Deal program notably Continued on Page 7-A
Syrians Must Leave
Before Peace in Lebanon Chamoun
'Chamoun justified Israel's role in standing
with the South Lebanese Army along Israel's
northern border.'
By DAVID HOROWITZ
UNITED NATIONS -
"There can be no stability or
peace in Lebanon until the
Syrian occupation forces leave
our country." declared one of
Lebanon's most notable Chris-
tian leaders, Dany Chamoun,
at a recent briefing held here
for the UN press corps.
The handsome and articulate
Chamoun, who is a candidate
for the presidency of Lebanon
as head of the National Liberal
Party (NLP). impressed
reporters with his candid
views and forthrightness.
In light of the constantly
negative and critical views
voiced by the Lebanese fac-
tional leaders against Israel,
whether they be Shiite, Sunni
or Christian, the Chamoun
voice at this time comes as a
welcome sound and bodes well
for the future of both nations.
CANDIDATE CHAMOUN
arrived in the U.S. for a
week's visit late last month to
meet with government of-
ficials in Washington with a
view to alerting them to the
peril of Syria's unhealthy role
in Lebanon and to the fact that
Damascus, despite declara-
tions to the contrary, and in
the face of Ambassador Ver-
non Walter's latest Presiden- the hub of international
tial mission in an effort to heal terrorism.
a U.S.-Syrian breach, remains Continued on Page 12-A
KVETCH!
TM
1967 David S Bofm*n nd Mrk Saundets A* rights rMfvd
"Of course I'm calling out the wrong letters
on purpose...for what you charge, you should
earn your money!"


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 14, 1987
Florida Reacts
To Spiraling Cost of Pope's Visit in Miami
man said. I cannot find ^
requested it, so the pro,,!!
gives me reason to
somewhat concerned."
I*
Cootiaued from PafC 1-A
tivities that afterwards were
found to be inappropriate. And
the Philadelphia Archdiocese
had to repay the city as a
result of a (legal) challenge,"
Friedman said.
The Miami group is hoping
that a lawsuit will not be
necessary, its members say.
They hope that their examina-
tion of every expenditure in
advance of the visit will avoid
problems later.
"SOMETIMES people
temper their decisions when
they know someone will be
monitoring the process,"
Friedman told The Jewish
Floridian.
The group's diversity shows
that an interest in maintaining
the constitutional separation
of church and state goes
beyond any particular
religious affiliation.
Some of its members include
Barbara Levinson, an attorney
and board member of the
American Civil Liberties
Union; Chuck Eastman, of the
United Protestant Appeal;
Chesterfield Smith, former
president of the American Bar
Association; Dr. Stanley
Margulies, a concerned in-
dividual; Brent Routman, of
the American Jewish Con-
gress; Rev. Carroll Schuster,
with the First Presbyterian
Church, as well as members
who represent the Seven Day
Adventists and Unitarian
faiths.
The committee was infor-
mally started when Rep.
Friedman, his aide. Susan
Glickman, and members of the
ACLU were examining the
issues of the county's lending
school buses to the Ar-
chdiocese and the construction
30 days in advance of a
100-foot-high cross, platform
and altar on the public proper-
ty of Florida International
University.
THE BUS issue now ap-
pears to be dead, and the bar
on the cross apparently will
not be erected until a day
before the papal mass on the
campus. Glickman said.
The committee has sent let-
ters to all 27 Dade County
municipalities, the Dade Coun-
ty School Board and the coun-
ty government requesting
budgets of all monies being
spent, which are a matter of
public record.
"There are a bunch of poten-
tial issues." Glickman said.
"We are checking the use of
county employees during the
visit, examining the closing of
courts and what the cost to
taxpayers is in relation to clos-
ing the courts and paying the
county bus drivers who will
drive 120 Metro buses (to the
mass)," Glickman said.
"I very consciously made it
(the committee) not all Jews,"
Glickman added. "We don't
see this as a Jewish issue. We
see this as our constitution
which we need to protect."
DIFFERENT members,
however, admit they have
specific areas of concern.
Christos Tzanetakof is direc-
tor of the Florida Chapter of
the Society of Separationists.
"Religiously speaking, we are
all atheists, we don't believe in
God," he said. Why is the
group involved?
"The federal, state and local
government all make a
mockery of the constitution by
their actions regarding the
Pope," Tzanetakof said.
"Spending four million of tax-
payers money for a religious
leader is unconstitutional.
Closing our schools to accom-
modate the Pope has been
unconstitutional.
"Erecting a 100-foot cross
on state-owned university pro-
perty is unconstitutional,
allocating 70 percent of our
police force is unconstitu-
tional, closing our courts to ac-
commodate the Pope is
unconstitutional.''
FRAN BOHNSACK-LEE.
president of the Dade County
National Organization for
Women, represents another
concern. In Dade County and
in other cities where the Pope
is scheduled to visit, the clinics
which perform abortions have
received letters threatening
their security if they remain
open on the days of the papal
visit, she said.
"In other words, they want
to stop abortion. That's not
constitutional, said
Bohnsack-Lee. "We've been
told $1.5 million will be
allocated from the state for
security. And that security is
not to protect the Pope but to
protect the people. NOW
wants to be sure that included
among those people who need
protection are the clinics and
the people who need
protection."
Barbara Levinson, a com-
mittee member and ACLU
board member, said her
organization would have
sought legal relief if the school
buses were used but that that
now appears to be a dead
issue. There is nothing else on
the surface that appears
wrong from a legal standpoint,
but it is still too early to make
a forecast, she said.
"ONE BUDGET item I'd be
looking at with scrutiny is
employees of the county who
are used, for example, "to sell
tickets for shuttle buses at the
county courthouse. I think
budget items of that nature
would be questionable."
Santiago Leon, an attorney
and member of the Protestant
Church, said he was asked to
examine the placement of the
crosa on FIU property.
"What you're talking about
is putting up an enormous
religious symbol on public pro
perty. It looks very much like
FIU is embracing and endors-
ing the principles of Christiani-
ty," Leon said.
There is another area that no
one can really figure out what
to do with, Leon said: FIU is
shutting down its campus for
the day that the papal mass
will be held.
"THERE ARE a lot of peo-
nle who work at FIU, and they
are going to be given an in-
voluntary day off without pay.
They've got the opportunity to
make it up in that pay period
by working extra days. On the
other hand, if you had FIU pav
them for that day. that could
cause a problem too because it
would look like FIU is suppor-
ting religion."
When the day of the papal
mass is over, Dade County
businesses should realize much
money from tourism, and mer-
chants should do well selling
papal paraphernalia, as well as
everything from hot dogs to
ice cream.
And part of the problem that
is leading to the expensive
security and manpower situa-
tion is the interest of members
of various faiths in seeing the
Pope during the papal parade
and mass that is expected to
draw between 300,000 and
500,000 participants, if traffic
will allow that many to con-
gregate at one time.
Says Friedman: "I do not
beli' ve that we are unable to
have a successful papal visit
that is compatible with the
separation of church and state.
I don't think those two things
are incompatible. I don't see a
reason for those two things to
come into conflict as long as
we are vigilant."
Still, Rep. Friedman says
priorities seem to have gone
somewhat awry over the papal
visit. Friedman said he propos-
ed a bill providing $4.3 million
for the homeless, and it got
knocked down to $1 million.
The state appropriation for the
Pope began at under half a
million and ended up at $1.5
million.
That the state money is go-
ing for papal security is not an
area of contention, the
legislator said. What bothers
him. though, is that the
legislative process was duck-
ed. When the papal expen-
diture was discussed on the
floor it was under $500,000.
"THE LAST night of the
session when the final budget
was given to us at 4 a.m., I saw
that the Pope's budget had
become $1.5 million." Fried-
Friedman, a school teacher
who says he carries around
copy of the Constitution in hi!
pocket, says there is no betUr
time to protect the constitu-
tion than during the years nf
its 200th anniversary.
"I'm Jewish. It's clear to m
that Judaism benefits from
fovernment's staying out
ame for Catholicism. Govern-
ment leaves religion alone -
that is the beauty of
system.
"If you don't assert it, you
can lose it. It's like every other
issue. You must learn from
history that vigilance is the
price you pay for freedom. It
applies to my history as a
Jewish citizen, and as a citizen
of the U.S."
our
Jews Aren't on Anyone's
Agenda Except Their Own
Continued from Page 4-A
1976. the world has learned
that no longer will Jews be
separated and killed just
because thay are Jews. Well, it
is a tough lesson. They are still
learning, and they do not like
it.
They do not like it because
they do not want us high on
any agenda. They don't want
in deal with us. But. it is time.
Time for the World to know
that we are not victims, we
will not be ignored, and we do
have an incredible role in the
overall scheme of things.
We know that Israel is
tolerated because of the
mythical Jewish clout in this
country and the fact that in the
world arena Israel is the hes:
(perhaps only) defense against
Islamic fundamentalism and
Communism and all the other
Isms in the Middle East.
SO, if we know why we can
move on. The world has its
agenda; we have ours. Jews
are first on ours. That is the
basic difference. The\ have to
be. because they don't figure
much on anybody else's And
the day the Pope comes to
Miami. I'll go to the beach.
How to find a doctor
who cares about your
health. And about you.
When you wake up
with a sure throat, or a
funny twinge in your back
Or eyes thai really sting
Or anything else thai
doesnl seem quite right,
you need to see a doctor
Bui how do you
find one"
It's simple All you
need is this numbei
1 800-CARE NOW The
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With our tree coin
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physicians who meet your
needs, no matter what
the specialty
\rn I well give you
the names of al leas) two
doctors close to your
home or office Physicians
who are affiliated with the
AMI Hospitals in Dade or
Broward.
The next tune you need to find a din tor
remember your phone And this number
1-800-CARE-NOVV The AMI Physician Refer
ral Service. Available from 9:00 am to 9i NI
p.m., Monday through Friday And If you
need to leave a message after hours, we'll be
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Friday, August 14, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Book Examines Failure of Jews Outside Holocaust
Continued from Page 5-A
_ouis Brandeis and Felix
frankfurter would not
bother" their beloved Presi-
dent with particular Jewish
problems.
Admittedly, they wanted to
Iprotect" the President from
'alarmist" and "aggressive"
[ewish elements seeking
bvernment intervention in
?half of Jewish suffering
Inder the Nazis.
WHEN 400 Orthodox rabbis
jmbled in front of the
V'liite House wishing to peti-
ion FDR. the President's
Jewish advisers urged him to
now the rabbis and to absent
Jimself from the White House.
is worth noting that at time
\{ the rabbis' march, the U.S.
merriment and the Jewish
paders were aware of the hor-
ible fate of four million Jews
^terminated in Europe.
But the rabbis did see some
ifluential senators and
lembers of the House who
ok the rabbis' pleas serious-
. The result was public hear-
Sgs on rescue, focusing on a
roposal by the Peter Bergson
roup. allied with the ()r-
lodox. to create a separate
wernment agency devoted to
tie rescue of European Jewry.
This, and the courageous
rsonal action of Treasury
Secretary Henry Morgenthau
Jr.. eventually led to the crea-
|i< m of the War Refugee Board
/liich on many occasions was
|xtremely helpful in rescue ef-
>rts initiated by Orthodox ac-
livists and is generally
redited with saving 100.000
|ves.
DR. KRANZLER'S book is
iportant for his account of
timidity on the part of the
American Jewish establish-
lent and the bitter strife and
lisunity among its leaders.
Jut this subject has already
sen widely discussed and
Inalyzed. What is remarkable
(bout "Thy Brother's Blood"
the long overdue story,
> \ er before told, of the highly
Effective network of Orthodox
fescue activists who were
Iriven by the biblical dictum of
linntth and pikuach ne/esh
responsibility for saving lives.
The Vaad Hatzalah the
inited Orthodox rabbinical
rroup coordinated its rescue
bid relief work through its
Representatives and contacts
in Switzerland, England,
Turkey, Tangiers and with an
inderground group in
Slovakia headed by the legen-
lary Rabbi Michael Ber
Weissmandl.
It was Rabbi Weissmandl
iho had sent the first une-
quivocal news of the Final
Solution and of the death
camps to the Sternbuchs in
Switzerland who in turn ex-
edited the material to the
V'aad in New York through the
illegal use of the Polish lega-
tion's diplomatic pouch. Im-
[mediately upon receipt, the
jVaad Hatzalah persuaded Dr.
I Stephen Wise, president of the
Zionist Organization of
[America and of the World
Jewish Congress, to convene a
meeting of all 34 American-
I Jewish organizations in order
I to unite American Jewry
I hehind rescue efforts.
AT THAT meeting, held
[ three days later (September 6,
1942), Dr. Wise quoted the
essentials from Sternbuch's
fable, and the leadership of the
entire Jewish community was
'David Kranzler has treated his subject with
great courage, clarity and objectivity, while
meticulously adhering to archival material.'
then officially made aware for
the first time of the Nazi
genocide against the Jews. But
Wise imposed an oath of
silence on those present until
the report was confirmed by
the State Department. Rabbi
Wise did not divulge then that
he already had a confirmation
cables he had received
earlier from Gerhard Riegner,
the World Jewish Congress'
representative in Geneva, and
from the Bund in Warsaw. In-
stead he accused the Orthodox
of spreading atrocity tales.
Nearly a year passed until a
new "unity" conference was
convened, on August 29, 1943.
During the intervening time,
another two million were ex-
terminated in Europe. But this
American Jewish Conference
bore no fruit of unity due to its
misplaced priorities. The
Zionists insisted on removing
rescue from the agenda and
concentrating instead on plans
for a future state and on
postwar reconstruction of
Jewish life in Europe.
It was after the collapse of
this effort at unity that the Or-
thodox intensified their rescue
and relief activities on a
broader, international scale,
centered around Rabbi
Weissmandl and the Stern-
buchs. as well as Dr. Yaakov
Griffel in Turkey.
RECHA STERNBUCH
began her personal involve-
ment with smuggling refugees
into Switzerland by bribing
border guards. For this she
was arrested. Later on, she
became the dynamo of rescue
on a larger scale. In 1944. she
arranged for the ransom of a
trainload of 1,210 Jews from
the Bergen-Belsen camp into
Switzerland by negotiations
with the SS Chief Heinrich
Himmler through Jean Musy,
the former Swiss president.
Another train with 1.684
released Jews followed
thereafter.
However, the Sternbuchs
were extremely hampered in
their activities by Saly Mayer,
a Swiss Jew working for the
American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee
("Joint"), as well as by Roswell
McClelland, the War Refugee
Board delegate in Switzerland.
Although mandated by the
WRB to facilitate rescue. Mc-
Clelland persistently showed
indifference to the cause and
stubbornly opposed ransom
and food shimpments, illegal
under the Trading With the
Enemy Act.
Mayer, the legalist and
Swiss super-patriot, actively
thwarted the cause of rescue
and admission of refugees to
Switzerland. Both McClelland
and Mayer disliked the rabbis
and Sternbuch. Despite all im-
pediments, however, the Or-
thodox eventually saved ap-
proximately 20,000 lives, and
thousands more through Dr.
Griffel's efforts in Ankara.
RECHA STERNBUCH had
actual plans worked out with
Himmler for the release of all
Jews from the camps at the
rate of 15,000 a month. These
plans, however, failed due to
Mayer's and McClelland's
hostile interference.
rwionu
(KEREN KAYEMETH
IF ISRAELI INC.
Kranzler cites many other
instances of indifference and
procrastination by these men
with dire consequences.
There was the case of the
Auschwitz Protocols the
first detailed report about the
death camp brought to the
West by two daring Slovak-
Jewish escapees, Rudolf Vrba
and Alfred Wetzler.
Based on interviews with
these men. Rabbi Weissmandl
prepared a 32-page protocol
showing the preparations com-
pleted at Auschwitz for the
deportation and gassing of the
Hungarian Jews. Weismandl
sent translated copies to his
contacts in Budapest.
Switzerland, Turkey and
Palestine. He followed up with
cables urging that Auschwitz
and the rail lines leading to the
camp be bombed. The Stern-
buchs received their copies on
May 20, 1944. and they rushed
on the Sabbath to deliver the
documents to the Allied em-
bassies in Bern.
Weissmandl kept up his bar-
rage of cables, repeating his
original plea to bomb the gas
chambers and the railway on
which 12,000 Jews were
transported daily to destruc-
tion. Some Jewish leaders in
the West later took up his plea
with the Allied governments,
but to no avail.
McClelland and the
WRB sat on the Auschwitz
Protocols for six months, and
the full story of Auschwitz was
not released in the U.S. until
November. During that
period, tragically, more than
half-a-million Hungarian Jews
had been killed, in addition to
another half-a-million from
Poland and other countries. By
then, the question of bombing
had become moot, for Himmler
himself had ordered the
dismantling of the killing in-
stallations in Auschwitz.
Kranzler is scrupulously fair
in crediting the largest relief
agency, the Joint and others
with remarkable
achievements. But he is highly
critical of their legalistic ap-
proach the strict observance
Continued on Page 13-A
HOLD THIS VERY IMPORTANT DATE JANUARY 20,1988
By Popular Demand
44The Jewish National Fund Israelis Are Coming''
Returning To Miami
In Concert
In Tribute To
MAESTRO SHMUEL FERSHKO
Wednesday Evening, January 20,1988
A t The Theater Of The Performing Arts
For Further Information Please Contact:
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND, 420 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach, Florida
538-6464


w
.. -'
Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. August 14, 1987
U.S. Jewish Leaders Accept
Invitation To Visit Pope in Vatican
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
American Jewish leaders have
accepted an invitation by the
Vatican to meet with Pope
John Paul II in Rome at the
end of August or early
September, prior to the Pope's
visit to the United States and
the scheduled meeting with
Jewish leaders in Miami on
Sept. 11.
The invitation was extended
last Tuesday (Aug. 4) by
Johannes Cardinal
Willebrands. president of the
Vatican Commission for
Religious Relations with the
Jews, in a telephone call from
Rome to Rabbi Mordecai Wax-
man, chairman of the interna-
tional affairs department of
the Synagogue Council of
America (SCA) and chairman
of the International Jewish
Committee on Interreligious
Consultations. (IJCIC).
AFTER A two-and-one-half-
hour meeting last Wednesday
in the offices of the SCA,
representatives of the IJCIC
decided to accept the
invitation.
Rabbi Marc Tanenbaum. in-
ternational affairs director of
the American Jewish Commit-
tee, told reporters that the
meeting with the Pope should
"clear the air" and the
misunderstanding that
resulted from the Pope's re-
cent audience with President
Kurt Waldheim of Austria who
Arson Cases
Examined
CLEVELAND (JTA) -
Cleveland Heights Assistant
Fire Chief Stanley Powaski
said it's not known if the two
fires that burned at the
Mayfield Jewish Center here
within 15 days were related to
each other or to arson.
"Any time there is more
than one fire at the same place
there is some reason for con-
cern, but at this time, we simp-
ly don't know," he said. He ad-
ded that a fire warden was
working with the JCC "to in-
vestigate it, and to determine
the extent of the damage."
The latest fire, on July 23,
was discovered at 12:30 p.m.
in an upstairs theater costume
storage room by a
maintenance staffer who
heard a smoke alarm. The
smoky, smoldering fire was
contained quickly, and about
100 older adults and children
were safely evacuated without
incident or panic.
MIAMI
BEACH S
GLATT
KOSHER
is accused of being a Nazi war
criminal.
"There are fundamental and
difficult matters to discuss,"
Tanenbaum told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency Thursday.
"We want to review with the
Holy See the meeting with
Waldheim and the whole ques-
tion of the Pope's attitude
toward the Nazi Holocaust."
TANENBAUM said that the
Jewish leaders, by accepting
the Pope's invitation, are
hopeful that the meeting "will
open the way" for their par-
ticipation in a meeting with
the Pope in Miami on Sept. 11.
The Miami meeting was in
doubt following the Pope-
Waldheim meeting June 25. a
meeting that angered and
upset American Jewish
leaders.
The Jewish community was
angered not only by the invita-
tion to Waldheim but also by
the Pope's failure to mention
the fact that Jews were the
main victims at the Maidanek
concentration camp.
The Pope visited Maidanek
last May and listed 14 na-
tionalities whose members
were murdered by the Nazis.
He did not mention the Jews,
although 850.000 of them were
killed there.
A STATEMENT issued
here Thursday by the SCA said
that the meeting with the Pope
in Rome would last between 60
to 90 minutes. It said that "the
full agenda of Catholic/Jewish
relations would be discussed
with the Vatican Commission
for Religious Relations with
the Jews and the Vatican
Secretariat to be followed by a
meeting with Pope John Paul
II."
The members of the IJCIC
are: The Synagogue Council of
America. World Jewish Con-
gress. American Jewish Com-
mittee, B'nai B'rith and the
Israel Interfaith Association.
Since 1972, IJCIC has
represented the world Jewish
community in discussions with
the Vatican on Catholic/Jewish
relations.
Waxman said last Thursday
that other issues to be discuss-
ed during the Vatican
meetings are anti-Semitism
and the Vatican's continued
refusal to recognize the State
of Israel.
As for the Miami meeting
with the Pope, Waxman said:
"We reserve our final decision
on whether or not to go to
Miami for the ceremonial
meeting with the Pope pen-
ding the outcome of the for-
thcoming discussions at the
Vatican."
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'ticks to Guns
Mistaken Identity To Blame
-
Friday, August 14, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
U.S. Lawmakers Hold Party
To Mark Wallenberg's Birthday
DAVID LANDAU
tUSALEM (JTA) -
)emjanjuk, in his second
.' testimony in his own
Be, has appeared plainly
be broken by the pro-
jn in one sudden collapse
i mistaken identity alibi.
r, as the long court ses-
proceeded, it seemed
that State Attorney
Rlattman and his able
int. Michael Shaked,
to chip away at the ac-
man's story, bit by
iking bit, and in this
ause it to crumble even-
in the eyes of the three-
Ijerusalem court.
J court for its part watch-
kentively to see whether
prosecution's cumulative
It would undermine the
lant, or whether, after
rueling weeks in the
s box, Demjanjuk could
with his story, though
and buffeted, still suf-
Uv intact to avoid a
KM).
>GE Dov Levin last week
ledly warned Demjanjuk
ie was undertaking a
Je responsibility" by not
direct answers to the
tutor.
questions, though seem-
tt'chnical. were key to his
he alibi. They focused on
Iniittedly false entries on
S. immigration applica-
Bubmitted at a displaced
Ba camp after World War
le defendant had written
\v spent the war years as
ner in Poland in the
of Sobibor.
itioned about the actual
ss of filling out that form,
lanjuk seemed to be
tng answering, incurring
i's wrath. "We will take
into account," Levin
lered.
njanjuk says he lied to
icans in order to avoid
repatriated to trie
The prosecution says
in order to conceal his
Identity Ivan the Terri-
frutcher of Treblinka.
CLAIM to have lived
ie Russia prior to and
the war, Demjanjuk
left the Americans no
to suspect him of
?rship in the Red Army,
though he was of con-
|tion age at the start of the
fact, he says, he did serve
Red Army. He claims to
feared repatriation
kse of his alleged member-
lin the turncoat Vlasov ar-
ia Russian POW division
'"ought on the German
In Russia he would have
considered a traitor and
have been executed.
[nijanjuk's lie may have
I understandable in the cir-
Btances, Shaked conceded,
why did he choose the
Sobibor as his false
fence in Poland? Why not
p* a place he claims to
been familiar with, such
Jwno, the POW camp in
>arl Appointed
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
re Pearl, the Washington
'resentative of the
'iian Jewish Congress
k 1980, has been appointed
lonal director Of Americans
[Democratic Action. He will
pime office Aug. 24.
Poland where he spent two
weeks, or Chelm, where he
claims to have been imprison-
ed 18 months?
THE PROSECUTION
places Demjanjuk at the
Treblinka death camp during
that 18 month period, where
he is accused of driving hun-
dreds of thousands of Jews to
their deaths in the gas
chamber.
Demjanjuk claims his choice
of Sobibor was arbitrary. Aid-
ed by a helpful friend at the DP
camp, he says he picked any
Polish town that came to mind.
Rut he insisted repeatedly
during last week's proceedings
that he had never actually
been in Sobibor (or in
Treblinka).
Rut Sobibor was an unfor-
tunate choice if it really was
arbitrary as the defendant
claims, for the town of Sobibor
hosted another notorious con-
centration camp. And Sobibor
is also mentioned on the defen-
dant's alleged SS identity
card, as the camp he was sent
to on completion of his SS
guard training at Trawniki.
Demjanjuk maintains that
the card, a central piece of
evidence in the case, is a KGR
forgery as the Soviet Union's
revenge against him.
BUT PERHAPS. Shaked
pressed on, Demjanjuk chose
the town of Sobibor because he
was indeed familiar with it it
being fairly close to Treblinka
and because he preferred
for obvious reasons not to cite
Treblinka itself.
Demjanjuk replied that the
friend had suggested Sobibor
because it had a substantial
Ukrainian population.
Contradicting his previous
testimony, he does not now
claim that Sobibor was a
misspelling on his U.S. im-
migration form, and that the
town in fact chosen was Sam-
bor. He now says that only
years later in the U.S.,
possibly after proceedings
against him had begun, he
tried to find Sobibor on a map.
When he was unable to find it
he presumed that the choice
must have been Sambor.
To press his point home fur-
ther, Shaked referred to the
case of Feodor Fedoienko, a
convicted Treblinka guard
recently executed in the
USSR, whose history allegedly
followed similar lines to Dem-
janjuk's. Fedorenko, also a
Ukrainian, had, like the defen-
dant, been imprisoned at
Rowno and then at Chelm. Rut
he admitted being recruited
there by the SS.
FEDORENKO WAS posted
to Treblinka and later to
another camp at Pelitz. He had
used the town of Pelitz as his
false residence on his U.S. im-
migration application. Ob-
viously he had thought it wiser
to name Pelitz rather than
Treblinka.
At this reference to
Fedorenko, Demjanjuk
repeated the phras. that has
cropped up again and again
during his cross-examination:
"I was never at Treblinka nor
at Sobibor."
The defense team, mean-
while, is soon to be strengthen-
ed by a Canadian attorney, a
Queen's counsel from Toronto,
who speaks Ukrainian.
Paul Chumak. 42 years old,
who has served as a public pro-
secutor for the province of On-
tario, is already attending the
daily sessions, listening to the
translation from a place in the
public section. Rut he is ex-
pected to be granted soon the
necessary license to practice
temporarily in Israel and
will join Yoram Sheftel and
John Gill as Demjanjuk's
defense team.
Demjanjuk's son, John Jr.,
told reporters that the family
had paid some $600,000 over
the past five years to attorney
Mark O'Connor, of Ruffalo,
N.Y., whom the defendant
dismissed as his lead attorney
earlier this month.
By JUDITH COLP
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Nine members of Congress
held a 75th birthday party last
Tuesday (Aug. 4) for Raoul
Wallenberg, the Swedish
diplomat who saved the lives
of nearly 100,000 Jews during
World War II before
mysteriously disappearing in
the Soviet Union.
"He put his own frail body
against the Nazi war machine
and he triumphed," Rep. Tom
Lantos (D. Calif.) who hosted
the event, told the some 70 in-
dividuals, including the
Swedish Charge d'Affaires,
gathered in the sweltering
heat on the steps of the
Capitol. "In 1945 Wallenberg
was arrested by Soviet
authorities and he has been
languishing ever since. We call
upon the Soviet authorities to
let him go so he can live his re-
maining years among his
friends, among his family and
among his people."
RAOUL WOULD want us to
be hopeful," said Lantos as he
lead the crowd in singing Hap-
py Birthday. "This is not a
solemn occasion."
A petition urging
Wallenberg's release will be
sent to Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev.
The Wallenberg story
became known through the ef-
forts of Annette Lantos, who,
along with her husband, was
among the many Hungarian
Jews saved by Wallenberg.
Mrs. Lantos knew only vague-
ly of the Swedish diplomat ten
years ago when she chanced to
read about him. She was deter-
mined that his story become
known.
"At a time when the world
was blind and deaf to the suf-
fering of millions, Wallenberg
fought like a tiger," she said.
"He was a figure of life and he
will stand as a witness to many
more who could have been sav-
ed if only a few more could
have been willing to help."
Wallenberg was made an
honorary U.S. citizen in 1980
by Congress, a distinction
given previously only to
Winston Churchill.
WALLENBERG, a wealthy
Swedish businessman, went to
Budapest in 1943 where he
made it a personal mission to
save as many Jews as possible.
Known as the "Angel of
Rescue," he issued thousands
of Swedish visas and even pull-
ed Jews off trains headed for
concentration cmaps. In 1945
when the Soviets liberated
Rudapest, Wallenberg was ar-
rested by Soviet officials and
disappeared. Under pressure
by the Swedish government
for news of his whereabouts,
Soviet officials said he had
died in 1947 of a heart attack.
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. August 14, 1987
Letter
From Prison
Pollard Charges That Israel
Left Him Twisting in Wind
SPRINGFIELD. Mo. -
(JTA) Convicted spy
Jonathan Pollard claims the
classified U.S. information he
gave and sold to Israel was for
an Israeli-Sanctioned high and
noble cause "pertaining to the
covenant and survival."
He adds in a 14-page hand-
written letter from federal
prison here, published by the
St. Louis Jewish Light, that
Israel unfairly repudiated him
Jonathan Pollard
and left him and his wife Anne
to take the rap.
POLLARD'S LETTER is
the first communication with a
U.S. Jewish newspaper since
he was transferred to prison
here, according to the Jewish
Light. All known Jewish
prisoners in Missouri receive
the newspaper.
"I wasn't motivated by
greed and I didn't set out to
become a martyr," he writes.
"... I don't condemn the
cause I served but only the
cowardly leaders who decided
to sacrifice us all on the twin
altars of diplomatic and per-
sonal expediency."
Israeli leaders at first term-
ed Pollard's work a "rogue
operation." No proof to the
contrary has been reported,
yet official Israeli investiga-
tions have criticized the top
governmental leadership for
poor oversight of the now
disbanded Lekem espionage
agency that recruited and
directed Pollard.
POLLARD, 32, received a
life term in March for his es-
pionage activities. A former
civilian analyst for the U.S.
Navy, he told the federal court
that he had come to realize
that rather than spy, he should
have taken his concerns that
Israel wasn't receiving enough
security information through
the channels of the Navy and
as far as the President.
He added that he regretted
sacrificing his wife "on the
altar of political ideology."
Anne, 26, was sentenced to
two concurrent five-year
terms fur being an accessory
to her husband's espionage
and receiving stolen govern
ment material. He claims the
inadequate treatment she
receives for a rare, painful
gastrointestinal disorder
keeps her in agony.
Pollard also contends that
Secretary of Defense Caspar
Weinberger's "even-
handedness policy" toward the
Middle East seeking to
erode "the Israeli army's
military superiority over the
Arabs" "eventually
precipitated my involvement
with the Israelis."
POLLARD CLAIMS that
Weinberger has "approved
such a radical pro-Arab tilt in
U.S. Middle East policy" by
accepting the Arab claim that
Israel's strategic value is
marginal, by selling "ultra-
sophisticated" arms and by de-
nying Israel "critical informa-
tion needed to neutralize the
new generation of Soviet
weapons being deployed along
her northern border."
Regretting that he broke the
law. Pollard nonetheless
writes that "after months of
agonizing ... I came to the
conclusion that the choice I
faced was between my belief in
Israel's right to continued
security and my Itgal obliga-
tion to uphold Mr.
Weinberger's betrayal of the
Jewish State. Having thus
identified my options, I acted
accordingly." The convicted
spy also attacks Morris
Abram, chairman of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organiza-
tions, and other U.S. Jewish
leaders "of his ilk." He accuses
them of being 'gl ib
apologists" who should "limit
themselves to fund-raising and
leave the less glamorous af-
fairs such as intelligence
gathering to those of us who
are not afraid to be exposed as
'unhyphenated' Jews."
HE SAYS Abram abetted
the Arab cause by "endorsing
Caspar Weinberger's rather
fanciful off-the-record assess-
ment of m/ actions as having
constituted 'the gravest
assault against the integrity of
this country's national
defenses in over 200 years.' "
MECCA DEATHS PROTESTED: Iran,,,,,
women, members of ilu Bassij mobilization
fmre, chant anti-American and anti-Israeli
slogans as they denwnstratt in front of th*
United Nations offiet in Teheran last week in
AP/WideWi
orid
protest over the deaths of t75 fntgriri i y,
,-. Unfurled banners at ike caUed for death to th, United States
>u1 Saud\ Arabia,
Weinberger later repudiated
that statement.
But above all. Pollard
writes. "Abram's outrageous
claim that I had. in fact,
subverted Israel's interest
struck me as being unaccoun-
tably naive ... It would appear
that salon Jews like Abram
either can't comprehend or ac-
cept the unfortunate
dichotomy that exists between
the noble halachic (Jewish
legal) values for which Israel
stands and the unpalatable
means she must sometimes use
in order to survive."
Nevertheless, he declares
that he and Anne "are still
confident that the American
Jewish community, if not its
leaders, will one day conquer
its fears and complexes long
enough to correct the terrible
injustice which has been
visited upon our heads."
POLLARD ALSO writes in
defense of his reputation. He
says he took no Israeli money
until six months into his es-
pionage, and then only at
Israeli insistence. On the con-
trary, he claims that he and his
wife bore the costs of their es-
pionage, including a trip to
Europe, until they could be
reimbursed.
He contends that "perhaps
in reaction to complaints being
voiced by the Jewish communi-
ty about the unjust nature of
my sentence, the government
appears set to unleash a
stream of unattributable
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^. tw osmi r c i bwcaich



im-Twisting
U.S. Envoy in Jerusalem
To Pressure Shamir on Talks
Friday, August 14, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
By DAVID LANDAU
.JRUSALEM (JTA) A
|ior State Department of-
al arrived here Monday to
talks with Premier Yit-
_. Shamir and senior Israeli
Icy makers in an effort to
Ivince Shamir to end his op-
lition to Foreign Minister
;ion Peres* proposal for an
jjrnational conference on
idle East peace.
he American envoy,
Vrles Hill, executive assis-
to Secretary of State
krge Shultz, will discuss
ke position of Israel's
fernment" to determine
kther there is sufficient uni-
\r the issue for some move-
it toward holding a
ference.
ACCORDING TO Yosef
j-Aharon, director-general
[Shamir's office, Hill will
that there is much more
ting the government than
tding it on this issue. Both
[ud and Labor are seeking
nove the peace process for-
r ed that the differences bet-
pii Shamir and Peres were
^er the tactical approach,
, the strategic goal.'
American sources were cited
[inlay as saying that
kshington "will not be
kfied with a flat no from
^mir regarding the con-
ence scenario."
loth U.S. and Israeli
rces have mentioned the
of a memorandum of
lerstanding to be drawn up
tween Washington and
pusalem, largely dealing
Peres, Rabin
Reject Deal
To Resolve
Taba Dispute
By BUGH OttGEL
[EL AVIV (JTA) -
reign Minister Shimon
res and Defense Minister
[t/.liak Rabin have rejected
American compromise pro-
sal to resolve the Israeli-
vptian border dispute over
i, and decided to continue
hiernational arbitration
(Geneva
L'nder the U.S. proposal,
emitted to Jerusalem and
uro three months ago, Egypt
puld be given sovereignty
(er the whole area while
rael would be granted full
d more or less free access to
k Taba region.
[THE PROPOSAL also pro
| al^ Israeli ownership of the
>nesta Hotel and the Rafi
lelson "village" at the site.
1 The Israeli leaders and their
ivisers are believed to feel
lat Israel has a sufficiently
ood case to warrant going on
international arbitration.
Israeli papers say that
premier Yitzhak Shamir has
lot been consulted about the
American proposals but is
fnderstood to be "open to
"'"promise but it depends
?" what sort of compromise."
with strategic and military
relationships between the two
countries which could serve
as an inducement to Shamir to
go along with the conference
option.
SUCH A memorandum, the
sources say, would be intended
to enshrine for many years
ahead the U.S. commitment to
ensure Israel's military
superiority over its potential
foes. Shultz is said to wish to
conclude a memorandum of
this nature in order to project
the present Administration's
strong commitment to Israel's
security forward into the
future.
An example of such a
memorandum is the 1975 ac-
cord signed between then-
Secretary of State Henry Kiss-
inger and then-Foreign
Minister Yigal Allon in which
the U.S. undertook not to
negotiate with the PLO unless
the organization accepted the
relevant United Nations
Security Council resolutions,
recognized Israel, and desisted
from terrorism.
In the Likud camp, however,
there is no sign of softening of
the party's solid opposition to
an international conference.
Likud spokespersons continue
to demand a mini-conference
that would exclude the Soviets
and the Syrians, or else direct
talks with Jordan without any
international umbrella.
PERES FOR his part insists
that such ideas are inherently
non-starters since the Arab
side, and specifically Jordan,
refuse to enter into talks
without such an umbrella. By
the same token, Peres main-
tains, an international opening
conference would immediately
lead to direct, bilateral talks
under an agreement which he.
King Hussein of Jordan, and
the U.S. Administration con-
cluded in April.
That agreement is still un-
published, but it is widely
reported to have been reached
at a meeting between Peres
and Hussein in London on
April 11.
Peres said Sunday that
despite the Likud's stance on
the eve of the talks with Hill -
he accused Shamir of intran-
aigence "the last word has
not yet been said" regarding
an international conference.
: St :v-.--i **
,0* -. '"' *
,K*, | (Ml Ml |
- s
; MM r -
Mrs. Rose J. Cohen (left) joins Hadassah Na-
tional President Ruth W. Popkin, Hebrew
University-Hadassah Medical School Dean
Dr. Marcel Eliakim and Hadassah Medical
Organization National Chairman Frieda
Lewis at ceremonies in New York installing
Dr. Eliakim in an academic chair at the
Medical School in Jerusalem named for Mrs.
Cohen and her husband, Wilfred P. Cohen.
Norwegian Soldiers
Hit by IDF Fire in Lebanon
TEL AVIV (JTA) Two
Norwegian soldiers serving
with the United Nations In-
terim Force in Lebanon
(UNIFIL) were wounded by
shots fired by an Israel
Defense Force patrol Monday
night. Norway has lodged a
sharp protest with Israel
through UNIFIL head-
quarters, and the IDF is in-
vestigating the incident.
The IDF spokesman said the
patrol had noticed two men
moving about in a suspicious
manner in the middle of the
night on the border of the
South Lebanon security zone,
and opened fire. The IDF"
patrol approached the wound-
ed men and were dismayed to
discover that they were
Norwegian UNIFIL soldiers
who had been moving about in
the area without the
knowledge of the IDF.
The wounded men were
treated on the spot by an IDF
doctor and then taken by the
Israelis to the UNIFIL
hospital in Nakoura where
they were treated for what
was described as light injuries.
An IDF source, commenting
on the incident, said that
"anybody moving about on the
edge of the security zone at 2
a.m. cannot be thought to be
on a mission of mercy."
Del Campo said that
Safeway does not own the
Arab stores, but has entered
into a "technical agreement"
with native companies licens-
ing them to use the chain's
name and give them advice.
She said the stores simply pro-
vided the local companies with
a list of manufacturers of
American products offering to
sell them. "The (claim) that we
constituted an agreement is an
absurd charge," she said.
The Arab boycott of Israel
increased substantially in the
late 1970's and the U.S.
adopted two laws to
counteract the participation of
U.S. firms in the boycott.
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 14, 1987
-i
No Peace in Lebanon Until
Syrians Leave, Chamoun Says
Continued on Page 12-A
"Damascus is behind all the
kidnappings," the son of the
late Camille Chamoun
declared.
It appears that the United
Kingdom is more realistic than
the United States. As the
world knows, London stands
adamant in refusing to restore
diplomatic relations with
Syria, relations which were
severed when Britain charged
Damascus with being behind
the recent abortive attempt to
blow up an El Al jet in London.
Chamoun surprised cor-
respondents when he justified
Israel's role in standing with
the South Lebanese Army
along Israel's northern border.
"The situation there is
understandable," he stated.
"There is no reason for a
change in that status until a
stable government is establish-
ed in Lebanon," he added.
"There is none now."
NOTING THAT Lebanon is
the only democratic state in
the region with the exception
of Israel, he branded most of
the others as dictatorships or
feudal kingdoms.
In reply to a question, he
made it clear that should he be
elected president in next
year's elections, he would com-
mence negotiations with Israel
for the establishment of a
peace treaty.
As for America's position on
the turmoil in Lebanon as
caused by the Syrian occupa-
tion, Chamoun expressed
disappointment in the Ad-
ministration's "wait and see
policy." While not having
deserted us, he noted, the
White House has sort of "step-
ped away" and lets things re-
main as they are in confusion
and turmoil.
"The Arabs and others are
clamoring for an international
conference on Palestine. What
the world needs," he insisted,
"is an international conference
on Lebanon."
PRODDED BY a pro PLO
correspondent on the dire fate
that has befallen the Palesti-
nians in Lebanon, Chamoun
replied by noting that the
Palestinian refugees are
welcome to reside in Lebanon
and even to become citizens.
But he made it clear that no
faction or party in Lebanon
will agree to the presence, of
armed Palestinians, namely.
PLO terrorists. They have no
place in our democratic nation.
"The Cairo agreement,
which had opened the door to
Lebanon for the PLO, is now
null and void," he added. "It
has been abrogated by all the
Lebanese factions."
Dany Chamoun may well
hold the solution to Lebanon's
future as a stable democratic
nation and thus to Israel's
peace and tranquility on the
northern border.
Intransigent Syria is now
looked upon as a cruel and
tricky occupier by Lebanese
leaders who have at last learn-
ed to shy away from
Damascus.
America should take note.
Did Egypt Help Iraq
Develop Mid-Range Missile?
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Iraq
has developed a medium-range
missile, possibly with Egypt's
cooperation, that could carry a
nuclear warhead and reach
major population centers of
Israel, the Israeli press
reports.
Israeli officials expressed
concern at the reports that the
Iraqi missile may be capable of
carrying a nuclear weapon and
causing considerable damage
even if it misses its target.
Haaretz last Wednesday
(Aug. 5) quoted an Iraqi news
agency report that Iraq and
Egypt, the two most
Gaza Curfew
Is Lifted
Continued from Page 1-A
took place in an area in the
center of town where local
residents, shopkeepers and
passers-by must have seen
what was happening.
Tal had been driving his car
through the city and slowed
down at an intersection to
make a sharp left turn. A man
who had apparently been stan-
ding unobtrusively near the in-
tersection approached the
slow-moving vehicle and fired
several shots point-blank
through the window and fled.
Hours later the Palestine
Liberation Organization claim-
ed responsibility for the at-
tack. Army sources said they
did not think Tal had been a
planned target, but rather a
"random" victim.
technologically advanced Arab
states, are collaborating in
building a medium-range
ground-to-ground missile
capable of flying 400 miles.
Haaretz military correspon-
dent Zeev Schiff reported that
military sources are concerned
by Baghdad's announcement
that the first test rocket flew
380 miles. Israel has known for
some time that Iraq was
developing such a missile. The
Iraquis have said the missile is
capable of hitting Teheran, but
it can also reach any target in
Israel, Schiff reported.
Egypt and Iraq reportedly
began cooperating on the pro-
ject during the Iran-Iraq war.
The cooperation likely assures
that Iraq will succeed in pro-
ducing a missile capable of car-
rying a chemical warhead
sooner than anticipated. Some
military sources have
speculated that Iraq has
already developed a missile
with the range and accuracy
claimed in last week's reports.
Iraq's announcement of the
missile test could be aimed to
rise the war-torn country's
morale. But Iraq may also
want to answer to Israel's
development of the medium-
range missile, the Jericho 2.
Syria and Egypt have
already acquired growing
numbers of ground-to-ground
missiles capable of striking
Israeli population centers. For
this reason, the IDF must
devise some form of protection
from the threat. One such solu-
tion is the Barak anti-missile
missile, Schiff suggested.
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Friday, August 14, 1987/The Jewish Fjoridian Page 13-A
W -
Gurion by an Israeli author
was published in the U.S.A.
In his review of "Ben-
Gurion: The Burning Ground
1886-1948," by Shabtai Teveth
(Boston: Houghton Mifflin,
1987). Martin Gilbert states:
"Mr. Teveth is in no doubt that
in regard to rescue. Ben-
Gurion adhered to a
'philosophy of what might be
called the beneficial
disaster.* (The New York
Times Book Review, June 21.
1987, p.25).
GILBERT FURTHER
quotes Teveth's assertion that
before the summer of 1944,
Ben-Gurion regarded the
Holocaust as "a relatively
modest catastrophe that his
Zionist concept defined as
suitable for exploitation."
More from Teveth's book, as
quoted by Gilbert in the New
York Times Book Review
reads as follows: "Two facts
can be definitively stated: Ben-
Gurion did not put the rescue
effort above the Zionist
politics, and he did not regard
it as a principal task deman-
ding his personal leadership
... It was not rescue, but .
the creation of a Jewish state
to which Ben-Gurion devoted
his efforts."
Gilbert terms this "an over-
simplification that may not
be sustained by the evidence."
He ought to read Dr.
Kranzler's book where he will
find ample evidence of what
this reviewer, a Dachau and
Auschwitz survivor, would call
the Zionist leaders' callous
disregard of the suffering of
the Holocaust victims.
REGARDLESS of one's
ideology, one must admit that
Kranzler has treated his sub-
ject with great courage, clarity
and objectivity, while
meticulously adhering to ar-
chival material.
Part Two of his book
features personality profiles of
individuals involved in the
wartime struggle to save
Jewish lives, including some
renowned leaders of Or-
thodoxy who had been malign-
ed and vilified at the time by
their secular opponents. By
telling the story of their per-
sonal sacrifices and
achievements, the author has
now restored their dignity and
rightful place in history.
^^
Our Readers Write: Study Of
Orthodox Singles in Order
Uprising recalled.- survivor of the
u< Ghetto uprising. Sssliga Henryka,
tyx flowers nt m txkibtt memorializing the
S.OIIO combatants and lSO.OOOciriliniis killed
AP/Wide World Photo
by the Nazis during the 68-day remit in the
Ghetto in X9UU. Anniversary /the beginning
it'the uprising was observed mi Friday, July
.11.
Tew Book Eyes
Failure of Jews Outside the Holocaust
Continued from Page 7-A
llie wartime laws enacted by
Allies while the Allied
renunents often ignored the
when other. non-Jewish
|ii|is were involved.
the rabbis on the other
k'i. and the Vaad Hatzalah
ists. were guided by what
perceived to be a higher
ral law of the Torah. As
mzler says, the Orthodox
I unorthodox means for the
of the survival of the
fish people. Despite the ban
ood shipments to occupied
rope, they found ways of
|ding tens of thousands of
parcels to the starving
n in the ghettos and camps
way of Tangiers in Morocco
Spain.
'HEY CAJOLED and
Inured the authorities to
rniit illegal transfers of
pej for ransom, they
pged smugglers to smuggle
Idren over the orders, and
pert counterfeiters to forge
ssports.
There is the fascinating
5ry of George Mandel-
kntello, an Orthodox Jew
I10 used his position as
.retary general of the
ilvadoran mission in
"tzerland to distribute
Jusands of passports to
free of charge. These
[cuments, alongside with
Jose issued by Raoul
[allcnberg in Hungary, saved
yny thousands from deporta-
>'i to the death camps. Prior
Mantello's action, Latin
tierican documents could on-
'Dr. Kranzler's book
is important for his
account of timidity
on the part of the
American Jewish
establishment.'
ly be obtained by the rich at ex-
orbitant prices.
The reader is impressed with
the author's painstaking use of
a mass of hitherto unknown ar-
chival material collected in
Europe, Israel and the United
States over a period of years.
Even a student of the
Holocaust generally familiar
with the facts will find
Kranzler's documented ac-
count of the accomplishments
of the Orthodox group highly
revealing. One is therefore
amazed why most historians of
the Holocaust have virtually
ignored the role of the
Orthodox.
RAUL HILBERG. in his
three-volume "revised and
definitive edition" of "The
Destruction of the European
Jews" (New York: Holmes and
Meier, 1985), includes a
45-page chapter on rescue,
with no mention of the ac-
tivities of the Orthodox group.
Prof. Henry Feingold ("The
Politics of Rescue," New
York: Rutgers University,
1970) has a single reference to
"Isaac Sternbach (sic), WJC
agent in Switzerland" an er-
roneous association.
Bernard Wasserstein, in
"Britain and the Jews of
Europe 1939-1945" (London:
Oxford University Press,
1980) does not even mention
the name of Rabbi Solomon
Schonfeld, despite the fact
that Schonfeld worked every
corridor of power and in-
fluence and rescued thousands
of Jews. A volume published
by Yad Vashem, based on a
symposium of historians of the
Holocaust on rescue, contains
not a single chapter on Or-
thodox activities.
By sheer coincidence, a cor-
roboration of Kranzler's thesis
about the stance of the Zionist
leaders has come from a very
unexpected source. Days after
the publication of Kranzler's
book, a new authorized
biography of David Ben-
EDITOR:
1 read Alisa Kwitney's gifted
writing and most provocative
article about young Jewish
singles. "Dating in the '80s,"
and 1 found it informative and
enlightening to my modern Or-
thodox background. I have a
Hebrew Academy educational
background with fundamen-
talist Orthodox kosher
leanings.
May I suggest another
documentary, this one to focus
on the Orthodox singles scene
in our South Florida area. It
would be unique because these
singles are most selective in
whom they date. They are very
structured and limited only to
dating within the confines of
their strict adherence to tradi-
tional Orthodox codes of
behavior including no pre-
marital sex, no driving on the
Sabbath, eating in only strictly
kosher restaurants, dress
codes, and the like.
Jewish Floridian readers
would be interested in these
attractive Yuppies who have
chosen to continue in their
traditional roles established by
their education and strict fami-
ly upbringing. Many are forced
to move to New York for social
opportunities because there is
so little chance to meet
suitable mates in the Greater
Miami area. This is much the
fault of the local Orthodox rab-
binate who fail to properly in-
troduce these young people to
one another. What is the Or-
thodox community doing to
keep their young singles here
in Miami?
TOBEE LAUREN
Miami
EDITOR:
Congratulations on your dar-
ing to publish the truth about
the death of Benjamin Lindner
in Nicaragua.
The Op-Ed Page article by
Gordon Zacks focuses the light
where it belongs: on the many
misled fanatics who are unwit-
tingly playing squarely into
the hands of our arch-enemies,
the Soviet Union and the
Sandinistas.
I hope your publishing the
article will play a little part in
focusing the need for truth in
our news media such as you
provided.
ALFRED LIPPMAN
New Orleans
EDITOR:
As a Bahai. I was happy to
read about "Bahai granted
legal status" in your paper
recently. But as a Bahai from
Iran, I was in tears with mixed
feelings; great happiness for
this wonderful news and
agreement between Israel and
the Bahai World Center in
Haifa, and deep sadness about
the Bahais in Iran who at this
day and age are still under
severe persecution just
because of their religion.
As you know, the Bahai
buildings around the world, as
well as the buildings on Mount
Carmel and in Acco, have been
paid for by the Bahais only. To-
day, Bahais in Iran (more than
300,000) are not allowed to
send money to Israel or even
visit their Holy places there.
During the last seven years,
many Bahais have been ex-
ecuted in Iran simply because
they had sent money to and
visited the Bahai World
Center in Haifa at the time of
the Shah, when Bahais had
been allowed to do so.
No matter where in the
world a Bahai lives, our World
Center is and will ever be in
Israel and we are supposed to
say our daily obligatory prayer
facing the Holy Land.
No power in the world can
ever change this because it
was God's Will, and the Pro-
phet of the Bahai faith,
Bahaullah, was exiled to the
Holy Land more than a cen-
tury ago.
NOSRAT S. SCOTT
Hollywood
V VvV,



rage i*-t\ me jewiaii rioriuuw/r riuay, August 1% igei
Jewish Hospitals in U.S. Are Troubled
Continued from Pf 1-A
as well as three health care
clinics for the elderly, mobile
diagnostic programs and two
adult day care centers.
The merger has left ques-
tions as to what will happen to
Denver's Jewish elderly who
receive care at Beth Israel
Geriatric Center, but board
members promise that the
hospital's sale will facilitate
the building of a new Beth
Israel to serve the elderly. The
construction could be finished
in four years, Siegel said.
IN MILWAUKEE, Mount
Sinai Medical Center, with 410
beds, will merge with Good
Samaritan Medical Center
within the next two years,
becoming the non-sectarian
Sinai-Samaritan Medical
Center.
Mount Sinai officials told the
Chronicle that they were com-
pelled to merge because the
high cost of providing health
care and the overcrowded
Milwaukee health care market
were threatening its closure.
They cited studies that show
the move will save the two
centers $7 million a year.
Stanley Kritzik, chairman of
Mount Sinai's board, called the
merger a gain for the
Milwaukee Jewish community
"because we're not going to go
to the Jewish community for
money to support waste and
inefficiency." Sinai-Samaritan
will probably continue to
receive money from the
Milwaukee Jewish Federation
to provide health care for
Soviet emigres and older
adults.
MOUNT SINAI'S chief of
staff, Dr. Morris Sable, said
the merger saddens him
because it means "the end of
an era" for Jewish doctors
who for years were prohibited
from practicing at non-Jewish
hospitals, the reason for
Mount Sinai's founding in
1903.
Another Jewish physician
wrote in The Chronicle that he
and many Jewish colleagues
were upset over the change
and their lack of input.
However, no doctors have pull-
ed their practices from Mount
Sinai.
The other Mount Sinai, in
Minneapolis, has begun steps
to merge with Metropolitan
Medical Center there. The two
hospitals will be joined under
Health One, the area's largest
multi-hospital organization.
Nancy Jensen, director of
public relations at Mount
Sinai, a 273-bed facility, told
the American Jewish World
that one reason for the merger
"was the complimentary ser-
vices of the two hospitals and
two, was the proximity of six
or seven blocks."
DR. IRVING SHAPIRO,
medical director of Mount
Sinai's Phillips Eye Institute,
said that the merger is "man-
datory. In this day and age,
the third-party payers' writing
insurance policies are not in-
terested in small, independent
hospitals. And a patient will
not come here because the care
is not paid for."
The "real savings,'' accor-
ding to Shapiro, will come in
the areas of common purchase
and services which will enable
the hospitals to operate their
separate treatment specialties
without doubling the cost.
"We will still maintain our
identity," said Shapiro, "and
will not change the special
relationship we have with the
Jewish community."
The Minneapolis Mount
Sinai was formed by the
Jewish community in 1951 to
enable all doctors to practice
as equals regardless of
religious affiliation. Shapiro
recalled that before Mount
Sinai "a Jewish physician
could not admit a patient
Jewish philanthropic funds.
The Minneapolis Mount Sinai
is considering the idea, its
president told The Chronicle.
In related news, the Jewish
Exponent of Philadelphia
reports that the Albert Eins-
tein Healthcare Foundation
will sell its Mount Sinai-Daroff
Division in the formerly
Jewish South Philadelphia
area to Graduate Hospital,
pending approval of both
boards.
The 210-bed Mount Sinai is a
constituent of the Federation
of Jewish Agencies of Greater
Philadelphia, and is not the
city's onlv Jewish-affiliated
hospital. The foundati
others.
ion owns
under his own name. He had to
find a non-Jewish doctor to ad-
mit the patient."
ALTHOUGH JEWISH pa
tients were attracted to the
hospital because of its
adherence to the Jewish
dietary laws, many, if not
most, of its patients were not
Jews.
Mount Sinai in Milwaukee
said it has established a foun-
dation to channel specifically
THE PURCHASE price fnr
the hospital, built around thl
turn of the century J!
renovated in 1983 for fen
million, is reportedly |JJ
million or $11 million
Graduate Hospital board chair-
man Harold Cramer said the
new facility's location in ,
residential area and se]|inr
price were attractive.
The Einstein foundation
selling at an acknowledged
loss because Mount Sinai
Daroff "has become an expen-
sive institution and a drain"
the ORIGINAL
Wolfie
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Arab and Jewish mothers and children plant
an dIire tree as a symbol of their desire for
/.. are at conclusion of'graduation' ceremonies
held nt Na'amat Israel day care renter in
Karkur/Pa rdess Chana.
"anada Scored
For Censoring Nazi Criminal Report
By MICHAEL SOLOMON
OTTAWA (JTA) Alti
lodal, the Oxford historian
rho conducted the principal
March for the Deschenes
immission report on Nazi
lar criminals in Canada,
lastigated the Canadian
[overnment for censoring her
50-page report "far beyond
meant the preservation
secrecy for the security of
tanada."
I The government released
ae heavily censored version of
le Rodal report Thursday,
ne told the JTA Monday, "I
d not expect such a heavy
ensuring of my report with
[hi ile pages and sections be-
ta expurgated." She accused
lie Ministry of Justice and the
loyal Canadian Mounted
lice of excessive censorship.
[THE RODAL report reveal-
that Canadian officials ad-
litted Nazi war criminals as
|t< as 1983. It also charged
lal U.S. intelligence
feratives withheld informa-
3ii al>out Nazi war criminals
misled Canadian officials
attempts to push refugees
Ito Canada immediately
lowing World War II.
Jewish groups in Canada
V e demanded the immediate
[lease of the uncensored
pdal report and have criticiz-
the Canadian government
?' instructing the full publica-
<>n of the report.
I 1 he Canadian government
pleased the censored report
wy after the Toronto Star fil-
tor the document under
lanada'a Access to Informa-
}m Act.
I One censored section of the
lodal document reportedly
Vovered the roles of two
Jrmer Canadian Prime
finisters, Louis St. Laurent
nd Pierre Trudeau in oppos-
prosecutions for known
[ar criminals living in Canada
famed to Council
[CANBERRA (JTA) Dr.
Joachim Schneeweiss, former
Resident of the Executive
"uncil of Australian Jewry,
? l>een appointed to the
Jfinie Minister"s newly-
ptablished 22-person Ad-
flsoi-y Council on Multicultural
Mlairs,
and in admitting known Nazi
collaborators to Canada.
ST. LAURENT reportedly
agreed to admit Slovakian
stormtrooper Karol Sidor, a
Nazi collaborator, to Canada in
1949 upon a direct request
from Pope Pius XII. Sidor
served as the Slovakian
delegate to the Vatican.
Trudeau. according to the
report, opposed prosecution of
alleged war criminals in the
early 1980's.
"I think that Mr. Trudeau in
his quality as a statesman
thought in his judgment that it
was too fragile to sustain the
kind of tension which would
have emerged from seeking
out Nazi war criminals in
Canada when his attention
was concentrated on problems
of bilingualism back in 1967,"
Rodal said.
"I also believe Mr.
Trudeau's personal perception
against that of some of his own
Cabinet, was that prospective
immigrants should leave their
quarrels at the Canadian
border. Personally, Mr.
Trudeau, as Minister of Justice
in Lester Pearson's Cabinet, in
11'tiT, categorically opposed
Simon Wiesenthal's diligent
appeals to open a file on Nazi
war criminals in Canada," she
said.
RODAL SAID Trudeau, as
Prime Minister in 1981, ap-
pointed the inter-departmental
committee on war crimes in
the face of pressure from
Jewish groups and public opi-
nion. Martin Row, Trudeau's
appointed chairman of com-
mittee, "carried through Mr.
Trudeau's position in his con-
clusion .. that there are no
legal means possible in Canada
for acting against war
criminals," according to
Rodal.
"The only sweetening of the
bitter pill was the committee's
promise that 'we won't let
them in the future.' The fact
that in 1983, under the
premiership of Mr. Trudeau,
two alleged Nazi collaborators
were admitted to Canada is
proof of the inconsistence of
the government's committee
with its own conclusions,"
Rodal said.
In other reactions to the
report "s publication. David
Matas, senior legal counsel for
the League of Human Rights
of B'nai B'rith. called the
report "a damning indictment
of 40 years of Canadian
government and the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police." He
castigated Ottawa for "its
bureaucratic obstruction,"
noting that a censored version
of the Rodal report was releas-
ed only after a four-month
delay.
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Friday, August 14, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
Rabbi in Japan To Mark 42nd
Anniversary of A-Bomb Attack
Continued from Page 2-A
Of the Camps say that people
look at them in disbelief and
that people do not believe their
stories. But they are our
witnesses and we must listen."
In recent months, several
reports have described anti-
Semitic publications in Japan.
Schudrich has been monitoring
these publications.
"To date," Schudrich said,
"there have been at least a
dozen books that are inflam-
matory in nature. Two of those
books, by Masami Uno, have
sold close to 800,000 copies."
ONE OF Uno's books, "If
You Understand the Jews,
You Can Understand the
World," talks about "interna-
tional Jewish capital" that has
damaged the Japanese
economy.
"There has historically been
great curiosity about Jews in
Japan," Schudrich said. "Jews
are an enigma to the Japanese,
and they are curious about
Jews. That's one of the
reasons these books have sold
so well. But it's important to
note that what people are
reading hasn't yet been con-
verted into real anti-Semitic
actions.
"We are a small community,
around 17(1 families. My con-
cern is that what Japanese are
reading not lead to action
against Jews."
Several of the books in ques-
tion have blamed Jews for in-
ternational catastrophes, both
political and social, including
the Tanaka scandal in Japan,
the Watergate scandal in the
U.S. and the current epidemic
rise of AIDS.
"IN ONE sense there is
positive admiration for Jews
here," Schudrich said. "Since
Japanese think Jews are rich
and clever, they would like to
emulate that, but the negative
information is more than
negative because it is false."
He added that the Japanese
are not readily exposed to in-
formation to the contrary.
The rabbi hopes to
spearhead a campaign to
finance the opening of a
Jewish cultural center in
Tokyo
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Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. August 14. 1987

Some Possibilities
Who'll Visit With Pope in Vatican?
Continued from Page 1-A
Vatican visit in the media.
The discretionary silence
thus leaves some questions.
Will the Vatican meeting be
more than just another
attempt to show harmony and
ceremonial relations between
Catholics and Jews? And what
is it exactly that Jewish
leaders hope to achieve in this
meeting? An apology? An
amends? A mutual
understanding? A revision in
the thinking that has divided
the two religious groups?
It is clear that the meeting
that will take place at the
Vatican would probably not
have occurred if the Pope
didn't receive Austrian
president Kurt Waldheim, an
alleged Nazi criminal, and top
it off by praising Waldheim's
abilities as a statesman.
IT IS likely that without the
Waldheim incident, the
meeting in Miami between the
Pope and Jewish leaders would
have, as planned, been a
prearranged exchange of
position papers read by the
Pope and a selected Jewish
leader without any discussion.
After the Pope's audience
with Waldheim, Jewish
leaders united and angrily
declared that the planned
Miami forum was no longer
acceptable. They wanted to
meet with the Vatican before
the Pope came to the United
States. They wanted to have
talks that were "substantial."
Sources have said between
five and seven Jewish leaders
will attend the Vatican
meeting, which is to include a
daylong discussion with
Cardinal Augostino Casaroli,
Vatican Secretary of State;
Cardinal Jans Willebrands;
and members of their staffs.
The Pope is scheduled to meet
with the Jewish leaders the
following day for one and a
half hours.
OTHER SOURCES say the
Jewish delegation may exceed
more than seven members and
that there will inevitably be
some conflict over who the
select group will include.
According to Rabbi Marc
Tanenbaum, director of
international relations for the
American Jewish Committee,
the core group of Jewish
leaders will consist of the
people who met with Cardinal
Casaroli in New York last
month.
That group who would meet
with the Pope tentatively
includes Rabbi Tanenbaum.
Rabbi Mordecai Waxman,
chairman of the International
Jewish Committee on
Interreligious Consultations
(IJCIC), and Rabbi Gilbert
Klapperman, national
president of the Synagogue
Council of America. Also
mentioned as a possible
Sarticipant has been Gerhard
iegner, of the World Jewish
Congress in Europe.
"WERE LOOKING for
ward to developing a
process of relationship, which
is probably more important
than the agenda item, Rabbi
Klapperman told the Jewish
Floridian, putting a seal on
that topic.
Theologically, Klapperman
said, there have been
Rabbi Tanenbaum
substantial changes in Jewish-
Catholic relations. "They're
not holding theologically that
the Jews were responsible for
the killing of Jesus. They are
also against proselytizing
among Jews."
The meeting with Pope John
Paul II in the Vatican will be.
according to Klapperman,
"the first meeting in Jewish
history where Jews will be
sitting with the Pope, and they
will not be in a state of
adversarial or confrontational
atmosphere.
"If you view the centuries
old relationship between
Christians and Jews which
involves persecutions and
inquisitions and other forms of
discrimination, and here
Jewish representation will sit
with the Pope and a papal
representative to discuss
substantive matters, this is a
very significant change."
AS FOR public knowledge of
Gerhard Riegner
this process, "We're not going
to discuss anything in the
preplanning stage.'
Klapperman said. "When
we're ready, we'll discuss it."
The general issues which will
be discussed are well-known,
the Jewish leaders say. They
include the Holocaust and its
uniqueness and the resurgence
of anti-Semitism in portions of
the world including Austria.
Rabbi James Rudin.
interreligious affairs director
of the AJCommittee, also
addressed the Jewish
Floridian's inquiry of what it is
that Jews are hoping to gain
from the Vatican visit.
"We want a full dress attack
on all forms of anti-Semitism
by the Catholic church and
Catholics wherever and
whatever form it comes in,"
Rudin said.
"WE WANT an under-
standing from the
church leaders and Catholic
leaders and Roman Catholic-
church life that the Holocaust
was a unique form of
persecution, and we Jews
suffered in a unique way and
were singled out by the Nazis
for persecution.
"We want to replace a bad
culture that many Catholics
have historically had about
Judaism with a good culture.
We want accuracy, respect,
and mutual understanding. It
also means that Jews
understand Catholics."
THE JEWS and Catholics
will not meet as strangers,
Rudin said. "We've had 22
years of building a new
relationship with the Catholic
Church after 1,900 years of a
very bad relationship. We are
not strangers. But it is a new
process."
Rudin said Jewish leaders
are taking this meeting "very
seriously." and he said it will
provide an "extraordinary
opportunity."
Local and national Jewish
leaders still have not decided
whether the Miami meeting
between the Pope and Jewish
leaders will play out as
expected.
But many agree with Rudin.
who says. "I certainly think
the meeting in Rome will move
our own decision about Miami
along more quickly and
probably favorably."
STILL TO BE resolved is
which Jewish leaders will
attend this historic meeting.
"I'm sure there will be a
great deal of pressure for
everyone to get in on the act,"
said the AJC's Tanenbaum.
"But it's not a circus.
Therefore the people who will
be selected need to have
substantial experience in
Jewish-Catholic relationships
and on diplomatic
negotiations."
Jewish leaders are hoping
lo. a meeting of th-TSP
inenbai said. "The!'.
nothing to be gaine.
this out in public
opera. It's not a
affects potentiall
as
Playing
. a SOM)
n. it I
y Kreat
importance to the i',ur *J
Jewish-Catholic relational
also the security of
I
Israel, the Soviet Union and
Austria, where anti-Semitism
has nsen as a result of tkJ
Waldheim affair.
"There's an obliRation |
deal with this seriously and
with restraint."
IN ANOTHER development]
in Catholic-Jewish relations
the Interfaith Commission of!
the Archdiocese of Miami and]
the anti-Defamation League of I
B'nai B'rith have jointM
announced that they will meet
sometime around mid-( )ctoher!
"No doubt there will
reflection on the Vatican and
Miami meeting," said .\DL
southern region director!
Arthur Teitelbaum.
In a joint statement
Teitelbaum and Monsignorl
Bryan Walsh, chairman of thai
Archdiocese's interfaith)
commission, said. "Ourl
dialogue in October is a
initiative designed to gjvel
expression to our sense ofj
responsibility for the future ofj
Catholic-Jewish relations In,
South Florida. Our]
commitment to dialogue takes I
on added significance in view!
of recent misunderstandings.
Rabbi Named
NEW YORK (JTA) -
President Reagan has ap-
pointed Rabbi Chaskel Besser
of New York as one of 21
members of the new Presi-
dent's Commission on the!
Preservation of America's
Heritage Abroad. Besser has
headed efforts to preserve
Jewish cemeteries in Europe
OVER 200
EXHIBITORS
CONFIRMED

Dec. 4-7. o7 Miami Beach Convention Center
June J-7. 'XX. New York. Javils Convention Centt
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As A Result of AIDS
Hebrew Academy To Teach A Course On Human Sexuality This Fall
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jeuixk FUrridian Staff Writer
The Hebrew Academy, for
the first time, will begin
teaching a course on Human
Sexuality this fall. The course
is scheduled to be offered as an
elective to 10th and 12th grade
students, and will include
discussions on the role of sex
in relationships, physiological
changes that teen-agers go
through, and the difference
between love and sex.
Jessica Schultz, assistant
principal of the junior and
senior high school of the
Academy, will be teaching the
course primarily from a
biological view, and Rabbi
Yossi Heber, principal of the
Academy, will teach the course
from a philosophical, biblical
and halachic perspective.
"THE ISSUE of sex educa-
tion became very critical as a
result of the AIDS scare in
America," Heber said. "We
wanted to first get a consensus
of our parents and invited
Marilyn Volker, a lecturer, to
give a session on the impor-
tance of sex education. After-
! wards, we asked the parents if
it would be their mandate to
have it implemented in the
school. And they felt very
strongly that it should be
implemented."
The course will be "value-
based," said Heber, and in a
public school there would be
difficulty with a generic course
in Human Sexuality because
who would choose which
values to base the course on?
"In a Jewish parochial
school, the values are intrin-
sic," Heber said.
FOR EXAMPLE, leading
doctors and public health sec-
tor spokesmen have endorsed
the merit of using condoms
during sex. Yet, said Heber,
"the use of condoms is against
Jewish law unless specific rab-
binical approval is given as a
result of medical
complications."
The idea of implementing
the curriculum is balancing the
tenets of Orthodox tradition
which forbids premarital rela-
tions and the culture of the
Western civilization which ac-
cepts that reality, Heber said.
"So as a result, the way
Rabbi Yossi Heber
Jessica Schultz
The course will be "value-based,"
said Heber, and in a public school
there would be difficulty with a
generic course in Human Sexuality
because who would choose which
values to base the course on?
we've dealt with this is within in a Jewish home, its beauty
the framework of Orthodoxy
we are teaching the role of sex
and significance, as well as the
dangers of an open and free
'Moonlighting': Orthodox Jew Simcha Hellinger
Leads Double Life As Private Eye
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Wrxtrr
One time, when private
[detective Simcha Hellinger,
head of Hellinger In-
vestigative Services, arrived
| at an airport on a case, his ap-
carance came as something
I"!' a shock to the man who was
|.-upposed to meet him there.
"I hope you won't take o'f-
Ifense," said the man. taking in
Hellinger's long beard.
skullcap and tzizit, the corded
[fringes which Orthodox Jewish
jmen wear over the waist of the
Ipants, "but is this your
|disguise?"
Simcha Hellinger, who often
I dons disguises in the line of du-
|ty, was not posing undercover
las an observant Jew. The
125-year-old ex-yeshiva bocher,
Iwho heads his own Miami-
: based investigative agency,
I has been following the letter of
[Torah law since the age of 16.
HIS DESIRE to be a private
I detective, however, goes back
|even farther.
"I've wanted to be a detec-
Itive since the age of four or
|five," says Hellinger.
"But after I became obser-
Ivant, I didn't think it would be
practical. The rabbis didn't
[discourage me, but other peo-
ple said it was a romantic idea,
[since I wouldn't be able to
[blend in with everyone else,"
I he recalls.
Hellinger almost signed up
[for a course in the various
. aspects of detective work
several times, always backing
down at the last minute, until
he read about a private in-
vestigator who had no hands.
Figuring that if a detective
with no hands could manage to
blend in with the general
populace, an Orthodox Jew
could do it, too, Hellinger went
ahead and completed the
course in criminal investiga-
tions, surveillance, and other
subjects relevant to the pro-
spective private eye.
"You can specialize, or you
can be a general private detec-
tive, like I am," Hellinger ex-
plains. "I utilize experts in
each field, from ex-FBI agents
to a former member of the
Israeli Secret Service."
HELLINGER, who has a
distant cousin who produced
many detective movies, in-
cluding some featuring legen-
dary screen star Humphrey
Bogart, travels throughout the
United States on cases, posing
as everything from a gas sta-
tion attendant to a rabbi.
His most difficult
assignment?
"Posing as a simple-minded
floor sweep," says Hellinger.
"The righteous men of our
religion used to pose as people
who were slow-witted, and
now I understand why it was
considered such a difficult
thing to do. You are treated
with disrespect by people who
know less than you do and
will never find out how much
you know."
Every detective must be
wary about slipping up and
revealing his disguise, but
Hellinger, who never forgets
that he is an observant Jew,
must be doubly careful not to
give away his true identity.
"WHEN YOU are creative,
there are ways to get out of
any situation," he contends.
"Once, in a bar, I was caught
Simcha Hellinger, private detective, used to think that
religious vocation would interfere with his career of choice.
his
saying a blessing over my
beer. When someone asked
what I was muttering, I told
them I was hoping it was
Budweiser."
As an Orthodox Jew, Hell-
inger cannot shake hands with
a woman. What does he do
when faced with this situation
while disguised as a non-Jew
"I pretend to drop
something, or say I have to
make a phone call," Hel,; W
reveals. "The trick is i to
get nervous, and to keep a
sense of humor. Then you can
get away with practically
anything."
Much of Hellinger's work in-
volves cases where a wife or
husband suspects a spouse of
Continued on Page 10-B
sexual society."
A goal of the course is to in-
spire students to recognize
that the solution to the general
sexual malaise in America is
abstinance from premarital
relations and also the fatal
dangers of the various diseases
transmitted in extra-marital
sex.
From the students, Heber
said he doesn't expect "perfec-
tion and an attitude of holier
than though. But I do expect
that they will be receptive to
the fundamental philosophy of
traditional Judaism and that
they will strive to live within
that to the best of their
ability."
ACCORDING to Schultz,
the course will be offered on a
trial basis to 10th and 12th
grade students to see in which
grades it will best be handled.
The course was initially going
to be taught to 10th grade
students, but Schultz said the
school wanted to reach the
seniors before they go out in
the world.
The course will also dwell on
the moral dilemmas a student
faces such as how to say "no,"
understanding why they say
no, and how to overcome peer
pressures.
Schultz also agrees that the
course will likely be different
from similar courses offered in
other schools around the coun-
try. "In most places, they give
the students a lot of facts, and
the teachers are afraid to come
to any sort of judgment on
whether a situation is good or
bad," Schultz said.
"I think it behooves our
school to teach students to
make these judgments, and
the students to make these
judgments."
WHILE THE course will be
a new experience for the
Academy, Schultz asserts that
"it's more risky not to have a
course like this. We're in a
very volatile age where
students hear part-truths. I
think a student has to have an
outlet where they can talk
about it and hear from a com-
petent person on what the
truth really is and modify their
lives, or they may not have
very long to live. It's very
scary."
Although most parents sup-
port the course, Schultz said
she is "sure that there will be
parents who will not want
their kids participating in
these discussions."
The students will have had a
course in biology previous to
this course and therefore will
have a fundamental
background on human
reproduction, she said. The
classes will usually begin with
a discussion by the teachers,
and then the students will be
invited to share their fears or
anxieties.
Our
i: 111111! 111
fcy
Friday, August 14, 1987 The Jewish Floridian Section B




Page 2-B The Jewish Floridiaii/Friday, August 14, 1987
In Interview
Archbishop Explains Catholicism
rendering of a prayer which
reads: "In the name of the
Father who has given us the
gift of life, and of the Son who
has redeemed us and saves us
through His death and resur-
Contiaaed from Page 3-A
chbishop. Cardinal is a special
honor given to a bishop or an
archbishop by the Pope. The
cardinal is a high official of the
Roman Catholic Church, rank-
ing next to the Pope. He is a
member of the Sacred College
and is appointed by the Pope
to assist and advise him in the
government of the church. The
names of the newly created
cardinals are usually announc-
ed at a papal consistory. They
may wear a especially design-
ed red hat and cassock. They
are the ones who elect the
Pope who, for centuries now,
has always been a cardinal
before his election. Since 1918,
all cardinals must be priests.
Before 1918, a lay person
could be a cardinal.
What is the Vatican?
The Vatican is an area
within the boundaries of Rome
which belongs to the Catholic
Church. That area is a nation-
state, the smallest country in
the world, only 108.7 acres in
size. The Pope is the head of
state. Vatican buildings house
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administrative offices for the
government, for the church,
for radio and TV stations, and
for the heads of religious con-
gregations. The Vatican con-
tains the archives of the
church.
A center for theological
study, the Vatican is home to
many churches. The most
famous is St. Peter's Basilica.
It is built over the land that
was once Nero's circus, where
many Christians were mar-
tyred and where Peter the
Apostle, the first Bishop of
Rome, is buried along with
other Popes. Some of the most
famous art in the world, in-
cluding Michaelangelo's Pieta,
Moses, and the painted ceil-
ings of the Sistine Chapel, are
also in the Vatican.
Why don't Catholic priests
and nuns marry?
The practice of celibacy, re-
mainii., nmarried and having
no sexual relations, is a man-
made law of the church. It is a
promise or vow taken upon or-
dination. The practice was
adopted by Pope Leo IX for all
priests so that they might
dedicate themselves more
completely to the service of
the church. In taking such
vows, one gives oneself as a
gift to religious life in imita-
tion of the holiness of the life
lived by Jesus.
Historically, there seems to
be a connection between the
early Christian attitudes
towards a priesthood based
upon the laws of Judaism. It
was related to the lives of the
priests in the temple during
the times of their sacerdotal
duties. Unlike the early temple
priests, who visited the Holy of
Holies infrequently, the
church's priests performed
their holiest of duties first on a
monthly then daily basis. Thus
the marriage laws for priests
were changed to a life of full-
time celibacy, even though the
change was not enacted until
the 12th century.
What are nuns and how do
they differ from priests?
Nuns are women in service
of the church. They too take
vows of poverty, chastity and
obedience. Nuns belong to
groupings called orders.
Orders were begun in the
church in response to par-
ticular needs of God's people.
Some orders teach, some care
for the sick, others devote
themselves to the needy and
neglected of society. One
order, the Sisters of Zion.
devotes itself to the better-
ment of life in Israel. Another
order, the Society of the Holy
Child, has given over one of its
members. Sister Ann Gillen, of
Chicago, to a lifetime of work
on behalf of Soviet Jews.
Nuns differ from priests also
in that they are not ordained to
be priests or to administer cer-
tain rites of the church called
the sacraments.
What are sacraments?
Sacraments are liturgical
celebrations of special events
in human life, including birth
itself. They include:
Baptism which brings Gen-
tiles into the Covenant of
Jesus. A person is born again
as an adopted child of God.
Catholics baptize through
sprinkling of water (rather
than total immersion), in the
rection. and the Holv ki
the love of the Trife:
unites us with each 07
whose inspiration, gu^ 2
strengthens us in the shaZ
life of grace. ^
form of the cross symbolizing
the suffering, death and resur-
rection of Jesus. When a
Catholic blesses him or herself
hv making the form of the
cross bv touching the forehead
and both shoulders, the person
is reminded of the great gift of
baptism and love of Jesus.
Confirmation gives the
seal of the Spirit to maturity of
faith.
Eucharist is receiving the
life-giving consecrated Bread
and Wine, the Body and Blood
of Jesus.
Penance reconciles the sin-
ner with God and the com-
munity. It restores the life of
the soul just as medicine
restores the body from a
physical ailment.
Holy Orders give the
power of the priesthood to an
ordained minister of the
church. It is the privilege of
celebrating the sacraments of
Eucharist and Penance in the
name of Christ.
Matrimony is the union of
a man and woman in the cove-
nant of Marriage.
How many Catholics are
there in the world and where
are the largest numbers
located?
There are approximately
800,000.000 Catholics in the
world. The largest numbers
are in South America. There
are approximately 52,000.000
Catholics in the United States.
2,500,000 in Florida, and
1,100.000 in the Miami
Archdiocese.
What is Vatican II?
Vatican II is the name given
to the second council called to
the Vatican. Called by Pope
John XXIII. its purpose was to
bring the Catholic Church
more closely in contact with
the modern world. Part of the
focus of the Council was the
church's relationship to non-
Catholics, including Jews.
Xostra Aetate was a land-
mark document adopted by the
Council. Among other things.
it called on Catholics to learn
more about Jews and Judaism
and to do so in dialogue with
our Jewish brothers anil
sisters. Ramifications of that
were felt all over the world, in-
cluding here in Miami. In
cooperation with the American
Jewish Committee and Temple
Israel. I was pleased to par-
ticipate in a two-day con-
ference on Catholic-Jewish
relations. The American
Jewish Committee. St. I.
Catholic Church. Congrega-
tion Bet Breira and the Na-
tional Conference of Chris-
tians and Jews have a dialogue
group which has been running
for over two years.
Xnstra Aetate also condemn-
ed anti-Semitism. It forever
removed from Catholic
teaching the charge of deicide.
the charge that the Jewish
people are collectively respon-
sible for the death of Jesus and
were dispersed and persecuted
as punishment for the crime.
Do Catholics beliei damned?
Never has such a statement
been an official teaching of the
( atholic Church.
What im the expression "In
the name of the Father, the Son
and the Holy Spirit" mean?
This is a "shorthand"
HAPPENINGS
Miami Beach attorney Laurence Feingold and bade Circun
Court Judge John Gale have been appointed to the Athletic Ad-
\isor> Board of M.ami-Dade Community College. W'olfson Can,,
pus Their appointments were announced by EduardoJ Padron
vice president of the former New World Center campus and b>
college president Robert H McCabe
Temple Menorah Sisterhood will hold its first meeting of the
season Sept 9 at noon in the Olemberg Hall on Miami Beach
The guesi speaker will be Miami Beach Mayor Alex baoud who
Mill show movies of his recent trip to Israel
Adath Yeshurun congregation will have an open house from 10
a m to noon Sundav at its Miami Gardens Drive facility The pro
gram will include a tour of the facilities available ai Adath
Yeshurun and information available about membership the
religious school dav care. Mommy and Me nursery and educa
nonal programs and other classes and programs A hghi
breakfast will be Mrved
Miami Beach attorney Laurence Feingold and bade Circuit
Court Judge John Gale have been appointed to the Athletic Ad
visory Board of Miami bade Community College. Woibon Cam
pus Their appointments were announced by Lduardo J Padron
vice president of the former New World Center campus and b>
college president Robert H McCabe
Jewish Floridian salute j
to our centenarians I
i
i
The following individual is already 100 years old or <
will be 100 by Dec. 31. 1987:
SAME:......................................
BIRTHDATE ............
PRESENT ADDRESS |]
APT CITY ........STATE
II
CITY OE BIRTH
STATE ZIP COUNTRY
--------------- I
SUGGESTED BY
ADDRESS APT
CITY ZIP
PHONi
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
Enclose a photograph of the centenarian if possible
and mail to 100 YEARS YOUNG. The Jewish Floridian
P.O. Box 01297.'). Miami. Ela. 33101.
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OPEN MON. THRU SAT. 9:30-4:30


Coming of Age In America
[^day. August 14- 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B

A Russian Girl Turns Sweet Sixteen
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Last Saturday night, Aug. 8,
a Miami girl celebrated her bir-
thday with a very American
tradition the sweet sixteen
party.
But this was no ordinary
sweet sixteen party, because
this was no ordinary American
teenager; Mila Kwitney spent
the first eight years of her life
growing up as a typical Rus-
sian child in Kiev.
Most of the approximately
100 people who crowded into
the Troika, a Russian
restaurant in the Dunes Hotel
where the party was held,
were Russian-born, and the
flavor of the evening was ap-
propriately Slavic.
A BAND played Russian
folk tunes as large quantities
iif vodka and caviar were con-
sumed throughout the even-
ing, along with other tradi-
tional Russian treats, such as
smoked fish, herring, and
Chicken Kiev. Guests danced
the regional folk dances of
their provinces, from the lively
movements of the Ukraine to
the sensuous, almost Middle
Eastern undulations of
Uzbekistan.
The women, sumptuously
dressed in ballgowns of satin,
sequins, and gold lame, wore
their hair piled high on their
heads, proving that some
70-odd years of Communism
have not affected the Russian
love of extravagance.
The birthday girl, Mila,
changed from a white, satin
floor-length gown to a lacy
white confection midway
through the evening, which
stretched from 8 p.m. to the
small hours of the morning.
Hebrew tunes were also
(played, and a Russian-bojm
; rabbi addressed the assembled
guests, speaking in Russian,
I the lingua franca of the event.
THE FEW guests who could
| not understand Russian, asked
their neighbors for a transla-
tion during the candlelighting
ceremony, during which Mila's
[friends and family, including
[her maternal grandmother and
Juncle, who had come all the
jway from Israel, came up to
[the stage to join Mila and her
[parents, Leon and Irene.
A videotape of Mila, who
[handled the evening with the
[accomplished poise of a
[seasoned debutante, showed a
[different side of the elegant
|young woman.
Early black and white pic-
tures revealed a round-faced,
[slightly serious child, looking
[startlingly old-fashioned with
|her solemn eyes and shy smile.
These photographs were
[soon replaced by color
[videoshots of a vivacious
[teenager with a mane of
[perfectlv-styled hair, groomed
[from the tips of her long
fingernails to the toes of her
fringed and studded Western-
| style boots.
IT IS the Russian child with
the grave expression and long
braid that I recall. Mila is a dis-
tant cousin of mine, and I met
her in a hotel room in Newark
eight years ago, when my
mother and I first met our
I Russian relatives, newly arriv-
al from Kiev.
Unlike our parents, who
could still speak enough Yid-
dish to communicate, Mila and
I had no common language.
Occasionally asking our
parents to translate for us,
Mila and I spent the evening
pointing at various things
around the room and giving
each other the Russian and
English terms for drapes,
table, light, and so on.
And we looked into the
slightly-warped mirror in the
hotel room, searching for a
family resemblance in our
reflections.
Now I search for a
resemblance between the little
girl that I remember and the
startlingly pretty teenager
that Mila is today.
HOW DID this transforma-
tion take place?
"Kids used to hate me
because I was Russian," Mila
recalls. "I used to come home
from school crying every day.
They picked on me, called me
names, or wouldn't talk to me
at all, because they heard from
their parents and from the
news on TV that Russia was
bad, so they figured that
anyone from Russia was bad."
Mila started to become
popular in high school, and can
now say that "if someone
doesn't like me because I'm
Russian, that's their problem.
It's who I am, and I can't
change it."
Yet Mila admits to having
become Americanized. "I'm
more independent, and my
mother and I are friends we
go shopping, have lunch
together ... In Russia, it
would be more of a mother-
daughter relationship."
PROUD OF her heritage,
Mila points to the aspects of
being Russian she values most.
"We have older customs
customs of being respectful to
parents, adults, and older peo-
ple," unlike the typical
American teenager, Mila adds.
"Also, people don't ap-
preciate what they have here
because they have always had
it this way. I appreciate what
my parents have given me,
because I know they never had
anything like what I have
when they were children. I
know I'm lucky I don't think
that it should be this way,"
Mila says.
"Since I was given a chance
for a better life, for more
potential to succeed than I
would have had in Russia, I
don't want to let it slip away,"
asserts Mila, who would like to
become a lawyer or possibly a
politician someday.
WOULD SHE be a different
sort of person today had she
remained in Russia?
"Definitely. I would pro-
bably have long hair in a braid,
wear no makeup and hardly
any jewelry, and I might be
plumper, because I wouldn't
be watching my figure. Here
I'm very conscious of my hair,
figure and clothes because I'm
going out with boys at this age.
In Russia, I wouldn't be.
"At 16, you're still a baby.
You still look like one, and
you're still treated like one. If
I were in Russia, I'd probably
be concentrating more on my
piano-playing, and on school,
school, school, because that's
more enforced there. I'd be
less independent," Mila
admits.
MILA HAS a fairly clear
idea of what she might have
been like had she remained in
Russia because she has a
cousin, roughly her age, still
living in Kiev.
"Eydita is six months
younger than I am, and we
were like sisters back in
Russia, because she only has
an older brother, and I have no
siblings at all," says Mila.
Would the two have
anything in common were they
to meet today?
"I don't know," Mila con-
cedes. "I'd be much more ad-
vanced than she, teenager-
wise."
Three years after Mila and
her parents arrived in Miami, I
entered the world that they
had left behind when my
mother, my uncle and I travel-
ed to Russia to visit the rem-
nant of our family still living
there.
THAT SUMMER I was 17,
and I recall meeting Eydita,
who reminded me of Mila
when I had first met her, in
that she was very sweet, very
polite, and openly affectionate
despite the language barrier
between us.
What stands out in my mind
about our visit to Moscow was
the inelegance of everything.
Wearing three layers of
clothing, my mother, my uncle
and I met with our Russian
relatives in public places, duck-
Mila Kwitney, Sweet Sixteen, stands beside her portrait, which
guests signed on the sides and back.
ing into bathrooms to ex-
change clothing, money, and
gifts.
We were aware of being
followed by the KGB, because
the Soviets do not always want
to conceal the fact that they
are monitoring your actions.
There were other
restrictions.
THE SPECIALTY shops
which sold the finest Russian
goods, from Stolichnaya vodka
to traditional handicrafts, such
as the wooden dolls which open
up one into another, were off
limits to our Russian relatives.
Hotel rooms and restaurants
were equally unfeasible op-
tions, and the party which
celebrated our reunion was
held in a Moscow apartment.
Many different types of
food, including several meat
dishes, were served, along
with the ubiquitous vodka, and
I recall feeling some discom-
fort about the quantity of food
our family had set out for us,
having heard countless stories
in America about the food
shortages and long lines for
meat and other choice items in
the Soviet Union.
It seemed to me then that
the assortment of delicacies,
the freely-flowing vodka, and
the sheer abundance of it all
revealed a philosophy which
was alien to me.
THAT PHILOSOPHY, if
put into words, might be to en-
joy what there is now, while
there is a cause for celebra-
tion, because who knows what
tomorrow might bring?
The last thing I remember
thinking before saying good-
bye to Eydita and the rest of
our relatives was that it took
only a small leap of the im-
agination to think of how, had
my grandfather not been the
only one of his brothers to
Continued on Paje 16-B
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So for cheese ravioli and macaroni shells with all the
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Thank Goodness for Chef Boyardee


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. August 14, 1987
United Synagogue Head Wants Pope
To Also Meet With Lay Leaders
By ANDREW MUCHIN
A principal Conservative
layman has urged that Jewish
congregational lay leaders be
invited to join the rabbis
scheduled to meet with Pope
John Paul II in Rome in ad-
vance of the Papal trip to the
United States in September,
including a now uncertain
meeting with Jewish leaders in
Miami.
Franklin Kreutzer of Miami,
president of the United
Synagogue of America, an-
nounced Friday that he is
"dismayed that the five
delegates of spiritual dimen-
sion suggested for the meeting
in Rome are not fully represen-
tative of the American Jewish
community, of which the over-
whelming majority consists of
laymen."
THE RABBIS he alluded to
represent the member groups
of the International Jewish
Committee on Interreligious
Consultations (IJCIC), which
was invited last week to meet
with the Pope and Vatican
officials.
However, a spokesperson of
the Synagogue Council of
America, a member of IJCIC,
said that the five IJCIC
delegates probably won't be
chosen for two weeks, and
would likely include two
laypeople Dr. Gerhart
Riegner of Geneva, represen-
ting WJC; and Seymour Reich,
president of B'nai B'rith.
In addition to SCA, IJCIC
consists of the American
Jewish Committee. B'nai
B'rith International. Israel In-
terfaith Association and the
World Jewish Congress
(WJC). Since 1972, it has
represented the Jewish world
to the Vatican. United
Synagogue is the association
of 850 Conservative congrega-
tions in North America, and is
a member of SCA.
KREUTZER SAID the
issues to be discussed at the
meeting reportedly the
Pope's recent audience with
Austrian President Kurt
Waldheim and the Papal at-
titude in general toward the
Holocaust transcend
theological concerns.
The Jewish world has
strongly criticized the Pope-
Waldheim meeting, and the
American Jewish Congress
has pulled out of the Sept. 11
Miami meeting scheduled bet-
ween Jewish leaders and the
Pope.
SCA also has withdrawn, but
has reserved the right to
reconsider. Other organiza-
tions have said they are con-
sidering withdrawal, but the
recently announced meeting
may prevent that.
Kreutzer. however, is argu-
ing a different principle. As he
describes it. rabbis can analyze
and express ideas through a
"spiritual dimension," but
can't wholly express non-
rabbis' visceral feelings about
an issue. He said the Pope's
meeting with Waldheim
"literally is a sore festering in
the minds, the hearts and the
guts of North American
/wry."
KREUTZER conn nds that
the laity accepts rabbinic par-
ticipation, and he would like
reciprocity. He may not get it.
Rabbi Gilbert Klaperman,
SCA president, told the JTA
that enlarging the delegation
is unnecessary and unwise.
He explained that the invita-
tion for the meeting from
Johannes Cardinal
Willebrands, president of the
Vatican Commission for
Religious Relations with the
Jews, was for a group of about
five. Klaperman said that
number could develop "one-on-
one relations and discussions
with the people that we're
meeting," which he considered
the best way "to develop an
ongoing process'' of
communication.
Even if most of the delega-
tions would be rabbis, Klaper-
man added, they would repre-
sent non-rabbinic organiza-
tions. In addition, he said he
would listen to Kreutzer's con-
cerns about the Pope-
Waldheim meeting if Kreutzer
called.
THE UNITED Synagogue
president said he has written
of those concerns to Rabbi
Mordecai Waxman, IJCIC
chairman. Kreutzer claims
that the Jewish delegation to
the Rome meeting could be
enlarged to include him as well
as the top congregational lay
leaders of U.S. Reform and Or-
thodox Jewry. He said he had
not discussed the issue with
any of them.
If his request is-denied, he
said he suspected "that the
(Jewish) laity across North
America will be very rebellious
and will then make a decision
as to what to do to this pro-
blem, because the Vatican
should not be allowed to dic-
tate" who represents the Jews
on this issue.
Yet, IJCIC has been Jewry's
representative to the Vatican.
"I don't think that they've
ever discussed many of these
:%WftftWftWftW:%WSW:W:
non-theological issues,
Kreutzer said, "and if they
have, then I'm greatly con-
cerned after all of these years
that they still have this severe
problem today."
HE EXPLAINED he was
referring to the lack of Vatican
recognition of Jerusalem as
Israel's capital ami of the
State of Israel itself, as well as
its stand on the Holocaust
For his part, he said he
would request the lay par-
ticipation in "every place
that's appropriate, including
the Vatican."
Kreutzer added that the
issue had a geographical
dimension. "I would hope that
the Jewish leadership that is
centralized in the Northeast
corridor will be sensitive to all
of America and will insist for
us," he declared.
The lay leader explained that
he was challenging the make-
up of the delegation based on
the appraisal of United
Synagogue's representative at
the latest IJCIC meeting.
United Synagogue's senior
vice president and chief ex-
ecutive officer. Rabbi Jerome
Epstein.
A RABBI representing a
congregational organization
whose president speaks so for-
thrightly against rabbinic
representation of laypeople'.'
"He is our senior profes-
sional," Kreutzer maintain.^.
"We have other professionals
on our staff who are not rab-
bis." The president added that
if he could have, he would have
represented I'nited
Synagogue.
The SCA spokesperson
noted that United Synagogue
has been represented at all
IJCIC meetings either by Eps-
tein or Rabbi Benjamin Kreit-
man, its executive vice
president.
Austrian Group Calls For The
Resignation Of An Official Who
Made Anti-Semitic Remarks
Bv REINHARD ENGEL
VIENNA (JTA) A
large poster has been put up in
Vienna and all Austrian pro-
vincial capitals calling for the
resignation of the vice mayor
of the provincial capital ofLinz
for anti-Semitic remarks he
made in a letter to World
Jewish Congress President
Edgar Bronfman earlier this
year.
A group "!' Austrian intellec-
tuals, artists, journalists and
politicians signed the poster
calling for the resignation of
Carl Hoedl. following publica-
tion of a letter he sent May 12
to Bronfman defending
Austrian President Kurt
Waldheim shortly after the
WJC head stated at the
organization's Conference in
Budapest that Waldheim had
b^en "part and parcel of the
Nazi Hlling machinery."
IN HIS letter, written on of-
ficial stationary, Hoedl. a
member of Waldheim's conser-
vative People's Party, com-
pared Jewish criticism of
Waldheim to the crucifixion of
Jesus. He also cited the Jewish
precept of "an eye for an eye
as not being "our European
concept.''
Hoedl's letter was published
in Austria in early July, pro-
mpting a storm of protest.
Chancellor Franz Yranitzsky
joined the protesters, and
several tup conservative politi-
cians asked for Hoedl's
resignation.
Nevertheless. People's Par-
ty leaders, including Vice
Chancellor and Foreign
.Minister Alois Mock and pro-
vincial party leader Gov. .Inset"
Ratzenboeck. supported
Hoedl. In a resolution, the city
assembly of I.inz condemned
anti-Semitism and Hoedl's let-
ter, and Hoedl himself voted in
favor of the resolution.
The poster, signed by 742
people including two Cabinet
ministers, several Vienna city
government members and
several meml>ers of Parlia-
ment, was put up Tuesday.
Plans call for plastering tin-
poster on several hundred
billboards. The appearance of
the first posters made front-
page news in some Austrian
newspapers and led to extend-
ed television and radio
coverage.
THE POSTER reads: "Dear
Dr. Hoedl, as vice mayor of
Linz, you made ami .1.
statements. You represent a
waj of thinking which we
deeply reject in Austria. Asa
contemporary witness. \ou
ought to know the results of
such an attitude. It endangers
OUT democracy. Thus you are
unacceptable as a public
representative. We ask you to
resign."
The poster campaign was
organized by a group of
business journalists in Vienna.
with the signatories paying its
costs. Wolfgang Hauptmann.
an economics editor, said "We
could not write about things
we dislike in the current
political development, since
our issues are business
oriented. But as private
citizens, we can express our
views."
The People's Party seemed
split over the issue. Marilies
Flemming. Minister for
Families and Ecology, who
signed the poster, called for
Hoedl's resignation ut the
sake of Austria and the party.
"We do not want to Ik- put in a
certain corner." she said
RATZENBOECK said that
Hoedl had excused himself for
the "very unlucky wording"
and no new manhunt should
come from this "political
mistake." alluding to the
widespread critic:--
Waldheim. Socialist Party
secretary general Heinz Keller
said Wednesday that Hoedl
had not done enough by voting
for the resolution condemning
anti-Semitism. Many
Austrians thought that the
resolution had not dealt with
the matter correctly.
The poster campaign was
not the first non-Jewish action
against anti-Semitism in
Austria. Two weeks ago, i
group of young people in Vien-
na approached worshippers
leaving the main synagogue
after Friday night prayer and
handed them carnations and
leaflets, saying they feel sorry
for the occurrences and that
they will fight them. They add-
ed that they hoped the Ji
community here will prosper
and grow in the future.
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Amy Seligson deft) looks on as Adds Tauber
'ights candles on a cake celebrating B'nai
B'rith Women's noth birthday. Tauber is the
cum "t president ofBBW'sfirst "JiapU r, San
Francisco No. One. which 1/me I'mm a group
of 84 women who first met together on August
IS. 1897. Seligson is president of BBW's
Jewish Women's Network, the newest chapter
in Son Francisco. Uniting Jewish women to
promote social advancement through educa-
tion, seme, and action, BBW today hits
120.000 members in son chapters throughout
the United Stoles and Canada.
B'nai B'rith Women
Marks 90th Anniversary
WASHINGTON B'nai B'rith Women will
i>rate its 90th anniversary this month. A
ip of 34 women who gathered in San
Francisco "ii August 18, 1897 were the small
inning <>t' today's major Jewish women's
anization with 120,000 members
throughout the United States and Canada.
BBW, uniting Jewish women to promote
advancement through education, ser-
vice and action, conducts programs and ac-
tivities in the U.S. and Israel addressing a
wide range of concerns. These include the
nation of Jewish life and values, ad-
vocacy for women, philanthropy and coin
munity services.
HBWs major contribution t< Israel for the
past 36 years has been its Children's Home
and Croup House, residential treatment
centers for emotionally disturbed boys. The
facilities have a worldwide reputation for
their unique treatment program, which
substitutes human contact for drugs and of-
fers long-term treatment of five years or
more.
The continuity and stability inherent in this
therapy have produced a remarkable
recovery rate of 70 percent; more than 1.000
of the Home's graduates are now productive
members of Israeli society as a result. During
BBW's 1987 Mission to Israel last March,
members participated in the groundbreaking
for a new residential cottage and expanded
facilities at the Children's Home.
BBW also sponsors the Arab-Jewish project
in Israel, which is administered by the B'nai
B'rith Hillel Foundation at Hebrew Universi-
ty. In order to foster understanding between
Arabs and .lews, this program brings
together Arab and Jewish students for
meetings, lectures and outreach programs in
Arab villages.
Advocacy for ami empowerment of women
is the major component of BBW's public af-
fairs agenda. BBW was the first Jewish
organization to back the Equal Rights
Amendment, and has Iteen a leader in uniting
Jewish women's organizations on issues that
affect women at home and in the workplace.
Last fall. BBW hosted a Women and Work
conference for the 12-member Leadership
Conference of National Jewish Women':
Organizations, where representatives of two
million members agreed to focus their com-
bined efforts on attaining parental/family
leave, pay equity and pension reform
legislation.
BBW produces and distributes educational
materials for its members about these and
other issues, and conducts a variety of pro-
grams centered on the needs of Jewish
women today. Members also participate in
leadership training, developing skills they can
use in their personal and professional lives. In
many cities, BBW provides networking op-
portunities for Jewish career women often
the only Jewish contact they experience.
Another constant on the BBW agenda
community service. Many chapters conduct
programs in hospitals, nursing homes, schools
and other facilities. In cooperation with the
March of Dimes, the organization's Operation
Stork program focuses on preventing teenage
pregnancies and promoting prenatal care.
and Project Gene provides education on Tay-
Sachs and other genetic diseases.
Throughout its history, B'nai B'rith
Women has remained firmly connected to its
Jewish roots. BBW supports the B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization and Hillel. which give
high school and college students the oppor-
tunity to explore their heritage and to
socialize with other Jewish youth. BBW also
supports and works with the B'nai B'rith
Anti-Defamation League to combat anti-
Semitism.
A convenor of the Women's Plea for Soviet
Jewry for more than a decade, B'nai B'rith
Women actively seeks freedom for Soviet
Jews, and recently launched an "Honor a
Refusenik" program which allows chapters
and individual members to purchase honorary
BBW memberships for refusenik women.
The new "Creating Jewish Memories" pro-
gram further demonstrates BBW's commit-
ment to the preservation of Jewish life and
values. The 20-minute slide show features
men and women who describe their Jewish
memories, attitudes and conflicts in an at-
tempt to determine what shaped their identi-
ty as Jews. The program is being utilized by
Jewish community centers, synagogues and
schools as well as by BBW members, to
stimulate thought and discussion about the
complex question of how to pass on Jewish
values to their children.
"As BBW continues to pursue the rights of
women and undertake programs to preserve
Jewish values, it gives its members the uni-
que opportunity to express the dual dimen-
sions of their identity as women and as
Jews.'' said BBW President Irma Gertler.
"Over the past 90 years, we have continually
met the challenge of change, both in the
world around us and in the needs of our
members," she added.
"On this important milestone for our
organization, we can look back with great
pride on what we have accomplished, and look
forward with confidence to what we will
achieve in our next !>> years."
Friday, August 14, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Temple Israel Welcomes
2nd Generation President
Temple Israel of Greater
Miami has welcomed President
Elect Henry E. Wolff, Jr., who
is the first "second generation
president," succeeding his
father Henry E. Wolff, exactly
30 years later. It comes at a
time when the congregation is
celebrating its 65th
anniversary.
Father and son are partners
in Henry Wolff and
Associates. President Wolff is
a former vice president and
treasurer of the Board of
Trustees of Temple Israel of
Greater Miami; and twice past-
president and a current board
member of the Miami Board of
Realtors. In addition, he is
treasurer of the Southeast
Region of American Jewish
Congress, a board member of
the Standard Club and a board
member of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith.
The officers serving for the
coming year are: Vice
Presidents: Jesse Casselhoff,
Kurt Enfield, Ethel S. Lee.
Janice S. Miller, Norma A.
Orovitz and Kenneth D.
Rosen. Treasurer: JoAnne
Bander. Secretary: Renee
Templer.
The Board of Trustees are:
Leonard Abess, Jr., E.
Richard Alhadeff, Michael
Berke, Peter Bermont, David
Blumberg, Marc Cordover,
Maurice Cromer, Irving Den-
mark, Herbert Dolgoff, Arthur
England, Jr., Martin Fine.
Also Ramon Fisch. David
Fleeman, Joseph Garfield,
Jane Goldberg, Nathan
Gumenick. Burton Kahn.
Robert Levenson, Melissa
Marvan, Sylvan Meyer. Jef-
frey Newman. Sidney Olson
Dr. Emanuel Papper, Hair.
Payton, Rabbi Rex I).
Perimeter. Arnold Rosen,
Candace Ruskin, Neil Schaffel.
Howard Scharlin. Jack Schill-
inger, Gerald K. Schwartz.
Leon Simkins, William Singer,
Harold Thurman, Philip War-
ren and Henry E. Wolff, Sr.
Hadassah Event
Hatikvah Hadassah will be
having their Board Meeting
Thursday. Aug. 20, 7:30 p.m.
at the home of Karen Sheskin.
All members are welcome to
the meeting.
Federation Proclaims
Synagogue Mobilization Month
In a communitywide effort
to increase membership in
area synagogues, the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation has
proclaimed the month of Elul,
the last month of the Jewish
calendar year, as Synagogue
Mobilization Month, beginning
Wednesday, Aug. 28 and en-
ding with the ushering in of
Rosh Hashanah on Wednesday
evening, Sept. 23.
Federation President Aaron
Pod hurst said that
"Synagogues have always
been the traditional center of
continuity in Jewish life in
every community. It is the
house of assembly and learn-
ing as well as the house of
prayer.
''Muring Synagogue
Mobilization Month, our
Federation urges all people
who are not presently af-
filiated with a synagogue to
participate actively in the
richness and beauty that
synagogues can offer.'1
Podhurst noted that in-
dmduals and families who are
interested in obtaining
synagogue membership infor-
mation can contact the Rab-
binical Association of Greater
Miami. The Association, with
offices in the Federation
building, will offer information
on Orthodox, Conservative,
Reform and Reconstructionist
synagogues throughout the
community to help guide
residents.
D A V I S-GARDENS
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Daily: HMi PM Sat.'Sun.: Nocn-6 PM
6767SW67Ave. North of Sunset on Ludlam Rd. 661.3ln


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 14, 1987
Focus On Issues
! Sighs Of Relief In Jerusalem
Ministry, and two Israeli arms
dealers, Yaacov Nimrodi and
Al Schwimmer.
Both Schwimmer and Kim-
che have been subpoenaed by
Lawrence Walsh, the special
prosecutor investigating A.
Iran/Contra affair Isrfel i!
seeking to have the subpoena^
auashed on the grounds that
the two were acting for the
Israeli government.

By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
There must have been sighs of
relief in Jerusalem when the
Senate and House select com-
mittees ended 11 weeks of
public hearings on the
Iran/Contra affair Tuesday
(Aug. 4).
The 41 days of public
testimony left little doubt that
it was Israel that proposed to
the Reagan Administration
that it seek an opening to
moderates in Iran and that
Israel continued to push the
Iranian initiative when the
United States was wavering.
BUT ON the one issue that
could have seriously hurt
Israel with Congress, there
was no hard evidence that the
Israeli government knew
about or had anything to do
with the diversion of profits
from the arms sale to Iran to
the Contras.
Since the diversion was first
revealed by Attorney General
Edwin Meese at a White
House briefing for reporters
last November, the Israeli
government has denied any
knowledge of the diversion.
This denial has been echoed by
all Israeli officials who visited
Washington over the past nine
months. The only evidence
linking Israel to the diversion
was a tenuous one from
Marine Lt. Col. Oliver North,
the former National Security
Council aide.
North testified that at a
meeting in Washington in
January, 1985, Amiram Nir,
the counter-terrorism advisor
to the Israeli Premier, sug-
gested that profits from the
sale of arms to Iran could be
used for other purposes.
Later at a meeting in
Europe between North, Nir
and Manucher Ghorbnifar, the
Iranian businessman who was
a go-between for the dealings
with Iran, North said Ghor-
banifar pulled him aside and
suggested the diversion to the
Contras as one of the ideas to
convince the reluctant North
to continue the Iranian
initiative.
NORTH SAID that he
assumed that Ghorbanifar was
acting with at least the ap-
proval of Israeli intelligence, if
not the government, since the
late William Casey, then direc-
tor of the Central Intelligence
Agency, had told him the CIA
believed Ghorbanifar to be an
Israeli intelligence agent.
Left with no proven Israeli
link to the diversion, some
have sought to place the
responsibility for the Iranian
initiative entirely on Israel in
an effort to give the Reagan
Administration the excuse
that "the Israelis made me do
it."
This view was rejected by
Secretary of State George
Shultz when he testified before
the committees. "When it
comes to undertaking
something by the United
States government, then we
have to recognize that
we're big boys and we have to
take responsibility for
whatever it is we do. We can't
say that somebody else sug-
gested it to us, therefore its
their fault."
HOWEVER, throughout
the hearings, Sen. James Mc-
Clure (R., Idaho) continually
questioned witnesses on
whether the Israelis had push-
ed the U.S. into the initiative.
McClure vigorously denied
he was anti-Israel at the clos-
ing public session. However,
he added, "We cannot really
trace the evolution of
American policy in this in-
stance without looking at the
influence, the very strong in-
fluence, and some would say
the very proper influence, of
people who are friends of
Israel upon U.S. policy and
Israeli influence upon our
policy."
Israel officials have made no
secret that they believe the ef-
fort to establish a link with of-
ficials in Iran was a correct
policy, as does President
Reagan.
DURING THE hearings
there was agreement by many
on the committees that while
the effort may have been
justified, it gradually
deteriorated into an arms for
hostages arrangement,
something which Reagan con-
tinues to deny strongly.
However, during a meeting
with reporters in Washington
in June, Israeli Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin argued
that the effort to use the sale
of arms to Iran to gain release
of the American hostages in
Lebanon was justified. He also
suggested that Israel is
hampered in its efforts to at-
tack terrorists in Lebanon by
the fear that the American
hostages could be killed in a
raid or because of it.
Testimony at the hearing
left little doubt that Reagan
approved the sale by Israel to
Iran of 508 TOW anti-tank
missiles in August, 1985 and
18 Hawk ground-to-air
missiles in November 1985,
although after the fact. Shultz
and Defense Secretary Caspar
Weinberger were opposed to
any arms being sold to the Ira-
nians. They had both led Iran
of 508 TOW anti-tank missiles
in August 1985 and 18 Hawk
ground-to-air missiles in
November 1985, although
after the fact. Shultz and
Defense Secretary Caspar
Weinberger were opposed to
any arms being sold to the Ira-
nians. They had both led the
U.S. effort to try to get other
countries not to sell arms to
either side in the Iran-Iraq
war.
TESTIMONY IN the final
days of the public hearing
revealed that at a November,
1985 meeting called to discuss
the sale of arms, Shultz said
that he felt "the Israelis suck-
ed us up into their operation so
we could not object to their
(arms) sale to Iran."
Weinberger, who had made
a note of this remark, said
Tuesday that while he had no
personal knowledge of
previous Israeli arms sales to
Iran, there had been consis-
tent reports on this
throughout the U.S. govern-
ment. He said when the
Israelis had been confronted
with the charge they said they
had U.S. approval, from
former Secretary of State
Alexander Haig, for example.
Weinberger also testified
that he had raised the possibili-
ty that the U.S. could be sub-
ject to "blackmail" from Iran,
Israel or others if it went
through with the secret arms
deal. He again raised this
possibility in November 1986
in urging a full disclosure by
the Administration after the
effort had become public.
THE HEARINGS also con
firmed the difference between
the U.S. and Israel on the Iran-
Iraq war. While the U.S. has
publicly called for a ceasefire
with no victors or losers, Israel
has leaned toward Iran with
which it had good relations un-
til the Shah was overthrown.
"As everybody knows. I am
a very warm supporter of a
strong relationship with
Israel. Shultz told the com-
mittees. "However, I think we
have to recognize that while
our interests and Israel's in-
terests are parallel in many
respects, they are not always
exactly the same. We have to
be smart enough to see that.
They have legitimate interests
which are not necessarily ex-
actly our interests."
In his testimony. North also
testified that Israel and the
U.S. differed on the Iran-Iraq
war, but were in "basic fun-
damental agreement," on the
need for the initiative to Iran.
"I believe that there was suffi-
cient congruence between
Israeli objectives and
American objectives that made
this project worthwhile," he
said.
REAR ADM. John Poindex-
ter, the former National
Security Advisor, in his
testimony, said that he ac-
cepted the Israeli assessment
in November 1985, that Iran
was losing the war with Iraq.
Shultz and Weinberger,
however, said that U.S. in-
telligence believed that Iraq
was the one in danger of being
defeated.
While the public hearings
are over, the committees are
continuing to take closed-door
testimony from CIA officials
and from Michael Ledeen. the
former consultant to the Na-
tional Security Council, who
first explored "with Israel and
others the possibility of mak-
ing contact with' Iranian
officials.
Ledeen said in a television
interview Tuesday that he was
asked in 1985 by Robert
McFarlane. then the National
Security Advisor, to look int..
the possibility of such an in-
itiative. The committees are
expected to release a joint
report in late September. One
aspect that will be eagerly
awaited is the assessment of
the material the committees
have received from Israel.
Israel provided the commit-
tees in June with details of its
financial transactions in the
Iran affair and last week turn-
ed over a 60-page chronology
from the beginning of the Iran
affair through Dec. 31, 1985.
A CHRONOLOGY that will
take Israel's participation to
November, 1986, when the in-
itiative was revealed, is still
being prepared.
The chronology is largelv
based on testimony from
David Kimche, the former
director general of the Foreign
Michael-Ann Russell JCC
Board Of Directors
The Michael-Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center
held the elections of its Board
of Directors for 1987-88.
New officers include: Sher-
man K. Canter, president;
Barbara Feingold, David
Parish, and Michael
Turtletaub, vice presidents;
Harvey Zalaznick. MD.
secretary; Barry M. Podolsky.
treasurer. Gary Y. Holtzman is
immediate past president.
The Board of Directors in-
cludes: Pedro Bermann, MD,
Harvey Brown, Fern Canter.
Andre Chauveron, Bruce
Cohn. DDS. Debbie Eisinger.
Ellen Elbrand, Stanley J.
Elbrand. Shirley Finkel, Barry
M. Frieder. Dan Jacobs,
Milton Klompus, Janice Kof-
man, William Lehman, Jr.
Also Oscar Levin, Myrna
Loman, Herb Margolis, Jim
Multack, Joy Pargman. Sondie
S. Rieff, Merle Saferstein,
Allen Shore, Dan Silverberg,
Robert Sugarman. Robert
Weisblum, Matthew L. Wohl.
Donald Yaffle, and Richard
Zadanoff. Daniel Yoffe is ex
ecutive director.
The Michael-Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center an
nounces goals for the coming
year are to improve the image
of the center in the community
through a leadership training
program for its layleaders and
professional staff, to take
place at its new Human
Resource Center.
Other goals are to have the
center cooperate with
synagogues and other Jewish
agencies in the area, and to
help implement its 'Sports
Are For Everyone" physical
fitness program, designed to
facilitate team and adult
participation.
The center will also be the
site for the Southeast Regional
Maccabi Games for Jewish
youth aged 12-26 this summer.
and intends to begin a special
learning disability program.
"Special Playtime-' for
children after school hours.
utilizing music, art. and
physical education.
South Shore Hospital
To Dedicate
Ultramodern CT Scanner
One of the most advanced
CT (computed tomographic)
scanners yet designed
anywhere has been purchased
and installed by Miami Beach's
South Shore Hospital and
Medical Center, affiliated with
the University of Miami School
of Medicine.
Manufactured in Israel by
Elscint, one of the most
renowned manufacturers of
medical equipment in the
world, the new, million-dollar
machine provides routine
head, spine and alwlominal
screening in an extremelv
short tune scan.
The incredibly fast scan time
(most segments require only
two seconds) means sharper,
clearer diagnostic im;iges. In
addition, the rapid, on-line,
stereoscopic, three-
dimensional image reconstruc-
tion performed by the CT scan-
ner provides doctors at South
Shore with further in-depth
diagnostic information.
A reception to dedicate the
new CT scanner and South
fchore s other new ultrasound
capabilities will be held Tues-
day. Aug. 25. at 4 p.m. in the
hospitals Community Room
on the 10th floor of Brodie
Pavilhon, 600 Alton Road.
Dr. Moshe Ben-Porath ex-
ecutive vice president of Els-
cint, Inc.. which has North
American headquarters in
Boston, will be on^and for the
dedication ceremonies. Elscint
works closely with the Tech-
'on. Israel's MIT. in pioneer-
ing medical electronic:s
The stereoscopic. 3-D im-
ages provided will be used in
conjunction with research at
the University of Miami Com-
prehensive Pain and
Rehabilitation Center, locate*!
at South Shore Hospital ani
Medical Center in Miami
Beach. The product of this
joint effort should provkfc
more information about back
injuries and their
rehabilitation.
Dr. Thomas Terr, Thomp-
son, director of rao
South Shore and pr
radiology at the ifl
Miami, is working in
cooperation with I>r Hubert
Rosomoff. director of the I *
Pain Center at South Shore
and professor and chairman of
the department,0'
neurosurgery at the I "
School of Medicine.
Marshall H. Berkson. presi-
dent and chairman of the
board of South Shore, who is
co-hosting the reception with
Elscint, Inc., savs "South
Shore Hospital and Medical
Center is investing this state-
of-the-art medical technology
as our contribution to Mum)
Beach A New Beginning
The hospital is the site of
huge banner bearing tJU'
slogan and the city's logo. v'
ble at Miami Beach s main
southern entrance highway
Dr. William Zubkoff, South
Shore executive director.
noted that the hospital is
city's largest employer
of Dade Boulevard
south


Friday, August 14, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Hadassah Young Leaders Institutes
Slated October Through February
BALTIMORE Hadassah
women aged 45 and under will
participate in the fifth annual
ieries of Young Leaders In-
stitutes at six sites throughout
he United States from Oc-
ober through February, Belle
Jimon, National Young
leaders chairman, announced
it the 73rd national conven-
aon of the American women's
Honist organization which
Hosed here.
The Institutes, designed to
rovide young Hadassah
Aiders with enhanced leader-
lip skills and the opportunity
share common questions
id concerns, are slated to
gin in Columbus, Ohio, on
;t. 11, followed by sessions in
m Francisco, Oct. 25-26;
luthern N.J.. Oct. 25; New
(irk City, Nov. 15-16; Nassau
tegion. New York, Dec. 6; and
'lorida. Jan. 31-Feb. 1, Simon
lid.
"Hadassah was developing
iders and teaching leader-
skills long before anyone
fought of using the words
fomen' and 'leadership' in
ke same sentence," Simon
ited. "Like Henrietta Szold,
Krreat leader upon whose
earns this organization was
t, we know it is up to us to
^Itivate a sophisticated and
imitted team of volunteers
no will meet the challenge of
\e future."
Institute sessions feature na-
)nal Hadassah speakers and
ler experts on a wide range
topics, including the
pganization's history,
Uosophy and mission; the
>locau8t; I'.S.-Israel rela-
)ns. and practical, action-
iented skills such as public
feaking, communications
chniques, group dynamics
time management, Simon
^plained.
"Hadassah's future lies with
ir future leadership,-'
idassah National President
Jth W. Popkin said of the In-
jtutes. "It is absolutely
i-ntial to the future of the
ranization and our mission
Israel that wf develop
|iowU'dgeable as well as com-
Itted volunteers who will
ad Hadassah into a new era
Bervice and achievement."
Details on times, locations
lid speakers for each of the
btitutea will be announced
Ruvin Named
o NOD Board
'ado County Commissioner
rvey Ruvin was recently
mil to the Board of Direc-
rs of the National Organiza-
i on Disability (NOD). NOD
i private organization based
Washington, D.C. which
s formed to expand the par-
ppation of disabled persons
their particular com-
lnities. This participation in
rn, ensures increased public
terstanding and acceptance
I the handicapped.
it present, voluntary
>ups from NOD are working
more than 1,700 com-
initiea throughout the na-
furthering support and
operation with the disabled.
>re than 400 civic organiza-
is are also involved in this
ieavor.
shortly, Simon said. The
general theme for this year's
Institutes is "B'Yachad" -
"We Bring Dreams to Life"
she noted.
Hadassah, which celebrates
the 75th anniversary of its
founding this year, is the
largest women's volunteer
organization of its kind in the
United States and the largest
Zionist organization in the
world, with 385,000 members
in 1,600 chapters throughout
the U.S. and Puerto Rico.
In Israel, Hadassah
established and maintains the
Hadassah Medical Organiza-
tion, which encompasses the
Hadassah-University Hospital
on Mount Scopus and the
Hadassah-Hebrew University
Medical Center at Ein Karem
both in Jerusalem.
The Medical Center is the
largest and most advanced
facility of its kind between
Paris and Tokyo and is
recognized worldwide for the
quality of its research,
teaching and patient care.
Hadassah also maintains an
extensive network of projects
in career education and
counseling, youth welfare and
land reclamation throughout
Israel.
In the United States,
Hadassah provides its
members with programs in
Jewish education, personal
and leadership development,
Zionist and American affairs
and Zionist youth activities.
Israelis originally from Florida gathered for the Fifth Annual
Reunion of Florida Ohm at the Jerusalem office of the Associa-
tion of Americans and Canadians in Israel last month, where
they greeted Morris Futernick. chairman of the Aliyah Council of
South Florida, who brought greetings and described the work be-
ing done in Miami to promote Aliyah. Pictured from left are
Aliyah Council Chairman Morris Futernick, Mickey Futernick.
Florida Hometown Co-Chairpeople Sandi Simon and Elizabeth
Homans, and National AACl Hometoum Chairperson Adina
Ben-Chorin.
Bennett Brummer Elected Prexy
Of Public Defenders Association
Dade Public Defender Ben-
nett H. Brummer has been
elected president of the
Florida Public Defender
Association for 1987-88.
The association is comprised
of the 20 elected public
defenders throughout the
state and their attorneys and
staff. The primary purpose of
the association is to coordinate
efforts to promote effective
representation of indigent
individuals.
Mr. Brummer previously
served as president in 1980-81.
Bennett H. Brummer
Miami Dentist Receives Award
Alan Stoler, DDS, a teacher
at the University of Miami
School of Medicine, recently
received the Academy of
General Dentistry's Master-
ship Award during a special
ceremony at AGD's annual
meeting in Seattle.
To earn Mastership,
members of the Academy must
have obtained AGD Fellowship
status (500 hours of continuing
dental education within 10
years), and then have com-
pleted 600 more hours, 400 of
which must be earned in
"hands-on" participation
courses. Only 450 have been
awarded to the 30,000 dentists
in the United States and
Canada who are members.
Dr. Stoler was graduated
from the University of
Maryland School of Dentistry
in 1957 and has been practic-
ing in Coral Gables since 1959.
He is also a staff member at
the Atlantic Coast and Dade
County Dental Research
Clinics, as well as six local
hospitals.
Concert Association Of
Greater Miami's Prestige
Series Begins Sixth Year
The Concert Association of
Greater Miami's Prestige
Series will begin its sixth year
with seven concerts beginning
on October 13 with Montserrat
Caballe, a soprano from the
Metropolitan Opera.
The series will continue with
pianist Emanuel Ax, violinist
Isaac Stern, and cellist YoYo
Ma on November 17; violinist
Itzhak Perlman and pianist
Samuel Sanders on January
The St. Paul Chamber Or-
chestra, with conductor
Eduardo Mata and pianist
Yefim Bronfman on February
2; the Atlanta Symphony Or-
chestra with conductor Louis
Lane and pianist John Brown-
ing on February 6:
The Kalichstein-Laredo-
Robinson Trio, and the
Guarneri String Quartet with
violinist Arnold Steinhardt,
violinist John Dalley, Viola
Player Michael Tree, and
cellist David Soyer on
February 22; and the Swedish
Radio Symphony Orchestra,
with conductor Esa-Pekka
Salonen and violinist Cho-
Liang Lin on March 22.
"We are especially pleased
to offer these musical riches
for the sixth annual Prestige
Series," said Concert Associa-
tion of Greater Miami Presi-
dent Judy Drucker.
All Prestige Series perfor-
manceegs are scheduled to
take place at the Dade County
Auditorium, at 8:15 p.m.
In honor of the twentieth an-
niversary of the Concert
Association of Miami's Great
Artists Series, violinist Itzhak
Perlman and Pinchas Zuker-
man will share the concert
stage for a gala program on
Sunday, December 20 at the
Miami Beach Theatre of the
Performing Arts, (TOPA),
beginning at 8:15 p.m.
"In what will be our most
triumphant season, the Great
Artists Series will celebrate its
gala twentieth anniversary in
grand style," said Judy
Drucker, president of the Con-
cert Association of Greater
Miami. Drucker, pointed out
out that both Perlman and
Zukerman have l>een featured
frequently on the Great Ar-
tists Series since its inception
two decades ago.
The gala twentieth anniver-
sary season begins on
November 16 with the London
Philharmonic Orchestra, led
by conductor Klaus Tennstedt,
and continues with pianist An-
dre Watts on November 30;
the St. Louis Symphony, con-
ducted by Leonard Slatkin on
January 19; the Atlanta Sym-
phony Orchestra with conduc-
tor Louis Lane and violinist
Nina Beilina on February 15;
baritone Sherrill Milnes on
March 30 and pianist Emanuel
Ax on April 30. Single tikets
for the Perlman/Zukerman
performance will go on sale
September 15.
Chamber Music
The Chamber Music Society
of Lincoln Center will perform
a series of four concerts on
December 16, 17, 19, 20, in a
special series presented by tne
Concert Association of
Greater Miami, according to
CAGM president Judy
Drucker.
The ensemble will play three
evening performances, beginn-
ing at 8:15 p.m. and one after-
noon performance, beginning
at 2:30 p.m., at a location later
to be determined.
The Chamber Music Society
of Lincoln Center, consists of
violinists Joshua Bell, James
Buswell, and Martha Caplin;
pianists Lee Luvisi, Jean-Yves
Thibaudet, and artistic direc-
tor Charles Wadsworth; and
Scott Nickrenz on viola, Leslie
Parnas on the cello, Gervase
de Peyer on clarinet, Paula
Robinson on flute; as well as
guest artists from the Emer-
son String Quartet Eugene
Drucker and Philip Setzer,
violin; Lawrence Dutton viola;
and David Finckel, cello.
Mostly Piano and
Mostly Orchestra
Music lovers who would like
to be able to pick and choose
offerings from the Concert
Assocoiation of Greater
Miami's Prestige and Great
Artists Series may now have
that option; according to
CAGM president Judy
Drucker, two new series.
"Mostly Piano" and Mostly
Orchestra" bring together of-
ferings from both the Great
Artists and the Prestige
series.
Patrons of the concerts will
be able to enjoy musical events
at both Dade County
Auditorium and the Miami
Beach Theatre of the Perform-
ing Arts. All concerts begin at
8:15 p.m. Information is
available at the Concert
Association of Greater Miami.
FIELD REPRESENTATIVE
Major National Jawtah Organization inoooa
dynamic, craatlva, anargottc. Mil ilin*
Fund Ralalng/Qroup Doratopmant aipart
anca pralarrad Salary nogotlabla. Maauma to
Bo. MAT c/o Jawlah Floridian, P.O. Bo.
012973. Miami. Ft 33101.
BAAL SHACHARIS
For high Holidays lor Adath
Yeshurun North Miami Baach.
Call Martin Walnatain after 6 p.m.
940-2302
WANTED
Kosher, elderly woman to
share apt. Kendall area.
Fully tumished, pool, bus-
es, and shopping nearby.
385-3236
MASTERCARD/VISA!
Regardless of credit history.
Also, new credit card. No ona
refused For Info, call:
1 -315-733-6062. ext. M2549


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 14, 1987
Write
Dear HTomi
For Advice
Demr Nomi, an advice column, will appear regularly in the
paged of The Jewiah Floridian. '
Dear Readers:
Recently I have seen a lot of
advertisements encouraging
parents to speak to their
children about drugs. The
main thrust of these ads has
been that if you wait until you
think that your child is mature
enough to hear the facts about
drugs, you may be too late;
your child may already be fin-
ding out about drugs from
peers, experimenting or even
becoming addicted to them.
Now that parents are becom-
ing alerted to the necessity of
speaking with their children
about drugs, many are
doubtless faced with the dilem-
ma of how to speak to them.
After all, parents have been
trying for generations to come
up with an easy, informative,
appropriate way to discuss sex
with their offspring, and yet
the subject is still a difficult
one for countless numbers of
people.
My advice to parents who
want to sit down with their
children and inform them
about drugs is this:
1) Do your homework. If
you don't know a great deal
about the different kinds of
drugs which are available to-
day, or don't know how to pre-
sent the information you know
to a young child, you can call a
service such as Switchboard of
Miami, a 24-hour crisis hotline
in Dade, at 358-HELP (4357).
Switchboard of Miami can of-
fer on the phone counseling to
parents, as well as referring
them to various support
groups.
Switchboard of Miami also
has available two brochures,
"What Everyone Should
Know About Drug Abuse,"
and "Drug Abuse: A Realistic
Primer for Parents." The
brochures are free, but there is
a limited quantity of them.
2) Create an ongoing
dialogue. Try to sit down in an
infomal atmosphere so that
your child feels encouraged to
open up, ask questions, and
discuss his or her views. It is
important that you relate the
information about drugs, what
they are, and what they can
do, but don't just deliver a
speech.
3) Include the topic of
alcohol abuse in your discus-
sion. Besides the physical and
legal aspects of drug and
alcohol abuse, you might want
to bring up the issue of what it
means to use a substance to
alter one's mood, rather than
relying on inner resources.
4) Prepare yourself for the
possibility that your child
might tell you that he or she
has been tempted to experi-
ment with drugs, or has ex-
perimented with them
already. If you react by
becoming enraged and furious,
you might discourage your
child from telling you about
what he or she is doing but
not from doing it.
You want to impress upon
your child what your feelings
on the matter are, you may
want to insist that they enter a
program for drug and alcohol
abuse if appropriate, but you
do not want to shut down the
avenues of communication.
5) Know what is going on
in your child's life. You don't
want to bring up the subject of
drugs and alcohol only after
you see signs that your child is
already using them, but do
keep alert to danger signs.
Stress and pressure at
school, emotional upheaval or
a crowd of friends who are in-
volved with drugs might be
factors which affect your child.
Mood swings, secrecy, sleep-
ing too much or too little, stop-
ping extracurricular activities,
a drop in grades, and a sudden
switch from one crowd of
friends to another are also
possible warning signals. If
you are alert, you will have a
good idea of when to open up
your discussion again.
But if despite these precau-
tions, your child does become
involved with drugs or alcohol,
don't feel that you have to han-
dle it on your own.
Your child may need to get
into a program and speak with
a counselor who is an expert
on teenagers and drug abuse,
but you could also benefit from
speaking to a professional for
advice on how to proceed.
Yours, Nomi
Write Nomi for advice in care
of The Jewish Floridian, P.O.
Box 012973. Miami, Fla. 33101.
Porno Pix On
Highways
Cause Accidents
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Agudat Israel MK Avraham
Shapira claims that por-
nographic pictures were the
cause of Israel's alarming
highway accident rate and sug-
gests that a day of fasting and
prayer be declared to "appeal
to God's mercy to stop the
awful slaughter on the roads."
The pornographic pictures
blamed by the Orthodox MK
are posters and billboards
advertising swim suits or other
items of female apparel con-
sidered "lewd" by some
religious Jews.
"Can someone who sees
such pictures drive after-
wards? Shapira asked. Last
year ultra-Orthodox zealots in
Jerusalem and elsewhere set
fire to bus shelters that carried
advertising posters they found
objectionable.
Shapira spoke during a
Knesset debate on the traffic
problem which also occupied
much of last Sunday's Cabinet
session. In 1986, 415 people
died in road accidents, and
more than 21,000 were in-
jured. The rate of traffic-
fatalities and injuries has been
even higher this year.
ANNE FRANK MEMORIAL: Miep Gies
(right) and her husband, Jan, hold their
'Courage to Care'award, which was presented
to them for helping to hide Anne Frank and
her family from the Nazis in World War II
APWid.' World Photo
Holland. Mrs. Gies, who has written heron]
memoirs entitled Anne Frank Remembeni
served as the lifeline for Anne, her family tut
other Jews who spent three yean in m
Amsterdam attic hiding from the Gestafi.
I
At a reception for Israel's retiring envoy to
Washington, Morris B. Abram (left). *a,r
man of the Presidents Conference, and Bern\
Tannenbaum (second from left), chatrper**
of the American Section of the WZO. pre***
___________ kiddush cup to Ambassador r
ft^M-racttw^Aw*............Rosenne as Mrs. Rosenne looks on. A*
..........-*-----"*"***HH*6Mstor Rosenne was praised as a prcj*
sional diplomat of integrity and honor-ty
Abram, Mrs. Tannenbaum and other speaV"
at the reception, held in New York and aft***
* by some 200 Jewish leaders and Is**'
diplomats.


tf*****^*^^ Friday, August 14, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
First in Florida
Dr. Karen Frye Urologist
Dr. Karen Frye, the first woman urologist
in Florida, has joined the North Miami
urological practice of Drs. Richard L. Fein
and Lawrence Winton. Dr. Frye is one of 85
woman urological surgeons in the country.
There are some 8,500 practicing urological
surgeons in the United States.
Dr. Frye completed her urological residen-
cy training at the Harvard Brigham Woman's
Hospital in Boston, Mass. She received her
medical degree from the University of
Michigan and obtained her general surgical
training at the University of Michigan
Hospital in Ann Arbor.
Dr. Frye has received specialty training in
kidney stone disease and is certified to
operate the kidney stone lithotripter, for the
removal of kidney stones without surgery.
Her other areas of expertise include the
urological evaluation and treatment of
women and children, including urinary
incontinence.
!
I
g
:::

I
BE
B
i
!
I
\$^*m New Director of Catering
For Castle Premier Caterer
,ee Brian Schrager is 28
irs old but the new director
catering for the Castle
remier Hotel and Resort on
lami Beach, has already
lassed considerable ex-
irience in his field.
schrager, who is single and
on Miami Beach, was
Dst recently with the Inter-
^ntinental Hotel in Miami for
fee and a half years. He also
rked with Omni Hotel and
lia Mar. He attended the
linary Institute of America
Hyde Park and studied
kspitality management at
lorida International
piversity.
Vt the Castle Premier, the
fmer Konover Hotel recent-
purchased by Abraham
rschfeld, Schrager will be
arged with developing the
iquet facilities concen-
tting on the social market as
\W as promoting the hotel in
' Jewish community.
I i rschfeld has begun a
Jssive $10 million renovation
he hotel and its facilities.
["When the hotel is complete-
renovated there'll be
thing like it in Miami or
Lee Brian Schrager
Miami Beach," said Schrager.
Schrager was chairman of
last year's Miami Film
Festival. The Manhattan
native is also on the board of
the March of Dimes, is a
Young President of Mount
Sinai Medical Center and is on
the Vizcaya Committee of 100.
We're Strictly Kosher^
DAIRY
DELIGHT
1
Il/M & II' VTAUI AN!
jmtr aJn nap tovb
3925 COLLINS AVE.,
AT THE CADILLAC HOTEL
:., MIAMI BEACH, FL 33140 j
PHONE 531-8383
TROPICAL GLASS
a CONSTRUCTION CO. COC #010169
MIRROR
WALLS & CEILINGS
TABLE TOPS EMERGENCY REPJ'.RS STOREFRONTS
Dade 757-0651 Broward 462-3711
HAROLD ROSENSTEIN, Pres. Se Habla Espanol
7933 N.W. 7th Avenue Miami
Inter-Ethnic
Award Goes
To 8th Grader
Scott Shepard
Scott Shepard, an eighth
grade student enrolled in the
Talented Photography Pro-
gram at Southwood Junior
High School, South Center for
the Performing Arts, has been
chosen to receive the first
Hands Across the Campus In-
tergroup Relations Award.
The photo essay contest called
for students' depictions of in-
tergroup relations here in
Miami.
The Hands Across the Cam-
pus program, now in its fourth
year, is sponsored by the
American Jewish Committee
and the Cuban American Na-
tional Council.
Campus Advisory Board
Chairpersons, Brenda Shapiro
and Marc Gallegos announced
that Shepard would receive his
award, a 35 millimeter
camera, from Hands Across
the Campus sponsor Barry
Yoskowitz at a fall reception,
when all the entries will be on
display.
Survivors From
Galicia Sought
MONTREAL (JTA) In
its continuing efforts to assist
in the identification of
suspected Nazi war criminals,
the Canadian Jewish Congress
is seeking to locate witnesses
to events in Galicia, primarily
those which took place in
Brzezany, Podhajce, Stryj and
Wisniowozyk.
In particular, witnesses to
the persecution of the Jews in
these places and the role
played by the police in these
activities are needed. Anyone
with such information is asked
to contact the Holocaust
Remembrance Committee of
Canadian Jewish Congress at
1590 Docteur Penfield, Mon-
treal. Quebec H3G ICS.
Dade County Prepares For
The Bicentennial Celebration Of
The Signing of The U.S. Constitution
Preparations are underway
in Dade County for the
Bicentennial celebration of the
signing of the United States
Constitution.
The preparations include
patriotic red, white and blue
banners and flags decorating
the Dade County Courthouse,
the Metropolitan Justice
Building, and the Juvenile
Justice Center, and plans for a
parade on Flagler street on
Thursday, Sept. 17 at 11:30
a.m.
Floats, high school bands,
the United States
Paratroopers' Choir, and the
girl and boy scouts will par-
ticipate in the parade, and
pocket sized copies of the Con-
stitution will be distributed.
A huge cake in the shape of
the United States, serving 700
people, will be baked especially
for the event by the Robert
Morgan Vocational School's
student bakers, and a
theatrical presentation of
"Four Little Pages," will be
performed.
Also, during the kick-off
celebration, 500 copies of the
"Constitution" will be
available for people to sign.
The copies will read: "We, the
people of Dade County,
Florida, celebrate the
Bicentennial of the United
States Constitution. We
uphold, protect, and salute this
magnificent document."
This celebration is con-
sidered the kick-off of a long-
term program to educate
children about the importance
and value of the U.S. Constitu-
tion, and a Speaker's Bureau
of judges and attorneys will be
visiting local schools during
the next four years to further
this goal.
A Bicentennial Committee
for the Eleventh Judicial Cir-
cuit has been appointed by
Chief Judge Gerald T. Wether-
ington. The committee, which
will be assisted by other
dedicated individuals and
agencies, consists of the
following judges and public
officials:
Ralph N. Person, vice
chairperson; C. Clyde Atkins;
David M. Gersten; Mario P.
Goderich; Arthur Maginnis;
Alfred P. Nesbitt; Henry L.
Oppenborn; Celeste H. Muir;
and Richard P. Brinker. The
late Edward D. Cowart was
chairperson.
Florida's mayors and circuit
judges have all been invited to
be part of the reviewing stand
at the kick-off celebration, dur-
ing which the official Bicenten-
nial song, "We, The People"
will be sung.
Airline Helps Singles
Mingle In Eastern Europe
While some investment bankers, lawyers and others
will summer in the Hamptons once again, a number of pro-
fessionals are choosing a different route to unwind and
meet in the season's heat.
Instead of sharing houses on Fire Island, they will be
part of a pioneering singles group who will share a common
destination and purpose to travel to their ancestral roots
in Poland/Hungary and Israel.
In a special package designed by El Al Israel Airlines,
Tandu World Jewish Singles Club and Travel Magic, two
groups of singles, one ages 25-45 and another aged 45-plus
will travel to Eastern Europe and Israel. The first group
left on Aug. 9. In total, there will be 6 heritage tours for the
first age group and 4 trips for the second in the late sum-
mer and early fall.
Founded by Dr. Mordechai Friedman, a 42-year-old
self-proclaimed matchmaker, Tandu recently ran ads for
single tours in local papers and magazines such as New
York Magazine. Friedman, a ninth generation sabra says,
"Sons would call up for their parents, fathers would call up
for their daughters. One thing is clear the demand for ac-
tivities and tours for singles which appeal to their intellec-
tual needs is very strong."
According to Friedman, over 1.000 singles have signed
on with the group which is "dedicated to introducing
singles to each other and fills a community need for singles
to enjoy the company and friendship of others."
The heritage tour for the 45-plus group offers a choice
between an extensive 19-day/17-night tour which will in-
clude 3 nights in Tel Aviv, 2 nights in the Galilee and 5
nights in Jerusalem or a 15-day/13-night tour of Poland and
Israel which includes 3 nights in Warsaw. The traveler will
visit the spiritual centers of the Hassidic movements, the
old Jewish quarters of Cracow, and the medieval towns of
Budapest.
According to David Shein, vice president and general
manager for El Al in North America, "We are taking a pro-
gressive direction by expanding our services to cater to a
very important segment of the market. Recently we in-
trod'"*ed our Jewish Heritage Tours to Eastern Europe.
These tours are just two of the many exciting programs
which El Al is introducing to help promote tourism in
Israel. Group travel makes any trip less expensive, and
more fun."
For information and reservations write away for a free
detailed colored brochure to: Jewish Heritage Tours, El Al
Israel Airlines, 850 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10022.


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 14,_ 1987_
Hy Wiener
Hy Wiener:
No Better Thing Any Human Can
Do Than Give Another Sight
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Hy Wiener has a belief. "I
think there's no better thing
any human can do than give
another sight," he says.
As a member of the Little
River Lions Club, an organiza-
tion that joined other Dade
County Lions Clubs to
establish the Florida Lions
Eye Bank in the Bascom
Palmer Eye Institute in 1961,
Wiener has joined hundreds of
other club members in helping
to make the gift of sight
possible.
HIS MOST recent effort
helped in establishing in recent
months the first eye bank in
the State of Israel. An eye
bank is an organization that
tries to get people to donate
their eyes and then procures
the corneas from those eyes
for transplant operations.
The Israel Eye Bank, located
in Tel A\iv, began with a visit
by Wiener to the Tel Aviv
Lions Club Wiener says he
tries U attend Lions "Club
meetings in countries that he
travels 'o, exchanging pins
and locai banners.
He hapoened to be at the Tel
Aviv Linns club meeting and
left information with them
about isascom Palmer. The
next day he received a call at
his hotel from a Lions Club
member who said the
organization was interested in
starting an eye bank in Israel.
THE CALLER said his club
would need about $150,000,
and Wiener returned to the
United States with plans to
help raise that money. Three
times, Wiener said, he had pro-
mises that would have brought
him dose to his goal, but it fell
through each time.
Then. Mrs. Liuba Arkin and
family of Israel donated
$100,00(i for the eye bank in
memory of Gidi Arkin.
For abort a year, Wiener
and Bascom Palmer staff
worked with the Tel Aviv
Lions club, sending them infor-
mation about how to establish
and operate the eye bank. On
April 28, the bank opened.
There still is work to be
done, said Wiener. The Tel
Aviv Lions Club has contacted
all major Lions eye banks in
America asking them to assist
by sending some of the corneas
they need to get started. They
estimate they will need 250
corneas a year.
WIENER, 78. who lives in
Miami with his wife, Dora, is
also hoping that Israel will
send a delegation to Miami to
learn more about the eye bank
operation.
Women Business
Owners Elect
New Board
The Dade County Chapter of
the National Association of
Women Business Owners
elected their new slate of of-
ficers for the coming year.
They are: President. Shari
Green; Vice President. Grace
Miller; Secretary, Carol
Cheek; Treasurer. Nancy
Pastroff; National Board.
Kathleen Shea.
The Board of Directors in-
clude: Elbe Burke, Ann Fisher
(Attorney), Ronnie Halpern,
Maria Teresa Cruz. Anne
Freedman, Barbara Raskin,
Kelly Renner. Immediate Past
President is Eva Reynolds.
Haifa's Jewish
Population Declining
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Jewish population in Haifa
declined by 6,000 persons (2.5
percent of the general popula-
tion) between 1981 and 1985.
while the Arab population
grew from 7.2 percent of the
population to 8.4 percent dur-
ing this period, according to
the annual report of the
"Shekmuna" housing
rehabilitation company in the
Carmel city.

University of Miami president Edward T.
Foote meets with Miami Beach leaders at the
city's newly-restored Old City Hall to discuss
opening of a proposed U-M branch there. Fon-
tainebkau Hilton owner Stephen Muss and
Mayor Alex Daoud are spearheading the pro-
ject. From left are Commissioners Abe
Resnick and Stanley Arkin, Foote. Dauud
Commissioner Sidney Weisburd, Utut City Manager Rob W. Parkins. The (Hit City
Hall is a part of Miami Beach's neu- Ju. Center, which opened this summer and he
the police headquarters and Bounty court
facilities.
'Moonlighting': Orthodox Jew Hellinger
Leads Double Life As Private Eye
Continued from Page IB
infidelity. Says Hellinger. "My
work has made me appreciate
Torah law even more the
laws of Torah prevent a mar-
ried couple from becoming the
subject of an investigation."
YET THE strict observance
of traditional Jewish laws has
not always been a difficulty for
Hellinger in his line of work.
"Torah and Talmud have
often been of help to me in my
investigations," asserts Hell-
inger, who rolls up his long
beard and uses a wig as the re-
quisite head covering when
traveling incognito.
"I've learned a very deep
human philosophy from the
Torah and Talmud, and when
you understand the human
psyche, you have a very good
grasp of why people do the
things they do all across the
hoard.
"Torah," says Hellinger, is
definitely head of the detective
field."
HELLINGER does not ig-
nore Jewish folk wisdom,
either.
"I don't believe in the
perfect crime because, as an,
old Russian Jewish saying
goes, when the bread falls off
the table, it always falls on the
butter side." says Hellinger.
A person who has committed
a crime is usually acting out of
passion, and therefore makes
mistakes, according to Hell-
inger. who also contends that a
person who has committed a
crime has a deep-seated urge
to confess.
"In the realm of interroga-
tion, the investigator goes in
with the idea that the person
really wants to tell you and get
it off their chest. It's like
something they ate didn't
agree with them, and they
want to throw it up." he
explains.
EVEN THE calculating pro-
fessional criminal may feel this
urge to wipe the slate clean,
says Hellinger. "There's
always hope, because God
doesn't make junk," he
asserts.
"Whatever you do in life,
whatever act you commit, it's
like throwing a stone in the
water. It leaves ripples," Hell-
inger adds on the subject of
catching an expert criminal
who makes few mistakes.
Hellinger. who uses body
language to tell whether or not
someone is lying and does not
hold with "strong arm tac-
tics," would not be afraid to
use a gun in self-defense.
"I don't worry that I'm the
kind of person to hesitate on
the trigger," Hellinger
reveals. "The commandment,
which is often misunderstood,
is 'Thou Shall Not Murder.'
And killing in self-defense is
not murder."
HELLINGER feels that his
work is as exciting as the
popular depictions of a detec-
tive's life on TV and in the
movies.
"I always wanted to see the
night world who's playing
outside the game, because
since the other person is cut-
ting through the red tape. I cut
through the normal modes of
obtaining information, too,"
says Hellinger.
"I get to know things the
general public does not know."
With the philosophy that "it
is healthy to be happy." and a
penchant for having a good
time, it is no wonder that Hell-
inger wants to dispel the
popular notion that being
religious means being very
limited in your options.
To further that goal. Hell-
inger has fulfilled another
childhood dream of his
becoming a Disc Jockey.
On Sunday nights, from 7 to
9 p.m., the private eye turns
into a D.J. who hosts a pro-
gram, "Sunday Night With
Simcha." on 1360 AM radio.
The program consists of inter-
views, guests, a wide range of
traditional and contemporary
Jewish music, and, soon.
treasure hunts.
"I WOULD like to remove
any trace of negative feeling
towards religious people."
says Hellinger of his radio
show. "A person can l>e very
religious and very with it." he
contends.
Since this Orthodox Jewish
private eyes instills faith
rather than distrust in his
clients ("they know I answer
to a higher authority") and has
even convinced one anti-
Semitic colleague that his
views on Jews were mistaken.
Hellinger may very well
change the public's image of
observant Jews.
So. in the tradition of fabled
detectives Sam Spade and
Philip Marlowe and in the
tradition of Abraham. Isaac,
and Jacob there is Simcha
Hellinger, a private eye whose
methods are guaranteed strict-
ly kosher.
wwrWwwxww
The Northeast Branch Library in North Dade County hai reft**,
ed a gift of the McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of >'<
I> ehnology from patron Julius Werbner. a retired inavrai
ecutxve from Quincy, Mass., has long been a Friend <"
m
porter oj the Miami-Dade Public Library System. Werbner if
active member of the B'rith Century Club, the Jewish CoWH*M
tenter of North Dade, the United Jewish Appeal a lid ""' Vt *T
organizations. Shown with Jean Biblo, Northeast bra**
librarian.
Mil
Call
join
Mei
Horn
'ape
T
'ion.
*:::*:**:^^
s*s


Friday^ August 14, 1987/TheJewJshFloridian Page 11-B
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
. "For the Lord thy God bringeth thee unto a good land ... a
land of wheat and barley ... a land of olive-trees and honey"
(Deuteronomy 8.7-8).
EKEV
EKEV Moses declares: "And it shall come to pass, because ye
hearken to these ordinances, and keep, and do them, that the
Lord thy God shall keep with thee the covenant and the mercy
which He swore unto thy fathers, and He will love thee, and bless
thee, and multiply thee" (Deuteronomy 7.1t-lS). The Israelites are
not to fear the Canaanite nations; witness the providence and
supervision of God over His people in the desert, though they sin-
ned. In passing, Moses makes a general reference to the incident
of the Golden Calf. The Israelites were not to inherit the land of
Canaan because of their own virtues: "Not for thy righteousness,
or for the uprightness of thy heart, dost thou go in to possess their
land; but for the wickedness of these nations the Lord thy God
doth drive them out from before thee, and that He may establish
(the word which the Lord swore unto thy fathers" (Deuteronomy
.5). After mentioning God's powerful miracles in Egypt and the
esert (particularly in reference to Dathan and Abiram), Moses
Iwells on the importance of the Promised Land. The portion con-
Itinues with the second part of the Shema, beginning "And it shall
pome to pass, if ye shall harken diligently unto My command-
ants" and ending "that your days may be multiplied, and the
ays of your children, upon the land which the Lord swore unto
your fathers to give them, as the days of the heavens above the
" (Deuteronomy ll.lS-tl). And the portion concludes with
e promise: "There shall no man be able to stand against you; the
>rd your God shall lay the fear of you and the dread of you upon
^4dl the land that ye shall tread upon, as He hath spoken unto you"
mveuteronomy U.t5).
| (The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law It extracted and based
m "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman-
imlr, $15. published by Shengold. The volume Is available at 75 Maiden
ie, New York, N.Y. 10038. Joseph Schlang Is president of the society
itributing the volume.)
Rabbi Tarsis Appointed
Goldstein Academy Headmaster
Educational administrator
Rabbi Joshua A. Tarsis has
been appointed Headmaster of
the Arthur and Anna Golds-
tein Hebrew Academy of
Dade. "Rabbi Tarsis br-
to our school a wealth of
|t and experience as an ex-
>nal educator and ad-
trator," stated Ronald
Goldstein Hebrew
my President during the
It announcement of Tar-
ropointment.
Il-known to the Miami
community active in
education, Tarsis has
over 25 years as a school
listrator, as the Principal
Solomon Scheck Hillel
mnity Day School in
Miami Beach for five
years. Holding a doctorate in
Educational Administration
from Fordham University, as
ceB as an Ed.S. from the Col-
)fSt. Thomas in St. Paul,
;sota, Tarsis is also an or-
Rabbi from the Mesiv-
-
mi Beach resident,
ine Fellman, RN, has
d the Mount Sinai
al Center/Miami Jewish
Health Agency as Assis-
Administrator. In this
ity, she will be responsi-
lor the day-to-day opera-
of the Agency.
tha Tiffereth Jerusalem in
New York.
Rabbi Tarsis' primary role at
the Goldstein Academy will be
the administration of both the
General Studies and Judaic
Studies programs at the
school, which presently serves
students from preschool
through the sixth grade. Tasis
is a strong believer in the
credo that secular and Judaic
studies must be co-equal, and
he emphasized that "the role
of the traditional Jewish day
school is to provide children
with sufficient information so
that they may make intelligent
individual choices about their
own commitment to Judaism."
Focusing on excellence, he
adds that "the school must
allow each student to attain
whatever educational goal he
or she has set for himself or
herself." This philosophy gels
well the with Goldstein
Academy's goal to "help each
child obtain his or her highest
potential."
When the Goldstein Hebrew
Academy opens its doors for
the 1987/88 school year on
August 31, the school will
begin its second year as the
Goldstein Academy and its
18th or "chai" year from its
beginnings as the South Dade
Hebrew Academy. With the
appointment of Tarsis, the
school hopes to evaluate the
addition of a junior high school
and reinstitution of special
education classes for Jewish
students.
Rabbi Tarsis, 48, is a native
of London, England and came
to the United States in the
'50's. He is married to Michelle
Stone and has seven children,
aged 22 years to 10 months.
The Goldstein Academy,
located at 12401 S.W. 102
Avenue, on the grounds of the
South Dade Jewish Communi-
ty Center, is the only com-
munity day school in South
Dade.
Susan A. Marx has been pro-
moted to the position of Direc-
tor of Major Gifts for the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion announced Federation's
Executive Vice President
Myron J. Brodie. In her new
capacity she will develop new
major contributors to the Com-
bined Jewish Appeal and
create fundraising events and
programs for these donors.
Marx has been with Federation
since 198S as the director of its
Alliance Division. In that
capacity she coordinated the
Federation's Combined Jewish
Appeal in the highrises and
condominiums throughout
Dade County.
Miami Ballet
Opens August 28
Anticipating the gala start
of its second season, the Miami
City Ballet will offer two
special performances at 8 p.m.
Friday and Saturday, Aug. 28
and 29 at the Gusman Center
for the Performing Arts.
Scheduled for a reprise are
the oft-requested first season
highlights: Donizetti Varia-
tions and the Pas de Deux from
Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake,
both choreographed by George
Balanchine; Fantasies, Johri
Clifford's intricate study of
relationships; and
Transtangos, the critically-
acclaimed original work by
resident choreographer Jimmy
Gamonet.
Performances of the Miami
City Ballet are supported in
part by grants from the Dade
County Council of Arts and
Sciences, the Florida Arts
Council and the City of Miami.
New Kollel
To Open
A new Kollel, or fellowship
program of post-graduate
research and teaching for rab-
bis and Jewish scholars, will
open in Miami Beach in
September at Yeshiva Toras
Chaim. Members of the Kollel
will conduct adult education
classes and individual study
sessions in all areas of Jewish
interest. Programs for young
people are also being planned.
The members of this Kollel
will be Rabbis Gedalya Glatt,
Moshe Yosef Gruenstein,
Yisroel Niman, and Elliot
Rubovsky. They will be living
in Miami Beach with their
families.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
7:45 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach, Fla 531 -2120
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig
AOATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Conservative
Cantor Zvl Rozen
Executive Director f
Harry J. Sllverman
Minyan 7:30 a.m. 6 6:30 p.m.
Sat Sun. 6 am. 4 6 p.m.
Shabbat ian Sal. 8:30 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Or.
S. Miami 667-6667
Dr. Herbert Baumgard,
Senior Rabbi
Rabbi Leonard Schoolman
Frl. 6:15 p.m Rabbi Leonard Schoolman,
Sr Rabbi Mill apeak
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 654-3911
Jack Riemer. Rabbi
Robert Albert, /St.
Cantor CT|
Rev. Milton Freeman. v**7
Ritual Director
MlnchahatfcOOp.m.
Dally Minyan
Mon. Tnura. r:30 am
Tun Wad a Frl. 7:46 a.m
Sun. 6 a.m. Evenlnga 5 30 p m
Sal 9 a.m. Rabbi Rlemer rill conduct aafvlca.
ailited by Canto* Robart Albert
Klddueh will lollow
BETH KODESH
Conservative
1101 S.W 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 858-6334
Cantor Joseph Krissei
Rose Berlin: Executive Secretary
Senrlcoe Monday a Thureday 7:30 am
Sat. 6:46 am
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St.. N. Miami, FL 33181
891 5508 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs, Rabbi
Dr. Joseph A. Gorllnkei. /-S\\
Rabbi Emeritus \
Moshe Friedler, Cantor
Frl. 7 p.m.
Sat. 8:45 am
Weekday aarv. Mon Fn 6 a.m.
Mon -Thura 5pm Sun 6:30 am
Sat 6:45 am
)
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave.. M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 5384112
Rabbi Alvadla Rosenberg
Cantor Moshe Buryn
Dally eerylc 6 a.m. 6 7 p.m
at til em
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
238-2601 /
Rabbi David H. Auerbach \
Cantor Stephen Freedman
Frl. Servtcee 6 p m
Sat. aarv. 6:30 a.m.
0aIIy eervlcee: tun 6:30 a.m.
Mon.. Tuaa. 6 Tnura. 7:30 am
Wad 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM 538-7231
Chase Ave. 41 st St
OR. LEON KRONISH, Sartor Founding Rabbi
OARY A. OUCKSTBM. Sartor Rabbi
MARRY JOLT, Awubary Rabbi
JASON OWASOOFF, Aaaaatant RabN
IAN AlPERIN, Cantor
DENNIS J WCt FT A, Executive Director
Frl. 6:16 p.m.
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd. aajBt
Dr Max A. Llpschltz. Rabbi fB)
Zvee Aroni, Cantor aV
Harvey L. Brown. Exjsc. Director
Dotty Servtcee Kon.-Frl. 7:30 am
8 5:30 p.m.
Sal. 6:26 a.m. 6 7 16pm
Sun S am 6 6 SO p.m
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami Beach
534-7213 534-7214
Barry J. Konovllch, Rabbi f\
Moshe Buryn, Cantor V
Sergio Grower. President
Sholem Epelbaum. President,
Religious Committee
m
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shifman, Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
Kabbalat Shabbat at S p.m
Sat. 6a.m. Rabbi Mumli Sanjararlli apaak
Cantor Yehuda Shltman will ohant.
DallyService6am a7p.m
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive. Miami Beach
532 6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schiff
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Mlam/'a Woaaar Reform Conorepat ion
137 NE. 19th St. Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Rabbi Rax D. Perimeter
Cantor Rachella F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob Q. Bomateln
Fri.Spjn.
Downtown: Rabbi Rax D. Perimeter will
conduct Shabbat eervlcea Wm. F. Saulaon
will conduct opon torum iQOMOlna on
"Uncompleted Exooua" a film by Bio Wlaaal
Liturgy Cantor Rachoila F. Notaon.
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 867-5657
Michael B. Eisenstat. Rabbi
Frl. 6 p.m.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rom
Shoshanah Raab, Cantor
Sarvloaa Frl. 7:30 p.m
Sat. 6:30 a.m.
Onao Snabbat wtll toMow
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowltz ^-.
Ari Fridkis, Assoc. Rabbi ()
Cantor Murray Yavneh VX'
Sat. 6 a.m. Sabbath eerrloe
Dally Mlnchah Sunday Friday
6 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Sat. 8 a.m. and 6:16 p.m
TEMPLE NER TAMID 8664345
7902 Cartyle Ave., 866-9833
Miami Beach 33141 Coneervatlve
Rabbi Eugene Laboviu ,
Cantor Edward Klein
Dally aarv Mon. Frl 6 a.m 6 6: 16 p.m
)
6:15 p.m. Sun. 6:30 a.m 6
6 16pm
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
232-6833 Modern Orthodoi
Rabbi Hershel Becker
Sat. 6-30 a.m. aerviee at
Temple Semu El
SSWiW162A*a.,
S ol N Kendall D<
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dade's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kirtgsley, Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
Frl 6 p m Mr 6 Mr* Norman Laopotd will
conduct aarvlcaa Cantor mtna, Shulkee will
i Sat at 18:30 a.m
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
2712311
Or Norman N Shapiro. Rabbi I
Benjamin Adter, Cantor
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Minyan 7 am Monday 6 Thuraday
SundayOem
Frl 6.16 pm
Sartteaa M be conducted by Or. Norman
N Shapiro. Rabbi a liturgy c.
by Canter Sa
Sal aarv 6 am conducted by
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 14, 1987
Deaths
Harold Weinstein, Funeral Home Partial
Arthur S. Rosichan, Former
Federation Executive
Arthur S. Rosichan. former
executive vice president of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion and founder of the
America-Israel Chamber of
Commerce, died Sunday. Aug.
9. at the age of 80.
Rosichan. a graduate of
Cast' Western University, was
executive vice president of
Federation from 1960 to 1976.
He headed the organization
during the major growth
period of Jewish population in
the 1960'a ill Miami and led the
development of the social ser-
vice apparatus to keep up with
growing human needs.
Some highlights of his years
in office include the efforts of
Federation and its agencies in
1%1 to coordinate the migra-
tion of Jewish refugees from
Cuba to Miami, the
reestablishment of the Com-
munity Chaplaincy Service in
1965. and the formation of the
Israel Emergency Fund Cam-
paign to assist Israel during; its
fa
Arthur S. Rosichan
war in 1967. He also oversaw
the establishment of the cur-
rent Federation building site
in 1968 which would become
operational three years later
as the "central address" for
the Jewish community, and the
creation of Federation Hous-
ing in 1976 to accommodate
the needs of the elderly in our
community.
His lifelong career in Jewish
communal work began in
Cleveland in 1928 after becom-
ing one of the first students to
receive certification from the
graduate school of Jewish
al Service.
Among his early positions
director of
istra-
tion 01 Washington, i
assistant director of the Pitt
sburgh Federation.
He next served with the
Federation of Jewish Com-
munity Services and Combined
Jewish Appeal of Montreal and
the United Jewish Federation
of Buffalo. NY.
He was a bibliophile who
operated the Book Warehouse
in Coral Gables from 1977 to
1985.
Rosichan. a 27 year resident
of Miami, is survived by his
wife. Florence; son. Richard;
daughter-in-law. Ellen; grand-
children. Amy. Lori and
Rebecca; and his brother. A.
Lester Rosichan.
Services were held Tuesday
at Temple Israel. Burial
followed at Mount Nebo
Cemetery.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
si ii w/, mum
FOREST PARK CHAPEL INC.
Here and in New York.
to assure swift and
understanding service
Dado County
Brov\.ird Countv
RaprcMnted I in.
New York: :,., K K..r,._,
Harold 'Hershey" Weins-
tein. a partner in Menorah
Chapels of South Florida and
Piser Weinstein Menorah
Chapels of Chicago, died Mon-
day at Memorial Hospital in
Hollywood. He was 78.
Mr. Weinstein whose family
became the first Jewish under-
takers in Chicago when they
opened a chapel in 1884. has
been connected with Menorah
since 1981. Today there are
ROSICHAN
Arthur 91 I V u
1961 Ml R r.ar. had twn ;i
n Ex
Federal i Ha
,::u with in:.
al Mi Riverside ii
. i of (lowers,
donations in men I lo iru-
I'nivei
BHAYNI
William W. (Bill) of Miami Beach, passed
UurustS Hi ma born September 22
l*il in Philadelphia He cam. I
the ear Ittanoad the I'ni\ersit> of
Florida in Gainesville, he left the I'll
- with a cousin in Orlando
and was also a hit actor with Laurel and
Hardy in Hollywood Bill was nan
Pretidenl Roosevelt as the fir~t General
Chairman of the I>ade County PoKo Cam
|iai(m and was active in the local Variety
Club which was instrumental in starting
what :s now the Miami Children's II
Mr Shayne entered the real estate b I
ami built over 50 homes in Coconul Grove
He was still active at the time of h;
II. was .i patron .n Cedars Med ca Center
a member of Temple Emanu-E u i B '
B'ntl. He m .. I I his > fi !
ren S
WEINSTEIN


I

S
tha r f H. "
and tin
ind Sylvia
many nitccf and nephi
butknu
nberg Car i
Foundation Funtr
his chapel Piser ". nstan Menorah Chapel
uhe (>npnal Weinstein and Sons. Chicago
III.)
APRIL. Leon. August 10. The Rival
FRIEDMAN Mrs Mar) yn
Rut ben
SHAPIRO, Sylvia 9 I M in Bi eh Wife
of the late Harold Shapiro, former
I Miami Beach Mrs Shapir
Kemma Shaj I '
rrl) 4 M ami Beach Inter
ment in Israel RuhinZilbert
\GINSKY Harr> n New
.lerse\
PLISSNER, Mary. ..f Miami Beach '
Si HWARTZ. France- Services, sren henl
WEISS Bereniei 63 11 Nortl
Beach. Auguat i Sorviosa and interment
held at Star of I land Memorial I
DELTCH. Cheater S It Beach Menorah chape -
FINK. Jack Menorah Q
SAVITT. Julius (Yudiei of Brooklyn Ser
vices held in Miami Eternal Light
KAIL Lorraine of Boston Bervkea held in
RCDNICK, kae of North Baj .
S. Mi -
ben
r K. I \ ..-.-
BOYARIN Ei
five Menorah chapels in South
Florida, as well as four Piser
Weinstein Menorah chapels in
the Chicago area.
"He was from the old
school," said Dennis Nolan, a
director at what was the
original Weinstein chapel on
Chicago's Peterson Road. "He
was so good to the people. He
treated everyone so well."
In fact. Mr. Weinstein was
HVMAN. Beatrice !<4. of Miami BarviCOS
KOTKIN, Henry, 82, August B Bervicas
w.-r.
l'"LI.IN. Ray, 100, of Miami Beach The
GOLDBERG, Bertha Rubin Zill*rt
M DELMAN Herman I Baj H
BORKIN R Bead
N'ebo \
SI -- .in
SCHW \RTZ Robert 1
KANE i Iward 80 I M in Bead
31 The Riverside
ISTR0FSIH \ 87 I \ rtl Mia
SOOTINN Marl na I M ui
were held
GREENE. Joatph. 64. of Kendall
,- arere held Intermenl at Mt
Neb
SILVERBERG SydeUs K W I M aa
I *ere helii.
DYMANT Mr- Vera t Miami Bead
Ruhm Zilbert
JACOBSON NathanS 7.' Julj 27 Scr
MICKENBERG Mali la I S rtl
IV.,. i I i -.-m
N \KI\1. ih 71, August 1 I
M imi. July
l<
SILVER s \| ,..
so generous, Nolan said that
his employees had to tnuS.
\y remonstrate the SSJ
director for giving away ser
vices. Mr. Weinstein, a lawv J
and graduate of Northwestern I
University, joined the family".
funeral home business in 19341
with the death of his father
Jacob. Jacob had establish^
the business 50 years earlier!
The younger Mr. Web**]
then became the president anql
owner of the Original Weins-I
tein and Sons Funeral Home'
In 1981. the Weinstein con-]
cern merged with
chapels, which already owned
Menorah. At that tin*
became a partner
operations, and had Ii 1
Hollywood for the
yean.
A family-oriented n in, Mr.]
Weinstein was involved in 31
number of religiuus aim | r,,.^
thropic concerns in t'h
including the Evelyi
Steinberg Cancer K.
Foundation, where memong'
contributions may be sent.
Survivors include I is wife.
Adeline: daughter. Linda
Bruce; brother. Herman.
sisters Diane Weinstein. Man
ly Bass. Ruth Gettleman ana
Sylvia Golan; and
grandchild.
Services were held at I
Weinstein Menorah I'.
Rd. Chapel in Chicago
SPECIAL LIMITED PRE-NEED DEFER
FUNERAL AND BURIAL
$1,595
1 .ik.-iJi Memorial r.trk ami Hernal 1 ight \ un ral [)ftrvCtOf* art,- prouJ to
-pnvr rhi* unique pritjrani hih comhint' ownership or a plot al iHir
htfliltiful Memorial Parl* anl a plan **f pri-paiJ funrral ktrvicvn
Thi* 1 \ii-|'ti.n.il value a**urv* that \our onr call v ill put \ ou in tou* h v* ith
the people w hi* hvlftevc rht-r- i* nlhin|{ Ji|cnilu-J ahtu( pa\ inu nri tr a
rr.1J1t1011.il |t-Mish funeral thai \iu have lo.
IHRI" l* U HA I \\b IV I I Df
exreRNAL
UqItc
1 Prompt Trannfrr frucn Plan <>l
Dtath
l jr<- jii.I Prrparanon l I V i a., ,1
1 L'a%krl and Hrar^r
1 Arrangrmrni l>irr>lion >4
(iratrtidr **rr%K"r*
1 Prrmil and Rrnrlil A..iin.c
24 hour aWWISJMHt mt\i.i
I Shu a lin.lli. lard* and Hrn>'hr
njigi^
t >ra\rilr
Pacd Pri\alr V mtaiion Paih
sini Hahafmiid Concrcti Vaal
Onrninn and t l.oing .? >">' ]
Prrnrlual Oiassjaltaa i an
Si* maintt-nan* > ir mtm.i '^*
J,i,h Tradiuon sistrc I4***
TOTAL: $1,595
No Interest Payment Plans Available
r(>r tomplrit' iniorntanon on our plot and tuni-ral Hi saitfcsai' P,an
...II yaw I afcsjaaaVj hirrnal I i|(hi trprrvniinn i.la>
In nmr .'I nri-d. om jll ill handlr all ihr driaiU
DADE:
592-0690
BROWARD:
525-93*9
RUBIN
ZILBERT
CHAPEL
MONUMINT CO
CIMITIRY COUNSILINQ
10 CHAPELS SERVING
DADE
BROWARD
PALM BEACH
RUBIN-ZILBERT
DADE
538-6371
BROWARD
920
REi
ZILBERT-RUBIN


Friday, August 14, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
Thomas Post Continues to Buy Prime Downtown Property
[iami developer and at-
ley, Thomas R. Post, is
itinuing his downtown
imi real estate assemblage
development activities,
th his recent purchase of an
fc of downtown property im-
liately west of the historic
bedom Tower.
Ir. Post's new property is
Itegically located on NE
Street between NE 1st
?nue and NE 2nd Avenue.
exactly one block west of
,side, one block east of the
City of Miami Arena, one
tk north of the Miami-Dade
pty College Downtown
ipus and only two blocks
the Federal Courthouse
lplex.
le parcel acquired by Mr.
It includes two large
iings formerly owned by
Wometco Enterprises. One
contains 14,000 square feet of
space and the other 12,000
square feet. Two large paved
and lighted parking lots make
up the rest of the 44,000
square foot site. The buildings
on the site were used for retail
shops, storage and offices.
According to Mr. Post, his
immediate plans are to rent
the buildings on a short term
basis, while he is preparing his
development scheme for the
entire site.
Mr. Post has been very ac-
tive in other land acquisition
activities in Miami for years.
He currently owns' two
separate half blocks of proper-
ty immediately west of the
Downtown Government
Center and a key development
lot on NW 1st Avenue across
Thomas Post
FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
I THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
>ADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-1954
Division 02
|RE:ESTATE OF
iLTAN NAGY
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
ALL PERSONS HAVING
MS OR DEMANDS
(A INST THE AB(> V E
lATE AND ALL OTHER
feONS INTERESTED IN
ESTATE:
I ARE HEREBY
1FIKP thai the administra-
of tli*- Batata of ZOLTAN
NAC": deceased, PDa Number
f|V>'' is pending in the Circuit
rt for Dade County, Florida.
late Division, the addn
is th w. nanjar Street,
pi, FL 33130. The personal
esentative of th*> estate is
1RIELLA NAGY AND
LRA VOROS. whose address is
Kendale Rd. North, Colum-
[Ohio 43220 and 20 Edmonton
i Willowdale. Ontario. Canada
(ctively. The name and ad
of the personal rcpresen
*s attorney are set forth
paraoni having claims or
ids against the estate are re
. WITHIN THREE MON
FROM THE DATE OF THE
PUBLICATION OF THIS
CE, to file with the clerk of
ihove court a written state-
1 of any claim or demand they
ave. Each claim must be in
ng and must indicate the basis
he claim, the name and ad
I of the creditor or his agent or
ney, and the amount claimed.
| claim is not yet due, the date
it will become due shall he
1 If the claim is contingent or
jidatcd, the nature of the
uinty shall be stated. If the
i> secured, the security shall
escribed. The claimant -.hall
pr sufficient copies of the
to the clerk to enable the
; to mail one copy to each per
representative.
persons interested in the
to whom a copy of this
of Administration has lieen
re required, WITHIN
IEE MONTHS FROM THE
ITE OF THE FIRST
ILICATION OF THIS
CE, to file any objections
may have that challenge the
iity of the decadent's will, the
lifications of the personal
esenlative, or the venue or
Idiction of the court.
LL CLAIMS. DEMANDS
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FII.
WILL BE FOREVER
IRED.
pte of the first publication of
Notice of Administration
ust 14. 1987.
GABRIELLA NAGY
KLARA VOROS
|i I'ersonal Representatives
of the Estate of
ZOLTAN NAGY
I hx'faifd
ORNEV FOR PERSONAL
'RESENTATIVE:
3ENE J. WEISS
Lincoln Rd. PHNE.
ni Beach, FL MM
|>hone: 305/534-4721
August 14,21, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE (^VISION
File Number 87-4315
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ETHYL B. GUBERNICK
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
Florida Bar No. 027105
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
V 0 I ARE HE R E B V
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of ETHYL B
GUBERNICK, deceased. File
Number 87-4315 (02), is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate is GEORGE J. ALBOl'M.
whose address is 333 Arthur God
frey Road-Suite 104. Miami Beach.
Florida 33140. The name and ad
dress of the personal represen
tative's attorney are set forth
Mow.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FRO MTHE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OP THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
l>c described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
I) A T E O F THE F I R S T
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any OOjjt tions
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
August 14, 1987.
GEORGEJ ALBUM
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ETHYL B. GUBERNICK
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
ESTELLE G. FURLONG
333 Arthur Godfrey Road
Suite 104
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Telephone: (305) -.38-6741
17920 August 14.21. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie-
titioui name FADE-GUARD
BEAUTY KOOL at 1831 Sahal
Palm Drive Apt. 303 Ft. Lauder
dale, Fla 33324 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Ray Freedman
Helene Freedman
1(1887 July 31;
August 7. 14,21.1981
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name ORDONEZ TILES a)
720 SW 100 Ct Circle Miami 33174
intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida
ORDONEZ ENTERPRISES.
INC.
17925 August 14. 21,28;
September 4. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87-32428 FC 09
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ANA LUCIA GAUDINO.
Petitioner.
and
BILLY W GAUDINO.
Respondent.
TO: Billy W. Gaudino
3040 82nd Street
Jackson Heights
Queens. New York
Present Residence
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to lerve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on Samuel S.
Sorota, Esq., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 801 N E
167th Street. No. Miami Boh.. FL
83162, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled Court
on or before August 2X. 1987;
Otherwise I default will Ik- entered
against you for the relief demand
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall Ik- pubHahod
once each week for four con-
secutive week in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
tins 24 day of July. 1987.
RICHARD P. BR1NKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: (Tarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
SAMUELS SOROTA
801 NE. 167th Strati
Suite SIM
North Miami Beach. FL 33162
Attorney for Petitioner
16894 My SI;
August 7. 14.21.1987
the street from Metro-Rail's
Central Rapid Transit and
People Mover Station. Mr.
Post also owns a half block of
exceedingly valuable Biscayne
Boulevard property at NE 9th
Street just two blocks north of
Bayside.
The Biscayne Boulevard pro-
perty has just been put on the
market for rent by Mr. Post. It
includes a 33.000 square foot
retail building at 900 Biscayno
Boulevard, and a 57.000
square foot six-story office
building and computer center
at 901 NE Second Avenue.
Mr. Post believes that the
Biscayne Boulevard property,
because of its visibility, loca-
tion and proximity to Bayside,
will make it a fantastic location
for a toy center, clothing
outlet, electronics store, or
restaurant site. The NE 2nd
Avenue Office Building could
be the operation center for a
major insurance company,
bank, cruise line, savings and
loan, or other major business
enterprise.
Some of Mr. Post's other
ventures have included
development of a complex of
apartment buildings which
was purchased for several
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
tious name NACHO APART-
MENTS at 14190 W. Dixie
Highway. No. Miami. Fl. 33161 in-
tend to register sair1 name with the
i lerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Shirley Ash and Nigel Ash
Willard K. Splittstoesser. Esq.
Attorneys for Applicants
13122 West Dixie Highway, Suite
B
North Miami. Florida 33161
17905 August 7. 14,21, 27. 1987
NOTICE
SERVICES TO PERSONS
UNABLE TO PAY THEREFOR
SOUTH SHORE HOSPITAL
AND MEDICAL CENTER
MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA
The Bureau of Community
Medical Facilities. Department of
Health and Rehabili'ative Ser-
vices, State of Florida, has
established the sum of $18,842 as
the level of uncompensated ser-
vices to !>e made available by South
Shore Hospital and Medical Center
in the period of June 1. 1987 to
May 31. 1988.
This determination has been
made pursuant to the re
quirements of the regulations of
the Public Health Service. IS
Department of Health. Education
and welfare (42 CFR. 53.111) and
the applicable provisions of Florida
Medical Facilities Construction
Plan.
"Uncompensated services
means services available in the
facility which are made available t' i
persons unable to pay therefor
without charge or at a charge
winch is less than the reasonable
cost of such services The level ol
such services. i~ measured by the
difference between the amount
paid by such paraoni for tin
vices and the reasonable cost
thereof.
The level set out almve meets the
presumptive compliance guidelines
of the federal regulations ami is 1"
percent of all federal assistance
provided the facility under the
Hospital ami Medical Facilities
I .instruction Act.
South Share Hospital and
Medical Center ha- tin- right to
determine how. when, and to
whom hospital services will he
provided.
There are no guidelines which
positively identify a person or
SI eligible to receive full Of
partial uncompensated services
Each case must In- evaluated on i'
own merits
171)18 August 14. 1987
million dollars in 1985, and the
successful lease, redevelop-
ment and lease sale of a two
hundred plus slip marina in
Dade County.
Mr. Post's real estate
development background is
the result of years of represen-
ting major developers and ob-
taining property tax reduc-
tions for clients on large shop-
ping centers, office buildings,
hospitals, apartment com-
plexes, hotels, stores, in-
dustrial parks and
warehouses.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-31261-17
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
ROSALYN ADORA DUNKLEY
and
OWEN DUNKLEY
TO: OWEN DUNKLEY
2840 Santa Barbara Drive
Atlanta. Georgia 30032
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ
ten defenses, if any. to it on JOY
BARKAN. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. lti.'Jrd
Street North Miami Beach. Florida
SS162, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before August 21. 1987.
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand
ed in the complaint or |>etition.
This notice shall lie published
onct each week for four con
secutive weeks it' THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of laid court at Miami. Florida on
this 17 day of July. 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C P COPEI.ANI)
(Circuit Court Seal)
16876 July 24. 31;
August 7. 14. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 87 4442
DIVISION: 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SHIRLEY F. BOOXBAUM
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
(FLA. BAR NO. 184878)
The administration of the Estate
of Shirley F. Booxbaum, deceased.
File Number 87-4442, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth In-low
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested peraofl OK
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, wnuc. or jurisdic
lion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
IONS NOT 80 FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication .if this Notice has
begun on August 14. 1987
Nathan Sidcn
Personal Representative
5890 S W It'll Street
Miami. Florida 33156
DENNIS R TURNER
Attorney- for Personal
Representative
STEARNS WEAVER MIl.I.ER
WEISSI.ER ALHADAFT4
SITTERSON. PA.
2200 Museum Tower
150 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 88180
(305) 789-3200
17917 August 7. 14.21.28. 1987


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 14, 1987
Foreclosure salespublic notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-4344
Diviiion 04
IN RE:ESTATE OF
PAULINA VALECKAS
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Paulina Valeckas. deceased. File
Number 87-4344. is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami. Florida 33131. The
names and addresses of the per
sonal representative and the per
sonal representative'? attorney art
set forth below.
All interested persons are re
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 7, 1987.
Personal Representative:
HARVEY CEPILIONIS
14509 Mallard Drive
Lockport, Illinois 60441
Attorney for Personal
Representative: '
HYMAN P GALBUT
Galbut. Galbut & Menin
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
17912 August 7. 14, 19871
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-4256
Division 01
IN RE:ESTATE OF
HENRY MISKIEWICZ
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of HENRY MISKIEWICZ.
deceased, File Number 87-4256, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 78
West Flagler Street, Miami.
Florida 33130 The names and ad-
dresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth,
below.
All interested persons are re-1
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 7, 1987
Personal Representative:
WALTER FRANCIS
MISKIEWICZ
285 Out water Avenue
Garfield. New Jersey
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HYMAN P GALBUT. ESQUIRE I
GALBUT, GALBUT & MENIN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: 305-672-3100
FLA BAR No 027363
17908 August 7, 14. 1987!
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87-31909 (25)
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
LLOYD WEDDERBURN.
husband
and
CLARA E. WEDDERBURN.
wife.
TO: CLARA E.
WEDDERBURN
Residence Unknown:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on ARTHUR
H. LIPSON. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 801 N.E.
167 Street. Miami. Fla. 33162
653-3030. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before August 28. 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed in
the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida or
this 22 dav of July. 1987.
RICHARD P. BLINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: John Branda
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
16882 July 24. 31:
August 7. 14. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-33371 CA 20
NOTICE OF ACTION
SOUTH FLORIDA SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION.
Plaintiff
vs.
MICHAEL W. CHARLES, et al..
Defendants. i
TO: MICHAEL W CHARLES i
2654 N.E. 135th Street
North Miami, Florida 33181
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Foreclosure of Mortgage on the
following described property:
LOT 1. BLOCK 1, of
HIDDEN COVE TOWN-
HOUSES, according to the
Plat fhereof. as recorded in
Plat Book 119. Page 64. of
the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida. AND the
West 30 feet of Tract B, HID-
D E N C 0 V E
TOWNHOUSES. Plat Book
119. Page 64. of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and you '
are required to serve a copy of,
your written defenses, if any, to it, I
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for ]
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida. 33146 on or before
September 11, .987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 6 day of August.
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
17923 August 14.21.28;
September 4. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-31109(07)
NOTICE OF ACTION
MIDLAND MORTGAGE
CORPORATION.
Plaintiff
vs.
DAVID ATKINSON, et
ux., et al.,
TO: RONALD FORTH and
HOPE FORTH, his wife
Route 2. Box 14
Independence. VA 24348
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property
The South Mj of the West Vi
of the S.W. '.of the N.W. '/,
of the N.E '. Section 16.
Township 56 South. Range
38 East, less the North 127
feet and less the South 25
feet, and less the West 43
feet, for Street Purposes.
Dade County. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it.
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida. 33146 on or before
August 21. 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately thereafter
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 16 dav of July.
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By ALEX BOSQUE
As Deputy Clerk
16874 July 24.31;
August 7. 14. 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FC CASE NO.: 87-5833 FC 13
IN RE: The Marriage of
MONTALAN JOSEPH
THERMITUS,
Petitioner/Husband,
vs.
SIMONE C THERMITUS.
Respondent/Wife.
TO: SIMONE C THERMITUS
50 East 19th Street. A-9
Brooklyn, New York 11226
shall serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 N.W. 12th Avenue.
Miami. Florida. 33136. and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before August 21. 1987, otherwise
a default will he entered.
July 20. 1
RICHARD BRINKER
Hv BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
16879 July 24. 31.
August 7. 14. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie-1
titious name CHIPS (or) CHIPS
COMPUTER INSTRUCTION
AGENCY at 1340 NE 174 St. N.
Miami Beach. FL 33162 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Tina Freiman
16883 July 31.
August 7. 14.21. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 87-31987
FLORIDA BAR NO. 549551
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CARL B. SPRINGER.
Petitioner/Husband,
and
MALVINA SPRINGER,
Respondent/Wife.
TO: MALVINA SPRINGER
158 Lawson Drive
Fort Bragg.
North Carolina 28307
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on MARIA
BREA LIPINSKI, Plaintiffs at-
torney, whose address is 15912
S.W. 92nd Avenue, Miami, Florida
33157, on or before August 28.
1987, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service on plaintiffs attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition
DATED: Julv 24. 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
BY Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
16893 July 31;
August 7,14.21, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, des.nng to
engage in business under the fie-
titious name TACA
DISTRIBUTORS at 8075 S.W.
107 Ave. No. Ill Miami. Fla.
33173 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
TARQUINO CALIXTO
8075 S.W. 107 Ave.
Miami. Fla.
17915 August 7. 14.21.28. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the under-igned. desiring to
engage in busineai under the fie
name PLACE DES ARTS
at MAYFAIR IN THE GROVE
BLD I R intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
ELIE GUIGUI
1MH My SI;
August 7. 14.21, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name ADAMS, HUNTER
ANGONES. ADAMS. ADAMS &
McCLURE at 66 West Flagler
Street. 9th Floor. Miami, Florida
33130 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Adams. Hunter. Ang
Adams. Adams & McClure. PA
"**' July 31;
August 7. 14.21. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-20944 CA 25
NOTICE OF ACTION
STOCKTON, WHATLEY,
DAVIN & COMPANY, a Florida
corporation.
Plaintiff,
v.
MARCOS BAYONA, and the
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other par-
ties claiming bv. through, under or
against him, AWILDA BAYONA
a/k/a AWILDA MARTINEZ;
UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA; and NORTH
AMERICAN EQUIPMENT
SYSTEMS. INC., a Florida
corporation;
Defendants.
To: Marcos Bayona, whose
residence is unknown, and the
unknown parties who may he
spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees. Iienors.
creditors, trustee-; and all par-
ties claiming interest In.
through, under or against said
Defendant, who are not
known to be dead or alive, and
all parties having or claiming
to have any right, title, or irj^
terest in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County. Florida:
Lot 7, in Block 23. of KINGS
GARDENS SECTION
THREE, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 95. at Page 30, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Albert C. Galloway, Jr.. Es-
quire, of Rosenthal & Yarchin.
PA., Attorneys for Plaintiff, Suite
800. 3060 Biscayne Boulevard,
Miami, Florida 33137. on or before
August 21st. 1987. and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 15th day of Jury
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
16872 July 24,31;
August 7. 14. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Aetioa
No. 87-02038 FC 30
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JOHN SANTORO,
Petitioner-Husband
and
ROSE SANTORO,
Respondent Wife
TO: ROSE SANTORO.
189 Bay 26th Street
Brooklyn. NY. 11214
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on EDWIN
A. WILLINGER, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 1655
Drexel Avenue, Miami Beach,
Florida 33139, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before August 7th,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 6th day of July, 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EDWIN A WILLINGER,
1655 Drexel Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone: 538-5756
MM July 10. 17,24.31,1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
I CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-31100-19
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARINA MURILLO BATRES.
Petitioner,
and
RENE ARTURO SOLIS,
Respondent.
TO: RENE ARTURO SOLIS
c/o Maria Ramona Batres
Rio Lindo Cortes
Contiguo a la Fusep
Honduras. CA.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
MELVIN J. ASHER. ESQ.. at
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is825 South Bayshore Drive.
Suite 543. Miami. FL 33131. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
August 21. IM7; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 16 dav of Julv. 19*7
RICHARD I' BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByT I AS A.MAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
16873 July 24, 31:
August 7. 14. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name WalkWise at 6627
South Dixie Hway Miami. FL
13143 intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
Walk Ways, Inc., a Fla. Corp.
By: Gary F. Canner. President
16877 July 24. 31;
August 7.14.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-34538 27
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United
States of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
JONI G DOLE, et at,
Defendants.
TO: JONI G. DOLE
2719 N.W. 23rd Street
Forth Worth. Texas 76106
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 2, Block 34, BENT
I TREE CENTER, according
to the plat thereof, as record
ed in Plat Book 109 at Page
82 of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it,
on Stuart H. Gitlitz. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruge Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
September 11, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 7 day of Aunust
1987. '
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By JOHN BRANDA
As Deputy Clerk
17921 August 14, 21, 28;
_^^^^ September 4. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
UOOUI name Carihe Finance in-
tends to register said name with
'< I l-;rk of the Circuit Court of
Dade ( ounty, Florida.
Audio Visual Language of
Puerto. In,
July,,!.
August 7. 14.21, IM7
IN THE CIRCUIT COl'T FOB
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-4226
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROSE APPELL
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the tt.
of ROSE APPELL, deceased n
Number 87-4226. is pending ,n th,
Circuit Court for Dade County
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flakier
St.. Miami. Florida. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal-|
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this com
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
THE FIRST PUBLICATION-,,K
THIS NOTICE: (li all data
against the estate and (2) any (in-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice m, served that
challenges the validity of the will
the qualifications of th. penonl
representative, venu.
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS \Mi ORJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVERBAKRF.il
Publication of tin- N
begun on August 7
Personal Repr. i
Jerome I-:.
900 West Avei
Miami Beach I
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Abraham A (ialhut
999 Washington Ave
Miami Beach. Fla. S31S9
Telephone: 672-3100
17914 August? U. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT.COIRT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNT!
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-3478115
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
AS TRUSTEE FOR THE DADE
COUNTY HOUSING FINANCE
AUTHORITY,
Plaintiff
PATRICK THOMAS
BLUBELLO. et ux.. et al.
Defendants
TO: PATRICK THOMAS
BLUBELLO and
DIANE M BLUBELLO.
his wife
1592 Pirkle Road
Norcroes, GA 30093
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of
Mortgage on the following
described property:
Lots 13. 14 and 15 less the
South 70 feet. Block 12.
SUNKIST GROVE,
according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 8. Page 49 of the
Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve copy
of your written defenses. if any
to it, on Stuart H. Gitlitz (
Attorney for Plaintiff, whose
address is Suite 214 I
Madruga Avenue. Coral Gables.
Florida. 33146 on or before
September 11, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or
immediately thereafter. Other**
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court this 10 day ol
August. 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By T. CASAMAV'K
As Deputy Clerk
17924 August 14. 21.
Septemlier 4. !'
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LA
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIW
that the undersigned desiring
engage in business under the K
titious name SHOPCEN III <>
VESTMENTS at 1500 San Rer*
Avenue. Suite 125. Coral '^
Florida 33146 intend
said name with the Clerk f w
Circuit Court of Dade count;
Florida. -rt-j
SHOPCEN III INVESTOR.
INC
AN"
ran in mvESTOi
17919 August I i
September 4. i


FORECLOSURE SALESPUBLIC NOTICES
Friday, August 14, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-30364 (27)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
ZENAIDA SANTANA LOPEZ.
Petitioner,
and
ALBERTO LOPEZ MARTINEZ.
Respondent.
TO: ALBERTO LOPEZ
MARTINEZ
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on MELVIN J. ASHER, ESQ., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 825 South Bayshore Drive,
Suite 543. Miami, FL 33131. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
August 21st. 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 15th day of July. 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
16871 July 24, 31;
August 7, 14. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-3775 (04)
IN RE:ESTATE OF
ROSE EHRENS
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of ROSE
EHRENS, deceased. File Number
87-3775 (04), ii pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami. FL 33130. The per
sonal representative of the estate
is BERNARD EHRENS. whose
address is 10090 Cherry wood
Place, Boynton Beach. FL 33436
The name and address of the per
.-.onal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re1'
quired. WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
:he above court a written state-
nent of any claim or demand they
nay have. Each claim must be in
vriting and must indicate the basis
or the claim, the name and ad-
Iress of the creditor or his agent or
ittorney, and the amount claimed
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
dark to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
August 7, 1978.
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ROSE EHRENS
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
HERBERT JAY COHEN, ESQ. .
COHEN & CHASE, PA
9400 S. Dadeland Blvd. Suite 600
Miami, Florida 33156
Telephone: (305) 6660401
17911 August 7, 14. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87-33133 (29)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
LIBIA E. PIZARRO.
a/k/a LIBIA E. GARCIA
and
JOSE GABRIEL GARCIA,
TO: JOSE GABRIEL
GARCIA
Carrera 47 No. 5.
E/57No. 1001-B
Call, Colombia
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on KMII.K i
C. PASTOR, PA., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is PH I
155 South Miami Avenue,
Miami, Florida 33130, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
September 4th. 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be pjblished
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 29th day of July, 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: John Branda
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EMILIOC. PASTOR. PA.
PH I 155 South Miami Ave.
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: 372-0088
Attorney for Petitioner
17902 August 7. 14. 21, 28, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Ft CASE NO.: 87-18657(19)
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARC VINCENT J COLAS.
Petitioner/Husband,
VI.
MARIE PIERRE VINCENT,
Respondent/Wife.
TO: MARIE PIERRE COLAS
318 N.E. 116th Street
Miami, Florida
shall serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney. 612 N.W. 12th Avenue,
Miami. Florida, 33136, and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before August 21, 1987, otherwise
a default will be entered.
July 20. 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
16878 Jury 24,31;
August 7, 14, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87 31940-19
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
EUGENE HUNTINGTON
and
DENISE ANN GREEN
HUNTINGTON
TO: DENISE ANN GREEN
HUNTINGTON
333 Hamilton Avenue
Paterson, New Jersey
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street North Miami Beach; Florida
33162, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
or before August 28, 1987; other
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 22 day of July. 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P. COPELANI)
As Deputy Clerk
16884 July 31;
August 7. 14,21, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name BAY HARBOR
DRUGS at 1001 Kane Concourse,
Bay Harbor Islands, FL 33154 in
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
KEYSTONE POINT
MEDICAL PHARMACY. INC.
By: Melvin B. Prine.
President
16880 July 24. 31;
August 7, 14. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-32647 29
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JORGE LUIS LINARES,
and
MARGARITA MENERVA
RIVERA PARRA.
TO: Margarita Menerva
Rivera Parra
Central Fructuoso
Rodriguez
Limonar
Matanzas, Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Steven
Miller, Esquire, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is FRIED-
MAN & KAPLAN, PA., 3636
West Flagler Street, Miami.
Florida 33135. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before August 28th,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 27th day of July, 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dmde County, Florida
By: John Branda
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
STEVEN MILLER, ESQUIRE
Friedman & Kaplan. P.A.
3636 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33135
Attorney for Petitioner
16896 July 31;
August 7.14,21.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87 4230
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MEYER MYERS
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of MEYER MYERS, deceased.
File Number 87-4230, is pending in
the Circuit Court for DADE Coun-
ty, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street, Room 307. Miami.
Florida 33131. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) anj ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 7, 1987.
Personal Representative:
Frances Pilloff
3268 Belvoir Boulevard
Beachwood, Ohio 44122
Joseph Wallis
for Jefferson National Bank
301 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Wayne A. Cypen
CYPEN &CYPEN
P.O. Box 402099
Miami Beach, Floida 33140
Teh -phone: (305) 532-3200
17909 August 7.14, 1961
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the lie
titious name Cielito Lindo
Restaurant intend to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Sikaffy Sikaffy & Aguilera. Inc.
by Rafael Aguilera. President
Herbert J. Lerner. Eaq.
Attorney for Applicant
801 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
Phone: (806) 6784000
17916 August". 14.21. 28. 1!K7
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SHIRLEON APART
MENTS at 13230 N.E. 6th
Avenue, North Miami, Fl. 33161
intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Shirley Ash and Lionel Ash
Willard K. Splittstoesser, Esq.
Attorney for Applicants
13122 West Dixie Highway. Suite
B
North Miami, Florida 33161
17906 August 7, 14.21,27, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COUT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87 4132
Division 04
IN RE:ESTATE OF
RUTH LANDSMAN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of RUTH LAND-
SMAN, deceased, File Number
87-4132. is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami, Florida 33130. The per-
sonal representative of the estate
is Louis Landsman-5151 Collins
Ave.. Miami Beach Florida and
Steven Landsman-Cross County
Center, 6 Xavier Dr., Yonkers.
New York. The name and address
of the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state
ment of any claim or demand they
may have Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amoung claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall the
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
lie described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity cf the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
August 7, 1987.
Louis Landsman
Steven Landsman
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Rt'TH LANDSMAN
I tat't';iS4*t1
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Kit-hard I. Kroop (12802.!)
Kwitnev, Kroop & Srheinherg,
P.A.
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 613
Miami Beach. Florida 88189
Telephone <::>5) 538 7575
17910 August 7. 14, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-30858-27
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Petition of
Juana M. Sanabria and
Pedro Sanabria for the adoption
of a minor child
TO: Hector Rafael Negron
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
ADOPTION has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, it any. to it
on ALAN SCHNEIDER. Esq..
Alan Schneider PA., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 2720
West Flagler Street. Miami,
Florida 33135 and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before September 4.
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this July 31, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By B.J. Frey
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
Alan Schneider, P.A.
2720 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33135
(Phone) (305) 643-6988
17907 August 7, 14,21.28. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-2534
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CHARLOTTE D. SHURIN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of CHARLOTTE D. SHURIN.
deceased. File Number 87-2534. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street. Miami,
Florida. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 7, 1987.
Personal Representative:
KSTELLE R. NEEDLE
25 Union Square
Randolph. Massachusetts 02368
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
l.eff. Pesetsky & Zack. P.A.
BY: SAMUEL I LEFF, ESQ.
1367 N.E. 162nd Street
No. Miami Beach, Fl. 33162
Telephone: (305) 945-7501
17903 August 7. 14. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name PROPERTY IN-
VESTMENT SYSTEMS at 2025
SW 1st St. Miami. FL 38186 in
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida
RAUL A. OLIVA
ANA G. OLIVA
17913 August 7. 14.21.28. 1987
i
I
I
t
I
:
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name LOVE YOUR
CARPET at 12130 SW. Ip7 Ave
Miami. Fl. 33176 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Klorida.
MPR Photographical Supply. Inc.
16886 July 31;
August 7, 14.21. 1967


]
Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 14, 1987
A Russian Girl Turns Sweet Sixteen
Continued from Page 3-B
leave Russia, we might all
have been American.
Or how we might all have
been Russian, had my grand-
father decided to remain.
"In Russia, birthdays are all
the same, the sweet sixteen
party is an American inven-
tion," says Mila. "It's wed-
dings which are done with real-
ly big parties in Russia."
AFTER THE couple signs a
civil registry, according to
Mila, they hold an all-night
celebration in a home, rented
hall, or restaurant.
"Families save up for a long
time, and only the bride and
maybe the mother of the bride
buy special dresses. Everyone
else just wears their best,
drinks and eats and dances all
night," Mila recounts.
Bar and Bat Mitzvahs, of
course, are also not celebrated
on the scale that they are in
the United States.
"The Jewish religion is not
practiced as openly as here, so
Bar Mitzvahs are done quietly
in the home, if they're done at
all," says Mila.
Is she more Jewish here than
she would have been in Russia?
"Yes," Mila replies. "I wear
a star of David here, and I'm
proud of it. In Russia, I never
would have. I remember so-
meone calling me zhyd a
Russian word that was a bad
name for a Jew, like 'kike,'
when I was in kindergarten.
"I asked my father what this
word meant, because at first I
didn't know. Then, later, when
I knew what it meant, and so-
Agudath Israel Hebrew In-
stitute of Miami Beach, which
serves modern Orthodox
Judaism, is celebrating its 86th
year since it was founded
under the leadership of the late
Rabbi Dr. Isaac Hirsh Ever,
ZTL. The synagogue now func-
tions under the leadership of
Rabbi Sheldon N. Ever, who
was graduated from the
Hebron Rabbinical College of
Jerusalem at the age of 18 as an
ordained rabbi.
Family Roots
AMSTERDAM (JTA) -
Dutch Jews eager to trace
their family roots have
welcomed the establishment of
a Dutch Society for Jewish
Genealogy in this city. More
than 150 persons visited its of-
fice here on its first day of
operation Monday after
reading a short notice about it
in the press, and indicated
their willingness to become
members.
meone called me something
similar, I ripped her notebooks
up and messed up her books,"
she recalls.
PERHAPS it is because the
line that separates one kind of
existence in the Soviet Union
from a radically different
lifestyle in the United States
can be so slim that Mila's
parents decided to celebrate
their daughter's coming of age
in America with an American
tradition interpreted in Rus-
sian terms.
And I cannot help but think
that despite the multitude of
guests, we were all aware of
who was missing amidst the
revelry Eydita and our
other Russian relatives, who
still remain in the Soviet
Union, in the Ukraine, under
the grip of a repressive
regime, in the wake of the re-
cent disaster at Chernobyl,
still walking in the shadow of
the long history of anti-
Semitism that darkens that
part of the world.
Mila's cousins, still living in the Soviet Union,
include (from left) the children of Mila '$ pater-
nal aunt, Svetlana: Vladik. 2*. and Eydita.
/6'.; and the children ojMila's paternal uwk
Vladimir: They are (right) Alexandra, 8. oi
Yanna, 18.
Publfx
"SW*?

Available al All Publix Stores and Fresh
Danish Bakeries.
Cinnamon
Raisin
Rolls..............P9n59
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only. Fresh Baked Daily
Rye Bread.............. 79<
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only. A Delirious Taste Treat
Apple Stmdel
Slices...................3for 99<
Cake Donuts.......610, 99<
Available at All Publly Stores and Fresh Danish
Bakeries. Serve with Your Meal or as a SnaTk
Zucchini Muffins.... fcj $159
weddKku:cha-'a3Ti"o'L">'
Wedding Cake
Ornament........... FRFFi
($15.00 Value)(Expire, August 31. 1987) '*-"-
mTt^rlirlll'i" Ausu,t ,3 lhru w* Auoust 19
|. '
V
"SQpteosute


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