The Jewish Floridian

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Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03039

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement This Issue
Vol. 60 No. 18
Miami Friday, May 1,1987
50 Cents
Israel's 39th Anniversary: Occasion
Steeped in Valor And Blood.
How A Nation Was Born
Two Presidents Examined Maps
By BARNET LITVINOFF
Immensely frail, Chaim
Weizmann rose from his sick-
bed and, accompanied by the
Jewish Agency expert Eliahu
Epstein, traveled to
Washington by train. Presi-
dent Truman, in no doubt how
ie visit would be considered
"{the UN lobbies, insisted on
absolute privacy, if not
f^recy. He and the "old doc-
tor, as he called Weizmann,
Pred over Epstein's sketch-
W of the area and tAlked for
"aJf an hour.
That same afternoon, the
President telephoned his chief
delegate at Lake Success: the
southern Negev, with its
keyhole to the Red Sea, must
be kept within the Jewish
State. In return the Arabs
were to be compensated with
Beersheba and a strip along
the Egyptian frontier. The
Russians proved agreeable,
and the situation was saved.
One further week remained
before the final vote in the
General Assembly, and Weiz-
mann's suite at the Waldorf
Astoria now became the nerve
center of the campaign to
force the partition motion
through.
THE LIST of likely op-
ponents and abstainers was
long and gave the Zionists
cause for grave anxiety. To
win the required two-thirds
majority, some minds had to
be changed. The Jews have a
way of advertising their inter-
national minority status as be-
ing a victimizing weakness. In
Continued on Page 14-A
U.S. Closes
Gate to Visit
By Waldheim
By MARGIE OLSTER
NEW YORK (JTA) The
U.S. Justice Department an-
nounced Monday a long-
awaited decision to bar
Austrian President Kurt
Waldheim, accused of involve-
ment in Nazi atrocities, from
entry to the Cnited States as a
private citizen.
Although Waldheim has not
l>een barred from visiting the
U.S. in his official capacity as
the Austrian head of State,
President Reagan pledged in a
letter written last year, that he
would never extend an invita-
tion to Waldheim for an official
visit.
A STATE Department
spokesman said "The Depart-
ment of Justice has determin-
ed that a prima facie case of
excludability exists with
respect to Kurt Waldheim as
an individual." (see related
story.)
Austria recalled its Am-
bassador to the United States
Monday in protest Austrian
President Waldheim
Foreign Minister Alois Mock
said in a statement, "This deci-
sion causes Austria deep
dismay and is categorically
rejected."
The decision assures that
Waldheim. the former United
Nations Secretary General,
Continued on Pajre 7-A
Mubarak Offended
Cairo Boots 7 PLO
Offices from Egypt
CAIRO In an act of
retaliation, Egypt Monday
shut down the offices of the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion in that country. Foreign
Minister Esmat Abdel-Meguid
read a statement that implied
the Palestinian officials and
their offices must be expelled.
"The Arab Republic of
Egypt has decided to close all
offices of the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization and the
organizations belonging to it
(in Egypt) and will take the
necessary measures related to
this," the Foreign Minister
declared.
ACCORDING to sources
here, there are seven offices of
the PLO and related agencies
in Cairo and Alexandria
covered by the statement.
Egypt's move was in ap-
parent retaliation for criticism
by the PLO voiced during a
week-long meeting in Algiers
of the Palestine National
Council last week.
In a series of resolutions, the
PNC declared that future rela-
tions between the PLO and
Egypt should take into ac-
Continued on Page 13-A
President Mubarak


Page 2-A TheJewish Floridian/Friday, May 1, 1987
IDF Unit
Repulses
Terrorist
Break-In
Bv GIL SEDAN
And HIGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) An
Israel Defense Force unit
repulsed a terrorist gang at-
tempting to infiltrate the
south Lebanon security zone
last Thursday. The clash took
place near Bint Jabil village.
There were no IDF casualties
but blood stains on the ground
indicated one or more of the in-
filtrators was wounded.
Personal weapons, sabotage
equipment and shoulder-fired
missiles were found near the
scene.
Earlier last Thursday,
Israeli helicopter gunships at-
tacked terrorist targets south
of Sidon in south Lebanon. An
IDF spokesman said buildings
that served as terrorist head-
quarters for planning and
launching attacks on Israel
were hit.
FOLLOWING THE attack.
Israel Air Force jets dropped
leaflets over south Lebanon
warning the local population
that cooperation with ter-
rorists would bring "harsh
measures" by the IDF.
Katyusha rockets have been
fired into Galilee from south
Lebanon last week. A terrorist
gang that infiltrated Israel
recently and killed two IDF
soldiers from ambush is believ-
ed to have found shelter in
local villages before they
breached the border fence.
Meanwhile. Israel has
reportedly warned Syria and
the Lebanese Shiite militia.
Amal. that it would not
tolerate terrorist attacks from
Lebanese territory. Military
sources have noted that since
the Syrian army occupied
Moslem west Beirut in March
and deployed elements
southward, Amal has directly
attacked IDF units in the
south Lebanon security zone.
Previously its targets were
limited to the Israel-backed
South Lebanon Army (SLA),
the main force in the security
zone.
ISRAEL WARNED it
would hold Amal responsible
for attacks on the IDF but
does not consider Amal an
enemy and will try to improve
relations with the local Shiite
population.
The most serious clash in the
KILLED BY TERRORISTS: The loved ones of Israeli soldier
Sgt. AsafAlon follow his casket to its last resting place in the Tel
Aviv eemetary. Sgt Alon was killed during a clash with throe for
rorists near Kibbutz Manara on Apr. 19. APWinV World PI
security zone involved the
Iran-backed extremist Shiite
movement Hezbullah which
mounted a large-scale attack
in the zone last month. It was
repulsed by IDF infantry back-
ed by tanks and helicopter
gunships. Hezbullah casualties
were severe. Initially. 18
bodies were discovered. Seven
more were found in the area
last week, bringing the total to
25. Four IDF soldiers were
slightly wounded in the clash.
A parcel bomb discovered in
a Tel Aviv-to-Ashkelon bus
last Thursday morning was
safely detonated by police sap-
pers after it was spotted by an
alert passenger
Escalation Noted
Resurgent Violence Linked to PLO Meet in Algiers
> hnistHcrkJiaun
Phona: (305) 373-4605
Published weakly very Friday
since 1827 by The Jewish Ftorl
dian Office and Plant 120 N.E
6th St Miami. Fla 33132 Phone
(306) 373-4605. Second-Class
Postage paid In Miami. Fla
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P.O. Box 012973. Miami. Fla
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Jewish Fiondlan does not
guarantee the Kasnrutn of the
merchandise advertised in Its
columns
SUBSCRIPTION RATES In ad
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:>e> copy
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Terrorist attacks along the
Lebanese border and in the ad-
ministered territories
escalated during the past
week. Most observers here link
the resurgent violence directly
to the hard line taken at tin-
Palestine National Council
meeting in Algiers.
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres expressed hope last
week that with the Palestine
Liberation Organization's
mainstream, headed by Yasir
Arafat, edging closer to
radicals and extremists in an
effort to achieve Palestinian
unity, moderate elements in
the territories would be
strengthened.
HIS VIEW arose from the
notion that Palestinians would
realize the PLO offered a dead
end, not a way to achieve
peace or advance Palestinian
interests. But this has proven
to be wishful thinking. Once
again, the Arab political com-
munity responded in accord
with the internal politics of the
PLO.
The East Jerusalem Arabic
press hailed the show of unity
at Algiers although it undercut
whatever small progress was
made in the past two years to
bring Palestinians closer to the
negotiating table.
Slogans smeared on walls re-
joiced over Arafat's apparent
reconciliation with hard line
terrorists such as George
Habash and Naif Hawatmeh
and news that Syrian-backed
PLO dissidents who drove
Arafat from Lebanon in 1984
were now back in the fold.
Terrorist elements in the
territories expressed their ap-
proval by violence. Two
gasoline bombs were thrown
at Israeli vehicles in the middle
of Gaza Saturday, injuring a
three-year-old child. On Fri-
day, five Molotov cocktails
were thrown at soldiers near
the Dahaishe and El-Aroub
refugee camps on the
JeruaalenvHebron road.
THE GAZA incident arout-
ed fury among Jewish settlers.
On Sunday they drove a
motorcade through Gaza,
openly displaying their
weapons as a warning and
show of force
Those developments, which
coincided with the end of the
PNC meeting, made it clear
that Israelis would have to re-
evaluate the political situation.
The severe blows inflicted on
the I'M) .n the Lebanon war,
and its fragmentation during
ine years that followed, did not
bring Palestinian moderates to
the fore. Now. with the PLO
seeingly reunited, the
moderates have run for cover.
Shortly before the PNC, the
so-called Palestinian
parliament-in-exile, convened
for its 18th session in Algiers,
Peres met twice with local
Palestinian leaders, some of
them known PLO sym-
pathizers. So did Abba Eabn.
chairman of the Knesset's
Foreign Affairs and Security
Committee.
Those meetings yielded no
concrete results and Palesti-
nians and Israelis now appear
farther apart than ever.
This view was expressed by
several Ministers after the
weekly Cabinet meeting Sun-
day. Communications Minister
Amnon Rubinstein of the
Shinui Party told reporters the
meeting in Algiers
"strengthened those of us who
M S-I-S7 M-6-147 M-6-1-87
think the PLO and peace an
mutually exclusive.*' Energy
Minister Moshe Shahal. a
l,al>orite. said Israel and Jor-
dan would have t" find other
Palestinians willing to come to
the negotiating table. Gad
Yaacobi, Minister of Economic
Coordination, also a Laborite.
thought the PNC meeting had
"created tome setback in the
political process*' but that it
wasn't "critical."
ONLY ONE Israeli
Minister. Ezer Weizman. has
insisted that come what may.
Israel eventually must
negotiate with the PLO But
Weizman's views arc not
popular now. even within the
I.abor Party and press
mounting to take strong ev
draconian measun
response to tern>ns; atts
the temritories
Where does this leave the
peace proceaa? Dr Alexander
Blei, of the Hebrew Univer-
sity! Truman Institute, sun
seated that the road to Middle
Eaat peace cannot be found in
Algiers or in Jordan, hut in
Moscow.
According to Blei, wh n
Continued on Pag;? 15**
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Friday, May 1, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
PLO Algiers Meet Fails
To Dampen Peres' Peace Hopes
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres insisted last week that
his hopes for Middle East
peace talks within the
framework of an international
conference have not been
,lamj>ened by the obdurate
staml taken at the Palestine
National Council (PNC)
meeting in a tightly-guarded
hall some 12 miles outside
Algiers.
Aides to the Foreign
Minister said he will continue
to pursue the idea of negotia-
tions with a Jordanian-
Palestinian delegation despite
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion chief Yasir Arafat's
renunciation of his 1985 accord
with King Hussein and his ap-
parent embrace of the most ex-
treme terrorist groups in the
name of Palestinian unity.
PERES BRIEFED the
Labor Party ministerial caucus
on his intentions and made
sure that his position was pro-
mptly conveyed to the media.
According to a report in Davar
last Wednesday (April 22),
Peres would bring his pro-
posals before the Cabinet
within 10 days. He is confident
of American support, confi-
dent that an international con-
ference will serve as a format
for direct talks between Israel
and all the parties concerned,
[>avar reported.
His aides said Peres is deter-
mined to go all-out over the
conference issue, even if it
means dissolution of the
Labor-Likud unity coalition
government. He believes the
nation will back him in early
elections.
Nevertheless, events in
Algiers where the 426-member
PNC. the so-called Palestinian
parliament in exile, met for the
first time since 1984, sent a
chill through diplomatic
quarters.
Arafat's threat of stepped-
up terrorist warfare against
Israel, his stated goal of an in-
dependent Palestinian state
with Jerusalem as its capital
and his reconciliation with ex-
tremists such as George
Hahash and Naif Hawatmeh
and the Syrian-backed PLO
dissidents who drove his forces
from Lebanon in 1984, cast a
pall over peace prospects in
the region.
EQUALLY CHILLING was
the demand by the PLO's
tore^n minister" Farouk
Kadloumi that the Camp
David accords be cancelled and
that Egypt return "to its pro-
per place in the Arab world."
Speaking at the PNC, he also
insisted on special relations
with Jordan, calling for a con-
federation of two independent
states Jordan and Palestine.
Kaddoumi also urged the
strengthening of the
21-member Arab League, from
which Egypt was suspended
after its peace treaty with
Israel in 1979.
A pessimistic assessment of
the situation was given in Con-
Related Story
. Page 10-A
gressional testimony in
Washington by Richard Mur-
phy. Assistant Secretary of
State for Near Eastern and
South Asian Affairs, who is
regarded as the State Depart-
ment's top expert on the Mid-
dle East.
Murphy's views and the
resurgent bellicosity in Algiers
were seen as vindication of the
Likud position that an interna-
tional conference would im-
peril Israel and that it is
useless to seek Palestinian
negotiating partners.
Premier Yitzhak Shamir has
been pounding these points
home in a bitter public feud
with Peres which some
observers see as a calculated
attempt to bring down the uni-
ty government. Shamir is said
to be convinced that public opi-
nion is oyerwhelmingly behind
him and an election fought
over the peace issue would
result in a Likud victory.
PERES, meanwhile, was
quoted as telling his Cabinet
colleagues that "What happen-
ed in Algiers does not hurt
peace prospects. We took into
account (the need) to make
progress toward peace without
Arafat and without his Fatah
because they are not in-
terested in peace."
He told Labor Party
members here that "We will
continue to strive for peace
with Jordan, with the in-
habitants of the administered
areas and with other regional
states. The chance of progress
is very great."
According to Peres' aides,
consultations with the Soviet
Union, the United States and
the Jordanians resulted in a
broad consensus on pro-

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i --
Lt. Gen. Dan Shomron, 50 (right), from Kib-
butz Ashdot Ya'aJcov after being sworn in as
Israel's ISth Chief of'General Staff, is con-
gratulated by the outgoing Chief of Staff Lt.
Gen. Moshe Levy. Present at the ceremony, at
JTA/WZN News Photo
the Prime Minister's office in Jerusalem were
Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir (center right)
and Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin (center
left).
cedures for an international
conference. Moscow now
agrees on the need for direct
one-on-one negotiations in
regional subcommittees and
agrees that the conference
plenary will not be allowed to
impose its will on the bilateral
negotiations, the aides say.
Sources close to the Foreign
Minister stressed that for all
practical purposes, the peace
[>rocess initially would be
imited to a dialogue between
Israel and a Jordanian-
Palestinian delegation. The
Israel-Egyptian peace treaty is
holding satisfactorily and
Syria is unlikely to attend
peace talks, at least in their in-
itial stage, the sources said.
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Page4-A TheJewish Floridian/Friday. May 1. 1987
Arafat: Miracle Man
Of Many Resurrections
Yasir Arafat is a man with an unbelievable
number of resurrections in the life of his
political fortunes. He pulled another one of
these rather remarkable occurrences in
Algiers last week. There, faced with the pro-
spect of disparate elements of his Palestine
Liberation Organization in disarray, and op-
posed to renewing his role as Chief. Arafat
managed to draw them together and to re-
main as their leader.
There is much that is breathtaking in this
because of the fate he suffered at the hands
of the Israelis in Lebanon in the 1982 war.
Defeated and drummed out of Beirut.
Arafat managed to reestablish himself in
Tripoli on a ticket of safe voyage there
guaranteed by the United States and
France.
His attempt at regrouping in Tripoli hav-
ing failed, he left Lebanon for Tunisia, this
time under the protective umbrella of the
French, who seemed especially worried that
Israel not hamper his departure or set a slur
upon his dignity.
Since then. Arafat has done a brilliant job
of infiltrating Lebanon anew of course,
with the aid of the Lebanese themselves,
who are dead set on committing national
suicide. Ditto, the Syrians, who most recent-
ly have occupied Beirut "for its own good.*'
Mubarak Offended
So much for Arafat's fabulous success
story. Now. for his failures. In 1985. he
came to an understanding with Jordan's
King Hussein about a new Palestinian state
and an accommodation with the Palestinians
which Hussein wanted, and still wants,
before acceding to peace talks with Israel
under the protective umbrella of an interna-
tional conference, including China and the
Soviet Union.
The King does not. after all. want to suffer
the fate of Egypt's President Sadat who
established peace with Israel unilaterally
and was assassinated for his troubles.
But at the Algiers conference, Arafat
could not stop the PLO's George Habash
types, or the shadow of Abu Nidal. from
castigating Egypt for its peace accord with
Israel. Nor did Arafat see anything wrong
with trashing his 1985 accommodation with
Hussein as a sabre-rattling act supreme.
It is for these reasons that Egypt's Presi-
dent Mubarak Monday moved against the
Palestine Liberation Organization's offices
in that country with vengeance in mind for
the offense to Egypt's own dignity.
Mubarak clearly has enough problems sus-
taining the Camp David peace treaty with
Israel without having to hear the PLO's
highest echelons chatter away about the
"necessity" of Egypt's scrapping the treaty.
Where does this leave things?
Unity Gov't. Folly
It leaves countries like the United States
and France no wiser about how to deal with
the Arabs than they were in 1982 or. in-
deed, in 1947. It ought to leave Israel a bit
more relieved than it was last week at the
prospect of a Palestine Liberation Organiza
bon renewed in Algiers.
But it also does little to resolve the Israeli
ediucal dilemma at home, where Prime
mister Yitzhak Shamir remains at odds
with Foreign Minister Shimon Peres, who
seems to be spoiling for a new election and
the opportunity to pursue his own Middle
East peace agenda once, as he believes, he
wins the prime ministership single-
handedly.
The question is whether Shamir and Peres
as keepers of the Unity Government can
maintain an even keel and agree on means of
bringing King Hussein and Jordan into a
peace arrangement with Egypt as shadchan.
circumventing the great magician at resur-
rections. Yasir Arafat, who shot himself in
the foot in Algiers with vows to establish a
new Palestine whose capital will be
Jerusalem.
This would be a dream devoutly to be con-
summated as Israel gets set to celebrate its
39th Independence Day this Monday. May 4.
Rather than to tear the country apart with
threats of new elections if not elections
themselves the Unity Government must
make certain that it exploits to the max-
imum the opportunity for peace with Jordan
that Arafat presented to the world in
Algiers and that Egypt tied with ribbons
and bows in its angry expulsion Monday of
PLO offices and officials from that country.
For the fact is that Peres would not win
singlehandedly in a new election. Nor would
Shamir. The Unity Government would be
best advised to move forward as it is
presently constituted and to take advantage
of President Mubarak's latest Arafat-
weakening move.
NEW POSTER. IN RUMANIA
Miami's Mayor Suarez
Work Ethic Acquires New Dimension
By XAVIER L. SI AREZ
Mivor. City of Miami
Few moments in my life
have been so stirring as my ar-
rival in Israel. Our 747 was
gliding peacefully, so still that
the only movement we felt was
our heartbeats as our approach
to Israel was announced. Im-
mediately after the announce-
ment, a haunting melody sur-
rounded our beings:
"Jerusalem of Gold." And our
hearts beat even faster.
Through the window, exact-
ly perpendicular to our plane's
direction, we could see the end
of the Mediterranean and the
skyline of Tel Aviv. Within
minutes, we had landed and
were on our way to Jerusalem.
THE TOUR guide narrated
conquest after conquest of this
extraordinary city. He gave
meaning to the rabbinical say-
ing that "When God created
sorrow, he gave nine measures
to Jerusalem and one measure
to the rest of the world."
But we could not feel the sor-
row of Jerusalem. Even our
political purpose was subsum-
ed in the sheer spiritual
character of what soon lay
before us. To quote Gabnel
Meyer, we saw before us an
"undulating skyline of dome
and spires. .an icon of
history. .a surprising and un-
forgettable confrontation with
our own heritage and indentity
as the People of God."
One can easily understand
why there is confusion bet-
ween church and state in
Israel they're so interwoven
historically. Three of the
world's five principal religions
were born here. Their
adherents have battled over its
territory- for over twenty
centuries.
One searches for common
thread, monotheism, and
seizes it. proclaiming it in the
name of peace and as a shield
for the history that lives here
hopefully never to endure
another conquest and another
destruction.
Is one common thread
MitHHi Mayor Xar\er L.
Suarez recently trawled to
Israel. He wrote this artieU
upon his return.
enough* Can a city so
heterogeneous in a region so
volatile function under one
flag for any appreciable length
of time'*
ONE CONCLUDES readily
that it can. The principal
reason are the Israelis Work
ethic acquires a whole new
dimension in Israel. Without
many natural resources, they
seem to have a surpi.
human resources. Order is ap-
preciated. work is embrace-i. b
common purpose o.,,<-.:.,
survival is undersUx-i
fering is expected, ultimate
success is taken for granted.
No one minimizes the
obstacles, both external and
internal. Externally, there? a
constant threat in the unifica-
tion of all border countries
against Israel <>ne senses that
even without L'.S. support, the
Israelis would feel confide I
their ability to repulse any and
all aggressors. Nevertheless,
they recognize the imperative
nature of U.S. help.
Internally, they seek to com-
pensate for their heten>genei-
ty by knowing extremely well
the religious forces that vie fi ir
primacy in this "Holy Land."
They try to surprise you and
sometimes do with
knowledge of Christ
theology that exceeds tr.
their C hnstian counterpart
THEY EXERCISE a
careful sort of paternalism
over the holy shnnes, mai
Coatiaeed oa Pmjr* M
Our Readers Write: Venom
Ignores Pollard's Spy Foolishness
Tke Jewish Floruiian:
Despite the mix-up of the
headlines for the Malaysia and
Pollard stones, it was easy to
identify' the venom emanating
from Abraham Scherr's
typewriter on your Op-Ed
page. April 17.
Disagree with Scherr. and
you become, tpso faeto. a col-
laborationist with Polish
cossacks. Disagree with him.
and you become a Quisling. If
you try to examine the implica-
tions of Pollard's act by some
outlandish and outrageous
twist of logic, you are accused
of being influenced "by dollars
and cents or self-interest."
What does Mr. Scherr have
to say about Israeli spokesper-
sons (see Page Ai who
disagree with Scherr's van-
tage point like Abba Eban. or
Michael Brison. distinguished
columnist of Haaretz I\> they.
and many other Israelis, have
a galut mentality or cringe?
I do agree that the sentence
hung on Jonathan Pollard is
excessive, but trying to com-
pletely absolve him for break
ing a U.S. law is foolhardy and
illogical.
There are varied viewpoints
to be taken but name-calling is
not the proper approach
JEROME BERLINER
Miami Beach
Jewish Florid ian
Fred K Snochet
Edrtor ana PuW'Vr
Leo Mindlin
*Moc>at EO'tcw
Suzanne Snocnet
Ei*cuttv E William T
D ':: -
Joan C Tegias
Friday. May 1.1987
Volume 60
2IYAR5747
Number 18


Friday, May 1. 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Dramatic Acre Prison Breakout Was Britain's Last Straw
By SUSAN BASS
Mav 4. 1987 marks not only
the 39th independence day of
the State of Israel, but the
40th anniversary of one of the
most dramatic events in the
struggle against British Man-
datory rule in Eretz Yisrael -
the Acre prison breakout in
which 41 IZL members and
251 other inmates escaped.
At four o'clock in the after-
noon on May 4, 1947, a com-
mando unit of IZL (Irgun Zvai
Leumi. National Military
Organization) attacked the
British prison housed inside
the massive Acre citadel and
freed 2'A prisoners 131
Aral's and 120 Jews. Contem-
porary newspapers described
the assault as "the greatest
jail-break in history," while
British defense experts
described it as a "military
masterpiece."
THE ATTACK came in the
wake of the British executions
of four Jewish freedom-
fighters at the prison,
members of IZL. The British
authorities carried out these
executions in virtual secrecy,
without notifying even the
families of the executed men.
On April 15. 1947 they impos-
ed a sudden curfew throughout
the country, and surrounded
the fortress at Acre with
troops and armored vehicles.
In the pre-dawn hours of
April 16, Dov Gruner. Dov
Rosenbaum. Mordecai Alkoshi
and Eliezer Kashani were
taken from their cells and ex-
ecuted by hanging on the
prison gallows. They went to
their death singing HatiJcvah.
toe week after the execu-
tions in Acre, the British
authorities prepared to hang
two Jewish prisoners held in
Jerusalem: Meir Feinstein. a
member of IZL. and Moshe
Banizani. a member of Lehi
(Lohamei Herut Israel.
Freedom Fighters for Israel).
At the last moment, these two
young men committed suicide
: exploding a hand grenade
The gallows m Acre prison where on April 16.
19i?. four members of the Irgun Zvai Leumi
were executed by hanging. The Hebrew in-
scription on the wall read*. The flame of their
memory will neivr be extinguished.'
which had been smuggled into
their cell.
IN THE wake of these ex-
ecutions, the Irgun decided to
carry out a daring operation to
free Jewish prisoners held by
the British in the fortess at
Acre. IZL prepared for the
assault with a careful recon-
naissance of the fortress and
its surroundings. As former
IZL leader Menachem Begin
wrote in his account of the at-
tack, "sometimes the recon-
noiterer appeared to be 'Arab.'
sometimes 'British' But
always they were Irgun
fighters."
Originally built by the
Crusaders, and later restored
by the Turks, the citadel in
Acre had withstood a siege by
Napoleon Bonaparte's ar-
tillery. With two-meter thick
walls, surrounded by British
army camps and encircled by
British troops, the citadel was
considered to be an im-
pregnable bastion. For this
reason, the British Mandatory
government had no qualms in
using the citadel as one of
Palestine's two central
prisons.
IZL was in close contact
with its members imprisoned
in the fortress, who were con-
stantly alert, preparing to take
an active part in their libera-
tion. A small quantity of ex-
plosives had been smuggled in-
to them and when the attack
began, they blew up from
within the two heavy iron
gates which separated them
from the assault group. Eitan
Livni, who was serving a 15
year sentence, commanded the
Irgun members imprisoned in
the fortress. He recalls, "We
know for a fortnight ahead of
time. Everything was planned
down to the smallest detail.
We received about seven
pounds of explosives which we
would need for the day of the
assault."
DOV COHEN, who used the
code name Shimshon. headed
the assault force. During
World War II. Cohen had serv-
ed with distinction in the com-
mando units of the British ar-
my. On the afternoon of May 4,
dressed in a British captain's
uniform, Cohen commanded
what appeared to be a British
army convoy traveling north
Towards Beirut. As the convoy
passed British soldiers
heading south, they exchanged
smiles of greeting and waved.
When the convoy reached
Acre, small groups dispersed
in all directions. A total of 27
Irgun members including
two women participated in
the assault. The commandos
planted mines and shelled
nearby army camps, both to
create a diversion and to pre-
vent reinforcements from
reaching the citadel.
The main assault group ap-
proached the southern wall of
the fortress. Climbing on the
roof of an adjoining Turkish
bath-house, they attached ex-
plosives to the citadel wall.
The explosion created a breach
in the two meter thick wall,
large enough for the prisoners
Continued on Page 12-A
How Hundreds Each Year Are Helped
To Become Educated Soldiers
i
Israel '
first Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion (right)
wiracterized the Israel Defense Force's approach to its new
^"Titsby declaring that 'A good soldier is an educated soldier.'
^hoVdtVl^Lr^T^tl TT^ t>ZrT^nlrT,^T- drP-out <* delinquent, the
tuns to recZ^i^!^.. %!^1' &7iZTber f ** l % *** *y had to "<* the mi,it*7
By ZEEV FISHER
It was the country's first
Prime Minister David Ben-
Gurion, who characterized the
IDE's approach to its new
recruits when he said. "A good
soldier is an educated soldier."
Vet each year many hun-
dreds of Israeli 18-year-olds
who are drafted into the army
are found to be ill-educated,
sometimes even illiterate. At
one time, the army rejected
such conscripts outright.
However, this sentenced the
youngsters to a life of social
alientation and frequently,
unemployment.
NOW WITH the help of
LIBI (Lema'an Bitachon
Yisrael, for the sake of Israel's
security) an IDF-run charity,
these disadvantaged soldiers
are offered educational enrich-
ment courses. In small classes,
with handpicked teachers,
young men labor over fourth
grade level studies, learning
basic Hebrew and
mathematics. Away from their
deprived homes and motivated
by the knowledge that this is a
second and last chance, most
succeed.
Thanks to LIBI and its
donors, many of these
erstwhile "failures" go on to
fulfil important functions
within the army. Yossi Janach
from Netanya typified the
dramatic turnaround in some
teenagers' lives. A school
start of his military service.
His rebellious nature led him
to spend several spells in
military prison before an
educational enrichment course
altered his outlook. "For the
first time people seemed to
care about me." he recalls. "I
was given encouragement and
major expansion: "We are an
intimate, low profile organiza-
tion," he says. "It would be
detrimental if we jrrew into a
large fund-raising machine.
Nevertheless, with a few more
officers we could approach a
lot more people."
Though LIBI is a nationally-
IsrxwVs anniversary recalls
David Ben-Gurion s adage.
Today Yossi
first sergeant in
a large army
recognize the new State of Israel.
police to collect him at the
affection.'
Janach is a
charge of
kitchen.
LIBI WAS the brainchild of
former Prime Minister
Menachem Begin and was set
up in 1980 under the initiative
of the then chief-of-staff.
Rafael Eitan. Approximately
75 percent its budget is spent
on educational projects for the
disadvantaged with the re-
mainder going towards the
development of new defense
weapons, the improvement of
training methods and the ac-
quisiton of medical equipment
and installations. Vital items
purchased by LIBI include air-
borne resuscitation systems
which are installed in special
helicopters, and tools for
treating burns.
While Lt Col. Meir Bleyer of
LIBI feels that his team of six
officers is not enough to ac-
complish all that is necessary,
he would not want to see any
known, registered state chari-
ty, offering tax deductible
rights to its donors, it pays
nothing in overheads. The ar-
my pays the salaries of LIBI's
staff, the Ministry of finance
provides offices, newspapers
allow LIBI to advertise free of
charge and a diverse range of
professionals give free
services.
LT. COL. BLEYER can
boast that "the public knows
that every shekel that comes
to LIBI goes to a good cause.
Moreover, larger donors can
stipulate exactly what they
want their money to purchase,
whether it be a certain piece of
medical equipment or the
financing of somebody's
education."
Israelis and even visitors
from overseas have been
highly responsive to LIBI.
Every year the organization
Continued on Page 12-A


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 1, 1987
If Necessary
Peres Threatens He'll Seek
New Elections on Peace Issue
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Vice Premier and Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres said on
television last Wednesday
night (April 22) that he would
seek new elections on the
peace issue if necessary.
Peres said he was "sure"
that Jordan would enter into
direct negotiations with Israel
following an "international
opening" of a peace con-
ference with the participation
of all parties concerned within
and outside the region.
His advocacy of an interna-
tional conference for Middle
East peace has brought him in-
Settlers'
Claims Nixed
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin flatly rejected claims by
Jewish settlers in the West
Bank, particularly the settlers
of Alfe-Menashe and Ariel, for
the same security sensitive
status as Israeli towns on the
northern borders.
He stated furthermore that
the territory on which those
settlements are located would
be negotiable when the time
came for peace talks with Jor-
dan. Rabin's remarks, at a
meeting of the Labor Party
Central Bureau last Thursday
(April 23). unleashed a storm
of protest from Likud.
ALFE-MENASHE and
Ariel lie close to the old "green
line," the demarcation line bet-
ween Israel and the West
Bank. A resident of Alfe-
Menashe died April 11 in a
firebomb attack on a car which
severely burned her husband,
three children and a friend.
The incident triggered
demands by settlers for im-
proved security.
Rabin maintained that "The
status of Alfe-Menashe is
similar to that of Afule (in the
Emek)." He said neither Alfe-
Menashe nor Ariel contribute
to Israel's security. "From the
defense viewpoint there is no
difference between Ariel and
Afule," he said.
Likud MK Eliahu Ben
EUssar called Rabin's asser-
tions "most serious."
Suarez
Reports
Continued from Pace 4-A
which are managed by several
district denominations which
previously were not
cooperating with each other.
As a practical matter, Israel
has a very little chance to
achieve its goals of statehood
and self sufficiency About the
same chance that a camel has
of going through the eye of a
needle, or David of defeating
Goliath, or a carpenter's son
from Nazareth of all places
of changing the course of
history. But Israel just isn't a
practical experiment. It is a
wonderfully spirited one. And
it will succeed.
to open conflict with Premier
Yitzhak Shamir. He was assail-
ed by Likud last Thursday for
allegedly implying that Shamir
was anti-peace.
PERES CAME under sharp
attack from Likud Minister
Moshe Arens who accused him
of partisan pursuit of a policy
(an international conference)
which has not been approved
by the Cabinet.
The Vice Premier said he
hoped dissolution of the Labor-
Likud unity coalition govern-
ment and early elections could
be avoided. There may well be
Likud Ministers who would
support an "international
opening" followed by direct
negotiations, he said.
Peres recalled that a ranking
Likud leader. Deputy Premier
and Housing Minister David
Levy, broke with his party
three years ago to vote with
Labor for withdrawal of the
Israel Defense Force from
Lebanon and for the economic
austerity program. Levy's
stock in the party declined
when Shamir was unanimously
reelected leader at the Herut
convention last month.
PERES HAS said he in-
tends to present his proposals
to the Cabinet which could
precipitate a showdown bet-
ween Labor and Likud. He did
not say when, but most
observers believe he will make
his move when he returns from
a visit to Washington he is
scheduled to make in two
weeks.
Peres said in his television
interview that the political
leadership is not likely to be af-
fected by reports on Israel's
involvement in the Jonathan
Pollard spy case, due to be sub-
mitted in the next few weeks.
The matter is under separate
investigation by a two-man
committee of inquiry ap-
pointed by the Cabinet and by
the Knesset's special in-
telligence subcommittee. The
latter began drafting its fin-
dings last week and expects to
complete the task some time
this month.
Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir appears in
high spirits during the featiif opening of the
Mimouna celebrations in Jerusalem last urek.
The Mimouna. traditionally a featwal of
Moroccan Jeu-s in Israel, is being celebrated
JTA W/s -., .
for the first time tail ynr u a COttnop
holiday around the world in ordtr-
crease understanding and bring about
meeting of hearts in the true spirit and '
tion of the Mimouna.'
Synagogue Leads in Rights Aid to Central Americans
By SHLOIME PEREL
MONTREAL (JTA) A
change in Canadian immigra-
tion policy prohibiting citizens
of 18 countries from waiting in
Canada for political asylum
there has brought the only
synagogue in a Canadian-U.S.
border town into the forefront
of providing aid to Central
Americans.
In the last two months,
several hundred Central
Americans have waited in
Plattsburgh, NY. a not-
wealthy town of 25,000. for
word from Canadian immigra-
tion officials. Plattsburgh
religious and volunteer
organizations, including Tem-
ple Beth Israel, have raised
money and provided social
relief, and have formed the
Central Volunteer Coor-
dinating Agency.
"I THINK WE can certainly
sympathize with the plight of
the refugees." explained Rabbi
Eric Slaton of Beth Israel, a
congregation of 90 families.
"Many of them are fleeing for
their lives, and I think more
than anyone else we (Jews)
have a historic connection with
their plight. I think that the
(American) Jewish community
can do much with all its
resources."
Like the United States.
Canada now will grant refugee
status only to people who can
prove they would he in
physical danger if forced to
return to their countm-
origin. If the policy isn't
changed, the Plattsburgh
volunteers estimate they will
need to raise $3 million next
year.
Honor Thy
Mother.
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-
Friday, May 1, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Slams Gate to Waldheim Visit
Continued from Pr* 1-A
will never legally enter this
country again. Jewish
organizations praised attorney
(leneral Edwin Meese and the
Justice Department for taking
the appropriate action in the
Waldheim case.
THE WORLD Jewish Con-
gress, which discovered and
exposed the first documenta-
tion of Waldheim's wartime
activities which he concealed
for four decades, issued a
statement saying: "The At-
torney General of the United
States "t" America, Edwin
Meese, has acted in a
courageous manner and has
sent a clear messsage: Nazis
are nol welcome here. After 40
.ears, justice has been done in
"the case of Kurt Weldheim."
Waldheim's past came to
public attention in spring 198*'>
after a World Jewish congress
-.Marcher discovered that a
file in the United Nations War
("rimes Commission (I'NWCC)
archive charged Waldheim
with "murder"' and "putting
ages to death.'" The
documents showed that
Waldheim served as an in-
telligence officer in the Ger-
man Army and committed
atrocities in Yugoslavia and
Greece by ordering the murder
of Jews. Gypsies, Serbs and
resistance fighters.
Waldheim has admitted that
he concealed part of his war
time service by claiming
repeatedly that he was
discharged in 1941 and finish-
ed a law degree in Vienna for
the remainder of the war. But
he has denied that he
perpetrated any Nazi
persecutions.
"TODAY the U.S. govern-
ment formally determined that
Kurt Waldheim falls under the
'Holtzman Amendment' which
holds that 'Nazi persecutors'
are ineligible to enter the
United States."' the WJC
statement said. Elizabeth
Holtzman. Brooklyn District
Attorney, authored legislation
barring Nazi war criminals
from entering the U.S. when
she served in Congress.
Holtzman issued the follow
ing statement Monday: "To-
day Kurt Waldheim "s past has
finally caught up with him. I
am pleased that Attorney
General Edwin Meese has
agreed to bar Kurt Waldheim
from the United States, enfor-
cing the law that I wrote that
bars Nazi persecutors from
our shores. Waldheim par-
ticipated in the German
Army's reprisals against inno-
cent civilians during World
War II and has consistently-
tried to cover up his past.
Under the Holtzman amend-
ment, such a person cannot
enter this country.
"The next step is to deter-
mine how a man with
Waldheim's past was sup-
ported by our own government
and many others while he was
Secretary General of the UN.
The opening of Waldheim's
secret UN file exposed his past
to the world. The United
States government must
reverse its position on releas-
ing the 37.000 other files on ac-
cused Nazi war criminals."
THE WJC statement prais-
ed the Justice Department's
Office of Special Investiga-
tions (OSI) for acting "in a
manner befitting its role as the
moral conscience of this
government." The OSI
prepared a 200-page report
supporting the case to bar
Waldheim from the U.S.
"It is particularly fitting in
this week set aside for com-
memoration of the victims of
the Holocaust, that the final
legal judgement has been
rendered in the case of Kurt
Waldheim." the WJC state-
ment said.
In other reactions from the
Jewish community. Morris
Abram, chairman of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organiza-
tions, said "The Attorney
General's action demonstrates
the determination of this
government to see to it that
the Holocaust is remembered
as it must be for all time. It
also shows that the watch-list
policy is administered without
regard to rank or station."
RABBI MARVIN Hier.
dean of the Simon Wiesenthal
Center, said, "We believe that
Mr. Waldheim should not be
treated differently than any
other accused war criminal. In
addition to the serious allega-
tions made against him in con-
Prqfessor Ephraim Kattir (right), president of the World ORT
I num and past President of thi St,,/, of Isriiel. Congratulate*
li'ind B. Hermehn on hit election a* president of the'American
i >RTFederation at the AOFNational i 'onferenreheld recently \n
New York City. Katzir wot truest speaker at the Conference ban-
quet session.
nection with atrocities in
World War II, Waldheim, as
Chief executive human rights
officer for our planet for over a
decade, deliberately violated
the trust placed in him by con-
sistently and deliberately lying
about his past."
Message Supports
Argentina's Alfonsin
NEW YORK (JTA) The
World Union for Progressive
Judaism, in a message of sup-
port to President Raul Alfon-
sin of Argentina, praised his
efforts "to strengthen
democracy, enhance the cause
of freedom and bring to justice
those found guilty of human
rights abuses during the
period when Argentina was
under military rule."
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Chrmn. JNF Exec. Board
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ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooom


Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 1, 1987
The Boys from Tel Aviv
How They Piloted Miami To An Enviable NBA Franchise Team
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Fl-rvii,in Staff Writer
Miami ha.- good reason to be
proud of her two adopted sons,
Ted Alison and Zev Bufman.
both originally from Tel Aviv.
It was largely due to the ef-
forts of these two men that the
long and hard battle has been
won for a franchise from the
National Basketball Associa-
tion (NBA) for Miami's basket-
ball team, Miami Heat.
If. back when he was a little
boy playing basketball in Tel
Aviv, someone had told Ted
Arison that he would someday
be the largest shareholder and
chief spokesman for Miami
Heat, he would have said,
"very nice."
And he wouldn't have believ-
ed them. "I wouldn't even
have believed them if they told
me three weeks ago," says
Arison. the soft-spoken owner
of Carnival Cruise Lines.
HOW DID HE manage to
convince the NBA owners to
admit Miami into the world of
professional basketball?
Arison says, in typically
understated manner, "I told
them the truth. Apparently I
was convincing."
So convincing, in fact, that
Arison. who normally keeps a
TED ARISON: Apparently. I was convincing.'
low profile, has since been
hounded by reporters to talk to
him. Regarding future pro-
jects, Arison says that he
"likes to present them when
they're ready" and hopes in
Anti-Semitic Vandalism
Police Investigate 'Worst Display'
Bj FREDDA SACHAROW
PHILADELPHIA (JTA)
As workers at Woodcrest
Country Club in Cherry Hill.
N.J., sandblasted swastikas
and offensive drawings off the
walls of their clubhouse, police
continued their investigation
into what observers termed
one of the worst displays of
anti-Semitic vandalism they
could recall. "This is the
largest, most extensive inci-
dent I'm aware of in years."
said Alan Respler. executive
director of the Jewish Com-
munity Relations Council of
Southern New Jersey. "Some
of the writing was to obscene
even the television camera-
couldn't tape it."
Illegal Now
To Demonstrate
Weapons
ATLANTA, Ga. (JTA) -
It is now illegal to teach, train
or demonstrate the use of
dangerous weapons and ex-
plosives in connection with a
civil disorder, riot or insurrec-
tion in Georgia, the Atlanta
Jewish Times reports.
Gov. Joe Frank Harris sign
ed into law last month a bill
that would mandate a max-
imum fine of $5,000 and one to
five years' imprisonment for
those convicted of this so-
called terrorist training.
Georgia is the 15th state to
adopt such a law, based on a
model bill prepared by the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith. according to the
agency
Respler was called to the
predominantly Jewish club
over the weekend after
maintenance workers
discovered slurs and
obscenities spray-painted in
black and red on the building
walls.
WOODCREST general
manager Robert Sierra, who
was one of the first to arrive
on the scene after workers
summoned him with an early
morning call, called the attack
"anti-Semitic terrorism."
Hate-filled graffiti covered
much of the exterior of the
club's main building and WM
splashed over the sidewalk and
a car left overnight at the club.
In addition, black swastikas
were painted on the grass at
the 10th and 13th tees of the
club's golf course.
A police spokesman said last
Monday that because no other
Jewish facility or synagogue
was attacked and because his
office has not heard of related
incidents in any other local
district, police believe the van-
dalism to be an isolated case.
No group or persons have
called the media to take credit,
and no other Jewish institution
has been hit, so we're looking
at a local level," said Cherry
Hill Detective John Long.
"IT MAY be juveniles, it
may be young adults or it may
be someone with problems
with the club," said Long, ad-
ding that police investigators
are interviewing management
personnel and employees of
the 400-member club.
'To my recollection, this is
the worst case of anti-
Semitism in some time." he
said.
The country club has tripled
its own security in the wake of
the incident, "said Dr. Philip
Slipyan. president of the club's
Board. Long estimated the
damage to the greens alone
could run between $5,000 and
$10,000. but Woodcrest of-
ficials declined to estimate the
final cost of the vandalism.
"The dollar figure really pales
when you compare it with the
frustration and anger." Sli-
pyan said.
The club has offered a $1,000
reward for information
leading to the arrest and COO
vietion of the vandal or van
dais. Lee VegOtaky, Southern
New Jersey representative of
the Jewish War Veterans, an
nounced that his organization
will add a $500 reward.
RESPLER said under New
Jersey's ethnic and racial ter-
rorism law. persons convicted
of ethnically or racially
motivated vandalism can face
up to five years in jail and a
$5,000 fine.
Woodcrest, a member-
owned club founded in 1929.
draws its largely Jewish
membership from Cherry Hill
and surrounding communities,
as well as from Philadelphia. It
has been the victim of anti-
Semitic attacks in the past, Sli-
pyan said, but none quite so
extensive or virulent.
As they gathered at the club
in the wake of the most recent
incident, many of the members
commented on its timing: the
fourth day of Passover, the
day before Easter Sunday
traditionally a time when anti-
Jewish sentiment tends to run
high and the A-eek before
Yom Hashoah, the com-
memoration of the Holocaust.
the meanwhile "that I'll be
able to maintain my privacy."
On the subject of Miami,
however. Arison becomes
outspoken.
"I think that Miami is now
accelerating into the future."
he contends, "and this team is
one of the energizing forces
that will help bring about the
renaissance of Miami."
ALSO HELPING to create
a Miami renaissance is Zev
Bufman. the distinguished
theatrical impresario.
"I felt shortchanged when
we didn't have professional
basketball in Miami." says
Bufman who. as a boy. believ-
ed that he was too short to
play the sport.
Bufman. who had the initial
idea of bringing professional
basketball to Miami, is not
distressed about the decision
to have Arison as spokesman
for the project.
"I wasn't disappointed," he
says. "Each of the four part-
ners (Bufman. Arison. Lewis
Schaffel and Billy Cunn-
ingham) had an area of respon-
sibility for our success. My
strong point is having a vision,
and mapping out the plan.
Like in every rjifl
ject. there will be I
the other partnt
come forth and rj<
necessary We
together the same w
athletic team doea
HOW DOES bringing an
athletic project together com-
pare witt bringing a theal
production to the Btage? Says
Bufman: "It's verj similar
theatre, so my experience waj
helpful. Basketball jg ;i;
audience-type event and the
arena is like the stage, the
coach like the director, and I
think that the players are
neither more nor less
temperamental than actors
are. '
The present looks bright, ac-
cording to Bufman. who con-
tends that "the new downtown
Miami has arrived. A year ago.
no one would have considered
going to the Bay side area day
or night it was Siberia. Now
100,000 or so go there a day.
and we anticipate that the new
sports arena will bring in well
over half a million."
LOOKING TO the future.
Bufman hopes that South
( on tinned on Following Vugt
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The Boys from Tel Aviv
Continued from ^weeding Page
Florida will be recognized as
nrl,(,r sports center. To that
(,n',i he has a new project
brewing.
Baseball is a wonderful
sport, and it's needed here. I
announced it as my
p;.x, project yet, but it sure
sounds intriguing. If the op-
portunitj arises ... or if I can
create the opportunity ."
Buftnan trails off. doubtless
thinking "f ways to make his
newest idea a reality.
Meanwhile. Miami basket-
hall fans, who thought that
the) would have to go on
holding their breath until Oc
tober when the NBA Board an-
nounced it would decide to
give its franchise to either
Orlando or Miami, have been
riven permission to breathe
again.
For ;t while, it seemed as if
the tension would just con-
tinue to mount as the 15,326
Mat downtown sports arena
grew steadily towards comple-
tion, while the future of the
team meant to fill the stands
remained uncertain.
THE DECISION to admit
tx>th the Miami and Orlando
teams into the NBA remained
up in the air until an hour
before the announcement was
made. Both Orlando and
Miami team owners continued
to do all they could behind the
scenes to insure their teams'
success.
I hte of the steps both groups
of owners had to take was
choosing one identifiable
owner who would represent
them, at the request of the
Friday. May 1, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Police Lab Chief Testifies That
Demjanjuk Card is Authentic
ZEV BUFMAN: Basketball is similar to theatre.'
NBA Board.
Orlando chose William Du-
Pont III, and Miami chose Ted
Arison which meant that the
Miami team's other owners, in-
cluding Zev Bufman, who had
spearheaded the drive for a
professional basketball team
for Miami, did not get to hear
Commissioner David Stern
welcome Miami Heat into the
league in person.
THE CONFRONTATION
between Orlando and Miami,
whose rivalry can now be
transferred to the courts, will
soon take place. The fact that
Miami was awarded a fran-
chise for the coming 1988-89
season, and Orlando's fran-
chise was awarded for the
1989-90 season provides a
good period of time for
tempers to cool and skills to
improve.
So, at least for now, Mia-
mians can sit back and bask in
the satisfaction of finally hav-
ing Miami Heat, the city's first
professional basketball team.
By DAVID LANDAl
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The head of the Israeli police
document ident ification
laboratory has testified that an
ss identification card bearing
the signature and photograph
of suspected war criminal John
Demjanjuk is authentic-.
Amnon Bezaleli appeared
for the prosecution in
Jerusalem district court as the
Demjanjuk trial resumed after
the Passsover recess, he said
there was "no doubt
whatever" of the signature of
Karl Streibel, commandant of
the Trawniki camp where
Demjanjuk allegedly was
trained for guard duty at
Treblinka.
AS FOR Demjanjuk's
signature, there is only "an ex-
tremely slight possibility" that
it was forged, Bezaleli said. He
said he had compared it with
Demjanjuk's signature on
numerous documents he sign-
ed over the years and discern-
ed an "inner authenticity" but
could "not definitely" deter-
mine it was signed by the
accused.
The Ukrainian-born Demjan-
juk, a former resident of
Cleveland, Ohio, has been
identified by a number of
Treblinka survivors as the
sadistic guard known as "Ivan
the Terrible" who ran the gas
chambers at the death camp
and brutally assaulted in-
mates. Demjanjuk contends he
was a German prisoner during
most of World war II. that he
was never anywhere near
Treblinka and is a victim of
mistaken identity.
The ID card, which Israel ob-
tained from the Soviel Union,
has been called a forger) bj
Demjanjuk's lawyer.-. Bezaleli
told the court he could not Ik-
more definite about the
signature because it is in Rus-
sian Cyrillic script.
HE EXPLAINED.
however, that he could discern
changes in the way Demjanjuk
shaped letters even in Rus
sian as his handwriting was
gradually influenced by the
Latin letters of English during
the 40 years that he lived in
the United States.
Bezaleli also testified that he
found indications that the
"original photo" on the card
may at one time have been
removed but "it was not
changed" for another.
Restrictions Eased
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Treasury and Bank of Israel
announced last Thursday an
easing of foreign currency
restrictions for Israelis travell-
ing abroad and those who stay
home. Starting immediately,
Israelis travelling overseas
may take $2,000 per person in
U.S. currency.
The previous limit was $800.
Israelis may also hold foreign
currency in the equivalent of
$2,000 in their bank accounts
and may send gifts of up to
$1,000 abroad per vear, up
from $300.
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Tuesday & Thursday mornings, 8:30-12:00 noon.
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RABBINIC JUDAISM (RJS 641):
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Page 10-A The Jewish Flqridian/Friday, May 1, 1987
For Mideast Peace
Palestine National Council Meet
In Algiers Said To Bode 111
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The five-day conference of the
Palestine National Council,
held in Algiers last week under
the chairmanship of Yasir
Arafat, bodes ill for the Middle
East peace process and par-
ticularly for those in Israel and
elsewhere who support an in-
ternational peace conference
with Palestinian participation.
The PNC. which calls itself
the Palestinian parliament in
exile, is controlled by Arafat's
mainstream Palestine Libera-
tion Organization which has
been split by dissension and
violence since the last PNC
conclave in 1984. At this, its
18th session, a great show is
being made of reuniting the
dissident factions under the
PLO umbrella.
EXTREMIST GROUPS
such as George H abash's
Popular Front for the Libera-
tion of Palestine and Naif
Hawatmeh's Democratic
Front which broke with the
PLO years ago, were
represented at the Algiers
meeting. Even more impor-
tant was the presence of
Syrian-backed terrorist
organizations, including the
Palestine National Salvation
Front, PLO dissidents who
drove Arafat's forces from
Lebanon in 1984 and attemp-
ted more than once to
assassinate the PLO chairman.
Whether the display of unity
is genuine or cosmetic, Arafat
Wallenberg
Plea Signed
Bj DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
More than 100 members of the
House have signed a letter
urging Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev to free Raoul
Wallenberg, the Swedish
diplomat who saved thousands
of Hungarian Jews from the
Nazis during World War II.
The letter, signed by 113
Congressmen, urged Gor-
bachev to release Wallenberg,
who was arrested by the Red
Army outside Budapest in
January 1945, or provide a
"full, complete and public ac-
counting of his fate.
"We believe he still lives,
and we urge that he be permit-
ted to leave the Soviet Union,"
said the letter which was mail-
ed to the Soviet Embassy here
for forwarding to Gorbachev.
Rep. Tom Lantos (D.. Cal),
who initiated the letter, said
he felt this was a good time to
make another effort at gaining
Wallenberg's release in view
of the Soviet Union's recent
moves in increasing Jewish
emigration and releasing
political prisoners.
"We're hopeful that the
Soviet leaders will respond
favorably on this issue as they
have on a number of other
human rights cases," Lantos
said. "The Wallenberg case
would be a perfect opportunity
to demonstrr**** the policy of
glasnost" or uiyenness.
The Sovi< ts have long claim-
ed that Wallenberg died in Lu-
byanka prison in 1947.
willingly paid the price. He is
less flexible and more intran-
sigent in his demands. He
declared null and void his 1985
accord with King Hussein of
Jordan which called for a joint
Jordanian-Palestinian delega-
tion to negotiate with Israel in
the framework of an interna-
tional conference. He is also
expected to cool relations with
Egypt.
Arafat still calls for an inter-
national conference, with the
participation of the five per-
manent members of the
United Nations Security Coun-
cil. But he demands an in-
dependent Palestinian delega-
tion of his own choosing. That
would require Israel to
recognize the PLO. which it
will never do.
ACTUALLY, the Arafat
Hussein rapprochement has
long been a dead isue. "The
pact with Jordan has been
shelved since February last
year." Hanna Seniora, editor
of the East Jerusalem Arabi
daily Al-Fajr wrote last Tues-
day. It was in fact abandoned
by Hussein who noted in
Februray, 1986 that after a
year of negotiations with
Arafat, the PLO was an
unreliable partner.
Hussein still adheres at
least publicly, to the notion
that the PLO is the sole
legitimate representative of
the Palestinian people. But
now the PLO appears to be
moving to the extreme.
There were hints in Algiers
that Arafat is seeking peace
with the most dangerous, most
wanted Palestinian terrorist,
the shadowy Abu Nidal whose
hit squads, operating under a
variety of flatulent names, are
held responsible for a long str-
ing of bombings, hijackings
and assassinations in Europe
and the Middle East. His vic-
tims include ranking PLO of-
ficials and Arafat was said to
head his death list. He himself
has been condemned to death
by the PLO.
Now the PLO chief is speak-
ing of intensifying terrorist at-
tacks in Israel and ending
them "outside the occupied
territories." This was seen as
an oblique invitation to Abu
Nidal whose antipathy for
Arafat stems from the latter's
alleged "softness" on Israel.
THE ABU NIDAL group is
not represented at the PNC
meeting. According to Arab
sources, other factions oppos-
ed his presence. But should a
rapprochement occur, Israel
would face a dangerous escala-
PLO CHIEF MEETS Z AM BIAS
DELEGATE: Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion chairman Yasir Arafat kneels before
Zambian Minister of State for Foreign Affairs
Al'/Wid* World l"
Hwmanis Muyunda after a speech dea Pins near Algiers last week (April tU
where the Palestinian Sational Council wa>
being held.
tion of terrorist attacks in the
months ahead.
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin has linked the recent
Katyusha rocket attacks on
Galilee and the attempted in-
filtration of Israel last week by
a three-man terrorist gang t<>
the PNC meeting.
Premier Yitzhak Shamir
reacted strongly to the PNC
meeting last Tuesday. (April.
21).' The worst of our enemies
are sitting somewhere discuss-
ing how to unite, how to harm
us and how to take Jerusalem
from us," Shamir told a
Jerusalem audience. "We shall
tell them that the people of
Israel are united. We are one
front. Their conspiracy will
fail."
As far as Israel is concerned,
there no longer seems any
point to work out some com-
plicated formula that would
allow for Palestinian represen-
tation at peace talks in tandem
with Jordan. But Arab
observers in East Jerusalem
were insisting publicly Tues-
day that the developments in
Algiers did not necessarily
doom the peace process.
BUT off-the-record com-
ments by Arabs expressed con-
cern that a reunited PLO
would adopt a hardline that
will scuttle the Middle East
peace process. Well informed
Arabs admitted that the idea
of an international conference
suffered a severe blow by
Arafat's demand for separate
PLO representation.
But the PNC conference has
won wide approval among
rank-and-file Arabs in the ad-
ministered territories Accor-
ding to one observer, "there is
nothing like national unity to
cheer up the popular spirits
even if it is doubtful how much
real benefit the local popula-
tion will derive from the closed
ranks.-'
Arab newspapers in East
Jerusalem hailed the show of
unity in Algiers Al-Fajr car-
ried a front-page cartoon
showing two Arabs con-
gratulating each other in
Algiers. Walls in East
Jerusalem were covered with
freshly-painted slogans ac-
claiming the newly achieved
unitv.
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Linnas in Estonia
To Face Charges He
Murdered 12,000
Friday, May 1, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) At
8 p.m Monday (Apr. 20). A
Czechoslovak airliner left New
York with accused Nazi war
criminal Karl Linnas aboard.
This put the cap on a long-
drawn-cut procedure to effect
the deportation of the man
irho was commandant of the
Tartu. Estonia, concentration
camp where over 12.000 men.
and children were
murdered during World War
II.
Linnas was flown to Prague,
and from there to the Soviet
following a refusal
' Monday by the 0 S Supreme
(Hurt to stay Linnas" deporta-
tion. The high court voted
Monday morning 6-3 against
granting the stay. Justices
William Brennan, Harry
Blackmail and Sandra Day
O'Connor registered the
dissenting votes in favor of the
stay.
BEFORE BOARDING the
plane, the 67-year-old Linnas.
a coat covering his handcuffs.
shouted to the press: "Tell the
American people what they
are doing is murder and
kidnapping."
In Moscow. Soviet Foreign
Ministry spokesman Gennady
Oerasimov said Tuesday (April
21) that Linnas may be allowed
to appeal his 1962 Soviet death
sentence.
Linnas was sentenced to
death in absentia in the Soviet
I'nion in 1962 for wartime
atrocities. Since 1951. Linnas
lived quietly in Greenlawn.
Long Island. He was granted
' S citizenship in 1960. after
concealing his wartime ac-
tivities upon entering the
country under the Displaced
ns Act of 1948.
Linnas was charged by the
' S. J istice Department erf
directing firing squads at
ers kneeling before pita
that served as mass graves.
and of personally shooting
camp inmates.
FOLLOWING investiga-
JUona by the Justice Depart-
ment's Office of Special In-
vestigations (OSI). Linnas was
stripped of his citizenship in
%. 1981 by U.S. District
Court in Westbury. L.I.. a
decision he appealed numerous
times through several courts.
He was ordered deported on
% 29, 1983. After losing a
b'd to the Board of Immigra-
tion Appeal, he took his case to
" Supreme Court, which
Lfnised four times since last
Member to hear his appeal.
Representatives of Jewish
organizations blamed U.S. At-
torney Geneal Edwin Meese
for refusing to sign off on the
deportation papers. Linnas
was represented by former
U.S. Attorney General
Ramsey Clark.
There had been charges in
some quarters that Soviet
evidence used in the Linnas
case may have been fabricated,
but FBI experts and the courts
which examined the evidence
verified its authenticity, Elan
Steinberg, World Jewish Con-
gress executive director.
pointed out.
"THERE HAS never been
me instance when a document
(in a war crimes matter) sup-
plied hv the Soviet Union has
been fabricated or forged."
Steinberg said. He added that
the OSI and the WJCongress
had requested the documents,
the Soviets never offered them
voluntarily. Last week. Linnas
came within hours of receiving
political asylum from Panama,
which retracted its offer after
the swift intercession of the
World Jewish Congress and
other leading Jewish legal ac-
tivists, including Menachem
Rosensaft, chairman of the In-
ternational Network of
Children of Jewish Holocaust
Survivors, and Brooklyn
District Attorney Elizabeth
Holtzmam. who as a con-
gresswoman authored legisla-
tion for the deportation of Nazi
war criminals.
WJC officials, who learned
during the first Passover seder
last Monday night of the deci-
sion by Meese to deport Linnas
to Panama, immediately con-
tacted Panamanian officials in
the U.S., as well as members
of the Panama Jewish com
munity. On Tuesday, WJC
general counsel Eli Rosen-
baum. together with Holtzman
and Rosensaft. flew to
Washington to meet with of-
ficials at the Panamanian
Embassy.
Early Wednesday (Apr. 22).
the Panamanian Embassy an-
nounced that the deportation
Elans would be delayed, and
iter that day the Panamanian
Consul General in New York
issued a second statement say-
ing that Linnas' request for
asylum had been denied. This
brought to 17 the number of
countries that rejected Linnas'
bid for asylum.
ACCORDING TO Rosensaft
and Rosenbaum, on Monday
Linnas' lawyers went through
a flurry of last-minute appeals.
They first tried to block his
deportation a final time in U.S.
District Court in Washington,
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LINNAS ARRIVES: Karl Linnas. who has
been sentenced to death by the Soviet Union,
arrives on an Aeroflat plane in Tallinn, the
capital of Estonia, a Soviet republic on the
Baltic Sea. Linnas was deported from New
AP/Wide World Phou>
York to Prague Apr. 20 after being tried by the
Soviets and found guilty in absentia on
charges he ran a Nazi concentration camp in
Tartu. Estonia during World War II.
D.C. before Judge Thomas
Hogan.
Turned down, they appealed
to a three-judge panel of the
U.S. Court of Appeals for the
District of Columbia and were
again refused, and Monday
night, while Linnas was
already on the plane, minutes
before departure, a final ap-
peal for a stay made to chief
Justice William Rehnquist was
denied, bringing Linnas' total
court appearances to 13.
"He has gotten every possi-
ble benefit of due process of
law." said Rosensaft. a senti-
ment echoed by Holtzman,
who said. "Karl" Linnas has
had more than due process.
He's exhausted the entire
justice system."
Within moments of hearing
of Linnas' deportation, a
Holocaust survivor, Ernest
Zelig. president of Bnai Zion,
notified the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency of his
satisfaction on the case's out-
come, saying, "I am grateful
at the Supreme Court's deci-
sion to deport the convicted
Nazi war criminal. Karl Lin-
nas. He has received due pro-
cess, something he denied his
12.000 innocent victims at the
Tartu concentration camp."
BENJAMIN MEED, presi
dent of the American Gather-
ing and Federation of Jewish
Holocaust Survivors, who was
preparing to mention the case
Sunday at a commemoration in
New York of the Warsaw-
Ghetto Uprising, said, "Thank
God. I think we should be pro-
ud of the action of our govern-
ment. It's not enough, and it's
quite late, but better late than
never. I would say that this
will probably encourage fur-
ther actions against Nazi war
criminals in the United States.
"This is not a question of
vengeance; it's a question of
going through the judicial pro-
cess. The books of the U.S.
should remain open, so that we
can't say that we did not take
action against known war
criminals, Nazi collaborators
and Nazi murderers." Meed
praised the "devotion" of OSI
director Neal Sher in seeing
through the process.
Rosensaft said he was "glad
it's over. I feel relief. I don't
feel any joy. I certainly don't
feel a sense of victory, but a
sense of having done the very
least and perhaps the only
thing we can do for Linnas'
victims and for all the other
victims of the Holocaust.
Continued on Page 14-A
Create Land From Sand'
OOOOOOOOOI

DO YOU HAVE a share in the redemption of
THE LAND OF ISRAEL?
HAVE YOU MADE your contribution to the
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND (KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL)?
IF NOT NOW... WHEN?
DO IT NOW!!!


Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. May 1. 1987
Britain's Last Straw
Israel's Independence Day Marks
Dramatic Acre Prison Breakout
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E. 1st Avenue, Miami, Florida
Continued from Page 5-A
to escape.
IRGUN COMMANDOS
fired at British guard towers
in order to secure the exit of
the escaping prisoners and
their approach to waiting
vehicles. In all, 41 members of
IZL and Lehi escaped. Eitan
Livni recounts that they
travelled in waiting trucks for
an hour and a half, then walk-
ed all night. In early morning
they arrived in Benyamina, 35
kilometers south of Haifa.
Two unforeseen cir-
cumstances seriously marred
the Irgun's victory in this
operation. Earlier in the day, a
group of British soldiers and
police had gone swimming
south of Acre, carrying their
weapons with them. When
they heard the explosion, they
rushed to the main road and
set up a road block inside the
security belt of Irgun posts
with which the commandos
had encircled the citadel. Fur-
thermore, the fighters at one
Disadvantaged
Soldiers
Assisted
Continued from Pag* 5-A
raises many milions of dollars.
Some Israelis will leave a be-
quest to LIBI in their will. One
man, who had lived modestly n
his lifetime, left $1.3 million to
LIBI.
A new drive headed by
Israel's Teachers* Union is en-
couraging classes in schools
throughout the country to
donate something to LIBI.
"We don't expect to raise
much money from this ven-
ture." explains Lt. Col.
Bleyer. "but we do expect to
raise the childrens' awareness
by letting them know who we
are. what we do and what we
stand for."
of the IZL forward posts did
not receive the signal to board
their truck, and they remained
encircled by British troops.
As a result, Irgun forces suf-
fered numerous casualties.
Ten members of the assault
force including commander
Dov Cohen were killed, as
were five escaping prisoners.
Several of the men who died of
their wounds could have been
saved if the British authorities
had allowed them to receive
medical aid. But the British
forces left the wounded men to
bleed for six hours on the floor
of the Acre Police Station
before a doctor arrived to treat
them. Their were no British
casualties.
THREE OF the captured
commandos were brought
before the Military Court in
Jerusalem. On June 16, the
same day that the United Na-
tions Special Comittee on
Palestine began its work, the
court sentenced these men to
execution by hanging. In the
pre-dawn hours of July 23, the
British authorities in Acre
Prison carried out this
sentence. The next day the
Irgun, which had given the
authorities prior warning,
hanged two kidnapped British
sergeants in retaliation.
The assault on the citadel of
Acre probably did as much as
any other single event to bring
an end to British Mandatory
rule in Palestine. The British
had hoped that by hangind Dov
Gruner and his comrades, on
the eve of a special session of
the United Nations which met
to discuss the question of
Palestine, they would
demonstrate to the world Bri-
tain's control of the country.
But the attack at Acre raised
serious questions about Bri-
tain's ability to govern
Palestine. These questions
echoed in the halls of the
I nited Nations, and in Britain,
the British public demanded
that their government get out
of Palestine
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Friday, May 1, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Mideast Peace Process Shouldn't
Be Hostage to PLO State Dep't.
AP/Wide World Photo
Hank. Jewish settlers went on a rampage in
Kalkilya two weeks ago following the murder
by Arab terrorists of an Israeli family fin
hirmhed in their car nearby.
SHAMIR WITH ARAB MAYOR: Israels
!' >> Minister Yitzhak Shamir tleft) talks
with Kalkilya Mayor Abu-Sneina Abdel-
Rahman at the Mayor's htrme \n the West
Egyptian MD
Loses Bias Appeal Against Mt. Sinai
U.S. District Judge Kenneth
I. Kyskamp has ruled that an
Egyptian physician. Dr.
Esmat Zaklama, is not entitled
to a $135.(XX) award in a racial
discrimination case he brought
and won against Mount Sinai
Medical Center.
A resident anesthesiologist
at Mount Sinai, Zaklama
argued that he was made to
resign in 1981. But Judge
Ryskamp reversed a jury deci-
sion last Feb. 25 that he was
let go because he is an Arab.
ACCORDING TO JUdge
Kyskamp. Mt. Sinai did not
make the anesthesiologist
resign. While he was working
here in 1981, he was actually
on assignment from Jackson
Memorial Hospital in Miami. It
*m. in fact, the chief of
anesthesiology at Jackson
Mem.-rial. Dr. Brian
Craythorne, who testified that
he rtvnmmended dropping
klama from the department
- and that only he had the
authority to do it.
When the case went to trial
in 1982, Jackson Memorial was
a defendant, but not part of
the proceeding when it went to
trial two months ago. In bet-
ween, Jackson Memorial asked
to be released as a defendant,
and since Zaklama did not res-
pond, the request was granted.
In reversing the jury judg-
ment. Judge Ryskamp ruled
that the doctors who supervis-
ed Zaklama's work at Mount
Sinai told him that he was be-
ing dropped from the residen-
cy program, but that they
were not responsible for the
action.
RYSKAMP ALSO ruled
that even if the Mount Sinai
doctors gave Jackson
Memorial unfavorable reports
about Zaklama. they could not
be legally responsible for his
dismissal because the law
under which Zaklama sued
does not forbid suggesting
that an employer (Jackson
Poll Says New Elections
Would Bring Same Stalemate
TEL AVIV (JTA) If
Miesset elections were held
now the outcome almost eer-
ily would be a new version
ol the present stalemated na-
tional unity coalition, accor-
*ng. to the latest opinion poll
Wished in Maariv Tuesday.
ine poll, conducted last month
J^n* 1,236 adult Jewish
2".by tnt" Modiin Ezrachi
/Kanization, found that
"e'tner Labor nor Likud would
pLv to form a governing
JJI'tion with their respective
leftwng or rightwing allies.
Labor, however, would
with^ stronger than Likud
ir i Knt>sset seats com-
r1,'" tht* 40 & won in the
,a* elections in 1984. Likud
JM down from 41 seats to 35
,n new election*
B,T NEITHER PARTY
would be able to put together a
governing majority in the
120-member Knesset because
the rightwing opposition par-
ties have gained ground since
1984, possibly at Likud's ex-
pense, and the leftist parties
which might align with Labor
have lost support
The ultra-nationalist Tehiya
Party would increase its
Knesset strength from five to
seven seats in new elections.
Rabbi Meir Kahane's ex-
tremist Kach Party would go
from one to four seats. The
poll showed the leftist Shinui
down from three to two seats
and Mapam reduced from six
to two.
Among the Orthodox fac-
tions, only the National
Religious Party mined sup
port. It would win six seats
compared to its present four.
Memorial) should fire
someone.
From the start, the doctors
at Mount Sinai also denied that
they had said anything
negative or derogatory about
Zaklama's ethnic background.
But the jury thought Zaklama
lost his job because of his Arab
extraction, and that he was
fired with malice, wantonness
or oppression. Judge Ryskamp
disagreed.
Judge Rysmkamp said that
it did not make much dif-
ference which hospital actually
fired Zaklama because he had
no proof it was done because of
his religion or national origin,
thus reversing the Feb. 25 jury
verdict against Mount Sinai.
Judge Ryskamp, in addition,
cited evidence that Zaklama's
wife, also born in Egypt,
started as a Jackson Memorial
resident at the same time as
her husband, was assigned to
Mount Sinai when he was, and
successfully completed her
residency after he was let go
by Dr. Craythorne.
"THIS FACT certainly
belies plaintiffs claim that he
was led out for discriminatory
treatment because he was
Egyptian," Judge Ryskamp's
order said. "There was clear
evidence which established
legitimate nondiscriminatory
reasons why Dr. Craythorne
asked for the plaintiff's
resignation.
"The evidence established
that the plaintiff got con-
sistently poor evaluations
while he was still at Jackson,
that his initial and follow-up
test scores were both near the
bottom of his class, that he
continued to have poor evalua-
tions after rotating to Mt.
Sinai, that there was concern
expressed about his future in
the program."
"We are very pleased that
this mark on our otherwise ex-
cellent reputation as an equal
opportunity employer has been
cleared," declared Fred Hirt,
president of Mount Sinai.
By JUDITH COLP
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The Middle East peace process
should not become "hostage to
the internal politics of the
PLO," a State Department of-
ficial has said. But Richard
Murphy. Assistant Secretary
of State for Near Eastern and
South Asian Affairs, admitted
that the Palestine Liberation
Organization's repudiation of
its 1986 accord with .Ionian on
a joint approach to peace at its
..inference last week in
Algiers may be "diversion"
from negotiators.
"It (the repudiation) does
nothing to get the negotiations
started," Murphy said in
testimony before the House
Foreign Affairs Committee.
"It may prove to be a diversion
in getting the Palestinians to
the table in a joint Jordanian-
Palestinian conference."
HE ADDED. "We don't
think the peace process should
become hostage to internal
politics of the PLO and we will
continue our efforts to give a
hand to people in the region
who are suffering from a lack
of progress in the peace pro-
cess. "Murphy said a Jorda-
nian statement indicated that
the Palestine National Council
(PNC) meeting in Algeria
would not "change the princi-
ple that they're interested in
getting to negotiations."
Earlier, State Department
spokesman Charles Redman
refused to comment on the
PNC conference. But Redman
said the U.S. expressed to
Algeria its concern it has ad-
mitted to the country Abu Ab-
bas, the terrorist accused of
spearheading the October,
1985 hijacking of the Italian
cruise ship Achille Lauro in
which an American passenger.
Leon Klinghoffer, was
murdered. The U.S. has no ex-
tradition treaty with Algeria.
Murphy described the PNC
conference as "the continued
mining by the PLO of that rich
vein of frustration and sense of
despair that they can't make
their voices heard and achieve
their rights." The repudiation
of the 1985 accord was an at-
tempt to "bring back to the
fold some radicals," he said.
But he noted that the con
ference decided not tO break
ties with Egypt.
MURPHY SAID the PLO
raid April 19 into Israel, in
which two Israeli soldiers were
PNC meeting won't
change their interest in
getting negotiations
going.
Richard Murphy
killed, was clearly timed to
coincide with the conferences.
But he told the Congressmen it
would be very difficult for the
PLO to open a major front in
Israel.
On the subject of peace
talks. Murphy said U.S. at-
tempts to start direct talks
between Israel and Jordan
have been stalemated over the
issue of an international peace
conference.
"We are trying to iron out
the difficulties. Direct negotia-
tions have problems for the
Arabs who don't want negotia-
tions without an international
conference. They feel they
must have international
legitimization," Murphy said.
"But we're worried that the
conference could become a
political theater for excessive
rhetoric and make things
messy," he added.
Murphy said he expected
visits to Washington sometime
this year by King Hussein of
Jordan and President Hosni
Mubarak of Egypt.
Cairo Boots 7 PLO
Offices from Egypt
Continued from Page 1-A
count the decisions of the 16th
session of the PNC held in
Algiers in 1983. At that time,
delegates condemned the 1978
Camp David accords
establishing peace between
Egypt and Israel.
They also called upon the
PLO leadership to encourage
Egyptian opposition groups
and "popular forces" to de-
mand that the Camp David ac-
cord be abrogated.
THE EGYPTIAN order
Monday stopped short of a for-
mal break in relations that
President Mubarak threatened
if the PNC resolution on Egypt
contained any reference to the
decisions adopted at the 16th
council meeting.
It is understood that PLO
chief Yasir Arafat had tried to
persuade the Council to ex-
clude the indirect condemna-
tion of Egypt, and PLO of-
ficials here were surprised at
Egypt's move against them.
PNC officials in general have
said that Egypt
"overreacted."
But one Egyptian official in
the Foreign Ministry said that
Arafat's position at the
Algiers conference showed
"insolence and ingratitude"
toward Egypt which has been
a staunch supporter of the
PLO and a firm supporter of
the need to include the Palesti-
nians in the Middle East peace
process.
"We are fed up with the
deceits," the official said. "We
understand he (Arafat) was
under pressure to accept this
resolution. But we will not be
taken for granted."
ABDEL-MEGUID said that
"It was imperative that Egypt
should put an end to this lowly
behavior and confront this ir-
responsible position with the
firmness dictated by the
supreme national interest and
by the necessity of preserving
Egypt's dignity."
He emphasized Egypt's role
in trying to improve the image
of the PLO with the United
States and Israel. The break
marks the most severe crisis
between Egypt and the PLO
since Arafat resumed relations
with Cairo in late 1983, some
five years after the launching
of the Camp David peace
accord.


Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 1^1987
How A Nation Was Born
Truman, Weizmann Pored Over Area Maps
last,
those
Continued from Page 1 A
fact it can be a source of
strength. Geography and
economics locates them
strategically in their Diaspora,
granting them access to the
centres of political decision.
Weizmann now manipulated
this power as he had long done
in public life.
France was under heavy
pressure from the Arab world
to suppress her instinct to vote
for the Jewish State. Her vote
was captured from under Arab
eyes by an assault from two
sides. Bernard Baruch, whose
war-time hostility to Weiz-
mann had changed to admira-
tion, advised the French
representative that American
aid to his country might be
withdrawn in the event of a
negative stand. The vote was
due to be taken on Nov. 26.
The evening before, Weiz-
mann telephoned a Zionist
friend in Paris, Marc Jarblum.
to transmit a message to Leon
Blum, now at the end of his
political and physical tether.
THIS SAID: "France's deci-
sion to abstain from voting has
caused painful dismay here,
and above all to the five-million
strong Jewish community. For
the first time, the two Great
Powers are in agreement.
French abstention could well
lead to others following her ex-
ample, and this may well
wreck the entire plan. If the
French government destroyed
the Jewish people's last hope,
it would bear a frightful
responsibility."
It was a midnight in Paris.
But Blum could not ignore the
plea. He had the message con-
veyed to President Vincent
Auriol, as well as to the
Premier, Paul Ramadier, and
the Foreign Minister, George
Bidault. France succumbed.
Less difficult to persuade
were those Central American
republics whose economic life-
blood depended on the United
Fruit Company, for this cor-
poration was owned by the
Zionist, Samuel Zemurray.
The Philippines were won over
when detective work tracked
Linnas
In Estonia
Continued from Page 11-A
which is to bring their killers
to justice. We can't bring them
back to life, we can't make
their agony and their suffering
any less.
"THE ONLY thing we can
do for them is to make sure
that their murderers are
brought to justice and are not
able to live out their days in
freedom knowing they have
gotten away with it. We talk a
great deal about keeping alive
the flame of remembrance.
But we never forget that that
particular flame cannot exist
without the flame of justice."
Rosenbaum, a former war
crimes prosecutor for the OS I.
said it was "a great relief that
Karl Linnas" four decades as a
fugitive from justice have at
last come to an end, and that
history has finally caught up
with Karl Linnas. But it's inap-
propriate to say that anyone u
happy, because it's not going
to bring back any of nil
victims."
down an American Jew in Lon-
don who had been physician
and friend to the President in
Manila. It was rumoured in the
lobbies that Liberia was moved
to a change of heart on a hint
from the Firestone Rubber
Company.
PASSAGE OF the resolu-
tion was still not assured,
when the Arab states
re-
quested more time, and
Thanksgiving Day intervened.
Unexpectedly, the Jews found
themselves with three days
grace to continue their can-
vass. In this inverval, they won
over Greece, Belgium and New
Zealand. Nov. 29 was a Satur-
day, and Jews with religious
scruples sought rabbinical
dispensation to travel on the
Sabbath to
denouement.
witness the
Emotionally and physically
spent, Weizmann remained in
his bedroom while the General
Assembly voted. A retinue of
faithfuls constantly traveled
back and forth to bring him the
progress of the struggle. Sud-
denly, all was quiet in his suite.
Meyer Weisgal, Shertok
(Moshe Sharett), all the others
had gone off to Flushing
Meadow, and he was left alone
with Vera (his wife) at
For the first time
historic weeks sometl
snapped in the old man He
broke down and sobbed.
The spasm endured barely a
few moments, and by the time
he recovered the General
Assembly had done its work
and Chaim Weizmann was
head in everything hut name of
what was already virtually an
independent sovereign Jewish
State restored after 19 can-
turies of hope and prayer.
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Resurgent Violence Linked
To PLO Meeting in Algiers
FHday. May 1. 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
( ntinued from P|re 2-A
pounded hia views on a televi-
n mierview. the Soviet
I mon IS interested in an inter
national conference for Middle
East peace on its own terms.
with participation by the five
permanent members of the
IS Security Council and all
regional parties, including the
PLO.
To achieve that goal. Blei
-an!. MOSCOW first pressed for
Monument
Vandalized
LONDON (.ITA) A monu-
; Holocaust victims in
Hyde 1'ark was vandalized
over the weekend. Members of
the Jewish community gather-
ing for the annual com-
memoration service
.red Sunday that white
paint had been poured over the
granite block set in a grove of
trees
The vandals left a placard
with the word "Perdition.'"
That was the title of a play
illeging that Zionists col-
laborated with the Nazis dur-
ing World War II. Its schedul-
ed opening at the Royal Court
Theater in London's West End
last month was cancelled after
historians branded it a traves-
ty and the Jewish community
protested.
Memorial services were con-
i at the monument Sun-
day They consisted of
readings from the Psalms and
from the works of Itzhak
Katnelson, a poet <>f the War-
saw (Ihetto who perished at
Auschwitz.
the reunification of the PLO
which appears to have been on
the agenda of Syrian President
Hafez Assad 8 talks with
Soviet leaders in Moscow last
week.
HE MET Friday with Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev.
Diplomatic observers said they
discussed Middle East peace,
Palestinian reunification and
the Iran-Iraq war. but dif-
ferences emerged on certain
issues.
A third facet of Soviet policy
seems to be a more flexible
position toward Israel. Fitted
with an ability to guide both
Syria and the* PLO. it would
give the Soviet Union a power-
ful voice in the Middle East.
There are obstacles, Klei
pointed out. The PLO's break
with Egypt so enraged Presi-
dent Hosni Mubarak that he
ordered his observers home
from Algiers before the PNC's
deliberations ended. The of-
ficial Cairo weekly Al-Akhbar
stated in an editorial that it
was time for Egypt to end its
active support for the Palesti-
nians. "We have suffered
enough for them." the editor
wrote.
ARAFAT WON re-elections
to the chairmanship of the
PLO last Saturday night, but
only after agreeing to conces-
sions against which he had
balked earlier in the day.
These included an enlarged
PNC executive committee in
which he will have to share
power with terrorist ex-
tremists, such as Abu Abbas,
accused of masterminding the
Achille Lauro hijacking. But
some Syrian-backed extremist
groups were excluded.
Retiring Chief of Staff Levy in Review
\P/Wr1 WorU Photo
LAST REVIEW: Israel's retiring Chief of
Staff Lt. Gen. Moshe Levy (right) reviews
Honor Guard as he leaves the Defense
Ministry in Tel A viv for the last time in that
capacity. Lt. Gen. Dan Shomron us the new
Israel Chief of Staff World Photo
With Jordan and Egypt
distancing themselves from
the Palestinians, with Israel
split over an international con-
ference and Syria and the PLO
more dependent than ever on
Moscow, the fate of the peace
process is most likely to be
determined in the Soviet
capital and in Washington.
\ 1 1
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T3K6S S
(And You May Not Even Know It)
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Hospital tar Om Afrt at Dmflis Gartfaas
Serving Polish Americans tor the past 39 years
TRADING CORPORATION
DELIVERS IN POLAND as per orders placed in the U.S.A.
Polish and Foreign automobiles
Food and gill parcels with ardcles most demanded in Poland
HjiIj and television equipment
Household appliances and
articles lor apartment lumishing
Sport and tourist equipment
Articles ol clothing <* ^lUp^^^rfifSB
Duildmg Materials T*~7^MjL
machinery ^"u&'l
Coal and Coke J
Medicines and many more
articles greatly demanded in Poland
TRANFERS TO POLAND orders Irom the U.S.A.
Dollars to interest bearing
i junts in Polish banks
Dollars to the hands ol
recipients in Poland (cash orders)
Certificates ol Dank PKO SA
(bony towarovve) entitling
the holders to purchase
any article sold at the
special loreign currency
stores in Poland
Dollars lor corporate apartment
and house purchases
SELLS IN THE U.S.A.
PEKAO checks authorizing dollar receipt Irom any branch ollice ol
Bank PKO SA in Poland
Polish silver and gold coins lor gifts and lor collectors
Upon receipt ol dollars or any article lorwarded through PEKAO the
recipients m Poland do not pay any additional charges, or endure ad-
ditional expenses
Information given and orders accepted by
ALL AUTHORIZED PEKAO DEALERS
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Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 1, 1987
Hell Meet Jewish Leaders
Pope John Paul Due in Miami Sept. 10-11
synagogue. The dialogue in
Miami is expected to open fur-
ther the channels of
munication between
and Jewish leaders.
corn-
Catholic
Pope John Paul will begin his
long-awaited 1987 visit to the
United States with a two-day
stop in Miami, on Sept. 10 and
11, that includes a meeting
with priests from around the
country, a parade through
downtown Miami, a dialogue
with national Jewish leaders
and an outdoor Mass expected
to attract more than 350.000
people.
The Pope will arrive from
Rome at Miami International
Airport the afternoon of Sept.
10. Following his arrival, the
Pope will go directly to a
gathering at St. Mary's
Cathedral, which is the mother
church of the Archdiocese of
Miami. The Pope traditionally
visits the mother church of a
city first, according to Mon-
signor Jude O'Doherty, Ar-
chdiocesan director of the
Papal visit.
THE POPE will conduct a
short prayer ceremony and
give his blessings to several
thousand religious and lay
leaders from South Florida
gathered in the cathedral.
Following his visit to the
cathedral, the Pope will meet
with representatives of United
States priests at St. Martha's
Church in the Archdiocesan
Pastoral Center. More than
500 priests two from each of
the 185 U.S. dioceses, with ad-
ditional representatives from
Miami will gather for this
historic exchange with the
Pope.
dialogue with almost 200
Jewish leaders from across the
country at the Metro-Dade
Cultural Center to discuss
issues of mutual concern. Pope
John Paul II set an historical
precedent when he met with
Chief Rabbi Elio Toaff at the
central synagogue in Rome on
April 13. 1986. He was the
first pope since St. Peter to
pay a recorded visit to a
The public highlight of the
Pope's Tiait will occur when he
celebrates an outdoor Mass on
Friday. Sept. 11, at Tamiami
Park on the grounds of the
Dade County Youth Fair at
Florida International Univer-
sity. Officials expect more
than 350,000 to attend, with
many assembling during the
early morning hours to ensure
a good view.
The Mass will mark the con-
clusion of the Pope's visit to
South Florida.
POPE JOHN PAIL: to make U.S. visit.
Although there has been no
official confirmation from the
White House. President and
Mrs. Reagan may journey to
Miami to welcome the Pope to
the United States. That
greeting would occur privately
after the Pope's meeting with
the priest >
The evening of Sept. 10 will
culminate with the Pope's first
public event: a procession
through downtown Miami
along the route of the Orange
Bowl parade. City officials ex-
pect more than a quarter of a
million people to line the three-
mile route for a glimpse of the
Pope in his specially designed
"popemobUe.'
AFTER overnighting at the
residenee of Archbishop Ed-
ward A. McCarthy, the Pope
will l>egin his second day in
.Miami by visiting an exhibit of
rare Hebrew illuminated
manuscripts from the Vatican
Library Collection at the
Center for Fine Arts, part of
the Metro-Dade Cultural
Center.
Immediately following the
viewing, the Pope will hold a
Any Ideas?
Denver Considering Ways
To Save Golda's House
DENVER. Colo. (JTA) The City and County of
Denver are seeking proposals U) redevelop and manage the
house here in which the late Israeli Premier Golds Meir liv-
ed from 1913-14 with her sister and brother-in-law.
Having fallen into disrepair, the house sits on tem-
porary footings in a loeal park. It has l>een the focu
cent battle between members of the City Building IN i art
ment of Appeals, who want to raze the struct in
members of the .Jewish community, who want to savi |
IT STILL MAY BE demolished as a threat
safety unless an alternative is found, according I I city
spokesman. Estimates for refurbishment of the two story
structure range from $6().(KM) to $200,000.
The house may l>e redeveloped on site or mow
anywhere. Preference will be given to proposals tl
porate the history and memory of Meir.
Proposals must meet all applicable government
and be submitted no later than June 1 to: Community
Development Agencv. 1425 Kalamath St.. Denver, Colo.
80204.
THE WOMEN'S INTERNATIONAL
ZIONIST ORGANIZATION WIZO
290174th Street, Suite 1807, No. Miami Beach, FL 33160
A Volunteer Organization With Less Than 3% Administration Expenses
COVERS THE MAP OF ISRAEL
Through 670 Institutions and Services In
* Day Care Centers
* Kindergartens
* Absorption Centers
* Family Units
* Youth Clubs
* Schools
* Summer Camps
* Girls in Distress
* Legal Counseling Bureaux
* Bereaved Families
* Battered Women
* Golden Age Clubs
* Residential Home For
Senior Citizens.
CELEBRATES YOM YERUSHALAIM
With the Presentation of
Guest Speaker
Beate Klarsf eld, a Christian born in Germany,
has dedicated her life to the moral rehabilitation of
Germany and support of the State of Israel. She is one of
the foremost Nazi-hunters in Europe and was responsible
for locating and exposing Klaus Barbie. In 1977 and
1984. Israel nominated her for the Nobel Prize. She is the
recipient of the 1984 Jabotinsky Prize.
RESERVATIONS: WIZO office: 9371308 & 932-9445
On Thursday,
May 28th, 1987
at 11:30 a.m.
at the Blscayne Marriott Hotel
& Marina
1633 North Bayshore Drive
Lunch will be served
Dietary Laws Observed


Robert Shevin:
I Remember What
Happened To My Father
Robert Shevin
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Two months have passed
since the Feb. 25 beating and
robbery of former Florida At-
torney General Robert Shevin.
His four broken ribs are heal-
ing. He's begun the process of
getting a permanent dental
plate where his teeth were
Knocked out. And he's back at
his law practice, flying off to
Aruba in recent weeks to take
depositions.
Before the incident, which
occurred outside his home as
Shevin was returning home
from work one evening, he was
already on the Executive Com-
mittee of Miami Citizens
Against ("rime and on the
Sunday
Hadassah Annual Spring
Conference At Omni Hotel
Hadassah, Miami Region's Annual Spring
I ference will takeplace at the Omni Hotel
on May .'<. 4, and 5. The plenary session to be
held Sunday evening. May 3 will feature Jews
in the media including (Jerri Helfman. Joan
Fleischman and Mark Lunder with Suzanne
. ... ting as moderator.
hairmu of the event are Mrs. John
v tin on and Mrs. Jay Hakerem.
Leal Silverstein. chairperson of the Na-
tional Service Committee and immediate Na-
\ ice ['resident of Hadassah. will be ail
for the conference.
3 rstein is past president of the Chicago
chapter f Hadassah, where she teaches a Bi-
ble class for the Hadassah women. She has
worked on behalf of endangered Jewish corn
muni;us throughout the world.
S erstein is member of a five-generation
Hadassah family.
Leah Silverstein
Graham: Never Forget Lessons Of The Holocaust
WASHINGTON The
*orlii must never forget the
Holocaust, because failure to
remenik-r would be a crime
against humanity equal to the
Holocaust itself, U.S. Sen. Bob
Graham said last week.
"A vigilant recall of history
js our best assurance that the
Holocaust will never be
repeated." said Graham, com-
"*ntmK on the Day of Remem-
brance tYom Hashoah).
Graham sent a special
message that was read Thurs-
S r^pril 23) at a meetinK of
we _Dade County Commission
Wing a special period
recognizing the tragedy of the
Sen. Bob Graham
Holocaust.
Graham, elected to the U.S.
Senate in 1986, is a repeat
visitor to Israel. One of his
most moving experiences was
a tour of the Yad Vashem
Museum in Jerusalem.
"I will never forget Yad
Vashem," Graham said.
"When I visited the Holocaust
museum, I felt the shock and
the pain of those unbelievable
events."
Graham's support for Israel
and freedom for Soviet Jews
are key concerns in his new
role as Florida's junior
senator. Graham has joined
the congressional Caucus on
Soviet Jewry.
The Rotation Diet... Page 4-B
Board of Directors of Florida
Citizens Against Crime.
BLEEDING AND semi
conscious, he crawled to the
front door of his home, minus
his watch and wallet He was
hospitalized for five days.
Now, he says. "I don't dwell
on it. And it doesn't bother me
psychologically. I recognize
that it was a bad experience,
but I was somewhat fortunate
that most of it took place when
I was semi-conscious."
He also figures he was lucky
U'cause he could have gotten
killed.
Shevin was somewhat taken
aback by all the publicity the
case got, admitting it was "a
little strange in the sense that
this does happen all the time."
It probably happens in Miami
several times a day.
HE CAN look back over the
years and say things have got-
ten worse. But he also
remembers what happened to
his father many years ago.
"When I was in college back
in the late 50s, my father.
Aaron, had a clothing store in
downtown Miami."
One day his father was
l>eaten and robl>ed and left in a
coma for a long time, suffering
severe brain damage as a
result of those injuries, and
died.
"To some degree it was a lit-
tle bit of deja i"u except that I
Continued on Page 3-B
Sen. Lawton Chiles To Speak
At Israel Bonds Brunch
Honoring Rep. Elaine Bloom
U.S. Sen. Lawton Chiles of
Florida will be the special
guest speaker at the Greater
Miami Israel Bonds Organiza-
tion's Women's Division
Brunch honoring State Rep.
Elaine Bloom on Sunday at the
Biscayne Bay Marriott. Miami.
The Brunch will begin at 11:30
a.m.
Chiles has had a distinguish-
ed political career since his
election to the Florida House
of Representatives in 1959. In
1%6 he was elected to the
Florida Senate and served in
this capacity until his election
to the United States Senate in
1970.
Since his inauguration to the
IS. Senate in 1971. he has
served on many key commit-
tees which have led to his cur-
rent major assignment as the
Chairman of the Budget
Committee.
He is also a member of the
Appropriations Committee.
Defense Subcommittee,
Transportation Subcommittee,
Special Committee on Aging,
the Democratic Steering Com-
mittee and is Chairman of the
Federal Spending, Budget and
Accounting Subcommittee of
the Governmental Affairs
Committee, among others.
In addition to serving the
public as an elected official.
Sen. Chiles' involvement with
many community, charitable
and philanthropic organiza-
tions over the years has earned
him many awards in Florida
and nationally.
Chiles was recognized as the
outstanding American of
Sen. Lawton Chiles
Florida by the Jaycees and as
the Man of the Year by the
American Federation of
Senior Citizens. He has also
received honors for his work
on behalf of the Disabled
American Veterans and his
legislative efforts to control
crime and drug abuse.
His support for the State of
Israel and for Jewish causes
has been consistently outstan-
ding. He was named an
Honorary Sponsor of the
American-Israel Friendship
League and was a recipient of
the United Synagogue Young
Soviet Jewry Award.
A practicing attorney in
Lakeland until his election to
the United States Senate in
1971, Chiles is a member of the
Continued on Pafe 9-B
Our
Dear Nomi... Page 5-B
Community
Friday. May 1, 1987 The Jewish Floridian Section B


Page 2-B The Jewish Ftoridian/Friday, May 1, 1987
The Commerce and Professional Division of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation held a
meeting to discuss the upcoming Commerce
and Professions celebration dinner on May tl,
at the Omni International Hotel. Pictured
from left (standing) are S'orman S. Rachlin,
Accountant's Division chairman: Dr. Elliot
Gordon, Healing Arts Division co-chairman;
Marvin Goldman, Healing Arts Division co-
chairman; Gary Y. Holtzman. Mercantile
Division, co-chairman; Harry Pay ton. At-
torneys' Division, co-chairman; Lee
Spiegelman. Builders. Real Estate and Allied
Trades Division, chairman; (seated, from left)
Arnold Altman Commerce and Professions
Division, co-chairman; Martin Fine, Com-
merce and Professions Division, chairman.
Shalom Jerusalem Celebration
Highlights Israeli Talent
In Art And Music
Music and art will highlight the "Shalom Jerusalem,"
celebration on Sunday. May 17. This program, celebrating
Israel's 39th anniversary and the 20th anniversary of the
reunification of Jerusalem in 1967. is sponsored by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation in cooperation with
Miami Dade Community College Wolfson Campus.
The music begins with Israeli singers Yaffa Yarkoni and
Yoel Sharabi. Yarkoni is a renowned Israeli songstress.
She has performed for troops during all of Israel's wars,
and toured throughout five continents. Yoel Sharabi. a
sabra (native Israeli) is a charismatic, multi-talented per-
former. He plays guitar and tambour to accompany his
songs. Sharabi also delights his audiences by playing two
flutes simultaneously Yarkoni entertains at 1 p.m.;
Sharaai performs at 2 p.m.. both on the main stage.
"Music and art have become interwoven into ihe fabric of
Jewish life and culture." said Norman Lieberman. chair-
man of the "Shalom Jerusalem" celebration. "To reflect
this we have interwoven the music and art of the best
Israeli talent into the day's festivities." he added.
Art lovers will get a real treat during the "Shalom
Jerusalem" celebration. Am ram Ebgi, craftsman and
master printer, considered a visionary by his fans will be at
the festival with his etchings. His work centers
predominantly on Jewish themes. Ebgi's popularity has in-
creased tremendously since coming to the United States,
from Israel, in 1969. His work has appeared in many of this
country's finest art museums. His etchings have also ap-
peared on the front pages of the Washingttm Post. World of
Art. Israel, Jewish Times. The Miami Herald, and Decor
Magazine, as well as on holiday cards published by
L'NICEF and Hallmark; and on the front covers of many
books.
During the Israel 39. "Shalom Jerusalem" celebration,
his work, as well as the work from other Israel and local ar-
tists, will be on display and can be purchased.
The "Shalom Jerusalem" celebration will be held at
Miami Dade Community College Wolfson Campus. 300
N.E. 2nd Avenue, from noon until 5 p.m.
More information about the celebration can be obtained
from the Greater Miami Jewish Federation at 576-4000.
* Attention Jewish Community!~{
Abraham 9s w Bakery
- AT NORTH MIAMI BEACH -
This Is What You've Been Waiting For!
757 N.E. 167th St., North Miami Beach
652-3343
(Nt to Jaffa* Stauomryl
STRICTLY PARVE O.R.C
Dynamic Educators Sought
$25.000-$35,000 for teaching couple with admin, abilities
at well established traditional day school. Additional
opportunity to teach m small Synagogue Sunday/Hebrew
school program
Mrs. Diane Kach
Peona Hebrew Day School
3616 N.Sheridan
Peoris.IL 61604
Beverly Davis of Palm Beach,
immediate past president of
B'nax B'rith W ed Secretary-Treasurer of the
Leadership Conference of .Va-
'xonal Jewish Womtm't
trqanizatxons iunng the
group's conference on isfMM .'
women and work. Ms Davit
appointment t<> 'hi twgOKUMOr
turn, which represents
than two million wish
i "men. follows >i distinguuhtd
career devoted f tht eonetrnt
of Jewish wmen.
Vice Mayor To Share
Role With Abe Resnick
Newly elected Miami Beach
Vice Mayor William Shockett
has announced that fie will
allow C v Commission
member Abe Resnick o nold
that position for ihe first two
months of the su-month post
because Resnick has never
iield tnat title. Shockett will
serve the remaining four
months.
Experienced
Funeral
Director
If your potential is limited
because of private owner-
ship or family heritage the
cemetery-mortuary field
has tremendous opportu-
nities for people with your
background. Our firm is
the fastest growing in the
industry today and has
openings for several
representatives in the
Miami area.
On a national basis the
representatives working
in this department have
established a very
substantial income.
Call MR. KINLEY.
(SBSl l Sale* Manage*
1-800-428-4786
Happenings
Miami-Dade Community College's Lunchtime Uvel> Arts
Series presents a portion of Mary Luft's new work Power Liv-
ing at noon. Wednesday, at the Wolfson Campus in downtown
Miami
Lon rein has been appointed coordinator of communuations
services at the Miami Heart Institute Prior to her appointment
she was director of marketing and public relations at Humana
Hospital-South Broward in Hollywood Fein also serves as wee
president of the South Florida Hospital Public Relations and
Marketing Association
The Hebraica .Miami Community Center will have a Mothers
Day celebration on May 10 at Hebraica featuring lunch and a
children's fashion show Seating by reservation
Registration for summer programs in Israel for high school and
coOege students is now in progress, in key cities throughout the
United States, it was announced by Irva J Strauss Director of the
American Zionist Youth Foundation s Israel Program Center
The Center is headquartered in M. nhanan at SIS Park A\e
The JCC Garden Oub will hold a Mother's Day Plant Sale 9
a m to noon on May 8 in the main lobby of the Michael Ann
Russell Center in North Miami Beach
The Democratic Executive Committee wiD feature a program
on The Jewish Vote and The Democratic Parts at 7 \l p m
Monday at the Everglades Hotel Penthouse
The Irvine C Spear Democratic Club wil meet 7 3 day at the Surfside Center The guest speaker will he Sgt Frank
Ma ye of the City of Miami Police Department Sgt Maye con-
ducted the recent Operation Homeless The board *ill meet u
6 4.5 p m
Temple Adath Yeshunin will celebrate :ts 29th \nm\ersar\
with the Annual Dinner Dance honoring Marilyn \nd Vlan l.adis
on Sundas with i-eremonies beginning at 6 p m and linner \:
p m at the Temple
Soviet Semantics and Simple 'iths till be he tubfC
the Sunny Seniors of I emple ISFM Jivusskmi >\ v\ illiam
Saulson at their open noon neetink vtondav t he mpk-
The 1986-1987 issue of he -Journal of Jewish Musk ind
1 Jturgy has been published bs -he Philip and ->arah Bell *v hool Jewish Musk and the antonaj C ouncil of Vmenca it a led
to the KMkh Anm\ersar\ t the founding of Neshi\.\ I un-
announced Macs Niiim.in the editor and i resident o! x
Miami Beach This lournai includes articles that focus Of) the
scholarl> analysis > aoous aspects of Jewish muSM ind n
Carlos Arbolesa Charles I einberg and he ate !>r Ml
(ova will b* beamed 4 honars degrees when *v rhon U
I niversitv uolds us 22nd commencement on nda\ at I SCI p
at Dade < ount> Auditorium Six hundred wentv-'ive Mud)
iiulergraduate and graduate will be receiving 'heir degrees
Mothers Day celebration at Temple Beth Raphael 1 54/i M
terson Ave Ma> 10 SI Mam Fkiwers to he ladies BageN nd
lox served b> Men s Club
4l
Residents'
?Get-A-Way
Head."
onM
a
\am llnndi faMmh' \1*s4kV indnSe* Se-uiluMi
..ne IN two-rtrdr....m mhIi with (ullwuuifiprd iMtfhrn and <|iW*n-sl"
. .. .... ... ......r -----'- '"
\it\n" r.-.i j.u//i
\Ku i*Hibh '-Win *kang Snorfcdiai ftatemH
W iiiilMirfini; (.II Jiul i< nni
( .ill 800-228-W22 lor reserwrtions.
MSN* T > fceamoes esssea eSftu ali^^^^TsV a-^ J C
.-..-..<>~ ^. ~t- *" a -a. Radisson bui
Zm?33EZ2 \ \'W on Marco Island
IM. So. ,iM -. MiI n ll'W: Ml*) IIUS s!*M'l
ite Resort
fli iiii MM I!,..p.. II "
S <
.11 '
I),4 Mm" !"*' '


75th Wedding
Anniversary
He met her at a social mixer and promised to teach her
how to dance; 18 months later they waltzed down the aisle.
, i I an^ng wedding vows and lifetime commitments. Four
children, nine grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren
later. Samuel Layton and his bride Reba danced at their
75th wedding anniversary party on this past Wednesday at
the Irving Cypen Tower (ICT).
The Laytons are in remarkably good health. At 97. Sam
j8 the oldest tenant of ICT. and Reba, 92, keeps active as a
inteer with the Douglas Cardens Greater Miami
Women's Auxiliary.
Approximately 140 family and friends joined the Laytons
in the celebration of their 75th anniversary which l>egan at
4 p.m. with cocktails and a cake cutting ceremony. Dinner
was scheduled for 5 p.m. and a party followed at 7 p.m.
Irving Cypen Tower, an adult congregate living facility.
i vision of the Miami Jewish Home for the Aged at
Douglas Cardens.
Friday. May 1. 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Bob Shevin
Continued from Page IB
was much luckier." Shevin
says.
Shevin 58, lives in an unin-
corporated section of Dade
County near Coral Gables. He
is primarily a civil trial lawyer
with the firm Sparber. Shevin,
Shapo and Heilbronner. It is a
firm of 50 lawyers.
HIS FIRST political venture
began in the state legislature
when he was elected in 1964 to
the House of Representatives.
From 1966 until 1970. he was a
state senator, and that year he
was elected as Attorney
G< eral.
Then, in 1978. he ran for
g n r It was the year Bob
n that office. The
.tit in riot winn-
said, left him more
ban his recent
i very, very major
tment,' be said. '"I
runner throughout
lp until the very end.
ost like snatching
the jaws of vie-
point was that I real
I was going to win
l to win.
SHEVIN DOESN'T see a
ick to public office in
r; Every lawyer I think
I'entually like to !>< a
I think certainly it
thing to look at, he
law office, which in-
brothers, Jerry and
also active in lobby
wg primarily through its
- office, and the
nta include the City
I Miami.
Shevin has been married to
Myrna Bresaack for 30 years.
He has three children. Laura.
->'. who recently was married
to Phil Bullock. Daughter
Hlary. 21, is studying fashion
coordination at the University
f Honda. His son. Harry. 19,
a freshman at the University
01 Honda, and will probably
go into law.
Shevin says he hopes the
"*n who mugged him will be
faught and he will leave their
sentence up to a judge.
AT THE time when it first
jappened, I probably felt very
jwiohc and upset, with good
heST.^T *?*on- yu
eai. I think what they did was
wiaiiy uneccesary.
'' think certainly what they
J I" me. and what they pro-
".v did to others, deserves
jome severe punishment. As
w"at that punishment
should be, I'd rarther leave
that up to the judge and a
jury."
Making fined plans for the Annual Spring
Dinner and Dance of Temple Emanu-El,
scheduled for 6 p.m. Sunday, in the Friedland
Ballroom are these leaders of the Miami Beach
congregation. From left, are Dr. and Mrs.
Isaias Lerner of Miami Beach, chairmen of
the event, and Dr. and Mrs. Stephen Wander.
The program unll highlight the installation of
officers, directors and trustees for 1987-88, ac-
cording to Lawrence M. Schantz. president of
Temple Emanu-El.
HERE'S A HEALTHY SNACK IDEA
MKI
AND TETLEY TEA.


Page 4-B The Jewish Ftorkhan/Fnday, May 1, 1967
Publix
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jswuft Floruha* Staff HVitfr
Dr. Martin Katahn. author
of "TV Rotation Diet," which
has been on the New York
Times Bestseller list for 46
weeks, is coming to South
Florida to start a weight loss
movement that hundreds of
thousands of Americans across
the country have already
begun.
Publix supermarkets is spon-
soring what might be the big-
gest weight loss community
campaign in diet history.
Katahn. whose book was
released in paperback last
month, will be visiting various
Publix supermarkets in this
area May 11 and 12.
THE PROGRAM officially
began April 23. with a volun-
tary weigh-m at any Publix in
Dade. Broward and Palm
Beach Counties. Each week,
participants will receive free
brochures that outline exactly
what has to be done.
In an interview with The
Jewish Floridian. Katahn
discussed some of the prin-
ciples of his popular diet. The
first person he will tell you
tried the diet was himself.
"I'm a former fat man who's
kept 75 pounds off for 24
years." said Katahn. who
formerly weighed 230 pounds.
"I was a fat kid. grew up fat
too. I had one of those Jewish
mothers who had me clean my
plate because of all the starv-
ing kids in Armenia, and then
in the next breath she would
tell me I was too fat and had to
go on a diet."
HE HAD a heart attack
when he was 35 years old.
Katahn. who is now 59. also
had high blood pressure. He
knew it was weight-related
because he said the minute he
lost weight and became active,
his blood pressure became
normal.
Katahn shies away from at-
tacking other diets publicly by
name, but he said certain diets
are excellent, but they don't
motivate people. Katahn says
his diet is "almost as fast as
starvation except, it doesn't
slow the metabolic rate.
There is a hitch to following
his diet: it goes part and parcel
with getting exercise in any
number of ways.
He urges people to get a bud-
dy and others to diet with
them.
"'Don't be one person
against the world." he says.
ANOTHER TIP is not to
fight mother nature. Don't try
putting ice cream before you.
You won't win. he says. People
are supposed to be comfortable
on his diet and to achieve that
comfort.
Katahn suggests a list of
several "safe" vegetables that
one can eat as he or she
pleases. They include:
asparagus, cabbage, escarole.
radishes, zucchini, celery,
cucumbers, lettuce, spinach
(raw), chicory, endive, parsley,
watercress, all of which con-
tain vitamins, minerals, and
beneficial amounts of fiber,
with fewer than 10 calories per
half-cup serving.
There are even some
vegetables you car. "cheat"
h. they are a^out
calories per half-cup and in-
clude tomatoes, broccoli, car-
rots, cauliflower, green beans.
Sponsor Of 'The Rotation Diet'
onions, summer squash and
mushrooms.
THERE ARE also fruits
that are considered "safe."
When you need a lift, feel
unbearably hungry or are
tempted to stray from the diet
for any reason, try an apple,
melon, pineapple, berries,
orange, tangerine, grapefruit,
peach or other fresh fruit in
season.
Katahn spent over two
decades refining his diet plan,
which he first began develop-
ing in 1963. In 1986. some
76.000 people in Nashville
went on the diet. Katahn has
been a professor of psychology
for 25 years at Vanderbilt
University in Nashville. Tenn..
where he also directs the
Vanderbilt Weight Manage-
ment Program.
He received the PhD degree
in psychology from Syracuse
University but began his later
education studying violin at
the JuUliard School of Musk.
Katahn has also written a
cookbook to accompany his
diet plan. He is in the midst of
an international tour, and his
book has been translated into
Swedish. Danish. German.
French. Italian. Spanish. Por-
tuguese. Hebrew, and it is go-
ing to be published in the
Republic of China-
THE ROTATION Diet is
not new to Publix. In 1986. the
supermarket chain met suc-
cess when it sponsored the diet
in its Lakeland and Jackson-
ville divisions, which encom-
passes all of Florida excluding
the southeast counties. More
than 75.000 dieters registered
at Publix and recorded a
weight loss of more than
188.000 pounds.
The brochures that will be
available at Publix will include
one for each of nine weeks in
the program.
A sample from Week One is
a welcome to the Rotation
Diet. And it tells you. "This is
going to be the most successful
diet you have ever under-
taken." and assures the dieter
that, if successfully followed,
the plan can "put an end to a
lifetime of dieting."
IT ALSO tells you what you
can expect on the diet, which
includes plans for men as well
as women in fact urging
couples to diet together
Here's one important statistic:
"The average weight loss on
this diet is 2/3rds of a pound a
day for 21 days.
At the end of three weeks
you must take a short vacation
from dieting, and. if you have
more weight to lose, you can
repeat the 21-day diet
The weight loss will also
have an additional benefit.
Publix Super Markets have
pledged to donate two cents to
the American Cancer Society
for every pound that is lost
during Publix"s Rotation Diet
Promotion that will run in
Southeast Florida through
June 25.
THE ROTATION Diet
alternates low-, medium- and
high-calone days over a three-
week period and includes daily
exercise the equivalent of
walking 45 minutes a day.
Women spend three days at
600 calories a day. four days at
900 calories and then a week at
1.200 calories. The third week
repeats the first. Men use rota-
tions of 1.200, 1.500 and 1.800
calories.
The Rotation Diet program
will offer participants daily
menus for quick weight loss
and maintenance, guidelines
for physical activity, motiva-
tional tips and answers to the
questions most frequently ask-
ed about the diet, recipes to il-
lustrate healthy, low fat cook-
ing, and advice on eating out
and dealing with various pro-
blem situations that may lead
you to overeat.
IN RED LETTERS on the
pamphlets is a warning that no
one should undertake this or
any other weight loss diet
without the advice of his or her
physician. It also stresses that
the Rotation Diet is not for
everyone.
Here is a sample menu for
women taken from his
book:*EP
Week One:
1
Breakfast: to grapefruit; one
slice of whole-wheat bread and
one slice cheese, no-cal
beverage.
Luck: one scoop of salmon,
unlimited free vegetables, five
whole-wheat crackers, no-cal
beverage.
Dinaer: Baked chicken, one
serving each of cauliflower
(one cup) and beets (Mi cup),
one apple, no-cal beverage.
DAY 2
Breakfast: Mi banana, one
ounce of high-fiber cereal.
eight ounces of skim or low-fat
milk, no cal beverage.
Laack: one scoop of low fat
cottage cheese, unlimited free
vegetables, one slice of whole-
wheat bread, no-cal beverage.
Diaaer: Poached Fish Filet,
one serving each of broccoli
(one cup) and carrots to cup. Mi
grapefruit, no cal-beverage.
HERE IS A sample menu
for men taken from his book:
Week I
DAY I
Breakfast: to banana, one
ounce of high fiber cereal.
eight ounces of skim or low-fat
milk, no-cal beverage.
Laack: large chef salad (one
ounce each of cheese and
turkey plus any salad
vegetables), lo-cal salad dress-
ing. five whole-wheat
crackers, no-cal beverage.
Diaaer: Baked chicken (four
and Mi ounces cooked), one
small baked potato, one serv-
ing of green beans, one apple,
one slice of cheese (one ounce),
no-cal beverage.
DAY 2
Breakfast: Mi grapefruit, one
slice of whole wheat bread, one
tablespoon of peanut butter,
eight ounces of low-fat or skim
milk, no-cal beverage.
Laack: large fruit salad (about
two cups), one slice of cheese
(one ounce), five whole-wheat
crackers, no-cal beverage.
Diaaer: Poached (or baked)
fish fillet (six ounces cooked),
one serving of green peas and
baby onions (Me cup), lo-cal
salad dressing, dinner salad,
no-cal beverage.
Here are some recipes from
Dr. Katahn s book:
COTTAGE-CHEESE
DRESSING
to cup of low-fat cottage
cheese
to cup of plain low-fat yogurt
Mi green pepper, chopped
4 radishes, sliced
2 Tbsps of chives
1 Tbsp. of poppy seeds
herb salt to taste
Mix in a blender or food pro-
cessor. It is excellent with
salads and baked potatos. For
variety, add onions or two
ounces of blue cheese. (Blue
cheese will add about 40
milligrams of sodium to each
tablespoonful of this dressing).
About 12 calories per tables-
poon, or 22 calories per tables-
poon when blue cheese is
added
LO-CAL SALAD
DRESSING
to cup of fine olive oil
1 cup of water
** cup of wine or fruit vinegar
1 clove of garlic, crushed
^ Tsp. of salt
1 Tsp. of dried tarragon
Blend by shaking in a jar and
letting stand for several hours
before its first use. Always
shake before using. Use dif-
ferent herbs for variety. For
extra tang, add one teaspoon
of Dijon mustard. About 33
calories per tablespoon.
ALMOND CHICKEN
3 pounds of chicken breasts.
skinned and boned
Mi cup of Tamari
1-inch cube of fresh ginger,
finely minced (or 1 Tsp of dry
ground ginger)
3 cloves of garlic, finely minc-
ed (or 1 Tsp. of powden
Mi cup of whole-wheat flour
^t cup of finely ground
almonds
Mi Tsp. of salt
Mi Tsp. of pepper
2 Tbsps of peanut or corn oi
In a large bowl, combine the
soy sauce, ginger and garlic.
Cut the chicken into bite-size
chunks and marinate in the s- >>
mixture while you prepare the
other ingredients.
In another bowl, combine
flour, almonds, and the rest of
the seasonings. Add this to the
chicken and toss until the
chicken is coated with the flour
mixture.
Heat the oil in a large skillet
or work on high heat. When
the oil is hot. add the chicken.
and turn the heat down to
medium. Cook covered, stirr-
ing often, about 20 minutes.
This goes well with nee and
a green vegetable.
Makes eight servings at 223
calories per serving, not in-
cluding the rice and
vegetables.
APPLE-NUT
BRAN SQUARES
1 cup of 40 percent Bran
Flakes or Raisin Bran
Mi cup of wheat germ
Mi cup of nonfat dry milk
powder
Mi cup of firmly packed brown
sugar
Mi cup of finely chopped ap-
ples, skins on
2 Tbsps. of vegetable oil
1 Tbsp. of dark molasses
Mi Tsp. of baking powder
1*8 Tsp. of salt
2 beaten eggs
1* Tsps vanilla
13 cup of chopped pecan
walnuts
Nonstick vegetable cooking
ray
Combine bran, wheat germ,
milk, baking powder, and salt
in a .arge bowl. In a separate
bowi. combine eggs, sugar, ap-
ples, oil, molasses and vanilla.
Add egg mixture gradually to
dry mixture, blending well
Add nuts. Spray a 9-mch
square baking pan with cook-
ing spray. Turn batter into pan
and bake at 350 degrees for 25
minutes. Cool and cut into 20
squares.
Makes 20 servings a: ap-
proximately 85 calories per
serving.
CHICKEN AND
SWISS SALAD
Mi cup of plain yogurt
2 Tbsps. of mayonna.--
1 Tbsp. of fresh di pped
parsley
1 Tsp. of horseradish
1 Tsp. of prepared mustard
1 Tsp. of rosemary
' 4 Tsp. of garlic powder
1 head of lettuce
12 sliced green pepper r i n
6 slices of Swiss che.....
ounce each
6 slices of sweet re>i
6 slices of cooked chickei r
turkey, one ounce etch
24 sliced cucumber rounds i
inch thick
12 tomato slices
Blend together a iri
mayonnaise, p a -
horseradish. must ird
rosemary, and gar.
and chill while prepar.- g
rest of the salad.
Remove core of lettuce nead.
Cut lettuce crossw.se I get 4
slices. Mi inch thick Place let-
tuce slices on ring |
Top each lettuce slice wrtl tn
green pepper nngs. 1 -
cheese. 1 slice of onion
of chicken or turkey. 4 es I
cucumber, and 2 likes
tomato. Top each server;,; with
2 tablespoons of g "
mixture
Makes icnringa u ---;
calories per tarring
MEDLEY CASSEROLE
J medium potatoes
(leave skins
1 medium carr* : 9
:nch rounds
1 stalk of celer
1 onion, sliced
rounds
14 Tbsps. of bu
1 Tsp. of dillweed
1 Tsp. of basil
Mi Tsp. of rosemary
14 Tsp. of salt
* Tsp. of black pepper
1 pound of fish fillets
1 medium green pepper
ped fine
1 Tbsp. of lemon juice
1 medium tomato ppM
fine
Layer potatoes
celery, and onion in ai W"
square baking dish M but-
ter and combine wit* <8L
basil, rosemary, salt and pep-
per. Spoon half of the *"J
butter over the veg<
Cover and bake it 42 kgW*
for 25 minutes
Arrange fish fillet.-
the vegetables and spnnl*
with lemon juice Spoon the re-
maining seasoned butter 'ver
the fish. Top with *h^PPf
green pepper. C "-*:
for 15 more minutes or u
fish flakes easilv witl 'rK.
Uncover and add
tomato Bake 5 min
- until ton. .
vegetables are te:
Makes 4 ser.
liH per ser


Friday, May 1, 1987/The Jewigh Floridian Page 5-B
Write
Dear IVomi
For Atlvice
Dear Nomi, an advice column, will appear regularly in the
pages of The Jewiah Floridian.
Dear Nomi:
I am a divorced mother of
three grown children, two
boys, ages 22 and 26, and one
daughter, age 24. My boys
have been on their own since
they were 19, but my daughter
is constantly moving back and
forth between my house and
her boyfriend's apartment.
I have told her several times
that I cannon stand for all this
unsettling and will not allow it
h> continue, but what am I to
do when she shows up at my
door m tears? I cannot turn
her away, yet she is driving me
crazy.
Signed,
Revolving Door
Dear Revolving Door:
What are you to do when your
daughter shows up at your
door in tears? Talk to her. It
sounds to me as if you are
being unsettled by the
uncertainty of the present
arrangement with your
daughter, and as if she is be-
ing unsettled by the uncer-
tainty of her relationship
with her boyfriend.
Perhaps the two of you could
come to an understanding
where she spends certain
days of the week at your
house and certain days at
his. But if you are unwilling
to have your daughter live
part time" at your house,
you must speak to her and
make her understand that
she cannot count on your
house ai her "place of
refuge."
\' I you might then suggest
tn your (laughter that she
think about finding a place
on her own, perhaps with a
ite who is not
boyfriend.
note "t' advice to the
r. I would caution
er living all
i boyfriend's
ent.
tending her running
to mother in tears, his
ent sounds like his
where he is king. It
joes not, however, sound
like there's room for a
queen there just yet, so your
laughter is better off as a
visiting dignitary than as a
serf.
Yours, Nomi.
bear Nomi:
rot the past five years, my
husband and I have been very
happily married. We aren't a
swinging couple" or
anything, but the intimate side
of marriage has been fine and
Pleasurable for us both. Or so I
thought.
You see, recently we bought
a video caaette machine and
nw my husband is talking
^ut getting one of those
Mue movies,T that you can get
10 Play on the machine.
'.would be so humiliated to
into a store and buy one of
hose movies, but worse, I
think that this means my hus-
** is tired of our love life
ana desires new tastes to whet
"ls appetite. Should I speak to
him and ask him if he is think-
ing about having an affair, or
just close my eyes to the
situation?
Sincerely,
Blue about blue movies
Dear Blue:
Your husband may want to
spice up your love life by
watching "blue movies" on
your video casette machine,
but that does not mean that
he is looking for a new dish.
I'm sure that your husband
has a favorite food, as well,
and that there are days
when he wants to taste a
different flavor but that
hardly means that he's
about to go to somebody
else's kitchen!
My advice to you is to relax
and talk to your husband.
You will probably discover
that he is very happy with
your love life, but would
also like to experiment with
something new. Once you
are reassured, you might
discover that you would en-
joy trying a new recipe once
in a while. After all. you can
always go back to your
favorite dish.
Yours. Nomi
Dear Nomi:
I am a 46-year-old man who,
up until this year, has not had
much truck with doctors. All of
a sudden my health has
become poor and I'm going
from one doctor to the next.
My problem is that each doc-
tor wants to do new tests, but
none of them want to tell me
exactly why and what and
how. I*m supposed to just
assume that they know In-st,
but to tell you the truth, lately
I've been feeling worse from
the tests than from anvthing
else
Signed,
Sick of Medicine
Dear Sick of Medicine:
lo.-tor~ are human beings,
iU8t as you and 1 arc and it
is foolhardy to put yourself
completely in their care, no
questions asked.
It is up to you to demand your
right to know exactly what
the tests are for, to find a
second and even third opi-
nion, and then to decide
whether or not you think
that the procedure is
warranted.
Doctors have training and in-
formation which you do not,
but different doctors have
different opinions and no
doctor is infallible. The
more active a role you play
as a patient the better the
care that you will receive.
Yours, Nomi
Dear Nomi:
A friend of mine just moved
nearer to me (he used to live
out of town). I am scared that
now that this friend is closer in
distance he will want more
from me than just friendship.
It's kind of awkward for me,
because although I have
received hints that he might be
interested, I am not complete-
ly sure that my friend is
romantically attached to me.
But I am only interested in a
platonic friendship and don't
want to lead my friend on.
Yours truly,
Platonic
Dear Platonic:
Unless your friend makes an
overt gesture towards
romance, I would suggest that
you continue acting in the
same manner that you have
always done. By acting friend-
ly and relaxed, you will not
send out any romantic signals
inadvertently.
But if he does make a romantic
gesture, you should discourage
him, either by saying openly
and honestly that you are only
interested in a friendship, or
by telling a white lie and say-
ing that your heart is already
committed elsewhere.
Although "honesty is the best
policy" in most cases, there
are times when honesty is
more cruel than kind. If your
friend is desperately in love, or
if he is extremely sensitive to
rejection, telling him that you
simply are not attracted to him
may not be the best solution.
Yours, Nomi
Dear Nomi.
My husband has jjrown a beard,
not because he is religious, but
because he likes it. I can't stand it.
He won't shave it. I prefer the
clean look and under that grizzly
mop he has a handsome face. Is it
a phase that will pass, and should I
have any say in the matter?
Signed.
Eleanor B.,
North Miami Beach
Dear Eleanor:
Shakespeare once wrote that
"love is not love which alters
when it alteration finds." Your
husband is still the same man
he was before he grew a bead,
and. although you may not like
facial hair, it is his right to have
a beard if he so desires
The only su^Restion I can offer is
that you have the same rights
as he does, and if you should
suddenly decide to wear ynw
hair in a Style he never liked, he
might suddenly realize the vir-
tues of ;i clean-shaven face
Yours. Nomi
Write Nomi for advice
in care of The Jewish
Floridian, P.O. Box
012973, Miami, Fla.
33101.
"Mission Of A Lifetime
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation held a coffee and dessert
reception to explain the detail* of its 50th Anniversary "Mis-
sion of a Lifetime." The mission unll he held from October 11-21.
Jewish Floridian salute
to our centenarians
The following individual is already 100 years old or
will be 100 by Dec. 31. 1987:
NAME
BIRTHDATE:...................................................
PRESENT ADDRFSS:
APT.:...............CITY:..... CITY OF BIRTH ................ .............STATE:..........
STATE.................ZIP: .....COUNTRY:................
SUGGESTED BY...............
ADDRESS APT
CITY:..................... ZIP

Enclose a photograph of the centenarian if possible
and mail to 100 YEARS YOUNG, The Jewish Floridian.
P.O. Box 012973. Miami. Fla. 33101.
^_______________________j
For 1,918 Passovers
We Have Been Telling Our Children
"Next Year In Jerusalem."
It's Out Turn to Keep the Promise.
Choose from a variety of excitingly different
high school and college-age programs.
louring Study Kibbutz ____
Archeology Art Tennis
Camping Religious Programs
and many more sponsored by the
American Zionist Youth Foundation
One address tor youth programs in Israel.
Israel Activities Department
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Brscayne Boulevard /K A A^j
Call (305) 576-4000 ^^C^


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 1, 1987
The Israel Histadrut Foundatitm which has
sponsored a Brunch as part of its Mid Winter
Conference presented awards to three outstan-
ding supporters of the Golden Chain of Yid-
dish Culture. Morris Fisher, Shimon Deitch
and Morris Friedman. Presenting thi a wan Is
from left to right. Dr. Sol Stem, President of
the Israel Histadrut Foundation; and Rabbi
Morton Malavsky. IHF Board Chairman.
Seimteen-year-old Peter Klein, a gifted
Miami Beach Senior High School student, cap-
tiwites three, four, and five-year-olds with his
piano playing at Mount Sinai Medical
Center 8 Young Presidents ChUd Care Center
every Monday from .f to 6 p.m. The Young
Presidents Child Care Center, founded in
1982. provides an environment for the
children of Mount Sinai employees to le-irn.
grow and flourish. Anyone interested in
becoming a teenage volunteer then ,.- en-
couraged to contact Mount Sinai Hospital.
Dallas Has A Jewish Mayor
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON i.ITA) -
Annette Strauss, a member of
the Dallas City Council for 1">
years, has been elected mayor.
the first Jewish woman to be
elected mayor of a Texas city
The 63-year-old Strauss.
who will be sworn in May 4. is
also the second Jewish woman
to become mayor of a major ei-
ty. The first was Dianne Feins
tein of San Francisco.
Strauss won a runoff elec-
tion with 56 percent of the
vote, defeating Fred Meyer, a
businessman and former chair-
man of the Dallas County
Republican Partj.
ALTHOUGH the election
was nonpartisan, Strauss, a
Democrat, was considered the
liberal candidate in a city that
has usually elected Republican
businessmen as mayor, accor-
ding to Jimmy Wisch. editor
and publisher of the Texaa
Jewish Post.
Wisch said she got support
throughout the city, but was
especially popular among
Jewish, black and Hispanic
voters.
Strauss, a public relations
consultant and former fash
model, is married to Theodore
Strauss. a brother of Robert
Si rauss, former Nati< i
Democratic Party chairman
and briefly Mlddli Bast
negotiator for the Carter
Administration.
She and her husband are
memlters of Tempi. Knianu
El, a Dallas Reform temple.
She is a former chairwoman of
the Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Dallas and a memlier of the
boards of the temple
sisterhood and the Greater
Dallas chapter of the National
Council of Jewish Women.
SPEND A VACATION
NOT A FORTUNE I
IN THE COOL
CATSKILL MOUNTAINS
SPRING LAKE INN
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I In MMVttfw country
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I tjatB'B^W"SB^i' ^s^aaijiiifw
ctoeft
ihrefefe*.
f, CCOIRfflOOOtlOOS
IforslMlM.

MSOpt'wk Pp dbi .K.
For FREE Irochure Writt:
SPRING LAKE INN
P.O. iOX 317
PARKSVILLE, NY 117M
or Call after tM M.
fl JS1 S4S or 1*3 4SI3
Weizmann Scientist Guest
Speaker May 12
Professor David Samuel,
Director of the Center of
Neurosciences and Behavioral
Research at Israel's Weiz-
mann Institute of Science, will
be the guest speaker at a din-
ner hosted by Jacqueline
Simkin at Nine Island Avenue
on Tuesday evening. May 12.
Prof. Samuel will speak on
Work at the Weisman* In-
stitute on Agmg of the Brain
and Related Problems. The
Science Forum is sponsred by
the Weizmann Institute's
American Committee Florida
Region, Rowland Schaefer.
chairman.
A member of te Weizmann
Institute staff since 1949.
Prof. Samuel six years aft
helped develop a drug
AL-721 wich reportedly has
had dramatic results in the
treatment of some AIDS vie
tims in Israel. The drug, which
was synthesized from egg
yolks by Prof. Samuel and a
Weizmann colleague. Prof.
Meir Shinitzky.- was for the
treatment of drug addicts, the
aged, and children suffering
from cystic fibrosis
At the Institute. Prof.
Samuel has established the
Chemistry of Brain and
Behavior Group which is now
part of the Center of Neuros
ciences and Behavioral
Research. Among the studies
conducted at the Center are
Prof. David Samuel
the causes and treatment of
epilepsy, multiple scler i
Parkinson's and Alzheimer*!
diseases, schizophrenia,
depression, mental retardation
and the effects i if stress >>n th*
immune system.
Prof. Samuel is current!;
Sherman Professor of }'>
Chemistry at the W.-izmanr.
Institute. He is the
of Viscount Herbert Samuel.
Britain's first High Comma-
sioner of Pah ind :>
himself the third \
Mount Carmel an I T Kteta,
American Cancer Society Breast
Cancer Detection Program
The Breast Cancer Detec-
tion Program it s campaign to
drastically reduce breast
cancer deaths in this country.
"It is designed to alert women
and :. ir ph) -1 iai the
ease and importance of elderly
brei Doris
Deimel, KN. chairman of the
Dad< I nil of the
Ameri ai I'ai cer Society.
;t one out of l" women
will lev nicer at
some time during I fe
130.000 in 1987
"We hope to reduce the
three main obstacles to
widespread use id" mi
mography high cost, fear of
radiation exposure, and lack of
knowledge about the effec-
tiveness of breast cancer
screening of asymptomatic
women.'' says Deimel.
Recent surveys have shown
that only IS percent of women
over 60 have a mammogram
every year, and tl il mly 11
percent of Amei
follow the Sociel
These inclu
Month!;.
examinatioi I
Regulai
aminations
physician
Man :
for asympt
and over
yean for a
Basel in.
women 86
The Breast
tionAwaren.
mg introduced
women througl
American Cai
volunteer- an
door to hand
ed. "Now. Breasl i u
tually has nop \&
Bnei Akiva To Hold Yom Haatzmaut Dinner
the Yom Hiokaron d-^j
Memorial Day) ss vll
Israel's Independence BJ
The program will sboft^
guest speakers Kawn -U
Neufeld. principal ol the HJ
Community Da) School *J
Rabbi Yosef Heber pnnl*
of the Hebrew Academy.
Bnei Akiva of Greater Miami
will host a festive dinner in
honor of Yom Haatzmaut on
Sunday evening at the Hillel
Community Day School in
North Miami Beach. In addi-
tion to the dinner, a special
ceremony will be presented to
highlight the significance of
Barry U. Groundbreaking
Congressman William
Lehman will assist in the
groundbreaking ceremony for
a new high-tech building at
Barry University, marking the
largest expansion in the
university's history, on Thurs-
day. May 7 at 4 p.m. The en-
tourage w.ll then mcjj*^
the west campus *n*var
groundbreaking for j JJgj
parking lot and xpa
athletic facilities will J*,
and then to h* **Jl
Science Center, whert *n
will be broken for *
classroom addition


Face Lift
The Beauty Of Youth
Friday, May 1, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Law Week Events
Bv ALISA KWITNEY
JtUfiak Floridxan Staff Writer
'Beauty is truth." wrote the
p0e1 Keats, but popular
culture endlessly advertises
,hat beauty is youth. The
relentless search for ways to
Stop the hands of time from in-
scribing its passage on the skin
of the face has uncovered yet
another possible option: the
non-surgical face lift
When the growth cycle
stops, the degenerative cycle
starts says Charles Alex-
ander, director of the Florida
Institute for the Re-Lducation
of Musculature. Inc. (FIRM) in
Fort Lauderdale "There's no
iktkxi <>t limbo." he adds.
ALEXANDER a tan and
handsome 34-year-old, first
became interested in finding a
system fo> preserving
yrouthful-lootdng skir when he
was .in athletu skill.1 instruc-
tor who noted that some of his
clients had "old faces and
youm/ bodies."
Alexander became a practi
tioner of Cosmetic Facial Ton-
ing ;i system by which the
facia, muscles are stimulated
by a gentle electro-magnetic
current transmitted through
two cotton-tipped probes. This
technique, which Alexander
was trained in by John
Milovich. an expert in electric
therapy was originally used to
reduce muscle atrophy in
stroke victims
"The body ha.v an electrical
charge running through it, a
life force, which is very strong
whet, we are young." contends
Alexander "The body's
regenerativ< powers are
electrical."
ALEXANDER, who says
thai the electrical stimulation
"t his Cosmetic Facial Toning
process triggers the body's
natural growth and repair cy-
ala says that facial exer-
cises and collagen-based
moisturizers do not help.
"Facial ? xercises stretch the
skin, ami the collagen and
eiastin molecules in skin pro-
ducts are toe large to
penetrate the pores." he
explains
Although a certain part of
one s looks as one ages is
Determined by one's genes.
"ther factors are also impor-
tant, according to Alexander.
WOMEN WRINKLE
wore than men because their
SKin ;;- thinner, and they utilize
the thirty muscles capable of
making facial expressions
ni(,re than men women are
Wore expressive." says
Alexander.
The sun, smoking and
alcohol are also wrinkle induc-
>"K. U is perspiration, and the
utn Floridian humidity can
lthUS*i, premature sagging of
Pf skin, making certain peo-
P'e develop jowels
prematurely."
0ne of the attractions of
josmet.c Facial Toning is that
T Pr" nan painful." according to
'exander. The treatments
M !r"m 45 minutes to one
W, and cost $100. A series
' "tteen treatments is the
usual recommendation.
[ people are trained to
"what I do." says Alexander
,' ^e cost of the procedure.
lrv('a,\!m,,i ar""nd the coun-
f > ^ere are about 200 people
";ir trained in the techni-
Charles Alexander administers a gentle electro-magnetic cur-
rent through two cotton-tipped probes.
que" including facial
therapists like himself, who
cannot treat the whole body
cosmetologists, massage and
physical therapists, chiroptac-
tors and doctors.
"The price will go down."
predicts Alexander. "The
machines are portable, and the
procedure is not intrinsically
expensive."
THE CONCEPT of electric
thrapy is based on principles
discovered by Dr. George
Goodheart. acknowledged a.*
the father of applied
kinesiology (the study of mus-
cle movement) who suggested
that stimulation should be
directed at the golgi tendons,
which are located at the
origins of the facial muscles.
Thomas Wing, a physician,
acupuncturist and electronics
expert who invented the
pocket-beeper, patented the
use of an electrical wave from
(ESTW) integral to the
procedure.
The discipline is young
(about ten years old), but its
popularity seems to be
assured, as electrical stimula-
tion can. according to its prac-
titioners, lift and augment
breasts and buttocks, tighten
the stomach, and work on the
cellulite which can accumulate
on the arms.
"I ALREADY have people
who have had the face
treatments who can't wait for
the breast and buttocks
treatments," says Alexander,
who would rather train other
qualified people and run the
administrative side of his
business than give the
treatments personally.
"I want my business to
grow," he explains with an
engaging smile, notwithstan-
ding the fact that smiling
creates lines and wrinkles in
the face. He can afford the
risk; the treatments are also
preventive, and Alexander,
along with his wife, Janice,
practices what he preaches.
Detractors of the non-
invasive procedures amis thai
the results are not lasting.
Even Alexander agrees that
not all his clients can expect a
drastic change, but that the
change might be more
"natural and gradual."
"When people started using
these techniques, they tried a
higher voltage current to pro-
duce more dramatic results."
says Alexander. "It didn't
work, the results were
temporary."
THE WEAKER current
creates a more permanent
result, contends Alexander,
who warns people against let-
ting anyone use an older style
machine on them, "especially
if it's plugged into the wall.
Avoid it you could get a
surge from the electrical
outlet."
Even though the procedure
is generally considered
harmless. Alexander turns
away pregnant women and
people with pacemakers,
more, he says, to prevent
possible legal complications
than out of a fear of possible
medical complications.
Are there any drawbacks to
a career which enables one to
remain youthful in appearance
while gaining fame and
fortune?
"I TEND to look at people's
faces clinically rather than
socially it's so ingrained in
me now. That's why I make
sure that the members of my
family have the treatments."
Alexander laughs, and ut-
ters his prediction for the
future: "In the next ten years,
this will become very popular
and commonplace, like a hair-
cut. Something people do to
maintain themselves."
Unless, of course, fashion
takes a turn for the unex-
pected, and lines and wrinkles
becoOM attributes which are
considered attractive. Which
isn't entirely impossible. After
all, it wasn't that long ago
when tanning was so popular
that people went to tanning
salons to maintain
themselves.
The Dade County Bar
Association, the Young
Lawyers Section of the Dade
County Bar, The Florida Bar
and the American Bar Associa-
tion is celebrating Law Day on
Friday, May 1. A nationally
celebrated day, this year's
theme is "We the people," in
honor of America's celebration
of the Bicentennial.
Starting this Friday,
through next Friday, the Dade
County Bar Association will be
hosting events for the legal
profession and will be sponsor-
ing special programs offering
FREE legal advice to the
community.
The Dade County Bar
Association's Young Lawyer's
Section will host their Annual
Law Day Luncheon on Friday,
starting at 11:30 a.m. at the
downtown Hyatt Regency
Hotel. Their featured speaker
will be Senator Lawton Chiles.
This traditional luncheon is
only open to the legal
profession.
In honor of Law Week, the
American Civil Liberties
Union will host a reception on
Friday, from 5 p.m. to 7:30
p.m., at the downtown Hyatt
Regency Hotel to toast The
constitution's Bicentennial.
The Coral Gables Bar
Association will host their An-
nual Installation Banquet and
Dance on Friday. May 8, 7
p.m.. at the Country Club of
Coral Gables.
Supreme Court Justice Ray-
mond Ehrlich will install the
new officers of the Coral
Gables Bar and president-elect
of the Florida Bar Ray Ferrero
will make a special guest
appearance.
Temple Judea To Honor
Religious School Teachers
Temple Judea will honor its
Religious School Teachers at a
Family Worship Service
scheduled at 8 p.m. Friday, ac-
cording to Rabbi Michael B.
Eisenstat.
"We invite the family and
friends of all of our con-
gregants to honor these men
and women for their commit-
ment to Jewish Education and
their continued devotion to
educating our children." the
Rabbi added.
Among those to be honored
are Rabbi Michael B
Eisenstat. Confirmation.
Sylvia Bott. 2nd Grade Sab-
bath School. Madelaine
Frishman. Drama Teacher:
Susan Kotkin. Art Teacher;
Simone Marinoff.
Kindergarten Sabbath School;
Hinda Rosenbleet. 1st Grade
Sabbath School and Jerry
Siegel, Music Teacher.
In addition, the following
Temple Judea Faculty
Members will be honored for
Bet Shira
Independence
Day Celebration
The Bet Shira Congregation
invites the community to its
celebration of Israeli In-
dependence Day on May 4. The
holiday, called Yom Ha'atz-
maut, commemorates the
establishment of the Modern
State of Israel 39 years ago.
The congregation has planned
performances, slide presenta-
tions, and Israeli dancing to
follow an Israeli-style dinner,
for which reservations are
required.
The event will be a culmina-
tion of efforts of the Congrega-
tion's Day and Religious
Schools, youth groups,
Sisterhood, Senior Assembly
and other affiliates.
having taught in Jewish
schools for 18 years or more.
These teachers include Hersch
Berman. Bar/Bat Mitzvah
teacher, Barbara Bulbin,
Hebrew teacher; Lenore Kip-
per. Hebrew teacher; Mania
Leventhal. 3rd Grade Sabbath
School; Mel Marcus. 9th Grade
Jr. High teacher; Ernestine
Rich man. Hebrew and 7th
Grade Jr. High teacher;
Robert Schneider. 8th Grade
Jr. High teacher and Linda
Spitzer, Heritage teacher and
7th Grade Jr. High teacher.
Furnished Ocesnfront
Rental Apt.
Miami Beach, fully turnlahad 2
badrooma/2 batha. pool, aauna,
guard, parking, plua Annual
Ink. No pata/cnlMran.
864-7301
DAVIE Valencia Villale
Condo Villa 2/2 End Unit 7
Yrs. Clubhouse Pools,
Tennis. All Appliances
Rant w/Option. Vacant.
$47,000. Owner 1-427-8803.
SINGLES
THE SINGLE JEWISH
Professionals and the
Single Shareholders are
co-sponsoring A SINGLES
LIVE BAND DANCE, featur-
ing the band, "Charlie
Brown & Yvonne", at THE
HILTON HOTEL, near the
Hollywood/Ft. Lauderdale
Airport. 1870 Griffin Rd.,
Dania, on Sunday, May 3,
at 8 p.m. Donation is $6
For Additional information
call 538-2884 or 932-4031.
DO YOU WANT a loving
companion to share your
apartment with you with
total support for the next
30 years? If so, I am the
charming, attractive
gentleman, 72 +, with high
cultural standards and fine
education who wants to
meet an intelligent Jewish
woman, 65-75, retired, self
supporting, and with a car
to get to Miami Beach.
Dade co. residents only. I
love traveling. Box SR c/o
Jewish Floridian, P.O.
012973, Miami 33101.
BETH TORAH SINGLES,
ages 21 to 45 invites you
to a Cabaret Night "In The
Round" featuring a star
studded performance by
Alan Prophet, comedian
(Billy Joel impersonator)
on Thursday. May 28 at
7:30 p.m. at Beth Torah
Congregation, 1051 North
Miami Beach Blvd..
Deakter Hall Ballroom.
Wine and cheese and hors
d'oeuvres will be served.
Admission $8.00. Limited
seating, reservations are
a must. RSVP Shelly
947 7528 or David 947-0779.


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. May 1. 1987
Na'amat Women
Survivors of the Holocaust, along with their
children and grandchildren lit candles during
a special ceremony during the "Yom
HaShoa," Holocaust Memorial Observance
last Sunday at Beth Torah Congregation. The
families of the following people participated:
Dora and Sam Seidman, Henry Ehrlich,
Hilda and Sol Fox, Alex and Millie Koslovsky.
Commissioner Abraham Resnick, Rabbi and
Mrs. Sadi Nahmias. The obsen>ance was spon-
sored by the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, Central Agency for Jewish Education,
Federations Community Relations Commit-
tee, Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami,
Southeastern Florida Holocaust Memorial
Center in cooperation with area survivor
clubs.
Survivors Of
The Holocaust With
Their Families
Light Candles
During
'Yom HaShoa'
Prohuor Innn Cotter, of Met', ill Umeereity
m Montreal, one of Canada's leading human
rights actuists. s-ftoke Cotler was resfninsihii
for launching the camfxiign leading t" tht
release of Anatoly Sharansky.
"New Services to Young
People and Women in Israel'*
will be the topic of an address
by Harriet Green, national vice
president of Na'amat at the
Wednesday, noon Israel In-
dependence Day Luncheon
Celebration of the Kinneret
Chapter of Na'amat. The
special event is scheduled in
the kosher restaurant in the
100 Lincoln Road Building.
Miami Beach.
Green, who will be leaving
on a special mission to Israel in
a few weeks, will discuss the
Na'amat sponsored Center for
Battered Women in the State
of Israel and other new in-
novative projects to help
women and children. She is
also on the national board of
the American Zionist Federa-
tion and president of the South
Florida Council of Na'amat
USA.
The entertainment program
will be headlined by Tony
Simone who will sing and ac-
company himself on the
accordian.
A commemoration of Israel
Independence Day and a slide
show documentary of the
Diary of Anne Frank will take
place at the Monday. 1 p.m.
meeting of the Eilat Chapter
of Na amat at the civic
auditorium of Financial
Federal Savings and Loan
Association. 755 Washington
Avenue. Miami Beach.
Cultural chairman Ida
Kovalsky will speak on Israci
receiving her indeF>en,|,.nc *
years ago and Frieda LevitS
w,l s,ng Wropriau S2
and lead a oommunitj -n
Rose Rubin and Ann Adler
w.ll be hostesses and *rl
home-baked cakes bv R^
Katz. *
Singer Madeline Kern wili
head the musical entertain,
ment at the closing luncheon
meeting of the liana ihapter
of Na'amat on Tuesday, a:
11:30 a.m. in the auditorium of
Winston Tower 800, 230 174th
St.. Sunny blm
Lillian Hoffman, president
will discuss Israel In-
dependence Day and the im-
portance not only to Jews, but
the world at large
A kosher luncheon will be
served and reservations mav
be secured by telephoning at
935-1026 or Hoffman at
935-0361.
A mini-lunch and nomination
and election of officers will be
on tap at the Wednesday, noon
meeting of the Masada
< 'hapter of Na'amat scheduled
in the conference room of the
organization. 60S Lincoln
Road. Miami Beach
The entertainment f>rtior.
of the program will include a
playlet entitled "To l.rusalerr.
With Love."
Planning for Amit Women's annual domo- lunrht"' \Mo*
May 18, at I p.m. in the Amerxcan Hnllro<>m oftkt Kon rR U
arr Iff} t>> right: Ruth Zellner. Chairman of tht Exeeui
FUrrxda Council; Ida Arluk. Runny Semreibtr .,. .ri.iru
Rnthenherg. Presidium IftmAsn the Florida tad
(ieraldine Brody. Member of the Vered Choptei Rothenberg is the dorrnr chairman and not shou-n. -man.
/sMftta Hash Alex Daowd, Mayor of Miami Beach u
xjieaker.
Amit Women To Hold
Annual Donor Luncheon
The Florida Council of Amit
Women will hold their annual
donor luncheon on Wednes
day. May 13 at 1 p.m.. in the
American Ballroom of the
Konover Hotel.
This annual affair honors the
dedicated and hardworking
members of Amit V\
attendance of
expected.
Alex Daoud. Ma) r fMian
Beach w.ll be P*?x
speaker, and a most ',rlainn
ing afternoon
planned.
tu'er,
The Temple Sinai of North Dade musical
group. "Shim Haler." performed at the
torn HaShoa.''
Gold & Diamond Outlet
Of Florida
Importer of Diamonds
Fine UK A 18K Jewelry
Wholesale A Retail
Pre Mothers Day Sale
SUPER DISCOUNTS
with any purchase you will receive a FRtt
Gold Heart for MOM.
Seybold Bldg
36 NE 1st St.. Suite 325
Miami, Fla. 33132
(305) 5770519


Hadassah Events
Friday, May 1, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Hatikvah Hadassah will
have their chapter installation
meeting May 14 at 7:30 p.m. in
the Greenery Mall in Dadeland
Square New installed officers
JJ the 1987-1988 year are
\my Mittelberg. President;
Diane Taub. Administrative
Vice President; Karen
Sheskin, Education Vice Presi
dent; Susan Kaplan and Alecia
Sachs. Fundraising Vice
Presidents; Penny Pawliger.
Membership Vice President;
Susan Nevel. Programming
Vice President; Debbie Hur-
witz. Treasurer; Susan Penn.
Financial Secretary; Karen
Gostel, Membership Dues
Secretary; Lesly Diaz, Recor-
ding Secretary; and Karen
Frost. Corresponding
Secretary End of the year
awards wil be given.
The Forte Towers Chapter
of Hada-ssah will meet 1 p.m.
May 11 in the auditorium. The
AJC 35th
Anniversary
Dinner
The American Jewish Com-
mittee will celebrate the Miami
Chapter's 35th anniversary at
its annual dinner meeting on
Thursday, May 7 at 6 p.m. at
the Omni International Hotel.
The topic will be "How Free
it Freedom of the Press" and
will feature panelists Jim
Hampton and Carl Hiassen of
the Miami Herald, Don
Wright, of the Miami News
and Salvador Lew of WRHC.
Moderator will be Audrey
Finkelstein of WLRN.
Lemuel Schofield, Associate
Dean. School of Communica-
tion. University of Miami will
the keynote address.
There will be an election of
nw ifficera and Executive
Comm ttee members and a
a I award will be
presented to Congressman
William Lehman.
The Israeli Army Trio
An entertainment group of
the Israel Defense Forces will
perform on Saturday, May 9 at
M6 p.m. at Bet Shira Con-
gregation, After the perfor-
mance and a sing-alon^.
irid refreshments will
" served There will be also an
ticket drawing.
All the proceed! will benefit
the Association "Friends of
f"' II'I formerly known as
ation for Welfare of
n Israel." For tickets
Md more information contact
Kuth Lidii. Tickets can be also
;" bought the day of the
performance.
Dide County Young
pemocrats Elect Officers
The Dade County Young
"gocrate have elected new
JJJJ. President; Ben Wesley,
fe 'V Vice P^ident;
geHe I) Tate. Political A*
'* Vice President; Aurora
Vir ?; Community Affairs
Willi. Frlsident; Mario
PreST' ^e'opment Vice
ProJ?*nt: ,Sharon **"">*
Chart "2, Vice President;
B?S B*Ton' SUte Liaison
mt*v rrs,de"ti Terry Sham-
CZ"' Rec,ordinK ^ Press
RSfiy Joeph S. GeUer.
'anumentarian.
guest will be Channel 4 an-
chorwomen Susan Lichtman.
The Albert Einstein Chapter
of Hadassah will hold its Donor
Luncheon on Thursday, May 7
at the Konover Hotel at noon.
The chapter will hold a lun-
cheon and card party on May
11 at noon in Temple Adath
Yeshurun on Miami Gardens
Drive.
The Hannah Senesch
Chapter of Hadassah will hold
its donor and installation
meeting on Monday at noon at
the Shelborne Hotel.
The Southgate Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its regular
meeting featuring the installa-
tion of officers for 1987-1988
by Gilda Fisher at 1 p.m. May
11 in the Southgate Terrace
Room. Muriel Kovinow will
speak on the highlights of the
Hadassah Diamond Jubilee
trip to Israel.
Hadassah Aliyah will hold
the installation of new officers
at Temple Samu-el Or Olum
during a dinner meeting at 7
p.m. on May 12.
Bonds Brunch
Continued from Pag* 1-B
Florida Bar Association. He
has also served as a member of
the Board of Directors of the
Democratic Leadership Coun-
cil, the Kiwanis Club and the
Sons of the American
Revolution.
Rep. Bloom is being
recognized for her tremendous
commitment to Israel, her
years of leadership in the
Greater Miami Community
and her service to the people of
Florida. She is currently serv-
ing on the Board of Governors
of the Greater Miami Israel
Bonds Organization. Co-
chairing the Brunch are Sen.
Gwen Margolis, Dade County
State Attorney Janet Reno,
Helene Berger and Myra Farr.
This is the second major event
of the women's Division in
1987 following the heels of a
successful fashion show
recently held at the Mayfair
House.
For reservations for the
Elaine Bloom Brunch, contact
the Israel Bonds Organization
at 531-6731.
Amii Women
Coral Gables Chapter of
Amit Women will meet on
Tuesday at noon at Zamora
Temple, Coral Gables. A lun-
cheon will be served and an in-
teresting program has been
arranged.
Galil Chapter celebrates
Israel's Independence Day
with a brunch on Monday at
noon, at the Young Israel
Synagogue, North Miami
Beach. A book review entitled
"Ethel Merman's Life" will be
presented by Beverly Berlin
followed by a sing-a-long of
Merman's songs which she
made popular. Youth Aliyah
Blue Book raffles will be
drawn.
Moorings Chapter will meet
on Tuesday at noon in the
auditorium of Moorings
Towers, North Miami Beach.
A wonderful menu and en-
joyable program will be
presented.
Shoshana Chapter cordially
invites one and all to attend a
party in celebration of Israel's
39th birthday and in honor of
Shoshana Chapter's Ayshes
Chayils and mothers and
fathers in Israel. The party
will take place on Thursday,
April 30 at 12:30 p.m. in the
Palace Playhouse of Seacoast
Towers East. Miami Beach. A
full course roast chicken din-
ner and special dessert will be
served, preceded by wine and
hors d'oeuvres and entertain-
ment will make for a most en-
joyable afternoon.
The Chai Chapter of Amit
Women (formerly American
Mizrachi Women) will be
holding their Annual Charity
Auction for Israel on Sunday.
May 17 at Temple Zion-
Israelite Center.
Early Bird Sale of smaller
merchandise and preview of
auction merchandise will begin
at 4 p.m., and the auction will
begin at 7:30 p.m.
A light kosher dinner will be
available at a nominal charge,
admission is free, and proceeds
from this auction are earmark-
ed for scholarships, Youth
Aliyah and social services.
Auction chairpersons are;
Jeanne Finkelstein, Ann Slot-
sky, Sadie Kane and the com-
mittee; Bess Sokol, Isabel
Alexander, Molly Beckerman,
Susan Feldman, Bernice Eps-
tein, Be Harris, Mildred
Gomez, and Edith Sirull,
President of Chai.


Page 10-B The Jewish Fkmdian/Fnday, May 1, 1987
Jay Horwitz
Public Relations Director For The Mets
Hebrew Academy Students Ir
National Bible Contest Finals
By MARK S. FREEDMAN
"What's a nice Jewish boy
doing in a job like this?" For
Jay Horwitz. the director of
public relations for the world
champion New York Mets, the
answer is easy, "loving every
minute of it."
A native of the Bronx and
Clifton, NJ, Horwitz is beginn-
ing his ninth year as public
relations director for the Na-
tional League franchise.
"EVEN THOUGH its been
eight years on the job, I feel
like I've just started, Horwitz
noted. One would imagine that
having to deal with high
salaried baseball players in the
media center of the world
would be frought with
difficulties.
"Quite to the contrary.'
Horwitz says. "Without excep-
tion, the Met players are easy
to work with. All the
statements one reads in the
press claiming that Met
players are egotistical and ar-
rogant is media hype. The
reason for this team's success
is the fact that the players
have never lost sight of their
common goal to win ball
games, and in the process,
working as a unit."
Horwitz notes that his pas-
sion for sport arose not as a
participant on the field, but
rather behind scenes. "You
really couldn't classify me as
the athletic type but I was
always interested and involved
in sports."
FIRST AS manager of the
football team for Clifton High
School, and then as manager
for New York University's
basketball team, Horwitz
developed his zeal for the
reams of statistics and percen-
tages that accent professional
sports.
Horwitz. who celebrated his
40th birthday last August,
works in a world with few
other Jewish employees,
although he notes that two
members of Senior Met
management, owner Fred
Wilpon and traveling
secretary Arthur Richman are
Jewish. The Mets. who at one
time had a Jewish player on
their roster a decade ago, Art
Shamsky, currently have no
Jewish ball players.
The fan situation in New
York is much different. Hor-
witz noted that nearly 50 per-
cent of all Met season ticket
holders are Jewish. On at least
one occasion, the
preponderance of Jewish
season ticket holders did pre-
sent a problem.
WHEN THE Mets were in-
volved in last season's playoff
with the Houston Astros for
the National League pennant,
a scheduling conflict arose bet-
ween the games and the occur-
rence of Yom Kippur.
"The league office scheduled
the playoffs so that two of our
home games fell on Yom Kip-
pur. The Met organization
tried everything it could to
change the dates and times of
these games, but the schedule
was locked in due to the re-
quirements of the television
network. r
"At no time wa' our office
provided with 'an opportunity
to offer input on the schedul-
ing conflict," Horwitz stated.
ON A MORE personal level.
Horwitz had his own conflict to
resolve. "I really didn't want
to work on Yom Kippur.
however, the demands were
too great. With a huge na-
tional press corps, and the na
tional exposure, the job came
first.
Like many Met fans of the
Jewish faith. Horwitz spent
Yom Kippur at Temple Shea.
Horwitz did note that the se-
cond of the games scheduled
on Yom Kippur was rained
out. "Perhaps a bit of divine
intervention." Horwitz added.
During the baseball season.
Horwitz has little time for out-
side activities. "My life is all
baseball," he said. The day
begins at 7:30 a.m.. and often
continues well past 1 a.m.
First there are daily press
releases, followed by arrang-
ing for interviews and photo
sessions for the players.
BY GAME time. Horwitz is
stationed in the press box. and
wired with a microphone, he
provides statistics, injury
reports and other minutiae to
the Mets television and radio
broadcasting crews and other
reporters. After the game.
Horwitz is off to the clubhouse
to monitor player interviews
and then he begins prepara-
tions for the next day's game.
The off-season is an equally
busy time for Horwitz. First
there is the business of prepar-
ing press guides ana year-
books then working with
various sponsors for Met pro-
motiona) days at Shea
Stadium.
During the course of the
season. Met give away days of-
fer fans everything from t-
shirts and baseball caps to
beverage coolers and raingear.
"If the off season is any
slower, I haven't noticed it,
particularly with the Mets,"
Horwitz added.
THE METS have had their
share of off-the-field troubles.
From the arrest of four Met
players in Houston last July, to
the off-season difficulties en-
countered by Dwight Gooden
and Darryl Strawberry, Hor-
witz applies his skills as a
public relations counselor as
well as promotor.
"We always try to be as up-
front and as honest with the
media as is possible. All our
players are briefed on how to
handle the multitude of ques-
tions they receive, particularly
when it involves an incident.
"More often than not. we're
dealing with rumors, and in
essence, we have nothing to
hide. The problems are
routine, and unfortunately the
individuals involved in them
are not."
"WHEN YOU'RE world
champions and you play in
New York City, you've got to
anticipate a circus at-
mosphere, and we've already
seen this during spring train-
ing. Our attitude with the
players is to make them realize
that they are playing under the
microscope of press and fan
scrutiny and we deal with it as
best as we can." Horwitz said.
Horwitz is of the belief that
in spite of this "circus at-
mosphere" Met players won't
be distracted from their main
task of winning ball games. "1
see absolutely no change in at-
titude from last year when we
were contenders and not
champions.
"In fact, if anything, the
players seem more committed
to their jobs. If anything
prevents the Mets from
repeating as world champions
it won't be of their doing, it
will mean they've been beaten
by a better ball club."
ON A PERSONAL level
Horwitz does see a life after
baseball although not in the
immediate future. He is un-
married but would like to have
a family to add to the three
cats who share his New Jersey
apartment with him.
Prior to joining the Mets.
Horwitz was sports informa-
tion director at New York
University and Farleigh
Dickinson. He has a Master's
degree in history and would
like someday to complete a
doctoral degree in that field.
But for now. Horwitz lives
both the fantasy and reality
that comes with working for
major league baseball's world
champion Mets. As Horwitz.
and this writer, stood talking
in the warmth of a West Palm
Beach spring training day. we
both looked ahead with an-
ticipation of more sunny days
to come for the Mets at Tem-
ple Shea.
JWV Auxiliary
Administration
Meeting
West Miami Auxiliary No.
223. Jewish War Veterans,
will hold its first meeting of
the 1987-1988 administration
on Thursday. May 7 at 8:15
p.m. at the home of Pearl
Fegarsky. Newly reelected
President, Carol Gold, will
chair the meeting. A program,
"Anne Frank A Portrait of
Hope" will be presented, spon-
sored by American Savings of
Florida. Mother's Day gifts
will be presented to all
members. Also on the agenda
will be a report on the VA
Hospital Party to be held on
Saturday by Jr. Vice Presi-
dent, Ruth Herman.
Mrs. Gold and other
members of the Auxiliary, in-
cluding Charlotte Mittler, Mrs.
Herman, Lee Rubin, Thelma
Potlock. Shirley Achtman.
Gladys Isgar, Tanya Levine.
and others, will attend the An-
nual Dade County Council
Convention on May 17 at the
Omni Hotel. They will also at-
tend the luncheon following
the morning session, honoring
County President. Phyllis
Shaw, and County Com-
mander. Norman Levine.
Four students of the Rabbi
Alexander S. Gross Hebrew
Academy of Greater Miami
will represent the Miami com-
munity in the finals of the Na-
tional Bible Contest to be held
on May 24 in New York City.
The students are Roni
Schechter, Eliezer Silberstein,
Chava Sznol and Assuf Tzur.
The contest is under the
sponsorship of the Department
of Education and Culture of
the World Zionist Organiza-
tion and is coordinated locally
by the Central Agency for
Jewish Education, and involv-
ed students from day and
synagogue schools throughout
the country in both Hebrew
and English divisions
The participation of the
students in the national finals
has been subsidized by the
Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami and the Central
Agency for Jewish Education
The instructor for th.
students at the Hebrew
Academy was Rabbi David
Shapiro. The contest is in it.
28th year and its objectives are
to promote a greater interest
in Bible among Jewish
students and to encourage
more extensive reading and
study of the Bible.
The local examination con-
sisted of 125 questions taken
from the Biblical books in-
cluding selected commentaries
by Rashi. The winners of the
regional contests then vie in
New York with the winner of
the national contest then in
vited to participate in the In
ternational Bible Contest for
youths in Jerusalem on lsrae;
Independence Day in the
following year
Panelists Appointed To
Review Art Grant Application
George Firestone has an-
nounced the appointment of
panelists who will review arts
grant applications for 1987-88.
The grant review panels, one
panel for each of 10 artistic
categories, will meet separate-
ly during June and July to
make recommendations for
arts funding that will be for-
warded to the Florida Arts
Council, the Secretary of
State's 15-member advisory
board on the arts. Each panel,
chaired by a Florida Arts
Council member, normally
meets for two days.
Panelists are selected from
nominations submitted from
the arts community. The
Florida Arts Council, after
reviewing the nominations,
submitted its recommenda-
tions to Secretar> of State
Firestone for approval.
The panelists for iy8?-8J
from Dade County and the
panel on which each will serve,
are:
Iris Acker. Media Arts.
Miami. Darrell Calvin Multi-
disciplinary. Miami Marc
Firestone. Arts in Education.
Miami. Ruth Foreman.
Theatre. North Miami Robert
Frankel. Visual Arts Organiza-
tions, Miami. Polita Cordon.
Media Arts. Coconut Grow: .1
Erik Hart. Dance. Miami; and
Jeffery Knapp Literature.
Miami. Mary Luft Dance.
Miami Elizabeth Marshall-
Beasley. Music. Miami Joseph
Nicastn Visua Arts
Fellowships. Miami Randy
Nimnicht. Folk Arts Miami
Mario Ernesto Sanchez.
Theatre Miami; and Cesar
Trasobares. Visual Arts
Fellowships. Miami.
Adult Education Classes
Registration is now open for
adult education classes and
recreational activities for the
spring and summer (evenings)
trimester, which begins Mon-
day at the McMillan Communi-
ty Center in southwest Miami.
Adult classes include accoun
ting. English as a Second
Language, computers, art.
sewing, shorthand, word pro-
cessing, typing, Spanish.
French, interior decorating, as
well as personal development
for careers.
Recreational activities for
adults and older teenagers are:
basketball, dog obedience,
flower arranging, in-
vestments, jazzercise, piano,
slimnastics, tennis and weight
training.
Among the teen/children ac-
tivities are acrylic painting,
ballet, basketball and weight
training, computers, jazz
dance, judo, modeling, piano,
tutoring in algebra, geometry
and math and other homework
help and tennis. There are ac-
tivities also at Royal Green
and Winston Park elementary
schools.
The following classes are of-
fered through Miami Beach
Senior High Community
School:
Strategies For Personal In-
vesting: focus on stocks,
bonds, mutual trusts and com-
modities and retirement plann-
ing. Mondays. 6:80-7:30 pjn.
at Miami Beach Senior High.
Know Your Car offen l
working knowledge ol JW
automobile's engine, body*
drive train. Wednesdays. 7-8
p.m. at Miami Beach Senior
High.
Miami Beach Community
Theater: ages 6 through adult.
Act in community theater per
formances. Sundays
U.S. Swimming I vA D.
Competitive swimming teams
meet daily at the Miami B-acn
Youth Center
Beginning and Intermediate
Bridge: instructor provides
entertaining atmosphere to
learn or further develop your
bridge playing skills. Tuesdays
and Thursdays. 7-9 p.m
Miami Beach Senior HKD
English. Spanish. l>iv.
Aerobics. Art. Computer and
High School Credit Clatftt
meet at Miami Beach Senior
High afternoons and e\enings.
Homomoker/Companion
Fof M-year-oM <>m<*" '1^"
Mtaml Beach, to help sW; coj
* |uatr*lp to get around U*.
optional. Call Mai "eekd.yi
617-242-4422
BfJ


B'nai Mitzvah
FELIPPE MONCARZ
Felippe M. Moncarz, son of
Dr. and Mrs. Raul Moncarz
(Elisa) will be called to the
Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday, at 10:30 a.m. at
Temple Emanu-El.
Felippe is a 7th grade honor
student at Nautilus Junior
High School. He is in all
honors classes including
honors algebra. Felippe has
received a number of awards
and trophies in academic ex-
cellence while attending North
Beach.
Felippe has attended Temple
E m a n u E I' s Afternoon
Friday, May 1, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Felippe M. Moncarz
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
|, j ifker mean* suffice not for a lamb, then shr shall tah
ej nr tui> young pigeons"
(Ltvi&inu 12.St.
TAZRIA
TAZRIA Cleanliness and uncleanliness are further defined.
hen in relation to childbirth and leprosy. "If a woman be
delivered, and bear a man-child, then she shall be unclean seven
days And she shall continue in the blood of purification three
ami thirty days But if she bear a maid child, then she shall be
unclean two weeks and she shall continue in the blood of
purification threescore and six days. And when the days of her
purification are fulfilled she shall bring a lamb of the first year
.H.t offering, and a young pigeon, or a turtle-dove, for a
ferine;, unto the door of the tent of meeting, unto the priest"
\t.t-6). Suspected lepers are to be brought to the
prk wlic quarantines the case for seven days. A careful
ption of the varieties of leprosy is followed by rules for the
(per identification and isolation. "And the leper in whom the
>. his clothes shall be rent, and the hair of his head shall go
loon and he shall cover his upper lip. and shall cry: Tnclean.
in.' All the days wherein the plague is in him he shall be
e i- unclean: he shall dwell alone; without the camp shall
his dwelling be" il.nitirus /.T ;5-;>.
11 Itht pnest shall look. and. behold, if the poigue of leprosy
be healed (m leper"
iLnntirus 1S.S).
METZORA
METZORA This portion describes the laws for the purification
er after he is healed. "Then shall the priest command t"
i! i.- be cleansed two living clean, birds, and
i scarlet, and hyssop. Anil the priest shali com
birds in an farther vessel over running
the living bird, he shall take it. and the cedar-wooo,
rlel ind the hyssop, and shall dip them :tri.i the living
i of the bird that wss killed over the running
i. sprinkle upon him that is to be cleansed from
evei times, and shall pronounce him clean, and
. bird into the open field And he that is to \-
.-. tah his clothes, and iff all his hair, and
n water, and he shall .* clean, end sfter that he
into ttie camp, but shall dwell outside his tent -even
' all !* on the seventh day. 'bat he shall shave all his
*d .mi! his In-ard and hiseyebrowns and he shall
.n water, and he shall be clean" (LevitiCUM
ifter bringing an offering to the priest on the eighth daj
i per -hall be formally clean Leprosj wss understood
i ss well as people. The portion describes the
es of leprosy and prescriln-s their treatment: "This is
i! manner of plague of leprosy, and for a scall; and for
fs nutrient, ami for a house, and for a rising, and for
I for S nright spot, to teach when it is unclean, and when
U (In- is the law of leprosy." iLri-itiru* I, '. 57)
counting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
udoi -he Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage, edited by P Wollmsn
Mm" *'5. published by Shengold The volume is available at 75 Maiden
Line New York. NY 10038 Joseph Schlang is president of the society
attributing me volume)
Barry U. Puppet Theatre Premieres
Arts at Barry.
The Harry University New
"Ppet Theater Company an-
nounces the premiere of its
"e*est production, "UTO"
y 11-15 at 10 a.m. and one
emng performance on May
'at 8:15 p.m. in the Broad
l<*ter for the Performing
Tribute To Israeli Soldier At Bet Shira
The Friends of the IDF will presentation will be sponsored
S i^nl Salut* to the Israeli hy Ruth and Alberto Lidji. The
Isrs vr in ce,ehration of honorable Rachamin Timor,
th o '*9t*1 anniversary and Consul General of Israel at
Also at the University, the
opening reception of the
Senior Art Exhibition will be
held in the library gallery Fri-
day from 7-10 p.m. The show
will extend through May 15.
20th anniversary of
foavu m's ^unification on
",2at8:45P-m. at Bet Shira
LOn8regation in Miami. The
Miami and Mrs. Timor will at
tend the performance and
reception.
Religious School for several
years where he has been plac-
ed on the Rabbi's honor roll
numerous times.
Many friends and relatives
from home and out-of-town
will be here to help celebrate
the happy occasion.
JULIE WEISBERG
Julie Shayna Weisberg,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alan
Jay Weisberg will be called to
the Torah as Bat Mitzvah on
Saturday at 9:30 a.m. at Bet
Shira and will share this with
her Soviet twin Alia Vodovoz
daughter of David and Dora
Vodovoz of the USSR.
The celebrant is a student in
the Bet Shira Religious school.
She attends Palmetto Jr.
High where she is in the 7th
grade.
Mr. and Mrs. Alan Jay
Weisberg; will host the Kii-
dush following the services ,n
honor of the occasion and a
reception will be held at the
Omni Hotel.
JARED MARGOLIS
Jared Margolis, son of
Arlene and Herbert Margolis
will become a Bar Mitzvah at
Temple Beth Moshe Saturday.
Rabbi Israel Jacobs will of-
ficiate and Hazzan Moshe
Friedler will chant the Sab-
bath Liturgy.
Jared is a seventh grade stu-
dent at Hillel Day School. He
excels in all sports and is
known as a disc jockey.
Honored guests will be arriv-
ing from Canada, France and
Michigan.
In Jared's honor his parents
will sponsor the kiddush
following the services in the
Clara and Seymour Smoller
Ballroom and in the evening a
reception at the Temple.
Hadassah Youth
Aliyah Project
For Miami
T h Inter- A men c a n
Hadassah, Mia
Beach Region, is planning a
fashion Bhow t<> take place at
the Fountainbleau Hilton
Hotel "ii Thursday. May 21 at
11 m.. when Hadassah will
join forces with Exit Shops to
benefit Youth Aliyah.
Youth Aliyah. a project that
has been sponsored by
Hadassah since 1935, helps
needy Jewish children in Israel
and elsewhere.
Proceeds from the Luncheon
Fashion Show at the Foun-
tainbleau, which is open to
men as well as women will go
to benefit Youth Aliyah
programs.
Mrs. Margot Backer, Mrs.
Anita Grossfeld and Mrs. Sara
Egozi are in charge of the
event.
Hapoel Games
In Israel
Athletes from India will par-
ticipate for the first time in the
13th Hapoel Games in Israel
from May 4-11. They are three
members of the Daniel family
badminton champions of the
12th Maccabia. Their par
ticipation was welcomed by
the Hapoel Organizing Com-
mittee since India has
prevented Israel from par-
ticipating in the New Delhi
Table Tennis World Cham
pionship for political reasons.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
7:34 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Baach. Fla. 531 -2120
Rabbi Dow Rozencwalg
Dally 7:30 a.m. Afternoon S:30 p.m.
Sulim
ADATHVESMURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Baach 947 14J5
Rabbi Simcha Freedmen
Canto, Ian Alpem Conservative

Minyan 7 30a.m ttpm
Sal k Sun Sim 4 6pm
Shaboal .... Sat 1:30am
Frl. I p m B not Mit/.ah
Boelta Chelem Vohanna Wartkchi
Set. 4 p.m.
Mlncha Bar Mitnan Mirt.,i stablnaay
TEMPLE BETH AM
SeSO N Kendall f>
S Miami M74M7
Dr Herbert Baumgard
Sonkx Rabbi
Rabbi Leonard Schoolman
Frl 7:30 p m Family Sanrica Rabbi Baumgard
Tha Magic ol Healing 'Sat 11 15 a m
Boot Mitnah Aleiander Tltlord ft
Micheiia Koroaa Sermon "Judaiam
ano Ma.ling
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W 3rd Avenue 854-3911
Jack Riemer. Rabbi
Robert Albert ('S'\
Cantor xjL'
Rav. Milton Freeman.
Ritual Director
Sat 9 a m Sabbath Sen
Mine hah at 7 44 p.m.
Mlnchah 8:20 p m
Dally Minyan
Sun I a.m B 5 30 pm
Mon 4 Thura 7:30 am. i 5 30 p.m
Tuea.Wed 4 f.i 7 44 a.m. 4 5 30pm
Sat to hf balora aunaet
BETH KODESH
Con sa>rva live
1101 S W 12 Ave
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joe eon Krteeel
Roee Berlin: Executive Secretary
854 6334
Annual Banquat May 18
Sanrica. Monday 4 Thursday 7 30 a m
Sat 8 45 a m
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St N Miami. FL 33161
891 5S0S Conserve! ve
Dr itraei Jacobs. Rabbi
Or Joseph A Gorftnkel.
Rabbi Emeritus
Moshe Friedler. Cantor
9>
Frl S p.m
Sat ItSim Bar Mitnah Jared Ma.goii.
Weekday ... Mon Fn 4am
Mon Thurt 5pm Sun 8 30am
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave.. MB. FL 33139
Tel 538 4112
Cantor Nissim Banyamini
Eve aery Spm Sat 8 IS am
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W 120th Street
238-2601 ->.
Rabbi David H.Auerbach J>
Cantor Stephen Freedman
Fn 4 p.m Contemporary laauea Forum
Speaker Steven Bayme The Jewiah Family
A State ot ttie Union "Sat S"30 a m
itraai mdep Shabbat Bat Mitnan Julia
Weleoerg 4 Soviet twinning Alia Vedovot
In abaantla
TEMPLEBETWSHOLOM W23,
Chaee Ave. a 41 at St. ,...>
D i ION MONISM FeeaaStrv. Senior ftabbi
GABV A OLICKSTf IN BiaSI
"' JOi I AeaMlery Mae*.
CANTO" DAVID CON VISE B
Frl 8 15 p m Sermon by ".abb. Jolt
Destruction a Rebirth What ol the future
Tom Haatimaut Reltactlons "
Set 10 44 a m ...
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7526
1051 N Miami Beech Blvd
Or Mai A Lipsch.tr Rebbi
Zvee Aront, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown. Exec Director
OaHy Service* Mon Frl 7:30 a I
4530pm
Sal 8 25am 4'15pm
Sun a a m 4 5 30 p m
ts*.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave Miami Beach
534 7213 534 7214
Barry J Konovltch. Rabbi ,'Sr.
Moshe Buryn. Cantor Wj
Sargio Grobler. President
Sholem Epelbaum. President
Religious Committee
TEMPLE EMANU EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beech
Dr Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shifman. Cantor
Maunce K lem Ritual Director
Gerald Taub. Executive Director
Kabbalal Shabbat 4 p.m
Sal aerv 9 a.m Dr Irving Letvmen will pniach
Cantor Yehuda Shltmen win chant
Bar Mitnah Felippe Moncen.
HEBREW ACAOEMY
BET M E L CONGREGATION
2400 Ptnetree Drive. Miami Beach
532 6421
Cantor Rabbi Solomon Sch.lt
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Ol Greater Miami
4tiam> f Phw* Hotoim Congragatron
137 N.E. 19th St.. Miami. 573-5900
9990 N Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell Bemat
Assistant Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor: Rachelle F Nelson
Cantor Emeritus.
Jacob G. Born stem
Director of Education
And Programming Jack L Sparks
Frl 8pm
Downtown Rabbi Haakell M Bemat -The
Roaenberga 4 the Pollarda Liturgy: Cantor
Racheiia F Nelaon Kendall Rabbi Flea D
Perimeter Where Have All the Ralorma..
Qona'- Liturgy Harvey Kaufman
Cantonal Soiolai
TEMPLE JUDCA
5600 Granada Blvd
Coral Gables
Macheel 8 Eisens ts t.
R#form
667 5647
Frl BIS Worehlp Service
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534 9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Shoshanah Raab. Cantor
Senrtcas Fn 7 30 p.m
Sal 9 30 a m
Onag Shabbat will loilow
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th St Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
An Fridkis. Assoc Rabbi (
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sat 9am Sabbath aervice
Uan. Mmchah Sunday F.iday
8am and 4 p.m
Sal 9am and 515 p.m
!f)
TEMPLE NERTAMIO B8SS35
7902 Cartyte Ave SS4VM33
Miami Beech 33141 Ceneervai.w.
Rabbi Eugene Labovlti
Cantor Edward KMMn
Daily tan Mon Fn 8am 4 4 15pm
Sal Minchafjibpm Sun 4 30am 4
4 15pm
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
ol North Miemi Beech
971 Northeast 172nd St
North Miami Beach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
232 6833 Modem Orlhodoi
Rabbi Hershel Becker
Sat 9 30 a m aenrlce at
' ampia Samu El
9343 SW1S2 Ave.
S ol N Kendall D.
TEMPLE SINAI 18601 NE 22 Ave
North Dedes Reform Congregation
Ralph P Kingsley Rebbi 932 9010
Julian i Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes Cantor
Barbara S Ramsay Administrator
*m maaaaa ^jn 7 X) p.rn araeu tibiae.^,^a_.___
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
000 Miller Dr. Conservative
2712311 ,_
Dr Norman N Shapiro. Rabbi '&)
Benjamin Adler. Cantor X'
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Minyan 7 am Monday 4 Thuraday
Sunday 9 a.m
Frl 8 '5 pm evening aerv will ba conducted
by Dr Norman N Shapiro.
"* Deeerved Tribute."
Set aerv Sam


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/FYiday, May 1, 1987
Jefferson National Bank
To Open In Boca Raton
OBITUARIES


Joseph G. Synder, veteran
Boca Raton financial and com-
munity leader, has been
elected senior vice president of
Jefferson National Bank,
which will open next month at
21302 St. Andrews Boulevard
at Town Square Center, west
of Boca Raton.
Announcement of Snyder's
election was made by Arthur
H. Courshon, chairman of the
board of Jefferson Bancorp,
Inc., a publicly-held bank
holding company which
operates two Jefferson Na-
tional Banks with six offices in
Dade County.
The Boca Raton bank is the
holding company's initial entry
into Palm Beach County.
Snyder moves to Jefferson
from Sun Bank/Palm Beach
County where he served as
vice president and marketing
director for 10 years. Prior to
that, he was vice president for
business development of first
Bank and Trust Company of
Boca Raton for four years.
He has been active in the
business and community life of
Boca Raton and Palm Beach
county, and from 1982 through
1984 served as chairman of the
District Nine Health Council,
which embraces Palm Beach,
Martin, St. Lucie, Indian River
and Okeechobee counties. He
also was a member of the
statewide Health Council for
two years.
Snyder was a member for six
years of the Palm Beach Coun-
ty Zoning Board of Adjust-
ment, has served as a board
member of United Way of
Greater Boca Raton and is a
member of the Florida Atlan-
tic University Foundation.
He is director of the
Florence Fuller Child Develop-
ment Center in Boca Raton
and has been active in the Boca
Raton Rotary Club for the past
Young Israel
Independence
Day Service
The Younn Urael <>f Sunny
Isies will conduct the nfficialh-
approved Israel Independent
Day Service on Monday at 8
a.m. at the Young Israel
Synagogue in Sunny Isles.
Hille Price, president of the
synagogue, extends an invita-
tion for the community to at-
tend this observance. Rabbi
Rubin R. Dobin. spiritual
leader of the Young Israel of
Sunny Isles will officiate.
The service will follow the
traditions set down by the
Chief Rabbinate of Israel.
After the service, the con-
gregation will be invited to
partake of a festive buffet.
South Dade
Auction
The 14th Annual Mammath
Auction will be held by the
South Dade Jewish Communi-
ty Center on May 9 at 7:30
p.m. at the Greenery Mall on
Kendall Drive. All proceeds
will go to the Linda Shapiro
Camp Scholarship Fund. The
fund is named for a former
Creative Arts Camp Director
who died of cancer at age 23 at
the end of the 1977 camp
season.
Joseph G. Snyder
15 years.
Snyder is married to
Adelaide Snyder, vice presi-
dent for university relations of
Florida Atlantic University,
who has been affiliated with
FAU since 1962. They have a
son and a daughter, both of
whom are Coral Gables
attorneys.
Courshon said Snyder's in-
volvement with Jefferson Na-
tional Bank "continues our
policy of strong community in-
volvement and indentifica-
tion." Courshon and other of-
ficers and directors of Jeffer-
son in Greater Miami have
held numerous top national,
regional, state and local posi-
tions with governmental, civic,
business and religious
org -nizations.
BRIER. faye C. (Own), of Miami. April
20 Services were heM
PLOTKIN. Selma. 66. of Miami. April 24.
Servieea were heJd
GORDON. Ethel. 74. of Coral Gables. April
23. Servieee were private.
FRANZBLAf. Morris Servieea held in
New York.
GALE* Fred, of Miami. April 25 The
Riverade
WEISS. Doha O of Miami. Apnl 25 The
Riverside.
WEISSMAN. Mrs Sadie. 98. of Miami
Beach Rubin Zilbert
INDYK. Arja, of Miami Beach Rubin
Zilbert
HARTZ. Stella, of Miami Rubin-Zilbert
K AI KM AN Frank A 44. of Miami Beach
The Riverside
LEFTER. Helene. of Miami Beach. Apnl
27. The Riverside
Sl'GERMAN. Samuel. 89. of North Miami
Beach. April 26 Levitt Weinatem
Florida Jewish
Singles Fourth
Annual Conference
The Fourth Annual Singles
Conference sponsored by the
Tampa Bay Jewish Singles
Council will take place June 5
through June 7 at the
Tradewinds Hotel on St.
Petersburg Beach.
Workshop topics include
Dating Over 55, Laughter.
Getting Wealthy, Com-
municable Diseases and the
Singles Lifestyles, Stress
Management, Jewish Identity.
Single by Choice or by Cir-
cumstance, Politics of Israel,
and Massage Therapy.
Additional information and
reservations for the con-
ference can be obtained by
contacting the Tampa Jewish
Community Center at (813)
872-4451.
.tiMIM.reen field Rd
Oak Park. Mi. hin 48231
13131 543-1622
Hebrew Memorial Chapel
of Greater Detroit
Efficient, Reliable. Traditional
with
I >i^ nn \ and I Inderstanding
i umpifii- Shipping Se>r\ > I v...
Your First Call to Us aiII
Handle Ail Funeral Arrangements
SPECIAL LIMITED PRE-NEED OFFER
FUNERAL AND BURIAL
IN THE BEST OF JEWISH TRADITION
$1,595
I ikoiJi Memorial Park anJ ritrrnal Light Funeral Director* arc proud lo
C'nu'f (hit unique program which combines ownership of a piof al out
beautiful Mrmorial Park and a plan for pre-paid funeral r\nn
Tim exceptional alur assures that your one call will put vou in touch with
the prople who heliete there nothing dignified about paying more for a
traditional Jewish funeral that vou hate to.
HERE IS WHAT WE INCLUDE:
< Prompt Tranafer from Place of
Death
' Care and Preparation of Deceased
I Casket and Heart*
I A rrangemrnt Direction of
Geavessde Servieea
> Permita and Benefit Aaaiatance
1 24 hour emergency service
Shiva C indict. Card* and Bench*.
Graveaite
Paved Private Viaitarion Path
Steel Reinforced Concrete Vault
Opening and Closing of Grave
Perpetual Graveaitea Care
No maintenance ow service fees
A Jewish Tradition since I9SS
TOTAL: $1,595
No Interest Payment Plan* Available
For complete information on our pint and funeral service package
call your Lakeside Eternal Light representative today.
In time of need. orse call will handle all the details.
DADE:
592-0690
BROWARD:
525-9339
BARCHAN. Joaeph. 87. of Miami. April 21
Servieea were held.
SCHOENBERG. Bertha. **. of Miami.
Apnl 22 The Riverside
FELOMAN. Carol. April 21. The Riveraide
GRAFT. Edward C. 41. of Melbourne ,
Maim. April 21. Service, were Eft
Temple Adath Yeahurgn. '
HAUSMAN. Samuel (Shim). f R,y Hart.
rUjbin-Zilbert. "Charter
ROTHENBERG. Ignate Rubm Zilbert.
Through years ot dedicated service,
we have become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH 'THE ASSURED PLAN
' .-" 0 -'I
LARRIES BLASBERG IRA M. BLASBERG MICHAEL C BLASBERG
jNloaiDcntCTOB Funeral Oueclo.
Paal P'evoe"' Jewian f une>ai
O'lecici j ice lie)
AblvlM' IBSTS'BIH 003-^dad M>
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service
Dade County
532-2099
Broward Count)
532-2O0!)
Represented by Riverside Memorial Chapel. Inc.
New York: (718) 263 7600 Queeno Blvd & 76th Rd.. Forest Hills N Y
You heard us right Mrnorah wants you 10 shop and J ""PM*
pre-arrangement plans. Then con* lo Menorali last V\un w
convenient locations, the finest options to custom lattoj your
plan, memorial gardens In Palm Heach and Broward ."
expert, counselors. Menorah Is the plan more Jewish l""!'s
are choosing And our plans are available at the lowest pnee
quoted by anyone. So go ahead shop them llrsi Ilu-mo
to Menorah where your last choice Is your besi choice
^*^G4udeiia and Funeral Chapeto
North Miami Beach: 931V3939 Sunrise: 742 6000
Margate: 975-O011 Deerfleld Beach: 427-47W
West Palm Beach: 627 2277
Cemeteries runrral Ouprla Mausoleum Pre Need Planning


Organization NTews
The South Sea* Chapter of Women's American ORT
will hold its Annual Auction on Tuesday. 1:30 p.m. at Tern-
le Adath Yeshurun on Miami Gardens Drive.
PcheTre Chapter No. 2285 of the B'nai B'rith Girls
recently elected new chapter officers. The new board is
headed by President Andrea Ruth. Other officers include
Programming Vice President. Evelyn Rok; Membership
Vfce President. Jennifer Demberg; Fund-raising Vice
President, Michelle Sandberg; Recording Secretary. Hope
Steinberg: Treasurer. Eva Deren; and Corresponding
Secretary! Deborah Klein. The new officers will serve for
six months.
Shoshanna Chapter of the B'nai B'rith Girls recently-
elected new chapter officers. The new board is headed by
President Marci Roberts. Other officers include Program-
ming Vice President. Michelle Finkelstein; Membership
Vice President. Melissa Kaplan; Recording Secretary. Lisa
Zebrick; Treasurer. Cori Langman and Corresponding
Secretary. Andrea Cohen. The new officers will serve for
six months.
B'nsi B'rith Sholem Lodge 1024 will hold its Installa-
tion Luncheon on Sunday at 11 a.m. at the Kendale Lakes
Country Club. Featured artist will be entertainer and
singer Greta Fleissig.
The Sisterhood at Temple Menorah will hold its Annual
Installation luncheon on May 13 at noon at 7435 Carlyle
Ave.. Miami Beach. Rabbi Meyer Abramowitz will officiate.
Hebrew Academy Women will hold their closing
meeting May 12 in the school chapel. There will be a board
meeting at 10 a.m. and a genera) membership meeting at
10:30 a.m.
The Broward/Palm Beach County Council JWV/VA
will hold a joint installation and luncheon on Sunday at the
Holiday Inn in Plantation. Norman T. Levine, commander
of the Hade County Council Jewish War Veterans and
President Phyllis Shaw will attend along with Dade County-
Council Chief of Staff. Al Linden and adjutant Bernard
Chancy
The Miami Beach Chapter, Women's Division.
American Technion Society, will honor Stella Topol at
their May 14 Luncheon Meeting at the Shelborne Hotel at
noon. Entertainment will follow.
For reservations, please call Jean Zaben. president, or
Diane Scherer.
The South Seas Chapter Women's American ORT is
featuring its annual auction following its regular luncheon
11:30 am Tuesday at Temple Adath Yeshurun in North
Miami Beach.
Reservations are now being taken for the Lido Spa
weekend. November 15-18.
Reservations also are being taken for a Thanksgiving
Dinner Show at the Newport Hotel.
Workmen's Circle. Miami Beach Branch 1059, will hold
their closing meeting on Wednesday. May 13. at noon in
the Surfside Community Center. Collins Ave.
Judge Charles Edelstein will install the newly elected of-
ficers. Refreshmenta will 1* served.
Arm.ld Mittelman. producing artistic director ami the
Board of Directors, of the Coconut Grove Playhouse will
host a gala evening marking the closing benefit event of the
30th anniversary season featuring A Roaring 20s Costume
Ball starring Kaye Ballard. The cocktails, dinner, perfor-
mance and dancing will be held at the Biltmore Hotel in
Coral Gables on Saturday at 7:30 p.m.
Honorary Chairmen are Secretary of State and Mrs.
George Firestone.
Mindy Shrago, a Florida artist working with clay to
create ceramic sculptures, will exhibit her works at" the
wona Luria Gallery in Bay Harbor through May 30. Ms.
anneo a sculptures and another exhibit entitled "Editions:
A selection" will open Friday evening from 7:30 to 9:30
_?t
/
A
1
" a cocktail rvcepti'-n murkinq the openimj <
i/w ......'' Hunk's > \nrth Skon branch art, Mr.
' art* Merwitzer and Mr. Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File N.abcr 84-5038 (02)
IN RE ESTATE OF
MINERVA GREENSTEIN,
Deceased.
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
Florida Bar No. 239828
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the Estate of MINERVA
GREENSTEIN. deceased, late of
Dade County, Florida, has com
menced in the captioned pro-
ceeding The address of the Per
sonal Representative listed below
is c/o MARKt:S & WINTER. PA..
2251 S.W. 22nd St. Miami.
Florida 33145
Y o r ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED AND KEQURED to
file any claims and demands which
you may have against the EstaU\
any challenge to the validity of the
Will admitted for probate, or any
objection to the qualifications of
the Personal Representative,
venue or jurisdiction of the Court.
ALL WITHIN THREE (3) MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PI'BLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE WITH THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF DADE COUNTY AT
MIAMI. FLORIDA
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJKCTK INS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
First publication of this Notice is
one the 1 day of May. 19*7
SHEILA HALI'ER
As Persona] Representative
of the Estate of
MINERVA GREENSTEIN.
MARK1S4 WINTER. PA
2251 S.W 22nd Street
Miami. FL 18146
Telephone (305) 866-6910
Bj SHELDON I PIVNIK. ESQ.
15681 May 1.8. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COl'RT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Actioa
No. 87-175*3-13
IN RE The Marriage of
JENNIFER MARIE
MII.l.INGKN
Petitioner/Wife,
ami
ERROL LLOYD JAMES,
Respondent. Hustiand
To Errol Lloyd James
53 West Gnon Crescent
Motrtago Bay. Si James
Jamaica. W I
YOU ARE -HEREBY NOT!
FIED that a petition for Dissolu
tion .>f Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
ttm a C0f>) nf your written
defenses, if any. to it on DAVID S
BEKGER. ESQ., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is Iini
North Biacaync Blvd No 1707,
Miami. Florida, 33132. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before May 29.
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 22 day of April. 1987
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: Jennis L. Russell
As Deputy Clerk
tCm-uit Court Seal)
DAVIDS BERGER
100 North Biscayne Blvd No 1707
Miami. Florida 33132
Telephone (305) 371 4556
Attorney for Petitioner
May 1.8.16.22,1967
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
Civil Action No 87-142*8 (IS)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
SUSAN LAUREL CORRELL,
wife
and
MARK CHARLES CORRELL,
husband
T> Mr Mark Chariot Corral
Rnairicinrn Unknown
V o i \ i: E II EREB Y
NOTIFIED that petition (or
DISSOLUTION 01 MARRIAGE
itnl commenced in
this court and fOU .ire required tn
.our written
Friday, May 1, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
defenses, if any, to it on ARTHUR
H. LIPSON. attorney for Peti
tioner. whose address is 801 N.E.
167 Street Miami. Fla 33162 and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
May 8. 1987; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief prayed for in the complaint
or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 2 day of Apnl. 1987
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By T CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
15634 Apnl 10. 17, 24.
May 1, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-18263 29
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK.
as Trustee for the Housing
Finance Authority of Dade
County. Florida, under a Trust
Indenture dated as of September
1. 1983.
Plaintiff
vs.
EULALIA DE LA CRUZ, et al .
Defendants.
TO: NATIONWIDE FINANCIAL
CORPORATION OF FLORIDA
n/k/a CITICORP PERSON TO
PERSON CORPORATION, a
dissolved Florida corporation
c/o DANIEL SAKI.AD -
DIRECTOR
670 Mason Ridge Court I>nve
St Louis. Missouri
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property
Unit 7 11. of TERRANOVA
I. A CONDOMINIUM, accor-
ding to the Declaration of
Condominium thereof, as
recorded Apnl 6, 1983, in Of
final Records Book 11749, at
Page 291. of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it.
on Stuart H. Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
(iahles. Florida, 33146 on or before
May 29. 1987 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter,
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand
ed in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 27 day of Apnl.
1987
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By JENNIS 1. RUSSELL
As Deputy Clerk
156811 May 1.8. 15,22 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
Civil Actioa No. 87-IC789 CA 12
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Fla Bar No. 0475203
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARIO A GONZALEZ,
Petitioner
and
MARISOL S MOLINA.
Respondent.
TO MARISOL S MOLINA
Residence-11 nknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your wntten defenses, if
any" to it on USHER BRYN.
ESQ. attorney for Petitioner
whose address is 2301 CoMni
Avenue, Suite M-8 Miami Beach.
Fla .'13139 and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
eoort on or before May 19. 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 27th day of Apnl. 1987
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Flonda
B) BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
ii irrint Court Seah
nej for Petitioner
' SHER BRYN ESQ
2301 CoUint \vi- Suite M >
Miami Beach. Fla 88189
May 1,8, 15.22 1981
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fir
titious name FORT MYERS T
SHIRT at 12631 S.W. 37 Terrace
Miami 33175 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
VIRGINIA I MARTINEZ
15678 May 1.8. 15.22. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name RALEX IN-
DUSTRIAL at 15 EAST 44th
STREET. HIALEAH. FL 33013
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
JUAN P. MONTANO
4655 PALM AVE APT 205
HIALEAH. FL 33013
15682 May 1,8. 15.22. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Naaiber 87-2321
Division 01
IN RE ESTATE OF
NORMAN WIENER.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of NORMAN WIENER, deceased.
Kile Number 87-2321. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Flonda. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street Miami. Flonda 33130 The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (21 any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will.
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or junsdic
Uon of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on May I, 1987
Personal Representative:
EDWARD WIENER
3675 No Country Club Dr..
No 1402
No Miami Beach, FL 33180
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
NELSON & FELDMAN. PA
1135 Kane Concourse. Bay Harbor
Islands. FL 33154
Telephone 865 5716
15679 May 1.8. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87-12420(28)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
CYNTHIA YVONNE KEEPLER
wife
and
WARREN GREGORY
KEEPLER. husband
TO Mr Warren Gregory
Keepler
1034 NW 60 Street
Miami. Fl.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you an- required to
serve a copy of your wntten
defenses, if any. to it'on ARTHUR
H LIPSON, attorney for Peti
tioner, whose address is 801 N E
167 Street. Miami. Fla 33162. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
May 29th.' 1987. otherwise
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the OHO
plaint or petition
This notice shall DO publish.si
once each week for four con
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
witness mj hand and the taal
of nid court at Miami. Florida on
this 22nd da) of April
RICHARD P BRINKER
\ -1 Herd Circuit I '-ourt
I lade ount\, Florida
By Barbara Ro
\- Daputj Ck
(Circuit Court Seal)
Ma\ I -


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 1. 1987
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-8927 CA 19
NOTICE OF ACTION
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
K(X HESTER, a federal savings
and loan association, successor by
merger to FRANKLIN SOCIETY
FEDERAL SAVINGS AND
LOAN ASStXlATION.
Plaintiff.
WESLEY T CURRAN, TOM K
GILLETT a/k/a THOMAS K
GILLETT. LAWREN
MICHELLE BROCKETT fk'a
LA WREN M GILLETT. and the
unknown spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other
parties claiming by. through,
under or against them;
Hl'GHETTE CURRAN: DAVID
F MURPHY and SARAH E
MURPHY;
Defendants
To: Wesley T. Curran. Tom K
' lil lett a/k/a Thomas K Gillett.
and Lawren Michelle Rrockett
f/k/a Lawren M. GiUett. whose
residences are unknown, and
the unknown parties who may
be spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors.
creditors, trustees and all par-
ties claiming interest by.
through, under or against said
Defendants, who are not
known to be dead or alive, and
all parties having or claiming to
have any right, title, or interest
in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County. Florida:
Lot IS, in Block 10. of FIRST
ADDITION TO SKY VISTA,
according to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 59.
at Page S. of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
VOW written defenses, if any. to it
on David R. Webster. Esquire, of
Rosenthal & Yarchin. PA, At-
torneys for Plaintiff. Suite 800,
30f>0 Biscayne Boulevard. Miami.
Florida 33137 on or before May
15. 19M7. and to file the original
with the Clerk "f this Court either
before service 00 Plaintiffs at
tannyi or immediately thereafter
otherwise, a default will be enteriM
against > I *J fi the relief demand
ed in the Complaint
WITNESS -.;. hand and seal of
this Court 00 April 8 1987
RICHARD P BRISKER. Clerk
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
DaputJ Clerk
1545 April 17.24. May 1 B -
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-289 FC 14
IN RE The Marriage of
LUDOVIC MKHELET
DESROCHES,
Petitioner
GERTRUDE DESROCHES
Respondent
TO GERTRI DE DESROCHES,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve eon of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar
nage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS
Attorne) 812 Northwest 12th
Ave Miami Florida. 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before Ma> B, USX, otherwise a
default will be entered.
Apnl 17. 19X7
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
15662 Apnl 24. May 1.8. 15. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
PICTITIOU8 NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious names CEMENTER10 DE
LAS AMERICAS EN DADE
COUNTY (THE AMERICAS
CEMETERY IN DADE COUN
TY) CEMENTERIO COLON EN
DADE COUNTY. (COLON
CEMETERY IN DADE COUN
TY) at 2900 SW 4th Avenue.
Miami. FL 33129 intends to
register said names with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun
tjr. Florida
Lasaro Albo
2900 SW 4th Avenue
Miami. FL 33139
15674 May 1.8. 15.22. 1987
IS THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 87-12872 CA 19
NOTICE OF SUIT
TO QUIET TITLE
ALBERT GAIXiL AND
RHODAGADOL, HIS WIFE
SCOTl LAWRENCE GADOL.
N K A SCOTT LAWRENCE
SI I. VK KM AS
IS THE SAME OF
THE STATE OF FU)RIDA:
To The Defendant:
Scott Lawrence Gadol n/k/a Scott
Lawrence Silverman. if alive, or if
dead to his or her unknown heirs,
devisees, legatees or grantees, and
all other persons or parties claim
ing by, through, under or against
him:
And u>
All parties or persons having or
claiming any right, title or interest
in and to the following-described
property, situated in Dade County.
Florida:
Lot 23. Block 14. First Addi
Uon, Fountambleu Gardens.
PB 67, Pg 125, As recorded
in the Public Records of Dade
County. Flonda.
You. and each of you. are
notified that a suit to quiet title to
the above-described property has
been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
answer to the complaint on the
Plaintiffs' attorney. Marvin B.
Seidman. 8501 SW. 29 Street.
Miami, Florida 33156, and file the
original in the office of the Clerk of
the Circuit Court on or before May
15, 1987; otherwise the allegations
of the complaint will be taken as
confessed
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secutive weeks in the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
Dated this 8 dav of April. 1987
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
15649 Apnl 17. 24. May 1.8. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-6752 CA 05
NOTICE OF ACTION
UXIANCE MORTGAGE
COMPANY, a Florida
corporation fka CHARTER
MORTGAGE COMPANY,
Plaintiff,
V
AMOS MURRAY, and the
unknown ipnaati. heirs, devisees
grantees, creditors, or otner
parties claiming by, through.
under .>r against him. ToLElHl
ASS MITCHELL OkAaTOLEDO
ANN MURRAY; and
ASSOCIATES FINANCIAL
SERVICES COMPANY OF
FLORIDA INC a Connecticut
corporation:
IVfendants.
I \ Murray. whose
-.-idence is unknown. Bl
unknown parties who may bl
spouses, heirs, devisees
grantees, assignees. lienors
I redn..rs. trustees and all par
i.- claiming interest b)
through, under or against said
Defendant, who are not knowl
to he dead or alive, and all par
ties having or claiming to have
any right, title, or interest in
the property herein desrnhed
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage 0B
the following property in Dade
County. Florida.
Lot 19. in Block 9. of RE VIS
ED PLAT OF BLOCKS 2. 3.
4 AND 6 OF ARCOLA
GARDENS, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 50. at Page 17. of
the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on David R Webster. Esquire, of
Rosenthal A Yarchin. PA.. At
tomeys for Plaintiff. Suite 800.
3060 Biscayne Boulevard. Miami.
Florida 33137, on or before May
15. 1987, and to file the original
with the Clerk of this court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torneys or immediately thereafter
otherwise, a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand
ed in the Complaint
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on April 13. 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER. Clerk
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
15666 Apnl 17, 24. May 1.8. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-3192 CA 18
NOTICE OF ACTION
STOCKTON, WHATLEY
DAVIS 4 COMPANY, a Florida
corporation
Plaintiff.
v.
ALVARO HOYOS a/k/a
ALVAROJ HOYOS a/k/a
ALVAROJOSE HOYOS
CLAUDIA HOYOS, SORMAS R
BURNS. CHARLOTTE A
BURNS, and the unknown
spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees.
creditors, or other parties
claiming by. through, under or
against them.
Defendants.
To Alvaro Hoyos a/k/a Alvmro J.
Hoyns a'k'a Alvaro Jom
Hoyos. Claudia Hoyos. No*
man R. Burns and Charlotte A
Burns, whose residences are
unknown, and the unknown
parties who may be spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors. creditors,
trustees and all parties claim
ing interest by. through, under
or against said Defendants,
who are not known to be dead
or alive, and all parties having
or claiming to have any right,
title, or interest in the property
herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County. Florida:
Lot 5. in Block 10. of PISE
LAKE SECTION TWO. ac
cording to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 111.
at Page 51. of the Public
Records of I>ade County.
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your wntten defenses, if any. to it
on David R Webster. Esquir.
Rosenthal A Yarchin. PA V
torneys for Plaintiff. Suite MM
3050 Biscayne Boulevard Miami.
Florida 88137 OB or bate* M.v.
15. 1987. and to file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
lief ore service on Plaintiffs at
torneys Of immediately thereafter
otherwise, a default will l>e enter.si
against you lor the relief demand-
ed in the Complaint
WITNESS mj bond
this Court on Apnl 18, 198
RICHARD P BRINKER
B) BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
DofMtJ Clerk
UM81 April 17 U M 1987
NOTICE I SDEK
FICTITIOl S SAME LAW
NOTIl E IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undo)
engage under the fie
t 11 i ii a A AND .'
LIGHTING AND TABLES at
N.Vi Ttil Ave Miami.
r'loriiia 33168 intends to register
said nam. with the Clark '
Circuit Court of I>a Florida
l.iseph Schneider
MICHAEI 1' CHASE P \
Attorns) for
JOSEPH SCHNEIDER
Aprs 24, Ma> 1.8.1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
No. 87-17075
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Bar No. 345741
IN RE: The marriage of
CHANTALJACKSON.
Petitioner/wife,
and
GREGORY JACKSON.
Respondent/husband,
TO GREGORY JACKSON
Residence Unknown
YOU. GREGORY JACKSON
residence unknown, are required
to file your answer to the petition
for dissolution of marriage with
the Clerk of the above Court and
serve a copy thereof upon the peti
tioner's attorney. MARTIN
COHEN. ESQ. 622 SW 1st
Street. Miami. Fla 33130. on or
before May 22. 1987, or else peti
Uon will be confessed
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court, at Miami, Dade
County. Florida, this Apnl 20,
1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
By E SEIDL
Deputy Clerk
15665 Apnl 24. May 1.8. 15, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-5818 CA 11
NOTICE OF ACTION
FORD MOTOR CREDIT
COMPANY, a Michigan
corporation.
Plaintiff,
v.
ADAM BETTER, and the
unknown spouse, heirs, devisee-
grantees, creditors or other
parties claiming by, through,
under or against him.
Defendants.
To: Adam Better, whose residence
is unknown, and the uknown
parties who may be spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees,
vssignees. lienors. creditors,
trustees and all parties claim-
ing interest by. through, under
or against said Itefendant. who
are not known to be dead or
alive, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, ti
tie. or interest in the property
herein desenbed.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County. Florida:
Lot 5. in Block 2, of
RIVIERA ESTATES, accor
ding to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 47. at
Page 39. of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your wntten defenses if any. to it
on David R Webster. Esquire, of
Rosenthal A Yarchin. PA At
torneys for Plaintiff. Suite 800.
3050 Biscayne Boulevard. Miami.
Florida 33137. on or before May
15. 1987. and to file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torneys or immediately thereafter,
otherwise, a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the Complaint
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Cotlrl on April '.' 1987,
RICHARD P BRISKERClerk
Rj BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
DofMtJ Clerk
...47 April 17.24. Ma> 1.8.191
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOl S N \ME LAV.
Sol ICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the uniersigi,.
engage il Bet
lious name el Mux" I >e \ inos in
|ar said name with
the i f the Circuit Court of
! '.I'l. Counl
\1
Apnl 10, '
Ma)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IS
IND EOK DADE COUNT!
(ml Action No 87-16780
NOTICE B! PI BLICATIOS
IN RE THE MARRIAGE "1
EVONNE I.ol IS wife
and
ARMOND EI.oi SIS LOUIS
ami
rO Mr Armoiid Elousus I anus
Residence Unknown
YOU A R I H E R E B Y
NOTIFIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has ban Bsd and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a 00fj) of your wntten
defenses, if any. to it on ARTHUR
II 1.1PSON "attorney for Peti
tloner whose address is 801 S I
167 Street Miami. Fla 33162 and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
May 22. 1987: otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief prayed for in the complaint
or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 17 day of April. 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By E SEIDL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
15663 Apnl 24. May 1,8, 15. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
riCTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVES
that the undersigned, le^inng to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name APACHE
WRECKER SERVICE at 1115
Opalocka Blvd Opalocka Florida
33064 intends to register amid
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Javier Morejon
15689 Apnl 24. May 1.8. 16. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File NsBRber 87-1995
Division 01
IS RE ESTATE OF
Jacob S Goldman a/k/a .
Jack Goldman
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Jacob S Goldman a/k/a Jack
Goldman, deceased. File Numtier
87-1995. is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County. Flonda.
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street.
Room 307 Miami. Flonda .WHO
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below
All interested persons an- re-
quin-d to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic
Uon of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED"
Publication of this Notice has
begun on April 24. 1987
Personal Representative
Leonard B Goldman
1234 E 104th Street
Brooklyn. NY 11236
Richard M Goldman
19000 N.E 3rd Ct.
Miami. Flonda 33179
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
LEFF. PESETSKY & ZACK.
PA.
BY SAMUEL I LEFF B8Q
IV.7 S I 16L'nd Street
Si. Miami Beach. FI 33162
Telephone (3051945 7501
16870 Apnl 24. May 1 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87 14565 (09)
IS RE The Marriage of
\ngf.L McCLOUD,
Petit.
and
MILTON I. McCLOUD
Rs ;-'nilent
To MILTON 1. McCLOUD
. unkaosii -hall
:> of your Answer -.
Petition for Dissolution of Mar
ring* upon GEORGE NICHOI
Attorntj 811 North oast lL'th
\.. Miami. Florida, 88188, and
i. nginal with Court l'Utk
May IS, 1987, uthararMi .,
default will be entered
April 7 I 1
RICHARD BRINKER
BY BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Aprs 10, 17.-'.
M)
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS SAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, ilesinng to
engage in buamaaa uixier the fie
lit,, .us name of PALMETT" 'EUR
NTTURE at 8600 N W TTth
Avenue. Hialeah Gardens. Kl
B016 ntaad I tar sa*l
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Cotlrl of Dade C.iunty. Flonda
IRIS ALVAREZ 100^
15654 Apnl 17. 24. Ma> 1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY (JIVES
that the undersigned, desinng to
engage in business under the fie
tilious name BELLAS WIG
SALON at 18153 Biscayne Blvd
North Miami Beach. El 33160 in
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
BLACK SEA INC
Paul Kwitney of
Kwitney. Kroop. A Scheinberg
PA.
420 Lincoln Road Suit 512
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139
Attorney for Black Ssa Inc.
15643 April 17. 24, May 1.8. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS N\MK I \u,
NOTICE IS HEKim RIVEN
that the undersign,
engage bl hnajnen
titious name M
FASHIONS at 290*
Miami KL SSI 14 ;..
register said name *.....
of the Circuit C
ty. Florida
JOSE M MENA
188TI May 1.8 is 22, |an
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desinng to
engage in business under the fie
titious name MISS LISSETTE
FASHIONS at 2140 West Flagler
Street. Miami. FL 33186 intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
IRMA COLON
15673 May 1.8. 15.22. 1987
IS THE CIRCUIT HURT OF
THE ELEVENTH J| l)|(|M
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IV
AND FOR DADE ( OUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-0*621 ( \i;
NOTICE OF ACTION
.1 1 K1SI.AK MuRD.viE
SERVICE CORPORATION
Plaintiff
vs.
LESTER J NEWKIRK.ettl
Defendants.
To NELLIE M NEWKIRX
Residence Unknow
If alive, and if dead, all jrtm
claiming interest ,g
under or against NELLIE M
NEWKIKK. and all parties
having or claiming to bar* am
right, title or interest in uV
property herein data -
You are hereby notified that i
action to foreclose a mortgagee
the following property .r. :**
County, Florida.
Lot 5. in Block I. of LEE
BELL HOMES, ace rdinri
the Plat thereof -
Plat Book 81 Page '
Public Bacardi
ty. Florida
has been filed against > are requuvd to serve a copj i
your wntten dafat
on Stuart H '",
Plaintiff. whoM iddn
214. 1570 Madruga \
(iables. Florida 331 H
May 29, IW
with the clerk of tl
baton service
tornaj or immadi
efault be ei
against > i
ed in the COBI| unl
WITNESS
nf this
1987
RICH A R!

B) BARBARA

NOTICE hi VI riON
CON8TRI CTIVl SERVIC1
(NO PBOPI RTYl
IN THE ( IRt I IT < id KT"F|
THE ELEVENTH JI I'M HI
(IRt 1 IT in H IIRIDA 1^
\ND FOR DADl i "I ST)
( ml ictiaa v.. H7-1T9M
ICTION FOR DISS0LI TIOS
OF MARRIACI
Florida Bar No I MM
IN RE The Marr
TREVOR BOi
tit
an ROS \ BOGU
Rca|
In ROSA BO"
Prior ty
St. Ann. Ji i
in HEREBY!
NOTIFIEI......
Dissolution
filed against rou and >''
tea daiaini I
JEROLD H REICHLER
tornev for Paul *J" *^l
dress'is 14i. N K *iamuar*"l
Dnve. Suite ^
Beach. Honda S3162. andI H"l
original with tn. derl ^"l
styled court on or before Mi) ^1
1987. otherwise a default: "^l
entered against y* fi* the rr
demanded in the OtajasM *>
PTnotice shall t* pA"**!
ecutive weeki in l rin '"
FLORIDIAN \
WITNESS my harni^*V"|
of said court at Miami. rTondt"!
this 24 day of Apnl. I9J
As Clerk. Circuit urt
Dade Count) rToB*
ByCLARINIiABKOV.N
As Deput) t Icrk
(Circuit Court Seal' ^
JEROLD H REUHl.Eh t>
LAW OFFICES Or
JEROLD H REICHLLK
Attorney for PetiUoner^HiitW- ,
1400 N E Miami Gardens l)n"
Suite 108 ,fl|
North Muun. BeachHV-^I
15675 Ms> "


Friday, May 1, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THF ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
circuit, in and for
nDE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Cm* No 87-31" CA 18
NATIONAL MORTC.AGE
COMPANY a Tennessee
.orporation
pisintiff.
LIJAH HKMI.EY a/k/a LIZE
HF.Ml.F.Y. and the unknown
MUM heirs. llWSMa*. grantees.
^..rrtherpHlifj
claiming b)through, under or
Hunfi him. PAULETTE
BEMLEY. and JET WINDOW
INSTALLERS. INC.. > Florida
corporation.
IVfendants
Lyah Bemley a/k/a Lisc Bemley.
whose residence is unknown.
and the unknown parties who
may bo spouses, heirs.
,,.. .,,-. grantees, assignees,
lienors. creditor*. truate*a and
all parlies claiming interest by.
through, under or against aaid
Defendant, who are not known
to be (iead or alive, and all par
ties having or claiming to have
any right, title, or interest in
the pp>perty herein described
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
xtxti to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County. Florida.
Lot 4. in Block 8. of SOUTH
MIAMI HEIGHTS MANOR.
according to the Plat thereof,
at recorded in Plat Book 68.
at Page 19, ( the Public
Records >f l>ade County.
Florida
nat neen filed igainat you and you
are required 0 *erve a opy of
vour written iefenaes. if any. to it
n Barn t irchin. Esquire, of
Rosrnthal t Yarchin. PA.. At-
waqn I ''Mamtiff. Suite hoo.
infm Biieayne Boulevard. Miami.
"Tnnda 13137 M >r before May
-" t- I ':! "he original
with 'he lerk if "his I 'ourt .'ither
r. "laintifTs .it
meyi fiiately hereafter
(-fault will he enternl
igains' hi' relief lemarol
n I'laint
WITNESS nj iaml ind seal .f
vpril I8S7
RICHARD P BRINKER, Clerk
B| BARBARA RODRIGUE2
!Tk
Barr. Caqutre
urrur. P A

vani
Man : r
.. 100
i M.., v 1987
NOTICE Of ACTION
CONSTRI CTIVE SERVICE
"NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COUBT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCriT Or FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
I I'll Vrtios No. 87-11664
IN RE The Marriage if
MAN! EL vTCHOT
Petitioner Husband
ind
WLVIA itRONAIX)
Respon.ient.Wife
T" SYLVIA 'ORONADO
It A.,-rudaHH-51
VU liermoaa 1.
ima 15
'Guatemala. GUATEMALA
Jj>'' ARE HEREBY
"2? <*" an action for
2"** Marnace has been
*> igainat vou and you are re-
I to serve a copy of your writ-
R-1"1"'. 'f say. to it on
ARKI S 4 WINTER. PA., at
f*y fee Petitiorjer. whose ad
g* 2251 S.W 22nd St..
*** """da 146. and file the
"J^ *ith the dark of the above
"TJM "win on or before May 16.
'"7. otherwise a .lefauh will be
g* inat you for the relief
***">* m the complaint or
Petition
T"" notice shall be published
ach we* for four con
nSfcuSfin E JEW,SH
WrTNKss my hand and the seal
""'""yofApnl. 1987.
KIOIARDP BRINKER
' lerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
"> BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
I ir- As Deputy Clerk
*ARKUS ft WINTER. P.A.
hrMs -'2nd Street
0,60 V>l 17. 24. May 1.8. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 8744073 (OS)
FB 226066
NOTICE OF ACTION
FAMILY CREDIT SERVK ES
INC
Plaintiff.
va.
IXIRENZO OROVIO. a single
man. and ZORAIDA OROVIO. a
single woman. LORENZO
OROVIO. a single man. THE
UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA: JOHN DOE
Defendants
TO: ZORAIDA OROVIO
Former address:
11480 S.W 98 Street.
Miami. FL 33173
Preaent address unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for FORECLOSURE has
been filed against you. You are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to the action
on plaintiffs attorney whose name
and address ii ARMANDO
GUTIERREZ. 2153. Coral Way.
Suite 400, Miami. Florida 33145.
on or before May 15. 1987. and file
the original with the clerk of this
court, either before service on peti -
tioner's attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise s judgment
will be entered to the relief
demanded in the complaint.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
>f this court .m Apnl 10. 1987
BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Clerk of Court
ARMANDO GUTIERREZ.
ESQUIRE
2153 ixiral Way. Suite 400
Miami. Florida 33145
Attorney for Plaintiff
15651 Apnl 17. 24. May 1. v 1967
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number Kt-6384
Diviaioa 03
IN RE ESTATE OF
ROSIN A SARNELLA.
I ieceased
FORM VI NOTICE
BY PUBLICATION
PO Unknown lieneficianes >r
lleirs-at Law '.iving or dead,
their respective Heirs .and ill
persons claiming by through
and under and or may be in
fant.s. incompetents other
wise sui juris Residence
unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Peti
ion for Determination of Heir-
has been filed in this court ind ;. u
are required to file vour written
ilefenses to the petition *ith the
lerk of this court and to iaTTe a
opy thereof not later than May 16.
I9ST, on petitioner- ittorney.
whose name ami address are
MARTIN W WASSERMAN At-
'orney lor Petitioner whoM d
Iress is 999 Washington Avenue
Miami Bee<-h Florida 33139 If you
fail to do so. juilgment may be
ntered in due '-ourse ipon 'he
jietiUon
WITNESS my hand and 'he seal
of 'his court on April '.', 1987
RICHARD P BRINKER. Clerk
As Clerk of the Court
By REINE E ALUPUDO
As Deputy I :ierk
16048 April 17. 24. May 1,8, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
'itiou* name Ace International at
1S0S0 West Dixie Highway, North
Miami. Floods 33161 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida
Ace MuaK Center. Inc.
13630 West Dixie Highway
North Miami. Florida 33161
Cypen A Cypen
K26 Arthur Godfrey Road.
Miami Beach. FL 33140
Attorney for Applicant
15638 April 10. 17. 24;
May 1,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-1925
Division 04
IN RE ESTATE OF
JACK FlTERNICK.
Dei-eased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of JACK Fl TERNICK. deceased.
File Number H7 1925. is pending in
the Circuit Court for DADE Coun-
ty. Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street. Third Floor.
Miami. Honda 88180, The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on April 24. 1987
Personal Representative:
MORRIS FITERNICK
2 Grove Isle. No 1509
Coconut Grove. FL 33133
(305) 686-032S (ofc.)
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
SYDNEY S. TRAUM,
ESQUIRE '193392 iBar No.)
Sydney S Traum, I'.A.
Shea and (kiuld
1428 BnckeJ! Avenue, oth Fir
Miami. Florida 38181
Telephone 3051 371 9041
15668 Vpnl24. Mav 1. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Vogel Sales at 7465
SW 115 Street. Miami Fla 33156
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Harvev Vogel
15642 Apnl 10. :
Mav 1. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT Or FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-16790 FC 15
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Fla. Bar No. 0475203
IN RE The Marriage of
VI.INA VALLENILLA,
Petitioner
and
WILLIAM VALLENILLA
Respondent
TO WILLIAM VALLENILLA
K.-siden.-e Unknown
VOU ARK HERE B Y
NOTIFIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION Or MARRIAGE
hat been C\\ft ind winiwnMd m
tn- .-our' ind .nil m- required to
saves a ODD) of your written
deftness, if any. to it on USHER
BRYN. Esquire ittorney lor Peti-
tioner whose address 18SOI Col
lins Avenue. Suite M 8, Miami
Beach. Florida 88188 and file the
i inginal with the clerk of the above
styled i.urt on or U-fore May 29.
1987. otherwise a defsult will be
entered igainat you for the relief
prayed for in the <-omplaint or
petition
WITNESS my hand ami the seal
of said court at Miami, ''lorida on
this 20 lay of April, '987
RICHARD P BRINKER
A* Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN. Ksy
2301 Collins Avenue. Suite M-8
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139
(Phone) (306) 532-1156
15666 April 24. May 1.8, 15. 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
rC CASE NO.: 8710644
IN RE: The Marriage of
ALFREUS CLAUDION.
Petitioner/Husband,
vs.
VERA ANN CLAUDION,
Respondent
TO: VERA ANN CLAUDION -
Residence Unknown shall serve
copy of your Answer to the Peti-
tion for Dissolution of Marriage
upon GEORGE NICHOLAS. At
torney. 612 N.W 12th Avenue,
Miami. Flomla. 88188, and file
original with Court Clerk on or
barars May H. 1987. otherwise *
default will I*- SntSTSd
April 8, 188
RICHARD BRINKER
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
April 10. 17.24.
May 1. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Namber 87-2101
Diviaioa 03
IN RE ESTATE OF
ROSE SIMS.
I lii-eased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ROSE SIMS, deceased. File
Number 87 2101. is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dads County.
Florida. Probate Division, the ail
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami, Florida 88180 The
names and addresses of the |>er
sonal representative and the per
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the -state and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or junsdic
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of 'his Notice has
begun on Apnl 24. 1987.
Personal Representative:
S. DONALD SIMS
1116 Maroney Lane
Pacific Palisades. CA 90272
Personal Representative:
M ELLIOT SIMS
405 Main Street
Port Wishington. New York
11050
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
NELSON & FELDMAN. P.A.
1135 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands. FL 33154
Telephone 885-6716
15664 Apnl 24. May 1. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Vrtion No. 7-1643
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
MARK DOUS8A,
husband,
and
JANET K. DOUS8A. wife
ro IA.NET K DOUSSA
B618 Valor Drive
ChaJmette. \a,
YOU ARE II E RE B Y
NOTIFIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION Or MARRIAGE
has "evil Hsd and OOBUBSIIOSd ill
this court and you are ns|uirisl to
kCTVS I copy of your written
lefenses. if any. to it on ARTHUR
H. UPSOri attorney for Peti
loner, who i.idr....... so \i >K
THEAST 167 STREET MIAMI
FLORIDA 88188 and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or In-fore May 22,
1987 othewise a default will he
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the -omplaint or
petition
WITNESS my han.i in,! the seal
of said court at Miami. Honda on
this 20 day of April. 1987
RICHARD P BRINKER.
As Clerk, Circuit (3ourt
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
15667 April 24. May 1, 8. 15. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
nCTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desinng to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Regina's Fashions of
Downtown. Inc at 113 S.E. 1st
Street Miami Fla. 38131 intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Flomla
Manuel Lacayo
15639 April 10. 17.24;
May 1.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name BELLAS WIG at
18153 His.-ayne Blvd North Miami
Beach, Fl. 33160 intends to
register said name with the Oars'
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida
BLACK SEA INC
Paul Kwitney of
Kwitnsy, Kroop, & Schsmbsrg,
P A
420 Lincoln Road Suit.
Miami Beach. Fla 88139
Attorney for Black Sea Inc
16848 Apnl 17 24, May 1. 8, 1887
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
Civil Action No. 87 18552-08
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
PRESTONJ BUSSEY husband
and
SYLVYA BUSSEY. wife
TO: Ms. Sylvya Bussey
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if sny to it on ARTHUR
H. LIPSON. attorney for Peti
tioner. whose address is 801 N.E
167 Street Miami. Fla. 33162 and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
June 5. 1987, otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief prayed for in the complaint
or petition
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 29 day of April. 1987
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
15686 May 1.8, 15.22. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-15287-16
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
VNNAMARIA T VISSCHER.
Petltioner'Wife
ind
WILLIAM S VISSCHER.
Respondent/Husband.
TO William S Yisscher
Route B
I.aKe Lucerne. N Y
YOU ARE H E R F U V
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage 'ia.- mm
filed against you and you ire re
iuinil to serve a copy of your writ-
ten lefenses. if any to it on
Samud S. BotOta, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address ..- 801
N E 167th Street, goita 808
North Miami Beach Florida
18162, and file the onguutl with
the -lerk of the above styled court
m or before May l.i. 1H87. other
aim i default will In- entered
against you for the relief lemand
iil in the complaint or petition
This notice shall tie published
nee .-ach week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand ami the seal
of said court at Miami. Flonda on
his g lay of Apnl. 1987
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Flonda
By C.P COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
SAMUEL S SOROTA
801 N.E. 167th Street
Suite 308
North Miami Beach. FL 33162
Attorney for Petitioner
15644 April 17. 24. May 1.8, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, deeinng to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Trump Terrace at 960
Biarritx Drive Normandy Isle
Miami Beach Ft 33141 intends to
register said name with the ('lerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Trump Realty Corp
Andrew B Gmsburg
Attorney
15631 April 10. 17. 24;
______________May 1.1967
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name FANTASTIC
FLOWERS at IS6S-C Sunset
Drive. Coral Gables. FL 88148 in
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida
FANTASY LAND INC
H. MARIA F. KF.I.I>
PRESIDENT
IS682 April 10, 17.24.
May 1. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-14575
ACTION FOR ADOPTION
IN RE: THE MATTERS OF THE
ADOPTION OF
a minor
and
TO Bl.AS ROLANDO BARRERO
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Adoption has lieen filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your wntten defenses, if
any. to it on Armando Gutierrez,
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 2153 Coral Way. Suite 400
Miami. Florida 33145, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before May 8,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 3 day of April, 1987
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By B.J FOY
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ARMANDO GUTIERREZ
ESQUIRE
2153 Coral Way. Suite 400
Miami. FL 33145
Attorney for Petitioner
15637 April 10, 17. 24;
May 1. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-10619
NOTICE OF ADOPTION
PROCEEDING
IN RE The Adoption of
A MINOR
TO MICHAEL FRENCHY"
BE AI DRY
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
N't ITIFIED that an action for Peti-
tion for Adoption has been filed in
volving vou and you are required
to seve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on
WILLARD K SPL ITT
TOKSSKR. ESQ. attorney for
Petitioner whose address is 13122
West Dime Highway. Suite B.
North Miami. Fl 88161, and file
the ongmal with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
May 11. 1987; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said '-ourt at Miami, Flonda on
his 2 day of Apnl. 1987
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By B.J FOY
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Willard K Splittstoeaser, Esq.
13122 West Dixie Highway. Suite
B
North Miami, Flonda 33161
(306) 891 3848
Attorney for Petitioner
15636 April 10, 17. 24;
May 1. 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CASE NO.; 87-13489
IN RE: The Marriage of
WILLIO DENEUS.
Petitioner
vs.
NORMA LYNN DENEUS.
Respondent.
TO NORMA LYNN DENE1S
Residence Unknown
shall serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of Mar
riage upon ANTHONY CAR
BONE, Attorney. 618 N.W. 12th
SS1S8, Miami. Florida with Court
Clerk on or before .lime 6, 1987.
Otherwise a default will he entered.
vpril 28, 19X7
RICHARD BRINKER
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
16684 Mas 1.8, 15.22. 19X7


Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. May 1, 1987
17 mg "tw" 1 3 mg nicotine, av. pet cigaietie by FTC method
SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Cigarette
Smoke Contains Carbon Monoxide.
. .
THE REFRESHEST



/% w?
MISSION OF A LIFETIME
See Story on page 3
Shalom Jerusalem ... The City of Gold Comes to Miami
Special Israel Independence Day Section pages 8-9


50th ANNIVERSARY MISSION OF A LIFETIME
WOMEN'S DIVISION
constituent hoard officers for 1987-88
Young Women's Leadership Cabinet
Women's Division Hold the Date
Campaign cleanup phonathon
YOUNG LEADERSHIP COUNCIL
YLC installation brunch
Second annual YLC "Mission to Tallahassee"
"The strategic balance in the Middle East" is topic of Forum
COMMERCE AND PROFESSIONS
Chairman's message
Commerce and Professions celebration dinner
Alan J. Kluger Chairman of Attorneys' Division
Healing Arts Division
ALLIANCE DIVISION
Winston Towers brunch
California Club community
Balmoral brunch
ISRAEL INDEPENDENCE DAY
Shalom Jerusalem The City of Gold Comes to Miami
Schedule of events
FOUNDATION/AGENCIES
Foundation honors Zero Coupon Bond participants
Safety and housing research for elderly published
JVS Nutritional Project receives award
South Dade JCC names co-chairmen
Jewish Community Leadership retreat to be held in June
Mount Sinai to conduct asthma research
COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMITTEE
CRC issues guidelines on South Africa
Archbishop Tutu accused of anti-Semitism
Concern expressed over regulations on advocacy activities
JEWISH FEDERATION TELEVISION
"Tree of Life" promotes messages of Judaism
JFTV directs video for JCC
"Teen Scene" receives letter from Israeli Consulate
JFTV schedule
GENERAL ASSEMBLY
Letter from Nancy Lipoff
Volunteer Application
SUPER SUNDAY
Thank you to volunteers
Israel Programs Office offers wide range of summer
programs to Israel
CALENDAR
8-9
10
11
12
13
14-15
16
This material was prepared for
The Jewish Floridian Supplement
May 1 by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
President
Aaron Podhurst
Executive Vice President
Myron J. Brodie
Chairman, Communications Committee
Forrest Raffel
/>
*
Director of Communications
Nicholas Simmonds
Newsmagazine Editor
Mark D. Friedman
2 Fedrratum, May 1987


"Mission of a Lifetime"
The highlight of the entire year-
long celebration of the
Federation's 50th Anniversary,
will he the "Mission of a Lifetime" to
Israel taking place between October
11-21, 1987. The Mission will honor
past Federation mission participants,
presidents, campaign chairmen,
founders as well as their family
members and other individuals who
have made a commitment to
Federation over the past half
century.
"In fifty years, this Jewish
community has grown significantly,"
said Harry A. "Hap" Levy, "Mission
of a Lifetime" coordinating
chairman. "With the increase in
residents came an increase in Jewish
needs. Now we are looking back and
taking the time, once again, to thank
the individuals who helped meet
those needs and make this Federation
a reality. The mission will be a chance
for these people to gather together
and celebrate in our Jewish
homeland," he added.
Highlight* of the mission include:
Presentation and special ceremony
in Israel for the founders, past
presidents and past campaign
chairmen of Federation;
Golden Anniversary Banquet at the
Knesset with the Prime Minister;
Golden Anniversary Simchat Torah
celebration;
Gala Anniversary Concert with the
Israel Philharmonic;
Golden Anniversary Gala Dinner at
Miami's Project Renewal "sister
city." Or Akiva;
Special presentation to Miami
leadership by the President of Israel
;n his home;
Oath at M a s a d a with
representatives of the Israel Armed
Forces;
Special Golden Anniversary service
it the Western Wall with the Chief
Kal'bi and Cantor Braun of the Israel
Defense Forces;
Golden Anniversary Dinner with
the Minister of Defense, the Head of
the Armed Forces and the Heads of
the Army, Air Force and Navy;
Special seminars with Israeli
< abmet Ministers;
Presentation of a scroll of honor
sting all Mission participants, to be
presented to the Government of
rarael for the State Archives;
A visit to Ein Hod artists village
n?ar Haifa and a Druze village;
Tour the Jordan wineries at
Katzerim in the Golan Heights.
"I
t"s a once in a lifetime
event," said Stanley C.
Myers, Federation's first
president, who is serving as honorary
chairman of the 'Mission of a
Lifetime.' "It will be a gathering of
the most dynamic individuals in the
Jewish community. These are the
people who made Federation what it
is today and over the years the funds
raised have helped 32 local
beneficiaries, our Project Renewal
"sister city" in Israel, Or Akiva, and
many projects that help needy Jews
around the world. Their dedication
has allowed us to arrive at our 50th
anniversary with a strong local
Jewish community," he added. Polly
de Hirsch Meyer, widow of Baron de
Hirsch Meyer, one of Federation's
original founders and its first
campaign chairman, is serving as
honorary chairman for Federation's
50th Anniversary campaign."
When Myers first presided over the
Greater Miami Federation of Jewish
Welfare Funds in May 1938. the
organization which became the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation,
there were 19,500 Jews in Dade
County, now there are 250,000.
The first annual Campaign kicked
off in 1939 with a Campaign goal of
$65,100 and raised $82,745. Today
Federation has a 1987 Campaign goal
of $21,750,000. "Times have changed
and so has the organization, but the
underlying idea of helping Jews in
need has always remained a
constant," added Myers.
"Mission of a Lifetime" Honorary
Chairmen are Stanley and Martha
Myers; Coordinating Chairmen are
Davida and Harry A. "Hap" Levy;
Vice Chairmen are Marvis and David
Schaecter, Dorothy Podhurst,
Women's Division president; Aaron
Podhurst, Federation president; and
Donald E. Lefton, 1987 Combined
Jewish Appeal chairman.
The "Mission of a Lifetime" is open
to everyone who makes a minimum
gift of $5,000 to the 1987 Combined
Jewish Appeal. If you would like
more information about Federation's
"Mission of a Lifetime" call
Federation at 576-4000.
I
I
I
I
.;
|
I
.v
I
|

Members of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
gathered at the home of Harry A. "Hap" and Davida
Levy recently to kick-off the Federation's Golden An-
niversary "Mission of a Lifetime" to Israel, which will
honor the organization's past presidents, campaign
chairmen, original founders and their families. Pictured
frtrm left to nght (suited) are: Nancy Ororitz. Felicia
Orovitz Deutch. Renee Warren. Edythe Kerness. Carl
Weinkle. (standing, from left tn right) Patty Packman,
Jimmy Ororitz. Elton ./. Kerness. associate executive nee
president of Federation; Donald E. Lefton. 1987 Combin-
ed Jewish Appeal chairman; Dorothy Kaplan. Philip
Warren, past campaign chairman; Mission of a Lifetime
Coordinating Chairmen Harry A. "Hap" Levy, Federa-
tion past president; and Davida Levy; L. Jules Ark in.
Federation past president; Shirley Arkin. David P.
Fleeman. Federation past president; Charlotte Hrodie.
Myron J. Brmiie, executiiv rice president of Federal inn;
Joan Smith and Harry R Smith, Federation past
president.
;.;

v.
I
Federation. May 198",


Phonathon
Women's Division is helping to
"clean-up" the 1987 Combined Jewish
Appeal. We need you to mark your
calendars for the weeks of Monday.
May 11-Friday, May 15. and Monday.
May 18-Friday. May 22. Come to the
Federation building any time during
those days. The individual who covers
the most cards, in our effort to close
the 1987 Campaign, will win a day at
Elizabeth Arden. The winner will be
announced at Federation's Annual
Meeting in June. To be eligible, you
must close a minimum of 18 "Chai"
cards.
Constituent boards
The Women's Division Constituent
Board Nominating Committees have met
and nominated officers for the 1987-88
year:
Business and Professional Women
Lisa Leuchter Treister. Chairwoman:
Sheila Jaffe. Raquel Bild-Libhm. Vice
Chairwomen. Campaign;
Hilda Mitrani Bennet. Secretary;
Ray Ellen Yarkin. Nominating Commit-
tee Chairwoman:
Anne Bloom. Miriam Singer, Nominating
Committee Members.
Miami Beach
Barbara Aronson. Chairwoman;
Sara Raiffe. Charlotte Rotenberg. Vice
Chairwomen. Campaign;
Rachel Neuman. Vice Chairwoman, Com-
munity Education;
Helene Berkowitz. Vice Chairwoman.
Leadership Development;
Candace Ruskin. Secretary,
Meryle Loring. Nominating Committee
Chairwoman;
Ann Lamet. Jan Miller. Nominating Com-
mittee Members.
South Dade
Gail Meyers, Chairwoman.
Sandy Landy. Estelle Segal. Vice Chair-
women. Campaign;
Joan Bloom, Joan Hayet. Vice Chair
women. Community Education;
Selma Rappaport. Elly Wolff. Vice Chair
women. Leadership Development:
Phyllis Harte. Secretary;
Barbara Kasper. Nominating Committee
Chairwoman;
Doris Notarial, Reva Rachlin.
Nominating Committee Members.
Southwest Dade
Nominating Committee meeting was held
Thursday. April 23. (Results unavailable
by day of printing).
North Dade
Shirley Bergman. Chairwoman;
Monica Gurland. Joanne Kane. Vice
Chairwomen. Campaign;
Ruth Kraniz Vice Chairwoman. Com-
munity Education;
Sandy Belkind, Vice Chairwoman.
Leadership Development;
Debbie E del man. Nominating Committee
Chairwoman;
Ellen Elbrand. Susan Fields, Nominating
Committee Members.
Hold the Date
Orientation Program
North
10:00 am.
Taeadar. May i
Overall Chairwomen Selection Meeting
9:30 am
Executive Officers Think Tank
11:30 am.
Wedday. May C
Miaou Bosch Orientation Program
10:00 am.
Moaday. May 11-Friday. May 22
Women's Division Phonathon Contest
Federation Bldg
sy. May It
Installation
Biltmore Hotel
9:39 am
BPW Installation
7:30 p.m
Young Women's Leadership Cabinet
United Jewish Appeal
Young Women's
Leadership Cabinet
Lois Entin '
Marilyn Kohn
Sara Raiffe
* Not pictured
o
Judy Adler
I
RartMrn Aronson
Maureen berkowxtz
Xaney Berkowxtz
Amy DM
Phylii* Harte
Barfxirn KipHU
Sunn AiVii''*'/
Snmii M
Ellen Rose
Susan Sirotta
Karen Brown Spxvack
Maryanne Wvtkin
Ray Ellen Yarkxn
The Young Women's Leadership
Cabinet (YWLC) was created by
the United Jewish Appeal in 1976
as a means of identifying, attrac-
ting, recruiting, educating, sensitizing.
motivating and training young women of
proven local leadership abilities, having
the potential to be the future leaders of
the American Jewish community
Through the Cabinet, these women may
be integrated into the UJA network of in-
ternational support services.
Cabinet members include both
dedicated career women and devoted pro-
fessional volunteers. They come from
federated and non-federated communities
and from different walks of life. They
share a common concern for Jewish sur-
vival and a commitment to their fellow
Jews in the United States. Israel, and
throughout the Diaspora. Working
together, they bring a new vision and an
invigorated approach to contemporary
Jewish living.
According to Susan Sirotta.
Miami area chairwoman of the
YWLC. "As s member of the
Young Women's Leadership
Cabinet, you make yourself available to
help both your federation and other
federations in the area." As an example
she points out Ellen Rose's involvement
with the Tampa Federation's Business
and Professional Women's Group. Rose, a
Cabinet member and chairman of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Young Leadership Council and a Federa-
tion board member, helped Tampa with
their annual fundraising parlor meeting
On a national level, Amy Dean, incoming
campaign vice president of Federation's
Women's Division and a Federaton board
member, as well as the YWLC Missions
chairwoman, recently returned from
leading the 200 member An* EeKad mis
sion to Europe and Israel.
Sirotta's goal this past year was to
allow the Miami area YWLC enough ex
posure to help the growth of our own
Federation. One of the ways she did this
was by hosting a leadership development
program to teach other Cabinet members
how to become program facilitators
44
M
the
eaibers of the YWLC have
an obligation not only to be
members of National LJA
but they are also response
local community." *aatc
ble for
Sirotta
To maintain membership in the YWLC.
Miami members must make a minimum
contribution to the Combined Jewish Ap-
peal of $1,500 and attend the annual
retreat in July.
"It is an extraordinary educational er
penence to serve as a member oi
Cabinet Through participation in me
Cabinet each of us learns more atxu
Judaism and develops a deep*
understanding of our commitment to u
Jewish community." said Sirotta
4 Federation, May 1987


YLC annual installation meeting
and champagne brunch
Ellen Rose
A Champagne Brunch will be held
on Sunday. May 31, at the Omni
International Hotel, 1601 Bis-
cayne Blvd., to celebrate the se-
cond anniversary of the Young Leader
ship Council. The program will feature
the installation of the new YLC Board
members.
Ellen Rose, has been unanimously nam-
ed by the YLC nominating committee to
serve aa chairman for the second con-
secutive year. Jack H. Levine. immediate
past chairman of YLC and chairman of
the nominating committee said. "Our
committee was very impressed with
Ellen's leadership during this past year
and recognizes her as one of the great
eaders of this Jewish community. There
is no doubt that she will approach the up-
coming year as an ongoing challenge and
opportunity to help the Young Leader
ship Council reach even greater heights "
Rose, who is an attorney and partner in
the firm of Therrel. Baisden and Meyer
Weiss, serves on Federation's Board of
Directors, Planning and Budget Commit-
tee and various other committees within
the organization. She is a member of the
UJA Young Women's Leadership
Cabinet and has served as co-chairman of
Super Sunday in 1986 and 1987. She also
serves as a legal counsel to the
Federation.
4 4 r|l ne individuals who have ac-
cepted nomination for next
-A. year's Board are a highly
qualified group who offer a
wide range of experience which we are
hopeful will result in another year of ex-
traordinarily successful programming.
We face the challenge of representing
Federation and its humanitarian goals
and of reaching out to other members of
our young (under 40) Jewish community
in order to educate and involve them. The
challenge is great hut I am confident that
it is one we can meet," said Rose.
Serving as YLC vice chairman is
Robert C. Gilbert, who served as vice
chairman of the 1986-87 YLC Community
and Political Involvement Committee. He
is an associate in the law firm of Shea and
Gould. Gilbert serves on the Federation's
Project Renewal Committee. Community
Relations Committee. Middle Fast and
Foreign Jewry Committee and Domestic
Concerns Committee.
The new YLC Board members are:
Roliert A. Kaplan. Campaign Committee
chairman; Eliot B. Treister. vice chair-
man: Lyn J. Pont, Community and
Political Involvement chairman; Samuel
J. Dubbin, vice chairman; Michael H. and
Susans E. Novak. Couples Committee
chairmen; Nancy and Phillip S. Plotka,
vice chairmen; Isaac K. Fisher, Mission to
Israel Committee chairman; Steven M.
Silvers, vice chairman; Lorraine
Solomon, Program and Education Com-
mittee chairman; Brian R. Daniels, vice
chairman; Tracey M. Dubin, Public Rela-
tions Committee chairman; Joel M. Levy,
vice chairman; Zena F. Inden. Singles
Committee chairman; Ian Kaplan, vice
chairman; and Members-at-Large: David
Abramowitz. T.R. Beer. Jeffrey Bercow,
Barbara Black, Steven Brodie, Jason
Feinberg, Charles Ganz, Howard Glass,
Sandor Lenner, Jeffrey Levine, Jeffrey
Levey. Raquel Bild-Libbin, Ann Lipoff,
Joel Marks. Michelle Merlin, Felicia
Schwartz, Susan Sirotta, Allison Smith,
David Smith, Joseph Smith and Charles
Treister.
All members of the Jewish community
are invited to join the Young Leadership
Council in this celebration. Invitations
will be forthcoming. Dietary laws will be
observed.
For further information call Marsha
Kolman at 576-4000. ext. 290.
The strategic balance
in the Middle East
is topic of Forum
Hirsh Goodman
"There is nothing that Jonathan J.
Pollard could have given the State of
Israel that could possibly have been worth
jeopardizing Israel's relationship with the
United States but worse, jeopardizing
Israel's relationship with American
Jewry." These are the words of Hirsh
Goodman at a recent address to a Cherry
Hill, New Jersey audience.
Goodman, who is currently a visiting
fellow at the Washington Institute for
Near East Policy, and the defense cor-
respondent and strategic analyst of the
Jerusalem Post, will be the featured
speaker during the last lecture of the
1987 Sandra C. Goldstein Jewish Public
Affairs Forum series. His topic will be
"The Strategic Balance in the Middle
East: An Analysis of the Present and a
Peek at the Future." This timely lecture
will take place on Wednesday, May 13,
beginning at 7:30 p.m. at the Hyatt
Regency Hotel. 400 S.E. 2nd Avenue.
Born in South Africa, Hirsh Goodman
has lived in Israel since 1965 and has
worked with the Jerusalem Post since
1969. Over the years he has held
numerous positions with the Post in-
cluding that of special correspondent
covering events in Cambodia. Belfast,
South Africa. Germany. France and the
I Inited Suites. He is a consultant for CBS
News and has written extensively for ma-
jor publications. His most recent article
on "The Pretoria Connection" appeared
in the April 20. 1987 issue of the New
Republic.
This program is being co-sponsored by
the Young Leadership Council and the
Community Relations Committee of the
(ireater Miami Jewish Federation. A
Happy Hour, with cash bar. for Young
Leadership Council members will be held
at 6:30 p.m. immediately preceding the
lecture. The lecture cost is $5 in advance,
$7 at the door. For further information
please phone Brenda at 576-4000, ext.
225.
Second annual YLC "Mission to Tallahassee
J9
Samuel J. Dubbin
The Young Leadership Council's se-
cond annual "Mission to Tallahassee."
under the auspices of YLC's Community
and Political Involvement Committee,
and sponsored by the Florida Association
of Jewish Federations, is scheduled for
Thursday. May 7, 1987. "The Tallahassee
trip promises to be one of the most ex-
citing of the year," said Samuel J. Dub-
bin, chairman of the YLC Legislative Mis-
sion, "It will be an historic event a day
that will feature Nobel Prize Laureate,
Elie Wiesel, addressing a rare joint ses-
sion of the Florida Legislature, Cabinet
and the Supreme Court on the topic of
human rights and human dignity."
Members of the Young Leadership Coun-
cil will fly to Tallahassee and join with
participants from other Federations
throughout the state.
The Legislative Day will also include
special gallery seating and a luncheon
with Wiesel following his address. Other
aspects of the day include opportunities
for one-on-one meetings with Florida's
lawmakers to discuss important
legislative matters and a press con-
ference announcing the kickoff of
"Florida Public Officials for Soviet
Jewry."
Steve Brodie, chairman of the YLC
Community and Political Involvement
Committee said, "The State Legislative
Forum, co-sponsored by YLC and
Federation's Community Relations Com-
mittee in March, was well received and
showed us that there is a great deal of in-
terest and concern about political issues
within our state. We look forward to a
large delegation from Miami during our
second annual 'Mission to Tallahassee.' "
Robert Gilbert, vice chairman of this
Committee, stated that, "This day will af-
ford an opportunity for Jews throughout
the state to become knowledgeable about
a number of critical issues which affect
our daily lives and our delegation can
make a profound impact on Florida's
elected officials."
Space is limited. For more information
please call the YLC office at 576-4000.
ext. 290.
Federation, May 1987 5


Martin Fine
Chairman
Stephen Bittel
Vice-chairman
Arnold Altmtin
Vice-Chairman
Chairman's message
Dear friends:
The next few months promise to be an
exciting time at Federation. The excite-
ment begins this month with the
community-wide Israel Independence
Day celebration. "Shalom Jerusalem
the" City of Gold Comes to Miami." on
Sunday, May 17. The following Thursday.
May 21 is our Commerce and Professions
end of the year celebration dinner One
month later. June 16. is another special
date to mark in your calendar books. It is
the closing of the 1987 Combined Jewish
Appeal. On that day. all of your cards
should be in.
The summer is a time when many peo
pie are away on vacation, both you and
the people whose cards you have You
can't wait until after the summer to make
the >olu-itations. bmmi m October,
Federation will begin celebrating its
(iolden Anniversary with a "Mission of a
Lifetime.'" This special mission will take
place from October 11-21. On the heels of
the mission, all of us will be busy with the
56th CJF General Assembly, being
hosted bv our Federation November
17-2L'
So you see. busy times are before us.
We realistically only have one more
month to work on getting those pledge
cards completed. Take the cards out of
your briefcases, jacket pockets and desk
drawers; pick up the telephone and make
the appointment, then close the gift. Call
the staff at Federation for an update to
learn who has not yet made their 1987
pledge. Let your friends and business
associates share a sense of urgency for
the June 16 deadline.
Martin Fine
Chairman
Commerce and Professions
Commerce and Professions
celebration dinner
The Commerce and !*rofessions Divi-
sion will be celebrating its successful par-
ticipation in the 1987 Combined Jewish
Appeal with a special dinner on Thursday.
May 21 at the Omni International Hotel.
This celebration, which begins with
cocktails at 6:30 p.m.. followed by dinner
at 7:30 p.m. will honor many of the
outstanding professionals in the division.
Attendance requires a $50 couvert plus a
prior signed 1987 pledge card with your
gift to the Combined Jewish Appeal.
The evening's guest speaker will be
U.S. Senator Joseph Biden (Delaware),
chairman of the Senate Judiciary
Committee.
During the course of the evening,
awards will be presented from the various
divisions falling under the umbrella of
Commerce and Professions.
The Harold H Boawortb Memorial
Award will be presented to Howard
Socol, chairman ox the board of Burdines,
Florida The Hosworth award is
presented to the individual who per-
sonifies the high humanitarian ideals to
which Harold Bosworth. founder of the
Mercantile Division, ascribed.
The Jewish Accountant of the Year
Award will be presented to an outstan
ding accountant in the community.
The Boneh Yieroel Award will be
presented by the Builders. Real Kstate
and Allied Trades Division U> Barry Chap
nick, and Commonwealth Savings and
I/oan. for their outstanding work in the
community Chapnick is chairman of the
Uiani of Commonwealth.
The Maimonides Society Award will be
presented to all medical professionals
who have I teen active in the Jewish 0001
munit) and have pledged minimum gift
of $10,000 to the 1987 Combined Jewish
Appeal.
For more information about the Com-
merce an liona dinner call Marty
Baraach at 576 4'mmi exl 274
Healing Arts Division
^p ^L

Wk^st 1 PJJJH H
m
"V jmm J^IH % 1 i ^^^ f ^H Bk- J 1, ^*^^^H
Under the leadership of Drs. Joseph Hams and Douglas Miller, dentists, doctors
and pharmacists recently held a dinner meeting at Federation to make final plans
for dosing Federation s 1987 Healing Arts Fund Raising Campaign on behalf of the
Combined Jewish Appeal. Pictured from left to right are: Marvin Goldman, Dr.
Paul Lane, Dr. Sheruyn Weiss. Dr. Eliot Gordon, Dr. Sean Kaufman, Dr. Isaac
Garaxi, and Dr. Douglan Miller who is co-chairman of the Healing Arts Division,
sitting (from left to right) are Eugene Greenzweig, director of Central Agency for
Jewish Education; and Dr. Joseph Harris, co-chairman of the Healing Arts
Division.
Kluger heads
Attorneys *
Division
l .' K iger
< 'hai r
I D
Each month the Commerce and Profit-
sions Dicision highlight* i of it*
outstanding leaders.
Alan J Kluger is current i> '.airman of
the Attorneys' Division at Federation.
His commitment to the Jew -' n :;iuni-
t> goes l>ack man) yean He has -en a
member of the National Young Leader
ship Cabinet since 1981 and wai co-
chairman of "Operation Upgrade forth*
Inited Jewish Appeals Southern Region
from 1984 to 1985. a program he has par
ticipated in since 1982 Pron 1970 to
1981 he was on the Steering i omnutteJ
of Federation's Young Adult Pivision.
currently known as the Young Leader-
ship Council, and served as the YAP cam-
paign chairman in 1980. Last year he
chaired the Attorneys' Division Judicial
Reception which was a huge success Me
recently led the Am Behad miss*
delegation that went to uncn.
Switzerland before arriving in Israel
Alan's commitment to the Jewish com
munity runa in the family Wife. Am>
Dean is a Federation board member, a
member of the National CJA tung
Women's Leadership Cabinet and is w
incoming vice president, with the pon-
folio of Campaign for Federation*
Women's Division.
6 Federation, Ma* 1987


Alliance Division Highlights
Winston Towers
Balmoral
Picturtd from left to right are Jerome Berliner chairman; Mannie Pearl:
Tkeodort and Rebecca Wulpe. komoram; Jomrph Masters. Dr. Gerald MetoUr.
Jerome Berliner, chairman of Winston Towers, presided at the Winston
Towers Brunch. Sunday March 15. when Rehecca and Theodore Wolpe were
honored for their years of dedication to Judaic Principles. The presentation of
tht- ('hai Award to the Wolpes was made by Joseph Masters. Coordinators of
this annual event were Mr. and Mrs. Sol Farber. Mrs. Florence Goldberg. Mr.
and Mrs. Joseph Masters. Mr. and Mrs. Mannie Pearl, and Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph Reisel. who were last years honorees. The standing room only crowd
was addressed by Dr. Gerald Meister. the Director of the Institute for Inter-
Krhgious Studies at Bar I Ian University. Ramat-Gan. Israel.
'lh, Hnhn.mil ('immunity recently held a Sunday brunch on behalt'ofthe 1987
Combined Jewish Appeal Pictured from left are Sylna Feldman.'er.-nt r,-
chairman; Betty Kopelowitz. erent chairman; Hiru-ard Stone, guest speaker;
Selnui Kramer and Florence Mescom. event co-chairmen. The Balmoral Com-
munity raises SX00.000 annually for the Combined Jewish Appeal.
California Club Community
Pictured at the Balmoral brunch are Samuel Schwartz. Frexda Schwartz, a
trustee of Women's Diinsion. and Betty Kopelowitz. event chairwoman.
Herb Polow (left), honoree. accepting Chai Award from Chairman Lou Rones.
Federation, May 1987 7


Israel will be celebrating 39 years of independence and the
20th anniversary of the reunification of the city of Jerusalem
after the 1967 Six Day War this year.
In our community, the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, in
cooperation with Miami Dade Community College Wolfson
Campus, will hold a special day long celebration titled .
"Shalom Jerusalem The City of Gold Comes to Miami."
The day-long, family-oriented festival will give participants a
truly Israeli experience.
Join in the fun, on Sunday May 17, 1987, from noon to
5:00 p.m. at 300 N.E. 2nd Avenue in Downtown Miami.
]SKCKiL
\orman Lieberman, Chairman
State Repretentatue Elaine Bloom, Honorary Chairman
The Association
3:30 p.m.
Another Israel
This lively audio-visual presentation
offers a colorful montage of the many
fascinating aspects of Israel today peo-
ple, culture, lifestyles, education.
technological advances in science and
agriculture, plus much more
Hundreds of color slides, shown by 16
projectors on a giant screen, create the
panorama that is Israel, from the coast of
the Mediterranean to the Jordan River,
including the desert and mountains The
introduction shows Israel's location and
size in relation to other countries, as well
as emphasizing the unique combination of
Jews. Arabs and Christians that makes
up Israeli society
Glimpses of Israeli tradition and
customs are accompanied by spirited
This half hour audio-visual spectacular,
which will be shown continuously
throughout the afternoon, will leave all
viewers with the feeling of having taken a
"mini visit'' to the Jewish homeland
One of the most popular aad suc-
cessful bands of the sixties.
"The Association." will perform
at the Israel Independence I)sy
Celebration on Sunday. May 17 at Miami
Dade Community College Wolfson
Campus
The group will perform the hits that
made them famous in the late sixties
Such songs include "Cherish." "Along
Comes Mary." "Six Man Band." and
"Time for LovuT "
Other entertainment will include
Yaffa Yarkoni. a renowned
Israeli songstress who has per-
formed for troops during all of
Israel's wars, and toured throughout five
continents; and Yoel Sharab
charismatic young Sabra (native Israelii
playing guitar, and tambour (orients,
drum I He also performs by playing two
flutes simultaneously
Yaffa Yarkoni
1:00 p.m.
Yoel Sharabi
2:00 p.m.
8 Federation, May 1987


"Shalom Jerusalem The City of Gold Comes to Miami"
Schedule of Events
Opening Ceremonies 12:30 p.m.
Yaffa Yarkoni 1:00 p.m.
This renowned Israeli songstress who
performed for troops during ail of Israel's
wars will perform for the Miami Jewish
community during Israel 39 festivities.
Yoel Sharabi 2:00 p.m.
A charismatic, multi-talented performer.
Sharabi, a Sabra (native Israeli), per-
forms with guitar and tambour. He also
delights audiences by playing two flutes
simultaneously.
The Association 3:30 p.m.
The popular musical group of the 1960's
performs the hits that made them
famous.
Swimwear Fashion Show
The Gideon Oberson line of swimwear.
(recently pictured in "Cosmopolitan"
Magazine) will be featured in a fashion
show modelled by Miss Miami-FIa and
Mis.-, Teen Miami-FIa.
MuKeum in a Box
Three 90-minute programs "transport"
participants to the City of Jerusalem;
allowing them to meet its people, ex-
perience Shabbat preparation in the "Ci-
ty of Gold," and discover the city's
history.
Community Showcase
Israeli dance groups and choirs from local
synagogues will perform on a special com-
munity stage filling the air with the sights
and sounds of Israeli music and dance
throughout the day.
Jerusalem Market (Shouk)
and Art Displays
\ endora of high quality items of Judaica
will display their merchandise for
purchase
Community Expo
Federation's beneficiary agencies, com-
munity agencies, organizations,
synagogues, and youth groups will be in-
vited to participate. The Expo is designed
to show the community the services that
are available to the Greater Miami area.
Fun Factory
An arts and crafts area featuring hands-
on activities for children of all ages will be
organized by the South Dade Jewish
Community Center.
Rides
Favorite amusement rides for youngsters
will be featured at the celebration.
Israeli Foods
Involving local kosher restaurants and
vendors, a "sit down" cafe will be created
during the celebration. All foods will be
under rabbinical supervision.
Sing-along area
Musicians will lead sing-a-longs for the
community in a relaxed, casual, at-
mosphere. Learn new songs and share old
favorites.
Storytelling area
Students and older adults will share
stories of our Jewish heritage in this
special Israel 89 program.
Israeli Dancing
Watch, learn and participate in Israeli
dances throughout the day.
Face painting
Artists will paint the faces of children
throughout the grounds.
3
Am ram Ebgi
In 1969 Amram Ebgi, craftsman and
master printer, came to the United States
from Israel. He has been considered a vi-
sionary whose imagination combines the
warmth of sensitive feelings with light,
and the complexities of life with subtle
structure. He translates these feelings in-
to etchings for all to see. Ebgi has par-
ticipated in many one man shows in New
York, group shows throughout the United
States and Israel, and his works hang in
many of this country's finest art
museums. His etchings have also ap-
peared on the front pages of the
"Washington Post," "World of Art,"
"Israel," "Jewish Times," "The Miami
Herald," and "Decor Magazine;" as well
as holiday cards published by UNICEF,
Hallmark, and on the front covers of
many books.
His popularity has mushroomed in the
years he has lived in the United States.
National and international exhibitions
have taken Ebgi's work from South
America to Israel. He is represented in
Miami. Atlanta. New York, Los Angeles.
Chicago. Michigan, San Francisco,
Australia, Canada, and Israel.
Ebgi and his work will be on displav at
Israel 39.
Parking
A special $2 parking rate will In-
available (courtesy of Miami 1'arking
System) at the following lots: CC, B.
and 1)1) (see map). To receive the
special rate, simply pick up the special
parking coupon at the information
ix>oth when leaving the Israel 39
celebration.
If using the 1)1) parking area, use
Metromover and stop at the College
Station. Metrorail will be operating
every 15 minutes; Metromover. every
2^i minutes. Both transit systems
close at 6:30 p.m.
Bus parking is available. For infor-
mation, call Federation at 576-4000.
ext. 387.
Security will be provided for your
safety.
The festivities are located one block
from Miami's newest edition, Bayside.
Spend the day with us and the night at
Bayside.

Museum in a Box"
One of the events guaranteed to give
participants a deeper understanding of
Jerusalem is "Museum in a Box." This
program, from the Kohl Children's
Museum in Chicago, features a "hands-
on" Jewish educational experience for
adults and children through multi-
sensory, dramatic experiences.
Three unique "Museum in a Box"
programs will be presented. The first is
"Shabbat in Jerusalem," a program
enabling participants to experience
preparations for Shabbat as if in
Jerusalem. Using Israeli money, they will
shop for wine in Mea Shearim, bargain
for flowers in the shouk (market), and
braid dough into challah in a kosher
bakery. They tour Jerusalem, give
tzedakah to a beggar and write a message
at the Kotel. The program culminates in a
gathering at the Wall for kiddusk, a
Shabbat story and singing.
The second program, "Peoples and
Cultures in Jerusalem," will allow
participants to experience the beauty and
reality of Jerusalem's multi-ethnic
character through meeting five of her
citizens: an Eastern European Jew, a
Yemenite Jew. a Moslem Arab, an
Armenian Jew, and a Moroccan Jew.
The participants experience the unique
cultural heritage of each of these
individuals through a folktale, dance or a
craft. Together, they taste representative
foods and experience the beauty of the
multi-ethnicity of Jerusalem through the
medium of song.
The final "Museum in a Box"
presentation will be "Archeology in
Jerusalem." This introduction to the
process of discovering past civilizations
will be a hands-on experience. Beginning
with a guided tour of a replica of the
"dig" south of the Temple Mount,
participants will "excavate" shards to
reconstruct pottery. They will create and
analyze multi-level "tels" (mounds) using
artifacts, and in the process discover
some of the same pitfalls that plague
archeologists Unlay.
Each program lasts for 90 minutes. The
cost to participate in "Museum in a Box"
is $li for adults and $1 lor children.
Admission to the Israeli festival is free.
Each program will be run twice during
the Federation's community-wide
celebration at Miami Dado's Wolfson
Campus located at 300 N.E. 2nd Avenue.
For more information about Israel
Independence Dav call Federation at
576-4000.
Israel 39
sponsored by
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
in cooperation with
in
MIAMI-DADE
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Nunihrr m in Aim-m .i
Volunteers are utill needed to help with
many of the Israel 39 activi,ies. To par-
ticipate contact Fed,. at ion at
576-4000.
Federation, May 1987 9


Foundation honors
Zero Coupon Bond
participants
The Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies will he honoring those people
who have made a commitment to the Zero
Coupon Bond Program at its next Board
of Trustees meeting on May 18. Those
honored will be:
David Ben Gurion Million Dollar
Society
Morris Futernick. Donald E Lefton.
Sidney Olson. Bess and Louis Stein,
Robert Traung. Philip T Warren. Harold
and Fay Zinn
Benefactor
Irving Frankel
Patron
Barbara Friedson. Herman and IX>ra
Gaba. Martin Kalb. Joel Karp. Leroy and
Shirley Raffel. Forest B. Raffel Family.
Allan Yarkin. and Norma and Allan
Wilson.
According to Philip T. Warren, chair-
man of the Foundation's Zero Coupon
Bond Committee, "By contributing a
minimum gift of $10,000 a year for five
years, an individual would be able to pro-
duce an asset of one million dollars as a
legacy to the future of the Jewish com-
munity with the funds that would be
generated over a 25 to 30 year period."
He went on to explain the other
categories of giving: Benefactor, which is
$5,000 a year for five years resulting in a
total gift of $500,000; and Patron. $2,500
per year for five years would generate
$250,000 over three decades.
JVS Nutritional
Project receives
award
The Jewish Vocational Service Nutri-
tional Project has been cited by the
American Legion. Department of Florida
for the second consecutive year as having
"exemplary service in employment of the
older worker." The Nutritional Project
was recognized for its outstanding record
of employment of older workers, and war
veterans in particular Many of JVS'
older workers deliver meals to home-
bound seniors, serve meals at one of
seven congregate meal sites, or provide
entertainment and education to the
Nutritional Project participants.
The Certificate was recently awarded
as a result of the project's entry in the
"National Employ The Older Worker
Week Citation Award" program by the
American Legion. JVS is honored by this
distinguished award, as are all of the
older workers employed by the Nutri-
tional Project.
JVS is a beneficiary agency of the Com-
bined Jewish Appeal.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and
Jewish Vocational Sennet Partner*
in a caring community
r
Safety and housing research for the elderly
Whether or not a frail elderly
person can live independently
may depend largely upon his or
her environment The Human
Factors Analysis Project at the Stein
Gerontologies] Institute (SCI), a division
of the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged, has been studying the role
the environment plays in continued
independence
Now thanks to a grant from the
Florida Department of Community Af-
fairs' Comprehensive Elderly Housing In
itiative Project (CEHIP), the SGI is
publishing their findings in the form of
two brochure*. The first, entitled
independent Living for Older Adults:
Creating A Safe Environment In Your
Home." is geared toward the elderly
consumer
"This consumer guide was prepared as
part of a research project designed to
bridge the gap between the structural
aspects of today's housing and the
capacities of older adults.'' noted
MJHHA Associate Executive Director
Elliot Stern. "With a few adaptations, a
physical environment can be created that
is sensitive to the diminished abilities of
the elderly, allowing them to live as in
dependency as possible in their own
homes."
The brochure focuses on five areas of
the home that often present problems for
elderly occupants kitchen, bathroom,
stairways, security systems and electrical
systems. In addition to "helpful hints,"
S(il researchers have included speciftf
tions for change that will make a home
safer and more accessible, such SJ
Cabinet handle* not below IH" from
the floor or higher than 60".
I se pegboards to store pot* and pan:
I m lecei rather than circular faucet
handle*.
Install toilet* or bathtub* with non-
slip surface* or line with non-slip
matting.
I se reacher-stick* to get lightweight
objects.
"We cannot stress sufficiently the im
portance of preventing accidents in the
home." continued Stern. "Accidents rank
as the fifth leading cause of death among
older adults. In fact, about 25.000 elders
die each year and more than 80UH0 suf
fer disabling injuries as a result of
accidents."
The second brochure to come out of this
grant is entitled "An Architect's Guide
For Building Age-Independent Homes:
Specifications For Maximizing Func-
tional Living For The Elderly "
Today, it is possible to build or
remodel homes that are sensitive
to age-related changes with little
or no more effort or cost than is
usual. New homes can fit the need!
older adults by incorporating certain
features that will mak. tne
long-term ability of oid.' idults I
independently
By adhering to the specil
SGI brochure, builder-
take an important step ti ensurt es
function for the elder-,
while reducing the risk of a
Not only is this a humai is!
towaid environmental design it is
good business." noted SHI Sei -
Research Scientist Dr Sara Czajs The
increased housing consciousness and the
solid purchasing power of the elderly con-
sumer group will generate a tremendous
market in the future for age-independent
housing "
To obtain copies of either brochure,
contact the Stein Gerontologies! Institute
at 576-9021.
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged is a beneficiary of the Com-
bined Jewish Appeal
lirrater Miami Jewish Federation sad
MJHHA Partner! in a cunng
cirmmunity.
South Dade JCC
names
co-chairmen
Developer Michael M. Adler and his
wife. Judy; and Seth Werner, president of
Werner Capital Corporation, have been
named capital fund campaign co-
chairmen of the new Dave and Mary
Alper Jewish Community Center, in
South Dade. The Adlers and Werner will
join Morris and Mikki Futernick in this
capacity.
Long time supporters of the Communi-
ty Center idea, the new co-chairmen will
be assisting with the campaign fund
development in order to facilitate the new
community center, located on a 21-acre,
lakeside site on SW 112th Ave.. and
112th St
The facility will house a fitness center,
child care nursery, theatre, library and
much more, making it a first-class, full-
service Jewish Community Center facility
for the residents of Miami.
The South Dade Jewish Community
Center is a beneficiary of the Combined
Jewish Appeal.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and
the South Dade Jewish Community Center
. Partners in a caring community.
Jewish Community Leadership
Retreat to be held in June
The first Jewish Community Leader-
ship Retreat will convene during the
weekend of June 5-7, at the Hyatt Palm
Beaches in West Palm Beach. Florida. In
attendance will be representatives from
over 150 of the major Jewish organiza
tions. institutions, and synagogues in the
Greater Miami area. The Jewish Com-
munity Leadership Retreat is being con-
ducted under the auspices of the Bob
Russell Community Retreat Center.
Charles T renter, chairman of the
Jewish Community Leadership Retreat,
in announcing the date stated. "This is
truly an historic event. For the first time,
leaders of the major Jewish organizations
in Greater Miami will have the opportuni-
ty to sit down with their peers and begin
to discuss the challenges and issues facing
our community as we approach the year
2.000."
The theme for the retreat is "Creating
a community agenda organizational
responses to the concept of community
building." Other topics which will be
covered during the weekend will include
discussions concerning how to reach the
marginally involved leadership, and
leadership development, which includes
training and continuity.
Norman Lipoff. chairman of the Bob
Russell Community Retreat Center, said,
"The Center is the ideal organization to
sponsor this exciting retreat. In the
future we hope to enable Jewish organiza-
tions and institutions to conduct their
own retreats both at a reasonable price,
and with little or no worries. Through our
director. Miles Bunder, and the Central
Agency for Jewish Education we can do
everything from planning the details of
registration and scheduling to the more
intricate details of planning the actual
programming and thematic discussions.
r
Mount Sinai
conducts asthma
research
The Pulmonarv Department at
Mount Sinai Medical Center is
looking for volunteers to
participate in the research study o!
a new asthma medicine
Participants must be 1M>5 years
old, nonsmokers and currently on
medication.
Those who qualify, will be
financially compensated. >
interested, please call Suzan
Monday Friday. 9 am 4 p.m..
674-2610
Mount Sina. Medical ('enter
beneficiary of The Combined
Jewish Appeal.
Greater Miami J**i
Federation and Mount 8*
Medical Center Partners
caring community.

10 Federation, May 1987


CRC issues guidelines on South Africa
In response to the extensive public
debate on relations between Israel and
South Africa, Jeffrey Berkowitz. chair-
man of Federation's Community Rela-
tions Committee and Dr. Douglas Miller,
chairman of the CRC'l Middle East and
Foreign Jewry Committee recently
is.iK' issues, extracts of which are reprinted
I*!..*
Israel's Position on Apartheid
Israel has maintained a strong and
v>cal opposition to apartheid which is
(insistent with the moral principles of
Judaism. Israel has been a leading ad-
ocate of the African fight against apar-
theid at the I'nited Nations, and has con-
stantly cast its vote against the in-
erests i if South Africa and has specifical-
\ condemned apartheid.
Trade between Israel and South Africa
There arc rumors that suggest Israel is
major commercial trading partner with
fciuth Africa. These rumors are far from
he truth The International Monetary
tad (I M.F.) statistics for 1984 (the
Itest available) show that Israel's trade
th South Africa amounts to less than
DC ha!:' of one percent (0.5 percent) of
B>>uth Africa's exports, and three
uartera of one percent (0.75 percent) of
r imports
Much speculation exists concerning
di if weapons to South Africa
a cursory glance at the 1986
ok of the authoritative Interna-
Vtitute of Strategic Studies and
iments show that nearly the en
S ith African arsenal is of French.
r British origin and support
m that her weaponry Bales to
a are insignificant.
In a modern era in which countries are
brought closer together by modern
technology and communications, and
economic ties often transcend govern
mental ones, many countries find
themselves trading with states whose
governments they oppose politically. For
example, no two philosophies of life could
l>e more different than those of the
I'nited States and the Soviet Union, yet
trade and cultural exchanges between
these two nations goes on every day. It is
the normal state of international rela-
tions. Therefore, it should not be surpris-
ing that Israel, with its historical sen-
sitivity to persecution and prejudice, and
Black African countries with fresh
memories of colonial white rule, continue
to have trade relations with South Africa.
South African Jewish Response
to Apartheid
The South African Jewish community
numbers 120.000 out of a white popula-
tion of 4.8 million. There are 22 million
blacks in South Africa. Approximately
sixty percent of whites regularly involved
in anti-apartheid activity in South Africa
and as many as fifty percent of the whites
arrested for protesting apartheid are
Jewish.
The South African Jewish community
has found itself caught in a difficult
political position between extreme
elements of the right and left. Some on
the left call for the end of apartheid but
are also extremely critical of Israel. Some
on the right are intolerant of any reform
of apartheid and have made anti Semitic
threats, complete with Nazi-like over
tones against South African Jewry.
Despite these constraints, the South
African Jewish Board of Deputies has
taken an unequivocal stand against apar
theid. calling for the "removal of all pro-
visions in the laws of South Africa which
discriminate on the grounds of color and
race
The American Jewish Community's
Position on Apartheid
The American Jewish community has a
longstanding policy against apartheid.
The National Jewish Community Rela-
tions Advisory Council (NJCRAC), which
is the umbrella organization for 11 na-
tional Jewish agencies and 113 Jewish
communities, including our own. has
spoken out repeatedly, highlighting
"unanimous and total denunciation of
apartheid as repugnant to Jewish tradi-
tion and incompatible with the commit-
ment of the Jewish community relations
field to equality and equal justice without
regard to race, religion, nationality, or
sex." This stance reflects the overwhelm-
ing sentiments of Jews throughout the
world. In 1985, 1986. and again in 1987.
the NJCRAC has declared the battle
against apartheid to be one of its top
priorities calling for Jewish communal in-
stitutions to divest their portfolios of in-
vestments in companies which do not
comply with the Sullivan principles.
NJCRAC! has also lobbied for the
Kennedy-Cray Bill of 1985 and the Anti-
Apartheid Act of 1986.
Locally, the Creater Miami Jewish
Federation's Community Relations Com-
mittee issued one of the early declara-
tions condemning apartheid and has been
active in pushing for the passage of anti
apartheid legislation.
Allegations of anti-Semitic remarks
by Archbishop Tutu proven false
Anti Semitic remarks have been
attributed to South African Archbishop
Desmond Tutu by the media, with
particular reference to a meeting with the
Jewish Board of Deputies in South Africa
in 1984. The Community Relations
Ummittee (CRC) of Federation has
obtained information concerning the
matter which prove the allegations to be
false.
Aleck Goldberg, executive director of
Jhe South African Jewish Board of
deputies, among others, has stated that
allegations are "apparently a right-
*"> smear campaign against Archbisop
'utu and are completely unfounded."
A number of sources have continued to
ndicate that the Archbishop told the
Board of Deputies in 1984. "In terms of
the New Testament, the Jews must
suffer. Therefore, we will put that
philosophy into practice if we are to be in
charge. The Jews are the biggest
exploiters of the Blacks, so they must
suffer. There will be no sympathy for the
Jews when the Blacks take over."
Goldberg has described the reports as
distorted, inaccurate and untrue,
indicating that Archbishop Tutu did not
address the Jewish Board of Deputies in
1984, the date of the alleged anti-Semitic
remarks. "He did, in fact, address our
organization in 1986 but he did not make
any of the comments attributed to him in
a number of public sources, some of which
originated in the United States. The
meeting, which was held last June, was
cordial, which would not have been
possible if Archbishop Tutu were anti-
Semitic," he added.
In a statement issued recently by
Archbishop Tutu, he indicated that the
office of the Archbisop has no knowledge
of the 1984 meeting with the Jewish
Board of Deputies. "In fact" the
statement went on to say, "no such
meeting took place. These are outrageous
lies. It looks like an orchestrated
endeavor to discredit our relationship
with the Jewish community of South
Africa."
Concern expressed
over regulations
on advocacy
activities
In a letter to Commissioner Lawrence
Gibbs of the Internal Revenue Service in
Washington, D.C., Federation's
Community Relations Committee
expressed deep concern about the
proposed regulations related to advocacy
activities by non-profit organizations.
The letter, signed by Jeffrey
Berkowitz. chairman of the Community
Relations Committee and Nan Rich,
chairwoman of CRC's Domestic Concerns
Committee, stated that "the proposed
rules are contrary to the intent of the Tax
Reform Act of 1976. an act with the
purpose of encouraging voluntary
organizations to participate in the open
discussion of public policy issues." The
letter went on to state that the
regulations would "severely limit the
rights of the voluntary sector
organizations from communicating with
public officials and even their own
memberships on important issues. .
limiting these agencies from engaging in
analysis and research on these issues, as
they expand in an imprecise manner the
definition of lobbying."
The letter urgently requested that most
proposed regulations be withdrawn and
that a committee be appointed which will
include representatives of the "voluntary
sector," to draft new regulations that will
"truly respond" to the spirit of the Tax
Reform Act of 1976 and result in an
"expanded participation on public policy
issues by the voluntary sector, rather
than the restrictive situation now
proposed.
"The proposed regulations raise more
serious concerns for voluntary
organizations both in the Jewish and
general communities." said Berkowitz.
"They would impair the ability of
organizations to communicate with
members of Congress, state legislators
and other public officials and even their
own memberships on important matters.
We certainly hope that the proposed
regulations will be withdrawn and
redone." added Rich.
Federation, May 1987 11


"Tree of Life"
promotes messages
of Judaism
Beginning this month, Rabbi Joseph
Langner will be taking his message of
Judaism to the air, with his half hour
"Tree of Life" programs. Each half hour
telecast begins with a 15 minute segment
highlighting a social or religious issue
such as loneliness, drug abuse, retirement
and other topics of concern. The final
portion of the program is called. "Ask the
Rabbi" in which Rabbi Langner answers
religious questions from letters sent to
him by the program's viewers.
The program is patterned partly after
"Donahue" and "Ask Dr. Ruth" with
studio guests and audience participation.
Rabbi Langner's program has been
seen throughout most of Palm Beach and
Broward County. JFTV will begin airing
the show this month for Dade County
residents.
The half hour program will have a
spiritual purpose according to Rabbi
Langner. It is his hope that the program
will reach the unaffiliated Jews and
"stem the tide" of assimilation and
intermarriage in the Jewish community.
"Christians have been spreading their
religious messages successfully for the
past 30 years. Why shouldn't we do it?"
said Langner.
JFTV will telecast episodes of "Tree of
Life" on Tuesdays at 6:30 p.m. and
Thursdays at 7:30 p.m.
JFTV welcomes
new board members
JFTV welcomes the following new board
members:
Ronald Krongold
Krongold and Bass. P.A.
Jay Gamberg
Krongold and Bass. P.A.
Daniel E. Gold
Knight Ridder Broadcasting Inc.
Pauline Winick
Pauline Winick and Associates. Inc.
Myron M. Samole. Esq.
President, Florida Citrus Tower
Mark Wolin
Law Offices of Herbert W Virgen III
Ester Smith
Travel Express
Martin Kalb
Greenberg. Traurig. Askew. Hoffman.
Lipoff, Rosen and Quentel
Samuel Dubbin
Steel, Hector and Davis
Marvin Kurzban
Kurzban, Kurzban, Weingrad and
Holtsberg
Anita Robriah
Check-Up
Mount Sinai
Check-Up/Mount Sinai with Lila Heat
ter, past president and honorary chair-
woman of the board of trustees for Mount
Sinai Medical Center, can be seen on
JFTV every Monday and Thursday at
5:30 p.m. and Saturday at 6:00 p.m. Each
month the program features an infor-
mative discussion on the latest in
medicine.
May 4 Internal Medicine
Dr. Fred Roaenbioom
May 11 Gastroenterology
Dr. Jamie Barkin
May 18 Intensive Care
Cathy Johnson. R.N.
May 25 Pediatrics
Dr. Howard Engle
Jt
Watch'Tree of Life
with Rabbi Joseph Langner
A half-hour program with audience participation on
topics of Jewish customs, laws and social issues
Tuesdays at 6:30 p.m. and Thursdays at 7:30 p.m.
PROGRAMMING SCHEDULE MAY 1987
Tim* Monday Tuoaday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
5:00 Eenie's Kitchen A Aieph Eentes Kitchen B Aieph Film Special Kaleidoscope 1 ow ilk .K | '.'
5:30 p.m. Cneck-Up/ Mount Smai Jewish TV National Magazine (Ma, : 4J6I Film Special (Ma, S& '9i Hello Jerusalem turn ID Check-Up/ Mount Snai Encounter Eenie s -en B
6:00 p.m. We Remember The Holocaust Film Special Encounter Een>e s Kitchen A Check-Up. Mount Snai Remember
JFTV Bulletin Board i.
5:30 p.m. Sun Small Voice or Viewpoint 'Tree o' Lite Jerusalem Cate Teen Scene Jerusalem Cate President s Comer
Fede'aton Today
7:00 p.m. P'esident's Corner Jewish Television Network Specials f (. A 1 a SMI Smaii Voice Of Viewpoint Hello Jem .i .. 11 i H Jewish TV Na' Maga."I v -. 1 M.. -
Federation Today "
7:30 p.m. I ; ow mith '' Kaidd : Pre : Jew '.'.-. i
Federal i To.: II :
Watch JFTV on Your Local Cable System
Sto" '.-.: Cnanrx
Storer (South Dadel Cna< > ':
Harte-ManKS Cnanm Ajeipr-a ( I
JFTV directs
video for JCC
The South Dade Jewish Community
Center opened its fund-raising campaign
for the new Dave and Mary Alper Jewish
Community Center in South Dade with a
promotional video.
The video, produced by Ev Clay
Associates, Inc. and directed by Jewish
Federation Television, used volunteer ac-
tors from the JCC for the various scenes.
Developed from the "Build the Dream"
theme of the new center, the video shows
a family at a Friday night dinner. Each
member then looks through the communi-
ty center brochure and "dreams" about
what the new center will mean to them
personally.
"We hope the video conveys how impor-
tant this center is to the South Dade
Jewish community. We need a focal point
for our community and the center will
provide that," said Ed Rosen, director of
the South Dade Jewish Community
Center.
Mikki Futernick. capital fund campaign
co-chairwoman, hopes the video "will get
other people dreaming about what the
center can do for them and how it is not
just a luxury, but a necessity for our
community."
"Teen Scene" receives letter from
Israeli Consulate
Randi Adler and Helene Leibowitz, the
producers and hosts of JFTV's popular
"Teen Scene" television program recent
ly received a letter from Robert Seitz,
with the Israeli Consulate.
The letter referred to the appearance
on "Teen Scene" of Nir Einan and Ariela
Eshed. both aged 16. from the State of
Israel. They were in Miami recently as
part of the Israeli Youth Delegation
program.
On the television program, the youths
discussed the similarities and differences
between American and Israeli teenager*
and talked about their stay
American "host" families.
"The media is ever so important to i
project such as this, and I am glad *e
the opportunity to work together W
dissemination of information aboutu*
kids" visit was furthered by your progrwi
("Teen Scene"). I began recemngj
quines for next year from new pownnj
host families interested in W^T
Youth Delegation Program after
broadcast." stated Seitt.
Jewish Federation Television invites
all agencies to make aae of its facilities
to create a quality promotional video.
12 FtUratwn, May 1987


A message from G.A. Chair Nancy Lipoff
Nancy Lipoff
Chair
1987 General Assembly
Dear Friend:
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation will host the 56th annual Council
of Jewish Federation's General Assembly, November 17-22. 1987. More
than 3.500 Jewish leaders from across the United States and Canada are
expected to attend the six days of meetings, seminars, workshops and
special receptions. We need your help in order to make this tremendous
undertaking a success..
There are many vital services which must be provided. Such jobs in-
clude working at the message and information centers and welcome desk,
meeting and greeting the guests, acting as hosts and hostesses in the
hospitality lounges, monitoring the set up of the meeting rooms, and work-
ing in the gift shop.
All those who volunteer their time will l>e allowed to participate in one
day's sessions at the G.A. free of charge. This is our wav of expressing ap-
preciation for their help in making the General Assembly a success.
Please call Miriam Zatinsky at Federation. 576-4000. ext. 215. for infor-
mation on how you can become involved or return the application below.
Cordially,
Nancy Lipoff
Chair
1987 General Assembly
Volunteer for the General Assembly
CJF GENERAL ASSEMBLY-NOVEMBER 17-22.1987
VOLUNTEER REGISTRATION
NAME
PHONE (H|
(B)
ADDRESS
_____ ORGANIZATION
Please check the time day and volunteer job preference (indicate 1 st. 2nd. 3rd choice) IF YOU
WISH TO WORK MORE THAN ONE DAY. OR AN ADDITIONAL SESSION, please indicate this on
the form
VOLUNTEER JOB
Information, Welcome Desk
Message Center
Meeting Monitors
Meeters & Greeters
Delegates Lounge
Reception Hosts
Gift Shop
Kits (Sunday. Nov 15
10:00 AM-5O0 PM)
TIME & DAY AM PM
7:30-10 00 9 30-12:00 1130-200 130-4 00 3 30-600 6 00-9 00
Tues 11 17
Wed 11 18
Thurs1119
Fn11 20
Sat 11 21
SPECIAL SKILLS
Sales______
Foreign Language
Spanish ____
French ______
Hebrew ______
Return Registration
Form to
GA-GMJF
4200 Biscayne Brvd
Miami. Florida 33137
Federation, May 1987 12


Thanks to a Caring Community:
Federation salutes its Super Sunday volunteers
Leslie Abady
David Abramowltz
Rachel Abramowltz
Bella Adin
Elrat Afek
Sari Agaston
Lm Alkao
Robert Albert
Arnold Altman
Michael Ames
Helen Amster
Annie Anchel
William Anchel
Leal Apple
Adlna Applebaum
Herman Applebaum
Judy Applesteln
Merlin Artty
Melvln Armltage
Kevin AronoH
Barbara Aronson
Steve Aronson
Rose Astrov
Jack Atkin
Jeasie Auster
nine Ausubel
Miriam Avick
Sophie Bach
Sam Badanea
Harold Ballyn
Lillian Baker
Robert Band
Mark Baranek
Ban B Barg
Suzanne Barbey
Eunice Baros
Jim Beros
Gwen Barry
Arthur Baaaett
Bern ice Baaa
Jill Baaaett
Judith Bat-Moshe
Cindy Baum
Edith Baum
Qtorta Baum
Mark Baum
Murray Baum
Rachel Baum
Aiin E. Becker
Melvln Becker
Lydia M. Beechler
Becky Ben**
Michael Bebar
RoeieBehar
Seby Behar
Vicky Behar
ZevBertcnman
Isaac Bekerman
Stacey Barter
Sandy Belklnd
Lisa Belklnd
Jack Bellock
Leonard Belstock
Hilda Bennett
Scot Bennett
Jack Ben-Ezra
Betty Bergii
Berts Berezdlvtn
Isaac Berezdhrtn
Adolph J Berger
Oaill Berger
Shirley Bergman
Rose Berkelhammer
Shirley Berko
Beatrice Berkowitz
Maureen Berkowitz
Paul Berkowitz
Richard Berkowitz
Stepante Berman
Gladys Bernat
Haskeli M Bemat
Jack Berne
Helen Berne
Harry Bernstein
Pearl Bernstein
Richard Bernstein
Ray Bernn
Roslyn Bernn
Bertha Bertman
Shirley Berzin
Michel Besso
Jane Blaliiew
Judi Biliig
Jacobo Siniackonski
Freida Bitten
Barbara C Black
ion Black
Margie Blasberg
Cindy Blaustein
Eugene Bloom
Elaine Bloom
Joan Bloom
Stacy Blum
David Blumenthai
Randi Blumenthai
JeroM Blumsteln
Andrew Boioskey
Clara Bomze
Nathan Bomze
Gary J Bomzer
Thomas A Borln
Anahei Borzykowaki
Jeriryn Boshnick
Marsha Botkm
Sharon Brafman
Zack Bramnick
Ruth Braun
May Braunstein
Richard Braverman
Ellen Brazer
Melvln Brazer
Ann Bretztelder
Kimberty Brett
Ruth Brief
Lorraine Brod
Bradley Brodie
Charlotte Brodie
Sidney Brodie
David Brock
Jon I Weiss Brooks
Alvin Lloyd Brown
Bert Brown
Michael B Brown
Sylvia G Brown
Herman Bruckner
Stephen Bunder
Jodi Budin
Barry Burak
Ruth Burke
George Bursteln
Freda Buratyn
Karen Burstyn
Vicky Busch
Gylian S Cahn
Robert L Cahn
Maximella Camerman
Herbert Canarick
Hazel Canarick
Irving Canner
Fem Canter
Sherman Canter
Sandy Cantor
Steven Cantor
Martha Cardona
Laz Carrandl
Mriis Caapi
Thelma Casselhott
Jerome Catz
Mitzi Center
Lillian Chabner
Debora Chemerlnski
Brenda Chemton
Jeremy Cheatler
Cart Cheatler
Judith Cheatler
Palo Chyzih
Saul Ctmbter
Beatrice Cohen
Judy Cohen
Lame Cohen
Lily S. Cohen
Lonny Cohen
Mae Cohen
Nurtt Cohen
Oscar Cohen
Ted Cohen
Charles Colbert
Lane Coleman
Cliff Colman
Anne Cotton
Mi mi Cooper man
Marc Cordover
Albert Costales
Eugenia Credi
JoaeCredi
Jennifer Crlatai
Sylvia Croweli
Donna Cutler
Jeff Cynamon
Hazel Decks
Brian Daniels
Deede Darnell
Sarah Davidoff
Leonard H Davidson
Robin Davidson
Henry E Davis
Joel Davis
Erez Dayan
Amy Dean
Trudl Degrazia
Eddy Deitch
Betty Sue Dekro
Ted M Deland. Jr
Mathilda Demayo
Sophie Demayo
Dorian Denburg
Susi Denerotf
Carol Deprlmo
Esther Dermer
Mitchell Dernis
Irving Diamond
Ruben Doom
Mrs Rubin Doom
Lillian Dorlson
Joseph Douglas
Lillian Drimmer
Nora Driver
Chaim Dromi
Steven Dubbin
Jeffrey Ducker
Alice Durst
Fred Durst
Sherry Dweck
Herman J Eaton
Jamie Edelstein
Lenny Edelstein
Thelma Edward
Anita Eiaenberg
Cheryl Elbrsnd
Mr* Larry Elbrand
Stanley Elbrand
Gail Engeiman
Carol Engler
Josephine Epeibaum
Sholom Epeibaum
Bonnie Epstein
George Erenburg
Marsha Fagin
Joe Falk
Michelle Falk
Edwin Farber
liana Farkas
Marshall Farkas
Helen Feder
Paul Feigenblum
Eric Feller
Barbara Feingoid
Lawren Feingoid
WMma Feider
Arlene Feldman
Donald Feldman
Herman Feldman
Joseph Feller
Candy Felton
Rachael Fersing
Phyllis Ferber
Roberto Fifn
Herbert Fields
Faith Film
Carol F Fine
Jerald A Fine
Lillian Fine
Martin Fine
Pat Fine
Shirley Flnkel
Neal Finkelstein
Pennie Flsch
Michael Fischer
Isaac Fisher
Janet Fisher
Ron Fisher
Nettie Fishman
Albert Fits
Sidney Gersteln
Celeste Gersten
Lillian Gartner
Estabell H Gettis
Arnold Gltten
Becky Ghen
Robin Ginsberg
Miriam Glnzburg
Lisa Gitten
Jeannette Gladston
Kim Giaser
Howard H Glass
Fanny Glasser
Marvin Giassman
Mark Glauser
Mary Click
Stacy Glickman
Esther Gllcken
Irving Gllcken
Maurico Gluck
Jennie Glinsky
Esther Gold
Louis Gold
Andrea Goldberg
Helen Goldberg
Sandra Goldberg
Louis Goldberg
Mrs Saul Goldberg
Alfred Golden
Glenne Golden
Norman Golden
Anna Goldenberg
Esther Greenspan
Eugene Greenspan
Betty Greenspan
Gene Greenzweig
Daren Grossman
Lillian Gruber
Jennifer Grundl
Morris Guberman
Ruben Gufoich
Annie Gyory
Milton K Hahn
Alexis Haime
Mark Hanson
Marilyn Hark
Pamela Hamick
Gail Harris
Phyllis Harte
Samuel Harte
Martin Haskeli
Mollie Haul
Leonard Hayet
Charlotte Held
Charles Held
Jonathan Heller
Sherri Heller
Burt Hellman
Debbie Hellman
Phyllys Henann
Joy Henry
Jose Heres
Mrs Jose Heres
Irene Hernendez
Eric Kaplan
Robert A Kaplan
Ruth B Kaplan
Sol Kaplan
Sharon Karlor
Fern Kams
Phil Karp
Gertrude Kartzmer
Mel Kartzmer
Barbara Kasper
Martin Kasper
Salomon Kassim Tesone
Yvette Kassin
Terry Kates
Robert Kassim
Ezra Katz
Jack Katz
Lillian Katz
Margaret Katzen
Jack Kaufman
Noam Kedem
Harnette Kedes
Nelson Keshen
Ida Kesseiman
Ehaz Kiflr
Shepard King
Morris Kipper
Ethelda Kirsh
Goidie Klein
Lee Klein
Peter Klem
Some Klein
Alice Lazarus
Mlndy Leberman
June Lebovitz
Luba Lecher
Ann Lechowltz
Joann Lederman
Beverly Lefcourt
Jeffrey Lefcourt
Don Left on
Rosalind Lehrman
Aiissa Leiberman
Ira Leichuk
Sylvia Lencz
Sandor Lenner
Elaine Leon
Irene Leon
Jey Leshaw
Shelley Levan
Barney Levandov
Martha Levandov
Fred Levin
Helen Levin
Joel Levin
Edward Levine
Jack H Levine
Jeffrey M Levine
Lillian Levine
Susans Levine
Terry Levine
Shirley Leviaon
Lottie Levitt
Shoshana Levitz
>S^:-:w*:*:*:*:v:-:*:*:w^^^
1987 Super Sunday
I
Saby Behar, Chairman
Judi Biliig Paul Berkowitz
Richard Berkowitz Ellen Rose
Vice Chairmen
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Combined Jewish Appeal
Donald E. Lefton, 1987 General Campaign Chairman
Aaron Podhurst
President
Myron J. Brodie
Executive Vice President
Thanks to those who
donated goods and services to Super Sunday
Carribean Radio
Carnival Fruit Co.
Hi-Grade Food
Henry Lee Co.
To-Fitness Inc
Churchill Coffee
Entenmann's Bakery of Miami
Bagel Bar
Foodcrafters
Specs Music and Tapes
A and B Bakery Supply
and Equipment Co.
West Indies Fruit Company
Jordan Marsh
Arnold's Bakery
Jewish Vocational Service
Tinted Beef
Croup Three Creneral Contractors
Israel Tourist Office
tnwnmann s naxery 01 miami :>
Michael Fitell
Jeffrey S. Fleisher
Mindy Flerssig
Theresae Floyd
Ben Fogel
Lewis Fogel
Yvett Fogel
Mmdi Lea Forer
Rose Forman
K Forseter
Sylvia Forseter
Joyce Foy
Steven j Fo
Jon Franck
Demse Frank
Jackie Frankel
Jill Franklin
Benjamin Jay Freedmar
Esta Friedman
Ronald Friedman
Ada Friedman
Lawrence Feingoid
Adrienne Fnehner
Jonathan Frieze
Sharon Frieze
Mitchell Fuerst
Jacqueline Fund
Lawrence Fuller
Mikki Futernlck
Morris Futernick
Jay Gamberg
Charles Ganz
Lee Gardner
Moe Gardner
Gary Garson
Mat Gatof
Fran Levey Gayor
Jonathan Geiger
Russell Geiger
Susan Geiger
Gladys Geib
Irving Goidfried
Don Goldman
Ida Goldman
M L Goldman
Reuben Goldman
Mrs Reuben Goldman
Shai Goldrat
Roland Goldsmith
Sylvia Goldsmith
David Goldstein
Doris Goldstein
Eva Goldstein
Harvey Goldstein
Loo Goldstein
Perpy Goldstein
Richard Goldstein
Rose Goldstein
Belle Goidstnch
Jack Goidstnch
Joan Goidwasser
David Goidweitz
Myna Golos
Tarni Golos
Bella Golub
Sol GoluD
Martin Goodman
Sidney J Goodman
Morton Gooze
Andrew Gordon
Jason Gordon
Mark Gordon
Edward Gorfinkel
Tracy E Gordon
Pauline Gothelf
Jeff Gothelf
Jeff Granoff
Ada Green
Billy Green
Dany Green
Freida Greenbaum
Michael Greenbaum
Regina Greenhill
David Herschteld
Mary Her.-
Ralph Herz
Harris Heyman
John Hill
Monica Hill
Mickey Hochberg
Linda Hoffman
Susan Hoffman
Kenneth Hoffman
Alma Hotstadter
Newton Hotstadter
Dara Holop
Alice Holtzman
Gary Y Holtzman
Michael R Hoiub
Marione Homstein
Roberta Chiprut Hulce
Clara nias
Ruth A Immermen
Zena Inden
Bobbie Indig
Honey Jackson
Dan Jacobs
Richard Jacobs
Geoff Jacoby
Leah S Jaffa
Ruth Jankowitz
Artean Jenks
Frances Johnson
Alex Joseph
Paula Joseph
Gen rude Kabak
Paul Kade
Mrs Richard Kahn
Helen Kalstone
Harold Kaiser
Judy Kaminsky
Rose Kammer
Atara Kane
Betty Kaplan
Judy Kligler
Ken Klieman
Alan Kluger
Isaac Knoll
Esteiie Kopcaks
Rebecca Kopowsky
Craig Kolman
Ruth Korenvaes
Rene Korn
Ann Korros
David Korros
Linda Kotkin
Mike Kovack
Brian Kovler
Florence Kraft
Mark Kram
Elaine Kramer
Ida Kramer
Andren Krantz
Ruth Krantz
Pauline Krauss
Alan Krlnzman
Sally Krone
Ronnie KrongreeO
Sebastian Krys
Sylvia Kuller
Dina Kuperman
Robi Kutun
Steven Kwartm
Nadlne Laham
Henry Landy
Sandy Landy
Luis Lang
Solomon Lanster
Amende Larkin
Elyse Larkin
Jeremy S Larkin
Edward Lasoff
Marva Lasoff
Irene Lasso
Al Lazarus
Andrea Levy
Gertrude Levy
Harry A Hap' Levy
Herschel G Levy
Mrs Herschel G Levy
Joel Levy
Joel M Levy
Karen Levy
Arthur Leyton
Bertha Leyton
Requel Biid Libbm
Jerry Llbbin
Freida Liberman
Ann Liebowitz
Natalie Liebman
Feiiea Lindner
Edith R Linn
Mildred Linaky
Annette Lrpko
Ann Lipoff
Nancy Lipoff
Norman H Lipoff
Max Lipschitz
Ronnie Litz
Harriet Lodin
Bea Loewenthai
Mary Logludice
Mark Lomaakin
Merel Lorlng
Frances Luain
Yacob Lubm
Nestor Lubowitz
Louis Lytton
Arden Magoon
Robert Maland
Emil Mann
Rene Mann
Ceil Mansker
Mrs Lesley Marchand
Sherrle Marcus
John Margolia
Lester Margolls
Shirley Margolls
Bonnie Marks
Dorothy Marks
Joel Marks
Suzanne Marks
Ruth Marmorstein
Manuel Marguez
Melissa Marvan
Hilton Marwell
Pearl Marwell
Julia Mash
Jennifer Mallow
Adam May
Leann Mayers
Mark Mayrsohn
Mireille Mechoullam
Ins Medvm
Barbara Menachem
Bertha Mendeison
Morris Meneghe
Ann Merlin
Robert J Merlin
Madelyn Merntt
Rosalind Merntt
Florence Mescon
Tim Mescon
Josh Messe'
Adrienne Messing
Steve Messing
Michelle Metsch
Gail Meyers
Bernard Micheison
Estelle Micheison
Max Micheison
Mrs Zammy Migdal
Leslie Mllberg
Edith Miiien
Arnold Miller
Cindy Miller
Douglas J Miller
Elaine Miller
Marti Miller
Nancy Miller
Linda Mlnkes
Beniamln Mlntz
Mazal Mlsaika
Ida Mitauer
Marti Mitauer
Florence Mohr
Pamela Molina Martin
Lois H Mondies
Jorge Mor Dukovlch
Saul Morgan
Ethelyne Morris
Alan Morrison
Joan Morrison
Rosalind Morrltt
Judy Moses
Henry J Mott
Beverty Muskat
Merced Neva
Jay Neross
Sidney Neross
Hannah Neuman
Jay Neuteia
Judy Neufeid
Joy Newberger
Gail Newman
Jeff Newman
Robert Newman
Neii Nieberg
Mindy Nlssenberg
Michael Novack
Susan Eckstein Novak
Dorothy Novis
Lisa Nusbaum
Gerald Olm
Naomi Olster
Dorothy Oppenheim
Anna Odroz
Nedra Oren
Mark Oren
Karen Orkent
Rick Ortan
Karen J Oriin
Roslyn Orr
Lillian Osband
Sandy Osband
Susan Panotf
Eli Papir
Jo Ann Papir
Julio Pardave
Brett Pargman
Kim Pargman
Stanley Pargman
David Parish
Mindla Parness
Hilda Pastor
Harry A Paylon
Jared Payton
Lisa Payton
Helen Re is
Aaron Podhurst
Dorothy Podhurst
Barry M Podolsky
Eiesnore Podolsky
Linos Pollack
Richard Pollack
Lynn Pont
Rosalyn Poryles
Freida Postal
Helen Pozert
Joy Pragman
Don Pravda
Carolyr Praer
William Pressman
Esther Presse'
Eilice Price
Lauren Raaack
Forrest Rattei
Gloria Rattei
Eiame Raileanu
Jordan Raileanu
Barbara Ramsay
Rose Rapaport
Seima Rappaport
Zach Rappaport
Sheah Raroach
Sylvia Ratner
Sondras Reiff
Barry Reiner
Jiii Reisman
Marcia Reisman
Saul Reiss
Henrietta Rhein
Sonya Riechelson
Jack Riemer
Sue Riemer
Jacqueline Rinhart
Mar|ory Riesenberg
Rose Rieser
Trsci Rmoom
Helen Robertson
Joan Robins
Steven Robinson
Ortelio Rodriguez
Henry Rodstein
Jordan Rohan
Joseph Roismar
BUI Romer
Carde Romer
Ellen Rose
Rhonda Ross
David Rosen
Ed Rosen
Harry Rosen
May Rosen
Nathan Roser-
Pauiime Rosen
Renee Rosen
Robert Rosen
Dora Rosenberg
Harry RosenWst
Pearl RosentHest
Leonard RosanWun'
Rose RosenNum
Sylvia RosenDluin
Mrs Zeke Rosen'eKJ
Susan Rosenstwr
Arieen Rosenth*
Oren Rosenthai
Ruth Rosenthai
Donna Rosman
Anna Ross
Elaine Ross
Gerald Ross
Charlotte Rotenbf!
Isidor Rot'eid
Frances Rottort
Hilda Roth
Mrs Philip Rot"
Lmda Rotztem
ids Routberg
James Rows
lliara Rozemberg
Henry Rubens'*"'
Muei Rubenst*""
j ,- OuPir
RutjM
Lillian Rub"1
I Rm:
jea-~e Sachs
Manon Sa'hmd
Lea Saiama
Enen Saiomc
Ira Salomon
jaime Sam
Da'd Saitzman
nioo. oav-d Saitzmar
Ranee Salem
Sandi Samo'*
Milton Samuels
Sue Samuel*
Ooroth, Sandio'*
Helen hois I?"!. ,
Mrs Bernard PeHovich Mariene Sanos
Fay Penn Je"c* <*"*.
Enrique Parcel
Ronnie Perelis
Linda Perkel
Peter Perkel
David Perkins
Beth Periman
Neddie Perlmutter
Peters Dan
Freida Philipson
Phil Philipson
Annette Phillips
Roslyn Phillips
Rose Picke'
Edith Pisk
Theodore Pisk
judi Piatt
Sam Piatt
Nancy Plotka
Phillip Plotka
Bernard Sap*
Beat": Sarm**>
Liia Sauison
Wriiiam Sauisoo
Nanette Saveo*
Clai's Savitt
Sylvia Sa
Helen Sea"
mT Schectmar
Arnold Sener
LiMiar Sen*'
Lawrence Sen*
^ M Scniang*'
Henme Schned*
Eleanor Sehoektn
Irving SOoenW
Rutn Scnoenteld
(Continued!
f
14 Federation. May 198?


Thank you to all Super Sunday volunteers
Micnale Schoz
Barry D Schreiber
Shirley Schreiber
Sylvia Schuller
Joseph Schulman
Frances Schupack
Hick Schuster
Ruthe Schutz
Aaam Schwartz
Ariene Schwartz
Brenda Schwartz
Elizabeth Schwartz
Esther Schwartz
Felicia Schwartz
3eraid K Schwartz
Lamie Schwartz
Ker Schwartz
Mamne E Schwartz
Thomas Schwartz
Ariene Schwara
Zasia Schweitzer
Steven Scop
Esteiie Segal
Gene Segal
Manne Segal
Roberta Segal
Ronna Segal
Bessie Selevan
Bernard Semigran
Florette Semigran
Shelly Senleld
Adeie Senter
Dorothy Serotta
Alan Serrlns
Sue Serrins
Cynthia Serure
Lor. Serure
Minna Shaler
Bette Shaiioway
Sabma Shalom
Netta Shaked
Ruth Shaded
Leo Shakier
Terry Shammay
Stanley Shapiro
Brenda Shapiro
Ellie Shapiro
Laurel Shapiro
Lee Shapiro
Esther B Shechtman
Mrs Marvin Sheldon
Rose Sher
Florence Sherskow
Roberta Shevin
Molly Shiland
Lillian Ann P Shires
Norman Sholk
Frances Siegel
Morton SHberfeld
Morris Silbering
Bella Silberman
Gary Silberman
Hadasa Silberman
Tai SHbertslein
Helen Sinai
Charles Silverberg
Dan Silverberg
Michele Silverberg
Barbara J Silverman
Evelyn Silverman
George Silverman
Steven Slivers
Elaine Sllverstein
Linda Sllverstein
Michelle Simkins
Lynne Simon
Marlon Lee Simon
Matt Simons
Minna Slmonaon
Miriam Singer
Mayer Singer
Eric Slater
Susan Roae Sirotta
Lillian Siskin
Lillian Sklaver
Nathan Skolmck
Mitchell Small
Bertha Smllowitz
Ben Rubin Smith
Diane Smith
Joseph Smith
Max L. Smith
Amy Smyler
Henry Smyler
Roae F Sohn
Joan Solinsky
Lorraine Solomon
Ruth Sondak
Guillermo Sostchin
Shirley Spear
William Spear
Yacob Sprung
Maria Srebnick
Saul Srebnick
Jean Regma Stamps
Pat Stauber
Elaine Stein
Fortuna Stein
Edith Steinberg
Betty Steinitz
Marta Stern
Irving Stessel
Linda Stiles
Jeane Stockheim
David Stollman
Julia Stollman
Allison Stone
Arthur Stone
David E Stone
Rachel Stone
Bernice Straus
Barbara Sugarman
John Sumberg
Ida Sussman
Lester Sussman
Ann Sussweln
Chatman Talley
Florence Tamarti
Rachel Tannenbaum
Paul Tecktlel
Anita Teltelbaum
Meah Tell
llene Temchln
Lisa Tendrich
Shareen Teplls
Jean Thompson
Carm Thorner
Sara Tlllman
Alfred Tirella
Julln Tirella
Zvi Tirosh
Felice Trakman
Sydney Traum
Sylvia Travis
Eliot Trelster
Mrs Joseph Tulcensky
Eleanor Turbm
Ricky Turetsky
Judy Turtletaub
Michael Turtletaub
David Ulnch
Naomi Umans
Jeremiah Unterman
Helen Vaccaro
Pearl Vaupen
Todd Victor
Lurie Vogel
Sidney Vogel
Doron Volkman
Norma Vziel
Isia Wagenberg
Salo Wagenberg
Richard Wagner
Beth Wald
Gloria Walters
Jean Walters
Jeffrey C Wander
Martha Wander
Phil Warren
Lois Wasserman
Rose Wasserman
Dolores Wax
Harvey Weidenfeld
Joanne Weidenfeld
Hortense Weiner
Louis Werner-
Norman Weiner
Laura Welnsoff
Eve Weinstein
Adrlenne Weinstein
Alex Welsberg
Gall Weisberg
Steven Welsberg
Elfriede G Weiss
Thomas Weiss
Jodie Weitzer
Gerry Weitzman
Sol Weitzman
Barney Wellman
Ida Wecksman
John Werksman
Barry White
Dan Willis
Jeffrey Willis
Karl Wills
Nada Willis
Rose Uriah Wilson
Eve Winston
Gloria Winter
Pat Winter
Lisa Winters
Seth Wise
Claire Witkin
Jenny Wohl
Matthew Wohl
Tamara Wohl
Michael Wolf
Martin Wolfe
Rosalie Wolff
Fanny Wolowitz
Lynn Wruble
Deane Wyche
Micheline Wulfstat
Harry Yablin
Anne Yabrove
Donald 0 Yaffie
Edith Yaffie
Barry S Yarchin
Allan Yarkin
Ellen Ray Yarkin
Charles Yavers
Jason Yedwab
Abraham Yormack
Esther Propls Yormack
Shelly Zabel
Diane Zacher
Sharon Zadanoff
Irwln Zaitz
Marie Zalma
Ken Zalls
Louis Zaresky
Danny Zaray
Marsha Zarco
Robert Zarco
Milton Zatlnsky
Marcia Zedeck
Steven Zeltz
Lorl Zigman
Lawrence Zimmerman
Esther Zipper
Alan Zipper
Harold Zombek
Jacguline Zonensain
Louis Zuckerman
Steve Zukoff
The list of Super Sunday volunteers
appearing in this ad was obtained from
final pre-registration information as of
3/18787. Federation also wishes to
acknowledge those volunteers who did
participate during Super Sunday but
whose names did not appear on pre-
registration lists.
Israel Programs Office offers wide range of summer programs
to Israel
Linda Minkes
RafliMiUer
wi
i i WT*'n hcrc to pmaotc the
idea of going to Israel."
said Linda Minkes, chair-
man of the Israel Pro
fnuns Committee of Federation. "This
summer the Israel Programs Office is of-
fering a wide range of youth program-
ing for individuals aged 18-24." she
announced.
"There are programs for. every in-
terest," said Raffi Miller, community
shahach" (emmisary) from the State of
[srael to South Florida and director of
federation's Israel Programs Office
"hen an individual comes into my of-
fice, 1 talk with him or her trying to
discover the program best suited to the
individual's needs and interests. As an ex-
ample, many people are not ready to work
outdoors on a Kibbutz, while others are
perfectly suited for this Israeli ex-
perience." he added.
Programs are divided into age
categories according to the par-
ticular interests and needs of
the individual traveler. People of
high school age. 13-18 years old. can take
trips which include a tour of Israel, in-
cluding a visit to a kibbutz, scuba diving,
film making, studying Hebrew, or
whatever else is of particular interest to
the youngster.
Most of the summer programs are six to
eight weeks in duration. Longer term
programs, including study in Israeli high
schools or universities, are also available.
The long term program provided to
high school aged students is called
"Youth Aliyah." This allows the
youngster to stay in Israel for a year or
more while studying at an Israeli high
school. This program provides individuals
with their regular American high school
curriculum, plus course work in Hebrew
and Jewish studies.
The second age group for Israel
travel is college aged individuals.
18-24 years old. They have the
choice of traveling for a six week
summer tour or staying longer by study-
ing at an Israeli university. Many univer-
sities such as The Hebrew University of
Jerusalem, Tel Aviv University, Bar-Ilan,
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. and
Haifa University, offer classes taught in
English to accommodate these students.
"Staying in Israel for a longer period of
time allows an individual to interrelate
with the people who live there and in time
the student can begin to truly understand
what it means to develop a deeper
understanding of Judaism." said Miller.
"By far the most successful program
for this age group is 'Kibbutz Ulpan.' '
said Minkes. "In this program, in-
dividuals spend up to six months working
on a kibbutz. Participants work half a day
and study Hebrew for half a day." she
adds.
Individuals attending college, who
are unable to get away for the sum-
mer, also have programs designed
for them upon graduation. "One
program of particular interest is 'Sherut
La'am,' meaning service to the people."
said Miller. In this year-long program,
graduates from American universities go
to Israel and begin their careers. They
begin by studying Hebrew for the first
three months in an intensive "ulpan" pro-
gram, after which they are placed in jobs
in development towns, such as Miami's
Project Renewal "sister city" Or Akiva,
that they are qualified to accomplish. Par-
ticipants receive housing and a monthly
stipend while working during this time.
" 'Sherut La'am' is a program for those
who want to touch more than the surface
of the Israeli experience. The appeal of
this program for college graduates is to
gain an insider's knowledge of Israel
while acquiring valuable work ex-
perience," said Miller.
Miller is quick to point out that the
Israel Programs Office is not a travel
agency. "When individuals come into our
office, we interview them, help them
decide on the appropriate program and
then expedite the necessary paper work
to New York, where the programs
originate," said Miller.
"If an individual discovers a program
that interests him, he should come to our
office at Federation and ask for more in-
formation. Some people don't ask because
they are afraid that they will not be able
to afford costs of the programs," said
Minkes. "Dade County residents should
be aware that the Israel Programs Com-
mittee has scholarship and loan money to
offer to qualified applicants," she
concluded.
More information about the programs
offered by the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Israel Program's Office can
be obtained by calling 576-4000. ext. 309.
Federation, May 1987 15


FRIDAY. MAY 1
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged will hold its
Volunteer Recognition Luncheon
at noon in the Ruby Auditorium.
For more information contact Ann
Berner at 751-8626.
SATURDAY MAY. 2
The Women's International
Zionist Organization will hold a
Glatt Kosher Barbecue at 4744 N.
Bay Road in Miami Beach beginn-
ing at 8:30 p.m. For more informa-
tion call 937-1308.
SATURDAY. MAY 2
SUNDAY. MAY 3
Performances of Temple Zion
Israelite Center Theater Guild's
production of "Brigadoon" begin
at 8:00 p.m. at the Temple, 8000
Miller Drive. Tickets available in
advance, as well as at the door.
Group sales are also available. For
further information call Jere Chait
at 595-8777 or 858-8660 or Marty
Friedman at 271-4560.
MONDAY, MAY 4
The Kadimah Chapter of
Hadassah will meet at the Surf-
side Community Center located on
Collins Avenue and 93rd Street. A
board meeting will be held at
10:30 a.m. followed by a light
lunch, regular meeting and con-
cluding with the installation of

new otncers.
TUESDAY, MAY 5
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged will hold its
Junior Auxiliary Board Meeting at
10:00 a.m. at the Bay Harbour Ci-
ty Hall. For more information con-
tact Steffi Cohen at 751-8626.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 6
Jewish Family Service of Greater
Miami is sponsoring a four-week
workshop beginning May 6 for
divorced parents titled, "Your
Child/Your Divorce." The
workshop will take place at the
JFS North Dade office, 2040 N.E.
163rd Street from 7:30 to 9:00
p.m. Seating is limited. For
registration information call Ran-
di Adler at 949-6186.
THURSDAY, MAY 7
The Aventura Jewish Center,
2972 Aventura Boulevard, will
hold its installation of new officers
beginning at noon. For more infor-
mation call 931-6233.
THURSDAY, MAY 7
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged will hold its
Greater Miami Women's Installa-
tion, at 11:00 a.m. in the Ruby
Auditorium. For more informa-
tion contact Steffi Cohen at
751-8626.
THURSDAY, MAY 7
FRIDAY, MAY 8
Mount Sinai Medical Center of
Greater Miami presents an educa-
tional seminar titled, "Drug Use
In Sports," to be held in the
hospital's Wolfson Auditorium.
Topics to be discussed include a
historical overview of drug use by
athletes and the incidence and
seriousness of the athletic drug
abusers. For seminar times and
further information call 674-2311.
SATURDAY. MAY 9
Final performance of Temple Zion
Israelite Center Theater Guild's
Production of "Brigadoon'' at 8:00
p.m. at the Temple. 8000 Miller
Drive. For ticket information call
Jere Chait at 595-8777 or
858-8660, or Marty Friedman at
271-4560.
TUESDAY, MAY 12
The Southeast Florida Conference
on Soviet Jewry will hold its mon-
thly meeting on Tuesday, May 12,
beginning at 7:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 13
The Ben Gurion Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its installation
of officers luncheon at the
Singapore Hotel beginning at
noon. For more information call
891-3015.
THURSDAY, MAY 14
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, North
Miami Beach Auxiliary Luncheon
meeting will be held at 11:30 a.m.
in the Ruby Auditorium. For more
information contact Steffi Cohen
at 751-8626.
THURSDAY, MAY 14
American Jewish Congress
Justine-Louise Wise Chapter will
meet at 12:30 p.m. at the
American Savings and Loan
Association Bank building at
Alton and Lincoln Roads. This is a
general meeting followed by a
mini-lunch. For more information
please call 864-1355.
Listing for Newsmagazine Calendar items
(Please print or type)
Deadlim for June event
I >rani;.ation
nt______
Place
Date
Time
I la.m
I p.m.
YottT name
nth
MAIL T< >
I'hone No
FEDE RATION
Communication-- I p.irt mefH
Miami Jewish Federation
iru Miami
Florida
SUNDAY, MAY 17
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation, in cooperation
with Miami Dade Community College Wolfson Campus, will
hold the Israel Independence Day celebration, "Shalom
Jerusalem The City of Gold Comes to Miami." The
festivities will be held at the college located at 300 N.E. 2nd
Avenue from noon to 5:00 p.m.
Highlights of the day's events include a performance
from the 1960's musical group, "The Association," renown-
ed Israeli songstress Yaffa Yarkoni, and charismatic Israeli
musician Yoel Sharabi.
Children can enjoy hands-on arts and crafts, sing-a-
longs, storytelling, rides, face painting, and Israeli dancing.
Families can enjoy the art of Amram Ebgi, a swimwear
fashion show featuring swimsuits by internationally famous
designer Gideon Oberson (as featured in "Cosmopolitan"
magazine) modeled by Miss Miami-FLA and Miss Teen
Miami-FLA, a multi media presentation titled. "Another
Israel," and a hands-on presentation about the City of
Jerusalem, plus food, Judaica. entertainment and much
more.
For more information about Israel 39, please refer to
pages 8-9 of this newsmagazine, or call Federation at
576-4000.
IsaaeL
SUNDAY, MAY 17
The American Israeli Lighthouse
will hold its 10th anniversary lun-
cheon at the Eden Roc Hotel
beginning at 11:30 a.m. For more
information call 531-1748.
SUNDAY. MAY 17
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, board of
directors meeting will be held at
10:00 a.m. in the Ruby
Auditorium. For more informa-
tion contact Marc Lichtman at
751-8626.
SUNDAY, MAY 17
The Southeast Region of the
American Jewish Congress will
hold the David Brown Forum at
Temple Israel of Greater Miami.
137 N.E. 19th Street, Miami,
beginning at 9:30 a.m. The topic is
"English Language Amendments:
The Debate in Florida." Guest
speakers are Dr. Martin
Hochbaum, director of national af-
fairs of the American Jewish Con-
gress, and Y. Thomas Kirby,
president of the Florida English
Campaign. There is no charge for
attendance and refreshments will
be served. For more information
call the regional office of the
American Jewish Congress at
673-9100.
SUNDAY, MAY 17
The Women's Committee of
Jewish Family Service of Greater
Miami will host "Tango on the
Fandango," a sunset dinner cruise
benefitting Jewish Family Ser-
vice. Dinner and dancing will be
aboard the "Fandango.*" docked
at the Biscayne Bay Marriott
Marina. Boarding begins at 5:00
p.m. couvert is $50 per person.
For information about reserva-
tions call Sharry Teplis, 895-4446.
MONDAY. MAY 18
Temple Zion Israelite I enter.
80(H) Miller Drive, will hold the
final meeting of the season tor its
Seniors Group. The donation $o.
For further information and time
of meeting call 271-2311.
FRIDAY. MAY 19
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged will hold its
Junior Auxiliary Installation at
noon in the Ruby Auditorium. For
more information contact Stem
Cohen at 751-8626.
FRIDAY, MAY 22
Temple Zion Israelite Center
8000 Miller Drive will hold its
Adult Forum following Fnday
evening services. The speaker wiu
be Brenda Meyerson and the topic
will be "Atomic Freeze or Fire
Services begin at 8:15 p.m. W*
public is invited. For more infor-
mation, please call 271-2311-
THURSDAY. MAY 28
The Women's InterjaUon*'
Zionist Organization will hold a
lunch meeting with guest^speaker
Beate Klarsfeld at the Biscayne
Bay Marriott Hotel beginnmgat
11:30 a.m. For more information
call 937-1308.

1$ Federation, May 1987


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FILES


PLO Algiers Meet Fails
To Dampen Peres' Peace Hopes
Friday, May 1, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
"oreign Minister Shimon
5eres insisted last week that
lis hopes for Middle East
jeace talks within the
ramework of an international
conference have not been
dampened by the obdurate
Stand taken at the Palestine
lational Council (PNC)
tteeting in a tightly-guarded
tiall some 12 miles outside
Ugiera.
Aides to the Foreign
linister said he will continue
pursue the idea of negotia-
nts with a Jordanian-
Palestinian delegation despite
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
|on chief Yasir Arafat's
enunciation of his 1985 accord
nth King Hussein and his ap-
irent embrace of the most ex-
reme terrorist groups in the
ime of Palestinian unity.
PERES BRIEFED the
ibor Party ministerial caucus
his intentions and made
jre that his position was pro-
optly conveyed to the media.
Recording to a report in Davar
st Wednesday (April 22),
would bring his pro-
ssals before the Cabinet
ithin 10 days. He is confident
American support, confi-
pnt that an international con-
ference will serve as a format
^r direct talks between Israel
id all the parties concerned,
ivar reported.
| His aides said Peres is deter-
ined to go all-out over the
inference issue, even if it
leans dissolution of the
ibor-Likud unity coalition
ttvernment. He believes the
ktion will back him in early
ections.
Nevertheless, events in
|giers where the 426-member
JC, the so-called Palestinian
liament in exile, met for the
It time since 1984, sent a
lill through diplomatic
arters.
Arafat"s threat of stepped-
terrorist warfare against
ael, his stated goal of an in-
endent Palestinian state
ih Jerusalem as its capital
' his reconciliation with ex-
fmists such as George
bash and Naif Hawatmeh
the Syrian-backed PLO
sidents who drove his forces
p Lebanon in 1984, cast a
1 over peace prospects in
region.
SQUALLY CHILLING was
demand by the PLO's
|>reign minister" Farouk
l'ioumi that the Camp
David accords be cancelled and
that Egypt return "to its pro-
per place in the Arab world."
Speaking at the PNC, he also
insisted on special relations
with Jordan, calling for a con-
federation of two independent
states Jordan and Palestine.
Kaddoumi also urged the
strengthening of the
21 -member Arab League, from
which Egypt was suspended
after its peace treaty with
Israel in 1979.
A pessimistic assessment of
the situation was given in Con-
Related Story
.. Page 10-A
gressional testimony in
Washington by Richard Mur-
phy. Assistant Secretary of
State for Near Eastern and
South Asian Affairs, who is
regarded as the State Depart-
ment's top expert on the Mid-
dle East.
Murphy's views and the
resurgent bellicosity in Algiers
were seen as vindication of the
Likud position that an interna-
tional conference would im-
peril Israel and that it is
useless to seek Palestinian
negotiating partners.
Premier Yitzhak Shamir has
been pounding these points
home in a bitter public feud
with Peres which some
observers see as a calculated
attempt to bring down the uni-
ty government. Shamir is said
to be convinced that public opi-
nion is overwhelmingly behind
him and an election fought
over the peace issue would
result in a Likud victory.
PERES, meanwhile, was
quoted as telling his Cabinet
colleagues that "What happen-
ed in Algiers does not hurt
peace prospects. We took into
account (the need) to make
progress toward peace without
Arafat and without his Fatah
because they are not in-
terested in peace."
He told Labor Party
members here that "We will
continue to strive for peace
with Jordan, with the in-
habitants of the administered
areas and with other regional
states. The chance of progress
is very great."
According to Peres' aides,
consultations with the Soviet
Union, the United States and
the Jordanians resulted in a
broad consensus on pro-
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Lt. Gen. Dan Shomron, 50 (right), from Kib-
butz Ashdot Ya'akov after being sworn in as
Israels 13th Chief of General Staff, is con-
gratulated by the outgoing Chief of Staff Lt.
Gen. Moshe Levy. Present at the ceremony, at
JTA/WZN News Photo
the Prime Minister's office in Jerusalem were
Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir (center right)
and Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin (center
left).
cedures for an international
conference. Moscow now
agrees on the need for direct
one-on-one negotiations in
regional subcommittees and
agrees that the conference
plenary will not be allowed to
impose its will on the bilateral
negotiations, the aides say.
Sources close to the Foreign
Minister stressed that for all
practical purposes, the peace
process initially would be
limited to a dialogue between
Israel and a Jordanian-
Palestinian delegation. The
Israel-Egyptian peace treaty is
holding satisfactorily and
Syria is unlikely to attend
peace talks, at least in their in-
itial stage, the sources said.
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ll
Page2-A JThe Jewish Flondian/Friday, May 1, 1987
IDF Unit
Repulses
Terrorist
Break-In
Bv GIL SEDAN
And" HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) An
Israel Defense Force unit
repulsed a terrorist gang at-
tempting to infiltrate the
south Lebanon security zone
last Thursday. The clash took
place near Bint Jabil village.
There were no IDF casualties
but blood stains on the ground
indicated one or more of the in-
filtrators was wounded.
Personal weapons, sabotage
equipment and shoulder-fired
missiles were found near the
scene.
Earlier last Thursday,
Israeli helicopter gunships at-
tacked terrorist targets south
of Sidon in south Lebanon. An
IDF spokesman said buildings
that served as terrorist head-
quarters for planning and
launching attacks on Israel
were hit.
FOLLOWING THE attack,
Israel Air Force jets dropped
leaflets over south Lebanon
warning the local population
that cooperation with ter-
rorists would bring "harsh
measures" by the IDF.
Katyusha rockets have been
fired into Galilee from south
Lebanon last week. A terrorist
gang that infiltrated Israel
recently and killed two IDF
soldiers from ambush is believ-
ed to have found shelter in
local villages before they
breached the border fence.
Meanwhile, Israel has
reportedly warned Syria and
the Lebanese Shiite militia,
Amal. that it would not
tolerate terrorist attacks from
Lebanese territory. Military
sources have noted that since
the Syrian army occupied
Moslem west Beirut in March
and deployed elements
southward, Amal has directly
attacked IDF units in the
south Lebanon security zone.
Previously its targets were
limited to the Israel-backed
Scuth Lebanon Army (SLA),
the main force in the security
zone.
ISRAEL WARNED it
would hold Amal responsible
for attacks on the IDF but
does not consider Amal an
enemy and will try to improve
relations with the local Shiite
population.
The most serious clash in the
KILLED BY TERRORISTS: The loved ones of Israeli soldier
Sgt. AsafAUm follow his casket to its last resting place in the Tel
Aviv cemetary. Sgt AUm was killed during rorists near Kibbutz Manara on Apr. 19. Al' Wida World Ph*
security zone involved the
Iran-backed extremist Shiite
movement Hezbullah which
mounted a large-scale attack
in the zone last month. It was
repulsed by IDF infantry back-
ed by tanks and helicopter
gunships. Hezbullah casualties
were severe. Initially, 18
bodies were discovered. Seven
more were found in the area
last week, bringing the total to
25. Four IDF soldiers were
slightly wounded in the clash.
A parcel bomb discovered in
a Tel Aviv-to-AihWon al
last Thursday morning nl
safely detonated by polices* I
pers after it was spotted by a I
alert passenger.
Escalation Noted
Resurgent Violence Linked to PLO Meet in Algiers
Phone: (305)373-4605
Published weekly every Friday
since 1927 by Tha Jewlah Fkxl
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;>er copy
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Terrorist attacks alone the
Lebanese border and in the ad-
ministered territories
escalated during the past
week. Most observers here link
the resurgent violence directly
to the hard line taken at the
Palestine National Council
meeting in Algiers.
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres expressed hope last
week that with the Palestine
Liberation Organization's
mainstream, headed by Yasir
Arafat, edging closer to
radicals and extremists in an
effort to achieve Palestinian
unity, moderate elements in
the territories would be
strengthened.
HIS VIEW arose from the
notion that Palestinians would
realize the PLO offered a dead
end, not a way to achieve
peace or advance Palestinian
interests. But this has proven
to be wishful thinking. Once
again, the Arab political com-
munity responded in accord
with the internal politics of the
PLO.
The East Jerusalem Arabic
press hailed the show of unity
at Algiers although it undercut
whatever small progress was
made in the past two years to
bring Palestinians closer to the
negotiating table.
Slogans smeared on walls re-
joiced over Arafat's apparent
reconciliation with hard line
terrorists such as George
H abash and Naif Hawatmeh
and news that Syrian-backed
PLO dissidents who drove
Arafat from Lebanon in 1984
were now back in the fold.
Terrorist elements in the
territories expressed their ap-
proval by violence. Two
gasoline bombs were thrown
at Israeli vehicles in the middle
of Gaza Saturday, injuring
three-year-old child On Fri-
day, five Molotov cocktails
were thrown at soldiers near
the Dahaishe and El-Aroub
refugee camps on the
Jerusalem-Hebron road.
THE GAZA incident arous-
ed fury among Jewish settlers
On Sunday they drove a
motorcade through Gaza,
openly displaying their
weapons as a warning and
show of force.
Those developments, which
coincided with the end of the
PNC meeting, made it clear
that Israelis would have to re-
evaluat.- the political situation.
The severe blows inflicted on
the I'M) ,n the Lebanon war.
and its fragmentation during
ine years that followed, did not
bring Palestinian moderates to
the fore. Now, with the PLO
seeingly reunited, the
moderates have run for cover.
Shortly before the PNC. the
so-called Palestinian
parliament-in-exile, convened
for its 18th session in Algiers,
Peres met twice with local
Palestinian leaders, some of
them known PLO sym-
pathizers. So did Abba Eabn,
chairman of the Knesset's
Foreign Affairs and Security
Committee.
Those meetings yielded no
concrete results and Palesti
nians and Israelis now appear
farther apart than ever.
This view was expressed by
several Ministers after the
weekly Cabinet meeting Sun-
day. Communications Minister
Amnon Rubinstein of the
Shinui Party told reporters the
meeting in Algiers
"strengthened those of us who
M &17 M -&187 M f. 1 H7
think the PLO and peace are
mutually exclusive" Energy
Minister Moshe Shahal. a
I.al>orite, said Israel and Jor-
dan would have to find other
Palestinians willing to come to
the negotiating table. Gad
Yaacobi, Minister of Economic
Coordination, also a Leborite,
thought the PNC meeting had
"created boom setback in the
political process" but that it
wasn't "critical."
ONLY ONE Israeli
Minister. Ezer Weizman. has
insisted that come what may.
Israel eventually must
negotiate with the PLO But
Weizman's views are Ml
popular now. even within tk
Labor Par-;, and presortfej
mounting to take strong. 3
dracon u easures >
response I terrorist
the terrritor es
Where I this leave*!
peace pr cess Dr Alexander
Blei, of the Hebres
sitv's Truman Institute, fflf
vested thai the road to Wm\
East peace ..uin-.t I* founds
Algiers or in .1-nlan. but a |
Moscow
According to Blei. who*
Continued on PsfU W
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