The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03038

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
"Jewish Floridiauni
Vol.60No. 17
Miami Friday, April 24,1987
50 Cents
Terrorists Break 7-Year Silence
GHETTO UPRISING TRIBUTE: Young Israelis holding their
country's flag take part in a ceremony (April 16) at the monu-
nent to the heroes of the Warsaw Ghetto in downtown Warsaw to
AP/Wide World Photo
mark the anniversary of the April, 1943 Jewish uprising against
the Nazis.
Palestinians
Shot At
Armed Border
JERUSALEM A three-
man infiltration squad, the
first in seven years, was killed
Sunday as it attempted to
breach the heavily-guarded
Israeli border. Two Israeli
soldiers were killed along with
them.
Spokesmen for the Israel
Defense Force said that the
Palestinians were apparently
hoping to take some Israelis
hostage as they were winding
up their Passover holidays. In-
stead, attack helicopters later
attacked PLO bases in south
Lebanon.
THE IDF spokesman said
that the would-be attackers
carried leaflets with them that
identified them as members of
PLO Chairman Yasir Arafat's
Fatah faction declaring that
they would trade hostages for
Palestinians jailed in Israel.
Early Sunday, the attackers
cut a hole in the metal fence
heavily equipped with heat,
movement and sound sensors
which triggered an alarm. IDF
trackers later followed them to
a spot only 500 yards from the
fence near the border kibbutz
of Menara, which is nine miles
southwest of the border town
of Metullah.
According to the IDF, an ar-
my patrol was searching the
undergrowth nearby when the
Palestinians showed
themselves, opening fire from
six to nine feet away and kill-
ing army Lt. Yoev Sharon, 22,
of Haifa, and Cpl. Assaf Alon,
21, of Arad. The rest of the
Israeli patrol opened fire and
killed the three infiltrators.
THE RETALIATORY
Israeli raid was against PLO
positions near the Palestinian
refugee camp of Rashidiyeh on
the outskirts of Tyre, a
Lebanese port city, 13 miles
north of the Israeli border.
Israeli security officials have
been predicting increasing
border violence since Syrian
peacekeeping troops moved in-
to Beirut in February, forcing
mainly Hezbollah gunmen to
flee to predominantly Shiite
southern Lebanon.
Lanzmann's 'Shoah' Highlights Awareness Week ... Page 5-A Soviets Cancel Consular Visit To Israel ... Page 7-A Woody Allen's 'Radio Days': Quiet Jew-Hatred .. .Page 15-A


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 24, 1987
Curfews, Mass Arrests Restore
Order, But Tensions Still High
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Curfews, mass arrests and
the closure of Arab cam-
puses restored order in the
West Bank over the
Passover holiday. But ten-
sions continued to run high
after a week of violence in
which Jewish settlers ram-
paged through Arab villages
destroying property and
burning fields in retaliation
for the fire-bombing of a car
which killed an Israeli
woman and severely burned
her husband, three children
and a young friend riding
with them.
Settlers from Alphe-
Menashe erected a memorial
at the site of the attack, bet-
ween the Arab town of
Kalkilya and Habla village,
and established a vigil there.
They were visibly hostile to
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin who visited the site
Wednesday (Apr. 13) to try to
calm spirits and answer their
charges that security forces
were not protecting Jewish
settlers on the roads.
CURFE WS WERE
clamped on a refugee camp in
the Arab town of Tulkarem
and on the nearby town of
A nabta where Arab youths has
stoned Israeli vehicles.
Curfews on Kalkilya and Habla
were lifted. But Bir Zeit
University near Ramallah was
ordered closed for four months
following a confrontation in
Vanunu Trial
Postponed
TEL AVIV (JTA) The trial
of Mordechai Vanunu, scheduled
to open in Jerusalem district court
last week, was postponed because
of a dispute between the defen-
dant and his lawyer. No new date
was announced, and legal
observers doubt the proceedings
will begin until late next month.
Vanunu, a former technician at
the Dimona nuclear facility, is ac-
cused of selling secret material
about Israel's alleged nuclear
weapons capabilities to a British
newspaper. He and his family
fired defense attorney Amnon
Zichroni over differences in
defense strategy.
Zichroni prepared a purely legal
defense. Vanunu demands that his
trial be made into a public forum
against Israel's nuclear research
and development programs.
Phone: (305) 373-4605
Published weekly every Friday
since 1927 by The Jewish Flori-
dian. Office and Plant 120 N.E.
6th St., Miami, Fla. 33132. Phone
(305) 373-4605. Second-Class
Postage paid in Miami, Fla.
USPS 275320. Postmaster: Form
3579 return to Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla.
33101. 5 Fred Shochet. The
Jewish Floridian does not
guarantee the Kashruth of the
merchandise advertised in its
columns
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: In ad
vance (Local Area) One Year
$9.00: Two Years $16.00; Three
Years $2200 Supplemental
Issue (Local Area) First Friday
each month (10 issues)
Sept June $2 00 Out of town,
country, upon request By Mail
par copy
which security forces killed
one Arab student and wound-
ed two others.
Najah University in Nablus
was also closed as was a nurses
school in Ramallah. More than
100 Arabs were arrested in a
police dragnet of the territory.
Nine were placed in ad-
ministrative detention for six
months which means they can
Kalkilya:
Deceptive Peace
. .. 7-A
be held without formal charges
filed against them.
Among them is Feisal Hus-
seini, 45, head of the Arab
Studies Society in East
Jerusalem who the autorities
claim is a leading supporter of
the Palestine Liberation
Organization and responsible
for recent unrest in the
territory.
THE SETTLERS are using
the latest terrorist attack to
press their political demands.
Rabin was confronted by a
large sign urging the im-
mediate deportation of ter-
rorists released from jail in a
prisoner exchange two years
ago, expansion of Jewish set-
tlements in the territory and a
commission of inquiry to in-
vestigate security ar-
rangements there.
"Today, in the area of
Judaea and Samaria and Gaza
there are more Israeli soldiers
than all along the border with
Lebanon," he told the settlers.
He insisted that security
measures were quite adequate.
He drew catcalls and angry
shouts when he reminded the
settlers that living in the ter-
ritories involved certain risks.
MORE SHOUTS of derision
greeted Rabin's oblique
reference to hooliganism by
Jewish settlers against Arab
civilians and when he insisted
that law and order would be
maintained by the military
authorities. He warned the set-
tlers that weapons they are
WOUNDED: Israeli soldiers carry one of the
wounded students from Bir Zeit University
into a Jerusalem hospital after Israeli
AP/Wide World Photo
soldiers opened fire to disperse a crowd of pro-
testing Arab students last week at the Univer-
sity, where one student was killed. AP/Wide
allowed to carry were for per-
sonal protection only.
Settlers complained that talk
in the government about an in-
ternational conference for
Middle East peace only en-
couraged terrorism. Rabin told
them, "We are beginning to
blame ourselves rather than
the PLO."
The focus of tension shifted
to East Jerusalem Wednesday
when a small group of Jews
who call themselves "The
Temple Mount Faithful"
visited the Temple Mount
which is reserved exclusively
for Moslem worship. They
came under heavy police pro-
tection. Local Arabs were in-
censed and one was arrested
after shoving a police officer.
He was released later when it
was discovered that the man is
mentally disturbed. Police,
fearing a disturbance, ordered
the Jewish group back behind
the gates to the Temple Mount
area but later permitted them
to re-enter the site
individually.
The Temple Mount contains
the Dome of the Rock and Al
Aksa Mosque, two of te holiest
shrines in Islam, and has often
been the scene of confronta-
tion between religious Jews
and Moslem worshippers.
Mayor Teddy Kollek of
Jerusalem protested angrily
that allowing Jews to enter the
area Wednesday was a
needless provocation. He was
furious with the police for not
consulting him beforehand.
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No One Asks Hussein for Anything
By YEDIDYA ATLAS
Ever since the last break-up
between Jordan's King Hus-
sein and PLO leader Yasir
Arafat, Israel has once again
been inundated with calls for
her to demonstrate her good
faith in the peace process and
encourage Hussein to join it by
offering him inducements
(read: territory).
Oddly enough, no one ever
demands the same from Hus-
sein, that he show his good
faith in the peace process by
offering Israel inducements.
In fact, it seems to be forgot-
ten that it was Jordan that at-
tacked Israel in 1967, and not
the other way around. So, it
might be a bit more fair to lean
on the aggressor state, Jor-
dan, to make conciliatory
moves towards Israel.
WHAT TOO many Western
observers and policymakers
overlook is that historical
claims are the basis for the
ongoing conflict in this region.
Both Arab and Jew take
history seriously, and policies
are determined accordingly. If
this were not the case, the
Arabs would not take the pains
they do to discredit Israeli
claims to the Jewish historical
homeland.
But while the Jewish people
trace their origins and claims
to the Land of Israel back to
Abraham, Hussein's
antecedents in the area go
back only to the year 1921
when his grandfather Ab-
dullah was made emir of the
eastern part of the region.
The fact is that not only does
> Jordan have no historical claim
to any territory held by Israel,
but Hussein would be hard-
pressed to prove the validity of
his own country's right to exist
on the area of land it currently
occupies (also known as "the
East Bank")..
THAT BEING the case, the
Jordanian monarch has in-
credible diplomatic chutzpah to
lay claim to a region that even
some other Arab countries say
does not belong to him.
On June 30, 1920, British
Major General L.J. Bols,
military governor of Palestine,
relinquished his command to
Sir Herbert Samuel, the new
high commissioner. General
Bols formally issued a
"delivery note" to Sir Herbert
in which he had written the
following: "Handed over to Sir
Herbert Samuel, one
Palestine, complete."
"Complete" here referred
specifically to both sides of the
Jordan River, wherein was to
be established the Jewish na-
tional homeland. There was
not only international recogni-
tion (the League of Nations)
for this historical and biblical
reincarnation, but Arab accep-
tance of Jewish claims as well.
NONE OTHER than Hus-
sein s great uncle, the Emir
'aisal, called the Zionist
claims "moderate." He too
*as referring to "one
Palestine, complete," i.e.: the
Land of Israel on both sides of
the Jordan.
'twas only in 1921, that Ab-
dullah left his home in the He-
J,az (today part of Saudi
rab>a). and invaded eastern
Palestine with a band of guer-
ril|as either by pre-
arrangement or, at least, with
le connivance of the British.
un March 27, 1921, he met
Friday, April 24, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
Arafat Tears Up Agreement With
Hussein At Algiers Conference
KING HUSSEIN: Incredible diplomatic 'chutzpah.'
with British Colonial
Secretary Winston Churchill
in Jerusalem.
There Abdullah was made an
emir, appointed to govern
eastern Palestine (78 percent
of the British Mandate for a
Jewish national homeland),
assigned two British advisers,
and awarded a substantial
No one ever
demands from
Hussein that he
show his good
faith in peace.
British subsidy. The then less
than 200,000 inhabitants of the
east bank were not consulted.
AT THE International
Zionist Congress in 1923,
there was a unanimous resolu-
tion protesting the high-
handed behavior of the British
and calling for Jewish settle-
ment on both sides of the Jor-
dan River. The resolution
signatories included the Revi-
sionists (Herut), Ahdut Avoda
(Labor), and Mapam.
In the same arbitrary man-
ner, in 1946, the British
created a country, called Tran-
sjordan, and made Abdullah its
king. In 1949, following the
capture and occupation of
Judea and Samaria by his
British-commanded Jordanian
Legion, Abdullah annexed the
territory and renamed his
country, the Hashemite
Kingdom of Jordan.
The annexation was
recognized by no country in
the world except for Ab-
dullah's British sponsor and
Pakistan. He was denounced
by his own Arab allies, and the
following year at the Arab
League Summit, a resolution
was presented jointly by Syria,
Lebanon, Egypt, and Saudi
Arabia to expel Jordan from
the Arab League for Ab-
dullah's actions.
IN 1951, Abdullah was
assassinated by a Mufti-backed
gunman and succeeded by his
son Talal. When, in the same
year, the new king had to be
institutionalized in an insane
asylum he was succeeded by
his son, the 18-year-old Hus-
sein. This, then, is the royal
line and history of the
Hashemite Kingdom of
Jordan.
Yet despite all this, there are
those who adamantly insist
that it is Israel that should
coax Jordan to the peace table
and not the other way round.
Israel Scene
ALGIERS Yasir Arafat
has torn up an agreement with
Jordan's King Hussein calling
for a joint peace approach to
Israel. Announcement of the
move, which observers here
saw as an Arafat gesture to
the hard-liners attending a
Palestinian conference in the
Algerian capital, came from
Khalil Wazir, deputy com-
mander of the Palestine
Liberation Organization and a
close Arafat aide.
At the same time, Wazir em-
phasized that Arafat refused
to yield to a second hard-
liners' demand, which was for
the PLO to cut all ties with
Egypt, the only Arab nation to
have a peace agreement with
Israel.
"THE AMMAN (Jordan)
agreement has been cancel-
ed," stated Wazir at the same
time that the PLO's executive
committee was meeting here
to discuss other military and
political moves aimed at en-
ding the bloody four-year feud
in the guerrilla movement.
Declared Wazir: "The rift is
over. I would say that 95 per-
cent of all the points of dif-
ference have been resolved."
Wazir, who is also known as
Abu Jihad, added that
"Although the PLO is scrapp-
ing the Amman accord, we
equally insist on maintaining
our brotherly ties with
Jordan."
NAYEF HAWATMEH,
head of the Marxist
Democratic Front for the
Liberation of Palestine, said
earlier that Arafat had
abrogated the agreement with
King Hussein during a
meeting with the leaders of
eight Palestinian factions.
"This is our present to the
Palestinian people and the
friends of Palestinians across
the world," Hawatmeh
declared.
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Page 4-A The Jewish Ftoridian/Friday, April 24, 1987
'Shoah' Will
Be Seen on TV Here
Some critics have said that Claude Lanz-
mann's 9V2-hour film, "Shoah," is too long
that it sweeps, however delicately, over
the same agonizing theme of the Holocaust
too repetitiously and that, with greater ef-
fect, it might have benefitted from a
judicious editorial hand.
Others have said that it is precisely the
repetitive documentation that is Lanz-
mann's method in "Shoah" that makes the
point. One can hardly, these critics feel, suf-
fer from what Hannah Arendt saw as the
banality of the Nazi evil in Lanzmann's
overwhelming opus and the sheer length of
time it takes to be witness to it.
Be that as it may, Public Television will be
showing Lanzmann's "Shoah" in a mini-
series of four parts. Miami's own WPBT Ch.
2 will show the film beginning at 8 p.m. over
a stretch of four evenings next Monday
through Thursday.
Miami's Commemoration
The national showing is part of Holocaust
Awareness Week, which begins on Sunday,
April 26, and will be marked here at a
community-wide commemoration Sunday,
7:30 p.m., at Beth Torah Congregation.
Sponsors range from the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and its affiliates, the
Central Agency for Jewish Education and
the Community Relations Committee, to the
Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami
and the Southeastern Florida Holocaust
Memorial Center.
Lanzmann's "Shoah" in four parts should
certainly reduce the undeniable human dif-
ficulty encountered in contemplating a
9V2-hour film in one sitting. On the other
hand, perhaps even in a small way, the
misery of cramped bones may remind us of
the profound agony the victims of the
Holocaust suffered at the hands of the Nazi
beast.
That is the real intent of "Shoah." That is
the real intent of Holocaust Awareness
Week here in Miami and elsewhere
throughout our country and the world. Both
are a reminder never to forget.
A Passover Plot?
We mean no disrespect to the World
Jewish Congress, but there were some of its
executives last week accusing Attorney
General Edwin Meese of trying to save ac-
cused Nazi war criminal Karl Linnas from
deportation to the Soviet Union where,
clearly, he awaits death.
The WJCongress executives went so far
as to see an unfair Passover night plot in-
volving American Jewish guardianship of
the public good otherwise engaged at Seder
as Meese conspired to get Linnas into
Panama where, thenceforward, he would
live the good life, an escapee from justice in
search of punishing the wicked.
Then, on Monday, Mr. Meese signed the
deportation papers in support of a Supreme
Court ruling against appeals to the contrary.
At this very moment, Linnas faces the sure
and swift punishment of Soviet justice. Or is
Soviet justice sui generis injustice?
Meese Caught In Middle
That philosophical conundrum apart, the
question deals with the equally sure and
swift inclination of some of the Jewish com-
munity's leaders to jump the gun, as it were,
in their judgments, in this case of Mr.
Meese.
It is not that Mr. Meese needs our defense.
It is rather that other Jewish community
leaders adopted him only last year as a
spokesman for their many organizational
causes, and so this latest WJCongress foray
might best have been avoided, for its ex-
ecutives found themselves early this week in
the unenviable position of crowing over Lin-
nas' deportation though they vowed they
were not.
Nor did they utter a single further word
about Mr. Meese and their pillorying of him.
At least not a single word that could be
heard.
Hussein's Dilemma
What will Jordan's King Hussein do now?
He is determined to make no peace with
Israel that will not also include the stamp of
half of the rest of the world, among them
enemies of Israel who don't even speak to
that country, not to mention the PLO's
chieftain, Yasir Arafat.
Such a display of world opinion, Hussein
reckoned, would be sufficient cover behind
which to hide his courageous determination
finally to reckon with the realities of Israel's
existence, without whose existence the king
might long ago have gone kaput.
But on Sunday in Algiers, where fighting
PLO factions attempted to bury the hatchet,
for once not in one another, Arafat did the
unthinkable: he tore up his treaty with King
Hussein requiring of Arafat that he
recognize Israel's existence in return for
substantial Israeli contributions of land to
Goldene Medina
the creation of yet another Palestinian state
in the Middle East.
Where is the poor Hashemite king to hide
now? Behind those solid convictions of his?
But We Were 'Ska Shtill' Generation
By JIM SHIPLEY
I grew up as a member of the
Sha Shtill generation. We
were Jews in a wonderful
country, full of wonderful op-
portunities and options. True,
there were quotas on Jews in
medical school, there were
quotas on Jews in law school,
there were no Jews in the ex-
ecutive suites. We drove daily
through beautiful
neighborhoods that had no
Jews and would not have
tolerated any.
But still, this was the
Goldene Medina and compared
to so many other lands, it was
the best of all choices for Jews
seeking to live a free life and
pursue a dream of freedom
and a chance for prosperity.
There were rules we followed.
We didn't protest too loudly
about subtle anti-Semitism.
We didn't protest too loudly
for that matter about overt
anti-Semitism. Sha Shtill, that
was the watchword: don't
make waves.
I HAVE a last name that
could pass anywhere in WASP
America. It wasn't always so,
but that's another story. God
also gifted me with a punim
which sports a short nose. So,
from the time I was a tad, I
could "pass." I didnt' make a
big deal of denying my
Jewishness, but I didn't make
a big deal of affirming it
either. We just didn't. If so-
meone asked us if we were
Jewish, we replied: "well .
yes ."
Sometimes you'd get caught
in the middle of anti-Semitic
discussion because people
didn't know or forgot that you
with the short nose and the
short name were Jewish.
Then, when you'd get a look on
your face like stone, and the
Gentile realized what you
were, his face would get
solemn, his eyes wide.
"Well," he would say,
perhaps reaching out to touch
your shoulder, "you're not the
kind we mean ..." Of course
not. I was acceptable. I had an
acceptable face, acceptable
clothes and an acceptable de-
meanor. And I accepted this
most lowly of all insults to my
people time and time again.
WHAT WAS I? Happy to be
accepted, set aside from my
own people? What was I -
chicken? The blacks have long
had an expression: "You got to
go along to get along." Were
we so different, we Jews of the
'30's and '40's?
Yes, things were good for
the Jews of America. The Ger-
man Jews who had come here
and established themselves in
commerce were prospering.
The Eastern European Jews
had come up through the nee-
dle trades and had moved on to
Continued on Page 12-A
Our Readers Write: Strong
Prejudice in Weinberger Editorial
EDITOR,
The Jewish Floridian:
The writer of "Weinberger's
Own Agenda" on your
editorial page April 3 must be
propelled by his strong
political prejudices rather than
by the necessity of informing
impartially his readership.
Some time ago, Shimon
Peres, then Prime Minister of
Israel, told to the American
television audience that, as far
as Israel is concerned, the
Reagan Administration is the
"best we ever had." Yitzhak
Shamir, the present Prime
Minister of Israel, stated on
CBS Face the Nation only
recently, "Thank God for the
Reagan Administration!"
So, if anyone is dishing out
"palaver," it is your editorial
writer, who is trying to make
us believe, contrary to what
the Israeli leaders tell us. that
the Reagan Administration is
bad for Israel (and, by implica-
tion, bad for America).
Quoting Wolf Blitzer, the
Washington correspondent for
the Jerusalem Post, on Feb.
18, during Prime Minister
Shamir's visit to Washington,
President Reagan asserted
that Israel's status had now
been "elevated to major non-
NATO ally."
The bare truth is that Israel
is happier today dealing with
the Reagan Administration
than it ever was with Mr.
Carter, who, by the way, was
refused a meeting with
Menachem Begin, when he so-
journed in Israel lately. I
wonder why? Isn't it that Mr.
Carter is leaning more to the
Arab side than he is to
Israel87
MICHAEL JOELSON
North Miami
eJewish Floridian

Fred K. Shochet
Editor and Publisher
Leo Mindlin
Associate Editor
Suzanne Shochet
Executive Editor
William T. Brewer
Director of Operations
Joan C. Teglas
Director o( Advertising
Friday, April 24,1987
Volume 60
25 NISAN 5747
Number 17
.-:-i..-~s


Friday, April 24, 198?/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
'Stwah' Will Not Let Holocaust Terrors Fade
By MICHAEL ELKIN
It has been hailed as "a
monument against forget-
ting And certainly those who
have seen3" "Shoah," Claude
Lanzmann's nine-and-a-half-
hour documentary on the
Holocaust, will not quickly
forget the horrors and harrow-
ing tragedies inflicted on the
Jews in concentration camps
across Europe.
Never forget is a refrain un-
said but often implied in
"Shoah," an unforgettable
movie which carries with it the
pain of the past and the
travails that come with a pro-
ject 11 years in the making.
"You suddenly realize,"
writer Simone de Beauvoir has
noted of "Shoah," "that
despite everything you know
about the extermination
camps, the experience itself
remained distant. For the first
time, you feel it in your bones,
your heart, your mind."
RELEASED IN theaters in
1985. "Shoah" will have its
American television debut
beginning Monday night on
Miami's Channel 2 at 8 p.m.
The broadcasts are in com-
memoration of National
Holocaust Remembrance
Week. The showing will in-
clude interviews of Lanzmann
by Roger Rosenblatt, essayist
for ''MacNeil/Lehrer
NewsHour" and a writer for
Time.
The epic documentary
makes shattering use of inter-
views rather than archival
footage. No camp scenes are
depicted; no victims are shown
led off to the showers.
The film's impact is in its
words, in interviews with sur-
vivors, villagers, Nazi hen-
chmen who paint images as
gruesome as those of
Concentration camp inmates gather with anticipation at a barbed wire fence moments before their liberati
smokestacks belching out
human flumes of pain.
Despite more than a decade
spent on the project, Claude
Lanzmann still has not been
able to answer one very impor-
tant question about the
Holocaust. It is a question, so
simple in statement, so com-
plex in meaning: Why?
"IT IS STILL a mystery for
me why this all happened,"
says the director, who fought
in the French Resistance dur-
ing World War II and worked
for many years as a journalist
before turning film-maker in
1970.
Speaking from his Paris
home, Lanzmann, whose other
documentary credit is "Why
Israel" (1973), said that not
even "Shoah," which has been
hailed worldwide by such
opinion-makers as Willie
Brandt, former chancellor of
West Germany, and Nobel
Peace Prize recipient Elie
Wiesel, explains the Holocaust
ion.
satisfactorily.
"In order for me to unders-
tand the Holocaust fully, I will
have to write a book" says
Lanzmann.
Meanwhile, "Shoah" will
Continued on Page 13-A
Polish Americans Feel Lanzmann's
Film Distorts Historic Truths of Nazi Era
documentary makes shattering use
oj interviews rather than archives.
By ALOYSIUS A. MAZEWSKI
Polish Americans are con-
cerned that "Shoah" presents
a narrow, one-sided view of
the Polish people as anti-
Semites, to a degree which
hardly distinguishes them
from the German Nazis.
"Shoah" is Claude Lanz-
mann's personal account of the
Holocaust a masterly work
of art but at the same time a
cunning distortion of the
truth, designed to justify his
preconceived notion of the
Poles' complicity in the exter-
mination of Jews by the Ger-
mans during World War II. To
a question posed in an inter-
view by the French L 'Express
(May, 1985) whether the film
"is an act of accusation against
Poland," Lanzmann replied,
"Yes, it is the Poles who ac-
cuse themselves. They
mastered the routine of
extermination."
THUS, "Shoah" must not be
considered a definitive,
historical documentary. This is
the point on which we are most
sensitive: that, based on
"Shoah," the viewer will form
an unfair perception about the
Poles and people of Polish
heritage.
"Shoah" presents the story
of the Jewish Holocaust totally
detached from the terror in-
stituted by the Germans in oc-
cupied Europe, especially in
Poland, where three million
Christian Poles were brutally
murdered in street executions,
Aloyisium A. Mazewski is
president of the Polish
American Congress, with of-
fices in Chicago and
Washington, D.C. In this arti-
cle, Mazewski takes strong ex-
ception to the perception of
Poles in 'Shoah' as having been
in complicity with the Nazis
and their plan to exterminate
the Jews.
Nazi prisons and concentration
camps, alongside the six
million European Jews exter-
minated within the German
program of the "final
solution."
While the Jewish Holocaust
is unique in that Jews were
marked for extermination
solely because they were Jews
the three million Christian
Poles were murdered in a com-
parable effort designed to an-
nihilate the Polish intelligent-
sia and leaders so that Poles
would be reduced to the level
of subhuman slave labor for
the German Reich.
UNDERSTANDABLY,
Polish Americans are concern-
ed that "Shoah" might be er-
roneously regarded as the
definitive history of those
times of inconceivable horror.
We feel that the film is unfair
because it does not reflect the
efforts of Poles to help Jews to
survive. It must be
remembered that only in
Poland was any help accorded
to the Jews punishable by
death, not only of the person
who rendered assistance, but
also of his entire family and, in
some cases, of an entire
village.
Despite this, approximately
one third of the 6,000
Righteous Gentiles com-
memorated at the Yad
Vashem Memorial in Israel for
the heroic saving of Jewish
lives are Poles. Failure to in-
clude these aspects of Polish
suffering and Polish aid to the
Jews implies that Polish peo-
ple were uniformly passive in
the fact of the Holocaust and
even cooperated with the Ger-
mans in the extermination of
the Jews. Errors and omis-
sions in the translation from
Polish to French to English
tend to reinforce this
implication.
Beneath the callousness and
indifference of the Poles to the
tragic fate of the Jews as
alleged in "Shoah" lies the
stereotype of the "endemic
anti-Semitism of Poles"
presented in several books, ar-
ticles and TV productions.
ANTI-SEMITISM was a
fact of life in Europe and in the
United States, as well as in
prewar Poland, especially in
the 1930's, stemming from the
religious, social and cultural
differences and the disparity
of the two communities. There
must be no apology for it. It
was a social evil which must be
condemned and fought.
"... on the eve of World
Continued on Page 11-A


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 24. 1987
Constitution
Protects
Religious
Institutions
NEW YORK Constitu-
tional guarantees of religious
freedom protect churches and
other religious institutions as
well as people, says the
American Jewish Congress in
a court brief related to church
involvement in the so-called
"Sanctuary Movement."
In an amicus, or friend-of-
the-court, brief submitted to
the United States Court of Ap-
peals for the Ninth Circuit, the
Jewish organization charges
that a federal district court in
Arizona erred when it ruled
that churches, as corporate en-
tities, do not have legal "stan-
ding" to bring freedom of
religion claims in court.
The district court had con-
tended that First Amendment
rights under the Constitution
"are guaranteed to in-
dividuals, not to
corporations."
AJCONGRESS wants the
appeals court to reverse the
district court ruling. The case,
Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
v. the United States of
America, stemmed from the
infiltration of several churches
in Arizona by undercover
agents working for the United
States Immigration and
Naturalization Service. The in-
formants were assigned to ob-
tain evidence concerning the
churches' alleged involvement
in a "sanctuary movement" to
hide and protect illegal aliens
seeking political asylum.
The churches brought an ac-
tion in the United States
District Court of Arizona
claiming that their Constitu-
tional rights had been violated.
The District Court dismissed
the suit giving as one of its
reasons the belief that the
churches lacked legal standing
to claim injury under the First
Amendment.
The district court decision
was "plainly wrong," says the
AJCongress brief. "Since vir-
tually the beginning of our
Constitution, it has been
recognized that religious in-
stitutions protect the religious
values embodied in the free ex-
ercise (of religion) clause of the
First Amendment."
THE BRIEF, which was
released by Simon Blattner,
president of the Pacific Region
of the American Jewish Con-
gress, notes that First Amend-
ment rights are not "purely
personal" since the Amend-
ment itself is worded not in
terms of "personal" rights but
simply as a general prohibition
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SHULTZ AT SEDER: U.S. Secretary of State George Shultz (left)
talks with Soviet refusenik Vladimir Slepak during the tradi-
tional Passover Seder celebrated at the American Embassy in
AP/Wide World Photo
Moscow last week (April IS). At the Seder, Shultz told guests that
they "must never give up, never give up" their struggle against
the Soviet Union to be free to leave to a country of their choosing.
against governmental action
abridging basic freedoms, in-
cluding free speech and the
free exercise of religion.
Citing previous court deci-
sions in which the corporate
rights of strictly commercial
organizations have been deem-
ed to come under the protec-
tion of the Bill of Rights, the
brief declares that the "cor-
porate rights of churches are
no less protected" under the
Constitution than those of
commercial institutions.
In appealing to the U.S.
Court of Appeals to overrule
the district court, the plaintiff
churches charged that the U.S.
government's infiltration ac-
tivities were not only illegal
but have substantially under-
mined the churches' ability to
carry out their religious
mission.
ONE OF the plaintiffs, the
Alzona Evangelical Lutheran
Church, reported that it no
longer conducts Bible study
meetings because its
parishioners are fearful of at-
tending. The Church has also
charged that general participa-
tion and support of Church ac-
tivities have been eroded and
that its clergy has been
diverted from regular pastoral
duties in order to deal with
problems created by the
government's infiltration
activities.
The amicus brief was
prepared by Amy Adelson,
Lois C. Waldman and Marc D.
Stern, of the American Jewish
Congress legal staff.
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Diamond Institute has
reported that Israel's exports
of polished diamonds rose 26
percent during the first three
months of 1987 compared to
the same period last year.
Value was up $510 million
from $406 million. Diamond
dealers forecast a record year
with sales of $2 billion com-
pared to $1.7 billion in 1986.
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Firebombing
Death of Woman Brought
Tensions To Fever Pitch
Friday, April 24, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
BY GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
terrorist firebomb which killed
an Israeli woman and severely
burned her husband, their
three children and a family
friend in their car on a road in
the West Bank has raised ten-
sions to a fever pitch between
Jewish settlers and the local
Arab population. It triggered a
new confrontation between
settlers and security forces,
with possible political reper-
cussions for the shaky Labor-
Likud unity coalition
government.
The victims were Ofra
Moses, 35, who was trapped in
the car and burned to death;
her husband Avraham, 37,
their children Tal, 5, Adi, 8,
and Nir, 14 and their friend,
Yosef Lallo, 14, all of whom
were hospitalized with first-
degree burns.
THE BOMB struck the car
on the way from the Moses*
home settlement of Alphe-
Menashe to Petach Tikva.
Shortly afterwards, furious
Jewish settlers descended on
the largest nearby Arab town,
Kalkilya, smashing windows
and vehicles, stoning the
mayor's home and setting fire
to fields and orchards. The set-
tlers justified their attack on
grounds that the security
forces failed to protect Jews.
A curfew was imposed on
Kalkilya, Hable and another
small village in te area Satur-
day night and remained in ef-
fect until late Sunday after-
noon when Ofra Moses was
buried in Petach Tikva.
Three rows of citrus trees
were uprooted by military
bulldozers Sunday on the road
where the attack took place.
The official reason given was
to clear away a possible am-
bush site. The citrus grove was
apparently owned by Arabs.
KALKILYA? Normally
bustling market town of
23,000, has had a long history
of peaceful relations with near-
by Jewish towns and set-
tlements in Israel and the
West Bank. It attracts
thousands of Jewish
businesses are closed.
Thousands of Arab workers
there find jobs in adjacent
Jewish population centers.
According to Israeli
authorities, the Arabs of
Kalkilya have a vested interest
in law and order and if there
are anti-Israel sentiments,
they are low key.
The town is governed by
Mayor Abdul Rahman Abu-
Sneineh, who was appointed
by the Israeli civil authorities
and is apparently popular with
the townspeople. There were
no indications that the ter-
rorists who attacked the
Moses' car came from Kalkilya
or had any connection with the
town.
BUT THE Jewish settlers
struck at it nevertheless. Ac-
cording to Mayor Shlomo
Katan of Alphe-Menashe, "the
lofel residents would not have
had to take the law into their
hands if the security forces
had done their job."
The attack was the latest
and the worst of many in-
cidents of unrest in the ad-
ministered territories during
the past week. Recent rioting
and stone throwing by Arabs
in East Jerusalem and the
West Bank was linked to a
hunger strike by some 3,000
Arab security prisoners
demanding better conditions.
Mayor Abu-Sneineh of
Kalkilya told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency Sunday
that the Jewish rioting in his
town would not improve the
situation between Arabs and
Jews.
Soviets Cancel Consular Level
Delegation's Visit to Israel
PARIS (JTA) The Soviet Union has canceled a
visit to Israel by a consular level delegation, Soviet Deputy
Foreign Minister Vladimir Petrovsky reportedly told a
press conference in Kuwait Sunday. He also ruled out
reestablishment of diplomatic relations with Israel, broken
by Moscow in 1967.
Petrovsky said the consular mission was to have
discussed Soviet property in Israel and related matters, but
"We have decided to cancel the visit" because Israel made
propaganda use of it.
HE SAID there would be no resumption of diplomatic
ties "until Israel announces its withdrawal from all oc-
cupied Arab countries and announces its agreement to an
international peace conference.
Reports from Jerusalem Monday said Israel had no
knowledge that the consular visit was canceled.
Cronkite, Buchwald To Receive
Hono^ry Degrees from Brandeis U.
FwmpVric* MtSS- ~ Sunday, May 17.
m er CBS anchorman ... Tt
Walter Cronkite and syn- Poet Adnenne Rich, U.S.
J'cated columnist Art Sen. Claiborne Pell (D R.I.)
Buchwald are among nine in- f"d I& ^f38-Prs,dent J
Jviduals who will receive ?e National Academy of
honorary degrees at Brandeis Sciences, also will receive
University's commencement honorary degrees at Brandeis.
BEING CAREFUL: Helmeted Israeli troops
stand near their half track watching
demonstrators near a roadblock in Ramallah.
Following serious riots in the West Bank, the
nearby University ofBir Zeit was closed. The
AP/Wide World Photo
riots resulted in the death of at least one per-
son and injuries to several others. Bir Zeit
University is a center for activist Palestinian
sentiment and was shut down for four months.
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Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 24, 1987
Linnas Deported To Russia,
Justice Has 'Triumphed' WJC
NEW YORK Karl Linnas
faces almost certain execution
in the Soviet Union, where he
arrived Tuesday. Linnas, an
accused Nazi war criminal,
was deported Monday to the
Soviet Union.
The Supreme Court refused
to block Linnas' deportation,
and a last-minute Justice
Department attempt to have
Panama accept Linnas failed.
Outside the courthouse, Lin-
nas' daughter continued to say
that "I'm going to try
everything I can to save my
father. He's been wrongly
deported to die. Hitler's and
Stalin's ghosts are probably
having a nice toast right now. '
ATTORNEY GENERAL
Edwin Meese refused to meet
with Linnas' daughter and
with the family attorney,
Larry Schilling. He authorized
the deportation to proceed.
A friend of the Linnas fami-
K/, Rein Olvert of Queens,
N.Y., was in the boarding area
followng Linnas' daughter's
plea that he witness the
departure.
"It seems they wanted to
punish him through any means
possible. That's wrong,"01vert
said. "I'm not saying he
shouldn't go on trial. If he did
what they say he did, he should
be punished."
"THERE REALLY is no
punishment that could ade-
quately be given out for the
crimes he and the others like
him committed," said Elan
Steinberg, World Jewish Con-
gress Executive Director.
"Justice has at last triumphed
over evil."
LINNAS ASYLUM: Eli M. Rosenbaum (left),
general counsel of the World Jewish Congress;
Menachem Z. Rosensaft, founder of the Inter-
national Network of the Children of Survivors
of the Holocaust; and Brooklyn, N.Y. District
Attorney Elizabeth Holtzman speak to
reporters outside the Panamanian Embassy
in Washington last week (April 15). The group
Background Report
Did Meese Plot Linnas' Freedom?
AP/Wide World Photo
met with Panamanian Ambassador
Dominador Kaiser Bazan to present
documents outlining allegations against ac-
cused Nazi war criminal Karl Linnas.
Panama suspended its decision to grant Lin-
nas asylum. Linnas is to be extradited from
the United States to the Soviet Union for war
crimes he committed during the Nazi era.
By MARGIE OLSTER
NEW YORK (JTA) The
World Jewish Congress accus-
ed Attorney General Edwin
Meese of protecting Nazi war
criminals and impeding justice
for Karl Linnas, the Nazi war
criminal who came within
hours last Wednesday of
receiving political asylum in
Panama and escaping deporta-
tion to the Soviet Union to face
war crimes charges.
While virtually the entire
Jewish community was
celebrating Passover, Meese
decided to deport Linnas to
Panama after 16 other coun-
tries had rejected asylum bids
for the man found guilty in
absentia in the Soviet Union of
executing men, women and
children in a Tartu, Estonia,
camp during the Holocaust.
ELAN STEINBERG, WJC
executive director, said WJC
officials learned Monday (April
13), durng the Seder, of
Meese's intentions from
government sources. The
sources said Panama had
agreed on April 10, five days
earlier, to grant Linnas
asylum, but Meese did not act
on the invitation until the
Passover holiday began,
Steinberg said.
Panama withdrew the offer
for asylum Wednesday
afternoon.
Had news of Meese's intend-
ed action not leaked out,
Steinberg said Linnas would
now be "vacationing" in a
free, safe haven in Panama,
where he would have disap-
peared and escaped justice
permanently.
"This was not a coincidence.
It was an attempt to catch the
Jewish community at a time
the Tartu camp were Linnas
was the camp commander.
Witnesses have testified that
Linnas would round up women
and children in mass pits and
shoot them in the head.
"LINNAS HAS more blood
on his hands than any other
Nazi war criminal in the
United States, "Steinberg said.
"The Panamanians were fool-
ed and deceived by those at-
tempting to help these w
criminals. When they were
alerted to the nature of this
person, they reversed their
decision within a matter of
hours."
Early last Wednesday the
Panamanian Embassy in
Washington announced the
plans for deportation would be
delayed until the case could be
further studied. Later in the
day, the Consul General in
New York issued a second
statement saying Linnas' re-
quest for asylum had been
denied.
"The Government of the
Republic of Panama echoes the
preoccupation of important
sectors of the Hebrew com-
munity and the rest of the
world that, as well as our coun-
try and our Government, re-
ject and condemn the crimes
committed by fascism." the
statement said.
With this, Panama became
the 17th country to refuse Lin-
nas asylum. And barring a
decision by Meese to deport
Linnas to the scene of his
alleged crimes in the Soviet
Union, that search will likely
continue.
Continued on Page 15-A
When you're not quite ready
to go home... we can help.
Edwin Meese
when it could not react,"
Steinberg said.
"Meese seems to show a
greater sensitivity for Nazis
than he does for their vic-
tims," he said.
THE WJC officials im-
mediately contacted represen-
tatives of Panama in the U.S.
the Ambassador, the UN Am-
bassador and the Panamanian
Consul General in New York.
The WJC also informed the
Jewish community of Panama
of the decision.
On Tuesday, Eli Rosenbaum,
WJC general counsel,
Menachem Rosensaft (April
14), chairman of the Interna-
tional Network of Children of
Jewish Holocaust Survivors,
and Brooklyn District At-
torney Elizabeth Holtzman,
who authored legislation for
the deportation of Nazi war
criminals, left New York for
Washington to meet the
Panamanian officials.
Some 12,000 people died in
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I
MK in Miami
Israel Can't Afford Coalition Split
Friday, April 24, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
By ELLEN ANN STERN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
The Israel coalition govern-
ment is deeply divided over the
issue of an international peace
conference in the Mideast, but
Israel, unlike any other nation,
cannot afford "the luxury" of
living without a coalition
government, said Avidov
Cohen, a member of the Likud
Party and Deputy Speaker of
the Knesset.
Cohen was in Miami this
week before joining two other
Knesset members on a two-
day visit to Honduras followed
by attendance at the Inter-
parliamentary Conference in
Nicaragua.
THE TWO main factions of
the coalition, Likud and Labor,
have been divided over the
idea of an international peace
conference, which Cohen says
he totally opposes.
"On our part, we see such a
conference as an Arab excuse
to evade direct negotiations
and recognize Israel. We think
that sovereign state can never
allow its fate to be decided by
strangers," Cohen said.
The key areas that might
eventually be subject for
negotiation as the possible site
for an autonomous Palestinian
national entity are the West
Bank and Gaza strip also
known by their biblical names,
Judea and Samaria. That area
was recently the site of
violence when a Molotov
cocktail was thrown into the
car of an Israeli family, killing
a pregnant woman.
"SOME OF the Jewish
residents of Judea-Samaria
tried to retaliate. I am against
that," Cohen said. "I don't
think they should take the law
into their own hands. They
should leave it to the govern-
ment. On the other hand, the
government must use very
hard force in order to sustain
order. People who are caught
should be expelled from the
country."
Addressing the tension bet-
ween the coalition partners,
Cohen predicted that it would
remain united at least until
next year. "I think so, and I
hope so," he added.
And if there were to be an
early election, Cohen predicts
that the outcome would be the
same, another coalition with
Labor and Likud as the domi-
nant partners.
"THE AIM of the Arab peo-
ple is to expel the Jewish peo-
ple into the sea. We need the
Israeli people in a coalition to
overcome the difficulties of the
state the economy and
defense problems."
The issue of the peace con-
ference has come out in bitter
verbal barbs that party leaders
have thrown at each other, but
it has not come to the Knesset
for a formal vote. "I think and
hope it will be turned down,"
Cohen said. "If there is disap-
proval, maybe this thing will
bring the election nearer."
Israel should enter direct
negotiations with its Arab
neighbors in the same way
Israel and Egypt negotiated a
peace treaty, Cohen said.
"I THINK (Jordan's King)
Hussein would like very much
to talk to us," Cohen said.
"He's afraid. Arab leaders are
afraid of suffering the same
fate Sadat did," Cohen said of
Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat, who was assassinated.
"They've got to take the
courage Sadat had and talk
together with us without
preconditions."
Asked about relations with
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the Soviet Union, Cohen said
they are not warming. "Nor-
mal relations are warm. Now,
there are no relations at all.
When they say they will
release 100,000 Jews, then I
will call it relations."
One of the issues that Cohen
said the Israel delegation will
try to bring up for a vote at the
Nicaraguan conference is the
topic of Jews in the Soviet
Union.
"BUT YOU know an inter-
national conference would in-
clude many countries opposed
to Israel," Cohen said. "These
include the Soviet Union. We
know beforehand it (the vote
at the Nicaragua conference)
won't pass, but we'll hope to
arouse public opinion. Israel
and Jews all over the world
will not forsake their brothers
and will not hold peace talks
until those who wish to leave
the Soviet Union can come
home. Jews don't emigrate,
they come home."
Cohen said other issues that
will be discussed during the
Nicaraguan conference are the
Iran-Iraq War, the elimination
of tariffs and other barriers,
and the contribution of
parliaments to the world for an
international peace
conference.
On the subject of inflation,
Cohen said the percentage has
dropped from 600 percent to
about 22 percent a year.
"ONLY A coalition between
the two big parties could
achieve that. That's why I see
the importance of this coali-
tion. Plan for economic expan-
sion should come from two
parties. To split would lead to
unrest. We cannot afford the
luxury of one party as you
have in the United States and
other countries.
"I think also that the Jewish
people in Israel need the
Jewish people outside of Israel
the same way as the Jewish
people living outside need
Israel. We must cooperate
together for the future and
safety of our future."
Cohen said he doesn't refer
to the existence of Jews out-
side of Israel as living in Galut
or diaspora. "Everyone living
outside is doing it on their own
free will."
He added that Israel is
"sorry that we invest much of
our riches in defending our
country. We should be glad if
we could invest more in
developing Israel and in help-
ing the neighboring countries
Meir H aber, Israeli
businessman, editor, writer
and lecturer, has been ap-
pointed national Israeli
representative of the Jewish
National Fund of America.
to develop. This can be done
only after peace in the area.
And I think the Jews living
outside Israel can help us to
achieve these goals and
hopes."
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridim/Friday, April 24, 1987
International Confab
'Peace' Move Receives New Spurt of Energy

By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The move for an international
conference as a means of br-
inging about negotiations bet-
ween Israel and the Arab
countries, particularly Jordan,
seems to have received a new
spurt of life in recent weeks.
But there seems as little
chance of it actually coming
about as it did when King Hus-
sein of Jordan first proposed it
in Washington last year in
order to provide him with an
"umbrella" for negotiations
with Israel.
This would be true even if
there was no split in Israel's
national unity government bet-
ween Labor and Likud over
the issue. Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres was in Europe
two weeks ago promoting the
idea, while Premier Yitzhak
Shamir reiterated his firm op-
position to such a conference.
THIS SITUATION could
change if the Soviet Union
were to restore diplomatic
relations with Israel, broken
since the 1967 Six-Day War.
Hussein has demanded that
the international conference
include the five permanent
members of the United Na-
tions Security Council, two of
whom, the Soviet Union and
the People's Republic of
China, do not have diplomatic
relations with Israel.
Both the Reagan Ad-
ministration and Israel have
rejected Soviet participation
until Moscow restores
diplomatic ties with Israel.
Although China is rarely men-
tioned in this context, it too
would have to open relations
with Israel before it could par-
ticipate in an international
conference.
The Soviet Union, which has
joined the effort pressing for
an international conference,
apparently sees it as a way for
Moscow to be dealt into the
Middle East peace process.
The Kremlin has been dropp-
ing hints about restoring rela-
tions and the increased Jewish
emigration from the USSR
may also have something to do
with this.
PERES RETURNED home
encouraged from a meeting in
Rome with two Soviet officials
and more may be learned when
Soviet officials visit Israel this
month, ostensibly to inspect
Soviet property there.
There was no public sign
during Secretary of State
George Shultz's meetings in
Moscow last week. But when
Shultz was asked at a press
conference whether he would
discuss an international con-
ference with the Soviets, he
appeared to reject it.
Shultz reiterated his position
that the "object is greater
stability and, in the end,
peaceful relationships between
countries in the Middle East."
He said the U.S. believes the
way to achieve this objective
"is through bilateral, direct
negotiations. Now the Jorda-
nians feel, and many others
feel, that there may be a role
for an international conference
in getting us to that point. We
have been exploring with the
Jordanians and others
whether or not such a useful
role can be defined and just
how that would work."
NOW THAT PLO chief
Yasir Arafat has just scrapped
his treaty with King Hussein,
the prospects for the King's
continued "support" may dim.
Shultz, after his meetings
with Shamir earlier this year
and with Jordanian Prime
Minister Zeid Rifai two weeks
ago, stressed that the U.S. was
willing to explore an interna-
tional conference as a means of
bringing about direct negotia-
tions, but not as a substitute
for it. Shultz said direct
negotiations were needed to
reach an agreement between
Israel and a Jordanian-
Palestinian delegation and
Israel and Syria.
Rifai, in his comments after
meeting with Shultz, seemed
to be moving away from Jor-
dan's willingness to discuss
just the West Bank and Gaza.
"We're not talking about
peace between Jordan and
Israel," he said. "We're talk-
ing about a comprehensive set-
tlement of the Arab-Israeli
problem."
He explained this included
negotiations about the Golan
Heights, south Lebanon as
well as the Palestinian pro-
blem, which he said was "at
the core of the Middle East
conflict."
FORMER President Carter,
during his recent Mideast visit,
also called for an international
conference to reach a com-
prehensive settlement. The
Carter Administration was
moving to an international
conference with the Soviet
Union in 1977 when Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat made
his historic visit to Jerusalem
which eventually led to direct
negotiations between Israel
and Egypt and the Egyptian-
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Israeli Peace Treaty.
Carter also said that in his
talks with Syrian President
Hafez Assad, the Syrian leader
expressed a willingness to at-
tend such a conference, a
change from his earlier
opposition.
When Israeli Ambassador
Meir Rosenne was asked about
this, he pointed to former
Secretary of State Henry Kiss-
inger's experience in 1974. As
Kissinger relates it in his
memoirs, he and Assad had a
long talk in which they finally
agreed about a proposed
Geneva conference, but when
Kissinger asked about a
preference for dates, Assad
replied it didn't matter since
Syria would not attend.
THERE IS some suspicion
that Assad's change of heart
may have more to do with the
Soviet desire to be part of the
Mideast peace process than
any Syrian desire for
negotiations.
Even if a mode for an inter-
national conference could be
found, there is still the ques-
tion of who represents the
Palestinians. Israel, and this
includes both Labor and
Likud, rejects any negotia-
PSH8 *" the Palestine
Liberation Organization.
The US. rejects any deal-
ings with the PLO until itlr
cepts UN Security Co^j
Resolutions 242 and 338 and
recognizes Israel's right to ex
.st. Even Carter accepts
position though he said that
since leaving the Presidency
Foreign Minister Peres
was encouraged by his
meeting with Soviet
diplomats in Rome.
he has felt free to meet with
members of the PLO.
JORDAN AND other Arab
countries would no doubt press
for PLO participation. The
Jordanians have been saying
for over a year that the PLO is
ready to accept the Security *
Council resolutions, although
every time the terrorist
organization appears to be on
the verge of doing so publicly
it pulls back.
Israel insists that Palesti-
nian members of a Jordanian-
Palestinian delegation must
come from the West Bank and
Gaza. Efforts have been made
for over a year to come up with
some names. Although several
have received the approval of
Peres such a delegation is still
a major stumbling block in the
effort to bring about
negotiations.
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JTAAVZN News Photo
Maj. Gen. Dan Shomron (right) Sunday took from retiring Lt. Gen. Moshe Levy. Shomron
over as the Israel Defense Force Chief of Staff became a lieutenant general in the process.
Levy Retires
Shomron Is Israel's New Chief of Staff
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Supreme com-
mand of the Israel Defense Force chang-
ed hands Sunday when retiring Chief of
Staff Lt. Gen. Moshe Levy turned over
his pennant and insignia of rank to his
successor, Maj. Gen. Dan Shomron, who
was promptly promoted to Lt. Gen. by
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin.
BOTH SENIOR officers received per-
sonal congratulations from President
Chaim Herzog, Premier Yitzhak Shamir
and Rabin. Shomron was received by an
honor guard at IDF general headquarters
and went to his office to chair his first
meeting of the IDF high command.
Levy drove to his home in Kibbutz Beth
Alfa where he donned civilian clothes
after 33 years in uniform. His immediate
plans are not known. He expects to go to
the U.S. for advanced university studies.
Shomron, 50, now Israel's 13th Chief of
Staff, was born in Kibbutz Ashdod
Yaacov in the Jordan Valley and began
his military career in 1956 as a
paratrooper.
HE COMMANDED an armored divi-
sion in Sinai during the Six-Day War,
later served as commander of the
southern front and in numerous staff jobs,
rising to Deputy Chief of Staff before his
appointment early this year to supreme
commander.
He is best known to the Israeli public as
the planner of "Operation Jonathan," the
long-range rescue of hostages from
Entebbe airport in Uganda on July 4,
1976.
Shultz Asked To Demand Release of UN Info
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The Commission on Social Ac-
tion of the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations
(UAHC) sent a telegram to
Secretary of State George
Shultz Monday urging him to
demand the release of informa-
tion on Nazi war criminals
from the United Nations.
The Reform Judaism group
authorized the telegram at a
"Consultation on Conscience"
which opened here Sunday
night to mark the 25th an-
niversary of the UAHC's
Religious Action Center here.
THE TELEGRAM, signed
by Harris Gilbert, chairman of
the commission, asked Shultz
to urge UN Secretary General
Javier Perez de Cuellar to
allow public access to the UN
files on Nazi war criminals. De
Cuellar rejected last month a
similar request from Binyamin
Netanyahu, Israel's Am-
bassador to the UN.
"The War Crimes Commis-
sion, in giving these files to the
UN, never intended that the
records be hidden from the
UN," the telegram to Shultz
said. "The UN action in keep-
ing them under lock and key
has no standing in law and no
moral justification. "We
respectfully urge you to de-
mand that the files be made
available to all scholars,
researchers and students."
Friday, April 24, 1967/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Poles Say 'Shoah' Shows
Distorted Picture of Anti-Semitism
Continued from Page 5-A
War II, the Jews in Poland
numbered some three-and-a-
half million people out of a
total population ... of only
about 34 million This mass
of Jews was able through the
centuries to develop their own
society and their own culture.
"Their freedom to pursue
traditional faith in peace and
to cultivate an autonomous
way of life affecting education,
language, dress and even the
administration of justice enabl-
ed them to cohere into one of
the greatest Jewish com-
munities of all time," remind-
ed Harold B. Siegel, director
of the Columbia University In-
stitute on East Central Europe
in a paper presented at the
1983 conference on "Poles and
Jews: Myth and Reality in the
Historical Context."
"To argue that this occurred
despite the Poles, or in the
face of Polish hostility, or
Polish repression, would be to
ignore the evidence of
numbers," he commented.
DURING THE past several
years, Polish Americans and
Jewish Americans have been
engaged in a dialogue designed
to bring about a closer
understanding of the tragedy
of both peoples leading to a
mutual trust and cooperation.
We are concerned that,
through its tendentious ac-
cusations, generalizations and
distortions of historical facts,
"Shoah" does a grave disser-
vice to both communities in
that it tends to polarize them
in their often misguided
perceptions of their mutual
history and prevents coopera-
tion in their common interest.
We must not allow this to
happen.
Also signing this article were
Helen Zielinski, vice president,
Polish American Congress;
Kazimierz Lukomski, vice
president; Bernard B.
Rogalski, secretary general;
and Edward G. Dykla,
treasurer.
Two Israeli Soldiers Killed
In S. Lebanon Security Zone
TEL AVIV (JTA) Two
Israeli soldiers were killed,
and two were wounded slightly
in an ambush in the south
Lebanon security zone. The
dead, Cpl. Ilan Haziza of
Raanana and Sgt. Ronen
Ayalon of Kiryat Motzkin,
both 20, were buried Sunday
at cemeteries near their
homes.
According to a military
spokesman, the ambush occur-
red near Kantara village about
eight kilometers from the
Israel border and was carried
out by a squad of Hezbullah,
the extremist Shiite group.
They opened fire on an Israel
Defense Force patrol with
machine guns and rocket-
propelled grenades.
The Israeli unit returned the
fire and is believed to have
caused casualites though no
bodies were found in the vicini-
ty. Reports from Lebanon said
the attack was followed by ex-
tensive Israeli air bombard-
ment, artillery and tank fire
which killed several villagers.
IDF attack helicopters strafed
villages in the area all day
Saturday, the Lebanese
reports said.
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday April 24, 1987
In the Goldene Medina, Jews
Were 'Sha ShtilT Generation
Continued from Page 4-A
better things and better jobs.
Jews were salesmen, bankers,
manufacturers. Jews'
dominated the movie business.
Why make a fuss if people
made fun of us or didn't like us
or told jokes in terrible taste?
Hadn't it always been so? So
what? This is bad? Relax, don't
pay any attention to them.
In the shtetls of Europe,
Jews were shut off from their
Gentile neighbors until the
neighbors got restless. Then
the Jews were forced to
become acutely aware of the
attitudes around them.
Sometimes it was a pogrom,
sometimes it was expulsion, in
the '30's it became much more,
much worse.
DR. DEBORAH
LIPSTADT has written yet
another telling documentation
of what happens when we ig-
nore the plight of other Jews,
no matter how far away. Titled
"Beyond Belief: The American
Press and the Coming of the
Holocaust 1933-1945," the
book documents what is seem-
ingly a conspiracy of false
reporting, silence and distor-
tion that goes beyond any sim-
ple mishandling of not easily
verified information.
But you know what is really
scary? The New York Times,
among other major
newspapers, is owned and
operated by Jews, and the
Times allowed deliberate
distortion of the news of the
Holocaust and held back infor-
mation from the public.
Unforgiveable!
But before I become
Bolivia Given
Strong Protests
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Two international Jewish
organizations have lodged
strong protests with the Boli-
vian government for granting
diplomatic status to the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion which has had an office in
La Paz since 1982.
Israel Singer, secretary
general of the World Jewis
Congress, and Seymour Reich,
international president of
B'nai B'rith, expressed shock,
concern and disappointment
over the move which they saw
as a dangerous precedent for
other Latin American coun-
tries. According to the WJC,
the Israel Embassy in La Paz
and the local Jewish communi-
ty have also objected
vehemently.
SINGER, in a telegram to
the Bolivian Ambassador, Fer-
nando Illanes de la Riva, said,
"Our protest in this regard
arises from the nature of the
PLO which has not renounced
terrorism and whose violent
history is all too well known."
Reich said in a statement
issued in Washington that
"There is little questions that
this move will be taken by the
terrorist organization and its
supporters as an endorsement
of their extremist and violent
activities which they claim to
perform in the name of
justice." He said B'nai B'rith
urges the Bolivian government
to reconsider its move.
judgmental, I have to look
deep within myself. I was only
three years old in 1933. But I
was 14 in 1944, a bright, in-
volved 14-year-old. I read
vociferously. I knew of
General Doolittle and "Skin-
ny" Wainwright and B-17's
and Spitfires and Dresden and
Coventry.
WHY DID I not know of the
first two-million of the six-
million? Where was my voice
at junior high school? Where
were my questions at the din-
ner table?
I wrote some months ago of
the inaction of organized
American Jewry at the time,
but now I am wondering about
the rest of us. Did we have
such a trust in our government
loaded, interestingly
enough, with Jewish cabinet
officers and advisers that
we could not believe that they
would allow such a thing? That
there must be some mistake?
Or could it be that we just
had it so good, that things
were going so well, that we
didn't want to rock the boat?
Could it be that we were so
happy to be "not the kind they
mean" that we would bury our
heads to what was going on in
Europe?
SUCH AN attitude seems
impossible 40-plus years later.
But not at that time. We had it
good. The war had ended the
depression with a bang. Why
make a fuss? Well, now we
know why. And never again,
right?
But how fast are we to jump
on an American bandwagon in
the '80's? Who did the
American Jews get angry in
the wake of the Pollard affair?
Not America for withholding
information vital to Israel. No,
rather the anger is directed at
Israel for endangering the
status of American Jewry.
When America came down
on the side of Syria and very
close to the PLO in 1982 dur-
ing the Lebanese war, plenty
of American Jews were ready
to trash Israel, using the infor-
mation from the same
American press which had
misled its public on the
Holocaust all those years
before.
WELL, God knows we got it
good today. We drive fancy
cars, we live out retirement in
a heavenly climate, our
businesses prosper. We give
money to Jewish charities and
build some fairly decent com-
munities. We fit right in. Fit in
so well that assimilation and
intermarriage are eating up
our people at a faster rate than
the organized butchery of all
the generations ever did. Our
girls get nose jobs, our boys
marry gentiles and "let the
kids decide for themselves on
being Jewish."
Please, God, this generation
will never face the threat faced
in the '30's. When you read
books like Dr. Lipstadt's, or
"While Six Million Died," you
wonder. Many of the writers
and editors as well as the
government advisers of the
time are still alive.
Would we, as Jews, remain
Sha ShtiU again? Would we
look at our neighborhood, no
longer Jewish in nature, at our
lifestyle, so far removed from
the shtetl and be happy that we
are "not the kind they mean"?
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.
The Film 'Shoah'
Horrors Will Not Be Forgotten
Friday, April 24, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 18-A

Continued from Page 5-A
suffice.^And for those whose
television exposure to the
Holocaust has been limited to
Joan Collins' mini-series and a
Kojak special, "Shoah" can be
startling revelation.
There is the image of Henrik
Gawkowski, a Polish
locomotive engineer, reliving
unfeelingly the train ride to
hell he helmed so many years
ago, carting Jews off to almost
definite death at Treblinka.
There is the grotesque non-
chalance of an SS guard
casually descrining the crema-
tion of Jews, noting "People
burn very well."
THE INTERVIEW with
Franz Suchomel, done surrep-
titiously by Lanzmann with a
hidden camera, has the former
SS Unterscharfuhrer poo-
poohing the "exaggerated"
number of Jews gassed at
Treblinka. No, he says with
contempt for inaccuracy,
18,000 Jews were not killed
dailv it was only between
12.000 and 15,000 Jews.
The concern over such a
numerical distortion reflects
only more vividly the Nazi's
distorted view of their goal of
genocide.
To live with such interviews
inside his head and tearing at
his heart, Lanzmann admits,
was not an easy task.
"Shoah," Hebrew for annihila-
tion, had a devastating effect
on the film-maker.
But he persisted, not solely
as a film-maker but as one
driven by a need to accomplish
the near-impossible: distill
some of mankind's most bar-
baric and inexplicable acts into
a work which could be
understood by the masses.
"I HAD a kind of mission in-
side myself," says Lanzmann.
"I had to fulfill this mission."
It was not without its costs.
He was beaten, harangued,
dismissed by those who
thought either the Holocaust
was a mistake only in that it
did not succeed or that it was a
reminder of a past best left
alone.
"The real question is why I
started, why I continued,"
says Lanzmann. "Why I went
on in spite of all the terrible
things I heard. It was a war to
make this," a war in which
there were few survivors.
"Yes," adds the director, "I
could have given up. I thought
of it several times. It was so
difficult, the inquiries in Ger-
many, they took so long, so
many failures."
There were other problems,
such as funding. "But let's not
talk about that," says Lanz-
mann. He will talk about what
it felt like to devote so much
time to one project. "It was
very sad to do such a work and
disappear from the world for
so long."
THERE WERE those who
would have liked Lanzmann to
disappear from the face of the
earth. "Of course I was
scared," he says of dealing
with the subject.
But the risks, Lanzmann will
tell you, were worth it. And
now with Channel 2 and other
public television stations about
to show "Shoah," the film-
maker feels vindicated.
"Now it will be seen by a
Holocaust Awareness week will be celebrated during the week
beginning Sunday, April 26. In Miami, a community wide com-
memoration is scheduled Sunday, 7:30 p.m., at Beth Torah Con-
gregation. This article by Michael Elkin, entertainment editor of
Philadelphia's Jewish Exponent, features an in-depth interview
with Claude Lanzmann, director of the nine-and-a-half hour film,
Shoah, which will be shown as a mini-series Monday throuqh
Thursday on WPBT, Channel 2, Miami.
Survivors in concentration camp uniforms arrive in Israel in
1948.
much greater number of peo-
ple" than was possible by
theatrical showings, says
Lanzmann.
"At first, I thought the best
way to see 'Shoah' was to see
it in the cinema. But according
to what I've learned since, it is
fine to watch it on any
medium." The film has been
broadcast globally, both on
television and theaters.
LANZMANN admits initial-
ly he felt that the length of the
documentary would prove
disadvantageous for a televi-
sion screening. However, the
way it is being shown, in
segments, "will not destroy
the feeling, the impact, for the
viewer."
He hopes, at the very least,
the impact will be greater than
that of the fictional movies and
television episodes dealing
with the era, citing in par-
ticular "Holocaust," the
watershed NBC-TV mini-
series first aired in 1977 which
served as a progenitor for
other television specials.
That mini-series served a
purpose, says Lanzmann, as
did other films. Nevertheless,
"Holocaust" and its offspring
had limited impact. "I don't
think they were very effec-
tive," says Lanzmann.
The Holocaust is "a
challenge for any kind of fic-
tion," says Lanzmann, echoing
the sentiments of sur-
vivor/author Wiesel. "How do
you depict such a thing?
"What I have done with
'Shoah' is completely dif-
ferent. Other works tried to do
something about nothingness
with nothing; they trivialized,
they made a kind of
transgression."
THERE IS no actor
talented enough, says Lanz-
mann, to depict the very real
horrors real people endured.
"Actors can not act such a
thing. The people in 'Shoah'
went through this," the real
horrors, says Lanzmann. "In a
way, they become actors."
But the scenes were oh too
real. "If you take the film
'Holocaust,' when they show
the gas chambers, they show
something too glamorous."
Lanzmann is adamant in his
belief that "fiction is a poor
way to show this."
Showing archival footage
was not the route to take
either, says Lanzmann.
"When I do something, I
prefer to do it myself," he
says. "I do not show footage;
there is nothing to see. What is
to show of Treblinka? You just
have stones. There is nothing
of Sobibor," the extermination
camp which just two weeks
ago was the focus of a CBS-TV
film.
DESPITE its length,
"Shoah" has captivated au-
diences worldwide.
"Everywhere the film has
been shown," says Lanzmann,
"whether it be Israel or Ger-
many, young people rush to
see it. The truth of 'Shoah'
becomes true for them."
Not everyone has welcomed
"Shoah" with open arms. In-
deed, Polish response had been
hostile the Polish govern-
ment had asked the French in
1985 not to broadcast the film
because it "contained
outrageous insinuations on the
alleged collaboration of the
Polish people in the
Holocaust."
Lanzmann reacted by say-
ing, "What the film shows is a
gut anti-Semitism born of
medieval-like relgious
devotion."
Poland, however, eventually
purchased "Shoah" for broad-
cast in its own country. The
film drew this critique from
Jerzy Turowics, editor of
Tygodnik Powszechny, a
Catholic weekly publication:
"There is a clear thesis on
Lanzmann's part that because
Poles had been anti-Semitic
. .. Poles are apparently co-
responsible in some way (for
the Holocaust), and this is ab-
solutely groundless."
"SHOAH," has provided
fertile grounds for educating
the world about the Holocaust,
Polish concerns notwithstan-
ding. "There is something
driving me to do this,
something that is higher than
me," says Lanzmann. "I have
a commitment to show the
world" the Jewish experience,
whether it be through
"Shoah" or his "Why Israel."
"I have given a lot of years
of my life to this field,"
without any regrets, adds
Lanzmann.
He has learned much. In fin-
ding that "the Germany of the
past has a collective guilt" for
the Holocaust, he also finds
that "you can not say the Ger-
many of today is guilty. But
they have a responsibility to
face the past."
And that means facing the
past fully. "They can not
hide," says Lanzmann.
"Everybody has to find a way
to cope with the past. I get ex-
traordinary letters from Ger-
mans who saw 'Shoah' who say
they must find some way to
live with this."
Lanzmann himself must now
live with his accomplishment
the truths unleashed, the
horrors relived. Could a
Holocaust happen again?
"NOT LIKE this," he says
of the Nazi reign of terror.
"This was a unique event in
mankind, but one can see other
massacres happening."
Although "Shoah" has been
called by many the definitive
work on the Holocaust, its
creator disagrees.
No, says Lanzmann, captur-
ing the Holocaust is an elusive
quest. "There is no end to this
story," says Lanzmann.
Protect Press,
Court Orders
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Supreme Court has issued a
landmark decision upholding
the right of journalists to pro-
tect their sources of informa-
tion, except in the most serious
cases of wrong-doing.
Supreme Court President
Justice Meir Shamgar ruled
that a journalist must reveal
his sources only if a crime car-
rying a five-year maximum
sentence or a lesser crime with
grave consequences, was in-
volved. He said in the case of a
serious civil crime, disclosure
would be required only if it
was essential in the interests
of justice.
THE RULING was on the
case of two journalists, Ben-
Zion Citrin and Yifat Nevo,
who appealed to the high court
against a demand by the Israel
Bar Association's disciplinary
tribunal that they reveal the
sources of published informa-
tion in the trial of two lawyers
charged with violating the
Bar's code of ethics.
For 1,918 Passovers
We Have Been Telling Our Children
"Next Year In Jerusalem."
It's Our Turn to Keep the Promise.
Choose from a variety of excitingly different
high school and college-age programs.
Touring Study Kibbutz ____
Archeology Art Tennis
Camping Religious Programs
and many more sponsored by the
American Zionist Youth Foundation
One address for youth programs in Israel.
Israel Activities Department
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation Q
4200 Biscayne Boulevard /\ A ,. r_/^t_~r-
Call (305) 576-4000 ^I^C^C^^


Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 24, 1987
In Miami
'How Free Is Free Press?,' AJComm. To Ask
Miami Chapter of the
American Jewish Committee
will celebrate its 35th anniver-
sary with a program entitled
"How Free is Freedom of the
Press?"
The program will take place
May 7, 6 p.m., at the Omni In-
ternational Hotel. Special
features of the evening will in-
clude a discussion panel of
local media personalities, a
special award to Congressman
William Lehman, and the elec-
tion of chapter officers.
The program panel will be
keynoted by Prof. Lemuel
Schofield, associate dean,
School of Communication at
the University of Miami. His
theme will be whether the first
amendment is being held cap-
tive by corporate America.
AUDREY FINKELSTEIN,
host of WLRN's "Straight
Talk" show, will moderate a
panel whose participants are
Susan Candiotti, investigative
reporter, WPLG-Ch. 10; Jim
Hampton, Editorial Page
Michael Adler
Michael Adler
Will Receive
ADL Network
Award
Michael M. Adler will
receive the 1987 Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith Network Leadership
Award at a dinner on April 30
at the Omni International
Hotel.
Dinner chairman Jeffrey L.
Berkowitz said that Adler is
being honored by the ADL
Network "for his qualities as a
superb leader, an exemplary
citizen, and an innovator
whose community service em-
bodies ADL's highest ideals."
The ADL Network is a group
of leaders ranging in age from
25 to 40.
As president and chief ex-
ecutive officer of Adler Group,
Inc., Adler is involved in real
estate, finance and banking.
He is an officer and board
member of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. His many
activities also include United
Way and the University of
Miami.
editor, Miami Herald; Carl
Hiassen, columnist, Miami
Herald; Salvador Lew, general
manager, WRHC; and, Don
Wright, editorial cartoonist,
Miami News.
Congressman Lehman will
receive a special Meritorious
Service Award for two special
projects he and Committee are
involved in. The first was a
series of year-long secret
negotiations with the East
German government which
culminated in permission for a
rabbi to perform Passover ser-
vices in East Berlin. Lehman,
who will be returning from
East Germany, will announce
whether the government will
allow the program to be
permanent.
Lehman has also been in-
volved with the chapter's
Alvin Cassel Pilot Project on
Black-Jewish Relations.
Lehman has been instrumental
in bringing together Liberty
City and North Miami Beach
the ORIGINAL
black and Jewish leadershin
with AJC. The meeting wS
culminate in a project mutually
selected by the group which
will become part of the two
year AJC effort in black
Jewish programming.
ROGER BERNSTEIN will
deliver his farewell remarks as
outgoing president, and
nominating committee chair
man Shepard King will call for
the election of officers and
board members. The new slate
is headed by Michael Bander.
Co-chairmen for the evening
Irt J?rian Denb^g and
Robert Waxman.
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Friday, April 24, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
Meese Charged With Passover
Plot To Save Karl Linnas
Zakha r Zunshain (second from left), who was
recently released from a Soviet prison and
allowed to emigrate to Israel, participates in
the National Conference on Soviet Jewry's
Israel Seminar. With him are (left, to right)
Minister Without Portfolio Moshe Arens;
Seminar Chairman Charlotte Jacobson, who
is also treasurer of the Jewish National Fund;
and NCSJ Executive Director Jerry
Goodman.
Woody Allen
'Radio Days': A Quiet Jew-Hatred
By LOUISE COHEN
According to film maker
Woody Allen, those wonderful
"Radio Days" of long ago are
to be respected and
remembered. For where else
could young and old be swept
into a wondrous world of
make-believe by the mere
twist of the dial?
Allen deftly directs and nar-
rates his new film, observing
the impact of radio on an en-
tire nation, including himself,
during World War II.
His movie family of eight,
living in a private house at a
beach area near New York Ci-
ty, includes the grandparents,
Uncle Abe (Josh Mostel), Aunt
Ceil (Renee Lippin) and the at-
tractive, unattached aunt
(Dianne Wiest) constantly in
search of "the right man/'
As seen through the eyes of
the inquisitive, impressionable
12-year-old Joe (Seth Green), a
portrayal of Woody, the
mother (Julie Kavner) and
father (Michael Tucker) "were
a happy couple, even though
they argued a lot."
WITH THEIR confined liv-
ing quarters, the constant fear
about the war, the rationing
and blackouts, no wonder the
family was nervous.
But radio had its special
tranquilizing effect, and peo-
ple's problems seemed mild
compared to those en-
countered by their radio
heroes.
Narrator Allen claims to
have "inside information"
about the lives of celebrities
during those "Radio Days,"
citing, for example, the
cigarette girl (Mia Farrow)
who succumbs to the rooftop
amours of a persistent male
(Allen).
Technically, this film brings
us a kaleidoscope of intriguing
characters, settings and
scenes. It is a glitzy,
glamorous, yet gracious
presentation of the men and
women who heroically brought
Joy mto the lives of countless
"naividuals through their
sincerity, talent and dedication
to their craft.
Many of Allen's fans con-
sider him to be a comedic
genius, yet one of his main
targets are Jewish foibles
with a demeaning and
denigrating result. Two ex-
amples came to mind from
"Radio Days."
IN ONE, the 12-year-old
pilfers the Jewish National
Fund collection box in order to
buy the ring advertised on his
radio program. The rabbi at
the Hebrew school summons
the boy's parents to his office.
They are astonished to hear of
the crime, then infuriated.
How could their clean-cut
yeshiva boy so humiliate them?
The boy apologizes to the
rabbi, then with a courtly,
salutary gesture, says, "I now
take leave of you, my loyal and
faithful companion." The au-
dience howls, but Allen has
dismissed deliberate dishones-
ty under the guise of humor.
In the other foray, the
heavy-set, food-obsessed Uncle
Abe is fasting on Yom Kippur
with the rest of the family. A
neighbor's radio blares, and he
is angry. "It's the High Holy
Day," he yells. "You should be
praying, not playing your
radio."
Ignored, he storms over to
their house, and is gone more
than two hours. When he
returns, he's hostile.
"Everyone has a right to do
what they want to," he booms.
"Starving is not the only way
to atone for one's sins." Then
he gives out a tremendous
belch.
A FEW MINUTES later, he
gets excruciating abdominal
pains. Filled with remorse,
he's afraid he's dying because
of his indiscretion.
Why has Allen challenged
Jewish values and tradition
with a dismal, degrading
depiction of Jewish family life?
Is his religious insecurity so
great that he must camouflage
his antagonism in humor? It
puts a dour damper on an
otherwise lovely movie.
JTA Services
i
Continued from Page 8-A
MEESE'S MISSING
signature on the deportation
paperwork is the only thing
blocking the execution of a
Supreme Court order to
deport Linnas to the Soviet
Union. All appeals, except one
which is still pending, to
reverse the deportation order
have been denied.
Meese's decision to deport
Linnas to Panama met with
dissension from Justice
Department officials who in-
cluded Neal Sher, head of the
Office of Special Investiga-
tions which seeks and pro-
secutes Nazi war criminals in
this country, according to
press reports Thursday.
Sher and others in the
Justice Department have pur-
sued Linnas' prosecution and
deportation for some nine
years. He faced nine tribunals
before he was stripped of his
U.S. citizenship for lying about
his past to immigration of-
ficials when he entered the
country in the 1950s. He was
then ordered to be deported to
the Soviet Union. Linnas is
currently imprisoned in lower
Manhattan in an Immigration
and Naturalization service
(INS) prison.
MEESE'S HANDLING of
Linnas' case is not the only
war crimes case which has met
with scathing criticisms within
the Jewish community. Meese
has dragged his feet for almost
a year now on the Justice
Department's recommenda-
tion that Austrian President
Kurt Waldheim be barred
from the U.S. because of his
Nazi affiliations during World
War II.
Steinberg called Meese's ac-
tions a "shocking pattern" of
impairing justice for Nazi war
criminals. "Nazi war criminals
have a great protector in the
name of Attorney General Ed-
win Meese," Steinberg said.
Separate Issue,
Says Shamir
TEL AVIV (JTA) Premier
Yitzhak Shamir said, last Thurs-
day, that the plight of Soviet Jews
should be considered apart from
Israel's policies toward the Soviet
Union and must not be "held
hostage" to Israeli negotiations
with Moscow.
Addressing representatives of
the American Council for Soviet
Jewry in Jerusalem, Shamir also
complained that American Jews
are not doing enough to persuade
the U.S. to abolish refugee status
for Jews leaving the USSR
TREES, KIDS
AND POWER LINES
CANBEA
DEADLY MIX.
Ordinarily, power
lines are quite harmless.
But when a tree grows
up close to a power line,
climbing the tree could
be dangerous. Especially
if your child tries to reach
up and touch a power line
with a stick, a pole or anything.
And under certain conditions,
such as wet weather, if a branch
makes contact with a power line, your child
could get a shock just from touching the tree
trunk.
Always look up. Whether you're flying kites,
picking fruit or pruning trees, installing
antennas or doing any activity that puts you in
possible contact with overhead lines. Don't be
a victim of your own carelessness.
HORlDA POWER LIGHT COMPANY


Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. April 24, 1987
Jewish AIDS Project
Director Receives Many Inquiries
By BEN GALLOB
The director of the first full-
time Jewish AIDS project
anywhere in the United States
says he is receiving inquiries
about the program from many
Jewish communities.
Andy Rose. AIDS project
coordinator for the San Fran-
cisco Jewish Family and
Children's Services, described
the project in a report in the
Northern California Jewish
Bulletin, supplemented in an
interview with the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency.
Anita Friedman. JFCS ex-
ecutive director, told the week-
ly that it was inevitable that
San Francisco agencies would
be pushed into the vanguard of
social work for AIDS victims
and their families.
Estimating that San Fran-
cisco has the second highest
concentration of people in the
nation diagnosed with AIDS,
some 3.000 victims, she
figured that five to ten percent
of them were Jews. Only New
York has more AIDS
sufferers.
THE AIDS project was
created mainly to help victims"
parents and relatives. 50 per-
cent of whom come to San
Francisco from other cities. It
is geared to serve Jews. Rose
said.
If AIDS is not to become the
20th Century equivalent of the
plagues of medieval Europe,
those providing support for
AIDS victims and their
families must become effective
educators. Knowing that
AIDS is transmitted through
anal, vaginal and oral sex.
along with introduction of the
virus into the body via dirty
hypodermic needles and in-
fected blood must become
known by the widest possible
number of potential victims of
the incurable disease.
Rose said that a bureau of 25
speakers has been developed,
four of whom are Jews with
AIDS, three men and one
woman.
They speak before every in-
terested group of Jews
synagogue groups, youth
groups, women's organiza-
tions and staffs and board
members of area Jewish agen-
cies. Rose said the goal is bas-
ed on the proposition that "the
least we can do is to educate
our community and young peo-
ple everyone who is. or who
is going to be sexually active
on how to protect
themselves."
THE CONTENT of that
education has become an ex-
plosive issue between those
who would stress abstinence,
invoking moral standards as
the guide; and those who ac-
cept that sexual activity is part
of the recreation of a broad
range of unmarried men and
women documented down to
13 years of age.
The second approach has a
formidable and knowledgeable
leader U.S. Surgeon
General C. Everett Koop. He
favors not only distribution of
condoms as part of the educa-
tion process, but also promo-
tion of the use of the device in
the public media.
Rose said that JFCS
speakers begin their talks by
stressing abstinence. Their ap-
proach to younger listeners
recognizes the power of peer
pressure, which leads the
speakers to emphasize a sim-
ple message "If you don't
feel like doing it. don't do it."
But. recognizing that
abstinence is not popular
among unmarried adolescents
and young adults, the speakers
stress the importance of safe
sex. with specific reference to
condoms.
Rose said that the JFCS
speakers do not distribute con-
doms, but will tell an audience
member seeking advice where
to find such contraceptives.
HE REACTS with hostility
to fundamentalists who preach
that victims of AIDS arp pay-
ing for their sins. Citing the
special obligation of Jews to be
compassionate, he said: "This
should make us more sensitive
when it comes to AIDS. You
don't stop a disease by blaming
some one for it."
He described the programs
specific services as including
crisis intervention; emergency
financial aid: rabbinic and
psychological counseling-, and
referral to other services, such
as the San Francisco AIDS
A Florida couple have contributed their third academic chair to
Brandeis University, Brandeis President Evelyn E. Handler has
announced. Victor and Gwendolyn Beinfield'g gift, recently an-
nounced at a Brandeis luncheon in Palm Beach, follows their
previous contributions to the university's fellowship program
and other Brandeis endowments. The Beinfields. retired and (k
ing in Bal Harbor, also have supported Brandeis' annual fund
program.
Foundation or the Visiting
Nurses Association.
He said it was the "family
connection" that gave the
JFCS program its most
recognizably human dimen-
sion, and the mitzvah of aiding
the sick "is a cornerstone" for
the whole program. Rose ex-
plained that this means "mak-
ing sure that no one with AIDS
is isolated from the Jewish
community and that every
resource possible is available
for victims and their families
when they need it the most."
He reported that the family
agency must deal with the fact
that infections of persons with
AIDS is growing so fast that
"all 30 of our caseworke-
have some involvement i
their work with AIDS pa-
tients, their families or both."
The Board of Rabbis of Nor-
thern California in January,
1986 passed a resolution, the
first in the United States, call-
ing for an end to discrimina-
tion against people with AIDS
and their families in housing,
employment, health, education
and community services, ac-
cording to a brochure,
prepared by the Jewish
Emergency Assistance Net-
work. JEAN is an organization
of a wide variety of area
Jewish agencies, including
JFCS.
JTA Ser
One Million For One Million
Cher One Million
0\er one million children loot their li\e> in the
Holocaust. An entire generation lost forever to the
w arid communitv.
Doctors who would never heal Musicians who
would ne\er compose. Parents who would ne\er
ha\e children of their own.
The> are gone and in danger of being
forgotten
Questions
How could ihi> iraged> happen1 How could we
permit an entire generation to be lost forever to the
world communit> Could u happen again1
Almost 50 vears ha\e passed and these questions
remain unanswered until now
And Answers
To answer these questions, the Jossi Berger
Holocaust Studv Center has been established b>
EMI NAH Women oi America to expand our know-
ledge and understanding of the Holocaust, its causes,
and oavatNcs
Located on the campus of EMUNAH Women"s
Florence c\: Joseph Appteman School for Technical
Art> Education in Jerusalem, the load Berger Hol-
ocaust Studv Center w ill be dedicated on Jul> 7
It will be a unique focal point far students and
adult- a place where the memorv oi one mil-
lion children will be kept aloe through ongoing
stuuV lecture^, and special outreach programs
EMUNAH Women
EMUNAH Women, committed to meeting the
social and educational needs oi the people oi Israel.
is a worldwide \olunteer movement with chapters
in 22 countries.
EML'NAHs 170 day-care centers and kindergar-
tens. 4 children's villages. 6 technical high schools
and American CommunitN College, as well as its
immigration absorption, adult education and senior
citizen programs improve the qualitv of life trom
infancv through old age
One Million For One Million
EMUNAH needs >our help to complete the Jossi
Berger Holocaust Studv Center one million
fellow Americans honoring one million children
. one million fellow Americans who care enough
to contribute S10 or more
Please give gcnerouslv and be one of the One
Million For One Million Thank vou for vour
help.
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I (trip JA1 bt one ot the Omt Ntifeoa For Omt
E->."**eU e> m* t\-aeiui.-tiNe ..vntnNmon of ------------
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Jewry
WASHINGTON U.S.
Sen. Bob Graham (D., Fla.) has
joined the congressional
caucus on Soviet Jewry, the
Senators's office announced
today.
"We will not be silent in the
face of Soviet tyranny,"
Graham said, "I look forward
to working closely with col-
leagues in Washington who
share my concerns for Soviet
Jewry."
Graham has joined a bi-
partisan group called the Con-
gressional Coalition for Soviet
Jews. The group works to help
ensure that the issues of
religious freedom and the
right to emigrate remain fun-
damental to a meaningful rela-
tionship between the United
States and the Soviet Union.
IN A RELATED matter,
Graham and Florida's Senior
Sen. Lawton Chiles, (D.) have
co-signed a telegram to Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev sup-
porting an exit visa for
refuseniks Lev and Inna
Elbert of Kiev.
'Please grant them an exit Sen. Bob Graham
visa so they can rejoin their
family in Israel as is their right
under the Helsinki Final Act,
the United Nations Declara-
tion of Human Rights, and
Soviet emigration law," the
telegram said.
The telegram to Gorbachev
was signed by dozens of
members of Congress, in-
cluding U.S. Rep. Claude Pep-
per of Miami.
The Florida congressional
delegation sent a letter to
Gobachev prior to Passover
urging exit visas for Aba ;ind
Ida Taratuta and their son
Misha.
"Concern for the well-being
of one's family members is a
universal sentiment," said the
letter, prepared by Senator
Chiles.
Graham was elected to the
United States Senate on
November 4, 1986, following
two terms as Governor of
Florida.
Israel 39 To Feature
'Hands On' Presentations
About Jerusalem
The Israel Independence
)ay celebration sponsored by
Greater Miami Jewish
federation in cooperation with
liami-Dade Community Col-
ege Wolfson Campus features
iny new and innovative ex-
eriences for participants.
Celebrating the 39th an-
niversary of the Jewish
komeland and the 20th an-
niversary of the reunification
f the city of Jerusalem after
he 1967 Six Day War, Miami's
elebration, on Sunday, May
7, will take on the theme,
iShalom Jerusalem The
|ity of Gold Comes to Miami.
"We want to give the com-
munity the feeling of Israel,
ur goal is to make par-
cipants feel as if we actually
fought a small piece of
erusalem to Miami," said
Norman Lieberman, chairman
of the celebration.
"One of the events
guaranteed to accomplish this
goal and give a deeper
understanding of Jerusalem is
'Museum in a Box.' This pro-
gram, from the Kohl
Children's Museum in
Chicago, features a "hands-
on" Jewish educational ex-
perience for adults and
children through multi-
sensory, dramatic ex-
periences," he added.
Three unique "Museum in a
Box" programs will be
presented. The first is "Shab-
bat in Jerusalem." The pro-
gram will enable participants
to experience preparing for
Shabbat as if in Jerusalem. Us-
ing Israeli money, they shop
Continued on Page 3-B
Federation Prepares For
Mission Of A Lifetime'
The highlight of the entire year-long celebration of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's 50th Anniversary, will
be the "Mission of A Lifetime" to Israel taking place bet-
ween October 11-21. The Mission will honor past Federa-
tion mission members, presidents, campaign chairmen,
founders as well as their family members and other in-
dividuals who have made a committment to Federation
| over the past half century.
"In fifty years, this Jewish community has grown
significantly," said Harry A. "Hap" Levy, Mission of a
Lifetime" coordinating chairman. "With the increase in
residents came an increase in Jewish needs. Now we are
looking back and taking the time, once again, to thank the
'^y'duals who helped meet those needs and make this
I federation a reality. The mission will be a chance for these
[people to gather together and celebrate in our Jewish
|nomeland," he added.
Higlights of the mission include:
Presentation and special ceremony in Israel for the
sunders, past presidents and past campaign chairmen of
'deration;
Golden Anniversary Banquet at the Knesset with the
r'me Minister;
Golden Anniversary Simchat Torah celebration;
au*i?a'a Anniversary Concert with the Israel
hilharmonic;
* Limited edition 50th anniversary lithograph, specially
pommissioned from an Israeli artist;
, Golden Anniversary Gala Dinner at Miami's Project
enewal "sister city," Or Akiva;
* Special presentation to Miami leadership by the Presi-
fent of Israel at his home;
,*Path at Masada with representatives of the Israel Arm-
11 forces;
Continued on Page 2-B
Sylvia Bennett
Daughter Of Two Holocaust Survivors
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Success has come in a big
way to Miamian Sylvia Ben-
nett. In the past five years, her
career has taken off with a
Grammy Award nomination
for her vocals performance on
the record, "Sentimental
Journey" with jazz legend
Lionel Hampton.
But what Bennett might
count as her greatest success
was singing the American and
Israeli national anthems at the
recent Simon Wiesenthal din-
ner, where a tribute was held
for Holocaust survivors and
liberators.
BENNETT IS the daughter
of two Holocaust survivors.
"I'm very proud of my
parents, that they could have
gone through something like
that and still look at the
positive side of life," says Ben-
nett, who tries to carry that
optimism over into her own
life.
Bennett has lived on Key
Biscayne with her husband,
opthomologist Hal Sawelson,
for the past 13 years. Music
has been part of her life since
she sang at a wedding at the
age of three.
Sylvia Bennett is the stage
name for Sylvia Shapiro, who
was born in Italy and moved to
Philadelphia with her parents
when she was one year old.
Her father, who loved to sing,
had the first name "Beno."
She incorporated his name to
become Bennett. "I don't like
to do things that don't have
meaning to me," she says.
BOTH HER mother and
father lost their first spouses
in Nazi death camps. Her
father had been best man at
her mother's first wedding.
After they were liberated from
Auschwitz, Sylvia's father
went to Italy to trace her
mother. Later they were
married.
"We had a lot of love in our
family," Bennett recalls. "We
did for obvious reasons.
Everyone we loved was lost in
the war. I never talk about
this. My family never really
talked about it that much."
Bennett was a regular per-
former at the age of 11, when
she appeared on a CBS televi-
sion program called The
Children's Hour."
"Ever since I was a kid, I
always wanted to be an enter-
Continued on Page 2-B
Sylvia Bennett
Sen. Chiles To Speak At Bonds
Brunch Honoring Rep. Elaine Bloom
State Rep. Elaine Bloom will
be the guest of honor at a
brunch sponsored by the
Women's Division of the
Greater Miami Israel Bonds
organization on Sunday, May
3, at the Biscayne Bay Mar-
riott, Miami. The brunch will
begin at 11:30 a.m.
As a member of the Florida
House of Representatives, a
leader in Jewish community
organizations, a role-model in
women's rights, and a
spokesperson for major issues
of our times, Bloom will
receive the Lion of Judah
award from the local Israel
Bonds, for which she serves as
a member of the Board of
Governors.
Elected in 1974 and 1976,
Bloom authored laws which
created international banking
activities, enhanced the educa-
tional system, improved the
quality of life for the elderly
and furthered the state's
business goals. After a period
in which she worked as a
broadcaster and government
relations consultant, she
returned to elective office in
1986 and now serves as Depu-
ty Majority Leader of the
Florida House of Represen-
Continued on Page 5-B
Oim
Community
Friday, April 24, 1987 The Jewish Floridian Section B


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 24, 1987
Sylvia Bennett
Daughter Of Two Holocaust Survivors
Continued from Page 1-B
tainer," she says."I appeared
in all the school plays and
performances."
BUT IT was a degree in
French and education which
she received from Washington
University in St. Louis. She
wanted to have something to
fall back on, but her skill with
languages has turned out to he
useful to her singing career.
Bennett, who sings in French
and Spanish as well as
English, has performed in
places such as Caracas,
Venezuela, Paris, China and
Moscow.
There are two universal
things in the world, medicine
and singing, according to
Benett. While her husband
traveled, performing and lear-
ning about eye surgery, Ben-
nett traveled, performing and
singing. "Music broke the bar-
riers," she says.
She never stopped singing
even if it took second place to
whatever else she was doing.
"I knew that sometime in the
future, when the time was
right, I'd go into it full-time,"
she explains. "I have a natural
voice that's been with me since
I was a child. I've been for-
tunate that singing has always
been a part of me."
IT WASNT until four and a
half years ago that Bennett
began to sing professionally
with the release of her first
record, "I Need a Man."
"Singing is a satire on life.
It's a great way of com-
municating with people," she
contends. "Songs have been
written for centuries to repre-
sent all that we go through,
ups and downs, happy times,
sad times, issues. I love music.
It takes a person away from
whatever is ailing them at that
time. I want to sing songs that
people can relate to."
Show business is a difficult
business to break into because
there are many talented peo-
ple, and the competition for
good jobs is steep. "In order to
make it into show business,
besides having talent, which is
just one small part of it, you
really have to know how to
handle rejection, not take it
personally and go forward.
And the rejection doesn't come
because you're not good. It
comes because there are so
Sylvia Bennett with Lionel Hampton, who was performing one
night on Miami Beach. Bennett had gone just for an audition, and
she ended up performing with him that very night, followed by
tours throughout the east coast.
many people who do what you
do," Bennett points out.
BUT SINGING is not all
that Bennett does.
When she returned to
Philadelphia after trying to
break into show business in
New York, Bennett got a job
as the first woman in
Philadelphia selling radio air
time.
When she married and mov-
ed to Key Biscayne, she began
to work on arrangements for a
show and did club dates and
Bar Mitzvahs, wedding and
special engagements. At the
same time, she worked at her
husband's office for eight
years, managing to coordinate
career and marriage, with
marriage being the priority.
"And I'm lucky enough to be
married to a man who en-
courages me to do what I love,
which is to share music with
people," she says proudly.
TWO YEARS ago, Bennefs
second record, "You're My
Fantasy," came out. It played
throughout the country at
dance clubs and on radio.
About that time, she met a liv-
ing jazz legend, Lionel Hamp-
ton, who plays the vibraphone
in his own band. He was
celebrating his 75th birthday
and 60 years in show business,
and he detected the talent in
Bennett.
He was performing one
night at the Konover Hotel on
Miami Beach. Bennett, who
went to audition, ended up per-
forming with Hampton that
night. The night turned into a
week. Then Hampton took her
North
American
Aliya
Movement/
ALIYA
CONFERENCE
June 12-14,1987
North American
Aliya Movement's
National Convention
at
The Jackson Hotel,
Long Beach, New York
'Moving With Israel into the 21st Century'
For Information & Reservations contact:
NAAM
515 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10022
Tel. (212) 752-0600
on tours throughout the east
coast, including a performance
at President Reagan's in-
augural ball.
Hampton told Bennett she
reminded him of the singers of
the '40s. They have made a
record together, "Sentimental
Journey, which was picked up
by Atlantic, a major record
company.
"AFTER WE did the
record, I found out it was the
first time he recorded with a
female artist in 30 years,"
reveals Bennett. "He prides
himself on discovering Dinah
Washington, Joe Williams,
Quincy Jones and Sylvia
Bennett, among others."
The songs they recorded
were from the era of swing
music, songs like "Sentimental
Journey," "The Lady's a
Tramp," and "Don't Get
Around Much Anymore."
"I feel like I'm dreaming
this. People in their whole
lifetime don't get the oppor-
tunities that I continue to get.
And I constantly learn new
things from Lionel because he
has had the experience of 60
years in the business," says
Bennett candidly.
LENA HORNE, still sing-
ing in her 70s, was a big in-
fluence on Bennett who hopes
she will be able, like Home, to
delight and inspire audiences
for many years to come, to be a
performer who has staving
power.
But no matter what, even if
the lady sings the blues, Sylvia
Bennett seems to have no in-
tention of living them.
"Mission Of A Lifetime'
Continued from Page 1-B
Special Golden Anniversary service of the WW*r*
Wall with the Chief Rabbi and Cantor Braun of the S
Defense Forces; '
Commemorative service and presentation of a perma
nent memorial from the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
to Yad Vashem (Holocaust Memorial);
Golden Anniversary Dinner with the Minister of
Defense, the Head of the Armed Forces and the heads of
the Army, Air Force and Navy;
Special seminars with Israeli Cabinet Ministers;
Presentation of a scroll of honor listing all Mission par-
ticipants, to be presented to the Government of Israel for
the State Archives;
A visit to Ein Hod artists' village near Haifa and a
Druze village;
Tour the Jordan Wineries at Katzerim in the Golan
Heights.
"It's a once in a lifetime event," said Stanley C. Myers
Federation's first president who is serving as honorary
chairman of the 'Mission of a Lifetime.' "It will be a gather-
ing of the most dynamic individuals in the Jewish communi-
ty. These are the people that made Federation what it is to-
day and over the years the funds raised have helped 32
local beneficiaries, our Project Renewal "sister city" in
Israel, Or Akiva. and many projects which service needy
Jews around the world. Their dedication has allowed us to
arrive at our 50t anniversary with a strong local Jewish
community," he added. Polly de Hirsch Meyer, widow of
Baron de Hirsch Meyer, one of Federation's original
founders and its first campaign chairman, is serving with
Myers as an honorary chairman for the "Mission of a
Lifetime."
According to Aaron Podhurst, Federation president,
"When Stanley Myers first presided over the Greater
Miami Federation of Jewish Welfare Funds in May 1938,
the organization which became Federation, there were
19,500 Jews in Dade County, now there are 250,000."
"When the first annual Campaign kicked off in 1939 we
had a Campaign goal of $65,100 and raised $82,745," said
Donald E. Lefton, 1987 Combined Jewish Appeal chair-
man. "Times have changed and so has the organization, but
the underlying idea of helping Jews in need has always re-
mained a constant," he added.
"Mission of a Lifetime" Honorary Chairmen are Stanley
and Martha Myers, and Polly de Hirsch Meyer; Coor-
dinatinig Chairmen are Davida and Harry A. "Hap" Levy;
Vice Chairmen are Marvis and David Schaecter, Dorothy
Podhurst, Women's Division president; Aaron Podhurst,
Federation president; and Donald E. Lefton, 1987 Combin-
ed Jewish Appeal chairman.
The "Mission of a Lifetime" is open to everyone who
makes a minimum gift of $5,000 to the 1987 Combined
Jewish Appeal. If you would like more information about
Federation's "Mission of a Lifetime" or would like to at-
tend a dessert reception at the Omni International Hotel on
Thursday, April 23 to join in this once in a lifetime mission
call Federation at 576-4000.
Bnei Akiva To Present Yom Hoshoa Program
Bnei Akiva of Greater
Miami, in cooperation with
Congregation Shaaray Tefilah
and the Young Israel of
Greater Miami, will hold
special program to honor Yom
Hashoa Holocaust
Rememberance Day at the
Young Israel Sunday evening
at 5:30 p.m.
The presentaton is open to
all. There will be a ceremony
to remember those who lost
their lives in the Shoah, follow
ed by a special showing of the
movie "Genocide."
Temple Beth Raphael
1545 Jefferson Avenue, Miami Beach, FL 33139
538-4112
Max Wagman, Pres.
Cantor Niasim Benyamiw
Leo Bell Vice Pres.
REMINDER:
We wish to remind you RE: YOM-HASHOAH" the Day of Holocaust
which will be solemnized at our Synagogue on Sunday, April 26tn a
2:00 P.M. It is incumbent upon all members and friends to participate.
Not to forget our MARTYRS.

ALL ARE WELCOME


Israel 39 To Feature 'Hands On'
Presentations About Jerusalem
Continued from Page 1-B
for wine in Mea Shearim,
bargain for flowers in the
"Shouk" (market), and braid
dough into challah in a kosher
bakery. They tour Jerusalem,
give "tzedakah" to a beggar
and write a message at the
Kotel. The program
culminates in a gathering at
the Wall for kiddush, a Shab-
bat story and singing.
The second program,
"Peoples and Cultures in
Jerusalem," will allow par-
ticipants to experience the
beauty and reality of
Jerusalem's multi-ethnic
character through meeting
five of her citizens: an Eastern
European Jew, a Yemenite
Jew, a Moslem Arab, an Arme-
nian Jew, and a Moroccan Jew.
The participants experience
the unique cultural heritage of
each of these individuals
through a folktale, dance or a
craft. Together, they taste
representative foods and ex-
perience the beauty of the
multi-ethnicity of Jerusalem
through the medium of song.
The final "Museum in a
Mayor Daoud
To Present
Box" presentation will be "Ar- kllde MOW
SSSSri ^Sl^L PS M&?r *** D&0Ud f Miami
introduction to the process of Beach will present a slide show
discovering the past civiliza-
tions will be a hands-on ex-
perience. Beginning with a
guided tour of a replica of the
"dig" south of the Temple
Mount, the groups will ex-
cavate shards to reconstruct
pottery. They create and
analyze multi-level "tels"
(mounds) using artifacts, and
in the process discover some of
the same pitfalls that plague
archeologist today.
"We want Israel 39 to be an
experience that individuals
will not quickly forget,"
Lieberman said.
Each program lasts for 90
minutes. There will be a fee to
participate in "Museum in a
Box." Admission to the Israeli
festival is free. Each program
will be run twice during the
Federation's community-wide
celebration at Miami Dade's
Wolfson Campus located at
300 N.W. 2nd Avenue.
For more information about
Israel Independence Day call
Federation.
Friday, April 24, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Congressman Bill Lehman
'Steps To A New Beat'
Temple Emanu-El
Rabbi Lehrman Installing Officer
At Annual Installation Luncheon
Dr. Irving Lehrman,
spiritual leader of Temple
Emanu-El will be the installing
officer at the Annual Installa-
tion Luncheon of the
Sisterhood and Parent
Teacher Association of Temple
Emanu-El scheduled for
Wednesday, at noon in the
Friedland Ballroom.
The officers of Sisterhood to
be sworn in will be Martha
Mishcon, president; Belle
(Mrs. Irving) Lehrman,
honorary vice president;
Rochelle Malek, Judy Sirkin,
Kitty DiFranco, Sheila Hollo,
Hildine Potashnick and Jeanne
Rosen, all vice presidents. Also
the following will be installed
as secretaries: Yetta
Rosenkrantz, Betty Sutnick,
Wendy Grenald, Renee Tarich
and Henrietta London. Also
Bea Mazor, treasurer; Diane
Heller, historian and Lorraine
Coperman, parliamentarian.
The officers of PTA to be in-
stalled include: Jeanne Rosen,
president; Belle Lehrman,
honorary vice president; and
wee presidents: Ana Sklar,
Cheryl Rivkind, Barbara
barber, Susan Eisdorfer, Nora
and Martha Mishcon.
the gala event.
The auction and
begin at 10:30 p.m.
bazaar
and talk on his most recent
trip to Israel Monday at 7:30
p.m. at the city's 10th Street
Auditorium, 10th and Ocean
Drive.
Daoud, an active member of
the American Zionist Federa-
tion, visited Israel last month
as co-chairman of a delegation
which dedicated the Jose Marti
Memorial Forest sponsored by
the Jewish National Fund. He
also went to Israel last year as
a participant in the seventh an-
nual Mayors' Conference spon-
sored by the City of Jerusalem.
City Commissioner Abe
Resnick accompanied Daoud
on both trips to Israel. Daoud
serves as legal counsel to the
South Florida Council of
Na'amat USA and has acted as
special counsel to the Miami
Beach Region of Hadassah.
Goldstein Hebrew
Academy To
Host Open House
The Arthur and Anna Golds-
tein Hebrew Academy of
South Dade will host an Open
House on Wednesday at 7:30
p.m. at the school's facility on
the campus of the South Dade
Jewish Community Center.
The Open House is open to all
prospective parents of
students from preschool
through the 6th grade for the
school semester starting
September 1987.
U.S. Rep. William Lehman
and almost 100 of his consti-
tuents will walk in Aventura
Mall, on Friday at 8:45 a.m., to
promote the "Step to a New
Beat" program, sponsored by
the American Heart Associa-
tion of Greater Miami,
Parkway Regional Medical
Center and Aventura Mall.
The program helps the elderly,
including many heart surgery
and pacemaker patients, stay
fit by walking.
Rep. Lehman, an avid tennis
player, plans to congratulate
the participants for their pro-
gress in the program. "Politi-
cians are used to running but
it's a pleasure to walk for a
change," Lehman said.
"Everybody needs exercise
and walking is a fun and easy
way to get it. It's suitable for
just about everyone."
Lehman, a North Dade
Democrat was surprised to
learn that over 500 of his con-
stituents are now involved in
the program. "I can't believe
how much the program has
grown in the last few months,"
Lehman said. "I hope as more
people learn about it, more
people will get involved."
"It takes hundreds of
billions of dollars a year for the
nation's air safety, highway
and mass transit programs,
said Lehman, chairman of the
U.S. House Appropriations
Transportation committee.
"But walking is the best form
of exercise and it doesn't cost
the government anything."
Rep. Lehman will meet the
Earticipants of "Step To a
few Beat" at the registration
desk on the first level in front
of the elevator (Macy's).
Lehman will address the
group at 9 a.m.
Lerners To Chair
Emanu-El Annual
Spring Dinner
Dr. and Mrs. Isaias Lerner
of Miami Beach have been
named chairmen of the Annual
Spring Dinner and Dance of
Temple Emanu-El of Greater
Miami. The event is scheduled
for 6 p.m. Sunday, May 3, in
the Friedland Ballroom.
A special menu and surprise
program for youngsters have
been arranged to encourage
family attendance at and par-
ticipation in the meeting, ac-
cording to synagogue presi-
dent Lawrence M. Schantz, a
Miami Beach attorney.
Claude Kadoch and his or-
chestra will provide music for
the program, which also will
feature the installation of of-
ficers, director and trustees of
Temple Emanu-El for 1987-88,
Schantz said.
Saul
Also to be installed will be
Kobin Osheroff, secretary; and
Marian Behar, treasurer.
Edith Irma Siegel has been
named honorary chairman of
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VtBETWLE LASAGNE
sottened
y cup milk
VI cup minced, onion
tvt teaspoons dried basil
XSSS&&&S&
, teaspoon garlic powder
iSspoon dried CJfJ-
2 cups broccoli florets
cup
Adda
Comome im --- nW srn0otn." *rrr ver bottom aoo -
w ,* ,i.h cheese. Bake K 8" u,w 8 servings
ending with cheese
Let
S:=^hetore se.mg
Makes 8 servings
For this lesson
in Italian we want to
insegnare (teach) you
how to select the best
pasta for your bambini
(children) and marito
(husband)
Everything you
need to know can
be summed up in
one word: Ronzoni*
(old family name)
For over 70 years,
Ronzoni* has used
only the finest, natu-
ral ingredients like
100% durum wheat
semolina in its pasta. iBJ^^.
That's why all 70
different shapes .^
and varieties f
have a wonderful
sapore (flavor) and
robustezza (robustness)
Ronzoni is also low in
cholesterol and has no
added salt And it's certified
Kosher and Parve so it's
perfetto (perfect)
with all your meat or
cheese sauces.
Before we say ciao
(goodbye), please tell us
everything you've learned.
Ready*?
Ronzoni Sono Buoni-
Ronzoni Is So Good*
Eccellente (excellent)
I : RONZONI SONO BUONI
RONZONI IS SO GOOD*
u Kosher and Parve
'987 Ron/oni Foods Cofpcxation




Page 4-B H JWMh FloridiMi^riday, April 24, 1987
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Alliance Division recently held its Costa
Bra iv Dinner on behalf of the 198? Combined
Jewish Appeal raising $8S,550 for the Cam-
paign. This represents a lS.t percent increase
over the previous year. Pictured from left,
standing, are Al Isaacson, chairman of Costa
Brava; Dr. Gerald Meister, guest speaker:
Stanley C. Myers, Federation's founding
president and Costa Brava executur commit-
tee member; Louis Harris, executive commit
tee; (stated, from left) Mildred Isaacson. Mar
tha Myers, and BUoHOr Harris.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Cuban Hebrew Committee recently held a din-
ner dance to celebrate the upcoming 39th an-
niversary of the State of Israel, in the Social
Hall of Temple Moses on Miami Beach. The
event was attended by more than S00 people.
Pictured from left are, standing, Rosita
Eiber, Dr. Enrique Eiber, Cuban Hebreu-
Committee president; Ambassador Rachamim
Timor, Consul General from the State of
Israel; Shoshana Timor; Sylvia Gleekel;
Jerome Gleekel, guest speaker; (seated, from
left to right) Morris Rapport, Susi Rapport;
Luisa Lerman; Isidore Lerman.
v
is
i
A "Brunch for Israel" was held recently by the
residents of the Ocean Point Condominium on
behalf of the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's 1987 Combined Jewish Appeal. The
event raised 5 percent more for the Campaign
than in the pretnous year. Pictured from left
are Professor Oscar Kraines. secretary; Stuff
Representative Elaine Bloom, guest speaker;
Lillian Ship, co-chairperson; and Morris
Davidsim, chairman.
Publix
Introduces Southeast Florida
To The 'Rotation Diet'
Community Weight Loss Program
Southeast Florida, you're
going on a diet!
Get ready to shed those ex-
tra pounds quickly and without
gnawing hunger pains with the
support of thousands in the
community on the "Rotation
Diet."
The Rotation Diet Communi-
ty Weight Loss Program, a
puhlic service campaign spon-
sored by Puhlix Super
Markets, Inc.. begins Thurs-
day. April 23 with voluntary
weigh-in at any Publix in
Dade, Broward, and Palm
Beach Counties
"The nine-week program,
developed by Dr. Martin
Katahn. a professor of
psychology and director of the
Weight Management Program
at Vanderbilt I'niversitv in
Dr. Martin Katahn
Nashville. Tennessee, is designed to provide the general
public with important information that will help them lose
weight and develop a more healthful lifestyle through im-
proved eating habits and exercises." said Mark Hollis,
president of Publix Super Markets.
The Rotation Diet is not new to Publix. In Julj I Igl
Publix successfully sponsored the diet in its Lakeland and
Jacksonville Divisions, which encompass all of Florida ex-
cluding the above mentioned Southeast Florida counties.
More than 75,000 dieters registered at Publix and recorded
a weight loss of more than 188,000 pounds.
Patterned after the well-publicized successful "Melt-A-
Million" campaign in Nashville where more than 75,000
people lost a million pounds over a 12-week period the
Rotation Diet alternates low-, medium- and high-calorie
days over a three-week period and promises a weight loss
of two-thirds of a pound a day if followed. It avoids
weighing food portions, includes a strong emphasis to exer-
cise the equivalent of walking 45 minutes a lay. allows
unlimited amounts of certain "free" vegetables and up to
three servings a day of a "safe" fruit designed to act as a
pick-me-up or hunger stopper, and gives dieters a vacation
with a special maintenance diet after the thin! week.
"With 90 percent of Americans believing they need to
lose at least five pounds and 20 percent actually
overweight, Publix is happy to provide a nutritionally
balanced program to make the Miami area healthier and
thinner," said Katahn. And no one goes hungry on the
Rotation Diet, says its creator.
Publix was founded in 1930 by George W. Jenkins and
established its first store in Winter Haven. Headquartered
in Lakeland. Publix has more than 300 stores throughout
Florida with more than 40,000 associates.
Jewish Floridian salute
to our centenarians
The following individual is already 100 years
will be 100 by Dec. 31.1967:
older
NAME
BIRTHDATE:.........................................
PRESENT ADDRESS:................................
APT.:................CITY:..................STATE
CITY OF BIRTH: ......................................
STATE:.................ZIP:.........COUNTRY
SUGGESTED BY:
ADDRESS:......
CITY:............
PHONE:.........
APT.:
ZIP
Enclose a photograph of the centenarian '[P0* .
and mail to 100 YEARS YOUNG. The Jewish r \ona
P.O. Box 012973. Miami, Fla. 33101.


Kronish Plaza To Be Dedicated
By City Of Miami Beach Friday
Friday, April 24, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Chiles To Speak At Bonds Brunch
Honoring Rep. Elaine Bloom
Kronish Plaza will be
dedicated by Miami Beach
Mayor Alex Daoud on Friday
to acknowledge the tremen-
dous contributions Rabbi Leon
Kronish has made to the city
and Temple Beth Shoiom.
Kronish Plaza will run north
of Arthur Godfrey Road at
Chase Avenue, ending at Muss
Park (44th St. and Prairie
Ave.).
The City of Miami Beach will
present a proclamation at
Temple Beth Sholom's Friday
night services honoring the
Rabbi, who is celebrating his
70th birthday this year, and
the 45-year-old temple that he
has guided since becoming its
first full-time rabbi in 1944.
"It is a distinguished honor
for a deserving individual,"
said Temple Beth Shoiom ex-
ecutive director Dennis Rice.
"Rabbi Kronish has for over 40
years worked to create a
strong Miami Beach and
Rabbi Leon Kronish
community world-
Jewish
wide."
Rabbi Gary Glickstein,
formerly of Temple Sinai in
Prime Minister Shamir Assures
Israel Bond Leaders The
U.S.-Israel Relationship Strong
JERUSALEM Speaking
at the closing dinner of the
week-long 1987 Israel Bond
Leadership conference, held
here recently, Prime Minister
Yitzhak Shamir declared that
the differences between the
I .S. and Israel "are insignifi-
cant compared to so much that
unites U8."
It was announced at the din-
ner that the 1987 Israel Bonds
campaign has passed the $150
million cash figure for this
ir, representing an increase
133 million in Israel Bonds
sales over the same period last
conference officers in-
id B. Hermelin <>f
itional Chair-
Brig. Gen. (R.
ih Halevy, President
ef Executive Officer;
Jian Venezky of Peoria.
Chairman of the Board; and
Mel Ross of Boston. Con-
ference Chairman.
"An economically sound
Israel jrjves us strength and
(onfidence for the future,"
Shamir continued. "We
believe that such an Israel is
important to the interests and
defense of the entire world.
this is the basis of our relation-
ship with the United States to-
day. An alliance is tested in
times of difficulty and stress.
Kecent difficulties, no matter
how painful, are of a transient
nature and the relationship
between the United States and
Israel is basically sound and
strong. It will endure and
nourish.
"We are aiming to extend
ur sophistication and ex-
cellence in technology to all
tranches of our economy. It
nas given us the feeling that
we can overcome the lack of
natural resources by an abun-
dance of skills and brainpower
wnich enable Israel to start
moving in the direction of
economic growth."
At an earlier conference ses-
sion. Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres focused on the two
"most urgent issues on our
agenda: the attempt to open
the doors of the USSR for
Soviet Jews, and the search
for peace in the Middle East."
"Soviet leader Mikhail Gor-
bachev is a realist.*" said
Peres. "Me understands the
real need to change the
USSR's priorities. Change is
in opening for the Jewish peo-
ple; it's an opportunity to save
>ur people. Soviet policy is
hard to follow, hut ii seems
there is a 'disorganized smile'
coming from the USSR
which is preferable to an
'organised '"/ t.
Peres spoke of the "sincere
wish i if all of us to bring peace
and understanding to the Mid-
dle East. We're a small people,
with a history of suffering, liv-
ing in a continent of confronta-
tion. Let us bequeath
ourselves and our neighbors a
different posterity from the
belligerence that has taken so
many lives. The process is
lengthy, difficult and com-
plicated, but the lesson of
history is that the harder the
challenge, the greater we shall
become."
In his conference address to
the Bonds delegates, Finance
Minister Moshe Nissim review-
ed Israel's economy. He
described it as emerging from
"deep crisis, characterized by
soaring inflation, with Israel
unable to adjust monetary and
employment levels to changing
times. '
The far-reaching govern-
ment economic program in-
troduced on July 1, 1985, he
said, has done much to
stabilize prices and improve
Israel's balance of payments.
"The recovery of the Israeli
economy is a long process," he
concluded. "It is being achiev-
ed with the help of the Israeli
Continued on Page 10-B
Worcester, Mass., joined the
congregation in 1985 as senior
rabbi. Dr. Kronish was named
senior founding rabbi at that
time.
Kronish is the (former) na-
tional chairman of the Israel
Bonds Rabbinic Cabinet and
national co-chairman of the
Israel Bonds campaign.
Under Rabbi Kronish's
leadership, the Temple has
become one of the most
culturally active in the U.S.
The Great Artists Series, now
entering its 20th season, has
brought some of the world's
greatest musical talents to
Miami Beach. The Lowe-
Levinson Art Gallery holds ex-
hibitions of both local and in-
ternational artists. The Sun-
day Omnibus Lecture Series
has brought speakers from
around the world to the
synagogue.
"It has always been his view
that there should be more to a
temple than Friday and Satur-
day night services," says Judy
Drucker, cultural director of
the Temple.
The Leon Kronish Institute
of Living Judaism was
dedicated in 1984. a complex
including temple offices, the
Lowe-Levinson Art Gallery,
meeting rooms, music rooms
and a new addition to the
school.
Rabbi Kronish's wife Lillian,
and his son, Rabbi Ronald
Kronish. of Jerusalem, and
daughter Mrs. Edward (Max-
ine) Snyder, will attend the
service, along with city
officials.
Rabbi Kronish will be
honored by the temple at a
Saturday dinner, including
temple president Neal Amdur,
and past presidents Shepard
Broad. Milton Gaynor. James
S. Knopke and Harold Vinik.
Festivities are also planned for
September.
Continued from Page 1-B
tatives and chairs the Subcom-
mittee on Social, Economic
and Developmental Services.
In addition to her involve-
ment with the Greater Miami
Israel Bonds organization,
Bloom has also been active
with many other community,
charitable and philanthropic
affiliations, including the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion. Together with her hus-
band, Circuit Court Judge
Philip Bloom, she was honored
by the State of Israel in 1979
and has received numerous
other awards for her concern-
ed involvement.
Serving as guest speaker at
the brunch will be U.S. Sen.
Lawton Chiles, who has had a
distinguished political career
since his election to the Florida
House of Representatives in
1959. In 1966 he was elected to
the Florida Senate and served
Rep. Elaine Bloom
in this capacity until his elec-
tion to the United States
Senate in 1970.
Stuart Simon Elected President
Of Pioneers Of Miami Beach
Miami Beach.
Attorney Stuart L. Simon
was presented a key to the Ci-
ty of Miami Beach by Mayor
Alex Daoud at the annual din-
ner meeting of the Pioneers of
Simon, a partner in the Firm
of Fine Jacobson Schwartz
Nash Block and England, mov-
ed to Miami Beach in 1926.
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Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 24, 1987
Write
Dear Nomi
... For Advice
Dear Noni, an advice column, will appear regularly in the
pages of The Jewish Floridian.
Dear Nomi:
I am a 28-year-old male and I
was raised in a very traditional
if not 100 percent observant
Jewish home. Over the past
two years my parents and
grandparents have begun to
put "friendly" pressure on me
to get married to "a nice
Jewish girl." But that's the
least of my problems.
My problem is that I have
never-well, hardly ever-found
myself attracted to Jewish
girls, only WASPS and even
Catholic young women. Unfor-
tunately, I haven't yet found a
woman who's captured my
heart, but I'm afraid that when
I do, she's likely to be someone
that breaks the heart of my
family. What do you suggest?
Sincerely,
Looking For Love
Dear Looking:
Traditional Jewish homes have
a reputation for being close-
knit, caring, and emotional
at times perhaps too emo-
tional. While the intensity
of feeling has the potential
for nurturing members of
the family, it also has the
potential for creating
stress.
Perhaps the WASP and
Catholic women whom you
are attracted to offer an
alternate style of relating
around emotional issues.
But since I sense in you a
reluctance to completely re-
{ect your family and their
leritage, you do not want to
resign yourself to marrying
outside of your faith.
My suggestion, then, is to
search for a Jewish woman
who embodies the qualities
which you are seeking.
Somewhere out there you just
may find a Jewish woman
who. like yourself, has
previously been attracted to
Christian men because she,
too, admires certain
qualities which they posess.
And this woman will share
with you a desire to reject
certain elements of her
cultural heritage without re-
jecting the parts that are
good and beneficial.
Or, to put it more simply, if
you don't want to break
your family's heart, don't
throw out the baby with the
bathwater. If you do, you
might just end up breaking
your own heart.
Your, Nomi
Dear Nomi:
I am a 37-year-old orthodox
man and a professional, with a
yeshiva education from the
local Miami Beach community,
and I can relate to the young
woman who wrote your col-
umn about the difficulty of fin-
ding a suitable match in the
community, because I find
myself in a similar situation.
With the object of making a
possible shidduch, I have left
my name and number with
Rabbi Mordecai Shapiro of
Congregation Beth Israel. If
the young woman would be in-
terested in a proper introduc-
tion and would like to know
more about my personal
background, please inquire
through the rabbi.
Signed,
A Possible Match
Dear Possible Match:
I wish all the luck in the world
to you and the young
woman both. But even if
you two are not the "perfect
match" that each of you is
looking for, it is important
for you to know that there
are others who are single
and hold similar views and
beliefs, who are also looking
for a serious, committed
relationship. All it takes is a
little step out into the world
(as in sending a letter to a
newspaper) and suddenly
options begin to open up.
I hope that the two of you meet
and take pleasure from the
simple fact that there are
people out there who want
to make a connection. But
if, by chance, you two turn
out to be soul mates, I am
sure that the readers of this
column (and I!) would love
to hear how things turn out.
Yours. Nomi
Dear Nomi,
We live in a condominium on
Miami Beach, which we moved
to after living most of our lives
in a private home in Boston. It
seems there is a board of direc-
tors who control everything,
and some of the things they do
are not to our liking.
But most people are willing
to go along with their decisions
rather than break away from
their card games to put up a
fight. We have invested a good
amount of money in our condo
and don't want to go through
the inconvenience of moving
again.
Signed.
Nancy and Harold W.
Dear Nancy and Harold:
If you can't organize the other
tenants in your building by
informing them about the
rules which are not to your
liking and inciting them to
action, then you should
think about trying to work a
change from within. The
next time elections come up,
why don't you run for the
board of directors?
Yours, Nomi
Write Nomi for advice
In care of The Jewish
Floridian, P.O. Box
1273. Miami, Fla.
Beach Federal To
Hold A Course
On Israel
Beach Federal will hold a
free 15 week course on "Cur-
rent Events Around The
World" with an emphasis on
Israel. Stanley K. Shapiro, of
the Ida Fisher Adult Educa-
tion Center will be the lec-
turer. The class will meet at
Beach Federal's Miami Beach
Branch, 430 Lincoln Road,
beginning May 4 from 11 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m.
Reservations without charge
are available.
George Wapnick, second from right, proudly
displays the Gates of Jerusalem Award he
received from the Greater Miami Israel Bonds
Organization during a recent luncheon at the
Coral Creek Country Club in North Miami
Beach. Wavnick was recognized for his sup-
Beth Am
Membership
To Honor
Baumgard's
Temple Beth Am's con-
gregational family plans to
honor Rabbi Herbert and
Selma (Mrs.) Baumgard on
May 2 and at a gala dinner
dance. The dinner dance is a
tribute to both Herbert and
Selma's 30 years of devotion to
Beth Am, as they prepare to
retire on May 30.
The dinner dance will be at
Signature Gardens in South
Dade. Bernard Goodman and
Herman Feldman. both past
President's of the more than
1.450 family congregation,
have announced reservations
are still available.
Al Leibert, dinner program
chairman announced that
three Rabbi's will perform the
dinner havdalh. Rabbi Leonard
Schoolman, Senior Associate
Rabbi of Beth Am. soon to be
Senior Rabbi as Rabbi
Baumgard becomes Rabbi
Emeritus, and Rabbi James
Simon and Robert Goldstein,
two former associate Rabbi's
at Beth Am.
Music for the evening, pro-
vided by Jerry Marshall.
Hebrew Academy
Victorious In
Spelling Bee
The Rabbi Alexander S.
Gross Hebrew Academy
emerged victorious after
students participated in the
Hebrew Spelling Bee competi
tion in the Foreign Language
Category of the Dade County
Youth Fair at the Central
Agency for Jewish Education.
The following Hebrew
Academy students won
awards: Andrew Raij, second
grade, won third place in the
primary grade category of
Hebrew; Avi Beckerman of
sixth grade won first place in
the Intermediate grade
category; Sam Finti of
seventh grade won third place
in the advanced Hebrew
category; Shira Kahn of 10th
grade won first place in the
Beginners Hebrew category.
port of Israel through the Israel Hands mh
gram, as well as for other philanthmmranA
community affiliations. Helping make Z
presentation are California Club 'Israel Bonds
coehaxrmen. from left to right. Herman
Sacks. Harvey Berman and Jack GeUman
^F^ ^^L a i
' 1 sw
1 $ i i i L *M
. -A 1
*^HI^? L h
Niety Gerson (center) proudly displays the award presented to
her for serving as Chairperson of the Greater Miami Israel Bonds
Organization's Women's Division Fashion Show ifhirh was
recently held at the Mayfair House in Coconut Grow. Making the
presentation are guest speaker, Susan Weikers. let}. Satinnai
Chairman of the Israel Bonds Women's Diiismn. and Amb.
Rahamim Timor. Israeli Consul General in Miami. 7V special
award was designed by internationally known artist Si/i-ndor
Dali.
Meyer Berkowitz proudly displays the Israel Leadership Award
he received for serving as chairman of the Burlexgh H^use Israel
Bonds Committee, which he was presented during a special Israel
Bonds Salute to Israel celebration recently held at the Burlcujh
House where Berkowitz resides. Joining Berkowitz at the award
presentation are his wife, Mildred, right, and guest speaker. Deb-
bie Wernick a distinguished local leader for Jewish causes who
worked for the Israel Bonds Organization for 15 years.
, left presents the Israel Freedom\Mm
Jeanette Sturm Rymer on behalf of the Greater Miami i
Bonds Organization during a recent brunch at twij* jj
Avenue in Miami Beach where Rymer >*f*j75j-l
recognized for being a staunch advocate for the ggT. M
through the Israel Bonds program, asweUasher "V .wni.
various community, charitable and philanthropy organu ^
Elan, who is a Paratroop Major \n the Israeli uejeru*
Reserves and is currently the Executive Director oj w
America Chamber of Commerce of Florida, sen
speaker at the brunch.
Medow. who is one of the
Bonds Committee.
her *oit-tn-tou\
HarS
With Rymer is her t-"^ lsTael
, loadersofthe Fifity-Seven-0-One 1*


Yeshiva University Chair In Medical
Ethics To Be Inaugurated
In Miami Beach May 7
Friday, April 24, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
A chair in Jewish medical
ethics established at Yeshiva
University in New York City
by the late Joseph Applehaum
and his wife, Leila. <>f" Miami
Beach, will be inaugurated
May 7 m Miami Beach when
[)r Moses I). Tendler, who
holds the Chair, lectures on
"The Giving <>f Life. Organ
Donation The Jewish
View."
The event will be held at the
Konover Hotel U'ginning at 8
p m.
|>r Norman Lamm, presi
i, i of the University, will
deliver greetings. Dr. Mat-
thew Zuckerman, chairman of
the Florida Friends of Yeshiva
versity, and Sidney L.
Olson, chairman of Florida
Friends of the University's
Albert Einstein College of
Medicine, are serving as
chairmen of the event.
The Chair, which has been
named for Dr. Tendler's late
parents. Kabbi Isaac and Bella
Tendler. is the first in Jewish
medical ethics to be establish-
ed at any university in the
United States.
The Applebaums and Rabbi
and Mrs. Tendler were close
friends for more than 40 years.
Dr. Moses Tendler is pro-
fessor of biology at Yeshiva
University and rosh yukiva
(professor of Talmud) at the
University's affiliated Rabbi
Isaac Flchanan Theological
Seminary. He is one of the
world's leading experts on
Jewish medical ethics.
He was ordained at RIETS
in 1949 and earned the PhD
degree in biology from Colum-
hia University in 1959.
He serves as chairman of the
Medical Ethics Task Force of
the Federation of Jewish
Philanthropies, for which he
edited Medical Ethics, a com-
pendium of principles on
morality, ethics, and Halakhah
(Jewish law).
Dr. Tendler's most recent
hook is Practical Medical
Halakhah, which examines
medical and moral issues from
the light of Jewish law. He is a
frequent lecturer on topics in-
volving medical ethics, and he
regularly receives inquiries
from around the world on such
issues.
Dr. Tendler is also the
author of Pardes Rimonim, a
text on Jewish family life. He
has contributed nearly 100 ar-
Yom Hashoa
Observance
This year's annual communi-
Jy wide Yom Hashoa
(Holocaust Memorial Day)
observance will be on Sunday,
'30 p.m. at Beth Torah Con-
gregation, with Professsor Ir-
win Cotler, visiting professor
at Harvard Law School and
human rights activist, as
keynote speaker.
kToS event is sponsored by
we Central Agency for Jewish
Education, the Community
delations Committee, the
greater Miami Jewish Federa-
0, the Rabbinical Associa-
tion of Greater Miami and the
Southeastern Florida
Holocaust Memorial Center.
Moses Tendler
tides on science and religion to
leading publications
He is spiritual leader of the
Community Synagogue of
Morisev. NY.
The Tendler Chair honors
the memories of Rabbi
Tendler. who for more than 40
years was spiritual leader of
the Kamenitzer Synagogue
(also known as the Pitt Street
Synagogue) on New York's
Lower East Side, and his wife.
Rabbi Tendler, ordained at
RIETS in 1921, was also a roA
yeshiva at the Rabbi Jacob
Joseph School on the Lower
East Side for more than 30
years,
Mrs. Tendler was one of the
first Jewish women in the
United States to receive a law
degree.
Both Rabbi and Mrs. Tendler
died in 11*80.
Arthur and Dale Moses
Dr. Lawrence and
Lois Srhimmel
Israel Bonds To Honor Two
Couples At Bet Breira Dinner
The Greater Miami Israel
Bonds Organization will honor
two couples, Arthur and Dale
Moses and Dr. Lawrence and
Lois Schimmel, at the annual
Congregation Bet Breira
Israel Dinner of State on May
9 at the Sheraton River House
in Miami, starting with a
cocktail reception at 7:30 p.m.
Members of Congregation
Bet Breira, the two couples
are being recognized for their
involvement in various com-
munity, charitable and philan-
thropic organizations, as well
as for their support of Israel
through the Israel Bonds pro-
gram. They will receive the
Israel Freedom Award.
President of Victor Land
Group, Arthur Moses is cur-
rently a member of the Urban
Land Institute and the Board
of Trustees of the Miami
Children's Hospital Founda-
tion. Dale is a member of the
board of Brandeis University,
Miami Chapter of the National
Women's Committee, the
Community Council of Young
Patronesses of the Opera and
the Miami Children's Hospital
Foundation.
Chairman of the Board of
Megabank and Chief of Staff
at Coral Reef Hospital, Dr.
Lawrence Schimmel is also on
the Board of Directors of Hope
Center. A member of the
Board of Directors of Con-
gregation Bet Breira, he is
also active with the B'nai
B'rith Doctors Lodge. His
wife, Lois, has served as a
member of the Board of Direc-
tors of both the Congregation
Bet Breira Sisterhood and the
Sabra/Aliyah Hadassah.
Guest speaker at the dinner
will be Howard Stone, a writer
and consultant to many Jewish
Organizations. He has served
the Jewish people in numerous
capacities including his cur-
rent position as a leader in
"Operation Independence"
which is an effort aimed at
strengthening Israel's
economy.
Music will be provided by the
Larry Lapin Orchestra.
Serving as chairmen are
Marc and Stephanie Hauser
with Gerald and Susan Silver
acting as honorary chairmen.
Trialogue At
Temple Judea
A trialogue on the topic:
"Judaism Today And for
the World of Tomorrow" will
be sponsored by the Temple
Judea Sisterhood at the Coral
Gables temple on Tuesday at 8
p.m. The guest speakers will
be Rabbi Rex Perimeter of
Temple Israel; Rabbi Jack
Riemer of Beth David Con-
gregation and Rabbi Warren
Kasztl of Miami Hospice.
Moderating will be Rabbi
Michael B. Eisenstadt of Tem-
ple Judea.
Congressman William Lehman greets Jonathan Kingsley, a
Junior at the University of Florida ami sun of Rabbi and Mrs.
Ralph Kingsley, during a recent Washington visit.
Safeguard
Your Estate
Through
Your Will
V
r*
&im
&
i ii
SERVES
ISTADRUT,
V
*Vi
s V
Provide for your
spouse, children, grandchildren,
friends and relatives,
Provide for your favorite charities,
and .
Don't forget your most important
relative .
The People of Israel.
Provide for Israel through the Israel Hlstadrut Foundation
by linking a bequest In your will with one of the following
Hlstadrut Social Service Agencies In Israel:
A Kupat Holim Hospital
A Kupat Holim Clinic
A Mishan Bet Avot
(Senior Citizens" Home)
A Mishan Children's Village
A Kupat Holim Dental Clinic (Orphans)
A Synagogue
A Youth Center
An Amal Vocational School A College
A Kupat Holim School
of Nursing
Clir AND MAIL THIS COUPON
Israel Hisladrut Foundation
1680 Michigan Avenue Suite 908
Mi.imi Beach FL 33139
Telephone 30S S31 8702
ATTENTION: Mr. Morton Goldberg, Executive Director
Dear Mr. Goldberg:
I J Please contact me for a confIdential appointment.
U Please aand ma your traa brochure, "Quast Ions a
Am war Designed to help you Safeguard Your Eatata
A Share Your Today with Israel's Tomorrow."
Nmc


Page Ms The Jewish Ftoridian/Friday, April 24, 1987
Afore fAan 700 persons attended the 19th annual Donor Luncheon
of the South Florida Council of Na 'amat Women at the Fon-
tainebleau Hotel. Speakers included, from left, Benjamin Cohen
of New York, national president of the American Zionist Federa-
tion; Miami Beach Mayor Alex Daoud; and Harriet Green, presi-
dent of the South Florida Council and national vice president of
Na amat USA.
Other principals in the Na'amat USA donor luncheon include
from left. South Florida Council vice presidents Leah Benson and
Felice P. Schwartz; Sarah Kaufman, past president of Beba
ldelson Chapter and Irene Raczkowski. president of the Beba
Idleson Chapter. Mrs. Green presided at the luncheon, which also
heard from Gerald Schwartz, associate natumal chairman of
Friends of Na amat USA.
PERSONALS
HAPPENINGS SINGLES is
having an OUTSTANDING
SINGLES PARTY on
FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 1987 at
9:00 P.M.. at the DIPLO-
MAT COUNTRY CLUB.
501 DIPLOMAT PARKWAY.
Hallandale. Florida. There
will be DANCING. LIVE
BAND. CONTINUOUS
hors d OEUVRES. GIFT
DRAWINGS and SUR-
PRISES. Admission is
$6.00. For more informa-
tion call Sharon Silver
385-1255.
THE AVENTURA Jewish
Center Singles of all ages
invite you to their monthly
Sabbath Service on
Friday. May 1st, at 10 P.M.
The service will be at the
Aventura Jewish Center
located at 2972 Aventura
Blvd., N. Miami Beach.
Rabbi David B. Saltzman
will lead the prayers and
Cantor Bernard Knee will
chant the liturgy. Oneg
Shabbat will follow the
service. A $3.00 donation
and an advance reserva-
tion is requested. Call
Shula Amikan at 935-3742
or Rabbi Saltzman at 932-
7969.
SINGLES EVENING In
Paradise WHO:
Happenings Singles
Invites All Singles. WHAT:
Singles Night at
International Mall
WHERE: International
Mall. State Road 836 and
N.W. 107th Avenue.
WHEN: Friday. May 1.
1987. 6:00 P.M.-9:00 p.m.
WHY: An Evening In
Paradise. There will be
non stop prizes, food
sampling, treasure hunt,
live band, DJ, a gift for
everyone, contests, new
people to meet and
surprises. For more
information: Call Sharon
Silver 385-1255.
DO YOU WANT a loving
companion to share your
apartment with you on a
50/50 basis for the next 30
years? If so I am the
charming, attractive
gentleman, 72-f with high
cultural standards and
fine education who wants
to meet a Jewish woman,
65-75, retired, self-
supporting, and with a car
to get to Miami Beach.
Dade Co. residents only.
Box SR c/o Jewish
Floridian, P.O. Box
012973, Miami, Fla. 33101.
Hadassah
Events
The Naomi Chapter of
Hadassah will bring to a close
the meetings of the regular ac-
tivity year with "A Diamond
Jubilee Celebration."
The dinner meeting, which is
the annual Awards Night and
Installation of Officers, will be
held 6:30 p.m. May 11 at the
Holiday Inn, 2051 Le June
Road, Coral Gables.
Ricky Spitzer will be install-
ed as President for the second
year. Other officers include:
Julia Friedman. Ad-
ministrative Vice President;
Mimi Becker. Fund-Raising
and Ways and Means Vice
President; Fran Higer, Pro-
gram Vice President; Rhoda
Haber, Education Vice Presi-
dent; Eleanor Packtor.
Membership Vice President;
Shirley Bowers and Barbara
Mintz, Co-Treasurers; Molly
Mann, Financial Secretary.
Muriel Kaufman, Membership
Dues Secretary; Rose Wolf.
Recording Secretary; Rosella
Leeds, Corresponding
Secretary; Eleanor Packtor.
Parliamentarian.
The I.R. Goodman Chapter
of Hadassah will hold its next
meeting on Tuesday at 1 p.m.
at the new Hadassah Region
office. 300 71st St.. Suite
430, Miami Beach. The pro-
gram will include highlights of
the Youth Aliyah project and a
slide film entitled "Diary of
Anne Frank" presented by
American Savings Bank.
Bessie Lepow is Chairperson.
The Hadassah Donor
Reward Luncheon will be held
May 17 at 11:30 a.m. at the
Hyatt Regency Hotel at 400
SE 2nd Ave. Nine chapters
will be participating: Aliyah.
Aviva, Chai. Eilat, Hatikvah.
Kinneret, Menorah. Naomi,
and Torah. Entertainment will
be provided by the Menorah
Minstrels, a singing group of
Hadassah Women.
The Chairperson of the af-
fair is Pearl Noble.
The Installation Luncheon
Meeting of the Stephen S
Wise Chapter of Hadassah will
be held on May 4. at 11:30 a.m.
at the Ocean Pavillion on
Miami Beach.
Installing officer will \*>
Katherine Goldberg. Enter-
tainment following will !* pn>
vided by Mary I'chitel at the
piano leading in a Sing-Almig.
The Inter American Chapter
of Hadassah Miami Beach
Region is currently planning a
fashion show to be held on
Thursday, May 21. 11 a.m. at
the Fountainbleau Hilton
Hotel in Miami Beach. For fur-
ther information or reserva-
tions contact Mrs. Margot
Backer, President, Mrs. Anita
Grossfeld, or Mrs. Sara Egozi.
The Henrietta Siold
Chapter of Hadassah, Miami
Beach, will hold their Monthly
Meeting on Monday, May 4, at
100 Lincoln Road at 10:30
a.m., at which time the Board
Meeting will be held, with the
Regular Meeting following.
Hadassah. Miami Region's
Annual Spring Conference will
take place at the Omni Hotel
on May 3, 4, and 5. The
plenary session to be held Sun-
day evening, May 3 win"
feature Jews in the media in-
cluding Gerri Helfman, Joan
Fleischman and Mark Lunder
with Suzanne Lasky acting as
moderator.
'ii
un,
i. -mm. m
Florida Council of Amit women held their annual schol
and special gifts luncheon recently on Miami Beach lV''''
Women gave special honor to Ten Pearlman. a dtdicatt d mernh!
ofShoshana Chapter. Guest speaker was Ambassador Raham
Timor. Consul General of Israel. At left. Ida Arluk, Pr,
Member of the Florida Council and Presidium Member of (Mi
Chapter; Betty Kugelmas, Vice President South ast Region Bta
ny Schreiber. Florida < 'ouncil Presidium Memb>-r; Ruth Zellntr
Chairman of the Board. Florida Council; 7Vn Pearlmaii
Honoree;Samuel Pearlman; Ambassador Rahamini Timor Mr!
Timor and Saundra Rnthenberg. Presidium Member Florida
Council. Not shown. Ida C. Sussman. Luncheon ('ham,,,,,,
Women's Division American
Society For Technion Luncheon
The Women's Division of the
American Society for Tech-
nion, Israel Institute of
Technology, Miami. Coral
Gables, Kendall Chapter will
have their installation lun-
cheon meeting at the Universi-
ty of Miami Faculty Club in
Coral Gables on Monday at
11:30 a.m. Rabbi Jack Riemer
of Beth David Congregation
will be the installing officer
and will also review his book
"Ethical Wills, A Jewish
Treasury."
The Southern Region will
honor Clara Kellner on Thurs-
day, April 30 at noon at the
David William Hotel in Coral
Gables for her contribution to
the Medical Engineering Pro-
gram which supports basic
research in bio-medical
engineering at the Technion in
Haifa, Israel. One of Tech-
nion's newest innovations is a
computer "tutor" to help im-
prove the quality of speech of
the deaf.
Honor Thy
Father.
We built Bnai Israel In honor of our parents lb help
them hold high their accomplishments lb respect
their dignity and beliefs
Bnai Israel Rehabilitation and Convalescent l lenter
is special We made it the only glatt kosher skilled
nursing facility under "< >rthodox I'nion super-
vision in the country We designed it to provide tin-
highest quality health care in an aesthetically
beautiful and spiritually observant environment
Our ISO bed center offers long term care, extensive
rehabilitation and activity programs, adult day care
and daily, holiday and Sabbath services at our own
orthodox synagogue.
Celebrate life with Bnai Israel A gift of low for the
ones you love.
Opening soon Gall Jon C. Aaron, Administrator, at
932-6239 or 932-6360 for reservations
israei
Rehabilitation and
Convalescent Center
18905 Northeast 2S Avenue North Miami Beach. H.


Wedding
MACPHERSONGORDON
It was a seagoing wedding for State
Senator Jack D. Gordon (D., Miami Beach)
hist week aboard the M.S. Eagle. The private
ceremony united the former Florida Senate
President Pro Tern with Myra MacPherson. a
Washington Post political reporter. She has
written books on the capital political scene
and on Vietnam, and is currently authoring
another book. The Gordons will live on Palm
Island in Miami Beach. He is a consultant to
Jefferson National Banks.
A mi t Women
Madar Chapter is sponsor-
ing a mother-in-Israel lun-
cheon, hosted by Ida
Kesselman and Helen G. Zalis,
on Wednesday at noon at the
Shelbourne Hotel, Miami
Beach. The afternoon will
feature a luncheon, entertain-
ment, and lots of fun.
Migdal Chapter is
celebrating Israel's 39th Birth-
daj with a fabulous party on
Wednesday, April 29 at noon
at the Forte Towers, 1200
Building Card Room. 1200
W.st Ave., Miami Beach.
Everyone is invited to join the
memlHTS for a delicious lun-
cheon, card party and prizes
galore.
Shalom Chapter will honor
Martha Gottschalk as their
mother of the year at their
mciting on Wednesday at
11:30 a.m. in the Club of 100
Lincoln Road Building, Miami
Beach. A lunch will be served
and a musical program will be
presented. Ruth Zellner,
Chairman of the Board, Amit
Women. Florida Council will
be guest speaker.
Simcha Chapter celebrates
Israel's 39th Birthday on Mon-
day, at noon at Winston
Towers, Building 100, Miami
'h. A luncheon will be
served, l>eautiful door prizes
can be won and a wonderful
entertainment program will be
presented.
Iamara Chapter meets on a
different date due to Passover.
The meeting will be held on
Thursday. April 23 at noon in
the Recreation Room of
Galahad III, Hollywood. The
program consists of a lun-
cheon, and a singer and
complished pianist.
ac-
Your Child/Your
Divorce' To Be Topic
Of JFS Workshop
Sharing experiences,
discussing common concerns
and learning techniques for
coping with divorce will be the
focus of "Your Child/Your
"ivorce," a workshop being
sponsored by Jewish Family
Service of Greater Miami.
Conducted by JFS Senior
Clinician Randi Adler. LCSW,
tn's workshop for divorced
Parents will meet for four con-
secutive Wednesdays from
'M to 9 p.m. beginning May
o. 1;articipants will meet at the
^S North Dade Office.
bating is limited.
Author/Artist To Speak
On Holocaust Book
The Miami Beach Branch
Library will present author/ar-
tist Israel Bernbaum on Thurs-
day, April 30, at 2 p.m.
Mr. Bernbaum's book "My
Brother's Keeper The
Holocaust Through The Eyes of
An Artist" has received
critical acclaim and is based on
his five Holocaust paintings,
which center around the War-
saw Ghetto.
Friday, April 24, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Organization News
South Florida Women's Committee will meet Wednes-
day, at noon, at the Cadillac Hotel, Miami Beach. A Salad
Luncheon will be served. Entertainment will be provided
by the Greater Miami Opera Association.
The South Dade Chapter of ORT is having its annual
Mellah Mother's Program to honor dear departed member
Sally Bluon on Tuesday at 10 a.m. at the Kendall Acres
Clubhouse.
B'nai B'rith Sholom Lodge No. 1024 will hold the in-
stallation of officers and trustees at a luncheon 11:30 a.m.
May 8 at the Kendale Lakes Country Club.
Temple Ner Tamid Sisterhood, will hold their Apprecia-
tion Angel Luncheon on Tuesday. April 28 at noon in the
Sklar Auditorium.
An opening and reception of an exhibition featuring
sculptures by Israeli artist Frank Meisler with special
guest Batia Meisler will be held at the Forum Room in the
Konover Hotel on Monday from 6-8 p.m. The exhibit will
continue through Thursday. April 30 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
and 4-8 p.m.
A symposium called "After Matisse" will be held at the
Bass Museum of Art on Miami Beach Saturday from 10
a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Participants include art historians Robert
Rosenblum and John Neff and artists Al Held, Alex Katz
and Joyce Kozloff.


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. April 24, 1987
u\m
Jihan Sadat
Mrs. George Bush
Ofira Navon
Hadassah 75th Anniversary Award
Goes To Bush, Sadat And Navon
NEW YORK Mrs. George
Bush. Jihan Sadat and Ofira
Navon will be honored with a
special award marking the
75th anniversary of Hadassah.
the Women's Zionist Organiza-
tion of America, in ceremonies
on Tuesday. April 28. in
Washington. D.C.. Hadassah
national president. Ruth W.
Popkin, announced.
"These three women have
made an indelible mark on our
world through their compas-
sion, concern and commitment
and their leadership in a range
of vital humanitarian causes."
Popkin said. "Their lives and
work provide an enduring ex-
ample for other women
everywhere who are striving
to change the lives of their
fellow human beings and
their own for the better."
THE CEREMONIES will
also feature remarks by M.
Peter McPherson. Ad-
ministrator of the United
States Agency for Interna-
tional Development, on
Hadassah"? contributions to
improved health care services
in developing nations, Popkin
added, and is part of
Hadassah's year-long celebra-
tion of its 75th anniversary.
Mrs. Bush is being honored
for her leadership in the move-
ment to eradicate illiteracy,
Popkin said. Mrs. Bush is
honorary chairperson of the
National Advisory Council of
Literacy Volunteers of
America and the Business
Council for Effective Literacy,
and has long been active in
programs to teach reading and
assist children with earning
difficulties.
Mr? Bush, who is also a
l>est-selling author, is the wife
of the Vice President of the
United States.
Mrs. Sadat will receive the
special Hadassah 75th anniver-
sary award for her efforts to
improve the status of women
in Egypt, her leadership in
upgrading and improving the
accessibility of medical
rehabilitation services in her
country, and her contributions
to international understan-
ding, the Hadassah president
stated. She is the widow of the
late Egyptian President An-
war el Sadat.
MRS. NAVON was selected
for the Hadassah honor
because of her leadership in ef-
forts to enhance educational,
social and cultural oppor-
tunities for gifted Israeli high
school students from disadvan-
taged backgrounds, Popkin
said.
Mrs. Navon also has been in-
strumental in international
organizations to assist disabl-
ed children and child victims of
war and natural disasters. She
is the wife of former Israel
President and current
Minister of Education Yitzhak
Navon.
The ceremonies will also
feature selections by noted
Israeli pianist David Bar-Ilan.
Charlotte Jacobson, 75th an-
niversary celebration chair-
man, will preside.
Shamir Assures Israel Bond Leaders The
U.S.-lsrael Relationship Remains Strong
t ontiMued from Page fr-B
people and the support of
Jewish communities abroad.
Israel Bonds' wonderful $603
million achievement of 1986
made an important contribu-
tion to our economy."
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin met with conference
delegates in Tel Aviv.
"The task ahead of us is to
make Israel's economy
stronger and more attrac-
tive," Rabin noted. "You have
an important role to play here.
In foreign policy and security,
we can manage alone. Where
we need help is in building up
our economy. The more you
help us, the better it will be."
The $90 million automated
container terminal at Haifa
Port and the $1 billion power
station at Hj to were among
the Israel Bonds-supported
{>rojects that #ere on the con-
erence itinerary. A number of
the delegates had been present
at the cornerstone-laying at
the Hadera facility 10 years
earlier.
Conference highlights also
included a 90-minute cruise by
groups of delegates across
Haifa Bay aboard one of
Israel's $100 million missile
craft and a festive evening in
the Druse village of Daliat-al-
Carmel near Haifa.
The 20th year of Jerusalem's
reunification was observed by
the Bonds delegates on Am-
munition Hill in Jerusalem
together with veterans of the
June, 1967 battle.
In the 36 years since Israel
bonds was founded, total sales
have passed the $8.1 billion
mark. These loan funds helped
build Israel's roads, railways
and power stations; developed
its national water carrier, its
ports, oil refineries, industrial
parks and science-based
industries.
Hadassah was founded at
Purim in 11*12 by scholar.
educator and Zionist pioneer.
Henrietta Szold. From a study
group with just 12 members,
Hadassah has grown to
become the largest women's
volunteer organization and
the largest Zionist organiza-
tion in the world, with
385.000 members throughout
the United States and af-
filiated groups in Israel and 18
other nations worldwide.
| "
The Tt'tnplr Zum Israelite Center Theatr, Guild will '
ting the Lerner and Lowe Musical "Brigadoon" r
Saturday and Sunday and again an May f, 3 and 9, Ticki
information may be obtained from Jere Cha.it hen Fr\
Patricia Gardner. "JEAN"; San ford Schnier, "ANDRl W MAC
LAREN", Kimily Knutkern. "FIONA."
The Private Bank has big plans
for the small business.
At Northern Trust Bank, we an- not so much interested in the size of your company '" ,,M' ""I*
of your ambitions. So we welcome the opportunity to help your business gn>w .
The Private Hanker gives you the personal attention you need A program is taikired U> ciinamv i
financial profile of both you and your company. (Kir businevsKiriented services are at your roiamaw
Such as. personal and commercial lines ofcndk, real estate financing, investment opportunities
empkiyec benefit plans, and many others. And. of course, we aho serve all your everyday hanking uee
So bring your mm.hi in Tlit Private Kink a
Well help your company n into it. \Ir iff I Ukfll rr\"l Nortnem Trust Rank of Fkirida. 7(>0 Brickell A ^** U"1"'1 V5. t UL
Awnue. Miami. Telephone 372 jmiTWm I*'""
Ask tor David High mark.
W*,r The* Hunt, yAW/.A/ Mhiih, ami .Win 7hM*lu/'<''<""
UrMi i>I \<*1krr /)/ ( iiifmniliiiH ( hn <*t Vrmbri FDH


B'nai Mitzvah
Friday, April 24, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Alvssa Mishcon
Joshua Covin
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
These shall ye not eat of them the camel the rock-
badger the hare the swine they are unclean unto you "
(Leviticus 11.4-8).
SHEMINI
SHEMINI On the eight day of their consecration, Aaron and
his sons offered sacrifices for themselves and the people at Moses'
command. Then Moses and Aaron came out of the tent of
meeting, blessing the people. The glory of God appeared; a fire
from Heaven consumed the burnt-offering on the altar. At the
sight, the people cried out and fell on their faces. Nadab and
Ahihu. Aaron's sons, offered "strange fire" on the altar, a fire
issued forth and devoured them. Aaron held his peace. The priests
are commanded not to drink wine or strong drink when entering
the tent of meeting "that ye may put difference between the holy
and the common, and between the unclean and the clean"
iLeriticus 10.10). The portion details the laws describing
cleanliness and uncleanliness in regard to the eating of animals.
fowls, and fish.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
urx>n The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage, edited by P Wollman
Tsamir. $15, published by Shengold The volume is available at 75 Maiden
Lane New York. NY 10038 Joseph Schlang is president of the society
attributing the volume 1
Rose Siaman displays The Israel Freedom Award she received
Jrom B nai Zion Rabbi Stanley Burstein, right, on behalf of the
water Miami Israel Bonds Organization. Sigman was
rttognized during a recent brunch at B'nai Zion for her staunch
support of Israel through the Israel Bonds program and her in-
volvement in various community and philanthropic causes. Help-
ing make the presentation was guest speaker Emit Cohen, a noted
American Jewish folk humorist.
Happenings
A free-wheeling discussion of 'Lincoln Road Today and
Tomorrow" will highlight the monthly meeting of the Civic
League of Miami Beach Monday at the Holiday Inn Hotel. 2201
Collins Ave Dinner at 6:30 p.m. will precede the 7:30 p.m.
business session and Lincoln Road panel Gerald Schwartz is
President
A gigantic book sale will be held Friday and Saturday from 10
*m to 4 p.m at the Main Library at the Metro-Dade Cultural
cnter in Miami
Build Israel With Books" has been selected as the national
"ember-ship campaign theme of American Friends of Tel Aviv
University. For more information contact Cal Kovens. chairman.
Southeast Region.
JOSHUA COVIN
Joshua Matthew Covin will
be called to the Torah on Shab-
bat morning, April 25, on the
occasion of his Bar Mitzvah at
Congregation B'nai Torah in
Atlanta, Ga.
Son of former Miamians,
Shelley Lipson Covin and the
late Robert J. Covin, Josh is a
distinguished seventh grade
student at The Harry H. Eps-
tein/Solomon Schechter
School of Atlanta, where he is
Vice-president of the
Knesset/Student Government.
A special Shabbat morning
service in honor of this simcha
will take place at B'nai Torah.
where Mrs. Covin serves as
Director of Education. The
Congregation's Rabbi, Juda H.
Mintz, will officiate, joined on
the bimah by the Bar Mitzvah
celebrant, his maternal grand-
father, Hazzan William W.
Lipson and uncle, Rabbi Nor-
man S. Lipson.
Special guests include Josh's
grandparents, azzan and Mrs.
William W. Lipson and Mr.
and Mrs. Michael Covin, as
well as Rabbi and Mrs. Nor
man S. Lipson and daughters,
and Mrs. Esther Kligman, all
of Greater Miami; Mr. and
Mrs. Gary Ticker and
daughters, of Dallas, Texas
Mr. and Mrs. William Wein
traub and daughters, and Mr.
and Mrs. Douglas Weintraub.
of Akron, Ohio.
ALYSSA MISHCON
Alyssa Mishcon daughter of
Dr. and Mrs. Arnold Mishcon
(Lori) will be called to the
Torah as a Bat Mitzvah on
Saturday at 10:30 a.m. at Tem-
ple Emanu-EI.
Alyssa is a seventh grade
student at Highland Oaks
Junior High where she is an all
honors student. Alyssa loves
to play the guitar and sings.
She has two plays to her credit
and has done several commer-
cials. Alyssa is an all around
student and quite popular with
her friends. Alyssa has attend-
ed Temple Emanu-El's after-
noon religious school for the
past year.
Dr. and Mrs. Arnold
Mishcon will host a luncheon
following services in the
Friedland Ballroom at Temple
KmanuEl. Many friends and
relatives from home and out-
of-town will be here to help
celebrate the "simcha."
CPR Classes
At Mount Sinai
Free three-hour certification
classes on CPR, Car-
diopulmonary Resuscitation,
are available on the fourth
Tuesday of everv month at
Mount Sinai Medical Center
from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. The
next class meets this Tuesday.
The basic heartsaver course,
which covers Adult CPR and
the Medical Center's Young
Presidents' Club. Registration
is limited.
Women In The Clergy
On Viewpoint
Viewpoint, a WPBT weekly
public affairs program, will ex-
amine the new roles that
clergywomen are assuming,
roles traditionally Filled by
clergymen, on Sunday at 5
p.m. Joining Viewpoint host
Rodney Ward in the WPBT
studio to discuss the pro-and-
con issues surrounding the
changing role of women in the
clergy.
Synagogue '
Listing
Candlelighting Time
7:30 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONQREQATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach. Fla 531 -2120
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig
Dally 1 20 a m Afternoon 5 30 p.m
Sat. 9 a.m.
ADATHYESMURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 047.14 j<,
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpern Conservative
fr)
Mlnyan 7:30 a.m. i ( p.m
Sal. 4 Sun 6 a.m. i 6 p.m.
Shabbat aan. Sat I 30 am
Frt. ip.m. 8 nol Mill van
fthrka Foxx. laab.ll. Jacoba
and Laura Kaya.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Tampla Bath Shmual
1700 Michigan Ava Miami Beach
534 7213-534 7214
Barry J Konovitch. Rabbi /*.
Moahe Buryn. Cantor '. W)
Sergio Groblar. President
Sholam Epelbaum President
Religious Committee
w
TEMPLE EMANU EL
1701 Washington Avanua
Miami Baach
Or Irving Lahrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Bargar
Yahuda Shifman. Cantor
Maurica Klain. Ritual Director
Garald Taub. Executive Director
Kabbalal Shabbat p.m.
Sal aary am Or Irving Lahrman ami preach.
Cantor Yahud* Shllman wall chant.
Bai Mltnah Alyau Mlaheon.
TEMPLE BETH AM
StSO N. Kendall Or.
S. Miami M7 6667
Dr. Herbert Baomgard
Senior Rabbi
Rabbi Leonard Schoolman
Frt. *:IS p.m.
Gi.n Stain will apaak on "Social Juaiica In
Amartca Today"
Sat. 1115am B'not Mltnah Kim Labowltz
and Naiaaha Frtadman
RabtM Baumgard will apaax on -String* Fire.'
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 85* 3811
Jack Rlemer, Rabbi
Robert Albert. (
Cantor
Rev. Milton Freeman.
Ritual Director
(D
Sat. t a.m. Sabbath San
Mnchah at 7.30 p.m.
MMchah IM p.m.
Dally Mlnyan hold morning t avoning
7 day* woo* Pl.aaa call for achodula
BETH KODESM
Conaervatlve
1101 SW 12 Ave
Rabbi Mai Shapiro
Cantor Joeeph Krtaaet
Roee Berlin: Executive Secretary
SSfl 6.134
Annual Banquat May 10
A Thursday 7:30 *.m
Same** Monday *
Sal 45 a
TEMPLE BETH MOSME
222S NE 121 St.. N Miami. FL 33111
8815506 Conaervatlve
Or. Israel Jacoba. Rabbi _.
Dr Joseph A Gofllnkel. /*
Rabbi Emeritus *%>
Moahe Friedler, Cantor
Frt. S p.m.
Sat 8 45 am Bar Mltnah Todd Wlrtahatpar
Weekday aarv Mon Frt. t a.m.
Mon Thur* S p m Sun. 30 am
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1S45 Jefferson Ave.. MB.. FL 33138
Tel. 538-4112
Cantor Nlsslm Benyamln!
Ev.aor.fpm Sal IS a m
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH EL CONQREQATION
2400 Ptnetree Drtve. Miami Beach
532 6421
Cantor Rabbi Soromon Schitf
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
afcami % Fiona*' Aaform CongiwQttton
137 N.E. 19th St.. Miami. 573-5900
9990 N Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell Bemat
Assistant Rabbi Rax D. Perimeter
Cantor Rachelle F Nelson
Cantor Emeritus.
Jacob G. Bornstem
Director of Education
And Programming: Jack L. Sparks
Frt. p.m.
Downtown Canlor Jacob Bomateln will ehanl
pr**ch "Th* Cardan of Edan Within Oa."
Kendall Rabbi Ra> 0 Padmeler will preach
Liturgy Man.., Kaufman, Cantortal Soio.ai
TEMPLE JUDEA
5600 Granada Btvd
Coral Oablee 7fMB7
Mlohaal B. Eiaenetat. Rabbi
Frt. 1:11 Worship Sam c a
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tal 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Shoshanah Raab. Cantor
S.rvic.1 Fn 730 p.m
Sat 9 30 am
Onag Shabbat will loilow
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St.. Miami Baach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
An Fridkis. Assoc Rabbi (
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sat 9am Sabbathaanrtce.
Dally Mlnchah Sunday-Friday
am and6pm.
Sal 9am and 5 15 pm
t)
TEMPLE NER TAMID
7802 Cartyta Ave
Miami Beech 33141
Rabbi Eugene LeboviU
Cantor Edward Klotn | (
Dally aan Mon Fn > am II1S p.m
Sal f*nch.15pm Sun S30a.m A
HSpjn
I);
BET SHIRA CONQREQATION
7500 SW 120th Street
23B-2B01 /5N
Rabbi David HAuerbach \W)
Cantor Stephen Freedman "^
Frt. p m Creatlva aomc* Sal so a.m.
B nol MUnan of Pefiynwi Oorhardt
and Main. Weinetean.
DaMy *amoa* Sunday 9 30 am
Mon Tuea Thur* 7:30a m Wad. 7 30 p m
TEMPLE BEfHSHOLOM 536 723.
Chase A.a A 41 at St mr
0 LEOM KIKMM8H, F,
OAB.Y A UUCKSTf. IN
MANRV JOLT, Ana Wary Mat
CANTON DAVID CON VlStB
nxVBjtJJ p m Sormon by NabcM ONckaleln
"aaai.fi Poatparlum Proacr
Sal 1**5 a m aor.
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 847 7528
1051 N Miami Beech Bivd
Or Max A Lipschit* Rabbi
Zvee Aronl, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
DaHy Sarvtcaa Mon Fn 7:10 am
4 5 30pm
SatSHamt7-1Spm
Sun. lam 4 5 30pm
!
SHAARAV TEFILLAH
Of North Miami Beach
871 Northeast U2nd St
North Miami Beach
861 1582
Yaakov Sprung. Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
232-8833 Mo 4am Cvwaadea
Rabbi Hershel Becker
M a.m aaMoaal
T*m#*a Somu El
BSS3SW1S2A**..
aVetN. KataaaBDr.
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave
North Dede's Retorm Con*iregatK>n
Ralph P Kingsiey. Rabbi 832 9010
Julian I Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Barbara S Ramsay Administrator
M.IU,
nWaxM Klngaaay' aermen "The Canwm al
Auachwlti and ana SawrM ol fvaoocrHallon
WoraMp aory Sal 10 30 am
B'not MltnahLlndsayUatonand
afaMMMl Satn.
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
Snail* Coneervatrve
Dr Norman N Shapiro. Rabbi '')
Benjamin Adfer, Centor K.'
Devld Rosenthal, Auxiliary Cantor
Mlnyan 7 a.m. Monday 4 Trmreday
Sunday 9 a m
Frl I 15 pm arenrnf *on wHi ba conducted
by Or. Neman N. Shaptro
Adult Forum following
Saf aar> 9 a rr
aTaBBaTal


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian^rkUy, April 24, 1967
Student Symposia
On Holocaust And Prejudice
The Southeastern Florida
Holocaust Memorial Center
will host three student
awareness days on the
Holocaust and Prejudice.
Students attending private,
public and parochial schools
will represent the different
races, nationalities and
religious which comprise our
community. 200 are expected
students to attend each day.
Student awareness day
workshops are being planned
in conjunction with Holocaust
Awareness week.
When, with the guidance of
various speakers, survivors
and facilitators, the students
will journey through the
historical and philosophical im-
plications of prejudice as ex-
emplified by the Holocaust.
The schedule is as follows:
Tuesday, April 28, 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. for 7th to 9th grade Dade
County students at Florid* In-
ternational University, Bay
Vista Campus.
Wednesday, April 29, 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. for 10th and 12th
grade Dade County students
at Florida International
University, Bay Vista Campus.
Thursday, April 30, 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. for 9th to 12th grade
Broward County students at
the Holiday Inn, 1711 North
University Drive, Plantation.
Sponsoring the three stu-
dent awareness days are: Mr.
and Mrs. Leonard Abess, Mr.
and Mrs. Bill Lehman, Jr., Mr.
David Katz, of the Holiday Inn
and the Hollywood Rotary
Club in the name of the In-
teract Club.
Honors And Appointments
AMSTERDAM (JTA) -
Dutch-born Lemvroman Smyt-
wo of New York has received
the silver medal of the Royal
Netherlands Academy of
Sciences for his work as a
biologist and author. A resi-
dent of New York for more
than 40 years, his writing is in
Dutch.
BEACHWOOD, Ohio -
(JTA) Mayor Harvey Fried-
man has proclaimed March
29-April 5 as Libbie Braver-
man Week here. Braverman is
an educator and author. She
and her late husband, architect
Sigmund, were noted for their
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service
Dade County
5.12-2009
Broward County
r>:i2 2(>w
Reprps^nU-d by Rivcmde Memorial Chapel. Inc.
New York: (718(263 760<> Qmeni Blvd. & 7th Kd.. Forest Hill.- N V
SPECIAL LIMITED PRE-NEED OFFER
FUNERAL AND BURIAL
IN THE BEST OF JEWISH TRADITION
$1,595
Lakeside Memorial Park and Etrrnal I ight Funeral Director* are proud to
sponsor this unique program which combines ownership of a plot at our
beautiful Memorial Park and a plan for prr-paid funeral service*
This exceptional value assure* that vour one call will put vou in touch with
ihe people who hrlieve there is nothing dignified ahout paving more for a
traditional Jewish funeral that vou have to.
HERE IS WHAT WE INCLUDE:
Prompt Transfer from Place of
Death
Care and Preparation of Deceased
Caaket and Hearse
Arrangemeni Direction of
Grave*ide Service*
Permit* and Benefit Assistance
24 hour ertvrrgencv service
Shiva Candle*. Card* and Benches
l >rave*ite
Paved Private Visitation Path
Steel Reinforced Concrete Vault
Opening and Cleaving of Grave
Perpetual Graveaitc* Care
No maintenance or service fee*
A Jewish Tradition since I95S
TOTAL: $1,595
No Interest Payment Plans Available
For complete information on our plot and funeral tervice package plan
call vour Lakeside Eternal Light representative today.
In time of need, one call will handle all the details.
DADE:
592-0690
BROWARD:
525-9339
support of synagogue life. Said
one admirer, "He builds them,
she fills them."
JERUSALEM (JTA)--
Prof. Moshe Davis of the
Hebrew University of
Jerusalem, whose work has
been dedicated toward
developing understanding bet-
ween diaspora and Israeli
Jews, has been awarded the
1987 Knesset Speaker's Prize
for the enhancement of the
quality of life in Israel.
NEW ORLEANS (JTA)
Lenore Feldman of
Lawrence, N.Y., a manage-
ment and leadership develop-
ment authority, was installed
as president of National Coun-
cil of Jewish Women at the
organization's 37th national
convention here March 19-22.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Eteiy DsvCiOied Ssbb*"-
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888

e { i t t
SM
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel 261 7612
OB.TUARIFS
KAPUSTIN, Jacobo, 81. of Miami Beach.
April 18. The Riverside
K0PET. Evelyn Conn The Riverside
CHECKMAN. Jeannette, 88, of North
Miami. April 17 Menorah ChapeU
SCHWARTZ. Henry. 91. of Miami April
17. The Riverside.
GRAHAM? Sheri A.. April 18. The
Riverside
ROTHMAN. Sally. April 17. Services were
Private.
SSIN. Sarah H 72. of Miami Beach.
April 16 Blaaberg Chapel
FAYSHTEYN. Yankel. of Miami Beach
Rubin Zilbert
HELD. Meier, of Miami Beach. Rubin
aaaaVJrt
MOSK. Blanche. 77. of Coral Gables April
18 Interment at Mt Nebo Cemetery
MOSKOWTTZ. Jacob, of Miami Beach
Rubin Zilbert
PRINCE. Joseph. 69. of North Miami
Beach. April 18 Levitt Weinstein
RAYMAN. Fannie. 92. of Miami Beach.
April 19 The Riverside
BAER. Or Bernhard. 72. of Miami Beach.
April 18 Services and interment held at
Ml Nebo Cemeterv
HOFMANN. Enc. of Miami Beach Rubin
Zilbert
FINN. Sal C M, ApYil 19 Service* were
held
I'KF.DINGKR. Tillye. 79. of Tamarac. April
20 Services and interment held at Mt
Nebo Cemeterv
MOM. Nathan. >.f Miami Beach. April 19
Blaaberg Chapel
LIEBERMAN. Herman, of North Miami
Beach Service* held in Philadelphia. Pa
SUITE Sylvia, of Miami Beach. April 14
Blaaberg Chapel
BIRNBACM. Arthur of Nort Miami Beach
Eternal Light
BLANK. Pearl, of North Miami Beach.
April 15 The Riverside
PEARL. EsteUe. (nee Rothstein) Services
held in Philadelphia Pa.
GRUBER, PM, 76, of Miami fear* *
16. Levitt-Wsinstem ^eh- AP"i
^SSfSSTttm tv
MelrS PaT o^
HAMMER. Florence, of Coral GsNei kme
^ntern>en,.,SUrofurCS
W"'TO. Lynn A O** N'wmsni %
*'SttApnl>* -.
KZUbene,fNOrth,,'mmiB'^^n
C1MBLE. June E 60 of M,am, RWh
April 6 The UvvnWa M
NE&IROW.Ev,.77fV,rlhMl4m, A
6 Service* werv bald in N V prL
MILLER. Esther, of Mian, |
ISL&fA f **
HERSH. Loui*. 79. of mm Beach. April 6
Service* were private
BROWD. Lillian, of North Miami Beach
April S Blaaberg Chapel
KAMELHAR Anne, of Surfed., Apr,! 6
Blaaberg < hapel
SCHWARTZ Melvin. 68. Mlim; ^
April 6 The Riverside
SLOAN. Abe, of Bal Harbour April 5 Ser
vices held in Michigan
Z'MMLE^HSrTy A S York The Riverside
-'
You heard us rlghl Menorah wants you lo sho|
i irrangemenl pi.in*, rhen come to Menord
i mmiii.iii loraJlona the finest options lo cusi
n nKini.ti.il gardens In Palm Beach and Hi
rxpen counselors Menorah Is the plan more lewis
are choosing And our plans arc available at the U m
quoted by anyone. Sogoahead shop "them Ilrsi
to Menorah where voui lasi i how la vour best i h
Gardens and Funeral Chapels
North Miami Beach: 935 3939 Sunrise: 742 6000
Margate: 975^)011 Deerficld Beach: 427 4700
West Palm Beach: 627 2277
l rnieirne-. Funeral Chapels M.uisolriim IT. Net
RUBIN I RUBIN-ZILBERT
ZILBERT
CHAPEL
MONUMIIIT CO
CIMtTIR Y C0UNSILINQ
10 CHAPELS SERVING
DADE
BROWARD
L PALM BEACH
DADE
S38-6371
BROWARD
920-6660
ZILBERT-RUBIN


FOUNDERS of the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged at Douglas Gardens en-
,. d a piano recital as part of their monthly
dinner meeting. Internationally acclaimed
soloist Sara Wolfensohn, granddaughter .if
Founders Bess and Ben Botwinick, captivated
harmed the gathering. Ms. Wolfensohn, a
graduate of New York's JulImrd School of
Music, ha played concert halls across the
P%
country, including Carnegie Hall, and is
scheduled to perform with the London Sym-
phony Orchestra in May. Pictured at the
recital are Sara Wolfensohn is, end from left)
With (let) to right) grandparents Ben'and Bess
Botwinick and new Founders Harry B. Kor-
man, Ann Korman. Lillian Zorn and Bess
Goldman,
Lawrence Lentz Joins MJHHA Staff
Lawrence Lentz has joined
the staff of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Ag-
ed at Douglas Gardens as
Assistant Administrator of
Community Services.
Marketing and Planning.
Mr. Lentz, who has an exten-
sive background in program
planning and marketing of
geriatric services, comes to the
Miami Jewish Home from
Cambridge. Mass. He served
for lti years at Youville
Hospital, most recently as
Director of Community Rela-
tions and Development.
Mr. Lentz holds a Bachelor's
degree from Boston's Emer-
son College and an MBA from
Northeastern I'niversity. He
has served as President of the
American Academy of Medical
Administrators. New England
Chapter; President of the
American Cancer Society,
Cambridge Unit; member of
the Kmerson College Board of
Trustees and President of the
College's Alumni Association.
Lawrence Lentz
He is currently a public affairs
specialist in the Air Force
Reserve.
"Mr. Lentz brings his con-
siderable skill in new program
Bank Leumi Suing Its Former Chief
Executive Officer To Return The
$4 Million He Got In Severance Pay
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Kank Leumi is suing its former
chairman and chief executive
"icer, Ernst Japhet. to
return the $4 million
severance pay he received
*nen he was forced to resign
almost a year ago.
Two prominent lawyers
representing the bank. Haim
** and Michael Heshin. fil-
^ suit in Tel Aviv district
court Thursday arguing that
the sum paid Japhet was the
result of a private deal he
nae with one or two of the
"anK directors without the
knowledge of senior board
number* and therefore
illegal.
JAPHET, who is living in
New York, has not replied to
[Je suit. But he has let it be
Known he intends to fight it
ad will insist that the bank
Pay his legal expenses.
The suit also demands that
Japhet repay the $30,000 mon-
thly pension money he receiv-
ed up to the time payment was
stopped by a new directorate
that took office at Bank Leumi
late last year. The court was
asked to fix a reasonable sum
for severance and pension for
the former bank executive.
Japhet was forced to step
down after a state commission
of inquiry found him and the
heads of four of the other
largest banks culpable in the
bank shares scandal which
precipitated a financial panic
in 1983. The heads of the
banks were held responsible
for inflating the price of shares
to mislead investors, resulting
in severe financial losses for
thousands of shareholders
when bank stocks collapsed
The disclosure of the amount
of severance and pension
money awarded Japhet led to
te resignation of the Bank
Leumi board last year.
development and marketing to
the Home at a time when we
are planning major program
expansion," noted MJHHA
Associate Executive Director
Elliot Stern. "We believe his
experience and talents will
make him a valuable member
of the Home's team."
Public Notices
NOTICE t'SIIER
KKTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
OOP in business under the fie
titious name 600 MILES AI TO
REPAIR at 8090 N W 7th Street.
MIAMI. FLORIDA S3126 intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Hade
County, Florida.
ELVING. LANDERO
1488 8.W. 3rd Street. AIT 1
MIAMI. PL 88186
16627 Aprils. 10, 17. 24. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
OADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-1995
Division 01
IN RE ESTATE OF
Jacob S Goldman a/k/a
Jack Goldman
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Jacob S. Goldman a/k/a JacJt
Goldman, deceased. File Number
87-1995. is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flajrler Street,
Room 307 Miami. Florida 33130.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on April 24. 1987
Personal Representative:
I.eonard B. (ioldman
1234 E 104th Street
Brooklyn. NY 11236
Richard M. Goldman
19000 N.E 8rdCt
Miami. Florida 88179
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
I.EFF. PESETSKY A BACK,
PA.
BY SAMUEL I LEPP ESQ.
1867 N.E, 162nd Street
No Miami Beach. Fl 38162
Telephone (806) 846 7601
April 24. Mao IW
Friday, April 24, mV^eJevnAF[ohdian Phga lg-B
Judicial College
Judge Starkman Honored
Dade County Court Judge
Milton I. Starkman has return-
ed from Reno. Nevada where
he spent two weeks at the Na-
tional Judicial College as
Faculty Advisor for its Special
Court course. Judge Starkman
was honored by the college, a
division of the American Bar
Association, for his work in
teaching courses such as
Search and Seizure, Evidence,
Traffic Court Management
and the "Role of the Judge."
When Judge Starkman, a
former City of North Miami
Beach municipal court judge
first elected to the county
court in 1978, returned he
found his home in North Miami
Beach had been burglarized.
He teaches criminal justice
at Florida International
University and holds both
Master of Law and Juris Doc-
tor degrees.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name APACHE
WRECKER SERVICE at 1116
Opaloeka Blvd Opelodca Florida
33054 intends to register said
name with the Clerk .if the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Javier Morejon
16669 April 24. May 1,8.15. 1967
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titkWI name BELLAS WIG
SALON at 18153 Biseaync Blvd.
North Miami Beach, Fl. 33160 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
BLACK SEA INC
Paul Kwitricy of
Kwitney. Kroop, & Scfaeinberg,
PA.
4L'n Lincoln Road Suit 512
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139
Attorney for Black Sea Inc.
15643 April 17. 24. May 1.8. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
ngagc in business under the fic-
titious names A AND J
LIGHTING AND TABLES at
13995 N.W. 7th Ave. Miami.
Florida 33168 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Joseph Schneider
MICHAEL P CHASE. PA
Attorney for
JOSEPH SCHNEIDER
15661 April 24. May 1.8. 15. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE I IT 11 JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
No. 87-1707S
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Bar No 34S741
IN RE: The marriage of:
CHANTAL JACKSON.
Petitioner/wife,
and
GREGORY JACKSON.
Respondent/husband,
TO: GREGORY JACKSON.
Residence Unknown
YOU, GREGORY JACKSON
residence unknown, are required
to file your answer to the petition
for dissolution of marriage with
the Clerk of the above Court and
serve a copy thereof upon the peti
tioner's attorney, MARTIN
COHEN, ESQ., 622 S.W. 1st
Street, Miami, Fla 33130, on or
before May 22. 1987, or else peti-
tion will be confessed
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court, at Miami. Dade
County. Florida, this April 20,
1987
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
B) E SEIDL
Deputy Clerk
15665 April 24. May 1.8, 15, 1987
Judge Milton I. Starkman
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87 14565 (09)
IN RE The Marriage of:
ANGEL McCLOUD.
Petitioner,
and
MILTON L McCLOUD.
Respondent
TO: MILTON L, McCLOUD.
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney. 612 Northwest 12th
Ave Miami, Florida, 38186, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before May 16, 1987. otherwise a
default will he entered.
April 7. 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
BY BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
1 r.*i- 1 April 10, 17,24;
May l. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
Civil Action No. 87-16780
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OP
EVONNE LOUIS, wife
and
ARMOND BLOUSUS LOUIS,
husband
TO Mr. Armond Elousus Louis
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on ARTHUR
H. LIPSON. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 801 N.E.
167 Street Miami, Fla. 33162 and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
May 22. 1987; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief prayed for in the complaint
or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 17 day of April, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By E. SEIDL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
15663 April 24. May 1.8, 15, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-2849 FC 14
IN RE: The Marriage of:
LUDOVTC MICHELET
DESROCHES,
Petitioner,
and
GERTRUDE DESROCHES.
Respondent.
TO: GERTRUDE DESROCHES.
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar
nag.- upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney. 612 Northwest 12th
Ave.. Miami. Florida. 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before May 22. 1987, otherwise a
default will be entered.
April 17. 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
16668 April 24, May 1. 8. 15. 1987


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 24, 1987
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADC COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-3192 CA 18
NATIONAL MORTGAGE
COMPANY. a Tennessee
corporation.
Plaintiff,
v.
LIJAH BEMLEY a/k/a L1ZE
BEMLEY. and the unknown
spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, or other parties
claiming by. through, under or
against him; PAULETTE
BEMLEY; and JET WINDOW
INSTALLERS. INC.. a Florida
corporation;
Defendants.
Lijah Bemley a/k/a Lue Bemley.
whose residence is unknown,
and the unknown parties who
may be spouses, heirs,
devisees, grantees, assignees,
benors, creditors, trustees and
all parties claiming interest by.
through, under or against said
Defendant, who are not known
to be dead or alive, and all par-
ties having or claiming to have
any right, title, or interest in
the property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County. Florida:
Lot 4. in Block 8. of SOUTH
MIAMI HEIGHTS MANOR,
according to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 68.
at Page 70, of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Barry S. Yarchin, Esquire, of
Rosenthal A Yarchin, PA., At-
torneys for Plaintiff. Suite 800.
3050 Biacayne Boulevard, Miami.
Florida S31S7, on or before May
16. 1987. and to file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's at-
torneys or immediately thereafter,
otherwise, a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on April IS. 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER. Clerk
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
Barry S. Yarchin. Esquire
Rosenthal Yarchin. PA.
Suite 800
3060 Bascayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida SS1S7
Telephone: (306) 676-1600
16665 April 17. 14. May 1.8.1987
NOTICE OP ACTION
CONSTRUCT!VI SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OP
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Artie. No. 87-11664
IN RE- The Marriage of
MANUEL VICHOT,
Petitioner/Husband.
aad
SYLVIA CORONADO.
Respondent/Wife.
TO: SYLVIA CORONADO
18 Avenida B 8-51
Vista Hermoaa 1.
Zonal5
Guatemala. GUATEMALA
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
MARKUS A WINTER. PA. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
is 2261 S.W 22nd St.
ii, Florida 33146. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before May 15.
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 10 day of April. 1987
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MARK IS k WINTER. PA.
2251 S W 22nd Street
Miami Flnnda 33145
18-4*10
Attorney for Petitioner
ROBERTO SCHWARZ
15660 April 17. 24. May 1.8. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nassaer 87-1870
DiriaioBOJ
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ZANA H SANDERS,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of ZANA H.
SANDERS, deceased. File
Number 87-1870 PC (03). is pen
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida. Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street. Miami. Florida
33130 The personal represen
tative of the estate is RUTH S
BERENSTEIN, whose address is
4925 Whitsett Ave., No.
Hollywood. CA 91607. The name
and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file the clerk of the
above court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated If the daim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
daim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed arc required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
iuui sssnUtiii. or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
April 17. 1987.
RUTH S. BERENSTEIN
Aa Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ZANA H SANDERS
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
ALBOUM AND FURLONG
333 Arthur Godfrey Road. No 104
Miami Beach. FL 33140
Telephone: (306) 638-6741
15663 April 17. 24. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nmaster 86-6384
Drriatea 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROSINA SARNELLA.
Deceased
FORMAL NOTICE
BY PUBLICATION
TO: Unknown beneficiaries or
Heirs at Law Living or dead,
their respective heirs and all
persons claiming by, through
and under and or may be in-
fants, incompetents or other
wise sui juris. Residence
unknown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Peti
tion for Determination of Heirs
has been filed in this court and you
are required to file your written
defenses to the petition with the
clerk of this court and to serve a
copy thereof not later than May 16
1987. on petitioner's attorney
whose name and address are
MARTIN W WASSERMAN. At
tomey for Petitioner, whose ad
dress is: 999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach Florida 33139 If you
fail to do so, judgment may he
entered in due course upon the
petition.
WITNKSS my hand and the seal
if this COUrl on April i. 1987
RICHARD!' BRINKER, Clerk
As Clerk of the Court
By REINE E ALUPUDO
As Deputy Clerk
15648 Aprill7.24. Ma> i.M9K7
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOB
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CA8E NO. 87-84w73 (06)
FBZ2S8M
NOTICE OF ACTION
FAMILY CREDIT SERVICES.
INC.
Plaintiff.
va.
LORENZO OROVIO. a single
man. and ZORAIDA OROVIO. a
single woman. LORENZO
OROVIO. a single man; THE
UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA: JOHN DOE
Defendants.
TO: ZORAIDA OROVIO
Former address:
11480 S.W. 98 Street,
Miami. FL 33173
Present address unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for FORECLOSURE has
been filed against you. You are re
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to the action
on plaintiff's attorney whose name
and address is ARMANDO
GUTIERREZ. 2153. Coral Way.
Suite 400. Miami. Florida 33145.
on or before May 15. 1987. and file
the original with the derk of this
court, either before service on peti-
tioner's attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a judgment
will be entered to the relief
demanded in the complaint.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court on April 10. 1987.
BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Clerk of Court
ARMANDO GUTIERREZ.
ESQUIRE
2168 Coral Way. Suite 400
Miami. Florida 33145
Attorney for Plaintiff
15661 April 17. 24. May 1.8. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Naaaaar 87-1794
Divisioa 82
IN RE ESTATE OF
MARCIA W KLINKENSTEIN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of MARCIA W. KLINKENS^
TEIN. deceased, File Number
87-1794 (02). m pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Dado County,
Florida. Probate Division the ad
drees of which is 73 West Flagier
Street. Miami. FL 33130 The
names aad sddrsssss of the per
sonal representative and the per
tonal representative' attorney are
set forth below
All interested persons are re
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all daims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or junsdic
Uon of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of thai Notice has
begun on April 17. 1987.
Personal Representative
WILLIAM L KLINKENSTEIN
4747 Collins Avenue. Apt. 816
Miami Beach. FL 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
NELSON k FELDMAN. PA
1136 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands. FL 33154
Telephone: 865-6716
16646 April 17. 24. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
Ficrmous name law
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Regina's Fashions of
Downtown. Inc. at 113 S.E 1st
Street Miami Fla 33131 intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Manuel Lacayo
15639 April 10. 17. 24;
May 1. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY UTVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the firt-
tious name el Museo De Vinos in
tends to register said name with
the Clerk Of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Malaga Restaurant Inc.
IMM April 10. 17. 24.
May 1. 1987
W THE CIRCUIT COURT FOB
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nassser 87 2186
Divisioa 03
IN RE: ESTATE OP
HARRY MARMORSTEIN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of HARRY MAR
MORSTEIN. deceased. File
Number 87-2106. is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the ad
dress of which is 73 West Flagier
Street. Miami. Florida 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate is Richard I Kroop. whose
address is 420 Lincoln Road. Suite
512. Miami Beach. Florida 33139
The name and address of the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MO-
NTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the
clerk of the above court a written
statement of any claim or demand
they may have Each claim must be
in writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount daim
ed If the claim is not yet due. the
date when it will become due shall
be stated If the daim is contingent
or unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
daim is secured, the security shall
be described The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
daim to the clerk to enable the
derk to mail one copy to each per
sonal representative
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE. u> file any objections
they may have that challenge the
vabdity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration
April 17. 1987
Richard I Kroop
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Harry Marmorstew
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Bruce J Scheinberg. PA (162677)
Kwitney, Kroop A Scheinberg.
PA
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 612
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-7575
15662 April 17, 24, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PC CASE NO.: 87-10644
IN RE The Marriage of
ALFREUS CLAUDION,
Petitioner/Husband.
vs.
VERA ANN CLAUDION,
Respondent.
TO: VERA ANN CLAUDION -
Residence Unknown shall serve
copy of your Answer to the Peti-
tion for Dissolution of Marriage
upon GEORGE NICHOLAS. At
torney. 612 N.W. 12th Avenue.
Miami, Florida. 33136. and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before May 8. 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered
April 3. 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
15636 April 10, 17.24;
May 1. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name FANTASTIC
FLOWERS t 1563-C Sunset
Drive. Coral Cables. FL 33143 in
tends to register said name with
the Cl.rk of the Circuit Court of
I>ade County. Florida.
FANTASY LAND. INC
H\ MARIA K KELLY
PRESIDENT
MB April 10. 17.24;
May 1.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nassaer 87-1925
Divisioa 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JACK FUTERNICK.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of JACK FUTERNICK. deceased.
File Number 87-1926. is pending in
the Circuit Court for DADE Coun-
ty. Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street. Third Floor.
Miami. Florida 33130. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the persona]
representative, venue, or jurisdic
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on April 24. 1987.
Personal Representative.
MORRIS FUTERNICK
2 Grove Isle. No 1509
Coconut Grove. FL 33133
(306) 686-0325 (ofc.)
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
SYDNEY S. TRAUM.
ESQUIRE 093392 (Bar No.)
Sydney S. Traum. P.A.
Shea and Gould
1428 Bnckeil Avenue. 6th Fir
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone (306) 371-9041
16668 April 24. May 1.1987
NOTICE Of ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIECUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Arties No. 87-167M PC II
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Fla Bar No 8476283
IN RE. The Marriage of
ALINA VALLEN1LLA.
Petitioner
and
WILLIAM VALLEN1LLA
TO WILLIAM VALLENILLA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
lisfsns. if any. to it on USHER
BRYN. Esquire attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 2301 Col
Has Avenue. Suite M-8. Miami
Beach. Florida 33139 and file the
ordinal with the derk of the above
styled court on or before May 29.
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 20 day of April. 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dads County. Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner
USHER BRYN. BJQ
2301 Collins Avenue. Suite M 8
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139
(Phone) (306) 532-1165
15666 April 24. May 1.8. 16, 1987
Namber 87-2101
______ Division 03
IN RE:ESTATE OF
ROSE SIMS.
NOTICE OF D"eM*d
ADMINISTRATION
ine administration of the .....
of ROSE SIMS, decease ??
Number 87210..^^^
Circuit Court for DsnTHj?
dress of which 73 W, FW
Street. Miam,. Florid. 33130 TV
names and addresses of the nT
sonal representative and the uer
sonal repreatnut.ve's,ttonve
set forth below "*
All interested persons are re
quired to file with this -
WITHIN THREE Mhn-thHf
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE M, all
against the estate and i2l any ob-
J*rtK>n by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validm of the will
the qualifications f tne per,,,^
representative, venue or jurisdic
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILKH WILL BE
FOREVER BARREL
Publication of this Notice has
begun on April 24, I -
Personal Representative
8 DONALD SIMS
1116 Maror.rv Lane
Pacific Palisades (A *)2?2
Personal Representative
M ELLIOT SIMS
405 Main Street
Port Washington New York
11050
Attorney for Personal
Representative
NELSON AFELDMAN PA
1136 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands. FL 33164
Telephone 865-5716
16664 April 24 May 1.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COl'BT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, W
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Arties No. 87-16943
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
MARK DOUSSA.
husband,
and
JANET K DOUSSA. wife.
TO JANET K DOUSSA
8619 Valor Drive
Chalmette. La.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that s petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced m
this court and you art required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on ARTHUR
H. UPSON. attorney for Pefr
boner, whose address is 801 NOR
THEAST 167 STREET MIAMI.
FLORIDA 33162 and fik the
original with the derk of the above
styled court on or before May 22.
1987; othewise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition
WITNESS mv hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 20 day of April. 1987
RICHARD P BRISKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Co inn. Florida
By CLARISDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
15667 April 24. May I. 8.15. I*.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
tiuous name Vogel Sales at 7465
SW 115 Street. Miami Fla. 33166
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
Harvey Vogel
15642 April 10, 17. 24,
May 1. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Robeii Rental at 1124
SW H Street Miami. FL 33135 in
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
Roberto Hernandez
(iwner
15621 Apnl.1. 10. 17.24. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LA
NOTICE IS HEREBY (HVEW
that the undersigned desiring to
engage in business under the K
Sou. name Ace International at
U^WWest Dixie Highway .North
Miami. Florida 381611mtrno* *
register said name with the tier*
of^edrruitCourtofDadeCoun
ty. Florida
Ace Music I enter. Inc
13630 West I >>**"*?">
North Miami. Honda 33161
Cypen A Cypen
825 Arthur Godfrey Rosa.
Miami Beach. FL 33140
Attorney for Applicant
1^638 ^iivlV
NOTICE UNOER
FICTITIOUS N MEL*
that the under "*fc
engage inlKis,-.-J-fsff-jfl
titioui ..'; s, '., j
PUEBLO at I
Miami. Fl.:l
s^dnamewrti -- ;**,,.
CircuM Court of I
Rafael Aki
I68M


Foreclosure Sales
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE HTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 8740311 (CA 23)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLBB FEDERAL
SWINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OP MIAMI, a
United States Corporation.
Plaintiff.
\N BARROS. ot al..
I vfendanta.
T< MERCIEL PRIMO
; 1270 8 W 73rd St
Miami. PL.. 88188
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
trtwn I" foreclose a mortgage on
hi following dateribad property in
Dade County. Florida.
I.,.i 11. in Block 38. of
KENDALE LAKES.
SECTION SEVEN.
rding to the Plat thereof.
u recorded in Plat Book 92.
.it Page 74. of the Public
Record! of Dade County.
Florida
MO filed against you and you
ire required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
Ufl Keith. Mack, Lewis & Allison.
Plaintiff's attorneys, whose
address is 111 N.E 1st Street.
Miami. Florida 33132. on or before
Ma> 1. 1987. and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorneys or immediately
thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 26 day of March.
1^X7
RICHARD P BRINKEK
Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
1 MB April 8. 10. 7. 24. 1987
NOTICE Or ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. US
\M> FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-15287-16
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
WNAMARIA T VISSCHER.
Petitioner/Wife
WILLIAM S VISSCHER.
Ki---|aindent/Huahand.
II i William S Visscher
Route 9
l.ake Lucerne. NY
V i 1 ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ
Ian defenses, if any. to it on
Samuel S Sorota. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 801
N E 167th Street. Suite 308,
North Miami Beach. Florida
33162. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before May 16, 1987; other
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 8 day of April, 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C.P. COPE LAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
SAMUEL S SOROTA
>I N.E 167th Street
Suite 308
North Miami Beach. FL 331S2
Attorney for Petitioner
'5644 April 17, 24, May 1.8. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
">' the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name BELLA'S WIG at
18153 Biscayne Blvd. North Miami
B*ach. Fl. 38160 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
" he Circuit Court of Dade Coun
*f. Florida.
BLACK SEA INC.
Paul Kwitney of
Kwitney. Kroop, & Scheinberg.
'-" Lincoln Road Suite 512
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139
Attorney for Black Sea Inc
1S643 April 17. 24. May 1. 8. 1987
Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
Civil Action No. 87-14268 (IS)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
SUSAN LAUREL CORRELL.
wife
and
MARK CHARLES CORRELL.
husband
TO: Mr Mark Charles Correll
Residence Unknown
Y 00 ARE H E R E B Y
NOTIFIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on ARTHUR
H. LIPSON. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 801 N.E
1H7 Street Miami. Fla 88168 ami
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
May 8. 1987. otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief prayed for in the complaint
or petition
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Flonda on
this 2 day of April. 1987
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Flonda
By T CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
15634 April 10. 17.24.
May 1. 1987
Friday. April 24, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-10*19
NOTICE OF ADOPTION
PROCEEDING
IN RE: The Adoption of
A MINOR
TO: MICHAEL FRENCHY"
BEAUDRY
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for Peti
lion for Adoption has been filed in
volving you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on
WILLARD K SPL ITT
STOESSER. ESQ.. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 13122
West Dixie Highway. Suite B.
North Miami. Fl 33161. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
May II. 1987. otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 2 day of April. 1987
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Flonda
By B J FOY
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Willard K Splittstoesser, Esq.
18122 West Dixie Highway. Suite
B
North Miami. Florida 33161
(306)891-3848
Attorney for Petitioner
15636 April 10. 17.24:
May 1.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name PACIFIC INTERN A
TIONAL TRAVEL at 3923 Alton
Road, Miami Beach. Fl 33140 in
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Sharien Enterprises Inc.
A Florida Corporation
Paul Kwitney. of
Kwitney Kroop & Scheinberg PA.
420 Lincoln Road Suite S12
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139
Attorney for Sharien Enterprises
Inc.
15620 April 3. 10.17. 24.1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-14575
ACTION FOR ADOPTION
IN RE: THE MATTERS OF THE
ADOPTION OF:
a minor
and
TO BLASROLANDO BARRERO
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Adoption has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on Armando Gutierrez,
attorney fur Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 2158 Coral Way. Suite 40<)
Miami. Florida 88145, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
Styled court on or before May 8,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall he published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 3 day of April. 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By B.J. FOY
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ARMANDO GUTIERREZ.
ESQUIRE
2153 Coral Way. Suite 400
Miami. FL 33145
Attorney for Petitioner
15637 April 10. 17.24.
May 1. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Trump Terrace at 950
Biarritz Dnve Normandy Isle
Miami Beach Fl 33141 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun
ty. Flonda.
Trump Realty Corp.
Andrew B Ginsburg
Attorney
15631 April 10. 17.24.
May 1. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. W AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-8927 CA 19
NOTICE OF ACTION
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
ROCHESTER, a federal savings
ana loan association, successor by
merger to FRANKLIN SOCIETY
FEDERAL SAVINGS AND
LOAN ASSOCIATION.
Plaintiff.
V.
WESLEY T. CURRAN. TOM K
GILLETT a/k/a THOMAS K.
GILLETT. LA WREN-
MICHELLE BROCKETT f/k/a
LA WREN M. GILLETT, and the
unknown spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other
parties claiming by. through,
under or against them:
HUGHETTE CURRAN; DAVID
P. MURPHY and SARAH E.
MURPHY;
Defendants.
To: Wesley T. Curran. Tom K
Gillett a/k/a Thomas K Gillett.
and Lawren Michelle Brockett
f/k/a Lawren M Gillett. whose
residences are unknown, and
the unknown parties who may
be spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees and all par-
ties claiming interest by,
through, under or against said
Defendants, who are not
known to be dead or alive, and
all parties having or claiming to
have any right, title, or interest
in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 13. in Block 10. of FIRST
ADDITION TO SKY VISTA,
according to the Plat thereof,
aa recorded in Plat Book 59,
at Page 3. of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve s copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on David R. Webster. Esquire, of
Rosenthal A Yarchin. P.A.. At-
torneys for Plaintiff. Suite 800,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami.
Florida 33137, on or before May
15. 1987, and to file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torneys or immediately thereafter,
otherwise, a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand
ed in the Complaint
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on April 8, 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER, Clerk
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
15645 April 17. 24. May 1.8, 1987
IN THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 87-12872 CA 19
NOTICE OF SUIT
TO QUIET TITLE
ALBERT GADOL AND
RHODA GADOL. HIS WIFE
vs.
SCOTT LAWRENCE GADOL,
N/K/A SCOTT LAWRENCE
SILVERMAN
IN THE NAME OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA
To The Defendant
Scott I.awrence Gadol n/k/a Scott
(.awrence Silverman, if alive, or if
dead to his or her unknown heirs,
devisees, legatees or grantees, and
ill other persons or parties claim-
ing by, through under or against
him.
And to
All parties or persons having or
claiming any nght. title or interest
in and to the following-described
property, situated in Dade County.
Flonda:
Lot 23, Block 14. First Addi-
tion. Fountainbleu Gardens.
PB rt7. Pg 125. As recorded
in the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida
You. and each of you. are
notified that a suit to quiet title to
the above-described property has
been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
answer to the complaint on the
Plaintiffs' attorney. Marvin B.
Seidman. 8501 S.W 29 Street.
Miami. Florida 33155. and file the
original in the office of the Clerk of
the Circuit Court on or before May
15, 1987; otherwise the allegations
of the complaint will be taken as
confessed.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
Dated this 8 day of April. 1987
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florids
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
15649 Anril 17. 24. May 1. 8. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-6752 CA 05
NOTICE OF ACTION
ALLIANCE MORTGAGE
COMPANY, a Flonda
corporation f/k/a CHARTER
MORTGAGE COMPANY.
Plaintiff,
v.
AMOS MURRAY, and the
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other
parties claiming by, through,
under or against him; TOLEDO
ANN MITCHELL f/k/a TOLEDO
ANN MURRAY; and
ASSOCIATES FINANCIAL
SERVICES COMPANY OF
FLORIDA. INC.. a Connecticut
corporation.
Defendants.
To: Amos Murray, whose
residence is unknown, and the
unknown parties who may be
spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees and all par-
ties claiming interest by,
through, under or against said
Defendant, who are not known
to be dead or alive, and all par
ties having or claiming to have
any right, title, or interest in
the property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County. Florida:
Lot 19. in Block 9. of REVIS-
ED PLAT OF BLOCKS 2. 3.
4 AND 5 OF ARCOLA
GARDENS, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
PUt Book 50, at Page 17. of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on David R. Webster, Esquire, of
Rosenthal A Yarchin. P.A.. At-
torneys for Plaintiff. Suite 800,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard. Miami.
Florida 33137, on or before May
15, 1987, and to file the original
with the Clerk of this court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torneys or immediately thereafter;
otherwise, a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand
ed in the Complaint
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on Apnl IS, 1887
RICHARD P. BRINKER. Clerk
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
15656 April 17. 24. May 1. 8. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-3192 CA 18
NOTICE OF ACTION
STOCKTON. WHATLEY.
DAVIN & COMPANY, a Florida
corporation.
Plaintiff,
v.
ALVARO HOYOS a/k/a
ALVARO J HOYOS a/k/a
ALVAROJOSE HOYOS
CLAUDIA HOYOS. NORMAN K
BURNS. CHARLOTTE A.
BURNS, and the unknown
spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees.
Creditors, or other parties
claiming by, through, under or
against them.
Defendants.
To; Alvaro Hoyos a/k/a Alvaro .1
Hoyos a/k'a Alvaro Jose
Hoyos. Claudia Hoyos. Nor-
man R. Burns and Charlotte A.
Burns, whose residences are
unknown, and the unknown
parties who may be spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors. creditors,
trustees and all parties claim-
ing interest by. through, under
or against said Defendants,
who are not known to be dead
or alive, and all parties having
or claiming to have any right,
title, or interest in the property
herein described
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County. Flonda:
Lot 5, in Block 10. of PINE
LAKE SECTION TWO. ac-
cording to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 111,
at Page 51. of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on David R. Webster. Esquire, of
Rosenthal & Yarchin. PA, At-
torneys for Plaintiff, Suite 800.
3050 Biscayne Boulevard. Miami.
Flonda 33137. on or before May
15. 1987. and to file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at
torneys or immediately thereafter,
otherwise, a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand
ed in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on April 13, 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER. Clerk
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
15657 April 17. 24. May 1.8. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-2015
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ISIDOR NAGOR. a/k/a ISADOR
NAGOR. a/k/a ISIDORE
NAGOR. a/k/a ISADORE
NAGOR.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
Florida Bar No. 048326)
The administration of the estate
of ISIDOR NAGOR. a/k/a
ISADOR NAGOR. a/k/a ISIDORE
NAGOR. a/k/a ISADORE
NAGOR. deceased. File Number
87-2015, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County. Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagier Street.
Miami. Florida. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will.
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on April 17, 1987
Personal Representative:
ANNETTE LEVINE
7 Sussex Road
Great Neck. New York 11020
ALAN R. LORBER. PA.
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
1111 Lincoln Road. Suite 68"
Miami Beach. Florida 88189
Telephone: (305) 538 1401
15659 April 17. 24. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-1773
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ILSE LEDERBERGER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ILSE LEDERBERGER.
deceased. File Number 87-1773
(01), is pending in the Circuit Court
for Dade ("ounty. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
Weal Flagier Street, Miami,
Florida 33130 The names and ad
dresses of the personal represen
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below
All interested persons are re
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on April 17. 1987
Personal Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagier St.. Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 W Flagier St.. Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: 374-3116
15658 April 17.24. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name of PALMETTO FUR-
NITURE at 9500 N.W 77th
Avenue. Hialeah Gardens. Fl
33016 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade ("ounty, Florida
IRIS ALVAREZ 100%
15654 April 17. 24. May 1.8.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-5818 CA 11
NOTICE OF ACTION
FORD MOTOR CREDIT
COMPANY, a Michigan
corporation.
Plaintiff,
v.
ADAM BETTER, and the
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other
parties claiming by. through,
under or against him.
Defendants.
To: Adam Better, whose residence
is unknown, and the uknown
parties who may be spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees and all parties claim-
ing interest by, through, under
or against said Defendant, who
are not known to be dead or
alive, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, ti-
tle, or interest in the property
herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County. Florida:
Lot 5, in Block 2, of
RIVIERA ESTATES, aceor
ding to the PUt thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 47. at
Page 39. of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on David R. Webster. Esquire, of
Rosenthal & Yarchin. P.A.. At-
torneys for Plaintiff, Suite 800,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard. Miami.
Florida 3S137. on or before May
15. 1987. and to file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at
torneys or immediately thereafter,
otherwise, a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand
il in the Complaint
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on April 9, 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER. Clerk
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
15647 April 17.24, May 1.8. 1987


Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. April 24, 1987
17 mq "w" 13 mq mcoime av pet ctqarette by FIC method
SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING.- Cigarette
Smoke Contains Carbon Monoxide.
THE REFRESHEST


Full Text
<
.
Kronish Plaza To Be Dedicated
By City Of Miami Beach Friday
Friday, April 24, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 6-B
Chiles To Speak At Bonds Brunch
Honoring Rep. Elaine Bloom
Kronish Plaza will be
dedicated by Miami Beach
Mayor Alex Daoud on Friday
to acknowledge the tremen-
dous contributions Rabbi Leon
Kronish has made to the city
and Temple Beth Sholom.
Kronish Plaza will run north
of Arthur Godfrey Road at
Chase Avenue, ending at Muss
Park (44th St. and Prairie
Ave.).
The City of Miami Beach will
present a proclamation at
Temple Beth Sholom's Friday
night services honoring the
Rabbi, who is celebrating his
70th birthday this year, and
the 45-year-old temple that he
has guided since becoming its
first full-time rabbi in 1944.
"It is a distinguished honor
for a deserving individual,"
said Temple Beth Sholom ex-
ecutive director Dennis Rice.
"Rabbi Kronish has for over 40
years worked to create a
strong Miami Beach and
Rabbi Leon Kronish
community world-
Jewish
wide."
Rabbi Gary Glickstein
formerly of Temple Sinai
in
Prime Minister Shamir Assures
Israel Bond Leaders The
U.S.-Israel Relationship Strong
JERUSALEM Speaking
at the closing dinner of the
week-long 1987 Israel Bond
Leadership conference, held
here recently, Prime Minister
Yitzhak Shamir declared that
the differences between the
U.S. and Israel "are insignifi-
cant compared to so much that
unites us."
It was announced at the din-
ner that the 1987 Israel Bonds
campaign has passed the $150
million cash figure for this
year, representing an increase
of $33 million in Israel Bonds
sales over the same period last
year.
The conference officers in-
du Detroit, International Chair-
Brig. Gen. (Res.)
lehudah Halevy, President
and Chief Executive Officer;
Jualian Venezky of Peoria,
Chairman of the Board; and
Mel Ross of Boston, Con-
ference Chairman.
"An economically sound
Israel gives us strength and
confidence for the fiiture,"
ahamir continued. "We
heheve that such an Israel is
important to the interests and
defense of the entire world.
this is the basis of our relation-
ship with the United States to-
day. An alliance is tested in
mes of difficulty and stress,
decent difficulties, no matter
"ow painful, are of a transient
"ature and the relationship
between the United States and
wael is basically sound and
strong. It will endure and
flourish.
We are aiming to extend
ur sophistication and ex-
cellence in technology to all
tranches of our economy. It
"as given us the feeling that
*e can overcome the lack of
natural resources by an abun-
dance of skills and brainpower
rnic.h enable Israel to start
*oving in the direction of
|Gnomic growth."
At an earlier conference ses-
sion, Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres focused on the two
"most urgent issues on our
agenda: the attempt to open
the doors of the USSR for
Soviet Jews, and the search
for peace in the Middle East."
"Soviet leader Mikhail Gor-
bachev is a realist," said
Peres. "He understands the
real need to change the
USSR's priorities. Change is
an opening for the Jewish peo-
ple; it's an opportunity to save
aur people. Soviet policy is
hard to follow, but ii seems
there is a 'disorganized smile'
coming from the USSR
which is preferable to an
'organized nyet.'
Peres spoke of the "sincere
wish of all of us to bring peace
and understanding to the Mid-
dle East. We're a small people,
with a history of suffering, liv-
ing in a continent of confronta-
tion. Let us bequeath
ourselves and our neighbors a
different posterity from the
belligerence that has taken so
many lives. The process is
lengthy, difficult and com-
EHeated, but the lesson of
istory is that the harder the
challenge, the greater we shall
become."
In his conference address to
the Bonds delegates, Finance
Minister Moshe Nissim review-
ed Israel's economy. He
described it as emerging from
"deep crisis, characterized by
soaring inflation, with Israel
unable to adjust monetary and
employment levels to changing
times. '
The far-reaching govern-
ment economic program in-
troduced on July 1, 1985, he
said, has done much to
stabilize prices and improve
Israel's balance of payments.
"The recovery of the Israeli
economy is a long process," he
concluded. "It is being achiev-
ed with the help of the Israeli
Continued on Page 10-B
Worcester, Mass., joined the
congregation in 1985 as senior
rabbi. Dr. Kronish was named
senior founding rabbi at that
time.
Kronish is the (former) na-
tional chairman of the Israel
Bonds Rabbinic Cabinet and
national co-chairman of the
Israel Bonds campaign.
Under Rabbi Kronish's
leadership, the Temple has
become one of the most
culturally active in the U.S.
The Great Artists Series, now
entering its 20th season, has
brought some of the world's
greatest musical talents to
Miami Beach. The Lowe-
Levinson Art Gallery holds ex-
hibitions of both local and in-
ternational artists. The Sun-
day Omnibus Lecture Series
has brought speakers from
around the world to the
synagogue.
"It has always been his view
that there should be more to a
temple than Friday and Satur-
day night services," says Judy
Drucker, cultural director of
the Temple.
The Leon Kronish Institute
of Living Judaism was
dedicated in 1984, a complex
including temple offices, the
Lowe-Levinson Art Gallery,
meeting rooms, music rooms
and a new addition to the
school.
Rabbi Kronish's wife Lillian,
and his son, Rabbi Ronald
Kronish, of Jerusalem, and
daughter Mrs. Edward (Max-
ine) Snyder, will attend the
service, along with city
officials.
Rabbi Kronish will be
honored by the temple at a
Saturday dinner, including
temple president Neal Amdur,
and past presidents Shepard
Broad, Milton Gaynor, James
S. Knopke and Harold Vinik.
Festivities are also planned for
September.
Continued from Page 1-B
tatives and chairs the Subcom-
mittee on Social, Economic
and Developmental Services.
In addition to her involve-
ment with the Greater Miami
Israel Bonds organization,
Bloom has also been active
with many other community,
charitable and philanthropic
affiliations, including the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion. Together with her hus-
band, Circuit Court Judge
Philip Bloom, she was honored
by the State of Israel in 1979
and has received numerous
other awards for her concern-
ed involvement.
Serving as guest speaker at
the brunch will be U.S. Sen.
Lawton Chiles, who has had a
distinguished political career
since his election to the Florida
House of Representatives in
1959. In 1966 he was elected to
the Florida Senate and served
Rep. Elaine Bloom
in this capacity until his elec-
tion to the United States
Senate in 1970.
Stuart Simon Elected President
Of Pioneers Of Miami Beach
Attorney Stuart L. Simon
was presented a key to the Ci-
ty of Miami Beach by Mayor
Alex Daoud at the annual din-
ner meeting of the Pioneers of
Miami Beach.
Simon, a partner in the Firm
of Fine Jacobson Schwartz
Nash Block and England, mov-
ed to Miami Beach in 1926.
Gold & Diamond Outlet
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Fine UK & 18K Jewelry
Wholesale & Retail
Pre Mothers Day Sale
SUPER DISCOUNTS
with any purchase you will receive a FREE
Gold Heart for MOM.
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Page 4-B The Jewish Floridiatn/Friday, April 24, 1987
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Alliance Division recently held its Costa
Brava Dinner on behalf of the 1987 Combined
Jewish Appeal raising $8.3,550 for the Cam-
paign. This represents a 12.2 percent increase
over the previous year. Pictured from left.,
standing, are Al Isaacson, chairman of Costa
Brava; Dr. Gerald Meister, guest speaker;
Stanley C. Myers. Federations founding
president and Costa Brava executive commit-
tee member; Louis Harris, executive commit-
tee; (seated, from left) Mildred Isaacson, Mar-
tha Myers, and Eleanor Harris.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federations
Cuban Hebrew Committee recently held a din-
ner dance to celebrate the upcoming S9th an-
niversary of the State of Israel, in the Social
Hall of Temple Moses on Miami Beach. The
event was attended by more than 300 people.
Pictured from left are, standing, Rasita
Eiber, Dr. Enrique Eiber, Cuban Hebrew
Committee president; Ambassador Rachamim
Timor, Consul General from the State of
Israel; Shoshana Timor; Sylvia Gleekel;
Jerome Gleekel, guest speaker; (seated, from
left to right) Morris Rapport, Susi Rapport;
Luisa Lerman; Isidore Lerman.


A "Brunch for Israel" was held recently by the
residents of the Ocean Point Condominium on
behalf of the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's 1987 Combined Jewish Appeal. The
event raised 25 percent more for the Campaign
than in the previous year. Pictured from left
are Professor Oscar Kraines, secretary; State
Representative Elaine Bloom, guest speaker;
Lillian Ship, co-chairperson; and Morris
Davidson, chairman.
Publix
Introduces Southeast Florida
To The 'Rotation Diet'
Community Weight Loss Program
Southeast Florida, you're
going on a diet!
Get ready to shed those ex-
tra pounds quickly and without
gnawing hunger pains with the
support of thousands in the
community on the "Rotation
Diet."
The Rotation Diet Communi-
ty Weight Loss Program, a
public service campaign spon-
sored by Publix Super
Markets, Inc., begins Thurs-
day, April 23 with voluntary
weigh-in at any Publix in
Dade, Broward, and Palm
Beach Counties.
'The nine-week program,
developed by Dr. Martin
Katahn, a professor of
psychology and director of the
Weight Management Program
at Vanderbilt University in
Dr. Martin Katahn
Nashville, Tennessee, is designed to provide the general
public with important information that will help them lose
weight and develop a more healthful lifestyle through im-
proved eating habits and exercises," said Mark Hollis,
president of Publix Super Markets.
The Rotation Diet is not new to Publix. In July of 1986.
Publix successfully sponsored the diet in its Lakeland and
Jacksonville Divisions, which encompass all of Florida ex-
cluding the above mentioned Southeast Florida counties.
More than 75,000 dieters registered at Publix and recorded
a weight loss of more than 188,000 pounds.
Patterned after the well-publicized successful "Melt-A-
Million" campaign in Nashville where more than 75.000
people lost a million pounds over a 12-week period the
Rotation Diet alternates low-, medium- and high-calorie
days over a three-week period and promises a weight loss
of two-thirds of a pound a day if followed. It avoids
weighing food portions, includes a strong emphasis to exer-
cise the equivalent of walking 45 minutes a day. allows
unlimited amounts of certain "free" vegetables and up to
three servings a day of a "safe" fruit designed to act as a
pick-me-up or hunger stopper, and gives dieters a vacation
with a special maintenance diet after the third week.
"With 90 percent of Americans believing they need to
lose at least five pounds and 20 percent actually
overweight, Publix is happy to provide a nutritionally
balanced program to make the Miami area healthier and
thinner," said Katahn. And no one goes hungry on the
Rotation Diet, says its creator.
Publix was founded in 1930 by George W. Jenkins and
established its first store in Winter Haven. Headquartered
in Lakeland, Publix has more than 300 stores throughout
Florida with more than 40,000 associates.
Jewish Floridian salute
to our centenarians
The following individual i already 100 years old or
will be 100 by Dec. 31,1987:
NAME:..........................................................
BIRTHDATE:...................................................
PRESENT ADDRESS:..........................................
APT.:................CITY:..................STATE:..........
CITY OF BIRTH:............................................
STATE:.................ZIP:.........COUNTRY:.
SUGGESTED BY:.
ADDRESS:.......
CITY:.............
PHONE:..........
APT.:
ZIP:.
Enclose a photograph of the <*n*^an'P^Ln
and mail to 100 YEARS YOUNG. The Jewish r lonaia
P.O. Box 012973, Miami. Fla. 33101.
,