The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03036

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
5747 A Happy Passover 1987
Vol.60 No. 15
Miami Friday, April 10,1987
Two Dollars
Shamir: 'I Hope Peres Trip Fails'
.ITA/WZN News Photo
PAS DE DEUX: Israel's Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir (right)
dances a few steps in a circle with Deputy Prime Minister David
Levy following Shamir's election (March 29) as leader of the
Herat Party. Shamir proposed Levy as deputy leader. Prior to
the election, Shamir vowed that the administered territories
would belorcg to Israel 'forever.'
Rightwing Likud Victory
Sharon, Arens Sail in With Shamir At Helm
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Herut convention wound up
here last week after handing
an undisputable victory for
Premier Yitzhak Shamir and
sharply boosting the political
fortunes of two of his most
outspoken rightwing
ministers, Ariel Sharon and
Moshe Arens.
Shamir was unopposed in his
reelection as party leader.
Sharon and Arens easily beat
back challenges from Herut
Knesset members for the of-
fices of Central Committee
chairman and the chairman of
the party Secretariat
respectively.
EACH WON with a 64 per-
cent majority of the 2,100
ballots cast. For Sharon, who
is Minister of Commerce and
Industry, it was his first elec-
tion to high office in Herut. He
defeated MK Eli Ovadia, the
Mayor of Afula, Arens, a
Minister-Without-Portfolio,
scored over former Finance
Minister Yoram Aridor.
Deputy Premier and Hous-
ing Minister David Levy was
reelected deputy chairman of
Herut but by a margin of 56
percent over MK Meir Cohen-
Avidov, in contrast to the bet-
ter showing by his two Cabinet
colleagues. He was promptly
labeled a "loser" by political
analysts who saw his chances
of replacing Shamir at the
head of the Likud ticket in the
next elections to be fading
away.
On the other hand, Sharon
and Arens were seen firmly in
the running for the office of
Prime Minister should Likud
defeat the Labor Party in the
next elections, whenever they
are held.
The Herut convention was
actually the wind-up of the
Continued on Page 15-A
Bright Light in Or Akiva
Main Street Named Stanley C. Myers Blvd.
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Fhridian Staff Writer
, "The light burns brightly
in Or Akiva.."
That, says Stanley C.
Myers, is the vision that a
team of delegates came
away with when they visited
the Israeli city that Miami
has adopted as its "twin"
for Project Renewal.
This year marked the
seventh visit of a delegation of
Jewish Federation of Greater
Miami members of Project
Renewal. The team returned
early this week.
During the group's visit, the
mayor of Or Akiva renamed
one of the main streets the
' 'Stanley C Myers
Boulevard," and the delega-
tion participated in the naming
ceremony.
On their trip, delegates
shared home hospitality with
Or Akiva residents. They were
also guests at a dinner party
Continued on Page 11-A
Wants
Spain
Soured
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Labor-Likud relations took
a sour turn Sunday as
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres left on an official visit
to Spain to seek support for
an international peace con-
ference with the publicly
proclaimed ill-wishes of
Premier Yitzhak Shamir.
Shamir stated flatly before
and during the Israel Bond
Organization Leadership Con-
ference in Jerusalem Saturday
night that he hoped Peres
"would not succeed." Peres'
aides called his remark that of
a political hack. It was "party,
not state politics and we will
not react," a spokesman for
the Foreign Minister said.
The sharply divergent views
of Shamir and Peres over an
international conference for
Middle East peace have long
been in the open. Peres has
vigorously pursued that goal
while Shamir has vowed
repeatedly that such a forum is
unacceptable.
BUT OBSERVERS here
could recall no precedent when
a Prime Minister, speaking in-
to radio microphones and to
the press, stated his hope that
a Foreign Minister's
endeavors during a trip of
great diplomatic sensitivity
would fail. Peres is the first
senior Israeli Minister to visit
Spain since the two countries
established diplomatic rela-
tions little more than a year
ago.
Before leaving for Madrid,
he told reporters he would ask
the Spanish Premier, Felipe
Gonzalez, to use his influence
in the Arab world to promote
Continued on Page 13-A
Stanley C. Myers


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 10, 1987
JTA/WZN News Photo
Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter is
shown being greeted by Minister Without
Portfolio Ezer Weizman on his arrival
(March 26) in Israel from Jordan after having
crossed the Allenby Bridge. Carter was on a
private jive-nation Middle East tour.
Int'l. Confab Only Way
Carter Wants Peace Talk Move
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Former President Jimmy
Carter has stressed that an
international conference is
the only way to move the
peace process forward in
the Middle East.
Carter, interviewed on NBC
TV's "Meet the Press" at the
conclusion of his Middle East
visit, said there has been a
"very significant move for-
ward" in the area since his last
visit there four years ago. He
said Syrian President Hafez
Assad told him he would
negotiate with Israel in the
context of an international
conference, something he has
previously rejected.
IN ADDITION, the Palesti-
nians on the West Bank, Gaza
and "perhaps" Yasir Arafat's
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion also have indicated a will-
ingness to participate in such a
conference, Carter said.
"I certainly understand the
animosity that exists, the
mistrust that exists between
the Palestinian people and the
Israelis," he said. "This is a
matter that can only be over-
come, in my judgment, by a
comprehensive approach
which is now possible, in my
judgment, through an interna-
tional peace conference."
Carter did not say whether
such a conference should in-
clude the Soviet Union and the
four other permanent
members of the United Na-
tions Security Council, as King
Hussein of Jordan has
demanded.
Both the Reagan Ad-
ministration and Israel have
rejected Soviet participation
as long as the USSR does not
have diplomatic relations with
Israel. Carter indicated a
belief that Arafat is moving
toward approval of Palesti-
nians who are not leaders of
the PLO to represent the
Palestinians at an interna-
tional conference.
"I'VE NEVER met with
Arafat, and I don't know him,"
the former President said.
"My understanding is that in
the format of a peace process
that is definitive in nature,
that he is willing to do these
things in order to be accepted
as a spokesman for the Palesti-
nians, or even so he can
designate someone to repre-
sent him as a spokesman.'
Carter was referring to the
U.S. conditions that the PLO
recognize Israel's right to ex-
ist and accept UN Security
Council resolution 242 before
the U.S. would recognize or
negotiate with the PLO.
As President, Carter said he
was "constrained" be these
conditions which were first
made as a commitment to
Israel by President Gerald
Ford and Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger.
Carter noted that the PLO
has not yet met the conditions,
but "when they do so in order
to participate fully in an inter-
national peace conference" the
U.S. should have "a meeting
with the PLO leadership."
THE FORMER President
defended his criticism of the
Reagan Administration during
his Mideast visit, noting he has
been "much more reticent
overseas than I have at home."
He explained that he did not
disagree with the Administra-
tion's Mideast policy as ex-
pressed by President Reagan
in his September 1, 1982
speech. But he criticized the
Administration for its failure
"to put Middle East peace as
one of its high priorities."
The former President seem-
ed to indicate understanding
of Israel's effort on behalf of
the U.S. in the Iran affair. "I
certainly don't blame Israel for
nurturing this alliance" with
the U.S., he said.
*Jenisti f/cridfiatn
Phone: (305) 373-4605
Published weekly every Friday
since 1927 by The Jewish Flori-
dian Office and Plant 120 N.E.
6th St.. Miami, Fla. 33132. Phone
(305) 373-4605. Second-Class
Postage paid in Miami, Fla.
USPS 275320. Postmaster: Form
3579 return to Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla.
33101. Fred Shoe net The
Jewish Floridian does not
guarantee the Kashruth of the
merchandise advertised in its
columns.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: In ad
vance (Local Area) One Year
$9.00: Two Years $16.00; Three
Years $22.00 Supplemental
Issue (Local Area) First Friday
each month (10 issues)
Sept.-June $2.00. Out of town,
country, upon request. By Mail
$1.35 per copy.
THE FLIGHT
THE LIMO
THE RESORT
THE FOOD
THE FUN
THE WEEK
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL
$709
FOR ONLY
low r* f D

South Fallsours. New Vbrk 12779 (914) 434-6000
CAIL TOLL FREE (800) 431-3124
O See io\* fcavei A^rw MAterCr'ar^e & vrsa Honored
That's right We'll fly
you to The Pines 'or
the whole week for only
S709 And back again
Your stay at The Pines
also includes three
meals a day and all
ground transportation
Call us today for com
plete details
t'S all on the premises
Indoor & Outdoor
tennis & free golf
Plus 36 holes of
golf nearby
Indoor & Outdoor Pools
Health Club
Steam Room
Sauna
Air Conditioned
Card Rooms
Dance Classes &
Exercise Classes
Speedy Garfm" Band
Top Star Studded
Entertainment
Soviet Jewish Emigration Hope
Heats Up U.S. Leaders' Enmity
2
"S
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The disclosure this week
that the Soviet Union
agreed to ease the emigra-
tion of Soviet Jews and to
allow a more liberal policy
toward Jews within the
Soviet Union a claim
which the Soviets denied
Thursday has brought to
the surface a long-
simmering behind-the-
scenes dispute between
various Soviet Jewry groups
in the United States.
The essence of the dispute is
over who has the mandate to
speak for the Jewish communi-
ty on the issue of Soviet Jews
in meetings with Kremlin of-
ficials. Should agreements or
"deals," as some view it, be
made by American Soviet
Jewry activists in talks in
Moscow? How much of the
purported agreements and
promises by the Russians can
be taken seriously?
THESE QUESTIONS came
to the fore after Morris
Abram, chairman of both the
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry and the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations, and
Edgar Bronfman, president of
the World Jewish Congress,
returned from their trip to
Moscow last week and
reported this week that they
had gained concessions from
Soviet officials, whom Abram
and Bronfman refused to
name.
A day before their
disclosure, on Monday, Rabbi
Arthur Schneier, president of
the Appeal of Conscience
Foundation, reported in The
New York Times that the
Soviets had agreed to establish
a new transit procedure for
future Jewish emigres that
would eliminate the
phenomenon of "neshira"
("dropping out") of Jews who
come to the U.S. instead of
Israel.
Schneier emphasized that he
had negotiated the new pro-
cedure in Moscow and
Bucharest in February, and
that flights would proceed I
directly to Israel via an un- 2
disclosed city in Rumania, f
bcnneier gave no numher of s
Jews who would be permitted \
to leave.
ESSENTIALLY, there was
nothing new about these
disclosures. Feelers toward
this end could be discerned in
an interview that Abram gave
JTA last December upon his
return from Rumania, where
he said he had "urged" Ruma-
nian President Nicolae
Ceausescu in a private
meeting in Bucharest to con-
vey to the Sovies the "lesson
of the Rumanian experience"
regarding its relationship with
it Jewish community and
Jewish emigration, and the ef-
fect that has had on its rela-
tions with the U.S., enabling
the granting of Most-Favored-
Nation trade status, which the
USSR does not enjoy because
of the imposition of the
Jackson-Vanik Amendment.
Indeed, one of the important
claims that Abram and Bronf-
man made this week was the
recommendation of annual
waivers of Jackson-Vanik in
exchange for stepped-up
Jewish emigration, an issue
hotly contested by other
Soviet Jewry groups.
Schneier made an even more
important revelation on March
2, when he told the JTA that,
based on meetings he held in
Moscow in February with high
Soviet officials, there would be
a significant improvement in
Jewish emigration and
religious freedom.
AT THAT time, Schneier,
chief rabbi of the Park East
Synagogue in Manhattan and a
frequent visitor to the Soviet
Union, met with Anatoly
Dobrynin, Secretary of Inter-
national Relations of the Com-
munist Central Committee;
Alexander Yakovlev, Com-
munist Party secretary;
Georgi Arbatov, a Central
Committee official and head of
the USA Institute; dissident
physicist Andrei Sakharov;
Konstantin Kharchev, chair-
man of the Council of Religious
Continued on Page 14-A
~<
TMf FIRST...
/AND STILL TMf FINEST


>o\rtlxaa.te A.owex-s
Hotels & Apartments
'Waterfront Rental Apartments"
900 West Ave. On The Bay
Miami Beach, Fla.
672-2412
Pool & Shuffleboard
Restaurant *
Lounge
1 & 2 Yr. Leases Available
Marine and Fishing Pier
Planned social activities
to fill your hours happily
FURN. & UNFURN. EFFICIENCY
FURN. ft UNFURN. 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH
Beauty Parlor on Premises
i
M-410-87 M-4-10-87 M-4-11K87


Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
"
There might never have been an Emancipation Proclamation
without a Passover.
On the night of 15 Nisan.approxi-
jwtely 3200 years ago.a new era in
nurnan history was begun.
On that date.the right and
pw-macy of huma" freedom was
wwmed to the peoples of the world,
i he Jews.under the leadership of
'loses.put an end to 400 years of slav-
7 imposed upon them by the ancient
Egyptians.
mPa880ver is the Festival that com-
memorates that remarkable event.lt
S? l,he b'rth of the Jews as a free
Pwpie.lt is the reassertion of Jewish
hSwiS fLreedom and diS.nitv are
'"alienable human rights.That no one,
be he king.dictator or private citizen
has a mandate to oppress or enslave an-
other human being.This commitment
to freedom as expressed by the Passover
is central to the thoughts and ideals
which have become the foundation of
western civilization.
It is the Ethic upon which Abra-
ham Lincoln based the Emancipation
Proclamation issued more than 30
centuries after the Exodus from Egypt.
For Jews.Passover is a time to
reaffirm the faith and morality forged
from the experience of Egyptian
enslavement and redemption.
But the story told in the Hagad-
dah speaks not just to Jews.but to all
people who love freedom and who are
willing to make sacrifices to keep it.
It is a story that strengthens our
resolve as free citizens of a great nation
to stand together and help others who
are less fortunate throughout the world
to reassert their destiny to be free.
Passover is the Festival of Free-
dom.It is celebrated during the awak-
ening of spring.the rekindling of life.
It renews our faith that someday
there will be liberty for all.It gives us
hope that some day all may live in peace
and dignity.
It's what makes us Jews.
MIAMI BEACH: 1920 Alton Road < 19th St.t
NORMANDY ISLE: 1250 Normandy Drive
MIAMI: 1717 S.W. 17th St. (Douglas Road)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH: 16480 N.E. 19th Ave.
DADE COUNTY PHONE: 531-1151
HOLLYWOOD: 2230 Hollywood Blvd
TAMARAC: 6701 W. Commercial Blvd
BROWARD COUNTY PHONE: 523-5801
WEST PALM BEACH: 4714 Okeechobee Blvd
PALM BEACH COUNTY PHONE: 683-8676
Kenneth.). Lassman
Six chapels serving the New York
Metropolitan area.
RIVERSIDE
MKMOKIAI.CI'AKDIAN CHAI'KLS
Sponsoring the GUARDIAN PLAN11 insurance funded prearranged funeral program.
4HH


Page 4 A The Jewish FlondiarvFriday. April 10. 1967
Herzog Returns
As Liberator Anew-
Much before he did anything else there of
an official or even ar. unofficial nature.
Israel's President C Herzog stopped off
at Berber: BeLsen where, as a young officer
toward the end of World War II. he came as
a liberator of the agonized survivors who
watched him in their glazed, zombie-like
^tares.
It is fitting that Herrog came a second
time to Bergec-Beisen as ha firs: priority
Monday on an official state visit as Presi-
dent of Israel the successor naooc to the
six million Jews whom Germar s Nan -
nions slaughtered in the cause ::" Hitler's
final solution to the "Jewish Question."
There, before a new memorial a: Bergen-
Beisen hewn of Jerusalem stone. President
Herxog repeated the words of King David in
Psalms: "I am in my pain forever." Simpiy
: -' .: i-as a statement, r.::: just :: the new
and vibrant West German Federal Repuboc
but to the world at large, that there can
never be. nor wu! there ever be. a forgetting
of the Holocaust.
And it was a statement to the German
children and grandchilirer. ::" their eiders
that no nation can ignore its history.
Tribute to Weizsaecker
We feel it is a tribute :: the Federal
Republic's President Richard voc Wen
saecker that he entireiy agreed. Va Weiz-
saecker is a leader fr:m whom we have
come to expect these fine, ieec-ly-felt sen-
timents tna: ~e ras frequently expressed :r
previous occasions in addresses :.: scholars
and hist.: mms ;-:_n:a. personalities and
frank \ sddishists.
Indeed. Voc Wetxsaecker wen: :ne step
farther when he auudei ... :ne scattering of
angry feelings in Israel before PresadeK
Herxog": departure oc his ;>f5cjal vtsn as
something he could ccmplete.y ^n.ierstand.
Presadent Herxog has certainly acquitted
himself wefl. His fellow- Israelis need not
have worried. In a frankness that nunced no
w.ris. fgntmg hack tears ::' angry memory.
he held out a hand in hopes of friendship. In
bis counterpart, he cook: see reasons for
Richard von Wexxsaecker s rtsmg poiiocai
star m West Germany today as a leader of
equal frankness committed to "rugh-mmded
pradple.
May the Sght of tms scar suffuse the Ger-
man narjoc as i
Passover Seder
The tradxoocal Seder serrice.
whirs the story of Passover is tcii w*E be
head Monday evening. April 13. But Zms*
(Vian. the Season of our Freedom.
mductng anxcg ethers Siiar CV-*ecz
and Fast :f the Firs Bom. on the day
t*sfcce. And many Jews wZ be cesecratmk:
Zwaw '7\tr*ze* wrth a second Seder ser-
vice on Tuesday evermg as we*L
Passover ccc-rvmcrates tne ierox
the iroer-t Lsraeirtes from Vr.-^ v
Pharaoh m Egypt. The Exodus was as tnutrh
an act of awrattcc free their mtoteracte
spmrtua. Kcdage as t was their reoemoccc
frctnphysaai slavery
Moses rejecsec of Egypt was thus a
ieearaucc x otjdeperjderjce* an art :c seif-
desersssaccc :c the tart :c tne Israectes
who bbBovt-: *- :_: ::" utem rt'~.~.y- is
weil as an art :c 5^f-3ecermrnaooc ry a oec-
nk seescng a hfe ::* tuman rjr.~ a-.;
freedom
Taroeg* the Seder services. Zmaa,
. *eilvt a arks not oatr redempooc as a
past ever_c They ate reecact therattcr. as a
present-day experience That s why uus
Paaacwer. the pagbt of Jews m the Soviet
laacc amt tne Arac :-*^fnes sense! he
-pcertrosc _n tne m-n-ns ano hearts of Jew-jsc.
famihes everywhere.
A special addition to the Seder service as
an expression of hope for the freedom of
Soviet Jewry is offered in Sec. C Jewish Floridian Passover Edition. For
these Jews, an Exodus is as much a life-
saving necessity as it was for the ancient
Israelites in their flight from Egyptian
bondage.
When the words. "Next year in
"rrusalem' are recited. Jews will re- ree:rr.-
mittJBjthem.se.ves : :re rene-e.: stm^it:
for liberation and justice and until all peo-
ple who seek freedom and self-
determination may experience these things
for themselves.
Fortunately for us, in our own land of
freedom, we have an opportunity to reflect
all the more on the aspirations of today's
Jews still in bondage eisewhere. For we can
continue : exodus during the four days of Choi Hzmoed
Pesach beginning next Thursday. April 16.
Ckag Sam -vroyi
jaridrwtarfjrvvt'..
>^ra
Hard Job
To Make Successful Changes in Things
By JDI SHIPLEY
Tms year, as Passover ai-
pnoaches. I thins aga^: :: me
- :r-;er ::" m-s m^ muly nrr:
and longest reiterated ::' i..
freed: rr. fescvals I :.- ::'
the -i.---._irr< -. -"_--" :: i
.-e^ecratec. .:' me _-.r-.-ria.
r.es -_-a: earn ::" _s _as
:: their parucular exrer.e--:e?
r. tr_s -: .dav and _: "* ye
hcvn
1 --:-- _::: >:e ::' me
: _- 1 ha-, c r.et _.-:r^ the a;,
the ta__oc_ and the _:t s<:
tamocs. What io yoo suppose
5am ra Streisard -5 _o_tg :':r
the first Seder chss tear*
Where are Dvd I>eder__ar
a&i Bury Crystal as I r__se _ty
first rasa o. w_" Wsere _i
Isaac Baseeva Scager* Wbere
-s Natan Sharansky. a_o hew
=t_sc he feeT
AND THEN I tfemk :i =v
frtend. Menachect Begtr_ My
fa.;"y beca__e frwe-ry wr__
the Beg__s _: tise ate Is*! 5
:_g refrre he :eca_te Pr_=e
Min-ster and ardhitect af die
frsc ;ea_e treary wtth a
hesele Arac scate a_o iz 1
t_=e *_e__ ?__ T-^rr^a at -.
he spcite :i h_s "cofieagaes
*h: had :':<_nt the gece hght
wtth hr ar.d hraaght freed.; c
to the scase :d Israel. How it
-3Q5C ha-re sees x those years
::r *. _: .-etecr_tc ?eaa__t
And. c re-T-rertng I
thnac af what t. tcci. v 1 in
that freeaoaL David Ben-
Gancc and Beg__ were at cc-
p.is.tc ;:__; p:cr__a_7 n_t tney
t.:tn te-.tre-t rrsne __e Sca_e
1_ thee :w_ way wrncng :*:r
the saae rcaL they both
_ut the ac__e*en__EC.
me zc each, the Passe^er w__e
was $c rweet teca-se :t* the
h-eedenx x recresecced.
T_* S-tate :t Lsraei was _oc
kcj The better
s: _fei<:cj_
_z.t ;ar:e-.
:c tae zirrz. paegs of the t_nrd
Jewtaa. Coauaoawealth
gaess tney were a nan nf the
secccd. W* Ecw haev were a
pan
EN THE 7: ran and even in
"..-.e Haggadah. we icnow of the
-.:"::_- -_,"r--.s- :e-:c-e
B-rdtes 21 moboc tend t.: stay
_t ~ :. 3.>he< at rest tc
:. stay there .*_ tcrrhie a;
5_aver.- was _t E^.^-t. :t was a
known.
There are :'_-- :-_f_ -__ r
the ea^err.ess wtv _.
tne ,'rT.;; ;e.;C'.e -*_.:<:-: tne
- -'. ::_. -. _h_\_ >:
Mar.;, w :__ -_aye stare;
- -.-. tr.e :-:-.-^
the fear
-": ~.:r. :,
Once _t the iesert. we icaow
trrigtt _i r.ec-" 'the
teccte as^e: ::' M:sne Reben-
eq. He did not have a paonc in
the iesert. It took a Sot in-
h-arg tw: ^.es m tne
sacrec tac*ecs But they got to
the as; r$**a, .Krai evr.
thee s was *xx easy
THEEE WERE 00 welcom-
ing parses f :r the Jews npon
enterag the 'and. we know
than The lessee there s that
fE 4. really w.rtnwhJ*
jcraes easly :r .a.- .-. ^
7 The aorfSra amoi
pec^ie have
of die world.
the world.
We know -_-^-. .-_- ^
Jews left Babykxua man;
stare: --- -: :ec:cung di
Jews of Persa a.-.-: ettatujj
Iran. Can ;.:_ magme die
ieoa^ ard tne dial
went on when re to
leave fee- Israe-*
THE JEWS : land :ciav
"_-: reas.:c :':- tr-:^* and
iisagree = er: i~ ong
tner^se-.~es an-: -t-.- tte Jews
te Vr_te: S-^.:-- a> -^ve
-- :wt: at-t i: ta-. -T~r-:-
iocs freedoc: n rnrst ::' the
ands we Wtac-ct yet en-
fhct. x=r iebate xtnnies. We
are just r-:t 1 ;e:c -. te^ned
to 6ve lt ta.tr.:-_ :-. i full-
tirrte basts.
And ew. a new ;eca^ is
r. Ooe that reserAbles
r2y the xcau; that
gone :cs. Elgvptall
those thoaaands ::' years ago.
The Russars a-^e raiting
lev w_ :cer the
:S1%
ft a the sctee that
the peccie we are. And
e i- iX ae : ^ this seascc
*e *re the yeast :c the se doors- We w am* a fftc cap
of wme tfcs Pass>:'.er and
break the =aacc :' '-.: -
the wine for th:se :f the
Hoiocaast wb: w -ever
ceieera* freedrc: a=c the
mataoh for the Eussaz Jews
wr: r^ght. Saoc
Bat. if the doors xes. Mike
Waface b rifht A-
TL^:.vr S:t **
chaw are down. There wt_ be
I rat **
Our Readers Write: Absentee Ballots
Available for Apr. 23 Vote
Thcs s a fakrw-^p tc a ieeer
I wrxe r-ir^g t !* y
thn: tae North a- Beach
emccs wH se seat on Aari
-1 the asc aj :c Passover
I was recess;;, gf.ued tnat
thoae regacerec ^:cers = the
Ca? of Nona Hans Beacn
wic ^eocse rf then re-ngt..-c.
;c a : ;
on
rin asay =cw ^ abie to
do ax
They =ay .-a= iz ateentee
hatat or naw even r-; prior
tc Apr. il at N-n SC*
Beach Oty Hal '-"'-' Nt
19th Aveaae
MAXHEDiOWTTZ
MtamuBead
^Jewish Floridian
a w.1 *
=atcr arc NMHMi


11 IWSAN 5747
oerl5


Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Can A Reconstructionist Rabbi Go Too Far?
By GARY ROSENBLATT
Covunght Baltimore Jewish Times
AU Publication Rights Reserved
The Reconstructionist
Rabbinical College has
decided not to take action
against Jane Litman, a
fourth year rabbinical stu-
dent whose radical feminist
beliefs allegedly haye in-
cluded a form of idol
worship.
The seemingly bizarre case
has attracted a good bit of at-
tention, perhaps in part
because it raises issues as to
what are the boundaries, if
any, of religious beliefs, and
how are they determined,
within Reconstructionist
[ Judaism.
Founded by Mordecai
Kaplan in 1934, Reconstruc-
tionism asserts that Judaism is
a civilization created by Jewish
people in history. Thus, Jews
should have freedom and
variety to work out their
religious practices.
AT PRESENT, there are
I some 60 Reconstructionist
I congregations in the U.S. and
I approximately 60 students
I currently in the rabbinical
[school, about evenly divided
I between men and women.
Leaders of the Reconstruc-
Itionist movement take pride in
[the fact that they are often on
[the cutting edge of Jewish
Iritual and practice,
[acknowledging that this sense
lof experimentation sometimes
| causes problems. The Litman
[controversy is a a case in
| point.
A memo from the
[Reconstructionist Rabbinical
ICollege (RRC) faculty in
[Philadelphia sent to alumni
[around the country several
[weeks sought to explain "a dif-
[ficult and painful episode in
the history of our institution,"
Iprecipitated by an article in
Ithe December 4, 1986 issue of
the Jewish Advocate in
1 Boston. The article included an
interview with Litman, 31,
Iwho is quoted as saying that
Ishe has been accused of
lidclatry for making statues of
Asherah, a Canaanite goddess,
las part of an effort to "dig up
women's spiritual practices
jfrom the past and see what
resonates.
'I CAN distinguish between
[worshipping a statue and wor-
shipping the energy. I see no
Iconflict between that and
hitman, who also calls
herself Litwoman.' has
ang been outspoken in
Nr radical feminist
f^ews. An article she
vrote several years ago
evolved around an
ncktent in Mea
ihearim. an ultra-
hodox part of
erusalem. She saw
fing Orthodox girls
Pushing and elbowing
Mi other' to catch a
''Npse of Chasidic men
[anting together an
wdent that. Litman
we. makes me burn
Nth anger and sick
kith rage.'
Radical feminists' views question how
borderless movement deals with limits.
monotheism," she is quoted as
saying. The article went on to
elaborate on Litman's feminist
views, which she said often
clashed with the sexism that
she finds prevalent in Judaism.
She is also quoted as calling
the Talmud and Halacha
"repulsive."
In a subsequent letter to the
editor, Litman said she was
"appalled and horrified" by
the story, charging that her
comments were "taken so far
out of context as to represent a
complete distortion of my
views and opinions." The Ad-
vocate stuck by its story,
noting that "it is unfortunate
that individuals who later
regret making on-the-record
statements to journalists feel
they have no recourse but to
fall back on claims of being vic-
timized by insensitive
reporters."
BUT THE matter did not
end there. Negative feedback
from the original article led to
a full-scale inquiry on Feb. 6 by
the faculty of the Reconstruc-
tionist Rabbinical College
(RRC).
ACCORDING TO the Feb.
20 memo, "after lengthy con-
versation with Ms. Litman, the
faculty accepted her statement
that the interview contained
serious distortions of her
views and practices. Ms. Lit-
man emphatically states that
she neither makes nor wor-
ships idols, nor does she use
them in any public devotional
context.
"Her supposed comments
concerning the Talmud were
taken entirely out of context;
the world 'repulsive' was used
regarding restrictions of the
rights of the disabled as
recorded in the Talmud, not at
all regarding the Talmud or
the rabbinic tradition as a
whole."
The memo goes on to say
that had the faculty "found the
statements printed in the
original interview to have been
a true reflection of Ms. Lit-
man's views, it would have
been unable to graduate her as
a rabbi. The faculty states une-
quivocally that it believes the
invocation of pagan deities,
male or female, to stand out-
side the bounds of Judaism as
it has historically developed.
IT SIMILARLY considers
the use of plastic or pictorial
imagery in a devotional con-
text to be regressive rather
than progressive in the
development of Judaism and
sees no place for it within
Reconstructionism. The pro-
cess of defining limits must
regularly proceed
simultaneously with our ef-
forts to expand our horizons."
Litman, who also calls
herself "Litwoman," has long
been outspoken in her radical
feminist views. An article she
wrote several years ago in
Lillith, the Jewish feminist
magazine, revolved around an
incident in Mea Shearim, an
ultra-Orthodox part of
Jerusalem.
She saw young Orthodox
girls "pushing and elbowing
each other" to catch a glimpse
of Chasidic men dancing
together an incident that,
Litman wrote, "makes me
burn with anger and sick with
rage."
SHE WROTE of leaving
Reform rabbinical school, her
local Hillel, and several
synagogues, including a gay
congregation, "all because of
sexism." She called for break-
ing the "stranglehold Or-
thodoxy has on Jewish growth,
especially in Israel," and for
creating a future where "we as
Jews will be an ethnic, cultural
and spiritual group within a
non-threatening feminist
society."
In subsequent articles for
Sh'ma and a Reconstructionist
rabbinical publication she has
dealt with homosexuality in
the rabbinate as well as ad-
vocating feminist God
language.
Described by several of her
teachers as a "very radical
feminist," Litman is con-
sidered an extremely bright
and serious woman interested
in feminine imaging of God.
"Jane believes that it is
idolatrous for Jews to only
speak of God in masculine
terms," said one of her
teachers on the RRC faculty.
BUT WHILE the RRC
memo condemned the use of
"pagan deities" as "outside
the bounds of Judaism," it did
not address itself to the use of
ancient Hebrew goddesses, the
type that Litman reportedly
dealt with.
E.M. Broner, a feminist and
novelist who knows Litman,
pointed out the historical reali-
ty of Hebrew goddesses and
said that Judaism has "ex-
punged" virtually all
references to them. "Jane has
been able to construct that
metaphor," said Broner, "and
I think it's a brave thing when
women are on the cutting edge
of Judaism, making us
stretch." She said she was
sorry Litman "had to deny her
actions rather than explain
them."
Broner added that "it is a
very dangerous thing when
our most liberal sect gets ner-
vous like this. It reminds us
that Spinoza is still near," she
said, referring to the 17th cen-
tury philosopher who was ex-
communicated by the Sephardi
community for his religious
views, which were considered
heretical. "I worry that
Reconstructionism may be
becoming reactive."
SEVERAL RABBIS,
graduates of the RRC, spoke
of the case as having broader
implications in terms of how
the movement deals with con-
flict and controversy.
"What we're really talking
about is a heresy trial, in no
uncertain terms," said Rabbi
Michael Paley, who will leave
his post as Hillel director at
Dartmouth College in June to
become the senior chaplain at
Columbia University. "It's
easy to be cynical, but we must
look at this seriously because it
reflects on an important tur-
moil at RRC."
Once a modern Jewish move-
ment removes limits of Jewish
laws, commandments and
observances, such as the Sab-
bath or kashruth, where does
one draw the line, he asked.
"On what grounds can she be
tried?"
"This whole issue is one of
boundaries," agreed Rabbi
Continued on Page 12-A
Litman is considered bright
and serious, interested
in feminizing God.


Page 6-A The Jewish rToridian/Friday. April 10. 1987
Herzog in Germany: 'My
Pain Is With Me Forever'
Bt DAVID KANTOR
BERGEN-BELSEN -
iJTA) President Chaim
Herzog of Israel, reciting
the words of the psalmist.
"My pain is with me
forever." unveiled a rock
quarried in Jerusalem at the
site of this former concen-
tration camp Monday and
dedicated it to the memory
of those who perished in the
Holocaust.
"I do not bring forgiveness
with me. nor forgetfulness."
declared Herzog. the first
Preaideat Herzog
President Von Wetszaecker
PresMer.-. :" [srac I
many. "The or_;. meiwh
forgive in 7-t ...-
ing have n right

wi | -
THE BRIEF, moving
ceremony a: Berg
:':-:* "} ^ *e n in Ber
I .-- tmwhere
Wi; Z-rrr-.e-Z V.'.- i. 21-gUT.
salute art per* naOj wek
ei President Richard
Wetzsaeeker of the Peiaral
ffifiiiii
Several hundred people
assembled here, including
Holocaust survivors and Weal
German dignitaries, beaded by
von Weizsaecker and the
Prime Minister of Lower Sax-
ony. Ernst AJbreeht. Many
fought back tears as the E.
Moie P.aekamtn. the prayer for
the dead, was chanted by a
cantor.
Then Herzog faced the au-
dience. "In this place, the vale
of slaughter, and at the outset
of my journey on this sod. I
leave as a memorial, my
brethren and sisters, victims
of the Shook (Holocaust), a
stone hewn from the rocks of
Jerusalem. On it are carved
the words of the psalmist, as
testimony to the decimation of
my people: 'My paun is with me
forever.
HE RECALLED. I was
her* :":.- the f.rsl -.:.~.e iz year?
ago. Then I was a Jewish
soldier from the land of Israel,
participating in the destruc-
tion of the Nazi regime, pluck-
ing the brands snatched from
the fire. The memory of those
shocking sights will never.
ever leave me.
"Now. accompanied by some
survivM-s I return as Pre?:-
dent of the State of Israel, the
independent Jewish State, by-
decision of its sovereign
government, to bear witness
before you that the ultimate
destiny of the Jewish people
will never be betrayed and that
the Jewish people lives on."
At the ceremony, a
Holocaust survivor. Hadassab
Rosensaft. recognized Herzog
as one of the officers of the
British army which liberated
the concentration camp. She
burst into tears and embraced
the President.
THE MEMORIAL service
at Bergen-Beisen was a far cry
both in mood and setting from
the ceremonial pomp that
greeted Herzog and his wife
Aura when they stepped from
their Israel Air Force jet at
Bonn airport at 10 a.m.
Monday.
After reviewing a guard of
honor. Herzog was flown by
helicopter to Villa Ham-
merschmidt. the official
residence of President von
Weizsaecker. There. German
army units passed in review
and the national anthems of
Israel and West Germany
were played. The two
Presidents had a brief talk and
were then flown to Hannover,
capital of Lower Saxony ar.o
from there by helicopter to
Berger.-Be*ser.. Bef re ir.ve:
iag the -err.-: rial stone Her-
riaked the aaaaeaa at the
-oration eaaaj nte and
pected -
Hen g i five-daj I nr :
"' ----- ,
B ------ .-- nd
aa atr n in [srad
are i aw :- aghi Press-
lent : Israei sfc ii - .: -
see at .- f his v q -
ok Hera t hr a
B on's invitati
-' arse 1 aadersta
'-". se : -..:: -:
Former President Jimmy Carter meet* vntk
West Bank Mayor of Betklekem Elxas Freij
ir\gkt) during Carter's rirtf in Betklekem tuv>
Af -; -:Phow
weeks ago. Carter and Fr*\; art Mm hen
prior to tkeir meeting \n tke Meg -' office,
vnere Carter met \c\tk Palestinian leaden.
he toki reporters three days
before Herzog's arrival. He
said the visit by the Israel:
:h:e: ::" s*.a:e -*-as ar Xtaar-
dinary event of an extremely
important meaning."
VON WEIZSAECKER
denied that the visit was in-
tended to "dose" the chapter
of the German past. "In
history there can be no such
closure." he saw.
Herzog's wari* M Berger.-
Belsen bore thai M for I
dressed himseL: :: th-: =
.ri::-: :
:
tmperat re of ei he
perpetual hatred. Not as bar-
ren, paralyzing hostility. But
as a call to strength and stead-
fastness, a call to understand
the depths to which the human
soul can sink, and a call to rise
above them. To fulfill with all
our very being the antithesis of
evil, of wickedness: Turn away
from evil, and do good. Seek
peace and pursue it."
HERZOG CONCLUDED:
"In the name of the Jewish
: the name of the
State :' lira*;. I repeat
-"' -' -- : : ree: -.- : :
forever faithful :: your be-1
quest the imperative of I
life."
Herzog aad \m wife spent I
five day; Switzerland lastl
week a.- ::' President I
Pierre Auber : tr.e Swiss Con-
federation, who :s also Foreign^
Minister.
In additior- I talks *itli
Auber on : I world I
issues :-..-:-.- the Middle
East, the Her: j- re feted
:;. the Swiss mmuni-i
ensure
se
rou-d the
l .
'* -.'. H :.-: i-.: :-.-.-.
:' '-
bequeathed a te-star-.er.*
.-- : the Jewian

_-.-.: and in id -
than in its abilir.
se-1:
.:>. -s N:t as a
T .T
Invest
In Your Future
And
Israel's
With Passover being the holiday when we celebrate the
*d0 of our people from slavery in Egypt it i s a very
appropriate tome to he4p ensure the economic independ-
ence of Israel today by either purchasing Israel Bonds
or reinvesting matured Bonds
For more information on how you can support Israel
through a purchase or a reinvestment of Israef Bonds,
contact THE GREATER MIAMI ISRAEL BONDS
ORGANIZATION OFFICE at 2301 Collins Avenue, M-24,
Miami Beach, or call S31 -731.
Happy Passover
State of Israel Bonds
SOME PEOPLE UVE THEIR
ENTIRE LIVES WITHOUT EVER
TASTING WATER.
5-:1-= :e:c*= ~.?.e -eve' 'as'e-: *acer
-.? ? best and puw i aw -; %aa?-
* oul sodaaw :<: ufcarts :- :izxr"aD(y
- .:(--.; aojr-: -ctr>rc :a*er
awaj Same ceic-e -a.e -?.' -Js&c
----- .= e. .Vate''-cr- a
aauna awing rtHolSpwigB --an&as
- fX. ? :re :< Tcse x-:c e -.
'''.-"':" .i.e. .Vir -:_ Qetasang
*ate< xr re aw) "ts; ir~e
MHI VAlllY MITB
Purety for drinking.
OAOE
696-1333
BROWARD
563-6114


One Deportation Blocked
Conflicting Orders Confuse
Nazi Criminals' Future
NEW YORK (JTA) -
A federal district court rul-
ed here last week that Karl
Linnas may be deported to
his native Estonia for war
crimes committed there
during World War II. But a
Cincinnati immigration
court judge delivered an op-
posite verdict in the case of
alleged war criminal Leonid
Petkiewytsch whom the
Justice Department wants
to deport to Poland.
Linnas, a 67-year-old Long
Island resident, was stripped
of his U.S. citizenship in 1981
and ordered deported in 1983
after lengthy hearings deter-
mined that he had been com-
mandant of the Tartu concen-
tration camp in Estonia and
was responsible for the deaths
of at least 12,000 inmates, in-
cluding thousands of Jews.
Petkiewytsch, 63, a resident
of Finneytown, Ohio, was
charged by the Justice Depart-
ment's Office of Special In-
vestigations (OSI) with the
Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Land Day
Observed
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Land Day was observed
peacefully by Israel's 700,000
Arabs Monday. But sporadic
violence, school and shop
closures in the West Bank and
Gaza Strip demonstrated the
contrasting moods and propen-
sities of Palestinian Arabs who
are citizens of Israel and those
in the administered territories.
A curfew was imposed on
the Balata refugee camp near
Nablus Monday morning after
youths hurled rocks at an
Israel Defense Force patrol.
Eight youngsters were ar-
rested in Ramallah, near
Jerusalem, for alleged incite-
ment. Rubber bullets were
fired at youths in nearby El
Bireh who were throwing
rocks. One Israeli soldier was
slightly injured when a rock hit
a private car he was driving.
A commercial strike was ful-
ly effective in Ramallah and
schools remained closed for
the day. But merchants in
Nablus opened their doors,
claiming they did so under
pressure from the authorities.
A commerical strike called in
Gaza petered out shortly after
it began.
persecution of inmates of the
Kiel-Hasse labor camp in Ger-
many during the war in col-
laboration with the Nazi
authorities and with conceal-
ing the fact that he was ar-
rested by the British for war
crimes, when he entered the
U.S. in 1955.
IMMIGRATION Judge O.
John Brahos ruled, however,
that the government showed
insufficient evidence that
Petkiewytsch acted voluntari-
ly rather than under duress
and that his detention by the
British was not material to the
issuance of a U.S. visa. The
OSI is expected to appeal.
But Linnas' fight against
deportation is apparently over.
The U.S. Supreme Court twice
declined to hear his appeals.
The ruling by the federal
district court last Wednesday
(April 1) was the second time
since last March that a federal
court found that deportation of
Linnas was justified.
Meanwhile, Supreme Court
Justice Thurgood Marshall
temporarily blocked Linnas'
deportation Monday until the
full court decides whether he
should be returned to the
Soviet Union to face certain
death for supervising mass ex-
ecutions at a Nazi concentra-
tion camp.
He was sentenced in absen-
tia in the Soviet Union in 1962
for war crimes committed in
Estonia which is now Soviet
territory. His appeals argued
that evidence obtained from
the Soviet Union was false.
BUT U.S. Attorney Rudolph
Giuliani argued that the
evidence supplied by the
Soviet authorities only cor-
roborated other evidence
presented at the hearings.
Although Attorney General
Edwin Meese delayed signing
the deportation order while
the case was under "review,"
the Justice Department is now
expected to act quickly to send
Linnas back to Estonia.
The case has stirred emo-
tions among Jews, including
Holocaust survivors who urg-
ed deportation and East Euro-
pean anti-Communist groups
which supported Linnas'
appeals.
In Ohio, meanwhile, sur-
vivors of the Kiel-Hesse labor
camp expressed bitter disap-
pointment over Judge Brahos'
decision and hoped that ap-
peals against it will be
successful.
BSttr gssSS-

0CEMIFMHT
BOWOtWttf HOTEL
28Str^*C*Hn.Avjr
Ssasr
i=t-=w-Sl
MEMORIAL DAY
4DWS/3 NIGHTS $37
MAY 22-25 $1Q9 ^ m
dbw occ
SHWUOT
:
HELPED OUT OF COURTROOM: John
Demjanjuk, the retired Ohio auto loorker ac-
cused of being the Treblinka death camp
guard, 'Ivan the Terrible,' is helped by two
Israeli policemen out of the courthouse after
Demjanjuk complained of pains in the back.
He did not attend his trial April 1 and watch-
APAVide World Photo
ed the proceedings on television instead. The
Israeli Supreme Court meanwhile denied an
appeal to delay presentation of evidence by
historian Wolfgang Schefler on the ground
that the defense needed time to study Schefler s
testimony.
Israel Wants Right To Inspect UN Documents
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Binyamin Netanyahu,
Israel's Ambassador to the
United Nations, revealed
Sunday night that Israel will
soon ask UN Secretary
General Javier Perez de
Cuellar to be given permis-
sion to inspect hundreds
more files at the UN archive
on war criminals.
In an interview with the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
shortly before he departed for
consultations in Israel,
Netanyahu said Israel will re-
quest an access to 500 more
files in addition to the 2,500
files it already examined. The
UN archive on accused war
criminals contains some
40,000 files.
Last month the Secretary
General rejected Israel's de-
mand that the archive be open
to the public, contending that
the nations which were
members of the long-defunct
War Crimes Commission had
objected to it.
oeeoeeeeeeo
"Cnate Land From Sand"
DO YOU HAVE a share in the redemption of
THE LAND OF ISRAEL?
HAVE YOU MADE your contribution to the
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND (KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL)?
IF NOT NOW... WHEN?
DO IT NOW!!!
Enclosed is my gift of: $-------------------
Name
Phone
Address
____Apt. No.
-wsgWfo
COLLECT:
All contributions to JNF are tax deductible.
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND, INC.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 353 Miami Beach, Florida 33139 Phone: 538*464
; JACOBS
osmMH^*'.
500000


Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 10, 1987
Bad Boy Barrister?
DWI Defense Attorney
Essen Has A Heart
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Richard Essen may be the
top lawyer in his field, but
as his field is DWI, the
defense of drivers arrested
on charges of drunken driv-
ing, he has won infamy
rather than fame through
his astonishing record of
successes; Essen has lost
only one out of the 2,000
cases he has handled, and
that case is presently on
appeal.
Essen has become the at-
torney whom the media love to
hate. He has appeared on 60
Minutes, the Today Show,
Good Morning America, the
Phil Donahue Show, and more.
He has been featured in People
magazine, the New York Daily
News, the Miami Herald,
Wallstreet Journal, Dallas
Morning News, and others.
ESSEN'S UNUSUAL
brand of popularity is as much
due to his straightforward, ar-
ticulate presentation of his
position as it is due to his being
a crackerjack lawyer who has
embraced an extremely con-
troversial cause.
The heavyset Miamian
speaks as easily and humorous-
ly about his addiction to the
refrigerator as he speaks
honestly and painfully about
his daughter's antipathy
towards his career.
"My daughter wanted to be
a lawyer, but when I became
involved with DOA law, it kind
of turned her off of the idea of
a legal career."
ESSEN'S DAUGHTER,
Elena, who is 16, said on 60
Minutes that "I love my dad,
I*m very proud of him, but I
think that most of the people
he represents must be guilty,
and I wish he would do
something else."
"That hurts," admits Essen,
who is married to Laura, a
social worker, and also has a
son, Michael, who is 15.
"My daughter has had
friends of hers from school
who were maimed by a
drunken driver," says Essen,
who does not expect that his
daughter's opinions on the
subject will change. And his
daughter is not the only person
to take exception to Essen's
chosen branch of the law.
"Some police across the
country have threatened that
they'll get even with me, and
they follow me when I'm in my
car, which is a form of harass-
ment. But most cops unders-
tand that I'm part of the
system," as they themselves
are, states Essen, who has
received letters threatening
his life.
MANY OF the articles writ-
ten about Essen seem to have
confused his methods for
defending people accused of
drunken driving, which include
finding loopholes in the law,
dismissing evidence on the
grounds of certain
technicalities, and trying to
avoid bringing cases to trial,
with his justification for choos-
ing this branch of the law.
Money (Essen makes $2,500
if the case involves a first of-
fense) may be part of the con-
sideration, but Essen does not
defend his choice on
mercenary grounds, nor does
he claim as his central motiva-
tion the excitement of this
field, although he does state
that "personally, I find it
fascinating and quick-moving,
as it deals with issues of life
and death."
Essen's defense of his own
choice of career is no less
skillful than his defense of
drunken drivers, and it is
almost impossible to refute.
RICHARD ESSEN: 'police threaten to get even with me.'
"I DON'T believe in
murder," says Essen, "and
murderers shouldn't commit
murder. But they should have
a defense without that, the
criminal justice system doesn't
work, and you don't have a
democracy."
Essen pauses and then asks,
"Should I sell the client out?
We all have a right to be
represented well. Who accuses
the civil lawyer who
represents the drunk driver?
Who accuses the surgeon who
patches the drunk driver
together so that he can go back
on the road again?
"I don't understand how
people can transfer their anger
from the defendant to the
lawyer who is only doing what
he is ethically bound to do."
Essen points out that drunk
drivers do not set out to com-
mit criminal acts, and that
many of the people he
represents are innocent. But
he would not decline to repre-
sent a client, even one who
was guilty, because that, he
contends, "is the price we pay
for democracy. Some of the
guilty go free."
ESSEN, whose first ex-
posure to criminal law was in
1963 when he defended the
comedian Lenny Bruce, has in
the course of his career been a
witness in the Patty Hearst
trial and even been a pro-
secuting attorney in the Dade
State Attorney's office,
specializing in narcotics cases.
Having experienced working
in a branch of law which did
not stir up so much debate,
Essen says, "I would prefer to
be in a field where people say,
'how wonderful,' not 'how can
you do that?'
"60 Minutes called me 'the
most hated lawyer in the
Warm wishes
for a healthy
and happy
Passover
from all
of your friends
at the BEACh.
BEACH
FEDERAL
SAVINGS & LOAN
United States.' My segment
received the largest response
in the history of the show -
mostly negative."
BUT ESSEN accepts his
status with equanimity. "I'm
not terribly interested in
public acclaim," he argues. "If
I were, I would have run for
public office."
Essen does not claim that
drunk driving is a problem
which has been overrated.
"Some 24,000 people a year
are killed because of drunk
driving. It is the largest
classification of arrests for a
criminal offense, with about
two million people arrested a
year. We lose more people to
drunk driving than we do in
wars. It's a terrible problem."
Continued on Following Page
I42IOIU
9890500
17') 'IVI1
I'm Spending
My Summer Vacation
With
Give us your summer.
And well give you all
the day and evening
pleasures of our
thousand-,*, re estate.
Golf on an 18-hole.
.7,157 yard champion-
ship course, at our
front door. 12 .ill
weather and clav tennis
uiurts. A fuIK -equipped
health cluh. Lakeside
tvalking trails. Outdoor
and indoor pools.
DIAHANN CARROLL
& VIC DAMONE
SHECKY GREENE
BEN VEREEN
LOU RAWLS
GOLDEN BOYS
OF BANDSTAND'
At
Three delicious meal>
daily, geared to vour
own special diet
Sec more great stun
plus special midweek
acts all summer long'
Call us for
information about
transportation from
Neu- York area air
ports to Kutsher's!
?82*290
BcMk 534 8820
Kutsher's
Monticello, New York 12701 (914) 794-6000
CALL TOLL FREE: (800) 431-1273
Complete Convention Facilities Major Credit Cards Honored


Essen Saj Ittiagfc ^Hurts'
*.VV. .
.-.
I Continued from Preceding Page
he admits.
But of the two million ar-
rested a year, Essen says that
about 500.000 are probably in-
Sent, by his estimate.
..it's the most subjective
area of the law," explains
Fssen "You're out at night
Sone, and a police officer pulls
vou over. Your breath smells
lof mouthwash, you stumble on
I a pebble, and then you take the
I balance test.
"You stand still, feet
Itoeether with your eyes clos-
led and. without being a,ble to
Ifocus on something, most peo-
Iple lose their balance."
THESE FACTORS could
lead to arrest on charges of
Idrunken driving, something
Iwhich. even without a convic-
tion, carries such stigma that
people can lose their jobs and
Spouses because of it, accor-
ding to Essen.
Furthermore, Essen claims,
oth the chemical tests and the
physical tests are inaccurate.
The breath test can produce
nisleading results because of a
jelch, and the conversion of
Jcohol content in the breath to
dcohol level in the blood can
miscalculated, as different
ople register different ratios
breath-to-blood alcohol
levels, and the machine con-
certs according to an average
number.
Florida Highway Patrol
Issued a report which stated
jthat with the exception of
hree tests, which are rarely
jiven. most of the most-*
frequently used roadside tests
lor drunkness have no scien-
tific validity.
THE THREE tests which do
have some scientific validity
prove that a person is drunk
with 82 percent certainty
which, Essen points out, is not
enough in a system where a
person is considered innocent
until proven guilty.
Essen freely reveals that his
methods for dismissing the
evidence of these tests are bas-
ed on the complex maze of
regulations which surround
their application, adding that
another drawback in the
system is that "there is no ef-
fective means for testing
drugs in the system unless
there has been a serious acci-
dent, or if the driver is
unconscious."
This is due to the fact that
urine tests are not time
specific, and a blood test can-
not be administered unless the
driver is unconscious or if the
other driver has been maimed
or killed. And there is no law
which expressly prohibits driv-
ing while impaired by a drug
taken on a prescription.
Essen, who has often been
depicted in the media as
gleefully taking advantage of
these legal oversights, speaks
about them with a combination
of irony and annoyance. He
may be skillful at manipulating
the red tape which surrounds
the chemical and physical
tests, but he also argues about
the validity of their results.
"THE STATISTICS show
that 90 percent of everyone
convicted of drunk driving is a
problem drinker," says Essen.
"Denial plays a very large part
in alcoholism, and the very
nature of alcohol impairs
reasoning. People don't intend
to go out, get drunk, and then
drive home. They intend to
have a drink or two.
"When I accept a client who
appearstorje.antdeohohe.-I in-
sist that he rrfust'eriter a treat- '
ment program. I have a list of
programs, and will even place
them. Society benefits more by
people being in those pro-
grams than by their being
punished."
Essen is not one to criticize
the system without offering an
alternative solution to the pro-
blem. His solution is a simple
one, so simple it seems to
almost have escaped notice: If
you can't stop them from
drinking, stop them fron
driving.
"JAIL IS not a deterrent to
a drunk driver. But the
suspension of his driver's
license is. On a first conviction,
I would suspend the person's
license indefinitely, until he
enrolled in a program and was
able to demonstrate to the
court that alcohol would no
longer be a factor in his
driving.
"Social drinkers could pro-
bably complete the program
very quickly, display their
competency to the court, and
drive again. But alcoholics
would need a year in all pro-
bability if they ever got
their licenses back at all. As it
is right now, alcoholics only
need to complete a three-day
school, which they can com-
plete so quickly that they can
drive away from the court
after the trial."
Another suggestion that

Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Passover Dinner
AtTheMayfair Grill.
Celebrate a tradituMi.il
I'.issover Dinner with your loved ones
at The Mayfair Grill
Monday. April 13 From f> p.m.
Rabbi Dr. Emmet Allen Frank officiating.
Passover Buffet Dinner:
Matzo Ball Soup
("hopped Chicken Livers
Creamed I lerring
Gefilte lish with Horseradish Sauce
Brisket of Beef with Natural lun.es
Roasted ("hit.ken with Matzo Fruit Dressing
( arrot T/immes
Browned New Potatoes
Julienne of Fresh Vegetables
Whole Green Beans
Tomato and Green Pepper Salad
Cranberry and Orange Salad
Assorted Passover Desserts
Red and White Kosher Wine
Coffee, Tea, Brewed Decaffeinated
Price $25. Children 12 and under, $15. Under 4 free.
Tax and gratuities not included.
Complimentary valet parking.
Reservations 441-0000, Ext. 3236.
at MAYFAIR HOUSE
hotel grand luxe
In the World of Mayfair
3000 Florida Avenue
Coconut Grove, Miami, Florida
6

Prof. Meir Wilchek (above), a biophysicist at Israel's Weizmann
Institute of Science, and Prof Pedro Cuatrecasas, an American
biochemist at Duke University, have been awarded the -prestigious
Wolf Foundation Prize in Medicine for 1987. Prof. Wilchek and
Prof. Cuatrecasas will share a $100,000 prize for their 'invention
and development of affinity chromotography and its application
to biomedical sciences.' This new technique will have significant
impact on the removal of toxins from the blood and the delivery of
therapeutic agents to specific organs.
Essen offers is that blood tests
be administered right on the
scene. Essen disseminates his
views in his column, "Essen's
corner," in the DWI Journal,
in his lectures and his two-hour
Continued on Page 12-A
Spring Break '
for Senior <*S
. Citizens] v^
Now, let SeaEscape take you on a day cruise
for just $69.
Our price includes port charges,
three generous meals, and round-
trip motorcoach transportation
from numerous locations in
Broward, Dade and Palm Beach
Counties including all major hotels.
Our Senior's fare, 55 years and
older is normally $89. But for the
months of April, May and June
we're giving Senior Citizens a
Spring Break. We've reduced this
price to a low $69. Every departure,
seven days a week, subject to space
availability.
SeaEscape departs Miami every day
at 8:30 a.m., spend the afternoon
in Freeport/Lucaya and return to
Miami at 11:00 p.m. You'll get all
the magic of a longer cruise in just
one day. Dine and dance. Relax by
the pool. Play bingo. Take in the
SeaEscape revue. Big band every
Monday. You can do as much or
as little as you like.
And when your club or homeowners
association books a group of 40 or
more, we'll take $5 more off each
fare and provide a special motor-
coach to/from most points of your
choice in Broward, Dade or Palm
Beach Counties.
So don't miss our special Senior
Citizen's Spring Break. See your
travel agent today or call SeaEscape
at 1-800-432-0900 or in Dade
County, 379-0000. SeaEscape
accepts American Express, Visa
and MasterCard.
^
South Florida's only daily one-day
cruise to the Bahamas.
l987Sfcx.pel.id
Ship'vKcgii-iry, Hahanu*


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 10, 1987
Vandalized Monument
Rededicated After Ex-JWV Chief UeateJ
DELRAY BEACH
A monument to
Jewish war veterans, van-
dalized here in January, was
rededicated March 29, three
days after Murray
Hymowitz, past commander
of Jewish War Veterans
Post 266, was badly beaten
by anti-Semitic assailants.
The Palm Beach County
Sheriffs Office said it had no
leads yet on the assault or the
vandalism. Hymowitz, 74, who
stands five-foot-five inches and
weighs 160 pounds, described
his assailants as three white
men in their mid-20's, two of
whom held him while the third
pummeled him after he left a
meeting of his veterans post at
a shopping plaza in nearby
Kings Point.
THEY SHOUTED anti-
Semitic epithets while beating
him and fled when an uniden-
tified passerby approached.
According to Louis Shure,
Palm Beach County regional
director of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, there has been a 68 rr
cent increase in anti-SeiS
attacks on .lows and JeS
property .n Florida in the i
year "Murray's beating A
far the worst," Shure said '
In the absence of clues, U
police could find no connect
between the attack 0
Hymowitz and the vandal
who toppled the six-foot-iS
grey granite monument
crowned by a Star of David, i,
the Veterans Park here thre.
$1600S ag' Repa'rs cos
"^
AP/Wide World Photo
Col. Avien Sella has resigned as commander of the Israeli Tel Nof
Air Base. In a brief statement, Sella reiterated that he did not
believe he made a mistake in recruiting U.S. Navy analyst
Jonathan Pollard to spy for Israel. Sella also declared that he was
resigning 'for the good of the country.' The United States this
week removed its boycott against Tel Nof, which it instituted
earlier in protest against Sellas appointment as Base com-
mander despite his implication in the Pollard spy scandal.
Israel Bonds Takes Low Profile
In Wake of Pollard Spy Case
TEL AVTV (JTA) The Israel Bonds Organization
has taken a low profile in the U.S. since exposure of the
Jonathan Pollard spy case, its world president Yehuda
Helevy disclosed Monday.
HALEVY TOLD Israel Radio that the Pollard affair
would cause a temporary suspension of Bonds activity
among non-Jewish organizations including commercial
firms, banks and pension funds. Those bodies are said to ac-
count for 30-35 percent of annual Bonds sales in the U.S.
Halevy said at the opening of the Bonds conference in
Haifa that a record $603 million worth of Israel Bonds were
sold last year.
PASSOVER
GREETINGS
FROM DELTA
AIRLINES
Delta Air Lines and its 48,000 professionals
extend best wishes to you and your family.
May your Passover season be filled with happiness.
1987 Delta Air Lines ,1m
1545 COLLINS AVE.
HOLIDAY PACKAGE
April 13 thru April 24
12 DAYS and 11 NIGHTS INCLUDES
3 Kosher Meals Daily
Nightly Entertainment
Dally Social Activities
Dally Religious Services
$693
00
Fresh Water Swimming
Facilities
Sightseeing Tours
Welcome Gift
Per Parson
Double Occupancy
Tax-NTIplncl.
CALL FOR RESERVATIONS 531-7381
"We Welcome You Like FAMILY...
; / and Treat You ROYALLY!"
PACKAGE SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY
Israel Histadrut Foundation
Cordially Invites You To Attend
ISRAEL'S 39th BIRTHDAY PARTY
Wednesday, April 29th, 1987 1:00 P.M.
at the Konover Hotel Miami Beach
J7
PROGRAM

EMIL COHEN
Renowned Humorist...

HON. RAHAMIM TIMOR
Consul General of Israel
Special Address by our own
DR. SOL STEIN
Chairman
RABBI MORTON MALA VSKY
Unique Musical Program
by
CANTOR YEHUDA SCHIFFMAN
of Temple Emanu-El with
accompanying 3 Piece Band
and...
A special presentation of $150 checks to CHAI ANNUITANTS
531-8702 Dade
COUVERT: $5.00 R S V P 462-5740 Broward


Bright Light in Or Akiva
Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Main Street Named Stanley C. Myers Blvd.
Continued from Page 1-A
hosted by Charles and Sandy
Simons, formerly of Miami,
and now residents of Caesana.
Each year, the Federation
budgets about $400,000 for
various projects in Miami s
twin city. Then the delegation
visits to see the progress that
is made and to discuss plans
for the future year.
NOT ONLY has Or Akiva
developed pride. The Miami
community "should take great
pride in the contributions it
has made to Or Akiva and its
population," said Myers, chair-
man of the committee and first
president of the Federation.
"An educational program
funded for the first time last
year is showing extraordinary
progress," Myers said. "When
the study was made of educa-
tional programs in Or Akiva
several years ago it was found
that student achievement was
far below the national average.
The special education program
was initiated last year, and the
achievement level of the school
population is climbing."
The Federation budgeted
about $130,000 for the educa-
tion project last year.
Past projects included con-
struction of a dental center
and daycare centers, and
Myers said it was exciting for
the delegation to see these pro-
grams now in operation.
PROJECT RENEWAL, a
program of comprehensive
neighborhood rehabilitation,
was announced in 1977 as a
joint effort of the Government
of Israel and the Jewish Agen-
cy for Israel. The goal of the
project was the social and
physical rehabilitation of 160
distressed neighborhoods,
thnughout the country, at a
cost of $1.2 billion.
Th? Miami Federation chose
Or Akiva. a city of about 8,000
residents, consisting mostly of
Nuclear
Energy Confab
GENEVA -(JTA) Israel
is participating in the first
United Nations conference on
peaceful uses of nuclear
energy The Israeli delegation
to the conference which ends
Friday is headed by Hannan
Baron, former deputy director
general of the Foreign
Ministry. Ambassador Moham-
med Ibrahim Shaker, the
Egyptian representative to the
United Nations here, was
elected president of the
conference.
immigrants from Rumania,
Iraq, Yemen and North Africa.
It is located between Tel Aviv
and Haifa and is adjacent to
the city of Caesarea.
Myers said this year's trip
was especially rewarding.
"You could see it in the eyes
of the children who are par-
ticipating in the special educa-
tion program. You could see
the pride in the eyes of the
residents of Or Akiva, in the
cleanliness of the streets.
'/THE POPULATION'S
pride in their community has
increased. More people leaving
rather than coming to the com-
munity has stopped, and
juvenile delinquency has
decreased. Last year, we plan-
ned with the municipality to
have an entrance to the city.
Now there are signs and a
beautiful entrance to the city
in which people are taking
pride," Myers said. Accompa-
nying Myers on the recent trip
to Or Akiva and Jerusalem
were Dr. Morton Teicher,
Ralph Chernin and Michael
Rassler.
"There has been a real warm
feeling that has been
developed between the people
of Or Akiva and the Jewish
population of Greater Miami,"
Myers said. Three or four
times a year, when the Federa-
tion sends missions to Israel,
they are especially welcomed
in Or Akiva, he added.
One of the major problems in
Or Akiva that is yet to be solv-
ed is economic development,
Myers said.
"THERE ARE very few in
dustrial programs providing
employment for the local
residents," he said. "One of
the goals is to assist in the
economic development of Or
Akiva so that the unemployed
can be trained in different
vocations and employed in
local industries.
"This year, the delegation
reviewed economic develop-
ment programs and will report
to the Miami community on
the feasibility of such pro-
jects," Myers said.
Other programs the delega-
tion took note of include the
Youth Alienation Program and
the community centers and the
improvement of environmen-
tal quality.
THE DENTAL CLINIC,
funded by the Miami Federa-
tion, provides dental care to
the residents generally, and
elderly indigents and children
in particular, and includes den-
tal education and prevention.
"In all of these areas, the
delegation noted positive
developments, the resulting
self-image improvement and
the increasing pride of the
population in their community.
With all that has been
achieved, Myers concluded,
the Miami community should
take pride that much has been
done but realize that there is
much yet to accomplish.
PLANNING
ON MOVING
TO ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
Call mo. Esther. 635-6554
and let me quote you
rates. Also local moving &
long distance moving
anywhere in the U.S. or
overseas.
A.B. VAN LINES INC.
(of Miami!
Bank Lewi wishes you a joyous
PESSACH
n
0ROWARD
Qaper *
Packaging
FREE DELIVERY FLORIDA
L 1 800 432 3708
QROWARD
Qaper &
Sackaging
bankleumi iwVipjn
Bank Leuan Le-lsrael B.M.
Head Office:
24-32 Yehudi Halev. St
Tel Aviv 65546
Tel: (03)632111
Telex 33586 LEUMIIL
Miami Agency
407 Lincoln Road Mall
Sun 7B
Miami Beach, FL 33139
Tel: (305)531-3378/9
Telex: 153522
New York* Montreal Zurich Buenos Aires Curacao
I/m Angeles* London Geneva Sao Paulo Johannesburg
Encino* Leeds Frankfurt a/M Santiago, Chr* Hongkong
Miami Paris Milan Mexico City Melbourne
Chicago* PMadHphia* Marseille Antwerp Panama City
Strasbourg Montevideo Cayman Islands
Toronto Lyon PuntadeiEste Caracas
Member FDIC With over 400 branches and offices worldwide


Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 10, 1987
*
Can A Reconstructionist
Rabbi Go Too Far?
Continued from Page 5-A
Susan Schnur, who was or-
dained from the RRC in 1982.
She said she found the RRC
memo and cover letter from
Dr. Arthur Green, president of
the RRC, an "overwrought
and overdone response."
THE RECONSTRUC-
TIONIST movement has
"always worried about its im-
age," suffering from being
perceived as fuzzy in its
beliefs, with "no black and
white credo like the other
branches," said Schnur. This
latest incident, and the faculty
response, will only add to that
perception, she believes.
While Schnur felt that this
particular issue reflected
"some unresolved views on
homosexuality in the move-
ment," now that the RRC
policy accepts avowed
homosexuals as rabbinical
students, faculty members
strongly disagreed, asserting,
as one put it, that "homosex-
uality has little to do with
theology."
Rabbi David Teutsch, direc-
tor of admissions at RRC and a
member of the faculty, noted
that the process of innovation
involves taking risks. He
characterized Litman as a
"very, very strong feminist
who is not highly modulated in
her views, and who is ex-
perimental in using varying
forms of God language." Some
of this experimentation is ex-
cessive, he said, "which is
characteristic of
experimentation.
HE DEFENDED
Reconstructionism as
courageous and willing to stay
on the cutting edge. "Part of
what this movement is about is
struggling with tradition while
looking ahead to the future,"
said Teutsch. "In this fast-
changing world, I would rather
that we sometimes err on the
side of innovation and then
back up, if necessary, then
have it the other way around."
Rabbi Jacob Staub, chair-
man of the RRC faculty and
editor of the Reconstructionist
magazine, acknowledged that
leaders of the movement "are
in a risky business in trying to
break new ground on many
fronts. We're always talking
about limits and standards,
because they are open ques-
tions." He explained that
"there are no absolutes in our
movement," noting that
"unless you are strictly Or-
thodox, you don't have boun-
daries but are constantly mak-
ing new decisions." According
to Staub, Reconstructionists
are "committed to Jewish
tradition without being com-
mitted to a system of mitzvot,
so inevitably it's a matter of
close choices and an ongoing
process of experimentation.
"We're committed to the
process as a limit rather than
the content," he added.
Ira Silverman, former presi-
dent of the RRC and now
director of the 92nd Street
YMHA in New York, asserted
that the RRC is "a fascinating
and wonderful place" because
it is always exploring new
limits "and sometimes that
makes it very tough." But he
believes that "ad hoc deci-
sions" are the only practical
way to deal with limits because
Reconstructionists "are not
about to create a new constitu-
tion or new Halachas."
DWI Defense Attorney Essen
Really Has A Heart
Continued from Page 9-A
video, "The Defense of Drunk
Drivers: An Expert's Ap-
proach." In typically con-
tradictory fashion, Essen has
seen to it that the proceeds
from the video go towards the
rehabilitation of alcoholics.
IS THIS all for image, or
does the bad boy of barristers
really have a heart? Does he
believe in what he is doing, or
are his reasons merely
justifications for an extremely
lucrative branch of the law?
"My own special corner of
hell," says Essen, "is my
Univ. Students
Go on Strike
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
About 80,000 university
students went on strike to pro-
test government plans to raise
tuition fees. Several thousand
massed outside the Prime
Minister's Office in what
began as a peaceful
demonstration and ended in a
violent clash with police.
The students said they are
prepared to pay the equivalent
of $800 a year. Education
Minister Yitzhak Navon has
proposed tuition slightly in ex-
cess of that amount.
children being hit by a drunk
driver. I'm quite sure that I
would never defend a drunk
driver again, not because I
would feel that I had done
something wrong, but because
I would have lost my
objectivity.
"But I hope that the driver
would have the best defense
lawyer available, because
without that we wouldn't have
a democracy."
"The worst kind of dictator-
ship," concludes Essen, his
characteristic joviality gone,
"is the dictatorship of the ma-
jority, because it carries so
much moral weight with it.
The reaction in the 1980's to
drunk driving is a good thing,
but we can't let the pendulum
swing out of control.'
THERE ARE many people
who dislike Richard Essen.
There are many people, in-
cluding his own daughter, who
would like to see him doing
something else with his con-
siderable talents. But the ques-
tion remains, whom do we
want to defend the drunk
drivers, the murderers and the
professional criminals?
And if the answer is no one,
or no one very skillful, do we
find ourselves living in a dic-
tatorship of the majority?
In any case, Richard Essen
will probably continue keeping
drunk drivers out of jail for a
long while to come.
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E. 1st Avenue, Miami, Florida
Alka- Seltzer
RANI
12's
FLAVORED
Alka-Seltzer
12's
Alka Seltzer
' IFFEITVCSCEMT AMTATIO
'. ft MIN if l II VI
V- llUfcl'SMtfOMCXS
YOUR
CHOICE
s1.39
Alka-Seltzer
* PUVtSLFNT ANTACID
4 MIN MLIKVi.il
1 l?TABIf TSINMOH ilUXS
AMMENS
Medicated
Powder
AMMENS ) 11 OZ.
$2.39
NUPRIN
Analgesic Tablets
SAFEGUARD
Deodorant Soap
CERTS
Assorted
5 Pack
1.19
DATRIL
Extra Strength
Analgesic Tablets
30's
$1.99
4 WAY
Nasal Spray
to
Menthol
1oz.
s3.79
...Delivers more
softness than other dryer-added sheets
40 USE
BOX $
ONLY
2.29
DOWNY
Fabric
Softener
33 oz.
1.29
BAN
Roll-On
Anti-Perspirant
| Deodorant
Regular
Unscented
Powder
Fresh
1.5 oz.
1.89
BUFFERIN
Extra Strength
Analgesic Tablets
100's
$4.99
SHOUT
22 oz.
1.59
jm FUTURE
Acrylic
Floor
Polish
27 oz.
s3.29
FREE
MAJqjHIMS
COUPON*
> BY MAIL
PROVEN PROTECTION
mmiimiim
PADS AND PANTYSHELDS
HIRE'S HOW 1
FREE MAXITHINS
OR PANTY SHIELDS
COUPON IV MAIL
CHEWELS
Chcwcls.-,
CHOMJCIS .- ,
Cheiutls ,-. ,
Cheiwls ,
Sugarless
Gum
5Pak
89$
STICKLETS
01
^n
smuts______V__y
Natural
Flavor
Gum
45 Stick
Pak
99$
FLEX NET
Aerosol
Hair Spray
Unscented
Extra Hold
7oz.99c
FORMULA 405
Light Texture
Moisturizer
2.25oz.S7.19
4.5 oz. M1-69
Cream
2oz.s5.99
Moisturizing Lotion
4oz.s5.59
PLEDGE
Aerosol
Or
Trigger
14oz.


Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
It Takes A Lot of Drive
To Make Successful Changes
MEETING IN MOSCOW: British Prime
Minister Margaret Thatcher (left) meets
(March SI) with 1975 Nobel Peace Prize-
winner Andrei Sakharov and his wife, Yelena
Banner. Since his release from internal exile
AP/Wide World Photo
in Gorky for dissident activities, Sakharov
has expressed vocal support for the new
'glasnost' policy of Soviet leader Mikhail Gor-
bachev.
Says
Shamir
I Hope Peres Fails in Spain
Continued from Page 1-A
an international conference.
"Politically, we will certainly
discuss the process of peace,
how to continue it, how to
develop it, how to enlarge it,
and what role Spain can play in
it," Peres said.
Only a few hours earlier,
Shamir was telling the Israel
Bond leaders that "Anyone
aiming for true peace and for
real progress toward this goal
should make it abundantly
clear that such a (interna-
tional) peace conference will
take us further away from
peace and hurt the chances of
achieving it."
THE INCIDENT had reper-
cussions at Sunday's Cabinet
meeting where Minister
Without Portfolio Ezer Weiz-
man, standing in for Peres
while he is abroad, demanded a
debate there and then on the
subject. Shamir refused.
Weizman observed that this
was the first time in Israel's
history that a Prime Minister
hoped for the failure of a
Foreign Minister on a mission
abroad. He accused Shamir of
undermining the govern-
ment's image at home and
overseas.
Shamir responded that he
did not oppose Peres' visit to
Europe but only his endeavors
for an international con-
ference. He said he wished
Peres well on everything else.
Peres said before his depar-
ture that in addition to the
Middle East peace process,
Israel and Spain "still have to
settle some differences concer-
ning the Common Market" of
which Spain as a member com-
petes with Israel's exports to
the European Economic Com-
munity (EEC), mainly citrus
and citrus products.
"Culturally, I think the
cultural ties (between Israel
and Spain) have developed
quite impressively," Peres
said. He said he planned to
visit Toledo "which used to be
a center of Jewish life, so there
will be an historic flavor to this
visit."
AFTER VISITING Spain,
Peres will go to Rome for a
meeting of the Socialist Inter-
national where the Middle
East peace process will also be
discussed. As head of Israel's
Labor Party, Peres is a
member of the Socialist
International.
Peres' latest feud with
Shamir drew the attention of
Egyptian President Hosni
Mubarak. He told a Kuwaiti
newspaper interviewer in
Cairo Saturday that what
Peres had to say carries more
weight than Shamir's
remarks.
"Listen to what he (Peres)
says and don't attach any im-
portance to Shamir's declara-
tions," Mubarak said. He also
observed that Israel and the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion would have to negotiate
directly to settle their
differences.
The newspaper Al-Rai Al-
Am quoted Mubarak as saying,
"Direct negotiations, whether
one likes it or not, are in-
evitable at some stage. Carrier
pigeons intermediaries
will not suffice."
Continued from Page 4-A
debate and disagreement
within the Russian Jewish
family about leaving the
known for the unknown. They
receive letters from kin in
Israel telling of the hardships
of life which the Israeli accepts
as part of it.
THEY RECEIVE letters
from brethren in America tell-
ing of the two sided coin of
freedom: freedom to succeed,
but freedom to fail, with no
guarantees. Hard for one rais-
ed in the strict structure of
Russian society to grasp.
In conflict and in little har-
mony, the next great Exodus
could be upon us. Here in the
safety of our community, here
with our strained budgets and
capacity work forces, will
there be a debate about the
Russian Jews coming? Oh, I
think so. Most communities
did not have a great success
ratio the last time around.
There will be debate in
Israel, too. But not about the
Russians coming. They are
Jews, they are needed. They
will be welcome. As to where
to put them and how, the
debate will be a great one. Not
in harmony but in accep-
tance. And eventually, in joy.
NEXT WEEK, as the Begin
family sits down to Seder
the father, Menachem,
distinguished founder; the
daughters; the son, Ben Zev
Begin; the grandchildren I
wonder what thoughts will
wander through the old man's
mind? Thoughts of taking a lit-
tle bread and watery soup
when he was a Russian
prisoner? Thoughts of the first
Seder in Palestine when he
was underground? Thoughts of
the future and what would
Seder be like in Israel 10, 20
years thence.
We will look around at our
children, at our children's
children and wonder the same
thing. There will be giggling at
the table, there will be, in all
probability, argument and
debate. Family is like that
yours, mine, the family of the
Jewish people. We were a na-
tion not born of harmony. We
are a nation so diverse, so
vibrant, we couldn't be. We
will debate, we will disagree,
but in harmony we will have
the four questions asked and
answered. The operational
word is "different" that's
us. Thank God.
8 Terrorists
Arrested
PARIS (JTA) French
counter-intelligence has ar-
rested eight men believed to be
terrorists planning to blow up
El Al and TWA airliners. The
police have refused to pinpoint
the date of the arrests and said
that one of the group was a
Lebanese, another a Fren-
chman known for his pro-
Palestinian leanings, and the
rest "came from the Middle
East."
Police say that documents
found at the time of the arrests
show that the group was also
planning to carry out in-
dividual attacks against
various Israeli personalities in
France as well as against Arab
representatives considered by
them as "hostile to the Palesti-
nian cause."
Police have found three hand
grenades and an unspecified
amount of explosives and are
searching for additional
weapons which, they say, the
group has hidden in the vicini-
ty of Paris.
Spanish Confused by Israel's
Policy on Mideast Peace Talks
By EDWIN EYTAN
MADRID (JTA) -
Israeli Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres met for over
f hour with King Juan
^arlos at the Zarzuela
Palace Monday and said
afterwards that "His Majes-
ty has promised to do what
Je can to help peace in the
Middle East.**
But Spanish officials are
Puzzled by what they see as a
strange dichotomy within the
"raei, government over how
Peace in the region should be
Pursued.
Peres, here on a two-day of-
Jjal visit, the first by an
sraeh Foreign Minister since
"pan and Israel established
J'Plomatic relations more than
J? ^ made clear he was
Peking S
international conference for
Middle East peace.
BUT THE Israel govern-
ment's position on this issue is
"far from clear," a senior
Spanish diplomat, Am-
bassador Jorge Dezcaller, told
Israeli correspondents at a
briefing Monday. Dezcaller,
who heads the Foreign
Ministry's Middle East depart-
ment, said, "We are puzzled by
the Israeli government. On the
one hand, Foreign Minister
Peres advocates a peace pro-
cess. On the other, Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir has
informed our Ambassador of
his opposition to the plan."
Nevertheless, Prime
Minister Felipe Gonzalez, who
had a three-hour meeting with
Peres Monday, pledged that
panish support for an Continued on Page 15-A
"..-''
Omni
International Hotel
Miami
We're on Biscayne Blvd.
at 16th Street, Miami.
Call 374-0000. Extension 302.
Miami's Largest Banquet Facility
Just Glatt Kosher*
'he Omni International Hotel
proudly announces our new,
complete glatt kosher kitchen, the
only one of its kind in downtown
Miami. So now, along with Miami's
largest ballroom and a variety of
versatile banquet and meeting rooms,
the Omni has the finest glatt kosher
catering facilities. For bar mitzvahs,
weddings, parties and special
occasions. Whether your affair is
small or a cast of thousands. L'chaim!


':/*
Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 10, 1987
Soviet Jewish Emigration Hope
Heats Up U.S. Leaders' Enmity
Continued from Page 2-A
Affairs, who visited the U.S. in
October at Schneier's invita-
tion an unprecedented such
visit; and even briefly with
Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev.
ON WEDNESDAY (April
1), Schneier responded tc
JTA's inquiry by reiterating
that he had indeed been
responsible for the negotia-
Morris Abrams
Edgar Bronfman
Rabbi Arthur Schneier
tions, and that he had briefed
Abram on them on his return
from Moscow. Schneier gave,
however, no number of Jews
who would be permitted to
leave, but said that "the first
part is the clearing up of all
refuseniks."
ON SUNDAY (March 29),
Abram told JTA that he and
Bronfman had returned from
Moscow in an "optimistic"
mood regarding Soviet Jewry,
but "it would not be produc-
tive at this time to go into
details."
However, on Tuesday
(March 31), a day after
Schneier disclosed in the
Times what he accomplished in
the Soviet Union, Abram pro-
vided the media with details of
his and Bronfman's talks in
Moscow.
What was new this time
were some apparent
discrepancies in reported
statements by Abram to
various news mediums. The
Washington Post on Tuesday
quoted him as saying that he
and Bronfman went to
Moscow in official capacity "on
behalf of major Jewish
organizations in the United
States and other Western
countries." He said the same
in a printed statement given to
the JTA Tuesday. However,
an Israel Radio report quoted
him as saying that he was not
in Moscow in any official
capacity.
IN ADDITION, Abram said
in his statement to the JTA
that the Soviets had made
specific agreements. But in his
Radio Israel interview he said
merely that Bronfman and he
"have reason to believe that
there will be direct flights .
increase in immigration .
and an expansion of Jewish
rights within the Soviet
Union,."
Abram also expressed regret
in his statement for "the
premature publication of
statements by other persons
who were not involved in their
discussions and who hold no
representative office in the
Jewish community." The
"other persons" were not
identified but it presumably
referred to Schneier, who was
interviewed in The New York
Times on Monday.
Abram, in the statement to
JTA, said his and Bronfman's
aim, "was to get the 'Jewish
problem off the table so as to
remove it as an issue of
contention.' "
Reactions followed
immediately.
THE STICKING point for
various Soviet Jewry organiza-
tions were media reports that
the Soviet Union would allow
11,000-12,000 Jews to leave in
the next 9-12 months, without
any indication of how many
would be allowed to leave an-
nually after that. There are
some 380,000 Jews who are
seeking to leave the USSR, ac-
cording to Soviet Jewry ac-
tivists in the U.S. and Israel.
Neither Abram, Bronfman nor
Schneier gave any number of
Jews who would be permitted
to leave.
Glenn Richter, national coor-
dinator of the Student Strug-
gle for Soviet Jewry, pointed
out that even if the Soviets ac-
tually allowed 11,000-12,000
Jews to leave annually, "At
this rate it would take 34-V2
years for all of them to leave."
The SSSJ maintains that
flexibility in Jackson-Vanik
must be accompanied by
specific conditions, including a
"free process of emigration"
that is "routine and institu-
tionalized, free from harass-
ment," with an annual figure
of 60,000, "to which the
Kremlin agreed during the
1974 Congressional debate on
the Amendment." In addition,
the SSSJ asks for release of
Prisoners Of Conscience from
labor camps to Israel, with a
pledge of no more prisoners,
and cessation of harassment of
unofficial teachers of Hebrew
and Judaism.
PAMELA COHEN, presi
dent of the Union of Councils
of Soviet Jews (UCSJ), was
angry that Abram had claimed
to represent them. "We did
not know that Abram was in
the Soviet Union," she said,
"until we heard it from our
sources there. We have had no
input in this, nor have the peo-
ple we're talking about."
She was equally incensed by
Officials of the Simon Wiesenthal Center met
recently in Bonn with West German
Chancellor Helmut Kohl (left). At the top of
their agenda was discussion of a list of UU
alleged Nazi war criminals believed to be liv-
ing in West Germany, which the Center had
transmitted to the German government late
last year. Other issues touched on by Rabbi
Marvin Hier (right), dean of the Center, dur-
ing their meeting were international ter-
rorism, Soviet Jewry, the unresolved case of
Raoul Wallenberg, and the controversy ow r a
proposed 'War Memorial' slated to be con,
structed in the Federal Republic's capital city.
talk of waiving the Jackson-
Vanik Amendment: "Why are
we discussing Jackson-Vanik
when there is no movement on
the part of the Soviets?" she
asked. "One of the reasons
that the UCSJ came out in
1979 against Jackson-Vanik
was that we knew that the ap-
paratus was closing. I was in
Odessa in 1979 and I saw them
closing down the OVIR offices
from five to two days a week."
Regarding the number of
refuseniks, Cohen said that
"the minimum number that we
can talk about is 50,000 for
whom you can use the word
refuseniks. The 11,000 may be
long-term refuseniks."
Schneier, in talking about the
numbers, said it refers to the
list of refuseniks given by
Secretary of State George
Shultz to Gorbachev at his
summit conference with Presi-
dent Reagan in Reykjavik last
year.
COHEN ALSO said the
Union was also tremendously
upset by the proposal to
eliminate the option to chose
one's country of destination,
which has been enabled at the
Vienna and Rome transit
camps. "One should be ab-
solutely free to choose where
he will go," Cohen said.
Besides, "If we are dealing
with direct flights to Israel, at
some point politically in the
Mideast negotiations and
Mideast powerplay, Soviet
client states will put pressure
on the Soviet government to
clamp down on them, and if
this arises, if that time coin-
cides with a period of repres-
sion and anti-Semitism, like
the first two years under the
Gorbachev regime, we have
closed the escape outlet to the
U.S.
"We have to start fighting
for the hearts and minds of
Continued on Page 15-A
When you're not quite ready
to go home ...ive can help.
The Miami Jewish Home &
Hospital for the Aged at Douglas
Gardens now offers the finest
short-term rehabilitation available
featuring:
the latest in rehabilitative and
diagnostic equipment and
individual therapy;
kosher meals and the full
spectrum of social and medical
services of the Miami Jewish
Home;
professional, skilled care in our
new, separate 4()-bed
rehabilitation center.
full courtesy privileges for private
physicians
At the Harold and Patricia Toppel
Rehabilitation Center...
W
We can help you come home.
For lurther information i wiitaci me Admiiunq Office at (305) 751-8626 ei 211 Of write 151 NE 52nd Street
Miami FL 33137
The Harold and Patricia Toppei Rehabilitation Centerfunded m pan by a grant Irom the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation


Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
Soviet Jewish
Heats Up U.S.
Continued from Page 14-A
Imerican Jewry," Cohen
ressed. "They must unders-
and that this issue is very
omplicated."
Richter also pointed out that
ther conditions must be con-
idered, which Abram and
Ironfm'an apparently did not:
The Kremlin did not promise
, keep the Gulag free of
ewish prisoners, nor to raise
lebrew teaching to the official
fatus of so many other ethnic
luages in the USSR. "The
rivate teaching of language is
modification announced by
ie Soviets several months
ro. Permission to import
'wish books would be an ex-
insion of the display of
lousands of different Jewish
ties at Moscow book fairs go-
g back to 1977."
RICHTER ALSO said that
lother consideration is that
\nti-Jewish attacks in the
jviet media and books must
id. There was no promise
at the stench of official anti-
mitism in the electronic and
inted mediums would
ase."
Asked who speaks for Soviet
ws, Lynn Singer, a past
esident of the UCSJ and ex-
utive director of the Long
and Committee for Soviet
wry, a member organization
the UCSJ, said emphatically
at "Soviet Jews should
jak for themselves. But in
ht of the fact that they are
t able to talk in one voice to
e West directly, the Union of
mncils is probably more tun-
in to the needs of Soviet
ra than anyone else. But we
Ive not been appointed or an-
inted, now has anyone else.
'That job belongs to the
ishiach. and since the world
s done an excellent job of
tiding Jews, then the
;esman for Jews has not
arrived."
'I THINK that the
sumptuousness of the self-
(pointed would-be Jewish
ders is frightening," said
Shamir, Arens
Big Winners
I Continued from Page 1-A
petition that opened here in
Ni, 1986 but broke up in
Jaos after two days, before
|y ballots were cast, because
|a determined effort by Levy
I unseat Shamir.
AT THAT TIME, Levy had
packing of Sharon. At the
of the convention, he bit-
f y accused the Shamir,
von and Arens camps of
ging up" on him and his
PPorters. He insisted that
[W percent was a vote of
JWience, a claim derided by
rwure opponents for party
idership. F '
Hjmir appealed for party
E.PM an end to petty
PJJles.In fact, he mention-
W 26 times in his brief
Png speech to the
fWW, and the words "uni-
loed1 "d,emocracy" were
EL endlessly by other
XSt Herut- indeed, was
f ^congratulatory mood,
Cy completed its once-
L*: convention with
Rer P^iamentary
ope
ity
Singer, adding that "the
40-member councils of the UC-
SJ were not consulted by the
NCSJ" although the UCSJ has
asked to talk to them many
times.
Schneier, asked who speaks
for Soviet Jews, responded: "I
think that the issue of Soviet
Jews is of such great concern
for every Jewish leader and
the Jewish community all over
the world that you certainly
have many people committted
to the cause. We have leaders
who have a great sense of com-
mitment to raise the plight of
Soviet Jewry."
Schneier also said that he
believes that in the case of
Soviet Jews whose families are
in the U.S. and who wish to be
united with them here, that ar-
rangements could be made by
the families in the U.S. apply-
ing with the U.S. government
for refugee status for them.
Most particularly, in the case
of cancer patients whose
families are in the U.S., he
spoke of "preferential visas"
for sick people issued by the
U.S. "Sick people wuld be able
to apply for entry to the U.S.
based on compassion,"
Schneier believes.
THE ROUTING through
Rumania to Israel, said
Schneier, "was just a general
principle that was approved.
All the questions raised are
legitimate questions that have
to be addressed. But first,
there has to be a resolution of
all the Jewish community."
Schneier cautioned on the
need for all Jews and Soviet
Jewry activists to close ranks
and move together in a united
front.
He told JTA that he refused
to cast any aspersion on any
Jewish leader or to engage in
divisiveness. "I would urge
that Jews join ranks and let's
move forward," he said. "It is
a historic time, and there are
many opportunities. Let's face
it," he said, "changes are tak-
ing place in the Soviet Union.
This is no time to have friction
within. We have to sit down
together and talk this over."
Prof. Martin Gilbert of Ox-
ford University, the
biographer of Winston Chur-
chill and an author of many
books on Soviet Jews, as well
as advisory board member of
the UCSJ and strong activist
for Soviet Jews in England,
told the JTA in an exclusive
telephone interview from Lon-
don that "At this time of
change and controversy, one
must never lose sight of the
true dimensions of the Soviet
Jewry problem, not only the
12,000 known refuseniks, but
the 382,000 Jews who have
already indicated their desire
to leave, and whose number
grows every day.
"NO DEAL or arrangement
with the Soviet authorities is
worthy of the Jewish people in
the free world, which does not
establish without conditions
the right of any Jew to leave
Russia who might wish to do
so, now or in the future.
"Even those refused on so-
called "secrecy grounds' must
be allowed without exception
to leave within a five- or at
most ten-year period after the
ending of their official work.
The cry 'Let my people go'
must mean 'all nvp people,' or
it means nothing.'
Spanish Confused
Peres-Shamir Rift Worries Them
Continued from Page 13-A
his government would use its
contacts in the Arab world to
see if an international con-
ference can be advanced,
Israeli sources here said. Even
so, Spain and Israel have dif-
ferent conceptions of an inter-
national conference.
Spain believes the Soviet
Union and the Palestinians
should participate. Israelis, at
least those who share Peres'
views, would exclude the
Soviet Union unless it
reestablished diplomatic ties
with Israel. They would accept
Palestinian representatives,
but only those with no connec-
tions to the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization.
IN STATEMENTS to the
press, to Spanish officials and
to representatives of Spain's
13,000-member Jewish com-
munity, Peres spoke of rela-
tions with Moscow. He stress-
ed Israel's current diplomatic
priority is to improve them.
The test of Soviet sincerity will
be its opening of the gates for
all Russian Jews who want to
leave, Peres said.
He called reports that exit
visas would be granted to
11,000-12,000 Jews this year
"a promising start" but far
from satisfactory in view of
the estimated 380,000 seeking
them.
Peres also met Monday with
Foreign Minister Fernando
Ordonez who invited Israel to
participate in the Spanish Na-
tional Exhibition in Seville in
1992, commemorating the
500th anniversary of Colum-
bus' voyage of discovery. He
said a special pavilion would be
devoted to the Jewish con-
tribution to Spanish history
and culture.
PERES, at his meeting with
the King, invited Juan Carlos
to visit Israel "to repair a
500-year-old injustice" the
expulsion of Jews from Spain
in 1492. Juan Carlos reported-
ly replied that he would be hap-
py to visit Israel. But no
definite plans can be made.
Such a visit must be approved
by the government and would
entail lengthy and detailed
preparations.
Traffic
Takes Toll
TEL AVIV (JTA) Traf-
fic accidents took a heavy toll
Sunday. Twenty-one people
were injured when a truck
slammed into a bus at a
highway intersection near
Ashkelon. All were hospitaliz-
ed. Only one passenger was
seriously hurt.
INTRODUCING
EL AL'S JEWISH
HERITAGE TOURS
TO HUNGARY-
CZECHOSLOVAKIA,
POLAND AND ISRAEL
Remember the past, as EL AL takes you back to your roots in
Eastern Europe. You'll be able to tour places like Budapest,
Warsaw and Prague. More important, you'll be able to discover
your heritage. Then, rejoice in the future as EL AL takes you
forward to Israelsymbol of the Jewish spirit reborn.
For more information about EL AL's new Jewish Heritage Tours
to Eastern Europe and Israel, see your travel agent or call EL AL at
1-800-ELAL SUN (1-800-352-5786).
For a free, detailed color brochure, please write:
EL AL ISRAEL AIRLINES
Jewish Heritage lours
850 Third Avenue
New York, NY 10022
I
I
I
I
L
NAMt _
AODKISS,
CITV
siAuyie
JFM-4/10/87
EL'ZMQL'ZM
The Airline of Israel
The airline people believe in.
COME TO ISRAEL. COME STAY WITH FRIENDS.


Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 10, 1987
TABLE
BLESSED
At Passover, your Seder table is blessed with prayers. Family.
And a lifetime of tradition. And assuredly, one of these traditions
is Manischewitz Kosher Wines.
Our wines have been served at Passover meals for generations
because they're made in accordance with strict Orthodox
Rabbinical requirements. Ones that make them as kosher and as
blessed as your Seder.
From all of us at Manischewitz, a happy, zissen Pesach.
m
Canandaigua Wine Company
Kosher Wine
Product of th Manlschewte Wine Co Naples, NY
Kashruth Certificate available upon request


Senior Citizens Can Lead Active Sexual Lives
By ALISA KWITNEY
.7, Floridian Staff Writer
It is hard enough for
children, even grown-up
children, to imagine their
parents having sex. But
when it comes to imagining
their grandparents being
physically intimate, most
peoples' minds draw a
blank.
Yet the fact remains that
many senior citizens can and
do retain their sexuality and
continue to lead active sexual
lives on into their seventies
and beyond.
"Society in general seems to
he under the impression that
upon the receipt of your
medicare card, many other
functions cease also, as if it
were a barter. But it's not
far from it," says Marc
Lichtman, executive director
of the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged.
"WE ARE what we were
when we get older," says
Lichtman. "It just becomes
more exaggerated.
"The difficulty that many of
the guardians of elderly people
have lies in their thinking that
old people need the same per-
mission as teenagers do to
engage in sexual activity. At,
say, age 87 and a half, a person
is most definitely an adult.
"At the Miami Jewish
Homes and Hospital for the
Aged, we have a door-
knocking policy, which means
that prior to entering
somebody's room, our staff
knocks. That room is their
home, and sex does go on. If
the person is physically
capable, we need to insure that
sex can continue in a healthy
environment with privacy
and without censure."
SEX IN the elderly popula-
tion may be expressed more
through acts of gentle physical
intimacy than through inter-
course, according to Lichtman,
who says that "In the frailer
population, the expression of
love might not be consum-
mated in the same way as
when they were younger, but
it is still transmitted to a part-
ner with a look, a touch, a gift
or even a smile."
At the root of the misconcep-
tions held about sex and the
elderly are societal values and
Puritan mores, but these
norms are changing, says
Lichtman.
"We have a more vocal,
educated and aware popula-
tion in the elderly now, who
can express their desires
and their rights," he contends.
ONE OF those rights may be
the right to information about
the physical, psychological and
emotional changes which af-
Marc Lichtman
feet sexuality as a person
grows older. One of the places
where this information is
available is at the Senior Sex-
uality Program run a few
times a year at Hollywood's
Memorial Hospital by Michelle
Cacciatore, a health education
coordinator at the hospital.
The program, which includes
a slideshow and a lecture on
prosthetic devices by a
urologist, covers the myriad
obstacles to sexuality which a
senior citizen may come up
against, such as the lack of role
models in the media, fear of a
second heart attack, lack of
partner availability, health
considerations such as ar-
thritis and cardio-vascular
disease, the censure of family
and society at large, and self-
image.
On the average, states Cac-
ciatore, sex uses up the
amount of energy usually ex-
pended in taking a walk or
cleaning the house, and most
heart attacks occur when peo-
ple are at rest. Furthermore,
she points out, it has been well
documented that 50 to 70 per-
cent of the over-sixty popula-
tion had active sex lives.
POOR BODY IMAGE,
which may be one of the
leading psychological obstacles
for a senior citizen who wishes
to be sexual, has a strong
physical component as well. By
learning the natural
physiological changes which
occur in the body as it ages,
senior citizens can also learn to
accommodate to these altera-
tions in responsiveness, rather
than become alarmed by them.
Changes in women include
diminished lubrication, thinn-
ing of the vaginal walls, pain-
ful uterine contractions accom-
panying orgasm, and shorten-
ing and narrowing of the
vaginal canal. The use of a
lubricating solution and
regular sexual activity are
some of the best actions a
woman can take to insure re-
taining her sexuality. Hor-
mone replacement therapy is
another alternative.
The older man many find
that he is slower to respond,
meaning that it will take more
time for him to achieve an
erection and to ejaculate. His
erections will be softer until
just before ejaculating, and he
will ejaculate less copiously.
The recovery period after
ejaculation may last from 12 to
24 hours or longer. Men are
advised to relax and not
pressure themselves about
performance.
IMPOTENCE, which can be
caused by a variety of factors,
such as the drugs taken to con-
trol high blood pressure, can
be corrected by the use of pro-
sthetic devices, although the
actual act of intercourse is on-
ly a small part of sexuality,
which in the end can he ex-
pressed through alt- ive
methods.
Programs such as the one
led by Michelle Cacciatore can
present senior citizens with a
full range of options, and can
offer moral support for those
who have held insecurities
about their sexuality in rela-
tionship to their changing pat-
terns of sexual responsiveness.
"Sexuality is totally emo-
tional," says Melvin Josephs,
63, one of the attendees at the
Senior Sexuality Program.
JOSEPHS' wife, who pass-
ed away in February, was ill
for five years, during which
time Josephs was celibate.
Now Josephs, who was trained
as a clinical psychologist, has
found that his sex drive has
diminished, partially due to his
period of abstinence, and par-
tially due to his age.
"The intensity is not the
same. Ejaculations are less in-
tense and erections are slower
in coming and more difficult to
maintain. That occurs around
the age of 50," he feels.
But what determines a per-
son's sexuality, according to
Josephs, are factors such as
"intimacy, caring, loving
more than just copulation."
Josephs, who would not look
for a partner any more than
eight to 12 years his junior,
says that he would not use a
condom, a form of contracep-
tion that has received a great
deal of publicity lately because
of AIDS.
"I think it diminishes the
sexual experience," explains
Josephs.
IN THE EARLY years of
her marriage, Rose Green,
whose husband recently pass-
ed away, was not forthcoming
about sex. But that has
changed.
"It was a secret. Women
weren't supposed to enjoy
sex," says the over-75 Green,
who is a resident at Miami's
Port Sonata during part of the
year.
"You wouldn't discuss your
menstrual period with your
husband. You would be em-
barassed to go to the
drugstore to buy Kotex," says
Green.
"I don't say that's the best
way I'm even beginning to
entertain the notion that
couples should have some in-
timate experience with each
other before marriage," she
adds.
Green, who has been mar-
ried twice, says that "there
are young seniors and old
seniors. Many people forget
how it was when they were
young, and live together like
strangers.
"The kissing and stroking
keep the marriage alive more
than anything else," states
Green, "but you have to adjust
to the fact that you don't have
exactly the same desires as
when you were younger
although desire does continue
on into the seventies."
GREEN, who contends that
she enjoyed relations with her
first husband despite the
stigma attached to sex when
she was younger, found it dif-
ficult at first to conceive of
herself being intimate with
anyone else after his demise.
"I didn't think I could get in-
to a bed with another man,
because when I first married, I
was a virgin, and my husband
was a virgin. I felt guilty that I
could love again," she says.
Another resident of Port
Sonata, who does not wish to
be named, agrees that "If a
woman enjoyed sex when we
were young, it was a secret,"
but admits that before her hus-
band became ill, they were
"physically intimate and very
happy."
GREEN AND the other
Port Sonata resident say that
they experienced orgasm dur-
ing sex, although, Green says,
"I didn't know what it was."
"But it was there," adds the
other resident with a laugh.
"I only found out about
orgasms 10 or 15 years ago in
a book," says Green. "Before
Continued on Page 2-B
Otui
Community
Friday, April 10, 1987 The Jewish Floridian Section B


Page ^-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 10, 1987
Myron Brodie To Serve On
Advisory Board Of Barry U.
Myron J. Brodie, executive
vice president of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation has
been invited to serve on the
Advisory Council of the Barry
University School of Social
Work. The committee is
designed to assist the universi-
ty in continuing to better meet
the needs of the communities
its students and faculty serve.
In accepting the committee
position, Brodie stated, "I feel
honored to work with this
group of professionals. I hope
the experience in the social
work field that I bring to the
committee will in some way
benefit the school and our
community."
Barry University established
the first graduate level social
work program in 1966 in
response to the demand for
professionally trained social
workers in South Florida.
Mvron Brodie
Brodie, who has been with the Federation since 1968,
holds a Masters Degree in Social Work from Boston
University.
Michele Cacciatore
Sex And The Elderly
Continued from Page 1-B
then, I didn't know there was a
name for it."
Green's recipe for sex over
the age of 60 is to "start off
with the right partner, a
spouse with whom you're com-
patible, and then, if you
understand each other, and if
you're patient and don't over-
react if one partner doesn't
respond, the physical changes
don't matter.
"It sounds very good,
doesn't it? It's the truth," con-
cludes Green.
AT THE age of 87, one
woman, who also declined to
have her name appear in print,
is still elegantly turned out,
with perfectly coiffed hair and
a tastefully coordinated outfit.
"I appear very sexy to
men," she admits, "and I have
desire, but there's no one
around I would consider going
to bed with someone if I fell in
love and got married again."
Her husband, who passed
away "a year and 12 days
ago," was "crazy about sex."
but she most definitely was
not.
"I got married at the age of
17, and I wish that I could have
enjoyed sex more when I was
younger. It got better as I
went on in life," although she
does not know exactly why this
should have proven to be the
case.
"WHEN PEOPLE get
older, the men have problems,
not the women," she contends,
adding wistfully, "He always
used to kiss and caress me. and
I used to tell him, "Save it for
your old age."
Almost all of the senior
citizens interviewed agreed
that intimacy, physical and
emotional, is more important
to them than the actual act of
sexual intercourse. A loving
partner who is affectionate,
passionate, understanding and
patient may therefore be the
best retirement plan that any
one of us can have.
Florida East Coast Properties
444 Brickell Ave.. Miami
358-7710
A Happy and Healthy Passover
Boris Begun
Nabbed Again
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) Boris
Begun, son of freed Prisoner of
Conscience Iosif Begun, was nab-
bed by Soviet police last week
after demonstrating in downtown
Moscow for the freedom of other
refuseniks, according to the Stu-
dent Struggle for Soviet Jewry
(SSSJ). Begun was detained along
with Ella and Theodore Finkel,
brother and sister refuseniks.
Boris Begun was threatened
with a 15-day jail sentence last
month for demonstrating on
behalf of his father, who was then
in prison. At the last minute, the
Soviet authorities .hanged their
tactics and refrained from in-
carcerating the younger Begun,
and freed Iosif Begun from
Chistopol Prison.
THEIR DEMONSTRATION
was the first in a series this week
of protests in the Soviet capital
against the denial of exit visas.
Others who have publicly declared
that they will demonstrate this
week are Michael Fuchs-
Rabinovitch and Leonid
Yusefovitch of Moscow, and
Michael Baizer of Leningrad, who
will go to Moscow to protest.
Meanwhile, a hunger strike
continues in Mosow by former
POC Vev Elbert of Kiev, who
began his action March 5.
Women will demonstrate in
Moscow at the national OV1R of-
fice on March 27 and 29, including
many of the women who last week
were on a hunger strike. The
women's demonstrations are plan-
ned to coincide with the visit of
British Prime Minister Margaret
Thatcher.
Jewish Federation
Freedom Seder
The South Florida Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry, an
arm of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Com-
munity Relations Committee,
held a special Passover Seder
on behalf of the more than
380,000 Jews trying to leave
the Soviet Union Sunday, at
Temple Samu-El or Olom. The
seder took place concurrently
with the 17 day hunger strike
in Washington, D.C. being
held by Alexander Slepak, son
of Vladimir and Maria Slepak.
Cohen To Be Installed
As GMAA President
Ted Cohen, former State
Representative, was installed
as President of the Greater
Miami Aviation Association at
its Annual Meeting on
Wednesday at a noon luncheon
at the Airport Regency Hotel.
Cohen, an alumnus of the
United States Naval Academy,
is a Lt Colonel in the Civil Air
Patrol, auxiliary of the Air
Force. He is a general aviation
pilot, holding credentials as a
commercial, instrument-rated
pilot, and certified flight
instructor.
PERSONALS"
YOUNG JEWISH SINGLES
will meet on April 12 at
11:00 AM for their monthly
Brunch. The program will
be a Film Trilogy dealing
with "History, Travel and
Comedy"!! The group
meets monthly at the
synagogue located at
8000 Miller Drive. Call
271-2311 for further
information.
Happenings
County Commissioner Barry D. Schreiber has been appointed a
member of the Finance Administration and Intergovernmental
Relations Policy Committee of the National League of Cities The
appointment was made by-Cathy Reynolds, president of the Na-
tional League of Cities.
Rabbi Scott B. Saulson is returning to the United States after
completing six years of service in South Africa to visit with his
parents Lila and William F. Saulson Saulson is director of the
Riverside Speakers bureau
The Association for Jewish Special Education and the
Jerusalem Club are holding their Ninth Annual Passover Seder
and Dinner on Sunday at 1:30 p.m at the Jewish Federation
building. Rabbi Solomon Sen iff will officiate
Israel Bernbaum. author of "My Brothers Keeper The
Holocaust Through The Fyes Of An Artist" will speak about his
art. his book and the Holocaust on "Something On 17." a pro-
gram to be aired on channel 1 7 on Thursday at 8 p.m
Miami Beach City Commission* r Ben Z Grenald and Beach
civic leader E. Albert Pallot have been co-chairmen of Keep
America Beautiful Week for Dade County Weather announcer
Bob Soper is a third co-chairman of the countywide effort to in-
volve at least 10 percent of Greater Miami's population in either
Clean-A-Thon or Adopt-A-Spot activities, scheduled for April
26-May 2.
Jewish Floridian salute
to our centenarians
The following individual is already 100 years old or
will be 100 by Dec. 31.1987:
NAME:
BIRTHDATE:................................ ........
PRESENT ADDRESS:.................................
APT.:................CITY:..................STATE:
CITY OF BIRTH: ......................................
STATE:.................ZIP:.........COUNTRY:......
SUGGESTED BY:................................................
ADDRESS:...................................APT.:.............
CITY:.........................................ZIP:..............
PHONE:....................-.....................................
Enclose a photograph of the centenarian if possible
and mail to 100 YEARS YOUNG. The Jewish Floridian.
P.O. Box 012973. Miami. Fla. 33101.



Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Lehrman Scholarship Ball Raises $468,000
Lawrence Schantz, Temple Emanu-El president, and Mrs. Schantz; Mr. and Mrs. Harry Dr. and Mrs. Irving Lehrman; Mr. and Mrs. Ted Arisen; and Mr. and Mrs. B. Morton
(Hap) Levy, former Scholarship Ball chairpersons. Gittlin.
Students of Lehrman Day School open evening with theme, "Peace and Fulfillment.
Mr. and Mrs. Hal Kaye; Haim Wiener; and Mr. and Mrs. George Goldbloom.
Dr. and Mrs. Sherman Kaplan and Judge and Mrs. Irving Cypen.
Jefferson Bank scholarship patrons Mr. and Mrs. Ira Giller, Mr. and Mrs. Barton S.
Goldberg and Mr. and Mrs. Jerrold Goodman.
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Stein and past president Carol Greenberg and Mrs. Greenberg.
A capacity audience of more than 400 persons attended the 19th annual
Lehrman Day School Scholarship Ball in the Friedland Ballroom of Temple
Emanu-El of Greater Miami, helping the Miami Beach congregation
surpass a goal of 450 scholarships of $ 1,000 each.
Dr. Irving Lehrman announced that a record-shattering 468
scholarships were donated under the leadership of Mr. and Mrs. B. Morton
Gittlin, Ball chairpersons. Highlight of the evening a yearly feature of
the Jewish community's social calendar was the presentation of the
Maimonides Award, Temple Emanu-El's highest honor, to Ted Arison, vice
president of the synagogue. Proceeds are used to offset the operating
deficit of the Lehrman Day School and to provide scholarship assistance to
needy students.
__i/r v_______________
Sadarid Mrs- Herbert s- Shapiro; Mr. and Mrs. Fred K. Shochet; Judge Frederick N.
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Frank and Oscar White.
and Mrs. Murry Koretzky; Dr. and Mrs. Irving Lehrmav Mr. and Mrs. John
mro: Ry Datz and Mrs. Martha Mishcon, president of Sisterhood.
Dr. Amir Baron, director of education, Mrs. Baron and Rochelle Malek, chairman of
Lehrman Day School board of education.


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Triday. April 10, 1987
Passover Holiday Begins
With Seder Monday Eve
The story of Passover, the holiday celebrating the exodus
of the ancient Israelites from their bondage in Egypt, will
be told in readings from the Haggadah at the first Seder
set for next Monday evening. April 13. In Orthodox tradi-
tion, there will be a second Seder on Tuesday evening April
14. although some Conservative and even Reform or
Liberal Jews celebrate Passover with a second Seder, too.
If in doubt, check with your spiritual leader.
The holiday begins with the traditional Siyum on Monday
morning, with a fast day for Jewish firstborn males in com-
memoration of the tenth plague, the slaying of the firstborn
male Egyptians.
A ritual in the home called Bedikat Chometz. a search for
chomeU or things not kosher for Passover, begins the even-
ing before.
All dietary laws observed during the first two days of
Passover remain in effect until nightfall of the eighth day
of Passover, which this year will be Tuesday. April 21. In-
termediate days are known as Choi Hamoed. which occur
starting on the nightfall on Wednesday. April 15.
At the Israel Histadrut Foundation Brunch,
as part of its Annual Mid Winter Conference,
awards were presented to three outstanding
supporters of the Golden Chain of Yiddish
Culture. Morris Fisher. Shimon Deiieh and
Morris Friedman. Presenting the Awards
was Dr. Sol Stein, President of the Israel
Histadrut Foundation on the left vnd Rabbi
Morton Malavsky. IHF Board Chairman on
the right.
Israel Defeats Czechs In Davis Cup;
Will Play India In Quarterfinal
NEW YORK (JTA) Israels
tennis fantasy continued to come
true this weekend with its na-
tional team's 3-2 victory over the
favored and highly rated Czech
team in Hradec. Czechoslovakia,
in Davis Cup international
competition.
Israel has thus qualified for the
quarterfinals for the 1987 cup.
and will play India in July. Before
this year's match with the Czechs.
Israel had never before made the
final round of 16 teams.
Israel's rising young tennis star.
Amos Mansdorf, won both his
singles matches. Last Friday, he
surprised Miroslav Mecir. one of
the world's five best players. 6-4.
6-2. 3-6, 3-2 (retired) on Friday.
Israel's previous team victory,
over Switzerland, also included a
default, rare in Davis Cup com-
petition. Glickstein lost to Mecir
on Sunday 3-6, 1-6. 2-6.
Glickstein and Mansdorf lost in
doubles on Friday to Mecir and
Tomas Smid, 2-6, 6-4. 6-8, 6-8.
India has been designated the
home team for its match with
Israel, with the site of the match
to be determined in about a
month. India recently refused to
allow an Israeli team to par-
ticipate in an internationaJ table-
tennis competition.
PASSOVER OTOCOLATE
YOU CANT PASS OVER
*^B\RlONS*
Hraditkmalls Delicious
rssh-srz
Alex Halberstein. assistant
treasurer of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, has been
elected to the Board of Direc-
tors ofHIAS. the Hebrew Im-
migrant Aid Society, announc-
ed HIAS President Robert L.
Irraeloff at the agency's 107th
Annual Meeting in New York
City. Mr. Halberstein is vice
chairman of the board and
senior rice president of Capital
Bank.

MIAMI AREA
DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR
I nn *
nnwt
The Haggadah was read.
The goodbyes were said.
Cup after cup.
The coffee was Brim.'
Fill your cup to the rim
With the richness of Brim.
brim P"? brim

9
FOODS
,


What Do
Jewish Women Want?
Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
"What do Jewish women
want?" A great many rabbis
and others seem to be asking,
debating, and tearing their
hair out over this auestion, if
we are to judge by the number
of sermons, articles, and books
that have appeared recently on
the subject.
At the same time, the grow-
ing body of Jewish women who
are both religiously committed
and influenced by feminism to
assume greater responsibility
for their lives are asking ques-
tions of a different order of
specificity: When three women
and two men eat together, can
a woman lead the introductory
blessings before Grace after
Meals bentsh mezuman), and
should the men respond?
WHEN A GROUP of
women daven together (as
they might in a girls' yeshiva
high school), what should one
do if she is mourner and has
been reciting kaddish with a
minyan? Can a women
halachically (according to
Jewish law) fulfil many of the
functions of a rabbi, and which
| ones can she not carry out?
What can a woman do at the
time of marriage or later to en-
sure that she will not be held
(ransom for a Jewish divorce
I (get) by a recalcitrant husband?
Many of the women asking
these questions have been anx-
ious to get their hands on some
sort of ready guidebook, a
IShulchan Arukh (the classic
Code of Jewish Law) for
Women, as it were, to answer
their practical halachic ques-
tions. Many have been picking
up and reading Moshe
Meiseleman's book Jewish
Woman in Jewish Law in
hopes that it is that book.
Although the title and the
table of contents suggest that
| it is. unfortunately, it is not.
THE BOOK ERRS fun-
Idamentally in addressing itself
in what Meiselman calls "the
feminist critique of Judaism."
It is hard to imagine what
secular feminist would stay
with him past the first few
pages on persepective, since
they long ago opted out of his
| framework of reference.
As for his natural audience,
religious Jewish feminists,
Meiselman is so doubting of
the sincerity of their motiva-
tion and so uniformly opposed
|to any of their innovations
[even those strictly permissable
within the halacha that they
I must experience the book as
|an exercise in slamming doors
p their faces.
The book's second structural
flaw is that it begins with an
[examination of axiomatic
ptatements ("perspectives")
about the nature of women.
BASING HIMSELF on ag-
me (non-legal) materials,
meiselman tells us that women
W a special capacity for
fed (deeds of lovingkind-
nf *5 imP,icit in the story
p their creation is a command
P develop the trait of tzniut
[modesty), and that "Jewish
ETC have tiways (emphasis
Ned) selflessly dedicated
pemselves to their ultimate
mi building the Jewish
Pgfly." He then argues
J'achic particulars from these
max assumptions, which a
few is not required by halacha
K believe.
"tore convincing approach
is that taken by Rabbi Saul
Herman in his essay, The
Status of Women in Halachic
Judaism, and in Elizabeth
Kolton's The Jewish Woman:
New Perspectives. Berman
analyzes "the legal com-
ponents of the status which
Jewish law assigns to women"
and then deduces purposes of
those laws to protect but not
to mandate the woman's role
in the home from the
particulars.
IT IS CLEAR that rabbis
have a stronger case when
they base their stances on
women's issues on concrete,
assertainable halachic facts
rather than upon attitudes
about women's inherent
spiritual nature. Data about
women's spirituality can be
more reliably gathered from
women who have davened
together and celebrated
Jewish life together, than from
male rabbis.
What can be gathered from
rabbis is the specialized
knowledge about halachot
governing women's actions.
From his learned discussions
of the legal (and comparative
legal) implications of women
as witnesses, and of women
and inheritance law, it is clear
that Rabbi Meiselman is in
thorough and firm control of
this body of knowledge.
However, he uses his rab-
binical expertise like a cour-
troom lawyer arguing a case
rather than like a teacher
presenting all of the relevant
information.
CONSEQUENTLY,
Meiselman, frequently, annoy-
ingly, stacks the deck in favor
of his conclusions, leaving out
information that might lead to
different assessment. For ex-
ample, on the subject of inser-
ting a t'nai (condition) into the
ketuba (marriage contract) in
order to insure that a get
(Jewish divorce decree) is
granted whenever a secular
divorce takes place, Meiselman
mentions the most recent full-
scale treatment of the subject
by an Orthodox rabbi. Dr.
Eliezer Berkovits' 1967 book,
T'nai bi'Nisuim V'Get (Condi-
tional Marriage and Divorce)
only in passing, saying that it
is a repetition of earlier ideas
on the issue.
He then proceeds to spend a
page refuting Berkovits
without ever having adequate-
ly presented the latter's
viewpoint.
Similarly, Meiselman
devotes a chapter to discussing
why must not take on the
obligation of wearing tzitzit
(fringes), quoting the Rama
(Rabbi Moshe Isserles) that to
do so would appear to be false
religious pride (yohara).
NOWHERE DOES he men-
tion the opinion in the Talmud,
Menachot 43a: "Our Rabbis
taught; All must observe the
law of tzitzit, priest, Levites,
and Israelites, proselytes,
women and slaves." While this
view is rejected by Rabbi Si-
meon, who states that women
are exempt from tzitzit
because it is a positive time-
bound commandment, there is
a story told here of a Rab
Judah who used to attach fr-
inges to the aprons of the
women of his household and
used to say the blessing.
NOR DOES Meiselman give
the precedent of women in
other ages having worn the
tallit.
Meiselman's defense of the
status quo extends even to the
more pliant realm of minhag
(customary practice). He
discusses the development of
new rituals to mark significant
points in the life cycle of a
woman, such as simchat bat
(celebration of a birth of a
daughter) and Bat Mitzvah
ceremonies, in a chapter pre-
judically entitled "Non-
halachic Approaches to the
Divine."
HE CONCLUDES that
while some kind of celebration
(read "party") is permissable,
Meiselman writes, "it com-
pletely mocks the entire struc-
ture of Judaism to invest these
celebrations with specific and
detailed rituals."
Yet Judaism has always
structured deeply felt simcha
(joy) into some kind of ritual
for thanking and praising God
witness Esther s petitioning
the Sages for an annual
reading of the Megillah to com-
memorate the deliverance of
the recitation of Hallel (with or
without a bracha blessing
because the new minhag is still
in flux) to celebrate Yom
Ha'atzmaut.
On two particular privileges
which halachic feminists have
fought for special aliyot to
the Torah in separate women's
services and carrying the
Sefer Torah for Hakafot on
Simchat Torah Meiselman,
unable to give a convincing
halachic defense, falls back
upon the weak straw of "it
isn't done" and "it doesn't
look right."
ON THE SUBJECT of
women's aliyot, he does not
precisely delineate the ra-
tionale used by certain
halachic women's davening
groups, including the West
Side Women's Davening
Group (Kol Nashim).
The reading of the Torah is
considered a limud (a study),
not a kriah (a reading); the
blessing for Torah study,
birkhot ha-Torah, is not said in
the birkhot hashachar (morn-
ing prayers), so that a woman
who says the blessing before
the Torah is not saying a
superfluous blessing (bracha
lebatala); the barchu part of
the blessing is not said because
it is davar shebikedusha (a
blessing for which a minyan is
required); and there is not pro-
blem of kvod hatzibur (the
honor of the congregation)
since the community is all
women.
Having found no clear flaw
in the formulation, Meiselman
argues from consequences;
"Something that looks like an
aliyah for women will in-
evitably lead to aliyot for
women" because the false im-
pression will be created that
these are regular aliyot. It
should be noted that the
halachic women's davening
groups have gone to great
lengths to educate their consti-
tuency as to what is being done
and why but this Rabbi
Meiselman could not know
because for obvious reasons he
wasn't there.
ON THE ISSUE of women
carrying Torah scrolls for
Hakafot on Simchat Torah, the
book is simply mistaken when
it states: "This practice has
been opposed by all contem-
porary rabbinic authorities."
This author knows of at least
three Orthodox rabbis in New
York City alone who permit
this practice. Since women
cannot make a Sefer Torah
ritually impure (tameh) by
touching it, the basis for
Meiselman's objections are not
halachic, only customary, and
minhag, as we know, can
change.
Despite its shortcomings,
this book may paradoxically,
strengthen the hand of
halachically-committed Jewish
feminists. First one can lear-
nhalachic particulars and
sources from Meiselman's
detailed discussions of women
and prayer, women and in-
heritance, and other issues.
El Al Introduces Heritage
Tours To Eastern Europe
Starting this month, travelers can visit both the land of
their Biblical roots Israel, and the land of their fathers
and grandfathers Eastern Europe.
El Al Israel Airlines is offering two new tours designed
to bring Jews back to their Polish and
Czechoslovakian/Hungarian ancestral roots the Jewish
Heritage Tours. Travelers will begin their journey in
Eastern Europe (Poland or Czechoslovakia/Hungary) and
will continue on to Israel where they will spend five nights
in Jerusalem, three nights in Tel Aviv and two nights in the
Galilee.
The 15 day/13 night Polish Heritage Tour will include
three nights and four days in Warsaw and Krakow, the
cities where Jewish culture once thrived. "In light of the
heightened cultural and religious awareness among
American Jews, El Al is giving everyone the opportunity to
return to the legacy of their forefathers. Poland, home to
Jews since the ninth century, was the wellspring of many il-
lustrious Talmudic scholars, lawyers and judges. It was
there that the commitment to the creation of a Jewish state
was born," says David Shein, vice president and general
manager for El Al in North America.
The Czechoslovakia/Hungary Heritage Tour allows the
traveler to spend three days discovering the old Jewish
town in Prague which dates back to 1270. Visitors will be
able to tour the world's largest Jewish museum, the State
Precious Legacy, the 13th century Alt-New Synagogue,
the Prague Castle and Lessertown. The next four days will
be spent touring the beautiful cities of Buda and Pest. Pro-
fessional licensed English speaking guides will lead you
through the Jewish Museum, Dohany Temple, Chana
Senesh Memorial and the National Folklore Theatre.
"On this joint tour, travelers both young and old can
discover the past and explore the future. El Al is very ex-
cited to be offering this unusual tour to the millions of Jews
who are yearning to go back to their roots," says Shein.
Shein adds, "Modern Israel is, to a great extent, a result
of the hard labor of the sons and daughters of Eastern
Europeans who realized their dreams and the dreams of
their parents. Overcoming great obstacles they created a
state which attracts those searching for a land rich in
culture and diversity."
For information and reservations, contact El Al's Miami
office 532-5441 or toll free number at 1-800-E1 Al Sun
(1-800-352-5786). Or, write away for a free detailed colored
brochure at: El Al Israel Airlines, Jewish Heritage Tours,
850 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10022.
Start a tasteful tradition. Make your
knaidlach with G. Washington's*
Seasoning and Broth.
] JMUyju mm pww
Mfta
HASONMM MOTH^
- -sr~
funs]
1A
For an extra special seder,
make knaidlach that are different
from all other knaidlach with
G Washington s Seasoning and
Broth G Washington s is more
than a flavor enhancer
It's a complete seasoning
The unique blend of herbs and
spices flavors your knaidlach in
more ways than one
Serve knaidlach made with
G Washington s and hear your
guests sing their praises'
G. WASHINGTON'S
KNAIDLACH "&[&
2 ecgs. lightly beiten
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
Vt cup matzah meal
1 quart boiling water
Mix eggs oil 1 packet G Washington s and pepper Gradually tod matzah meal
stirring until thick Relrigerate 20 minutes in covered howl form dough into 8
balls Add remaining 4 packers G Washington s to boiling water slit Dropmai
zah balls into broth, simmer 30 minutes Makes 8 matzah balls
5 packets G Washington s
Golden Seasoning and Broth
dash pepper
I K Certified Kosher lor Passover in Specially Marked Packages


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. April 10, 1987
Sara Wolfensohn Presents Concert
At MJHHA At Douglas Gardens
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jevisk Floi-idian Staff Writer
The residents of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged at Douglas Gardens
were treated to a concert
Wednesday by solo pianist
Sara Wolfensohn. whose
grandparents. Benjamin and
Bessie Botwinick of Miami
Beach, are founders and active
in the Jewish Home.
The response from the
crowd after her 40-minute
recital showed appreciation
and gratitude.
"You were wonderful. You
moved me to tears.'* said
LoUie Kahn, a pianist who is
now a resident of the home.
Miss Wolfensohn, 23, comes
from a family of music lovers.
She is the daughter of Elaine
and James Wolfensohn, who is
president of the Board of
Directors of Carnegie Hall.
She is currently a student of
Bella Davidovich at the
Juilliard School of Music,
where she has done
undergraduate and post
graduate studies.
Born in Australia and now a
resident of New York, Miss
Wolfensohn began to play the
piano at the age of seven.
"I really did love it, especial-
ly when I started.*'
She made her New York
debut last year during a recital
with the Soviet Emigre Or-
chestra in Alice Tully Hall at
Lincoln Center. She also
traveled this summer in South
America, giving performances
to audiences she said "were so
warm."
In 1985. she made a suc-
cessful London debut with the
Chamber Orchestra of London
at the Barbican Centre.
Her recital for the residents
of the Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged included
selections from Bach and
Chopin. Wednesday evening.
Miss Wolfensohn performed
before the monthly dinner
meeting of the Home's
founders.
"The audience was wonder-
ful and someone even sang
along with me." she said.
On May 22. she is scheduled
to play with the Royal Philhar-
monic in London.
"It takes a lot of hard work
It means seven hours a day on
a piano and discipline. It's a
self-discipline. You have to
budget your time.*'
Miss Wolfensohn also makes
time to work with the
Jerusalem Foundation New
Leadership Committee, which
works with an Israeli village.
Neve Yaacov. trying to in-
tegrate Jews there of all ages
and raising money for the set-
tlement. She hopes to give her
first performance in Israel
Beverly Sills Named
Ambassador
Of The Arts
Secretary of State George
Firestooe h*s named Miss Beveriy
Sills as a Florida Ambassador of
d Arts-
Miss Sills. General Director at
the New York City Opera and a
performer of -intermnonal fame,
received the award from
Firestone at a hmeaeon at the
GoTtrnor's Mansion ia
Tallahassee
next year. But she is still in
transition, she says, from stu-
dent to professional. She prac-
tices on a Steinway grand
piano she has at her home.
"Aside from music she's just
a delight." said her proud
grandfather. Benjamin Bot-
winick. "All grandparents
should have the same relation-
their
mm***0&00'000*i0*
ship with
grandchildren."
Mrs. Botwinick also joined
her husband at the recital.
"I was happy for her." she
said.
They had been a bit worried Concert pianist Sara Wolfensohn (center/ is flanked by hergrmA-
because before the perfor- parents Ben and Bessie Botwinick of Miami Beach, after Sam
mance. their granddaughter gave a recital at the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for theAq-
had come down with a cold. ed at Douglas Gardens on Wednesday.
Passover Greetings
the ORIGINAL
Wolfie's 21
THE WORLD'S MOST FAMOUS DELI-RESTAURANT
"WHERETHE ELITE MEETTO EAT!"
Collins Avenue & 21st Street on Miami Beach
NOW OPEN 24 HOURS!
* In the heart of Miami Beach s Historic Art Deco District
*6AKF4
SPECIALS
WOLRE-S FAMOUS ROLLS OR
BAGELS. CREAM CHEESE.
BUTTER. COFFEE OR TEA .........
OR
2 EGGS. ANY STYLE, GRITS
OR POTATOES. CREAM CHEESE.
BUTTER ROLLS. MINI DANISH.
[COFFEEOR TEA.................
19
>25
SPECIALS
CHOOSE FROM 6 08XJOUS
ENTREES*
$095
FROM
2
0\NNp
SPECIALS
CHOOSE FROM 12 ENTREES'
95
FROM
$4
WOLFIE'S
PASSOVER MENU
fJ> ENJOY j>
*r WOLFIE'S
SPECIAL
MIDNIGHT SNACKS
MENU"
11 PM TO 4 AM
MATZO BRIE.
Made the traditional way........3.95
WOLFIE'S Special
MATZO MEAL PANCAKES.......3.95
ALA CARTE LUNCH / DINNER
ROAST BRISKET OF BEEF.
Choice of Matzo Meal
Pancake or Potatoes..
8.45
ROAST CHICKEN,
Choice of Matzo Meal
Pancake or Potatoes.
6.25
BOILED BEEF FLANKEN,
with Garden Vegetables. Choice
Choice of Matzo Meal
Pancake or Potatoes............8 45
FULL COURSE LUNCH / DINNER
{NCLUDES COMPLIMENTARY GLASS OF WINE"
CholCR of: GEFILTE FISH, MATZO BALL
SOUP or TOMATO JUICE.
Choice of:
ROAST BRISKET OF BEEF......9.95
% ROAST SPRING CHICKEN.... 7.45
BOILED BEEF FLANKEN........ 95
BROILED FILET OF SOLE.......7.95
(or Ftert of tt Day)
CHICKEN IN THE POT...............7-95
Includes: Choice of Tzimmes. Matzo Meal
Pancake, or Potatoes
DESSERT: Choice of SPONGE CAKE.
SLICE OF MELON or JELLO.
COFFEE OR TEA
Owned and operated by WOLFIE'S RESTAURANT, INC., Joseph Nevei. Chairmen; David H. Navel. President


v-x!
Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Write
Desur Komi
For Advice
Dear Nomi, an advice column, will appear regularly in the
pages of The Jewish Floridian.
Dear Nomi:
I am 89 years old and living
alone. Although my children come
to visit me at least twice a week, I
spend most of my time staring at
the four walls of my apartment.
Most of my old friends have pass-
ed on, and I don't have the energy
to do the things I used to, like tak-
ing walks in the park or playing
chess.
It seems to me that there is
nothing left to do, and I can't ask
my children to spend all their free
time with me. I would rather just
take a pill than go into an old age
home, so don't even think of sug-
gesting that. But I don't unders-
tand how, after such a long and in-
teresting life, I have ended up like
this.
Signed,
D. Goldfarb
Dear D. Goldfarb:
There are many things which you
could do other than stare at the
four walls of your apartment. I
assume from your letter that
you are in very good shape for
your age, as you are managing
to live pretty much on your
own, without live-in-help.
There are others who are not so
fortunate, and they are either
completely housebound or in
old-age homes. You could
become a volunteer and visit
such people, or you could try
and find out about one of the
new programs where "Foster
Grandparents" give much
needed affection to babies and
children who must stay for ex-
tended periods of time in
hospital wards.
Many people find pets add a great
deal of warmth and companion-
ship to their lives. An older dog
(who does not need much exer-
cise) or cat might be a good
choice.
Finally, there are programs in
community centers for people
interested in a variety of ac-
tivities. Some are listed in this
paper. All you need to do is
begin to look around you and
discover how much life still has
to offer and how much
more you still have to offer life.
Yours. Nomi
Dear Nomi:
1 am presently taking care of
my 76-year-old mother who is
living in my house. I love her
dearly, but had trouble com-
municating with her back
when I was 18 and left home.
Now, in her old age, all my
mother's most aggravating
<'haracteristics have become
exaggerated. She used to fret
about doctor's bills, my health,
cooking dinner, and so on.
Now she even frets about an
open window, where she left
her purse (when it's on her lap)
and whether or not it's safe to
cook food in a microwave.
She's driving me crazy, but I
don't want to put her in a
home. In the course of writing
this letter she has interrupted
me three times, twice to ask
for a telephone number, and
once to ask what I am doing.
Yours truly,
F.G., North Miami
Dear F.G.:
It sounds as if you need two
things: one, help caring for
your mother, and two, some
time when you can relax
and be by yourself. A social
worker might be able to
assist, or a part time nurse,
if your finances permit that
kind of an option. I am
assuming from your letter
that you have no siblings
whom you can call upon to
take on some of the respon-
sibility of caring for your
mother.
Even if you can't afford to hire
somebody, a social work
agency might be able to of-
fer suggestions about low-
cost programs which care
for the elderly during part
of the day. Meanwhile,
make sure to tell your
mother clearly and simply
that you need some time to
yourself, when she should
not disturb you except in
case of an emergency.
Your mother will probably be
most willing to give you
time alone if you set aside
some time specifically to be
with her, talk to her and pay
attention to her. Then you
can say "that was our time
together, and now I need
my time alone."
Good luck!
Yours. Nomi
Dear Nomi:
When I was in my thirties
and even my forties, I was
always the sort of woman who
went around saying, "Well,
I'm not going to dye my hair
when the grey comes in." I
thought that if I kept myself in
fairly good shape, I would have
no trouble accepting the
changes that come with middle
age.
But now I'm 53 and not only
do I help my hair retain its
former brown shade, but am
f>resently considering a face-
ift. I remember all the reasons
I used to have for not wanting
'Israel 39'
Miami's Jewish community is gearing-up for a day-long
festival called "Shalom Jerusalem" on Sunday, May 17 be-
ing held at Miami Dade Community College Mitchell
Wolfson Campus.
In addition to internationally renowned entertainment
and a host of activities, a "community showcase" of various
Jewish agencies, organizations and synagogues will be
featured at Shalom Jerusalem, during the hours of noon to
5 p.m. A myriad of community groups will participate, as
approximately 7,000 visitors are expected to attend the
festivities.
To reserve a place at the "community showcase" and
highlight your group's achievements, contact ISRAEL 39
at 576-4000. ISRAEL 39 is a presentation of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation in cooperation with Miami Dade
Community College Mitchell Wolfson Campus._____
to undergo the pain, danger
and expense of surgery just to
appease my vanity, but when I
look in the mirror lately, I see
an old lady.
What should I do?
Sincerely,
Wrinkled
Dear Wrinkled:
During the course of a lifetime
most of us make pro-
nouncements which, in later
years, we reconsider.
A face-lift will make you look
younger, but there are
many other considerations,
such as expense and the in-
herent dangers of surgery,
for you to consider. You
might want to make a list of
the pros and cons, and even
interview several plastic
surgeons, finding out all you
can about the procedure, in
order to make an educated
decision.
Also, you might ask questions
of people who have had face
lifts, finding out whether or
not they are glad that they
had the surgery.
But remember, dyeing your
hair and having a face lift
are very different pro-
cedures. One is relatively in-
expensive, reversible, and
painless, while the other is
basically none of those
things.
A final suggestion is that you
consider meeting with a
therapist for a session or
two in order to examine the
emotional and psychological
aspects of your decision.
Are you sure that when you
look in the mirror and see
an old lady that you are
really seeing yourself
clearly?
Yours, Nomi
Write Nomi for advice
in care of The Jewish
Floridian, P.O. Box
012973, Miami, Fla.
33101.
Pesach Delights
From Manischewitz
LAMB CHOPS ON PRUNE STUFFING
1 cup minced onion
V2 cup diced celery
6 Tbsps. vegetable shortening
6 matzos, finely broken *
V* Tsp. salt
1/8 Tsp. pepper
2 Tsps. paprika
1 egg, slightly beaten
1 can condensed clear chicken soup undiluted
1 lb. jar stewed prunes (20) drained, pitted and chopped
6 large shoulder lamb chops
Saute onion and celery in shortening until tender. Add
broken matzos and toast lightly. Combine salt, pepper,
paprika, egg and soup. Add to matzos. Fold in chopped
prunes. Spread in a greased shallow baking pan. Brown
chops in a hot skillet. Arrange chops on stuffing and cover
pan, using aluminum foil if pan has no cover. Bake in a
moderate oven (325 degrees) for 1 hour or until chops are
tender. Serves 6.
* 4 cups matzo farfel may be used instead
BASIC MATZO STUFFING
'/ cup vegetable shortening or chicken fat
% cup minced onion
10 matzos, finely broken
1 Tsp. salt
V* Tsp. pepper
1 Tbsp. paprika
1 egg
1% cans (2 cups) condensed clear chicken soup undiluted *
Saute onion in fat until tender but not browned. Add
broken matzos and toast lightly. Combine seasonings, egg
and soup. Add to matzo mixture. Enough for a 10-12 lb.
bird.
VARIATIONS
Celery Stuffing: Saute 1 cup diced celery with the onion.
Mushroom Stuffing: Saute 1 cup diced fresh mushrooms
with the onion.
Nut Stuffing: Toast Vh cup coarsely chopped nuts with
the onion before adding matzo crumbs.
Giblet Stuffing: Cook giblets in water until tender (2 to 3
hours). Mince and add to dressing.
* NOTE: This makes a dry dressing. If you prefer the
moist type stuffing, increase the condensed chicken soup to
2 cans.
Now, I'm not alone ...
I have my own apartment, but there's always help when I need it.
1 have my privacy, and I have my friends too.
The nurses, doctors, housekeepers and all the staff take good care of
me ... and help me to take good care of myself.
I live at the New Carlyle.
The Nursing Home Alternate
Call today for a V.I.R Tour
jtanwd AOI

ON THt BAY. LTD
1900 North Bayshore Drive, Miami, Florida 33132
Telephone: (305) 371-3035
An adult congregate living facility offering
short and long-term care


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Fnday, April 10, 1987
Rabin Concerned Hadassah Events
\
J^L*
Mildred Riesenberg of Miami, President of the Miami Region of
Hadassah, left, and Ruth Popkin, National President of
Hadassah, march through the streets of Jerusalem, carrying
speciality inscribed unbrellas on the joyous festival ofPurim dur-
ing the Hadassah Diamond Jubilee Mission to Israel. Shown
below are: Jean Temkin, of North Miami Beach, President of the
Miami Beach Region of Hadassah, left., and Ruth Popkin, Na-
tional President of Hadassah, in the procession.
Miami Hadassah leaders from left, Diana Issenberg, a member of
the National Service Committee; Mildred Riesenberg, President
of the Miami Chapter; and Helen Weissberg, a member of the Na-
tional Board attend the opening ceremony in Jerusalem of the
Hadassah Diamond Jubilee Mission to Israel.
Miami Beach Girl Scouts
Need Meeting Places
Over 100 Miami Beach girls are patiently waiting to join
Girl Scout Troops but. .. they have no meeting places.
Girl Scout leaders were recruited, screened and trained
many months ago but everything is on "hold" until meeting
places can be found in the vicinity of North Beach Elemen-
tary and Treasure Island Elementary Schools.
Many families of the girls attending these schools do not
have transportation so meeting rooms are needed within
walking distance. There are 12 to 15 girls in each troop...
they need room to play simple games, participate in arts
and crafts activities and enjoy a snack. Girls are well super-
vised by trained adults and the Girl Scout rule is to "leave a
place cleaner than we found it."
If you can help by providing a meeting place for Girl
Scout Troops in Miami Beach, please call the Girl Scout
Field Services office at 253-4841.
Over Israeli
Sanctions
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin is unhappy with the
sanctions Israel has announced
against South Africa which he
fears may serve as a precedent
for similar embargoes by many
countries against Israel. He is
also concerned over the impact
Israel's action may have on the
south African Jewish com-
munity of 115-120,000.
Rabin expressed his views to
a visiting Israel Bond
Organization delegation here.
Referring to the government's
recent announcement that it
would enter into no new arms
sales contracts with the
Pretoria government
though it would honor existing
ones Rabin said he disliked
embargoes and sanctions. He
recalled that Israel was the
victim of boycotts by the U.S.
and Europe in 1948 and 1967.
South Africa, Rabin said,
was the only country to send
Israel badly needed spare
parts for its French-built
Mirage jets after the 1967 Six-
Day War when France and
other Western European coun-
tries imposed an arms em-
bargo against Israel.
Israel has always expressed
abhorrence for apartheid,
despite its friendly relations
with South Africa. But it never
let the domestic policies of any
regime influence its diplomatic
relations with that country,
Rabin said.
Hatikvah Hadassah is hav-
ing a membership social, a
Lingerie Party, Thursday,
April 16 at 8 p.m. at Knob Hill
Club House.
Live models will show
lingerie from Lingerie Plus.
Hatikvah Hadassah will be
having their end of the year
family picnic, Sunday, April
26, at 11 a.m. at Continental
Park.
Stephen S. Wise Hadassah is
sponsoring a weekend at the
Lido Spa on April 23026.
Mary Uchitel is in charge.
Hatikvah Hadassah will be
having their Board Meeting on
April 23, at 7:30 p.m. at the
home of Jill Hershbein. All
members are welcome.
Hadassah Aliyah Chapter
elected officers for 1987-1988
at a life membership dinner
and general meeting in Ken-
daltown Club House.
The new Administrative
Board for Aliyah Hadassah
consists of: Pam Brown, presi-
dent; Nancy Roseman, ad-
ministrative vice president;
Natalie Bess, education vice
president; Patty Beniam and
Denise Gordon, membership
vice presidents.
Judy Yanowitz, program
vice president; Jane Bernstein,
publicity and public relations
vice president; Etty Foodman,
social fundraising vice presi-
dent; Diane Herstick and Rona
Mandel, ways and means fun-
drasing vice presidents.
Judy Klein, treasurer; Geri
Halperin, financial secretary;
Esther Bentolila, membership
dues secretary; Kim Fried-
man, recording secretary;
Elyse Segal, social secretary;
and Ellen Bolner, Irene
Graboyes and Rhoda Hied, cor-
responding secretaries.
Police Probing Petition
On Conversion
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
police are investigating a petition
prepared by several dayanim
(religious court judges) which
challenges the right of the
Supreme Court to rule on the
registration of converts as Jews.
The petition, initiated by Rabbi
Yosef Axelrod, refers to the case
of Shoshana Miller, an American
immigrant to Israel who was con-
verted to Judaism by a Reform
rabbi. Miller as a Jew because the
case is of a purely religious
nature.
Attorney General Yosef Harish
ordered the police investigation to
determine whether Axelrod could
be charged with contempt of
court.
In another case involving the
religious establishment, the
Supreme Court has been asked to
rule on the complaint of Leah
Shakdiel, whose appointment to
the Religious Council in the town
of Yeroham was rejected by the
Chief Rabbinate Council earlier
this month on grounds that a
woman cannot serve on such
bodies.
To Celebrate.
Israel Oiscount Bank takes this hoHday occasion to extend
greetings and best wishes to our friends and customers.
Israel (Discount Bank provides the local business community
with a full range of trade Financing and international banking services
through its subsidiaries, branch offices and representatives on the
North American Continent and around the world.
We strive to excel at everything we do.
IW Israel Discount Bank
HEAD OFFICE: 27 Yehuda Haievi Street. Tel Aviv
OVER 270 BRANCHES AND OFFICES IN ISRAEL AND ABROAD.
MAM AGENCY: 14 NE First Awe Man) (305) 579-9200
420 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach (305) 674-7260
U.S. SUBSIDIARY: Israel Oiscount Bank or New York. 511 Filth Avenue. New York, NY
10017. (212) 551-8500 CANADIAN SUBSIDIARY: Israel Discount Bank ol Canada. 150
Bloor Street Wesl. Toronto LOS ANGELES AGENCY: 206North Beverly Drive. Beverly
Hills REPRESENTATIVE OFFICES: Montreal, 2000 Peel Street Toronto, 150 Bloor
Street West
TOTAL CONSOLIDATED ASSETS EXCEED $10 BILLION.


Delegates Worldwide To Attend
31st Zionist Congress
Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Bt ELLEN ANN STEIN
leuish Floridian Staff Writer
This December in
erusalem, over 600
derates from around the
orld, including 152 from
,e United States, will at-
nd the 31st Zionist
ongress.
Benjamin Cohen, of Manhat-
n is president of the
nerican Zionist Federation,
umbrella organization for
American Zionist
Jganizations.
I think there may be as
fcny definitions of Ztonism as
re are Zionists," Cohen
id in an interview while he
is in Miami to address the
Jamat donor luncheon last
nday at the Fontainebleu.
EVEN WITHIN Zionist
ganizations there are dif-
ences. There are those
Jganizations which say all our
rgies should be devoted to
yah, returning to Israel,
ere are those organizations
dch say, yes, aliyah is the
made of Zionist ambition,
t the Zionists also have to
irry about the strengthening
the Jewish people and
engthen their position in
I diaspora.
'Some say we have to push
Jewish education and
wish influence. There's a
pute between those of us
io believe Israel is the focal
Sit of Jewry throughout the
rid."
Bomehow, the various
bnist factions will come
tether and decide who the
legates to send to the con-
fess will be. Some 900,000
lots will be mailed out in
iy for the nationwide
fction.
I'WE GET just as intense as
Democrats and
publicans do every four
|tfs," Cohen said. "Get out
Ire and vote," he urges.
is an election year. Jews
i all over the world will be
changing views, exchanging
l*'s with Israelis who are
Nsts and also delegates to
i Congress.
[Jews from outside of Israel
I tell Israel how to run their
pry, and Israelis will tell
Jews how they should behave
in their country. And they will
not always convince each
other."
But, he adds, "We come
back envigorated and inspired
and ready to go full tilt for
another few years."
IN MANY respects, the
Zionist organizations follow
the political division that exists
in Israel but not entirely. If
there's a Labor Party in Israel,
then there are Labor Zionist
organizations worldwide.
There is Herut worldwide, and
also Likud.
And usually there are dif-
ferences, Cohen said, like
there would be in any major
organization with a million and
a half members worldwide.
People have different visions
of Israel.
"There are those who sup-
port factions who want a
greater Israel. There are those
who support political factions
that would rather support a
compromise on the borders if
that will achieve peace with
the Arab neighbors.
"THERE ARE those who
want to see less politicization
generally. There are those who
are right wing. There are
those who are left wing. It's a
whole political spectrum.
There are those who are con-
nected, who are members of
Zionist organizations only
because they support a par-
ticular system of Judaism
Orthodoxy, Conservative or
Reform."
The AZF stands as an um-
brella for it all. The AZF func-
tions in areas where all of the
Zionist organizations are in
agreement, Cohen said. "We
support those who believe in
the centrality of Israel in
Jewish life. We all pursue the
strengthening of Zionism in
the whole area of Jewish
education. We believe that
every Jewish child should get a
good Jewish education and
should have an extended visit
to Israel."
One of the key issues ex-
pected to come up at this
Zionist Congress is the pro-
blem of aliyah from the free
countries.
f

Benjamin Cohen
"THE NUMBER of Jews
who make aliyah voluntarily
has been quite small, Cohen
said, "compared with those
who made aliyah as refugees
or because they had to come
there. The number who come
voluntarily from the free
world, western Europe, U.S.,
Australia, South Africa,
especially in the last 10 years
or so, has been quite modest to
put it nicely."
Yet this is the type of aliyah
that Israel needs most, Cohen
believes. "It needs people who
have grown up in democratic
countries and who are general-
ly well educated and highly
skilled. These are people who
represent a real treasure for
the state of Israel, who come
because they are idealists and
not because they have no other
alternative."
Cohen also predicts topics at
the December Congress to
turn to the relative importance
of Israel in the Jewish world
and, also, new methods to
energize the Zionist movement
and make it more effective.
ON THE front burner of
For
18 Passovers
e Have Been Telling Our Children
Next Year In Jerusalem."
Turn to Keep the Promise.
hoose from a variety of excitingly different
iigh school and college-age programs.
'Touring* study* Kibbutz
Archeology* Art-Tennis
camping Religious Programs
and many more sponsored by the
American Zionist Youth Foundation
fne addfess lor youth programs in Israel.
lel Activities Department
je Greater Miami Jewish Federation
^Biscayne Boulevard Aa ,, _f-^\
"'(305) 576-4000 %^zCl
AZF issues, Cohen said, is get-
ting Jews who want to
emigrate out of Russia to be
able to do so.
"We're concerned, and we
really don't know what to
believe," Cohen declared.
"There are too many conflic-
ting reports coming out. So far
we have not received confir-
mation of any of the optimistic
reports that we're getting. So
we believe the pressure has to
be kept up."
The AZF has not taken an
active voice in the case of
Jonathan Pollard, the
American who was convicted
and sentenced to life imprison-
ment for his role in spying on
the U.S. for Israel.
Cohen did say that the AZF
"certainly does not take the
extreme position that the Anti-
Defamation League or some
other organizations have taken
that keep pointing a finger,
and we think are blowing the
incident out of proportion.
"WE THINK it (the Pollard
case) was poorly handled and
are quite upset that a par-
ticular federal judge has decid-
ed to impose a sentence that
goes far beyond anything the
American federal prosecutors
had in mind.
"And some of the people
who were involved and are be-
ing villified happen to be peo-
ple who provided some very
useful information to the U.S.
defense forces many times
over, such as Aviem Sella, the
general who was forced to
resign the command at Tel Nof
Air Base. He gave the U.S. in-
formation that enabled them
to figure out how to deal with
Soviet SAM missiles that were
placed in Syria.
"This information was im-
mediately passed on to the
American Defense Depart-
ment, and it set back Soviet
aircraft defenses by maybe
five, 10 years.
"The other thing is that all
of the secrets that went to
Israel, went to the hands of an
ally. And much of that infor-
mation we freely provided to
our closest NATO allies. So
again, we disagree with those
who only take an extreme
position."
Concord Sets Season Of Stage And
Sports Superstars For Summer
The Concord Resort Hotel, that phenomenal fun place in
Kiamesha Lake, N.Y. has set its celebrated superstar
schedule for the summer of '87. The world-famed New
York State vacation complex will feature a cornucopia of
comedians, singers, sports personalities; headliners who
are proven hits, performers who have played to much ac-
claim on the great stage there.
To lauch the season in style early, Concord president
Robert Parker has signed comedy star Fred Travalena,
Saturday, May 23 and the spectacular Spinners, Sunday,
May 24, for Decoration Day Holiday Weekend. Concord
favorites set to return on key summer weekends include
Yakov Smirnoff, Saturday, July 18; Buddy Hackett, Satur-
day, July 25; Harry Belafonte, Saturday, Aug. 1; Paul
Anka, Saturday, Aug. 15; Tom Jones, Saturday, Aug. 22;
Clint Holmes, Friday, Aug. 28; Freddie Roman, Saturday,
Aug. 29. Appearing for the first time on the great stage of
the Concord will be the fastest-rising young comedian in
America today, Jay Leno, starring in the summer's first
Singles Weekend, Saturday, July 11. Still more headliners
will be announced.
Happy Passover
from
The Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Miami, Inc.
Our Passover Products:
Coca-Cola Classic 2 Liter NR
and
Diet Coke 2 Liter NR Bottles
were prepared with strictly Kosher for
Passover ingredients without the use of corn
sweeteners under the personal supervision of
Rabbi Tibor H. Stern.
When Coca-Cola's part of your life...
you can't beat the feeling!


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 10, 1987
The Balmoral Community, part of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's Alliance Divi-
sion, held a Sunday brunch on behalf of the
1987 Combined Jewish Appeal. Pictured from
left are Sylvia Feldman, event co-chairman;
Betty Kopelowitz, event chairman; Howard
Stone, guest speaker; Selma Kramer and
Florence Mescom, event co-chairmen. The
Balmoral Community raises $800,000 annual-
ly for the Combined Jewish Appeal.
The Alliance Division of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation held its Point East "Ad-
vanced Gifts Cocktail Reception and Dinner"
raising approximately $5S,600 for the 1987
Combined Jewish Appeal. Pictured from left
(back row) are Max Schoen, event host, Ruth
Lewitter, chairman, Kenneth Lewitter. chair-
man; Ernest Samuels, event host; (middle
row) Mollye Lovinger-Fox, associate chair-
man, Ruth Norton, financial secretary, Mar-
tha Katz, reservations chairman; (seated)
Anne Ackerman, associate chairman. Arthur
Kepes (not pictured) also hosted the event.
Chaplaincy Service To Conduct Passover
Services In Many Institutions
.
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Community
Chaplaincy Service will con-
duct Passover services in more
than 30 institutions in the
Greater Miami area this year.
According to Benjamin Bot-
winick, Chairman of the
Chaplaincy Advisory Commit-
tee, "The Community
Chaplaincy Service serves the
spiritual needs of some 15,000
persons each year who are
unaffiliated with a synagogue
and who are confined to
hospitals, nursing homes,
Hospice, correctional institu-
tions, or homes for the
retarded."
Since its creation, the Com-
munity Chaplaincy Service,
which is sponsored by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion in association with the
Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami, has sought to
create an atmosphere of
tzedakah of caring on a
community-wide basis.
Through the program,
chaplains offer pastoral care,
counseling, friendly visits, and
religious material to those in
need. In addition to serving
the religious needs of institu-
tionalized Jews, the CCS "also
serves as a referral agency for
other Federc :jon services as
well as social welfare agencies
of the state and county," said
Benjamin Botwinick
Rabbi Solomon Schiff, Com-
munity Chaplaincy Director.
Each year the Jewish Com-
munity Centers of Greater
Miami operate a program
known as the community
Passover Fund or "Matzoh
Fund." The "Matzoh Fund" is
a community-wide project
assisting thousands of needy
people, with food baskets and
community Seders in
celebrating Passover the
Exodus of the Jews from
Egypt-
The Jewish Community
Centers of Greater Miami with
the Community Chaplaincy
Service will be providing food
packages to Jewish residents
of various nursing homes, con-
tinuing the more than 11-year
tradition of the "Matzoh
Fund."
Community-wide projects
"where thousands of less for-
tunate Jews who are unable to
celebrate Passover traditional-
ly are assisted in a variety of
ways." In addition to the
Jewish Community Centers
and the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Community
Chaplaincy Service, over 250
community volunteers, along
with several other local agen-
cies assist with the Project.
Funds raised provide for the
purchase of Kosher for
Passover food packages which
are distributed to families in
need, homebound people, nurs-
ing homes, and state and local
correctional institutions.
In addition, community
Seders throughout the com-
munity bring together more
than 3,000 people and over
5,000 gift food packages were
delivered.
Assisting Rabbi Schiff in this
year's religious services will be
Rabbis Maxwell Berger,
Joseph A. Gorfinkel, Warren
Kasztl, Allan Mirvis and Mar-
vin Rose.
Rabbis Shapiro and Singer presenting Canandaigua Presi-
dent Richard Sands ana Vice President Robert Sands with
Manischewitz Certificate ofKashruth.
Canandaigua's Manischewitz
Kosher Plant Begins Operation
NAPLES, NY After receiving the Certification of Kashruth
from the certifying Rabbis, Manischewitz Wines and Champagnes
began rolling off the production line at the new Kosher wine facili-
ty of Canandaigua Wine Co. in Naples, NY. The certificate
guarantees that the wines and champagnes bearing the
Manischewitz label are produced strictly Kosher under the re-
quirements of Jewish laws and traditions.
Rabbi Dr. Joseph I. Singer and Rabbi Solomon B. Shapiro,
whose names are on each bottle of Manischewitz to attest to the
purity and Kashruth of the wine, inspected the plant and gave
their certification on the production facilities to produce
Manischewitz Kosher Wines.
"We are completely satisfied with the winery. All of the
Manischewitz wines are produced in accordance with strict Or-
thodox Rabbinical requirements," said Rabbi Singer.
Manischewitz, the top selling Kosher wine in the United States,
was produced in Brooklyn until Canandaigua Wine Co. bought the
Monarch Wine Co's wine division last year. Around the same
time, Canandaigua purchased the winery in Naples where the
Manischewitz wines are now being purchased.
The move of Manishewitz production to Naples, NY initiated
concern about whether the wine could still be produced under
Kosher conditions because of fears that it would no longer be pro-
duced in a traditional Jewish community.
Explained Rabbi Singer, "The task of transferring everything
from Brooklyn to Naples was done over a three-month period. We
received unusual cooperation from the people in Naples. Now, not
only does the wine meet Kosher standards, but it is being produc-
ed so it is strictly Kosher for use during the Passover season.
Howard Jacobson, Canandaigua Wine's marketing director.
said. "We have done everything possible to make sure that
everything connected with the production of Manischewitz Is
Kosher."
To be qualified to produce Kosher wines, there are many sanita-
tion procedures to guarantee purity with all the wine tanks,
holding tanks and other equipment completely koshenzed.
The day-to-day operations and production will be under the
supervision of two learned Mashgichim (Rabbis' representatives]
- from crushing to bottling as required by Jewish laws. Because
of the Sabbath, there will be no production of Manischewitz
Kosher wines on Fridays.
Richard Sands, president and chief operating officer ^Canan-
daigua Wines, commented, "Canandaigua is committed to tne
adherence of all Jewish laws and requirements in the production
of Kosher wines. We will maintain the same excellent qualin
has been traditionally expected by the Manischewitz
discriminating consumer."
The Naples facility is expected to produce over 8.400 ho"lesof
Manischewitz wines an hour to assure an adequate supply
Manischewitz Kosher wines which are Kosher for Passover d
well as all year round.
Organization Xcw
Jewish War Veterans Post and Auxiliary No.123 will
not hold its monthly meeting on Sunday, April If, "
the Jewish holidays. The next meeting will be held bunaay,
May 17 at the Surfside Center
Greater Miami Women's Division, American Friends
of the Hebrew University will hold a luncheon meeting
Thursday, April 23 at 11:45 a.m. at the Ocean Pavilion.
Guest speaker will be Dan Levenson, a Foun^elr*L
benefactor of the American Friends of the nev
University. .
The 11:45 session, which is open to the public, is being
coordinated by Florence D. Feldman, director oi i
Greater Miami Women's Division. Reservations may
made by calling te office of the American Friends oi
Hebrew University.
B'nai B'rith is holding a dinner meeting at the Bnckell
Point Holiday Inn on Wednesday, April 22 at 6^ P- ion
thur Teitelbaum, district director of the Anti-ueian
League, will be guest speaker.


Lubavitcher Rebbe To
Celebrate 85th Birthday
Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
The Lubavitcher Rebbe,
Menachem M. Schneerson will
celebrate his 85th birthday
Friday as Lubavitchers
throughout the world make
special prayers in his honor.
A delegation of 15 rabbis
from the South and Central
areas of Florida will join Rab-
bis from throughout the coun-
try at a reception Thursday,
April 9 in the Dirkson Senate
office building in Washington,
D.C.
The U.S. Congress recently
passed a joint resolution mark-
ing Friday, April 10 as
"Education Day U.S.A.,"
honoring the Lubavitcher
Rebbe, by designating the day
as one to be devoted to fur-
thering the ideals which he
champions, education and pro-
motion of spiritual and moral
values.
The resolution includes the
creation of an international
scroll of honor to be signed by
President Reagan and other
heads of state from
throughout the world.
Rabbi Menachem Mendel
Rebbe Menachem Schneerson
Schneerson is seventh in the
dynastic lineage of Lubavit-
cher leaders. The Chabad-
Lubavitch movement was
founded in the 18th century by
Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi
(1745-1812).
Noted Educator Honored
With Hebrew Award
Dr. Joseph Diamond,
veteran Jewish educator and
former president of the
Moadon Ivri Hebrew
Culture Forum of Greater
Miami, was honored by the
Histadrut Ivrit, national
Hebrew Cultural Foundation,
at ceremonies which took place
on Wednesday, April 8, at 1:30
p.m. at the Fiesta Room at the
Mirasol Towers.
Dr. Diamond served as ex-
ecutive director of the Board
of Jewish Education in Toron-
to for many years prior to com-
ing to the Miami area where he
directed the Judaica programs
at the Irving Lehrman Day
School and the Beth David
Congregation Religious
School.
A former president of the
Council for Jewish Education,
Diamond has recently publish-
ed "Torah Out of Zion," a
translation of the Biblical
study sessions held in Israel at
the homes of Israeli prime
ministers and presidents.
Diamond also served as
president of the Moadon Ivri
for more than a decade and
was instrumental in founding
the annual luncheon benefit-
ting the Histadrut Ivrit,
Hadoar, and the Brit Ivrit
Olamit World Union for the
study of Hebrew.
Also participating in the pro-
gram, during which Dr. Dia-
mond was presented with a
medallion by National Board
Member Matthew Mosenkis,
were Dr. Jehudah Melber, cur-
rent president of the Moadon
Ivri, and Dr. Abraham Git-
telson, associate director of
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education.
JWV And Ladies Auxiliary
223 To Hold Joint
Installation Of Officers
Jewish War Veterans and
Ladies Auxiliary West Miami
Post No. 223 are holding their
Annual Joint Installation of
Officers on Thursday evening,
April 9, at 8 p.m. at Temple
Beth Tov.
Dade County Council Com-
mander Norman T. Levine will
install Post officers, including:
Abe Isgar, commander;
Stanley Gold, Sr. vice-
commander; Eugene Dondes,
1st Jr. vice-commander; Mike
pearlman, 2nd Jr. vice-
commander; Norman Levine,
judge advocate; Norman Bur-
man, quartermaster.
Jack Pales, adjutant; Ben
stner, 3 year trustee; Fred
Mirschorn, 2 year trustee;
*e Pearlman, 1 year
^stee; Milton Cohen, 3 year
welfare; Joe Witten, 2 year
welfare; Abe Isgar, 1 year
welfare.
Dade County Council, Aux-
iliary President Phyllis Shaw
will install Auxiliary Officers,
including: Carol Gold, presi-
dent; Tanya Levine, Sr. vice-
president; Ruth Herman, Jr.
vice-president; Rose Felson,
chaplain; Lee Weiner,
patriotic instructor; Natalie
Rosenberg, conductress;
Gladys Isgar, treasurer;
Florence Dondes, Ella
Grossman, Dorothy Noretsky
as trustees; Florence Dondes,
corresponding secretary;
Charlotte MittTer, recording
secretary.
Installaion co-chairmen are
Stanley Gold and Thelma
Potlock.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation recent-
ly held a press conference, at which time, the
Speaker of the Florida House of Represen-
tatives, Jon Mills announced that Eli Wiesel
would address an unprecedented joint session
of the Florida House, Senate and Governor's
Cabinet. Pictured from left are Jeffrey
Berkowitz, chairman of Federation's Com-
munity Relations Committee; Myron J.
Brodie, Federation executive vice president;
Norman Braman, vice president of Federa-
tion; Representative Elaine Bloom; House
Speaker Jon Mills; Representative Betty Met-
calf; Sam Dubbin, chairman of Federation's
Young Leadership Council Tallahassee Mis-
sion; Representative Fred Lippman; Aaron
Podhurst, president of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Alliance Division held its Del Prado Brunch
raising $75,000 for the 1987 Combined Jewish
Appeal. Bella Eisenbaum was honored during
the evening for her devotion and support of the
State of Israel. Pictured from left are Jeanette
Biumenthal, co-chair; Bella Eisenbaum,
honoree; Jerome Gleekel, guest speaker;
Charles Wilder, chairman; Mac Gale, co-
chair.
The Chaim Weizman Branch of the Farband
Movement held its annual luncheon on behalf
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
1987 Combined Jewish Appeal, raising a
substantial amount for the campaign. Pic-
tured are members of the Weizman Branch ex-
ecutive committee (from left, seated) Viola
Freed, co-chairperson; Goldie Rubinstein,
secretary; Sara Goldberg, corresponding
secretary; (standing, from left) Sender M.
Kaplan, guest speaker; Frieda Mailman,
social hostess; Sheva Berland, chairperson;
Sam Freed, financial secretary; Sara Kauf-
man, co-chairperson.


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 10, 1987
U.S. Dependence On Mideast Oil
Creates Potential For A National
Security Threat, Warns Report
By JUDITH COLP
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Increasing United States
dependence on Middle
Eastern oil is creating the
potential for a "national
security threat in the next
decade," a Reagan Ad-
ministration official has
warned.
"Although lower oil prices have
benefited the economy in the
short-term, there in justification
for national concern over both the
declining competitiveness of
American oil and gas and over ris-
ing imports," said Secretary of
Energy John Herrington in
releasing a report on energy
security.
THE REPORT, which was sub-
mitted to President Reagan,
states that the Persian Gulf is ex-
pected to supply between 30 and
45 percent of the world's oil by
1995.
"Over the longer term, U.S. oil
imports could exceed the range
they reached in the mid-1970's,
the report states. "U.S. net oil im-
ports (could reach) in the range of
8 to 10 million barrels per day
about one half or more of total
projected U.S. oil consumption."
The bulk of this oil comes from the
Persian Gulf nations.
Oil imports are currently 33 per-
cent of U.S. consumption.
The report warns that "recent
Middle East history shows that oil
supplies there can be interrupted"
as they have been 15 times since
1950 such as during the Iranian
revolution and the Iran-Iraq War.
A "politically-inspired oil em-
bargo" such as occurred in 1973-4
during the Yom Kippur War is not
a "significant threat," although it
could become one if oil imports in-
crease, the report warns.
"Although there is only a small
risk of a significant disruption
that could cause another sharp in-
crease in oil prices in the near
term," the report says, "many of
the political, social and military
factors that led to sharp disrup-
tions are likely to persist in the
future."
The Department of Energy
stops short of supporting an oil
import tax, noting that for a $10
barrel fee the GNP would lose as
much as $273 billion from 1988 to
1995, said Herrington. An oil im-
port fee would also cause U.S.
businesses to pay higher energy
costs than international com-
petitors and would hurt U.S. ex-
port sales, said Herrington.
HERRINGTON said he sup-
ports tax initiatives to increase
U.S. production such as the
elimination of the windfall profits
tax, deregulation of natural gas
and electricty, development of
coal, and regulatory measures on
nuclear power to restore its
economic vitality.
The Department of Energy
report notes that while other fuels
such as coal, natural gas, nuclear
power and renewable resources
will increase their share of world
energy consumption, oil will re-
main the most important fuel in
the 1990's.
Ephraim Katzir (right), president of the World ORT Union and
past president of the State of Israel, congratulates David B.
Hermelin on his election as president of the American ORT
Federation at the AOF National Conference held recently in New
York City. Katzir was guest speaker at the Conference banquet
session.
Second-year medical student Stuart Varon
has already tasted the sweet smell of scientific
success. While doing research at the Weiz-
mann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel,
the young American confirmed the curative
powers of garlic. He wanted to verify an obser-
vation cited in the Talmud: 'Garlic kills
parasites in the bowels.' With David
Mirelman, Besen-Brender Professor of
Microbiology and Parasitology, Varon showed
that aUtcxn, the pungent active principle in
garlic, is a potent killer of dysentery amoeba
in laboratory cultures. The 27-year-old Varon
attends the SUNY School of Medicine in Buf-
falo, N.Y. '
Students at the Jerusalem College of
Technology are combining advanced optics
research and computerized image processing
technology to develop a touch-sight device
which will enable the blind to 'see' objects
around them by sensing their outlines. Every
JCT student must, during his four-year
academic program, create an original
research project, applicable to industry, in
order to receive his baccalaureate deuree.
Natan (Anatoly) Sharansky is congratulated on being named a
Golda Meir Fellow of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem by
Samuel Rothberg, international chairman of the Golda Meir
Fellowship Fund.
A victim of a bomb explosion near Jerusalem's
Damascus Gate last week receives medical
treatment. The bomb exploded just as one
Border Police unit was taking over from
another and injured 12 policemen. Five
passers-by were also wounded. Fatah s ctock
Force 17 unit took responsibility for the oiasi-


B'nai Mitzvah
Bruce Zemel
Perry Bakst
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
.. ."And he poured of the anointing oil upon Aaron's head, and
anointed him, to sanctify him"
(Leviticus 8.12).
TZAV
TZAV An elaboration of the sacrificial laws: the burnt-
offering, the meal offering, the sin-offering; guilt-offering and
peace-offering. Moses consecrated Aaron and his sons for the
priesthood: he made their offerings of consecration, sprinkled
them with the oil of anointment, and taught them the order of
sacrifice "And at the door of the tent of meeting shall ye abide
day and night seven days, and keep the charge of the Lord, that
ye die not; for so I am commanded" (Leviticus 8.35).
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law Is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman-
Tsamlr, $15, published by Shengotd. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
Lane, New York, N.Y. 10038. Joseph Schlang is president of the society
distributing the volume.)
USSR Seen Softening Its
Position Towards Israel's
Condition For Soviet Role
In Mideast Peace Talks
TEL AVIV (JTA) The Soviet Union may be soften-
ing its position toward Israel's conditions for Soviet par-
ticipation in an international conference for Middle East
peace. Jerusalem was informed of the latest Soviet views
following a recent meeting between Mikhail Gorbachev and
Prime Minister Bettino Craxi of Italy, Haaretz reported
Sunday.
ACCORDING TO the report, Gorbachev said Soviet
policy on the resumption of diplomatic relations with Israel
would change once an international conference becomes a
concrete possibility. He also reportedly said that Israel's
conditions for such a conference would not constitute an
impediment.
Haaretz said the issues of diplomatic relations and
Jewish emigration from the USSR would be discussed at a
meeting in New York this week between the Soviet Am-
bassador to the United Nations and Avraham Tamir, direc-
tor general of the Foreign Ministry.
Bonn (JTA) President Chaim Herzog of Israel will
begin his visit to West Germany on April 6 at the site of the
Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, which he helped
"berate as an officer in the British army during the final
stages of World War II.
THE IRISH BORN HERZOG will be accompanied by
President Richard von Weizsaecker of the Federal
Hepublic throughout his four-day state visit. On the even-
lng of April 6, Herzog will host a dinner for leaders of all
Political and social groups in West Germany.
m beach GENERAL CARE FOR FUNGUS NAILS miami beach
'QOichael Greenfield! f f *"*** Av.iubja
^&r |Podiatrist Foot Surgeon]
P 1674 Meridian Avenue. Ste. 104
(Across from Burdintf's)
spoct, **<: 531-0414
WE ACCEPT MEDICARE ASSIGNMENTS
MELISSA BERKOWITZ
Melissa Robin Berkowitz,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Paul
Berkowitz will be called to the
Torah as Bat Mitzvah on
Saturday at 9:30 a.m. at Bet
Shira Congregation. Melissa's
Soviet twin, Rena Fulmacht,
will be called in absentia.
The celebrant is a student in
the Bet Shira Religious School.
She attends Ransom
Everglades where she is in the
seventh grade.
She is a member of the
Honor Roll, the Builders Club,
the newspaper staff and in the
school choir.
Mr. and Mrs. Berkowitz will
host the Kiddush following the
services in honor of the
occasion.
Special guest will include her
grandparents Fay Berkowitz
of Philadelphia and Harold and
Ruth Harris of Boca Raton.
PERRY BAKST
Perry Lyle Bakst son of Mr.
and Mrs. Irving Bakst (Jac-
queline) will be called to the
Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday at Mincha Service at
Temple Emanu-El.
Perry is a seventh grade stu-
dent at Ransom Everglades
School. He is an outstanding
athlete and is quite musical.
He plays piano and drums.
Perry has attended Temple
Emanu-El's afternoon
Religious School for the past
year.
Many friends and relatives
from home and out-of-town
will attend and help celebrate
the joyous occasion.
BRUCE ZEMEL
On Shabbat Hagadol, Satur-
day, at 9 a.m. in the Young
Israel of Greater Miami, Bruce
Samuel Michael Zemel will be
called to the Torah on the occa-
sion of his Bar Mitzvah. Bruce
is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Mor-
ton B. Zemel.
A luncheon in Bruce's honor
will take place April 12, at
noon at Beth Torah Congrega-
tion, in North Miami Beach.
He will also lead the Shabbat
Mincha and Maariv services
and the Torah reading at
Shaaray Tefilah Congregation
on April 11 to be followed by a
Shalosh Seudot there.
(Shaaray Tefilah Congregation
on N.E. 172 Street and N.E.
10 Avenue, North Miami
Beach.)
Bruce Zemel is a student in
the Junior High School of the
Hebrew Academy of Miami
Beach and attended the Hillel
Community Day School
through the sixth grade.
His hobbies are baseball,
basketball, swimming, and
football. His brothers, Joseph
and Fred, and his sisters
Pnina, Alisa and Aviva will
celebrate with him.
Other honored guests in-
clude: grandmother, Rose
Kamzan, of Brooklyn New
York, uncles and aunts, Mark
Kamzan, of New York City,
Aunt Shirley Z. Kaufman of
Miami Beach, and Sylvia
Zemel of Miami Beach, Mr.
and Mrs. Herbert C. Zemel of
Miami Beach, Mr. and Mrs.
Nathan Zemel of Orange City,
Florida. Cousins present in-
clude Dr. and Mrs. Edward
Zemel of North Miami Beach,
Mr. and Mrs. Nussie Zemel of
Miami Beach, Mr. and Mrs.
Ted Shrensel of Montclair,
New Jersey, David Frank of
West Orange, New Jersey, Mr.
and Mrs Daniel Zemel of
Miami Beach and Franklin
Zemel of Miami Beach, Mrs.
Marcia Leder and Mr. and
Mrs. Yonah Berzon.
Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
Synagogue
Listing
CandlelightingTime
7:23 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach, Ha. 531-2120
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig
Dally 7:20 a.m. Afternoon S:30 p.m.
Sat. a.m.
ADATHYESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947 1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpem Coneervetlve
Mlnyan 7:30 a.m. 1 8 30 p.m.
Sal. a Sun. t a.m. a 6 p.m.
Frl. 8 p.m.
Shabbat aarv. Sat. S:30 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM
SM0 N. Kendall Dr.
S Miami M7-M67
Or. HortMWI Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
Rabbi Leonard Schoolman
Frl. 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Baumgard "The Pollard
Atlalr." Sat. 815 a.m. Bar Mitzvah Abraham
Smllowltz and Scott Llebowltz. Sal. 1115 a.m.
Bar Mltzvahs Jalfray Reiaman and
David Baama.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
262S S.W. 3rd Avenue 854-3911
Jack Rlemer, Rabbi
Robert Albert,
Cantor
Rev. Milton Freeman,
Ritual Director
Sat. 9 a.m. Sabbath Sao.
Mlnerwjci at iMo m Daily Paaaoveraarv.
Mon 7:30 am A 8 p.m Tuaa. t a.m. A p.m
Wad. 0 a.m. A 7:16 p.m Thur*. 7:10 a.m.
Sat 9 am aarv Mincha h 8:20 p.m.
Dally Mlnyan held morning A evening
7 days a araak. flaaaa call for acrtadula.
BETH KOOESH
Conservative
1101 S.W 12 Ave
Raboi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joaeoh Krtoaol
Roee Berlin Executive Secretary
8586334
Annual Banquet May 18
Sarvlcaa Monday A Thuraday 7:30 a.m.
Sat 8.45 a m
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
222S NE'121 St.. N. Miami. FL 33181
8915508 Coneervetlve
Dr. itraei Jacoba. Rabbi _.
Dr Jo.ephA. Gorfinkel. fflKV
Rabbi Emeritus v"f'
Moahe Frledler, Cantor
Frl. 8 p.m.
Sat. 8 a.m. Bar Mitzvah Raymond Lllwln.
Weekday aarv. Mon Fri 8a.m.
Mon.Thura. 5 p.m. Sun. 8:30 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave., M.B.. FL 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Cantor Nlsslm Benyamini
Eva aarv. 6 p.m. Sat. 8:15 a.m.
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
238-2801 h
Rabbi David H. Auerbach ^.'
Cantor Stephen Freedman
Frl. 6 p.m.
Speaker: Roger Bamataln Sal. 9:30 a.m. aarv.
Bat Mitzvahs Melissa Robin Berkowitz Soviet
twinning Rena Fulmacht Paeeover aarv.
Tuaa. A Wad. 930 a.m.
Dally aervlcee: Sunday 9:30 am
Mon. Tuaa. A Thura. 7:10 a.m. Wad. 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SH6LOM 538 723.'
Chase Ave. 8 41 at St neerai
DR LEON KMONISH, Founding Sankx Rabbi
GARY A GLICKSTEIN. Rabbi
HARRY JOLT. Auxiliary Rabbi
PAUL 0 CAPLAN. Aaelalant Rabbi
CANTOR DAVI0 CONVISER
Frl. 8 15 p.m Sermon by Rabbi Qllckaleln "Great
Shabbat:I thin* HaPaaach Time Sat. 10 45
aarv Sun. 9:30 a.m. Breaklaat Sympoelum Pass
ovar aarv. Tuaa. 10:45 a.m.
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
(051 N Miami Beech Blvd
Or Max A Liptchitz. Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Dally Sarvlcaa: Mon. Frl. 7:30 a.m. -. ,
A 5:30 p.m. *0
Sal. 8:25 a.m. A 7.1S pm .V
Sun. 6 a.m. A 5:30 p.m. -
P.aaovar aarv.: Mon. 7:30 a nv 6:30 p.m.
Tuaa A Wad 6:25 a.m. A 6:30 p.m.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave Miami Beech
534-7213 534 7214
Barry J Konovitch. Rabbi /'Sty.
Mosne Buryn. Cantor .'St.'
Sergio Grobler. President
Sholem Epelbaum. President.
Religious Committee
TEMPLE EMANU EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miemi Beach
Dr Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Barge'
Yehude Shifman. Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gereld Taub. Executive Director
Kabbalat Shabbat 6 p.m.
Sat. 9 a.m. Dr. Irving Lehrman will preach.
Cantor Yehuda Shltman will chanl.
Bar Mitzvah Parry Lyta Bakat. Mon. 6 a.m.
Slyum Hab'Chor Paaaover aarv. Mon. 6:30 p.m.
Tuaa. 9 a.m. A 6:30 p.m. Sadar to follow
both eve. aarv Wed. 9 a.m.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Pfnetree Drive. Miami Batch
532 6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schiff
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Mramt's Plonr Reform Congicgition
137 N.E. 19th St.. Miami. 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell Bemat
Assistant Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor: Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritua:
Jacob G. Bornstein
Director of Education
And Programming: Jack L. Sparks
Frl. 6 p.m.
Downtown Rabbi Dr. Haekell M. Bemat
' Cl aan Ing up our Act." Liturgy Cantor Rachelle
F. Ne I eon Kendall: Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
"Waiting, tor Wlnge Tha Java ol Ethiopia."
Liturgy: CantortalSololal Harvey Kaufman
TEMPLE JUDEA
5600 Granada Blvd
CI Qablll 987 5867
*B0fiael B. EJeenetat, Rabbi
Frl. 8:15
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Shoshanah Raab, Cantor
Sarvlcaa Frl. 7:30 p.m.
Sat. 9-30 am
Onag Shabbat will lollow
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Ari Fridkis, Assoc Rabbi f
Cantor Murray Yavneh w
Sal. 9 a.m. Sabbath aervice.
Dally Mlnchah Sunday-Friday
8 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Sat. 9 a.m. and 5:15 p.m.
TEMPLE NEN TAMID 898 1348
7902 Carlyle Ave 806-9*33
Miami Beach 33141 Corveervei.ve
Rabbi Eugene Labovltz .5-*.;
Cantor Edward Klein Sp i)
Dally aarv. Mon.Frl. 8 a.m. A 6:15 p.m. '
Sat. Mincha 6:15 p.m. Sun. 6:30 a.m. A
6:15 p.m.
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beech
971 Northeest 172nd St
North Miami Beech
651 1562
Yeekov Sprung. Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
232-6833 Modern Orihodo.
Rabbi Hershel Becker
Sat. 9:30 a.m. service at
Temple Samu-EI
9353 SW 152 Ave
S. of N. Kendall Dr
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave
North Dede S Reform Congregation
Ralph P Ktngsley. Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes. Centor
Barbara S Ramsey. Administrator
Worship aarv. Sal. 10:10 a.m. B'nai Mitzvah
Keren Erdberg A Jeffrey Zucker Sun. Mlnyan
6:45 a.m. Mon. Paaaover aarv. 6 p.m. Tuaa.
Paaaover aarv. 10:30 a.m.
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
271-2311 ,-,
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi 9>)
Benjamin Adler, Cantor w-
David Rosenthal, Auxiliary Cantor
Mlnyan 7 am Monday A Thuraday.
Sunday 9 a.m.
Frl. 8:15 p.m. evening aarv. will be conducted
by Dr. Norman N. Shapiro. Sat. aarv. (a.m.


*
Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 10, 1987
Artist's drawing shows new processing plant and office facility being constructed by Empire Kosher Poultry
Rebirth Of An Empire
Passover, One Year Later
5 a.m., Feb. 16, an unusually
large crowd of rabbis, managers
and employees gathered at the
main processing plant site of Em-
pire Kosher Foods in Mifflintown,
Pennsylvania. It was a special
day: several hundred chickens and
turkeys were to be prepared for
the kosher markets. People had
come early to witness the first
complete operations on the site in
over a year.
The tension of the crowd soon
gave way to relief and silent
prayers of thanks and celebration.
Empire had stepped onto the road
to recovery from the fire that
destroyed over 80 percent of its
facilities and two million pounds
of inventory on January 26, 1986.
The disastrous 25-million dollar
loss had threatened the survival of
the largest producer of kosher
poultry in the world.
When the fire struck, produc-
tion of poultry had been increased
for Passover, the busiest season in
the kosher foods industry. Empire
had already started hatching and
raising chickens and turkeys,
specially fed on a restricted diet in
preparation for Passover. The
fierce competitiveness of the
broiler industry combined with
the crippling of the company
before its peak production season
caused many outsiders to question
the future of Empire Kosher.
Those inside, however, knew
that a company is the sum total of
its people, and none of those peo-
ple was willing to surrender. Nine
hundred people refused to give up,
and rebuilt an Empire from the
ashes. Passover 1987 marks their
special triumph, and an end to a
year of tension and difficulty.
Growth
The late Joseph Katz founded
Empire Kosher Poultry, Inc., in
New York state in 1938. He set a
goal of mass producing top quality
kosher chickens for the contem-
porary American Jew. At that
time, few outlets of kosher pro-
ducts existed, especially for Jews
living or traveling in parts of the
country where kosher butchers
were scarce. Joseph Katz and his
son Murray, President of Empire
since 1962, remained committed
to producing new and convenient
poultry products that maintained
the highest standard of kashruth.
They worked side by side for 30
years to see those concepts suc-
ceed. Murray's sons Steven and
Alan are continuing in the family
business, following the ideals set
by Joseph. Empire Kosher has
grown to become one of the
largest producers of kosher foods
in the world, backed by a reputa-
tion of quality and attention to the
changing needs of the modern
kosher consumer.
The facilities were moved to
Mifflintown in 1961, in the hearty
mountain farmlands of central
Pennsylvania. Modern equipment
was installed. Hatching and rais-
ing operations were refined and
expanded. New, interesting
frozen foods and delicatessen
items were added to the original
line of fresh poultry. By 1986,
Empire had created one of the
best-integrated poultry opera-
tions in America, with over 250
products sold internationally. Em-
pire had also become the largest
company and the major source of
employment in Juniata County,
Pennsylvania.
Destruction
Sunday afternoon, January 26,
1986. A cold rain fell on Juniata.
Fire started in an electric heater
inside the live poultry area of the
enormous plant. Within seconds,
it reached the wood framed roof.
Within minutes, it engulfed the
whole facility. Nineteen fire com-
panies from the area could not
stop the inferno.
Word traveled fast in the small
community. Empire's manage-
ment and several hundred
employees stood helplessly in the
rain, watching their careers go up
in smoke. It soon became ap-
parent that nothing at the location
would be left untouched by the
fire. They worried about their
future in Mifflintown as they wat-
ched their jobs disappear.
Murray Katz, who was in
Florida for the weekend, was
reached by telephone that after-
noon. At first he did not believe
the report of the damage. Op-
timistically, he told the managers,
"We'll be back in full production
by Wednesday." When he arrived
at 3 a.m. the following morning,
the utter devastation was painful-
ly evident. After almost 50 years
of hard work, Empire Kosher had
been destroyed overnight. Murray
told the employees, "We'll
rebuild."
Coping
While the fire was still raging,
Donald McNemar, Manager of
Plant Operations, began
reconstruction. A maintenance
crew was dispatched to a small
satellite plant in Mount Union,
over 50 miles away. New
machinery, new lines, improved
employee facilities and double
work shifts would be needed to ap-
proach the production capabilities
that had been lost.
Live chickens were rerouted
from the destroyed Mifflintown
plant to Mount Union. Live
turkeys scheduled for production
had to be sold. Supervisors divid-
ed their staffs into shifts and
made commuting arrangements.
Monday morning, Jan. 27, pro-
cessing began in Mount Union.
Employees commuted more than
two hours each day to work. They
worked shoulder to shoulder in
cramped conditions. Their lives
would be disrupted for over a year
working varied shifts and longer
hours. Although the obstacles
seemed impossible, they faced the
challenge. Few complained.
Orders for fresh poultry from a
few New York distributors were
loaded on trucks by Empire's
sales staff. With only one truck
bay and virtually no freezer space,
it was necessary to load the
poultry into the truck straight
from the production line.
An immediate search was made
for a building to house the cor-
porate offices. Empire would need
a place to coordinate the
satellites, plan rebuilding, and
maintain a sales office. Manage-
ment located an abandoned auto
parts store in a small shopping
center near the fire-ravaged
plant. By Wednesday, renovations
to the former store, installation of
phone and computer services, and
rental of office equipment were
under way. Most of the ir-
replaceable computer files had
been ruined. All historical records
and sales, production and accoun-
ting files had burned. Empire
would have to reconstruct
customer and employee records
completely.
Management immediately
began clean-up, redesign, and con-
struction of a new facility on the
site. As twisted beams and con-
crete were removed, oxygen rush-
ed in to rekindle the flames and
further hamper the clean-up pro-
cess. Remarkably, part of the
turkey processing room and half
of the freezers and cooking rooms
remained standing, although
heavily damaged by smoke and
heat and separated by several
hundred yards of charred rubble.
Cleaning and rebuilding the sur-
viving rooms became a priority.
Workers who had been processing
poultry a few days earlier worked
at removing the thick black soot
from the machinery. Within two
weeks F.mpirp again hpfran prn.
cessing turkeys. Within three
weeks, cooking and further pro-
cessing of cooked turkey breasts
and delicatessen items resumed.
The Mount Union plant bustled
with people 20 hours per day, ex-
cept Saturday, the Sabbath. Two
shifts kept personnel and
machinery busy. When production
was not running, the time was
devoted to clean-up and
maintenance. The small Mount
Union freezer was overhauled,
and within a month, Empire was
ready to produce new items
scheduled before the fire.
With Passover less than a
month away, Empire was
operating five small, separate
facilities to do the work once
managed under one large roof.
The strain of rebuilding while
maintaining production levels
weighed heavily on management.
Comfortable offices for the ad-
ministrative staff were replaced
with makeshift partitioned
quarters in the store's large single
room. Rabbis from New York and
Baltimore added two hours of
traveling to their already busy
schedules. Workers tired from
longer hours, difficult conditions,
and commuting. Two smaller fires
in the following months one
caused by faulty wiring and one
caused by arson threatened
recovery efforts. Murray Katz re-
mained optimistic, and the people
of Empire pulled together for
survival.
Rebuilding
Within two months after the
fire, Empire had revived itself and
was producing at about 80 percent
of its former volume, but much
had been lost. Notices in major
metropolitan newspapers
throughout the country apologiz-
ed to loyal customers for the lack
of available products for
Passover. Valuable shelf and
freezer space in the stores and
butcher shops filled with the pro-
ducts of competitors. In many
areas, demand for Empire pro-
ducts far exceeded the supply
available.
Support from the Jewish com-
munity and food industry helped
to ease the burden. Customers re-
mained patient during periods of
product shortages. Distributors
and butchers tolerated late or in-
complete shipments of orders.
Business associates helped
reconstruct records and accepted
payment delays caused by the fire.
Employees and neighbors con-
tinued to contribute the best of
their efforts to help Empire sus-
tain production without sacrific
ing quality or the adherence to
kashruth.
Rebirth
Now, little more than one year
after the fire, Empire's process-
ing lines for chicken and turkey
are both operating smoothly in the
new, nearly completed plant in
Mifflintown. Constructed of
masonry and steel, the rebuilt
plant is designed for maximum
cost-efficiency and safety. The
corporate offices will move into
the new building and finishing
touches will be complete by June
1987. Empire will consolidate all
employees and activities and
return to the level of operating it
had before the fire.
Upon completion, the new Em-
pire plant will be the largest
kosher poultry operation under
one roof, with over 240,000
square feet. New machinery and
processing techniques will make
Empire's production facility one
of the most modern businesses in
the kosher food industry today.
Plans for new product develop-
ment and improved distribution
disrupted by toe fire are now be-
ing implemented. Murray Katz
feels that the new processing
plant will help to deliver even bet-
ter quality at a lower cost due to
the installation of the new state-
of-the-art equipment.
Empire Kosher has always used
a more expensive chicken, raised
in larger living quarters and
grown more slowly than chickens
raised by most poultry breeders.
The process of koshering requires
additional steps and extra costs
for production. Because of tne
strict kosher laws of humaneness
and cleanliness, the shortcuts us-
ed in the production of non-kosher
poultry are unacceptable. Empire
will continue its commitment to
bring the Jewish consumer tne
best kosher poultry products
available, combining the ancient
tradition of kashruth with the in-
novation of modern food process-
ing techniques.
The fire that could have brought
Empire Kosher to an end has pro-
vided the strength and nope
survive and progress, mu
Passover season, Mr. Katz can
confidently say. "We are deter-
mined not to lose."______.-------


day, April 10, 1987/The Jewish FlorTftan iPage 15-B
of Israel Bonds president and chief ex-
lire officer. Yehudah Halevy, standing,
er. recently met with many members of the
ater Miami Rabbinal Association to
KM Israel Bonds' record year in 1986 and
re plans for the Israel Bonds Organiza-
which includes the continuation of solid
from synagogues. Among the rabbis
ing with Halevy at the meeting were, from
standing, Haskell Bernat of Temple
'.; Sol Schiff, executive vice president oj
abbinical Association of Greater Miami;
Maxwell Berger, Associate Rabbi of Temple
Emanu-El; Mayer Abramowitz of Temple
Menorah; Simcha Freedman of Adath
Yeshurun and Ari Fridkis, Associate Rabbi oj
Temple Menorah. Seated, from left are Irving
Lehrman of Temple Emanu-El; Jeffrey Ballon
of Temple Emanu-El, Lauderdale Lakes;
Ralph Kingsley of Temple Sinai of North
Dade; Elliot Skidell of Ramat Shalom, Plan-
tation; and David Saltzman of Aventura
Jewish Center.
ish a Chili! Cocktail Reception held at the
ie of Sauwlrn Rothenberg and hosted by
indra Rothenberg, Bunny Schreiber and
aldine Brody hosted from left, Ruth
ner, chairman of the board, Florida Coun-
Ida Arluk. president Galil Chapter and
tsidium member Florida Council; guest
oviet Jewry
speaker Chaim Ripple, principal of Amit
Junior High School in Israel; Bunny
Schreiber, presidium member Florida Coun-
cil; Marvin Leff, national executive director
AMIT Women; Saundra Rothenberg,
presidium member Florida Council and
Geraldine Brody.
f
if

C
lW


4f)*rT
I V1*^
i,-
r
r
I toi/iT ,nght>- Minister of Absorption,
I n. soviet Jewry activists outside the
UhZ K,r's tff- The demonstrators
1 m Israeli government is not doing
enough to obtain the release of Jews who wish
to leave the Soviet Union. Police briefly detain-
ed six protestors after they chained themselves
to the gate of the Prime Minister's office.
Nathan and Clara Bomze, center, proudly display Vie Lion of
Judah Award they received from the Greater Miami I ,rael Bonds
Organization during a recent Breakfast at the Port Royale con-
dominium in Miami Beach where they reside. Helping make the
presentation were David Pretner, Port Royale Israel Bond Com-
mittee co-chairman, and Jack Finn, chairman of the committee.
Mrs. Wendy Medin, left, of Miami with her daughter L isa, who is
a student this year in the one-year program of the Rothberg
School for Overseas Students of the Hebrew University of
Jerusalem. Mrs. Medin was among parents of students at the
Rothberg School who participated in the "Kesher" tour to Israel
sponsored by the Office of Academic Affairs of the American
Friends of the Hebrew University.
In a photo obtained by the Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry, a
chest bedecked with medals gives vivid testimony to the heroism of
World War II combat pilot Naum Rabinovich of Zaporozhie. In
(me noted incident, he saved the crew of a crippled American 'Fly-
ing Fortress' bomber by guiding it to safety urith his fighter
behind Russian lines. As 'thanks' for his courage, the Kremlin
has repeatedly refused Rabinovich an exit visa to freedom to re-
join his wife, son and daughter, whom he has not seen for seven
years.


Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 10, 198?
Grant For
Agricultural
Project In
Ethiopia
NEW YORK (JTA) United
Support of Artists for Africa has
granted the American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee
(JDC) $150,000 for an agricultural
recovery project in the Gondar
region of Ethiopia, according to
JDC president, Heinz Eppler.
U.S.A. for Africa was founded in
1985 in response to the reports of
widespread famine in Ethiopia. It
gained immediate prominence
with the song and music video,
"We Are the World."
The JDC will use the funds to
buy oxen, seeds, and tools that
will help farmers regain self-
sufficiency. "After so many years
of famine," Eppler said, "thou-
sand of rural families have com-
pletely lost their ability to con-
tinue farming. They have to start
over from scratch, but they have
nothing to start with."
SYLVIA HASSENFELD,
chairman of the JDC Committee
on the Third World, said "Restor-
ing traditional life styles and
rebuilding the farmers' produc-
tivity is far more cost-effective
than perpetuating the relief syn-
drome. We are very grateful for
U.S.A. for Africa's support, and
we look forward to working
together to help Ethiopians
recover from the horrible effects
of drought and famine."
The project will help about
12,000 families, or 60,000 people,
according to JDC executive vice
president Ralph Goldman. "All
are farmers who were directly af-
fected by the emergency," he ex-
plained. "Either they were
displaced from their homes, or
they sold their tools and oxen dur-
ing the worst of the drought to
buy food."
Goldman said the oxen, seeds,
fertilizer, and other supplies will
be bought in Ethiopia and then
distributed in the designated area.
JDC has been providing non-
sectarian assistance in the Gondar
region since 1983. In addition to
the agricultural recovery project,
JDC has built a health center in
the village of Tedda and is plann-
ing a polyclinic in the town of
Gondar.
44th Anniversary
Of Warsaw Ghetto
A Ghetto Memorial meeting
commemorating the 44th an-
niversary of the Warsaw Ghet-
to uprising will be held on Sun-
day, April 19, at 1 p.m. at the
Surfside Community Center.
Six candles will be lit by
Holocaust survivors in
memory of the six million Jews
who perished and a musical
pageant portraying life during
the Nazi occupation of Europe
will be part of the program.
Performed by Rose Luski,
Bracha Shlien, Molly Lubelski,
Rosa Infeld, Abram Harchik
and Charles Infeld.
Camp Beth Torah
Summer Registration
Camp Beth Torah, located
on the Benny Rok Campus of
Beth Torah Congregation, has
announced that registration
has begun for Summer Camp
1987.
Camp Beth Torah offers four
divisions servicing children 18
months old through 12 years of
age. Camp director is David
Brook.
^ V
w** iC
V6
Members of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation gathered at the
home of Harry A. "Hap" and Davida Levy to kick-off the Federa-
tion's Golden Anniversary "Mission of a Lifetime" to Israel,
which will honor the organization's past presidents, campaign
chairmen, original founders and their families. Pictured from
left (seated) are: Nancy Orovitz, Felicia Orovitz Deutch, Renee
Warren, Edythe Kerness, Carl Weinkle, standing, from left, Pat-
ty Brickman, Jimmy Orovitz, Elton J. Kerness, associate
ecutive vice president of Federation; Dorothy Kaplan, Phi
Warren; Mission of a Lifetime Coordinating Chairmen Harry
"Hap" Levy and Davida Levy; L. Jules Arkin, Shirley Ard
David B. Fleeman, Charlotte Brodie, Myron J. Brodie, execut\
vice president of Federation; Joan Smith and Harry B. Smit


eJewisht meridian
April 10,1987
References to Ritual in the Bible
Mikveh Helps Keep Jewish Love Story Alive Today
Section C
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
At a time of increasing
divorce rates it is nice to
know that there is a method
of keeping the Jewish love
story alive. The tradition of
a woman immersing herself
in a mikveh, saying prayers
to God, and then resuming
marital relations with her
husband dates back to three
references in the Bible.
In the Greater Miami area
there are three mikvehs, two
for women and one for men.
Thousands of women, even
those who do not strictly
follow other religious laws,
make the monthly trip to the
mikveh.
A MIKVEH is a pool of
water that is by no stretch of
the imagination easy to build.
Thousands of books have been
written on mikvehs. Guidelines
on their use and construction
can be found in volumes. But
the construction of a mikveh is
as complicated as the concept
of a mikveh is simple.
According to the laws of
family purity, a woman must
cease sexual relations with her
husband at the onset of her
menstruation. Once certain
that her menstruation has
stopped, she must then count
seven days.
During this time, the hus-
band and wife are not allowed
to kiss, hold hands, tempt, or
even touch each other. On the
seventh evening, she goes
through the ritual of mikveh.
That evening, marital rela-
tions can be resumed.
SOME MODERN women
take offense at the notion that
they are referred to as
"unclean" during their
menstruation. It is a natural
life process, they say.
On the other hand, there are
those who say a mikveh and
the laws of family purity may
produce some of the best
psychology and reasoning
possible to keep a marriage
alive. Even more than that,
they say it is an experience in
which the wife feels like "a
new bride" every month of the
year.
"In Russia, when there was
no mikveh, women would go to
the river when it was frozen
and chop out ice so they could
get to the water," says Reb-
betzin Chani Lipskar, a
teacher at the Alexander S.
Gross Hebrew Academy.
"THE BLOOD that comes
out of a menstrual cycle is
death of a seed. That is a sign
of the absence of life. So clean-
sing a woman is to go from the
extreme of death of a child to
the presence of life flowing
waters."
The word mikveh means
hope.
Zahava Druin runs the
Miami Beach mikveh,
Daughters of Israel, at 151
Michigan Ave. As a teacher at
a Ba'al T'shuva (return to Yid-
dishkeit) Institute in Israel for
14 years, Druin said she began
to take an interest in tradi-
tions of women that were lost
through the ages.
"Along the way, I met a
Rebbetzin. She was the
mikveh lady as was her
mother's mother going back
for 2,000 years. She got the
tradition from the Holy Tem-
ple which was destroyed 2.000
years ago. She became my
teacher and I became a mikveh
lady."
THE PHILOSOPHY of the
mikveh, its beauty, caught her
interest.
"Misinformation is that it's a
process for cleansing. But
what it's all about is a process
of beginning to love each
other. A woman loves a love
story. And this is a process of
love. A woman is commanded
to love her husband from the
tip of her toes to the top of her
hair.
"Two weeks out of the
month she is commanded to
love her husband intellectual-
ly, for the personality, for the
I, for the inner being of who
we are, and not to touch. At
the end of this two-week
period, the couple will really
have worked it out."
For all the hours that Druin
says she spends talking with
women about the mikveh, she
says they are surprised to
learn that the immersion in the
pool, recitation of a special
prayer, takes only about a
minute and a half.
BUT THERE is a process a
woman must go through first.
Enter the comfortable sitting
room in the lobby of the
Daughters of Israel mikveh.
On the coffee table, there
are brochures telling about
mikvehs written in seven
languages English, French,
Spanish, Hebrew, Yiddish,
Russian and Iranian to ac-
commodate the variety of
women that come to use the
mikveh.
Then a woman goes into one
of the two mikveh rooms, and
she first stops in the bathroom.
There is a procedure she must
follow and some women prefer
to do it at home.
First, she must remove all
foreign matter: rings, band-
aids, false teeth, and the like.
She must comb and wash her
hair thoroughly in warm
water. She must cut all nails
and remove all dirt and polish
from them.
SHE MUST bathe all parts
of her body thoroughly. She
must brush her teeth well and
clean her mouth out. She must
soap and remove scabs from all
over.
She is given a clean robe,
paper slippers and is ready to
go into the mikveh. There are
no set times that a woman
must dip herself entirely in the
mikveh. It is usually the
amount of times her mother
taught her to dip. She says the
prayer, and that is it.
When she gets out, there is a
room where she can go to
blow-dry her hair, get made
up, spritz on perfume.
"It's very special when a
woman goes to mikveh. It's
like a honeymoon again," says
Rebbetzin Lipskar.
And the mikveh that is used
on Miami Beach is the exact
shape and size as the mikvehs
that were used 2,000 years
ago, said Mrs. Druin. It con-
tains 99.9 percent plain
Florida water but a very small
percent, she adds, is rain-
water, "a special water that
was brought down by Adam.
The mikveh lady stands in front of Daughters of Israel mikveh on
South Miami Beach. The stone wall is similar to the wall of the
Holy Temple.
Mikveh pool inside Daughters of Israel on South Miami Beach is
exact size and shape of mikvehs of 2,000 years ago or of those
found anywhere throughout the world today.
Texture of the stone wa /Daughters of Israel mikveh on South
Miami Beach is a unique site in this area. It is modeled after the
Holy Temple.
That secret was passed on, and
it's still here."
THERE ARE other times a
mikveh is used in addition to
the completion of a women's
menstrual cycle. A new bride
goes to the mikveh before her
marriage, and men use the
mikveh especially before a
high holiday. Mikvehs are also
used for conversions.
The use of the mikveh by
Conservative and Reform
religious leaders is a point of
disagreement in a pluralistic
Jewish community.
"I've been told we cannot
use them for conversions,"
said Reform Rabbi Gary
Glickstein, spiritual leader of
Temple Beth Sholom. "What
we end up doing to substitute
is we use the ocean.
"For conversion, it's dif-
ficult because according to
conversion tradition you're
supposed to enter the mikveh
in the same way you were in
the womb, without jewelry,
makeup or clothes. So in order
to protect the modesty of those
who are converting, we have
them wear a towel or robe and
go in until the water is above
their shoulders.
"Then they remove the
towel or robe, they go under
the water, and when they
emerge, they put the towel or
the robe back on and come
out."
THERE ARE many Reform
rabbis who wouldn't use a
mikveh at all because they
don't feel it's a necessary
ritual, even for conversion,
said Glickstein.
"All Jews should be able to
use them," he adds. We use
butcher shops and ritual cir-
cumcisors, we are welcome to
pray in Orthodox synagogues.
I see no reason why we should
be refused access to any
Jewish religious facility."
Rabbi Tibor Stern, spiritual
leader of the Orthodox Jacob
C. Cohen Community
Synagogue, was on the com-
mittee that built the
Daughters of Israel mikveh.
He answers Glickstein's ques-
tion this way:
"CONSERVATIVE or
Reform rabbis' conversions
are not recognized as proper
according to Jewish law for a
very simple reason. They de-
mand of the convert not ab-
solute acceptance, uncondi-
tional acceptance to Jewish
religious adherence. A convert
comes before me, and I ask,
'Are you going to observe the
Sabbath, have a kosher home?
"If they tell me no, I won't
convert them, but a Conser-
vative or Reform rabbi will.
Therefore, the mikveh
becomes misused if it is being
done that way. If I am to pro-
vide a mikveh for them, then
they are my guests, and they
have to use it properly."
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz,
representative of the Conser-
vative movement and spiritual
leader of Temple Ner Tamid
on Miami Beach, said he gave
up on trying to use the
mikvehs a long time ago but
quickly adds, "I didn't give up
on the practice, God forbid. I
believe in mikveh not only for
conversion purposes, but I
Continued on Page 6-C


SSxSSSS
Two Jewish Perspectives On Surrogate Motherhood
By MARIAN BORDEN
Judge Harvey Sorkow in
tbe 'Baby M'" surrogate
mother case in New Jersey
has finally ruled in favor of
the biological father.
Wflham Stern, and his wife.
Elizabeth. Experts in
Jewish law see the case as
clear-cut. In general,
talmudk scholars believe
that there should never
have been a surrogate
motherhood contract in the
first place and that any ex-
isting ones are
unenforceable.
One of the scholars is Rabbi
Moses Tendier. chairman of
the Bio-Mecbcal Ethics Com-
mittee of the Rabbinical Coun-
cil of America (Orthodox), and
chairman of the Biology
Department and Professor of
Talmudk Law at Yeshiva
University. He argues that
under Jewish law a contract
can be written only on an ob-
ject that exists, and not on
something such as a baby yet
to be conceived with a sur-
rogate mother.
FURTHERMORE. Tendier
points out that there is a
religious prohibition against
artificial insemination except
in extreme cases. In his view
the desire on the part of a man
to have a genetic hnk to a child
would not justify artificial in-
semination with a woman who
is not his wife.
He suggests that there is
"no cruder form of enslave-
ment" which also violates
Jewish law than "renting a
uterus" and imposing the risks
of pregnancy in exchange for
money.
Rabbi Marc Gellman. a
Reform rabbi with a doctorate
in medical ethics who serves
on the Committee on Medical
Ethics of the UJA-Federaooo
of New York, agrees that "sur-
rogate motherhood is against
Jewish law and an unwise
social practice for our society
as a whole."
HE CITES the bibiica; case
: Abraham ar.-: Hagar Sarah
not Hagar. was Abraham's
preferred wife. Geilman ex-
plains that tbe problems and
tensions within the famDv
caused by Hagar's pregnancy
prove that even ir. that time
the idea of surrogate
Marian Edeiman Borden is
a freelance urriter living in
Larckmont. S.Y.
motherhood was unwise.
In addition, be argues that
Jewish law forbids self-
endangerment except to ac-
complish a mitzvah. and giving
birth for someone else would
not so qualify.
Gellman also contends that
under Jewish law one can't
make a contract to sell oneself,
another interpretation of a
surrogate mother contract.
GeUmac recommends adoption
as a solution for infertile
couples, and states that "to
adopt an existing baby is a
very high mxtzvak-" He dis-
counts as merely an "ego
need" men who seek a sur-
rogate mother to provide a
"genetic tie to the baby."
Furthermore. Gellman sees
surrogate motherhood as a
'"basic fundamental problem of
exploiting poor women for
nooey poor women have
jabies for wealthy women ..
Judaism, being opposed to all
forms of exploitation, must in-
clude (opposition to) this form
of exploitation as well."
AMONG JEWISH scholars.
Rabbi Seymour Siegel
presents an opposite view.
Convinced that a Jew may
make a contract to hire a sur-
rogate mother to bear his
child, the Ralph Simon Pro-
fessor of Ethics and Theology
at the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America
disagrees even with many of
his colleagues in the Conser-
vative movement-
He claims that "we make
contracts about everything .
and the whole of civilization is
based on expectation and pro-
mises to fulfill, to be honored
and to be taken
He discounts the concepts of
"enslavement" or "endanger -
ment" that would forbid such
contracts, provided that the
surrogate mother enters into
the agreement "voluntarQ)-
and with full knowledge of the
consequences."
For instance, he notes that
many jobs, such as a telephone
repairman who works with
high voltage wires, involve
self-endangerment Similarly,
a womar. with fid knowledge
of the risks of pregnancy may
choose to near a child for
another couple, be claims.
THE Baby M case. Siegd
rejects the theory that sur-
rogate mother Jane
Whitehead did not have full
knowledge of the conse-
quences of ber actions, hence
relieving ber of her obligation
to fulfill the contract. He
points out that she previously
had given birth to ber own
children.
Siegel also stresses that
Jewish law is "pro-natal." For
example, the priests in ancient
times offered blessings and
prayers on behalf of infertile
women.
Tbe rabbi believes that sur-
rogate mothers are another
alternative for "people to have
children When nature
plays a trick (infertility), in my
opinion it's a great blessing to
use whatever we can to let
these people enjoy
parenthood."
Looking at surrogate
motherhood as an ethical issue
and in the context of the pain
of an infertile couple. Siegel
adds that it's important "to
HIAS Brings Lost
Relatives Together
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Location Service at HIAS. the
Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society.
reports that it fulfilled more than
10 percent of the 2.000 requests it
received \xst year to bring
together relatives scattered
across the world, and has reunited
thousands over the yean.
Coordinated through HIAS
headquarters here, the service
utahses HLVS offices m Europe.
Israel and Latin America and the
services of tbe International Red
Cross and the Internationa! Trac-
ing Service to search for peopie
separated by time. relocation and
upheaval.
Tbe service, beaded by Eva
Gamm. even brought together
genealogist M^iam Werner of
Seraacas. NJ.. and a Soviet
emigre cousin. V!adimir
imochkevitch-
think about these questions
with vour heart as wefl as vour
bead.*"
ON THE issue of embryo
transfers transferring a fer-
tilized ovum of a husband and
wife to a surrogate mother for
the nine months of pregnancy
Tendier and Gellman both
see major ethical problems.
The surrogate mother in this
case is an "incubator mother,"
says Tendier.
Tendier wonders who is to
be considered the mother u
such a case, the woman who
contributes "the little bit of
DNA" or the woman who pro-
vides the "ger .^.
tion" and supports, with the
attendant rises of pregnancy
the existence of the baby?
"We have often had rnHdruu
born with doubtful fathers,"
he said. "Never before have
we had doubtful mothers."
JTA Services
7V Southeast Region of the American Jetritk Congress held its
Horace M. KaUen Distinguished Community Service Aunrd Din-
ner vith Florida Secretary of State. George Firestone receiving
the KaUen Award/or hxs many years of service to the citizens of
Florida. Seen above. Dinner Chairman Tibor Hollo, at left,
presents Firestone vxth the KaUen Award. Joining them fur the
presentation mu Firestone s un/e. S'ola.
Happy Passoi-er
Otfica
tc :-
SS"-0OH
THE NEWEST KOSHER RESORT HOTEL
MOUNTAINAIRE-PARKSVILLE. X.Y.
______CATSKILLS MOUNTAINS
LUXURIOUS ACCOMMODATIONS. INCLUDES
EVERYTHING YOU EXPECT FROM THE
FINEST RESORT: renovated full size
AIR-CONDITrONED ROOMS. INDOOR AND
OUTDOOR SWIMMING POOLS. ROWING AND
FISHING ON OUR WEU-STOCKED LAKE. TOP
ENTERTAINMENT. SHOWS. DANCING NfTEiY.
RATES FROM$ 1 50 A WEEK
WITH THREE MEALS.
FOR MORE INFORMATION AND
RESERVA TIONS. PLEASE CALL
(718| 462-8641. MARK ABRAMOWITZ
718) 376-8586. BORIS KOTLYAR
292-9717 AFTER 5 20/87


Happy & Healthy Passover
"/t^./"
****'
Save
M00-900'V I ^ j
Serta Bedding ^^
Sc through Sahaday enjoy special savvigs on
e*er> Serta sleep set on our Aoor Its easy to find
ihe comfort you prefer i t* sue you need t .er
tamous Serta Periect Sleeper* modeH are mciuded
*i this tvee-dayvonry sale. Shown. just one exam-
ple of the savings youH find, many more Serta
sftte ah pneed rvstore'
SEETA POFECT SIEEPHT
=**B &30C
98
:EN 2Pc Set W* -"* **' I
FUU-Ea.Pc QUEEN
158 s448 s598
-*; Ma *ec sooc **; S"-^^J
S4s Nfc izstn :
t SwAMy 1PMPM
Aa &MM Ctdii Carry Saa* D*L
Final Pncas do nat apply la
Happy Home Specialists
-
t





Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-C
U.S., Israel To Expand Exchange
Of Scientific Data And Personnel
-~^fcv\
WASHINGTON (JTA) from community in-home ser-
_ The United States and es {r the physically im-
Israel are exploring ways to and research on social
Sid existing agreements J J to housing for the
Sween their governments aged and juvende dehnquency.
on the exchange of informa- These agreements reflect a
ton and personnel in the c se relationsh.p of 20 years'
uon fields of science medical we are eager to maintain and
care and social welfare pro- to strengthen that
grams, according to relationship."
Undersecretary of Health NEWMAN SAID a recent
and Human Services Don tour of the Medical Center and
Newman. meetings with Hadassah
Newman, who recently Medical Organization director-
returned from Israel where he general Samuel Penchas and
represented Human Services other key members of the
Secretary Otis Bowen, held medical staff "gave impetus to
talks with Israeli officials on our desire to see these
the expansion of two agreements expanded."
memoranda of agreement Newman indicated the U.S.
which provide for cooperation nas a special interest in the
between Israel and the U.S. on y0utn project called "Youth
issues of health care and 2000" which encompasses
human welfare services. government programs dealing
THE AGREEMENT on with teenage pregnancies,
medical care, now four years drug abuse, fetal alcohol syn-
old, "identifies several areas drome, underweight newborn
of mutual interest" between babies and AIDS,
the U.S. and Israel, Newman He ^ cited an innovative
said, including health, man- program in Israel in which
power and services, health ser- developmentally disabled
vices research, information children and adults are trained
systems, public health to work on kibbutzim. He said
biomedical research and ne was impressed with the
related areas such as food and results achieved by encourag-
drugs. ing the developmentally disabl-
The Undersecretary said the ed to work in, and develop a
second memorandum of agree- relationship with, the soil,
ment, approved in 1985, Newman, who met with
"covers areas of cooperative Israei Minister of Health
activities and interest" in a Shoshana Arbeli-Almoslino
broad spectrum of social during his recent visit, said the
welfare programs ranging UtS. is interested in enlarging
**************** **************v.<
* *
J Women's Division of the J
J Greater Miami *
Jewish Federation I
* *
J NOMINATING COMMITTEE *
I PRESENTS THE FOLLOWING SLATE J
J OF OFFICERS FOR 1987-88 J
+ *
* President.............................................Ellen Mandler *
Vice President, +
* Portfolio of Campaign.................................Amy Dean
* *
J Vice President, J
* Portfolio of Campaign Designate..........Micki Hochberg +
* *
* Vice President, *
* Portfolio of Community Education..........Terry Drucker *
* Vice President, Portfolio of Leadership *
* Development...........................................Elaine Ross *
^ Secretary......................................Robbie Herskowitz *
* Parliamentarian.....................................Gail Newman *
J ?
t Nominating Committee t
Chairwoman...................................Dorothy Podhurst ^
J *
Presented by the Nominating Committee in accordance with the By-Laws ^
of the Women's Division of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation ^
(amended 1985) Article X, Section 1 F, G, and I. ^
^ Section 1-F 1[
m The list of nominees shall be presented to the Women's Division by J
^ publication no later than April 15. Jj
* Section 1-G *
r Additional nominations may be made only by petition carrying fifteen (15) *
J or more signatures of persons with voting privileges, provided consent of *
* the nominee has been obtained in advance. These petitions must reach the *
* Chairwoman of the Nominating Committee not later than fourteen (14) *
* days after the slate has been published. *
* Section 1-1 ?
* If there are no further nominations, the slate as published shall be
* considered elected on May. 1 ?
* WOMEN'S DIVISION NOMINATING COMMITTEE J
********************************
the scope of health care
statistics and methodology
currently exchanged by the
two countries and in expan-
ding cooperative activities in
areas such as medical
technology, a drug reaction
registry, laboratory practices
and biomedical research.
3 Terrorists Killed
TEL AVIV )JTA) At
least three terorroists were
killed in two clashes with
Israel Defense Force patrols in
the South Lebanon security
zone Sunday night and several
terrorists were believed
wounded, a military
spokesman announced. There
were no IDF casualties.
The first clash occurred near
Majdal Selim where an IDF
patrol encountered suspicious-
acting persons and opened
fire. The body of one was
found and signs indicated that
the body of another, either
dead or wounded, was dragged
along the ground. Land mines,
Katyushua rockets,
Kalachnikov rifles and parcels
of high explosives were found
in the vicinity.
Dr. Michael Schiff, left, founding Dean of Yeshiva University's
new Sy Syms School of Business, meets with Mr. Syms, Chair-
man of the Board of Syms Corp. and Member of the University's
Board of Trustees. A resident of Teaneck, NJ, Dr. Schiff is a
former professor at the Graduate School of Business of New York
University. The Sy Syms School of Business was established at
Yeshiva University in response to growing student interest in
finance, management, and economics.
MIAMI HIGH CLASS OF 1957
Members of the Miami High School Class of 1957 who
have not been contacted by the Committee for invitations
to the 30th Year Reunion, July 31-Aug. 2, may contact
Barbara Laskin Cohen, 666-9472.
Tradition.
Fruity and hearty
traditional Kosher
red and white wines
KOSHER B1SSOVER WINES


Page 4-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 10, 1987
The End of An Era
SPD Chairman
Willy Brandt Retires
By WOLFGANG WEBER
BONN (DaD)-SPD
chairman Willy Brandt has
decided to retire a year
earlier than planned.
Brandt, 73, has been SPD
chairman for the past 23
years. He announced his
resignation from the party
after he came under heavy
criticism from within the
fmrty for his style of
eadership.
At a special party meeting in
June, Hans-Jochen Vogel, 61,
at present SPD leader in the
Bundestag, will be elected the
new SPD chairman.
JOHANNES RAU, Prime
Minister of North-Rhine
Westphalia, is to be a deputy
chairman along with Oskar
Lafontaine, 43, who is Prime
Minister of the Saar. He is also
spoken of within the party as
the chancellor candidate for
the next elections to take place
in 1990.
Anke Fuchs, 49, has also
been included in the reshuffle
in the SPD leadership. She has
been nominated to succeed
Peter Glotz, the party's na-
tional manager, who has said
that he wants to step down.
Willy Brandt's early resigna-
tion was triggered by the row
that blew up over his choice for
the position of party
spokeswoman. He wanted
Margarita Mathiopoulos, 31,
Greek but brought up in the
Federal Republic, to take over
the job.
THIS UNUSUAL decision
aroused considerable opposi-
tion among many prominent
party members and among
large sections of the party's
grass roots.
Brandt accepted the conse-
quences of his choice of party
spokeswoman at a meeting of
the party executive. To cut
short the unreasonable,
bewildering discussions about
his successor he resigned, ac-
cording to Rau.
The upheavals about his suc-
cessor and the appointment oi
Mathiopoulos were causing
harm, it was thought, to the
party in an important year in
which a number of state elec-
tions take place.
Within the party there is
relief that an agonizing discus-
sion about the party leadership
that had been going on for
months had been brought to an
end and embarrassed silence
at the sudden end to the career
of the greatest politician in the
Federal Republic's post-war
history.
WITHIN AND outside the
party there was considerable
amazement that a statesman
of such historical importance
and with such an international
reputation should regard what
was a comparatively minor
matter as reason for his
resignation.
Willi Brandt won con-
siderable international respect
as the mayor of Berlin, and
when in 1966 he led the SPD
into a Grand Coalition with the
CDU and served as the
Federal Republic's Foreign
Minister under Chancellor
Kurt-Georg Kiesinger.
Three years later, he found-
ed the SPD-FDP coalition
under the Free Democrat
Walter Scheel and as
chancellor developed the new
Ostpolitik, responsible for
relieving East-West tensions
in the 1970s.
He was awarded the Nobel
Peace Prize and in 1972 won
an overwhelming victory for
the Social Democrats in a
general election.
TWO YEARS later, Brandt
resigned as chancellor after an
East German spy was
discovered to be working in his
immediate entourage. This
crisis, for which no blame was
laid at Brandt's door, did no
harm to his reputation. He re-
mained undisputed head of the
party during the chancellor-
ship of his SPD successor,
Helmut Schmidt and during
the political change in Bonn in
1983. In 1976 he was elected
chairman of the Socialist
Internationale.
FDP secretary general,
Helmut Haussmann, said after
the surprising announcement
of Brandt's resignation, that
this was a sad and undignified
end for an internationally-
renowned politician.
Heiner Geissler, CDU
secretary general, said that
the premature end of the
Brandt era reflected "the
breakdown and decline" of the
SPD.
The Point East Rally was held on behalf of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's 1987
Combined Jewish Appeal. Guest speaker
Israel Amitai spoke about the needs of
worldwide Jewry. Pictured from left (stan-
ding) are Ernest Samuels, co-host of the Point
East Advanced Gifts Cocktail Reception and
Dinner; Kenneth J. Lewitter and Ruth Lewit-
ter, chairmen of the Point East Combined
Jewish Appeal; Ruth Norton, financial
secretary; Mollye Lovinger-Fox, associate
chairperson, Point East Combined Jewish Ap-
peal; Israel Amitai, guest speaker; (seated)
Anne Ackerman, associate chairperson. Point
East Combined Jewish Appeal.
Lavi Second Prototype Has
Successful First Test Flight
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Pro-
totype No. 2 of the Lavi,
Israel's second generation jet
fighter-bomber, had its first
test flight last week (March
31). The manufacturer, Israel
Aviation Industries (IAI), ex-
pressed satisfaction with the
results but gave no indication
of how the second prototype
differs from the first model,
which has undergone 23 test
flights over the past two
months.
Unlike previous Lavi flights,
flown by IAI's chief test pilot,
Menachem Shmul, the pilot
Tuesday was an Israel Air
Force combat veteran whose
name was not disclosed. He
put the second prototype
through easy paces, cruising
over central Israel at subsonic
speeds of 150-350 mph. at an
altitude of no more than
20,000 feet.
The Lavi development pro-
gram calls for 1,800 test
flights of five prototype
models over the next three
years. But the program is in
deep trouble regarding costs.
The U.S. Defense Department
has urged Israel to abandon
the Lavi because of estimated
high costs in favor of an
American-built plane such as
the advanced F-16C. Many in
the Israeli defense establish-
ment agree.
IAI, meanwhile, is not rely-
ing on military orders. Its
American representatives,
Atlantic Aviation, announced
the sale of four more of its
Westwind executive jets in the
U.S. So far, 250 Westwinds
have been sold in North
America.
Temple Israel
of Greater Miami
Mfam/'a Ptonr Rttorm Congragallon
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr. 595-5055
RABBI DR. HASKELL M. BERNAT
Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Jacob G. Bornstein, Emeritus
Dr. Jack L. Sparks, Director of Education
Ethel S. Lee, Administrator
Wishing The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy Passover.
GeraldK. Schwartz, President
BETH KODESH CONGREGATION
Sisterhood and Man's Club
Extend Passover Greetings To All!
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Joseph Kriasel, Cantor, High Holy Days
Rose Berlin, Executive Secretary
1101 S.W. 12th Ave.. Miami 858-6334
Temple Zion Israelite Center
A CAHINQ CONSERVATIVE CONOnEOATION
Wishes Our People Everywhere A Happy Passover
Of. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi Mlchaal M Exalbart. Praildanl
Banjamln Adlat. Cantor Norman S Pollack. Eiacullva Olractor
Dairld Roaanlhal. Aux. Cantor
Happy Passover
Temple Beth Am
Rabbi Harbart M. Baumgard, Snr. Rabbi Laonard A. Schoolman. Ataoe. RaoDi
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Miami Phone 667-6667
Wishes The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy Passover
Beth Torah Congregation
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
North Miami Beach Phone 947-7528
Wishes The Entire Community and Members
A Happy and Healthy Passover
Dr. Max A. Lipschltz, Rabbi
Harvey L. Brown, Executive Director
Zvee Aroni, Cantor Rev. Mordechal Adler, Ritual Director
Rhea Schwartzberg, Religious School Director
Shulamit Gittelson, Early Childhood Director
David Brook, Youth Director
Stephanie Engelberg, Active Adults Director
Robert Whitebook, President
Temple Bnai Zion
200 178th St. Miami Beach. Fla. 33160
Phone-932-2159
Wishes The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy Passover
Temple Beth Moshe
2225 NE 121 St. No. Miami
891-5508
A Happy and Healthy Passover
Amit Women
(Formerly American Misrachi Women)
633 N.E. 167th St., Suite 815, N. Miami Beach, 33162
651-1444
Shalom Happy Passover Members and Friends
*&!$>*"
*&*
S^S
"S3
JEWISH VOCATIONAL SERVICE
318 N.W. 25 St. 920 Alton Rd. 8353 S.W. 124 St.
576-3220 672-2184 235-9482
IMS NE MIAMI GARDENS DRIVE
RABBI SIMCHA FREEDMAN
ADATH YESHURUN
StatarfcaaalFnaa
CaayaaaUaa PraaUaat. Alaa Daaaa
at. Marilya Laaaa Ma. a
M7-143S
CANTOR IAN AI.PERN
Clah PraaUaat. Joai Chaaaaff
Eaatativa Daraetar. Rabat! A. Kravtta
FarallaaaJ Dtrartar. Adrlaaaa PnaaiH
Early CMIdaaad Dinrw. Jaaa Baraaaaa
R1%toaa School Prladaai. Raefcatla Baltaea Yoata Dtractar. Mark Sjkaa
.over
pa*
Hadassah
Wishes The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy Passover
MIAMI BEACH REGION JEAN TEMKIN. PraaWant
I
mrna



^
TV newswoman Barbara Walters (right)
presents Jihan Sadat with the Jewish Na-
tional Fund's first Peace Award of the Inter-
national Peace Park Project at a recent recep-
tion at the Stanhope Hotel in New York City.
The JNF's project commemorates Vice 1978
Camp David Accords between Israel and
Egypt and is located in Ezuz Beerotayim on
the Israel-Egypt border in the negev desert.
Sadat has been in the U.S. since 1985. She has
served as visiting professor at the University
of Souih Carolina in Columbia, S.C., and.
American University in Washington D.C. She
recently finished her autobiography, 'A
Woman of Egypt.'
Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-C
Gothelf Named Director Of
Federation Women's Division
Phyllis Gothell has Deen ap-
pointed to the position of
Director of the Women's Divi-
sion of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation announced
Executive Vice President
Myron J. Brodie.
Her main responsibilities in-
clude working with the lay
leadership of the Women's
Division in the coordination of
its programs and events which
raise money for the Combined
Jewish Appeal.
Gothelf has served as the
assistant director of the divi-
sion since 1985. Predating that
position she was a public ad-
ministration intern and staff
member of the department.
"Phyllis is not new to the
division," said Brodie. "She
has quite literally worked her
way up, learning every aspect
of Federation and the depart-
ment she now heads, he
added.
Gothelf was also the
southeastern area represen-
tative to the National Young
Judea Executive Board.
She received her education
at Florida International
University, California State
Polytechnical University at
Phyllis Gothelf
Pomona, and the Jerusalem
Institute in Israel. Her major
course work was in public ad-
ministration and urban and
regional planning. She is also
knowledgeable in Hebrew,
modern Zionism and ancient
history.
Kahane Assails Israel
For Not Standing
Behind Pollard
JUDITH COLP
SILVER SPRING, Md. -
(JTA) Rabbi Meir Kahane
has excoriated Israel for not
standing behind convicted
American spy Jonathan
Pollard and for "forcing" the
resignation of his Israeli con-
tact. Col. Aviem Sella, from
his new position as commander
of Tel Nof Air Base.
"Israel owes Pollard loyal-
ty.'' Kahane told an en-
thusiastic audience of some
KK) persons at the Silver Spr-
ing Jewish Center. "We have
not only left behind Pollard,
we have thrown him and Sella
to the dogs."
"The Israeli government has
an obligation to have the
American government expel
the Pollards and let them live
in Israel. Israel has an obliga-
tion to say we did it (we spied),
and he's not going to pay for
it," he added.
Kahane said his concern
about the Pollard affair pro-
mpted the quick visit to the
U.S. during the final week of
the winter session of the
Knesset where he represents
the Kach Party.
Kahane said Pollard's
sentence of life imprisonment
by a federal district court here
was particularly harsh and
evidence of "vicious anti-
Semitism in United States."
Pollard, he added, never
meant to hurt America and
should have been expelled to
Israel. Kahana said he also
believed reports that the
United States spied on Israel,
iirst suggested by Sen. David
Durenberger (R., Minn.).
Everybody spies against
everyone else. The United
States Embassy in Tel Aviv
bristles with antennas. Twenty
percent of all workers in em-
bassies are spies," he said ad-
ding that there is "nothing im-
moral or illegal about spying."
Kahane, speaking the day
before the State Department
was scheduled to release a
report on countries illegally
selling arms with South
Africa, criticized Israel for
bowing to American pressure
in this area.
"No decent Jew will ever de-
fend apartheid, but what will
take its place? Oliver Tambo
(leader of the African National
Congress) defends the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion (PLO). The Jewish people
have interests and their major
interest is to survive and the
Third World doesn't want
Jews to survive," he said.
The world's foremost
violinist celebrates
the land of his birth.
CDC-47904
CDC-47166
VTVAIDI
TM( KXJ SEASON
rrZHAX PtRLMAN
tvatt PNVurmonK
fe'tfiv
CDC47319
VHX IN CONCERTO
SI "f NAM MCLAMCOIKX4
CDC-47106
ITZHAK PEBLMAN
Paganm
Trw24CwnCM.Op 1
If f I
CDC-47171
RHINESTONES'
2oss Austrian Crystals & Colors $4.50 or.
I Brisk-Set Rhinestone Machine *10*99
20%
b OFF
AIINailheads
& Appliques
Offer Good With Ad Thru 4-1&S7
** PERSONALITIES *
I 7329 Collins Ave.
MiomiBtoch.Fl
865-0006
The Mall at 163rd St.
Girt in Front
of Burdmes
Grand Opening
WestkmdMoll
of West
Mom Entronct
____ 1987
^^^y Nominee'
Tel Aviv-born Itzhak Perlman cap-
tures the true Jewish spirit with this
collection of traditional melodies,
including "Doynal' "Raisins and
Almonds!' "A Yiddishe Mamme','
accompanied by the Israel Philharmonic
Orchestra, conducted by Dov Seltzer.
ALL TITLES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE ON
ANGEL XDR CASSETTES AND LPs.
Great
Artists,
Great
Art
"i3S?
The LP or Cassette
Is On Sale For s6.99.
The CD Is s12.99.
The Prices Are Good From April 10-18.
"5"
_


Page 6-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 10, 1987
Mikveh Helps Keep
Jewish Love Story Alive
Continued from Page 1-C
think it's magnificient for the
continuation of Jewish life.
"IT'S A beautiful part of
our tradition. The beauty
comes from the renewal of the
relationship each month bet-
ween husband and wife."
But rather than make it a
cause celebre, we decided to
take the young lady or man to
the ocean," Labovitz said.
"My pain is this," he added.
"When I personally was
teaching converts, the time
and effort and the soul that
went into their learning could
compare to any convert from
any faction of Judaism. My re-
quirements for their conver-
sion were no less than the Or-
thodox rabbi's.
"The proof of the pudding
was that many of them became
much more observant after the
conversion than many of our
so-called born Jews. And
therefore I was overwhelmed
with grief, literally grief, that
these women were barred
from use of a public mikveh, to
which all its many factions of
Judaism had contributed to
help build and sustain."
SO A question arises. Why
don't the Reform and Conser-
vative movements build a
mikveh of their own?
"In some communities, they
have. We just haven't gotten
together on that," Labovitz
said.
The specialness of a mikveh
is that it was one of the three
mitzvot that were given ex-
clusively to women, said Reb-
betzin Lipskar. The others are
baking challah and lighting
Shabbas candles.
"It's a beautiful ex-
perience," says Lipskar. "The
mikveh elevates us from
animal to spiritual. It creates a
system of limitation, control,
that there's a superior being
and that we are guided by, not
only lust."
Another myth, says Lipskar,
is that a mikveh was used in
ancient times because it was
the only time a woman could
bathe. "That's not true. A
woman cannot immerse
herself until she has physically,
properly cleaned."
ACCORDING TO several
people involved with mikvehs,
there is a resurgence of their
use.
"The idea of a mikveh is
definitely coming alive again
when the woman realizes the
benefit to them and their
families. Although you find
men and women today who are
not observant Jews, they will
go to mikveh. A community
New S13.99 One Price
Shoe Store
Tremendous opportunity from Prestige Fashions to open
your own shoe store with top quality nsme brsnd shoes
thst others offer for $19 to $60. Over 135 brands, 250
styles. First quality guaranteed, NO seconds. $21,900.00
includes opening inventory, in-store training, fixtures and
grand opening promotions. Call Anytime.
Prestige Fashions
1-800-247-9127
without a mikveh, is not really
a community," according to
Lipskar.
Building the mikveh was no
easy task, says Rabbi Stern.
About 10 years ago, the old
mikveh on South Miami Beach
was torn down and rebuilt.
The stones on the wall of the
building are similar to those
used in the Holy temple.
"Since times that we can
remember, there were always
rabbinic disputes about the
building of mikvehs," Stern
said. "For instance, the
woman is immersing in a main
pool, but that pool is attached
to a reservoir of kosher water.
"IT WAS NOT touched by
human hands. It has to be well
water or rain water or the
ocean itself. The roof on the
mikveh is built in such a way
that when it rains it goes into a
reservoir without any pipes or
metal attached to it. These
reservoirs have connections to
the main pool," the rabbi
explained.
Research has been done that
shows that among women who
use the mikveh, the incidence
of cancer in their sexual
organs is practically zero, says
Rabbi Stern. Marriage itself
becomes an eternal honey-
moon, he says. That means
that there is much less divorce
rate among two religious
people.
Rabbi Yaacov Sprung,
spiritual leader of Shaaray
Tefilah of North Miami Beach,
had served as the chairman of
the board for the second
women's mikveh in Dade
County, Mikvas Blima.
HE ECHOES what the
other rabbis say: "There's no
question that the usage of
mikveh has significantly enabl-
ed the Orthodox community to
maintain one of the lowest
levels of divorce. The concept
of mikveh really offers a
woman a certain significant
space, so to speak, when she
and her husband are really
able to relate to one another
without having to bolster their
relationship upon their
physical needs and desires.
"And that's what is so glar-
ingly missing in most mar-
riages that don't work. Within
the framework of a mikveh is
the respect for one another
with an understanding of the
needs of one another, namely,
the emotional, psychological
and intellectual needs."
Local Leaders
In Who's Who
Three Miami Beach civic and
religious leaders have been
named to the 1987-88 edition
of Who's Who in the World,
just published by Marquis
Who's Who.
Those listed include Arthur
H. Courshon, chairman of the
board of Jefferson National
Banks; Gerald Schwartz,
president of the Gerald
Schwartz Agency; and Dr.
George S. Wise, life chancellor
and former president of Tel
Aviv University.
The Vizcayan Foundation
honored Senator Jack Gordon
ofMmmi Beach at their recent
Board meeting for his help in
securing a $560,000 State
aproprwtion for the restore
turn of all the fountains at the
Vizcaya Museum and
Gardens. Ray E. Marchman
Jr., chairman of the Founda'-
turn and director of Marketing
for Northern Trust of Florida
presented Senator Gordon with
a framed picture of the Villa
ISRAEL HISTADRUT CAMPAIGN
2450 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood
945-9760 (Dade) 920-8801 (Broward)
Wishes You and Yours
A Happy and Healthy Passover
Elliot Engelbaum
Executive Director
W:SWrW<<::;:W:W:W:W^^
!

Jason's First Passover
It's the first night of Passover and the Sedar is ready,
we are just waiting for our Uncle Freddy.
When he would walk in, my Pappa would know
Passover was here, and his family would glow.
How the table was set, with all Mama's best,
how hard she had worked without any rest.
The candles were lit, the Sedar Plate ready,
but where oh where was our Uncle Freddy.
The food looked so good, it was hard not to eat.
Passover dishes are such a great treat.
With matzo, with Kugel, with gefilte fish
Horseradish, Horseradish what a great dish.
Chicken soup, matzo balls and latkes galore.
Uncle Freddy, Uncle Freddy please walk through the door
Mama was anxious and Pappa was too,
it was getting so late, what were we to do
Suddenly, as I watched the hands of the clock,
I heard a great bang, it was a door knock.
We ran to the door and to our great surprise,
Elijah the Prophet was before our own eyes.
A long white beard and small black sandals,
he held up a staff and one little candle.
I wanted to scream, but to my surprise,
Elijah the Prophet was Uncle Freddy all in disguise.
Pappa looked angry, but Mamma just laughed.
I said come on in, he gave me his itaff.
We all sal at the table, all ready to start,
everyone was here to play his part.
From start, right to finish, our Sedar was great,
thanks Uncle Freddy...you're really first rate.
3rom the
Gold's Josmhf
makers of Quality
Horseradish


Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-C
nai B'rith Girls
And AZA To
Accept Eighth
Grade Youth
Mm B'nai B'rith Youth
jjanization (BBYO) has # ex-
uded the services it provides
teenagers in its component
boys, Aleph Zadik Aleph
m and its component for
Is B'nai B'rith Girls, by ex-
Kling membership to eighth-
ide youth.
Jnder the organization's
v policy, eighth-graders can
n AZA and BBG in April of
eir school year. At that time,
ev will be offered a 15-month
mbership incentive that will
ry them through June of
ninth grade.
According to Marlene Zakai,
YO's international director
program services, the new
m will allow eighth graders
integrate into chapter ac-
ities in the spring, so they
1 be prepared for the major
igrammiiiK that traditional-
takes place in the fall.
aid Zakai, "We are meeting
demand that exists in the
mmunity to provide activity
a younger segment of our
irish population."
5BYO provides services for
renth and eighth-grade
ith in its new Teen Connec-
n component.
n South Miami there are
400 BBYO youth par-
pating in programs such as:
nmunity service, cultural,
ial, athletic, and Jewish
ritage, according to Nancy
yers, assistant regional
tor.
Iny eighth-grade member of
i Connection who would
to join AZA or BBG in
I of their eighth-grade
will also be offered an op-
Btunity to do so under a
irate plan. Details on that
are available from the
TO regional offices in the
es that house the Teen Con-
tion program.
/.-7
About 900 were in attendance when Congressman William Region (front row center) and chairpersons Sylvia Herman, Ed-
Lehman presented awards to the twenty Women of the Year in dyse Kessler (back row right) Marilyn Krick and Barbara Bretan
Hadassah at the Omni Hotel last Sunday. Pictured are the Klein (back row left.)
honored women with Mildred Riesenberg, president of the Miami
n
il
Israel Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir studies City of Maimi
Beach Proclamation expressive solidarity with the Jewish state
as City Commissioner Abe Resnick and Mayor Alex Daoud,
right, look on during televised ceremonies in Jerusalem. Visit
with the Israeli premier highlighted a Jewish National Fund
mission which launched the Jose Marti Memorial Forest spon-
sored by the Cuban community of South Florida.
Holiday Greetings
from
Wometco Theatres
Wometco Vending
and the
Miami Seaquarium
Gordon Roofing *"~"
and Sheet Metal
Works, Inc.
1450 N.W. 21st Street
Phone: 325-8287
Have your roof repaired now;
you will save on a new roof later
"Satisfactory Work by
Experienced Men"
Happy Passover
Joseph Nevel
Pershing
Auto
Leasing
1545 Alton Road,
Miami Beach
Phone: 538-5313
lordan
Jmarsn
FLORIDA
BARTONS0 CANDIES...
A PASSOVER TRADITION OF KOSHER EXCELLENCE
The name Bartons is your guarantee ot Kashruth and quality. Each piece of
their delicious candy is specially prepared Kosher under the strict supervision
of the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America. Shown.
Bartonettes Assortment. 1 lb.. 11.95. Passover Assortment. 12 oz.. 10.95;
Miniature Nuts. 8 oz.. 8.95; Seder Mints. 8 oz.. 6.95; Almond Kisses. 8 oz.. 5.95.
Selection varies by store. Candy (dept 800). Omni. Oadeland. 163rd Street.
The Galleria. Coral Square. West Palm Beach only.

1

I


Page 8-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 10, 1987
Cedars Medical Center Presents Concern Award
Joseph Weintraub, 82, a
long-time resident, active
business leader and major
shareholder of Atico Financial
Corp., is the recipient of this
year's Concern Award from
Cedars Medical Center. The
award recognizes his "lifetime
of accomplishments on behalf
of his fellow citizens."
The award was presented at
Cedars' annual donor dinner.
"Since 1980 Cedars, in an-
nually presenting its Concern
Award, recognizes a responsi-
ble citizen in our community
who has dedicated his or her
life to making this a better
place in which to live and
work, and Joe Weintraub is a
shining example of this com-
mitment to helping others,"
said Donald S. Rosenberg,
chairman of Cedars' Develop-
ment Committee.
Previous recipients have
been: Alice Elise Adams,
Chester Cassel, MD, Con-
gressman Dante Fascell,
Audrey R. Finkelstein, Jack
Taylor, Harold L. Fein and
Ellen Whiteside McDonnell.
This year's recipient moved
to Miami 60 years ago after
receiving a law degree from
the University of Virginia Law
School. Weintraub followed his
parents, who had moved to
Miami while he was in college.
He was admitted to the
Florida Bar in 1927.
Weintraub practiced law in
Miami for more than 30 years
before launching a second full-
time career in banking. In
1948 he organized
Metropolitan Bank, which
later became People's National
Bank. Several other banking
ventures followed until he pur-
chased Pan American Banks in
1965. He served as chairman
of the board until the bank
Joseph Weintraub
merged with NCNB National
Bank of Florida. He is current-
ly deputy senior chairman of
that firm.
Cedars' Rosenberg said of
this year's honoree, "Joe
Weintraub has always placed
community involvement high
on his list of priorities. He has
supported key institutions in
our community providing them
with his counsel, expertise and
financial support."
The many organizations he
has served include the Greater
Miami Chamber of Commerce,
the Salvation Army, United
Way of Dade County, Cedars
Medical Center, the Crime
Commission of Greater Miami
and the Greater Miami Sym-
phony Association.
A former Trustee of Temple
Israel of Greater Miami, Wein-
traub is also a Founder of
organizations such as Miami
Children's Hospital, Greater
Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, Mount
Sinai Medical Center and
Barry University. He is a
Founder at Cedars Medical
Center, having made his first
gift in 1961 to help build the
original hospital. He has been
a director of the Miami Heart
Institute since 1960, and is a
Benefactor there.
In addition to his many other
commitments, Weintraub is in-
volved with the University of
Miami, where he is a Founder,
Trustee and a member of the
Ibis Society. He is also a past
president of UM's Citizens
Board.
Weintraub also serves on the
Dade County Educational
Facilities Authority, the Board
of Goodwill Industries of
South Florida, and is a
member of the Opera Guild.
This Israel Independence
Day Is Different
By RONALD KRONGOLD
Campaign Chairman
Greater Miami Israel Bonds
Israel's Independence Day
(May 4) comes right after
Passover, while the opening
Rebel Solloway and
Benes and Alan Glackman
Wish All Their Friends A Very Happy Passover
Dr. Leonard Cantor and Family
Wish Their Friends A Very Happy Passover
Ms. Rosalind Getlis
Wishes Her Friends A Very Happy Passover
Mr. and Mrs. Eleazer Greensteln
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy Passover
Dr. and Mrs. Benjamin Leigh
Wish All Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy Passover
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Sures
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy Passover
question of the Seder still
sounds in our ears: Ma
Nishtana?
This year's Independence
celebration is different
because the events of the past
year and the tasks facing
Israel in the coming year im-
pose upon us as American
Jews special responsibilities.
IN THE past year, the Israel
Bonds campaign achieved a
record sale of $603 million, the
highest in its 35-year history
with the total sale of Bonds
since the inception of the pro-
gram in 1951 surpassing $8
billion.
This unparalleled ac-
complishment should en-
courage us to aim at new
heights in 1987.
We have to redouble our ef-
forts in order to enable Israel
to achieve her most ardent
desire, peace, from a position
of strength. The progress of
the nation's economy, achiev-
ed through the many sacrifices
of its people, has to be
strengthened and accelerated.
The way to help Israel is
through the Israel Bonds pro-
gram, the major instrument in
the historical partnership of
North American Jewry with
the people of Israel in the up-
building of the country.
THE STATE is still young
at 39 years. Yet its founda-
tions rest on ancient layers. Its
roots are imbedded in eternal
values. Its glory radiates upon
the Diaspora the world over
and brightens our lives with
sublime ideals and aims.
Israel, its struggles and ac-
complishments, takes on
universal dimensions, affec-
ting the lives of all Jewish com-
munities, as well as of every
Jewish individual.
Let us, on the eve of Israel's
39th Independence Day,
renew and reaffirm our unity
with Israel through a new
record Bonds effort.
Labor MK's Including Peres, Eb*
Talk Peace With Palestinians
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Labor members of the
Knesset, including Vice
Premier and Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres, are attempting
to put together a peace front
with representative Palesti-
nians from the West Bank.
Peres met last week with
Hanna Seniora, editor of the
East Jerusalem Arabic daily
Al-Fajr, and Fayez Abu-
Rahme. Both have been men-
tioned as possible members of
a Palestinian-Jordanian
delegation in peace talks with
Israel.
Seniora, who makes no
secret of his sympathy for the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion, was one of four Palesti-
nians who attended a meeting
with Labor MKs Abba Eban
and Ora Namir at the King
David Hotel. The others were
Mayor Elias Freij of
Bethlehem and two Nablus
businessmen, Said Kanan and
Bassel Kanan.
THE SIX SIGNED a joint
statement calling for peace
talks within the framework of
an international conference
which would include
"legitimate representatives of
Israel, Jordan and the Palesti-
nian people." The statement
said, "A peace settlement
must contain elements
meeting the legitimate securi-
ty rights of Israel and the
legitimate rights of the
bet
Palestinian people."
The meeting was Sm
than anticipated. Several i
figures from the adminis*
territories did not
because they refused to
statement which made no m
Jon of the PLO. Seniora
dicated he was taking a
sonal risk by signing.
"I know there are dai
involved, but I am willing
ahead because I value
much more than war,"
reporters.
Labor MK Haim Ramon
outspoken dove, said he sta'
away because a meeti
without PLO represent*
was flawed to begin with.
ACCORDING TO .
the basic weakness of all
cent meetings between Isr,
policymakers and leaders
the Palestinian community
in their divergent attitu
toward the PLO.
"Whereas the Palesti
by and large stick to the
as the 'sole legitii..
representative of the Pal
nian people,' Israeli lej
want no contacts wha
with the PLO lobby in
ritories," Ramon said.
But Eban was opti
"We have decided to st
the pace of dialogue," he _
He warned, however, that
was an illusion to believe
continuing impasse does
harm.
thet
Wongs Shanghai
Restaurant
17047 W. Dixie Hwy., NMB 949-4944
12420 Biscayne Blvd., NM 891-4313
Happy Passover To All
Joe's Stone Crab Restaurant
227 Biscayne St. Miami Beach
673-0365
Happy Passover
Endurance Floors
18460 NE 2 Ave., Miami-652-6481
Happy Passover
KIMBERL Y FURNITURE
1014 E. 29th St., Hialeah, Fla. 33013
691-1481
Happy Passover
New Deal Strictly Kosher
Meat & Poultry Market
1362 NE 163 St., No. Miami Beach 945-2512
Wishes A Happy Passover To The Jewish Community
Holland Machinery Co.
395 East 10 Ave.
Hialeah 885-2575
Happy Passover
Fine Distributing Co.
3485 NW 65th St.
Miami-691-0231
Happy Passover To All



Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-C
Shellie Sherry 40, Passes
Bor,
Rochelle (Shellie) Sternberg
Sherrv passed away March 31
theage of 40. Born in Wind-
Ontario, Canada, Mrs.
errv had spent her life
1 to ledicated to Jewish causes,
rom an early age she was an
ctive participant in her
vnagogue, Shaarey
Shamayim in Windsor, as well
5 USY, the Jewish Communi-
ty Center and the B'nai B'rith
i'outh Organization as a BBG
nge presidenl in her hometown of
Vindsor arid the Detroit
pea Metropolitan community.
At age 15 the Sherry family
noved to California where she
ontinued her interest and in-
olvement in Jewish life. Upon
jer move to Florida, Mrs.
gherry joined numerous
ewish organizations. In par-
lcular, she became an integral
art of both the Goldstein
sra lebrew Academy and Con-
regation Shaare Tefillah of
tyii Kendall as a commitment to
itud
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
thai the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Vogel Sales at 7465
SW IIS Street. Miami Fla. 33156
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Harvey Vogel
1.-.642 April 10, 17.24;
May 1, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fict-
tious name el Museo De Vinos in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Malaga Restaurant Inc.
15633 April 10, 17,24;
May 1.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Regina's Fashions of
Downtown, Inc. at 113 S.E. 1st
Street Miami Fla. 33131 intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Manuel Lacayo
15639 April 10, 17,24;
May 1, 1987
her belief in traditional
Judaism.
Mrs. Sherry's efforts on
behalf of the Goldstein Hebrew
Academy (formerly the South
Dade Hebrew Academy)
helped to insure the survival
and excellence of the com-
munity day school in South
Dade. Mrs. Sherry took her
responsibilities as a Board
member and as a parent of
children attending the school
very seriously. She was stead-
fast in her support of tradi-
tional Jewish education and
expended untold hours in fund
raising and establishing a solid
philosophy and direction for
the school.
Mrs. Sherry also played a
vital role in the development of
Congregation Shaare Tefillah,
an Orthodox congregation in
Kendall.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-12984 (11)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
LUIS EDUARDO VELEZ,
Petitioner,
and
LUISA MARINA ALVAREZ,
Respondent.
TO: LUISA MARINA ALVAREZ
Carrera Segunda "A"
Oeste No. 5-60
Cub. Colombia, S.A.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
MELVIN J. ASHER. ESQ.. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 825 South Bayshore Drive,
Suite 543, Miami, FL 33131, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
May 1, 1987; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 25 day of March. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By JENNIS L. RUSSELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
15619 March 27;
April 3,10, 17.1987
SPECIAL LIMITED PRE-NEED OFFER
FUNERAL AND BURIAL
IN THE BEST OF JEWISH TRADITION
$1,595
LtlwMc Memorial Park and Eternal Light Funeral Director* are proud to
jTon*>r this unique program which combines ownership of a plot at our
beautiful Memorial Park and a plan for pre-paid funeral nervice*.
Tnliexceptionk] value awure* that your one call will put you in touch with
'he people who believe there ii nothing dignified about paving more for a
traditional Jewish funeral that vou have to.
HERE IS WHAT WE INCLUDE:
eCGRNAL
LlGfot:
npt Transfer from Place of
Death
l!?7 ,nd Pr*Pnirion of Deceased
* Cuke, and Hean
Afnmgement/Direction of
Or.ve.ide Services
I ""' nd Benefit Assistance
I, f!\hour emergency service
! **". Candles. Cards and Benches
Gravesite
Paved Private Visitation Path
Steel Reinforced Concrete Vault
Opening and Closing of Grave
Perpetual Gravesites Care
No maintenance or service fees
A Jewish Tradition since 1955
TOTAL: $1,595
No Interest Payment Plans Available
Fr complete information on our plot and funeral service package plan
call your Lakeside/Eternal Light representative today.
In time of need, one call will handle all the details.
DADE:
592-0690
Israel Discount Bank Limited Publishes
It Consolidated Financial Statements For 1986
NEW YORK Israel Dis-
count Bank Limited, the prin-
cipal banking subsidiary of
IDB Bankholding Corporation
Limited and parent of Israel
Discount Bank of New York,
published its consolidated
financial statements for 1986.
Total consolidated assets at
December 31, 1986 amounted
to NIS 18.8 billion ($12.6
billion) compared with NIS
20.8 billion ($14 billion) at
year-end 1985, a decrease of 9
percent. This decrease
resulted from a substantial
part of the Bank's assets being
denominated in dollars and the
fact that many balance sheet
items were influenced by the
difference between the annual
increase in the consumer price
index for 1986 on the one hand
and the stable rate of ex-
change in 1986 for the New
Israel Shekel in relation to the
U.S. dollar on the other.
However, unlinked Shekel
deposits from the public in
Israel grew in real terms by 25
percent.
ORUM
Kosalyn Levine. 70, of Kendall passed away
April 4. Mrs. Orum and her family were
pioneer residents coming to Miami in 1925.
Her aunts and uncles came here in 1910.
Mrs. Orum was a graduate of Florida State
College for Women (FSU) and retired from
teaching Social Studies in the Dade County
School System with a life-time teaching cer-
tificate from the State of Florida. Wife of
the late Victor Levine and wife of Maurice
Orum. Mother of Paul (Sali) Levine of
Miami. Dr. Stephen (Cheryl) Levine of Plan-
tation, Robert (Carole) Levine of Miami, Dr.
Andrew (Toni) Levine of Tampa; daughter
of the late Adolph and Fannie Daum; aunt of
Marcel!< Steinberg of Kensigton. Md.;
grandmother of Gregory, Shana, Michele.
Alexander, Matthew and Dana. Funeral ser-
vices were held at Congregation Bet Breira
with interment at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
Consolidated net income for
1986 totalled NIS 2.4 million
($1.6 million) compared with
NIS 40.2 million ($27 million)
for the year 1985. The main
causes for the decline in net in-
come were a reduction in
spreads permitted on local cur-
rency transactions in Israel
and a freeze on bank commis-
sions. Net income was also af-
fected by a change in the ac-
counting method used by com-
mercial banks in Israel for
stating the value of partially
linked securities in their finan-
cial statements.
Israel Discount Bank of New
York continues to operate
satisfactorily and continues to
be the largest Israeli-owned
bank in the United States.
Based on its deposits at
December 31, 1986, Israel Dis-
count Bank of New York was
ranked as the 16th largest
commercial bank in New York
State and the 87th largest in
the United States.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every Day Closed Sabbatn
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
532-2099
Brow.ird County
532-2099
Represented by Riverside Memorial Chapel, Inc.
New York: (718) 263-7600 Queens Blvd. & 76th Rd., Forest Hills, N.Y.
RUBIN-ZILBERT
DADE
538-6371
BROWARD
920-6660
ZILBERT-RUBIN
BROWARD:
525-9339 |
HAVE ,
YOU BEEN
COMPARING *
APPLES and ORANGES
AMONG PBE-ARKANGEMENT PLANS?
II you've shopped lor tuneral pre-arrangements.
you've found there are some big differences among them.
Some "package" plans look economical, but then you read the fine
print and discover the add-ons. surcharges, hidden costs they forgot I
mention. At Menorah. you'll find the custom-designed pre-need plan
your pocketbook with extra value, extra attention and no extra cha
U you have a plan now. bring it in and we'll write a Menorah Pre-Neea
tor less and give you a dozen oranges. Now isn't that a peach ol an oiler?
^**^Grden and Funeral Chapels
West Palm Beach 627-2277.Deerfield Beach 427-4700.Sunrise: 742-600.Maraate 9750011 -North Miami Beach 935-3939
westraimaeacacw f>utwml chap^.Cemeteries Mausoleum Pro-Need Planning ______________^^


Page 10-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 10, 1987
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87-11544 PC 1
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
YOLANDA PALACIO. a/k/a
YOLANDA SANCHEZ,
Petitioner/Wife,
and
ROBERTO SANCHEZ, a/k/a
ROBERTO AVILES,
Respondent/H usband
TO: Roberto Sanchez, a/k/a
Roberto Avilea
Tierra Cabente,
Municjpto de Tusantla
Michoacan, Mexico
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu
tion of Marriage has been filec
against you and you are requires
to serve a copy of your writter.
defenses, if any, to it on Alan H
Miller. Esq.. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 10700
Caribbean Blvd., Suite 317, Miami,
Florida 33189, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 24, 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 19th day of March, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Alan H. Miller, Esq.
10700 Caribbean Blvd.,
Suite 317
Miami. Florida 33189
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone: (305) 238-1080
15606 March 27;
April 3, 10.17. 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-4201 (02)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ELIANE MARIE BRADLEY,
Petitioner,
and
EDDIE GEORGE BRADLEY,
Respondent.
TO: EDDIE G. BRADLEY
Residence unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu
tion of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney, 612 Nor-
thwest 12th Ave.. Miami, Florida
33136. and file original with Court
Clerk on or before May 1st, 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered.
24th March, 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
15614 March 27;
April 3. 10. 17,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-12954 (22)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
YVONNE BERGSTROM
RENAUD. wife
and
LUC RENAUD. husband
TO: Mr. Luc Renaud
c/o Mr. Yvon Renaud
203 Meunier Laval
Montreal H7G IR8. Canada
YOl ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on ARTHUR
H. LIPSON. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 801 N.E.
167 Street Miami. Fla. 33162 and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
May 1. 1987; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief prayed for in the complaint
or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 25 day of March. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
15618 March 27;
April 3.10,17.1987
W THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nnmber 87-806
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
EMILIE E. STADLER,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of EMILIE E. STADLER. deceas-
ed, File Number 87-806 (01), is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
Dade County Courthouse, 73 W.
Flagler Street, 3rd floor. Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on April 3, 1987.
Personal Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler Street, Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler Street, Suite 1201
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 374-3116
Florida Bar No. 059023
15629 April 3, 10. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-12067 (0)
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
HUGO ROBERTO LUNA
a/k/a
ROBERTO LUNA,
Petitioner,
vs.
MARIA DEL PILAR LUNA
a/k/a
PILAR LUNA.
Respondent.
TO: Maria Del Pilar Luna
Apt. No. 2
4021 Medford Drive
Annandale, Virginia 20007
You are hereby notified that the
petitioner has commenced the
above styled action against you
seeking a Dissolution of his mar-
riage to you, and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Elliot L.
Miller, 960 Arthur Godfrey Road
(Suite 116), Miami Beach, Florida
33140-3349 on or before April 24.
1987 and file the original with the
clerk before said date otherwise a
default will be entered.
Dated this 19th day of March.
1987.
Richard P. Brinker
By: T. Casamayor
15608 March 27;
April 3, 10, 17. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Robeli Rental at 1124
SW 8 Street Miami. FL 33135 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Roberto Hernandez
Owner
15621 April 3,10. 17. 24. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
Ficrmous name law
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Battersea Medical
Publications at number 3591 North
Prospect Drive, in the City of
Miami. Florida, intends to register
the said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 17
day of March, 1987.
Murray Epstein, M.D.
Nelson C. Keshen, Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
8905 SW 87th Avenue, No. 209
Miami. Florida 33176
15603 March 27;
April. 3,10.17,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-11927
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION,
an association organized and
existing under the laws of the
United States of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
ISRAEL OJALVO.
et ux., et al..
Defendants.
TO: ISRAEL OJALVO and
MARILYN OJALVO,
his wife
Apartado3065
Caracas. 1010A Venezuela
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Unit 701-A, of THE ROYAL
CLUB CONDOMINIUM, ac-
cording to the Declaration of
Condominium thereof, as
recorded in Official Records
Book 11979, at Page 1624, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida, 33146 on or before
April 24. 1987 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 18 day of March,
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
14597 March 27;
April 3,10, 17. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 87-09209 13
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
MOZENA M.E.F.
COLEBROOKE
Petitioner
and
RODNEY F. COLEBROOKE
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: RODNEY F. COLEBROOKE.
St. Andrews Isle,
Bahamas
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.J.
GRAFF. ESQ., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St. N.M.B. Florida 33162 on
or before April 24th. 1987, and file
the original with the clerk of this
court otherwise a default will be
entered against you.
DATED: March 23, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
15610 March 27;
April 3.10, 17, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name FANTASTIC
FLOWERS at 1553-C Sunset
Drive. Coral Gables. FL 33143 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
FANTASY LAND, INC.
By MARIA E. KELLY
PRESIDENT
15632 April 10, 17.24;
May 1.1987
NOTICE L'N'.JER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEHEBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SEMANARIO
PUEBLO at 2025 SW 1st Street
Miami. FL 33135 intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Raul R Oh va 50% Owner
Rafael Alcazar 50% Owner
15626 April 3,10.17,24. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOB DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-06081 CA-2C
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
GOLDOME SAVINGS BANK,
successor by merger to
PALMETTO FEDERAL
SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff
MAHLON PAUL OLSON,
etal.,
Defendants.
TO: MAHLON PAUL OLSON
20175 Seneca Road
Apple Valley.
California 92307
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Unit 6-2, LAKESIDE XI
CONDOMINIUM, according
to the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof, as record-
ed in Official Records Book
11619, at Page 1469. amend-
ed by instrument recorded in
Official Records Book 11747,
at Page 1472, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida, and as subsequently
amended,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it.
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida. 33146 on or before
April 24. 1987 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter:
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 18 day of March.
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
14598 March 27;
April 3. 10, 17,1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-10643
IN RE: The Marriage of:
LUCIEN JEAN-BAPTISTE,
Petitioner,
and
DONN1EL.
JEAN-BAPTISTE
Respondent.
TO: DONNIE L.
JEAN-BAPTISTE,
Residence unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu
tion of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney, 612 Nor-
thwest 12th Ave., Miami. Florida
33136, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before May 1st, 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered.
March 24th. 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
15612 March 27;
April 3. 10.17, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-12953 (22)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CARMEN CHUBECK, wife,
and
GARY CHUBECK. husband.
TO: GARY CHUBECK
5100 EAST TROPICANA.
No. 19F
LAS VEGAS. NEVADA
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on ARTHUR
H. LIPSON. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 801 Nor-
theast 167 Street Miami. Florida
33162 and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on
or before May 1. 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this day 15 of March. 1967.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
15617 March 27;
April 3, 10, 17,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-11081 CA 06
NOTICE OF ACTION
STOCKTON. WHATLEY
DAVIN AND COMPANY, a
Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
v.
The Estate of ELWOOD E
YOUNG, deceased, and the
unknown heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, or other parties claiming
by, through, under or against the
Estate; CLEO F. YOUNG; CRAIG
YOUNG; STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE
UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA; JOHN DOE and
JANE DOE;
Defendants.
To:
The Estate of Elwood E.
Young, deceased, and the
unknown parties who may be
spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees and all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
said Defendant, who are not
known to be dead or alive,
and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, ti-
tle, or interest in the proper-
ty herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an ac-
tion to foreclose a mortgage on the
following property in Dade Coun
ty, Florida:
Unit 809C. PHASE 3,
LAKESHORE 6, A CON-
DOMINIUM, according to
the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof, as record-
ed in Official Records Book
12684. at Page 2946. of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida; together with an
undivided share in the com-
mon elements appurtenant
thereto, and any and all
amendments thereto.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on David R. Webster. Esquire, of
Rosenthal and Yarchin. P.A., At-
torneys for Plaintiff. Suite 800.
3050 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami,
Florida 33137. on or before May
1st, 1987, and to file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's at-
torneys or immediately thereafter;
otherwise, a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the Complaint
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on 24th March, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
By: Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
15613 March 27;
April 3, 10, 17. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOB
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-613
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
TRUDE BODENHEIMER.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of TRUDE BODENHEIMER.
deceased. File Number 87-513 (01),
is pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
Dade County Courthouse, 73 W.
Flagler Street. 3rd floor. Miami.
Florida 33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all daims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on April 3, 1987.
Personal Representative:
ROSE STRAUSS
13509 Drexmore Road
Cleveland. Ohio 44120
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON, ESQUIRE
19 West Flagler Street. Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (306) 374-3116
15628 April 3.10.1987
NOTICE OF ACTim.
W THE CIRCUIT COW
OF THE 11TH JDuSL
CIRCUIT IN mSjJ
DADE COUNTY*^
Civil Action No. 85.?J
NOTICE BY PufigS
INRE:RAINSOFT0F-Tim
"Sm^0"*-?
vs.
ISMARCORP.aFlond,-
ISMAELDEMARCmNr1
OSCAR MACHAD0 (5ft.
RUIZ. PAUL SEASH0LB
BRITTON FOREMAN 1
DANIEL VILLALBA
Defendants. ,
TO:ISMARCORP.,1f1orjJ
corporation and ISMAELI
DEMARCHES '
Address Unknown
YOU ARE HERPh
NOTIFIED that a Co^l
damages and injunctive rebrfl
been filed and commenced -f
court and you are required to.
a copy of your written defn
BRAXTON. P.A.. ittlxZl
Plaintiff whose address |
406. One Datran Cento
South Dadeland Boulevard |
Florida 33156 and file the'o,,
with the clerk of the above i,
court on or before April U, I
otherwise a default will be e
against you for the relief i
for in the Complaint.
This notice shall be
once a week for four i
weeks in THE JEWll
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and thtj
of said court at Miami, Flor
this 18 day of March, 1987. ,
RICHARD P BRINKER |
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florid.
BY: BARBARA R0DRIG11
As Deputy Clerk
HAROLD M. BRAXTON, PJ
Attorney for Petitioner ,
Suite 406, One Datran Cental
9100 South Dadeland Boulen
Miami, Florida 33156
Telephone: (305) 661-0766
14599 Ma
April 3.10,17.1
IN THE CIRCUIT COW t
DADE COUNTY. I
PROBATE DIVISION ,
File Nnmber 87-1038
Division 04
IN RE:ESTATE OF
THOMAS CLAYTON
ANDERSON
FORMAL NOTICE
BY PUBLICATION
TO: ALLEN ANDERSON:
1455 West Avenue. No. 203
Miami Beach. Fonda 33139
and all unknown parties wtoj
claim as heirs, devisees, gr
or beneficiaries of the E*t
the late THOMAS CLAY
ANDERSON, be they I
competents or otherwise raj
juris.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED
Petition for The Deter
Beneficiaries and Heirs Imj
filed in this court. You are r
to serve written defenses to I
petition not later than Aprij
1987, on petitioner's
whose name and addren
HAYS. GRUNDWERGAVU
28 West Flagler Street, Suit* I
Miami, Florida 33130 and to|
the original of the written d
with the clerk of this court i
before service or inro
thereafter. Failure to serve i
ten defenses as required
result in a judgment or on
the relief demanded in the p
without further notice.
WITNESS my hand and m
of this court on February 20. 'I
RICHARD P. BRINKS |
As Clerk of the Court
By HOLLIS L. LANGE
As Deputy Clerk
15609
April 3.10.17,
AFFIDAVIT USDW
FICTITIOUS NAME ST.""
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF DADE
WThe undersigned, und !,
says; It is the intention j
undersigned to engage "I
business enterprise under mi
titious name of FA",
PURRS located at 6**"^
in the city of Miami. D**1
Florida. ,.
Those interested in "
prise, and the *.
Erostofeach.isas ouo
Luv of Amma"nc_
Ann Monttiw. P"*"|
689 N.E. 79 St. l
April 3.10,1T|
15616


t nday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-C
foreclosure Sales Public Notices
L'K OF SALE
!ANT TO CHAPTER 46
HE CIRCUIT COURT OP
r FLEVENTH JUDICIAL
L,IT IN AND FOR DADE
^rv' FLORIDA
NERAL JURISDICTION
Ko. 86-46894''-
hEBAL NATIONAL MOR-
5gE ASSOCIATION. a
i SUtei corporation,
fcoffls)
LeTH C. BELLE, et al..
j^ESis HEREBY GIVEN
ant to an 0rder or F,n*J
merit entered in this case now
ing in said Court, the style of
h is indicated above, I will sell
. highest and best bidder for
i on THE SOUTH STEPS of
IDsde County Courthouse in
mi Dade County, Florida at
-Oo'clock A.M.. on the 24th day
April. 1987, the following
Inbed property:
Il8 ia Block 2, of CUTLER
HI CLUB SECTION ONE.
ding to the Plat thereof, an
dfd in Plat Book 114, at
t30, of the Public Records of
* CouitT, Florida.
TED the 8th day of April.
ICHARD P BRINKER
|erk of Circuit Court
nit Court Seal)
(Maria Sama
wty Clerk
|r for Plaintiff
I & Yarchin, P.A.
| Biscayne Blvd.
i. Florida 33137
hed 4/10-17
; CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-1815
Division 01
fcE: ESTATE OF
&LDA K. THAU
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
! idministration of the estate
ELDA K. THAU, deceased,
[Number 87-1815, is pending in
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Probate Division, the ad
i of which is 73 West Flagler
t, Miami, Florida 33130. The
I and addresses of the per-
I representatives and the per-
I representative's attorney are
brth below.
interested persons are re-
to file with this court,
SIN THREE MONTHS OF
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
NOTICE: (1) all claims
hst the estate and (2) any ob-
pn by an interested person on
i this notice was served that
i the validity of the will,
ilifications of the personal
ntative, venue, or jurisdic-
^f the court.
CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
T'S NOT SO FILED WILL BE
EVER BARRED.
Jlication of this Notice has
ion April 3, 1987.
personal Representatives:
Eugene Victor Thaw
Eastover Farms
' Valley, New York 13320
Cecilia R. Grunhut
1366 Biarritz Drive
mi Beach. Florida 33141
*>' for Personal
|sentati\v
1 A. Cypen, Esq.
JWANDCYPJiM
|Box 402ii.i..
'Beach. Florida88140
ne: (3(15) 5324200
April 3, 10, 1987
.NOTICE UNDER~~
PCTITIOLs NAME LAW
F'CE IS HEREBY GIVEN
P* undersigned, desiring to
ny in business under the fic-
SR^ SMITH TERMINAL
KIBLTION SYSTEMS at
d> Mi2"d Avenue. Miami,
I67 intends to register
IJMjf with the Clerk of the
* of Dade County,
IAREH0J SE COMPANY
I (a Florida corporation)
t^nSklawer-Pr^dent
ftYS.TRAUM pA
' Knin. Lel'inson &
[Bnck,|| Ave,IUe.
7 F 3313]
P^js for
EjfRMlNAL
| .NY
March 20,27;
April 3,10,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, PLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTON
DIVISION
Caae No. 84-18971 (CA 29)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States
Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
OSCAR HORMAZA, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: OSCAR HORMAZA,
residence unknown, if alive
and if dead, to all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against the said
OSCAR HORMAZA and all
parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or in-
terest in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an ac
tion to foreclose a mortgage on the
following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Condominium No. 512 of
5050 CONDOMINIUM, ac-
cording to the Declaration of
Condominium thereof, as
recorded in Official Records
Book 10337, at Page 293, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida, together
with undivided interest in the
Common Elements appurte-
nant thereto, as amended;
together with all im-
provements, appliances and
fixtures thereon
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your writen defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis and Allison,
Plaintiffs attorneys, whose ad-
dress is 111 N.E. 1st Street,
Miami, Florida 33132, on or before
April 24th, 1987, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 19th day of
March, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
15605 March 27;
April 3,10, 17.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name The Amusement
Group and/or Vito's Video at
13541 S.W. 62 Lane, Miami,
Florida intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Jay M. Hecker 100%
13541 S.W. 62 Lane. Miami,
Florida 33183
Hays, Grundwerg & Vann
Attorneys for Jay M. Hecker
28 W. Flagler Street, Suite 800
Miami, Florida 33130
14592 March 20, 27;
April 3, 10, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name FESTIVAL DE LA
PRENSA at 2025 S.W. 1st Street,
Miami. Florida intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
RAUL R. OLIVA
Owner
14595 March 20.27;
April 3. 10. 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-12158
IN RE: The Marriage of:
RAOUL ETIENNE,
Petitioner,
and
CLARA L. ETIENNE,
Respondent.
TO: CLARA L. ETIENNE,
Residence unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney, 612 Nor-
thwest 12th Avc.. Miami. Florida
33136. and file original with Court
Clerk on or before April 24, 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY Diana Can
AprilS. 10, 17.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-1325
Division (04)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
AMELIA LAGER.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of AMELIA LAGER, deceased.
File Number 87-1325 (04), is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
Dade County Courthouse, 73 West
Flagler Street, 3rd floor, Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
to whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun April 3, 1987.
Personal Representative:
ERIC LAGER
1138 Woodbine Avenue
Narberth, Pennsylvania 19072
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler Street. Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 374-3116
15623 April 3.10,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-00311 (CA 23)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI, a
United States Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SUSAN BARROS, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: MERCIEL PRIMO
14270 S.W. 73rd St.
Miami. FL., 33183
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Lot 11, in Block 38, of
KENDALE LAKES.
SECTION SEVEN,
according to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 92,
at Page 74, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis & Allison,
Plaintiff's attorneys, whose
address is 111 N.E. 1st Street,
Miami, Florida 33132, on or before
May 1. 1987, and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorneys or immediately
thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 26 day of March,
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
15622 April3, 10. 17,24. 1987
F
' .
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name EAST COAST
TRANSPORTATION COMPANY
at 12300 N.W. 32nd Avenue,
Miami, Florida 33167 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
SMITH TERMINAL
WAREHOUSE COMPANY
(a Florida corporation)
By: J. Leonard Sklawer, President
SYDNEY S. TRAUM. P.A.
Myers, Kenin, Levinson &
Richards
1428 Brickell Avenue,
Miami, Fl 33181
Attorneys for
SMITH TERMIN
WAREHOUSE COM1
'
M-l-r'
April 3, 10. 1987
..:
, .&$:
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NUMBER: 87 1795
DIVISION: 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JACOB L. FRIEDMAN,
Deceased.
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the Estate
of JACOB L. FRIEDMAN,
Deceased, File Number 87-1795, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the Co-Personal
Representatives and the Co-
Personal Representatives' at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with the Court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE: (1) all claims against the
estate and (2) any objection by an
interested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, venue or jurisdiction of the
court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this notice has
begun on April 3, 1987.
ANN UHLAR FRIEDMAN,
Co-Personal Representative
ARTHUR E. LIPSON,
Co-Personal Representative
MORTON B. ZEMEL,
Co-Personal Representative
MORTON B. ZEMEL, ESQUIRE
Florida Bar No. 090723
16666 N.E. 19th Avenue, Suite
111
North Miami Beach, Florida 33162
Telephone: (305) 949-4237
15624 April 3.10,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name LANNIE at 1944 SW
8 St. Miami, FL 33135 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Adela O. Nasser
14591 March 20.27;
April 3,10,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name 500 MILES AUTO
REPAIR at 3090 N.W. 7th Street.
MIAMI. FLORIDA 33125 intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
ELVIN G. LANDERO
1428 S.W. 3rd Street, APT. 1
MIAMI. FL 33135
15627 April 3. 10. 17.24, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-14575
ACTION FOR ADOPTION
IN RE: THE MATTERS OF THE
ADOPTION OF:
a minor
and
TO: BLAS ROLANDO BARRERO
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Adoption has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on Armando Gutierrez,
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 2153 Coral Way. Suite 400
Miami, Florida 33145. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before May 8,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 3 day of April, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By B.J. FOY
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court SMI)
ARM A \ I"1 Gl TIERREZ,
ESQUIRE
: i. '
Apru 10,17,^4;
May 1,1987
i.^,--: ,- '
. :'<'' 1 '"'
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-1598
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HERMAN LEIBOWITZ.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of HERMAN LEIBOWITZ,
deceased, File Number 87-1598, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
DADE County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, 3rd Floor,
Miami, Florida 33130. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on April 10, 1987.
Personal Representatives:
AARON FALKOWITZ,
Personal Representative
301 174th Street, No. 1001
Miami Beach, Florida 33160
ANITA FALKOWrrZ.
Personal Representative
301 174th Street, No. 1101
Miami Beach, Florida 33160
RENEE GRUNTWAGEN,
Personal Representative
95 Ashford Drive
Syosset, New York
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Sydney S. Traum, Esquire
SYDNEY S. TRAUM, P.A.
Myers, Kenin, Levinson &
Richards
1428 Brickell Avenue, 6th Fir.
Miami, Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 371-9041
15640 April 10,17,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name PACIFIC INTERNA-
TIONAL TRAVEL at 3923 Alton
Road, Miami Beach. Fl 33140 in-
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Sharlen Enterprises Inc.
A Florida Corporation
Paul Kwitney, of
Kwitney Kroop & Scheinberg P.A.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 512
Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
Attorney for Sharlen Enterprises
Inc.
15620 April 3, 10,17, 24,1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FC CASE NO.: 87-10544
IN RE: The Marriage of
ALFREUS CLAUDION,
Petitioner/Husband,
vs.
VERA ANN CLAUDION.
Respondent.
TO: VERA ANN CLAUDION -
Residence Unknown shall serve
copy of your Answer to the Peti-
tion for Dissolution of Marriage
upon GEORGE NICHOLAS. At-
torney, 612 N.W. 12th Avenue,
Miami. Florida. 33136, and file
original with Court Clerk on or
liefore May 8, 1987; otherwise a
default will lie entered.
April 3, 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
15636 April 10. 17.24;
May 1. 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87 14565 (09)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ANGEL McCLOUD.
Petitioner,
and
MILTON L McCLOUD,
Respondent.
TO: MILTON L. McCLOUD.
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave Miami, Florida. 88186, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before May 15, 1987. others
default will be enti

Kit m VRD BRINKER
April lo
May 1, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
Civil Action No. 87-14268 (15)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
SUSAN LAUREL CORRELL.
wife
and
MARK CHARLES CORRELL,
husband
TO: Mr. Mark Charles Correll
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on ARTHUR
H. LIPSON, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 801 N.E.
167 Street Miami, Fla. 33162 and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
May 8, 1987; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief prayed for in the complaint
or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 2 day of April, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
15634 .- April 10,17,24;
May 1, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-10619
NOTICE OF ADOPTION
PROCEEDING
rN RE: The Adoption of
A MINOR
TO: MICHAEL "FRENCHY"
BEAUDRY
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for Peti-
tion for Adoption has been filed in-
volving you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on
WILLARD K. SPLITT
STOESSER, ESQ.. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 13122
West Dixie Highway, Suite B,
North Miami, Fl. 33161, and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
May 11, 1987; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 2 day of April. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By B.J. FOY
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Willard K. Splittstoesser, Esq.
13122 West Dixie Highway, Suite
B
North Miami, Florida 33161
(305)891-3848
Attorney for Petitioner
15635 April 10, 17,24;
May 1, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Ace International at
13630 West Dixie Highway. North
Miami. F'lorida 33161 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Ace Music Center, Inc.
13630 West Dixie Highway
North Miami. Florida 33161
Cypen & Cypen
825 Arthur Godfrey Road.
Miami Beach, FL 33140
Attorney for Applicant
15638 April 10,17, 24;
May 1.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Trump Terrace at 9.">0
Biarritz Drive Normandy Isle
Miami Beach Fl 33141 intends to
I odd name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Conn
ty, Fl
15681 ApVii c. 11 -..
May 1.1987
'V


Page 1WJ Tke Jew^sk illon4aJilrUay,Aprll 16. [W
Jewish National Fund Leon and Genendel Schuster Forest Is Dedicated
Dedication ceremonies for the Leon and
Genendel Schuster Forest were held in the JNF-
American Independence Park, Jerusalem on
March 9. Participating in the dedication were
leaders of the Jewish National Fund, the
Schuster family and friends who came from all
over the country. Words of praise for Leon
Schuster, for his accomplishments and
achievements throughout the years as an outstan-
ding JNF leader, dating back to the time when he
was the JNF President in Havana, Cuba, were
related by Mordechai Dayan, World Co-
Chairman Keren Kayemeth Leisrael, and Zev W.
Kogan, President JNF Southern Region.
Although Mr. Schuster could not attend the
dedication himself, he was represented by his
daughter and son-in-law Rela and Julio
Schniadoski, as well as his grandchildren Israel
and Roselyn, who all participated in the
ceremony. Left: Zev W. Kogan, President Jewish
National Fund Southern Region, addresses the
Israel Bonds To Honor Miami Beach Couple
assembled group at the dedication. Center-
Salomon Garazx, Past President Sephardic Con
gregatxon Temple Moses; Mordechai Damn
World Co-Chairman Keren Kayemeth Lei^ael
Jerusalem; Rabbi Barry J. Konovitch. Spiritual
&fB*r, S*f" ebrew C(m99ation TemvU
ShmueL Right: The Schuster family, grandson
Israel, daughter Rela Schniadoski,
daughter Roselyn, and son-in-lav
Schniadoski.
Redford For Reelection
grand-
Julio
Marion and Archie Bockner
of Miami Beach will be the
guests of honor at a luncheon
on Sunday, April 26, when the
Greater Miami Israel Bonds
Organization recognizes their
effort for Israel through the
Israel Bonds program. The
luncheon, will begin at 11 a.m.
in the Sklar Ballroom in Tem-
ple Ner Tamid, Miami Beach.
Members of Temple Ner
Tamid for 25 years, the
Bockners helped initiate the
purchase of a State of Israel
One-Half Million Dollar Note
that was underwritten by the
temple's membership. Since
the first purchase of the State
of Israel's Note 10 years ago,
they have been leaders at the
temple to continue the support
of Israel through this
program.
In addition to their active in-
volvement with the State of
Israel Bonds and Temple Ner
Tamid, the Bockners, who will
receive the Israel Freedom
Award, have supported the
United Jewish Appeal and Ar-
chie Bockner is a member of
B'nai B'rith.
Originally from Toronto,
Canada, the Bockners are the
proprietors of Bay Harbor
Fine Foods which they opened
28 years ago after they settled
in Miami. Their son, David, is
now also active in the opera-
tion of the family business
after making Aliyah for six
years on a kibbutz and serving
in the 1973 War.
Special guest speaker will be
Gil Elan, Executive Director
of the Israel-America
Chamber of Commerce of
Florida. A Paratroop Major in
the Israeli Defense Force
Reserves, Elan served as a
Commanding Officer of the
Spokesman Unit in Beirut dur-
ing the recent war in Lebanon.
Acting as chairman of the
Temple Ner Tamid-Israel
Bonds Luncheon is David S.
is
Meyer. The co-chairman
Alfred Golden. Serving on the
committee are Goldie Cohen,
Morry Nathanson, Fannie
Rest, Louis Suchman and
Elaine Zane.
[3
Publfx
County Commissioner Jim
Redford will be honored at a
fund raising reception and din-
ner hosted by Barry and Judy
Kutun, Friday, April 24, 6 p.m.
at the Grove Isle Club in
Coconut Grove. Redford was
first elected to the Dade Coun-
ty Commission in 1974.
The April 24 fund raia
hosted by former Hou
Speaker Pro Tempore, Bi.
Kutun is the initial activity]
behalf of Commissioner
ford's reelection campaign i
1988.
Publix
wishes you and
your family a
joyous Passover
celebration.
May the spring festival of
Passover bring you an abundance
of peace and happiness.
Marion and Archie Bockner
^


eJewisln FloiridiainL
April 10,1987
Section D
festival of fpeedom
passoveR matzot Recalls ReBiRth of Spaing
By YITZHAK DINUR
IN addition to being a
festival of freedom and
redemption from slavery,
Passover is a festival of spring,
a festival of rebirth of nature
and nation. As Passover oc-
curs in the month of March or
April (depending on the cor-
respondence of the Jewish
lunar calendar with the civil
calendar), it coincides more or
less with spring in the nor-
thern hemisphere.
In the land of Israel, this is
the time when the heavy rains
of winter are being replaced by
the dews of spring. For this
reason, the morning prayer for
the first day of Passover con-
tains a prayer for dew, and
many of the poems in the
Passover prayers evoke spring
and nature.
Like most Jewish festivals,
the Passover festival has a
number of separate aspects,
now considered inseparable.
This particular festival has
four distinct aspects, each of
which is given a name in the
Bible or in later Jewish tradi-
tional literature: the Festival
of Pesach (Exod. 34:25), the
Festival of Matzot (Exod.
23:15 and 34:18), the Time of
Our Freedom (Mishna
Pesachim 10:5), the Festival of
Spring and Agriculture (Deut.
16:1).
TODAY THE themes of the
Passover sacrifice, the eating
of matzot, national redemption
by divine providence and the
idea of national freedom are
more prominent, whereas the
theme of the Festival of Spr-
ing is less significant, too often
taken for granted and
sometimes entirely forgotten.
In the Bible, Nissan, the
Jewish month in which
Passover falls, is called the
Month of Spring (Aviv). Just
as spring begins the year in
nature, so Nissan is the first
month in the enumeration of
the months of the year. The
word aviv is also the Hebrew
agricultural term for barley, in
the early part of spring, which
is not yet ripe.
This is the beginning of the
barley harvest and the coun-
ting of the Omer (the sheaf)
which begins on the first day
of Passover, the morning after
the Seder and which continues
until the end of the barley
harvest. The beginning of the
wheat harvest 50 days later at
Shavuot is a reminder of the
ceremonial cutting of the sheaf
at the beginning of the barley
harvest in First and Second
Temple times. In those times,
the sheaf was placed on the
Temple altar.
AMONG CITY Jews in the
Diaspora, this aspect of
Passover is the aspect that is
least felt and most neglected.
Yet even in such cities, spring
is all around. Trees begin to
put out leaf buds and to bloom
in the boulevards, and wild
flowers burst forth on vacant
I ;md in neglected corners.
the Haggadah, spring
does not receive much atten-
tion. The Haggadah stresses
the divine redemption and the
covenant aspects, and it leaves
the reading of the Song of
Songs, that celebrates spring
and God's love for the Jewish
people, to the end.
The eating of matzot is also
connected with the spring. It is
not just a ceremonial pro-
cedure following an arbitrary
divine command; nor is it
merely a remembrance of the
haste with which the Israelites
left Egypt so that their bread
had no time to rise. Flavius
Josephus, the ancient Jewish
historian, asserts that the mat-
zot had to be made of the
previous year's grain, and that
the Jews were not allowed to
partake of the new grain until
after the sheaf of barley had
been ceremonially placed on
the Temple altar. After that,
they might partake of the new
year's grain, but leaven was
still forbidden until the end of
Continued on Page 15-D


Page 2-D The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 10, 1987
passovea tells Us
We must pRize fpeedom
By JACOB NEUSNER
PASSOVER tells us that we
must prize freedom, for we
know what it means to be
slaves. This is a lesson which
we learn from the Jewish
Situation.
We who remember that we
began as slaves know how im-
portant is an act which we do
freely, the gift we give freely.
Because we have suffered so
TTD
grievously in history, we know
how important is the opposite
of slavery, cruelty, and oppres-
sion, namely, liberty, kindness
and love.
From the lessons of redemp-
tion, moreover, we have learn-
ed that we are neither animals,
nor God; neither wholly the ob-
jects of nature and history, nor
wholly subjects of either. We
see our human duties and
capacities, therefore, as
neither wholly passive, nor en-
tirely active. We know that
man may achieve very little,
but that he may in fact achieve
something. What he may do is
to act freely, decently compas-
sionately, for freedom means
at least that much.
IN THE LARGER part of
our lives we may be condition-
ed by forces outside of our own
power, but within, there lies a
precious corner of freedom,
freedom of will and will at its
most virtuous is goodwill, in
Hebrew "hesed," abstract
compassion, and gemilut
hasadim, concrete act of
compassion.
It is hardly necessary to be a
Jew to understand the Jewish
situation, as Passover reveals
that situation. We Jews have
known longer than other men
what freedom means and what
it demands but others have
long since learned. We Jews
have words for our situation
we have festivals to celebrate
these words, such as this "time
of our freedom." The meaning
of these festivals must be
shared by all men. Those in
freedom must celebrate their
freedom, and those under
Communism or otherwise op-
pressed, politically, spiritually,
morally, must remember
freedom, just as we Jews com-
memorated freedom when we
did not have it, and celebrate it
when we do.
In a sense, therefore, all men
may learn the lessons of the
Jewish situation. It has been
said that on account of
Hiroshima, we are all
murderers. If so, then on ac-
count of Auschwitz, we are all
Jews. Just as we men in-
cinerated entire cities, in our
fury, so we men were in-
cinerated, shot, gassed, starv-
ed, destroyed in our fraility.
AN AGE THAT feels itself
threatened by utter annihila-
tion knows what it means to be
Jews, who in our own day suf-
fered the annihilation of their
entire European civilization.
An age that knows no securi-
ty knows what it means to be
Jews, who have lived for
thousands of years without
security.
An age that finds itself
almost powerless to change
the course of events knows
what it means to be Jews, who
have lived so long as outsiders,
standing always on the wings
of history but never in the
spotlight.
An age that sees itself in the
grip of the past from 1914 or
1939 onward, knows what it
means to be Jews, who have
seen themselves forever in the
grasp of events they have not
made, and ultimately, in the
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Aster and Family
Wish All Their Friends A Very Happy Passover
Dr. Zalman Bachelkov DDS and Staff
Wish Everyone A Very Happy Passover
Dr. and Mrs. Maxwell Dauer
Dr. and Mrs. Edward A. Dauer
Mr. and Mrs. Roger A. Dauer
Wish All A Very Happy Passover
Mr. and Mrs. George Feldenkreis and Family
Wish All Our Friends A Happy Passover
Mr. and Mrs. Ainslee Ferdie
Marshall, Meredith and Deborah
Wish All A Very Happy Passover
ram nt tn jmh namn ta
hands of Providence.
IF THIS IS SO, then we
must hope that others will
learn the lessons of the Jewish
PiTOK
situation as we have learned
them; the lesson that freedom
must be nurtured, and that
freedom is indivisible, but
must either be shared with all
or lost to all.
The world may well learn
from our quest for meaning in
events, our consecration to the
human intellect, our capacity
to think, create and preserve
culture; our appreciation of the
preciousness and sanctity of
men's slender treasures of
compassion and of love; our
awareness of the reality, im-
mediately, and centrality of
God's will; our knowledge that
it is not we, but God who deter-
mines the history of men and
nations.
We Jews, for our part, must
rehearse the lessons of our
situation, if we hope to share
them with the world. We must
not cease to see ourselves as
men redeemed by the action of
God from slavery and brought
forth to freedom. We must
continue to look into the
events of our age for the action
of our Creator, who, we
believe, acts through history
and reveals. His will through
what happens to us.
No generation of Jews
should find this task more
meaningful, for none has
witnessed the great things we
have.
We do not need to speak of
the past when we speak of
redemption. Every Jew alive
was redeemed not from
slavery of Egypt, but from the
horror of Auschwitz.
EVERY JEW of mature
years has witnessed in the
creation of the State of Israel,
an event which one can hardly
regard as less than a miracle.
So we have seen an hour of
redemption no less awesome
than that of Moses.
God has done great things
before our eyes, great, and ter-
rible and awesome things and
we alive are here to bear
witness before the nations.
W. Qewnan paosecutOR
Vouches fop document
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) A West German prosecutor
has vouched for the authenticity of a key document in the
trial of alleged war criminal John Demjajuk, obtained from
Soviet sources.
Helge Grabitz, head of the Nazi war crimes section of
the Hamburg District Attorney's Office, said that "not
even once" had she received a forged document from the
USSR or any other Communist bloc country.
GRABITZ TESTIFIED about 15 documents pertain-
ing to the Trawniki SS training camp where prisoners of
war were trained for guard duty at Treblinka and other
death camps. The Ukrainian-born Demjanjuk claims that
an indentity card issued at Trawnkiki, bearing his name.
photograph and physical description is a Soviet forgery.
The card bears the signature of the Trawniki comman-
dant, Karl Streibl. Grabitz, who was chief prosecutor at
Streibl's trial in West Germany, said she could easily iden-
tify the signature, having seen hundreds of documents
bearing it in the course of doing research for that trial. She
said Streibl himself authenticated his signature.
Laura and Dick Fink
Wish Their relatives and Friends
A Very Happy Passover
Mrs. Paul Gaier and Family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy and Joyous Passover
Mr. and Mrs.Gary Gerson
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy Passover
Mr. and Mrs. Barton S. Goldberg
Wish Family and Friends A Happy Passover
Mr. and Mrs. Howard W. Gordon and Family
Wish All Their Friends A Very Happy Passover
m


Sarajevo h&QQA6ah
is pRiceless m&nuscRipt
Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-D
By GABRIEL LEVENSON
IT IS a mark of the
worldwide fame of the Hag-
gadah of Sarajevo that, im-
mediately after the Nazis had
captured the city, in April of
1941, they hastened to
"liberate" the priceless
manuscript then, as now,
one of Yugoslavia's national
treasures.
Discovered only 50 years
earlier, it was perhaps the
oldest example of medieval
Jewish art; its thick vellum
pages richly illuminated in
azure-blue, deep red and bur-
nished gold, the Sarajevo Hag-
gadah was certainly among the
most beautiful a prize fit for
the collection of so
discriminating a connoisseur
of painting as Air Marshal
Hermann Goering himself.
Acquisition was high on the
agenda that first day of oc-
cupation, but to their chagrin
the avid Germans found that
the manuscript, the local
museum's most valued exhibit,
had simply vanished.
DR. ISAK LEVI, the elder-
ly veterinarian who headed the
Sarajevo Jewish community,
remembers the occasion and
elaborates, with zest, on the
saga of the disappearing Hag-
gadah. Other memories of the
war years are bitter: 10,000 of
the city's 11,000 Jews were ex-
terminated in the death camps
- a tragedy solemnized an-
nually at a moving Yom
Hashoah service in the one re-
maining synagogue, the
Ashkenazic, on the right bank
of the Miljacka, River, which
runs down the middle of
Sarajevo.
In a ceremony of several
hours, lay readers (there is no
longer an ordained rabbi)
alternate in reciting the names
(of the martyred dead. As each
name is intoned, a member of
the family (if there is still one
alive) rises head bowed -
for a moment of silent prayer
or reminiscence.
In contrast, the rescue of the
Haggadah over 40 years ago is
a joyous event which Dr. Levi
and the other survivors of that
time will never forget. As the
doctor tells it, the German
command had dispatched the
usual booted, black-jacketed
SS officer, with an escort of
heavily-armed commandos, to
make the pick-up from the
museum where the Haggadah
was kept, under lock-and-key,
to be shown only to scholars
and other special visitors.
THE OFFICER was receiv
ed politely enough by Dr. Jose
Petrovich, the museum's
curator, and held in conversa-
tion long enough for a young
secretary to slip out a side-
door, the Haggadah wrapped
in her shawl. On the street, she
hailed a peasant with horse
and wagon, returning from the
Sarajevo market to his home in
the mountains overlooking the
city.
The peasant readily agreed
to take the manuscript and
drove off with it to Foca, his
village, half-way up Mt. Ig-
man, where it was entrusted to
the local priest for the balance
of the war. (Mt. Igman was the
site of the 1984 Winter Olym-
pics held in Sarajevo.)
Today, Foca is the distina-
tion of the young people of
Sarajevo who make the yearly
march up Mt. Igman to com-
memorate and replicate
the Exodus-like trek of the
Yugoslav Partisans 45 years
ago. On a cold night in January
of 1942 the reading was
minus 32 degrees Celsius
Tito's First Proletarian
Brigade escaped entrapment
by the German divisions occu-
pying and surrounding Sara-
jevo. Half-frozen, the par-
tisans trudged up the moun-
tain, to establish secret winter
headquarters in Foca.
Dr. and Mrs. Alan S. Graubert
Dr. and Mrs. Richard Koby
Dr. and Mrs. Edward Goldman
Dr. Brian Zatls
Wish Everyone A Very Happy Passover
Mrs. Ernest L. Hallbauer and
Daughter Rosalie
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy Passover
Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Isan
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy Passover
Dr. and Mrs. H. Koran vaes
Wish The Entire Jewish Community
And Patients, Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy Passover
D Flo and Ben Kram
Hint-Rite Co., 748 NE 79 St., Miami691-5452
Wish Everyone A Very Happy Passover
On Passover, which this year begins Monday
evening, April IS, Steven Schiff, a Miami
Beach resident and a senior at Yeshiva
University in New York City, views an
elaborate Elijah's cup that is now on display
at the Yeshiva Museum. The one-of-a-kind
goblet, created by noted Israel artist,
Menahem Berman, is made of silver, glass,
and amethyst. The Hebrew lettering at the
base of the goblet is a prayer recited during the
part of the Passover Seder in which Elijah's
cup is filled. Schiff, son of Rabbi Solomon and
Shirley Schiff of Miami, is president of the
Student Council of the Isaac Breuer College of
Hebraic Studies. He is a computer science
major.
IT WAS HERE, a month
later, that the Supreme Com-
mand of the Partisans issued
the Foca Regulations, the first
legal document of the New
Yugoslavia, born then and
destined to assume power
three years later, after the
defeat of Germany. Signators
to the document included both
Tito himself and the man who
had actually written it
Moshe Pijade, the Jewish
painter and intellectual (his
works hang in the National
Museum in Belgrade), who was
second-in-command.
And it was from Foca that
the Haggadah was returned, in
triumph, in April of 1945, ex-
actly four years, to the month,
after its disappearance. The
Partisans had driven the Ger-
mans out of the city; the Hag-
gadah was brought back to its
place of honor in the museum.
How it had gotten there in-
itially is another bit of history
which Dr. Levi enjoys retell-
ing. The 14th century
manuscript, despite its name,
was not written in Sarajevo at
all: there was no Jewish settle-
ment in the city before the
beginning of the 16th century,
when Sephardic families, ex-
pelled from Spain in 1492,
finally established themselves
in the area.
SOME HAD come by way of
Venice, in Northern Italy,
across the Adriatic Sea, or
overland, to Dubrovnik, on the
coast, and thence inland to
Sarajevo, then one of the ma-
jor cities of the Ottoman Em-
pire and an important stop on
the caravan route between
Constantinople and the
trading centers of Europe.
Others had come northward
Continued on Page 11-D
George and Nan Kronengold
Jim and Sandy Kronengold
Wish All Their Friends
A Joyous and Happy Passover
Mrs. Joseph Landsman
Wish Friends, Family and
The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy Passover
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Lawrence
Wish All Family, Friends and Clients
A Very Happy Passover
Councilman and Mrs. Ted Nelson
Bay Harbour Island
Happy Passover
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Palmer
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy Passover


Page 4-D The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 10, 1987
youngest Chil&aen Can
Appreciate Ceremony
By RABBI
DOV ELKINS
ONE OF the many in-
genious things about Jewish
rituals and ceremonies is that
they can be understood and ap-
preciated by the youngest
child in the family and by the
greatest scholar in the
community.
People have said that Swift's
story Gulliver's Travels, finds
its greatness in that it is on the
surface a simple and dramatic
tale which grips the heart of
the fledgling, and yet has
deeper levels of interpretation
for the more intellectual
reader.
This is true as well as Jewish
rites and ceremonies; they are
concrete and beautiful symbols
for the young to see and enjoy,
and yet have laid deep within
them profound lessons about
life.
THIS IS certainly true
about the Seder. Many of its
rituals are specifically geared
to arouse the interest of the
children, the four questions,
the Seder plate and its
veriegated symbols, the
Afikomen, Elijah's entrance
and so on.
And yet, the greatest
scholar in Israel can wrench
vital lessons from the
meaning-laden leaves of the
traditional Haggadah. The
universal and abiding
significance of the Festival of
Freedom is not lost on his
penetrating and fact-filled
mind.
Haggadah means "telling"
the telling of the story of the
Exodus. The biblical story of
this great historical event, the
liberation from Egyptian bon-
dage, contains all of the
elements of a great drama. A
vigorous hero, the Prophet
Moses, arouses the will of the
people to seek freedom to wor-
ship God, brings deadly
plagues on the ruling king,
escapes in the night into the
desert, walks across a parted
sea, watches his enemies
drown in the same sea now re-
joined, and sings a song of
praise to God for salvation.
EACH YEAR the story is
retold, the eyes of the child
light up with thrill and fascina-
tion. Each year he identifies
himself with his hoary
ancestors, and follows the an-
cient dictum of feeing as
though he himself were being
liberated.
The involved process of mat-
ching the right type of foods
with the right blessings and
prayers and readings, also
stimulates the mind of the
youngster. It is a challenge to
him to know what goes into
the Hillel Sandwich, and what
it represents; when to mix the
charoses with the maror and
when to have the maror with
matzoh. What matzoh to take
at which time, when to make
the blessings, which ones to
make, and what to do with the
matzoh afterwards all these
and other intricate rites keep
the mind alert and the eye
peeled to the action.
And yet, with it all, Passover
can only be appreciated on its
highest level by him who
knows enough Jewish history
to appreciate the significance
of the concept of freedom. The
Seder rituals are best ap-
preciated by the perceptive
mind of the adult who reads
and understands the language
of the Haggadah, and can feel
the warmth of the legends
spun around the biblical
verses, who can distinguish
between the biblical and rab-
binic layers of interpretation,
and who has had enough ex-
perience with that capricious
mistress called Life to ap-
preciate the hardships and
toils of an enslaved people and
its newly acquired, sweet
tasting freedom.
THE SEDER is not a mean-
Mr. and Mrs. Howard N. Pelzner and Family
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy Passover
Dr. and Mrs. Paul Richman and Daughters
Wish Patients, Friends and Family
A Happy Passover
Mr. Lester Rogers
Wishes Clients and Friends
A Happy and Healthy Passover
Dr. Morton Rosenbluth
Wishes Patients, Friends and Family
A Happy Passover
Dr. and Mrs. Hugh Unger
Wish Patients find Frjends
A Happy PSssd'ver
ingless, dry, repetitious drag
to the student of Jewish
history, the Hebrew language,
biblical criticism, and literary
interpretation. Each year
begins the insights of a new
commentary on the Haggadah
(of which there are untold
numbers and kinds). Each year
brings us closer to the in's and
out's of that pocket-sized
booklet of eternal ideas and
values.
To the person who studies
Torah, who loves to pore over
the holy books of Jewish law
and lore, ancient, medieval,
and modern, who can find his
ways through the tortuous
paths of the Seder ritual and
the Haggadah, each new ex-
perience of Passover is a
stimulating, challenging,
creative interplay of mind,
heart and soul.
It is all there to be found, all
the treasures of the ages of
man, for young and old alike, if
only we want it enough to seek
it and to study it.
Athens Sentences teRRORist to two yeaas
ATHENS (JTA) A
Palestinian terrorist linked to
the October, 1982 bombing of
the main synagogue in Rome
was sentenced here to two
years' imprisonment Friday,
shortly after completing 19
months of a 20-month sentence
for smuggling explosives into
Greece.
Zomar Osana was convicted
on charges of carrying an il-
legal weapon in jail while
awaiting trial, attempting to
escape and resisting a prison
guard. But his sentence was
seen by many here as another
move by the government to
avoid extraditing Osana to Ita-
ly where he would face possi-
ble life imprisonment if con-
victed of the synagogue attack
which killed a two-year-old-
child.
His extradition was ordered
by two appeals courts in 1984
and upheld by the Supreme
Court in a unanimous decision.
In March, 1985, the Minister of
Justice signed the extradition
order. But three days later it
was rescinded on grounds that
Osana was under investigation
for an attempted terrorist at-
tack at Athens airport, not-
withstanding that he was in
jail at'the time. A grand jury
'refused to indict him.
Dr. Richard A. Weiss
1400 N.E. Miami Gardens Dr.,Suite 202
North Miami Beach 33179
Phone -940-2311
Wishes All His Clients and Friends
A Happy and Healthy Passover
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Weltzer
Wish Friends, Family
And The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy Passover
Ralph and Jack Welolf
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy Passover
Mr. and Mrs. David H. Zorbers
Wish All Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy Passover


Samaritan paiests
paepaae foa Sacpif ice
Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-D
By ZEV GOLAN
"Preparations for the
sacrifice are complete," says
Benyamin Tsedaka. Every
family already has its matzah.
The fires have been burning
for hours. No meat, bread or
matzah has been eaten all day,
to ensure an appetite for the
lamb. The High Priest arrives
at dusk, ascends the high stone
and reads the Haggadah. The
lambs are slaughtered, cooked
and eaten with matzot and bit-
ter herbs."
Benyamin Tsedaka's ac-
count of a Passover sacrifice
may sound as if it took place in
Jerusalem 2,500 years ago, but
Tsedaka lives in Holon, Israel
in the 1980's and is describing
events he has seen and par-
ticipated in. While Jews today
no longer make the Passover
sacrifice or even pray on the
disputed Temple Mount in
Jerusalem, another "Temple
Mount" now less disputed
but once the subject of fierce
controversy and even battle in
ancient Israel is the object
of regular pilgrimages by
those Children of Israel who
are called the Samaritans.
"WE ARE Israelites," declares
Tsedaka. "When the Jewish peo-
ple returned to Israel from exile in
Egypt, the Samaritans were
already here. We never left." Ac-
cording to Tsedaka, he is a 125th
generation Israeli. The
Samaritans have in fact been
centered around their holy moun-
tain, Mount Gerizim near Nablus
in Samaria, for thousands of
I years.
Although they numbered over
one million people in the 4th Cen-
tury, their numbers dwindled
through pogroms, persecution and
I forced conversions to a mere 146
| by the end of Ottoman rule.
The creation of Israel was a
great boon to the Samaritans who
are now enjoying a renaissance of
sorts and about 535 of them today
I live in Nablus and Holon. "We still
I use the ancient Hebrew script,"
I notes Tsedaka, "our priests are
descended from Aaron, and our
music has been recognized as the
oldest religious music in the
world." The Samaritans,
however, are probably most
famous for having kept alive the
tradition of the Passover sacrifice
as described in the Bible.
THE SAMARITANS' Passover
sacrifice of the paschal lamb takes
place on Mt. Gerizim, some 85
yards from the summit. The high
priest climbs upon a large stone
and gives the signal to slaughter
the sheep whilst reading the story
of the Exodus from Egypt. The
sheep are slaughtered as the con-
gregation raises its voice in
prayer. Then the sheep are clean-
ed, rinsed and salted. They are
then placed in ovens that have
been dug into the earth and sealed
with shrubs and wet earth.
Six hours later, the ovens are
opened, and each family comes for
his portion of the sacrifice. An
outsider at the ceremony may feel
as if he has been transported back
3,000 years in time.
"Even the Jews continued the
ritual of sacrifice after their Tem-
ple's destruction," Tsedaka con-
tinues. But the Samaritans believe
that God chose Mt. Gerizim as his
only holy place. Historians and
rabbis are divided over whether
the conflict over the relative
holiness of Jerusalem and Mt.
Gerizim caused the split between
the Northern and Southern
Kingdoms of Israel in 930 BCE.
In any case, today's Samaritans
say they are the descendants of
the ten northern tribes, never
completely "lost" as Jewish tradi-
tion holds, while rabbinical
sources regard the Samaritans as
descendants of the Assyrian col-
onizers brought to Nablus in 721
and who consequently converted
to Judaism.
THE SAMARITAN Pen
tateuch, interestingly, resembles
the Jewish version except that Mt.
Gerizim, not Jerusalem, is refer-
red to as God's chosen dwelling
place.
On top of the holy mountain, Mt.
Gerizim, are 12 stones supposedly
put there by Joshua when Israel
entered Canaan, as an altar to
The Officers and Staff of
BARNETT BANK
Wish All Of Our
Friends
A Happy Passover
arnett
?anK
Member FDIC
Barnett Bank of
South Florida, N.A,
.
Samaritan priests and elders on Mount
Gerizim at the Passover sacrifice of the
paschal lamb.
Adam and his son Seth. The altar
is said to be the place where
Abraham prepared Isaac for
sacrifice. Archaeologists are cur-
rently attempting to determine
whether any Temple ever stood
U.S. mum
On RumoR
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The Reagan Administration
has no comment about a
reported agreement by Soviet
officials to allow Jewish
emigrants to fly directly to
Israel through Rumania.
But Department deputy
spokesperson Phyllis Oakley
made clear that the United
States was against any policy
forcing Soviet Jewish
emigrants to go to Israel. "It is
long-standing United States
policy that Soviet Jews should
be able to immigrate to the
country of their choice,"
Oakley said. "That remains
our position."
The Administration rejected
a request from Israeli Premier
Yitzhak Shamir, during his re-
cent visit to Washington, that
Soviet Jewish emigrants not
be given refugee status which
allows them to immigrate to
the U.S.
Soviet Jews, all carrying
visas to Israel, now emigrate
from the USSR through
Austria, where the majority
decide to go to the U.S.
Morris Abram, chairman of
the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry and of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organiza-
tions, and Edgar Bronfman,
president of the World Jewish
Congress, during a visit to
Moscow reportedly were told
that the Soviets would permit
the direct flights to Israel via
Rumania.
Oakley did not comment on
assurances the two Jewish
leaders received for increased
Jewish emigration.
"We've noticed that on
several occasions during the
past few months, both in public
and in private, Soviet officials
have said that the emigration
level would rise in 1987," she
said. "By the end of March, ap-
proximately 700 Jews will
nave arrived in the West this
year. This is a good beginning,
but there is still a long way to
go. All who wish to leave the
Soviet Union should be permit-
ted to do so." _______
there, but have so far found no
evidence of this sort.
Benyamin Tsedaka and his
brother, Yefet, have published the
world's only bi-weekly quadri-
lingual (English, Hebrew, Arabic,
Ancient Hebrew) newspaper,
"AB," for 17 years and are
fanatically devoted to preserving
the fascinating history of their
people and furthering the study of
their history and literature.
A Happy Passover To All
ROSE A NDIR VING NE WMA N
AND SONJEFFER Y M. OF THE
Newman Insurance
Agency, Inc.
1558 NE 162 St.
North Miami Beach, Florida
Dade 940-7515 Broward 921-0616
Southgate Towers
900 West Ave.
Miami Beach 33139
Phone:
672-2412
Wishes Tenants & Friends
A Happy Passover
Growers Packing
Company Inc.
Growers...
Packers and Shippers
of Quality Tomatoes
STATE
FARMERS
MARKET
P.O. Box 3012,
Florida City 33030


Page 6-D The Jewish Floridian/Friday. April 10. 1987
inBAl keeps
Yemenite
SpiRit Alive
By ANITA ERLICH
As a remit :' mlimitc I
migration during WM
and 50's, Israel experienced an
influx of foreign tradition,
music, dress and life styles.
each indigenous of the com-
munities the olim had come
from: Morocco. Yemen. Iraq.
Tunisia. Kurdistan.
Many of these immigrants
gradually discarded their
traditions and heritage, think-
ing them outdated.
Ethnographers, musicologists
and sociologists have, in recent
years, begun to realize that for
this reason a wealth of culture
is disappearing, and will be
lost forever unless something
is done to capture and
preserve it.
ONE PERSON bent upon
preserving her roots, long
before it became
fashionable," is Sara Levi-
Tanai. founder and artistic
director of the Inbal Dance
Theater, a troupe established
39 years ago to keep the spirit
of "the Jews of Yemen alive.
Unlike some of her dancers
who actually came to Israel in
"Operation Magic Carpet,"
which brought 49,000
Yemenite Jews to the country
in 1949-50. Levi-Tanai is a
sabra, born in Jerusalem to
Yemenite parents and brought
up in an orphanage.
It wasn't until adulthood,
and after having lived and
worked in a kibbutz teaching
dance and music, that she
began to feel the desire to
identify with her heritage.
Inbal. which means "tongue
of the bell." began as a folk
dance group, bringing the
music, costumes and
The Inbal Dance Troupe in a sequence from 'Carry Us to the Desert.'
movements of the Eastern
Oriental communities to the
Israeli stage. As early as 1951,
the internationally acclaimed
choreographer Jerome Rob-
bins, returning from a trip to
Israel, wrote: "I found Inbal
the only unique dance, all else
was ersatz-western Europe,
outmoded and outdated."
In 1972, Sara Levi-Tanai
was nominated "best
choreographer of the year" by
the Theater of the Nations in
Paris, and in 1972 she was
finally acclaimed by her own
country by being awarded the
*yvi/ifru 'jPawet
Israel Pnze.
TODAY, Inbal. whose per-
mament home is at Neveh
Tzedek in Tel Aviv, is a tight
knit group of 12 dancers rang-
ing in age from 20 to 50. Since
its choreography and expres-
sion is drawn from real, every-
day life experiences, a dancer
at Inbal can't be "too old."
Young members, mainly
from Sephardi families,
generally come with no formal
dance training, but once ac-
cepted, begin the rigorous
12-hour-a-day. six-day-a-week
routine which is Inbal's.
Several of the dancers, who
have been devoted followers of
Levi-Tanai for over 20 years,
are now choreographers and
teachers of dance in their own
right, spreading the "Inbal
idiom" throughout the country
while continuing to work and
perform with the troupe.
Inbal recently participated
in a conference on Jewish
dance in New York and
perhaps the greatest
testimony of its success is the
invitation it received to return
for a two-week tour later this
year. One of the highlights of
this appearance was "An Ode
to a Teacher." The tribute was
to 80-year-old Ann Sokolow,
teacher and choreographer,
and long time friend of the
troupe.
Here the dancers express
Coatiaaed on Pmg 15-D
MERCHANTS BANK
OF MIAMI
950 S W 57th Aveaae (Red
Road). Miaaai/ Braaches:
6600 SW 8th Street. 11401
Bird Road / Phoae 266-IOOO
Member TDK Km EmwI Hemaxnm Lender
AflilHjie of nondm Commtercnil Bcmta
Imc a registered baakmotdt** cvmpanu
Serving the Advtrtismg-
Pubtithing Industry since
1967 mnd mow with the
Most Modem Production
Facilities throughout Florida
1000 KANE CONCOURSE, MIAMI BEACH
DADE: 864-2271/BROWARD: 922-4686
nexTHree
E*n a* a. a
r *
SJ5UM
Seybold Jewelry
36 NE 1St.-Miami
374-7922
Wishes Friends & Customers
A Happy and Healthy Passover


Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-D
tips fOR CeleBRAtmq passovep
Dr. Kerry Olitzky, director
of the School of Education,
Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion, and other
members of the faculty have
compiled the following tips for
the Passover holiday. Other
questions will be answered by
the School of Education's
Educational Resource Center
via a telephone call to them at
the Center at One West 4th
Street, New York 10012.
Protect the "fresh" taste
of Matzah each year by
discouraging students from
eating matzah before Pesach.
Protect the excitement of the
Seder by discouraging a trial
of Seder-like experiences in
religious school or nursery
school. This means no more
model Seders.
Include additions to your
Seder that place the transcen-
dent universal themes of
freedom and deliverance into
the particular context of con-
temporary life.
Each year, create a new
family tradition for Pesach
that gets added to your family
Seder. These can be songs, ac-
tivities or anything with which
your family is comfortable.
As you participate in the
Seder experience, dress up as
some of the characters in the
exodus experience. The leader
of the Seder may even want to
use the "paper-bag dramatics"
techniques as the Seder story
unfolds.
Get everyone in the family
North Miami Beach Florist
487 N.E. 167th St. 661-2040
$2.00 OFF Holiday Flower Arrangements with Coupon
Happy Passover
A ventura Florists
2962-C Aventura Blvd.
No. Miami Beach 931-6231
Happy Passover
T
ROYAL EMBASSY
5750 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach 866-6892
Happy Passover
Lincoln Savings & Loan Assoc.
360-41 St.
Miami Beach 534-3600
Happy Passover
Sykes Ace Hardware
284 NE 79 St.
Miami 754-2556
Happy Passover
Mantell Plaza Hotel
255 24th St.
Miami Beach 538-1821
Happy Passover
North Miami Beach Florist
487 NE 167th St.
No. Miami Beach 651-2040
Happy Passover

involved in the planning and
preparation of the Seder.
Always invite someone
special to join in your Seder
a lonely older person or a col-
lege student away from home,
for example. Include non-
Jewish friends as well.
Make you own wine special
for Pesach.
Begin a ritual art collec-
tion of Seder plates, adding
one each year in celebration of
Pesach.
Imitate life in the desert
(ala the Exodus) in preparation
for Pesach.
With your children, make
gastronomic buildings during
the week made from matzah.
As a family, prepare your
house for Pesach, including
cleaning their own rooms, and
giving outgrown clothes to
clothing collectives as an act of
tzedakah.
During the week of
Pesach, listen to music from
other cultures dealing with the
theme of enslavement.
Especially for urban
dwellers, take a trip to the
country in order to enjoy the
new life of spring.
Try Passover foods from
different traditions, such as a
Sephardic recipe for charoset.
During the Seder, use tape
recordings of different music
for certain chants such as Ha-
lachma anya or even the Four
Questions.
Each year, at the beginn-
ing of the Seder, teach an in-
depth portion of the
Haggadah.
Collect Haggadot from
around the world and across
the centuries.
Make your own family
Haggadah.
involved in the planning and
preparation of the Seder.
Always invite someone
special to ioin in your Seder
a lonely older person or a col-
lege student away from home,
for example. Include non-
Jewish friends as well.
Make you own wine special
for Pesach.
Begin a ritual art collec-
tion of Seder plates, adding
one each year in celebration of
Pesach.
Imitate life in the desert
(ala the Exodus) in preparation
for Pesach.
With your children, make
gastronomic buildings during
the week made from matzah.
As a family, prepare your
house for Pesach, including
cleaning their own rooms, and
giving outgrown clothes to
clothing collectives as an act of
tzedakah.
During the week of
Pesach, listen to music from
other cultures dealing with the
theme of enslavement.
Especially for urban
dwellers, take a trip to the
country in order to enjoy the
new life of spring.
Try Passover foods from
different traditions, such as a
Sephardic recipe for charoset.
During the Seder, use tape
recordings of different music
for certain chants such as Ha-
lachma anya or even the Four
Questions.
Ea*ch year, at the beginn-
ing of the Seder, teach an in-
m mti ki
Farr Tours
2323 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach 531-5327
A Very Happy Passover To All
$
Johnnie & Mack
Body Shop
3647 NW 36 St. Miami 633-0181
Happy Passover To All
Balogh Jewelers
Happy Passover
Federal Discount
Pharmacy
1120 West 49 St., Hialeah 556-5270
Happy Passover
Spec's Music
Happy Passover
10
Chez Philippe
13505 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami 945-5807
Passover Greetings
Centro Vasco
2235 SW 8 St., Miami
643-9606
Wishes A Happy, Hearty Passover
To The Entire Jewish Community


Page 8-D The Jewish Floridian/Friday. April 10, 1987
i
-
This sentence in ancient Egyptxan reads: The
Israelites lIS-IR-AERll are ruined, their
crops exist no more.'
eqyptian evidence op the exodus
By ZECHARIA SITCHIN
As opinions differ about the
merits of the Ivan the Terrible
trial in Jerusalem, one ex-
planation for it is that it is im-
portant to let the world hear
again eye witness testimony of
the Holocaust because, incredi-
ble as it is. there are those who
deny its happening and who
call it a Jewish mith.
We stand astonished, but
should not be surprised. At-
tempts to discredit Jewish
history are as old as the Bible,
and go back to questioning the
existence of an Abraham or
the taking place of the Exodus.
AND IF there were no Ex-
odus, there was no Covenant
at Mount Sinai. Where is an in-
dependent mention of Moses,
critics of the Bible have asked,
and why don't Egyptian in-
scriptions reflect such unusual
events as those of the plagues
and the Exodus?
The counter-argument has
usually been that you cannot
expect the Pharaohs, who
boasted in their inscriptions of
victories, to record a humilia-
tion. Even so, critics respond,
where does the biblical tale fit
into Egyptian history?
Because the biblical tale
Zecharia Sitchin's most re-
cent book. The Wars of Gods
and Men.' deals with the times
of Abraham and the cataclysm
that led to the upheaval of
Sodom and Gomorrah.
speaks of Moses and his
parents as Hebrews, it has
been suggested that the
reference to these "Hebrews"
in Egyptian inscriptions does
exist when they speak of
tribesmen called Habiru that
appeared on the scene in the
13th Century BCE. Also, the
Bible names the two cities in
whose building the Israelites
had toiled as Pithom and
Ramses cities known to
have been rebuilt by the
Pharaoh Ramses II.
IT HAS THUS been
customary to consider him as
the Pharaoh of the Oppression,
and him or his successor as the
Pharaoh of the Exodus. This
dates the Exodus to about
1270 BCE. This in turn leaves
the whole tale vulnerable,
because there is absolutely
nothing in that king's records,
or of his immediate successors
or predecessors, that even
hints at the biblical events.
There simply was no Moses

The bright way to bank.
Member FWC A SunTrust Bank
in Egypt's court at that time.
And so the ground remained
fertile for the doubters: the
Exodus, they have claimed, is
a Jewish myth.
This is not to say that the
Jews of the time have gone
unmentioned. But oddly, they
mention place and tribe names
(such as "Asher") as those of
well-known and long-
established peopled places, not
as of tribes just leaving Egypt
in search of a permanent
home. To this, the doubters
have developed a theory that
the Israelite Exodus only
followed a long period of
gradual infiltration into
Canaan.
One of the most embarrass-
ing, and well brushed-off,
pieces of contradictory
evidence is the stela erected by
the Pharaoh Merneptah II. the
son and successor of Ramses
II, in commemoration of his
victorious campaigns. These
listed, among places in Libya
and Canaan, the following
sentence: "The Israelites (I-S-
I-R-A-E-R-U) are ruined, their
crops exist no more."
AS THE NOTED Egyp
tologist and biblical scholar.
Sir Flinders Petrie. who had
discovered the stela, wrote,
this was the only known men-
tion of the Israelites in Egyp-
tian monuments. This happen-
ed precisely in 1219 BCE. and
it spoke of the Israelites as
already settled on their land,
an established people among
the peoples surrounding Egypt
and not as a conglomeration
of tribes in the process of settl-
ing in a new land.
There is another school of
scholars who seek to sustain
the biblical tales by associating
them with known natural
phenomena. They have lately
sought to explain the plagues
and the parting of the waters
as phenomena caused by the
great volcanic eruption on a
Mediterranean island circa
1477 BCE.
This would date the Exodus
some two centuries earlier
than generally accepted; and if
so, it would require a search of
inscriptions and court events
in the 15th Century BCE.
About five years ago, the
chairman of the Department of
Near Eastern Studies at John
Hopkins University, Prof.
Hans Goedicke, announced
that a rereading of an inscrip-
tion by Queen Hatshepsut,
who was co-regent at the tine,
convinced him that events akin
to the Exodus sue mentioned
therein.
THE TALE of this female
monarch is most intriguing.
First, she belonged to a dynas-
ty in whose names the term
Mote (some read it Mosis) were
a component. Secondly, after
the death of her father, the
Pharaoh Tothmosis I, her half-
brother, Tothmosis II, married
her because she was fully of
royal Mood on both parents'
sides, while be was not But
she could not bear him a son.
The only son Tothmes n bad
was bora to him by a harem
giri- '.i- .':
It was against this
background, I believe, and
have shown in my recent
books, that the princess was
authorized by birth to bear the
title Pharaoh's Daughter, fall-
ing in love with a baby that
fate had sent her way, adop-
ting him as her son and
bestowing on him the family
name Mose/Moshe. And. with
a slightly different turn of
events, he could have ended
ascending the. throne as
Tothmes III rather than the
harem girl's son.
Does this make sense* If
skeptics of the BiMe were to
accept its chronicles >hev
would realize that I Kines
* "Kg that SolomS
began to build the Temple 480
years after the Exodus This
places the Exodus in the year
1433 BCE and comfirms the
biblical tale of the death of a
Pharaoh and the return of
Moses to Egypt as events that
fit precisely with Egyptian
events.
And so we can say that the
Exodus, like the Holocaust,
did indeed happen.
\m ma
C.U. Associates
P.O. Box 523534 Miami
551-4700
Happy Passover
American Plumbing
& Electric Supply
1735 Alton Rd. Miami Beach 532-3446
Jack Kali A Max Gross and Families
Happy Passover
Florida Fill Inc.
P.O. Box 160855-Miami
255-5555
Happy Passover
Holbert Electric
1434 Alton Road
Miami Beach 672-6611
Passover Greetings To All
La Salle Cleaners
2341 Le Jeune Road
444-7376
Happy Passover
LEE JUBELIRER From
Bellmar Flowers & Gifts
17506 Biscayne Blvd.. North Miami Beach 33160
Phone 940-5173
Wishes Happy Ptssorer To Fnands Clients
Public Safety Devices
322 NE 80th Terr.
Miami. FL 33138 754-1928
We Wish Everyone A Very Happy Passover
Dade Pipe & Plumbing
975 NE 163rd St.
No. Miami Beach 949-0801
Happy Passover To AH
Farm Fresh Products
1672 Alton Road. Miami Beach
672-1725
Happy Passover To All My Customers
Certified Poultry &
Egg Co., Inc.
Passover Greetings
763 West 18th St .-379-0675


Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-D
*


5fc?
t
m
*m
45?.
r~y2
authority on the intriguing and
little-known relationships bet-
ween the National Socialist
government and Third World na-
tions ." His lecture, "National
Socialism and the Third World,"
apparently followed the theme of
his book on the same subject.
In 1986, the leading Santiago
daily newspaper, El Mercurio,
devoted two-thirds of a page to his
lengthy defense of Nazism.
Serrano is linked to CEDADE,
(Spanish Circle of Friends of
Europe), a neo-Nazi group based
in Barcelona, now active in Chile
and Argentina. CEDADE
distributed in Chile new editions
of Hitler's "Mem Kampf" and
"The Protocols of the Elders of
Zion." Both contained prefaces
written by Serrano.
HE DESCRIBED Mem
Kampf as "the Bible of the Aryan
peoples" with "immortal validi-
ty." In the 30-page preface to
"The Protocols," he asserted that
the Jews' objective is "the total
domination of the world," and
credited Hitler and the Nazis for
having discovered "this great
plot." Serrano added that 'The
Protocols' are being fulfilled, part
by part, protocol by protocol,
here, among us."
Serrano cannot be dismissed as
a harmeless eccentric. His ideas
have explosive potential in Chile's
current political and economic
crises.
Acts of vandalism and terrorism
against Jewish institutuions and
homes, including the bombing of
the home of the chairman of B'nai
B'rith's ADL Committee in Chile,
are ominous.

__A is open to the opening pages as these
at a Seder prepare for the evening's
4
ceremony of recounting the ancient story of the
Exodus.
Spector's & Sons Realty
575 SW 22nd Ave.
Miami 642-3153
Happy Passover
Mean diplomat Is Anti-Semite
MORTON ROSENTHAL
Life magazine photo
ved him offering the
salute over the open
^e of Walter Rauff, the
war criminal who in-
ted the mobile gas
nber and later found
je in Chile. He was bill-
i a keynote speaker for
\s Angeles convention of
California-based In-
lute for Historical
lew, a group that claims
[Holocaust is a Jewish
|a Chilean diplomat, he was
issador to India and became
ntimate friend of Indira
(name is Miguel Serrano. He
colorful and charismatic
cter who has been in the
ont of an upsurge of Nazism
nti-Semitism that has caused
m to the Chilean Jewish
^unity during the past three
EIR FEARS have been
ened because these acts
I an apparent change in the
fry government's policy,
from the time it took
in 1973 until 1984, had
1 to prevent manifestations
fe-Semitism. Two weeks after
P|3 coup, representatives of
lilitary government came to
N-Defamation League's na-
I headquarters in New York
Fissured the agency's Latin
Pan Affairs Department
[were is no anti-Semitism in
land there will be none."
|984, the Jewish community
K deplored the increase of
fctmty in Chile. Recently,
resident of the Represen-
1 Committee of Jewish En-
L8. n Chile, Isidoro
Pischer, met with the
P of Justice, Hugo
\to discuss the problem
fflcally the activities of
Serrano. The Jewish
urged legal sanctions
""> who promote racist
"o is a self-declared racist.
erues all meatixoa (per-
muced ancestry with
1 'ndian blood) as "bad."
PARANOID anti-Semite.
T 8ees Jewish plots
'ere. Among his contem-
vilains are "the Great
Masonic Lodges and
no Published three books
WfftUer.'ZiegHeill.and
Rabbi Morton M. Rosenthal
is director of the Latin
American Affairs Department
of the Anti-Defamation
League's International Affairs
Division.
dated "the 97th year of the Hitler
Era."
One of the books is entitled "Na-
tional Socialism, the Only Solution
for .the People of South America."
Another, "The Resurrection of
the Hero," is a mystical treatise
invoking astrology and alchemy,
in which Serrano portrays Hitler
as the "Incarnation, the emana-
tion of a God, a hero ..." The
book denounces the Catholic
Church as an entity "which takes
its orders from the Synagogue."
The third is entitled "The
Chilean Racial Cycle." All three
are being distributed widely.
A LEFTIST in the 1930s, Ser-
rano first published his Nazi
ideology in 1978 in a book called,
"The Golden Cord: Esoteric
Hitlerism." The work claimed
that the Holocaust never occur-
red, a theme he repeats in later
books. He also argued that Hitler
is still alive, concluding that even
though he had been unable to find
him, "Hitler, for us, is as alive as
Jesus for the Christians."
Serrano is well-connected, in-
side and outside of Chile. In 1982,
he was invited to lecture at the
Chilean Academy of National
Security. Addressing the military
officers, he expressed his hope
that the Chilean Army would be
transformed into a "Racist War
Order."
In an interview published in the
Spanish newspaper El Pais, in
1985, Serrano claimed that the
Nazis did not operate "even one
gas chamber" and described the
Holocaust as a "diabolic hoax."
IN ANNOUNCING Serrano's
appearance as a speaker at the In-
stitute for Historical Review con-
vention in Los Angeles, in
February, 1986, the Institute
described him as "a world-class
author ... the world's foremost
Dade Tire Co.
1501 No. Miami Ave.
Miami 373-8445
Happy Passover
ilBh
i
Lily an Cortez
6700 NW 77 Ct.
Miami 592-8000
Happy Passover
Cye's Lounge & Restaurant
444 Brickell Ave.
Miami-358-9100
Passover Greetings

Chase Federal Savings and Loan Association Extends Passover Greetings To All
gk-, CHASE FEDERAL } "H Savings and Loan Association Hi


Page 10-D The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 10, 1987
passovea StoRy tupns
Light on deliverance
By CHARLES SHULMAN
OF ALL the annals of
history, there is none like the
Passover story narrating the
freeing of a people from
slavery and marking the
deliverance of this people as its
birthday and the conditioning
of its future destiny. Other
peoples speak of their heroic
origins. Jews speak of their
humble beginnings and are
perpetually reminded never to
forget that their history vir-
tually commences with slavery
in Egypt.
Throughout the Bible, we
find ample evidence of this:
The most exalted moral laws
of the Jewish religion are tied
to the Exodus from Egypt.
Thus we read in the book of
Exodus: "And a stranger shalt
thou not oppress; for ye know
the heart of a stranger, seeing
you were strangers in the land
of Egypt." And even the law
of the Sabbath rest is
associated, with the Passover
in the fourth of the ten com-
mandments found in the se-
cond version of the Book of
Deuteronomy which em-
phasizes the ethical motive in
demanding for the man-
servant and the maid-servant a
day of rest.
IN MOVING words, this
commandment instructs:
"And thou shalt remember
that thou wast a servant in the
land of Egypt and the Lord thy
God brought thee out by a
mighty hand and an outstret-
ched arm; therefore the lord
thy God commanded thee to
keep the Sabbath day."
The impact of the Passover
story has not been limited to
the Jewish people. It is deeply
etched in the lives of Chris-
tians in all lands, particularly
of those in our own country.
When the American colonies
rose in rebellion against the
tyranny of King George, the
ministers in the Christian
pulpits recounted to their con-
gregations the Bible account
of the Egyptian Exodus and
compared the English
monarch to the ancient
Pharoah as they echoed the an-
cient words of the Hebrew Bi-
ble, "Let my people go!"
When the Revolutionary
War was in progress, on the
very day that the Declaration
of Independence was adopted,
a committee consisting of John
Adams, Benjamin Franklin
and Thomas Jefferson was ap-
pointed for the purpose of
preparing a design for the seal
of the United States of
America.
THE COMMITTEE report
submitted to the Continental
Congress on August 10, 1776,
proposed that on one side of
the seal there should be
Pharaoh sitting in an open
The Forge Restaurant
432 Arthur Godfrey Rd.
Miami 538-8533
Happy Passover
Animal Lovers West
8454 SW 24th St.
Miami-223-7141
Happy Passover To
The Entire Jewish Community
Simons & Rose Agency
2901 Bridgeport Ave., Miami443-4886
Passover Greetings
Charade Restaurant
2900 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables 448-6077
Happy Passover
Edna's Beauty Salon
1553 NE 164th St.
No. Miami Beach 944-9504
Happy Passover To Our Friends A Customers
The Studio Restaurant
2340 SW 32 Ave.. Miami445-5371
Happy Passover
Frank B. Hall & Company
of Florida

2600 Douglas Road-448-2211
Passover Greetings
A page from the 15th Century Italian Hag-
gadah, the work of artist-scribe Joel Ben Si-
meon, donated to the Jewish National and
University Library in Jerusalem, by Mn\
James de Rothschild-
chariot, a crown on his head
and a sword in his hand, pass-
ing through the divided waters
of the Red Sea in pursuit of the
Israelites. Rays from a pillar of
fire expressive of the Divine
Presence beam on Moses who
stands on the shore and whose
extended hand over the sea
causes it to overwhelm
Pharaoh with the motto,
"Rebellion to tyrants is obe-
dience to God."
The seal as proposed by the
Committee was not accepted.
Yet there has always been
close correspondence between
America's struggle to achieve
independence and the Jewish
Exodus from the house of
bondage.
The lessons of Passover
apart from the great inspira-
tion toward freedom and the
determination of the character
of the Jews throughout the
centuries are still powerful
ones for the modern Jewish
community. First among these
is Jewish education. There is
no greater instrument of in-
struction in Judaism than the
Passover Seder.
The Bible categorically em-
phasizes this fact in the state-
ment: "And thou shalt tell thy
son in that day, saying, it is
because of that which the Lord
did for me when I came forth
out of Egypt Thou shalt
therefore keep the ordinance
in season from year to year."
THE ANGLO-JEWISH
scholar, Dr. S.M. Lehrman,
succinctly described the educa-
tional importance of the Seder
by noting that it is the child
who unlocks the door of the
Seder ceremony. It is the
nature of the child to question,
he says, and the parents' duty
must be to know the answers.
Jewish education is raised to
the forefront in the Passover
ceremony.
The Seder was never intend-
ed to be a meal in itself. It was
always the majestic prelude to
the mean in which each
member of the family shared
in an orderly, leisurely pro-
its dignity. The very word
"seder" means procedure or
order. In this observance, the
child asks the questions and
receives the answers, the
bols ae dramatically expla
Continued on Page 14-D
A-l-A Employment
1325 NE 1st Ave.. Miami 379*401
Happy Passover
Cynthia Apts.
2115 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach 531-3143
Happy Passover To All
Volpe Tours Inc.
1520 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach 532-7326
Happy Passover To All Our Friends And Clients
Miami Tobacco
& Candy Co.
8601 NW 61 St. Miami 594-0063
Happy Passover
Ocean Electric
741 5th St., Miami Beach
672-7233
Happy Passover
Bay Harbor Fine Foods
1077 95th St., Miami Beach
8650331
Happy Passover To Our Friends & Customers
I. Brown Sales Corp
4380 East 11 Ave.. Hialeah-685-7622
PassoverXrreetings_


Sarajevo haqqa6ah
is ppiceless manuscript
Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-D
Continued from Page 3-D
from Salonika, also Turkish-
held and. at the time, the
second-largest city in the
ire.
presumably, the Sarajevo
Haggadah was brught
eastward from Spain (it is
undeniably of Spanish origin,
and is dated from about 1350),
but its history for the next 500
years is unknown until its
reappearance in the hands of a
Sarajevo schoolboy in 1894.
As Dr. Levi heard the story
from his father, who was a stu-
dent in the community-run
yeshiva at that time, the
youngest of the Cohen boys
walked into class one morning,
carrying an old Hebrew
prayerbook under his arm. He
had come to sell it. The boy's
father had died only shortly
before, and the Cohens -
among the Sephardic families
long established in Sarajevo
looked to the sale of the book,
one of their few possessions of
any possible value, as a means
of survival.
DR. LEVI does not know
what price the Cohens receiv-
ed for the Sarajevo Haggadah
(for such, of course, was the
old prayerbook), but what is
certain is that it eventually
emerged as one of the stellar
attractions of the city's
recently-created Bosnian Na-
tional Museum.
Sarajevo was the capital of
Bosnia-Herzogovina, a pro-
vince which the Austro-
Hungarian Empire had won
but 16 years before. At the
Congress of Berlin, in 1876,
when the defeated Turks were
forced to surrender the ter-
ritory, the Austrians had
demanded it, assuring their
allies that the people of
Bosnia-Herzogovina would
gladly accept the hegemony of
an enlightened Christian
power and that the formal
takeover would require little
more than a regiment or so of
Hussars in dress uniform, led
by a brass band.
As it happened, more than
the regiment or so of Hussars
was needed. The Moslems of
the province, together with
their non-Moslem fellow-
Bosnians, took up arms
against their new rulers.
Ultimately, it took 300,000
Austrian soldiers, supported
by the most up-to-date heavy
artillery, to subdue the un-
friendly natives. In the face of
continued resistance, guerrilla
movements and outright ter-
rorism, Austrian control of
Bosnia-Herzogovina for the
next four decades was stormy,
violent and precarious. It came
to a halt on a June day in the
year 1914.
THAT MONTH, the area
around Sarajevo was the site
of the Austrian army's large-
scale maneuvers. They were
attended by no less a per-
sonage than the Archduke of
Austria Francis Ferdinand,
nephew to the venerable
Emperor Franz Josef and suc-
cessor to the throne for the
preceding 25 years ever
since Francis Ferdinand's first
cousin, Crown Prince Rudolf,
had committed suicide at the
royal hunting lodge of Mayerl-
ing, in the Vienna Woods.
Francis Ferdinand was heir-
presumptive not only to the
throne of Austria but also to
the 45 other, equally-splendid
titles (with all their privileges,
responsibilities and
Miami Rug Co.
11150 NW 32 Ave., Miami 685-8444
Happy Passover
Andalusia Bake Shop
248 Andalusia Ave.
Coral Gables 445-8196
Happy Passover
Gottex of Israel
777 NW 72 Ave.
Miami-261-4700
Happy Passover
Edward Don & Co.
2200 SW 45 St. Ft. Lauderdale
(Dade) 374-3121 (Broward) 983-3000
Happy Passover To All
Captain John Callan of
The Helen C
16375 Collins Ave. 947-4081
Happy Passover
Pepe Auto Parts
1225 West 49 St. Hialeah
823-3891 821-4670
Happy Passover
A Yemenite family from Moshav Yakhini in the Negev celebrating the Passover Seder.
emoluments) which made up
the royal portfolio. Among
them were: Apostolic King of
Hungary, King of Galicia and
Ilyria, Margrave of Moravia,
Princely Count of Habsburg
and Tyrol, Grand Voyvode of
Serbia and Duke of
Auschwitz!
Suffice it to say that on June
26, 1914, Archduke Francis
Ferdinand's ascension to the
crown and its 45 corollary
titles was abruptly, and ir-
revocably, halted. Riding that
day in an open touring car
through the Sarajevo streets
lined with cheering subjects,
Archduke Francis Ferdinand
and his wife, the Archduchess
Sophie, were shot to death.
Their assassin, the young Bos-
nian nationalist, Gavril
Princept, had thus given the
great powers of Europe the
pretext they had long sought
to declare war upon one
another.
PRINCEPT HIMSELF was
immediately seized he offered
no resistance), tried before a
military court and, because he
was only 19, under legal age,
spared the death sentence
meted out to his fellow-
conspirators. Instead, he was
given a life term at Terezin,
the infamous concentration
camp near Prague at which, a
generation later, Czech Jews
were held before their final
transport to the death camps
in Poland and Germany.
Princept did not survive long
under the harsh conditions of
his imprisonment at Terezin.
He died in 1918, a victim of
Continued on Page 12-1)
Mr. Carmen Beauty Shop
1604 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach 534-2900
Happy Passover
Golden Touch Beauty
6981 Collins Ave.
865-6428
Happy Passover
Coastal Towers
Beauty Salon
400 Kings Point Dr., No. Miami 944-7527
A Very Happy Passover
To Our Friends and Customers
Mario Chuy Hair Salon
HAIRCUTTERS DESIGNERS UNISEX
19062 NE 29 Ave.
No. Miami Beach 932-4247
Happy Passover To All
Reliatex Inc.
2201 NW 72 Ave.
Miami 592-3220
Happy Passover
The Palette
125 NE 26 St.. Miami-573-0980
Happy Passover


Page 12-D The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 10, 1987
Sarajevo haqoadah Consi&eped pmceless
Continued from Page 11-D
overwork, malnutrition and
tuberculosis. A dozen bridges
cross the Miljacka, the shallow
stream which bisects Sarajevo.
One of them, the actual site of
the archduke's assassination,
has been renamed the Gavril
Princept Bridge; an adjoining
museum displays memorabilia
of the short life of an honored
national hero.
The Jews of Sarajevo have
their own history, and it is em-
bodied in the Haggadah. Its
discovery in 1894 created
something of a sensation
among the Judaica scholars
and art-historians of Vienna.
They clearly recognized, from
that moment, that there had
existed a great body of
Hebrew illustrated
manuscripts in the Middle
Ages, despite the general im-
pression, still held at the end of
the 19th century, that Biblical
injunctions against graven im-
ages had prevailed over any
expression of a medieval
Jewish art.
OTHER ILLUMINATED
manuscripts of that era have
since been discovered con-
firming the fact that Jewish
artists were at work both in
the Sephardic centers of
Spain, France and Italy and
in the Ashkenazic communities
of Germany and Central
Europe.
The unearthing of the Dura
Europos Synagogue, in our
own time, demonstrates that
Jewish figurative art .had
flourished as early as the Third
Century CE and that, pro-
bably, the murals on the walls
of Dura Europos had been
copied from Hebrew
manuscripts created centuries
earlier.
The Sarajevo Haggadah
itself reflects the beginnings of
the present-day Jewish com-
munity, in medieval
Barcelona. The manuscript is
composed of 34 pages of il-
lustrations and 59 pages of
text, also richly embellished
with drawings. The illustra-
tions depict Biblical scenes,
ranging from the Creation to
the death of Moses; and, ex-
cept for the nudes like Adam
and Eve, the characters por-
trayed wear the costumes
associated with the Barcelona
Jews of the 14th century.
Elderly personages,
especially the Patriarchs, wear
long robes with attached capes
and cowls covering their
heads. This was the traditional
costume of Jewish scholars in
Barcelona at that period. The
style was carried across the
Mediterranean to Morocco,
after the 1492 expulsion from
Spain, and worn by the rabbis
of the land; and the same style
has persisted in Israel up to
the present, in the garments
worn by older men who had
been born and raised in North
Africa.
THE CALLIGRAPHY in
the 50 pages of the Seder
ritual has been traced, similar-
ly, to the Barcelona of the 14th
century. The bold, upright
characters, with their long
ascenders and descenders
above and below the line, are
typical of the place and the
time. The Ha Lahma ("This is
the Bread of Affliction") page,
which begins the seder service,
is decorated with the coat-of-
arms of the City of Barcelona
and of the royal family of
Aragon which then ruled that
area of Spain.
Hearne Electric
14801 NE20thAve.
No. Miami Beach 944-7799
We Wish The Entire Jewish Community
A Very Happy Passover
Elsie Undergarment Co.
8295 W. 20th St.
Hialeah- 822-6981
Isaac and Elsie Silverberg
Happy Passover To All
B & B Discount Grocery
1421 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach 534-6779
We Wish All Our Friends
A Very Happy Passover
Smith Terminal
Warehouses
17300 NW 36 Ave., Miami 685-0325
Happy Passover
American Electric of Miami
11371 SW 208 Dr.
Miami -253-9131
Happy Passover
Hi Grade Food Co.
240 NE 71 St., Miami758-0516
Happy Passover
These coats-of-arms have
been found in other
manuscripts of Barcelona
Jewry. They indicate both the
sense of local pride in the
kingdom in which the Jews had
prospered and a feeling of
connectedness, as court Jews,
with the very highest circles.
For it was only the wealthy
the merchants, doctors or
jewelers employed by the king
of Aragon who could have
afforded to commission for
their personal Passover tables
such expensive works as an il-
luminated Haggadah or
prayerbook.
Barcelona Jewry in the 14th
century had developed the
foremost community
throughout Spain, surpassing
all others in wealth, in scholar-
ship and in the degree of its
recognition by the reigning
monarch. The Sarajevo Hag-
gadah could not have been pro-
duced any later because, by
the end of the century, the era
of prosperity would be brutally
terminated.
In 1391, the outbreak of
persecutions, forced conver-
sions and massacres which had
decimated the Jewish com-
munities of Seville, Valencia,
Toledo and Mallorca now hit
Barcelona as well.
THE GATES of the Juderia,
the Jewish Quarter, were
burned. Then the buildings
within were looted and also
burned. The records of the
community were destroyed.
Precious silver ornaments in
the synagogues were stolen or
melted down. Hundreds of
men, women and children
were killed.
The community never
recovered. Some of its
members escaped to North
Africa; the majority of the sur-
vivors accepted conversion. As
Marranos, secret observers,
they maintained a kind of
Judaism for another century
until the Inquisition of 1486
and the Expulsion of 1492
finally brought to a close
Jewish life in Barcelona and
the whole of Spain.
Jewish dispersion in the
following decades is well
known to Portugal and
North Africa, to the New
World, to Holland, to Italy,
Greece and Turkey, and to
Sarajevo. Two notes added to
one page of the text of the
Haggadah suggest that the
Sarajevo Jews paused for at
least a century in Italy before
reaching their ultimate
destination in the heart of the
Balkan Peninsula.
The first note is written in
Hebrew and is dated Sunday,
August 25, 1510. It is a note of
sale; its choice of words,
method of dating and
calligraphy are in the style of
the Italian Jewish scribes. The
second note is written in Latin
and is dated 1609 by a Giovan-
ni Domenico Vistorini, a cen-
sor employed by the Church.
He testifies that he has ex-
amined the manuscript and
has found nothing objec-
tionable in it.
THIS MUCH we know, that
a Jewish community still exists
in Sarajevo, its older members
still speaking, on occasion, the
Ladino of their Spanish
ancestors, still observing the
unique ritual and cuisine of the
Sephardic seder. And there is
the Haggadah, with its made-
in-Barcelona illustrations and
the notes added in fine Italian
and Latin hands. There is a
1711 W
I
0913
schoolboy selling the book in
1948, and there is, in our own
time, a sleight-of-hand
directed against the Nazis.
Between the good friar,
Vistorini, writing Latin, and
the little Cohen boy, reading
Hebrew, there is a gap in the
life of the Sarajevo Haggadah
of almost 400 years. It will re-
main, forever, a mystery.
Roth man's Shoe Salon
9700 Collins Ave., Miami Beach -866-1172
Happy Passover
Country Gentleman Stables
15500 Quail Roost Dr.
Miami -233-6615
Happy Passover
Twin City Glass Co.
1220 16th St.
Miami Beach 673-2967
Happy Passover To All
R.E.A. Air Conditioning
8860 SW. 82 St.
2664627
Happy Passover
Venzer's Florida Forecast
1663 Collins Ave.. Miami Bch.-531-9068
Dina Rothbart, Owner
A Very Happy Passover To All
Decor Inc.
9487 Harding Ave. Surfaide 866-0905
We Will Buy Your Fine Antiques
Happy Passover To Alt


Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-D
Why moses isn't mentione6
By RABBI
SAMUEL J. FOX
Why is it that Moses' name
is not mentioned in the basic
text of the Passover Haggadah?
There are some who con-
sider this omission to be inten-
tional. Historically, they relate
this omission to the struggle
between Rabbinates and the
Karaites. The latter restricted
its account of the Passover
Haggadah to the literal text of
the Bible the only text to be
considered authentic, especial-
ly because of their disavowal of
rabbinic law and interpreta-
tion. The Rabbinates,
however, felt that the words of
scripture did not reach their
full value without the oral in-
terpretation of the rabbis.
Since the Haggadah liturgy
was to be universally recited
on Passover eve, the rabbis
wanted to emphasize the hand
of the Almighty as the instru-
ment of salvation which
brought the Hebrews out of
Egypt. Indeed, in a popular
text such as the Haggadah,
they were fearful of playing up
any human figure even
Moses, for fear that the
popular masses would
somehow tend to deify Moses
and no human being should be
cast into the form of a God.
Thus, the Rabbinates
eliminated the name of Moses
in the Haggadah although his
name certainly lived on in the
minds and hearts of the Jewish
people.
Why is the unit called
"Hallel" split into two parts in
the course of the Seder evening
(e.g. one part before the meal
and one part after the meal) in-
stead of being chanted as one
unit as is done in the prayers?
Basically the liturgy of the
Haggadah on Passover eve is
ture of fruits and nuts was in-
tended to alleviate somewhat
the sharpness of the bitter
herbs eaten on the Passover
night. Others say that it is a
reminder of the mortar which
the enslaved Jews used in
order to make bricks for
Pharoah (Pesahim 116:a).
fftt MN
divided into two sections. The
part which is recited before the
meal speaks of the deliverance
that occurred in the past,
especially the exodus in Egypt.
The liturgy after the meal
refers to the eschatological
period of the future when final
deliverance will come to the
Jewish people and all
humanity.
The first Psalms in the
"Hallel" collection generally
referred to the deliverance of
the past while the others refer-
red to the expected
deliverance in the future. Thus
the latter was held off until
after the meal when the
liturgy praising the future
salvation is recited on
Passover eve.
What is the significance of
the "Charoseth" used at the
Passover Seder?
The rabbis in the Talmud of-
fer a number of reasons. Some
claim that this paste-like mix-
Conger Life Ins. Co.
5050 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami -754-3291
Happy Passover To The Jewish Community
Fulton Pest Control Co.
DadMMK26 Broward 763-5860
Philip 8. V.n Dun, President
Termite Control/ Lawn Spraying Fertilizing
1981 N.E. 153rd Street, P.O. Box 600068. North Miami Beach, FL 33160
Happy Passover
Broadmoor Hotel
7450 Ocean Terrace, Miami Beach
866-1631
Happy Passover
Dade Dental Centre
1225 Washington Ave., Miami Beach
532-3300
Pumpernicks
917 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd. 11415 So. Dixie Hwy.
Hallandale Miami
944-6663 235-2424
Happy Passover
JERRY LOZENIK
HAPPY PASSOVER
KING DAVID KOSHER FOODS
PHONE S34-0197
Tak. Out Foods
EATWELL, INC. "W3
HEBREW NATIONAL PRODUCTS EXCLUSIVELY STRICTLY KOSHER DELICATESSEN
AND CATERERS CLOSED SATUROAY
'MB WASHINGTON AVENUE, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA________________
Boy's Towne Clothing
6602 SW 57 Ave., So. Miami
661-8368
.... Happy- Passover........ '
The Jerusalem Talmud
reports that some consider it
to be made in a red color to re-
mind us of the blood that was
spilled in Egypt. Others claim
that the fruits used in making
the Choroseth should
specifically be those to which
the people of Israel are com-
pared in the Biblical book of
"Song of Songs."
Why is wine required for the
Seder night of Passover?
A number of reasons are of-
fered for this. First, since the
Seder night ritual is a happy
celebration, it requires wine to
display the happy mood of the
celebrants, like all happy occa-
sions (Teshahim 109:A).
Others say that drinking, the
wine is a symbol of freedom,
since the free man alone can
afford the luxury of wine in a
relaxed atmosphere. Some say
that it is not the drinking of
the wine which is significant,
but the regulation which limits
the drinking to a certain
prescribed order which is
significant.
While drinking is practically
unlimited and not regulated in
any order in the course of
other celebrations, the drink-
ing on Passover eve is
regulated to show that
freedom requires responsibili-
ty. While the slave need not be
too concerned about the im-
pression he makes since he has
no social standing, the
freeman must consume his
drink in a dignified manner ac-
ceptable both to society and
God.
'Operation pesach' fields questions
The Union for Traditional
Conservative Judaism has in-
augurated "Operation
Pesach," a new program to
assist Jews in observing the
laws of Passover. The program
includes a day set aside for
fielding Passover questions on
the UTCJ's toll-free number,
volunteer in communities
throughout the country to pro-
vide further help, and a na-
tional center for the sale of
chametz (food with leavening).
The UTCJ will open its toll-
free Kashrut Information Hot-
Line to answer Passover ques-
tions on Thursday, from 9 a.m.
to 10 p.m., New York time.
Halachic authorities will be on
call to provide information and
advice on all aspects of
Passover observance.
IN SOME communities, UT-
CJ volunteers will be vailable
for further assistance in
preparing for Passover. Call
the Hot-Line for details and
comunities served.
Arranging for the sale of
one's chametz just prior to
Passover is a step that is taken
after a thorough houseclean-
nig and the burning of residual
chametz. The sale, called
mechirat chametz, assures that
all chametz is released from
one's possession during
Passover.
The sale of chametz is usually
arranged by a rabbi who has
received authorization in
writing from the head of the
household to transact the sale,
along with a small amount of
money for the transaction and
an additional donation for
charitable purposes. The
ownership of the chametz is
returned in a second transac-
tion immediately following
Passover.
- Rabbi Ronald D. Price, ex-
ecutive director of the UTCJ.
noted: "The National Center
for Mechirat Chametz was set
up to make this important pro-
cedure easier and more ac-
cessible. Simply by sending in
a note of authorization to UT-
CJ headquarters, you may be
assured that the transaction
will be completed at the cor-
rect time by rabbis in each
time zone in North America."
THE UTCJ will accept
authorization notes through
Friday, Apr. 10; the transac-
tions must be completed by 10
a.m., on Monday, Apr. 13, as
Passover begans that evening.
IUU1I
Golden West Tours
6626 W. Atlantic Ave.. Delray Beach. Florida 33446
Phone:1-800-824-3088 1-498-11C6
Specializing In Group Tours To Western U.S.
(California. Arizona. Colorado, etc.)
Wishes Friends, Clients < Family
A Happy & Healthy Passover
Happy Passover
Westchester General Hospital
2500 SW 75 Ave.
Miami 264-5252
Hip
Holiday Inn at golden glades
148 NW 167 St.
No. Miami Beach 949-1441
Happy Passover
Ms.tJa// Spier
Marketing Director


Page 14-D The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 10, 1987
hope Voiced f or Soviet Jews
'mm?

THE MATZAH OF HOPE *^4W I
mpnn mu> *7Vit nyn
Ai the seder, we drink four cups of
ine f>r the firs four of the following
fhe expressions of freedom declared to
the Jewish People when we were slaves
in Egvpc
I will bring you out frixn under the
burdens of Egyp< and I will deltrer
you out of their bondage and I will
redeem you with an outstretched arm
and with great ludgments. and I will
take you to me for a people and I
will bring you in to the Land which I
swore to give to Abraham. Isaac and
Jacob iFJuiusot>8>
Timight. when we dnnk the four cups,
let us dedicate our thoughts to NAiet
lews
TOur work will not cease until you
are brought out from under the
oppressive thumb of Soviet harassment
W We will do all in our power to
' deliver you out of the prisons and
labor camps to which you are sentenced
TOur hearts and our hands stretch
out across the ocean in untmng
efforts to redeem you.
B e prav that our labor will take
* you from repression to liberty
e anxiously await the da\ when the
fifth expression of freedom will he
fulfilled
W NXTien the Jews of the *x>viet In ion
are brought into the Land of our
ancestors
National Conference on Soviet Jewry
m cooperation with the
Coalmen to Free Soviet Jews
At an apfmjpnaie point dtmng Ar Stdrr
ffer .jj.' lakes a maizato and toys
'rip oire iy D'in^ ukp -ijp-i
IW "jKi.gr" 'as irni-6 trv "*'?nri BMP 'tf
nn i:aS hy .T^yrs it nyr; rmyiiaryrvo
o'jivS pnj* ^3 ifK oj'31' "'J'3 ire****'
"Oij ttnnn 151 Kinc noon ana nny
-nn *:a oj'k msry'o-vrv-ia '-tin'tp
**a oj'K -iji*y ni*y** dry"? j>vm "33 oj*k
33 oj'k optpSi uvnag n-11015 ioV? i*wi
cita** tvnrtf 0*1311 0*110 tbo.t** **"iin
0**n 'f?3B* IV* 1*0K '9*>K PR 1313
nicrv ov'bj fay* nf/npn lamp B*nvr
."13B*13J Onon'jn *U"31C K""a.7 n*33
Ki*t- ty o.ir in* -toy** D"Jjra o*i*3iv uk
-iSikiii nrun hk Vnjri img pk
?7>i* matzah u hich u M rtrttfr u
symbol of hope for the Jem of the Sot wl
I mun. reminds us uf the indestructible
links that exist ht-tu een MS
As ue 1 Amtt v rf>is /es/ / 0/ freedi I m
ue rex. all that v x i'ii.t aith'litharassment to learn uf
their past to pass on then religious
tradith "is to learn the language of their
fathers to tram teachers and robins of
future general n >.
\X e remember the scores ubo sought K
Ine as lews and struggled to leaie for
Israelthe land of our fathersbut
nou languish in SqMW labor camps
Their struggle against their oppressors
goes on They uiU not be forgotten
lleutl stand urtb them in their struggle
until the light of freedom and
redemption shines forth
Flowers, Fruits & Fancies
FrMh and SUk Rowan For Ail Occasion* Balloon Arfangamantt
Fruit Baakats Gourmet Baskets Man Qardana
Wire Service Major Credit Cards Accepted
3017 N.E. 163 St. (Sunn, >w sou*-*. North Miami Baach 949-4611
Dorwin's
1574 Washington Ave., Miami Beach 532-4061
Happy Passover To Our Friends and Clients
Central Taxi
672-7400 532-5556
Happy Passover
Associated Photographers
19 SW 6th St.
Miami 373-4774
Happy Passover
Kane's Masterbuilt
Furniture
5651 NW 35 Ave.-633-0542
Passover Greetings To Everyone
Miami Jewelry Center
"The Diamond Professionals"
- FACTORY PRICES TO YOU -
EXPERT REPAIRS WE BUY DIAMONDS & GOLD APPRAISALS
7271 RED ROAD. MIASMI. FLORIDA 33143 (305) 661-7627
lawsuit
dismissed
LOS ANGELES (JTA)
- The U.S. District Court
here has dismissed a lawsuit
brought by David Mc-
Calden, a distributor of
printed matter alleging the
Holocaust never occurred,
who claimed his civil rights
were violated.
McCalden headed the In-
stitute for Historical Review,
which publishes and circulates
material denying the
Holocaust and currently runs
an organization known as
"Truth Mission," which makes
the same allegations.
His suit charged the Simon
Weisenthal Center, the
American Jewish Committee,
the California Library Associa-
tion and the Bonaventure
Hotel with breach of contract
and violation of civil rights
after the Library Association
cancelled McCalden's schedul-
ed appearance at its 1984 an-
nual conference at the
Bonaventure Hotel.
Judge Consuelo Marshall of
the U.S. District Court
dismissed the case against all
of the defendants, except the
City of Los Angeles. McCalden
was given 10 days to show
cause in writing why the re-
maining action against the
municipality should not be
dismissed.
passovea Stopy timns
Light on deliverance
Continued from Page 10-D
and the story of the Exodus
from Egypt narrated in detail.
The public Seder of the pre-
sent day tends to run not on
the historic timetable but on
the timetable of caterers. It,
therefore, misses much of the
educational value inherent in
the Passover story.
A SECOND LESSON which
Passover holds for the modern
Jew is Jewish consciousness.
The night of the Exodus did
not end with the Jews who left
Egypt. It has, unfortunately,
continued throughout the cen-
turies as one Pharaoh after
another oppressed the Jewish
people. The cry, "let my peo-
ple go," can still be heard
directed to heads of govern-
ment in many parts of the
world. The Jews of Russia
reflect the bondage of their
forefathers in Egypt.
The immigrants streaming
into the land of Israel are
reminders of the Exodus of Bi-
ble times.
The Pharaohs may have
changed their appearance but
not their basic character. In
the light of these tragic
realities of the day, the words
of the Passover Haggadah cor-
roborating an ancient
Talmudic injunction, hold
great significance in our time.
"Every person in every
generation must consider
himself as having personally
been freed from Egypt. The
Holy one, Blessed be He, has
not only redeemed our
ancestors, but us also together
with them ."
A THIRD LESSON of the
Passover is concern which the
Jew is called upon to exercise
on behalf of the impoverished
the needy, the dispoSsesseJ
among his own. The impe^
toward this traditional
characteristic in Jewish life is
expressed in the beautiful
Aramaic words recited at the
opening of the Passover seder
"Let all who are hungry come
and eat with us.
In our time, when so many
Jewish people have been cast
into the role of strangers in
their own countries and com-
pelled to leave the lands of
their birth, the Passover
theme assumes more tragic
mm
than romantic proportions,
and the organizations of mercy
like the United Jewish Appeal
and its subsidiaries carry
special significance.
Today the lot of the Jews in
many areas of the world
poignantly reminds us that the
Jews have been more or less
strangers in life. The reality
and gravity and meaning of
their alienation are measured
by the Passover observance. In
the past two thousand years
Jews have known expulsion
from some country or other
over two-hundred times, an
average of once every ten
years. The end is not yet in
sight. No Jew of today can
read the Haggadah unmoved.
It contains memories that lie
too deep for tears.
Dance Masters Dance Club
12390 W. Dixie Highway, N. Miami
893-3010
Happy Passover
AAA Fence Co.
19510 NW 48 Ct., Miami
620-6270
Happy Passover
Career Associates
640 NE 124 St.. Miami
893-0810
Happy Passover
A1A Ideal Business Machines
3672 Coral Way. Miami
448-2784
Happy Passover
Metro Gas
1234 NW 79 St. Miami
693-3921
Happy Passover
Furniture Artist & Upholstery
30 Years Experience In Upholstery
783 N.E. 125 St., Miami, Fla. 33161
895-6951
____________ Happy Passover


eating of matzot Recalls
Reamth of Spaing
'riday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-D
Continued from Page 1-D
Lfestival, because the leaven
mehow made the grain
ipure.
his is of no modern
jficance, as today matzot
all factory-made before the
,-er. and most Jews are
, people who have no con-
c't with unripe barley at any
,e and certainly not at
jssover. Even in Israel to-
J barley is no longer grown,
jving been almost completely
placed by wheat.
[vr THE VERY beginning
the revival of Jewish settle-
nt in the Land of Israel, the
ments of spring at Passover
re seized upon. Jews return-
to agriculture and striving
national rebirth found that
,. Festival of Spring and the
jbirth of nature were sym-
Ithetic accompaniments to
ie rebirth of Jewish national
iling and the revival of life in
ancient homeland.
JKibbutz Haggadot, which
ere recast in a more contem-
irary vein, adopted medieval
id modern Hebrew poems of
. and dew, as well as ex-
its from the Song of Songs.
ine such poem is "A Coat of
Hues" by Moses Ibn
(about 1055-1135):
t garden dons a coat of many hues,
t embroidered carpet hath enrolled,
moods are brave in chequered
Hies.
v a wondrous scene may every eye
newborn flowers acclaim the
thorn spring,
1 forth to meet his coming gaily
i their head on sovereign throne
)orne Ike rose,
flovret's queen queen of my
IBRAHAM SHLONSKY, one
of Israel's leading contemporary
poets, wrote in "Dews" which was
included in the Haggadah of
Hashomer Hatzair kibbutzim:
The haze spreads over shade and
moisture.
Whispering grass, now tongues
released.
Talk dew and rain and naked sigh.
Withered yellows cross the arid coun-
try which these hills contain.
So rists thr field, speechless in
captivity,
And fettered to these ranges by a burn-
ing hand.
Till night possess it trruellest in
humanity).
And dew, increasing dew. soaks
through the thirsty land.
Not only kibbutz members add-
ed these and similar poems to the
Haggadah. In the cities as well,
beautiful melodies that modern
Jewish composers have dedicated
to many of the moving lines of the
Song of Songs are sung before,
during and after the official seder
service, such as:
Let us lodge in the villages.
Let us rise early to the vineyards.
Let us see if the mnes have blossomed
Whether the young grapes have opened
to view
Whether the pomegranates have
budded.
The mandrakes are fragrant, and at
our door
Are all manner of precious fruits.
THE SONG of Songs is full of
such nature poetry. Also its
celebration of physical love is as
impassioned and uninhibited as
the verses of John Donne, the
17th Century English divine. Of
course, the Jewish sages
understood the Song of Songs
allegorically as symbolizing God's
love for Israel, not as describing a
physical relationship.
This understanding, combined
with the many lyrical descriptions
of spring, worked in favor of the
book becoming an Orthodox ac-
companiment to the Passover
festival. Hardy souls read the
Song of Songs in its entirety at
the end of the Seder and on every
Pep Boy Auto Stores
3984 West 12 Ave., Hialeah
821-4670 823-3891
Happy Passover
Nice Jewish Boy
Moving & Storage
2390 NW 144 St., Miami 758-6500
Happy Passover

3vaprrn< ky: ono^ ">3i y-im-i o-d*>t< vjdtj -wo
t.'OrnDTOnrawn av3rov.--i myy ->v-N;n3ton-y

n\yy ivjn--------
_ ipw Ms-\yi yzw rjr mar* -p^: mry
L~X' nrivn-o p-fc "i" nwy? ston k-qtyw';..
...^ inni v.rYixo3 uv-'-pi n\to V jjoo^-vi oy ^ao ml
CZJJo:i trjn nnnv-* -
WpUTOK) mr\3 \>3'3 tySD IWIO'Ol YMp H^-PD ronrp
THDtyrw ps-ot rnruoi yv\r> -\riDi | nvojn TDV -^3D
;i 0'3T r\vmr> o'Tymi i -mjrj5 rrav/i romou1
ioi ninriwon in( or nro Ski ^at'^i or n* nv?
"CH \f ~\? Kino ror
- lups-ot H3nK3)Ti''ir)-\yjDiimri3K"''icrpyrvs
warn viUHtnavyrvfcnnD v .-inNpna uroarvn wvaf
w\m--it;Kn-nND fou cniyn tjd.uton rvui "p.
' r-i\r\ idS uyjni ud\*>i l/rinw inwn'pD uwtlj
."TIB *vn,-Din3.Yrni.,unp .
v. -"mo.n^oK'2po. rvsn-V
/-
Decorated Seder dish from Padua, Italy, 167S.
This Israel Museum photo is by David Harris
from the Encyclopedia Judaica.
succeeding day of Passover.
Thus Passover, with its several
levels of meaning, also combines
the theme of the Jewish people's
issuing forth from slavery and
entering into a life of freedom,
with the springtime breaking
forth of nature from the bonds of
winter to a season of freedom
inBAl keeps Yemenite Spirit Alive
Continued from Page 6-1)
veneration for their teacher
and leader, very much like the
way a Rebbe receives homage
from his scholars. The teacher
is presented with gifts, enter-
tained and shown constant
adoration. Judging by the
devotion and commitment I
saw given to Levi-Tanai, it
seems quite obvious where this
expression is drawn from.
INBAL PERFORMANCES
often include Yemenite ritual,
such as "The Wedding," com-
plete with traditional dress.
This includes the Bar'a, the
ton
knowledge about a precious
heritage, and establishing a
sense of pride and identity in
the hearts of Yemenites in
Israel. Hence, she and several
of her dancers stage 'happen-
ings' in the form of all day
dance seminars, or evening
programs at schools and com-
munity centers throughout
Israel. And sharing her devo-
tion, is a group that is a credit
to Israel and the Yemenite
tradition.
Canton of Westchester
2501 SW 87 Ave., Miami
552-5292
Happy Passover
Travel By Rusty
3941 NE 163rd St.
No. Miami Beach 944-0666
Wish All Their Friends
A Happy and Healthy Passover
Camp Shalom
9340 SW 103 St., Miami
279-0401
Happy Passe
S & S Discount World
7306 Collins Ave., Miami Beach
861-0694
Special Kosher For Passover Foods
Happy Passover
Happy Passover
Deep Tan
5300 NW 167 Street, Miami
621-5551
Happy Passover
A-1 Carting Co.
1171 SE 10 Ave., Hialeah
885-3300
first part of the festivities
which always takes place after
the Sabbath, the Henna ritual
celebrated prior to the wed-
ding, when the bride's hands
are painted with henna, a red
dye made from the leaves of
the hawsonia alba plant, and
the wedding ceremony itself.
Another favorite is the
dance Shabbat Shalom, depic-
ting the traditional Jewish sab-
bath. Also included in the com-
pany's repertoire are biblical
themes such as the Song of
Deborah, and more recently
the Song of Songs, in which
King Solomon expresses his
love for Shulamit, the
Shepherdess, an allegorical in-
terpretation for the love of
God for the Jewish people.
Sara Levi-Tanai's
choreography elaborately com-
bines the expression of love
and religious ecstasy, and uses
movements from the religious
rites of various Jewish
communities.
Sara Levi-Tanai sees herself
as an educator, spreading
Happy Passover
George H. Bernstein, C.L.U,
7550 SW 57 Avenue
South Miami 33143
662-4131
All State Exterminating
North Miami
652-3205
Wish All A Happy Passover
Food Spot Harris
7901 SW 67 Ave., Miami
666-0642
Happy Passover To The Jewish Community
Cancellations Unlimited
9484 Harding Ave., Surfside
864-8112
Happy Passover


Page 16-D The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 10. 1987

Announcing the Opening of i
THE GARDENS AT MOUNT NEBO
Miami's most beautiful exclusively Jewish Cemetery
Nowhere is the Jewish concept of life eternal expressed with more
dignity, love and beauty than in Mount Nebo. Lush landscaping
combined with more than 50 years of devoted care, creates
at Mount Nebo a lasting tribute to loved ones in the highest
tradition of Judaism.This tradition is continued in the Gardens,
Mount Nebos latest expansion.
SPECIAL PRE-OPENING PRICE OFFERINGS
FOR A LIMITED TIME. VISIT OR CALL US AT:
261-7612
MOONTNEBO
Mount Nebo Cemetery 5505 N.w. 3rd Street. Miami, FL 33126
!


Full Text
Pigel6-D The Jewish FTohdian Friday. April 10. 1967
Announcing the Opening of
THE GARDENS AT MOUNT NEBO
Miami* most beautiful exclusively Jewish Cemetery
Nowhere is the Jewish concept of life eternal expressed with more
dignity, love and beauty than in Mount Nebo. Lush landscaping
combined with more than 50 years of devoted care, creates
at Mount Nebo a lasting tribute to loved ones in the highest
tradition of Judaism. This tradition is continued in the Cardens
Mount Nebos latest expansion.
SPECIAL PRE-OPENING PRICE OFFERINGS
FOR A LIMITED TIME. VISIT OR CALL US AT:
261-7612
MOUNT NEBO
Mount Nebo Cemetery 5505 N.w. 3rd Street. Miami. FL 35126


Page 8-D The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 10, 1987
*

^
I I I
This sentence in ancient Egyptian reads: 'The crops exist no more.'
Israelites (IS-I-R-A-E-R-U) are ruined, their
eqyptian evidence of the exodus
By ZECHARIA SITCHIN
As opinions differ about the
merits of the Ivan the Terrible
trial in Jerusalem, one ex-
planation for it is that it is im-
portant to let the world hear
again eye witness testimony of
the Holocaust because, incredi-
ble as it is, there are those who
deny its happening and who
call it a Jewish mith.
We stand astonished, but
should not be surprised. At-
tempts to discredit Jewish
history are as old as the Bible,
and go back to questioning the
existence of an Abraham or
the taking place of the Exodus.
AND IF there were no Ex-
odus, there was no Covenant
at Mount Sinai. Where is an in-
dependent mention of Moses,
critics of the Bible have asked,
and why don't Egyptian in-
scriptions reflect such unusual
events as those of the plagues
and the Exodus?
The counter-argument has
usually been that you cannot
expect the Pharaohs, who
boasted in their inscriptions of
victories, to record a humilia-
tion. Even so, critics respond,
where does the biblical tale fit
into Egyptian history?
Because the biblical tale
Zecharia Sitchin's most re-
cent book. The Wars of Gods
and Men,' deals with the times
of Abraham and the cataclysm
that led to the upheaval of
Sodom and Gomorrah.
speaks of Moses and his
parents as Hebrews, it has
been suggested that the
reference to these "Hebrews"
in Egyptian inscriptions does
exist when they speak of
tribesmen called Habiru that
appeared on the scene in the
13th Century BCE. Also, the
Bible names the two cities in
whose building the Israelites
had toiled as Pithom and
Ramses cities known to
have been rebuilt by the
Pharaoh Ramses II.
IT HAS THUS been
customary to consider him as
the Pharaoh of the Oppression,
and him or his successor as the
Pharaoh of the Exodus. This
dates the Exodus to about
1270 BCE. This in turn leaves
the whole tale vulnerable,
because there is absolutely
nothing in that king's records,
or of his immediate successors
or predecessors, that even
hints at the biblical events.
There simply was no Moses
n
i ___UK
The bright way to bank.
| I Member FDIC________________ A SunTrust Bank
in Egypt's court at that time.
And so the ground remained
fertile for the doubters: the
Exodus, they have claimed, is
a Jewish myth.
This is not to say that the
Jews of the time have gone
unmentioned. But oddly, they
mention place and tribe names
(such as "Asher") as those of
well-known and long-
established peopled places, not
as of tribes just leaving Egypt
in search of a permanent
home. To this, the doubters
have developed a theory that
the Israelite Exodus only
followed a long period of
gradual infiltration into
Canaan.
One of the most embarrass-
ing, and well brushed-off,
pieces of contradictory
evidence is the stela erected by
the Pharaoh Merneptah II, the
son and successor of Ramses
II, in commemoration of his
victorious campaigns. These
listed, among places in Libya
and Canaan, the following
sentence: "The Israelites (I-S-
I-R-A-E-R-U) are ruined, their
crops exist no more."
AS THE NOTED Egyp
tologist and biblical scholar,
Sir Flinders Petrie, who had
discovered the stela, wrote,
this was the only known men-
tion of the Israelites in Egyp-
tian monuments. This happen-
ed precisely in 1219 BCE, and
it spoke of the Israelites as
already settled on their land,
an established people among
the peoples surrounding Egypt
and not as a conglomeration
of tribes in the process of settl-
ing in a new land.
There is another school of
scholars who seek to sustain
the biblical tales by associating
them with known natural
phenomena. They have lately
sought to explain the plagues
and the parting of the waters
as phenomena caused by the
great volcanic eruption on a
Mediterranean island circa
1477 BCE.
This would date the Exodus
some two centuries earlier
than generally accepted; and if
so, it would require a search of
inscriptions and court events
in the 15th Century BCE.
About five years ago, the
chairman of the Department of
Near Eastern Studies at John
Hopkins University, Prof.
Hans Goedicke, announced
that a rereading of an inscrip-
tion by Queen Hatshepsut,
who was co-regent at the tune,
convinced him that events akin
to the Exodus are mentioned
therein.
THE TALE of this female
monarch is most intriguing.
First, she belonged to a dynas-
ty in whose names the term
Mose (some read it Mosis) were
a component. Secondly, after
the death of her father, the
Pharaoh Tothmosis I, her half-
brother, Tothmosis II, married
her because she was fully of
royal Mood on both parents'
sides, while he was not. But
she could not bear him a son.
The only son Tothmes II had
was born to him by a harem
gii-i.': ; .
It was against this
background, I believe, and
have shown in my recent
books, that the princess was
authorized by birth to bear the
title Pharaoh's Daughter, fall-
ing in love with a baby that
fate had sent her way, adop-
ting him as her son and
bestowing on him the family
name Mose/Moshe. And, with
a slightly different turn of
events, he could have ended
ascending the. throne as
Tothmes III rather than the
harem girl's son.
Does this make sense? H
Skeptics of the Bible were to
accept its chronicles, thev
would realize that I Kino;
clearly states that SolonX
began to build the TempleS
years after the Exodus ThU
places the Exodus in the ra
1433 BCE and comflrrr/X
biblical tale of the death of a
Pharaoh and the return of
Moses to Egypt as events that
fit precisely with Egyptian
events. f
And so we can say that the
Exodus, like the Holocaust
did indeed happen.
lw mar
C.U. Associates
P.O. Box 523534 Miami
551-4700
Happy Passover
American Plumbing
& Electric Supply
1735 Alton Rd. Miami Beach 532-3448
Jack Kalz & Max Qross and Families
Happy Passover
Florida Fill Inc.
P.O. Box 160855-Miami
255-5555
Happy Passover
Holbert Electric
1434 Alton Road
Miami Beach 672-6611
Passover Greetings To All
La Salle Cleaners
2341 Le Jeune Road
444-7376
Happy Passover
LEE JUBELIRER From
Bellmar Flowers & Gifts
17508 Blscayne Blvd., North Miami Beach 33160
Phone 940-5173
Wishes Happy Passover To Friends 8 Clients
Public Safety Devices
322 NE 80th Terr.
Miami. FL 33138 754-1928
We Wish Everyone A Very Happy Passover
Dade Pipe & Plumbing
975 NE 163rd St.
No. Miami Beach 949-0801
Happy Passover To All
Farm Fresh Products
1672 Alton Road, Miami Beach
672-1725
Happy Passover To All My Customers
Certified Poultry &
Egg Co., Inc.
Passover Greetings
763 West 18th St.-3794)675


' Jewi]b Floridian
Vol. 80 No. 16
Miami Friday, April 17,1986
50 Cents,
>
"0
o
3
o
s
FIGHTING BACK: A student (right) lifts his
arm as he attacks a mounted policeman who is
trying to hit him with his nightstick during a
police charge into a group of students in
downtown Jerusalem last week. The students
were demonstrating against the rising cost of
university tuition fees. At least 17 students
were arrested, and three people were injured.
[Unprecedented' Crime
Don't Belittle Genocide, Kohl Says
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) -
chancellor Helmut Kohl, in
|nis strongest public state-
Iment on the Nazi era, called
|tne. crime of genocide
lagainst the Jews a crime
I" unprecedented in history,"
declaring "we should keep
Jive the memory of the full
EmS ?tnat terrible past"
d "will oppose any at-
JMpts to dismiss them
[om our thoughts or belittle
hem."
The Chancellor's remarks, at
puncheon last Tuesday (Apr.
J in honor of the visiting
resident of Israel, Chaim
lerzog, was seen as a warning
Chancellor Kohl
against attempts by some
West German scholars to
equate the Nazi extermination
of Jews with other crimes in
modern history and by neo-
Nazis to rewrite history by
claiming the Holocaust never
occurred.
"THE PERIOD of genocide
is the darkest chapter in Ger-
man history," Kohl said. "We
Germans have to live with the
terrible truth that in the days
of National Socialism the Jews
were subjected to unspeakable
suffering at the hands of the
Germans ... It is part of our
self-image that we keep alive
the memory ..."
Kohl ended his speech with a
toast "to Israel's future in
Continued on Page 3-A
Angry Words
Shake Unity
Coalition
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Labor and Likud leaders
argued angrily last week
over whether their unity
coalition government should
be broken up because of
sharply divergent views on
an international conference
for Middle East Peace.
Much of the controversy
centered on Vice Premier and
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres who was on a two-day
official visit to Spain where,
among other things, he sought
support for an international
conference. Premier Yitzhak
Shamir told reporters here
that Peres had exaggerated
the importance of his trip and
maintained that an interna-
tional conference would bring
"no salvation and certainly no
peace."
PERES DISCUSSED that
approach to Middle East peace
with King Juan Carlos of
Spain and Prime Minister
Felipe Gonzalez. But Shamir
noted that "Spain will not
even participate in such a con-
ference should it take place,
nor does it depend on Spain if
such a conference is convened
Continued on Page 14-A


Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-D
3K?
M
*m
4P
^_
r
authority on the intriguing and
little-known relationships bet-
ween the National Socialist
government and Third World na-
tions ." His lecture, "National
Socialism and the Third World,"
apparently followed the theme of
his book on the same subject.
In 1986, the leading Santiago
daily newspaper, El Mercurio,
devoted two-thirds of a page to his
lengthy defense of Nazism.
Serrano is linked to CEDADE,
(Spanish Circle of Friends of
Europe), a neo-Nazi group based
in Barcelona, now active in Chile
and Argentina. CEDADE
distributed in Chile new editions
of Hitler's "Mein Kampf" and
"The Protocols of the Elders of
Zion." Both contained prefaces
written by Serrano.
HE DESCRIBED Mein
Kampf as "the Bible of the Aryan
peoples" with "immortal validi-
ty." In the 30-page preface to
"The Protocols," he asserted that
the Jews' objective is "the total
domination of the world," and
credited Hitler and the Nazis for
having discovered "this great
plot." Serrano added that 'The
Protocols' are being fulfilled, part
by part, protocol by protocol,
here, among us."
Serrano cannot be dismissed as
a harmeless eccentric. His ideas
have explosive potential in Chile's
current political and economic
crises.
Acts of vandalism and terrorism
against Jewish institutuions and
homes, including the bombing of
the home of the chairman of B'nai
B'rith's ADL Committee in Chile,
are ominous.

h is open to the opening pages as these
$ts at a Seder prepare for the evening's
ceremony of recounting the ancient story of the
Exodus.
Spector's & Sons Realty
575 SW 22nd Ave.
Miami 642-3153
Happy Passover
thilean diplomat is Anti-Semite
i MORTON ROSENTHAL
Life magazine photo
fed him offering the
salute over the open
of Walter Rauff, the
war criminal who in-
led the mobile gas
per and later found
ie in Chile. He was bill-
a keynote speaker for
i Angeles convention of
California-based In-
lte for Historical
w, a group that claims
lolocaust is a Jewish
Chilean diplomat, he was
ssador to India and became
ktimate friend of Indira
ki.
name is Miguel Serrano. He
1 colorful and charismatic
er who has been in the
t of an upsurge of Nazism
iti-Semitism that has caused
to the Chilean Jewish
Unity during the past three
EIR FEARS have been
Bned because these acts
t an apparent change in the
ty government's policy,
from the time it took
in 1973 until 1984, had
t to prevent manifestations
1-Semitism. Two weeks after
p3 coup, representatives of
flitary government came to
^-Defamation League's na-
' uarters in New York
ssured the agency's Latin
in Affairs Department
here is no anti-Semitism in
nd there will be none."
i the Jewish community
|y deplored the increase of
:vity in Chile. Recently,
esident of the Represen-
I Ummittee of Jewish En-
" Chile, Isidoro
jwcher, met with the
of Justice, Hugo
to discuss the problem
ctfically the activities of
Serrano. The Jewish
urged legal sanctions
1 toose who promote racist
'is a self-declared racist.
cterizes all mestixos (per-
mixed ancestry with
Indian blood) as "bad."
PARANOID anti-Semite.
r0 sees Jewish plots
[WJJ Among his contem-
ains are "the Great
ue- Masonic Lodges and
Rabbi Morton M. Rosenthal
is director of the Latin
American Affairs Department
of the Anti-Defamation
League's International Affairs
Division.
dated "the 97th year of the Hitler
Era."
One of the books is entitled "Na-
tional Socialism, the Only Solution
for .the People of South America."
Another, "The Resurrection of
the Hero," is a mystical treatise
invoking astrology and alchemy,
in which Serrano portrays Hitler
as the "Incarnation, the emana-
tion of a God, a hero ." The
book denounces the Catholic
Church as an entity "which takes
its orders from the Synagogue."
The third is entitled "The
Chilean Racial Cycle." All three
are being distributed widely.
A LEFTIST in the 1930s, Ser-
rano first published his Nazi
ideology in 1978 in a book called,
"The Golden Cord: Esoteric
Hitlerism." The work claimed
that the Holocaust never occur-
red, a theme he repeats in later
books. He also argued that Hitler
is still alive, concluding that even
though he had been unable to find
him, "Hitler, for us, is as alive as
Jesus for the Christians."
Serrano is well-connected, in-
side and outside of Chile. In 1982,
he was invited to lecture at the
Chilean Academy of National
Security. Addressing the military
officers, he expressed his hope
that the Chilean Army would be
transformed into a "Racist War
Order."
In an interview published in the
Spanish newspaper El Pais, in
1985, Serrano claimed that the
Nazis did not operate "even one
gas chamber" and described the
Holocaust as a "diabolic hoax."
IN ANNOUNCING Serrano's
appearance as a speaker at the In-
stitute for Historical Review con-
vention in Los Angeles, in
February, 1986, the Institute
described him as "a world-class
author the world's foremost
Dade Tire Co.
1501 No. Miami Ave.
Miami 373-8445
Happy Passover
Lilyan Cortez
6700 NW 77 Ct.
Miami 592-8000
Happy Passover
Cye's Lounge & Restaurant
444 Brickell Ave.
Miami-358-9100
Passover Greetings
"can.
I10 Published three books
J!*.tl with the
*fft"r/ZiegHeil!,and
Chase Federal Savings
and Loan Association
Extends
Passover Greetings
To All
FEDERAL >
Savings and Loan Association M
.


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E141DMEQK_5SX87S INGEST_TIME 2013-06-24T21:08:28Z PACKAGE AA00010090_03036
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES