The Jewish Floridian

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Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03035

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
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Full Text
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement This Issue
Jewish FlojridiainL
Vol. 60-No. 14
Miami Friday, April 3,1987
50 Cents


BEFORE START OF MEETING: Former President Jimmy Israel during which former Prime Minister Menachem Begin, co-
Carter (left) meets with Israel's Foreign Minister Shimon Peres signer with the slain Egyptian President Sadat of the Camp
in Jerusalem. The former President was on an unofficial visit to David Accord, refused to see Carter. (See story, Page 6-A).
Carter's New Breams of Glory
Says Assad, Hussein Prepared To Enter Into Peace Talks
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Former President Jimmy
Carter arrived in Israel
Thursday (March 26) saying
he was convinced that the
leaders of Syria and Jordan
would join direct peace talks
with Israel held within the
framework of an interna-
tional peace conference.
Meeting with Vice Premier and
foreign Minister Shimon Peres
shortly after reaching Jerusalem
^ the Allenby Bridge from Jor-
dan Carter said that President
Hafez Assad of Syria understood
that an international conference
*as the next stage toward direct
negotiations.
HE SAID that King Hussein of
>rdan wanted to advance the
Peace process and held "flexible
flews" hut was unable to move
'onvard in the absence of an inter-
national forum. According to
^"er Assad regards Jordan as
a leading force in the peace pro-
ess- Carter said that in his own
view, Syria, too, has an important
role in the process.
Carter's visit to Israel, his first
since 1983, is the final leg of a tour
that took him to Algeria, Egypt,
Syria and Jordan. The former
President stressed repeatedly
here and in the Arab capitals that
his visit was private and the views
he expressed were his own. He
made clear he is not representing
the U.S.
He made several statements in
the course of his journey on the
need to include the Palestine
Liberation Organization in an in-
ternational conference.
CARTER'S ARRIVAL in
Israel coincided with the eighth
anniversary of the signing of the
Israel-Egyptian peace treaty on
March 26, 1979 at a White House
ceremony. The signatories were
then Israeli Premier Menachem
Begin and the late President An-
war Sadat of Egypt. Carter
engineered the treaty.
Carter asked for a meeting with
Begin, who has been living in
seclusion at his suburban
Jerusalem home since he resigned
from office in August 1983. Ac-
cording to Begin's spokesman.
Yechiel Kadishai, the 73-year-old
former Premier said "that he
can't see him, that's all. He didn't
give any reason." Begin and
Carter last met during Carter's
1983 visit.
Carter told reporters Thursday
that one of the lessons of Camp
David, at which Egypt, Israel and
the U.S. talked was that one
Continued on Page 6-A
'Islamic Bomb' Poses Serious Threat
To Israel's Existence, Sen. Glenn Says
By JUDITH COLP
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Pakistan's interest in ob-
taining nuclear weapons
poses a threat to Israel's ex-
istence, and Congress
should consider halting
military aid, Sen. John
Glenn (D., Ohio) said
Monday.
Glenn, testifying before the
Senate Foreign Affairs Subcom-
mittee on Near East and South
Asian Affairs, said there is strong
evidence indicating that Pakistan
is "manufacturing and testing
Sen. John Glenn
components for nuclear
weaponry." He proposed
eliminating military aid to
Pakistan unless it can be certified
that it has no nuclear materials.
GLENN, noting that former
Pakistan Zulfikar Ali Bhutic said
he was building an "Islamic
bomb," said the weapon is "the
ultimate threat to Israel's ex-
istence. Pakistan's nuclear
weapons production will sooner or
later result in a wider frontier
of nuclear weapons technology to
countries in the Middle East. The
flash point for nuclear war will be
Continued on Page 2-A


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 3, 1987
Demjanjuk 3-Judge Panel
Refuses To Disqualify Self
By HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The trial of suspected war
criminal John Demjanjuk
was marked by rancor bet-
ween the defense counsel
and the three-judge bench
last week as a West German
jurist took the witness stand
to give testimony about a
key document in the case.
Demjanjuk's American at-
torney, Mark O'Connor, and his
Israeli aide. Yoram Sheftel, ob-
'Islamic Bomb'
Called Threat'
Continued from Page 1-A
lowered through the combination
of religiously-based conflict with
the means for mass destruction."
The Reagan Administration is
seeking continuation of a $4.02
billion six-year package to
Pakistan that was approved by
Congress last year. Supporters of
the assistance assert that refusal
to grant aid would induce
Pakistan to develop nuclear
weapons.
"Development of a close and
reliable security partnership with
Pakistan gives Pakistan an alter-
native to nuclear weapons to meet
its legitimate security needs and
strengthens our influence on
Pakistan's nuclear decision-
making," said Richard Murphy,
Assistant Secretary of State for
Near East and South Asian
Affairs.
WITH THE Soviet invasion of
Afghanistan, Pakistan is also
perceived as a critical bulwark
against Soviet influence.
"Pakistan today is directly
threatened by the Soviet Union.
Indeed were it not for Pakistan,
by now Moscow would have suc-
ceeded in its brutal efforts to drag
bleeding Afghanistan into the
Soviet Empire," said Sen. Gordon
Humphrey (R.. N.H.).
Halacha
Hotline Listed
NEW YORK (JTA) Puzzl-
ed about a Jewish legal question
and have nowhere to turn? Call
(718) 436-1889 on Mondays, 3-5
p.m., Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m., and
Thursdays, 4-6 p.m. and 7-9 p.m.,
and speak with a decisor of
halacha.
The halacha hotline has been
established by the five-month-old
National Conference of Agudath
Israel Branch Rabbonim, the rab-
binic arm of Agudath Israel of
America.
* Jenisfi Fk>ridHain
Phone: (305) 373-4605
Published weekly every Friday
since 1927 by The Jewish Flori-
dian. Office and Plant 120 N.E.
6th Sf, Miami, Fla. 33132. Phone
(305) 373-4605. Second-Class
Postage paid in Miami. Fla.
USPS 275320. Postmaster: Form
3579 return to Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla.
33101. c Fred Shochet. The
Jewish Floridian does not
guarantee the Kashruth of the
merchandise advertised in its
columns.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: In ad-
vance (Local Area) One Year
$9.00: Two Years $16.00; Three
Years $22 00 Supplemental
Issue (Local Area) First Friday
each month (10 issues)
Sept June $2.00. Out of town.
rr- ,ntry. upon request. By Mail
S" J5 oer copy
jected strenuously that they were
not given time to study the writ-
ten testimony on which the
witness, Helga Gravitz, will be
cross-examined. Gravitz, a Ham-
burg district attorney since 1966,
is active in researching and pro-
secuting former Nazis and their
collaborators.
DEFENSE OBJECTIONS
were overruled but the court
agreed, over protests by the pro-
secution, to cancel the afternoon
session to allow O'Connor and
Sheftel to scrutinize the material.
Gravitz will be questioned about
the identification card reportedly
bearing Demjanjuk's photograph
and physical details, issued at the
Trawniki SS camp where guards
were trained for their duties at
the Treblinka and Sobibor death
camps.
The card was obtained from the
Soviet Union and the defense con-
tends it is a forgery. Gravitz, who
has gathered documents in a
number of countries, including the
USSR, will testify as an expert.
Meanwhile, the Supreme Court
has agreed to hear a defense ap-
peal against the three-judge
panel's refusal to disqualify itself.
O'Connor had demanded that the
judges step down because of alleg-
ed bias against the defendant and
his lawyers. The motion was
denied, and the court refused to
suspend the hearing while the ap-
peal was pending.
JUDGE DOV LEVIN, presi
dent of the court, insisted the
bench has acted "with more than
usual forbearance" in hearing the
case. But there is evident an-
tipathy between the judges and
defense counsel.
O'Connor was sharply
reprimanded last week for the
manner in which he cross-
examined Martin Roller, a
Holocaust survivor who was
employed by the U.S. occupation
forces in Europe after World War
II investigating Nazi war crimes.
Roller, 67, was questioned
about his testimony in the 1978
denaturalization trial in Florida of
alleged war criminal Feodor
Fedorenko who, like Demjanjuk,
was identified as a guard at the
Treblinka death camp. He describ-
ed as "cold and almost hostile"
the Florida court's attitude
toward Treblinka survivors who
testified about Fedorenko's
activities.
ASKED BY O'Connor if he felt
the same way about his cross-
examination here, Roller replied,
"Heaven forbid." Judge Levin in-
terjected, "That should put Mr.
O'Connor in a better mood."
Demjanjuk, who was held at the
maximum security prison in
Ramie until his trial began six
weeks ago, is now confined to a
cell in the Binyanei Haooma con-
cert hall which is serving as a
courtroom to accommodate the
large numbers of spectators and
the media.
Red Army
Chorus Demo
WINNIPEG, Man. (JTA) -
The performance here last month
of the Red Army Chorus and
Dance Ensemble was met by a
demonstration by 25 or 30 Jewish
students who claimed that Soviet
soldiers do more than sing.
"In Moscow, you would not
believe what they do," said the
pamphlet distributed by the
students to about 1,500 people, ac-
cording to demonstration
organizer Carnie Rose. She was
referring to repression of Soviet
Jews. She told the Jewish Post
here that the demonstration's
purpose was to show the incon-
sistency in Soviet policy."
AP Wide World Ptao
Not All Ukrainians Assisted Nazi Murderers
AVOIDING STEREOTYPES: Ukrainian
historian George Kulchytsky shows a photo
document and concentration camp uniform
from his exhibit on how Ukrainians suffered
at the hands of the Nazis during World War
II. The exhibit was produced partly toi\~r-
the image created in the trial of John Demjan-
juk in Jerusalem that Ukrainians assisted thi
Nazis, especially at the death ramps.
Poland-Israel
Ties Improve
NEW YORK (JTA) Rela-
tions between Poland and Israel
are improving in all areas, accor-
ding to Kalman Sultanik who was
reelected president of the
American Federation of Polish
Jews last week.
Addressing the Federation's an-
nual conference here Sunday
marking 1,000 years of Jewish life
in Poland, Sultanik spoke of en-
couraging signs that Israel and
Poland are drawing closer after
20 years without diplomatic ties
He stressed that the content of
their relations, for example
cultural exchanges, are more im-
portant than their formality.
Nevertheless, reporting in his
recent meeting with Joseph
Cyrek, chairman of the Polish
Parliamentary Commission on
Foreign Affairs, Sultanik said
steps are being taken to restore
diplomatic relations between the
two countries.
Cyrek told him that Poland is
also very much interested in im-
proving its relations with the
Jewish community in the United
States, Sultanik said.
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Deeper Understanding
Leaders Have Heard Israel's Motives in Spy Case
Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A

By MARGIE OLSTER
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
American Jewish leaders
who came here two weeks
ago to warn the leaders of
Israel that their handling of
the Jonathan Pollard spy
case was not being well
received in the U.S., have
left for home saying they
had gained a deeper
understanding of Israel's ac-
tions and motives.
The 40-member delegation of
the Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organiza-
tions also gained insight into
Israel's relationship with South
Africa and its efforts to have the
U.S. government abolish refugee
status for Jews leaving the Soviet
Union, according to Conference
chairman Morris Abram.
"I think Americans will never
be able to fully understand Israeli
actions when they (Israelis)
Peres Raps
Unity Gov't.
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Foreign Minister Shimon Peres
expressed sharp criticism of the
Labor-Likud national unity
government Wednesday and came
down strongly on one side of an
issue that could result in its
dissolution.
Addressing the leadership of the
National Religious Party, Peres
spoke forcefully against Jewish
settlements in the administered
territories. There was no need for
towns like Emmanuel and Ariel in
the West Bank, he said, which
serve as no more than bedroom
communities.
He also charged that the unity
government had no real political
or social program, implying that
he saw no justification for it to
I continue.
While he spoke, Likud's Deputy
Premier and Housing Minister
David Levy was dedicating the
new West Bank settlement of
Betar, just south of Jerusalem.
He did so in face of a protest
demonstration by the Peace Now
I movement and a delegation from
I the development town of Sderot
I in the Negev.
perceive their security interests
are at stake," Abram told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency.
HE REFERRED specifically to
a matter which soured U.S. at-
titudes toward Israel and aroused
serious concern among American
Jews the advancement of the
careers of Air Force Col. Aviem
Sella and former Mossad
operative Rafael Eitan, the Israeli
officials who, according to
Pollard's trial testimony,
recruited him and ran his spy
operation in the U.S.
"People who live in constant
fear of utter destruction and
death look on a Col. Sella as a na-
tional asset and a hero of which
there are not enough in a
dangerous world, so there is sym-
pathy for Sella and I have that
sympathy too. I know what Sella
is and what he represents,"
Abram said.
He maintained that Sella was in
fact "punished" by not being pro-
moted to the rank of Brig. Gen.,
even though he was given com-
mand of Israel's second largest air
base.
THE AMERICAN Jewish
leaders had long, frank discus-
sions with Premier Yitzhak
Shamir, Vice Premier and
Foreign Minister Shimon Peres,
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin
and other top political and
military figures.
They were told repeatedly that
the Pollard spy case was a "rogue
operation" conducted without the
knowledge or authorization of the
highest levels of government.
Abram said he believed this and
was confident the other members
of the delegation left Israel also
believing it.
But at least one member still
has doubts. Barrett Zumhoff,
president of the Workmen's Cir-
cle, said "Shamir, Peres, Rabin
and all said it was a rogue opera-
tion. It sounded convincing but I
don't believe it."
"Part of espionage is that the
head of state has to have deniabili-
ty," Zumhoff observed.
"Regardless of this, the Pollard
affair was only compounded by a
number of errors made by the
Israeli government in the wake of
the crisis, the worst of which were
the promotions of Sella and
Eitan." Those actions were "ex-
ceptionally stupid," he added.
Eitan, who ran LEKEM,
Pollard's spy unit, was given the
chairmanship of Israel Chemicals,
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ZUMHOFF WAS also critical
of the public stand taken by the
Presidents Conference delega-
tion. "I didn't agree that we
should have made so much noise
about it. I felt we had overdone
it," he said. "Criticism of the
Israel government would have
been more beneficial if conveyed
privately, not in the media."
Israel Friedman, executive vice
president of the Religious Zionists
of America/Hapoel Hamizrachi,
echoed those sentiments. "The
whole thing was blown out of pro-
portion," he said.
But Abram called the meeting
of Jewish leaders with Israel's top
leadership last week a
"watershed."
"This has been a historic
meeting because I have never in
my life seen in such stark forms,
issues boil to the surface not
just abstract issues like 'Who is a
Jew?', but in terms of how the
relationship of Jews in the
diaspora to Israel affects the
State of Israel," Abram said.
SPEAKING OF the Pollard af-
fair in general, Abram said the
Presidents Conference never in-
tended to dictate to the Israeli
government how to conduct its in-
ternal affairs. But, Abram said,
"We had every responsibility, and
discharged it, to tell the State
leaders of Israel how their actions
were being perceived in the U.S."
The deeper understanding of
Israeli positions also extended to
the controversy over Israel's
military ties with South Africa,
according to Abram. "We
understood some who said Israel
had to very cautious about the use
of the boycott the word em-
bargo doesn't strike responsive
chords in a country which is
almost embargoed out of the
United Nations," Abram said.
Days after the Presidents Con-
ference delegation arrived, the
Israeli government decided to im-
pose limited sanctions on South
Africa. Abram explained that
Israel has done more to hurt itself
in this action than any other state.
"Israel needs an arms industry
because it has so few arms sup-
pliers and an arms industry needs
exports. No state similarly beset
and beleaguered, so insecure, at
war with all its neighbors has
taken an action so contrary to its
military interesrt on behalf of its
moral principles," Abram said.
J.M. Coetzee, the distinguished
South African writer, has been
awarded the 1987 Jerusalem
Prize, whose defining them* is
'The Freedom of the Individual
in Society.' Coetzee was chosen
'for his staunch opposition to
apartheid, violence, and op-
pression in all its forms.' The
Prize jury stated, 'John
Coetzee stands out in his novels
and essays as a fighter for
human freedom and dignity.'
Village Dedication
NEW YORK Neve Shalom,
the Israeli village dedicated to
fostering Jewish-Arab coopera-
tion, has received the annual
Buber Rosenzweig Medal
presented by the Deutsche Koor-
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 3, 1987
It's About Time
U.S. Jews Are Mollified
The Conference of Presidents of Jewish
Organizations in America went off to
Jerusalem real steamed, specifically about
Israel's handling of the Jonathan Pollard spy
case. Now, the Conference is back home.
President of the organization, the
distinguished Morris Abram, says he and
other leaders have returned considerably
mollified. Finally, according to Abram, they
understand Israel's point of view.
It's about time.
For example, the resignation of Aviem
Sella on Sunday as commander of the Tel
Nof Air Base is not a statement of Sella's
complicity in a secret spying operation
against the United States conducted by es-
pionage agent Jonathan Pollard. More in
conformity with what appears to be increas-
ingly clear, it is Israel's sop to that master-
mind of U.S. strategy, Secretary of Defense
Caspar Weinberger's demand for an Israeli
beheading.
Weinberger's Own Agenda
Weinberger, apparently, has his own
secret agenda. Talk about being steamed,
that is how Weinberger says he felt when he
"discovered" that some information Pollard
uncovered and passed on to the Israelis was
in turn rerouted by the Israelis to South
Africa.
It was on the basis of this still-
uncorroborated information that
Weinberger let the American media, always
delighted to engage in a round of Israel
bashing, know that "irreparable" harm was
done by Pollard's allegedly wide-ranging es-
pionage resulting in "extremely sensitive"
information winding up in the hands of the
Pretoria government.
That information: the names of either one
or several agents spying for the United
States in South Africa.
Revelations about this kind of roundrobin
spying game are not needed to corroborate
Israel's own minor key bleating in response
to the big guns of Secretary Weinberger's
fusillade aimed at Jerusalem that the United
States has also been doing espionage of its
own in Israel.
What the Israelis may have told their
visiting American delegation of U.S. Jewish
leaders is that all the Reagan Administra-
tion palaver about U.S. ties to Israel are just
that palaver when it comes to a genuine
sharing of intelligence information with the
Israelis.
Israel Gets Little Back
Already, many news sources in the
American media, including magazines like
Newsweek and Insight, have emphasized
that in the matter of espionage and counter-
espionage, the United States has been get-
ting more, much more than it gives so far as
Israel is concerned.
In short, while Israel's very survival
depends upon accurate intelligence informa-
tion about its enemy neighbors, the United
States, its best friend, or so its PR agents
would have us believe, has been holding out
on the Israelis.
The fact is that the U.S. agenda, as the
Reaganites see it in the Middle East, is to
achieve peace there by rolling back Israel's
borders. It does not choose to enlighten
Israel as to ways of frustrating that agenda.
Let that not be forgotten.
Two wrongs do not make a right, not even
in matters of spying. But the Aviem Sella
resignation Sunday is yet another
American-engineered wrong, and so it ill-
behoves the Reaganites to take such a high-
handed approach against Israel in the
Jonathan Pollard case.
Surprising Words
Soviet Jews. A case in point: cancellation of
the Jackson-Vanik Amendment which links
Jewish emigration to Most Favored Nation
trade status for Moscow providing 50,000
Jews are allowed to leave per year.
Does Sharansky forget the nature of the
Kremlin's policy as the engineer of an op-
pressive society that takes every opportuni-
ty to advance its international expansionist
cause? Certainly, he knew it far more
viscerally when he walked across the bridge
between East and West Berlin to freedom
early in 1986.
We are surrounded by neophytes and
naive innocents who believe that every
miniscule human gesture emanating from
Moscow is a major sign of Soviet change in
the cause of the new Gorbachev policy called
glasnost. For Sharansky to become one of
them is disappointing indeed.
What the Soviets need are not rewards.
What they need is unyielding Western
response to their oppressive tactics. No less
a skilled diplomat than former Secretary of
State Henry Kissinger has warned us that
glasnost is a Soviet necessity whose object is
to elicit precisely the kind of recommenda-
tions that Sharansky has made so that the
Soviets may turn their attention for a while
to solving some of their longstanding
domestic problems. Rapprochement with
the West is not its major purpose.
Indeed, Kissinger warns, glasnost relies
on Western cupidity the kind of cupidity
that fails to separate the Soviet Union's
desire to direct some of its attention to its
Ghetto Athletics
domestic agonies from the Western world's
desire to see the Soviet Union emerging as a
nation of human beings rather than of
never-ending aggressive expansionist
policy. In this sense, we must not gear our
own foreign policy to the Soviet Union's at-
home priorities.
If Sharansky joins these victims of cupidi-
ty, what hope is there for the rest of us? He
suffered Soviet oppression first-hand. His
desire for international change should not
now feed on pipe dreams made in the
Kremlin for Western consumption.
Once, There Were Many Jewish Champions
By JIM SHIPLEY
It has always been the tradition
in America that one way up from
the ghetto is athletics. Teach your
kid how to box, how to play foot-
ball or shoot baskets, and he'll get
an education and go on to finer
things.
For generations, the fight game
was the fastest route out. So, we
saw legions of Irish fighters,
Italian fighters, black fighters,
Puerto Rican fighters and yes,
Jewish fighters, all of whom pun-
ched their way into the spotlight
and then, for the most part, had
their lights punched out.
WHEN THE great potato
famine hit Ireland, they came to
America, a million strong. They
went to work on the docks, in the
cops and in the ring. They were
fighters from a national tradition
of fighters. They produced legions
of club fighters and also cham-
pions, like John L. Sullivan.
The Italians came from an im-
poverished land to find the
richness of America. They worked
the railroads, they climbed down
into the mines and up into the
ring. Jake LaMotta, Willie Pep,
Melio Bettina, Rocky Marciano,
even that hoax of a huge
heavyweight, Primo Camera, con-
tinued the tradition of Italian
champions. A way out of the
mines, off the railroad gangs, into
the spotlight.
For the blacks, it was an obvious
route. In many cases, it was the
only way out. Exploited, hated by
the fans who came to see the black
dude take a whipping, constantly
fighting against the "white hope"
that would knock him off, the
black fighter has been in the ring
since they let him fight for money.
THE MOST famous of the black
fighters? Well, I guess it depends
on your age. Mohammed AH or
Larry Holmes for this generation.
I guess Mike Tyson for the next.
For mine, it was Joe Louis. And
Henry Armstrong, who once won
a championship while legally
blind; Sugar Ray Robinson, not
Leonard; Ike Williams, Jersey Joe
Walcott do I stir some
memories?
But let's not forget that, for a
period of time, the Jewish fighter
also used the ring to achieve a
slice of notoriety and a bit of the
American dream. Out of the nee-
dle trades and diamond merchants
and teachers and hack drivers
who came to these shores there
were tough street kids who found
a new, strange way to make some
Continued on Page 14-A
Our Readers Write: Chassidic Jews
Make Little of Dress Codes
EDITOR, The Jeunsh Floridian:
With regard to the letter by Ar-
thur Greenfield, I would like to
say that I was shocked.
Being Chassidic Jews, we have
an age-old traditional "dress
code" for the Sabbath and even
though we are accused of being
set in our ways, any Jew, no mat-
ter what he wears, as long as he is
"decent," is welcomed in our
synagogue.
I will never forget Dr. Velvel
Green, noted NASA scientist,
who told us that although he drove
up to a Chassidic synagogue Fri-
day night and came in carrying
suitcases, no one ridiculed him or
threw him out. Rather they took
him in and taught him better.
Green went on to become a Baal
Teshuva and a source of great
pride to the Jewish people.
Prayer is a service of the heart
and is not expressed through
one's external appearance as we
learn from the encounter of the
prophetess Channah and the High
Priest Eli.
I find it strange that the Conser-
vative and Reform can be so rigid
when it comes to manmade rules
and yet so permissive with
regards to Torah laws.
We need each and every Jew,
and it is only through ahovas
Yisroel that we can bring them
back to Judaism.
RIVKAKORF
Miami Beach
Your editorial treatment of
Rabbi Neusner's unfortunate arti-
cle in a recent issue of the Miami
Herald is very much appreciated.
I havt discussed it with many
leaders in our Jewish community,
and they are unanimous in their
praise of the position taken by The
Jewish Floridian.
The fact that you so deftly tied
in the actions of the Presents
Conference and the comments oi
Prof. Shlomo Avineri is a clear in-
dication of the groundlessness o
Rabbi Neusner's hypotheW- '
cannot understand how tn
Jewish intellectual can allow lus
mind to become so tortuous, rrom
some of his recent writings ana
behavior, it would seem *
when it comes to areas of Jewu*
Continued on Page 15-A
Fred K. Shochet
Editor and Publisher
'Oewisli Floridian
Leo Mindlin
Associate Editor
Suzanne Shochet
Executive Editor
We are surprised by Natan Sharansky's
proposal that the Soviet Union be rewarded
for easing emigration restrictions against
William T. Brewer
Director ot Operations
Joan C. Teglas
Director of Advertising
Friday, April 3,1987
Volume 60
4 NISAN 5747
Number M


Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Visionary, Dead At 90, Was Man of Immense Stature
By SIMON GRIVER
Meir Ya'ari, who died in
February at age 90, was a
Zionist visionary of im-
mense stature and in-
fluence. He was one of those
instrumental in setting up
Hashomer Hatzair, the
Zionist youth movement,
established the Kibbutz Art-
zi movement, and for many
years led the left-wing
Mapam Party. He was a
lifelong member of Kibbutz
Merhavia and served in the
Knesset from 1949 to 1973.
Many young Israelis had never
heard of Ya'ari, or knew him as a
frail, old man who suffered from
blindness in his later years. Yet
veteran Zionists recall the spirited
young radical, who tirelessly
travelled the length and breadth
of Europe delivering fiery
speeches that persuaded
thousands to emigrate to the
Jewish State.
IN LATER years, though
plagued by physical infirmity, his
incisive mind remained razor
sharp. "Many assumed that he
had retired when he left the
Knesset in 1973," said Mapam
Knesset Member Eliezer Granot.
"But he remained active until the
days before his death, both as a
kibbutz member and in the
Mapam central committee. He
fought tenaciously to retain the
historic alliance with the Labor
party in 1983. and he advocated
the break up of that alliance after
the formation of the National Uni-
ty government in 1984."
Ya'ari was born in Kanczuga in
Galicia, Poland in 1897. He came
from a family of eminent Hasidic
rabbis, and although he totally re-
jected orthodoxy, he injected
quasi religious fervor and an
apocalyptic passion into the
Zionist and Socialist philosophy
that he adopted.
DURING THE First World
War. he volunteered for the
Austrian army and became a fir3t
lieutenant. After the war, he
studied at the University of Vien-
na, where Sigmund Freud was
one of his teachers.
In the wake of the Russian
Historic photo of Golda Meir and Meir Ya'ari, who died last month.
fighting in the Russian revolution.
Borochov was so disgusted by the
inherent anti-Semitism of the
Russian and other European na-
tions that he predicted the an-
nihilation of the Jewish people
before a world Marxist order
could evolve and therefore urged
the establishment of a Jewish
homeland in Palestine.
Ya'ari enrolled in Vienna's
Agricultural Institute, intending
to settle on the land in Palestine.
At the same time, he set up the
Viennese branch of the Hashomer
Hatzair movement. In 1920, he ar-
rived in Palestine and for many
years led teams of building and
agricultural laborers. In 1927, he
moved to Kibbutz Merhavia in the
Jezreel valley.
YA'ARI WAS an austere man
who believed in hard work and
communal responsibility. A con-
vinced socialist and Marxist, he
was, nevertheless, never
dogmatic and was always
prepared to revise his views and
admit mistaken perceptions.
For many decades, he was an
enthusiastic supporter of the
Soviet Union but after Stalin's
blatant anti-Semitism in the early
1950's, he severed his allegiance
to Russia. He opposed the parti-
tion of Palestine, believing that
Jew and Arab could live together
in a bi-national state, yet he was
always a loyal patriot and in the
aftermath of the Six-Day War, he
led Mapam into a coalition with
the Mapai (Labor) Party.
Ya'ari had always hoped that
Mapam, a party more zealously
faithful to socialist doctrine,
would prove to be a viable alter-
native to Mapai. This made him
both a friend and foe of Ben-
Gurion. "There was always a com-
mon bond between us," Ya'ari
once said of Ben-Gurion. "A bond
of love for the historic task of the
building of our homeland and for
the Labor movement."
THOUGH YA'ARI revised his
beliefs, he never altered their
essence. In his final years he felt a
bitter disappointment with what
he saw as negative trends in
Israeli society a tendency
towards greater materialism and
capitalism, and the spread of
chauvinism and accompanying
negative attitudes towards Arabs.
As his veteran colleague in
Mapam. Ya'akov Hazan, revealed,
Ya'ari was not the type to feel
complacent about anything. "I
have never known a man who was
Continued on Page 12-A
Recently Unearthed Deficiencies
Place Into Question Israel's Intelligence Community
revolution, he became a devout n chmiivt avrvv
Marxist. But he was deeply in- By SHMUEL SEGEV
fluenced by the Zionist-Marxist INS The recently-
thinker, Ber Borochov, who died unearthed deficiencies in
'dirty operations' committee like
Lenry Kissinger's needs establishing.
the functioning of the entire
Israeli intelligence com-
munity have, and rightly so,
given rise to questions about
the way intelligence bodies
are operating and the ex-
tent of the (political) leader-
ship's supervision of the
operational echelon.
Questions were raised not only
in regard to methods of action,
but mainly concerning the fiascos.
In at least two cases the supply-
ing of weapons to Iran and the
Pollard affair the Mossad was
not involved in running the opera-
tion. Yet when the political
echelon decided to cooperate with
the U.S. and supply Iran with
small quantities of weapons and
military equipment, Mossad
leaders refrained from throwing
their full weight so as to induce
their superiors to change their
mind.
Their behavior thus resembled
that of the American Secretary of
State George Shutlz and Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger, as
described in the Tower Commis-
sion report, which charged that
while Weinberger and Shultz had
expressed their opposition to
President Reagan, "by not stan-
ding their ground, they failed to
serve the president properly."
THE TOWER report clearly
implies that the CIA was involved
in all the planning and execution
stages of the arms to Iran deal.
The CIA had its doubts concern-
ing Ghorbanifar, yet when the
U.S. President decided on the
operation, the CIA was full part-
ner throughout all stages. The
Mossad, on the other hand, did not
insist on filling its role, as
obligated by definition of its pur-
pose, thereby consciously leaving
itself in a position inferior to its
American counterpart.
The same applies to the Pollard
affair. Ever since its establish-
ment, in the late fifties, th*
science liaison unit took care to
adhere to its defined role and did
not engage in espionage. The
Pollard affair is thus indeed an ex-
ception, yet the very fact it could
have taken place behind the
Mossad's back is worrisome.
The two affairs are currently
under investigation by various
commissions. The arms to Iran
deal is being examined by Maj.
Gen. (res.) Raphael Vardi, and the
Pollard affair by the Rotenstreich-
Tsur commission. The probity and
professional reliability of these
three men are beyond doubt, yet
the two commissions have not
been authorized to draw conclu-
sions regarding the Israeli in-
telligence community's method of
operation.
IF THE government means to
follow in the Americans' footsteps
and set up a special commission
such as the Tower Commission ap-
pointed by President Reagan to
look into the National Security
Council's functioning, it would be
desirable. Yet there is room to
doubt the wisdom of appointing
the two Israeli commissions of in-
vestigation if their terms of
reference have been deliberately
limited to prevent an expansion of
their investigation.
When Henry Kissinger served
as President Nixon's national
security adviser, he headed the
"40-member committee," whose
role was to approve all "dirty
operations" that is, operations
that were especially sensitive
politically. The committee was
comprised of representatives of
all intelligence bodies, and its
recommendations were presented
to the President by Kissinger
himself.
We do not know whether this
committee still exists, yet there is
no reason why a similar, though
smaller, committee should not be
established near the prime
minister's office, and through a
Continued on Page 14-A
This report by Shmuel Segev
first appeared in Maariv in
that newspaper's March 18
edition.
Not only methods of action, but
fiascos also being studied.


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 3, 1987
Carter Says Assad, Hussein
Prepared To Talk With Israel
Continued from Page 1-A
should not stick to any single
specific formula in pursuing peace
and that it is time to advance to a
new stage. He said that would
seem to be an international
conference.
HE SAID his visit to Israel was
to raise questions and float ideas
for Israeli leaders, as a private
citizen. He added that he had
never succeeded in convincing
Israelis "or anyone else" to do
what they did not want to do.
Asked why the peace process
had not advanced after Camp
David, Carter said "Perhaps there
is more I could have done, but I
don't think that in the last six
years (the tenure of the Reagan
Administration) it has been as
high a priority as it has been with
me, when it was almost an
obsession."
Carter expressed hope never-
theless that the last two years of
the Reagan Administration would
see the Middle East peace process
become a greater priority.
The Reagan Administration
sharply criticized Carter for a
remark before the American
Chamber of Commerce in Cairo
last week that there was "missing
leadership" in Washington.
"President Reagan has not been
inclined to use negotiation and
diplomacy as a means to achieve
our nation's goals as have his
Democratic and Republican
predecessors. He's more inclined
to exert America's military
strength, either the actual use of
it or the threat of it," Carter said.
THOSE REMARKS brought
an angry response from White
House spokesman Marlin Fitz-
water last Friday. He said the Ad-
ministration was "deeply disap-
pointed" that Carter would make
such a statement on the "very
delicate" Mideast peace process
while in a foreign country. "It is
not right to say we have not been
pursuing the peace process in the
Middle East," Fitzwater said.
State Department spokesman
Charles Redman declared that
"This Administration has remain-
ed actively involved in the peace
process and is deeply committed
to it."
Carter met with Assad in
Damascus for three-and-a-half
hours Sunday, according to
Syria's official news agency,
Sana, discussing "issues relating
to the international situation, the
Middle East and Lebanon."
CARTER ARRIVED in Jordan
earlier Tuesday (March 24) asser-
ting that" As long as the parties
stay flexible and listen to contrary
views, the hope for a (interna-
tional) conference is kept alive."
He met with King Hussein and
Crown Prince Hassan.
Also, while in Amman, Carter
called for the release of prisoners
in Israel and hostages in Lebanon.
"AH those being held on both
sides, unless being guilty of some
crime, should be released," he
said.
In Jerusalem Thursday, Carter
said he had no word on any possi-
ble progress on the hostage issue
in Lebanon. He expressed hope
that with the deployment of
Syrian armed forces in west
Beirut, progress would be made
toward the release of hostages.
Peres Answers Arabs' Queries
On Wireless Telephone Hook-Up
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Utilizing an international
wireless telephone hook-up
via West Germany, Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres
answered questions from
callers in the Arab world for
a half-hour Thursday (Mar.
26). Most of the questions
related to Middle East
peace.
The telephone exchange was ar-
ranged by the Arabic service of
the state-owned Israel Radio in
cooperation with a radio station in
Bonn. Except for callers from
Egypt, who used the newly install-
ed direct-dialing, questions and
answers were relayed through
Bonn. Peres heard simultaneous
translations and r-.-p'-ed in
English, which was translated in-
to Arabic.
CALLS FROM Syria, during a
practice run Wednesday, were cut
off abruptly, and there were no
Syrian calls Thursday. But there
were calls from Lebanon, Jordan,
Egypt and the West Bank. Peres
was asked about an international
conference for Middle East peace,
the peace process with Egypt and
the situation between Israel and
Syria since Syrian armed forces
occupied West Beirut earlier this
month.
The Foreign Minister stressed
that Israel wants peace, but apart
from Egypt has found no Arab
partners.
He said Israel was ready to par-
ticipate in preparations for an in-
ternational conference or in talks
with a joint Jordanian-Palestinian
delegation, but not with the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion, which he said "preferred
shooting to talking."
EARLIER, Peres met with
three Palestinian leaders. Hanna
Seniora, editor of the East
Jerusalem Arabic daily Al Fajr;
Fayez Abu Rahman, a West Bank
attorney; and Dr. Saeri
Nusseibeh.
He said his purpose was to hear
their opinions on Israel-
Palestinian relations and acquaint
them with Israel's policies.
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FOREIGN MINISTER MEETS FORMER
PRESIDENT: Israeli Prime Minister Yit-
zhak Shamir speaks with former U.S. Presi-
dent Jimmy Carter last week (March 26) in
Jerusalem. During a live call-in radio pro-
gram featuring questions from Arabs in
Israeli-occupied territories and elsewhere in
AP/W'ide World Photo
the Middle East, former Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres called for negotiations to 'share
the government' of the West Bank and Gaza
Strip. Last weekend, Shamir reaffirmed his
government's determination to keep these ter-
ritories 'forever.'
Deschenes Report Spotlights Nazi Safe Haven
By BEN KAYFETZ
TORONTO (JTA) Evidence
of Canadian participation in ef-
forts to provide safe haven for
certain Nazis right after World
War II is contained in an un-
published section of the
Deschenes Commission's report
on Nazi war criminals in Canada,
presented to the House of Com-
mons last week.
According to MP Robert
Kaplan, a former Solicitor
General, "it's essential that it be
brought out so that Canadians will
know the whole story of war
crimes."
KAPLAN was referring to a
study done for the Deschenes
Commission by researcher Ati
Rodel which could be embarrass-
ing for Ottawa on several counts.
It outlines Canada's willing par-
ticipation in a British-U.S. plan to
settle German scientists, many of
them active Nazis, in Canada, the
U.S. and Britain to keep them out
of Soviet hands.
Rodel is said to have found
evidence, though not conclusive,
that British and American in-
telligence may have spirited
known Nazi collaborators out of
Eastern Europe into Canada,
without the government's
knowledge, in order to establish
anti-Soviet spy networks.
Rodel's study includes a review
of anti-Semitic, fascist, political
organizations active before and
during the war, such as the Iron
Guard in Rumania.
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Sella Quits Valued Post
To Help Ease His Country
Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
JERUSALEM Col.
Aviem Sella, the Israeli Air
Force officer promoted to
the post of commander of
the Tel Nof Air Base after
his alleged role in serving as
"handler" of convicted U.S.
spy Jonathan Pollard, has
resigned his post.
Sella was earlier indicted by the
I'nited States on charges that he
recruited Pollard, but Israel has
no intention of forcing him to go
the U.S. to stand trial.
In a letter of resignation Sun-
day, Sella said that "The
deterioration in Israel-U.S. rela-
tions and my concern for the
future of ties between the two na-
tions and for relations with
American Jewry have induced me
to ask you to release me from my
duties as commander of the Tel
Nof Base."
IN HIS 28-line letter, Sella
hinted that he played only a
"minor role" in the Pollard case.
He ended by noting that "Had
facts been the only consideration,
I would not have resigned."
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin, in an Israel Defense Forces
statement, declared that Sella's
decision had been accepted by
Chief of Staff Gen. Moshe Levy.
It appears here that Sella's
resignation was spurred by a
report in the London Sunday
Times that Israel had passed on
Pollard's espionage secrets to
South Africa, which in turn used
them to track down at least one
and perhaps several American
spies in Pretoria.
THE ORIGINAL allegation
was a part of U.S. Secretary of
Defense Caspar Weinberger's
secret affidavit to a Washington
court that tried both Pollard and
his wife, Anne Henderson Pollard.
The Times of London report
speculates that this passing on of
the information may explain the
life sentence to Pollard, a former
Navy intelligence analyst, and
five-year sentence to his wife.
It was the American reaction of
anger to the appointment of Sella
as commander of Tel Nof last Feb.
27, which the Reagan Administra-
tion in fact saw as a promotion,
that led to a storm of criticism
aimed at Israel's role in the
Pollard case.
According to the Administra-
tion, Israeli officials insisted
repeatedly that they would
cooperate fully in an investigation
into the Pollard affair, but these
officials allegedly kept secret the
details of Sella's involvement, as
well as the involvement or four
others in the case:
Rafael Eitan, a counterter-
rorism expert who headed
LEKEM, the now-disbanded
secret scientific intelligence agen-
cy that is alleged to have "run"
Pollard; Yosef Yagur, former
science counselor at the Israeli
Consulate in New York; Irit Erb,
Former Greek President Slated
To Head B-G Centennial Body
ATHENS (JTA) A former President of Greece,
Konstantine Tsatsos, heads the Ben-Gurion Centennial
Committee formed here to mark the 100th anniversary of
the birth of Israel's first Prime Minister, David Ben-
Gurion.
TSATSOS IS ALSO well-known as an author and the
committee he heads includes distinguished figures in Greek
politics, culture and academia Angelos Vlachos, a former
Ambassador and professor of political science, will be
keynote speaker at the major centennial event to be held at
the City Hall on April 8.
The best known member of the committee perhaps is
the Greek Minister of Culture, Melina Mercouri, an interna-
tionally famous actress.
William Nakash (center) arrives at
Jerusalem's High Court of Justice to hear the
court's decision on whether or not he is to be
extradited to France, where he has been con-
victed of murder. In its response to the peti-
tion filed by Knesset members from the
Citizens Rights Movement and Mapam, and
JTA/WZN News Photo
from 11 Hebrew University professors, the
court decided to send the case back to Justice
Minister Avraham Sharir, for reconsidera-
tion. Sharir had made the original decision
not to extradite Nakash.
a former secretary to the science
counselor at the Israeli Embassy
in Washington; and Ilan Ravid, a
science expert.
EITAN NOW heads Israeli
Chemicals, while Yagur, Ravid
and Erb still work for the govern-
ment. Meanwhile, Israel continues
to insist that the Pollard affair
was a "rogue operation" led by
Eitan and unauthorized by the
country's top leaders.
Sella, an ace fighter pilot who
was to have become Israel's chief
of the Air Force, met Pollard
when he was enrolled at New
York University in 1984. Israeli
officials declare that it was
Pollard who volunteered his ser-
vices to Sella, who passed Pollard
on to Eitan. Sella, they say, was in
New York on a legitimate study
visit.
Reports this week indicate that
Sella's resignation had been called
for by several senior Air Force of-
ficers "for the good of the ser-
vice." But in his letter of resigna-
tion Sunday, Sella declared: "My
present request is the result of a
personal and independently made
decision stemming from my
education as a fighter and com-
mander in the Air Force .
"I HAD made it clear ... a long
time ago, that whatever role 1 am
assigned must not constitute a
burden or obstacle to the Air
Force or the IDF. I reiterated my
stance to the Defense Minister
(Shimon Peres) as well and I
noted that should my appointment
constitute an obstacle of any kind,
I would put the country's interest
above my own and resign my
post."
MIAMI
BEACH'S
GLATT
KOSHER
He added: "I had long desired
the post I was assigned only
weeks ago a post which is the
dream of any commander in the
Air Force. Ending a role ... is a
profound sorrow for me, yet I
have reached the conclusion that I
owe it to the causes for which I
have fought, and for which I shall
continue to fight together with my
colleagues in the Air Force."
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Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 3, 1987
Reward Soviets for Emigration
Reforms, Sharansky Declares

By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Natan Sharansky proposed
that the West offer the
Soviet Union quid pro quo
for easing emigration
restrictions for Soviet Jews.
For Jewish emigration of
10,000 a year, Moscow
would be rewarded with a
broadening of scientific and
cultural ties.
If 50,000 Jews are allowed to
leave a year, the U.S. should
cancel the Jackson-Vanik amend-
ment which links Jewish emigra-
tion to Most Favored Nation trade
status for the USSR, Sharansky
told some 1,500 North American
immigrants at a meeting Sunday
U.S. Youth
Agents in IDF?
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) An
American magazine report that
the U.S. intelligence community
occasionally planted agents
among American Jewish youth do-
ing non-military volunteer work
for the Israel Defense Force over
the last 10 years was flatly denied
here Thursday by (March 26)
''authoritative security
elements."
The report, in The New
Republic, noted that thousands of
Jewish youth have done clean-up
and maintenance work for one-
month periods at IDF camps in a
program called "Volunteer
Israel" which began after the
Yom Kippur War.
The magazine cited two well-
placed sources in the American in-
telligence community who said the
volunteers could have picked up
pieces of information about
Israel's military while performing
menial chores.
The report followed by less than
a week the assertion by Sen.
David Durenberger (R., Minn.),
former chairman of Senate In-
telligence Committee, that in
1982 the CIA planted spies in the
IDF. Israeli leaders and U.S.
Secretary of Defense Caspar
Weinberger have denied the
allegation.
organized by the Association of
American and Canadian Im-
migrants to Israel and the Soviet
Jewry Education and Information
Center.
THE EVENT, billed as "an
evening with Natan Sharansky,"
"coincided with the 10th anniver-
sary of his arrest in Moscow,
allegedly for spying for the United
States. Sharansky, who came to
Israel in February 1986 after nine
years in the Soviet Gulag, said he
thought it would be "dangerous
precedent" for Israel to ask the
United States to abolish special
refugee status for Jews leaving
the Soviet Union.
"I have no doubt that the best
place for a Jew to live is in Israel,
but I don't want anyone brought
here against his will," Sharansky
said. In this he is at odds with
Premier Yitzhak Shamir and
other Israeli leaders who have
been urging the U.S. to abolish
refugee status in order to make it
more difficult for Soviet Jewish
emigres to go to the U.S. instead
of to Israel.
Sharansky also believes that
direct flights from Moscow to Tel
Aviv "are not an issue" or an
answer to this problem. He said
the Soviets have built it up as a
bargaining device to extract con-
cessions. It is an example of how
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev
"fixes his own price," Sharansky
said.
HE ALSO thought the new
Soviet emigration regulations
that took effect Jan. 1 pose the
most serious problem for Soviet
Jews since they were forced in
1972 to pay for the free education
they received in the USSR before
leaving. The new regulations
restrict family reunification to on-
ly the closest kin parents or
siblings.
The new law automatically
reduced the number of potential
emigrants to a mere 30,000,
Sharansky said. He criticized the
Israel government for "taking
several months" before it lodged a
protest.
Sharansky said there was not
necessarily a "direct linkage" bet-
ween the possible resumption of
diplomatic relations between
Israel and the Soviet Union and
relief for Soviet Jews. Renewed
relations should be based on the
understanding that "the problem
of Soviet Jewry is Israel's pro-
blem," he said.
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ARRESTED AT EMBASSY: Nationally-
known Christian Gospel singer, Patti Thomp-
son, is taken into custody last week (March 28)
by police outside the Soviet Embassy in
Washington as she demonstrated on the plight
AP/Wide World Photo
of Soviet Jewish refuseniks Vladimir and
Maria Slepak. Officer at right folds up the
sign Thompson displayed as the other officer
handcuffs her.
rew
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'emple Arsonist
Says He's Innocent But Turns Himself in to Police
Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
lemr.
By LAWRENCE HARMON
WESTWOOD, Mass. r
LjTA) The only suspect in
arson fire that gutted
iple Beth David, the
town's sole synagogue,
urned himself in to police
week. Christopher
Odessa, 22, the subject of a
nationwide search, is being
held on $20,000 cash bail,
ifo trial date has been set.
Badessa has pleaded innocent to
tharges of destruction of a place
\{ worship, arson of a building,
breaking and entering and
arceny. The District Attorney's
would not speculate on a
notive.
HOWEVER, Leonard Zakim,
Executive director of the New
England Region of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith. had said that Westwood
Police were premature in ruling
hit anti-Semitism shortly after
he blaze.
Badessa is a former landscape
irorker, auto mechanic and
iboy who was arrested in 1984
motor vehicle violations and
ossession of marijuana. He
efaulted on the bail.
On March 7, the blaze destroyed
synagogue, including three
Jv>rah scrolls, one of which surviv-
the Holocaust and was on per-
nanent loan to the Temple.
Footprints in the snow led from
he synagogue to Badessa's home,
nd police found his fingerprints
i a video cassette recorder stolen
rom the Temple.
ALMOST, 1,000 Westwood
esidents had packed the high
chool auditorium to express their
hock and outrage at the blaze.
meeting, called by the
Vestwood Interfaith Council, was
^ven more poignant after reports
Jewish Role
To Be Stressed
By YITZHAK RABI
i NEW YORK (JTA) -
high-ranking Spanish
tovernment official said
Mre Wednesday (March 25)
nat his government plans
stress the contribution of
Spanish Jews to the
liscovery of America in the
ourse of the quincentennial
elebrations of the event in
1992.
I Uis Yanez, Spain's Secretary
State for International
operation, said at a special
lefing with Israeli reporters and
e Jewish Telegraphic Agency
at he visited New York last
ek specifically to meet with
sh organizational leaders.
|HE SAID that he discussed
p_ leader* of the American
Vm Committee, the American
1 Congress and other
ations his government's
is to reinvoke the role of the
? "J.fte discovery of America
noiding seminars, discussions
1 congresses and by publishing
Formation on the issue.
"Tne response of the Jewish
mzations was very positive,"
nez 'n reply to a question.
rp0R MANY
years
Ien<*d disinformation
we ex-
regar-
R the role of Jews in modern
go. he asserted. He said, in
rv w a question, that during
decades of Gen. Francisco
f" m)e in Spain, "Jews
ain"Cns ered enemies of
t and their contribution to
country was ignored.
circulated that the president of
the B'nai Jacob Synagogue in
nearby Dover, Mass., received
threats that his shul also would be
destroyed by fire. The threats
were not carried out.
Margery Eramo, president of
the Westwood Interfaith Council,
said her town is experiencing
"disbelief, shock and a sense of
personal loss" in the wake of the
two-alarm blaze.
Town Selectperson Shirley
Howard pledged the town's com-
mitment to help the Temple's ef-
fort to rebuild, estimated to cost
more than $500,000. At the end of
the hour-long meeting, billed as an
effort "to show our love and sup-
port of the Congregation of Tem-
ple Beth David," ushers passed
collection baskets for the
rebuilding fund.
RABBI HENRY ZOOB thank
ed his fellow clergy and citizens in
an emotional appeal for unity and
understanding. He also stressed
the nature of the crime. "We can-
not forget it was specifically a
Jewish house of worship that was
destroyed," he stated. "We have
no clear proof that it was an anti-
Semitic act. but we can assume
that this may have been motivated
by the hatred of Jews."
Before the town meeting,
Jewish Defense League
spokesman Michael Slomich said
his group would patrol the Temple
environs. But Zoob chided him.
"They think we need protection,
but nothing could be further from
the truth," the rabbi told the au-
dience. "We are at home here
among friends."
He said the arson was the first
"overt act against the temple"
during his 17-year tenure.
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 3, 1987
i
Reality of Apartheid
Struck New Rabbi After Midnight
JTA/WZN News Photo
Former Prisoner of Zion Zachar Zunshine and his wife, Ta-
tiania, are shown at Jerusalem's Western Wall. Zunshine, who
served three years in a Siberian prison camp on charges of
'spreading anti-Soviet propaganda,' was released on March 6.
From Soviet Union
Rise in Jewish Emigration
Heartens Jewish Organizations
NEW YORK (JTA) Two
national Jewish organizations said
Wednesday (March 25) they were
heartened by reports from
Moscow that 400 Jews will have
been allowed to leave the Soviet
Union by the end of March, but
stressed their reservations over
whether this "welcome step"
signified a meaningful change of
policy or a gesture aimed at im-
proving the Soviet image.
Alan Pesky, chairman of the
Coalition to Free Soviet Jews,
noted that since prominent
refusenik Natan Sharansky was
freed from prison and allowed to
leave for Israel in February, 1986,
there have been a number of
"heartening developments," such
as the release from prison of Iosif
Begun and the exit permission
granted long-time refusenik
David Goldfarb.
NEVERTHELESS, Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev "has
been able to reap a public relations
windfall while actually giving very
little in return," Pesky said. Ruth
Popkin, national president of
Hadassah, the Women's Zionist
Organization of America, also
hailed the granting of exit visas to
400 Soviet Jews this month.
"We sincerely hope that this ac-
tion reflects a significant change
in the Soviet Union's long-
standing policy of repression of its
Jewish citizens and is more than
an illusory and politically
motivated ploy to improve its rela-
tions with the United States in the
pursuit of its own ends," Popkin
said. "Time, and the release of ad-
ditional Soviet Jews, will tell," she
added.
Pesky noted that while only
three Jews remain political
prisoners in the USSR, "They are
there on trumped-up charges, as
were all Jewish prisoners held
captive solel.', because of their
desire to emigrate to Israel."
HE SAID "cKe Soviet emigra-
tion policy has the effect of deny-
ing the right to emigrate to some
400,000 Jews" who have asked to
leave for reasons other than fami-
ly reunification, "including
repatriation to Israel." Therefore,
"mere numbers are not enough.
There must be normalization of
the Soviets' emigration
procedures."
Popkin congratulated the new
emigrants who will be reunited
with family and friends in time for
the Passover holidays next month.
"We look forward to the time
when all Soviet Jews will
celebrate Passover in freedom,"
she said.
m
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff" Writer
It didn't take long for
Rabbi N.M. Bernhard to ex-
perience the reality of apar-
theid in South Africa, after
he moved there to lead an
affluent and influential
congregation.
There was a law which said a
black servant could sleep over at
the home he or she was working
in, but only if they slept in ser-
vant's quarters. And, of course,
the spouse was not allowed to stay
over too.
"Very soon after I arrived in
South Africa, about one, two
o'clock in the morning, I was stu-
dying, and all of a sudden I heard
whistles blowing and dogs barking
and shouts and a bang on the
door," Bernhard recalled during a
recent visit to the United States.
"IT WAS the police raid, look-
ing for unauthorized bantus, as
they call the blacks. Of course, I
had to let them in." They scoured
his house and then moved to the
back where the servants' quarters
were, and "behold, they turn up
this terrified, 18 or 19-year-old
bantu female. She was the wife of
our manservant gardener, and she
came down to be with him for
awhile. And I knew she was there.
And I was, like most people, con-
tent to let her be there.
"So I was then faced with a
choice. Either I sign an admission
of guilt admitting she was there
with my permission, and I'm an
infractor of the law, or I let them
take her away, arresting her.
"I damn well wasn't about to let
them take her away. On the other
hand, it was Shabbas, and I wasn't
about to sign."
BERNHARD FINALLY con
vinced one of the police to sign the
paper for him and went to court,
where he was fined the equivalent
of about $5.50.
There are some 118,000 to
120,000 Jews living in South
Africa today, and those Jews who
are observant have a special role
to carry out in the midst of the
apartheid regime, according to
the rabbi.
"Judaism definitely has a very
powerful social gospel," he told
the Jewish Floridian during a visit
to Miami last week."
"There are seven command-
-This Summer;
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Head north for the Fallsview. You'll be
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Plan to make your summer reservations
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So this summer, come to where the
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RABBI N.B. BERNHARD
ments binding upon the Gentiles
that are in effect a program of
human decency in the name of one
God. And we're supposed to be en-
couraging the non-Jewish world
to adopt that."
THUS BERNHARD has
become one of three rabbis among
some 70 in South Africa who have
become outspoken against apar-
theid. Another of those outspoken
rabbis. Rabbi Ben Isaacson of
Johannesburg, recently made
fa
statements in the American press
saying many Jews in South Africa
are "sick" because they have not
been active in the fight against
apartheid.
This leads to the questions: How
can a Jew be racist with his own
experience? How can a Jew in-
volved with the black struggle be
called a "traitor" by other Jews!
"Rubbish," Bernhard declares.
Continued on Following Page

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Barking Dogs At 1 a.m. Woke Rabbi to Apartheid
Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
ontinued from Preceding Page
.They (South African Jews) are
here because they're there.
Very few Jews in apartheid
outh Africa today chose to live
Ire Most of them are children
. erandchildren of refugees born
nd bred there. And so they share
he dilemma of the white liberal in
louth Africa: What to do about
FURTHER, Bernhard said, m
iouth Africa there have been a
,umber of Jews involved in pro-
est and demonstration. There
u-e proportionately more anti-
partheid Jews in South Africa
ow than there were in America
the heyday of American Jewish
Lolvement in the cause of
,merican blacks.
I know that the South African
iw is very troubled by the entire
ituation of racial injustice and in*
quitv that take place in South
Sea. He is very troubled by the
tiustice and the inequity and
jels additionally troubled when
i feels that Jews are actively or
en just passively a part of it."
An Orthodox rabbi, Bernhard
id served as spiritual leader of a
ngregation in Wichita, Kans.,
fore going to South Africa.
orn in the United States, he
imed his rabbinic degree here.
Bernhard went to South Africa
2 years ago to lead the
._0-member Oxford Synagogue
;nter in Johannesburg. The first
ing he did was become ac-
lainted with the nature of
artheid.
"APARTHEID is not so much
i active oppression as it is a mat-
r of withholding of rights and
portunities. This, of course,
suits in all kinds of oppression
i the level of the victims in the
nse that they are as a result
lable to fulfill themselves,
lere's a lot of lost opportunity
d they (black victims) feel stifl-
and frustrated.
"On the level of not being able
earn adequately, there are
verty and deprivation. With
Israeli Pavilion
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
raeli pavilion at the Interna-
onal Trade Fair in Cairo had
me 10,000 visitors during the
rst week of the fair last week, ac-
Drding to an Israel Embassy
pokesman in Cairo.
denied political rights there is
anger. It's not active oppression
in the sense of concentration
camps or beating people in the
streets or shooting people."
But apartheid is an "absolutely
outrageous and pernicious system
nevertheless something that no
'right-thinking' individual could
tolerate," Bernhard said.
AS A RABBI of one of the ma-
jor synagogues in the country,
Bernhard notes that the audience
he speaks to is "both sophisticated
and important." And he uses his
pulpit to speak out against apar-
theid and urges his congregation
and the community to take action.
To that end, his congregation
established OSSAC, the Oxford
Synagogue Social Action Commit-
tee. The operation includes a full-
time black community worker,
and classes are held in which
thousands of blacks have received
everything from literacy training
to instruction in skills such as sew-
ing and driving.
"Here you have the most plush
synagogue in the region that has
thrown open its doors to
thousands of black people," he
said.
POLITICAL POWER in South
Africa has rested, at least until
recently, in the hands of the
Afrikaaners, whites of Dutch des-
cent, Bernhard said. The Jews, he
adds, have no political clout in
South Africa.
It is impossible to be a white liv-
ing in Africa and not be affected
by apartheid. The factory
workers, laborers are part of a
pyramid of disadvantaged, ex-
ploited black people. "I frankly
believe I would have a very big
problem justifying being there if I
didn't feel I had an overriding
justification," Bernhard said.
"When I first came to South
Africa, the question I had to ask
myself was what is the basis of
apartheid. Is it protection of
vested interest or is it bigotry?"
He concluded that it is a protec-
tion not just of vested economic
privileges, but it's also a protec-
tion of what Afrikaaners consider
to be their culture, their way of
life, what Bernhard calls "their
Christian rational civilization."
"The Afrikaaners are basically
religion Calvanists. They consider
themselves a chosen people, of br-
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m
inging the message of white
Christian civilization on to South
Africa."
THE JEWISH community has
changed since Bernhard has been
there. He says he has seen it grow
to a more religious, more obser-
vant Torah community and that is
thriving in unity more than ever
before.
And the government is starting
to change as well.
"In fact, some of the great legal
bastions of apartheid have felt
themselves grow limited. A great
deal of change has been made. But
instead of welcoming that and en-
couraging it, there's been a nasty,
carping, bitchy kind of ungracious
poo-pooing of the whole thing.
"There's a lot of misunderstan-
ding. I am personally very resent-
ful of the media war against South
Africa, the willful distortions that
have taken place overseas, refus-
ing to report anything positive or
upside of it, trying to
sensationalize.
"BASICALLY," suggests the
rabbi, "it's come down to a ques-
tion of: Is there going to be a
revolution that will serve the
cause of those who want the
Marxist regime, or is it going to be
evolution and a smooth transition
to a new and fair South Africa?
"There are those who im-
mediately discount anyone who's
trying to work for a smooth
transition."
For the first time in the history of the State of Connecticut, a rab-
bi has been appointed to serve as a member of the prestigious
seven-person State Ethics Commission which administers the
code of ethics for all public officials, state employees and their
families, candidates for public office, and lobbyists at the state
level. Rabbi Michael Menitoff, spiritual leader of 980-family-
member Congregation B'nai B'rith Jacob in Woodbridge and
Fellow of Ezra Stiles College of Yale University, is shown at his
swearing-in ceremony at the State House in Hartford following
hearings of the Joint Executive and Legislative Nominations
Committee of the Connecticut General Assembly.
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 3, 1987
Interfaith Body Condemns
Unsolicited Conversion Activity
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
- The Interfaith Con-
ference of Metropolitan
Washington has issued a
statement condemning ef-
forts at religious conversion
which are deceptive or deny
the legitimacy of another
religion. Specifically con-
demned were deceptive
AIDS Drug
Shows Promise
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
drug developed by the Weiz-
mann Institute of Science
which reportedly had
dramatic results in the
treatment of some AIDS
victims, has been approved
by the Health Ministry for
limited use in Israel.
The drug, AL721, was syn-
thesized from egg yolks six years
ago by Weizmann Institute Profs.
Meir Shinitzky and David Samuel
for the treatment of drug addicts,
the aged and children with cystic
fibrosis. Though not approved for
public use by the U.S. health
authorities, it is being manufac-
tured in experimental quantities
by Praxis Pharmaceuticals Ltd. in
Beverly Hills, Calif., under license
from the Weizmann Institute.
ITS EFFECT on AIDS (Ac-
quired Immune Deficiency Syn-
drome) was discovered accidental-
ly in 1985 by an American cancer
specialist, Dr. Robert Gallo, while
treating a patient suffering from
AIDS. Since then, Dr. Yehuda
Skornik, an Israel-born American
physician, has treated a number of
American AIDS victims with the
drug at Rokah Hospital in Tel
Aviv.
In a television appearance,
Skornik described what he said
were remarkable though still in-
conclusive results. He said one pa-
tient, a well-known musical con-
ductor, arrived from the U.S. too
weak to leave his wheelchair. He
was suffering from fever, extreme
weight loss and loss of appetite,
and given only a few weeks to live.
But after treatment with
AL721, the patient gained weight,
his temperature went down, and
he is able to walk for miles, Skor-
nik said. He cautioned, however,
that this does not prove the drug
to be a cure for AIDS but it shows
an ability to reverse physical
decline and bring about major
improvement.
MEANWHILE, the Health
Ministry approved an application
by Dr. Zvi Bentwich of the Kaplan
Hospital in Rehovot to treat 10
AIDS patients with the drug. But
the Ministry urged physicians and
researchers to "go slow" and not
encourage false hopes among pa-
tients in Israel and abroad.
practices aimed at Jews.
The statement by the Con-
ference, which is made up of 29
Islamic, Jewish, Mormon, Protes-
tant and Roman Catholic "faith
communities" in Washington and
the surrounding Maryland and
Virginia suburbs, stresses support
of "the right of all religions to
share their message" with people
of other religions.
"But it is inappropriate for one
faith group to openly demean or
disparage the philosophies or
practices of another faith group as
part of its proselytizing," the
statement said. "Proselytism
which does not respect human
freedom is carefully to be avoided.
Proselytism must be done with a
sense of humility and a respect for
others."
WHILE INTERFAITH groups
throughout the country have
issued statements condemning a
specific occurrence, this is believ-
ed to have been the first general
statement issued by such a group,
according to Dr. Sidney Schwarz,
executive director of the Jewish
Community Council of Greater
Washington, and the Rev. Clark
Lobenstine, executive director of
the Interfaith Conference.
The Conference statement
noted that it felt "compelled to
speak out when a religious group
promotes or sanctions activities
that are harmful to the spirit of in-
terreligious respect and tolerance.
We condemn proselytizing efforts
which delegitimize the faith tradi-
tions of the person whose conver-
sion is being sought. Such tactics
go beyond the bounds of ap-
propriate and ethically based
religious outreach."
The statement added that
deceptive methods "are practiced
on the most vulnerable of popula-
tions residents of hospitals and
old age homes, confused youth,
college students away from home.
These proselytizing techniques
are tantamount to coerced conver-
sions and should be condemned."
AS EXAMPLES, the state-
ment listed practices used by such
groups as Hebrew, Christians,
Messianic Jews and Jews for
Jesus.
"These groups specifically
target Jews for conversions to
their version of Christianity, mak-
ing the claim that in accepting
Jesus as the savior/messiah, a Jew
'fulfills' his/her faith," the state-
ment said. "Furthermore, by
celebrating Jewish festivals, wor-
shipping on the Jewish sabbath,
appropriating Jewish symbols,
rituals and prayers in their chur-
ches and, sometimes even calling
their leaders, 'rabbi,' they seek to
win over, often by deception,
many Jews who are sincerely look-
ing for a path back to their
ancestral heritage."
The Conference statement will
be distributed to some 2,000 chur-
ches and synagogues and
clergymen in the Washington
area, Lobenstine said, and will be
sent to some 300 interfaith groups
around the country.
Zionist Visionary, Who Died At 90,
Was Leader of Immense Stature
Continued from Page 5-A
as self-critical as Meir Ya'ari,"
Hazan observed. "His whole life
was spent in such profound self-
scrutiny and in extraordinary
demands upon himself."
When he was laid to rest in the
cemetery at Kibbutz Merhavia,
thousands attended the ceremony,
including President Chaim Her-
zog, Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres, and Deputy Prime Minister
David Levy. Prime Minister Yit-
zhak Shamir, on a state visit to
America, was unable to attend.
His condolence cable to a man at
the opposite end of the political
spectrum to himself bears a mov-
ing tribute to Ya'ari: "Even one
who disputed his political path,"
said Shamir, "cannot but admire
his conti-ibution to the rooting
anew of the people of Israel in the
Land of Israel. Meir Ya'ari was a
true pioneer and a guide to a
political movement of many
achievements. He was a giant
among the generation that had
founded the state."
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Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
'Deeply Distressed'
'60 Minutes' Failed To Tell Story
JTA/WZN News Photo
[spected child molester Avrohom Mondrowitz, accused of sexual
sault on young boys in New York, is seen here on his way to
nagogue in Jerusalem last week. Acting Interior Minister Ron-
Milo said that the decision to deport the New York rabbi was
ltd.
srael Points Finger At De Cuellar
As Custodian of Access to Files
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
TA) Israel has contend-
1 here that "the decision
id responsibility" regar-
ng the granting of free
iblic access to the UN files
I Nazi war criminals lies
ith Secretary General
vier Perez de Cuellar.
The Secretary General rejected
t Thursday Israel's request to
en the files at the UN archive
war criminals to public
utiny, contending that the na-
ns which were members of the
ig-defunct War Crimes Com-
ssion had objected to it.
HNYAMIN NETANYAHU,
ael's Ambassador to the United
toons, told a press conference
re he hopes that de Cuellar will
xmsider his decision in view of
ormation obtained by Israeli
Searchers who examined more
an 300 files obtained by Israel
t May from the UN archive on
f criminals. The UN archive,
ated in downtown Manhattan,
'tains some 40,000 files on
spected Nazis and their
ahorators.
'Yad Vashem researchers have
termined that public access to
i files would generate a signifi-
it amount of new information
garding the Holocaust,"
fcnyahu said. He said that a
rough investigation of 347 files
'ealed the extent of information
Pfaing the Holocaust that
ped the West before the war's
Jle 79/P/G/16 describes the
"ruction of hundreds of
"sands of Jews at Treblinka
"centration camp. It was
^ered to the UN War Crimes
fission on April 24, 1944,"
Ambassador said. Similar in-
"''"""inn the mass murder of
's at. Maidanek and Belzec con-
ation camps was delivered to
the Commission on June 3, 1944,
Netanyahu noted. World War II
ended in May 1945.
YAD VASHEM researchers
also discovered, according to
Netanyahu, lists of personnel who
ran the camps; the nature and
amount of property confiscated
from European Jewry by the
Nazis; the number of victims and
survivors of the Holocaust; infor-
mation on the "Sondergrichte"
the special German couiLs in oc-
cupied Nazi territories; official
reports, unknown until now,
detailing Nazi policy on European
Jewry and the camps; and new
details on Nazi medical
experiments.
"Public access to the files is in-
dispensable to establish a more ac-
curate record of that historical
period," Netanyahu declared.
"The present rules of confiden-
tiality prevent widespread
research into this material and its
publication and dissemination."
He added: "Unfettered access
to the files would facilitate the
work of governmental agencies
pursuing and prosecuting Nazi
war criminals by providing new
historical accounts and legal
documents."
THE ISRAELI ENVOY noted
that many of the files were writ-
ten in English. "This is highly
unusual and would benefit many
young researchers not fluent in
German, Polish, Czech and other
East European languages," he
said.
Netanyahu, confirming the fact
that only Australia, out of the 17
nations who were members of the
War Crimes Commission, agreed
to the opening of the files, was
asked why, in his opinion, the ma-
jority of the former members of
the Commission objected to the
opening of the files. "I can assume
that some of the findings will be
unpleasant to individuals and to
governments," he answered.
NEW YORK The
American Jewish Congress
says it is "deeply distress-
ed" by a CBS "60 Minutes"
segment on March 22
because it claims the pro-
gram suggested that only a
relatively small number of
Soviet Jews are unhappy
with life in the Soviet
Union.
A statement by Theodore R.
Mann, president of AJCongress,
said the segment, featuring Mike
Wallace, presented a "simplistic
and inaccurate picture" of Soviet
Jewish reality and was dedicated
"to sweeping aside painful
evidence of decades of anti-Jewish
discrimination and oppression."
THE STATEMENT asserted it
has never been denied by
American Jewish organizations
that some Jews are satisfied with
Soviet life and do not wish to
leave. But it noted that the "key
concern" is with the "400,000
Jews who have requested and
received invitations from Israel"
and with additional hundreds of
thousands "who may wish to leave
but are fearful of even expressing
such a desire."
Mann's statement also question-
ed the candor of "satisfied" Jews
interviewed by Mr. Wallace, con-
tending they were fully aware
that their comments "would even-
tually be seen and heard by the
Soviet government."
The text of Mann's statement
reads:
"WE ARE deeply distressed by
a March 22 segment on CBS's
'Sixty Minutes' suggesting that
only a small group of hard-core
Soviet Jewish dissidents are
dissatisfied with life in the Soviet
Union.
"We have never denied that
there are some Jews who are
satisfied with Soviet life and do
not wish to leave. Others, referred
Scholar Raps
South Africa
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
leading Israeli scholar and former
diplomat delivered an un-
precedented blast at South
African Jewry here Tuesday.
"They are part of the white power
structure and benefit from it.
There's nothing Israel owes peo-
ple who are part of a racist
regime," Prof. Shlomo Avineri
declared at a Hebrew University
symposium on South Africa.
Apparently referring to Israel's
reluctance to follow the West in
applying sanctions against the
Pretoria regime because of possi-
ble repercussions for South
African Jews, Avineri asserted
that "South African Jews can
take care of themselves very well
and don't need Israel's support."
Israel announced last week that it
would phase out its military and
other relationships with South
Africa.
Avineri, who was director
general of the Israel Foreign
Ministry in 1976-77 and is a world
renowned authority on Marx and
Hegel, raised a storm earlier this
month when he accused American
Jewish leaders of demonstrating a
"galut" mentality in their
response to the Jonathan Pollard
spy case, "cringing" for fear of
charges of dual loyalty.
Avineri, long a critic of Israel's
relations with South Africa, urged
Tuesday that the estimated
15,000 Israelis living in South
Africa be stripped of their
citizenship.
to in the TV segment by a Soviet
Jewish refusenik as 'trained
Jews,' have been willing to trade
their Jewish identity for material
rewards within the Soviet system.
"Our key concern, rather, is
with the 400,000 Soviet Jews who
have requested and received in-
vitations from Israel. These do not
even include the additional hun-
dreds of thousands of Jews who
may wish to leave but are fearful
of even expressing such a desire.
"The Sixty Minutes segment ig-
nores this truth about the Soviet
Jewish condition and dedicates
itself to sweeping aside painful
evidence of decades of anti-Jewish
discrimination and oppression.
"ONE CANNOT help wonder
about the candor of some of those
"satisfied" Jews interviewed on
camera who knew full well that
their comments would eventually
be seen and heard by the Soviet
government.
"It is strange that 'Sixty
Minutes' did not make a single
reference to the U.S. State
Department's recently-issued
'Country Reports on Human
Rights Practices for 1986' which
notes that Jews in the Soviet
Union are subjected to
'systematic persecution based on
ancestry.' This report also
declares that Jews are denied ac-
cess to the better schools and
universities, are virtually banned
from political careers in the Com-
munist Party and upper echelons
of state government and from
other crucial areas of public life,
and have been subjected to vicious
anti-Semitic Vilification in official
Soviet propaganda, including
books, broadcasts and newspaper
articles. Moreover, Soviet Jews
study or teach Hebrew or Jewish
history only at the risk of
imprisonment
"Even those assimilated Jews
who have sought accommodation
with the Soviet system cannot en-
tirely escape the burden of their
official designation as Jews. And
for those who choose to live as
Jews, worship as Jews or main-
tain Jewish cultural traditions, the
price is infinitely greater. In
Soviet terms, one cannot be a full-
fledged citizen and also be a Jew.
"It is regrettable that 'Sixty
Minutes,' in its eagerness to scoop
its competitors in the media, has
presented a simplistic and inac-
curate picture of a complex and
troubling problem that will surely
be recorded by Soviet public rela-
tions specialists as a major
triumph."
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ft
Page 14-A
The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 3, 1987
Once, There Were Plenty of Jewish Athletic Champions
Continued from Page 4-A
money and move up.
They too, like all the others,
were exploited, but they fought
proudly and many with some
acclaim.
Champions? There were plenty
of Jewish champions. They made a
movie about Barney Ross. A
champion in two divisions, a
Marine hero in World War II,
Ross became addicted to drugs
after having been wounded. He
came all the way back to reclaim
his position of honor. When I met
him about 30 years ago, he was
traveling in the entourage of a
young singer named Eddie
Fisher.
ROSS FOUGHT some great
ones. Three times he fought
another Jewish fighter, the legen-
dary Benny Leonard. In their first
encounter, he had Leonard on the
ropes and clubbed him a couple of
real good shots so that Leonard
could hardly stand. He grabbed
Ross and said: "Is that as hard as
you can hit?" Ross backed off and
lost the fight.
There was Slapsy Maxie
Rosenblum who became a
nightclub comic and Abe Simon, a
Jewish heavyweight, who wore
the Mogen David on his trunks.
Max Baer actually became
heavyweight champion of the
world for a short time.
Years later, his son would star
in "The Beverly Hillbillies."
Baer's brother, Buddy, was a
pretty good heavyweight, as was
Lou Novakoff who fought under
the name Lou Nova. He trained on
yoga and used to hang from a
California Redwood tree by one
foot. I don't know why.
THE JEWS seemed to phase
out of boxing shortly after the se-
cond world war. The Italians and
the blacks stayed in. Why the
Irish and the Jews left, I really
don't know. I know that, having
met some ex-fighters, it is no job
for a Jewish boy.
Other sports were a pretty good
avenue to get a kid a college
education his folks couldn't af-
ford. Football attracted Jewish
boys. No kidding. Names like Mar-
shall Goldberg at the University of
Pittsburgh, Sid Luckman at Col-
umbia and then the Chicago
Bears.
But the game that attracted the
most Jews for years was basket-
ball. Jewish names used to
dominate the rosters of college
teams in the east. CCNY had
some great all-Jewish squads.
Then there were Joe Lapchick,
who became a great coach, and
Nat Holman of the original
Celtics. A team named the Celtics
Intelligence
Services Studied
Continued from Page 5-A
special intelligence adviser ap-
prove and recommend to the
political echelon sensitive
diplomatic and security
operations.
THE ISRAELI intelligence
community is blessed with person-
nel that would be the pride of any
intelligence service in the world.
The people heading our secret ser-
vices have reached their present
positions by virtue of their
achievements and operational ex-
perience. Each of these bodies can
continue to jealously preserve its
uniqueness, yet the time has come
to afford the government access
to their joint findings.
The intelligence community will
thus be able to alert the political
echelon to the risks involved in
various operations. A joint com-
mittee of this kind will also pre-
vent the embarrassing
phenomenon of cabinet ministers
claiming they had no inkling of
what was going on.
was dominated by Jews an ox-
ymoron, but true.
ONE OF the original franchises
in pro basketball was that of the
Philadelphia SPHAS. The SPHAS
became the Philadelphia Seventy-
Sixers. The old club used to play
their games at the Broadwood
Hotel on North Broad Street,
pretty far from home base, for
SPHAS stood for South
Philadelphia Hebrew Association.
A little guy named Red Klotz us-
ed to play for them when I was a
pre-teen. The last time I saw Klotz
was just three years ago, and he
was still playing. He showed up
with the Washington Nationals,
the team which plays the Harlem
Globetrotters. They announced
that he was in his fifties, but they
were shading him anyhow a
decade.
Jewish kids from the
neighborhoods grew up playing
great basketball. In Philadelphia
and Brooklyn, the houses had
back doors leading to the alleys
between the streets. Every alley
had its basketball net.
BY THE time they reached high
school, they had played together
as a team for seven years or so
and had their moves down pat.
Sometimes a whole basketball
team would go on to college all
from the same two streets.
After World War II, the Jewish
kids moved out of neighborhoods
that had alleys and into the
suburbs. They still played some
basketball, but it was different.
There is an intensity about a kid
from a rough neighborhood in
sports that you just don't get in a
suburban school.
Now, I will admit to you that I
don't know a whole lot of seven-
foot Jewish boys. When I went to
school in Philadelphia, a kid nam-
ed Barry Goldburg broke
owing record in the
pIayed-forWe;t'kIe5e
was followed fnt?"'
neighborhood and his <*w. Lhl
really big black kid Z^V
every record GoldburgTffe
was Wilt Ch^&rM
the rest as they say And
As I watched this year's Npa l
basketball tournament*'5^
one Jewish i"'^-----
Lefkowitz
kid,
from
ohP *5
leaked out of piacTwe^nd di?
find dif.
-----~- >" me lOD now
there are no Jewish ghettos
the k,ds to rise above. I'm n.
making a value judgment I
justl
m "Thatl
just not a white man? "' '
anymore."
know, like the coach
Championship Season'
game!
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Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
Our Readers Write: Chassidic
Jews Want Only 'Decent' Dress
Continued from Page 4-A
concern, he is the last mad man. I
wonder that he cannot understand
the terrible harm he is causing the
Jewish community. And this at a
time when we need all the help
and encouragement we can
muster.
Your editorial in the March 27
issue clearly calls for the widest
kind of condemnation. The Jewish
media should once and for all call
this trouble-maker to task. With
such friends we certainly do not
need enemies. Rabbi Neusner
should know that his gratuitous
ruminations do not represent the
thinking of the vast majority of
American Jews. America and
Israel are two main focal points
for the Jewish populace in this
country, and no one should dare.
certainly not a learned rabbi, im-
pugn their love for either country
and their loyalty to the United
States.
RABBI RUBIN R. DOBIN
Miami Beach
I have finally come upon a
realization but not a conclusion.
With little concentration, a
question is raised. Is cantonal
chanting a takeover of "rock"
music in the minor key?
Or is "rock chanting" a
takeover of cantorial mu^ic in the
major key?
If the rock singer and t lie cantor
exchanged places, would then' be
an increase in audience?
C.S. MAZOR
Miami
TOKUMADOOKSl TTQKUMA DOOKS) Coretta King Remembers
BESTSELLERS: More than 650,000 copies of
two books by author Masami Uno entitled 'If
you Understand the Jews, You Can Com-
prehend the World' and '1990 Scenario for the
AP/Wide World Photo
Final Economic War,' have been sold in
Japan in recent months. The books contend
that a world-wide Jewish conspiracy is to
blame for Japan's increasing economic woes.
Heschel As a Great 'Prophet'
Anti-Semitic Feelings
Feared on the Rise in Japan
By JUDITH COLP
WASHINGTON (JTA)
I- Officials of the Anti-
[Defamation League of B'nai
JB'rith have expressed con-
kern to Japanese Am-
Ibassador Nobuo Matsunago
about the rise of anti-
|Semitic literature in Japan.
They told Matsunago at a
fneeting here that the ADL
vanted "to work with the
Uapanese by making available
[materials to reduce prejudice and
stereotyping," according to Jess
Hordes, ADL's associate
Washington director. Hordes was
accompanied to the meeting at the
Japanese Embassy by Burton
|Lcvinson. ADL national chair-
nan, and Abraham Foxman, ADL
issociate national director. Mat-
sunago was "Open and ap-
preciative of the proposal and said
ne would convey it to the govern-
ment," Hordes said.
THE MEETING was prompted
|>y press reports in this country of
h popular Japanese author,
Masami Uno, who claims that his
country's recent economic woes
pre due to a conspiracy by "inter-
national Jewish capital" and that
Jewish-dominated interests have
un a "targeted bashing of
Japan."
According to a recent article in
Restore Lost
Jewish World
LOS ANGELES-(JTA)-The
Py way to avenge the deaths of
P Jewish Holocaust victims is
P restore their lost Jewish world
H Perpetuate their values and
JJpous beliefs," the president of
rPMath Israel of America said
tekinB at the recent ^ond
W dinner of Agudath Israel
' ^liforma, Rabbi Moshe Sherer
[uni, Orthdox Jewish com-
ud ofT Tlant|y sPread the
r? M Torah "until every Jew is
E'ovlng and God-living ...
tn t!'ng this eal wil1 not on'y
V tie memory of the Holocaust
1 T, wil1 he the 'sweet
ayef" for which the martyrs
the New York Times, Uno has
charged that "America is a Jewish
nation" and that Jews form a
"behind-the-scenes nation" con-
trolling major U.S. corporations,
including IBM, General Motors,
Exxon, Standard Oil. Ford,
Chrysler and AT and T.
Other books and articles that
have recently appeared in
bookstores include titles like "The
Jewish Plan for Conquest of the
World." "How to Head the Hid
den Meaning of Jewish Protocol,"
and "Mysterious Judea."
Articles assert that .lews were
behind the Lockheed Aircraft
bribery case that led to the
criminal conviction of a former
Japanese Prime Minister, Kakuei
Tanaka, and the Watergate scan-
dal. A book. "The Secret of
Jewish Power to Control the
World," was written in 1984 and
is still in circulation. Its author,
Eisaburo Saito, is a member of
Parliament's upper house.
UNO, in his book, "If You
Understand Judea, You Can
Understand the World," claims
that Jews caused the Great
Depression of the 1930's and are
plotting a second one for the
1990's. In his second book, "If you
Understand Judea, You Can
Understand Japan," Uno asserts
that the number of Jews killed in
World War II was exaggerated.
The two books have sold a total
of 650,000 copies. Uno describes
himself as a Christian fundamen-
talist and head of an Osaka-based
organization called the Middle
East Problems Research Center,
according to the Times.
Matsunago told the ADL that
Japan guarantees freedom of
speech and that anti-Semitic
views are not representative of
the people or the government.
The Japanese Embassy refused to
comment about the meeting.
IN A LETTER to the New
York Times, Itari Umezu, director
of the Japan Information Center,
said that "anti-Semitism has no
roots in Japanese history." Dur-
ing World War II, when Japan
was an ally of Nazi Germany,
some Japanese aided Jews in
escaping from Europe. There also
have been disclosures of a prewar
Japanese project, the "Fugu
Plan," to invite German Jews to
settle in Manchuria.
But reports of current anti-
Semitism in Japan prompted a let-
ter by Rep. Charles Schumer (D.,
N.Y.) and Sen. Arlen Specter (R..
Pa.) in which they told Prime
Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone that
"the raw anti-Semitism in your
country cannot go unchallenged."
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Rabbi Abraham Joshua
Heschel, the late Jewish
philosopher and civil rights
activist, was recalled as a
"prophet" by Coretta Scott
King here Monday.
King, president of the Martin
Luther King Jr. Federal Holiday
Commission, spoke at a meeting
of the commission of the "com-
mon ground of faith" between her
late husband and Heschel, who
was a professor at the Jewish
Theological Seminary of America.
She said it was good from time-
to-time to be reminded that "peo-
ple like Martin and Rabbi Heschel
don't come around very often."
She said the two men were friends
and co-workers in the civil rights
struggle.
Martin Luther King spoke to
the Rabbinical Assembly of
America, the Conservative rab-
binic group, in March 1968, ten
days before he was slain by an
assassin in Memphis, Tenn., and
his widow recalled Heschel's in-
troduction of her husband. "Mar-
tin Luther King Jr. is a voice, a vi-
sion and a way," Heschel said. "I
call upon every Jew to hearken to
his voice, to share his wisdom to
follow his way. The whole future
of America will depend on the im-
pact and influence of Dr. King."
NUVEEN
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price ettectrve date March 23 1987 The return shown is tor one trust and will vary with changes
in income price payment option and amount invested Interest income will remain the same as
long as the porttolio remains intact An investment in these securities is not a deposit and is not FDIC
insured
j
i


Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 3, 1987
In Florida
Do We Need An Official 'English Only' Movement?
Is there a need for Federal
or state laws making
English the "official
language" of the United
States? How do the
"English-only" movements
relate to America's tradi-
tion of cultural pluralism? Is
bilingual education effec-
tive? Should all Americans
be multilingual?
And how can we defuse the
often heated tensions surrounding
these issues and replace rancor
with reasonable, workable
solutions?
These and related questions
were discussed at what is believed
to be the first major Conference
on Language Policy in the United
States, a forum on "English: The
Only Language? Whose Deci-
sion?" last week at the Tamiami
Campus of Florida International
University in Miami.
SPEAKERS included experts
in bilingual education, leaders of
minority communities, and
intergroup-relations specialists.
Conference sponsors were the
American Jewish Committee, the
Center for Educational Develop-
ment, Center for Multilingual and
Multicultural Studies of Florida
International University, Cuban
National Planning Council, Dade
County Community Relations
Board, Florida International
University, Greater Miami
United, and the Mitchell Wolfson
New World Center Campus of
Miami-Dade Community College.
Keynote speaker was Dr. Sarah
E. Melendez, associate director of
the American Council on Educa-
tion's Office of Minority Con-
cerns, who said in an inteview:
"We don't need laws to make
English the official language, as it
already is, by tradition and
custom. Furthermore, Hispanics
and other language minority
groups don't need laws to force
them to learn English; rather,
they need opportunities they
need classes, teachers, and
materials. Every ESL class has a
waiting list, which proves we
don't need to be coerced to learn
English."
Dr. Melendez also disputed "the
prevalent notion that large
numbers of Hispanics never learn
English," pointing to Census
Bureau findings than 94 percent
of Hispanics in the United States
speak English to some extent.
AS FOR the youngsters of
Hispanic origin. Dr. Melendez said
that "there is no danger that
children going to our school
systems will not learn English,"
adding: "The reality is that
without some special efforts they
will soon forget their parents'
language, which is too bad
because the United States needs
many people with multiple
language capabilities."
Irving M. Levine, director of
AJC's National Affairs Depart-
ment and of its Institute for
American Pluralism, discussing
the issues covered by the con-
ference, censured those who
30 Poles
To Take Part
BEERSHEBA (JTA) A
team of 30 athletes from the
University of Warsaw will par-
ticipate in the 19th International
Student Sport Games, April
26-May 3, hosted by Ben-Gurion
University.
This marks the first appearance
of a Polish team in the tourna-
ment which will include approx-
imately 1,000 athletes from
Brazil, Switzerland, Germany,
England and Israel.
"become emotionally over-
wrought about linguistic diversi-
ty, demand 'English-only,' and
refuse to see the value in people's
maintaining their ethnic linguistic
and cultural interests."
Agreeing that "becoming com-
petent in English is more of a
necessity than ever for new im-
migrants," Levine held that,
nevertheless, "mastering the new
language while also preserving
the old is what the equation should
be for new ethnic Americans."
AS FOR Americans whose
forebears came here a generation
or mroe ago, Levine suggested
that "it might not be a bad idea
for them to learn the language of
their heritage," adding: "But if
they do not care to do that, let
them at least be more tolerant of
those who do not wish to discard
the treasures the spoken and
written words of cultures that
have enriched our own."
Also slated in a major address at
the conference is Dr. Rodolfo J.
Cortina, director of the Center for
Multilingual and Multicultural
Studies at Florida International
University. Indicating a central
issue examined in his address, Dr.
Cortina said that the United
States Constitution, "like the na-
tion, did not confirm any single
ethnic reality but was, rather, in-
vented by multiple ethnic
groups."
Moreover, he said, the Constitu-
tion "was meant to be a map of
the future rather than a confirma-
tion of the past" and, he stressed,
"the Constitution contains not
one statement on language policy,
thus demanding that we invent a
language policy for our own
future."
FRAMERS OF the Constitu-
tion, continued Dr. Cortina,
"were not unaware of the strong
feelings provoked by language
and ethnicity, but their Constitu-
tional silence on this issue stems
from the common-law tradition of
not restricting future generations
through needlessly detailed laws
. And I believe that a language
policy in the United States has to
be made by the people, and not by
unnecessary laws."
Touching on another aspect of
the debate. Marilyn Braveman.
AJC director of education and one
of the organizers of the con-
ference, maintained that "re-
quirements that English be the of-
ficial language can have
dangerous, far-reaching, and
unanticipated effects."
"Current English-language pro-
positions," she said, "contain
specific provisions for enforce-
ment, raising the specter of costly
and time-consuming litigation.
Opponents say this could en-
danger or have a chilling effect on
911 lines, interpreters in state
courts for witnesses, crime vic-
tims and defendants, health and
mental-health services, and
multilingual police, fire, and
emergency services. They say it
could eliminate public service an-
nouncements in .,
other than Engff
pamphlets exnlain;
enrollachild^fe
RATHER THAN
negative approaches"
H. "we should sun,
develop positive ^Jrt j
88 *. English SEal
Brn
and other
Profit
programs
ncjj
help children and aduluS* |
ficiency m English." **l
an 'English-plus' rath* ii^
'English-only'TlH
Braveman concluded"!
additional languages to
needs of
not pose
true
^eat to aZ2
true common heritage iT*
mon bond the quest fh
and opportunity."
Weinberger: I Was Misquoted
On Israel's 'Destabilizing Factol
JERUSALEM (JTA) U.S. Defense &
Caspar Weinberger told Israel he was misquoted!
misinterpreted by defense counsel in the Jonathan P
spy case, with respect to his deposition to the court
ISRAEL'S AMBASSADOR to the U.S.,
Rosenne. reported last Thursday (Mar. 5) that he]
lengthy telephone conversation with Weinberger |
specifically denied stating in his deposition that a s
Israel was a destabilizing factor in the Middle East
Earlier, Vice Premier and Foreign Minister SI
Peres had called Weinberger's reported statement
unpleasant surprise to Israel.

. It Costs So Little
And It Means So Much.
f 9 H.
Southern Bell Long Distance is a great
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M*


Ill*
IJ I I I I I I I I I
y
[lay, April 3, 1987 The Jewish Floridian Section B
Robert Merrill
Wanted To Play Baseball
His Mother Had Other Ideas

-* 1 5
bid Cobb has let his hair grow a little bit since his graduation
kre from Miami Beach Senior High School, Class of '52. Cobb
\ the committee organizing the 85th reunion which will begin
Friday with a beach party at the Bal Harbour Sheraton.
Ka now a consulting engineer and landscape architect. The
ion will be a good chance to find out what ever did happen to
classmates.
5th Reunion
Miami Beach High
[Class Of '52 Reunion
fy ELLEN ANN STEIN
uish Floridian Staff Writer
hat ever happened to
Morris, Don Tannen-
Fred Singer and
|se Morgan Taylor?
bably the same thing that
ened to the other 246
ers of the Miami Beach
fr High School Class of '52.
[emerged from the sock hop
efore the emergence of the
pent 60s, and found their
i in life.
Irris became a bio-
lician. Tannenbaum became
tyer in California and has
pndmark cases to his credit,
became a motion-picture
per and director, and Louise
bn to become a member of
ward County School
W OF the students from
bse-knit group are still in
i But, for those curious to
khat became of the girls in
nes and the boys with crew
his weekend should be fun.
j be the 35th reunion of the
52, and former teachers
as students will be coming
over the country for the
ay party.
ch party Friday night at
I Harbour Sheraton will get
[started. Will malteds still
favored drink? An old-
w nickolodean will turn
pes like the Miami Beach
Howard Katzen
Rhumba. Saturday night will be a
coat and tie dinner and dance,
starting at 7 p.m., also at the
Sheraton.
SINGER HAS put together a
film called "You are There." Sun-
day morning, for those still hang-
ing in there, the reunion will close
with a brunch.
Prizes will be given for the cou-
ple with the most children and the
longest, note continuous,
marriage.
Elizabeth Teller will be among
Continued on Page 13-B
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Opera star Robert Merrill
wanted to be a baseball
player, but his mother
quickly discouraged that
youthful dream and instead
brought him to a voice
teacher.
Success quickly followed, and
several decades later, Merrill got
a chance to combine his love of
baseball with his well-trained
voice. He now sings the national
anthem for the New York
Yankees, and last year, for the
first time, he got to throw out the
opening ball.
MERRILL WILL be featured
with cello player Matt Haimowitz
at the closing program of the
Great Artists series under the
direction of the distinguished
Miami impresaria, Judy Drucker,
on Thursday, Apr. 9, 8:15 p.m., at
the Theatre of the Performing
Arts.
He will perform Ernest Bloch's
Sacred Service, a liturgical offer-
ing the late composer wrote some
40 years ago. The composition
features the text of a Friday night
religious service, and Merrill has
recorded it for worldwide distribu-
tion on the Columbia label with
Leonard Bernstein and the New
York Philharmonic Orchestra.
Merrill was born and raised in
Brooklyn, where he graduated
from New Utrecht High School.
His mother, Lillian, was a soprano
who came to America from War-
saw, Poland, when she was 16
years old. His father, Abraham,
also moved to this country from
Poland around the same time, and
they married a year later.
"MY MOTHER had a beautiful
voice, but in those days you
couldn't study. They had no
money," Merrill recalls.
But his mother knew he was go-
ing to sing right away. After all,
she heard me scream right away,"
he said.
But Merrill pursued baseball
and got a job pitching on Sundays
for a semi-professional team. His
mother didn't like that, and when
Merrill was 17, she got him his
first and only voice teacher,
Samuel Margolis.
"He inspired me immediately,"
said Merrill. "I took the subway
from Brooklyn and got off at 39th
and Broadway, which is where the
old Metropolitan Opera used to
be. I would feel inspired as soon as
I got off the subway and went to
his studio."
LESSONS WERE $3 at the
time, and were too expensive for
Merrill. Margolis helped him get a
scholarship to continue his
studies. Three years later, he got
a job in the Catskills and, with
popular songs, began to make a
living singing. One thing led to
another, and he found himself an
agent.
In 1945, Merrill auditioned for
the Metropolitan Opera, and,
although nervous, he was confi-
dent because of his good training.
He won and made his debut that
year in La Traviata, playing the
father, Germont. He still con-
siders that his favorite role. For
the next 32 years, he sang with
the Metropolitan Opera, and at
Robert Merrill
one point had his own radio pro-
gram on NBC.
Merrill is married to Marion,
and they have two children,
David, a composer, and Lizanne,
an artist.
MERRILL LEFT the
Metropolitan Opera about seven
years ago. "I wanted to spend
more time doing concerts and
traveling around the world," said
Merrill, whose 25 roles during his
tenure with the opera included
Aida, the Barber of Seville, and
Othello.
"I'm looking forward to singing
the Bloch Sacred Service," he
said. "It's one of my favorite
pieces. Everything fits." Merrill
will be singing the 50-minute com-
position with the Philharmonic
Orchestra of Florida, conducted
by Samuel Krachmalnick.
Rabbi Gary Glickstein of Temple
Beth Sholom will be narrator. The
Civic Chorale of Greater Miami
with Lee Kjelson, musical direc-
tor, will also accompany.
In 1987, Merrill will perform in
some 15 concerts.
"I STILL enjoy it, and I enjoy
getting before the public and sing-
ing very well and having fun," he
said. "The day I feel it's not fun,
I'll retire."
Except for wanting to pitch in
the Big Leagues for a few years,
Merrill said of his career, "I
wouldn't have wanted anything
else."
Amiram Efrati
North American
Representative Of Mapam
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Israelis must face the fact
that they are situated in the
middle of an Arab ocean,
and that there will eventual-
ly be a Palestinian state on
their eastern border, either
on the West Bank or in Jor-
dan, states Amiram Efrati,
the North American
representative of Mapam,
the United Workers Party
in Israel.
"And Israelis must face the
reality that there will always be an
Arab minority in Israel, no matter
what," adds the native born
Jerusalemite.
"There is a mentality in Israel
which says that we are in the mid-
dle of a minefield, so don't move.
But there are those among us who
think that some of the mines are
time bombs."
EFRATI, who has lived on Kib-
butz Dan on the border near
Lebanon and Syria since he was
17, is presently based in New
York in order to further his goal
of facilitating direct discussions
among Arabs and Jews.
One of the time bombs, accor-
ding to Efrati, is the religious
radicalization which has token
Continued on Page 7-B
ISeder For
Soviet Jews
2-B
Dear Nomi
8-B
Passover
Recipes
9-B
Synagogue
Listing
15-B
Obituaries
16-B


Page2B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 3, 1987
Federation's Israel Programs Office
Offers Summer Programs To Israel
"We're here to promote the
idea of going to Israel," said Lin-
da Minkes, chairman of the Israel
Program Committee of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion. "This summer the Israel Pro-
grams Office is offering a wide
range of youth programming for
individuals aged 13-24," she
announced.
"There are programs for every
interest," said Raffi Miller, com-
munity "shaliach" (emmissary)
from the State of Israel to South
Florida and director of the Israel
Programs Office. "When an in-
dividual comes into my office, I
talk with him or her trying to
discover the program best suited
to individual needs and interests.
As an example, many people are
not ready to work outdoors on a
kibbutz, while others are perfectly
suited for this Israeli experience,"
he added.
Programs are divided into age
categories according to the par-
ticular interests and needs of the
individual traveler. People of high
school age, 13-18 years old, can
take trips which include a tour of
Israel, including a visit to a kib-
butz, scuba diving, film making,
studying Hebrew, or whatever
else is of particular interest to the
youngster.
Most of the summer programs
are six to eight weeks in duration.
Longer term programs including
study in Israeli high schools or
universities are also available.
The long term program provid-
ed to high school aged students is
called "Youth Aliyah." This
allows the youngster to stay in
Israel for a year or more while
studying at an Israeli high school.
The second age group for Israel
travel is college aged individuals,
18-24 years old. They have the
choice of traveling for a six week
summer tour or staying longer by
studying at an Israeli university.
Many universities such as Bar-
Ilan, Ben-Gurion University of the
Negev, Haifa University, The
Hebrew University of Jerusalem,
and Tel Aviv University, offer
classes taught in English to ac-
commodate these students. "Stay-
ing in Israel for a longer period of
time allows an individual to inter-
relate with the people who live
there and in time the student can
begin to truly understand what it
means to be an Israeli," said
Miller.
"By far the most successful pro-
gram for this age group is 'Kib-
butz Ulpan,' said Minkes. "In this
program, individuals spend six
months working on a kibbutz. Par-
ticipants work half a day and
study Hebrew for half a day," she
adds.
Individuals attending college
who are unable to get away for the
summer, also have programs
designed for them upon gradua-
tion. "One program of particular
interest is 'Sherut La'am.' mean-
ing service to the people," said
Miller. In this year-long program,
graduates from American univer-
sities go to Israel and begin their
careers. They begin by studying
Hebrew for the first three months
in an intensive "ulpan" program,
after which they are placed in jobs
that they are qualified to ac-
complish. Participants receive
housing and a monthly stipend
while working during this time.
" 'Sherut La'am' is a program
for those who want to touch more
than the surface of the Israeli ex-
perience. The appeal of this pro-
gram for college graduates is to
gain an insider's knowledge of
Israel while acquiring valuable
work experience," said Miller.
Miller is quick to point out that
the Israel Programs Office is not a
travel agency. "When individuals
:ome into our office, we interview
them, help them decide on the ap-
Linda Minkes
propriate program and then ex-
pedite the necessary paper work
to New York, where the programs
originate," said Miller.
"If an individual discovers a
program that interests him, he
should come to our office at
Federation and ask for more in-
formation. Some people don't ask
because they are afraid that they
will not be able to afford costs of
Raffi Miller
the programs," said Minkes.
"Dade County residents should be
aware that the Israel Programs
Office has scholarship and grant
money to offer to qualified ap-
plicants," she concluded.
More information about the pro-
grams offered by the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's Israel
Program's Office can be obtained
by calling 576-4000, ext. 309 -
Mark Friedman.
Passover Seder
For Soviet Jews
Soviet Jews Will Not
Be Forgotten At Passover
On Sunday Temple Samuel Or Olom in South Dade will
be the site of a special Seder on behalf of the more than
380,000 Jews trying to leave the Soviet Union. More than
150 South Dade teenagers are expected to attend.
According to Shirley Pollak, co-chairman of the South
Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry, an arm of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's Community Relations Commit-
tee, "the Seder will have special poignancy because it will
take place durine a 17-day hunger strike in Washington
D.C. by Alexander Slepak, son of Vladimir and Maria
Slepak who have been trying to emigrate since 1970." The
Soviet authorities recently told the Slepaks that they would
"never" be allowed to leave the Soviet Union because they
had "access to state secrets." In addition to the Slepaks
eight others have also become "permanent refuseniks" as a
result of the edict: Yulian Khasin, Natalia Khassina, Yuli
Kosharovsky, Dr. Alexander Lerner, Yakov Rakhlenko,
Valery Soyfer and Lev and Alia Sud. "We will be thinking
of all of them during Passover" said Pollak. "Also, let us
not forget Ida Nudel, 'the mother of the refuseniks,' who
first applied for an exit visa in 1971, and was subsequently
sent to Siberia and then into internal exile."
The Freedom Seder will take place between 3-5 p.m. on
Sunday at Temple Samuel Or Olom, 9353 SW 152 Ave.,
Miami.
MAXWELL HOUSE* HAS BEEN ENJOYED
AT SO MANY SEDERS,
WE FEEL LIKE PART OF THE FAME^Y
4
Good to the Last Drop
0 Certified Kosher for Passover
THE ORIGINAT PASSOVER COFFEE
9
FOOOS
1966 General Foods Con-


Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridlan Page 3-B
r
Around 380 guests turned out for the first
Miami tribute to the Los Angeles-based Simon
Wiesenthal Center. Wiensenthal (seen left)
called 'Attorney General' for the millions of
people murdered in the Holocaust, flew in
from his home in Vienna for the affair. He is
shown standing next to mistress of ceremonies
Pia Zadora, the evening's honoree Don Soffer
and Rabbi Marvin Heir, dean of the Wiesen-
thal Center.
Simon Wiesenthal:
It Has Not Been An Easy Life
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Internationally-known
Nazi war criminal hunter
Simon Wiesenthal twice
tried to commit suicide
when he was taken to a con-
centration camp, where 89
members of his family
perished in the Holocaust.
Izak Lehman was the concen-
tration camp prisoner who was
ordered to clean the blood from
the car where Wiesenthal, know-
ing what was in store, tried to kill
himself.
LEHMAN and Wiesenthal
reminisced last week about the
painful experiences at a dinner to
celebrate the opening of a South
Florida branch of the Los
Angeles-based Simon Wiesenthal
Center.
Wiesenthal flew in from his
home in Vienna to attend the din-
ner at Turnberry Country Club.
"I was in a jail hospital, and I
tried to commit suicide again,"
Wiesenthal said during a press
conference held before the dinner.
"I stole a little box of pills. I didn't
know what they were. I swallowed
them all and noted they tasted bit-
ter. The next day the doctor came
to me and said, "You've stolen my
500 saccharin pills."
WIESENTHAL, 78, has spent
nearly half his life tracking down
Nazi war criminals who con-
tributed to the deaths of not only
six million Jews but of six million
non-Jews alike."
Since his liberation in 1945,
Wiesenthal's relentless efforts
have resulted in bringing 1,125
Nazi war criminals to justice.
"It has not been an easy life,"
Wiesenthal said. "My wife says I
am not a husband, but that I am
married to millions of the dead."
The matter "must remain open
tor the sake of the future," he
said, adding his ever-present war-
Sf" "history can *****
i,An& ,the criminals, he said,
snould know that they are not
forgotten.
"When I was a young man, like
my grandchildren, we were so
wiieving in the progress of our
century. Now we hope that we
>uJd. through our work, bring
wnsitive knowledge to young peo-
Z Sthat they may recognize the
danger. To live like nothing hap-
pened is a crime. To be alive is to
Pay a price. There's not a written
law that the next victims should
be Jews."
THERE ARE still "tens of
thousands" of Nazi war criminals
living in different parts of the
world with false names.
"My program is to reduce
hatred because hatred and
technology survived the two big
monsters: Hitler and Stalin. When
we cannot reduce hatred, the
future of the whole people in the
world is in danger."
The affair at Turnberry brought
some 380 guests. It was a formal
event where the white-gloved
waiters continually poured wine
and Evian water from bottles
wrapped in both napkins.
The developer and owner of
Turnberry, Don Soffer, received
an award as guest of honor "for
his generous contribution to the
Wiesenthal Center." Mistress of
Ceremonies, actress Pia Zadora,
referred to Soffer as a man who
gives "in a quiet and dignified
way."
AMONG GUESTS of honor
were Col. Richard R. Seibel,
whose command liberated
Wiesenthal and thousands of
others from the Mauthausen
death camp. Seibel was an ex-
ecutive officer in Gen. George S.
Pattons' Third Army of Combat
Command B.
Seibel's reaction to the camp
was that it was "unbelievable,"
and something that an ordinary
citizen could not imagine. There
were death, starvation, sickness,
"anything you want to mention,"
he said.
A special highlight of the even-
ing came when Wiesenthal and
other Holocaust survivors and
liberators walked down an aisle in
the ballroom, and each lit one long
candle. One man wiped tears from
his eyes. His wife had been gassed
at the Treblinka death camp.
Excerpts from the Academy
Award-winning documentary,
"Genocide," were shown. The
movie, co-written by Rabbi Mar-
vin Heir, who was also present at
the dinner, will be airing on some
155 public television stations
throughout the country in April,
May and September.
Gold's Horseradish.
A tradition with gefilte fish.
t/zy tluttfui Jamity *3 A
Gold's Mat/oh Cheese Kugel
Ingredients
5eggs
2 cups cottage cheese
I cup milk
I teaspoon salt
'A cup honey
1 teaspoon cinnamon
Vi cup slivered almonds
3 tablespoons GOLD'S
White Horseradish
3 teaspoons vegetable oil
6 matron, broken
into pieces
Instructions
Beat together eggs and milk. Add cottage cheese, salt.
honey, cinnamon. Gold's Horse radish and oil. Place hall
the matron pieces in a greased two quart baking dish
Pour hall the cottage cheese-egg mixture on top.
Sprinkle with almonds. Cover with second hall
ol matzoh pieces and rest of cheese-egg
mixture. Bake in a 350 degree oven
lor 40 minutes Makes eight
to ten servings
Golds
"t *ft '"4*
Rooted in
Tradition!
wnlrl-iM n On* 4
Evelyn Lubin, a long time volunteer at the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, accepts an award on behalf of the volunteer depart-
ment by Elton J. Kerness, associate executive vice president of
Federation. The plague was presented at the "Thank You Lun-
cheon" held by Federation in honor of its corps of hardworking
volunteers.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
of Greater Miami
1701 Washington Ave., Miami Beach
announces
COMMUNITY PASSOVER
SEDORIM
MONDAY, APRIL 13th and
TUESDAY, APRIL 14th at 7 P.M.
Dr. Irving Lehrman
Cantor Yehuda Shit man
Conducted By
DR. IRVING LEHRMAN
And CANTOR YEHUDA SHIFMAN
For Reservations please call:
538-2503 Ext. 14
n?oJ rr.i,
KOSMtR
A

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Page 4-B The Jewish FToridian/Friday. April 3, 1987
Families Divided As Some
Soviet Jews
Emigrate, Others Cannot
YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
A Soviet Jewish emigre
with cancer who underwent
a major operation here last
week to save her life plead-
ed for Soviet authorities to
permit her brother and his
family to leave the Soviet
Union and reunite with her
and her family here.
Seated in a wheelchair, fragile.
pale, her tears streaming. Irene
Grottei told a press conference at
the New York University School
of Medicine that she has not beer.
able to see her brother. Zinovy
Ostrovsky of Leningrad, and his
family since she immigrated to the
I\S 10 years ago
"MY BROTHER has been
refused exit visas nine times.'
Grottei said. She said that her
father and sister immigrated to
Israel a few years ago and that
her father died there last year.
'"My brother wonders why his
father does not call or write him.
and we don't dare tell him that our
father is no longer alive.'' she
said.
Neither does her brother know
about her serious illness, she said.
I am pleading with the Soviet
government to let my brother
reunite with me before it is too
late. Let him reunite with the liv-
ing, not the dead.'" she said, her
voice shaking with sadness and
agony.
She said her brother cart get
an exit visa because he allege-: j
ncnds ''state secrets." He was an
engineer, but for the last 11 years
has worked as a porter, loading
and unloading trucks it. a Len-
ingrad restaurant.
ABOUT TWO DOZEN S
Jew-.sr. err. i^res wh'.se
rr.err.oers a_-e still refused permis-
son to reunite with ther- i_> par-
ticipated in the press e.reference.
Adath Yeshurun
Presents Passover
Workshops
And Lectures
Terr.pie Adath Yeshurun of
North Miami Beach wZI present a
moto-dimenswcai approach to the
hobday of Passover with five ses-
sions to be given simultaneously
and repeated every 30-45 nucutes
at the Tempie on Tuesday at 7:30
The featured fama and
i iiops *-... _-...u-:e The
Order m tat Seder": "The songs
and tales of the Haggaoa H m
r^ke a matzah war a^aaal
items to prepare on Pesac-' k -
have a kosher Passover and
more. Instructors include
Rocheiie Baituch. Joan Bergman.
Dr. Manuel Bergman. Tsafra
Cheanoff. Rabbi Simcha Freed-
man. Carol Lefkuwiu and Eiieec
Meager
JWV Post 682 Aid
To Israel Bar-B-Q
The Ladies Auxuiary of Abe
Horowitz Post No. 682 Jewish
War Veterans wfll bold aa ~Aid to
Israei Bar-b-Q" on Sunday at
Greynoid's Pan West. The pro-
ceeds will go for mwaral equip-
ment for the Chan* Sceba
viapctal in Israe-1
The recipient af the Nailh
Miami Beach "Poocemaa af
Year" award presented by tae
- vas officer Don ReyooM*
. .adaes auxtSanr g jm 'i for tag
There was no indication bow
many Soviet Jewish families are
affected. The emigres signed an
appeal to New York Go v. Mario
Cuomo, who is going to Moscow at
the end of the month to intercede
on their behalf with Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev
Vladimir Rabinovich. who
brought to the press conference
his seven-month-old daughter, ap-
pealed to the Soviet authorities to
allow his father to reunite *~:r
him and his sister, who lives in
Israei. He said that his father.
Nahum Rabinovich of Zaporozhe
in the Ukraine, is a former World
War II combat pilot who also serv-
ed later as a test pilot.
"My father is -4 ;.r.i.-- i 1--1-
never saw his grandchildren in
Israel and the United States. He
applied first for an exit rial in
1982. but his application has beer.
rejected. Last month he applied
again and his request was
denied. Rabinovich said. He add-
ed that Soviet authorities toid his
father that he will not receive a
security clearance until 1995.
The California Club Community, part of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federations Alliance
Division, held a dinner dance on behalf of the
198? Combined Jewish Appeal. Pictured from
left are Lou Rones, chairman; Howard Stone,
guest speaker: Herb Polow. honoree: and Herb
Canarick. Alliance Division chairman Z)r
ing the evening. Rones presented Ptiow via
an award for his outstanding work in cow-
dinating Federation's campaign at ^
California Club.
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Emanu-El Maimonides Award
Dr. Irving Lehrman presents the 1987 Temple Emanu-El
Maimonides Award to Ted Arison as Lin Arison looks on.
The synagogue's highest honor was a highlight of the 19th
annual Lehrman Day School Scholarship Ball Saturday
night in the Friedland Ballroom of the Miami Beach con-
gregation. Rabbi Lehrman gives an engraved, antique silver
kiddush cup to Bernice and Morton Gittlin, chairmen of the
Scholarship Ball. The black-tie dinner and dance surpassed
its goal ofU50 scholarships by producing a record 468 dona-
tions of $1,000 each.
Organization STews
Deborah Hospital Greater Miami Chapter is planning a
bus trip to Mineral Springs in Venice, Fla., on Wednesday,
May 19 to Friday, May 21. The trip includes three
breakfasts, three dinners, and a top Broadway show. Pearl
Green is in charge.
The South Seas Chapter of Women's American ORT
will meet 11:30 a.m. Tuesday in the social hall of Temple
Adath Yeshurun. There will be entertainment by Miss Bar-
bara Gail.
The chapter also is taking reservations for its May 1-3
Newport Hotel weekend.
The Annual Auction will be held on May 5.
The B'nai B'rith Sholem Lodge 1024 will have a sing-a-
long luncheon with live entertainment at its next regular
meeting 10 a.m. Sunday at the University of Miami Hillel
House. Yvonne Lee, managing director of the Jewish Com-
munity Center of Miami Beach will speak on "The Func-
tions of the JCC of Miami Beach."
The Adlai Stevenson Democratic Women's Club will
hold a board meeting at 10:30 a.m. and a membership
meeting at 11 a.m. on Thursday, April 9 at the Surfside
Community Center. Richard A. Pettigrew, chairman of the
Dade County Democratic Party, will speak on "Sun Setting
on Sales Tax."
The Temple Menorah Sisterhood will hold a regular
meeting on April 8 at noon at 7435 Carlyle Ave., Miami
Beach. A program: "Anne Frank, a Portrait of Hope," is
being presented by the American Savings Bank.
The American Jewish Congress, Justine-Louise Wise
chapter will meet Thursday, April 9 at 12:30 p.m. at the
American Savings and Loan Association Bank Building at
Alton and Lincoln Roads for a general meeting and mini-
lunch.
The theme of marriage and family binds the 1987-1988
season at the Coconut Grove Playhouse, announced pro-
ducing artistic director Arnold Mittelman. The eight pro-
ductions include six on the main stage and two in the En-
core Room Cabaret Theater.
The following productions have been announced: Eli
Wallach and Anne Jackson in "The Flowering Peach" by
^lifford Odets; Kaye Ballard in "High Spirits" by Hugh
Martin and Timothy Gray; "Fanny" by Joshua Logan and
*>-N. Berman; "110 in the Shade'r by Richard Nash; "The
House of Blue Leaves" by John Guare; "Green Eyes," a
UJW musical review; "Something for the Boys;" and
waiting for You."
Sunny Seniors
To Present
Two Plays
Sunny Seniors of Temple Israel
Players will present two plays at
their Monday meeting, noon, at
the Kendall facility.
Drama teacher, Girt Bossak,
who will direct the plays, has
adapted for stage "The Missing
Piece," a popular story for all
ages, as a "think piece." It will be
related to the Pirke Avot,
Judaism's "Saying of the
Fathers," a collection of moral
and religious teachings by the ear-
ly Rabbis.
"I'm Herbert," one act of the
Broadway plav "You Know I
Can't Hear You When the
Water's Running," will also be
presented.
Cast consists of Betty and Nor-
man Rosenberg and Gloria Boas.
A repeat performance of "The
Missing Piece" will be presented
to the Temple's Kendall Early
Childhood Department on April
23, at 11 a.m. Upon its conclusion
teachers and children will discuss
the play's message.
Do-Si-Do With
Friends Of
Douglas Gardens
Do-Si-Do with Friends of
Douglas Gardens Saturday, 7:30
p.m. in the Ruby Auditorium, 151
NE 52nd St., Miami.
This second annual event,
chaired by Roz and Murray Heikin
will include country music and
some of the best down-home
barbeque around.
Proceeds benefit the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged at Douglas Gardens.
Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
BULLETIN!
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Page 6-B The Jew^si: Flaritfiaarndar. April S. 1SST
'22 Cents And A Wish'
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Amiram Efrati
North American Representative of Mapam
Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Continued from Page 1-B
place on both sides.
The danger is that instead of
having a conflict between two
states, we will have a conflict bet
ween two religions," which can
remain unreconciled for hundreds
of years, as history has shown.
Another time bomb is the Israeli
occupation of the West Bank and
Caza. which has been ticking for
almost 20 years now.
"Even without the problems of
occupation, the annexation of
those lands would be a problem,"
says Efrati.
"IMAGINE THAT the Palesti-
nian leadership had come to Israel
and said, 'given a choice between
you and Jordan, we'd rather be
annexed by you. At least you
didn't kill 20,000 Palestinians in
one month (Black September) like
Hussein.' Given the present rate
of population growth, by the year
2000 the Jews would no longer be
a majority in Israel.
"Either you would no longer
have a Jewish State, or you would
no longer have a democracy."
But occupation poses additional
dangers, says Efrati.
"The occupation is corrupting
us, no question about it. In-
tolerance, violence, and anti-
democratic trends don't know
green lines, and they don't know
borders.
"If the police can break into
Berzeit University in the West
Bank, they can break into Hebrew
University in Jerusalem.
"RACISM IS a part of occupa-
tion, and it will eventually appear
at our front door. You take a very
nice, 18-year-old boy, raised on
kibbutz, given the best education,
and you send him to Gaza to find a
terrorist in his home. This ter-
rorist has killed innocent people,
but in order to find him, our young
soldier has to throw the family out
onto the street, break into univer-
sities, and shoot at
demonstrators.
"What kind of citizen will he be,
what kind of husband and
father?" asks Efrati.
Israeli and Arab teenagers who
have come to maturity under oc-
cupation are among the most
susceptible to racist and violent
proposals, because "younger peo-
ple look for black and white solu-
tions," claims Efrati.
"You can educate a teenager for
five years about the importance of
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peaceful co-existence, and then
along comes someone like Meir
Kahane with a clever slogan and
sweeps it all away."
EFRATI, who calls Kahane a
"mirror that reflects the small,
ugly part of racism which exists in
each and every one of us," says
that "There are people in Israel
who might not have elected
Kahane to the Knesset, but who
share some of his ideas. But if you
try to explain to them that
Kahane's solution (to expel all the
Arabs from Israel) justifies
everything done to the Jews in
their history, most will re-
examine their thinking."
Part of the problem, according
to Efrati, may be that "Jews and
Arabs often do not meet until they
reach the university level, if they
don't meet on opposite sides of a
demonstration first."
This can be directly attributed
to the fact that Arabs do not serve
in the army, which is an important
social force and melting pot in
Israel.
"IT IS extremely difficult to be
an Israeli Arab, admits Efrati.
"Abdul Aziz Zuabi, the first Arab
to be elected vice minister, once
said that 'my tragedy as an
(Israeli) Arab is that my country is
at war with my nation.'
"There should be a declaration
on the part of Israel, Jordan, the
United States and the PLO of
mutual recognition of the rights of
self-determination," states
Efrati, who supports dealing with
the mainstream of the PLO in
negotiations.
"The question is not with whom
to talk," he says, "but about what.
Where do we start? When we talk
about peace process, we have to
know that a paper of peace can
easily become a piece of paper."
EFRATI SAYS that he
assumes that, as in the case of the
Civil War in America, it will take
several generations for warmer
relations to develop between
Palestinians and Israelis, even
after the fighting has stopped.
And after the fighting stops, the
Israeli arms industry should
reflect the diminished need for its
products.
"The Israeli military industry
should supply Israel, period,
without materials for export,"
contends Efrati.
"A Jewish state should not be
involved in selling arms arms
kill, and you don't know if they
will be used by good killers or bad
killers."
In the end, Israeli exports of
arms to countries like Iran can
produce truly painful examples of
the irony of war.
"My kibbutz was once shelled by
Shiites using arms originally sold
to Iran by Israel," says Efrati.
IN THE Israeli film, "Avanti
Popolo," an Egyptian soldier begs
for a drink of water from an
Israeli soldier by quoting from the
speech in the Merchant of Venice
where Shylock asks, "If you prick
us, do we not bleed?"
"What's up with him?" asks one
Israeli soldier.
"He has his roles confused,"
replies the other.
But in the confusing reality of
the Middle East today, with such
complicated problems as an
American Jew, Jonathan Pollard,
spying for Israel because certain
information pertaining to Israeli
security was being withheld, who
hasn't gotten their roles
confused?
"Many things are not clear,"
says Efrati of the Pollard case.
"You have to assume that there's
spying going on back and forth
between the United States and
the USSR, and the sentences
given out were less than life.
"Pollard's life sentence must
have been some kind of red light
Amiram Efrati
to the Israelis don't push it too
far. That's the only way I can
understand it."
AS FORthe promotions of two
key Israeli figures, Aviem Sella
and Rafael Eitan, Efrati says that
even "If there were no govern-
ment involvement, the promo-
tions challenge the credibility of
both Israel and the United States.
"Almost all of the Israeli
population in Israel is in agree-
ment that the spying was wrong,
but why did America withhold the
information? The world of in-
telligence is a twilight zone which
no one talks about."
Episodes of the television
series, "Twilight Zone," usually
ended with the voice of the nar-
rator giving some kind of explana-
tion providing a moral to be learn-
ed. Whether or not the enigmatic
episodes of the past year will be
supplied with a similar closing
passage yet remains to be seen.
But Amiram Efrati, many miles
and light years away from dairy
farm he used to manage on his kib-
butz, will doubtless continue to
search.
Efrati spoke on the subject of
"Political Morality in Israel" in
Deerfield Beach's Century Plaza
last week in both Hebrew and
English, and at the Michael-Ann
Russell Jewish Community
Center in North Miami Beach for
the Americans for a Progressive
Israel and Friends of Hashomer
Hatzair, the youth movement with
which Efrati was affiliated as a
high school student in Israel.
Bet Breira Jewish
Film Festival
Congregation Bet Breira an-
nounces the sixth film of their
Jewish Film Festival, A Trilogy of
Holocaust Short Films; "The
Hangman," "Night and Fog,"
and "Joseph Shultz," will be
screened on Sunday, April 12, at 7
p.m. A discussion led by Dr.
Henry Green, director of Judaic
Studies, University of Miami, will
follow.
DELICIOUS FISHES
KOSHER FOR PASSOVER
The first name in kosher foods brings
you the finest from the sea! Delicious
haddock, cod. sole, and flounder fillets
flash-frozen for convenience and flavor'
Ask your grocer for Empire fish fillets
For that special meal,
start with Empire!
TlJiipirv]
The Most Trusted Name in Kosher Foods
I (800) EMPIRE 4


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. April 3. 1987
Write
Dear RTomi
... For Advice
Dear Nomi. ma advice column, will appear regularly in the
pages of The Jewish Floridian.
Dear Nomi.
My rabbi says the Torah die
tates that women should wear
skirts or dresses that cover the
knee even when seated and shirts
that cover the elbows. According
to his interpretation of Torah dic-
tates. I can never again wear a
bathing suit when there are men
present and I can not wear pants
even when mountain climbing. I
respect my rabbi and can see some
advantages to the concept of
modesty, but I just. gulp, can't see
discarding my wardrobe of pants.
Signed.
Hemmed In
Dear Hemmed In.
Over the centuries, religion has
forced people to make some
pretty difficult decisions.
Whether or not to convert,
flee, or be killed. Whether r
I to break the Sabbath in
nd one's home and
- pared :
your ]
-
- L In fact, son urj -
I i .. : :

-'
9 igreeing with the rigid
re?'- ..... ited with
rering the araa,
legs, end heir) that the Conser-
vative and Reform moverre: :.-
were torn
ktk yourself whether or not you
be :eve :n strict, precise inter-
pret ( the ancient iaw*
If you do. then you should
:' .. the ed eta af thoae laws
tht etter. If. or. the other
hand, you believe that ancer.t
laws should be adapted to
modem times, you may not
want to change your wardrobe
you may want to change
- dbhi
S
Dear Nomi.
-
- fiett and I ar
* N
-. _
ss
l>ear Staffed.
_*- t i j i
image which most improve
re the weight can come off
safeiy and permanently. Peo-
ple who basically accept and
hi theselves f-1 t easier -..
change
As for a sound quick weight kss
diet, there is only one; eat less,
eat healthy foods, and exercise.
The way to make this work,
however, is to be kind to
youseif.
Treat yourself to m^ttmtm
perks, and don't punish
yourself for cheating a hole
from time to time.
Yours. Nomi
Dear Noeai:
Although I have been divorced
for many years, being alone has
not bothered me ooto now. There
always used to be opportunities
for me to go out on dates before.
but suddenly I find that, ax the age
at* 50. my options seem to be nar-
range are interested, and those
that are seem to hare become so
to being bachelors that the*
.Efeesx left to the
Shoui-' I xn-to get used to
alone, or is there still a chance for
romance after 50?
Signed.
J.S. from Miami Beach
Dear J.S.:
There is more of a chance for a
woman to find romance at 50
and over now than there was a
generation or so ago. when the
popular notion was that a
woman of "a certain age"
should be content to knit and
bake for her grandchildren.
But the stark reality is that
there are more single women
than men in your peer group,
and traditionally women have
looked for men who are slightly
older and at least as successful
as they are. which narrows
their choices.
One thing which you might con-
sider is searching for men who
are your age or slightly
younger, broadening the pool
of possible companions.
Another idea is to look outside
of your immediate
geographical area, if a
commuter-relationship might
be an option for you.
Yet it is not a bad idea for you to
learn to enjoy being alone. Be-
ing independent has its advan-
tages, such as the freedom to
travel, open your home to
whomever you please, etc. The
fuller and happier you make
your life as a single woman, the
more attractive you will be to
others who would like to share
that life with you.
Yours. Nomi
Dear Nomi:
I have been dating the same guy
for over a year and he has never
made a sexual advance. When I
first started seeing him he told me
that he had just been jilted and
was still getting over it so I
assumed that this was the reason
he was reluctant to become
involved.
Now after a year of dinner dates
I would think lie would show more
interest. We enjoy each others
company, and I see him on a
regular basis. He says he does not
see anyone else. We are both over
40.
How can I bring up the subject
without sounding cheap insen-
sitive or sex crazed?
I have found it hard to approach
him about this and wonder if
possibly his reluctance is related
to the current fears of AIDS and
numerous other risks today.
What can I do?
Sincerely,
Wondering
Dear Wondering:
Your friend may still be reluctant
to get romantically involved
for any one of a number of
reasons; he may still be suffer-
ing from the insecurity of hav-
ing been rejected in his last
relationship, he may have
reservations about com-
plicating a good friendship, or
he may simply not be attracted
to you as a lover. It is also
possible that he fears contrac-
ting, or possibly transmitting,
a sexually transmitted disease.
The only way to find out is to
speak to him. On one of your
dinner dates (not at a
restaurant!) you might begin
by asking him whether he still
thinks about his last relation-
ship, and if he would like to
become romantically involved
again.
You should prepare yourself for
his answer, which may not be
exactly what you want to hear,
but once you find out exactly
where vou stand in this rela-
tionship, you can decide what
you want to do. which include
Although it might seem oSJ
wise, you have nothing to km
by communicating, and plenty
to gain! K l*
Yonrs, Noaj
Write Nomi for advice
i?, c"e of The Jewish
Floridian, P.O. Box
12171, Miami, Fla
SUM.
Yiddish Culture
Winkle To Hold
Yom Hashoa Program
"Yiddish Culture Winkle" will
hold their Yom Hashoa gathering
on Thursday morning. April 9 at
10:30 a.m. at Temple Ner Tamid.
Rabbi Yehuda Melber. spiritual
leader of Temple Raphael, will
deliver a tribute to the six million
Jews who perished and songs ap-
propriate to the day will be sung
by Rosa Luski. Menasha Felds-
tein. Temple Ner Tamid's presi-
dent, will recite the kaddish, and
Rabbi Melber will say the "E!
Mole Rachamim."
At Passover, your famity deserves the best. And
nothings better than Motts" Apple Sauce and Apple Juice
Whether you prefer our tegular or natural varieties, you can
be assured that our sauces and juices get ther dehaous
flavor from only tie finest blend of apples So this Passover
be sure to stock up on Motts"
Best wishes to you and your family during Passover
See pacxaoes marxec KJ>
Certwwd Kosher and Parve lor Pi by Rabbi J H Ralbag,


Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Fioridian Page 9-B
National Foods/Beverages Offer Holiday Suggestions
LAMB CHOPS ON PRUNE STUFFING
1 cup minced onion
'A cup diced celery
6 Tbsps. vegetable shortening
6 matzos, finely broken *
1/2 Tsp. salt
1/8 Tsp. pepper
2 Tsps. paprika
1 egg. slightly beaten
1 can condensed clear chicken soup undiluted
1 lb. jar stewed prunes (20) drained, pitted and chopped
6 large shoulder lamb chops
Saute onion and celery in shortening until tender. Add
broken matzos and toast lightly. Combine salt, pepper,
paprika, egg and soup. Add to matzos. Fold in chopped
prunes. Spread in a greased shallow baking pan. Brown
chops in a hot skillet. Arrange chops on stuffing and cover
pan, using aluminum foil if pan has no cover. Bake in a
moderate oven (325 degrees) for 1 hour or until chops are
tender. Serves 6.
4 cups matzo farfel may be used instead
BASIC MATZO STUFFING
% cup vegetable shortening or chicken fat
% cup minced onion
10 matzos. finely broken
1 Tsp. salt
'A Tsp. pepper
1 Tbsp. paprika
1 egg
Vk cans (2 cups) condensed clear chicken soup undiluted *
Saute onion in fat until tender but not browned. Add
broken matzos and toast lightly. Combine seasonings, egg
and soup. Add to matzo mixture. Enough for a 10-12 lb.
bird.
VARIATIONS
Celery Stuffing: Saute 1 cup diced celery with the onion.
Mushroom Stuffing: Saute 1 cup diced fresh mushrooms
with the onion.
Nut Stuffing: Toast lVi cup coarsely chopped nuts with
the onion before adding matzo crumbs.
Giblet Stuffing: Cook giblets in water until tender (2 to 3
hours). Mince and add to dressing.
* NOTE: This makes a dry dressing. If you prefer the
moist type stuffing, increase the condensed chicken soup to
2 cans.
PASSOVER HARVEST SOUP
4 packets G. Washington Rich Brown Seasoning and Broth
4 cups water
1 pkg. (10 oz.) asparagus
1 pkg. (10 oz.) mushrooms
1 xk cups thinly sliced celery
l'/2 cups thinly sliced carrots
xk cup chopped onion
1 Tbsp. chopped fresh parsley
1/8 Tsp. basil
1/8 Tsp. oregano
Add G. Washington to water; bring to boil in a three quart
saucepan. Add frozen green beans, peas, celery, carrots,
onion, parsley, pepper, basil and oregano; cover. Simmer
for 15 to 20 minutes until vegetables are tender, but still
crisp.
Matzo Brei with a Secret Ingredient
The secret ingredient of this delicious matzo brei is G.
Washington's Golden Seasoning and Broth certified
Kosher-Parve for Passover. It also adds flavor to meats,
vegetables, casseroles, soups, dips and salads.
HEZEKIAH MATZO BREI
Soak 4 matzos in cold water for 2-3 minutes. Drain; crum-
ble coarsely. Beat 4 eggs and 2 packets G. Washington
Golden Seasoning and Broth together in a bowl. Add mat-
zos, mix well. Heat 3 tablespoons oil in 9" skillet over
medium heat. Pour egg mixture into it. Fry until browned
on bottom; turn and brown on top, approximately 5 minutes
per side. Serve with jelly and sugar lightly sprinkled on top.
A TETLEY TEA TWIST
This recipe calls for the big tea taste of Tetley's tiny little
tea leaves. Tetley, the traditional tea in Jewish homes for
more than half a century, is certified Kosher-for-Passover.
MINT TEA
Heat the teapot. Add 4 Tetley Tea bags and pour a little
boiling water over them. Add a handful of fresh or dried
whole mint leaves and sugar to taste and pour in 4 cups boil-
ing water. Allow to steep for about 5 to 8 minutes, then
skim off any mint that has risen to the surface. Taste a little
of the tea and add more sugar if necessary. Serve in glasses.
APPLE MATZOH KUGEL (PAREVE)
4 matzoh
3 eggs, beaten
lk Tsp. salt
lk cup honey
V cup oil
1 Tsp. cinnamon
1 Tbsp. Gold's Passover Horseradish
y* cup chopped walnuts
2 apples, chopped
lk cup raisins
1. Break matzoh into pieces, soak in water and drain.
2. Combine eggs, salt, honey, oil, cinnamon and horseradish
and add to matzoh. 3. Mix in nuts, apples and raisins.
4. Place in a greased 8 inch square baking dish and bake at
350 degrees for 45 minutes. Makes six to eight servings.
MOCHA SPONGE CAKE
12-ounce package Passover sponge cake mix
2 Tbsps. Maxwell House instant coffee
6 eggs, separated
V cup water
lVi ounces bittersweet chocolate, grated
Stir Maxim instant coffee into package of mix. Combine
ingredients and bake as directed on box. While folding in
beaten egg whites, add the grated chocolate. Frost, if
desired, with Coffee Fluff.
BEEF AND VEGETABLE MEDLEY
1 pound ground beef
1 cup Birds Eye Small Whole Onions
1 package (10 oz.) Birds Eye Cauliflower
1 can (8 oz.) tomatoes
V2 Tsp. oregano
xk Tsp. salt
2 Tbsps. chopped parsley
Shape beef into a square block about 1 inch high. While
browning bottom of beef block in skillet, cut or break into
about 20 small blocks; then turn each to brown quickly on all
sides. Push to side of skillet. Add onions and cauliflower,
stirring to brown onions and thaw cauliflower. Add
tomatoes, oregano and salt. Stir meat and vegetables
together; cover and simmer 3 minutes. Sprinkle with
parsley. Makes 4 servings.
THE AFIKOMAN AND SANKA
What should you be serving with the Afikoman this
Passover? Sanka Brand Decaffeinated Coffee, of course.
Just made for people who love coffee but are caffein con-
scious. All coffee lovers like it because it's the only leading
coffee decaffeinated with pure mountain water and natural
effervescence. Serve Kosher-for-Passover Sanka. Look for
the K-P. Ground, Instant or Freeze-Dried.
MAXWELL HOUSE
THE ORIGINAL PASSOVER COFFEE
Maxwell House has been gracing Seder tables for more
than half a century. Be sure to stock up on Maxwell House.
Always hearty, rich and mellow, this very special coffee is a
favorite in Jewish homes every day too. Instant or regular,
Maxwell House is the way to end a special meal. Look for
the K-P.
"PHILLY"' WALDORF SALAD
1 8-oz. Pkg. Philadelphia Brand cream cheese, softened
2 Tbsps. orange juice
1 Tbsp. grated orange rind
1 Tbsp. sugar
3 cups chopped apple
1 cup chopped celery
lA cup chopped walnuts
Combine cream cheese, juice, rind and sugar, mixing until
well blended. Add remaining ingredients; mix lightly. Chill.
Eight servings.
SERVE BRIM DECAFFEINATED COFFEE
The family has gathered from far and near, and the
children are impatiently waiting for the moment when they
may ask the four questions.
What coffee are you serving? Brim Decaffeinated Coffee
so that everyone can drink to his heart's content. Treasured
memories are roused in everyone's hearts by the rich and
meaningful Seder service. To be sure that these treasured
memories aren't disturbed by sleepless nights, serve 97 per-
cent caffeine-free Brim. Regular or dark roast, Brim is now
available in one grind for all coffee makers, or in freeze-
dried, and is certified Kosher for Passover. Look for the
K-P.
COFFEE FLUFF
1 Tbsp. Brim instant coffee
5 Tbsps. water
2 egg whites, unbeaten
lVs cups brown sugar
Dash salt
Dissolve Brim instant coffee in the water. Place all ingre-
dients in top of double boiler over rapidly boiling water.
Beat constantly with hand or electric beater until frosting
stands in a peak on beater. Spread on cake. Garnish with
walnut halves.
Sun Maid Raisins Wishes You A Happy Nisan!
These cookies are delicious with dark Seedless Sun Maid
Raisins; however, you may vary the recipe with Golden,
Muscat or delectable Sun Maid Currents. All four kinds of
Sun Maid Raisins are bursting with natural energy and
they're dried the old-fashioned way in the sun. All cer-
tified Kosher for Passover. Great mixed with nuts or by
themselves served throughout the holiday.
FRUIT-NUT CHEWS
2 cups matzo meal
2 cups matzo farfel
1V cups sugar
1 Tsp. cinnamon
Vi Tsp. ginger
1 Tsp. salt
1 cup chopped walnuts
1 cup Sun Maid Raisins
3 eggs, well beaten
3/ cup peanut oil
lk cup mashed ripe banana
Combine matzo meal, farfel, sugar, cinnamon, ginger,
and salt. Stir in nuts and raisins. Beat eggs, oil, and banana
together very thoroughly. Beat into dry mixture very
thoroughly. Drop by teaspoonsful onto well-greased cookie
sheets. Bake in a moderate oven (350 F degrees) 20 minutes
or until browned. Makes about 50.
FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS
...AND EVERYDAY!
Breakstone's butter is 100% natural, premium quality
butter. Since 1882, it's the only butter good enough to
have the Breakstone's name.
KOSHER FOR PASSOVER
m
I V
21<
73010"
SAVE IOC
On Breakstones
Butter (any size
or variety).
RETAILER Kraft inc (Dairy Group) wrl retm
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PROMPTLY


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 3, 1987
Happening
Robert B. Gross, son of Robert B. and Helen J. Gross. Miami,
has been promoted in the U.S. Army to the rank of sergeant.
Gross is a squad leader with the 505th Infantry Regiment at Fort
Bragg. He received an associate degree in 1976 from Dade South
Community College. Miami
Miami Falasha Rescue's second meeting will take place on
Tuesday from 7:30-9 p.m. at the Morton Marcus Residence
Topics of discussion will include items from a report from
Washington, which outlines methods for rescuing Ethiopian Jews
still trapped in Ethiopia Mort Marcus may be contacted for direc-
tions and further information about the new group.
There will be an organizational meeting on Sunday. April 12.
at 2 p.m. in a meeting room at 875 NE 195 St. to begin an official
Miami chapter of Friends of ALYN. the American Society for
Handicapped Children in Israel.
Cedars Medical Center will sponsor a free program on the
causes, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of headaches on
Tuesday at the Radisson Mart Plaza Hotel Registration will begin
at 7 p.m. and the program will commence at 7:30 p.m. Dr. Allan
Herskowitz. neurologist and medical director of Cedars'
Headache Treatment Center, will be the featured speaker.
ACT III. Arthritics Caring Together, a Dade County support
group sponsored by the Florida chapter of Arthritis Foundation,
will hold its monthly meeting Thursday. April 9 at 1030 a.m. at
Parkway Regional Medical Center.
The Hebraica Miami Community Center announces April 12.
at 9:30 a.m. for a "Rally '87." Instructions and rules are offered
at Hebraica.
William F. Saulson will speak of "Baubles. Bangles and Beads
Soviet Jewelry." during the breakfast meeting of the Men's
Club of Temple Ner Tamid on Sunday.
A free seminar on the treatment and management of headaches
will be presented by Cedars Medical Center from 7:30-9:30 p.m
on Tuesday at the Radisson Mart Plaza Hotel in Miami. Biofeed-
back and thermography will be demonstrated. The speaker is
Allan Herskowitz. MD. Neurologist and Medical Director of
Cedars' Headache Treatment Center.
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-
Hadassah
Events
The Henrietta Szold Chapter of
Hadassah will meet on Monday.
Due to the Passover holiday, the
meeting will be held at 300 71st
St., Hadassah Building in the City
National Bank, Room 430 at 10:30
a.m.
Reservations are now being ac-
cepted for the May 14 donor lun-
cheon, the gala event of the year.
Hatikvah Hadassah will have
their chapter meeting Thursday,
April 9 at 7:30 p.m., at the Har-
mony School in southwest Miami.
The program for the evening will
feature detective Gus Ewell
speaking on the topic, "Street
Safety for Women and Children."
Refreshments will be served. All
members and prospective new
members are welcome.
The Miami Beach Region of
Hadassah will hold its Miami
Beach conference on May 17 at
the Konover Hotel, announced
Jean Temkin, president of the
Miami Beach Region. The theme
will be "Dor 1 'Dor Generation
to Generation." Chairwoman of
the day will be Ricki Igra.
The Ko'ach Chapter of Miami
Beach Hadassah will meet 8 p.m.
Tuesday in the Cadillac Hotel on
Miami Beach. Dr. Merry Haber,
psychologist, will lecture on "How
to Have a Healthy Mental
Attitude."
The Torah Chapter of Hadassah
will hold its regular meeting on
Monday at 12:30 p.m. at Temple
Zamora in Coral Gables. Southern
Bell Telephone will present a safe-
ty program, "Help is as Close as
your Phone."
The slate of officers to be
presented will be headed by presi-
dent, Vera Fiefler. Vice
presidents are Olga Issenberg,
Libby Lieberman, Diane
Nichtberger and Dorothy Spector;
Secretaries; Ann Young and Mary
Zack; Treasurer; Lee Stiglitz and
Parlimentarian Ann Goldberg.
Israeli Film Festival
Opening A Gala Event
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Fhridian Staff Writer
There were sequins and
champagne and wandering
face-painters to sprinkle
more glitter on the crowd
which turned out for the
opening night gala of the
Israeli Film Festival at the
Colony Theatre Sunday.
When the elegant crowd, which
included many prominent Jewish
Miamians, was seated in the
theatre, Nora Swan and Hank
Kaufman, co-directors of the film
festival, and Mayor Alex Daoud of
Miami Beach, recently returned
from a trip to Israel, introduced
the first film of the festival,
"Avanti Popolo," with proper
pomp and circumstance.
RAHAMIM TIMOR, Israeli
Consul General to Miami, also
helped, introduce the evening's
festivities.
When the film, which will be
shown again Sunday at 6 Pm
began to roll the images of the
elegant evening dress of those at
tending were replaced by the dus
ty fatigues of Egyptian soldiers on
the screen.
Israelis and Americans alike
were given a chance to see the end
of the 1967 Six-Day War through
the eyes of two Egyptian soldiers
who, like the Israelis they en-
countered, were through" with
fighting and only wanted to get
home.
AFTER THE film, a black-tie
show party was held at the Surf-
side Beach Hotel.
The Israeli Film Festival con-
tinues through this week,
culminating in an Israeli fair on
Lincoln Road Mall on Sunday,
beginning at noon.
For those who love Israel from a
distance, both films and the
fair m; be .u chance to ex-
perience Israeli culture up close
right here at home.
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Enjoy
one of
Passover's
most
satisfying
traditions.
Lllfi'iVft^ftWfr
Santa" has been part of
Passover for generations.
And because Sonko*
naturally decaffeinated
using pure mountain water
and nature's sparkling
effervescence, it's one d If*
Holiday s most satisfying
traditions So be sure to
continue the tradition mis
Passover. Serve smooth.
Decaffeinated Coffee at

I m





So. Fla. Council Na'amat
Donor Luncheon April 5
Jaime Bronstein, clarinetist,
and the Klezmer Band will
highlight the entertainment pro-
.rram of the 55th annual Donor
Luncheon of the South Florida
Council of Na'amat USA schedul-
ed for noon, April 5 in the
ballroom of the Fontainebleau
Hilton Hotel in Miami Beach.
This traditional Klezmer band
(instrumental entertainers)
revives the art of medieval Euro-
pean Jewish musicians who travel-
ed from town to town performing
songs, but today adds a touch of
American ragtime and now the
sound of Jewish, Israeli, modern
and traditional songs. Bronsztein
has performed in Argentina for 20
years and was the founder of the
Lubavitch band in South America.
Harriet Green, chairman of the
annual gala, has announced the
following chairmen: Margot
Bergthal, reservations; Shirley
Partner, hostess; Irene Rac-
zkowski, decorations; Lillian
Davis, invitations. Veda Gruber of
the Eilat chapter will deliver the
reservations.
Ben Cohen of New York City,
national president of the
American Zionist Federation will
be the principal speaker. Some
750 persons are expected to at-
tend the luncheon.
A slide show of the adventurous
travels of Isadore Hanken and a
musical program featuring
Passovir melodies is on tap for
the Beba Idelson Chapter of
Na'amat at their Wednesday,
April 8, 11:30 a.m. meeting to be
held in the clubroom of the 100
Lincoln Road Building, Miami
Beach.
Hanken, the son-in-law of the
late Pauline Cossow, the founder
I of the club 32 years ago, is a lec-
turer and author. He has written a
book on the Florida Everglades
and has written technical manuals
for the military. His slides will in-
clude those taken in the State of
I Israel.
Esther Weinstein, vice presi-
dent, will entertain with her
repertoire of Hebrew, Yiddish and
English songs. She will be accom-
Amit Women
Coral Gables Chapter will meet
Ion Tuesday, at noon at Zamora
I Temple, Coral Gables. A luncheon
Iwill be served. A wonderful pro-
jgram will be presented.
(.alii Chapter will have a Mini
I Luncheon on Monday, at noon at
Ie Young Israel Synagogue,
Iorth Miami Beach. Mrs. Hannah
IMathews will present a Model
I seder Table and a Passover
I seminar. Family and friends are
| invited.
Hadar Chapter meets oh Thurs-
|y. April 2 at noon in Byron Hall,
IMiami Beach. A book review will
I*given by Shulamith Cohen and
ptreshments will be served.
Moorings Chapter will meet on
l2.efSday' at noon in the
Wditonum of Moorings Towers,
worth Miami Beach.
g Hatikvah/Miami Beach
fl-hapter will hold a Pre Pesach
K o meetin* on Thursday,
vST, iat noon in the Kneseth
trf :S"ml Hall, Miami Beach.
, nta will be served and
l Peaker will be Rabbi Yossi
fourth Annual
Macrobiotic
Passover Seder
if
Vn-
panied by Helen Skolnick at the
piano.
Sarah Kerbs and Mildred Frank
will serve as hostesses for the
Passover refreshments.
"Passover the Holiday of
Freedom," is the topic of a talk to
be given by Ida Kovalsky with a
Passover musicale to be led by
Frieda Levitan at the Monday,
April 6, 1 p.m. meeting of the
Eilat Chapter of Na'amat to take
place in the civic auditorium of
Financial Federal Savings and
Loan Association, 755
Washington Ave., Miami Beach.
Veda Gruber, Spritual Adoption
chairman will give a current
report on the project to assist
small children in Israel who are in
need of a day/night home.
Rose Rubin and Ann Adler will
serve the Passover refreshments,
according to Faye Brucker,
president.
Fannie Rest, teacher and
scholar, will be guest speaker on
the topic of "Passover Today
Its Relevance," at the Monday,
April 6, noon meeting of the Kin-
neret Chapter of Na'amat. The
session will be held in the social
room of Temple Ner Tamid.
Rest is a long-time teacher at
Temple Ner Tamid.
Rita Adoff, president of the
club, said Passover cakes will be
served.
Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Love And Hope Ball
Dr. Dominick P. Purpura,
dean of Yeshiva University's
Albert Einstein College of
Medicine, has been appointed
to the additional position of
vice president for medical af-
fairs of the University, Dr.
Norman Lamm, president of
the University, has announced.
Holocaust Memorial
Day Observance
The Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami will hold its annual
communitywide Yom Hashoa,
Holocaust Memorial Day obser-
vance on April 26 at 7:15 p.m. at
Beth Torah Congregation in
North Miami Beach.
The keynote speaker will be
Professor Irwin Cotler, a McGill
University Art and Law graduate
who was appointed a visiting Pro-
fessor at Harvard Law School.
Pictured at the ISth Annual Love and Hope Ball to benefit the
Diabetes Research Institute at the University of Miami School of
Medicine, are from left., Mrs. Baron de Hirsch Meyer with
Chairmen Mr. and Mrs. Leon Simkins. Mr. Simkins holds the
gold rose which was presented to Mrs. de Hirsch Meyer in
gratitude for her support of the Diabetes Research Institute.
:

Spread the news
this Passover.

We re spreading the news that Philadelphia Brand cream cheese has only halt the
calories of butter or margarine. So this Passover you can en|oy deliciously rich and
creamy Philly twice as much or twice as often Its certified Kosher for Passover by
Rabbi Bernard Levy. Look for specially marked Philadelphia Brand cream cheese.
And spread the news with best Passover wfshes from Kra".
nOD*7 -KM



Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 3, 1987
Israel Bonds To Honor Two
North Miami Beach Couples
BBYO Sports Roundup
The Greater Miami Israel
Bonds Organization will honor
two North Miami Beach couples
during a Salute to Israel breakfast
at the Buckley Towers con-
dominium on Sunday. Being
recognized at the celebration
which will begin at 9:30 a.m. will
be Isidore and Pearl Feldman and
Joseph and Gussie Goldberg, who
reside in Buckley Towers.
Both couples, who will receive
the Israel Freedom Award, are
being honored for their involve-
ment in many philanthropic
organizations. The Feldman and
the Goldbergs have been staunch
supporters of the State of Israel
through the Israel Bonds
program.
Now retired from the Jewish
Postal Workers, Feldman has
been a member of B'nai B'rith for
25 years while his wife, Pearl, has
been active with B'nai B'rith
Women. The Feldmans have been
members of Adath Yeshurun for
eight years and have been active
with Hadassah, as well as with the
Buckley Towers Social Club.
Like the Feldmans, the
Goldbergs have been active in
B'nai B'rith and Hadassah. They
have also been members of Adath
Yeshurun for 13 years and are
members of the Buckley Towers
Social Club.
Guest speaker at the breakfast
will be Debbie Wemick, a local
leader for the Jewish nation. A
representative of the Israel Bonds
Organization for 15 years, Wer-
nick has also been actively involv-
ed with Hadassah and AMIT
Women.
The breakfast is being spon-
sored by the Buckley Towers
Israel Bonds Committee. Acting
as chairperson is Mary Ross while
Elaine Miller is serving as co-
chairperson.
The Gold Coast B'nai B'rith
Council of BBYO is gearing up for
its 1987 Basketball League.
Beginning in April, eight chapters
of the AZA, the boys component
of BBYO, will begin competing for
the title. Games will be played
each Sunday at the Jewish Com-
munity Center in Fort
Lauderdale.
The Council recently concluded
its 1987 Flag Football season and
B'nai Israel AZA of Hollywood,
Football Championship. BY
In the playoffs held previous
undefeated Genesis AZA of fi
Miami Beach beat fourth 1
Melech AZA of P.antaS fc
Second place B'nai Israel AZA of
Hollywood soundly defeated ft&
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Joseph and Gussie Goldberg
Who Is To Blame For
Rising Medical Costs?
"Is your lawyer or your doctor
responsible for your rising
medical costs?" will be the topic of
discussion at the next Temple
Beth Am Congregational
Breakfast Forum in the Temple
Youth Lounge, April 12 at 9:30
a.m.
Participants will be Dr. Stephan
Wise Unger, spokesman for the
Dade County Medical Association,
Attorney Richard Stephan Mas-
ington, specialist in medical litiga-
tion, and Bernard Goodman,
board member of Temple Beh Am,
who will act as moderator.
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insured


35th
Miami Beach Class Of '52 Reunion
Continued from Page 1-B located. Twelve have since died.
L. 20 teachers to return for the
"rtv Teller was a guidance
Kelor at the old Beach High.
Uich was then located at what is
now Ida Fisher. Teller will be go-
ne to her own 50 year reunion at
the University of Georgia this
year.
The big issues at that time, for-
tunately, were not more serious
than how many petticoats a girl
wore and chewing gum, which
resulted in a detention.
"WE JUST didn't have any
serious discipline problems"
Teller recalls. "If you had a child
in school wouldn't you rather they
were battling over chewing gum
than hard drugs?"
Until three months ago, when
she lost her husband, Teller still
served as a substitute at Beach
High and noted that the business
department, in particular, turns
out students who stack up to
students anywhere else.
Coach Frank Paskewich will be
there, rerunning plays over and
over, such as the time Beach High
tied state champs Miami High,
7-7.
"Miami High was the top team
in the state year after year, and
no other local school had ever
beaten them or tied them" said
the coach, who was at Reach High
iron. 1946 through 1952
OTHER TEACHERS expected
to return for the reunion include
the Gilkej sisters. Margaret. Bet-
ty and Ann; coach Harold Lan-
nom, whu is now principal of
Miami Edison; former principal
lain Katz and school nurse Lois
Clark Alls worth.
Reunion committee member
Harold Cobb said that at least 200
members of the class have already
made reservations for the dinner
And with them will certainly be
memories.
Marlene Bertman Levin
remembers "Amicus" and the
beginning of strong feelings about
sisterhood.
Carole Wien Porter remembers,
"The clean air, changing classes,
showering after gym. white gym-
suits, knowing an answer in class,
watching the clock, dances in the
courtyard, the 14th Street beach,
the.5th Street beach and the 47th
Street be trying to unders-
tand formulas, trying to unders-
tand lifi
MALI OM STEIN remembers
",nf : when I entered
wach High in LOth grade, when
! made me feel so
imfortable."
Barabara /..'it i,oeb remembers
''having to spend two weeks
detention because Dean Tarrar
caught me sliding a salt shaker
down the table in the cafeteria."
Ann Broad Bussel, who is co-
chairman with Edyne Lurie Win-
ner, has been working since July
Putting together a directory of the
students. It was not an easy task,
W all except 60 students were
Dade Foundation To
Fnd Teen Businesses
JJe Dade Foundation will grant
* money to community-based
gamzations, with the capability
aunchmg teen busineases that
""'function within the multi-
^"Jral community.
wlJii8 '"itiat've, "Miamians
pha.JngfTgeiher-" i8 "*
mX ,a five-year program
foundation Challenge grant that
nVru? ^atched two to one by
"* Dade Foundation.
drl ,7ney wil1 be used to ad-
,* he lsSue of cultural and
ExL? K ls Dade Foundation
executive Director.
IT WAS an excellent school,"
said Bussel, who was teaching
specially handicapped students
until she recently retired to pur-
sue various business investments.
"The population on the Beach was
such that the students posessed
unique skills and talents. Most
people were fortunate to attend
that high school because it had an
excellent faculty that motivated
and was interested in the
students."
Phone calls are still coming in
from around the country of
former students eager to attend
the reunion, Bussel said. One has
to brace his or herself
psychologically, Bussel added. It
will be a shock to see someone
who has lost their hair, gained a
few pounds or wrinkled with time.
And not everybody was a suc-
cess, she said. Everybody has
their ups and downs.
So find out what happened to
Mary Jo, Al, Fred, Marlene ."
Centenary Tribute To
The Chopin Foundation will
observe the 100th Anniversary of
the birth of Arthur Rubinstein,
Master pianist and greatest
Chopinist of this century on Fri-
day, April 10, at 7:30 p.m. at the
Gusman Center for the Perform-
ing Arts.
Madame Arthur Rubinstein will
be coming from Paris as our Guest
of Honor.
Janina Fialkowska, the interna-
tionally acclaimed pianist and
Rubinstein's foremost protege,
will appear as the performing ar-
tist. Fialkowska is a Prize-Winner
of the Arthur Rubinstein Interna-
tional Piano Competition in Israel.
The concert will be followed by a
Reception at the Miami Center
Lobby, 100 Chopin Plaza and a
Gala Supper Dance at the
Bayfront Room of the Inter-
Continental Hotel, 100 Chopin
Plaza hosted by the Miami Center
on behalf of the Chopin
Foundation.
The General Chairmen for the
event are Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Wiegand. Mrs. Blanka Rosenstiel
and Mrs. Hanna Saxon.
DON'T BE LATE!
Saturday Only! Before you
," Mil ctafltaad were
" ;>- s Udi h Soecia1
purchases, factorv Cto*
and our usual everyday price
CUtl d'f making furniture
'oroaoie its a sail
for people w"o don t h
A.t1-'"
Selected Sectionals.
Sofas, Loveseats and
Modulars from
froms1
Selected Dining
Rooms and 3,5 and 7
piece Dinette sets
> from s5900
Selected Adult,
Youth Bedrooms and
Brass Daybeds
froms299
Selected Twin to
King Size Bedding
sets and Sleep Sofas
from'4900
Selected Accent
Chairs, Reclinera and
Swivel Rockers
fromMW00
545 NE 125th ST.. N'.M. 893-0800
Mon.-Fn.: 3 AM-7 PM. Sat 9 AM 5.30 PM
Sunday. 1 PM 6 PM
MAJOR CREDIT CARDS HONORED
All Sales Cash & Carry. (Small Del. Charge)
All Sales Final Prices do not apply to previous sales.
Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
North Miami Beach MJHH
Auxiliary To Hold Donor Luncheon
The North Miami Beach Auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged at Douglas Gardens will hold its Donor
Luncheon at Turnberry Isle Country Club on Thursday, April 9 at
noon. Over 100 people are expected to attend this annual event
chaired this year by Auxiliary President Sophie Desky. The Aux-
iliary will be honoring those members whose contributions have
earned them the titles of "Life Trustee."
The 235-member North Miami Beach Auxiliary is a support
group that raises almost $20,000 annually to benefit the Miami
Jewish Home. All monies raised by the group in 1986-87 are ear-
marked for the Gumenick Alzheimer's Respite Center.
This new division of the Miami Jewish Home on North Miami
Beach provides day care for Alzheimer's patients living in the
community and counseling for their families.
Further information on the North Miami Beach Auxiliary's
Donor Luncheon is available from Steffi Cohen at the Home.
Arthur Rubinstein ("""
I
Terrific Teachers!
We are looking for more creative, talented
teachers for Day School, Early Childhood,
Sunday and Hebrew Schools. An exciting,
progressive Jewish environment. Apply now
for Fall '87; call Rabbi Cook at Temple Sinai of
North Dade, 932-9010.
j
Seeking An Intimate,
Spiritual Seder?
JOIN RABBI SHLOMO CARLEBACH
WHO WILL LEAD SEDERS ON MONDAY, APRIL 13
AND TUESDAY. APRIL 14
AT THE DELIDO HOTEL
155 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, FL 33139
Fee: $50 PER PERSON (Discounts for Students and Sr. Citizens)
CALL RABBI WEISS 534-2683 FOR RESERVATIONS
RHINESTONES
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THIS PASSOVER
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FOR YOU
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For nearly 100 Passover seasons
Jewish families have known the en-
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think Swee-Touch-Nee.
DISTRIBUTED BY:
HI-GRADE FOOD CO. INC.
305758-0516


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 3, 1987
$11 Million In Yom Kippur War Next Generation
Bonds Reinvested In New Securities Brings Art To
A total ot 930 Jewish congrega-
tions in the United States and
Canada joined over the Purim
weekend in the launching of a
massive two-year Israel Bond
'Reaffirmation with Israel"
reinvestment campaign.
More than $11 Million in 1972
and 1973 Bonds have already been
reinvested in a "dramatic reaffir-
mation of support for Israel's goal
of achieving economic in-
dependence." it was announced
by Rabbi Stanley M. Davids of
New York, chairman of Israel
Bonds' National Rabbinic
Cabinet.
"One million friends of Israel
rallied in support of Israel by pur-
chasing bonds at the time of the
Yom Kippur War and helped the
nation to reconstruct its post-war
economy. Israel now wants to say
'thank you' by giving up to 20
months' advanced interest to bon-
dholders for reinvesting
1972-1973 bonds early," Rabbi
Davids said.
Local temples participating in
the Purim Reinvestment program
were: Aventura Jewish Center,
Bet Breira, Temple Beth Am,
Temple Beth Sholom, B'nai Zion,
Cuban Hebrew Congregation,
Hebrew Academy, Temple Israel,
Temple Judea, Temple Menorah,
Temple Moses, Temple Ner
Tamid, Temple Samu-El/Or Olom
and Temple Emanu-El.
Approximately $400 million in
Israel Bonds are eligible for
reinvestment in 1987 and 1988.
Bonds purchased in 1972-1973 are
valued at their full maturity
amount if investors add the cash
difference between that sum and
the issue price of a higher
denomination security.
Secretary of State George
Firestone was elected president
of the Greater Miami Chapter
of the American Technion
Society, Jay E. Leshaw, presi-
dent of the Greater Miami
Chapter and Sam B. Topf,
southern regional chairman
and a national vice president
made the announcement.
CUT ALONG DOTTED LINE AND USE FOR SHOPPING LIST-----------
A delicious Passover
is in the bag with
EASON
BRAND
ENDORSED BY THE
KOSHER FOR PASSOVER
CANNED FISH
Norwegian Sardines
-Portuguese Sardines
-Ibmato Sardines
-Sprats
-Kipper Snacks
-Fillets of Mackerel
-Salmon
-Tuna Fish
DRIED FRUITS
-Prunes
-Mixed Fruit
-Apricots
-Pears
-Peaches
-Diced Fruit Mix
-SB
-Raisins
CANDY & SNACKS
-Fruit Slices
Potato Chips
JUICES
-Grapefruit Juice
-Tomato Juice
-Grape Juice
-Apple Juice
-Cranberry Juice
-Prune Juice
FRUITS
-Cranberry Sauce
-Compote
-Stewed Prunes
-Grapefruit Sections
-Peaches
-Fruit Cocktail
-Pears
-Sliced Pineapple
-Apple Sauce
VEGETABLES
-Mushrooms
-Tomato Paste
-Tomato Sauce
-Asparagus
-Beets
-Carrots
-Potatoes
-Tomatoes
-Sweet Potatoes
DRESSINGS
Horseradish
-French Dressing
-Italian Dressing
-Russian Dressing
-Vegetable Oil
-"Creamy Garlic
CONDIMENTS
-Mayonnaise
-Catsup
-Cider vinegar
-Horseradish
SYRUPS
-Chocolate Syrup
-Pancake Syrup
PRESERVES
-Grape
-Cherry
-Strawberry
-Raspberry
-Orange Marmalade
-Honey
KITCHEN PRODUCTS
- Detergent
-Steel Wool Soap Pads
INSTANT MASHED POTATOES
IMPORTE0 OLIVES STUFFED WITH ALMONDS
AND REAL PIMENTOS
-BROOK TROUT-CREAMY ITALIAN DRESSING
D TASTE IS ALWAYS IN
DMtributtd .ie*onalry through Season froduct Corp Irvmgton. N.J.
Jewish Home
"A Taste of Culture," an even-
ing of cocktails and music, opened
a mixed-media art exhibit at the
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged at Douglas Gardens
on April 1.
"When the Next Generation
dedicated the Grand Salon of the
May Visitors Center, we were
hoping to bring art and culture to
the residents of Douglas Gardens
as well as to the community at
large," explained Next Genera-
tion President Nancy Ranch.
"This is the first of many special
events we plan to hold in our new
Home." The Next Generation is a
support group of up-and-coming
business and professional people,
each of whom has pledged $10,000
over the next 10 years toward the
capital expansion of the Miami
Jewish Home.
The exhibit, mounted by the
Moosart Gallery and Gallery 99,
offers melange of sculpture, pain-
tings and drawings.
The show will run from 8 a.m. to
7 p.m. through April 28 in the May
Visitors Center at Douglas
Gardens, Miami, and is open to
the public.
m
Rabbi Menachem Raab has
been appointed Dean of the
Samuel Scheck Hillel Com-
munity Day School. He uriU
assume this position on Aug. 1.
The school, located at 19000
N.E. 25th Avenue in North
Miami Beach, has an enroll-
ment of over 760 students from
preschool to ninth grade.
Bea Briklod, a long-time Girl
Scout leader and a volunteer at
Palmetto General Hospital,
was selected as one of six
outstanding local women to
receive the Community
Headliner Award at Women in
Communications' "Date With
the Press" lunchSn and
Treasurer of Temple Tifereth
Jacob.
The Junior Maccabiah, an annual athletic competition for Imm
boys and girls from Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties
took place last Sunday at the South Dade Campus of Miami Dads
Community ColUsge. Hank Kaufman, pictured here, coordinated
this event, which included about 800 participants, ranqinq in am
from U-l 8 Steve Klein, local director of youth actmtiesZ
BnaiB nth, has the task of preparing for the Junior Maccabiah
throughout the year.
Committee members pictured at the Opti-Mrs. Club of Miami
Beach annual fund-raising Silver and Gold Luncheon and
musical fashion show from left: Irene Pilzer, reservations and
seating; Dorothy Carmel, publicity and co-chairperson; Barbara
Miller, president of Opti-Mrs.; and Muriel Weston. overall
chairperson. Committee members not pictured are Mrs. Arnold
Renkoff, Mrs. Jack Segal, Mrs. Lee Pines and Mrs. Milton Olkin.
Not since the asking of the Four Questions
has something so tiny made it so big.
Its Tetley s tiny little tea leaves They ve been making it big in
Jewish homes for years Tetley knows that just as tiny lamb
chops and tiny peas are the most flavorful, the same thing is
true for tea leaves So for rich, refreshing flavor, fake time oui
for Tetley tea Because tiny is tastier'
fETLEY
Kosher for Passover
n-e ... i.r TETLEY. TEA
"Tiny is tastier
.* -" >* ft "'"- "


Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
... "And he shall bring forfeit unto the Lord for his sin which he
hath sinned"
(Leviticus 5.6).
VAYIKRA
VAYIKRA God called to Moses from the tent of meeting and
revealed the sacrificial laws. The burnt-offering was to consist of
a male animal without blemish; if it be a fowl, it was to be a turtle-
dove or a young pigeon. The purpose of this offering, which was
to be completely burned, was to make atonement for evil
thoughts. The meal-offering was to consist of fine flour, raw,
cooked, or stewed, generally intended as a freewill offering. The
peace-offering, of cattle or sheep, either male or female, was
another freewill offering, or vow, offered in the name of a family.
The sin-offering was intended to make amends for sins committed
by error. Different categories of individuals and groups were to
sacrifice different aminals for sin-offerings. The anointed priest
and the congregation offered a young bullock, the prince a he-
goat, a common person a she-goat. The person who touched an
unclean object, or failed to keep a vow, must bring a female lamb
or a female goat for a sin-offering; and if he could not afford
either, he must bring a burnt-offering, the second as a sin-
offering. A ram served as a guilt-offering in the case of a violation
of a negative ("Thou shalt not") commandment, or in cases of
theft of articles set aside as holy.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman-
Tsamir, $15, published by Shengold. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
Lane, New York, N.Y. 10038. Joseph Schlang is president of the society
distributing the volume.)
Miami beach GENERAL CARE FOR FUNGUS NAILS miami beach
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fAcross from Burdtne's)
Sport. MadlelM [ 531-0414}
WE ACCEPT MEDICARE ASSIGNMENTS
Sinai Academy
of Temple Sinai
of North Dacie
Share the Experience!
Temple Sinai of North Dade offers the most
exciting educational alternative at North
Dade's only Liberal Jewish Day School.
An enriched, challenging curriculum
A creative and loving faculty
A beautiful natural setting for learning and
playing
Register now for Fall '87 Kindergarten
through Sixth Grade.
Call RABBI COOK at 932-9010 for details
Sinai Academy does not discriminate on the basis of race,
color, national or ethnic origin.
Bar >li t *vali
Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
DANIEL MUHTAR
Daniel Albert Muhtar, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Jack Muhtar (Silvia) will
be called to the Torah as Bar Mitz-
vah on Saturday morning at 10:30
a.m. at Temple Emanu-El.
Daniel is in the seventh grade
and has been a student at
Lehrman Day School for the past
four years. Daniel has received
numerous awards and trophies in
different fields of sports, his
favorite hobby. He is a popular,
fine young man, and is well liked
by his peers.
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Muhtar
(Silvia) will host the Kiddush
following services and a reception
will be held Saturday evening in
the Friedland Ballroom at Temple
Emanu-El.
Many friends and relatives from
out-of-town and from home will
attend the joyous occasion.
Jewish Floridian salute
to our centenarians
The following individual is already 100 years old or
will be 100 by Dec. 31,1987:
NAME:............
BIRTHDATE:...................................................
PRESENT ADDRESS:...........................................
APT :................CITY:..................STATE:..........
CITYOFBIRTH:................................................
5"ATE:.................ZIP:.........COUNTRY:................
SUGGESTED BY- ......
ADDRESS: ...
CITY:
PHONE:.
Enclose a photograph of the centenarian if possible
"d mail to 100 YEARS YOUNG, The Jewish Floridian,
^ IM). Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101.
Dr. Arkadi M. Rywlin, Direc-
tor of the Department of
Pathology and Laboratory
Medicine at Mount Sinai
Medical Center, has received
the Distinguished Medical
Scientist of Florida Award.
Rywlin, who has been with
Mount Sinai's Department of
Pathology for 28 years, receiv-
ed the award from the Florida
Society of Pathologists, of
which he is a member.
City Of Hope Honors
Larry Paskow
The Phyllis Dropkin Chapter of
the City of Hope will honor the
memory of Larry J. Paskow at its
Spirit of Life Ball to be held at
Turnberry Isle Country Club on
Saturday, April 11 at 7:30 p.m.
Mr. Paskow was a member of
the National Board of Directors of
the City of Hope and this event
will be in recognition of his
generosity, dedication and leader-
ship over the past 25 years.
Hebrew Sunday School
Society Of Philly
Gala Reunion
The Hebrew Sunday School
Society of Philadelphia, founded
in 1838 by Rebecca Grata, will
hold a gala reunion for all past
teachers, alumni, friends and
family of the Hebrew Sunday
School Society on Sunday, April 5,
at the Gershman YM/YWHA.
The Society hopes to contact
former students, teachers and
friends who no longer live in the
Philadelphia area. For more infor-
mation about the reunion and for
invitations, contact the reunion
committee at (215) 735-7972.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
6:20 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach, Fla.
Rabbi Dow Rozancwaig
531-2120
Daily 7:20 cm. Afternoon 5:30 p.m.
Sat. 9 a.m.
ADATH VESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Cardans Drive
North Miami Beach 947 1435
Rabbi Slmcha Fraedman
Cantor Ian Alpem Coneervative
ft
Mlnyan 730 a.m. 16 p.m.
Sat. a Sun. a a.m. a 5 30 p.m.
Frl- Sp.m.
Ylddlth Stiabas. Prof. Sendar and
Mandall Wejemen.
Sat.aar. 8:30 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM
59S0 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 867-6667
Dr. Herbert Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
Rabbi Leonard Schoolman
Frl 7:30 p.m. Family San. "The First Teacher."
Sat. 11:15a.m. Bat Mltnah Karen Schrier.
Sermon "The God Who Calls."
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854-3911
Jack Rlemer, Rabbi
Robert Albert. ('
Cantor |
Rev. Milton Freeman,
Ritual Director
Sat. 9 a.m. Sabbath Sen. Mystery Night.
p.m-12 Sun. Trl alogue 8 p.m. "What Qod
Means To Me
Sat. 9 a.m. sen. Mlncheh 6:20 p.m.
Dally Mlnysn held morning ft evening
7 days a week. Please call lor schedule
BETH KODESH
Conaervatrve
1101 S.W. 12 Ava.
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joeaph Krlaael
Roee Berlin: Executive Secretary
6564.134
Annual Banquet May 18
Services Monday a Thursday 7:30 a.m.
Sat. 8:45 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
222S NE'121 St.. N. Miami. FL 33181
8915508 Coneervative
Dr. larael Jacobs, Rabbi _,
Dr. Joaeph A. Gorf Inkel. ( >,
Rabbi Emerltua \%'
Moaha Frledler, Cantor
Frl. 8 p.m.
Set. 8 s.m. Bst Mltzvah Andrea Porter.
Weekday ssrv. Mon Frl. 8 s.m.
Mon.-Thurs. 5 p.m. Sun. 8:30 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave., M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Cantor Nlssim Benyamini
Eve serv. 6 p.m. Sat. 8:1S a.m.
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
238-2601 ffiN
Rabbi Devld H. Auerbach \ V /
Cantor Stephen Freedman ""
Frl. p.m
Family Service. Grade 3 of the Dey School
rill participate Sat. 9:30 a.m. Bar Mltnah
Joel Andrew Markue.
Dally services: Sunday 9 30 s.m.
Mon.-Tuee. a Thurs. 7:30 a.m.
Wed 7:30 p.m
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM SM 7231
Chaae Ave. 141el St. in**
DP LEON KH0NI9M, Founding Senior Rabbi
GAR* A aUCKBTEIN.r
HARRY JOLT, Au.lllery P.
PAUL 0 CAPLAN, Aeeletent Nebbi
CANTON DAVID CON VISE*
Frl. 8:15 p.m. Sermon by Rabbi Gllckateln Sat
10:4S a.m. Bet Mttneh Jane Laien a twinning
with Sewe Oreeutehkln Soviet relueenrk Sun
10-30 am. Queet speaker Or Warren Barged
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N Miami Beach Blvd
Or Mas A Lipschiu. Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Dally Senrtcee: Mon Frl 7:30 a.m.
5:30 p.m.
Set. 8:25 e.m. 18:15 p.m.
Sun. 8 a.m. a S p.m.
Late service Frl f p.m.
if)
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Tampla Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami Beach
534-7213-534 7214
Barry J. Konovltch. Rabbi f
Moahe Buryn. Cantor
Sargio Grobler. Praaident
Sholem Epelbaum. Prasidant
Religious Committee

TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Bargsjr
Yehuda Shifman. Cantor
Maurice Klein. Ritual Director
Gerald Taub. Exacutive Oiractor
Kabbalat Shabbal 8 p.m
Sat. 9 a.m. Dr. Irving Lehrman will preach
Cantor Yehuda Shifman will chent.
Bar Mltnah Daniel Albert Muhtar.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetree Drive. Miami Beech
532-8421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schift
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Miami's Ptoiwr Reform Congi*gation
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami. 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595 5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell Bernat
Assistant Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor: Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob G. Bornstein
Director of Education
And Programming: Jack L. Sparks
Frl. 8 p.m.
Downtown: Rabbi Dr. Haskell M. Bernat
Torn Hamoreh Teachers Sebbeth. Liturgy
Cantor Rachelle F. Neleon end the Cantor's
Club Shebbat Dinner 8:45 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA
5600 Granada Blvd
Coral Oablaa
Michael B. Eleenetat.
Frl. 8:15
Reform
667 5657
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Shoahenah Raab, Cantor
Services Fri 7.30 p.m.
Sat 9:30 e.m
Oneg Shebbat will follow
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowltz it^
Ari Fridkis. Assoc. Rabbi (*.
Cantor Murray Yavneh \ygj/
Sat. 9 a.m. Sabbath service.
Dally Mlnchah Sunday Friday
8 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Sat. 9 a.m. and 5:15 p.m.
133
Cone>rva1iaj>
TEMPLE NEN TAMIO
7902 CarlyL. Ava .
Miami Baach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Lebovltx
Cantor Edward Klein
Dally sen. Mon.-Frl. 8 a.m. a 6:15 p.m. --*i"'
Sat. Mlncha 6:15 p.m. Sun. 8:30 a.m.
6:15 p.m.
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northaaat 172nd St
North Miami Beach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung. Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
232-6833 Modem Orthodox
Rabbi Hershel Becker
Set. 9:30 e.m. service et
Temple Semu-EI
9353 SW 152 Ave..
S. ot N. Kendell Dr.
TEMPLE SINAI 16801 NE 22 Ava
North Dede's Reform Cortgragetton
Ralph P Ktngslay. Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkas. Cantor
Barbara S Ramsay. Administrator
Frl. 6 p.m. Family Service
Birthday Weeelng for children bom In April.
Sat. a.m. serv Bat Mltnah Julia Faaa.
Baby naming Alex Benjamin 4 Roee David
Flnkel. Wedding bleeemg Steven Rosen a
Adrian Unger
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conaervetrva
271-2311
Dr Norman N Shapiro, Rabbi '
Benlemln Adfer. Cantor
David Roaenthal, Auxiliary Cantor

Mlnyan 7 am. Monday Thursday
Sunday 9 e.m.
Frl.eerly mi 8:30p.m. conducted by
Kadlme Youth Group Sat. 9 a.m. blessing of
children bom In April


Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 3, 1987
Stanley Stern 69, Passes, Rose From
Usher To Head Entertainment Division
Ida Schwartz, Resident For 70 Years
Stanley L. Stern, a 52-year mo-
tion picture industry executive
and retired senior vice president
in charge of Wometco's entertain-
ment division, died Monday of
cancer at his home in Coral Gables
at the age of 69.
He was born in Philadelphia on
December 31, 1917 and moved to
Miami Beach with with his mother
in 1932.
A nationally known figure in the
entertainment industry, Mr.
Stern spent his entire working
career with Wometco, joining the
company as a teenager in 1933 as
a movie theatre usher at the old
Capitol Theatre on North Miami
Avenue. He was promoted to
theatre manager and film booking
executive, then rose quickly up
the corporate ladder becoming
vice president in 1959, senior vice
president in 1967 and director in
1972. That same year, he was
named assistant to the president
for theatre division operations
and, in 1976, was elected senior
vice president, entertainment
Louis Hoberman,
Former
Vice Mayor
Louis Hoberman, 75, of Miami
Beach passed away this past
week.
Mr. Hoberman wa a member of
George Gershwin Lodge No. 195
K. of P., past president of ZOA
having served for 13 years, and
past Vice Mayor and Councilman
of Surfside having served for 12
years.
He is survived by his wife
Estelle; daughter Barbara
(Richard) Solomon of Miami;
grandchildren Martin and Danny
Solomon; brothers Morris Hober-
man of Miami Beach and Isadore
Hoberman of Delray Beach;
sisters, Ruth Pascul of Miami,
Esther Appelbaum of Miami
Beach and Shirley Malavenda of
Miami.
Services were held. Rubin
Zilbert in charge of
arrangements.
HAMMOND
Katie Levine. 94, March 30. Mrs. Hammond
is survived by her daughter Edith (Albert)
Rosenberg of Palm Beach, PI and Rye, New
York; sons. Herbert (Nancy) Hammond,
Baltimore. Md.; Dr. Morton L. (Beatrice)
Hammond. Miami Beach and Dr. Daniel 0.,
(Rosemond) Hammond, Miami. Services
were held.
ROTH. Samuel "AJ,M March 24. Services
held in Philadelphia, Pa.
LEVINSON, Leonard, of Bal Harbour, Fla.
Menorah Chapels.
SHAPIRO, Carl K.. of Miami. March 25.
Services were held.
THAL, Bernice "Bobbie.-' 62, of
Philadelphia and Miami Beach, March 24.
Services held in Philadelphia.
BERMAN, Helen Sparber, of Miami Beach,
March 29. Blasberg Chapel. Interment at
Mt. Nebo Cemetery,
ROLLER, Charles of Miami. Rubin-Zilbert.
BOOKMAN, Gertrude Cohen, of Miami
Beach. Eternal Light.
GLASS, Benjamin, of Miami Beach, March
24. Rubin-Zilbert.
ESTERN Bertha, 87, of North Miami
Beach, March 25. The Riverside.
BASS, Clara K.. of Miami Beach. Menorah
Chapels.
GELIGOFF, 76, of Miami. March 30. Levitt-
Wei natein
BLUM, David, 78. of North Miami Beach,
March 25. Menorah Chapels.
ROSENTHAL, Ida Pancer, of North Miami
Beach. March 28. Services in Pittsburgh,
Pa.
RAKOFT, Albert, of Miami Beach. Rubin-
Zilbert.
BERDMAN. Barney J., of North Miami
Beach. Eternal Light.
LEVINE, June, 53, of Miami. March 11.
Services were held.
HOWARD. Sid, 72, of Miami Beach, March
14. Rubin Zilbert
RUGENDORF, Wilton M of North Miami
Beach. The Riveraide.
BLEEKER. Abraham, of Kendall, March
18. Services were held.
SCHNEIDMAN, Minner, 86, of Kendall,
March 14. Services and interment at Mt
Nebo Cemetery.
SIMON, Line, of Miami Beach. Eternal
Stanley Stern.
Bertha D. Davidson,
104, Passes
Mrs. Bertha D. Davidson, 104,
passed away March 27. She was a
resident of Miami Beach for 29
years, coming from Passaic, New
Jersey.
She was a founder of Temple
King Solomon of Miami Beach, a
life member of Hadassah, the
Sisterhood of the Temple, ORT,
and many other organizations.
She is survived by her daughter,
Edythe D. Jiser, a grandson, a
great-granddaughter and a sister,
Esther Slavkin of Bloomfield Ct.
Services were held in New
Jersey. Rubin-Zilbert in charge of
arrangements.
division, with responsibility for all
of Wometco's theatres and tourist
attractions, including the Miami
Seaquarium (R).
When Wometco was purchased
in April 1984 by a group of private
investors led by Kohlberg Kravis
Roberts and Co., he was elected
senior vice president in charge of
the entertainment division of the
successor company, WEI Enter-
prises Corporation. He retired in
May 1985.
Mr. Stern was a charter
member of Variety Clubs Interna-
tional Tent 33 (was recipient of its
"Good Guy Award" in 1969) and
vice president and a director of
the National Association of
Theatre Owners. He was also a
vice president of Motion Picture
Pioneers, served on the Advisory
Committee of Will Rogers
Hospital and was a director of the
Dade County Chapter of the
American Red Cross.
He enlisted in the U.S. Air
Corps during World War II as a
private and rose to the rank of ma-
jor. He held several campaign rib-
bons and the Bronze Star. He was
recalled to active duty during the
Korean conflict.
Mr. Stern is survived by his
mother, Ethel. His wife,
Madeleine, died in 1986.
Services were held Wednesday
at 1:30 p.m. at Temple Beth Am.
FRANK, Irving, of Miami Beach. Rubin-
Zlbert.
GERTLERKRUPP, EUie. 34. Services held
in Montreal.
LIEBERMAN, Eli, of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert.
HOFFMAN, Daniel, 82, of North Miami
Beach, March 30. Levitt-Weinstein.
ZAIDENWORM, Mrs. Gilt Schulman, of
Miami Beach. Rubin-Zilbert.
SHERRY, Rochelle (Shellie) of Miami.
Rubin-Zilbert.
26640 (.reenheldRd.
Oak Park. Michigan 48237
(313) 543-1622
Hebrew Memorial Chapel
of Greater Detroit
Efficient. Reliable. Traditional
with
Dignity and Understanding
Complete Shipping Service From I- ii >t ill,i Area
Your First Call to Us will
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Lakeside Memorial Park and Eternal Light Funeral Directors arc proud to
sponsor this unique program which combines ownership of a plot at our
beautiful Memorial Park and a plan for prc-paid funeral service*.
Thi exceptional value MM res that vour one call will put you in touch with
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traditional Jewish funeral that son have to.
HERE IS WHAT WE INCLUDE:
Prompt Transfer from Place of
Death
Care and Preparation of Deceased
Casket and Hearse
Arrangement Direction of
Graveside Services
Permits and Benefit Assistance
24 hour emergency service
Shiva Candles, Cards and Benches
Gravcsite
Paved Private Visitation Path
Steel Reinforced Concrete Vault
Opening and Closing of Grave
Perpetual Gravesites Care
No maintenance or service fees
A Jewish Tradition since I95S
TOTAL: $1,595
No Interest Payment Plan* Available
For complete information on our plot and funeral service package plan
call your Lakeside/Eternal Light representative today.
In lime of need, one call will handle all the details
DADE:
592-0690
BROWARD:
525-9339
Ida Schwartz, 79, of Miami pass-
ed away March 29. She had made
her home here for the past 70
years coming from Fort Pierce,
Fl.
She was a member of the NC-
-W-sSastBr-
She is survived bv hpr 0;*
say--Was
Services were held.
Through years of dedicated service,
we have become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH "THE ASSURED PLAN
RRIES. BLASBERG IRA M. BLASBERG MICHAEL C BLASBERG
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
Pas! President Jewish Funeral
Oneetorsot America
'20 SEVENTY FIRST STREET
IRA M. BLASBERG
Funeral Director
865-2353
Funeral Director
MIAMI BEACH KOHiDA;
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service
Dade County
532-2099
Browdrd County
532-2099
Represented by Riverside Memorial Chapel, Inc.
New York: (718)263-7600 Queens Blvd. & 76th Rd., Forest Hills. NY.
You heard us right: Menorah wants you to shop and compare
pre-arrangement plans. Then come to Menorah last. With "ve
convenient locations, the finest options to custom-tailor your
plan, memorial gardens In Palm Beach and Broward. and
expert, counselors. Menorah is the plan more Jewish families
are choosing. And our plans are available at the lowest pnees
quoted by anyone. So go ahead shop "them" first. Then come
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^^Gardena and Funeral Chapel*
North Miami Beach: 935-3939 Sunrise: 742-6000
Margate: 975-O011 Deerfield Beach: 427-4700
West Palm Beach: 627-2277
Crmrlrrtrs Funeral Chaprb Mausoleum ITr Need HlanntnR


Business
Notes
Eliot Bennett Treister has been
appointed Loan Proposal Analyst
at Florida Fidelity Financial, ac-
cording to Marjorie Weber, presi-
dent The Miami-based firm deals
investment banking for the real
estate community.
The law firm of Tescher and
MiUtein PA, has announced the
KSn of its offices to 2100
Ponce de Leon Boulevard, pen-
thouse. Coral Gables. Victor L
Tibaldeo has become associated
with the law firm and will be
working primarily with Richard
C Milstein in probate and guar-
dianship litigation, general civil
litigation and family law matters.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-1815
Division 01
IV RE: ESTATE OF
ZELDA K. THAU
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ZELDA K. THAU, deceased.
File Number 871815. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representatives and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on April 3, 1987.
Personal Representatives:
Eugene Victor Thaw
Eastover Farms
Cherry Valley, New York 13320
Cecilia R. Grunhut
136fi Biarritz Drive
Miami Beach. Florida 33141
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Wayne A. Cypen, Esq.
CYPEN AND CYPEN
P.O. Box 402099
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
Telephone: (305) 532-3200
15630 April 3,10, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-513
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
TRLDE BODENHEIMER.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of TRUDE BODENHEIMER,
deceased, File Number 87-513 (01).
is pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
Dade County Courthouse, 73 W
Flagler Street. 3rd floor. Miami
Florida 33130. The names and ad
dresses of the personal represen
tative and the personal represen
Jatives attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
"nom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
Uon of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
^Kun on April 3. 1987.
Personal Representative:
ROSE STRAUSS
13509 Drexmore Road
Cleveland. Ohio 44120
Attorney for Personal
wpresentative:
HENRY NORTON, ESQUIRE
'**est Flagler Street, Suite 1201
warm. Florida 33130
eMone: ,305) 374-3116
8W8 April 3.10, 1987
I 2ADENYU... ggggjjjfK BjjjjfT^:
Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 17-B
BY YOSCF Ben A a. on
W)i-OR mt CHU-V, IS IOHtJ
YttU KtFUSt To TIP ft
-piSCoOATEOot WrtiT(!
-That same RtJTflUHBrfr// 'fkM
^ / rf..t
J7J4B / ..''. .* t ,- i .-.
Hollywood resident Marjorie
L. Silberman has been engaged
by Mount Sinai Medical Center
of Greater Miami as Assistant
Vice President, ad-
ministratively responsible for
several major clinical areas.
Silberman comes to Mount
Sinai with more than eight
years hospital administrative
experience.
Women's Day
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Knesset marked International
Women's Day by enacting a law
equalizing the retirement age of
women and men. Until now, men
retired at 65 and women at 60.
Under the new measure, women
may work until age 65 unless they
choose to take their pensions at
60.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-805
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
EMILIE E. STADLER,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of EMILIE E. STADLER, deceas-
ed. File Number 87-805 (01), is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is
Dade County Courthouse. 73 W.
Flagler Street, 3rd floor. Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on April 3. 1987.
Personal Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler Street. Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler Street, Suite 1201
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 374-3116
Florida Bar No. 059023
15629 ... April3.10.19M. _J
The Sunny Isles Community recently
celebrated the donation of a $53,900 emergency
vehicle, a mobile intensive care unit, to the
State of Israel at Temple Bnai Zion in Miami
Beach. The vehicle will be operated by Magen
David Adorn, Israel's Red Cross society,
which is supported here by the American Red
Magen David for Israel. Leading the drive for
this major gift were Jack and Irene Kwartner
(to the right of the ambulance). Other friends of
the Kwartners and of Israel include (to the left
of the ambulance) Mrs. Jack Sonofsky, Jack
Sonofsky, Harry Gibber, Vice President of
Temple Bnai Zion and Ruth Gibber. To the
right of the ambulance, besides Irene Kwart-
ner are (left to right) Cantor Yehuda Ben-
jamin of Temple Bnai Zion and Bernice
Kramer.
Participating in the annual meeting of the
B'nai B'rith Youth Commission in
Washington are, left to right: Carol Hymson
of Miami; Brian Hafter ofMillbrae, Calif, in-
ternational president of the Aleph Zadik
Aleph (AZA), the boys division of the B'nai
B'rith Youth Organization (BBYO); Janet
Sugarman of Atlanta; Jerry Sugarman of
Atlanta; Eileen Polices of Potomac, Md.;Alvin
Singer of Baltimore; Suri Duitch of Colorado
Springs, Co., B'nai B'rith Girls (BBG) inter-
national president; and Louis Hymson of
Miami. The commission convenes annually to
coordinate and oversee the worldwide ac-
tivities of BBYO.
Save
$400-s900 "V I
Serta Bedding
Now through Saturday enjoy special savings on
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SERTA PERFECT
$<
TWIN.Ea. Pc
Reg. $300
FULL. Ea. Pc
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I SI
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fURHITUPl
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MAJOR CREOIT CAHOS HONORED
All Sales Cash ft Carry. (Small Dal. Charge)
All Sales Final Prices do not apply to previous sales.
v


Page 18-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 3, 1987
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-8730
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
DANIA TORNA.
Petitioner /Wife
and
MIGUEL TORNA,
Respondent/Husband
TO: MIGUEL TORNA
Residence: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on ALAN
SCHNEIDER Esq., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 2720
West Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida 33135. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 17, 1987,
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 10 day of March, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ALAN SCHNEIDER, Esq.
2720 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33135
Attorney for Petitioner
14589 March 13, 20.27;
April 3, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11 Til JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-09652
Florida Bar No. 082676
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: The Marriage of
DEBORAH M. PINDER.
Petitioner/Wife,
and
CHRISTOPHER S. PINDER.
Respondent/Husband
TO: RESPONDENT
CHRISTOPHER
S. PINDER
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage and Other Relief has been fil-
ed against you; and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
HAROLD A. TURTLETAUB.
Petitioner's attorney, whose ad-
dress is 9995 Sunset Drive. Suite
108. Miami, FL 33173, on or
before April 10, 1987. and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on Peti-
tioner's attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
DATED this 5 day of March,
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
14577 March 13,20,27;
April 3,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Pacific International
Travel at 3928 Alton Road, Miami
Beach, Fl 33140 intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Sharlen Enterprises
A Florida Corporation
Kwitney Kroop A Scheinberg
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
Attorney for Sharlen Enterprises
15620 April 3.10,17,24,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name FESTIVAL DE LA
PRENSA at 2025 S.W. 1st Street.
Miami, Florida intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
RAUL R. OLIVA
Owner
14595 March 20, 27;
April 3, 10, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-1450
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MAX ROTHMAN,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
(Florida Bar No. 048326)
The administration of the estate
of MAX ROTHMAN, deceased.
File Number 87-1450, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
AH interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on March 27, 1987.
Personal Representatives:
MARTIN S. ROTHMAN
HERBERT A. ROTHMAN
401 Broadway
New York City. N.Y. 10013
ALAN R. LORBER, PA.
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
By: Alan R. Lorber
1111 Lincoln Road
Suite 680
Telephone: (305) 538-1401
12600 March 27. April 3, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-1038
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
THOMAS CLAYTON
ANDERSON
Deceased
FORMAL NOTICE
BY PUBLICATION
TO: ALLEN ANDERSON:
1455 West Avenue, No. 203
Miami Beach. Fonda 33139
and all unknown parties who may
claim as heirs, devisees, grantees
or beneficiaries of the Estate of
the late THOMAS CLAYTON
ANDERSON, be they minors, in-
competents or otherwise not sui
juris.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Petition for The Determination of
Beneficiaries and Heirs has been
filed in this court. You are required
to serve written defenses to the
petition not later than April 30,
1987, on petitioner's attorney,
whose name and address are:
HAYS, GRUNDWERG & VANN.
28 West Flagler Street, Suite 800,
Miami. Florida 33130 and to file
the original of the written defenses
with the clerk of this court either
before service or immediately
thereafter. Failure to serve writ-
ten defenses as required may
result in a judgment or order for
the relief demanded in the petition,
without further notice.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court on February 20,1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By HOLLIS L. LANGE
As Deputy Clerk
15609 March 27;
April 3,10,17,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SMITH TERMINAL
DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS at
12300 N.W. 32nd Avenue, Miami,
Florida 33167 intend* to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
SMITH TERMINAL
WAREHOUSE COMPANY
(a Florida corporation)
By: J. Leonard Sklawer, President
SYDNEY S. TRAUM, PA.
Myers, Kenin, Levinson &
Richards
1428 Brickell Avenue,
Miami, Fl 33131
Attorneys for
SMITH TERMINAL
WAREHOUSE COMPANY
(a Florida corporation)
14594 March 20, 27;
April 3, 10,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTON
DIVISION
Case No. 86-18971 (CA 29)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States
Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
OSCAR HORMAZA, et. al.,
Defendants.
TO: OSCAR HORMAZA,
residence unknown, if alive
and if dead, to all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against the said
OSCAR HORMAZA and all
parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or in-
terest in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an ac
tion to foreclose a mortgage on the
following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Condominium No. 512 of
5050 CONDOMINIUM, ac-
cording to the Declaration of
Condominium thereof, as
recorded in Official Records
Book 10337, at Page 293, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida, together
with undivided interest in the
Common Elements appurte-
nant thereto, as amended;
together with all im-
provements, appliances and
fixtures thereon
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your writen defenses, if any, to it
on Keith. Mack, Lewis and Allison,
Plaintiffs attorneys, whose ad-
dress is 111 N.E. 1st Street,
Miami. Florida 33132, on or before
April 24th, 1987, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 19th day of
March, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
15605 March 27;
April 3,10,17. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name The Amusement
Group and/or Vito's Video at
13541 S.W. 62 Lane. Miami,
Florida intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Jay M. Hecker 100%
13541 S.W. 62 Lane, Miami,
Florida 33183
Hays, Grundwerg & Vann
Attorneys for Jay M. Hecker
28 W. Flagler Street, Suite 800
Miami, Florida 33130
14592 March 20,27;
April 3.10,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name THE NATURAL
FOOD EXPRESS at 1717 Collins
Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida
33139 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
SOUTH FLORIDA
WHOLE FOODS CO. INC.
a Florida Corporation
By: DEBORAH S. WEISS,
President
1717 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
BERNARD HUTNER, P.A.
Attorney for South Florida Whole
Foods Co. Inc.
14578 March 13,20.27;
April 3,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under th< fic-
titious name CYGNUS ENTER-
PRISES at 5840 W. FLAGLER
STREET (SUITF-1) MIAMI.
FLORIDA 33144 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
VITTORIO CREATINE-PRES
CYGNUS ENTERPRISES.
CORP.
14586 March 13.20. 27;
April 3, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-1325
Division (04)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
AMELIA LAGER,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of AMELIA LAGER, deceased.
File Number 87-1325 (04), is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
Dade County Courthouse, 73 West
Flagler Street, 3rd floor, Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
to whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun April 3. 1987.
Personal Representative:
ERIC I.ACER
1138 Woodbine Avenue
Narberth, Pennsylvania 19072
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler Street, Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 374-3116
15623 April 3. 10. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-00311 (CA 23)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI, a
United States Corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
SUSAN BARROS, et al
Defendants.
TO: MERC1EL PRIMO
14270 S.W. 73rd St.
Miami, FL.. 33183
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Lot 11. in Block 38, of
KENDALE LAKES,
SECTION SEVEN,
according to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 92.
at Page 74, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis & Allison.
Plaintiff's attorneys, whose
address is 111 N.E. 1st Street.
Miami, Florida 33132, on or before
May 1, 1987, and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorneys or immediately
thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 26 day of March,
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
15622 April 3, 10,17,24, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name LANNIE at 1944 SW
8 St Miami. FL 33136 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Adeta O. Nasser
i4691 March 20,27;
April 3, 10, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name fhe Enchanted Child
at 7130 SW 117 Ave. Miami FL
33183 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
De Los Rios, Inc.
Owner
14556 March 6, 13.20. 27, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NUMBER: 87 1795
DIVISION: 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JACOB L. FRIEDMAN.
Deceased.
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the Estate
of JACOB L. FRIEDMAN,
Deceased, File Number 87-1795, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the Co-Personal
Representatives and the Co-
Personal Representatives' at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with the Court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE: (1) all claims against the
estate and (2) any objection by an
interested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, venue or jurisdiction of the
court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this notice has
begun on April 3, 1987.
ANN UHLAR FRIEDMAN,
Co-Personal Representative
ARTHUR E. LIPSON.
Co-Personal Representative
MORTON B. ZEMEL,
Co-Personal Representative
MORTON B. ZEMEL, ESQUIRE
Florida Bar No. 090723
16666 N.E. 19th Avenue. Suite
HI
North Miami Beach. Florida 33162
Telephone: (305) 949-4237
15624 April 3, 10, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name EAST COAST
TRANSPORTATION COMPANY
at 12300 N.W. 32nd Avenue,
Miami, Florida 33167 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
SMITH TERMINAL
WAREHOUSE COMPANY
(a Florida corporation)
By: J. Leonard Sklawer, President
SYDNEY S. TRAUM, P.A.
Myers, Kenin, Levinson &
Richards
1428 Brickell Avenue.
Miami. Fl 33131
Attorneys for
SMITH TERMINAL
WAREHOUSE COMPANY
(a Florida corporation)
14593 March 20, 27;
April 3, 10, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SEMANARIO
PUEBLO at 2025 SW 1st Street
Miami, FL 33135 intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Raul R. Oliva 50% Owner
Rafael Alcazar 50% Owner
15626 April 3. 10, 17,24. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Battersea Medical
Publications at number 3691 North
Prospect Drive, in the City of
Miami, Florida, intends to register
the said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this 17
day of March, 1987.
Murray Epstein, M.D.
Nelson C. Keshen. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
8905 SW 87th Avenue. No. 209
Miami, Florida 33176
15603 March 27;
April, 3,10,17,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name ZURITA MANAGE
MENT at 1407 MERIDIAN
AVENUE. MIAMI BEACH, FL
33139 intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
ADAN ZURITA
14580 March 13. 20 "
April 3. 1
NOTICE IS HERFRvLr.A,*
that the umfersbme? 7 -G VEK
engage in busin K^,?* to
titious name KLS P?b2S fic'
SHIP at 15985 North RTNEIt
Avenue. Hialean & *
^ register said "da ,nt*dS
ClerkoftheKuiH?eWithth*
County, Florida C0Unf^
no0* KASTEN
505 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida ttlM
Tel. No. (305) 672-7772
14587 March 13,20,27;
_______^^ April 3,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY^-
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic
titious name 500 MILES AUTO
REPAIR at 3090 N.W. 7th Strm
MIAMI. FLORIDA 33125 fi
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
ELVIN G, LANDER0 -
1428 S.W. 3rd Street, APT 1
MIAMI, FL 33135
15627 April 3,10.17,24.1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-12158
IN RE: The Marriage of:
RAOUL ETIENNE.
Petitioner,
and
CLARA L. ETIENNE,
Respondent.
TO: CLARA L. ETIENNE,
Residence unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney, 612 Nor-
thwest 12th Ave., Miami. Florida
33136, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before April 24, 1987:
otherwise a default will be entered
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: Diana Campbell
15604 March 27:
April 3.10,17,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring io
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Robeli Rental at 1124
SW 8 Street Miami, FL 33135 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Roberto Hernandez
Owner
15621 April 3. 10.17.24.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Ace S.L.V. at 13630
West Dixie Highway. North
Miami. Florida 33161 intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Ace Music Center. Inc.
13630 West Dixie Highway
North Miami, Florida 33161
Cypen A Cypen
825 Arthur Godfrey Road.
Miami Beach, FL
Attorney for ApplicantlW
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME WW.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned. 4nng
engage in business under the nc
UUouT name New *?*?
Parts at 6251 SW 8 StreetUW
FL 33144 intends to WJF*"?
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida
Carrera Plus Corporation
Melvin J. Asher
Attorney for Carrera Plus
sar- *-
NOTICE UNDER
ncrmousNAMEWw
NOTICE IS HEREBY that the undersigned, dearW
engage in busing, under g }
titious name *''*" Pwkg
HUBERT d/b/a Economic kw*
ing at 9500 SW 51 8W*JJ
FL 33165 intends to ngff
name with the Clerk of die Cw-
Court of Dade County, Flon
FERNANDO JHUBEKi
9500 SW 51 Street
Miami. Fla. 33165


Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 19-B
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
NOTICE OF ACTION
rONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PBOPERTY)
ik THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87-11544 FC 16
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
YOLANDA PALACIO, a/k/a
YOLANDA SANCHEZ,
Petitioner/Wife,
Roberto sanchez, a/k/a
ROBERTO AVILES,
Respondent/Husband
TO: Roberto Sanchez, a/k/a
Roberto Aviles
Tierra Caliente,
Municipio de Tuzantla
Michoacan, Mexico
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu
lion of Marriage has been filec
against you and you are requirec
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Alan H.
Miller, Esq., attorney for Peti
tioner, whose address is 10700
Caribbean Blvd.. Suite 317, Miami.
Florida 33189. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 24, 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 19th day of March, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Alan H. Miller, Esq.
10700 Caribbean Blvd.,
Suite 317
Miami. Florida 33189
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone: (305) 238-1080
15606 March 27;
April 3. 10, 17. 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-4201 (02)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ELIANE MARIE BRADLEY,
Petitioner,
and
EDDIE GEORGE BRADLEY.
Respondent.
TO: EDDIE G. BRADLEY
Residence unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney, 612 Nor-
thwest 12th Ave.. Miami, Florida
33136, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before May 1st, 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered.
24th March. 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
,54 March 27;
April 3. 10,17,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-12954 (22)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
YVONNE BERGSTROM
RENAUD. wife
and
LL'C RENAUD, husband
TO: Mr. Luc Renaud
c/o Mr. Yvon Renaud
203 Meunier Laval
Montreal H7G IR8, Canada
V.J0 U ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
UISS0LUTION OF MARRIAGE
bas been filed and commenced in
"is court and you are required to
*e a copy of your written
ises, if any. to it on ARTHUR
" LIPSON, attorney for Peti-
ner, whose address is 801 N.E.
'*< Street Miami, Fla. 33162 and
"'* we original with the clerk of
e above styled court on or before
Mii' '9!^: otnerwise a default
be entered against you for the
"ef prayed for in the complaint
or Petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
' said court at Miami. Florida on
* & day of March, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
B>' T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
March 27;
April 3.10.17. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-1421
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALEX FURST
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration of
the estate of ALEX FURST.
deceased, File Number 87-1421, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
W. Flagler Street, Miami, FL
33130. The personal represen-
tative of the estate is A.J. FURST.
whose address is 8802 Arvida
Drive, Miami, FL 33156. The name
and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
March 27, 1987.
A.J. FURST
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ALEX FURST
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Alan R. Chase
Cohen and Chase, P.A.
9400 South Dadeland Blvd.
Miami, FL 33156
Telephone: (305) 666-0401
15607 March 27;
April 3, 1987
15618
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-12057 (06)
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
HUGO ROBERTO LUNA
a/k/a
ROBERTO LUNA.
Petitioner,
vs.
MARIA DEL PILAR LUNA
a/k/a
PILAR LUNA,
Respondent.
TO: Maria Del Pilar Luna
Apt. No. 2
4021 Medford Drive
Annandale, Virginia 20007
You are hereby notified that the
petitioner has commenced the
above styled action against you
seeking a Dissolution of his mar-
riage to you, and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Elliot L.
Miller, 960 Arthur Godfrey Road
(Suite 116), Miami Beach, Florida
33140-3349 on or before April 24.
1987 and file the original with the
clerk before said date otherwise a
default will be entered.
Dated this 19th day of March,
1987.
Richard P. Brinker
By: T. Casamavor
15608 March 27;
Aprils, 10,17, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-11927
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION,
an association organized and
existing under the laws of the
United States of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
ISRAEL OJALVO,
et ux et al..
Defendants.
TO: ISRAEL OJALVO and
MARILYN OJALVO,
his wife
Apartado 3065
Caracas, 1010A Venezuela
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Unit 701-A, of THE ROYAL
CLUB CONDOMINIUM, ac-
cording to the Declaration of
Condominium thereof, as
recorded in Official Records
Book 11979, at Page 1624, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
April 24. 1987 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 18 day of March,
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
14597 March 27;
April 3, 10, 17, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 87-09209 13
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
MOZENA M.E.F.
COLEBROOKE
Petitioner
and
RODNEY F. COLEBROOKE
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: RODNEY F. COLEBROOKE.
St. Andrews Isle.
Bahamas
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.J.
GRAFF, ESQ., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St., N.M.B. Florida 33162 on
or before April 24th, 1987, and file
the original with the clerk of this
court otherwise a default will be
entered against you.
DATED: March 23, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
15610 March 27;
April 3. 10, 17,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Harvey Vogel d/b/a
Southern Construction &
Maintenance at 7465 SW 115
Street. Miami. Fl 33156 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Harvey Vogel
14583 March 13.20.27;
April 3, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-06081 CA-26
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
GOLDOME SAVINGS BANK,
successor by merger to
PALMETTO FEDERAL
SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff
vs.
MAHLON PAUL OLSON,
etal.,
Defendants.
TO: MAHLON PAUL OLSON
20175 Seneca Road
Apple Valley,
California 92307
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Unit 6-2, LAKESIDE XI
CONDOMINIUM, according
to the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof, as record-
ed in Official Records Book
11619. at Page 1469. amend-
ed by instrument recorded in
Official Records Book 11747,
at Page 1472, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida, and as subsequently
amended,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
April 24, 1987 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 18 day of March,
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
14598 March 27;
April 3,10,17,1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-10543
IN RE: The Marriage of:
LUCIEN JEAN-BAPTISTE,
Petitioner,
and
DONNIE L.
JEAN-BAPTISTE
Respondent.
TO: DONNIE L.
JEAN-BAPTISTE,
Residence unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney, 612 Nor-
thwest 12th Ave., Miami, Florida
33136, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before May 1st. 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered.
March 24th, 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
15612 March 27;
April 3, 10,17,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name "LAS PERLAS DE
AMERICA" at 6422 SW 133th Ct.
Miami intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Beatriz Consuegra
V-Presidente
International Numismatic Corp.
14588 March 13, 20,27;
April 3,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-12953 (22)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CARMEN CHUBECK, wife,
and
GARY CHUBECK, husband.
TO: GARY CHUBECK
5100 EAST TROPICANA,
No. 19F
LAS VEGAS, NEVADA
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on ARTHUR
H. LIPSON, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 801 Nor-
theast 167 Street Miami, Florida
33162 and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on
or liefore May 1, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this day 15 of March, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
15617 March 27;
April 3.10, 17. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-11081 CA 06
NOTICE OF ACTION
STOCKTON, WHATLEY,
DAVIN AND COMPANY, a
Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
v.
The Estate of ELWOOD E.
YOUNG, deceased, and the
unknown heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, or other parties claiming
by, through, under or against the
Estate; CLEO F. YOUNG; CRAIG
YOUNG; STATE OF FLORIDA,
DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE;
UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA; JOHN DOE and
JANE DOE;
Defendants.
To:
The Estate of Elwood E.
Young, deceased, and the
unknown parties who may be
spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, iienors,
creditors, trustees and all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
said Defendant, who are not
known to be dead or alive,
and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, ti-
tle, or interest in the proper-
ty herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an ac
tion to foreclose a mortgage on the
following property in Dade Coun-
ty, Florida:
Unit 809C. PHASE 3,
LAKESHORE 6. A CON-
DOMINIUM, according to
the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof, as record-
ed in Official Records Book
12684, at Page 2946, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida; together with an
undivided share in the com-
mon elements appurtenant
thereto, and any and all
amendments thereto,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on David R. Webster, Esquire, of
Rosenthal and Yarchin, P.A.. At-
torneys for Plaintiff, Suite 800,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami,
Florida 33137, on or before May
1st. 1987. and to file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torneys or immediately thereafter;
otherwise, a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on 24th March. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
By: Barbara Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
15613 March 27;
April.3, 10, 17,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-3662
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HYMAN DINER
Deceased
RE-NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of HYMAN DINER, deceased.
File Number 86-3662(01), is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Re-Notice has
begun on March 27, 1987.
Curator
ANNETTE D. PACKER
55 Davis Avenue
Rye. New York 10580
Attorney for Curator
IRVING CYPEN
Cypcn and Cypen
P.O. Box 402099
Miami Beach, FL 33140
Telephone: (305) 532-3200
15615 March 27;
April 3, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTI )N
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT CMJRT
OF THE 11TH JUD'CIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND ''OK
DADE COUNTY. FIORIDA
Civil Action No. 85-1'7562(11)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: RAINSOFT OF MIAMI,
INC., a Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ISMAR CORP., a Florida Corp..
ISMAEL DE MARCHENA,
OSCAR MACHADO. ORLANDO
RUIZ, PAUL SEASHOLTZ,
PAUL DE LA BASTIDE,
BRITTON FOREMAN and
DANIEL VILLALBA,
Defendants.
TO: ISMAR CORP.. a Florida
corporation and ISMAEL
DE MARCHENA
Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a Complaint for
damages and injunctive relief has
been filed and commenced in this
court and you are required to serv?
a copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on HAROLD M
BRAXTON, P.A., attorney for
Plaintiff whose address is Suite
406, One Datran Center, 9100
South Dadeland Boulevard, Miami,
Florida 33156 and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 24, 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the Complaint.
This notice shall be published
once a week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 18 day of March, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
BY: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
HAROLD M. BRAXTON. P.A.
Attorney for Petitioner
Suite 406, One Datran Center
9100 South Dadeland Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33156
Telephone: (305) 661-0766
14599 March 27;
April 3.10,17,1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-12984 (11)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
LUIS EDUARDO VELEZ.
Petitioner,
and
LUISA MARINA ALVAREZ,
Respondent.
TO: LUISA MARINA ALVAREZ
Carrera Segunda "A"
Oeste No. 5-60
Cali, Colombia, S.A.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
MELVIN J. ASHER, ESQ., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 825 South Bayshore Drive,
Suite 543, Miami, FL 33131. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
May 1, 1987; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 25 day of March. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By JENNIS L. RUSSELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
15619 March 27;
April 3, 10, 17, 1987
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME STATUTE
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF DADE
ss:
The undersigned, under oath,
says; It is the intention of the
undersigned to engage in a
business enterprise under the f -
titious name of PAWS AND
PURRS located at 68y N.E. 79 St.
in the city of Miami, Dade Count).
Florida.
Those interested in said enter-
prise, and the extent of the in-
terest of each, is a- rollows:
Luv of Animals, Inc.
Ann Montanez, President
689 N.E. 79 St.
15616 March 27;
April 3, 10.17.1987


. i

/
' *r
Greater Miami Israel Bonds campaign chair-
man, M. Ronald Krongold, second from left,
presents the President's Award to Greater
Miami Jewish Federation President, Aaron
Podhurst, who received the award on behalf of
the Federation's Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies' Investment Committee in
recognition of the committee's purchase of
Israel Bonds in support of the nation's
economic development. Representing the In-
vestment Committee are Mel Kartzmer, (stan-
ding next to Podhurst) and Joseph
Handelman. Helping make the presentation
are Israel Bonds National Vice Chairman
and Florida Chairman, Sidney Cooperman
and Philip T. Warren, currently a member of
the Greater Miami Israel Bonds Board of
Governors, who served as Campaign Chair-
man for two years prior to Krongold.
= \*"

Sister Jeanne O'Laughlin, President of Barry University deft)
received the ADL Woman of Achievement Award at a luncheon in
her honor from D. Inez Andreas, luncheon chairman Sister
Jeanne was honored for her enlightened leadership, generous
spirit, and her love of humanity and her country.
Rabbi David Saperstein, direc-
tor of the Religious Action
Center of Reform Judaism in
Washington, has been elected to
the Board of Directors of the
National Association for the
Advancement of Colored Peo-
ple, it was announced this week
by Benjamin Hooks, NAACP
executive director.
Russ Berrie, will be guest of
honor at a Boys Town
Jerusalem's 39th anniversary
international dinner on May
27 at the Plaza Hotel in New
York. In recognition of his sup-
port for diasadvantaged
Israeli youth, he will be
presented the Gate of
Jerusalem Award.
Workmen's Circle
Meeting Set
Workmen's Circle, Miami Beach
Branch 1059, will hold their mon-
thly meeting at noon on Wednes-
day, in the Surfside Community
Center.
The guest will be Public Infor-
mation Officer Vincent Mulshine
of the Miami Beach Police Depart
i, jment. His subject will be "Defense
'.'Against Crime and Criminals."


April ffl?
Special insert: Bet Shira Solomon Schechter Day School
Federation gears up for 1987 CJF General Assembly
See story on Page 5


IsRaeL
'Shalom Jerusalem
The City of Gold comes to Miami'
1987 marks not only the 39th an-
niversary of Israel's rebirth, but
significantly, it is also the 20th an-
niversary of the reunification of
Jerusalem in 1967. Accordingly,
the county-wide celebration that
will take place at Miami-Dade
Community College New World
(Wolfson) Campus in downtown
Miami on Sunday, May 17, is call-
ed, "Shalom Jerusalem the City
of Gold Comes to Miami."
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion board member, Norman
Lieberman, who is chairing the
"Shalom Jerusalem" organizing
committee is predicting a joyous
celebration. "Let's face it," he
says, 'there are very few occasions
when the Jewish community of
Dade County can come together at
one location and have a thoroughly
good time. I promise that this will
be a family-oriented, fun filled ex-
perience. Mark your calendars."
For information about "Shalom
Jerusalem" call event coordinator
Melody Leeds at Federation,
576-4000, ext. 353.
Super Sunday moves
campaign ahead
Pictured, from left, at Super Sunday, Donald E. Lefton, 1987
Combined Jewish Appeal chairman, and Saby Behar, Federa-
tion's Super Sunday chairman congratulating Rosalind
Streicher who received a $50,000 pledge in her first hour on the
phone. $1.68 million was raised between Super Sunday and Mop-
Up-Monday.
ISRAEL 39 2
"Shalom Jerusalem The City of Gold comes to Miami"
Super Sunday moves campaign ahead
CAMPAIGN 3
Give A Day program is huge success
An open letter to Rabbi Haskell Bernat and Gerald K. Schwartz
of Temple Israel of Greater Miami
WOMEN'S DIVISION 4
Constituent boards take active role in CJA
Women's Division elects new officers
BPW networking directory being prepared
Women's Division Hold the Date
GENERAL ASSEMBLY 5
Federation will host 1987 G.A.
Volunteer information
Sign up application
YOUNG LEADERSHIP CABINET 6
Miami takes an active role in Young Leadership Cabinet
SPECIAL INSERT 7-10
Bet Shira Solomon Schechter Day School
COMMERCE AND PROFESSIONS 11
Chairman's message
Rabbi Azulay works hard for the CJA
Paytons host dinner party on behalf of CJA
Commerce and Professions Hold the Date
HIGHLIGHTS OF ALLIANCE DIVISION EVENTS 12
Admiral's Port
Aventura
Balmoral
California Club
Costa Brava
"Fabulous Fiftys" Alliance Brunch
Kenilworth Tiffany
Terrace Towers
JEWISH FEDERATION TELEVISION 13
JFTV program schedule
Matchmaker, matchmaker on JFTV
"Encounter"
A "Passover Adventure" on JFTV .
Make JFTV your voice
COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMITTEE 14
Cult authority to speak at interfaith seminar
CRC calls for abrogation of agreement
Elie Wiesel to speak at governmental seminar
CAMPAIGN/AGENCIES 15
YLC to hold "Shalom Brunch"
YLC "Purim Blast"
Miami Jewish Home opens Alzheimer's hot line
JVS thanks volunteers
Mount Sinai Medical Center works with observant Jews
Foundation to hold seminar
Westview dinner
CALENDAR 16
This material was prepared for The Jewish Floridian Supplement

April 3 by the jHli
Greater Miami Jewish Federation 4
4200 Biscayne Boulevard Vt
Miami, Florida 33137
President
Aaron Podhurst
Executive Vice President Director of Communica
Myron J. Brodie Nicholas Simmonds
Chairman, Communications Committee Newsmagazine Editor
Forrest Raffel Mark D. Friedman
2 Federation. April 1987


Give A Day program is huge success
"Give A Day" has been a resounding success for the 1987 Combined Jewish Appeal help-
ing to push the annual campaign ahead by 16.5 per cent over this time last year. Par-
ticipants in the program include:
Judy Appelstein
Samuel I. Adler
Jim Baroh
William Baros
Saby Behar
Jack Bellock
Helene Berger
Jeffrey L. Berkowitz
Paul Berkowitz
Richard Berkowitz
Alvin Lloyd Brown
Jack Burstein
Tom Borin
Herb Canarick
Amy Dean
Rabbi Rubin Dobin
Terry Drucker
Sam Dubbin
Rabbi Michael Eisenstat
JoeFalk
Myra Fan-
Martin Fine
Pat Fine
Ike Fisher
Mike Fischer
David Fleeman
Harvey Friedman
Morris Futernick
Al Golden
Goldie Goldstein
Elliot Gordon
Emil Gould
Gary Gerson
Alex Halberstein
Sam Harte
Charles Held
Charlotte Held
Arthur Horowitz
Steven Jackman
Marvin Jacobson
Martin Kalb
Ian Kaplan
Robert Kaplan
Roberto Kassin
Ezra Katz
Shepard King
Alan J. Kluger
Steven J. Kravitz
Bemie Landers
William Lehman, Jr.
Edgar Lewis
Moises Levin
Jack H. Levine
Harry A. "Hap" Levy
Nancy Lipoff
Norman H. Lipoff
Jose Lurie
Ellen Mandler
Josh Marcus
Bob Merlin
Michelle Merlin
Dr. Douglas Miller
Linda Minkes
Stanley C. Myers
Gail Newman
Jeffrey Newman
Jerry Olin
Michael Olin
Nedra Oren
Harry Payton
David Paul
Aaron Podhurst
Dorothy Podhurst
Norman Rachlin
Forrest Raffel
Carolyn Praver
Nan Rich
Lou Rones
Ellen Rose
Mike Rubin
Herschel Rosenthal
Sandy Samole
Bill Saulson
Howard R. Scharlin
Michael Scheck
Marc Schectman
Gerald K. Schwartz
Lee Spiegelman
Marc Sheridan
Fred K. Shochet
Rick Sisser
Norman Sholk
Dr. Steven Silvers
Elaine Silverstein
Harry B. Smith
Joseph Smith
Lorraine Solomon
Shirley Spear
Eli Timoner
Eliot Treister
Rick Turetsky
Harold Vinick
Salomon Wainberg
Harvey Weinberg
Norman Weiner
George S. Wise
Barry S. Yarchin
Norma Kipnis Wilson
Gio* a day participant* at of 2/25/87
Super Sunday Chairmen
help make day a success
Judy Billig,
Super Sunday
vice-chairman
Richard Berkowitz,
Super Sunday,
vice-chairman
Pictured (from left) are Vice Chairmen Paul Berkowitz and Ellen Rose,
seated next to Super Sunday Chairman Saby Behar.
An open letter to
Temple Israel
An open letter to Gerald K. Schwartz, president of Tem-
ple Israel of Greater Miami and Rabbi Haskell Bernat.
Dear Gerald and Haskell:
As you probably already know, Super Sunday was a ter-
rific success raising more than $1.6 million in a single day.
A large part of that success was due to your support. The
generous allowances you made this year, as in past years,
in making available to Federation the Temple s facilities
saved the community a great deal of money and allowed
Federation to channel the funds back into the Campaign
and the programs and agencies that so urgently need our
support.
Again, many thanks to the both of you, and to the Temple
board of directors and staff, for helping making Super Sun-
day a success.
Cordially,
Aaron Podhurst
President
Donald E. Lefton
1987 CJA Chairman
Saby Behar
Super Sunday Chairman
Myron J. Brodie
Executive Vice President
Elton J. Kerness
Associate Executive Vice President
Federation, April 1987 3


......................

... .-...- .-..- rf ..<-.:.. .
Constituent boards
take active role in
CJA
The highlight of the 1987 campaign
year was the "Queen of Hearts Banquet"
boasting a 64 percent increase in gifts to
the Combined Jewish Appeal.
"Working with the area campaign
chairwomen has enabled me to grow,"
said Gail Newman. Women's Division
Campaign chairwoman. "Each person
has brought to their position their own
personal sense of value and this has
helped the Women's Division grow; mak-
ing it a strong asset to Federation's cam-
paign effort.
"The area constituent boards have been
the backbone of the Women's Division."
said Dorothy Podhurst. the Division's
president. "It has enhanced my term in
office, working with so many talented in-
dividuals." she added.
Miami Beach
On Miami Beach, the Area Board has
held many informative board meetings
throughout the year. The women on the
Beach have discussed and learned about
many different issues of a political and
religious nature, as well as matters of
particular concern to our local
community.
The final Miami Beach board meeting
for the year is scheduled for Wednesday.
April 29 at the home of chairwoman
Meryle Loring. The meeting will be a lun-
cheon, to thank the Beach's Area Board
members for all of their efforts. "It has
been a delight and an honor working with
the women of the Miami Beach Board to
help Jews in need. I am hopeful that more
women will find this a fulfilling ex-
perience and join us to support the Com-
bined Jewish Appeal." said Loring.
North Dade
Debbie Edelman. North Dade Area
chairwoman for the past two years,
hosted a meeting at her home on Thurs-
day, April 2. for her board. The meeting
featured an image and wardrobe consul-
tant from "Color Me Beautiful" and a
discussion on skin conditioning by Dr.
Dorothy Koreman.
"I have enjoyed serving as North Dade
Area chairwoman. My tenure has afford-
ed me the opportunity to meet new people
and to help educate the women in my area
as well as myself." said Edelman. "The
work of the North Dade Board members
has made our contribution to the CJA
quite successful," she added.
South Dade
Micki Hochberg, South Dade Area
chairwoman announced. "At a time when
volunteensm across the nation is low, the
volunteer spirit in the South Dade Board
is at an all time high!" The South Dade
Board recently held a meeting featuring
Father Dennison of St. Augustine and the
University of Miami Catholic Student
Center. The past meetings have featured
programs and discussions on issues con-
cerning politics, religion and updates on
community concerns. The final meeting
for the 1987 campaign year will be held on
Thursday, May 14. At that time, the in-
coming officers and new board members
will be introduced.
Southwest Dade
In Southwest Dade, under the leader-
ship of chairwoman Judy Adler. they have
made record breaking success in their ef-
forts for the Combined Jewish Appeal.
"The women on the Southwest Dade
Board are a strong part of the future of
the Women's Division." said Adler.
The "Generation to Generation Annual
Luncheon" recently held by the Board
was attended by over 170 Women, who
raised 24 pecent more this year than at
the previous year's event. The Southwest
Dade Board has tripled in size and the
women have held active positions in
Women's Division Leadership Develop-
ment. Community Education and Cam-
paign programs.
Women's Division elects
new officers
Maxine Schwartz, Chairwoman of the
Women's Division Sominating Commit-
tee, proudly presents the following
slate of officers for 1987-88:
Ellen Mandler
President
Amy Dean
Vice President.
Portfolio of Campaign
Micki Hochberg
Vice President,
Portfolio of Campaign
Designate
Terry Drucker
Vice President.
Portfolio of Community
Education
Elaine Roes
Vice President.
Portfolio of Leadership
Development
Robbie Herakowitz
Secretary
The "Queen of Hearts Banquet" was held by the Women's Din-
sion as a city-wide campaign event on behalf of the 1987 CJA. Pir-
tured from left to right are: Sandy Landy, event chairwoman:
Camelia Sadat, daughter of the late president of Egypt. Anwar-
Sadat and a guest speaker; Alice Golembo. grandniece of Israel's
late prime minister. Golda Meir, and a guest speaker; Gail
Newman, Women's Division Campaign chairwoman; A my Dean.
Women's Diiision t'icepresident, campaign designate. Sadat and
Golembo spoke about their famous relatives and their contribu-
tions to humanity.
The Business and Professional Women's IBPW) Campaign event
in support of the 1987 Combined Jewish Appeal was held recently
at the Grand Bay Hotel and featured guest speaker Elizabet)
Holtzman. District Attorney of Kings County in Brwklyn. N.Y.
Pictured from left are Ray Ellen Yarkin. BPW co-ckairwoman
for ca mpa ign; Ga il Sewma n, Women '$ Division ca mpa ign cha
woman; Amy Dean. Women's Division, vice president, campaign
designate. Anita Gray. Young Women's Leadership Cabinet.
chair designate; Karen Brown, BPW co-chairwoman for cam-
paign; Mary Anne Witkin, BPW chairwoman; Sheila jaife and
Judith Applestein. BPW event co-chairwomen.
Annual Installation to be 1
held May 19
:
::
BPW directory
The Business and Professional
Women's Board is geared to women who
work full time, part time or identify
themselves with this group.
The third BPW networking directory,
"The Source" will be printed for distribu-
tion in late May. All women who are listed
in the directory have pledged a minimum
contribution of $100 to the Combined
Jewish Appeal. More than 300 Business
and Professional women will be listed by
their professions. Call the Women's Divi-
sion at 576-4000. ext. 231 for more
information.
The Women's Division will be holding
its annual installation of officers and
constituent board members on Tuesdav
May 19. '"
This year's installation will be a
"morning of elegance" according to
Renata Bloom, co-chairwoman of the
installation.
"The Biltmore Hotel, the location of the
event, will establish the ambiance," said
co-chairwoman. Elaine Richman. "It will
be the setting for the morning's breakfast
and ceremony," she added.
The couvert is $15 for the alfresco
breakfast which begins the days events
al 9:30 am.
For more information contact the
Women's Division office at 576-4000. ext I
231. |
Robbie Herskowitz is the vice president |
for Leadership Development.
Dorothy Podhurst
Nominating Committee
Chairwoman
aad Women's Division
Immediate
Past President
Women's Division
Hold the Date
Taeaday. April 7
South Dade Executive Officers Meeting
10:00 am.
Wedaeaday. April 8
Long Range Planning Committee Meeting
10:00 am.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Thursday. April 23
Southwest Dade Nominating Committee
Meeting
6:00 p.m.
South Dade Federation Office
Taeaday. April 28
BPW Networking Program
Executive Officers Meeting
5:45 p.m.
Biscayne Bay Marriott
Wedacaoay. April 29
Miami Beach Board Meeting
10:30 am.
Thursday. April 30
Executive Committee Campaign
Committee Evaluation Meeting
10:00 am.-2K p.m.
MBJCC on Pine Tree Drive
and BPW
Steering
aU^M.


Federation will host 1987 General Assembly
November 17-22, 1987, the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation will play host to
the Council of Jewish Federations' 56th
annual General Assembly (G.A.) to be
held at the Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel on
Miami Beach, announced Nancy Lipoff,
who chairs the host committee.
Working with Lipoff are vice chair
Helene Berger, who is serving as special
events coordinator, and Herb Canarick
who is serving as volunteer chair.
"More than 800 volunteers will be
needed for the week-long event and we
will be recruiting individuals throughout
Greater Miami to serve in a variety of
positions," said Lipoff. Volunteers will be
needed to handle message centers,
information, welcome and meeting areas,
hospitality lounges, gift shop areas and a
host ofother assignments. As volunteers,
individuals will have the opportunity to
attend G.A. sessions at no charge.
In addition to providing the human
resources for this huge event. Miami, as
host community, will also welcome
delegates with two special receptions. A
Thursday night Gala event and a
Saturday evening Young Leadership
gathering will highlight the week-long
activities. In addition, a tour of the Miami
area is also planned as well as a
traditional Shabbat dinner.
More than 3,500 Jewish leaders from
across the United States and Canada are
expected to attend this event that will
provide Miami with a unique opportunity
to showcase the community. A special
effort to attract Jewish community
leadership from Central and South
America is also underway and a
committee to encourage participation
from these regions has been set up.
Pictured from lejl to rujht are G.A. Vice Chairs Helene Berger and Herb Canarick,
with G.A. Chair Nancy Lipoff.
"A steering committe has been formed,
made up of community leaders, to insure
the success of the assembly," stated
Lipoff. Serving on the General Assembly
Steering Committee are: Rosie Behar,
Saby Behar, Maureen Berkowitz, Paul
Berkowitz, Rabbi Haskell Bernat, Helene
Berger, Helen Berne, Judge Philip
Bloom, Representative Elaine Bloom,
Tom Borin, Charlotte Brodie, Hazel
Canarick, Herb Canarick, Terry Drucker,
Lenore Elias, Myra Farr, Pat Feldman,
Martin Fine, Paula Friedland, Gloria
Friedman, Harvey Friedman, Mikki
Futernick, Al Golden, Moises Gorin,
Sergio Grobler, Debby Grodnick, Barry
Gurland, Charlotte Held, Robbie
Herskowitz, Rochelle Kaminsky, Rose
Klausner, Rabbi Mark Kram, Steven J.
Kravitz, Wendy Kravitz, Susan
Kleinberg, William Lehman, Jr.,
Harry A. "Hap" Levy, Davida Levy,
Ellen Mandler, Juan Matalon, Judge
Robert H. Newman, Gail Newman,
Sydney Newmark, Jerry Olin, Dorothy
Podhurst, Felix Reyler, Nan Rich, Marvis
Schaecter, Debby Schwartz, Esther
Schwartz, Gerald K. Schwartz, Maxine E.
Schwartz, Roberta Segal, Marc Slotnick,
Joseph Smith, Harry B. Smith, Robert
Traurig, Jackie Traurig, Charles
Treister, Lisa Treister, Rick Turetsky,
Pam Turetsky, Barbara Wagner, Dolores
Wolf, Ray Ellen Yarkin, and Daniel
Yoffe.
CJF GENERAL ASSEMBLY-NOVEMBER 17-22,1987
VOLUNTEER REGISTRATION
NAME.
-PHONE (H),
-(B)-
ADDRESS-
ORGANIZATION
Please check the time, day and volunteer job preference (indicate 1 st. 2nd, 3rd choice). IF YOU
WISH TO WORK MORE THAN ONE DAY. OR AN ADDITIONAL SESSION, please indicate this on
the form.
VOLUNTEER JOB
Information/Welcome Desk
Message Center
Meeting Monitors
Meeters & Greeters
Delegates Lounge
Reception Hosts
Gift Shop
Kits (Sunday, Nov. 15
10:00 AM-5:00PM)
TIME & DAY A.M. RM.
7:30-10:00 9:30-12:00 11:30-2:00 1:30-4:00 3:30-6:00 6:00-9:00
Tues 11/17
Wed 11/18
Thurs 11/19
Fri 11/20
Sat 11/21
SPECIAL SKILLS
Sales______
Foreign Language
Spanish ----------
French ----------
Hebrew ----------
Return Registration
Form to:
G.A-G.M.J.F.
4200 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, Flonda 33137
In addition to having a steering
committee in place, some corporate
sponsorship has already been secured for
the many events to be held during the
Assembly. Several of the sponsors who
have agreed to participate are: Shearson-
Lehman, Ryder Corporation, Continental
Services Corporation, Champs, Florida
Sun-Gold, Doral Hotel Corporation, and
Deloitte, Haskins and Sells.
If you would like to volunteer for the
G.A. or would like more information on
any of the events taking place, call
Miriam Zatinsky at 576-4000.
Volunteer for
the G.A.
The following are the types of
volunteer jobs required for the
General Assembly. Volunteers
will be asked to serve for a
minimum of two hours. Primary
duties involve:
Message Center Volunteers
will handle written messages
communicated to and from the
delegates. This position requires
efficient alphabetical sorting and
distribution of messages in a hectic
environment.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17
10:00 a.m.-9:(M) p.m. Wed, Th,
Fri, Sat 8:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.
Information Desk and
Welcome Desk Volunteers will
offer delegates information
concerning G.A. events and should
be prepared to respond to
delegate's questions on other
resources of our city, i.e.
restaurants, shopping, etc.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17
10:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m. Wed, Th,
Fri, Sat 8:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.
Meeting Monitors
Volunteers will be assigned to
meeting rooms to make certain that
the rooms are set up properly, take
attendance and follow through on
other meeting chores.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17
10:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m. Wed, Th,
Fri, Sot 8:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.
Meeters and Greeters
Volunteers will become familiar
with the Fontainebleau Hilton in
order to assist delegates in getting
their bearings within the hotel.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17
10:00 a.m.-9:0O p.m. Wed, Th,
Fri, Sat 8:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.
Hospitality Lounges
Volunteers will host the lounges
where delegates can relax, chat and
enjoy refreshments and must be
willing to take responsibility for the
maintenance of the lounge area.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17
11.00a.m.-8:00p.m. Wed, Th9:00
a. m. -8:00 p. m., Fri 9:00 a.m. -3:00
p.m.
Gift Shop The Gift Shop
volunteers will need to be familiar
with retail sales, to assist in sorting
of merchandise, inventory control,
record keeping and packing items
for shipment.
Gift Shop Hours: Tuesday
through Thursday 10:00
a.m.-11:00 p.m. Friday 10:00
a.m.-3:00 p.m. Saturday 7:00
p.m.-9:00 p.m.
For Receptions Volunteers
must enjoy meeting and greeting
people and extending hospitality.
Convention Kits Volunteers
will assemble the delegates kits.
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 15
10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. only.
Federation. April 1987 5


Miami takes an active role in Young Leadership Cabinet
Across the nation, there are more
than 325 members of the Young
Leadership Cabinet,
representing the best of young
Jewish leadership in their communities.
Miami has the distinction of having the
largest number of Cabinet members from
any one community, with 22 members.
Created in 1963 by the United Jewish
Appeal, the Young Leadership Cabinet
has become an instrument to insure the
continuity of our nation's dynamic Jewish
communities. The Cabinet is composed of
Jewish men between the ages of 25 and
40 who have proven their commitment to
Judaism and Jewish community life
through their leadership. Membership
criteria are rigid. Participants must
maintain a responsible giving level to the
Combined Jewish Appeal, attend an
annual Cabinet retreat, continue their
active leadership in Federation and its
agencies, and promote United Jewish
Appeal programs such as national
missions and the annual Washington
conference.
A parallel organization, the Young
Women's Leadership Cabinet, was
created by UJA in 1976 for young
women, who, like their male
counterparts, are seen as current and
future leaders. Susan Sirotta chairs the
Miami area Cabinet.
Cabinet members come from all
walks of life. They include
lawyers, doctors, accountants,
builders, and developers. "The
Cabinet is made up of young executives
who share one thing in common," said
Richard Berkowitz. chairman of the
Florida Region of the Cabinet, "the
desire to be in the forefront of this
generation of young Jews, a cadre of
young leaders who care deeply about the
destiny of the Jewish people."
According to Saby Behar, chairman of
the Miami area of the Cabinet, "The
Miami members play major leadership
roles within the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation as well as the Jewish
community-at-large."
Many Miamians serve in both national
and local leadership positions. Examples
include Michael M. Adler. Jeffrey L.
Berkowitz and Jack H. Levine. Adler.
who is the immediate past national
chairman of the Cabinet serves as the
chairman of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Summit Division. He is also
the chairman of national UJA's Super
Sunday committee. Berkowitz. will co-
chair the sixth National Young
Leadership Conference in Washington
D.C. in March. 1988. He is actively
involved with Federation as the chairman
of its Community Relations Committee.
Levine chairs the National Committee on
Leadership Development of the Council
of Jewish Federations and is the
immediate past chairman of Federation's
Young Leadership Council.
Cabinet members:
Robert Maland (not pictured)
a
M
any of the Cabinet
members serve on
Federation and agency
boards of directors and
committees. They are also in key
leadership roles within the Campaign
through their participation in Super
Sunday and the new "Give a Day"
program. Others are active in their
synagogues and on the boards of
directors of local branches of national
Jewish organizations." added Behar.
One of the things that distinguishes the
Cabinet members is their strong
commitment to Jewish education and
learning. To help local members of the
Cabinet rethink the ways in which Jewish
tradition and contemporary lifestyles
interrelate, a three part series on rlaidral
Jewish texts and contemporary Jewish
issues is now in progress, led by Cabinet
member Robert Kaplan.

i
Michael M. Adler
Saby Behar
Jeffrey L. Berkowitz Paul Berkowitz
Richard Berkountz
Robert Berrin
Stephen Bittel
Tim R. Cohen
Samuel Dubbin
Larry Elbrand
Mark Friedland
Robert Kaplan
Roberto Ka&sin
Alan J. Kluger
Jack H. Levine
imisl^mi. si____
Robert J. Merlin Steven Messing Dr. Douglas Miller Jeffrey Newman Marc Sheridan ~ Turetsky
The Cabinet, however, is not a
static organization. It continually
rethinks and revamps its
programs in light of the current
needs of Israel and the Jewish people.
"Raising money is still the centerpiece
of our agenda." said Behar. "But it is not
the whole of our agenda. There are a
number of new, exciting and innovative
programs sponsored independently by
the Cabinet or in concert with
organizations in Israel, such as the Jewish
Agency and the Israel Forum on the
future of the Jewish community," he
added.
These programs include the Moru.
process, a broad mechanism for contact
between new leadership in the Diaspora
and in Israel; the First World Youth
Assembly, a meeting in Israel of almost
200 Jewish teenagers from the United
States. Canada and Israel who met for
ten days of conversation, controversy and
camaraderie; and Otrma, a unique Jewish
Service Corps that will provide an
opportunity for young Jews of post-
college age to give a year of service in
Israel followed by a commitment of
service to the Jewish community in the
United States where they reside.
Missions also play an important role in
Cabinet programming. Two in particular,
have special significance because
leadership was provided by Cabinet
members from this community. Am
Echad was a unique mission last month to
Western Europe and Israel that provided
an opportunity for young American Jews
to meet with, and begin a dialogue with,
their counterparts in five European cities
followed by seven days in Israel. Amy
Dean, a member of the Women's Cabinet
from Miami was co-leader of this mission.
Her husband, Alan Kluger, a member of
the Men's Cabinet led the delegation
visiting Zurich, Switzerland.
Tim Cohen, another Miami member of
the Cabinet, has already led two economic
missions to Israel for young leaders that
highlighted the opportunities for
economic development, critically
important if Is.ael is to become self
sufficient.
On a related note, another Miamian,
Rick Turetsky, was one of the leaders of
the economic discussions at the recent
World Gathering of Young Leadership in
Tiberias, Israel.
Although membership on the
Cabinet is by invitation only.
there are Cabinet sponsored
events that are open to all young
leaders. "One of these," said Richard
Berkowitz," is the bi-annual United
Jewish Appeal, Florida Region. Young
Leadership Retreat that will be held in
Palm Beach, Florida at the Hyatt
Regency Hotel, May 1-3. The Retreat will
offer an opportunity for those who attend
to experience the joy of Shabbat. discuss
issues of paramount concern on the
Jewish agenda, develop leadership skills,
meet old friends and make new friends,
emphasized Berkowitz. More information
about the retreat can be obtained by
contacting Milton Heller at Federation,
576-4000, ext 279.
"Those of us who are privileged to be
involved with the Cabinet firmly believe
that we are making an invaluable
contribution today and laying the
foundation for still greater achievements
tomorrow," concluded Behar.
6 Federation, April 1987


BETSHIRA SOLOMON O
SCHECHTER DAY SCHOOL
A continuing commitment to excellence
MShimSolomon^echter Day School is a beneficiary agency of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation s Combined Jewish Appeal
The Bet Shira Solomon Schechter Day
School is a conservative Day School located
in Kendall, a South Dade, Miami suburb. The
school was organized in 1972, for a handful of
families wanting a private conservative Jewish
education-with superb Judaic instruction.
At the turn of the century, Solomon Schechter
(1857-1915) uncovered and identified thousands
of Biblical and ancient fragments of the archival
room in the Cairo Synagogue. He was bringing
knowledge to light, ft is that light that we at Bet
Shira Solomon Schechter Day School continue
to fuel. His founding of Conservative Judaism
in the United States integrated American and
Jewish traditions and reinvigorated Jewish
thought. Bet Shira Solomon Schechter Day
School carries on the values that Schechter
himself represented.
In the face of increasing assimilation, there
is a growing commitment to Jewish Day
Schools-more and more Jewish families
are choosing day school education for their
children. From 1962 to 1984, the number of
students enrolled in Jewish day schools in
America has increased from 62,000 to
120,000. Since its founding in 1964, the Sol-
omon Schechter Day School Association has
grown to 71 schools, with 13,390 students.
In 1986, Bet Shira Solomon Schechter Day
School had an enrollment of 240 students with
a faculty of 46. which included specialists in
areas of music, art, physical education, library,
computers, speech, resource, (remedial and
gifted learning) and a child psychologist.
The Bet Shira Solomon Schechter Day
School facilities include a two-story air con-
ditioned classroom building, library, chapel,
social hall, teen lounge, large playing field, and
an early childhood playground. Future plans
for expansion include a science lab, gym-
nasium, more classrooms and a junior high
facility.
Bet Shira Solomon Schechter Day School
is governed by the Solomon Schechter Day
School Association and the Department of
Education of the United Synagogue of
America, the parent body of the Conservative
Congregation.
The goal of the school is to promote Jewish
identity and commitment through Jewish learn-
ing. The school has an integrated General and
Judaic studies program that provides students
with a unified world view based on Jewish
values and concerns.
A synthesis and appreciation of both Jewish
and American culture is created through a total
dual curriculum program: half day General
studies and half day Judaic studies. Educa-
tional excellence is achieved through free
inquiry, discussion, and creativity while pro-
moting integrity in a warm, personal, highly
motivating atmosphere.
Classes at Bet Shira Solomon Schechter
Day School are small. The average teacher
student ratio is 1 to 12 in the elementary
grades with an average of as few as 1 to 5 in
the nursery classes. The school is fully accre-
dited by the Southern Association of Colleges
and Schools, and the National Solomon
Schechter Day School Association.
Bet Shira's programs exceed all the basic
local, state and national requirements. The
results of the Iowa Test of Basic Skills, which
are administered each Spring to the students,
attests to the excellence of the program. On
the average, students scored in the 95th per-
centile.
Attention is focused on the individual child,
being sensitive to his or her developmental
needs, interests, and aptitudes, while at the
same time fostering individual growth through
personalized instruction.


Administration
Dr. Michael Halzel-Headmaster
Dr. Halzel is responsible for implementation
of the school's entire program of studies and
activities. In 1981, Dr. Halzel completed his
doctoral studies in the field of Educational
Administration at Nova University. He also
holds a Master of Arts from New York Univer-
sity's School of Education, a Master of Jewish
Education from Bostons Hebrew College and
both a B.A. and B.H.L. from Yeshiva University.
Dr. Halzel has successfully served as a school
administrator for the past 23 years and has
been headmaster at Bet Shira since 1985. He
was recently elected as a National Officer of
the Jewish Educators Assembly
Susan Neimand-
Assistant to the Headmaster
Mrs. Neimand has served the school as an
outstanding teacher and administrator since
1978. She received her B.A. from Brooklyn'
College and her M.A. in Education from Florida
International University. She is currently a Doc-
toral candidate in Elementary Curriculum and
Instruction. She assists and supervises in all
aspects of the program.
Faculty
The teaching faculty at Bet Shira is comprised
of highly qualified men and women who hold
baccalaureate and graduate degrees in their
area of expertise. The teachers are all licensed
by the State of Florida and or Central Agency
for Jewish Education. Teachers show their
commitment to the program and the children
through long-standing devotion to Bet Shira.
The average faculty member has been at the
school 8 years with some having been employed
in excess of 20 years. Teachers are sensitive
to each child and maintain close contact with
the home.
Our Physical Education teacher spends 30
minutes a day with each group of elementary
school children. She follows the guidelines for
the Dade County
curriculum which
outlines specific
skills for each grade.
Her program stresses
skills, development,
enjoyment of activi-
ties and cooperative
play rather than
competition. She
also teaches move-
ment exploration
and body manage-
ment to the 3 and 4
year olds 3 times a
week. The President's Physical Fitness awards
are given each year to those children who
score 85% or better in strength, speed, agility,
endurance and mobility.
"\
The promise of our school is to
equip our students with the
intellectual tools, the academic
skills, the motivation and self
confidence to enable them to reach
their full potential, and we take
pride in fulfilling this promise.
Bet Shira can
boast having one of
the largest and most
complete private
school libraries in
South Florida.
According to the
School Librarian, the
combined Secular and Judaic collection now
totals over 11,000 volumes. In addition, the
Library subscribes to 36 periodicals that are
available to students, staff and families. The
library is a dual facility with part geared to the
students, while also containing a large collec-
tion of reference material suitable for adults.
All students have a regularly assigned library
period each week, which is devoted to the
teaching of library skills, that will prove invalu-
able as they further their education. The pre-
school children have a regular Library hour for
story telling and play acting.
All of the children from kindergarten through
6th grade, enjoy their art class each week. The
children work with a large variety of materials
while developing skills in drawing, design,
sculpture, painting and print making. Some of
the special projects introduced this year
include: silkscreening, enameling, making
imitation stained glass windows, antiquing,
metal and Batik. The program stresses creativ-
ity and encourages the children to use their
imagination. Numerous projects are proudly
exhibited at the Youth Fair each year.
The school's elementary music teacher has
devoted many years to the Bet Shira Solomon
Schechter Day School. The music program
consists of weekly classes in Jewish music
appreciation and music theory. Religious and
secular holidays are celebrated through song.
Studies of famous Jewish musicians, Cantors
of today and yesteryear, instruments of the
orchestra and music reading and writing con-
tinue throughout the year. Students share their
special talents and much is learned from one
another. A group of 50 students comprise the
Bet Shira Youth Choir, which sings two and
three part choral music. These students devote
much of their free time rehearsing and perform-
ing throughout the community. The overall aim
of the music program is the development of a
love of music and an appreciation of how
music enriches one's life.
Nursery children are enriched through a
formal music program once a week. They are
taught songs and dance relating to both secu-
lar and Judaic themes. The nursery children
look forward to their music classes with great
enthusiasm.
The students at Bet Shira Solomon Schechter
Day School participate in computer classes
several times a week. The classes are
arranged to extend and augment the regular
General Studies program. Once the computer
basics have been mastered, the lab time con-
sists of using a variety of educational software
to reinforce concepts studied in other subject
areas. A wide variety of Hebrew language and
Jewish Holiday programs are available for the
computers as well. The students love to work
with the computers and look forward with
excitement to lab time.
The resource center has been set up in
order to meet the special learning needs of
specific individual students. A small structured
environment enables students to take an
active role in their own learning. Students learn
to work out and apply strategies spontane-
ously to help themselves learn better. Students
are taught specific study skills, information
gathering techniques and problem solving
strategies.
The enrichment center for academically
advanced students provides a flexible and indi-
vidual environment that promotes growth of
creative and critical thinking skills. It encour-
ages the students to begin to make his or her
own decisions about topics that they might like
to explore at greater depths and higher levels
of involvement.


Dr. Lani Kaskel is a practicing private child
psychologist, who spends one day a week at
the school. She is a warm, caring dynamic indi-
vidual, who goes beyond her realm of respon-
sibility. She has conducted several successful
effective educational workshops for teachers,
parents and students. Dr. Kaskel does in-depth
psychological evaluations and diagnostic
screening in order to guide teachers in meet-
ing each child's individual needs. She is
always available to consult with tdachers, par-
ents and students concerning any school
related problem.
In addition to the school's own specialists,
Dr. Deborah Lerer, Director of Special Educa-
tion at the Central Agency for Jewish Educa-
tion consults with Bet Shira on a regular basis
in dealing with the enrichment and special edu-
cation needs in Judaic studies.
Mrs. Gerri Marcus, a speech and hearing
specialist, visits the school regularly to
remediate speech problems. Financial
arrangements for this service are made pri-
vately.
Smooth and consistant daily operations
could not successfully be accomplished with-
out the dedication and commitment of Anne
Cohen and Linda Bick, the school secretaries,
who are always there to assist the parents,
faculty and most importantly the children in
whatever is necessary.
rsery School
The Bet Shira Solomon Schechter Day
School has a very dynamic Nursery program:
a most dedicated staff of professionals deals
with each child on an individual basis, taking
into account his or her social, emotional and
academic needs. Teachers are concerned with
the total child-programs are tailor-made
based on a unified curriculum hierarchy of
skills.
Nursery children have the opportunity to
grow socially as well as academically as they
move upward in the school. There is a con-
Bet Shira Solomon Schechter
Day School:
A Continuing
Commitment to Excellence
tinuity from one year to another, due to a
clearly defined curriculum which stresses
social development, play activities, gross and
fine motor development, science, health edu-
cation, cooking experiences, creative art,
social studies, physical education, music,
computers, Sabbath and Holiday celebrations,
beginning Hebrew language, and academic
readiness skills for those students ready to
accept them. The children also have library
time, where they are encouraged to play act,
and use their creative imagination.
Special programs and activities augment
the program. Community helpers are brought
into the classrooms relating to units of study.
The Nursery division holds an Israel Fair,
where each class learns about a particular
city in Israel and play acts their adventure to
other students. The Holidays play a large part
in the Nursery School creating on-going
excitement. From blowing the Shofar on Rosh
Hashanah, to dressing up as Pilgrims and
Indians for a real Pow Wow on Thanksgiving,
to becoming wicked Haman or good Queen
Esther at Purim, or having their own model
Seder for Passover, the flavor and the excite-
ment is present throughout the school at
every possible celebration.
Each Friday, the Nursery School has a
Shabbat Assembly, in which each class puts
on a program correlating to the events or units
of that week and the other classes help by
participating in song and dance. An Ima and
Abba are selected every week from each
class and the children are taught to recite the
blessings for the Shabbat candles, the KkJ-
dush for the wine and the Hamotze for the
challah.
Many exciting Cultural Arts programs are
brought to the school for the children. They
include dances, musicians, clowns, as well as
the animal farm. Our goal is to expand the chil-
dren's horizons by exposing them to many
varied special events.
The P.M. enrichment program, coordinated
by Mrs. Norma Presley is a fun and learning
extension of the day for students whose par-
ents wish for them to stay beyond their normal
dismissal time. This program is run indepen-
dently of the morning classes and usually
includes hands on activities and creative play.
The children are taught the values that form
the basis of the Jewish people in a way they
can understand. They learn the importance of
tzedakah and sharing. This past Chanukah a
group of children brought Chanukah decora-
tions to the elderly at Douglas Gardens. The
pupils are given a basic foundation of Judaism,
while at the same time integrating secular infor-
mation so as to allow them to live comfortably
and participate fully in the diversity of Amer-
ican life. In addition, a Hebrew language
teacher comes into the class to familarize the
children with the language. The children are
taught the fundamental basic Hebrew terms of
the classroom, home, one's self, Shabbat and
festivals.
The Nursery hours are:
8:45 -12:45 HALF DAY PROGRAM
8:45 3:15 FULL DAY (4 year olds)
Children seeking admission to the school's
2 year old program must be toilet trained and
2 years old by September 1 st.
The Early Childhood Department has
invited a group of outside specialists to review
its program and assist in applying for National
Accreditation from the National Association for
the Education of Young Children.
The school actively participates in the work-
shops sponsored by the Central Agency for
Jewish Education and the Jewish Council of
Early Educators.
Elementary
A typical day for the elementary school child
consists of a three and one quarter hour gen-
eral studies program including math, reading,
language arts, science, social studies, health
education and physical education. In addition,
there are specialists such as art, music, com-
puters and library (where books are checked
out on a weekly basis). Each class is divided
into 3 or 4 reading groups and 2 or 3 math
groups, which ensure that each child is work-
ing at his or her own level and enables the
teacher to give individualized instruction and
attention to specific needs. The Judaic pro-
gram is comprised of Prayer, Hebrew Lan-
guage, literature, history, Bible, customs and
ceremonies conducted during the remaining
half of the school day. There are several levels
within these classrooms as well. Bible stories
are learned through the study of text with com-
mentary. The history program consists of many
parts. The students learn history from the time
of the Patriarchs to the Shtetl. The study of
modern Israel, Zionism, American Jewish His-
tory and the Holocaust is also included.
Teachers teach their students how to actively
participate in daily, Shabbat and holiday
prayer. The students are also taught the mean-
ing and background of the various tefillot and
services. Every Monday and Thursday the chil-
dren come together in the chapel for services
which include reading of the weekly Torah por-
tion by the 6th graders. Building fluency in the
Hebrew language is an important part of the
program which results in most classes being
taught Ivrit B'lvrit.
Bet Shira Solomon Schechter Day School
students participate in community and Central
Agency sponsored events which include: Yom
Ha'atzmaut celebration, City Wide Torah Fair,
the General Spelling Bee in which the 6th
grade team came in 2nd out of 10 Jewish Day
Schools from Dade and Broward County this
year. Bet Shira Solomon Schechter Day
School students have entered more than 300
projects in the Dade County Youth Fair and
have won more awards per capita than any
other school in Dade County. In addition, these
students are typically found among the win-
ners in the Dade County Youth Fair Hebrew
Spelling Bee.
Many special events throughout the school
year are hosted by the school. These include
the Around-the-World Fair in which each class
presents a program reflecting their studies of
Continued on next page
* 7
- ?3
Childhood is a kind of Paradise
M i LEVENSOHN


Elementary continued
the history, background, culture and language
of a chosen country. Another event is the Israel
Fair, in which each class represents a city in
Israel and presents various artifacts and infor-
mation regarding the city to their fellow students.
In addition, for the elementary school, there
are the Science, Torah, and Math Fairs, where
the students create various displays, projects
and games which are displayed for all the stu-
dents and parents to view.
The annual Student Council Talent Show is
another event that is anxiously anticipated.
The children are encouraged to display their
creative talents at an evening performance
which parents and faculty are invited to attend.
All the holidays and festivities throughout the
year are celebrated at the school. On Purim,
the faculty perform a spoof Purim Spiel for the
students. The students are encouraged to
dress in costume for the occasion and join in
on reading of the Megillah. On Passover, the
school conducts model seders for all its chil-
dren. Bet Shira students are well prepared to
conduct the Passover seders in their own
homes. A Passover meal is prepared for the
entire school by the Parents Teachers Associa-
tion. Lag B'Omer is celebrated by having the
older students hike to a local park where they
participate in various sport activities while the
younger pupils have a field day at the school
facility.
Spirit Week, which is held each spring, is a
fun-filled tradition. It includes such activities as
creating class cheers, a barbecue presented
by the P.T.A., Crazy Hat Day, Topsy Turvy Day,
and Bet Shira T-Shirt Day. Senior Day, under
the guidance of Mrs. Neimand, allows the 6th
graders to prepare lesson plans and conduct
classes under the supervision of faculty.
The student council is comprised of a repre-
sentative from each grade in the elementary
school. The officers of the student council are
elected through a democratic process of cam-
paigning, voting, ballots, and elections. The
representatives hold monthly meetings and
plan activities and programs for their peers.
Each Friday the elementary division at Bet
Shira conducts an Erev Shabbat assembly. On
a rotating basis, each class presents a pro-
gram correlated to the weekly Torah portion or
other calendar events. It is an opportunity to
join together in spirited song and prayer. The
weekly collection of Tzedakah teaches all the
children the value of sharing. The members of
There is no treasure I ke friends
MIVHAR HAPENINIM
But Shira offers the children a nutritious
ana tasty hot lunch program, which is avail-
able to all students for a nominal fee.
the Student Council learn about allocating
funds as a part of their responsibility. They dis-
tribute the monies that are collected to various
deserving charities such as Mazon, The Ship
A Box Program, The Heart Association, The
American Cancer Association, ALYN, the
home for the handicapped children in Israel,
etc.
Each week at the Shabbat Assembly birth-
day books are presented to those children
whose families have honored their birthdays
by donating a book to the library. A Citizen of
the Week from each class receives a merit cer-
tificate as reward for commendable classwork,
exemplary behavior or for being the most
improved or most helpful student.
Shabbat Dinners are another tradition at Bet
Shira. One Friday evening each month the chil-
dren of a different grade in the Day School join
with their families in an Erev Shabbat Dinner at
the Synagogue, which is followed by the chil-
dren conducting the Kabbalat Shabbat service
for the entire Congregation.
Because of the many occasions the children
are called upon to perform, they have learned
to feel comfortable and confident in front of an
audience.
Brownies and Girl Scouts meet once a week
at the school. They participate in community
activities and weekly projects which help them
earn merit badges while becoming better citi-
zens and having fun at the same time.
For more information:
Name of child____
Age_______Male
Female,
Entering Grade-
Name of Parents
Address_______
City _
State
Zip
Home Phone
Business Phone________________
Hi We request a brochure
? We request an application for admission
We would like to arrange for an
appointment with Dr. Halzel
We would like a Bet Shira
Representative to call us.
? Other Comments
For further information please call:
Anne Cohen, 238-2606
Complete and return to:
Bet Shira Solomon Schechter Day School
7500 SW 120 Street, Miami. Florida 33156
Attention: School Office
Helping Hands
The Parent Teachers Association at
Bet Shira is an integral part of the school's day
to day happenings. The parents provide the
extras for all holiday celebration and programs
Through fund raising, the P.T.A. provides Cul-
tural Arts programs, purchases musical equip-
ment, computer equipment, video equipment,
as well as token gifts to all the students on
holidays. The P.T.A. is always there to assist
the faculty and the school in whatever is
necessary.
The Leo Gelvan Scholarship Fund was
established this past year by Mr. and Mrs.
Gelvan with a gift of $100,000. This fund is
being supplemented by other sources such as
fund raising and bequests and is available to
meet the needs of any family requiring finan-
cial assistance.
The Fund Raising Committee assumes
responsibility in the school of helping offset the
budgetary deficit. Some of its main fund rais-
ers include: An Art Auction, A Night at the
Races, and a Trivia Pursuit Night. The cul-
minating event of this year will be the annual
Dinner Dance which is held in conjunction with
the Schools Ad Journal to be held June 6,
1987.
The School Board is the overall policy-
making body of the school. The Board, at its
monthly meetings, reviews and plans for the
school and acts on the recommendations of
the various subcommittees, i.e., education,
budgeting, fund raising, long range planning
and faculty relations. Membership on the
School Board is open. A broad spectrum of
the community is represented at the monthly
meetings.
Dedicated Faculty
Priscilla Adler
Joan Andrews
Sara Baumgarten
Ellen Bayer
Judi Bayer
Joan Benbaset
Helene Benyunes
Sandra Berger
Linda Bernabo
Linda Bick
Lee Block
Anne Cohen
Chana Engelman
Elaine Funk
Sara Gamberg
Channah Globus
Rhoda Haber
Rachel Haims
Linda Hakerem
Celie Halzel
Ella Handel
Michelle Hauser
Dr. Lani Kaskel
Karen Kass
Elaine Katz
Talma Keshen
Jody King
Shula Leshetz
Susan Neimand
Lorraine Pearl
Norma Presley
Claude Roatta
Frankie Ryttenberg
Sharon Sachs
Karen Saks
Yona Sarel
Sharon Schwartz
Zelda Schwebel
Cecilia Serviansky
Carol Simon
Arleen Snyder
Gloria Waldenberg
Leanne Zimmerman
Barbara Zimmeft
#.
Bet Shira Solomon Schechter Day School is
Oa beneficiary Agency of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation...
Partners in a Caring Community.
We gratefully acknowledge the donation of
this space by the Greater Miami Jewish Feder-
ation, to allow us to illustrate to the community
our outstanding program.
Bet Shira Solomon Schechter Day School is
fully accredited by the
Southern Association of Colleges
and Schools, and the National
Solomon Schechter Day School Association.
The Bet Shira Solomon Schechter Day
School is governed by the Department of the
United Synagogue of America.
The Bet Shira Solomon Schechter Day
School admits students of any race, color,
national and ethnic origin to all rights,
privileges, programs, activities generally made
available to students in the school.
Bet Shira
Solomon Schechter Day School
7500 SW. 120 Street
Miami, Florida 33156
School Office, 238-2606
-??* *? -*? -?? -?-?
LI


Martin Fine
Chairman
Stephen Bittel
Vice-Chairman
Arnold AUman
Vice-Chairman
\Chairman 's
\message
Thank you all for your help and will-
ingness to reach out in support of the
1987 Combined Jewish Appeal. One
I of the ways you are helping the Cam-
paign reach its goal is through the
"Give A Day" program. To say that it
has been a success to date would be
an understatement. Allow me to
I share a couple of examples with you.
An accountant, who had previously
I made a gift, of $1,500 annually, raised
his gift to $5,000 because he was asked
| personally.
A young attorney who just began his
] \to $600 and agreed to volunteer his
time to solicit two more people.
These two examples highlight the
importance of the "Give A Day" pro-
gram to the 1987 CJA. Those that
have participated feel terrific about
their successful involvement. Talk to
them. We still need you to join.
Many of you who have committed
I to give your day still have cards to
cover. Don't let them sit in your
jacket pocket. Call Federation if you
heed more information or a second
person to join you on a solicitation. Or
I call me, I'm anxious to help you!
You all know that in the summer
opportunities for the Campaign are
minimal. Let's try and reach our goal
for the 1987 CJA before the annual
meeting on June 16. It's our turn.
Let's do it now.
Martin Fine
Chairman
Commerce and Professions
Rabbi Azulay 's hard work pays off for CJA
Rabbi Shimon Azulay
Paytons host dinner
party on behalf of
the CJA
Harry and Lisa Payton hosted a dinner
party recently on behalf of the Combined
Jewish Appeal which was attended by
twelve couples. Half of those present had
traveled with the Payton's on a recent
mission to Israel, the rest were
professional colleagues and friends.
During the evening, time was taken to
discuss the needs of the Jewish
community and how those needs can be
met through the Combined Jewish
Appeal. Everyone present gave a
generous gift to the campaign.
If anyone would be interested in
hosting a meeting in their home, the way
the Payton's did, call Dan Lepow at
Federation. It's your turn now.
Rabbi Shimon Azulay, director of the
Judaic High School Program at the
Central Agency for Jewish Education,
has been working hard for the 1987
Combined Jewish Appeal, bringing in
many new gifts for the campaign.
Born in Jerusalem, Azulay studied in
the great Yeshivot and was ordained by
the Chief Rabbi of Jerusalem.
He was a member of the Haganah and
later the Lechi Israeli Freedom Fighters
(IFF). Azulay was critically wounded in
an attempt on his life during one of the
IFF's operations in Tel Aviv.
In 1947 he moved to Toronto, Canada
where he was Director of Camp Masad. It
was there that Azulay became involved in
Jewish fundraising efforts with the
Jewish Welfare Fund, where he devoted
his time to the United Israel Appeal.
He returned to Israel in 1955 and
worked for two years as the educational
director of Ramat Hadassah Youth
Aliyah. It was 1957 when he arrived in
Miami. Rabbi Azulay quickly became
involved with the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and became a member of the
board of directors. Although he no longer
sits on the board he continues to be active
with Federation's Combined Jewish
Appeal.
"As a child, I knew that in my parents
home, you didn't sit down and eat without
having some poor people at the table. At
that time, we didn't have much ourselves
but we still shared what we had. This
tradition of giving of ourselves to help
others is something I have taught my
children, who are also active members in
the Jewish communities in which they
live."
It is this sense of giving that has made
Rabbi Azulay one of the hardest
campaign workers on behalf of the 1987
Combined Jewish Appeal.
Reserve the Date
----------------------------------------HrrT\
Thursday, May 21,1987
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Commerce and Professions
Celebration Dinner
Omni International Hotel
Details to follow
BUILDERS REAL ESTATE AND ALUED
TRADES FINANCE INSURANCE
STOCK BROKERS-FOOD AND HOTEL
AND ALLIED TRADES' MERCANTILE
MANUFACTURING TRANSPORT-
SERVICES-HEALING ARTS-
ATTORNE VS ACCOUNTANTS
DRUGGISTS DENTISTS PHVSICl ANS
Federation, April 1987 11


,

Highlights of Alliance Division events
Aventura
The Aventura Community Brunch was
held in mid-March at the Turnberry
Garden Room featuring guest speaker
Dr. Gerald Meister. The chairman was
Hazel Canarick. Buildings participating
in the event were Biscaya, Bonavida,
Bonavista, Coronado, Del Vista Towers,
El Dorado, Ensenada, Flamenco,
Hamptons, Villa Dorado, Waterview, and
Waterways. The event raised 15.1
percent more for the campaign than last
year's brunch.
Balmoral
A brunch, benefitting the 1987
Combined Jewish Appeal was held at
Balmoral on Sunday, March 29. The
women responsible for making the event
a success were Betty Kopelowitz,
reception chairman; Florence Mescon and
Selma Kramer, reception co-chairmen.
These women are trying to bring back the
spirit of the Federation campaign to their
community.
"Fabulous Fiftys" chairman Ida Kesselman is flanked by
Alliance Division chairman Herb Canarick (left) and guest
speaker Elton J. Kerness, associate executive vice president
of Federation. The meeting celebrated the raising of
$325,000 for the 1987 Combined Jewish Appeal, an 18 per-
cent increase over 1986.
"Fabulous Fiftys" Alliance Brunch
The "Fabulous Fiftys" Alliance Brunch
took place in March at the Konover Hotel
producing an 18 percent increase in gifts
to the Combined Jewish Appeal over last
year. The event co-chairmen were Ida
Kesselman of Seacoast Towers South and
Harold Medow of 5701. The executive
committee members were Ruth Charin
and Leon Srago of Corinthian, Ben
Botwinick and Shara Stock of Crystal
House, Florence and Jerome Brill of
5701, Lou and Elsie Friedman of Maison
Grande, Lester Abrahamer of Seacoast
Towers East, Betty Dreier and Dorothy
Rosenthal of Seacoast Towers South and
Florence Fink, Mildred Abramowitz and
Frank Kamen of Seacoast Towers Five.
Genevieve R. Medow, a member
of the "Fabulous Fifty's"
Executive Committee and wife of
Chairman Harold Medow, died
suddenly two weeks prior to the
event. Genevieve dedicated her life
to her family and worked to enrich
the lives of the people in her
community. We will never forget
her.
<**'**
*
2*J? 9^ U
\
Pictured from left to right at the KenilworthJTiffany 1987
Campaign event at the Jockey Club are Howard Stone, UJA
guest speaker; Herman Glickman, Dr. Bernice Miller, Mor-
ris Marder and Sy Roth, event co-chairmen.
Pictured at a meeting at the Four Winds Condominium are
(from left) Robert Greenhill, acting campaign chairman of
Four Winds Condominium; State Representative Elaine
Bloom, guest speaker; William Feinberg, honorary chair-
man; Eve Semmel, acting chairperson; Ben Koplovsky, com-
mittee member; and Ben Levin, acting chairman. Feinberg
was presented with a certificate of appreciation from
Federation for his many years of dedicated service as cam-
paign chairman at the Four Winds Condominium.
Kenilworth Tiffany
Dr. Bernice Miller and Sy Roth, coor-
dinators of the Kenilworth-Tiffany
Alliance Brunch were delighted at the en-
thusiasm for the Combined Jewish Ap-
peal at the event.
In order to reach many of the new
residents of these buildings, plans are be-
ing made to hold a series of parlor
meetings in order to involve as many
residents as possible.
Admiral's Port
The Admiral's Port Champagne Party
on behalf of the 1987 CJA took place
recently. The evening was a resounding
success, bringing in several thousand
dollars in additional pledges. A heartfelt
standing ovation was given to speaker
Danny Pinkas, who spoke passionately on
Israel and the meaning of being a Jew in
the world today. The Admiral's Port
leaders are Nate Katzen, Milt Engelman,
Belle Tuch, Dr. Arthur Levine, and Eric
Salm.
Pictured at the Admiral's Port champagne party are
members of its executive committee: Eric Salm, Max Anker,
Nat Cutler, Al Morrows, Milt Engelman, co^hairmen of
Admiral's Port; Belle Tuch, Women's Division chairman
of Admiral's Port; Danny Pinkas, guest speaker; Nate
Katzen, chairman of Admiral's Port; Art Levine, Paceset-
ter chairman of Admiral's Port.
Costa Brava
Costa Brava held its annual CJF Dinner
at the Costa Brava Restaurant. Dr.
Gerald Meister was the featured guest
speaker. Al Isaacson was the chairman of
the event, Bea Durchslag was the
reception chairman. The executive
committee included Stanley Baraett,
Louis Harris, and Stanley C. Myers.
California Club
The California Club held its annual
Dinner Dance on behalf of the 1987
Combined Jewish Appeal on March 29 at
the Coral Creek Country Club. Herb
Polow was honored for his many years of
dedicated service to the CJA. Noted
author and lecturer Howard Stone was
the evening's guest speaker.
12 Federation, April 1987
Terrace Towers
Terrace Towers held their Combined
Jewish Appeal Breakfast in March which
was attended by over 85 people. The
event raised many thousands of dollars
for the 1987 CJA. Leo Gelvan sponsored
the breakfast; Simon Reisman chaired the
event; Danny Pinkas was the guest
speaker.


-------.....~v*------1'
Matchmaker,
matchmaker on
JFTV. .
Well sort of .
Recently, JFTV played a unique role as
matchmaker. Two people who appeared
on "Pillow Talk," a very popular show
hosted by Suzanne Lasky, which deals
with life-style issues for Jewish singles,
will be tieing the knot. Karen Kaye, a
therapist who specializes in the singles
area and Allen Wachholder, an accoun-
tant both appeared on the show in July,
1984. The topic of that program was
"Sexuality in the 80's."
Allen was smitten with Karen and
although they had one date back then,
Karen's feelings were not mutual. In
September, 1986, they met again and the
timing and the feelings were right for
both of them. They will marry in August.
JFTV presents
'Encounter9
Mike Leiderman and Marilyn Preston
moderate this unrehearsed issue-oriented
series of political dialogues and debates.
Ambassadors, U.S. Senators, Consuls
lenera! and other prominent public
figures address subjects of national and
international interest.
JFTV airs "Encounter" on Thursdays
at 6:00 p.m. and Saturdays at 5:30 p.m.
Passover Adventure*
A "Passover Adventure" follows
Israeli actor Jonathan Segalle as he at-
tempts to follow the route of the Exodus.
In the course of the odyssey, we witness
how matzah is baked, celebrate a
Passover Seder on an Israeli kibbutz, and
join in a celebration at Jerusalem's
Western Wall, one of the holiest sites for
world Jewry. The program is both enter-
taining and informative. "Passover
Adventure" was shot on location in Israel
and the Sinai.
A "Passover Adventure" airs on Tues-
day. April 7, 14 and 21 at 6:30 p.m. and
Thursday, April 9 and 16 at 7:30 p.m.
Check-Up
Mount Sinai
Check-Up/Mount Sinai with Lila Heat-
er, past president and honorary chair-
woman of ^e board of trustees for Mount
m Medical Center, can be seen on
ZF every Monday and Thursday at
!r P-m; and Saturday at 6 p.m. Each
KB the program features an infor-
"tttive discussion
Medicine.
on the latest in
JPril 6 Surgical Oncology
Victor Dembrow.
jl* 13 Pulmonary Medicine
* Bruce Krieger

<&

?
Watch "Passover Adventure
with Israeli actor Jonathan Segalle
Tuesday, April 7th, 14th & 21st at 6:30 p.m. or
Thursday, April 9th & 16th at 7:30 p.m.
it
PROGRAMMING SCHEDULE APRIL 1987
Time Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
5:00 Eenie's Kitchen A Aleph Eenie s Kitchen B Aleph Film Special Kaleidoscope Pillow Talk "* Un.if .i Jordan Marsh
5:30 p.m. Check-Up/ Mount Sinai Jewish TV National Magazine f. 28) Film Special (Apr 14&21) Hello Jerusalem (_/'..' .-. by Signj' fens Check-Up/ Mount Sinai Encounter Eenie's Kitchen B
6:00 p.m. We Remember The Holocaust Film Special Encounter Eenie's Kitchen A Check-Up/ Mount Sinai We Ri 'member The
JFTV Bulletin Board Holocaust
6:30 p.m. Still Small Voice or Viewpoint "Passover Adventure" (Apr 7. 14&21) Film Special (April 28) Jerusalem Cafe Teen Scene Jerusalem Cate President's Corner Teen Scene
Federation Today
7:00 p.m. President's Corner Jewish Television Network Specials Pillow Talk Underwritten by Jordan Marsh Still Small Voice or Viewpoint Hello Jerusalem ** Underwit ten by Signature Gardens Jewish TV National Magazine (Apr 11 & 25) Film Special (Apr 4 & 18) Hello
Federation Today Jerusalem Underwritten
7:30 p.m. Programs Are Pillow Talk '* Underwritten by Jordan Marsh Kaleidoscope President's Corner "Passover Adventure" (Apr 9 & 16) Film Special (Apr 2. 23 4 30) Jewish Television Network Specials by Signature Gardens
Subiect to Change Underwriier Federation Today JFTV Bulletin Board JFTV Bulletin Board
You Can See It Only On JFTV
Hello Jerusalem
The Israeli magazine program
Pillow Talk
Single adults discuss issues of concern
Check-Up/Mount Sinai
A medical advice program
Kaleidoscope with Suzanne Lasky
A Miami Jewish television magazine
Jerusalem Cafe
A nightclub show providing Jewish bluegrass. \azz and Russian folk songs
Teen Scene
Local teen-agers discuss controversial issues
We Remember The Holocaust
Survivors and liberators discuss the past
Eenie's Kitchen
A kosher cooking show
President's Corner/Federation Today
How your Federation works tor you
.
Watch JFTV on Your Local Cable System
Storer (North Dade) Channel P-29 Dynamic Channel 38
Storer (South Dade) Channel 14 Tele-Communications- Channel 4
Harte-Hanks Channel 2 Adelphia Channel 21 or 28A
Make JFTV your voice
JFTV is using time on cable T.V. to
raise funds to purchase programs.
Look for your friends and neighbors
on JFTV and answer their requests
generously. Make JFTV your voice.
^edemtion]_April 1987 13


Cult authority to speak at interfaith seminar
Marcia Rudin
In a program initiated by Federa-
tion's Community Relations Com-
mittee through its Committee on
Cults and Missionary Groups,
religious leaders of South Florida will
soon host one of the world's leading
authorities on the cult phenomenon.
Sponsored by the Religious Leaders
Coalition of Greater Miami, Marcia Rudin
will appear on Wednesday, April 29 at
10:30 a.m. at the Pastoral Center, Ar-
chdiocese of Miami before an audience of
religious leaders, educators and
counselors, and the interested public.
An acknowledged authority on destruc-
tive religious cults, Rudin has authored,
co-authored and edited a wide variety of
books, monographs and scholarly studies
on this and other important topics and
has lectured widely on the cult
phenomenon. Her many television and
radio appearances have included,
"Donahue," "Larry King Live," "Late
Night America," and "The Barry Farber
Show," among others; and she has
testified as an expert witness in cult cases
across the nation.
A Magna Cum Laude and Phi Beta
Kappa graduate of Boston University,
Rudin received her joint-masters degree
from Columbia University and the Union
Theological Seminary. She also studied at
the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.
Among the cooperating sponsor
organizations at the event, in addition to
CRC, are the Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami, the Metropolitan
Fellowship of Churches, the Archdiocese
of Miami and the Miami branch of the Na-
tional Conference of Christians and Jews.
W!
^"W T"e will have the privilege of
~ hearing a truly important
authority on the cult
phenomenon," said Rabbi
David Saltzman, spiritual leader of the
Aventura Jewish Center and chairman of
the CRC's Committee on Cults and Mis-
sionary Groups. "The cult phenomenon
has become a matter of serious concern
for many of the legitimate religions in the
United States and throughout the
world," he added.
CRC chairman Jeffrey Berkowitz add-
ed, "While we affirm the right of free
religious expression, we also recognize
that there are elements so controversial
as to merit our most serious study and at-
tention. We are extremely pleased to be
one of the sponsoring organizations of
this program."
Elie Wiesel to speak at governmental seminar

The Community Relations Committee (CRC) and the
Young Leadership Council (YLC) of Federation held a
state legislative forum recently to prepare for the up-
coming Annual State Legislative Day in Tallahassee.
Pictured, from left (seated) are Rep. Susan Guber,
Rep. Betty Metcalf Rep. Michael Friedman, Rep.
Elaine Gordon, Senator Given Margolis; standing
from left are Jeffrey Berkowitz, chairman of the CRC,
Samuel Dubbin, chairman YLC State Legislative
Forum, Nan Rich chairwoman CRC Domestic Con-
cerns Committee, and Aaron Podhurst, president of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
The highlight of a special Governmen-
tal Seminar sponsored by the Community
Relations Committee and the Young
Leadership Council of Federation will be
a keynote address to a rare joint session,
of the two Houses of the Florida
legislature by Elie Wiesel, world-
renowned chronicler of the Holocaust and
1986 Nobel Prize Winner. The special
seminar will be held in Tallahassee on
Thursday, May 7.
The seminar will also involve briefings
by governmental experts, direct exposure
to the legislative and other governmental
processes, meetings with the legislators
and officials of the executive branch
among other important activities.
"I cannot overstate the importance of
the Elie Wiesel appearance before our
legislature," said CRC Chairman Jeffrey
Berkowitz. "Who can better interpret the
broad spectrum of the goals of the Jewish
community," he added.
CRC and YLC have coordinated this
event with the cooperation of community
relations committees and federations
throughout the state of Florida. The
Seminar will occur at the midpoint of the
April-May Legislative Session. Additional
partners in the ambitious undertaking are
the Florida Association of Jewish Federa-
tions, the United Ways of Florida and the
United Protestant Appeal.
An important purpose of the annual
Tallahassee event is to fortify members of
the legislature with an understanding of
the broad range of social services spon-
sored by the convening organizations,
primarily through a range of service
agencies in the various communities that
are funded, in part, through the state
with funds supplied by the state and
federal governments.
"The legislative process is of the ut-
most importance to the Jewish and
general communities in any number of
ways," said Jules Arkin, chairman of the
Governmental Affairs Committee of the
Florida Association of Jewish Federa-
tions, an organization comprised of the
twelve Federations in the State of
Florida. "It is through the legislative pro-
cess that many of our agencies receive
significant portions of their budgets. We
have only recently begun to realize the
importance of the legislative process.
Much remains to be learned about dealing
with state government," he concluded.
CRC calls for
abrogation of
agreement
The Community Relations Com-
mittee (CRC) of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation has call-
ed for abrogation of the Declare-.
tion of Agreement" entered into in May
of 1986 between the American Bar
Association (ABA) and the Association of
Soviet Lawyers (ASL). According to the
terms of that agreement, the two associa-
tions pledged to "promote legal in-
itiatives for peace and human rights and
to advance the rule of law in the world."
The question of calling for the abroga-
tion of the agreement has been a matter
of intense discussion in the Jewish com-
munity and was debated at the recent an-
nual meeting of the National Jewish Com-
munity Relations Advisory Council
(NJCRAC) in Ft. Lauderdale. The issue
was brought to the CRC at its February
meeting by Hinda Cantor, co-chairman of
the South Florida Conference on Soviet
Jewry (SFCSJ), an arm of the CRC, and
by Michael Tryson, chairman of the
SFCSJ Lawyers Committee. It was their
strong recommendation, based on months
of study and intensive debate, that
abrogation be sought at this time. In a
unanimous vote the CRC agreed.
IB its resolution calling for the
abrogation of the agreement, the
CRC characterized the ASL as or*
of the "more anti-Semitic arms of
the Soviet government" and an "instru-
ment of repression of Soviet Jews and
other human rights activists." It also
stated that "instead of advancing the
cause of human rights, the ASL has
resisted opportunities to do so."
The CRC's resolution refers to
statements by ABA officials suggesting
that concern for Jewish emigration is a
"minority concern of Jewish groups" and
"Jewish members of the ABA." It also
takes note that the ABA has listed as a
positive result of the ABA-ASL agree-
ment, the Soviet Government's an-
nouncement of a new policy dealing with
emigration. The CRC resolution stated
that the new policy has, in fact, been de-
nounced by Soviet Jewry and human
rights groups as restricting rather than
freeing emigration," and that it violates
contradicts and abuses international
human rights agreements (including tne
Helsinki Accords, Universal Declaration
of Human Rights and International ton;
vention on Civil and Political Rights).
"The new policy," it states, "provides no
judicial review, thus making a mockery oi
any attempt at due process."
CRC Chairman Jeffrey Berkowitz com-
mented that although he is aware that
there are those who would postpone tne
question of calling for abrogation ot tne
agreement, in the hope that the new
several months may see Pos'1 *
developments between the ABA and w
ASL, it is his view and the view of the
committee that "the time for action is
now."
"I know of nobody the J**"?
community who is happy with either w
fact of the agreement or the NMJ
Hinda Cantor. "To look to the future <*
positive results from the ASL is, indJJ
to be involved in an empty hope, **
added.
14 Federation, April 1987


YLC 'Purim Blast
YLC to hold
'Shalom Brunch'
The YLC "Shalom Brunch" is designed
to introduce newcomers to the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and the Young
Leadership Council. It provides an
opportunity for new members to socialize,
meet the officers and chairmen of the
YLC Board and gain a better
understanding of Federation.
The brunch will be held at the Towers of
Quayside in the social room on Sunday,
April 5, beginning at 11:00 a.m. The cost
is $3 per person. The co-chairmen are
Jason Feinberg and Toni Miller, both of
whom joined YLC this year.
Miami Jewish
Home opens
Alzheimer's
hot-line
While there is no known cure for
Alzheimer's Disease, there is hope and
there is help; the Alzheimer's CARE
LINE, a new service of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged at
Douglas Gardens.
576-5533 is a direct link to the entire
network of Alzheimer's services offered
by MJHHA as well as other agencies in
the community. Staffed by senior case
managers Monday through Friday from
9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., the CARE Line
also provides information 24 hours a day
through an emergency beeper system.
"Often, family members or even elder
care professionals do not know the kinds
of services that are available and which of
those services would be most appropriate
for a loved one or client," explained
Associate Executive Director EUiot
Stern. "The Alzheimer's CARE LINE
Puts people in touch with exactly the kind
m help they need, and that is a tremen-
dous service, particularly in times of
stress or crisis."
At the present time, the Miami Jewish
nome operates a wide range of inpatient
and community programs for Alzheimer's
suiterers and their families. By the end of
W calendar year, even more services will
be available.
Two recently opened programs special-
J designed for Alzheimer's patients are
M9 Tnenick Respite Center at 1733 NE
22? Street in North Miami Beach
."men offers day services as well as family
^ing and counseling; and the Rood
^aieimer Unit on the Douglas Gardens
ampus at 151 NE 52nd Street in Miami,
a,ii u care inDat>ent program. Also
va,lable to Alzheimer's patients through
ml:_^m!Jewish Home are an outpatient
. ital, short-
itation center and a broad ar-
SS $!? a ^"atric hospital, short-
nn rehabilitation center **"* ^-H --
*y of at-home services.
^fer Miami Jewish Federation and
a2 Sh Home and Hotpitalfor
Ma. Parttum in n rnri-nn
Partners in a caring
Pictured at "Purim Blast"
are (from left) Richard and
Felicia Schwartz, vice
chairmen of the YLC Couples
Committee; and Barry
Reiner, YLC member.
Westview Dinner
The Westview Country Club held a dinner on behalf of the 1987 Combin-
ed Jewish Appeal recently. Pictured at the country club are (standing,
from left) Sid Cooperman, Bernie Fuller, Westview Federation chair-
man; M. Jack Herman, president of Westview Country Club who was
honored by the club during the evening for his many years of communi-
ty service; Senator George Mitchell of Maine who was the evening's
guest speaker; Stephanie Herman, Barbara Herman, Lori Herman,
Gwen Berlin, Jerry Berlin. Seated from left are Ruth Fuller, Lorraine
Cooperman, Sid Schneider, and Jan Schneider. Westview raised in ex-
cess of $275,000; representing an 11 percent increase over last year.
JVS thanks volunteers
' YLC recently celebrated Purim with a
"Purim Blast" featuring a "Megillah"
reading and a western style party. Pic-
tured (from left) are event Co-Chairmen Ike
Fisher and Zena Inden.
Foundation to
hold seminar
The Women's Committee of the
Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies is
planning a joint program with the South
Broward Federation's Jewish
Community Foundation. The meeting will
be held at Turnberry Country Club on
April 22, from 9:30 a.m. to noon.
The subject of the seminar will be
"Taking Charge of Your Finances" and
will feature Ann Kliman Schlesinger and
Edward S. Schlesinger. Ann is the
director of the Center for Preventative
Psychiatry and an authority on the
subject of psychology in estate planning
and administration. She has lectured at
the New York University School of Law,
University of Miami Institute on Estate
Planning and numerous Bar Associations
across the country. Ed Schlesinger is an
attorney in private practice and an
Adjunct Professor at the University of
Miami School of Law. He is a popular
speaker on estate planning and
administration and was featured at the
Foundation's 14th Annual Tax Seminar
in November, 1986. Mr. Schlesinger has
published extensively in many leading
periodicals and is co-author of "New York
Probate," published by Lawyers
Cooperative Publishing Company.
The two Foundations are fortunate to
have a joint Seminar Committee co-
chaired by Florence B. Hecht and Evelyn
Stieber, and supported by Ellie Ganz,
Esther Gordon, Joan Gross, and Gert
Kartzmer, all longtime champions of
educating women in the financial arena.
Norma Kipnis Wilson, a director of the
Foundation Board of Trustees, will also
be a featured speaker at this event.
Mount Sinai Medical Center
works with observant Jews
Fred Katz, vice president of JVS; Rachel
Tannenbaum, JVS associate executive
director; Isadore Siegel, coordinator of
the Meals on Wheels Program; and Steven
Weisberg, project director, JVS Nutri-
tional Project.
The Jewish Vocational Service (JVS)
recently sponsored a party to thank
volunteers from the B'nai B'rith Meals on
Wheels Program at Aventura who deliver
meals to homebound elderly residents on
Miami Beach.
Each volunteer driver received a Cer-
tificate of Appreciation from JVS. In ad-
dition, Isadore Siegel, who volunteers his
time to coordinate the program, was
awarded a special plaque. The function
was held at Aventura Jewish Center.
i
The Jewish Vocational Service is a
beneficiary of the Combined Jewish Ap-
peal. Greater Miami Jewish Federation
and the Jewish Vocational Service .
Partners in a caring community.
Before you can be admitted to a
hospital, you have to sign a
number of special forms
designated to keep patients'
records in order. For most people, this is
a simple task and they just sign away. But
for observant members of the Jewish
community, it's not that easy. These
forms can cause quite a problem.
According to the Jewish religion, obser-
vant Jews cannot write or sign any tran-
sactions on the Sabbath (sundown Friday
to sundown Saturday) or on Jewish
holidays. So, what happens to an obser-
vant Jew who must be admitted to the
hospital for immediate medical attention,
but refuses to sign the forms? Will he be
turned away for failure to comply with
hospital rules?
Not at Mount Sinai Medical Center. The
Medical Center has long been admitting
observant members of the Jewish com-
munity on the Sabbath and religous
holidays without requiring them to sign
hospital admittance forms. Recently,
Mount Sinai made this practice official by
incorporating a special clause in its
hospital policy.
L L k 11 that is required of the pa-
f\ tient when being admitted is
, JL. an oral agreement that the
patient will sign the re-
quired forms at another time during his
hospital stay," said Fred D. Hirt, Mount
Sinai's president and chief executive of-
ficer. "A financial representative, respon-
sible for the patient's account, will follow-
up after the Sabbath and make sure that
all of the necessary forms are signed.
"This is a much needed service for the
observant members of the Jewish com-
munity," said Rabbi Solomon Schiff,
director of chaplaincy for Mount Sinai
and the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion. "This allows observant Jews to take
care of their medical emergency needs on
these specific days, while alleviating the
anxieties faced by these patients if they
must be admitted to the hospital on Shah
bat or a religious holiday. This policy also
helps them deal with the conflict of their
medical needs and desecrating their
religious duties."
"Mount Sinai has made a commitment
to the observant members of the Jewish
community," said Hirt. Last year, the
Medical Center instituted a Shabbat
elevator, which is programmed to
automatically stop on each floor during
the Sabbath and on religious holidays.
This allows the observant Jewish visitor
to use the elevators without actually ac-
tivating the electrical circuits, which is
against his or her religious beliefs.
Mount Sinai Medical Center is a
beneficiary of the Combined Jewish
Appeal.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation
and Mount Sinai Medical Center .
Partners in a caring community.

Federation, April 1987 15


k^.
FRIDAY, APRIL 3
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged will hold its
Senior Olympics at Douglas Gardens,
9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. For more infor-
mation, contact Mark Rawdin at
751-8626.
FRIDAY, APRIL 3
The Aventura Jewish Center Singles
Group will hold its monthly Sabbath
Service at the Center, 2972 Aventura
Blvd., North Miami Beach beginning
at 10:00 p.m. Singles of all ages are
invited to attend. A $3 donation and
advance reservations are required.
Call Rabbi Saltzman at 932-7969 for
details and reservations.
SATURDAY, APRIL 4
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, South Dade
Friends Square Dance will be held at
Ruby Auditorium at Douglas
Gardens, 7:30 p.m. For information
call Steffi Cohen at 751-8626.
SUNDAY, APRIL 5
The Abe Horowitz Ladies Auxiliary
681, Jewish War Veterans will hold
its annual "Aid to Israel" barbecue
today from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. at the
Greynolds Park West, NE 22nd
Avenue and Miami Gardens Drive.
Donations are $5 per person and $3
for children under 12 years of age. All
proceeds are donated to the Chaim
Sheba Medical Center in Israel. For
more information, call Elsie Greebel
at 652-7399.
SUNDAY, APRIL 5
The Sisterhood of Temple Adath
Yeshurun will hold its first "Women
of Valor" luncheon honoring Mrs.
Paulina Gothelf at noon in the
Rosenberg Social Hall. For more
information, call Judy Levy at
935-4514.
SUNDAY, APRIL 5
The Women's International Zionist
Organization (WIZO) will present
Yonit's Children's Fashion Show
Luncheon at 11:00 a.m. at the Doral
on the Ocean. For more information,
please call 937-1308.
SUNDAY, APRIL 5
The South Florida Council Na'amat
USA will hold its annual donor
luncheon at noon at the
Fontainebleau Hilton. Ben Cohen,
national president of the American
Zionist Federation, will be the guest
speaker. For more information,
please call 538-0385.
MONDAY, APRIL 6
The Torah Chapter of Hadassah will
sponsor "Help is as close as your
phone," a Southern Bell safety
meeting, at Temple Zamora in Coral
Gables at 12:30 p.m. For more
information, please call 649-7134.
TUESDAY. APRIL 7
An exhibit of the work of
internationally renowned painter and
graphic artist, Amram Ebgi will open
at 6:00 p.m., at the Gallery at the
Hillel Jewish Student Center, located
on the University of Miami campus,
1100 Stanford Drive, Coral Gables.
The one man show will run through
May 29.
TUESDAY, APRIL 7
The Women's International Zionist
Organization (WIZO) will sponsor a
Visit to the South Florida Art Center,
1037.Lincoln Road, at 11:00 a.m. For
more information, please call
937-1308.
TUESDAY, APRIL 7
Ben Gurion Chapter of Hadassah will
hold its regular meeting with
entertainment by an Israeli dance
group led by Yusi Yanich this
afternoon, beginning at 12:45 p.m. at
the North Miami Community Center.
For more information call Clara
Fellerman, 891-3015.
TUESDAY, APRIL 7
The South Florida Conference on
Soviet Jewry will hold its monthly
meeting this evening, beginning at
7:30 p.m. at Federation. For more
information call 576-4000, ext. 291.
TUESDAY, APRIL 7
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged will hold its
Junior Auxiliary board meeting at the
Bay Harbor City Hall, 10:00 a.m. For
information call Steffi Cohen at
751-8626.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8
The Sisterhood of Menorah Temple
will hold its regular meeting in the
Temple Social Hall, 7345 Carlyle
Avenue on Miami Beach, beginning
at noon. For more information call
865-1133.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8
The Women's International Zionist
Organization (WIZO) will hear
clarinetist Giora Feidman at the
Theatre of the Performing Arts at
8:00 p.m. For more information,
please call 937-1308.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8
The Sisterhood of Temple Menorah
will hold its regular meeting in the
Temple Social Hall, 7345 Carlyle
Avenue on Miami Beach, beginning
at noon. For more information call
865-1133.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged will hold its
Founders dinner meeting at the May
Visitors Center and Ruby Auditorium
at Douglas Gardens, 6:00 p.m. For
more information contact Steve Rose
at 751-8626.
Listing for Newsmagazine Calendar items
(Please print or type)
Deadline for May events is April 8
Organization ___________________________
Event ________________________________
Place__________________________________
Day
Date.
Time
( )a.m. ( )p.m.
Your name
Title _____
Phone No.
MAIL TO:
FEDERATION
Communications Department
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard Miami, Florida 33137
THURSDAY, APRIL 9
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged's North Miami
Beach Donor Luncheon will be held at
Turnberry Isle Country Club at noon.
For informationcall Steffi Cohen at
751-8626.
SATURDAY, APRIL 11
SUNDAY, APRIL 12
"Senior Citizens and Retirees Better
Living Show" will be at the War
Memorial Auditorium in Fort
Lauderdale (next to Parker
Playhouse) from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00
p.m. both days. Over 90 exhibitors
such as bankers, medical group
service representatives, travel
agents, cruise lines, real estate
developers, and others who have
services and products of interest to
senior citizens, plus free health
testing and screening. Admission is
free. For information please call
921-7654.
SUNDAY, APRIL 12
Young Jewish Singles at Temple Zion
Israelite Center will meet today at
11:00 a.m. for a brunch and special
Passover program. The donation is
$2. The group meets monthly at the
Temple, 8000 Miller Drive. Call
271-2311 for further information.
SUNDAY, APRIL 12
The Association for Jewish Special
Education will hold its 9th annual
Passover Seder beginning at 1:30
p.m. at the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, 4200 Biscayne Blvd. For
more information call Charlotte
Klieman at 279-8150.
THURSDAY, APRIL 16
North Dade Chapter, Women's
Division, Israel Institute of
Technology, will have it's closing
meeting for the season at Rolling
Green, 1401 N.E. 191st St., Bldg D,
4th Floor, 12:30 p.m. Passover treats
will be served. Program will be a
Fashion Show, presented by Essie's
of Skylake Mall. Models will be
volunteers from the Technion
women. For further information call
Celia C. Mandel at 651-8545.
SUNDAY, APRIL 19
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged will hold its
board meeting in the Ruby
Auditorium at Douglas Gardens,
beginning at 10:00 a.m. Contact the
Executive Director's office at
751-8626 for details.
TUESDAY, APRIL 21
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, Junior
Auxiliary General meeting will be
held at the Singapore Hotel at noon.
For information contact Steffi Cohen
at 751-8626.
THURSDAY, APRIL 23
North Dade Chapter, Women's
Division, Israel Institute of
Technology, will have its closing
luncheon and installation of officers
at the Coral Creek Country Club,
195th Street, off Ives Dairy Road,
beginning at 11:45 a.m. Cost per
person will be $18. For information
and reservations please call Celia C.
Mandel at 651-8545 or Miriam
Lamkay at 948-6518.
THURSDAY, APRIL 23
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged will sponsor
the Greater Miami Women's
Auxiliary Life Trustee Tea at the
home of Ruth Neinken at 1:30 p.m.
For information contact Steffi Cohen
at 751-8626.
THURSDAY, APRIL 23
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, South Dade
r nends general meeting will be held
at 8:00 pm. For information cor
Steffi Cohen at 751-8626.
THURSDAY, APRIL 23
The Golden Shore Chapter of
Women s American ORT is holding a
theater party at 8:00 p.m. for the
showing of "Cheaters" at the Ruth
Forman Theatre. For ticket
information, call Judy Klein at
989-4463. at
FRIDAY, APRIL 24
Temple Zion Israelite Center will
present an Adult Forum following
Shabbat Evening Services. The
speaker will be Hersh Berman who
will speak on "Looking Back Some
Thoughts by a Holocaust Survivor."
Services begin at 8:15 p.m. The public
is invited. For more information call
the Temple at 271-2311. The Temple
is located at 8000 Miller Drive.
SATURDAY, APRIL 25
Temple Zion Israelite Center Theatre
Guild will present "Brigadoon" at
8:00 p.m. Performances will also be
held on the following dates: Sunday,
April 26, Saturday, May 2. Sunday!
May 3 and final performance on May
9. All performances will be at 8:00
p.m. Group sales and advance tickets
are available. Tickets will also be sold
at the door. The Temple is located at
8000 Miller Drive. For more
information, please call Jere Chait at
595-8777 or 858-8660, or Marty
Friedman at 271-4560.
SUNDAY, APRIL 26
Sephardic Jewish Center of North
Miami Beach will be holding a White
Elephant and Rummage Sale. 17100
NE 6th Avenue in North Miami
Beach beginning at noon. For more
information, contact Stella Algaze,
652-2099 or 931-8146.
MONDAY, APRIL 27
Monthly Seniors Brunch will be held
at Temple Zion Israelite Center, 8000
Miller Drive, at 11:30 a.m. The
program will consist of a movie. "The
Lost Sea" which deals with the
escape of survivors from Europe via
the sea and mountains to Palestine. A
donation of $5 is asked of
participants. For further
information, please call 271-2311.
MONDAY, APRIL 27
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged will sponsor "A
Luncheon to Remember," benefitting
Alzheimer's Disease care programs
at the Fontainebleau Hilton,
beginning at noon. For information
call Lou Fischer at 751-8626.
TUESDAY, APRIL 28
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, Junior
Auxiliary Donor Luncheon will be
held at the Doral Hotel, beginning a
noon. For more information can
Steffi Cohen at 751-8626.
TUESDAY, APRIL 28 ,
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee, Miami Beacn
Chapter, will install its newly electee
officers at a luncheon at the Strand
Restaurant, 671 Washington Avenue.
Call 865-5252, for reservations.
16 Federation, April 1987


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