The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03032

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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dfewlslhi Floif idliaini
50-No. 11
Miami Friday, March 13,1987
50 Cents
$ Eban Heads
Pollard Query
Committee
thousand Ethiopian men, women and
children demonstrate outside the Prime
(mister's office, demanding that the Israeli
overnment increase its efforts to reunite
wmlies separated during Operation Moses.
rnme Minister Shamir received a delegation
JTA/WZN News Photo
of demonstrators in his office and assured
them that the government sympathized with
their plight and was doing everything in its
power to bring their relatives to Israel. The
Hebrew placard reads, 'When will I see my
family?'
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Abba Eban, chairman of the
Knesset Foreign Affairs
and Security Committee,
announced Monday that its
subcommittee on in-
telligence will open a deter-
mined investigation this
week into the Jonathan
Pollard affair.
Eban said he rejects Premier
Yitzhak Shamir's assertion earlier
Monday that the matter is "clos-
ed" and his refusal to appear
before the Knesset body. The
special subcommittee "reserves
the right to summon anyone we
see fit, both ministers and civil
servants," Eban declared. He said
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin
would be the first called to testify.
THE SUBCOMMITTEE meets
in camera and is not prone to the
leaks which frequently emanate
from the full committee.
Eban, a Labor MK and former
Foreign Minister, appears to have
the backing of virtually all com-
mittee members, from left to
right, to conduct a thoroughgoing
probe of the government's in-
volvement with Pollard who was
sentenced to life imprisonment in
Washington last week for spying
for Israel.
Shamir came under heavy
pressure from several Ministers at
Sunday's Cabinet meeting to
order a full-scale judicial inquiry.
He promised that the Inner
Cabinet (five Labor and five Likud
Ministers) would convene in clos-
ed session Wednesday to consider
the issue in depth.
BUT SHAMIR warned the
Continued on Page 8-A
MD's Say
1v. Privileged Die Secretly from AIDS
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Fbridian SUtf Writer
AIDS, or the Acquired
une Deficiency Syn-
lnsid
Rabbi Baumgard
Eyes Retirement... 6-A
O'Connor's Defense
Witnesses... 7-A
Israeli Steel
ln Miami... 14-A
1 Rabbi Speaks
On Condoms... 2-B
drome, is not just a disease
of the young, according to
Dr. Lionel Resnick, chief of
Retrivirology in the Depart-
ments of Dermatology and
Pathology at Mount Sinai
Medical Center on Miami
Beach.
"The evidence suggests that
some of the elderly in our com-
munity are infected with the
virus," says Resnick, who, along
with Dr. Jay S. Herbst, chief
medical resident in the Depart-
ment of Internal Medicine, has
written two chapters in "AIDS:
Modern Concepts and
Therapeutic Challenges," the
most comprehensive textbook
available on the subject today.
"Since it is known that a large
percentage of the prostitutes in
Miami are infected with the virus
that causes AIDS," states
Resnick, and since some of the
elderly men in the community fre-
quent these prostitutes, the older
segment of the population in-
cludes individuals who have con-
tracted AIDS.
"YOU WOULD be surprised at
how sexually active our elderly
population is," adds Resnick.
"They're just as much at risk,
given the circumstances that
elederly men have contact with
prostitutes," as well as with their
peers, to whom they can transmit
the virus.
AIDS is the most severe
manifestation of the HIV (Human
Immunodeficiency Virus), but
there are other recognizable
symptoms, such as generalized
swelling of the lymph glands,
neurological disorders Dr.
Resnick was among the first to
recognize these as being related to
the virus and skin disorders,
Continued on Page 8-A
Sad Lesson
U.S.-Israel
Ties Seen
Damaged
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israeli leaders and Knesset
members across the political
spectrum agreed last Thurs-
day (Mar. 5) that U.S.-Israel
relations were seriously
damaged by the case of
Jonathan Pollard, who was
sentenced to life imprison-
ment by a federal court in
Washington Wednesday for
spying for Israel.
Pollard's wife, Anne
Henderson-Pollard, was sentenc-
ed to five years as an accessory.
While there was some sympathy
here for the tragic couple, the
overriding consensus is that Israel
has painful lessons to learn from
the episode and that it must
punish those involved with Pollard
in what the government claimed
from the outset was a "rogue
Continued on Page 11-A
Dr. Lionel Resnick
Dr. Jay Herbst


Page 2-A The Jewish FToridian/Friday. March 13. 1987
Unity Gov't. Survives
Shamir, Peres Anger
Bt DAVID LANDAU
GIL SEDAN
Aad HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Yitzhak Shamir
and Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres had a sharp
verbal exchange at the Sun-
day Cabinet meeting of
March 1. which still sending
out sharp repercussions, hut
the long anticipated coali-
tion crisis over the issue of
an international conference
for Middle East peace failed
to materialize.
It was the firs meetzryc bet-
ween the two men Around the
Cabinet table in several weeks.
Peres had just returned from a
two-day visit to Cairo, where he
and his hosts issued a joint state-
ment committing their countries
to strive to reach agreement this
year on convening an interna-
tional conference as a framework
for direct negotiations between all
of the parties concerned.
SHAMTB, who returned to
Israel several days before from a
10-day visit to the U.S. only hours
Vanunu Trial
May Be
Postponed
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
ammtawml of Mordeehai Vanunu's
lawyer may force a postponement
of the trial of the former Dimona
technician accused of selling
classified information about
Israel's afleged nuclear weapons
capabilities to a British
The trial was scheduled to open
m Jerusalem this week. Vanunu's
famfly fired defense counsel Am-
non Zkhroni Sunday in an ap-
parent disfmte over how the
defense sbood be conducted.
Ziehroni said be would not
withdraw from the ease unless
asked to by his cheat, and then on-
ly with the court's consent.
Z*ehroni is reported to have
prepared a purely legal defense at
the trial which wiE be head ir
secret. The defendant's brother.
Mesr Vanunu of Boston, demands
that the trial be m an open court,
and masts that the defense focus
on the principle* of oppos-
land weapons
j to the >xal media, he
i to turn the trial ato a cause
.-elebrt aimed at applying world-
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after Peres left for Cairo, made
dear that his opposition to an in-
ternational conference was as
strong as ever. He stressed
repeatedly that Peres had no man-
date to agree to any undertaking
on the part of Israel and that
whatever resulted from his talks
with Egypt's leaders would have
to be brought before the Cabinet.
Peres, who had two meetings
with Egyptian President Hosm
Mubarak and lengthy discussions
rus rffkU hail Egyptian
1- reign Minister Esmat AM
Meg reportaW on IwJ
return that there was nc need for
to PTing the joint statement ::
Bat Caere: for mtiSentlH
He explained, however, that he
opposed the idea of an mtema-
doual conference as a negotiating
: c r ~. The peace : a. k 5
themselves must be direct,
without outside intervention, he
said He said Shamir "has no man-
date to reject such a conference."
PERES AND the Egyptian
leaders agreed in their joint state-
ment that the Middle East conflict
should be resolved in all its
aspects, including the question of
the legitimate rights of the
Palestinian people
Peres said they also agreed that
the Palestinian representatives
participating in the negotiations
must be pea sous acceptable to all
of the parties. The Palestine
Liberation Organization was not
mentioned. According to
I of Peres' entourage, this
signified Egypt's understanding
that Israel opposes any role for
the PLO in peace talks.
According to Haarttx cor-
respondent Akivm Eldar. who ac-
companied Peres to Cairo, there is
an understanding that Egypt and
Israel will begin diaconadns on
preparatory talks, with the par-
ticipation of others to create a hat
of acceptable Palestinian
members of a Jordanian-
Palestinian negotiating delgatioc.
Peres ducked questions of an
imp*w*ing Labor-Likud split that
could bring down the unity
government. He insisted the joint
communique in Cairo was within
the framework of government
pobcy and said he would report on
his talks to "the Premier and the
Cabinet"
Earner. Shamir said be had not
spoken to Peres for nearly two
weeks and had receded no reports
from hue while be was in Egypt.
"i will not chase him." Shamir
was quoted as saying
WHILE THE Premier refused
:c reacr. to the Cairo comnunique
Fraay. observers were primed far
an ezplosrve confrontation in the
Cabinet Sunday. But the session
turned out to be -cool but cor-
rect. Shamir and Peres reported
on their respective visits to the
VS. and Egypc
What triggered their exchange
was a remark by Likud Deputy
Premier David Levy After hear-
ag both reports, he'said the unity
coalition could not continue
m two
At that point, the Shamir-Peres
rift emerged They i irhaiigul
been the case. Ae-
rael
GOOD-BYE: Israels Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres leaves pood-bye at the door of his
private executive jet before boarding for a
AP-WideWjrid Photo
return flight to Israel. Peres came to Cairo for
fux> days of talks icith President Homi
Mubarak.
wants to return to the 1967 lines,"
(He was referring to Israel's
pre-1967 borders.)
Peres: "He who does the op-
posite lulls the peace process."
Shamir "If you say that you
don't want the 1967 borders, then
this meeting was worth its while."
Peres: "You don't understand
the differences between negoba-
tioos within an international con-
ference and negotiations which
open with an international
conference.
Shamir "I beneve that the con-
Peres Warns:
ference is a Soviet-Arab idea."
SHAMIR EXPRESSED
"sadness" over the latest
developments. He accused the
Labor Alignment, beaded by
Peres, of trying to impose its
views on the rest of the govern-
ment, contrary to the coalition
guidelines.
Peres said he was appalled by
the "ugly campaign" against him.
"There was a rotation in the
Premiership, but not a rotation in
pobcy." be said, adding that he
would continue to work toward an
intemational conference, and
whoever wanted to stop hia I
should bring the matter before tin
Cabinet for a vote.
The consensus after the Cabin* I
session was that the present crab |
has subsided and the national mi
ty government wfl] remain intaa |
for the time being.
In fact, it seemed apparent oal
Friday that Likud in particulir,
wants to avoid a break MK Ron- I
nie Milo. a dose aide to Shamir,
played down the importance A
Peres' talks in Egypt The mom-
tain has produced a mouse." bt
said.
Don't Reject Peace Conference
EHAHTK: He who says that
apposes an ontuaa
tast the pence
p should take back hs
words."
~He who accuses aw far
a conference of a Soviet
: I want to return
to the 1967 borders, he h the one
rho shosad take back hat words.
Shassin Indeed, he who
today far a
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Knesset opened debate
Wednesday on an interna-
tional conference for Middle
East peace. The session,
marked by an angry ex-
change between Vice
Premier and Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres and
Likud MK Ronnie Milo. a
close aide to Premier Yit-
zhak Shamir, underlined the
growing rancor between
Labor and Likud over the
issue.
The possaboirty of a coalition
crisis was heightened when
Shams- warned that if "other par-
ties" persisted m advocating ar.
mternauonai conference, it could
lend to the downfall of the Labor-
LaVud unity government- Socrces
a: the ?r-* SL-_%: :
quoted Shamir *s say-.rg such a
forum was "the stupidest idea"
ever promoted in Israel: foreagc
pobcy.
PEBES. who returned from
meetings with President Hosm
Mubarak of Egypt in Cairo two
weeks ago with an agreement by
ternaaonai conference, appeared
the Knesset to address two od-
ds on the subject.
One, by the Crusens Rhts Move-
ment (CRMl supported a con-
Tony Curtis Named
BROOKLYN t/TA> Actor
Tocy Curtis is the honorary chacr-
t of tike new Eaanaei Founda-
CaJture which
iwiaure the Dohacy
-' 3jiacesr. ^.z -.-'.
vide other assistance to the
of
ference while the other, by the
Tehiya Party, was opposed
Peres warned that to reject the
international conference option
would be to oal chances of pro-
gress toward peace. He recalled
be has said this at many public
forums when be was Premier and
that his position was accepted by
the government and Knesset.
He accused Shamir of being dis-
--**>"'->.-_ :;. prttawJ^f awS thai
this is a departure from govern-
ment pobcy.
PERES TOLD the Knesset. I
have no intention of withdrawing
from the idea of an international
peace conference." MK Yoss
Sarid of the CRM urged Peres to
"take a few more steps" in the
direction of peace. Tehiya MK
Geula Cohen said Peres'should
"face reality." which does not
allow for peace.
The session was adjourned for |
an hour to allow tempers to cool
after Peres and Milo exchanged
insults. "What have you ever done
for the country?" Peres asked the
Likud MK. who is a Deputy Prime
Minister.
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Background Report:
Pollard Gets Life,
5 Years for His Wife
Friday, March 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
_ Jonathan Pollard, the
former civilian Navy analyst
who pleaded guilty to spying
on the United States for
Israel, was sentenced
Wednesday (March 4) to life
imprisonment.
Chief Judge Aubrey Robinson of
the United States District Court
for the District of Columbia also
sentenced Pollard's wife, Anne
Henderson-Pollard, 26, to two
concurrent five-year terms on
charges of being an accessory to
her husband's espionage activities
and receiving stolen government
material.
The 32-year-old Pollard stood
with his right arm behind his wife
as the sentences were being pro-
nounced. When Robinson an-
nounced the life sentence, Mrs.
Pollard yelled "No, no" and fell to
the floor.
WHEN HER sentence was pro-
nounced she collapsed again,
screaming. She could be heard
screaming after being taken from
the courtroom.
U.S. Attorney Joseph diGenova
indicated that neither Pollard had
a chance for parole and both
would have to serve their full
sentences.
Robinson sentenced the two
Pollards after three hours of
testimony in which husband and
wife pleaded for mercy for each
other and expressed their mutual
love.
"1 pray to God every day that
I'll be reunited with my husband,"
Mrs. Pollard said. "That's all I live
for."
She wept through much of the
Neo-Nazis
Encouraged
By Recent Vote
BONN (JTA) A political
party that polls just 0.06 percent
of the popular vote in a national
election would seem to be headed
for oblivion. But the neo-Nazi Na-
tional Democratic Party (NPD)
took encouragement from that
showing in January's Bundestag
elections and will participate in
upcoming local elections, its
leaders have announced.
NPD was heartened because
under federal law any party which
exceeds 0.05 percent in an elec-
tion is eligible for generous public
Ending. The 250,000 votes cast
for the NPD translates into
veral million Marks. This will
allow it to broaden its organiza-
tional structure and advance its
Political activities.
NPD is expected to enter can-
es in the state elections in
Eh' Bremen and Poss'bly
Although the leaders concede
"*y have little chance of winning
* in those legislatures, par-
2?S? in e'ections will give
2JWD a chance to show it has
~a, f^ugh marginal, support
^ong the electorate.
Of the several neo-Nazi political
STfipff federal ^Public,
" NPD is the most "respec-
3 and the oldest. It had some
W,688 ,n State parliamentary
ZTV" the 1970s. bt soon
in a, afld Presently holds no seats
m any legislative body.
hearing and appeared to be in pain
from a gastrointestinal disorder
from which she suffers. The hear-
ing was recessed twice to allow
her to receive medical attention.
RICHARD HIBEY, Mr.
Pollard's lawyer, argued that
while there was "no excuse" for
what Pollard did there was "no in-
tent" to harm the U.S. and there
was no damage done to the U.S.
He said the information was not
given to an enemy of the U.S., but
to a country that "except for
England and Canada, is our
closest ally."
But Assistant U.S. Attorney
Charles Leeper argued that the
information did damage the U.S.,
as Defense Secretary Caspar
Weinberger noted in classified in-
formation presented to the court.
He said Pollard was a "very
dangerous man" and if not given a
long sentence could still provide
classified information from his
memory.
Pollard told Robinson that while
he now knew he was wrong to
break the law, "I was not inten-
ding to hurt the United States,
but to help an ally. What I did may
benefit this country in the long
run."
IN NEWSPAPER interviews.
Pollard said he acted because he
found that the U.S. was not pro-
viding Israel with information
about arms going to its Arab
neighbors and endangering the
existence of the Jewish State.
But he said Wednesday he now
realizes he should have taken his
concerns through the channels on
the Navy and as far as the Presi-
dent rather than commit an illegal
act.
Pollard said that he not only
broke his trust as a government
employee, but an even more im-
portant trust, to his wife. "Unfor-
tunately, I sacrificed her, in-
advertently ... on the altar of
political ideology," he said.
Both Pollards stressed that
although Mrs. Pollard knew what
her husband was doing, she had
not participated in his espionage
activities. She said she became in-
volved when after he knew his es-
pionage had been uncovered, he
called her, using a previously ar-
ranged codeword, and she sought
to get rid of the government
papers in their apartment.
Both Pollards stressed that they
were sorry that their activities has
caused harm to U.S.-Israeli rela-
tions. Mr. Pollard "undertook his
actions because he believed he
was doing good for both the
United States and Israel," his
wife said.
SHE SAID that after her hus-
band called her on Nov. 18, 1985,
she turned to her husband's
handler, Israeli Air Force Col.
Aviem Sella for help.
This allowed the Israelis involv-
ed to leave the country. A U.S.
court on Tuesday indicted Sella,
recently named commander of a
major Israeli airbase, on three
charges of espionage. He is not
expected to stand trial, unless he
returns to the U.S.
The attorneys for the two
Pollards argued that both of their
clients had been threatened in
prison, partly as a result of anti-
Semitism, and had to be kept in
isolation.
Robinson indicated that Mrs.
Pollard had harmed her case by
her appearance on CBS-TV's "60
minutes" last Sunday. He also in-
dicated that Pollard had violated
the judge's order to clear all
statements he made with the
Navy in his interview with The
Jerusalem Post.
'//<*
\
i
AP/Wide World Photo
BETTER DA YS: Convicted spy Jonathan Jay
Pollard and his wife are shown at President
Reagan's Inaugural Ball in 1985. Pollard said
Friday (Mar. 6) that 'extremely detailed' re-
quests for U.S. military intelligence from his
Israeli handlers suggested a 'highly coor-
dinated' espionage effort by Israel. Pollard
also said he did not give Israel any informa-
tion regarding the U.S. National Security
Council's operations in Israel.
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 13, 1987

Shamir Has Good Case
In Israeli Visas
It is remarkable how quickly and with such
enthusiasm the American press has jumped
on the bandwagon of Israel discontent.
Motivating this negative feeling are the
Iran-contra arms deals, the Jonathan
Pollard spy case, and now, Prime Minister
Shamir's efforts to influence the United
States to end the practice of giving Soviet
Jewish emigrants who do not opt for Israel
the status of political refugees.
Shamir has a good case in the last of these.
When he visited Washington several weeks
ago, Shamir emphasized that the only way
for Soviet Jews to leave the country is via an
Israeli visa. This automatically makes them
citizens of Israel, and so they can no longer
be considered refugees on their departure.
But the Reagan Administration countered
with its belief in "freedom of choice." Once a
Soviet Jew leaves, he should be entitled to
go wherever he wishes.
The fact is that this leaves Israel with the
role of rubber stamp for a process of emigra-
tion in which it takes no other part. In ef-
fect, this humiliates the State of Israel's
sovereignty. It forces Israel to play second
fiddle to a quirk in Soviet Union procedure
which is predicated upon an Israeli visa for
departing Jews. Otherwise how could the
Soviets argue that no one else but
"Zionists" want to leave the Soviet Union
anyway?
Others have also noted and spoken out
against this anomaly, among them Leon
Dulzin, chairman of the Jewish Agency
Executive.
Marred by Stonewalling
What makes this predicament all the more
tasteless is the bitter memory of American
reaction to other refugee Jews during the
Hitler era, when no American port on the
Eastern seaboard, including Miami's, was
open to them not to mention the port of
Havana, which also turned the refugees
back to sure and certain death in the ovens
and gas showers of Nazi concentration
camps.
The sudden "love affair" for the "freedom
of choice" of the Soviet Union's Jews sug-
gests to us more U.S.-Soviet political
maneuvering than Jewish humanitarian con-
cern. And the palaver of the American press
in opposition to Prime Minister Shamir's
recommendation is just that palaver.
Furthermore, that palaver has behind it
the venom of a nation which, itself, feels
stung by Israel's role in the Iran scandal
and the Jonathan Pollard spy case. In that,
the press is justified. But let it be frank and
fair rather than punitive.
In the end, as we see it, if Israel acts to put
those two unfortunate situations behind it,
then Shamir might at some future cir-
cumstance get a more sympathetic Ad-
ministration hearing about Soviet Jews with
Israeli visas who opt for American
emigration.
Unfortunately, it is Shamir himself who
appears these days to be stonewalling
vigorous investigations into Israel's role in
the sale of arms to Iran and the Pollard spy
case. The Administration's insistence upon
the "freedom of choice" principle for Soviet
Jews may, in the end, be more a reaction to
Shamir's attitude in these situations than in
the Soviet abuse of Israeli visas.
65 Years for Beth Jacob
Beth Jacob Congregation will celebrate its
65th anniversary on Sunday at a special lun-
cheon. More than half a century of institu-
tional existence is an incredibly long time in
our South Florida community. And so it is
for Beth Ji
The Orthodox congregation was declared
an historic religious site by the State of
Florida four years ago.
But numbers and the passage of time are
not all that Beth Jacob is about today. The
congregation, which once boasted a
membership of 500 persons, is now depleted
to 120.
Situated at the foot of Washington
Avenue on South Miami Beach, Beth Jacob
has long been a bastion of traditional
Judaism, but the demography of that
enclave are at the root of its unnatural attri-
tion: the bulk of the Jewish community there
has moved away as newly-arriving Latins
and Haitians have taken over the area.
This is not meant to be critical of the
nature of this change but an insight into the
reality of what in fact occurred.
Still, Beth Jacob looks to its future with
hope. Rabbi Shmaryahu T. Swirsky, the con-
gregation's spiritual leader for the last 23
years, and Edward T. Newman, its current
president, say that "We're trying to
revitalize the synagogue We hope that
with the revitalization of South Beach, the
synagogue will come alive" again.
May their fondest hope come true. This
beautiful congregation, with its marble altar
and Ark, and boasting impressive stained
Free Emigration
glass windows in its traditional Sanctuary
setting, deserves no less. Being named a
State of Florida historic religious site
underscores that fact.
Must Be Name of Game for Soviet Jews
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
Two major Soviet Jewry ac-
tivist groups say that they
do not support Israeli
Premier Yitzhak Shamir's
request that the United
States stop granting
refugee status to Soviet
Jews, which allows them to
come directly to the United
States instead of Israel.
Shamir stated throughout his
recent visit to the United States
that with the existence of Israel,
no Jew is a refugee.
Glenn Richter, national coor-
dinator of the Student Struggle
for Soviet Jewry, said he agrees
that Jews no longer may be con-
sidered refugees. But he
presented a different explanation
for neshira Soviet Jews "drop-
ping out" from Israel and coming
to the U.S. with their Israeli visas.
"I THINK that the statements
(of Shamir) don't meet the pro-
blem," he said, "which arises out
of frustration from the Soviets'
deliberately releasing those who
they know will go to America. The
ratio of noshrim (dropouts) has re-
mained relatively constant for the
last five years."
"If the Soviet government
would permit direct flights from
the USSR to Israel," added
Richter, "then Soviet Jews could
see Israel for themselves rather
than being subjected only to the
Kremlin's propagandistic view of
Israel."
But there is another problem,
Richter observed: "Soviet Jews
who arrive in Israel cannot legally
go to the U.S. if they ask to leave
Israel, because they've lost their
refugee status. However, a Soviet
Jew arriving in the U.S. is always
welcome in Israel."
"One must still retain an ele-
ment of choice," Richter said. The
issue, as it now stands, he said,
creates a "no-win situation."
LYNN SINGER, executive
director of the Long Island Com-
mittee for Soviet Jewry and a past
president of the Union of Councils
for Soviet Jews, spoke for both
organizations, the Long Island
Committee being a member
organization of the Union of
Councils. The Union's position,
Singer said, is that "We do not
agree that neshira destroyed the
opportunity for Soviet Jews to
receive exit visas. We fully em-
pathize with the State of Israel in
its position that all Jews should
make aliya. But realistically, the
name of the game is free emigra-
tion, and this is how the Union of
Councils understands it. Family
reunification, repatriation,
whatever nomenclature one
chooses to give it, the energy is
for emigration."
However, the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry (NCSJ) is
currently taking a more cautious
position on the matter. Shamir
spoke at a session convened by the
NCSJ at which leaders of national
Jewish organizations were pre-
sent to discuss the issue of Soviet
Jewry.
The NCSJ released a statement
following the meeting saying that:
"The matters the Prime Minister
discussed have now been squarely
placed on the agenda of the
American Jewish community for
careful consideration as an urgent
item affecting the welfare of the
Jewish people as a whole.
THE PRIME MINISTER and
the community are as one both on
the need for substantial and sus-
tained emigration from the Soviet
Union to the State of Israel, and
that the claim for repatriation to
Israel is a valid and compelling
argument. There was mutual
agreement that issues delineated
by the Prime Minister must be
subjects for serious and ongoing
deliberation."
Jerry Strober, a spokesperson
for the NCSJ, told JTA that the
matter of neshira would now be
given priority for consideration.
but no position one way or
another would be taken at this
time.
Our Readers Write: Article By
Kahane Was Inappropriate
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
In your Feb. 27 issue, an
editorial defended your publishing
of a column by Rabbi Meir Kahane
that appeared on your Op-Ed
Page. Obviously, you must have
had some feelings about the inap-
propriateness of Kahane's
diatribe, or you wouldn't have
justified its publication in the
editorial. Your initial instinct was
correct.
A newspaper addressing the
needs of the total Jewish com-
munity does not need to give
publicity to the bigoted, hateful
and vituperative outpourings of
Meir Kahane who is an embarrass-
ment to everything that Jewish
life represents. He gets sufficient
publicity in the general press
without our needing to give him
more.
Moreover, I found it most
disturbing to see on the same Op-
Ed Page a picture of Adolf Hitler.
Why in heaven's name do you feel
the need to put that hateful face
before us? It has a place in history
books and in the archives, but cer-
tainly doesn't need to be cir-
culated to the Jewish community
of Greater Miami.
Truly, there are better ways to
fill the pages of your newspaper.
RABBI RALPH P. KINGSLEY
Temple Sinai of North Dad*
Fred K. Shochet
Editor and Publisher
eJTewislh Floridian
Leo Mindlin
Associate Editor
Suzanne Shochet
Executive Editor
William T. Brewer
Director ot Operations
Friday, March 13,1987
Volume 60
Joan C. Teglas
Director of Advertising
12ADAR574J
Number n


Friday, March 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
For 'Minor' Holiday, Purim Brings Joy to Many Ages
By SIMON GRIVER
According to Jewish tradi-
tion Purim is a "minor"
festival. Yet if the con-
spicuousness of celebration
is a measure of significance,
then visitors to Israel are
left with the impression that
Purim is one of the most im-
portant holidays, as the na-
tion dons its Purim
costumes and exuberantly
flaunts them in the streets.
To be sure, all Jewish festivals
take on a more visible dimension
in Israel. On Yom Kippur there is
an eerie silence in the streets as
few people, and not a single mov-
ing car can be seen. During Suk-
koth. small wooden cubicles
sprout up at the sides of apart-
ment buildings and on balconies.
while on Independence Day there
I i? literally dancing in the streets.
PURIM. perhaps even more
I than on Independence Day, is a
time for letting one's hair down.
In the weeks preceding the
festival, parents begin to prepare
lor purchase Purim costumes, a
Isacred task that no conscientious
Iparent can avoid. So proud are the
[children of their garb, that in the
[week prior to Purim many
[youngsters can already be spotted
in the streets sporting their
I costumes.
By far, the most popular outfits
lare the traditional Queen Esthers
land Mordechais, but other
[children prefer more contem-
[porary characters, and the streets
[abound with miniature cowboys
|and Indians and budding
| Supermen and Wonder Women.
Adults are more patient in
[awaiting the day itself before put-
ping on their costumes. The coun-
try's diverse cultural mosaic pro-
vides much food for thought, and
[often Ashkenazim will dress up as
[Orientals, secular Jews as
| Hasidim and Jews and Arabs.
POLITICIANS inevitably get
[in on the act. Last year, for exam-
ple, Jerusalem Mayor Teddy
I Kollek could be seen riding around
[the city on a camel wearing top
Israeli children in Purim garb on the streets of Jerusalem.
hat and tails. Jerusalem, like most
cities, arranges special Purim
events with street theater, puppet
shows and other activities to en-
courage the festive spirit. Several
times in recent years
unseasonably cold weather has
brought snow-storms to
Jerusalem at Purim, making it
seem as if the city itself had put on
festive fancy dress.
Jerusalem, like Safad, Tiberias
and other walled cities celebrates
Purim a day after the rest of the
country. Thus Purim in Jerusalem
is called Shushan Purim after the
walled city of Shushan in Persia
which did not receive the good
news of Hainan's plan to exter-
minate the Jews until a day after
the rest of the country. Thus while
Israelis from other parts of the
country are whooping it up over
Purim, observant Jerusalemites
are still observing the Fast of
Esther.
But abstinence is superceded by
excess. Tradition has it that at
Purim it is a mitzvah to drink so
much wine that it is not possible to
tell the difference between the
"blessed Mordechai" and the
"cursed Haman." This is not an
entreaty that appeals to Israel's
anti-alcoholism organizations, but
Israelis are no 'great' imbibers of
alcohol, and though some take an
extra tipple for Purim, many na-
tions of the world would be happy
if they could reduce alcoholic con-
sumption to the level of Israelis at
Purim.
MORE POPULAR than wine
are hamentashen, a triangular
shaped pastry which represents
Hainan's ears. These are usually
included in the mishloach manot,
parcels of sweets, cakes and other
homemade goodies that are given
as gifts at Purim.
Purim is still officially a working
day, though in recent years more
and more individuals and
organizations have been taking it
as a holiday. Many go to the
synagogue to hear the Book of
Esther read and children are
given carte blanche to drown out
the name of Haman whenever it is
mentioned. Purim is also a time
for fancy dress parties and like
Christmas or New Year in the
West there are usually many par-
ties to choose from.
Practical jokes are popular at
Purim, rather like Apru Fool's
Day. The newspapers print spoof
editions, and more subtly deceiv-
Continued on Page 12-A
Calendar Vagaries
Plus Book of Esther Riddles, Make Purim 'Upside-Down' Festival
By RABBI
NORBERT WEINBERG
This year. Jews around the
world will celebrate Purim,
(the Feast of Esther, on Sun-
day (March 15) which falls
on Adar 14, but in
Jerusalem, Jewish heritage
insists on celebrating on
March 16 (Adar 15),
i a MaVertPurim plate ** *n ^form fa three-sided hamantash,
\Han^ngUTr 8naPed pa*try which represents Haman's ears.
ZfrTJ* fading Mordechai on the king's horse. The inscription
|Z ;^u*,8Aa" u done to the man whomtheKing delights to
"w. (bather 6:11).
Shushan Purim, the Purim
of the ancient Persian
capital, Susa.
This vagary of the Jewish calen-
dar is but one of many
peculiarities of the festival about
which one can say, in the words of
the Scroll of Esther to describe
this day 24 centuries ago,
venahofoch Hu "It was turned
upside-down."
It is too easy to think of Jewish
teaching and heritage as straight-
laced. Prominent ancient Rabbis
frowned upon levity and light-
heartedness. The prophets cer-
tainly could strike no one as being
humorous; the festivals surely
deal with weighty themes of
liberation, revelation, dedication,
or mourning.
FOR THAT reason, Purim is of
even greater value in setting
aright a lop-sided vision of the
heritage of Israel. The Midrash
Shohar Tov declares, "All the
festivals will be abolished in the
end of days, but Purim will never
be abolished." The statement is a
vital reminder that joyousness
and levity are indelible and
undeniable aspects of humankind.
Purim, by celebrating the triumph
of the innocent over the wicked,
gives legitimate expression to this
essential facet of our nature.
At the heart of the celebration is
the Scroll of Esther, a book, which
from chapter one to the end, is
laden with irregularities and dif-
ficulties. Some thinkers, Gentile
and Jew alike, have had trouble
digesting the work. For Abraham
Geiger, it was in "bad taste and
mean feeling," and Martin Luther
complained, "They Judaize too
much and have too much heathen
corruption."
The book poses many problems.
There is a Persian King,
Ahasuerus, yet there is no record
of such a king having had a wife
named Esther; for that matter, no
Shah of old could pick a wife by
beauty contest the queen had to
be a daughter of one of the seven
noble families of Persia. A search
for reference to a Queen Vashti,
or an adviser Haman, leave us
empty handed.
WHAT OF our hero and
heroine, the bearers of such
classically Jewish names as
Mordechai and Esther? Are these
not rather Marduk and Ishtar, the
god and goddess of Babylonia?
Finally, for a Jewish book, where
is God to be found? Nowhere in
the pages.
What made this book win its
place in the Jewish heart? There is
a feeling of a righting of historical
wrong. Mordechai is "descendant
of Kish, the Benjaminite," and
Haman is an "Agagite." The
story echoes the battle, centuries
earlier, between Saul and Agag,
the Amalekite; the clash between
two courtiers is the metaphor for
the eternal war of Israel against
Amalek the ethical and just
against the devotees of
groundless hatred and malicious
evil.
Certain other lines and images
struck a respondent chord in the
Jewish heart over the centuries.
Hainan's accusation, "There is a
certain people scattered abroad
and dispersed their laws are
diverse from those of every peo-
ple; neither keep they the king's
law," portend of the accusations
of a Torquemada or a Hitler.
Esther's predicament spoke to
later generations as well. The Jew
who has "made it" in the world at
Continued on Page 12-A
There is a Persian king, but no record of
his having a wife named Esther.


Page 6-AThe Jewish FloridJan/Friday, March 13. 1987
At Beth Am
Baumgards Won't Be Sentimental About Leaving
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jrtn$k Fh^\duxn Staff Writer
Rabbi Herbert Baumgard
says he is a sentimental guy.
but when it will come to par-
ting ways with the
synagogue he helped build
from scratch to the thriving
enter it is today, he says he
will try not to be
sentimental.
But he sure talks like a rnar
is sentimental.
This synagogue is my baby. My
blood, sweat and tears went into
it. They're not just congregants.
They are friends, fellow builders,
fellow sufferers. fellow creators."
SOMETIME around June.
Baumgard will leave his post as
the first and only rabbi of Temple
Beth Am in Kendall. The end of
his 31-year tenure will also mark
the end of service of his secretary,
for the past 12 years, his wife
Selma.
As be sits in his study, filled
with books, including two he
wrote, there are two jars on his
desk. One says, "answers." the
other says, "pearls of wisdom."
The wisdom he has arrived at is
that he is "ready to retire." The
job "has a great many ad-
ministrative duties that I'd like to
unload."
IN ITS place. Baumgard said he
would like to write and has at
least three ideas for books already
formulating in his mind.
He would like to shape up and
publish his doctoral dissertation
on the "Concept of Good in the
Bible."
"Originally the Semitic world
for "good" was that which God
approved." says the leader of the
Reform Congregation. "In the
pre-Hebraic nations, that had
nothing to do with ethics. It had
only to do with the proper ad-
ministration of rituals. It was the
genius of the Hebrews to say that
of which God has approved was
ethical."
Another book would be on the
prophet Jeremiah, i think his life
would make a good play." say?
Baumgard.
The third book would be called.
"Why Judaism?"
BAUMGARD BEGAN giving
sermons before he was a rabbi
when he was a chaplain's assistant
during World War II at Camp
Shelby. Miss.. and that, he says, is
bow he became interested in the
rabbinate.
"I was interested in reforming
society so that more people could
experience the advantages of
society and helping the poor, of
which I was one.
"I come from a very poor
background newspaper boy.
street peddler. I was always in-
terested in racial justice, in
eliminating wars, and all this was
found in Judaism."
FOB HIS undergraduate
studies. Baumgard majored in
economics at the University of
Virginia and was interested "in
trying to help create the good
society with Franklin Roosereh."
But in Norfolk, Va., where
Baumgard was born, "Jewish
boys couldn't get elected into
politics." he said.
The next +iw- nnnf,] stop was
the University of Virginia, where
Baumgard studied law. Pearl Har-
bor erupted, and Baumgard went
into the Army.
Baumgard's father was a tailor,
his mother was a homemaker, and
bite Selma'i parents, were from
an Orthodox background.
- why Reform leadership?
"I feh the Orthodoxy I ex-
'This synagogue is my baby ... my blood,
sweat and tears went into it.' Rabbi Baumgard.
perienced would not capture the
loyalty of young American Jews.'
Baumgard said. The old-school"
services and rabbis "were not
comprehensible." he said.
IN 1946, Baumgard went to the
Jewish Institute of Religion in
New York, the Reform seminarv
founded by Rabbi Stephen D.
Wise. He was ordained in 1950
and became spiritual leader of
Temple B'nai Israel congregation
which he helped found in Long
Island.
He moved to Florida when he
was asked by the national Reform
movement to be its area director.
He came here in 1956 and helped
found three congregations, choos-
ing to be part-time rabbi at one.
Temple Beth Am. Soon, be found
the two jobs too much to handle
and chose to remain full-time at
Temple Beth Am.
By 1960. there were 300
families attending the new
synagogue. That year, a social hall
was buOt on the 10-acre site in the
5900 block of North Kendall
Drive, and the following year, a
day-school was built.
ON THE other aide of U.S. 1,
neither Dadeland Mall nor the
bouses and apartments were built,
and Rabbi Baumgard recalls, "I
never dreamed" the synagogue
would become to big.
But he worked with the strong
belief "that a synagogue is more
than a bouse of prayer."
His philosophy was that a
synagogue should try to meet as
manv needs of the Jewish com-
munity as it can. "We met the
needs and we were equal to the
challenge." Out of a nursery
school came the first Reform day
school in modern times.
"WE WE RENT following any
pattern. We had the guts to do it
and went forward." Baumgard
said. "We had problems getting
proper teachers, money, space,
getting parents involved. But we
had a good founding director.
Sima Lessor.
"I would say one of the reasons
the Temple has been unusaily suc-
cessful, and I say it without
boasting, is that it's a different
kind of Temple. We tried to create
an atmosphere in which talented
and creative people can do their
thing. Now that's a rare thing.
"What I did was help Sima
Lessor to do her thing. She had an
interest in creating a school for
quality education. I had an in-
terest in advancing Jewish educa-
tion. And we combined the two."
BAUMGARD WENT through
open heart surgery about eight
months ago, and that has helped
form his decision, that "there is a
time to step down."
In preparation, the Temple's
search committee brought in Rab-
bi Leonard Schoolman, who began
to share the puhxt and duties with
Baumbard in September.
Baumgard says the Temple
Beth Am religious school is
senior citiien communit, -
Baumgard said. "We're m&
old. We're not getting Eg
young people involved tk
primary problem is the sej
revolution. People are ablet
satisfy their sexual needs outsjj
of marriage. There is the 2
on the part of women that the*-
don't need to be mothers to
fulfilled. While all this is hal
ing for Christians too. ,r Jew! j.
is calamitous."
THE BAUMGARDS have
three children. Jonathan is a doc-
tor who lives in Mi .-n nj,
wife and two children. Daughter
Shira also lives in Miami where
she is a dance therapist w rkingin
the drug and alcohoi unit a: Mount
Sinai Medical Center. S. iianje|
is married and involved in real
estate.
Selma Baumgard formed the
Temple Choir 31 years ago and
will give up that position when she
retires. She also will give up her
job as the rabbi's secretary, which
started one day when she had a
broken leg and came to the Tem-
ple to answer phones
The rabbi told her his secretary
was ill and he needed someone to
answer phones in his office.
"I said, "You're crazy We'll eat
each other alive. Two Leoa should
not work together. Even if I don't
believe in horoscopes. Leos are
very forceful people. It's been 12
years. I yell. He yells. It's
wonderful."
THE TEMPLE that they wi
leave in an official capacity now
has 1.700 families in its congrega-
tion. That has come a long way
from what former Temple Beth
Sholom spiritual leader Rabbi
Leon Kronish once referred to as
"the Negev" because there was
nothing in Kendall.
In their legacy, the Baumgards
will leave a basketball program
that now involves 350 y -uths. a
teen center, a "caring program"
that focuses attention on the sick,
elderly and divorced young
mothers, programs for the han-
dicapped, a religious sch >l that
has 1.100 student-
"My role? The biggi
did was give of
because he wa nevi
Seima Baumgard say?
"THE ONE thing I
was we eat dinner togetl S n
dinner that was. It wa<
and he had to leave for a r: -
and another meeting.
"It was a sacrafice or. the part
of the children and me. He was a
very dedicated and ambitious
young man. There was always
something new pushing him. He
made things happen."
"atypical" in that most religious
schools are "plumeting."
"American Jews are becoming a
UAHC Vice President
Vorspan To Speak At Service
In Honor of Rabbi Baumgard
Al Vorspan, vice president of the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations and director of the Commission on Social
Action of the UAHC will be the principal speaker at the service
paying tribute to Rabbi Herbert Baumgard, on Friday. 8:15 p.m.
at the temple.
Rabbi Baumgard, who will continue his activities as senior
rabbi until May 1st, is the founding rabbi of Temple Beth Am.
which he helped establish in 1956.
DELUXE KOSHER
PASSOVER TOURS
rO^MTA0^BLEAUHLTON TAMUENT PESO"'
***S8fKK>. RESORT ono*t.
SHERATON BAL HARBOUR "* "J^f70*
SANSsoua
COPACABANA
POSAOAD6LSOL
ussxxmjs RESORT
PrVfRAmJON
*WSinoi
HOTEL MEHOtN
AMBASSADOR BEACH
OUPONT PLAZA
HARBOR GLAND Sf*
AtniAVrteurfU"'
FvrtoHco
. i ^t!SJI?S^^S?5Ji'^t!^S. IffffS


Friday, March 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Demjanjuk
Loses Cool, Calls
Witness 'A Liar'
Striking government hospital workers
demonstrate opposite the Knesset to protest
against what they call the Finance Minister's
'tight-fisted' policy on granting them wage in-
creases. The placard reads, 'We'd be better off
JTA/WZN News Photo
receiving unemployment benefit.' The
Treasury and the 11,000 strikers have since
settled differences over the timing of payment
of an increase ofNIS 200 per employee.
Witnesses Will
Demjanjuk Not 'Terrible Ivan'
Say
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Mark O'Connor, the
American lawyer defending
accused war criminal John
Demjanjuk, said he plans to
call seven witnesses to
verify Demjanjuk's claim
that he was a German
prisoner of war during most
of World War II and never
was near the Treblinka
death camp where he is
alleged to have been the
sadistic guard known as
"Ivan the Terrible."
O'Connor refused to divulge the
names of the witnesses in the
course of a wide-ranging inter-
view with Tom Segev, editor of
the political weekly Koteret
Rashit. "Naturally, they fear for
their welfare," he said, adding
that they come from different
countries and "are people who
were with him (Demjanjuk) during
the whole war."
FOUR TREBLINKA survivors
have positively identified Demjan-
juk as "Ivan the Terrible," poin-
ting to the prisoner in Jerusalem
district court where the trial
finished its third week last Thurs-
day. In addition, a senior police of-
ficer, Alex Ish-Shalom, who head-
ed the team that interrogated the
Ukrainian-born Demjanjuk before
Witness: He
Ripped Flesh
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Jttav Borax, an 87-year-old
Holocaust survivor who lost his
fta family at Treblinka, has
MOM in Jerusalem district
^ that accused war criminal
*W Demjanjuk was the brutal
death
camp guard known as "Ivan
to Terrible."
Borax the oldest witness to ap-
P* so far, was the fourth to iden-
^ Demjanjuk since the trial
opened. Speaking in Yiddish, he
J he was in his 30's when he
SLfeS^J? Tblinka and
of?C J0b, of ^^"K heads
JJJJJi about to go to the gas
bSS! tes*ified that he saw Ivan
J terrified women at bayonet
Xu?t?theroom where Borax
JJJJ- Ivan often stabbed them,
**" "ie witness said.
the trial, testified Thursday that
Demjanjuk was unable to recall
the name of even one of his fellow
Ukrainians he claimed were in the
POW camp with him.
Nevertheless, O'Connor said he
has "not a shadow of a doubt"
that Demjanjuk is an innocent vic-
tim of mistaken identity. He in-
sisted that the SS identification
card of Demjanjuk placed in
evidence last week was a Soviet
forgery. He charged that the pro-
secution has refused to allow in-
dependent experts to examine and
test it for authenticity.
"They won't let my expert
touch the document. They main-
tain that we'll destroy it," O'Con-
nor said. Proof of forgery will put
Israel in a "very embarrassing"
position, O'Connor warned. "This
is a very delicate moment in
negotiations between Israel and
the Soviet Union" and the pro-
blem of the card's authenticity is
"a great political question," he
said.
O'Connor rejected Segev's
charge that the implied collusion
between Israel and the USSR
served the interests of anti-
Semitic Ukrainian exile organiza-
tions. "I do not represent" the
Ukrainians he said. They "are
working against Mark O'Connor."
He was apparently referring to
Ukrainian groups in the U.S.
which had lobbied against Dem-
janjuk's extradition to Israel more
than a year ago.
O'CONNOR SAID he plans to
test the memories of the
Treblinka survivors testifying at
the trial "to examine their mental
state at the time they absorbed in-
to their memories the information
they now impart. what happen-
ed to that information during the
half century that has passed since
then, and what was added mean-
while to the reservoir of their
memory." He said in doing this he
would "unfold the story of the
Holocaust in more detail than the
prosecution."
O'Connor would not answer
directly when asked if he believes
in the independence of the Israeli
court hearing the case. "It's not a
question of whether I believe or
not ... I maintain that an Israeli
court has never stood before a
question with such far-reaching
political meaning The in-
dependence of an Israeli court has
never been placed before such a
difficult test."
O'Connor was joined in Israel
Saturday by his three children,
who will remain with him for the
duration of the trial. He said he
believed ."it is more important
that they should experience this
historic trial together with me
than to have another year's
schooling."
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
A Treblinka survivor who
identified John Demjanjuk
as the brutal death camp
guard known as "Ivan the
Terrible" was called a liar
by the accused as the trial of
the 66^year-old Ukrainian
born former automobile
worker from Cleveland,
Ohio ended its third week in
Jerusalem district court.
Eliahu Rosenberg, pointing at
the accused last Wednesday
(March 4), told the court, "That is
Ivan, I have not a shadow of a
doubt." He was relentlessly cross-
examined by Demjanjuk's
American attorney, Mark O'Con-
nor. It was Rosenberg's third day
on the witness stand, and Judge
Dov Levin, president of the three-
judge panel hearing the case, said
it would be the last.
ROSENBERG, who testified
that he was a member of the
prisoner squad forced to clean the
gas chambers after each mass kill-
ing, was asked by O'Connor why
he did nothing to warn his fellow
Jews as they were driven to their
deaths.
"How could I have helped
them?" was Rosenberg's anguish-
ed reply. "I had no contact with
living people there ... If I would
have shouted to them I would
have been thrown alive into a pit
filled with blood."
At that point, Demjanjuk called
from the prisoner's dock, "You
are a liar." He hurled the epithet
in Hebrew, which he has learned
since he was extradited to Israel
from the U.S. more than a year
ago.
O'CONNOR'S cross
examination was aimed at
discrediting Rosenberg by
demonstrating that his memory is
faulty. He succeeded in finding
discrepancies between
Rosenberg's testimony in court
and statements he signed at other
times.
One related to the date he was
brought to Treblinka. Was it dur-
ing June, 1942 or on the eve of
Rosh Hashanah that year; and
how old was he when he gave
testimony in the trial of Adolf
Eichmann 25 years ago, 35 or 40?
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Page 8-A The Jewish Floridiaa/Friday. March 13, 1987
Beach MD's Say:
Elderly, Privileged Dying of AIDS
Continued from Page 1-A
some of them quite common in the
general population, which does
not have the virus.
'Kaposis Sarcoma, a form of
skin cancer, is such a conspicuous
manifestation that it has been in-
cluded in the definition of the syn-
drome." says Dr. Herbst, but
there are other dermatological
symptoms as well.
"FUNGAL AND bacterial in-
fections of the skin, such as
Athlete's foot and common warts,
benign and malignant tumors are
some of the others, but before we
panic every person in South
Florida who has Athlete's Foot,
let me explain that in the cases
where AIDS is suspected, the
disorder is more severe and
unusually resistant to therapy."
In addition, the patient would
moat probably belong to a high
risk category of the population.
Tne disorders are more pro-
nounced and resistant to treat-
ment because the AIDS virus
mpreaaea the immune system and
leaves the body more vulnerable
to opportunistic infections.
"We're not exactly sure why the
immune system is destroyed in
AIDS, but we do know that the
virus interferes with the function
of white blood cells which are
crucial to the function of cell-
mediated immunity" one of the
body's two mechanisms for
fighting off infection, tan
Herbst.
THE IMPORTANCE of
recogrunng die dermatological
iers

thai "If
mannestat: r? .: -_-.,? -.-.-.:> :ri:
-vcur before the .rr.rr.ur.o Logical
abnormafitiei set m can be iden-
tified by a physkiar.. perhaps
the f-rurv e can direct therapy."
warti Herbal
Recognizing AIDS victims is
further complicated by the fact
that, according to Resnick. "Peo-
ple are dying and it's being kept a
secret. The cause of death is not
reported as being AIDS" because
the victims have high standing in
the community and the disease
carries a great deal of stigma
along with its diagnosis.
The answer to the very serious
problem of AIDS is, obviously, to
find a cure or a preventive vac-
cine, but this goal is being
hampered by the apathy of the
public and politicians, contends
Resnick.
'The money and attention ap-
portioned to research are propor-
tionate to the amount of time re-
quired to find a cure." he explains.
"The reality of the world is that
most people don't give a damn.
They don't want to get involved
because they're scared." says
Resnick.
IN FACT, there is plenty to be
scared of.
"The people who are infected go
off and live the rest of their lives
in solitude and secrecy." states
Resnick. And a person who tests
positive for the AIDS antibodies
might not develop the syndrome
itself for ten years or longer.
"It would do no good for me to
round up the young and tell them
that they have to have sex in a
particular way for the rest of their
lives." says Resnick.
"Safe sex" is in actuality on
"safer sex" because no form of
prevention is 100 percent effec-
tive, and testing, according :
Resnick. is not a solution for the
genera! public because the test
results car. be negative r.e day
and positive the next day. week
or year.
TOO WOULD have to be
Eban To Head Knesset Inquiry
Into Pollard Spy Case
Coatiaied froai Page 1-A
Knesset Monday that "hysteria
fanned Israel book: "infect die
United States to Israel's great
detriment. He claimed that
cnocawr :: the pjowamrr.er.: >
handrwg of the affair by members
of the Knesset committee and
others .corned sharper than
rr-.txisrr. vo.ee>;: :.-. the I" 5
Ebar discussed that argument
and informed the Premier of his
- tjre .- nteamal :.; amma s
probe The s^ff sentence imposed
on PoLard. a former arama m-
ta^feaee analyst ernpioyed by the
O-S Navy indicated to macv
Israelis Wasi:ng*.cn > severe
d-STueasure wtta Baaa1 hi aha
a2a=r
Americas az^er ts foamed oa
the appoastBMat of An- Force CoL
Avmsc Sefia to the imaainl of
one of Israel's largest air bases
-7 few days before Poiiard
wai sertesced. According to
Pollard s tesamoey. he was
1 by Seua and recened hat
( assjgments front ham.
mdvtec a. ira>aua for
_J by a federal grand jbtv
= Waacagtoc ias: week.
ANOTHEK EET figure a the
affair, former Mosaad operative
Rafael Eitas. was recently
rewarded wish the eaaarmmmeap
of Israel Taiamiili the rtrgeat
gore- seat-owned corporatrta
here :tar headed PoaareTs ea-
nioc^e oavit. "Lekem.'
MKAabaEbaa
mark the first cane a body of the
Knesset acted snumrtv to a L'S
senate ccenmitxee ptuhiag mat-
ters of urgent pabbc concern. He
amid the Premier's assertion that
the matter was "ckaetT made it
ai the more important for the
to coaduct its own
The Poflard affair a of deep con-
cern to Israeas and.'
and can bardr be
hystera. Eban'aaid.
MEANWHILE, three
of nca-esefideuce rt the gowem-
"** wfl be aaimhiud the
Tnesnay by the oppoa-
and the
for Peace. Bat no
twos are expected from
MKs. denpate a strong
Lot
defer,
tested every day." he says, "and
even the test has its inherent pit-
falls." meaning that the test is not
always accurate.
"A cure is not going to happen
until millions of people decide to
do something about it. but the
chance of that happening before
millions of people die is slim to
none.
"The government is not pushing.
and the young lads of today wul be
inheriting this problem they
will either live in the remnants of
a plague-devastated society, or
become actively involved in sway-
ing our political leaders into deal-
ing with the problem." contends
Resnick.
"The Jewish community is
becoming just as heavily at risk as
anyone else." he adds, "and it
behooves them to get involved."
RESNICK. who has en-
countered the classic problem of a
prophet in his own land, whom no
one wul pay attention to, says that
be is still inspired to continue his
fight.
"I haven't eaten more than one
meal a day for over a month."
says Dr. Resnick. who had slept
only one hour the night before,
because of his involvement with
the AIDS research.
"I've been up against the wall
all the bigotry, all the political
nonsense and pure hatred, but
yes. I'm still inspired.
"I fee: like Carter at his last
stand I keep seeing arrows go
through peopie and I can't do
aajtl -
The tax moat fraatratiag
tmagi forme ana been an
- fie bat re mj -
and thai nfr atiag the apathy
::' the peopie who couki effect a
change "
Or. to put Dr. aaaakfc'l
message :r.i- the Lar-guags ::'
literature rather than science.
"Ask not for whorr. the :-
it toils for thee
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Soviet Official Declares
Friday, March 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Future of Relations with Israel up to Jerusalem
By TAMAR LEVY
GENEVA (JTA) A
Soviet official said here
Thursday (Mar. 5) that the
future of relations between
the Soviet Union and Israel
is up to Israel. He also in-
dicated that Soviet and
Israeli diplomats are in
regular" contact at the
United Nations in New
York.
Ambassador Vladimir Lomeiko,
head of the Soviet delegation to
the conference of the United Na-
tions Human Rights Commission,
spoke at a press conference in
response to questions by the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency. "The
key for the resumption of
diplomatic relations between the
USSR and Israel is in the Israeli
hands," he said.
LOMEIKO maintained that the
Soviet Union is implementing
widely our policy of letting people
who wish to emigrate do so." He
also claimed that many emigrants
are returning. "They are
thousands." he said.
Asked if the new policy would
allow Jews who immigrated to
Israel to return to the USSR to
visit their families, and Jews in
the Soviet Union to visit their
families in Israel, the Soviet
diplomat replied: "Unfortunately,
we have no diplomatic relations
with Israel or any other contact
which would enable an easier way
of action. All the keys for such
relations are in the hands of
Israel There are regular contacts
in New York between our
diplomats and Israelis."
Ambassador I'inchas Eliav, the
Israeli envoy to the UN here, said
last Thursday that Israel ap-
preciates the statements by the
Soviet leadership about new ap-
proaches to social and cultural
issues and emigration, but so far
has seen little concrete evidence
of change.
He said while Israel welcomes
the release of a number of Jewish
Prisoners of Conscience, the
overall situation of Soviet Jewry
remains worrisome. He spoke of
the denial to Jews of all forms of
national and cultural expression,
the fact that there are no Jewish
or Hebrew schools, and even a
small private Jewish kindergarten
in Moscow was closed by the
police.
"WE WILL always remember
Koehler Gets Boot
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
German-born John Koehler, who
was a member of the Hitler Youth
as a child, was dismissed from his
White House job last Friday, only
five days after becoming Presi-
dent Reagan's communications
Director.
He was sacked by the new
White House Chief of Staff,
ormer Sen. Howard Baker, who
w>k over from Donald Regan just
r!2r ag0 Baker reportedly told
Jtoehler that in reorganizing the
White House staff his job
^"'cation might be eliminated.
that it was the valor of the Red at stake now is its spiritual and
Army which was principally national existence," Eliav said,
responsible for the physical sur- With respect to emigration, the
vival of this remnant, but what is i8raeli envoy ^ ^^ s^,.
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very close relatives abroad.
"They fail to insure that the de-
mand of hundreds of thousands of
Soviet Jews to be permitted to live
in the Jewish State are granted.
In fact, in the month of February
1987, only 142 could leave the
country, and thus even the asser-
tion that 500 exit permits were
granted in January has yet not
been substantiated," Eliav said.
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Page 10-a The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 13, 1987
Israel May Rethink
View of Syria
As Non-Threatening
B* GIL SEDAN
JERUJ
A violer
Syrian
Druze on
Sunday
VLEM (JTA) -
anti-Israel pro-
lemonstration by
he Golan Heights
'.ay alter Israel's
recent perception of Syria
as a country too weakened
by economic problems and
ostracism by the West to
pose an immediate threat to
Israel.
The demonstration was occa-
sioned by tne 24th anniversary of
the Syriar. Baath Party, now
headed by E resident Hafez Assad.
It was the orst confrontation in
a year between Golan Druze and
the Israeli authorities.
ABOUT 100 high school
students marched chanting pro-
Syrian, pro-Assad slogans and
waving Syrian flags. Police rush-
ed to the scene were struck by
rocks and other heavy objects.
Ten policemen were injured, and a
Druze woman was wounded when
police opened fire.
She was reported in serious con-
dition at .ambam Hospital in
Haifa. The demonstrators were
finally dispersed with tear gas.
Several hours later, Assad ap-
peared on Damascus television to
hail the bravery of "the Syrian
citizens ir. the Golan against the
Zionist er.emy." He pledged that
the "day of liberation" would
come wher the Golan will once
again be part of Syria.
Assad's bombast is nothing new
and in fac most of his speech was
relatively oderate, without the
usual thn s against Israel, the
U.S., Western Europe and Egypt.
BUT THE outburst on the
Golan focused attention here on
the sudden change in Israel's
strategic a ^essment of Syria that
emerged statements by top
policy-makt rs last month. Their
political purpose was unclear.
Where;.- Syria was long
depicted as Israel's most
dangerous :oe in the region with
greatly improved ground and air
forces capaole of striking without
warning, Defense Minister Yit-
Brooklynite
Turns 100
BROOKLYN (JTA) -
William "Velvel" Weinreb of
Queens, N.Y., celebrated his
100th birthday Feb. 28 with his
fellow residents at the Aishel
Avraham Residential Health
Facility here. A New Yorker since
immigrating to the U.S. in 1919.
he was independent until two
years ago.
Qroward
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zhak Rabin and others began to
play down the menace.
According to them, Syria is in
economic shambles, and Assad,
constrained by domestic problems
from adventures abroad, is forced
to keep a low profile because of
the exposure of Syria's links with
international terrorism.
THEN THE wheel began to
turn. Assad, attending the Islamic
summit conference in Kuwait in
January, appeared to join hands
with his rival, President Hosni
Mubarak of Egypt. A month later,
Syrian tanks and infantry oc-
cupied most of Moslem West
Beirut in what appears to be a suc-
cessful effort to restore law and
order in that violent city.
Israel, which itself entered
West Beirut nearly five years ago,
reacted calmly. Assad said he sent
his army into the Lebanese capital
because he could no longer stand
seeing the city "drown in a
bloodbath."
Israelis of course know his
motives were more self-serving
than humanitarian. Syria feared
the collapse of the mainstream
Shiite militia, Amal, in its bloody
confrontation with Palestinian
terrorists and extremist Moslem
factions.
DAMASCUS also shares
Israel's concern that the Palestine
Liberation Organization may
regain its power in Lebanon. In-
stability in Lebanon threatens the
stability of Syria. Assad's move
into Beirut was also calculated to
rehabilitate his image in Western
public opinion and in the Arab
world.
For the time being at least, the
daily shooting and bombings have
ceased. Kidnappers are not snat-
ching victims off the streets.
Businesses have reopened and the
Lebanese Pound has revived.
Syrian forces have inflicted
bloody losses on the extremist,
pro-Iranian Hezbullah
strongholds in Beirut and that
alone may go far to restore
Assad's image in the West and put
Syria on the map as a key element
in Middle East strategy.
ASSAD MADE two connected
remarks in his Sunday television
speech. He said he expected
Syrian Commando Among 7,500 on Guard in Beirut
GUARDING A WEST BEIRUT STREET: A
helmeted Syrian commando, armed with
Soviet-made AK-U7 rifle, guards a West
Beirut street while a mother and her children
pass by. Most of the capitals Moslem sector is
reconciliation and an accord in
Lebanon, and he praised the "na-
tional Lebanese resistance"
against the "Israeli occupier in
the south."
If a national accord is reached in
Lebanon, Assad will doubtlessly
try to unite the various factions
against Israel. That will not be
easy considering that the
Lebanese civil war has been going
on since 1976. But it is necessary
to prevent Syria from sinking into
the Lebanese quagmire.
Israelis agree that a stable
Lebanon is in their best interests.
As long as the Syrian army is kept
busy maintaining order there,
Assad is not likely to launch any
strikes on the Israeli border.
now controlled by the 7,500-strong Syrian in-
tervention force which quelled week-long
clashes that claimed 300 lives and injured
1,300 people. AP/Wide World Photo.
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Israel To Learn Many Bitter
Lessons from Handler's Role
In Pollard Spy Case
Friday, March 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Continued from Page 1-A
operation."
..The (Pollard) trial was not the
trial of a nation, but of an in-
ividual." Vice Premier and
Foreign Minister Shimon Peres
^d Thursday, reacting to the
news of the stiff sentences.
HE NOTKD that Israel had
-made "it clear before the trial"
that Pollard's case was a big
mistake. "The error was big. but
it remains an individual case, and
I would not draw any collective
responsibility from it."
He added that he hoped "it
would never happen again," and
that indeed is the lesson learned
from the affair.
Pollard, a former U.S. Navy
civilian analyst, pleaded guilty to
the spying charges after his arrest
in 1985. In Jerusalem Thursday,
Labor MK Abba Eban, chairman
of the Knesset's Foreign Affairs
and Security Committee, and its
former chairman. Likud MK
Eliahu Ben-Elissar, agreed that
the case had damaged Israel's
special relationship with the U.S.
"This might be the toughest time
in the history of Israel's foreign
relations," said Eban, a former
Foreign Minister.
HE STRESSED the "terrible
responsibility" of those who had
mounted the Pollard spy opera-
tion. He demanded that the
government explain why it ap-
pointed one of them. Rafi Eitan,
to the prestigious civilian post of
chairman of Israel Chemicals and
why another. Air Force Col.
Aviem Sella. recently was
promoted.
Ben-Elissar. once a Mossad
operative, called for a thorough
investigation ; the role of Israelis
in Pollard'.- spy operation.
Premier Yitzhak Shamir, the
Likud leader went on record last
week as op| any further
inquiry
"I do not underestimate the
gravity of the damage" to
Art Prof. Will
Head New Center
TEL AVIV (JTA) Tel Aviv
University art historian Prof.
Asher Ovadiah has been chosen by
the Israel Academy of Sciences to
head the Israeli Academic Center
in Cairo. He succeeds Dr. Gabriel
Warburg of Haifa University. The
J-enter provides a forum for
Israeli-Egyptian scholarly
exchange.
Jonathan Pollard
U.S.-Israel relations, Ben-Elissar
said. He said it would be long-
lasting and that the "aspect of
dual loyalties" would be harmful
for American Jews.
MK MORDECHAI Virshubski
of the Shinui Party demanded the
resignations of Ariel Sharon and
Moshe Arens, Minister of Com-
merce and Industry and Minister
Without-Portfolio respectively in
the unity coalition. Both are
former Defense Ministers and Vir-
shubski said they should leave the
Cabinet because of their previous
ministerial responsibility for set-
ting up the "Lekem" intelligence
unit which drafted Pollard.
Lekem, headed by Eitan, has
since been disbanded. Yossi Sarid
of the Citizens Rights Movement
(CRM) urged that Eitan be fired
from Israel Chemicals.
The National Religious Party
declared that al! those responsible
must be held to account as Israel
originally promised the U.S. The
NRP seemed to be referring
specifically to Col. Sella who has
been described as Pollard's
"handler."
The media expressed sorrow for
Pollard and his wife. Some
newspapers blamed U.S. Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger for
Pollard's life sentence because of
his testimony to the court that
Pollard's espionage severely com-
promised U.S. intelligence.
BEN-ELISSAR had no
criticism of the American judicial
process. "However much it hurts
to say this, the Pollards were
traitors to their country, and I say
this even though it was my coun-
try that benefitted from their
treachery," he said.
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Under Supervision of National Kashruth
Headed by RABBI YACOV UPSCHUTZ
Air Force Chief
Rewarded for His Espionage Role
By JUDITH COLP
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Israeli Air Force Col.
Aviem Sella was indicted
Tuesday (Mar. 3) by a
federal grand jury on three
charges of espionage.
Sella was charged with conspir
ing to deliver classified U.S.
military information to Israel with
Jonathan Pollard, a U.S. Navy
analyst who has confessed to spy-
ing for the Israelis, and several
Israelis.
The charge carries a maximum
of life imprisonment and a fine of
$500,000. However, Sella is not
expected to stand trial, as the
U.S. extradition treaty with Israel
does not include espionage.
SELLA RECENTLY was pro
moted to commander of Israel's
second largest air base, a move
which angered the U.S. State
Department.
Sella was Pollard's first contact
in providing Israel with classified
national defense documents, ac-
cording to the indictment. Sella
was a graduate student in New
York at the time.
THE OTHER Israelis mention-
ed in the conspiracy, but not in-
dicted, were Rafi Eitan, an Israeli
counterterrorism specialist; Yosef
Yagur, who at the time was
science attache at the Israeli Con-
sulate in New York; and Irit Erb,
who was a secretary in the Israeli
Embassy here.
The State Department said it
expected Israel to "call to ac-
count" any individual involved in
the case of Jonathan Pollard, an
American Navy analyst who has
confessed to selling U.S. military
information to Israel.
The State Department issued its
statement during a press briefing
when asked about the recent pro-
motion of Col. Aviem Sella, an
Israeli Air Force officer alleged to
have supervised Pollard's activity.
Sella has been named commander
of Israel's second-largest air base.
"AT THE time Pollard's es-
pionage was discovered, the
government of Israel said it would
take steps to prevent the recur-
rence of such unauthorized activi-
ty and any Israeli involved would
be called to account," said State
Department Deputy Spokesper-
son, Phyllis Oakley. "We expect
the government of Israel to stand
by these undertakings."
The Pentagon and U.S. Air
Force have indicated that they
will not cooperate with Sella, ac-
cording to reports.
Oakley did not indicate that the
State Department had directly
told Israel of its displeasure over
Sella's promotion, but said that
"the government of Israel is
aware of our position on all the
people involved in this case."
Some Israeli leaders have com-
plained of U.S. intervention in
Israel's affairs, and called it "un-
precedented" for the Americans
to declare a boycott against a
senior Israeli officer.
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 13, 1987
A 19th Century handrnade Scroll of Esther, from Turkey, with
parchment and scroll cotter, given by a bride to her groom. Bottom
right are a blessing and dedication. The Scroll was recently on
sale at an auction of the Society ofJudaica Collectors, Jerusalem.
Purim Marked by Many
Peculiar 'Upside-Downs'
Continued from Page 5-A
large must choose assimilate or
remain loyal to one's heritage.
"Think not with thyself that thou
shalt escape in the king's house,
more than all the Jews," is the
warning posed by Mordechai to all
court Jews.
AS FOR pagan names, and the
absence of God's name, it has been
suggested by scholars that the
author deferred to religious sen-
sibilities of his day. Jews did carry
pagan names, as the Yiddish
name, Feival, attests (from
Phoebus Apollo, the sun-god). On
the other hand, it was indelicate to
mention God's name in the same
Reprieve For
Golda's Home
DENVER, Colo. (JTA) -
Golda Meir's former residence
here has again received a tem-
porary reprieve from the wreck-
ing ball.
A hearing scheduled to explore
the fate of the house was postpon-
ed, and the City and County of
Denver agreed to advertise ag-
gressively for the next 60 days for
bids to move the house from the
city's Sanderson Gulch Park,
where it sits on steel beams, in
disrepair.
City officials and members of
the local Golda Meir Memorial
Association have argued whether
the house can be moved safely.
This action by the city to entertain
bids for moving the structure is
seen as a small victory by the
Association, according to its presi-
dent, Mel Cohen.
Golda Meir resided in the duplex
in 1913-14.
'Minor' Holiday
Defies Its Place
Continued from Page 5-A
ing are bogus items slipped deftly
into the radio news bulletins.
Many Israelis were upset to hear
on Kol Yisrael Radio at Purim
several years ago that the Eurovi-
sion song contest winning tune
Hallelujah was to replace the
Hatikvah as the national anthem.
EVEN MORE were upset by
reports that the dollar would
replace the shekel as the country's
currency. Last year a fake report
on Galei Zahal, the army radio sta-
tion, resulted in the dismissal of
the soldier responsible.
But essentially Purim is a time
of fun. An opportunity for Israelis
to forget about everyday
pressures and indulge in tricks
and treats and the odd glass of
wine.
breath with beauty contests and
scheming courtiers.
Mordechai's words to Esther
also made the statement for
Jewish faith "deliverance will
come from another place."
The word for place (makom). in
later Hebrew is a euphemism for
God, and it attests to the classic
Jewish belief that God is the prime
mover behind the great events of
human history.
It is as an outcome of this
perception of perpetual delivery
out of misery that the Purim
celebration was highlighted by
ribaldry and jest-making.
Rabbi Isserles, author of the key
amendments to the Code of
Jewish Law, the Shulchan Arukh,
could also write, for Purim, a
parody, "The Price of Wine," pok-
ing fun at the work of Rabbis such
as himself.
THE POET-philosopher, Ibn
Gabirol, whose teachings became
accepted even in medieval Chris-
tian circles, could compose a
poem, praising wine and denounc-
ing sobriety on Purim.
To enhance the sense of
venahafoch hu, of topsy-turvy, the
ancient rabbis commanded that
one should imbibe (but not too
much) adloyada until he cannot
distinguish between "blessed is
Mordechai" and "cursed is
Haman."
All such attitudes attest to the
fact that the story of Purim is a
comedy on both a petty and grand
scale. In the petty sense, it is a
comic pastiche, built up around a
historic core. There is a feminist
rebellion, internal palace intrigue,
an implausible bevy of beauties,
the midnight indigestion of the
king, the turning of tables by vic-
tim on villain, and a rousing battle
scene.
There is comedy on the grand
scale as well. In the classic scheme
of literature, the line between
tragedy and comedy is fine. In
both tragedy and comedy, hero
and heroine are in danger.
IN TRAGEDY, they die; in
comedy, they live. The Book of
Esther, and with it, the Feast of
Esther, are an affirmation of com-
edy on a grand scale, a universal
scale. For the tragedian, the hero,
no matter how noble, is doomed.
For the Story of Esther,
"deliverance" will always come
from "another place."
Thus, the Jewish view of history
is one of "comedy" in each
generation, there may be troubles
without end; yet there is the faith,
that through the worst, goodness
and good triumph: that for all
Crusades, Inquisitions, and even
gas chambers, the Jewish people
survive and thrive.
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tfo Jews Once
Shul of Bal Harbour,
In Fifth Year, Eyes
New Synagogue
Friday, March 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
B. ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jevish Floridian Staff Writer
The men gathered in one
I circle, the women in
another, clasped hands and
danced festively until late
hours of the night. It was
neither a formal wedding
nor celebration of birth, but
in a sense it stood for both.
Young couples just starting
their lives together and elderly
couples, including men with flow-
ing white beards, were united by a
marriage of a people and a
svnagogue and by the growth of a
Jewish community still in its in-
fancy. That brought them
] together.
WHILE SEVERAL South
|Florida synagogues are
celebrating long-time anniver-
saries this year, these people at-
tending the fifth anniversary
I celebration of the Shul of Bal Har-
I bour last week are pioneering the
I first major synagogue in the area.
This, in an area of Bal Harbour
Iwhere several people still
I remember hotels that posted signs
haying "No Jews or dogs
I allowed."
The celebration marked the
I plans, still on the drawing board
and with $1 million of the $4
million goal raised so far, for the
| new synagogue.
WHAT BEGAN as a small
I group gathered into a card room
at the former Beau Rivage Hotel
has now moved to a standing-
room-only shul in the Bal Harbour
Sheraton Hotel. Organizers are
hoping to have construction of the
new synagogue, which will be call-
ed "The Shul," underway by the
end of this year or by early next
I year.
Shul of Bal Harbour spiritual
leader Rabbi Sholom Lipskar said,
"What we are building here is far
more important than a
synagogue. We are building a
I community."
Dr. Paul Dermer, first president
of the Bal Harbour Shul, said,
"There are more Jews in the area.
We see more Jews walking to
synagogue on Saturdays. You feel
the presence more of a Jewish
community now. What's impor-
tant about it is it not only attracts
Orthodox Jews, but Conservative
and Reform as well. When we us-
ed to ask Rabbi Lipskar what kind
| of Shul it was, he said, "Jewish."
Surfside Mayor Ben Levine
said, when he came to the area in
1951, "You couldn't buy land or
ground in Bal Harbour with the
name of Levine. I used the name
of an associate, William C. Hall."
BAL HARBOUR Mayor John
Sherman, who came to the area in
1979 from Louisville, Ky., recalls
the alarm he felt when he read a
1980 census. The census said 80
percent of the Bal Harbour
residents lived on the east side of
Collins Avenue, and it had only
one voting district.
And the west side, which had 20
percent of the population in single
family homes, had four districts.
The west side now has approx-
imately seven Jewish families and
the apartment side to the east is
predominantly Jewish.
"I went to City Hall and asked
the manager if this wasn't a
typographical error. When he said
that the founding fathers
districted this way, and any
redistricting would be up to the
council, I visited the mayor, who is
now deceased.
"HE SAID, 'You don't want to
change this districting,' and I
said, 'Why not?'
"He said, 'If you change this
districting we'll become more like
Miami Beach and Surfside.'
Sherman lived on the east side.
He recalls that he told the former
mayor, "My neighbor is Henry
Crown, chairman of General
Dynamics, and my other neighbor
is a retired Supreme Court Justice
from New York. How would this
caliber negatively upset Bal
Harbour?"
Sherman said he obtained a
copy^ of the Code of Laws and
found that if he got 50 signatures
he could force a referendum on
the issue. He got those signatures
and went to the mayor, sug-
gesting, "Surely you don't want a
referendum on such an embar-
rassing issue?"
THEY DIDN'T. Sherman said
the Village Council voted to
change the districting to its cur-
rent status: three seats from the
east side and two from the west
side.
Four years ago, Sherman and
Lipskar were behind an effort for
the first time to place a Chanukah
Menorah next to the traditional
Christmas tree at the entrance of
Bal Harbour.
And the Bal Harbour Club,
which had no Jews as members,
has long since lifted restrictions
Continued on Page 14-B
JbuST^ m?ment in th* We of the Shul of Bal Harbor occurred
wyor John Sherman of Bal Harbour (right) presented an
*r #
V
jf # 1
Ef !"'"r"""tiun. congratulating the Shut n'its fifth on-
Sholom Lipskar.
took pl*K*qLthe
Architect'8 rendering of the Bimah and sane tuary of The Shul.
Purim Party for Children, Adults
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
The Shul of Bal Harbour will be
holding a Purim party for children
and adults and a reading of the
Megillah starting at 8 p.m., Satur-
day. The megillah also will be read
at 9:30 a.m., Sunday.
Each person will receive a
grager, a traditional noisemaker
that generally children and adults
have been using for a millenium to
symbolically trounce Haman for
his evil plot, said spiritual leader
Rabbi Sholom Lipskar.
"PURIM ACTUALLY
represents a much more signifi-
cant and powerful miracle than
most miracles in Jewish history
because it was a singular time
when every single Jew was going
to be annihilated. There was no
way to escape. There were no
borders to run to."
There are also five mitzvot that
one does on that day, and the
Aleph Institute, led by Rabbi Lip-
skar, and Orly Alexander, presi-
dent of the Hebrew teachers
alliance of Dade County, will be
providing a means for those mitz-
vot to be fulfilled.
Some 4,200 packets will be
distributed to all students of
Hebrew schools and nursery
schools "so they will have a hands
on relationship with the holi-
day," said Lipskar.
THE FIVE mitzvot include the
reading of the Megillah, "in terms
of just representing friendship
and good will toward one another,
because the reason for destruction
is hatred. The Talmud says the
reason the temple was destroyed
was because there was baseless
hatred," Lipskar said.
Another mitzvah is to send two
foods, readily edible, to a friend.
That is called Shalach Monos,
which is the sending of gifts.
There's also a mitzvah on that day
to give gifts to the needy,
something to at least two poor
people on that day, and it is tradi-
tional for people to go out that day
and look for people. It is also a
mitzvah to eat a festive meal.
On Saturday and Sunday, the
Shul of Bal Harbour will be giving
each person a little packet that
will contain edibles and pennies so
they will be able to do a mitzvah
with them.
IN ADDITION to the 4,?00
packets, which will be packed by
ladies of the Shul of Bal Harbour,
the Alef Institute will be sending
five groups of students to cover
the entire State of Florida. They
will visit 20 state and federal
prisons to make sure the Jewish
men and women in there are 1
able to enjoy the celebration.
Sami Rohr, of Bal Harbour (left), is shown after receiving a sterl-
ing silver Megillah cover honoring him for outstanding leader-
ship on behalf of the Shul of Bal Harbour. The Annual Award was
presented by Rabbi Sholom D. Lipskar, spiritual leader of the
congregation. A message, expressing the Rohr's family's good
wishes, was extended by granddaughter, Varda Katz (center). The
tribute took place at the fifth annual dinner of the congregation
March U.
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Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 13, 1987
Ashdod Renewed
Israeli Steel Arrives in Miami
By ALISA KWITN1T
Jewish Florutia* Staff Wrxt*
Once, Ashdod was a
Philistine city which rang
with the sound of iron
weapons and chariots
iron which the ancient
Israelites did not have.
But the modern city of Ashdod
now rings with the sound of steel
being produced in a new foundry
whose products are being shipped
to the United States. The first
such shipment, of one and a
quarter million pounds of steel
reinforcing bars, arrived in the
Port of Miami on Monday.
THE STEEL, which was pur-
chased by Milton Gordon of the
Gulf Atlantic Trading Corpora-
tion, was still being lifted off the
ship Zim Miami when the press ar-
rived on board in the afternoon to
view the celebration of the steel's
safe arrival.
The fact that the ship's captain,
Simantov Yemini, turned his ship
back into a storm-tossed sea in an
attempt to save crew members of
the Philippine ship the Balsa,
which had capsized in the storm,
made the shipment's safe arrival
an unusually dramatic event.
"The Philippine ship sent an
SOS, and we heard it and called
the Coast Guard Station," said
Yemini. "We couldn't locate their
Talking Bool*
For the Blind
NEW YORK A free "Talking
Book" program to help persons
with limited vision continue
"reading" by listening to books on
tape is undergoing major expan-
sion, it was reported this week by
the Jewish Braille Institute of
America.
Noting that "millions of
Americans, especially the elderly,
have had to give up the pleasure of
books because they can no longer
read comfortably," Dr. Jane
Evans, JBI president, declared:
"JBI offers an exciting alter-
native, 'Talking Books' books
you can listen to on tape." Like all
JBI services, she said, participa-
tion in the "Talking Book" pro-
gram is free of charge.
The Institute, which has been
serving the blind and visually-
impaired since 1931, is expanding
its library of 5,000 books of
Jewish interest recorded on
standard-size audio-cassette
tapes. According to Gerald M.
Kass, JBI executive vice presi-
dent, the "Talking Book" library
includes current best-sellers and
classics, history, politics and
philosophy, biographies, poetry,
works of fiction and works of
scholarship. New titles are added
each month, he said.
"Anyone with limited vision
may obtain these free recordings
of books," Mr. Kass added. Each
cassette may be borrowed for up
to 90 days and then returned to
JBI in the postage-free mailing
container that accompanies the
tapes.
JBI will also provide informa-
tion on how a visually-impaired
person may receive a free
cassette-player for listening to the
"Talking Books," he said.
"If reading is no longer as easy
as it used to be, listening can be
fun," Kass concluded. "It's all
free and it's beautiful to hear."
Further information about par-
ticipating in the "Talking Book"
program may be obtained by con-
tacting the Jewish Braille In-
stitute of America at 110 East
30th Street, New York 10016.
position so we gave the Coast
Guard our course, speed and posi-
tion. We had just come out of the
storm, which was very bad, and
they asked us to go back 200 miles
to try and save the other vessel.
"IT WAS a very difficult deci-
sion. We thought that our ship
could get into trouble, too, but so-
meone asks for help, you do your
best."
A Navy submarine did manage
to save one of the Philippine
sailors, but the rest perished at
sea with their ship on Feb. 25, ac-
cording to sources.
Asked about how beat to avert
such disasters at sea as the Dover
ferry incident, Yemini said that
"Pushing, checking, and recheck-
ing, sometimes being a nudnick to
the crew" makes the difference.
"I think that it is not skill," he
added. "It is mostly the small
things you do before crossing the
Atlantic in winter, like keeping
everything tied down and safe.
"What I know about the sea is
that there is a tendency for
seamen to get slack, because
nothing happens for so long. They
can get careless, and then you
have a domino effect."
THE ZIM ships stop at ports of
call all over the world, excluding
Russia, and Miami is a regular
stop for the shipping line.
The steel will be used for con-
struction in South Florida, and is
"every bit as good as the
American steel, and less expen-
sive," according to Milton Gor-
don, its buyer, who received a pla-
que from toe Israel-America
Chamber of Commerce for JK
volvement in the venture.
"We iu^ investigating shippi^
raw materials from America to
the foundry in Ashdod," said Gor
don concerning possible futuri>
ventures.
GIL ELAN, executive *,
present of the Israel-America
Chamber of Commerce, said that
the foundry has created much
needed jobs in Ashdod, a citv
which depends primarily on its
port for its livelihood.
So Israeli steel, shipped
overseas to America, is the new
strength behind Ashdod, the an-
cient city where Samson, th
original "man of steel," once
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... ; '. '' to" '
State Dep't. Didn't Dissuade
Carter from Visiting Syria
..''. .;' i
..
Friday, March 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
_ The State Department
maintains that it has not
tried to dissuade former
President Carter from
visiting Syria when he goes
Tthe Middle East this
week.
At the same time, Department
deputy spokesperson Phyllis
Baker Seen
As Friendly
To Israel
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Former Sen. Howard Baker, who
began his duties Monday as White
House Chief of Staff, was con-
sidered friendly toward Israel
during his 18 years in the Senate.
However, the 61-year-old Ten-
nessee Republican, was not con-
sidered among the leading sup-
porters of Israel in Congress.
In particular, Baker rejected ef-
forts to deny arms to Arab coun-
tries that were considered
enemies of Israel. As Senate Ma-
jority Leader in 1981, he was in-
strumental in preventing Senate
rejection of the Reagan Ad-
ministration's sale of AWACS
and other sophisticated equip-
ment to Saudi Arabia.
In 1978, Baker also voted
against the effort to block the
Carter Administration's sale of
Flos to the Saudis and F-5Es to
Egypt.
Thus, in his new post, Baker is
expected to reinforce the Ad-
ministration's policy of support
for Israel while providing arms to
such Arab countries as Jordan and
Saudi Arabia.
Oakley stressed that Carter was
no doubt "aware" of the Reagan
Administration's policy of having
limited contact with Syria.
"President Carter is a private
citizen," Oakley said. "He makes
his own decisions. We're confi-
dent that he's aware of our policy
toward Syria."
SHE WAS responding to a
published report that the Ad-
ministration tried to persuade
Carter not to go to Syria on his
forthcoming trip, which will in-
clude visits to Israel, Egypt, Jor-
dan and Algeria.
"It's not for us to object or not
to object" if Carter decides to go
to Damascus, Oakley said.
She said that the Reagan Ad-
ministration announced last
November 14 a policy of "limiting
our political and economic" con-
tacts with Syria because of Syria's
support of terrorism. This includ-
ed "prohibition on high-level visits
between Syrian and U.S.
officials."
This does not apply to Carter
since the ex-President is not a
government official, Oakley
noted. She added that there was
no prohibition on U.S. citizens
traveling to Syria.
CARTER, who helped bring
about the 1978 Camp David
agreements between Israel and
Egypt, has kept up his interest in
the Mideast since leaving office.
His current trip to the Mideast
will be under the auspices of the
Carter Center at Emory Universi-
ty, Atlanta.
Oakley said that the State
Department briefed Carter on the
countries he will visit. She did not
know whether he would report
back to the State Department on
his findings, but noted that the
Department "encourages" visits
to the Mideast by private citizens.
"We feel it serves a useful pur-
pose," she added.
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'Jews Have Good Life' Shevardnadze
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SOVIET IN CANBERRA: Soviet Foreign
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Davis (left), president of the Jewish Board of
Deputies, in New South Wales, after the Soviet
Foreign Minister's arrival at ihe Royal
Australian Air Force Base, Canberra. Davis
asked Shevardnadze about the plight of Soviet
Jews, to which he replied through an inter-
preter that Soviet Jews 'have a qood life.'
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Page 16-A The
. Mara- 12, i7
At Grandma's table,
there was always
room for one more.
Someones the dacken soup was a bole
dun. But she always made sure there was
enough to go around
\o maoer how bme food was in her
pantry or icebox, she could never say no to
another Jew who had none.
Grandma and Grandpa may not be here
anymore, but hunger sofi is. Thousands of
Jews, old enough k> be grandparents them-
selves, are starving. Living alone, on fixed
incomes. Living on crackers and tea for lunch.
com flakes and mdi for supper.
A wholesome kosher hot meal every day.
along with what mav-be the days only contact
with the outside world can keep the* bodies
and sprits tram wasting away
But the Jewish Vocational Services
Xutnbonal Project can serve ore? L800 meals
a day. The Jewish Federation helps provide
the funds, and this year there's not enough *>
go around
Because m spue of some very generous
gjfe to Federation, the average pledge barely
covers a restaurant dinner for two.
You have so much more to share than
your grandmother had So on Super Sunday
March 22. when the Federation volunteer
cafe, please open your checkbook the way
Grandma opened her heart.
She can't do it for you.
Now it's your turn.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation & 1
1987 Combined Jewish Appeal ^L 9
4200BiscavTier3ouk^ard\liarni.FL33O7 #**
U I


Onii
IJ I I I I I I I I I
Friday. March 13, 1987 Th Jewish Floridian Section B
Beth Jacob At 65
A Proud Congregation Tries
To Beat The Odds Of
Survival On South Beach
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jeurish Floridian Staff Writer
As Beth Jacob Congrega-
tion, Miami Beach's oldest
synagogue, turns 65 years
old this year, there are
touches of both joy and
sadness when congrega-
tional leaders recount
events of the past decade or
so.
An honor was bestowed on this
landmark synagogue at 301-311
Washington Ave., about four
years ago when the state declared
it an historic religious site.
THERE IS some sadness
however in that the synagogue,
once thriving with 500 members,
now has only 120 members.
"It was a beautiful
neighborhood, chock full of
Jews," says Rabbi Shmaryahu
Swirsky, spiritual leader of the
congregation for the past 23
years.
"It was literally a garden of liv-
ing, practicing, proud, committed
Orthodox Jews. Then, because of
the great influx of the Cuban
Mariels and Haitians and Puerto
Ricans, the bulk of the Jewish
community began to move away,"
Swirsky said.
ON MARCH 15, the synagogue
will celebrate its anniversary with
a luncheon at the Shelborne Hotel.
There will be a musical program
and Congressman Dante Fascell,
chairman of the U.S. House
Foreign Affairs Committee, will
be guest speaker, addressing
topics such as Israel and the Mid-
dle East, the situation of world
Jewry today, what the U.S.
government has done to try to get
Jews out of Russia and the Iran
arms scandal.
Edward T. Newman, has been a
member of the Congregation since
1934, when his family moved to
Miami Beach from Atlantic City,
N.J.
"We're trying to revitalize the
synagogue," said Newman, ad-
ding that that has been his task
since he was asked to take over
the Congregation presidency by
Rabbi Swirsky three years ago.
"ITS VERY difficult because
many of the Orthodox Jews have
been moving out of the area and
not returning," Newman said.
"We hope that with the re vital iza-
tion of South Beach, the
synagogue will come alive."
As a boy, Newman remembers a
wooden stage being erected on the
corner of Third Street and
Washington Avenue and enter-
tainers Joe E. Lewis, Harry Rich-
mond and Sophie Tucker perform-
ing to help raise funds for the ad-
Continued on Page 7-B
After 27 Years
Beth Torah's Rabbi Lipschitz
Enjoys Personal Ties to Congregants
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
On March 27, 1947, Dr.
Max A. Lipschitz became
the second youngest
member of his class of 85 to
be ordained as rabbi at
Yeshiva University in New
York.
During Shabbat services on
March 20 and 21, Lipschitz will
celebrate his 40 years in the rab-
binate with Beth Torah Congrega-
tion, of which he has been spiritual
leader for the past 27 years.
"I would say I enjoyed the rab-
binate in the last 10 or 15 years
more," says Lipschitz. "One of
the reasons is that I have a great
congregation. Perhaps it's
because of my personal relation-
ship with them. They're not just
my congregation. They're my
friends."
RABBI LIPSCHITZ was born
in Poland and with his family
emigrated to Israel when he was
six years old. For eight years, he
lived in Israel, beginning his study
of Torah at the age of four and the
study of Talmud at the age of five.
"I think that was the reason I
was ordained at such an early
age," Lipschitz said.
The rabbi's first position was at
Beth Israel Congregation in
Madison, Wis. from 1947 to 1959.
He moved to North Miami Beach
from Wisconsin in 1959 to serve
as spiritual leader of Congrega-
tion of Monticello Park, which
later became known as Beth
Torah Congregation.
IN HIS 27 years, Rabbi
Lipschitz has seen the congrega-
tion grow from 200 families to to-
day's membership of 1,500
families with education facilities
for Early Childhood through
Hebrew High School. There also is
an Adult Education program.
The need for a Jewish Day
School for his children brought
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz
BETH JACOB CONGREGATION ON WASHINGTON AVENUE, MIAMI BEACH.
him to this area, says Lipschitz,
because there was no such school
in Madison.
If the rabbi has a recurrent
theme and concern, it is the unity
of the Jewish people.
"I am distressed by the
divisiveness in the Jewish com-
munity," Lipschitz said. "I have a
great love for the Jewish people,
and therefore when I find this
type of disunity I am distressed.
There has to be not only more
tolerance but understanding bet-
ween the various forms of
Judaism."
THE ORTHODOX became ex
tremely rigid in their practice and
observance and their intolerance
toward other Jews, he said. At the
same time, Lipschitz said, he is
concerned about the "diminishing
emphasis of observance and
respect for Jewish law, halacha,
on the part of Reform and
Conservative."
In general, there must be a
"conversion of Jews. They've got
to return to greater commitment
to the Sabbath and Jewish tradi-
tion, Kashrut," he said.
"The synagogue cannot
manufacture Jews. The prepara-
tion for entry into the synagogue
has to be done outside through
Jewish observance and Jewish
living."
OVER THE years, Lipschitz
has seen a return of the younger
generation to the synagogue, a
sign that he views as good.
On his anniversary celebration,
at which his wife, Rhoda, and
their five children will take part,
Lipschitz says he has no plans to
retire.
Of his 40 years in the rabbinate,
he feels, "I have found it to be one
of the most gratifying, challeng-
ing and inspiring professions in
the world. The variety of ex-
periences and challenges that a
rabbi encounters daily brings him
a tremendous sense of satisfac-
tion. It is a sacred calling from
God, not only to his own people,
but to the community-at-large."
In addition to being ordained at
Yeshiva University, where he
studied under Rabbi J.B.
Soloveichik, Rabbi Lipschitz
received his BA degree at Yeshiva
University, a Master's degree at
Columbia University, and PhD at
the University of Wisconsin.
NOW, hardly a day passes when
he does not get 25 to 30 calls, most
with personal problems, most
which do not pertain to Judaism.
"A rabbi is more than just a
teacher of wisdom, he's a teacher
of life. I get it primarily from the
Torah and the Jewish ideals as
they should be practiced."
One offshoot of modem times is
a program he started four months
ago called "The Old-Fashioned
Way." If you want to meet a part-
ner, you will be interviewed by the
social worker at the synagogue
and matched with one of 180
applicants.
"I'm frustrated by all the
aloneness of so many single peo-
ple and also concerned about in-
termarriage," he said.
ON A MORE positive note.
Rabbi Lipschitz said he sees
Miami becoming one of the most
dynamic Jewish communities in
the country.
Besides his love for his con-
gregation, Lipschitz said his love
for the State of Israel is a key part
of his life.
"I'm an inbred Zionist," he said.
"The fact that my family
emigrated from Poland in 1924 is
reflective of our family's love for
Israel. I'm always active in the
Continued on Page 5-B
Condoms Can Help 2-B Super Sunday Purim 3-B Israel Bonds Fashion Show 5-B Iranian Jew Escapes 6-B Treats For Purim 12-B


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 13, 1987
Condoms Can Help
Jewish Tradition Defends Their Use
By RABBI
RALPH P. KINGSLEY
Temple S\na\ of North Dade
God bless Gary Trudeau's
"Doonesbury" cartoon which has
a wonderful way of twitting our
sacred cows and bringing to the
fore those issues that are present-
ly of concern.
A recent dialogue, in a TV film,
between a young woman and a
young man goes like this:
"Oh Brad, maybe you're right.
Maybe we are finally ready!"
"Well, we have been together
for nine years darling."
"OK., but remember, we have
to practice safe whoopee."
"Of course, of course."
"Have you got a condominium
darling?"
NOT CONDOMINIUM, but
condoms, is the basis for "the
Great Condom Controversy."
Specifically, the question is to
advertise or not to advertise con-
doms on TV over which question
very many words have been
spoken and written of late. Pro-
ponents are saying that people
need to be educated.
Opponents argue that sex is a
private matter and that such
public expressions as Condom Ads
on TV violate sensitivities. And so
the argument goes back and forth.
Fill in the blanks.
Now, what has that got to do
with Judaism or the future of the
Jewish people? The answer is
nothing and everything.
ON THE one hand, it's really
not a Jewish problem. What goes
on TV affects us no differently
than it affects any other person
except if broadcasts are dealing
with Israel or some other par-
ticularly Jewish issue. Then we
listen and watch with different
eyes and ears.
But on the other hand, it is a
Jewish problem, for what we are
dealing with is a question of
values. What is good or not good
for the preservation and enhance-
ment of the human race in
general, and for oar society in par-
ticular, is of supreme interest to
Judaism. It is central to the
Jewish enterprise, for Judaism is
concerned with every aspect of
life from the loftiest ethical
principle to the most mundane ex-
periences of the every day.
In point of fact, the question of
contraception is raised in the
Talmud as a means of birth con-
trol not as used by the man, but
as used by the woman. At issue
was the question of whether con-
tr?ptk>n is permitted, since it
prevents the fulfillment of the
mitxvah ofP'ru V'roo be fruit-
ful and multiply.
THE ANSWER? Not only was
contraception permitted, but it
was required under three cir-
cumstances.' if the woman was a
minor, since she was too young to
conceive, and therefore "her life
might be at risk i remember that
girls were bethrothed at a very
young agec if she was pregnant,
since it was believed that her fetus
might be endangered: or if she
was a new mother, since the fear
was that her milk supply might
dry up.
Never mind that it was the
woman who was to use a con-
traceptive. Note rather that in all
three instances, the overriding
concern was that the health and
safety of the woman and also her
unborn fetus or even a living child
not be endangered even at the
expense of a biblical command-
nt. The saving of human life
; precedence over all else.
In terms of the present con-
troversy over contraception, the
fear of sexually-transmitted
disease, if Diacine a condom ad on
Rabbi Ralph P. Kiagsley
TV can lead to the saving of a life
then. Jewishly. it is defensible.
HERE, I suppose, I could let
the matter rest. But I need to go
further. What we face today is a
potential epidemic, and it is not
limited to the Gay community. It
ultimately endangers us all
men, women and children. Dr. C.
Everett Koop. our Surgeon
General, with whom I disagree on
many other things, understands
what the President and his
Secretary of Education, William
J. Bennett, do not. They live in a
dream world, arguing that by
preaching abstinence, the problem
of AIDS will go away or, at least.
not be exacerbated.
Let me refer you to a scenario
that Richard Cohen sketched in
the Miami Herald. A bisexual
male, whose homosexuality is
kept secret from his wife, has a
Gay encounter and becomes in-
fected. He then cohabits with his
wife and infects her. She subse-
quently conceives and gives birth
to a child with AIDS. Were she
herself involved in an extra-sexual
encounter, the disease would fur-
ther be spread.
Cohen was using that example
to press for mandatory AIDS
testing, and I must admit he was
convincing. For our purpose, I
would use his scenario to
demonstrate simply that we are
all at risk each and every one of
us who engages in any kind of sex-
ual activity even within
marriage.
THERE IS as yet no cure for
AIDS, and Washington has unfor-
tunately not taken the lead in
directing our resources towards
that end. All that we can do at the
moment is to alert people to the
need for greater safety Gays
and heterosexuals alike, and
especially our young who are
woefully ignorant about sex.
We owe it to them and to
ourselves to use all possible
avenues to create an awareness of
what Dr. Ruth likes to call "safe
sex." If advertising condoms
helps the process and responds to
the need then so be it. "He who
saves one life it is as if he saved
a world." says the Talmud.
But what of whose who are of-
fended? Very simple, let them
tune out. like we do during foot-
ball games when we switch chan-
nels to avoid the commercial.
But beyond that, how are con-
dom ads more offensive than com-
mercials about women's hygiene
supplies, or the wonderful ads for
sufferers of hemorrhoids who are
told to use Preparation H. or the
ads which advise those with ir-
regularity (a wonderful
euphemism) to use Ex Lax and
feel good again. Is an ad urging
the exercise of care in sex worse
than that? Especially where the
saving of a life may be concerned. ?
BUT MOST of all. whom are
the TV people, or the viewers
whom they claim to represent,
kidding? With all of the raunch
and immorality and infidelity pic-
tured on the Soaps, and the
violence on the police shows, can
anyone argue that community
standards will be threatened by
screeing a condom ad? When did
the TV moguls suddenly become
so self-righteous, or we the view-
ing public, for that matter?
In sum, I have a concern about
the health and safety of our socie-
ty because AIDS is no less a
threat to us than the Bubonic
Plague was in the Middle Ages,
perhaps worse.
To parents of younger children
who object to certain kinds of
advertising. I suggest they exer-
cise more control over the wat-
ching habits of their children.
TO ADULTS who are of a mood
to complain, pick a good issue: like
getting some of the TV preachers
off the air. who spew messages of
anti-intellectualism and attack
those whose vision and values are
different from theirs. In general,
how about ridding the air waves of
their fascination with violence?
And if you realy want to do
something worthwhile, then lobby
for more sex education courses
that are meaningful, that deal not
only with "plumbing," as sex
educators put it. but with feelings,
and human beings as people: that
respond not only to the so-called
Victorian morality that did not
even exist in the Victorian period,
but to the realities of our time
which call for frankness and
openess in matters sexual, and ad-
dress issues such as teenage
pregnancy caused by ignorance
and the dangers of venereal
diseases which are increasing in
frightening proportions, and
especially AIDS.
All of us need to wake up to the
danger. AIDS is a threat not only
to the moral fabric of our society,
but to its very survival. It can't be
business as usual.
WE NEED to use every means
to help ourselves. That means not
only large sums for research, but
in the meantime, the use of every
teaching device possible to get the
message out to the people, in-
cluding the TV screen.
Rabbi Akiva taught that the
greatest principle in the Torah is
V'ahavta Lertacha Kamoeka
"Love your neighbor as yourself."
To love him, one must begin by
caring about his life. And that's a
Jewish concept that I hope and
pray we all share.
Miami Herald Executive
Editor Heath Meriwether will
speak on "The Role of In-
vestigative Reporting" at the
Downtown Breakfast Forum
hosted by Temple Israel of
Greater Miami at 7^5 a.m. on
Thursday, March 19.
Rep. Lehman Joins Effort To
Enforce Linnas' Deportation
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
WASHINGTON Moves
for the deportation of con-
victed Nazi war criminal
Karl Linnas picked up fresh
support on Capitol Hill last
Friday as several Con-
gressmen signed a letter to
Attorney General Edwin
Meese urging him to act
immediately.
Meese told the House Judiciary
Committee last Thursday, (March
5) that Linnas' deportation was
being delayed for 30 days on a
plea from Linnas' lawyer, Ramsey
Clark, who is seeking to find a
country that will accept him. Lin-
nas, a New York resident, faces
deportation to the Soviet Union,
where he will be confronted by the
death penalty.
CONGRESSMAN William
Lehman (D, N. Dade) and Sen.
Lawton Chiles (D., Fla.) have join-
ed Sen. John Danforth (R.. Mo.)
and Congressman Bill Green (R.,
N.Y.) in circulating a letter in the
U.S. House and Senate, to collect
signatures and support for the
deportation of Nazi war criminal
Linnas.
The letter calls on Attorney
General Meese to deport Linnas,
who lied on his application for en-
trance into the U.S. in 1951 and
also misrepresented his activities
during World War II when he ap-
plied for naturalization as a U.S.
citizen in 1960.
The letter, which states that
"Congress has repeatedly made
clear that those who were involv-
ed in the Holocaust shall not be
allowed to find safe haven in A.
United States," also cites the
that "The Linnas case has been
heard by a Federal District Judee
twice by the Second Circuit, twice
by an immigration judge, twice by
the Board of Immigration Ap-
peals, and three separate times
the U.S. Supreme Court has
refused to review it."
REP. LEHMAN, in a telephone
interview with The Jewish Flori-
dian Tuesday, said that the letter
ends with a request for Meese "to
act today to reaffirm our nation's
commitment to justice."
"Karl Linnas should have con-
sidered the implications of depor-
tation when he falsified the
documents concerning his
background," said Lehman.
"Karl Linnas showed no mercy
or compassion when he executed
hundreds of Jewish women and
children and others, and now At-
torney General Meese is acting
like a bleeding heart and is show-
ing a great deal of concern when
he should be carrying out the
orders of the U.S. Federal
Court," he added.
Unas' 30-day delay will be up
this Sunday.
Sephardic Jewish
Center Has
New Cantor
The Sephardic Jewish Center of
North Miami Beach will hold an
Oneg Shabbat Friday. March 13
at the center at 8 p.m. in honor of
their new cantor, Jacob Malka.
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Friday, March 13, r987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Super Sunday Is A Day
Filled With 'Ruach'
"Super Sunday, March 22, will be a day filled with
'Ruach' (spirit)," says Super Sunday Chairman Saby
Behar. Super Sunday is the day when nearly 2,000 in-
dividuals will make phone calls to 60,000 Jewish households
in Dade County, seeking support for the 1987 Combined
Jewish Appeal. "We have a big job ahead of us," adds
Behar, "and we still need volunteers." The telephone room
will be located at Temple Israel of Greater Miami, 137 N.E.
19th Street in Miami, from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
All persons who volunteer to work on Super Sunday will
receive a short training course before getting on the phone.
The training will be conducted by some of Federation's top
leadership, including: David Abromowitz, Barbara Aron-
son, Helene Berger, Maureen Berkowitz, Fern Canter,
Amy Dean, Dorian Denburg, Mikki Futernick, Phyllis
Harte, Gary Holtzman, Robert Kaplan, Alan Kluger, Jack
Levine, Raquel Libbin, Norman Lieberman, Robert
Maland, Robert Merlin, Douglas Miller, Ken Schwartz,
Maxine Schwartz, Susan Sirotta, and Joey Smith.
During the Super Sunday phonathon, there will be a
"Ruach" Center located at Temple Israel. "The Center will
show the 'spirit' of the community and give the phoners a
sense of what the dollars they are raising go to support,"
said Behar. "The Center will be made up of displays, ex-
hibits, videos and slide shows, balloons and flowers, and
festive decorations. It promises to be an exciting time for
everyone who participates. We've asked the various agen-
cies of Federation, who are participating to be especially
creative for this event. There will definitely be some sur-
prises this year," he explained.
Organizations that will be participating include many of
Federation's beneficiary agencies plus non-affiliated local
Jewish agencies. Participants include: Central Agency for
Jewish Education, Florida Friends of Bar Ilan University,
American Jewish Congress, B'nai B'rith Youth Organiza-
tion. Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center,
Miami Beach Jewish Community Center, Samuel Scheck
Hillel Community Day School, Hillel Foundation, Israel
Program Office, Girls Town/Or Chadash, Women's
American ORT, South Florida Conference on Soviet
Jewry, Israel Aliyah Center, Jewish Vocational Service,
Jewish War Veterans-Dade County Council, Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged, B'nai B'rith Women
(Miami Council), and Workman's Circle.
Raffi Miller, community "Shaliach" from the State of
Israel to South Florida is also actively involved. He is
organizing Jewish teenagers from area high schools to help
add to the day's excitement. Performances are expected to
include Israeli songs and dances and other activities.
To conclude the day, there will be a Super Sunday victory
party where people will be able to make their own "Super
Sundaes."
If you still haven't volunteered for Super Sunday, call the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation at 576-4000, ext. 215.
Super Sunday vice chairmen are Paul Berkowitz, Richard
Berkowitz, Judi Billig, and Ellen Rose.
Purim:
Recreation Center Dedication Saturday
The official dedication of the
21st Street Recreation Center,
which has been made possible by
the 21st Street Oversight Com-
mittee along with many local
businesses, will take place on
Saturday from 7 p.m. until 10
p.m. at the new recreation center.
A Big Band Dance and dance
competition, with prizes ranging
from $100 to dinners at Wolfie's
and other restaurants, will be the
focus of the night's festivities.
There will also be over 20
decorated "theme cakes,"
decorated in whimsical shapes,
each serving 80-100 persons.
Admission is free, and 6 p.m. ap-
pearance is requested to secure a
number and register for the dance
competition.
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The Legend Of Esther
By DVORA WAYSMAN
Purim, which falls on the
Hebrew date of 14th Adar,
is the time of merriment,
masquerade and miracles,
celebrating as it does the
deliverance of the Jewish
people from their oppressor,
Haman. The heroine of the
story is Esther, a modest,
virtuous girl who became
queen during the reign of
Ahasuerus, King of Persia.
There are a lot of mysteries sur-
rounding the whole episode, the
main one being that no one knows
when it occurred. The Book of
Esther mentions no dates, and
although scholars place it in the
Second Temple period, it is first
referred to only after the year 100
BCE.
The Book of Esther is read
every Purim, and it is incumbent
on every Jew, male and female,
young and old, to listen to the
Megillah. However, the story nar-
rated in the Book of Esther in
which, incidentally, God's name is
never mentioned, only tells part of
the story!
ESTHER'S REAL name was
Hadassah, but when she replaced
the disobedient Vashti as queen,
she was given the Persian name
for Venus, which was Esther.
Her origins are revealed in the
Aggadah, which tells us that she
was a descendant of King Saul.
Her father, an exile at Susa, died
before she was born and her
mother, Abihail, at her birth. She
became the ward of her cousin
Mordechai, who is often
misrepresented as her uncle.
Esther was described as one of
the four most beautiful women in
the world (Ibid., 15a) of ideal
height, lovelier than Median or
Persian women, although her
complexion is also described as
"sallow." We are told that the
king would compare the women
who entered his bedchamber with
a statue of Vashti which stood
near his bed. Later, he replaced it
with a statue of Esther.
Beautiful and chaste as she was,
she nevertheless was required to
undergo a 12-month purification
program, six months of which she
had to spend anointing herself
with oil of myrrh. Myrrh, called
mor in Hebrew, is a gum resin
which, together with
frankincense, was an ancient
treasure almost as precious as
gold.
IT WAS put in anointing oils,
and the Israelites scented their
garments, beds and bodies with it.
It was a rare ingredient because
the trees and bushes which pro-
duced it grew only in the moun-
tains of Southern Arabia,
Somalia, eastern Sudan and parts
of Ethiopia.
Esther was the inspiration of
many dramatists, artists and
musicians throughout the ages
who were drawn to the legend of
her beauty, her virtue and her
courage. However, she is truly im-
mortalized in her own Scroll of
Esther where her greatest honor
lies in having saved the Jewish
people of Persia from
extermination.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's "Fabulous Fifty's"
chairman, Ida Kesselman is flanked by Alliance Division Chair-
man Herb Canariek (left) and guest speaker Elton J. Kerness,
associate executive vice president of Federation. The meeting
celebrated the raising of $325,000 for the 1987 Combined Jewish
Appeal, an 18 percent increase over 1986.
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Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 13, 1987
He'll Be 102 In June
Cited For His Heart Assn. Work
David Kane has received a special award from Congressman
Claude Pepper for his work with the American Heart Associa-
tion. He will be 1 OS in June.
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
David Kane, a 101-year-old
artist, received a special
award from Congressman
Claude Pepper (D., Fla.) for
his work with the American
Heart Association with
humility and a pledge to
"not stop until I am not here
anymore."
The visit to Kane's home in the
Soutbgate Apartments by Pepper
this week lasted about two hours
and was arranged because Kane
may be the oldest living volunteer,
according to the national head-
quarters of the American Heart
Association.
'THE HEART Association did
more than I ever expected in all
my life," said Kane, who still is an
active painter with the medium of
oils.
"I think what they did for me
was quadruple for what I did for
them. But I shall continue to do
everything I can for as long as the
good Lord permits me to."
Kane is active in soliciting funds
for the American Heart Associa-
tion year-round and is one of the
hardest working volunteers for
the organization, said a
spokesman for the local division of
the Heart Association.
KANE ALSO used to drive his
friends to their doctors' offices or
for groceries until his driver's
license was revoked when he was
100-years-old. He also fixed ap-
pliances for friends, and when
they offered to pay him. Kane told
them to make a donation to the
Heart Association, the spokesman
said.
Kane said he was taken by sur-
prise "when a host of television
cameras" arrived at his apart-
ment to recrod the ceremony with
Pepper. Because the event was
televised by cable television, Kane
said he was thrilled when his son
and daughter-in-law, vacationing
in the Dutch Netherlands, called
him and said, "Dad, we saw you
on cable television!"
Kane has about 60 paintings be
is planning to sell at an exhibit at
Soutbgate and says be will donate
all the proceeds to the American
Heart Association.
"THE REASON I am doing it
is that I had two sons. One of my
dearest sons suddenly passed
away after a massive heart attack
at 53. My wife, with whom I lived
for 66 beautiful years her name
was Wilhelmina was the
greatest little darling God ever
created, and she passed on
because of her heart condition.
His other son Richard, who, be
said "just called me." would in his
opinion also have passed away "if
it wasn't for the research that the
American Heart Association does
with its funds. He underwent
surgery that was almost impossi-
ble years ago."
Kane gets choked up as he says,
"I have good reason to work for
the American Heart Association.
And do you blame me? I live with
gratitude for the American Heart
Association because of the money
they are using for research to
make human beings live longer."
KANE WAS born in the small
Russian town of Pinsk, which also
was the birth place of David Ben
Gurion and Menachem Begin.
When he was four-years-old. his
family moved to the United
States, after arriving in Quebec.
He made his living as a painter,
starting when he was a child in
Russia.
"I was sitting there sketching
my rabbi in Hebrew school, and he
came and looked over my back
and saw a likeness of him, and he
slapped my face. When I came
home, my mother saw the red face
and said, 'What happened
darling?'
"I told her what happened
the slap and she said that it was
against Jewish law (sketching
likenesses), which says you cannot
worship graven images."
KANE SAID he has not been in
a synagogue since coming to the
United States.
"The reason for it is my
philosophy is entirely different. I
say God ... is not a man up in
heaven somewhere. I say God is a
divine, benevolent, omnipotent,
incomprehensible intelligence.
"Everything that we see that
was created by no hand of ours
must have been created by a
divine intelligence. And the sun
and the moon and the stars are
proof of it. They circle around
swiftly, and they don't crash. If
we drive our cars at a high speed,
we crash. My shul is the sky, the
heavens, the waters, the trees, the
flowers and all that we see around
us that we didn't create."
Kane still paints in his bedroom,
which he uses as a studio. He will
be 102 on June 21.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation held its first "Cocktail
and Conversations" meeting at Federation. The meeting u
designed to allow Federation leadership to interact with leaden
in the local business community, hearing their views and discuss-
ing Federation s role in the community, on an informal basis
Pictured from left to right are Kjrman Braman, Federation vice
president; Richard G. Capen. Jr. publisher of the Miami Herald
who made the evening s presentation; and Donald
chairman of the 198? Combined Jewish Appeal.
E. Lefton,
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Friday, March 13, 1987/The Jewish Flori Israel Bonds Dinner For
Shamir Produces
Million In Sales
$31
ID
Sales totaling $31 million
new Israel Bond purchases were
announced at the Bond Organiza-
tion's National Dinner welcoming
Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir in
Washington, D.C. which launched
the 1987 campaign.
The Prime Minister, who had
just concluded meetings with
president Reagan, was the guest
of honor at the gathering of more
than 600 Bond leaders from 32
communities in the United States
and Canada as well as prominent
Washington Jewish leaders.
Earlier, he had met with
Secretary of State George Shultz
and leaders of the U.S. Congress.
Praising the Bonds organization
for its record 1986 results of $603
million and for its 35 years of
aiding the nation's economic
growth, the Prime Minister said it
helped "to establish, build and
develop a country which even op-
timists could not forsee only 40
years ago."
A special partnership has made
it possible, Shamir said, combin-
ing "readiness to sacrifice on the
part of the people of Israel, and
the confidence to invest on the
part of Jews and Israel's other
friends abroad."
He praised the key leadership
role of the Bonds Organization in
helping to "write a new chapter in
the history of our people."
Prime Minister Shamir reported
that the economy of Israel had
responded well to the recovery
program implemented in 1985 by
the National Unity Government
and that stability had been
restored, providing a basis for
renewed growth.
"Initial steps have now been
taken to reduce company and per-
sonal taxes," he noted, "Israel's
credit and capital markets will be
disengaged from the traditional
heavy government involvement as
the nation embarks on a strategy
of privatization which is the new
direction of the economy in many
free countries."
The Prime Minister expressed
the hope that "these and other
measures will produce still
greater confidence by investors
and entrepreneurs to encourage
them to bring capital, experience
and skills to Israel. The present
economic situation offers open-
ings for new ventures and joint
ventures in many fields of
endeavor."
Rabbi Lipschitz
Israel Bonds Women's Division
To Host Fashion Show
Continued from Page 1-B
cause the Federation, Israel
Bonds."
He visits Israel almost every
year and still has many family
members living there. Whether he
will live in Israel is at the center of
a personal conflict, he says.
"I feel as a Zionist I should live
there, but I feel personally I can
do more for the people of Israel
living in America, raising funds,
educating children, encouraging
tourism."
LIPSCHITZ served as presi-
dent of the Rabbinical Association
for two separate terms. He is one
of the founders of the Samuel
Scheck Hillel Community Day
School and is presently a member
of its governing committee.
He is past president of the
American Jewish Congress of
Florida and has served on the Na-
tional Executive Committee of the
Congress. Rabbi Lipschitz served
as president of the Southeast
Region of the Rabbinical
Assembly from 1980-1982 and
was a member of the National Ex-
ecutive Committee of the
Assembly.
He is the author of "The Faith
of a Hassid," published in 1967.
Beauty will be the highlight of the day on Thurs-
day, March 25, when the Greater Miami Israel
Bonds Women's Division will host a fashion show
at the Mayfair House, in Coconut Grove. Entitled
"Bond with Glamour," the fashion show, will begin
with a luncheon at 11:30 a.m.
The show will consist of Israeli fashions which in-
cludes suedes, leathers, beachwear, sweaters and
evening wear. The production is by Rosita Rivas,
owner of Le Cadeau, located in the Mayfair. The
public is invited to view the fashions designed by,
among others, Gideon Oberson and Daniel
D'Hiver.
"We believe that the fashion show will be very
entertaining and colorful, while making people
aware of the importance of Israel Bonds to Israel,"
said Niety Gerson, chairman of the fashion show
and a member of the Israel Bonds Women's Divi-
sion. "I am positive that the "Bond with Glamour"
fashion show will be a success since the production
is being done by Rosita Rivas."
Guest speaker at the fashion show will be Susan
E. Weikers, National Chairman of the Israel
Bonds Women's Division. An insurance represen-
tative for the Equitable Life Assurance Society of
the U.S., Weikers is the first working woman ever
to be National Women's Division Chairman.
As a key leader of the Bonds Organization for
over a decade, Weikers was instrumental in in-
troducing the concept of the working woman as a
vital participant in the Israel Bonds campaign. She
helped establish the Careers Division in Baltimore
when she lived there, and later, she headed the Na-
tional Careers Division of the Women's Division.
A member of the Executive Board of the Na-
tional Women's Division for many years, she was a
National Associate Chairman with the portfolio of
National Chairman for Corporate Outreach.
Before assuming her present post, she was
Associate National Chairman for Special Projects
for the overall Bonds campaign.
In addition to announcing the fashion show, Ger-
son, who has been involved with the Greater Miami
Israel Bonds office for many years and has been
Niety Gerson
active in many other philanthropic and community
organizations, noted that actress and singer Rita
Moreno is serving as Honorary Chairman of the
event.
For reservations, contact the Israel Bonds
office.
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Community Corner
-H>e History of the Jewish Community in trie State
o# Ftorkla" will be the final lecture of the year of the
Moadon hrri-Hebrew Cultural Forum. The lecture. Mtrtdi
nil be heW at the auditorium of the Miami Bea-h
Pub*c Library on Tuesday. March 17 at 1-J0p.m *: ^
grvenby Dr. Abraham J. Gitte4son. associate 1 '&-::; -">
rr Cer>traf Agency for Jewish Education.
""-e ;e a--: ca-acte' -' :-e Be :a g.-e .::
la a.-^aryzec D> RabCx Menachem Raab. director 0'
Day School Department of the Central Agency
Jewish Educaton. at the Miami Beach Public :
- iVeonesday at 10:X a.m.
""" s =:_' s r:at 0' the Spiritual Giants of "^-e :
s-T-es Z--2--Z z. Sa~-j =e ser. and cooro =e
M 2en*ni Agency for Jewish Education.
The Yiddish Vincte at Aventura Jewish Cerue'
ho*0 ts r>ejrt meeting and Frailicheh Program Marc
a: 2 p-m Y"iddsh singers, actors, poets, anc rr s
are wrted to the Farbrajng."
ill
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24
Esc. chairperson of the AJC's
Mr >-eat9 mrjamtrt *a*
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HAS BEE> REBORA
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1SHU4MID UHmt.|-l.l*n'
^ewtsh War Vete-a-s Post and Auxiliary Ha-. -
Gormen Mo. 732 will hold its monthry meeting Survca. U
'C a_m. at Sorfs*de Communrty Center.
3et- Dar-2 Congregahon will ho*d a Punm Car- .a>
trv ga-es. booths, rides, ponies, a petting zoc a-a
*ooc or Sunday at 1130 a.m. at the synagogue.
"The Christianizing of Arnenca" wiM be the secc-5
iltfiiflinr en a series of Shabbat lectures co-
sponsoree b> the Amencan Jewish Committee and 3et
Shwa Congregation. The discussion will follow 8 bjr.
sert-ces or MmcH 2C at Bet Srura. The speaker mU be
Dor*r Denoerg
Ovrcn-State Cc^
-That =aouojs Rxir From Yesteryear" will se
*ear_*c e*-trca -e Punm Ce-oraton on Saturday at 7:30 pjn. The
Meg ar wiS be read, tradrbonai Punm songs w z-e
sung, anc a cosrume contest for children will be he : a:
f s evert
* M tradt*onai Megiliah reading is schedulec tof
Sunday a: 8 am. and a Punm Camhrai. compiete :~
-oes saoes a-c -eresr.mems. w* begin at 103C a1-
:srae -siaor-t Campaign's Mission to israe *
eave M -ar- rr- Ms* 25 ard return on June 8- In ts'ae
r*e -: Scocr _aocrator, *or Optics in Rs-r-
_sZ-*o- a De aeccatec Elfcot Cngefcaum, exec,:
s.-ec-.c :" ~e s*ae s:ac'_t Ca.-^r>ac;- s c"a-:e
=^t- :;. : ::-:-r-;a- :- S s:e-:o: ceera e
t--e "Xt- a-- ersa-. r' -* Torah Fund with a --
creor iVetr-esca. Wa-r 25. The guest soea*e- c-e
"cr=--.c Segau past chawmai of the To*-a* =.-:
=es..oer.c -a, a-c cast preeOent of the Sstemcoc
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*;-:= s-=r^ C-c-c'e-ca-c- a *eat--e a =.'~
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a ac'ri : w ; -; -.. .j: at 7 p_m. There well a sc z~ a
c::^-.-^ :;-:- ': :c:" :- rr a~c ac_ :s *"
;t*s ': ~^ --r-5 ;-: -a a-tasc^e-- -=
K^B
^^Kfl^^^BQi^ .*lf*rxi


Beth Jacob At 65
A Proud Congregation To Beat .
The Odds Of Survival On South Beach
Friday, March 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Continued from Page 1-B
dition of a new Beth Jacob facility
that is now used for holidays. The
original synagogue still is used for
daily services, office space and
receptions.
When Beth Jacob was founded,
there were only nine Jewish
families on Miami Beach.
"THEY HAD to bring over a
man from across the bay to make
a minyan." Swirsky says. "In
other words, the genesis of the
synagogue is the genesis of the
Jewish community in Miami
Beach. From this synagogue,
grew all the other synagogues."
There have only been four rab-
bis over the years. They were
Rabbis David Rosenblum, Moses
Mescheloff, Tibor Stern, who is
currently spiritual leader of the
Jacob C. Cohen Community
Synagogue, also on Miami Beach
and Swirsky.
"Beth Jacob has always been
Orthodox no compromises and
no deviations," Swirsky says. "In
all the years, the ideology has re-
mained the same, totally commit-
ted to traditional Judaism in an
uncompromising fashion."
Edward T. Newman
The synagogue opened the first
Hebrew and Sunday School on
Miami Beach. "There is hardly a
person who did not have some af-
filiation with Beth Jacob," Swir-
sky says.
BETH JACOB was also the
first one for many years to have a
Vaad Hakashrut, which made
sure that all the meats and poultry
coming into Miami Beach were
kosher, and all the meat markets
were under supervision of'the
Vaad.
Beth Jacob is a beautiful
synagogue and delights in having
"one of the finest and most im-
pressive stained glass windows of
any in the city," according to
Swirsky. The altar and the Ark
are made of marble.
As for the future of Beth Jacob
Congregation, Rabbi Swirsky
says, "It will come back, but I
don't think I'll be living at that
time."
BERNARD FRANK, whose
father, Morris B. Frank, was a
founder of the synagogue and its
president for about 25 years, is
also saddened by the decline in
membership. He is hoping that a
younger generation moving into
the area and new construction will
bring new members. "It all
depends on whether they are
religious or not."
INTERIOR VIEW OF THE BIMAH AND SANCTUARY.
N'Shei Chabad, Lubavitch Women
Celebrate Week Of The Jewish Women
Nshei Chabad of Miami,
Ubavitch Women, will celebrate
we .third annual "Week of the
Jewish Woman" on March 22 at
am. at Temple Moses on Miami
"each. Brunch will be served.
_ft "3>n speaker for the day
JJ be Esther Friedman, of Kan-
h* v3\ who teaches in a Jewish
nigh School and is a mother of
Sd Friedman was bo >n
ce!eWtheme of thi8 year'8
wl atlon ,s "Th Jewish
irpL^0^"After
wom *nedmans presentation,
*men can participate in one of
SirfrtS* "Matzoh, the
food of Faith-. "The Challenge of
age'; "Jewiah Parenting";
fvl Jewish Wom*n and Her
Community Reaching Out."
bifiS musical Program will
^thUv^byPiani8tand8iner
^hairwomen of this event in-
clude the presidium of N'shei
Chabad of Miami, Chana Rubin,
Sara Grosz and Tzipora Feldman.
Additional participants in the
preparations are Rifka Korf,
Dvorah Leah Greenspan, Rifka
Mendelsohn, and Golda Chava
Malinish.
Auction At
Temple Samu-El
Temple Samu-El Or Olom's Se-
cond Annual Goods and Services
Auction will be held Saturday,
March 21, 7:30 p.m. at the
Temple.
Hundreds of items will be auc-
tioned in order to raise funds for
Jewish education programs and
synagogue operating expenses.
Admission is free. Martin
Levine is in charge of the event.
Purim Celebration
At Beth Jacob
There will be a Purim Celebra-
tion in honor of Temple Beth
Jacob's 65th anniversary. The
oldest synagogue on Miami Beach
will hold its celebration on Sunday
at 1 p.m. at the Shelborne hotel.
Congressman Dante Fascell (D.,
South Fla.) will be the guest
speaker. Congressman Fascell,
who serves as chairman of the
House Foreign Relations Commit-
tee, will address the subject of
present U.S.-Israeli relations.
Rabbi Dobin
Announces
Purim Services
Rabbi Rubin Dobin of Young
Israel of Sunny Isles announces
Purim services will begin at 6
p.m., Saturday with the Megillah
to follow.
On Sunday, the Megillah will be
read at the morning service begin-
ning at 8 a.m., followed by a
special Purim Festival collation.
Rabbi Shmaryahu Swirsky
National Commander To Speak At
JWV Post-Auxiliary Joint Installation
Abe Horrowitz Post No. 682
and Ladies Auxiliary, Jewish War
Veterans, will hold a joint installa-
tion of officers for 1987-88 on
Sunday, March 22, 10:30 a.m. at
the McDonald Center.
National Commander Edwin
Goldwasser will be the guest
speaker, and Ceil Steinberg, na-
tional senior vice president,
Lillian Weintraub, department of
Florida president, Norman T.
Levine, commander of the Dade
County Council, Marjorie
McDonald, Mayor of the City of
North Miami Beach and City
Councilmen will be in attendance.
PNC Irvin Steinberg and PDP
Justine Warmbrandt will be
master and mistress of
ceremonies, and a special award
will be given to the North Miami
Beach Policeman of The Year, Of-
ficer James Calvert.
Guests and Installing Officers
are: Ed Tyler, Department of
Florida commander, and Phyllis
Shaw, president of the Dade
County Council.
The Newly Elected Officers of
the Abe Horrowitz Post are: Com-
mander Bernard Massarsky; Sr.
Vice Commander Herbert
Bergen; Jr. Vice Commander Max
Simon; 2nd Jr. Vice Commander
Gene Ferber; Judge Advocate
Bernard Chaney; Post Surgeon
Dr. Jack Gerard; Chaplain Sy
Hoberman; Adjutant Soil
Weinberg.
Quartermaster Beatrice Trep-
per; Officer Of The Day William
Schneider; Service Officer
Herbert Bergen; Three Year
Trustee Moe Gromet; Two Year
Trustee Frank Goldberg; One
Year Trustee Frank Ash, and
Americanism Officer Carmine
Goldapple.
The Newly Elected Officers of
the Ladies Auxiliary are: Presi-
dent Selma Levine, Sr. Vice Presi-
dent Rose Weinberg, Jr. Vice
President Harriet Rolnick;
Chaplain Rae Leff; Patriotic In-
structor Faye Goldapple; Conduc-
tress Florence Gilde; Treasurer
Sylvia Wilkins; Guard Rhoda
Bendel; Historian Yvette Gromet;
Trustees Ann Friedman, Ceil
Zucker, Janice Alter; Financial
Secretary Alice Brunner; Recor-
ding Secretary Ruth Weingarten,
and Correspondence Secretary
Rose Greebel.
HTa'amat Women
Games, cards and lunch are on
tap for the Or Chapter at a special
event taking place in the Card
Room of the Kenilworth Con-
dominium, Bal Harbour on Thurs-
day, March 12 from 11 a.m. to 4
p.m.
According to Raquel Rub, presi-
dent, funds raised will be sent to
Israel for Na'amat projects sup-
porting child care centers
throughout the state.
A weekly seminar entitled,
"Eight Questions on Judaism,"
being sponsored by the Or
Chapter began Wednesday, and
will continue each subseqent
Wednesday for eight weeks, ex-
cept for two weeks during the
Passover holiday. The seminars
will be held in the auditorium of
Winston Towers 700, Sunny Isles.
Rabbi Abraham Anselem of
Temple Moses on Miami Beach
will be the leader of the study
sessions.
Matilde Behar is chairman of
the event.
The Or Chapter is comprised of
women of Latin background.
A Purim celebration will be
hosted by the Kinneret Chapter of
Na'amat USA on Monday, at noon
in the auditorium of Temple Ner
Tamid.
Sheva Berland, vice president,
will read the Purim Megillah, and
Rose Lusky will do a special
Purim reading and sing her reper-
toire of the holiday's melodies.
iHamantaschen, will be served
by Lee and Nathan Seiler in honor
of their anniversary.
A new film on Na'amat in Israel
and a Purim presentation will
take place at the Thursday, March
19, noon meeting of the Golda
Meir Chapter to be held in the
civic room of the 100 Lincoln
Road Building.


Page S-B The Jewish FV>ridian,Triday. March 13. 1987
First Provost
New World School Will Create Something Special For Miami
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jtvuk Horidmn S'-ir? Wrac
Richard Klein, appointed
after a national search as
the first provost of the New
World School of the Arts.
has on his desk a large
ceramic aspirin, a miniature
keg of Barbados rum and a
tennis ball in a plexiglass
case.
Sounds like these items coald
compose a survival kit. but they
are merely decorations in the
56-year-old artist's new. tem-
porary quarters.
IN SEPTEMBER, the first
wing of de school will open. The
program will be unique
throughout the world. Klein says.
her any it wiE offer students with
talent in the arts an opportunity
to begin studying at the New
World School in their sophomore
year A high school and continue
through college, where they can
earn a Master's degree m the arts.
"I think it's an opportunity to
create something for the com-
munity that doesn't now exist.
that's needed and wanted. And
that's exciting." says Bern, as he
places various decorations on his
waQ.
There is a television show based
on a movie called "Fame." that
begms each week with an opening
sr_-:: ::' iancers _-. ilassrxr.
bard at practice, and the teacher
teffing them that if they war:
fame they have v. sweat and
work hard.
Tbe show was oased m the ac-
ruai coarse of studies at LaGuar-
ia High School if Musk and ski
Arts. For le years. Klein was
:-..-.:.ta. ::' that tBBBBS Nr-
York City school.
He was chosec from a po> of
170 appocants and moved to
Mam: x recent weeks with hit
wife. Rhoda. a guidance
KLEIN, an artist in his own
right, who majored in art at the
City College of New York, is a
water color painter who prefers
semi-abstract i*tw4tp There
was a point in his career when
Klein faced the decision of spen-
ding his time soiery as an artist or
remaining, in the field of
education.
He could not have had both.
When the World Trade Center
opened in New York, one of the
galleries wanted to buy hundreds
of water colors from him, which
Klein says he could not have pro-
duced if he also remained a school
administrator.
"It was a tough deoawo. I love
teaching. I love painting. I love
working with kids. I think I love
teaching kids to paint more than
painting myself."
STILL. Mom; provides a new
backdrop for Klein to paint as he
chooses
"This is a very beautiful area.
The scenery is just breathtakmg."
he says. "It's hah and beautiful.
There's an excitement in Miami
for a New Yorker. This is a town
abve. I think v****"** is a dynamic,
growing citv where things can get
done."
Klein may be remembered by
some Fkrichars from the nine
summers he spent giving art
lessons a: the orthodox Hotel
Pine-V-.ew La the Cats-:
Mocmtair.-.
Eeir. i lane children also are
talented creatrveiy. His daughter.
Susan, is a eocyrrrvter for Bank A
America His son. Jonathan, is a
producer for the CBS weekend
news. And -.5 ; jurist laugr.'.er
Debra. is a wnter.
KLEIN IS ioofcmg forward to
the first sophomore class atten-
.4 new musical versv/n t/Tkl Emper-yr ? Sew Clothes" is being
-iuced by Tneat**vorka.VSA. The company mil c~-r<*-m at
Patmttlo Senu?" H'^k School on Sunday. March in a'produc-
tion aaaBaanaj by the South Dade Jewish Community Center.
Soon, aadrooes wiO begin, and
about 350 iludeim wiD be ac-
cepted. As opposed to having to
search for students. Klein said he
beheves the problem wiD be
"restricting it to students."
Talented youth who ieave the
area for northern schools wfll ead
up staymg in the area he says.
and he plans to bring Latm
American students here.
"We're going to attract the
most outstanding teachers in the
country. We hope to rival Jmlhard
(Conservatory) in New York." be
says.
KLEIN ALSO said he wants to
make sure the academic program
is as good as the arts program.
since students will spend three of
their high school years at the
school- The curriculum wiD be
prepared by the Dade County
School system, which will share
positions on the governing board
with members of Florida Interna-
tional University and Miami-Dade
Community College
Most of the classes will be held
at the Mitchell Wotfson campus of
Miami-Dade Community College
in downtown Miami.
The school is now renovating
the NCNB National Bank building
oc Northeast Second Avenue and
Fourth Street. The first floor will
be used for administration, the se-
cond floor for music and third
f. >:r ::- theatvi :.!:
A GALA fundraiser has been
planned for Mar. 21 at the Inter-
continental Hotel to support
operating expenses for the com-
ing year
"Three years Ban tr.e road."
Deal says we should have
sorr.ethaaj equal to any art pro-
enai in the worid. and. if I can be
so bold, better."
Richard Klein
Yale Russian Chorus, At Wolfson Campus
The Yale Russian CaatBB, an a
capeila men's group which has fre-
quently toured the USSR will be
tserf-.rrrung at the Auditorium at
If boo Campus. Miami I>ade
Commumr. loilege M r.-ia;.
at noon. This ever.: ..- .-;i-nsored
tvj tat L Arts
Series
The noon program will be
I aval at 1 t :; A Tribute
-..- Ber. : _-. r in honor of Jewish
Cakaral Week. The tribute will
feature music bv Yehudah Shif-
man and Richard Fie -
reflections on Ben Gori [ da
Israeli consul and by Rah- lr\"ing
Lehrman.
The Yale Russian Chorus
Capella men"; grout ai i... be
prrf:rrr.in-g :r. Ssteria sum-
mer. will sing at the A:-
:" Florida Internatk-r.a. 1'niver-
sity's Tamiami Car.:.- Tues-
day at 8 p.m.
Admission is free ar
the public.
Organization UTews
The Miami Beach Chapter of the City of
I Hope will hoid their next meeting at the Surf-
4 side Community Center. Wednesday at 1 p.m.
|:j William F. Saulson has been asked to review
; the Cynthia Freeman novel Seasons Of The
I Hmrt Mr. Saulson is director of the saver-
g side Chapels Speakers Bureau.
South Florida Women's Committee of
% Shaare Zedek Hospital will rr.ee:
P March 23 at noon, at the Tower
I Restaurar.: fir dinner and aaterta:r.rr.er.: : ;.
? American Jewish hurr.: rial Pr.ir.3r. Lipsky.
The Greater Miami Women's Division.
| Asaerican Friends of the Hebrew L'niversi-
ty. *-... hold their KB :.'.- r. meeting r. Thurs-
| day. March 19. at the Ocean Pavdlior. r. '.'. 43
f. a.m.
A report will be given regarding the
"Women of the Year" luncheon and Wiiiiam
8F. Saulson. director of the River;idc
$ Speakers Bureau, will be guest speaker
The event is open to the public. Reserva-
;$ tions are available at the American Friends of
5 the Hebrew Universirv office.
A film will be shown on the work of ARM-
DI. Israels Emergencj- Service. Rcbert
Schwartz. Director of the Southeast Region
will be available to answer questions
The Opti-Mrs. Club of Miaau Beach a-ili
boW its annual fund-raising Silver and Gold
luncheon at the Doral Hotel on March I"
^ A musical fashion show will be pot
Cache.
Mrs. Lawrence A. Weston is chairt-*--
The iuncheon committee includes Mrs. L iiis
Puzer. Mrs. William Carmel. Mrs. Ar
Renkoff. Mrs. Jack Segal. Mrs. Milt.
Mrs Lee Pines and Mrs. Ronald Milier
Tony Award-winner Judd Hirsch 006OUT-
ing with his original Broadway buddy
Cleavon Little, follow their soldout runs at
Xbe Royal Poinciana and Parker Playhouses
theatrical South Florida engagement of Herb
:.: for Tecaaioa will hold its Annual Scholarship Gardner's Tony Award-winning Best Play of
: Luncheon on Monday, at the Miami Airport 1986. "I'm Not Rappaport." Tuesday. March
The Miaau-Coral Gablea-Dade Chapter.
Wobmbb's Divisioa of the Ajaerieaa Societv
7V .pie Imtei Sisterhood Donor Luncheon Committee plant
for tht r-irent Wednesday at tke Doral Hotel Pictured an co-
ehairmer Rose Kakn and Candace Rusktn. Also. Harriett
BuUnn. .' i Willis and Debra Schwartz.
i Hilton Hotel at noon.
% Rabbi Theodore H. Gordon. Emeritus Main
I Line Reform Temple. Philadelphia. wiD speak
I on the subject of "Student* of Technion: Key
i;i to Israel's Future." Tnere wfll also be musical
% entertainment.
Both members and guests are invited, and
| reservations may be made by contacting
1 Ethel Sernaker or Mildred Spirer.
I Aaaerkaa Red Magea David for Israel
will be holding an open bouse in the Chapel of
I Temple Zion Israelite Center Thursday
I March 19 at 8 p.m.
17 through Sunday. March 29 as producer
Zev Bufman's fourth pJay of his 198o-87;
theatrical season at the Miami Beach Theater
of the Performing Arts.
Staged by Daniel Sullivan who directed the
Broadway production, featured from the
original company is Cheryl Giannmi. with
Tom Stechschulte. Kevin M. Moccia.
Catherine Christianson and Richmond Hone
rounding out the company.
"I'm Not Rappaport" concerns the adven- \
tures and misadventures of two lively senior
citizens who strike up an unusual friendship j
in Central Park.
^:::->>i-:>:---x-i.>^^
u


Happening
As the counterpart to a session previously shared with students
of the Temple Beth Am Religious School. William F. Saulson will
conduct a seminar with parents and other adults on "Open Hands
dealing with death? on the final event of the Adult Education
life cycle course at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, according to Rabbi
Leonard Schoolman and Dorothy Herman. Director of
Education.
Army 2nd Lt. Kevin J. Applebaum. son of Coast Guard Capt.
Richard A. Appelbaum of Miami, has arrived for duty with the 9th
Infantry in South Korea. Appelbaum is an infantry officer.
The Dade/Broward Lupus Foundations regular monthly
meeting will be held on March 25 at 8 p.m. at Parkway Regional
Medical Center in North Miami Beach. The featured speaker will
be Dr. Elaine Tozman, a Rheumatologost from Miami who will
speak on "Lupus and Pregnancy."
Friday, March 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Several former mayors of Miami Beach will discuss the city's
past, present and future Monday night, at the monthly meeting of
the Civic League of Miami Beach. The 6:30 p.m. dinner, followed
by a 7:30 program, is scheduled at the Roney Pub restaurant.
Florida college students are invited to cruise from Haulover
Marina in Miami Beach north to Port Everglades Saturday night
from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. on the University Service Department of
the American Zionist Youth Foundation "Cruise to Israel." There
is room for 100 students, and for those interested in Israel sum-
mer programs, information will be available. Tickets are in ad-
vance or at the dock. Randy Kritchman at the Israel Aliyah Center
has additional information.
The Vegetarians of South Florida will hold their monthly "veg-
in" from 5-7 p.m. on March 21 at the Environmental Center of
Miami-Dade Community College South. There will be a dinner.
film and discussion led by George Eisman. Coordinator of the
Vegetarian Studies Program at Miami-Dade.
Florida Attorney General Bob Butterworth will address
members of the Tiger Bay Political Luncheon Club Wednesday,
at the Town Club in the Dupont Plaza Hotel, downtown Miami.
Karen Brown Appointed Exec.
Director Of Carlyle On The Bay
Karen S. Brown has been ap-
pointed Executive Director of the
New Carlyle on the Bay 250-bed
adult congregate living facility.
Ms. Brown is the former Assistant
Executive Director of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged. She holds a Master's
Degree in Business Administra-
tion from Boston University and
has also served as Vice President
of the Dade-Monroe Council of
Community of Mental Health Pro-
viders, Inc.; Chairperson of the
Gerontology Division of the
Florida Council for Community
Mental Health, Inc.; Campaign
Vice Chairwoman of the Business
and Professional Women's Board
of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and an instructor at
the Barry University School of
Social Work.
kings bay
yacht and country club
From the moment your guests arrive they'll
understand why you chose to celebrate your
Special Day in our beautiful Country Club
setting! At Kings Bay Yacht & Country Club
we custom and cater to All your needs with
exacting attention to make your occasion truly
a Time to Remember!
* Elegantly redecorated Grand Ballroom,
Dining and Party Rooms for ALL occasions
to accommodate your number ... a large
reception, a small and intimate gathering,
or a business meeting
' Magnificent food, impeccably prepared and
presented
' Beautifully furnished hotel rooms and
suites to house you and your guests ...
splendid Golf Course view or Tropical
Sailboat Lagoon
'Gracious, personal service and courteous
valet parking
' 136 acres of manicured lawns, flowers and
trees nestled around Biscayne Bay
Call 235-7161 and ask for our Catering Team
private memberships available
14401 Southwest 62nd Avenue
Miami, Florida 33158
Federation Happenings
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Women's Division held its "Queen of Hearts
Banquet" honoring the women who have work-
ed at making Federation's 1987 Combined
Jewish Appeal a success. Pictured from left to
right are: Sandy handy, event chairwoman;
Camelia Sadat, daughter of the late president
of Egypt, Anwar Sadat and a guest speaker;
Alice Golembo, grandniece of Israel's late
prime minister, Golda Meir, and a guest
speaker; Gail Newman, Women's Division
campaign chairwoman; and Amy Dean,
Women's Division vice president, campaign
designate. Sadat and Golembo spoke about
their famous relatives.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation held
its Admiral's Port champagne brunch on
behalf of the 1987 Combined Jewish Appeal.
Pictured from left to right are members of the
Admiral's Port executive committee: Eric
Salm, Max Anker, Nat Cutler, Al Morrows,
Milt Engelman, co-chairmen of Admiral's
Port; BeUe Tuch, Women's Division chairman
of Admiral's Port; Danny Pinkos, guest
speaker; Nate Katzen, chairman of Admiral's
Port; Art Levine, Pacesetter chairman of Ad-
miral 's Port.
The Alliance Division of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation held its Terrace Towers
Breakfast on behalf of the 1987 Combined
Jewish Appeal. Pictured from left, to right are
members of the Terrace Towers committee, Al
Meyer, Sy Reisman, chairman; Leo Gelvan,
sponsor of the breakfast: Murray Schneider,
Rose Krupnick, Anna Heller, Helen Fuller,
Paula Schwartz, Betty Kaufman. Ben Kauf-
man, Diane Barr, Alice Levine, Julius Fein.
The Three Seasons Religious
Group, part of the Alliance
Division of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, recently
presented a check to Federa-
tion's 1987 Combined Jewish
Appeal in the amount of
$S,U25. Pictured from left to
right are Aaron Ginsburg, Ar-
min Schon, Elliot Fromkes,
president of the group; and
Alfred Friedman.


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 13, 1987
Fred D. Hirt, Mount Sinai's
President and Chief Executive
Offier and an internationally
renowned authority in the field
of geriatric care, received a
"Citation of Distinguished
Service" from the North
American Association of
Jewish Homes and Housing for
the Aged (NAAJHHA). The
award was presented at their
annual meeting held in West
Palm Beach. Mr. Hirt was
given this honor in grateful ap-
preciation for his distinguish-
ed leadership and valued con-
tributions to the enrichment of
the lives of the Jewish aged. The
citation commends him for his
concern with human hap-
piness, his sense of obligation
to humanity, and his practical
idealism, which have all played
a vitalizing role in creating a
more meaningful social ex-
istence for older persons.
AJCommittees Summer Seminars
The American Jewish Commit-
tee's Academy for Jewish Studies
will hold its summer seminars in
Judaic Studies at Skidmore Col-
lege in Saratoga Springs, from Ju-
ly 12 through July 31.
The course offerings are: "Jews
in Islam," taught by Raymond P.
Schendlin, Professor of Medieval
Hebrew Literature at the Jewish
Theological Seminary of America,
July 12-17; "Jewish Immigrants
in America," taught by Henry L.
Feingold, Professor of History,
Baruch College and Graduate
School of the City University of
New York, July 19-24; and "The
Great Jewish Texts," taught by
Robert Goldenberg, Associate
Professor and Director of Judaic
Studies at the State University of
New York at Stony Brook, July
26-31.
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1ST SEDER, 2ND SEDER or BOTH SEDERS
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Simon Wiesenthal, whose life
story will soon be made into a
film, will be in Miami on
Thursday, March 26, to par-
ticipate in the first Annual
Simon Wiesenthal Center
Miami Tribute Dinner, honor-
ing Turnberry Isle owner and
develper Don Soffer.
Refusenik
Honored
BONN (JTA) A Soviet
film, "The Theme," banned for
seven years because it dealt with a
Jew's desire to immigrate to
Israel, has won the West Berlin
International Film Festival's
Golden Bear Award.
The film, by Gleb Panfilov, was
produced in 1979. Because of its
taboo subject it was not released
in the USSR until last January,
following a shake-up of the Soviet
movie bureaucracy.
The story is about a Jewish
writer in the Soviet Union who,
though successful, decides to go to
Israel to escape artistic con-
straints.
cquire for your home
the masterful art ot Edna Hibel
from our lovely new location
Edna
Gallery
Oil Paintings
Original Stone Lithographs
Lithographs on Porcelain
Porcelain Collector Plates
Framed Reproductions
Sculptures & Gifts
The art ot Edna Hibel...
tor a lifetime ot beauty!
311 Royal Pomoana Plaza
Palm Beach 655-2410
Hours 10 AM to 5 PM Mon thru Sat
Enioy Free Pa'king
/5th Anniversary
Diamond Jubilee Banquet
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF YOUNG ISRAEL
rt. i. ot Moiiywoo sssa
8HOMMAWARO
>HM-lfc|aYtLCftr
tor raaanattona t Journal ad blank* contact
WCYIBiiilinria m
a w. au nv. dr. mm i
______ areaaensaaum
At Home With
An Israeli Family
A visit to Israel generally consists of touring interesting
historical and religious sites, enjoying beautiful and varied
scenery and soaking up the sun along one of the country's
beaches. While this is certainly enough to entertain any tourist,
Israel also offers its visitors something special an opportunity
to really get acquainted with the country by meeting its people.
Many tourists travel throughout the world without a word to the
local populace, with the exception of tour guides, taxi drivers and
hotel reception clerks, thereby missing out ,on the country's
human dimension. While Israel's top grade tourism personnel will
do their utmost to make your visit an exciting, enjoyable ex-
perience, it's very possible that an evening spent at the home of
an Israeli family will turn out to be the highlight of your vacation.
Ever since the days of the Patriarch Abraham, the Jewish peo-
ple has placed great value and emphasis on hospitality.
Throughout the ages, Jewish travellers have known that the
homes of their co-religionists would be open to them. This tradi-
tion is continued in Israel today through the Ministry of Tourism's
home hospitality program, in which hundreds of Israeli families
voluntarily open their doors to visitors from abroad on a regular
basis. Motivated solely by a desire to make tourists feel welcome
in Israel, these hosts provide their guests with the opportunity to
see how the average Israeli lives.
Tourists wishing to register for the program do so by filling out
a questionnaire at the Government Tourist Information Offices in
Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, Netanya, Haifa or Eilat, several days in ad-
vance of the date they choose for the visit. (For groups, ar-
rangements must be made one month in advance.) Every effort is
made to match people of similar ages, interests and professions.
The IGTO personnel will provide you with your host's name, ad-
dress and telephone number, as well as a map to help you find
your host's residence. Guests are expected to conduct their hosts
to finalize arrangements. The visits usually take place around 9
a.m., giving you time to relax after a day of touring. It's advisable
to skip desert after dinner as your hosts will no doubt offer you
delicious home-made cake as well as a cup of coffee.
What do hosts and guests talk about? Everything under the
sun. People discuss their jobs, their hobbies, their children.
Israelis love to talk about the country's political and economic
situation and each person is sure to have an original and unique
opinion. Many Israelis have fascinating stories of how they came
to the country and what it was like years ago, or equally intrigu-
ing tales of daily life in the country today. And they're just as in-
terested in hearing what you have to say. As a matter of fact, it's
not unusual for lasting friendships to grow out of these meetings.
While you're filling out your home hospitality request form at
the Government Tourist Information Office, you'll also want to
take advantage of its other services. This is the place to get all the
information you need on touring the country. You'll be given city
maps with detailed descriptions, locations and opening hours of
all tourist attractions as well as a calendar of events listing tours,
folklore evenings, plays and special events. There's a wealth of
printed material available and the staff will be happy to answer
any questions you may have on tours, transportation, accom-
modation and a variety of other subjects. The Government
Tourist Information Offices, located in all of Israel's major tourist
centers, are open Sunday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
and Friday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Government Tourist Infor-
mation Office at Ben Gurion International Airport is open 24
hours a day, seven days a week.
Another organization devoted to making your stay in Israel
more pleasant is the Voluntary Tourist Service. This groups,
which now comprises over 400 volunteers, offers assistance to
visitors in Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, Haifa, Eilat and Tiberias,
operating under the auspices of the Ministry of Tourism and in
cooperation with the local municipalities. The volunteers are on
duty at major hotels in these cities from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Sunday
through Thursday. In addition to answering your questions on
tourism matters, the Voluntary Tourist Service volunteers
specialize in locating friends and relatives who are "somewhere in
Israel." They've had great success in finding people with only a
minimum amount of information and time and take great
pleasure in arranging such reunions.
For more information about the home hospitality program and
other hints on planning a vacation in Israel, contact the Israel
Government Tourist Office in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles,
Houston, Miami and San Francisco and Washington, D.C.
FISH SKI -
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The Choice is Yours at Club Nautico of Miami Beach
Rent a 20, 22 or 25 foot power boat and experience a day
on the bay or ocean. Our boats are radio equipped and
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about our Membership Plan to save 50% off our rental rates at
over 23 franchised locations.
Call 673-2502 to Reserve your Day of Fun.
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Friday, March 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
in
*r
i
M
l ten's American ORT (Organization for Rehabilitation
[rough Training) District VI, will feature Marianne Balshone,
plocaust survivor, and heroine of "Determined," authored by
^husband, Benjamin. The Fourth Annual "Gala for Giving
be held, Sunday, March 29, at the Westin Cypress Creek
|otel, Fort Lauderdale, at noon.
jnit Women
|Hitikvah-Miami Beach
hapter will meet Thursday
th 12, at noon at the Kneseth
el Synagogue. Refreshments
01 be served, and all are invited.
[Dvorah Chapter will meet
Wednesday (March 18) at 1 p.m.
the Roney Plaza for an in-
vesting program.
IChai Chapter will meet on
lednesday. March 25 at 8 p.m. at
[member's home.
iGeulah Chapter will meet on
fednesday. March 25 at 7:30
in the Jewish Community
filter.
digdal Chapter will meet at the
brte Towers for lunch and an in-
resting program at noon on
fednesday, March 25. William F.
Json of the Riverside Chapels
eakers Bureau, will speak on
Different View of the Mid-
st."
Rishona Chapter has planned a
|la weekend from Friday, March
I to Monday, March 23 at the
Jore Club Hotel, where there
j be food, gifts, a cocktail party
I nightly entertainment.
Hello, Egypt?
This Is Israel
|TEL AVIV (JTA) Direct-
_ telephone connections
wen Israel and Egypt went in-
imect last week, an outcome of
pign Minister Shimon Peres's
w to Cairo two weeks ago.
Wedding FINKELSCHULMAN The marriage of Renee Sheri Finkel and Mr. Jeffrey Schulman took place March 8 at Temple Beth Shumel. Rabbi Ralph Glixman officiated. The bride is the daughter of Herbert and Eva Finkel of Miami, granddaughter of Joseph and Sonia Liberman of Miami, and Myer and Kate Finkel of Miami Beach. She was attended by her sister, Elise Burger, as matron of honor, and bridemaids Maria Moraitis, Leslie Fuentes, Anula Shah, Diane Gipson, Debbie Schulman, Suzanne Duncan, Rebecca Lury, and Cheryl Lury. Her dress was a long silk organza, headed and sequined bodice and trimmed in venise lace. She wore a coodinating hairpiece, with a fingertip veil. Mr. Schulman is the son of Lois Schulman of Edison, New Jersey, and Richard Schulman of Freehold, New Jersey, grandson of Marie Schulman of North Miani Beach, and Julius Bard of Fort Lauderdale. He was attended by Frank Duncan as best man, and ushers Marc Schulman, John Duncan, Mark Burger, Mitchell Prince, Ron Orland, Jeff Orland, Jim Hisey, and Lenny Armuth. A finance graduate of the University of South Florida, the groom is employed by Congress Financial. Mrs. Schulman is a recent graduate of the University of South Florida with a degress in microbiology. Following the wedding reception, the couple Mrs. Jeffrey Schulman honeymooned in Hawaii. They will reside in Pembroke Pines upon their return.
'5th Anniversary
|Wlt"dJ"blleBnqut
|"K)NAL COUNCIL OF YOUNQ ISRAEL
honoring
******** OmMi+nMt
(TJ.OIQfM|wMtam(j
Mi la
HOFA AWARD
Z-S"" "** Hmm Y* *
^~" tourrwl ad bianka contact:
irT?*1'"'''"'"''


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 13, 1987
Treats For Purim
A PAPRIKA PURIM
Faigie Ackerman comes from
Hungary, where she learned these
special Purim recipes at her
mother's knee. This Purim you,
too, can spice up your holiday by
cooking the Old Country way.
"Dnnky"
Gizzard and necks (chicken) cut up
into small pieces
Ground white chicken meat
1 onion, chopped
1 raw egg
Challah (a few slices) soaked in
cold water
1 tablespoon flour
Salt, pepper, and paprika to taste
2 cups water
'My children called this recipe
"Dunky" because you dunk
challah into it," says Mrs. Acker-
By MILDRED L. COVERT
And SYLVIA P. GERSON
Throughout history, musicians,
f aywrights and artists have been
inspired by the story of Purim and
the beauty and grace of Esther.
From medieval motets to 20th-
century operas, Esther's praises
have been sung. Even a
Shakespearean company toured
Germany with a Purim play.
The Book of Esther, the story of
Purim, can be compared to an ar-
tistic "tapestry of life." There is
drama, suspense, gallantry and a
message of hope and courage. The
story also has added meaning for
feminists. From this tapestry of
life has emerged the first feminist
Queen Vashti, Esther's
predecessor. Defiantly, she refus-
ed to appear at a huge feast where
King Ahasuerus wanted to display
her beauty and charm to his
guests. Her refusal was a rarity at
that time, where even a Queen
was personal property, at the
whim of her husband. Her act was
not lost on all the men assembled,
who could forsee their own wives'
rebellion.
Vashtd's banishment and loss of
property was swift, but her stand
was a first step taken for
Women's Rights. This was follow-
ed shortly by Esther's equally de-
fiant act of appearing, unbidden,
before the King (a capital offense).
She had gone beyond the limits.
Her's was a desperate act to
thwart off Haman's intentions.
Thus, Esther, too, became a
forerunner for the Feminists.
Interestingly enough, women
have come a long way. The
feminist of today, in her role as a
working woman, nevertheless is
still a mother and wife. During
\ Purim she continues to sharpen
her skills. She not only makes
traditional poppy seed and prune
Hamantaschen, but adds her own
independent thinking, taking
traditions one step further and
bakes whole wheat, chocolate and
orange-flavored Hamantaschen in
her 20th-century kitchen.
WHOLE-WHEAT
HAMANTASCHEN
Vt cup butter or pareve margarine
Mi cup sugar
y* cup honey
1 Tsp. vanilla
1 Tsp. lemon juice
2eggs
lVf cups whole-wheat flour
Vk cups all-purpose flour
2 Tsps. baking powder
Vi Tsp. baking soda
Vi Tsp. salt
1 Tsp. cinnamon
Filling of your choice
Cream together butter or
margarine, sugar, honey, vanilla.
lemon juice and eggs. Sift
together the all-purpose flour,
baking powder, baking soda, salt
and cinnamon. Blend in the whole-
wheat flour. Add to butter mix-
ture and blend well. Place on
floured board and knead into
man of this meat appetizer.
To make this dish, mold the
ground white chicken meat into
small balls, using the challah soak-
ed in water, xk chopped onion, raw
egg and spices (salt, pepper, and
paprika.)
Fry the other half of the onion
with the gizzard and neck (in their
own juices) adding the tablespoon
of flour immediately. Wait, then
add paprika to color.
When the gizzard and neck are
browned, add water until a sauce-
like consistency is achieved (about
2 cups water.) Put in the chicken
balls and let cook another half
hour.
The sauce should be eaten with
challah, which is, of course,
dunked.
smooth ball. Wrap in plastic wrap
and refrigerate 1 hour.
Divide in 4 to 6 parts. Roll out
each part on floured board
1/8-inch thick and cut into 2- or
3-inch rounds. Drop generous
teaspoon of filling in center. Bring
edges up to form triangle and
pinch seams together to seal. Re-
roll scraps and repeat with re-
maining dough and filling.
Line baking sheets with greased
foil. Arrange Hamantaschen on
pan and bake at 350 degrees, 15
minutes or until edges and bot-
toms are brown. Cool on wire
rack. Makes about 4 dozen.
If you think chocolate Haman-
taschen is something new, think
again. Israelis have been baking
them for years.
CHOCOLATE
HAMANTASCHEN
1"A cups flour
2 Tbsps. sugar
lk cup butter or pareve margarine
1 egg yolk
1 Tbsp. strong coffee, or water
2 Tbsps. melted semisweet
chocolate
Filling of your choice
Combine flour and sugar in
large bowl. Cut in butter or
margarine until crumbly. Com-
bine egg yolk, coffee or water and
melted chocolate. Add to flour
mixture and blend until dough
comes together. Place on floured
board and knead to smooth ball.
Wrap in plastic wrap and
refrigerate 1 hour. Divide into 4
parts for easier handling and roll
out 1/8-inch thick.
Cut dough into Vh to 2-inch
rounds. Drop teaspoon of filling
onto center. Bring edges up to
For a side dish with meat, how
about something sweet? Rice and
Flomen (or prunes) are easy to
make and healthy to eat, so why
not try what they make when they
are hungry in Hungary this year?
Rice and Flomen:
1 cup dried rice
Margarine
V2 pound pitted dried prunes
2 cups water
Sugar or vanilla to taste
Pinch salt
Fry one cup dried rice in
margarine until slightly brown,
then pour 2 cups water, a pinch of
salt, and the pitted prunes.
Add lemon to taste, a little bit of
sugar or vanilla, and cook until the
water is absorbed (20-25 minutes.)
form triangle and pinch seams
together to seal. Re-roll scraps
and repeat with remaining dough
and filling.
Line baking sheets with greased
foil and arrange Hamantaschen
on sheet. Bake at 375 degrees 5 to
10 minutes or until edges and bot-
toms are brown. Cool on rack.
Makes about 2 dozen.
These two different fillings will
give a new twist to your
Hamantaschen.
RASPBERRY FILLING
1 cup raspberry preserves
1 cup golden raisins
1 cup finely chopped walnuts or
pecans
1 Tbsp. sugar
A Tsp. cinnamon
Combine preserves, raisins,
nuts, sugar and cinnamon. Mix
well. Makes about 3 cups filling.
CHOCOLATE FILLING
Vi cup cocoa powder
1/3 cup sugar
V cup coffee, or milk
1 cup chopped walnuts or pecans
Combine cocoa, sugar, coffee or
milk, and nuts and blend
thoroughly. Makes lVs cups
filling.
KOSHER KLUES: Never sift
whole grain flours such as whole
wheat or rye. The coarse particles
will not go through the strainer.
Before measuring, stir the flour
with a spoon so it will be easier to
pour into the measuring cup.
Hamantaschen dough can be
prepared in advance, covered with
plastic wrap and foil, and stored in
the refrigerator or freezer until
ready to bake.
National Ballet Of Canada
To Perform March 21, 22
The National Ballet of Canada
will appear in Miami March 21 and
22 for four performances,
showcasing the company's ac-
claimed production of "Alice" and
including a special appearance by
Rudolf Nureyev in "Coppelia."
The weekend of dance at Dade
County Auditorium will be
presented under the sponsorship
of the Concert Association of
Greater Miami, according to
CAGM president Judy Drucker.
The National Ballet of Canada
will perform a repertoire that in-
cludes Glen Tetley's "Alice,"
George Balanchine's "Serenade"
and-Erik Bruhn's "Coppelia."
Highlighting the National
Ballet's performances of "Cop-
pelia" will be an appearance by in-
ternational superstar Rudolf
Nureyev, who will dance the
leading role of Franz, opposite
Karen Kain in the March 21 even-
ing Gala performance. "Coppelia"
will be performed that day at both
the 2 p.m. and 8 p.m.
performances.
On March 22 the company will
perform George Balanchine's
"Serenade" followed by "Alice,"
for both 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. shows.
Miami follows Minneapolis and
Chicago on the Company's month-
long tour, before stops in Clear-
water and West Palm Beach and a
week's engagement at the Ken-
nedy Center in Washington.
"This major U.S. tour gives us
the opportunity to showcase the
wealth of artistic achievements
and talent within the Company,"
noted Associate Artistic Director
Lynn Wallis.
Tickets are available through
the Concert Association of
Greater Miami box office.
Purim in the streets of Jerusalem: The girl on the right has her
'mishloach manot' gift in her hand.
No Love Of Cake, She Bakes
Hamantaschen for Others
By ALISA KW1TNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Mrs. Philip Poretsky, president
of the Sisterhood of the Young
Israel of Sky Lake, admits that
she is not a lover of cake.
"I just like baking them," says
the woman who, for the second
year in a row, is helping to supply
the West Coast of Florida with
Hamantaschen.
Poretsky, along with two other
women (who roll the dough and
watch the ovens) and one
gentleman, who fills the pastries
with poppy, prune or apricot, has
filled the coffers of her synagogue
by filling the bellies of
Hamantaschen-hungry members
of organizations such as
Hadassah, B'nai B'rith, as well as
Hebrew school students and
others.
Poretsky, who tried recipes
from kwoks. friends, and im-
provisation, had to contend with
the frustration of shrinking dough
before she hit upon this year's
Purim-perfect recipe.
"We would get so mad," she
says, "because we worked so hard
and then, just before we filled
them, the dough would shrink
from the size of a water glass to a
juice glass."
Four days a week, from 8:30
a.m. to 4 p.m., Poretsky and the
other loyal volunteers work to fill
orders as large as 300-400 pieces.
Some of the orders are resold.
Although the Hamantaschen
are; as "pure as if your mother
made them," it seems that tradi-
tion is not everything.
"Prune and apricot are more
popular than poppy, the tradi-
tional filling," says Poretsky.
"Poppy gets in people's den
tures," she explains.
Temple Emanu-El To Hold
A 'Purim Happening'
Temple Emanu-El will hold a
"Purim Happening" Saturday
evening, to mark the Jewish
festival which begins at sundown.
The event, supervised by Dr. Ir-
ving Lehrman and by Dr. Amu-
Baron, education director of Tem-
ple Emanu-El and the Lehrman
Day School, gets under way with a
6 p.m. buffet snack at the Miami
Beach congregation.
Youngsters are urged to attend
in costume to depict the holiday
described in the biblical Book of
Esther.
At 7 p.m., the program shifts to
the main sanctuary where the
traditional reading of the
Megillah, will be led by Rabbi
Lehrman.
The party continues at 8 p.m.
with a procession from the sanc-
tuary to the adjacent Friedland
Ballroom, where all in costume
will receive prizes. In addition,
junior and senior Queen Esthers
and King Ahasuerus' will be
crowned.
Then, at 8:30, it will be time for
fun, contests and feasting at an
International Bazaar. There will
be food and game booths, with
dancing, eating and drinking
coupled with surprises all evening.
according to Temple Emanu-El
president Lawrence M. Schanu.
Babysitting services, including
cots, will be provided for little
ones so that entire families can
participate, Schantz said. Reser-
vations for the Purim Happening
may be made at the Temple ac
tivities office.
Hadassah
Events
The Ko'ach Chapter of Miami
Beach Hadassah will be holding a
White Elephant Sale on Sunday,
March 22, to benefit the Hadassan
Medical Organization. There will
be lots of new and slightly used
merchandise for family and home
on sale at bargain prices.
The event will be held at Muss
Park, 4400 Chase Avenue.
"The I.R. Goodman Chapter of
Hadassah" will hold its monthly
meeting at the new Hadassan
Region offices Tuesday, Marcn
24 at 1 p.m. at City National BanK
Building, Miami Beach.
The program will be a Report on
the Diamond Jubilee Hadassan
75th Anniversary Mission w
Israel.


Max And Ruth Smolar To
Receive Israel Freedom Award
Bidents of Mar-Len Gardens
..ffirth Miami Beach will
jUte their annual Night in
,el on Tuesday, at 8 p.m. in the
,.Len Social Hall.
jTt that time, Max and Ruth
Lolar will receive the Israel
freedom Award recognizing their
lone participation in Jewish
PUnthropic and service
Organizations.
I yax and Ruth Smolar have been
Lunch supporters of the State of
Israel and the Jewish way of life,
joth in New York and in the
Miami area.
Smolar is an active member of
the Labor-Zionist movement. He
retains his membership with the
Brenner Branch in Manhattan. He
is also on the Board of Directors
of the Mar-Len Gardens Men's
Club and an active member of the
Mar-Len Committee.
His wife, Ruth, is a member of
the Eleanor Roosevelt Chapter of
Hadassah, as well as the Mar-Len
Gardens Women's Club.
Isadore Chensky is chairman
and Emanuel Gold is co-chairman
of the event.
Emil Cohen, American Jewish
folk humorist, will be a special
guest.
Israel Bonds To Hold Event
At Keys Jewish Center
The State of Israel Bonds
realization and the Keys Jewish
immunity Center will be holding
i special Oneg Shabbat on Friday,
irch 20, 8 p.m., at the Center,
ated at Mile Marker 93 in
favernier.
| The Oneg Shabbat marks the
t event being held by the Israel
londs organization in the Keys in
1987.
Guest speaker will be Major Gil
n, executive director of the
el-America Chamber of Com-
merce of Florida. Prior to assum-
l his current position, Elan was
the Greater Miami Jewish
PERSONALS
ICHARMING, attractive
gentleman 72+ with high
[cultural values and very
fine education loves to
[travel would like to
.meet a retired Jewish
woman, 65-75. self support-
I ing and with a car to get to
Miami Beach. Box SR c/o
Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box
012973, Miami 33101.
THE AVENTURA JEWISH
Center Singles 40 Plus will
have a special perform-
ance for Purim. This will be
held during their monthly
meeting on Monday, March
16, at 7:30 p.m. The famous
I singer star from Broadway
[musicals. Phyllis Green,
[will entertain with the
renowned pianist, Sy
Greene. Members $3, non-
jmembers $4. Refresh-
ments and social hour will
[follow. For more informa-
tion call Shula 935-3742 or
I Doris 932-9382
NY. BUSINESSMAN in
MB. till March 15-20. Hand-
some, athletic, non-
smoker, 57", looking for
jetty, slim girl 27-37. Write
boxTD, c/o Jewish Florid-
'". P.O. Box 012973,
"ami 33101.
BETH TORAH SINGLES-
Jg 25-45 presents Dr.
M'chaei Andron, founder of
SKodesh Center. This
:"' be a program on
Thil ,s Mar,agement."
S'1'^ ^Id Thursday,
Ja, 12 1987, 7:30 p.m
* Beth Torah Congrega-
te Benny Rok Campus,
\ttZ*t North Miami
G n i ,0rida in our
Cent"? DGhe"nan Youth
rei50 Wnich deludes
weshments.
Federation and the American
Jewish Congress.
Elan is a paratroop major in the
Israeli Defense Forces who served
as a commanding officer of its
spokesman Unit in Beirut during
the recent war in Lebanon. Since
then, and until his arrival in
Miami, he has been serving his
reservist duty as a senior press
briefing and escort officer for the
IDF.
Purim Weekend
At Temple Sinai
The annual Purim celebration at
Temple Sinai of North Dade will
begin with Sabbath eve services
on Friday, with early services
beginning at 6 p.m. followed by
late services at 8 p.m., during
which Rabbi Ralph P. Kingsley,
Cantor Irving Shulkes and the
Temple Sinai Adult Choir will lead
the congregation in prayer.
Rabbi Kingsley's sermon will be
"Funny and Not So Funny Mus-
ings On The Eve Of Purim." The
Megillah Reading will take place
on Saturday at 6 p.m., followed by
a Purim family dinner.
Food, exhibits and other ac-
tivities will be included in the
Purim celebration on Sunday,
beginning at 11 a.m. The com-
munity is invited to attend the
festivities at Temple Sinai.
Associates Joins
Law Firm
The law firm of Cohen, Berke,
Bernstein, Brodie and Kondell,
PA announces that Cynthia
Barnett Hibnick, Karen Z. Rosen
and David M. Glassberg have
become associates of the firm.
Friday, March 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
Rose Sigmmn
Israel Bonds
To Honor
Rose Sigman
The Greater Miami Israel Bond
Organization will honor Rose
Sigman of North Miami Beach
during a Brunch on Sunday even-
ing, March 22, at Temple B'nai
Zion, No. Miami Beach. The
festivities will begin at 10:30 a.m.
Rose Sigman is being recogniz-
ed with the Israel Freedom
Award for her dedicated and
devoted service to numerous
philanthropic organizations, as
well as to the State of Israel
Bonds Organization.
She has been on the Board of
Directors of Temple B'nai Zion
from 1974 to 1987 and is the
financial secretary and treasurer.
She is president of the Sisterhood
and a life member. She is also a
life member of Hadassah, a
member of ORT, National Jewish
Center for Immunology and a
board member and secretary of
Winston Towers 330 Association.
Special Guest of the event,
sponsored by the Temple B'nai
Zion State of Israel Bonds Com-
mittee, will be Emil Cohen,
American-Jewish folk humorist.
Chairman of the Brunch is Max
Krieger. Co-chairman is Harry
Giber.
Gordon Roofing
and Sheet Metal
Works, Inc.
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Phone 325-8287
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f
From left: Joseph Walker, Elliott Engelbaum, Ruth Glasco, Betty
Traugot and David Silverbush.
Ruth Glasco, Betty Traugot Honorees
At Histadrut's Purim Festival
The Israel Histadrut Campaign
of South Florida will celebrate
Purim with a festive luncheon on
Sunday, at the Konover Hotel in
Miami Beach.
Ruth Glasco and Betty Traugot,
presidium presidents of the
Histadrut Women's Council, will
be honored for their exceptional
dedication to the general welfare
of the people in Israel. Each will
be presented with Histadrut's
prestigious "Award of Merit" in
recognition and appreciation for
their achievements.
Under the inspirational leader-
ship of Ruth Glasco and Betty
Traugot, the Histadrut Women's
Council has amassed an outstan-
ding record of accomplishments
which include a dormitory at the
Ruppin Agricultural College, an
automotive department in the
Mitchell Amal School and
numerous perpetual and annual
scholarships for deserving but
underprivileged Israeli youth, all
part of Histadrut's educational
system.
It has sponsored a Neo-Natal
Unit and an Oncology Department
in the Soroka Hospital in Beer-
sheba and rooms in "Kupat
Holim" clinics in Israel, all part of
Histadrut's comprehensive
medical program covering over 85
percent of Israel's population. In
addition the Histadrut Women's
Council has sponsored a
playground for underprivileged
children in the Katamon section in
Jerusalem.
The Women's Council this cam-
paign year is making a substantial
donation for the "Irving Gordon
Laboratory for Optics" at the
Ha'amit Amal School in Rishon-
Leziyon, Israel.
Additional information and
tickets for the Purim Festival are
available through Elliott
Engelbaum at the Histadrut office
in Hollywood.
Business Note
Edward Gillman of Seitlin and
Company, Insurance, has been
awarded the Accredited Adviser
in Insurance (AAI) designation
and diploma by the Insurance In-
stitute of America for successfully
completing three national ex-
aminations which test for
knowledge of insurance
coverages, marketing concepts,
selling techniques, and agency
and sales management.
Don't Be Late! Don't Be Late!
You've Got A Very Important Date
With Nureyev -Alice and
The National Ballet of Canada
The Concert Association ol Greater Miami
A Not Foi PfoAl OlIUUAbOfl) )4llh (Huth*l lirvidrr
The National Ballet
of Canada
with The National Ballet Oi, hrsli j
Walter Babul and Ervanao Florio, Coatactors
Saturday, Marc*. 21 at 2 eV 8 PM
Coppelia
Choreographed by Erik
Kr uhn ud set to 1
AfBiflceat score by Leo
(Full length) Dehbei. COPPELIA is t
during cUmi
AT 2 PM
Ichino. Pugh,
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AT 8 PM
Kain. Nureyev,
Gornssen.
Join as (or the special Saturday
Evening Gala performance of
Coppelia with Guest Artist,
Rudolf Nureyev
dan cine
the role of Franz
Sunday. March 22 at 2 Alice
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- Abba Kisselgofl, N Y. Ttae.
Set to a PaiiUcr Prize wibbibk score by David Del
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AT 2 PM AT 8 PM
Allemann, Witkowsky, Glasco. Kain.
Ottmaan, Randazzo Harrington. Ottmann
Qornnaflo Choreographed ay Georfe
OCIClldUC Rajaachine with the
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lchaihcrraky.
AT 2 PM AT 8 PM
Tesamer. Lightheart, Tennant. Witkowsky.
Nychka. Montague. Goldman. Osborne.
Harrington. Randazzo.
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olColl.ialAM-jri m. M >. .da *. i


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 13, 1987
No Jews Once
Shul Of Bal Harbour,
In Fifth Year, Eyes
New Synagogue
Continued from Page 13-A
that said >ou have to be a club
member before you could buy pro-
perty, Sherman said.
By the time the Menorah was
boldly displayed on the grass next
to the Christmas tree, it was,
Sherman said, "A symbol of
brotherhood and unity, and that
was very important. It symbolized
the end of ;in era."
NOT ONLY did Bal Harbour
get its first synagogue, but it was
one that followed Orthodox prac-
tices, including the separation of
men and women at services. And
strict observers of the Torah do
not drive on Shabbat. They walk,
usually with their families, to the
Shul.
Author and spiritual leader Rab-
bi Zalman Posner flew in from
Nashville to speak at the Shul's
dinner celebration last week.
Posner, author of the book,
"Think Jewish," noted that
"Jewish people are very peculiar.
In this week's Sedra they are call-
ed upon to contribute to the sanc-
tuary. A few weeks later, we will
learn that they were called upon
to give to the Golden Calf, and
they gave lavishly to that too. It's
a response to leadership.
"If they fall, the leadership
lacks vision. This evening shows
how a leader has a vision."
IF YOU TALK to a Jew about
Yiddishkeit, and he does not res-
pond it is your fault, Posner said.
"If a Jew speaks from the soul, it
will strike a chord. Words from a
person's mouth can only get to a
person's ears. Words that come
from the heart can only get to
another heart."
Posner, noting that, "Our
Jewish people today are divided
into too many groups two
groups is too many," said that
what he is afraid of is that "so
often the emphasis is not on the
word Jew. It is on the other word,
Orthodox, Conservative, Reform.
The emphasis is on the part that
breaks them apart, not what br-
ings them together."
IT WAS about five years ago
when a man named Sam
Greenberg invited Rabbi Lipskar
to start a congregation in Bal Har-
bour. Lipskar, who is a Lubavit-
cher, said he wrote the Lubavit-
cher Rebbe Menachem Schneer-
sohn, and asked him whether he
should begin the Shul. He said the
answer came with two simple
words that translated in to, "It
would be proper."
In 1982, a small group of area
residents shared the dream of Beit
Chabad that one day a truly tradi-
tional synagogue that would be
large enough to serve Bal Har-
bour and its neighboring com-
munities would be built.
They gathered in a small room
at the Beau Rivage, and when that
hotel closed in 1984, the group,
escalated to about 125 members,
moved to the Bal Harbour
Sheraton Hotel.
That location offered services
not only to area residents but to
visitors who came from abroad
and other parts of the United
States to the beaches of South
Florida.
STUDY CLASSES were added
and an increasing number turned
to the Shul, for Minyan prayers,
for the recitation of Kaddish, for
study, for Tzedakah, for the op-
portunity to meet other people,
for advice on personal matters
and family problems.
Three months ago, leaders of
the Shul closed a deal on the pur-
chase of land for a three-building
site on Collins Avenue between
95th and 96th Streets in Surf side.
Miami architects Charles
Triester and Antonio Cantillo
drew plans that incorporated con-
cepts and features that once
enhanced the famous central
synagogues of Cracow, Prague
and Warsaw during the nostalgic
era in Europe when traditional
Jewish pride and respect for
Torah enriched Jewish life.
ACCORDING TO architectural
plans, the Shul's main sanctuary
will contain a decorative center
Bimah. Open space will separate
this center point from the in-the-
round seating, extending on two
levels, around the perimeters of
the sanctuary. The Shul, set in a
landscaped courtyard, will con-
tain, in addition to the main sanc-
tuary, classrooms, meeting
rooms, a library and a mikvah.
"The problems of assimilation
and a broken Jewish people will
fall away as time goes on," Posner
said. "And having a share in an in-
stitution that's designed to bring
every Jew together, bound by
Torah and Mitzvah, will create a
community where children will
carry the heritage of 150 genera-
tions into the future."
Conference To Address Problems
And Solutions Confronting
Elderly Care Services
Shrinking resources. govern-
ment cutbacks... an increasingly
frail "old-old" elderly population
. the complexities of a
technological society dealing
with multi-ethnic elderly com-
munities as well as a lack of public
understanding of the problems
facing the elderly are some of the
tough issues with which profes-
sionals and advocates for the
elderly wrestled with the Alliance
for Care Conference, ending to-
day at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in
Downtown Miami.
The conference, jointly spon-
sored by United Way's Area
Agency on Aging for Dade and
Monroe Counties and the Miami
Jewish Home anr Hospital for the
Aged, brings together nationally
and internationally recognized ex-
perts in the field of elderly care
for in-depth sessions, workshops,
exhibits and informal roundtable
discussions. Their goal is to ex-
change information and build a
network an alliance for care
that will provide effective service
for the nation's elderly in the
years ahead.
Helping to plan the 19th annual Scholarship
Ball of the Lehrman Day School are, from left,
past Temple Emanu-El president Sidney
Cooperman, president Lawrence M. Schantz,
Dr. Irving Lehrman and vice president
Sidney Poland. Cooperman, Schantz and
Poland are former chairmen of the Lehman
Day School Scholarship Ball, slated March 28
this year in the Friedland Ballroom of the
Miami Beach congregation.
Israeli Teenagers And American
Counterparts Learn About Each Other
Israeli teenagers and their
American counterparts will be
learning about each other during
the month of March when Nir
Einan and Ariela Eshad, both age
16, and participants in the Israeli
- Youth Delegation program, visit
local high schools. Coordination of
schools in South Florida was
handled through the Central
Agency for Jewish Education
(CAJE), through its Community
Services Department.
Miami area families will host the
two Israeli high school students
through March 15. The program is
part of an international youth mis-
sion organized by the Israeli
Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
During their stay in Miami, the
teenagers will visit local high
schools, telling students about
Israel's culture and their observa-
tions on life in America. They will
share with the students their
observations on the similarities
and differences of growing up in
Israel or the United States and
answer questions about anything
from Israeli television to politics.
Nir Einan is from Jerusalem,
Israel's capital, he spent six years
with his family in Mexico City
when his father represented
Israel as director of the Keren
Hayesod. Nir speaks English and
Spanish as well as Hebrew. He is
studying biology and mathematics
and enjoys music, swimming, and
movies.
Ariela Eshaed is a scout leader
in her native Jerusalem. She par-
ticipates in a drama group and
takes special courses at the high
school in music and Jewish
philosophy. Her father is a jour-
nalist and her mother is an assis-
tant to Israeli Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres.
...
N.
\
N
SINGLE?
ALONE?
JEWISH?
REACH OUT AND FIND SOMEONE THROUGH.
FLORIDA JEWISH SINGLES NETWORK"
FLORIDA'S MOST COMPREHENSIVE MAGAZINE
DEVOTED TO JEWISH SINGLES
P.O. BOX 0211 TAMPA. FL. 33601
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SEND SELF-ADDRESSED STAMPED ENVELOPE
Nireinan and Ariela Eshed
Eshed and Einan are among 46
young people who will be meeting
with their peers in dozens of
American cities under the
auspices of the Israel Youth
Delegation, now in its fourteenth
year. Others will visit France,
Belgium, Sweden, Holland,
England, Ireland, Canada, and
South America.
The schools selected by CAJE
for the students to attend include:
American High School, Ar-
chbishop Curly High, Coral Gables
High, Belen Catholic School,
Killian Senior High, Adath
Yeshurun, North Miami High,
Miramar High School, Jewish
High School of South Florida,
Hialeah-Miami Lakes, Miami
Beach Senior High, Pinecrest
High, and North Miami Beach
Senior High School. The classes
that the Israeli teenagers will visit
in these schools are, for the most
part, in the Social Studies
Department.
Beth Torah Celebrates
Rabbi's Anniversary
The Beth Torah Congregation
Benny Rok Campus will celebrate
Rabbi Max Lipschitz's 40th year
in the rabbinate and 27th year at
Beth Torah during a Shabbat din-
ner March 20 at 5:45 p.m. u>
Deakter Hall. The dinner will be
followed by regular late Friday
evening services at 8 p.m. in the
main sanctuary. Seating will be
limited and reservations close
March 15.


Friday, March 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
Jon Burns
David Ryan Tishgart
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
"And thou shalt make holy garments for Aaron thy brother,
for splendour and for beauty"
(Exodus 28.S).
TETZAVEH
TETZAVEH Moses was told: "Thou shalt command the
children of Israel, that they bring unto thee pure olive oil beaten
for the light, to cause a lamp to burn continually. In the tent of
meeting, without the veil which is before the testimony, Aaron
and his sons shall set in order, to burn from evening to morning
before the Lord." For Aaron and his sons were to serve as priests
to God. The priestly garments are described in grat detail, as well
as the various offerings that the priests were to bring on the day
of their anointment. This portion concludes with the laws relating
to the offering of incense on the altar.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of tho Law Is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. WoUmen-
Tjamlr, $15, published by Shengoid The volume Is available at 75 Maiden
Line, New York, N.Y. 10038. Joseph Schlang Is president of the society
distributing the volume.)
Noam Zion To Speak On
The Book Of Genesis
Noam Zion, a scholar and
esearcher with the David Hart-
i Institute in Jerusalem will be
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Rock Climbing. Basketball. Soccer.
S^b*" Hockey Zootogac* 4 Scenes
*ty*n- Computer Programming Al
*> Ltn Observed. Shabbat Sar-
* Start Avatisbts st A Times
Your iamp Directors
COACH J J MONTGOMERY. C.C.O.
IfiBiSj SHEILA WALDMAH
DiMiBiKhniMi M &3 3434 arWrlta
1SH28M Mumi Batch Hi 33140
Temple Samu-El/Or Olom's
scholar in-residence during its
Torah Study weekend March
20-22.
Zion will give three presenta-
tions focusing on the book of
Genesis. On March 20, at services
starting at 8 p.m., Zion will speak
on "God as a Parent Facing
Failure; The Hard Path to
Realism." At the 10:45 a.m. ser-
vice on Shabbat morning, Zion
will discuss "God as a Mat-
chmaker: Jewish versus Christian
view of Marriage, Love and Sex-
uality." His topic on Sunday mor-
ning, beginning at 9 a.m. will be
"Parental Expectations and Sibl-
ing Rivalry." The Sunday morn-
ing session also will include a
bagel brunch and showing of the
James Dean film version of "East
of Eden."
A native of Jerusalem, Zion was
raised in Minneapolis where his
father was rabbi of congregation
B'nai Abraham. His particular
area of research is rabbinic no-
il' tions on the origin of violence in
human nature.
ESCAPE THE HEAT!
v/scco/i? ^w a he s^ft i
IN THE COOL 8 SCENIC BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAINS
DELICIOUS JEWISH-AMERICAN CUISINE
SWIMMING POOL WHIRLPOOL / *29 $64
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Resort Hotel on Beautiful Lake Osceola opfIN
for Brochure & RMes Call Miami Office may 20
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""""EACH 'GENERAL CARE FOR FUNGUS NAILS' MIAMI BEACH
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v* I Across from Burdinc'i)
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EDWARD KLEIN
Edward Lee Klein, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Robert Klein will be call-
ed to the Torah as Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday at 10:30 a.m. at Temple
Sinai of North Dade.
The celebrant attends Highland
Oaks Junior High where he is in
the seventh grade. Edward was
awarded the Cloverleaf Communi-
ty Service Award in the sixth
grade at Highland Oaks Elemen-
tary School.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Klein will
host the Kiddush following the
services in honor of the occasion.
DAVID TISHGART
David Ryan Tishgart, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Charles Tishgart, will be
called to the Torah to celebrate his
Bar Mitzvah, on Saturday, 11 a.m.
at Congregation Bet Breira.
David is a seventh grade honor
student at Glades Jr. High. He is
also in the pre-confirmation class
at Bet Breira.
Special guests at the Bar Mitz-
vah include both sets of grand-
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edward
Tishgart and Mr. and Mrs. Hy
Coverman. David celebrates his
Bar Mitzvah on the same day as
his grandfather, Hy Coverman,
who will also turn 70 on this day.
To celebrate happy simchas, three
great aunts have come from New
York, Mrs. Sarah Geller, Mrs. Ray
Sutton, and Mrs. Pearl Drucker.
Many of David's aunts and uncles,
the Adelmans, Covermans and
Greenfields, all long time Miami
residents-will be attending. In all,
over 70 family members, in addi-
tion to many friends will be in
attendance.
JONATHAN BURNS
Jonathan Bums son of Mr.
Robert Burns and Mrs. Marilyn
Burns will be called to the Torah
as Bar Mitzvah on Saturday,
March 14, at 10:30 a.m. at Temple
Emanu-El. Jonathan is a student
of Ransom Everglades School and
is in the 7th grade. He has won the
Presidential Fitness Award, the
Florida Mathematics League
Award and is an honor student.
Jonathan has been a student of
Temple Emanu-El's Afternoon
Religious School for the past 5
years.
Special guests attending:
Mildred and Irving Berger, grand-
parents; Ester and Bobby Burns,
grandparents; Thelma Berger,
aunt of California; Murvin and
Edith Seittles, uncle and aunt of
Boca Raton; Eleanor and Jack
Mendelson, aunt and uncle of
Boca Raton, Philip and Jean
Berger, uncle and aunt of New
York.
Beth Torah
Teenager Choir
Purim Concert
Premier Event Purim Concert
featuring the Beth Torah Teenage
Choir, guest cantors and The
North Miami Beach Symphony
Orchestra, featuring Chassidic,
Yiddish and liturgical music will
take place Tuesday, at 7:30 p.m.
at Beth Torah Congregation,
North Miami Beach.
Irving Kuttler, is chairman.
The Beth Torah Teenage Choir,
directed by Greta Fleissig, will
open the program with holiday
songs. Featured artists are David
Bagley of Toronto, David Fisher
of Petach Tikvah, Israel, Yakof
Motzen of Montreal, and Beth
Torah Cantor Zvee Aroni.
Lawrence Siegal will conduct the
North Miami Beach Symphony
Orchestra.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
6:11 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach, Fie. 531-2120
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig
Dally 7:20 a.m. Aftamoon 5:30 p.m.
Sal. 9 a.m.
AOATHYESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947 1435
Rebbi Slmche Freedmen
Cantor Ian Alpern Conservative
Mlnyan 7:30 a.m. A8 p.m.
Sat. A Sun. S a.m. A 5:15 p.m.
Frt. 8 p.m
F rl a p.m. Poet Bar A Bat Mitzvah etudente
rill feed aervtcee. Nursery aehool Purim
Program. Hebrew school Award Shabbat.
Shabbat dinner ORT Shabbat.
Sat. 8:30 a.m. Maglllah reading. M/M Lao
Halmon will aponaor kksdiah In
honor SSth Anniversary.
TEMPLE BETH AM
5850 N Kendall Dr
S. Mleml 177
Dr Herbert Beurngard
Rabbi Leonard Schoolman
Fri. BrU Kabbt Baumgard "EMwoe In Buabtaaa
A Government." Bel SMI aju Bar MHxveh
Mere Sterna A Brendan Btiiirman.
tt:16 ris) MMzveh rjovte Chepiek A
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2825 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854-3911
Jack Rlemer. Rabbi
Robert Albert,
Cantor
Rev. Milton Freeman,
Ritual Director
Sat.Sa.rn.aT>. Mlnchah 8:15p.m
DBtiy Mlnyawi nsid fnorntna otvbciIm
7 days a week. Meeee oeN tor echedute.
Sat. 7 pji. Purim Berates A MaeBUh JeSBawB,
Puppet show. Bun. 11 a.m. Purim Carnival
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave Miami Beach
534 7213 -534 7214
Barry J. Konovitch. Rabbi /'KN
Mosrve Buryn. Cantor \W/
Sergio Grobler. President
Sholem Epelbeum. President.
Religious Committee
TEMPLE EMANU EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beech
Or. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehude Shifmen. Cantor
Meurice Klein. Ritual Director
Gerald Taub. Executive Director
Kabbalat Shabbat 5 p.m.
Lata Fri. ave aar. S p.m
Rabbi Maiwell Bargar will preach on
"The Meeaage and the Meaning."
Cantor Shlfman will chant.
Sat. 9 a.m. Rabbi Lehrman will praach on
weakly portion ol the Biota.
Bar Mitzvah Jonathan Lyla.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetra* Drive. Miami Beach
532 6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schiff
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Mlemi
Miami i Pionaar ftaform Congregation
137 NE. 19th St., Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haekell Berne t
Aasistant Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob Q. Bomstom
Director ol Education
And Programming: Jack L. Sparks
tissue.
Neleon. Kendall: Rabbi Or
"Coma Play Jawleh Dung.
Mtf
:Ce
rWistiUlf.
AOragone."
r OareorJon ol
Dr Jack Sparta S Cantortal Sotoial
Harvey Rl
I Kaufman.
BETHKODESH
Conservative
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joseph Krteeei
Rose Berlin Executive Secretory
8>
546334
Sabbath Servtcee 8:45 a.m.
Sat. 6 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
222S NE'121 St., N. Miami, FL 33161
891-5506 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jecobe. Rabbi _j.
Dr Joseph A. Qorllnkel. I M\
Rebbi Emeritus \Jy/
Moshe Friedler, Centor
Fit. Sun.
Sat. 8:46 a.m.
Weekdey aerv. Men.-FrL S a.m.
Mon.-Thura. 5 p.m. Sun. 830 am
TEMP.E BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave.. MB FL 33139
Tel 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Centor Nissim Benyomini
Dally nrvlcaa S a.m. and 7 p.m.
Sat 8 15 a m
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
238-2001 /
Rabbi David H. Auerbach ;
Cantor Stephen Freedmen
Fri. S p.m. Family aerv. Bet Claaa will
participate. Set. 9:30 a m Bar Mttxvah
Brian Mlllalaln Michael Mermerahteln USSR
Inabaanlla.
Dairy aarvtoae: Sunday MB a.m.
Mon.-Tuea. A Thura. 7:30 a.m.
Wad. 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE lETrllH^OL6M 536 723.
ChsseAve. 8 41st St. lasers
OH LEON KROMISH. Founding Senior Rabbi
GARY A OLICKSTEIM. T
marry JOLT. AuiNlary I
PAUL 0 CAPLAN. Aoelelont Mebbl
CANTON DAVID CON VISE R
Frt. 815 p.m Rabbi Ollckaiakn. "Ethiopian Jewry
Update.Sat 10:45 2nd Bar Mitzvah Rabbi Marry
JoH m conjunction S3 birthday. Sun 10 ajn.
Purim Miga.aH RaacSng Panrde-Camrval
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7526
1051 N Miemi Beech Blvd
Dr Max A Lipschitz. Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Dally Servtcee: Mon Fri. 7:30 a.m. .
A 5:30 p.m. *> j
Sat. 8:25 a.m. S:15 p.m. V
Sun. 8 a.m. S 5 p.m. **
Late aervlca Fri 8 p m '
TEMPLE JUDEA
SBOOOrenod
Coral Qobooo_____ 887 5887
Mediae* 8. Ekeenetat, RebM
Frt. fcIS Bebbl Daanetet "Aid tor thoaa
wtthAI Da-
Sun. 11 a.m. Maglllah Heeding Coaturaa
Parade-Covered DM Bnmoh.
TEMPLE KINO SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Shoshanah Raab, Cantor
Senricee Fri. 7:30 p.m.
Sat. 9:30 a.m.
Onag Shabbat will follow
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowltz
Ari Fridkis, Assoc. Rabbi f
Cantor Murray Yavneh |
Sat. 9 a.m. Sabbath eervtca
Dally Mlnchah Sunday Friday
8 a.m. and 8 p.m.
Sat. 9 a.m. and 5:15 p.m.
D
TEMPLE NER TAMID
7802 Carlymi Ave ,
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Cantor Edward Klein (I
Dally aerv. Mon Fri 8 a.m. S 8:15 p.m.
Sat.Mlncha 9:15 p.m. Sun. 8:30 a.m. A
8:15 p.m. Fri. 8 p.m. Purim Saudah-Shabboa meal
Sat. 8:30 p.m. Maglllah Raadlng t Concert.
888-8893
Conaewalivo
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
ol North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St
North Miami Beech
851 1582
Yeakov Sprung. Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
362 0698
Rabbi Hershel Becker aSaesrn rjnMeeea
Sat. 930 a.m. aenrlca at
Tampla Samu-EI
9353SW152A...
S ol N. KendaH Dr.
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave
North Dede's Reform Congregation
Ralph P Kingsley. Rebbi 932 9010
Julian I Cook. Associate Rebbi
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Barbare S Ramsay. Administrator
Fri. aeriy Shabbat aerv. 8 p.m. Lata aerv.
8 p.m Rabbi Klngalay -Funny 4 Not So Funny
Mualnge on the eve ol Purim."
Sat 8 p.m. MegHlah Raadlng A Purim Family
rjwiner.Sat. 10:30 a.m. BarMNxveh Edward
KMn. Sun. 11 a.m. Purim eel oblation.
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
271-2311 ,-,
Dr Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi, fft'\
Beniamin Adler, Cantor ? T-
David Rosen thai, Auxiliary Cantor
Mlnyan 7 a.m. Monday A Thuraday.
Sunday 9 a.m.
Fri. 9 p.m. Mlnyanalraa Sabbath, aerv. laad by
MaU Sloan Sat. aerv. 9 a.m. Sat. 7:30 p.m.
Maglllah Raadlng. Ratraahmenta.
Sun. 11:30-1:30 p.m. Purim -Ada Carnival



'
Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 13, 1987
11,000 Government Hospital
Workers, Promised Raise
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Striking
administrative and maintenance
employees returned to work at 29
government hospitals Wednesday
(Mar. 4). They ended their 10-day
strike on the basis of a proposal by
Histadrut that they be paid an ad-
vance of 200 Shekels against
future wage increases while a
special committee calculates how
much the increase should be.
Equity of pay between govern-
ment hospital employees and their
peers at the hospitals of Kupat
Holim, the Histadrut sick-fund,
was the main issue of the strike
that idled 11,000 workers for
nearly two weeks. A body known
as the Padeh Committee,
established several years ago to
investigate wage inequities, will
be called upon again.
The strikers said they relied on
Histadrut to ensure that the back-
to-work proposals would be fulfill-
ed. But Israel Radio reported
Wednesday that Finance Minister
Moshe Nissim will not agree to the
advance payment of 200 Shekels
or to reactivate the Padeh Com-
mittee until all of the strikers are
back on the job and guarantee no
further walk-outs.
Arthur Grossberg Elected Officer
Of Jewish Funeral Directors Of U.S.
Arthur Grossberg was elected
treasurer of the Jewish Funeral
Directors of America at their re-
cent annual meeting in Hawaii.
Grossberg, a native of South
Florida, is vice president of
Levitt-Weinstein Memorial
fa
1*"

8T:0
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel. 261-7612
SPECIAL LIMITED PRE-NEED OFFER
FUNERAL AND BURIAL
IN THE BEST OF JEWISH TRADITION
$1,595
Lakeside Memorial Park and Eternal Light Funeral Directors are proud to
sporuor thi* unique program which combine* ownership of a plot at our
beautiful Memorial Park and a plan for pre-paid funeral aervica.
This exceptional value assure* that your one call will put you in touch with
the people who believe there is nothing dignified about paying more for a
traditional Jewish funeral that you have to.
HERE IS WHAT WE INCLUDE:
Prompt Transfer from Place of
Death
Care and Preparation of Deceased
Casket and Hearse
Arrangement/Direction of
Graveside Services
Permits and Benefit Assistance
24 hour emergency service
Shiva Candles. Cards and Benches
Gravesite
Paved Private Visitation Path
Steel Reinforced Concrete Vault
Opening and Closing of Grave
Perpetual Gravesites Care
No maintenance or service fees
A Jewish Tradition since 1955
TOTAL: $1,595
No Interest Payment Plans Available
For complete information on our plot and funeral service package plan
call your Lakeside/Eternal Light representative today.
In time of need, one call will handle all the details.
DADE:
592-0690
BROWARD:
525-9339
Obituaries-
Chapels and Beth David Memorial
Gardens
Mr. Grossberg is a member, as
well as a former board member, of
Temple Solel in Hollywood and a
member of Emerald Hills Lodge
of B'nai B'rith and Workmen's
Circle.
DARLING
Anne M.. of Lauderhill, Fla.. formerly of
Pittsburgh passed away on Friday February
27. Beloved wife of James H. Darling. '
Beloved mother of Leon J. Darling of
Redlands, Calif., Marc S. Darling of
Monroeville, Pa., Rosalie Darling MsJlinger
of Richmond, Vs., sister of Elsie Baem of
Pittsburgh. Also survived by grandchildren
Graveside Services and interment were held
Monday March 2, at Temple Sinai Memorial
Park Cemetery. Arrangement* by Ralph
Schugar of Pittsburgh, Pa.
rVER? Jeannette M., of Miami Beach.
Rubin Zilbert.
WACHT, Ann, of North Miami Beach.
March 6. Services held in New York.
CHERNIN, Henrietta (Yetta) of Miami,
March 7. The Riverside.
GREENBAUM, Etta of Miami Beach.
Rubin Zilbert.
ANTELL, Irving, 95, of Miami Beach.
Rubin-Zilbert
ENGLISH, Lois Sharon, of Miami. Rubin-
Zilbert.
KESSLER, Alan S., of Jacksonville,
February 27. Blasberg Chapel.
NEUMAN. Ester, of Bal Harbour. Rubin-
Zilbert.
NICHTER, Gilbert, of North Miami. Eter-
nal Light.
SCHAINEN, Celia, of Miami Beach. Rubin-
Zilbert.
STERN, Walter, 64, formerly of Miami
Beach, February 26. Interment at Mt.
Nebo. The Riverside.
KAUFMAN, Sarah. 77, of Miami. The
Riverside.
LEVINSON. Jack L.. 81, of Kendall,
February 25. Services were held.
SUSMAN, Nathan, 70. of Miami. February
26. Levitt-Weinstein.
BLAUSTEIN, Anna. 85. of Miami,
February 24. Services were held.
SCHLESINGER, Betty, 83, February 24.
Graveside services and interment were
held at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
GREENWALD. Anita M., 75, February 24.
Services were held.
GRAYSON, Howard, 58, of Hollywood,
February 25. Levitt-Weinstein.
OKA
Judge Kenneth, 70, of Miami Beach, resi-
dent more than 50 years, originally from
New York City, passed away March 7. Sur-
vived by devoted wife, Gertrude; loving son,
Jonathan and daughters, Barbara, Michele
(Frederick) Doner, Stephanie (Herbert) Oka
Freed; sister, Rachael Kann; three cherish-
ed grandchildren, Jordan, Jeremy and Ran-
dall and cousin, Robert Zuckerman. Judge
Kenneth Oka served a total of 12 years in
his judicial capacity. In 1957, be was elected
Mayor of Miami Beach and was re-elected in
1961. Judge Oka was appointed by the U.S.
State Department and served as Director of
the People to People affiliation program in
Japan. Funeral services were held at the
Alton Road Chapel of The Riverside with in-
terment at Mt Nebo Cemetery.
LASH, Gussie, 93, of Miami, March 4. The
Riverside.
LEON, Dr. Andrew Joseph. Rubin-Zilbert.
GREENFIELD, Eileen, 38. Levitt-
Weinstein.
FINK, Jacob (Jack), 75, of Miami, March 4.
The Riverside.
PEARIS, Charles, 91, of Miami. Levitt-
Weinstein.
SCHEIGE, Leo, 81. of North kWi,
March 8. Menorah Chapel, !
GOULD. Robert of Cincinnat Ohio I
7.8ervicheldinOhio ^'1
COHN, Alex. March 8. The Rjv.nbA.
SINGER? Blanche, 80, of Wan^L,
Levitt-Weinstein. ^^ "
KESNER Salomon, of Miami
Rubm-ZUbert.
WALDER, Ethel, of Miami Beach hW.
The Riverside. ""*
GREENBERG, Ida K., 96, of Miami I
9. Levitt-Weinstein.
BERNSTEIN, Saul, 82, of Miami
ment in New York.
MANHEIMER Lee, 73, of North .
Baech, March 10. Levitt-Weinstein
NADLER William, of North Miami i
Eternal Light.
PORTNOY. Celia Simon, of North
Beach. Eternal Light.
ROSENBERG. Irene, of Miami
Rubin-Zilbert.
WANGER. Alexander, of Miami
Rubin-Zilbert.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every DayClosed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888
RUBIN
ZILBERT
CHAPEL
MONUmNT CO
CIMITIRY COUNSELING
10 CHAPELS SERVING
DADE
BROWARD
l PALM BEACH
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
532-2099
Broward County
532-2099
Represented by Riverside Memorial Chapel, Inc.
New York: (718) 263-7600 Queens Blvd. & 76th Rd., Forest Hills. N.Y.
RUBIN-ZILBERT
DADE
538-6371
BROWARD
920*6660
ZILBERT-RUBIN
# HAVE
YOU BEEN
COMPARING
MraS^ORANG
AMONG PRE-ARRANGEMENT PLANS?
II you've shopped lor funeral pre-arrangements,
Fyou've lound there are some big ditlerences among
Ihem. Some "package" plans look economical but then you
read the tine print and discover the add-ons, surcharges, hidden costs
they forgot to mention. At Menorah, you'll rind the custom-designed
pre-need plan for your pocketbook with extra value, extra attention
and no extra charges. If you have a plan now, bring it In and we'll
write a Menorah Pre-Need Plan lor less and give you a dozen oranges.
Now isn't that a peach of an offer?
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(7' yMSAMMMOAM -L ol I-95 via Northlake Blvd. Exit ^manninfl
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LIMITED TIME OFFER -A FREE SET OF JEWISH HOUDAYPRThnS FOR THE FIRST 500 VisffOB)
MENORAH GARDENS


Friday, March 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 17-B
foreclosure Sales Public Notices
KS COUNTY. FLORIDA
I WfJoBATE DIVISION
r m Nwber 87-4M
I&sielomjon^
NOTICE OF
K.IMS OB DEMANDS
Stthe above
I^.TF AND ALL OTHER
Sons INTERESTED IN
VSpHgHJ notl
hen tht the administration of
R^ of THERESA LON-
\" deceased. File Number
K or DADE County Flonda
Iprotote Division, the address of
fc address ,s 171 W. 57th
K. No. 6B. New York. New
I York 10019 The name and ad-
!, of the personal represen-
lutive's attorney are set forth
|be!o
1 All persons having claims or
Idemands against the estate are re-
|K*TTHIS THREE MON-
ItHS FROM THE DATE OF THE
InRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
llJOTICE. to file with the clerk of
Itbe above court a written state-
Iment of any claim or demand they
Intr have. Each claim must be in
Ifhong and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
Idress of the creditor or his agent or
lawney, and the amount claimed.
Ilf the claim is not yet due, the date
ben it will become due shall be
loted. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
rtainty shall be stated. If the
_i is secured the security shall
described. The claimant shall
Aver sufficient copies of the
j to the clerk to enable the
i to mail one copy to each per-
I representative.
All persons interested in the
tstate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
died are required, WITHIN
HREE MONTHS FROM THE
>ATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
khey may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
nullifications of the personal
presentative. or the venue or
diction of the court.
all claims, demands,
ind objections not so fil-
ed will be forever
Barred.
Date of the first publication of
Notice of Administration:
16,1987.
David A. Dreiling
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
THERESA LONDON a/k/a
TESSIE LONDON
I Wk*#'h "^fi
kTTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
LYNN W. FROMBERG, ESQ.
Fromberg, Fromberg, Gross,
Phore. Lewis and Rogel, P.A.
No. 800.2500 E. Hallandale Beach
Blvd.
Hallandale, Florida 33009
telephone: (305) 940-0709
1 March 6, 13, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PRORATE DIVISION
File Number 87-349
Division 01
IN RE:ESTATE OF
ESTHER WEINZIMMKR.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration of
the estate of ESTHER WEINZIM-
MER, deceased, File Number
87-349 PC (01), is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Third Floor, Miami,
Florida 33130. The personal
representatives of the estate are
PHYLLIS ACKERMAN and
RUTH BROFSKY. whose address
is c/o ALBOUM and FURLONG.
333 Arthur Godfrey Rd., No. 104,
Miami Beach. Fla. 33140. The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
March 6. 1987.
PHYLLIS ACKERMAN
and RUTH BROFSKY
As Personal Representatives
of the Estate of
ESTHER WEINZIMMER
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
ALBOUM and FURLONG
333 Arthur Godfrey Road, No. 104
Miami Beach, FL 33140
Telephone: (305) 538-6741
14562 March 6, 13. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
ncTmous name law
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
I Hat the undersigned, desiring to
l8ge in business under the fic-
Wious name International Com-
iBodities at 750 S.W. 10 Ave.
I*mii FL 33130 intends to
lister said name with the Clerk
|w Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
|t)'. Florida.
M&J Systems Supplies Inc.
Owner
L March 6, 13,20, 27, 1987
nc2JlCE UNDER
nKWus name law
iJSXLH hereby given
Lw,u^er81gT,ed' de8irin to
l ??u,Family Pe8t Control
E^WttiIntend, to register
^ft*1* the Clerk of the
^Court of Dade County,
frfymondBourbeau, President
T^n Miami Beach. Fla. 33162
**:305-944-6556
^h 6,13,20,27, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 874753 CA 10
NOTICE OF ACTION
LLOYDS BANK OF
CALIFORNIA, a California state
chartered bank,
Plaintiff,
v.
RAFAEL RONCALLO, HILDA
RONCALLO, and the unknown
spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees
creditors, or other parties
claiming by, through, under or
against them,
Defendants.
To: Rafael Roncallo and Hilda Ron-
callo, whose residence address is
Calle 76 No. 5629. Barranquilla,
Colombia, South America, and the
unknown parties who may be
spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees and all parties claiming in-
terest by, through, under or
against said Defendants, who are
not known to be dead or alive, and
all parties having or claiming to
have any right, title, or interest in
the property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Unit No. 416. in Building No.
250, of THE ISLES CON-
DOMINIUM. a Con-
dominium, according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, as recorded in Of-
ficial Records Book 9964, at
Pages 212 through 251, in-
clusive, of the Public Records
of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on David R. Webster, Esquire, of
Rosenthal & Yarchin, P.A., At-
torneys for Plaintiff, Suite 800,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard,' Miami,
Florida 33137, on or before April 3
1987, and to file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's at-
torneys or immediately thereafter;
otherwise, a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed'in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on March 2, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER. Clerk
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
SWD No. 21580O-3-320-G
I.level.- No. 0215800
14571 March 6,13,20,27,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name E.C. Truck at 1068
West 38 St. Hialeah FL 33012 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Elio Cruz
Owner
14555 March 6,13,20,27,1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-08408
IN RE: The Marriage of:
LOUIS MICHEL V.
DESROSIERS.
Petitioner,
and
BETTY J. DESROSIERS,
Respondent.
TO: BETTY J. DESROSIERS,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney. 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before April 3, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 26, 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: Barbara Rodriguez
14564 March 6,13.20.27,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-362 CA 14
NOTICE OF ACTION
WATERTOWN SAVINGS
BANK, a Massachusetts savings
bank,
Plaintiff,
v.
LORENE ABDOOL and
ABDOOL. her husband, if
married; MONIQUE M.
DUBERCEAU;STEPHEN
KREIMER, LESLEY
KREIMER. ALISA KREIMER.
and the unknown spouses, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, or
other parties claiming by,
through, under or against them;
and PROFIT SHARING TRUST
COMMITTEE for the PAPER
MART, INC., and the unknown
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees, or others claiming by,
through, under or against it; and
PEOPLES EQUITY
MORTGAGE. INC., individually
and as trustee:
Defendants.
TO: Monique M. Duberceau,
whose residence is
2201 N.W. 93rd Avenue,
Pembroke Pines,
Florida 33023.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 39, in Block 108, of
LESLIE ESTATES SEC-
TION SEVEN, according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 97, at Page 28,
of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on David R. Webster, Esquire, of
Rosenthal & Yarchin, P.A., At-
torneys for Plaintiff. Suite 800,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami,
Florida 33137, on or before April
3, 1987, and to file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torneys or immediately thereafter;
otherwise, a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court on February 25,1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER, Clerk
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
14551 March 6, 13, 20.27.1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-08207 (10)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
BRUCE CRAIG BROCKWAY
Petitioner,
and
MARIE MYRIAM BROCKWAY
Respondent
TO: MARIE MYRIAM
BROCKWAY
1415 Leaven worth
Apt. No. 4
San Francisco,
California 94109
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on
STANLEY E. GOODMAN. ESQ..
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 909 East 8th Avenue.
Hialeah. Florida 33010. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
April 3, 1987; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 27th day of February. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
STANLEY E. GOODMAN. Esq.
909 East 8th Avenue
Hialeah, Florida 33010
Attorney for Petitioner
14567 March 6, 13, 20,27, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87-07301 FC 23
IN RE: The Marriage of:
STELLA JOYCE SNARKE.
Petitioner/Wife
and
JEFF GUITTARRI SNARKE.
Respondent/Husband
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
TO: Jeff Guittarn Snarke
610 8th Street -
Apartment 7
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
(last known address)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Bruce J.
Scheinberg, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 420 Lin-
coln Road-Suite 512, Miami Beach,
Florida 33139, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 10th,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
3rd day of March. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Kwitney, Kroop and Scheinberg,
P.A.
420 Lincoln Road-Suite 512
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
14675 March 6,13, 20.27, 1987
W THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87 1040
Diviiion 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
Ernest Peter Goldring,
a/k/a E. Peter Goldring,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Ernest Peter Goldring, a/k/a E.
Peter Goldring, deceased, File
Number 87-1040, is pending in the
Circuit Court for DADE County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 W. Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenge the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on March 6, 1987.
Personal Representative:
Lydia Goldring and
Kenneth Goldring
4560 Prairie Avenue,
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Elliott Harris
111 SW 3rd St., 6th Floor
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: 305/358-0146
14672 March 6.13. 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 87-08430-17
IN RE: The Marriage of:
MECENE CILLYS.
Petitioner,
and
E LOUISE CILLYS.
Respondent.
TO: ELOUISE CILLYS,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave.. Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before April 3, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 25. 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: C.P. COPELAND
14552 March 6. 13.20,27, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 87-08429-17
IN RE: The Marriage of:
BONY JEUNE.
Petitioner,
and
LINDA DIANE JEUNE,
Respondent.
TO: LINDA DIANE JEUNE,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave.. Miami. Florida, 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before April 3, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 25, 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: C.P. COPELAND
14553 March 6. 13. 20, 27. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name of Via Veneto Jewelry
at 36 N.E. First Street Suite 615
Miami, Florida 33132 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Knortonom
President
Gema International Corp.
36 N.E. First Street. Suite 615
Miami, Florida 33132
14561 March 6,13.20.27. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Wholesales of Florida
at 13126 W. Dixie H.Way Suite B
N. Miami, FL 33161 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
SaFar Shahl'ouri
14573 March 6,13,20,27, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-2870 FC 03
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JEAN RICHELET REBECA,
Petitioner,
and
CAROLYN D. REBECA,
Respondent.
TO: CAROLYN D. REBECA
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before April 3, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 26, 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: Barbara Rodriguez
14565 March 6. 13. 20, 27,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-09455
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
LINCOLN SERVICE
CORPORATION,
Plaintiff
vs.
CARL C. PANTIN, et al..
Defendants.
TO: LARRY J. SISLER
Rt. 1 Box 60
Friendsville, Maryland 21531
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 14. in Block 2, of ADDI-
TION "J" SO. MIAMI
HEIGHTS, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 68. at Page 74. of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1670 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
April 10, 1987 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 3 day of March,
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
14574 March 6.13, 20, 27,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-776
Division 0.1
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MAX M. ORNSTEIN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Max M. Omstein, deceased. File
Number 87-776, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on March 6, 1987.
Personal Representative:
Stella Krainin and
Philip Krainin
6161 N.W. 2nd Avenue,
Apt. 619
Boca Raton, Florida 33431
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
GEORGE GILBERT
One Lincoln Road Bldg.
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: 538-4312
14563 March 6,13.1987



.... .. ..
Page 18-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 13, 1987
Public Notices
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name KLS PARTNER-
SHIP at 15935 Northwest 49th
Avenue, Hialeah, Florida intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
DAVID A. KASTEN
RONALD E. LANDRUM
RONALD SCULTHORPE
Attorney for KLS Partnership
Douglas D. Stratum
505 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Tel. No. (306) 672-7772
14587 March 13,20,27;
Aprils, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name New Jersey Auto
Parts at 6251 SW 8 Street 33144
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Carrera Plus Corporation
Melvin J. Asher
Attorney for Carrera Plus
Corporation
14590 March 13, 20, 27;
April 3,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name ZURITA MANAGE-
MENT at 1407 MERIDIAN
AVENUE. MIAMI BEACH. FL
33139 intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
ADAN ZURITA
14580 March 13, 20, 27;
April 3,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name The Enchanted Child
at 7130 SW 117 Ave. Miami FL
33183 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
De Los Rios, Inc.
Owner
14556 March 6, 13, 20, 27, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
Ficrmous name law
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name FERNANDO J.
HUBERT d/b/a Economic Packag-
ing at 9600 SW 51 Street, Miami,
FL 33165 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
FERNANDO J. HUBERT
9600 SW 51 Street
Miami, Fla. 33165
14679 March 13.20,27;
April 3,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASK NO. 87-4MS2
Florida Ear No. 082*76
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: The Marriage of
DEBORAH M. PINDER,
Petitioner/Wife,
and
CHRISTOPHER S. PINDER,
Respondent/Husband
TO: RESPONDENT
CHRISTOPHER
S. PINDER
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage and Other Relief has been fil-
ed against you; and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
HAROLD A. TURTLETAUB,
Petitioner's attorney, whose ad-
dress ia 9996 Sunset Drive, Suite
108, Miami, FL 33173, on or
before April 10, 1987, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on Peti-
tioner's attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
DATED this 6 day of March,
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
14877 March 13, 20,27;
April 3, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Joseph D. Ventura
and Associates at 67 NW 166
Street, North Miami Beach, Fla.
33169 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Ventura Enterprises, Inc.
Marvin I. Moss
Attorney for Applicant
14543 February 27;
March 6.13,20,1987
NOTICE UNDER
Ficrrnous name law
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name THE NATURAL
FOOD EXPRESS at 1717 Collins
Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida
33139 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
SOUTH FLORIDA
WHOLE FOODS CO. INC.
a Florida Corporation
By: DEBORAH S. WEISS,
President
1717 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
BERNARD HUTNER, PA.
Attorney for South Florida Whole
Foods Co. Inc.
14578 March 13, 20, 27;
April 3, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-224
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
EZEKIEL BARUCH
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration of
the estate of EZEKIEL
BARUCH, deceased, File Number
87-224, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida. The personal
representative of the estate is
Richard I. Kroop, whose address is
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 512,
Miami Beach, Florida 33139. The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
March 13, 1987.
Richard Kroop
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
EZEKIEL BARUCH
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Bruce J. Scheinberg, (162577)
Kwitney, Kroop and Scheinberg:,
PA.
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 512
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-7575
14576 March 13. 20, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name CYGNUS ENTER
PRISES at 5840 W. FLAGLER
STREET (SUITE-1) MIAMI,
FLORIDA 33144 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
VITTORIO CREATINE-PRES.
CYGNUS ENTERPRISES,
CORP.
14586 March 13,20,27;
April 3.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTmOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name "LAS PERLAS DE
AMERICA" at 6422 SW 133th Ct.
Miami intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Beatrix Consuegra
V-Presidente
International Numismatic Corp.
14588 March 13,20,27;
April 3.1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
87-07896
Caae No.: 01
IN RE: The Marriage of:
THEODULE CHARLES,
Petitioner,
and
MAXINE CHARLES.
Respondent.
TO: MAXINE CHARLES,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida. 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before March 27, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 23, 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: T. CASAMAYOR
14549 February 27;
March 6,13,20,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Ace S.L.V. at 13630
West Dixie Highway, North
Miami, Florida 33161 intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Ace Music Center, Inc.
13630 West Dixie Highway
North Miami, Florida 33161
Cypen & Cypen
825 Arthur Godfrey Road.
Miami Beach, FL
Attorney for Applicant 33140
14582 March 13,20.27;
April 3.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Niunber 87-1076
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
REGINA GOLD
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of REGINA GOLD, deceased, File
Number 87-1076(01), is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dresses of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on March 13, 1987.
Personal Representative:
Theodore R. Nelson
1135 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands, Florida 33154
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
WAYNE A. CYPEN. ESQ.
CYPEN & CYPEN
P.O. Box 402099
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
Telephone: (305) 532-3200
14581 March 13,20, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-0*848-14
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ESTHER REFUSE COQMARD,
Petitioner,
and
JOSEPH JURIGNY COQMARD,
Respondent.
TO: JOSEPH JURIGNY
COQMARD,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northweat 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before March 27,1987; otherwise a
default wul be entered.
February 17, 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. Casamayor
14530 February 20.27;
March 613, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 87-923
DIVISION: (03)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JUAN HERIBERTO BONILLA,
a/k/a Johnny Herbert Bonilla,
Deceased.
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Juan Heriberto Bonilla. a/k/a
Johnny Herbert Bonilla, deceased,
File Number 87-923. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below:
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on March 13.
Aracelis Turull Santiago
Personal Representative
13000 S.W. 256 Terrace
Homestead, Florida 33032
Dennis R. Turner
Attorney for Personal
Representative
STEARNS WEAVER MILLER
WEISSLER ALHADEFF & SIT-
TERSON. P.A.
One Biscayne Tower, Suite 2800
Miami, Florida 33131
!305) 374-4800
14584 March 13,20, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-846
Division (03)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARIE E. BLAIR
FORMAL NOTICE
BY PUBLICATION
TO: BARBARA A. LATHER
8001 N.W. 166 Street
Royal Oaks
(Miami Lakes),
Florida 33016
TO: JAMES L. BLAIR
252 West 43 Street
Hialeah, FL 33012
and all unknown parties who may
claim as heirs, devisees, grantees
or beneficiaries of the Estate of
the late MARIE E. BLAIR, be
they minors, incompetents or
otherwise not sui juris.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Petition for The Determination of
Beneficiaries and Heirs has been
filed in this court and you are re-
quired to file your written defenses
to the petition with the clerk of this
court and to serve a copy thereof
not later than April 6, 1987, on
petitioner's attorney, whose name
and address is:
HAYS, GRUNDWERG AND
VANN, 28 West Flagler Street,
Suite 800, Miami. Florida 33130.
If you fail to do so, judgment
may be entered in due course upon
the petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court on February 27, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Reina E. Alexander
As Deputy Clerk
First publication or posting on
March 6, 1987.
14568 March 6,13,20,27, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OFTHE11THJUDICIA,
CIRCUIT, IN AND for
DADE COUNTY, FLORin.
GENERAL JURIES
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-O8536-02
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI a
United States Corporation '
Plaintiff,
vs.
ENRIQUE BARRIGA and M
OLGA de BARRIGA a/k/a M
OLGATUNONde BARRIGA y.
wife, et al..
Defendants.
TO: ENRIQUE BARRIGA and
M. OLGA de BARRIGA
a/k/a M. OLGA TUNON de
BARRIGA. his wife
Ave. Colon 3386
Santiago, Chile
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County. Florida:
Condominium Unit No
S-701, SOUTH TOWER OF
FAIRVIEW HOUSE CON
DOMINIUM, according to
the Declaration of Con-
dominium, recorded in Of-
ficial Records Book 10623, at
Page 1114, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida, together with all im-
provements, appliances and
fixtures located thereon
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis & Allison.
Plaintiffs attorneys, whose ad-
dress is 111 N.E. 1st. Street.
Miami, Florida 33132, on or before
April 3, 1987, and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torneys or immediately thereafter:
otherwise, a Default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 25 day of
February, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: T. CASAMAYOR
Deputy Clerk
14559 March 6, 13,20,27.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87 1100
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RAY HOFFMAN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of RAY HOFFMAN, deceased,
File Number 87-1100, is pending in
the Circuit Court for DADE Coun
ty, Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jections by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will.
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on March 6, 1987
Personal Representative:
MICHAEL A. DRIBIN
Broad & Cassel
1 Biscayne Tower No. 3333
Miami, Florida 33131
(305)371-9100
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Michael A. Dribin
Broad & Cassel
1 Biscayne Blvd. No. 3333
Miami. Florida 33131
FLORIDA BAR NO: 205656
Telephone: (305) 371-9100
14560
March 6,13,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the IK"
titious name Harvey Vogel d/Ws
Southern Construction
Maintenance at 7465 SW 115
Street. Miami. Fl 33156 intends w
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Harvey Vogel
14583 March 13, 20.27.
April 3.1987


Friday, March 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 19 B
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
m THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
fflElLEVENTH JUDICIAL
nScUIT OF FLORIDA IN
^ND FOR DADE COUNTY
ffnAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
r*8E NO. 87-03077 CA-23
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
MELLON BANK (EAST).
NA.,
plaintiff
ELAINE M. PULEO,
tlLi
TO^SnEM. PULEO
10090 N.W. 80th Court,
No. 1128
Hialeah, Florida 33016
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
PrSminium Unit No. 1128,
in SAMARI LAKE EAST, a
Condominium located in the
City of Hialeah Gardens,
Dade County, Florida, pur-
suant to the Declaration of
Condominium for Samari
Lake East, a condominium,
recorded in Official Records
Book 9831, at Page 1411, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214,1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
March 27, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 20 day of
February, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
14546 February 27;
March 6, 13. 20,1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 87-8482 17
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JEAN AMBROISE,
Petitioner,
and
VALENCIA L. AMBROISE,
Respondent.
TO: VALENCIA L. AMBROISE,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney. 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before April 3, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 25, 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: M. GENDRON
14554 March 6, 13, 20.27.1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-084*9
IN RE: The Marriage of:
VICTOR ROD R I G U E
LAURENT,
Petitioner,
and
ETTA DIANA LAURENT.
Respondent.
TO: ETTA DIANA LAURENT,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida. 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
Wore April 3, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 26, 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: Barbara Rodriguez
14566 March 6, 13, 20. 27. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
HCTITIOUS NAME LAW
WICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
y the undersigned, desiring to
gy in business under the fie-
mous name TOLL FREE at
EVV3?1 Avenue' p-
"**. Flonda 33056 intends to
Per sa.d name with the Clerk
J.nondr,lCourtofD,idecoun-
JERRY SUE FASHIONS. INC.
"3170 NVV 43rd Ave.
HARVEY D. ROGERS. ESQ.
Attorney for ^
gW SUE FASHIONS. INC.
February 20.27;
March 6,18,1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-04724 FC04
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
FREDDY PACHECO
Petitioner
and
MARGARITA ENRIQUEZ
PACHECO
Respondent
TO: MARGARITA ENRIQUEZ
PACHECO
Resident and address
unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Mark
J. Friedman, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 350 Lin-
coln Rd., Suite 422 Miami Beach,
Fl. 33139, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before March 20,1987; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 12 day of February, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MARK J. FRIEDMAN
Attorney at Law
350 Lincoln Road, Suite 422
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Phone: 305-532-5409
Attorney for Petitioner
14523 February 20. 27;
March 6,13, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-06851-15
IN RE: The Marriage of:
SYLVANA ROBERTSON,
Petitioner,
and
JEROME ROBERTSON,
Respondent.
TO: JEROME ROBERTSON,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami. Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before March 27,1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 17. 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. Casamayor
14532 February 20, 27;
March 6 13,1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-0*847 (17)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
EDMOND ABNER FENELON,
Petitioner,
and
GWENDOLYN D. FENELON
Respondent.
TO: GWENDOLYN D.
FENELON,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before March 27, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 17. 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. Casamayor
14529 February 20. 27;
March 6, 13. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name JESSPORT at 1035
East 31 Street. Hialeah, Florida
33013 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
lei STEVEN SIEGLER
Secretary/Treasurer
NUMBER ONE STORE, INC.
JOSHUA D. BASH, ESQ.
Attorney for
NUMBER ONE STORE, INC.
1926 Hollywood Blvd.
Suite 228
Hollywood. FL 33020
305-940-1200/922-1400
14627 February 20, 27;
March 6,18,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTmOU8 NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Sunshine Holidays at
4300 N.W. 136 Street, Opa-Locka,
Miami, Florida 33054 intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Sunshine Holidays, Inc.
4300 N.W. 135 Street
Opa-Locka, Miami, Florida
Attorneys for Applicants
Steven D. Tiahler, Esquire
8625 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33138
(305) 754-1001
14636 February 20,27;
March 6,13,1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-0*862 (31)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
FRITZ ANNEAS,
Petitioner,
and
MARY H. ANNEAS,
Respondent.
TO: MARY H. ANNEAS,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before March 27,1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 17, 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. Casamayor
14531 February 20, 27;
March 6 13,1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-045849 (03)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JULIO MONDELUS,
Petitioner,
and
NADJA R. MONDELUS,
Respondent.
TO: NADJA R. MONDELUS,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before March 27,1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 17, 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. Casamayor
14533 February 20, 27;
March 6 13,1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 87-06845 (17)
In Re: The Marriage of
NELSI BEJARANO,
Petitioner,
and
GUILLERMO BEJARANO,
Respondent
TO: GUILLERMO BEJARANO
Cra. 31 No. 26B-83
Barrio Jardin
Call, Valle, Colombia
Last known address
You shall serve a copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage upon: Nelsi Be
jarano. 2815 S.W. 37 Ct. Miami,
Florida 33134, and file original
with the Clerk on or before March
27, 1987, otherwise a default will
be entered.
February 18. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
BY BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
14537 February 27;
March 6. 13. 20. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SILK NATUREL at
12301 S.W. 195 Terrace, Miami,
Fla. 33177 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
court of Dade County. Florida.
Manuel A. Alvarez
14539 February 27;
March 6.23.20. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name R & S INSURANCE
II at 2291 N.W. 28th Street,
Miami, Fl 33142 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
LATIN INSURANCE CENTER.
INC.
OSCAR R. SANTANA. President
14528 February 20. 27;
March 6.13.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Cane No. 86-36146 CA-27
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
VALLEY NATIONAL
BANK OF ARIZONA,
Plaintiff
vs.
SISTER DONUT, INC.,
etal.,
Defendants.
TO: THE FRYDENBURG
CORPORATION, a dissolved
Florida corporation
HORSE WORLD, INC., a
dissolved Florida corporation
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 3, Block 2, PANACHE,
SECTION 1, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 126, Page 37, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
March 20, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 13 day of
February, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
14526 February 20,27;
March 6.13.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-07779 08
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States
Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
PIEDAD JIMENEZ, et al..
Defendants.
TO: PIEDAD JIMENEZ
Ave. Principal
Lomas de Chuao
Quinta A rue
Caracas, Venezuela
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade Country, Florida:
Condominium Unit No.
10700-1, Building 10700
N.W. 7th Street, of
LAGUNA CLUB CON-
DOMINIUM, according to
the Declaration of Con-
dominium filed in Official
Records Book 9009, at Page
1608, of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida, as
amended; together with all
improvements, appliances
and fixtures located thereon
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis & Allison,
Plaintiffs attorneys, whose ad-
dress is 111 N.E. 1st Street,
Miami, Florida 33132, on or before
March 27, 1987, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 20 day of
February, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: JENNIS L. RUSSELL
Deputy Clerk
14545 February l!7:
March 6, 13, 20. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name AIRPORT TAXIST
CLUB at 3660 Coral Way Miami
FL 33145 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Aurelio V. Tapia,
Principal Partner of
Alfredo Avello,
Angel M. Hernandez
and Aurelio V. Tapia Partnership
14644 February 27;
March 6,13,20,1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CASE NO.: 87-4028 FC 2*
IN RE: The Marriage of
ELIZABETH SERRANO.
Petitioner
vs.
LUIS A. SERRANO.
Respondent
TO: LUIS A. SERR\NO,
Residence Unknown shall serve
copy of your Answer to tho Peti-
tion for Dissolution of Mi mage
upon GEORGE NICHOLAS, At-
torney, 612 N.W. 12th Avenue,
Miami, Florida, 33136, and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before March 27,1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 18, 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
14536 February 27;
___________March 6,13,20,1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87 06846-12
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ABEL BARONVILLE,
Petitioner,
and
PRISCILLA BARONVILLE.
Respondent.
TO: PRISCILLA BARONVILLE,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before March 27, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 17, 1987
RICHARD BRrNKER
BY: T. Casamayor
14534 February 20. 27;
_____________March 6 13.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Le Mienne For Her at
8870 SW 40 St. No. 2 Miami FL
33165 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
YENISEY INC.
8870 SW 40 St. No. 2
Miami. FL 33165
14548 February 27;
March 6,13,20.1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-8730
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
DANIA TORNA,
Petitioner/Wife
and
MIGUEL TORNA,
Respondent/Husband
TO: MIGUEL TORNA
Residence: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on ALAN
SCHNEIDER Esq., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 2720
West Flagler Street, Miami.
Florida 33135. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 17, 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 10 day of March. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ALAN SCHNEIDER. Esq.
_'71!0 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33135
Attorney for Petitioner
14589 March 13. 20. 27;
April 3. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY G1VEK .'
that the undersigned, dcsirinir t
engage in business under the fie
titious names Halen Products
Blue Cologne by Halen Day and
Night by Halen at 4150 NW 7 St.
Miami. Fla. 33126 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Ricardo Palacio
Owner
14558 March 6. 13, 20, 27,1987


Page 20-B The Jewiah Floridian/Frkfay, March 13, 1987
This Is becoming one of Israel's
biggest tourist attractions*
While the value of the dollar is falling in many
traditional \-acation spots, it's stronger than ever
in Israel.
And that means, if you go to Israel, your vaca-
tion dollar will go a lot further.
For example, if you stay at a five-star hotel in
Jerusalem, you not only get all the luxuries of a
world-class hotel, you
get the luxury of a lower
bill at checkout time.
Likewise, eating out
will take a smaller bite
out of your budget. \bu
can eat at the finest
restaurant in
Israel for a
fraction of the price you'd have to fork
out in comparable restaurants
around the world.
Then there's shopping.
The wares you'll find in our shops, boutiques and
bazaars are always pretty hard to resist. But at
these prices, you won't have to.
Of course, the fact that
Israel is such a bargain these
days is hardly the only reason
for visiting us.
But it's a great reason to
visit right now.
The dollar is still strong in Israel.
With prices like this. I can t afford
I not to go Please send me more information
I on vacationing in Israel.
jn
1
NAME.
ADDRESS.
CITY_____
i
.STATE.
.ZIR.
L
Israel Government "KxJrist Office
420 Lincoln Rd.
Miami Beach. Ft 33139
Israel

C 1987 Lsrad Government "touria Office


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